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Sample records for hgps pathogenesis inhibition

  1. Discordant gene expression signatures and related phenotypic differences in lamin A- and A/C-related Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS.

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    Martina Plasilova

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a genetic disorder displaying features reminiscent of premature senescence caused by germline mutations in the LMNA gene encoding lamin A and C, essential components of the nuclear lamina. By studying a family with homozygous LMNA mutation (K542N, we showed that HGPS can also be caused by mutations affecting both isoforms, lamin A and C. Here, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in both, lamin A- (sporadic and lamin A and C-related (hereditary HGPS. For this, we performed detailed molecular studies on primary fibroblasts of hetero- and homozygous LMNA K542N mutation carriers, accompanied with clinical examinations related to the molecular findings. By assessing global gene expression we found substantial overlap in altered transcription profiles (13.7%; 90/657 in sporadic and hereditary HGPS, with 83.3% (75/90 concordant and 16.7% (15/90 discordant transcriptional changes. Among the concordant ones we observed down-regulation of TWIST2, whose inactivation in mice and humans leads to loss of subcutaneous fat and dermal appendages, and loss of expression in dermal fibroblasts and periadnexial cells from a LMNA(K542N/K542N patient further confirming its pivotal role in skin development. Among the discordant transcriptional profiles we identified two key mediators of vascular calcification and bone metabolism, ENPP1 and OPG, which offer a molecular explanation for the major phenotypic differences in vascular and bone disease in sporadic and hereditary HGPS. Finally, this study correlates reduced TWIST2 and OPG expression with increased osteocalcin levels, thereby linking altered bone remodeling to energy homeostasis in hereditary HGPS.

  2. Discordant Gene Expression Signatures and Related Phenotypic Differences in Lamin A- and A/C-Related Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS)

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    Plasilova, Martina; Chattopadhyay, Chandon; Ghosh, Apurba; Wenzel, Friedel; Demougin, Philippe; Noppen, Christoph; Schaub, Nathalie; Szinnai, Gabor; Terracciano, Luigi; Heinimann, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a genetic disorder displaying features reminiscent of premature senescence caused by germline mutations in the LMNA gene encoding lamin A and C, essential components of the nuclear lamina. By studying a family with homozygous LMNA mutation (K542N), we showed that HGPS can also be caused by mutations affecting both isoforms, lamin A and C. Here, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in both, lamin A- (sporadic) and lamin A and C-related (hereditary) HGPS. For this, we performed detailed molecular studies on primary fibroblasts of hetero- and homozygous LMNA K542N mutation carriers, accompanied with clinical examinations related to the molecular findings. By assessing global gene expression we found substantial overlap in altered transcription profiles (13.7%; 90/657) in sporadic and hereditary HGPS, with 83.3% (75/90) concordant and 16.7% (15/90) discordant transcriptional changes. Among the concordant ones we observed down-regulation of TWIST2, whose inactivation in mice and humans leads to loss of subcutaneous fat and dermal appendages, and loss of expression in dermal fibroblasts and periadnexial cells from a LMNAK542N/K542N patient further confirming its pivotal role in skin development. Among the discordant transcriptional profiles we identified two key mediators of vascular calcification and bone metabolism, ENPP1 and OPG, which offer a molecular explanation for the major phenotypic differences in vascular and bone disease in sporadic and hereditary HGPS. Finally, this study correlates reduced TWIST2 and OPG expression with increased osteocalcin levels, thereby linking altered bone remodeling to energy homeostasis in hereditary HGPS. PMID:21738662

  3. Defective lamin A-Rb signaling in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and reversal by farnesyltransferase inhibition.

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    Jackleen Marji

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging disorder caused by a de novo heterozygous point mutation G608G (GGC>GGT within exon 11 of LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins. This mutation elicits an internal deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A. The truncated protein, progerin, retains a farnesylated cysteine at its carboxyl terminus, a modification involved in HGPS pathogenesis. Inhibition of protein farnesylation has been shown to improve abnormal nuclear morphology and phenotype in cellular and animal models of HGPS. We analyzed global gene expression changes in fibroblasts from human subjects with HGPS and found that a lamin A-Rb signaling network is a major defective regulatory axis. Treatment of fibroblasts with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor reversed the gene expression defects. Our study identifies Rb as a key factor in HGPS pathogenesis and suggests that its modulation could ameliorate premature aging and possibly complications of physiological aging.

  4. Pathogenesis and Inhibition of Flaviviruses from a Carbohydrate Perspective

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    So Young Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are enveloped, positive single stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA viruses with various routes of transmission. While the type and severity of symptoms caused by pathogenic flaviviruses vary from hemorrhagic fever to fetal abnormalities, their general mechanism of host cell entry is similar. All pathogenic flaviviruses, such as dengue virus, yellow fever virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and Zika virus, bind to glycosaminglycans (GAGs through the putative GAG binding sites within their envelope proteins to gain access to the surface of host cells. GAGs are long, linear, anionic polysaccharides with a repeating disaccharide unit and are involved in many biological processes, such as cellular signaling, cell adhesion, and pathogenesis. Flavivirus envelope proteins are N-glycosylated surface proteins, which interact with C-type lectins, dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN through their glycans. In this review, we discuss both host and viral surface receptors that have the carbohydrate components, focusing on the surface interactions in the early stage of flavivirus entry. GAG-flavivirus envelope protein interactions as well as interactions between flavivirus envelope proteins and DC-SIGN are discussed in detail. This review also examines natural and synthetic inhibitors of flaviviruses that are carbohydrate-based or carbohydrate-targeting. Both advantages and drawbacks of these inhibitors are explored, as are potential strategies to improve their efficacy to ultimately help eradicate flavivirus infections.

  5. Antisense-Based Progerin Downregulation in HGPS-Like Patients’ Cells

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    Karim Harhouri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Progeroid laminopathies, including Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS, OMIM #176670, are premature and accelerated aging diseases caused by defects in nuclear A-type Lamins. Most HGPS patients carry a de novo point mutation within exon 11 of the LMNA gene encoding A-type Lamins. This mutation activates a cryptic splice site leading to the deletion of 50 amino acids at its carboxy-terminal domain, resulting in a truncated and permanently farnesylated Prelamin A called Prelamin A Δ50 or Progerin. Some patients carry other LMNA mutations affecting exon 11 splicing and are named “HGPS-like” patients. They also produce Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Δ35 and Δ90 at the transcriptional and/or protein level. The results we present show that morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AON prevent pathogenic LMNA splicing, markedly reducing the accumulation of Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Prelamin A Δ35, Prelamin A Δ90 in HGPS-like patients’ cells. Finally, a patient affected with Mandibuloacral Dysplasia type B (MAD-B, carrying a homozygous mutation in ZMPSTE24, encoding an enzyme involved in Prelamin A maturation, leading to accumulation of wild type farnesylated Prelamin A, was also included in this study. These results provide preclinical proof of principle for the use of a personalized antisense approach in HGPS-like and MAD-B patients, who may therefore be eligible for inclusion in a therapeutic trial based on this approach, together with classical HGPS patients.

  6. Pluripotent stem cells to model Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS): Current trends and future perspectives for drug discovery.

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    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Nissan, Xavier

    2015-11-01

    Progeria, or Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), is a rare, fatal genetic disease characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. This syndrome is typically caused by mutations in codon 608 (p.G608G) of the LMNA, leading to the production of a mutated form of lamin A precursor called progerin. In HGPS, progerin accumulates in cells causing progressive molecular defects, including nuclear shape abnormalities, chromatin disorganization, damage to DNA and delays in cell proliferation. Here we report how, over the past five years, pluripotent stem cells have provided new insights into the study of HGPS and opened new original therapeutic perspectives to treat the disease.

  7. Estriol strongly inhibits DNCB-induced contact dermatitis: role of antigen-specific antibodies in pathogenesis.

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    Zhang, Elizabeth Yan; Zhu, Bao-Ting

    2014-12-01

    The endogenous estrogens are important modulators of the immune system and its functions. However, their effects are rather complex and many aspects have not been studied. In this study, we used the 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB)-induced contact dermatitis as a disease model and investigated the effect of estriol (E3), along with two other estrogens, 17β-estradiol and estrone, on the pathogenesis of contact hypersensitivity. A series of parameters, such as ear swelling, skin inflammation, antigen-specific immunoglobulins, and lymphocyte compositions in peripheral lymphoid organs, were evaluated in mice following development of contact dermatitis. We found that administration of all three estrogens elicited strong inhibition of DNCB-induced dermatitis, while E3 exerted the strongest suppressive effect. Administration of E3 alleviated dermatitis, and this effect was accompanied by decreases in serum DNCB-specific immunoglobulins, such as IgA, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b. Besides, treatment with E3 reduced B cell population, especially IgG-producing cells in the peripheral lymphoid organs following the induction of dermatitis. These observations consistently suggest that the antibody (Ab)-mediated humoral immune reactions play a critical role in the pathogenesis of DNCB-induced contact dermatitis. The results from this study demonstrate, for the first time, that estrogen administration has a strong suppressive effect on the pathogenesis of contact dermatitis. These findings offer important insights concerning the pathogenic role of antigen-specific Abs in contact dermatitis and the treatment of chemical-induced, Ab-mediated skin hypersensitivity reactions in humans.

  8. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori CagA-Induced Pathogenesis by Methylantcinate B from Antrodia camphorata

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    Chun-Jung Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori (Hp is the leading risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Hp virulence factor, cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA interacted with cholesterol-enriched microdomains and leads to induction of inflammation in gastric epithelial cells (AGS. In this study, we identified a triterpenoid methylantcinate B (MAB from the medicinal mushroom Antrodia camphoratawhich inhibited the translocation and phosphorylation of CagA and caused a reduction in hummingbird phenotype in HP-infected AGS cells. Additionally, MAB suppressed the Hp-induced inflammatory response by attenuation of NF-κB activation, translocation of p65 NF-κB, and phosphorylation of IκB-α, indicating that MAB modulates CagA-mediated signaling pathway. Additionally, MAB also suppressed the IL-8 luciferase activity and its secretion in HP-infected AGS cells. On the other hand, molecular structure simulations revealed that MAB interacts with CagA similarly to that of cholesterol. Moreover, binding of cholesterol to the immobilized CagA was inhibited by increased levels of MAB. Our results demonstrate that MAB is the first natural triterpenoid which competes with cholesterol bound to CagA leading to attenuation of Hp-induced pathogenesis of epithelial cells. Thus, this study indicates that MAB may have a scope to develop as a therapeutic candidate against Hp CagA-induced inflammation.

  9. Attenuated inhibition of medium spiny neurons participates in the pathogenesis of childhood depression

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    Dandan Liu; Linghan Hu; Junqi Zhang; Ping Zhang; Shengtian Li

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the nucleus accumbens, which is involved in mechanisms of reward and addiction, plays a role in the pathogenesis of depression and in the action of anti-depressants. In the current study, intraperitoneal injection of nomifensine, a dopamine reuptake inhibitor, decreased depression-like behaviors in the Wistar Kyoto rat model of depression in the sucrose-preference and forced swim tests. Nomifensine also reduced membrane excitability in medium spiny neurons in the core of the nucleus accumbens in the childhood Wistar Kyoto rats as evaluated by electrophysiological recording. In addition, the expression of dopamine D2-like receptor mRNA was downregulated in the nucleus accumbens, striatum and hippocampus of nomifensine-treated childhood Wistar Kyoto rats. These experimental ifndings indicate that impaired inhibition of medium spiny neurons, mediated by dopamine D2-like receptors, may be involved in the formation of depression-like behavior in childhood Wistar Kyoto rats, and that nomifensine can alleviate depressive behaviors by reducing medium spiny neuron membrane excitability.

  10. A High Throughput Phenotypic Screening reveals compounds that counteract premature osteogenic differentiation of HGPS iPS-derived mesenchymal stem cells

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    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Jaskowiak, Anne-Laure; Egesipe, Anne-Laure; Tournois, Johana; Brinon, Benjamin; Pitrez, Patricia R.; Ferreira, Lino; de Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Levy, Nicolas; Nissan, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare fatal genetic disorder that causes systemic accelerated aging in children. Thanks to the pluripotency and self-renewal properties of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), HGPS iPSC-based modeling opens up the possibility of access to different relevant cell types for pharmacological approaches. In this study, 2800 small molecules were explored using high-throughput screening, looking for compounds that could potentially reduce the alkaline phosphatase activity of HGPS mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) committed into osteogenic differentiation. Results revealed seven compounds that normalized the osteogenic differentiation process and, among these, all-trans retinoic acid and 13-cis-retinoic acid, that also decreased progerin expression. This study highlights the potential of high-throughput drug screening using HGPS iPS-derived cells, in order to find therapeutic compounds for HGPS and, potentially, for other aging-related disorders. PMID:27739443

  11. Estriol strongly inhibits DNCB-induced contact dermatitis: role of antigen-specific antibodies in pathogenesis

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    Zhang, Elizabeth Yan; Zhu, Bao-Ting

    2014-01-01

    The endogenous estrogens are important modulators of the immune system and its functions. However, their effects are rather complex and many aspects have not been studied. In this study, we used the 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB)-induced contact dermatitis as a disease model and investigated the effect of estriol (E3), along with two other estrogens, 17β-estradiol and estrone, on the pathogenesis of contact hypersensitivity. A series of parameters, such as ear swelling, skin inflammation,...

  12. The effect of inhibition of PP1 and TNFα signaling on pathogenesis of SARS coronavirus.

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    McDermott, Jason E; Mitchell, Hugh D; Gralinski, Lisa E; Eisfeld, Amie J; Josset, Laurence; Bankhead, Armand; Neumann, Gabriele; Tilton, Susan C; Schäfer, Alexandra; Li, Chengjun; Fan, Shufang; McWeeney, Shannon; Baric, Ralph S; Katze, Michael G; Waters, Katrina M

    2016-09-23

    The complex interplay between viral replication and host immune response during infection remains poorly understood. While many viruses are known to employ anti-immune strategies to facilitate their replication, highly pathogenic virus infections can also cause an excessive immune response that exacerbates, rather than reduces pathogenicity. To investigate this dichotomy in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), we developed a transcriptional network model of SARS-CoV infection in mice and used the model to prioritize candidate regulatory targets for further investigation. We validated our predictions in 18 different knockout (KO) mouse strains, showing that network topology provides significant predictive power to identify genes that are important for viral infection. We identified a novel player in the immune response to virus infection, Kepi, an inhibitory subunit of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) complex, which protects against SARS-CoV pathogenesis. We also found that receptors for the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) promote pathogenesis, presumably through excessive inflammation. The current study provides validation of network modeling approaches for identifying important players in virus infection pathogenesis, and a step forward in understanding the host response to an important infectious disease. The results presented here suggest the role of Kepi in the host response to SARS-CoV, as well as inflammatory activity driving pathogenesis through TNFα signaling in SARS-CoV infections. Though we have reported the utility of this approach in bacterial and cell culture studies previously, this is the first comprehensive study to confirm that network topology can be used to predict phenotypes in mice with experimental validation.

  13. The effect of inhibition of PP1 and TNFα signaling on pathogenesis of SARS coronavirus

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    McDermott, Jason E.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Josset, Laurence; Bankhead, Armand; Neumann, Gabriele; Tilton, Susan C.; Schäfer, Alexandra; Li, Chengjun; Fan, Shufang; McWeeney, Shannon; Baric, Ralph S.; Katze, Michael G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2016-09-23

    The complex interplay between viral replication and host immune response during infection remains poorly understood. While many viruses are known to employ antiimmune strategies to facilitate their replication, highly pathogenic virus infections can also cause an excessive immune response that exacerbates, rather than reduces pathogenicity. To investigate this dichotomy in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), we developed a transcriptional network model of SARS-CoV infection in mice and used the model to prioritize candidate regulatory targets for further investigation. We validated our predictions in 18 different knockout (KO) mouse strains, showing that network topology provides significant predictive power to identify genes that are important for viral infection. We identified a novel player in the immune response to virus infection, Kepi, an inhibitory subunit of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) complex, which protects against SARS-CoV pathogenesis. We also found that receptors for the proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), promote pathogenesis through a parallel feed-forward circuit that promotes inflammation. These results are consistent with previous studies showing the role of over-stimulation of the inflammatory response to SARS-CoV in pathogenesis. We conclude that the critical balance between immune response and inflammation can be manipulated to improve the outcome of the infection. Further, our study provides two potential therapeutic strategies for mitigating the effects of SARS-CoV infection, and may provide insight into treatment strategies for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV).

  14. A-type lamins and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: pathogenesis and therapy.

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    Gonzalez, Jose M; Pla, Davinia; Perez-Sala, Dolores; Andres, Vicente

    2011-06-01

    Lamin A and lamin C (A-type lamins, both encoded by the LMNA gene) are major components of the mammalian nuclear lamina, a complex proteinaceous structure that acts as a scaffold for protein complexes that regulate nuclear structure and function. Abnormal accumulation of farnesylated-progerin, a mutant form of prelamin A, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a devastating disorder that causes the death of affected children at an average age of 13.5 years, predominantly from premature atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction or stroke. Remarkably, progerin is also present in normal cells and appears to progressively accumulate during aging of non-HGPS cells. Therefore, understanding how this mutant form of lamin A provokes HGPS may shed significant insight into physiological aging. In this review, we discuss recent advances into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying HGPS, the main murine models of the disease, and the therapeutic strategies developed in cellular and animal models with the aim of reducing the accumulation of farnesylated-progerin, as well as their use in clinical trials of HGPS.

  15. Combined inhibition of p38 and Akt signaling pathways abrogates cyclosporine A-mediated pathogenesis of aggressive skin SCCs

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    Arumugam, Aadithya; Walsh, Stephanie B.; Xu, Jianmin; Afaq, Farrukh [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p38 and Akt are the crucial molecular targets in the pathogenesis of SCCs in OTRs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined inhibition of these targets diminished tumor growth by 90%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of these targets act through downregulating mTOR signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) are the most common neoplasm in organ transplant recipients (OTRs). These cancers are more invasive and metastatic as compared to those developed in normal cohorts. Previously, we have shown that immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine A (CsA) directly alters tumor phenotype of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) by activating TGF-{beta} and TAK1/TAB1 signaling pathways. Here, we identified novel molecular targets for the therapeutic intervention of these SCCs. We observed that combined blockade of Akt and p38 kinases-dependent signaling pathways in CsA-promoted human epidermoid carcinoma A431 xenograft tumors abrogated their growth by more than 90%. This diminution in tumor growth was accompanied by a significant decrease in proliferation and an increase in apoptosis. The residual tumors following the combined treatment with Akt inhibitor triciribine and p38 inhibitors SB-203580 showed significantly diminished expression of phosphorylated Akt and p38 and these tumors were less invasive and highly differentiated. Diminished tumor invasiveness was associated with the reduced epithelial-mesenchymal transition as ascertained by the enhanced E-cadherin and reduced vimentin and N-cadherin expression. Consistently, these tumors also manifested reduced MMP-2/9. The decreased p-Akt expression was accompanied by a significant reduction in p-mTOR. These data provide first important combinatorial pharmacological approach to block the pathogenesis of CsA-induced highly aggressive cutaneous neoplasm in OTRs.

  16. Oxytocin-mediated GABA inhibition during delivery attenuates autism pathogenesis in rodent offspring.

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    Tyzio, Roman; Nardou, Romain; Ferrari, Diana C; Tsintsadze, Timur; Shahrokhi, Amene; Eftekhari, Sanaz; Khalilov, Ilgam; Tsintsadze, Vera; Brouchoud, Corinne; Chazal, Genevieve; Lemonnier, Eric; Lozovaya, Natalia; Burnashev, Nail; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2014-02-07

    We report that the oxytocin-mediated neuroprotective γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) excitatory-inhibitory shift during delivery is abolished in the valproate and fragile X rodent models of autism. During delivery and subsequently, hippocampal neurons in these models have elevated intracellular chloride levels, increased excitatory GABA, enhanced glutamatergic activity, and elevated gamma oscillations. Maternal pretreatment with bumetanide restored in offspring control electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes. Conversely, blocking oxytocin signaling in naïve mothers produced offspring having electrophysiological and behavioral autistic-like features. Our results suggest a chronic deficient chloride regulation in these rodent models of autism and stress the importance of oxytocin-mediated GABAergic inhibition during the delivery process. Our data validate the amelioration observed with bumetanide and oxytocin and point to common pathways in a drug-induced and a genetic rodent model of autism.

  17. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication by small interfering RNAs directed against Glioma Pathogenesis Related Protein (GliPR expression

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    Ottmann Oliver G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, we showed that glioma pathogenesis related protein (GliPR is induced in CEM T cells upon HIV-1 infection in vitro. To examine whether GliPR plays a role as HIV dependency factor (HDF, we tested the effect of GliPR suppression by siRNA on HIV-1 replication. Results Induction of GliPR expression by HIV-1 was confirmed in P4-CCR5 cells. When GliPR was suppressed by siRNA, HIV-1 replication was significantly reduced as measured by HIV-1 transcript levels, HIV-1 p24 protein levels, and HIV-1 LTR-driven reporter gene expression, suggesting that GliPR is a cellular co-factor of HIV-1. Microarray analysis of uninfected HeLa cells following knockdown of GliPR revealed, among a multitude of gene expression alterations, a down-regulation of syndecan-1, syndecan-2, protein kinase C alpha (PRKCA, the catalytic subunit β of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PRKACB, nuclear receptor co-activator 3 (NCOA3, and cell surface protein CD59 (protectin, all genes having relevance for HIV-1 pathology. Conclusions The up-regulation of GliPR by HIV-1 and the early significant inhibition of HIV-1 replication mediated by knockdown of GliPR reveal GliPR as an important HIV-1 dependency factor (HDF, which may be exploited for HIV-1 inhibition.

  18. A novel contribution of spvB to pathogenesis of Salmonella Typhimurium by inhibiting autophagy in host cells.

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    Chu, Yuanyuan; Gao, Song; Wang, Ting; Yan, Jing; Xu, Guangmei; Li, Yuanyuan; Niu, Hua; Huang, Rui; Wu, Shuyan

    2016-02-16

    Salmonella plasmid virulence genes (spv) are highly conserved in strains of clinically important Salmonella serovars. It is essential for Salmonella plasmid-correlated virulence, although the exact mechanism remains to be elucidated. Autophagy has been reported to play an important role in host immune responses limiting Salmonella infection. Our previous studies demonstrated that Salmonella conjugative plasmid harboring spv genes could enhance bacterial cytotoxicity by inhibiting autophagy. In the present study, we investigated whether spvB, which is one of the most important constituents of spv ORF could intervene in autophagy pathway. Murine macrophage-like cells J774A.1, human epithelial HeLa cells, and BALB/c mice infected with Salmonella Typhimurium wild type, mutant and complementary strains (carrying or free spvB or complemented only with ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of SpvB) were used in vitro and in vivo assay, respectively. To further explore the molecular mechanisms, both SpvB ectopic eukaryotic expression system and cells deficient in essential autophagy components by siRNA were generated. Results indicated that spvB could suppress autophagosome formation through its function in depolymerizing actin, and aggravate inflammatory injury of the host in response to S. Typhimurium infection. Our studies demonstrated virulence of spvB involving in inhibition of autophagic flux for the first time, which could provide novel insights into Salmonella pathogenesis, and have potential application to develop new antibacterial strategies for Salmonellosis.

  19. Synthesis and bioevaluation of novel 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylbenzimidazole derivatives that inhibit Helicobacter pylori-induced pathogenesis in human gastric epithelial cells.

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    Chang, Chih-Shiang; Liu, Ju-Fang; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Lin, Chia-Der; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Lu, Dah-Yuu; Sing, Yu-Ting; Chen, Li-Yu; Kao, Min-Chuan; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2012-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, and even gastric malignancy. H. pylori's antibiotic resistance is the major obstacle preventing its eradication. A series of 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylbenzimidazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-H. pylori activity. The compound, 2-fluorophenyl-5-methyl-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)benzimidazole (FMTMB), was determined as the most potent in the inhibition of H. pylori growth and pathogenesis of host cells. An in vitro H. pylori infection model revealed that FMTMB inhibited H. pylori adhesion and invasion of gastric epithelial cells. Results from this study provide evidence that FMTMB is a potent therapeutic agent that exhibits both anti-H. pylori growth properties and anti-H. pylori-induced pathogenesis of cells.

  20. Drug-induced Inhibition and Trafficking Disruption of ion Channels: Pathogenesis of QT Abnormalities and Drug-induced Fatal Arrhythmias.

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    Cubeddu, Luigi X

    2016-01-01

    Risk of severe and fatal ventricular arrhythmias, presenting as Torsade de Pointes (TdP), is increased in congenital and acquired forms of long QT syndromes (LQTS). Drug-induced inhibition of K+ currents, IKs, IKr, IK1, and/or Ito, delay repolarization, prolong QT, and increase the risk of TdP. Drug-induced interference with IKr is the most common cause of acquired LQTS/TdP. Multiple drugs bind to KNCH2-hERG-K+ channels affecting IKr, including antiarrythmics, antibiotics, antivirals, azole-antifungals, antimalarials, anticancer, antiemetics, prokinetics, antipsychotics, and antidepressants. Azithromycin has been recently added to this list. In addition to direct channel inhibition, some drugs interfere with the traffic of channels from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell membrane, decreasing mature channel membrane density; e.g., pentamidine, geldalamicin, arsenic trioxide, digoxin, and probucol. Other drugs, such as ketoconazole, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, citalopram, escitalopram, donepezil, tamoxifen, endoxifen, atazanavir, and roxitromycin, induce both direct channel inhibition and impaired channel trafficking. Although many drugs prolong the QT interval, TdP is a rare event. The following conditions increase the risk of drug-induced TdP: a) Disease states/electrolyte levels (heart failure, structural cardiac disease, bradycardia, hypokalemia); b) Pharmacogenomic variables (presence of congenital LQTS, subclinical ion-channel mutations, history of or having a relative with history of drug-induced long QT/TdP); c) Pharmacodynamic and kinetic factors (high doses, women, elderly, metabolism inhibitors, combining two or more QT prolonging drugs, drugs that prolong the QT and increase QT dispersion, and drugs with multiple actions on ion channels). Because most of these conditions are preventable, careful evaluation of risk factors and increased knowledge of drug use associated with repolarization abnormalities are strongly recommended.

  1. Antioxidants inhibition of high plasma androgenic markers in the pathogenesis of ethylene glycol (EG)-induced nephrolithiasis in Wistar rats.

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    Naghii, Mohammad Reza; Mofid, Mahmood; Hedayati, Mehdi; Khalagi, Kazem

    2014-04-01

    The association between serum gonadal steroids and urolithiasis in males received only limited attention. Calcium oxalate urolithiasis is induced by administration of ethylene glycol in drinking water. It appears that the administration of natural antioxidants has been used to protect against nephrolithiasis in human and experimental animals. The purpose is to study the potential role of antioxidants as inhibitors of high plasma androgenic markers or hyperandrogenicity in the pathogenesis of ethylene glycol-induced nephrolithiasis in Wistar rats. Male Wistar rats were studied in 4-week period. Group 1 (control) was fed a standard commercial diet. Group 2 received the same diet with 0.5 % of ethylene glycol. Group 3 received EG plus the diet and water added with antioxidant nutrients and lime juice as the dietary source of citrate. Group 4 and Group 5 were treated similar to Group 2 and Group 3 with 0.75 % of ethylene glycol. For antioxidant supplementation, the standard diet enriched with 4,000.0 μg vitamin E and 1,500.0 IU vitamin A for each rat per day added to the diet once a week, and provided daily with 5.0 mg vitamin C, 400.0 μg vitamin B6, 20.0 μg selenium, 12.0 mg zinc, and 2.0 mg boron for each rat per day in their drinking water. After treatment period, collection of blood was performed and kidneys were removed and used for histopathological examination. The results based on various assays, measuring size of crystal deposition, and histological examinations showed that high concentration of androgens acts as promoter for the formation of renal calculi due to ethylene glycol consumption and the inhibitory role of antioxidant complex in the formation of renal calculi disease. Data revealed that the size and the mean number of crystal deposits determined in EG 0.75 % treated groups (G4) were significantly higher than the EG-treated groups, added with antioxidant nutrients and lime juice (G5). The mean concentration of androgens in Group 4 increased after

  2. Migraine Pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nabih M. M.D. Ramadan

    2000-01-01

    @@Introduction Various theories of migraine pathogenesis have been developed over the years. To this date, none fully explains all the migraine phenomena. A complete description of each proposed theory is beyond the scope of this chapter. Nonetheless, a brief description of the arguments for and against the leading theories is noteworthy

  3. Anthrax Pathogenesis.

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    Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H; Vrentas, Catherine; Pomerantsev, Andrei P; Liu, Shihui

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is caused by the spore-forming, gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The bacterium's major virulence factors are (a) the anthrax toxins and (b) an antiphagocytic polyglutamic capsule. These are encoded by two large plasmids, the former by pXO1 and the latter by pXO2. The expression of both is controlled by the bicarbonate-responsive transcriptional regulator, AtxA. The anthrax toxins are three polypeptides-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF)-that come together in binary combinations to form lethal toxin and edema toxin. PA binds to cellular receptors to translocate LF (a protease) and EF (an adenylate cyclase) into cells. The toxins alter cell signaling pathways in the host to interfere with innate immune responses in early stages of infection and to induce vascular collapse at late stages. This review focuses on the role of anthrax toxins in pathogenesis. Other virulence determinants, as well as vaccines and therapeutics, are briefly discussed.

  4. The Pathogenic Mechanisms and Therapeutic Strategies of Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome%早老症(HGPS)的发病机制与治疗策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾涛; 刘新光; 周中军

    2007-01-01

    早老症(Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome,HGPS)是一种早发而严重的过早老化性疾病.它是由于编码A/C型核纤层蛋白的LMNA基因发生点突变而引起.这个突变激活了基因11号外显子上一个隐蔽的剪接位点,产生了一种被截短了50个氨基酸的A型核纤层蛋白.然而,一个广泛分布于核膜上结构蛋白的突变,如何引起HGPS患者的早老表现,目前还不太清楚.最近研究发现,HGPS患者的细胞核结构与功能发生了各种异常,主要表现在:progerin蓄积与核变形、细胞核机械性质的改变、组蛋白修饰方式与外遗传控制的改变、基因表达调控异常、p53信号传导通路激活和基因组不稳定等方面.目前存在机械应激假说和基因表达失控假说两种假说解释HGPS的发病机制.对于HGPS患者,尚无有效的临床干预措施,但有学者提出了一些治疗策略,如应用法尼基化的抑制剂、反义寡核苷酸和RNA干扰方法.HGPS被认为是研究正常衰老机制的一个模型.对HGPS深入研究将有助于阐明A型核纤层蛋白和核膜的正常生理功能,及其在生理衰老和疾病中的作用.

  5. Matrilysin (MMP-7) Inhibition of BMP-7 Induced Renal Tubular Branching Morphogenesis Suggests a Role in the Pathogenesis of Human Renal Dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harju-Baker, Susanna; Rims, Cliff; Sheen, Joong-Hyuk; Liapis, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Congenital renal dysplasia (RD) is a severe form of congenital renal malformation characterized by disruption of normal renal development with cyst formation, reduced or absent nephrons, and impaired renal growth. The authors previously identified that matrilysin (matrix metalloproteinase–7) was overexpressed in a microarray gene expression analysis of human RD compared to normal control kidneys. They now find that active matrilysin gene transcription and protein synthesis occur within dysplastic tubules and epithelial cells lining cysts in human RD by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Similar staining patterns were seen in obstructed kidneys of pouch opossums that show histological features similar to that of human RD. In vitro, matrilysin inhibits formation of branching structures in mIMCD-3 cells stimulated by bone morphogenetic protein–7 (BMP-7) but does not inhibit hepatocyte growth factor–stimulated branching. BMP-7 signaling is essential for normal kidney development, and overexpression of catalytically active matrilysin in human embryonic kidney 293 cells reduces endogenous BMP-7 protein levels and inhibits phosphorylation of BMP-7 SMAD signaling intermediates. These findings suggest that matrilysin expression in RD may be an injury response that disrupts normal nephrogenesis by impairing BMP-7 signaling. PMID:22215634

  6. HIV gp120 inhibits the somatotropic axis: A possible GH-releasing hormone receptor mechanism for the pathogenesis of AIDS wasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulroney, Susan E.; McDonnell, Kevin J.; Pert, Candace B.; Ruff, Michael R.; Resch, Zachary; Samson, Willis K.; Lumpkin, Michael D.

    1998-01-01

    AIDS is often associated with growth retardation in children and wasting in adults. The dissociated envelope protein of the HIV (HIV-1), gp120, can be found in significant concentrations in the parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid of brains in infected individuals, even in the earliest stages of HIV-1 disease. On the basis of this and the fact that we observed pentapeptide sequence homology between GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and the V2 receptor-binding region of gp120, we initiated experiments to determine whether gp120 could affect GH secretion and growth in vivo and/or interact with anterior pituitary GHRH receptors in vitro. Although acute IV administration of gp120 in conscious rats had no effect on plasma GH levels, acute administration of gp120 (400 ng) into the brain significantly suppressed pulsatile GH release over a 6-h period compared with saline-injected controls. Furthermore, the putative gp120 antagonist, Peptide T (DAPTA), prevented the suppression of GH by gp120. In support of these in vivo findings, gp120 also significantly (P < 0.05) suppressed GHRH-stimulated GH release in static cultures of dispersed pituitary cells and from cells undergoing perifusion with the peptides. DAPTA prevented the GH suppression by gp120 in both of the pituitary cell paradigms. Furthermore, chronic administration of gp120 into the third ventricle significantly reduced body weight in juvenile rats, compared with saline-injected controls. Thus, gp120 appears to act both at the hypothalamus and pituitary to suppress GH release, and its action at these two locations is associated with a significant loss in body weight in chronically treated young animals. These findings may suggest a specific mechanism for the pathogenesis of wasting in HIV-1 patients that involves blockade of endogenous GHRH receptors by gp120. PMID:9465119

  7. Trypsin inhibition: a potential cause of cobalamin deficiency common to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer-type dementia and AIDS dementia complex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaddon, A; Regland, B; Fear, C F

    1995-08-01

    There is increasing evidence for an association between Alzheimer-type dementia (AD) and nutritionally independent cobalamin deficiency. Furthermore, low serum cobalamin values occur in a kindred with familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) and histopathological confirmation of AD neuropathology. The Cobalamin deficiency could be either a consequence or cause of amyloidogenesis. Cobalamin deficiency is also associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A common pathogenic mechanism may exist for AIDS dementia complex (ADC) and AD, but there is no explanation at present for these associations. This paper presents the hypothesis that protease inhibition is a common factor in AD and ADC resulting in protein-bound cobalamin malabsorption and disrupted cobalamin metabolism.

  8. Blocking RhoA/ROCK inhibits the pathogenesis of pemphigus vulgaris by suppressing oxidative stress and apoptosis through TAK1/NOD2-mediated NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Junqin; Zeng, Xuewen; Halifu, Yilinuer; Chen, Wenjing; Hu, Fengxia; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Huan; Kang, Xiaojing

    2017-06-12

    Oxidative stress and apoptosis play critical roles in pemphigus vulgaris (PV). The main aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of RhoA/ROCK signaling on UVB-induced oxidative damage, and to delineate the molecular mechanisms involved in the UVB-mediated inflammatory and apoptotic response. In HaCaT cells, we observed that blockage of RhoA/ROCK signaling with the inhibitor CT04 or Y27632 greatly inhibited the UVB-mediated increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, inhibition of RhoA/ROCK signaling reduced UVB-induced apoptosis, as exemplified by a reduction in DNA fragmentation, and also elevated anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein, concomitant with reduced levels of pro-apoptotic protein Bax, caspase-3 cleavage and decreased PARP-1 protein. The release of inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 was also attenuated. Mechanically, we observed that blockage of RhoA/ROCK repressed the TAK1/NOD2-mediated NF-κB pathway in HaCaT cells exposed to UVB. Taken together, these data reveal that RhoA/ROCK signaling is one of the regulators contributing to oxidative damage and apoptosis in human keratinocytes, suggesting that RhoA/ROCK signaling has strong potential to be used as a useful therapeutic target in skin diseases including PV.

  9. The Complexity of Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis: The Role of RAGE as Therapeutic Target to Promote Neuroprotection by Inhibiting Neurovascular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Perrone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia. Amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are prominent pathological features of AD. Aging and age-dependent oxidative stress are the major nongenetic risk factors for AD. The beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ, the major component of plaques, and advanced glycation end products (AGEs are key activators of plaque-associated cellular dysfunction. Aβ and AGEs bind to the receptor for AGEs (RAGE, which transmits the signal from RAGE via redox-sensitive pathways to nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB. RAGE-mediated signaling is an important contributor to neurodegeneration in AD. We will summarize the current knowledge and ongoing studies on RAGE function in AD. We will also present evidence for a novel pathway induced by RAGE in AD, which leads to the expression of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP, providing further evidence that pharmacological inhibition of RAGE will promote neuroprotection by blocking neurovascular dysfunction in AD.

  10. Progress on pathogenesis of pterygium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Peng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pterygium is one of the common ocular surface diseases, characterized by local subconjunctival fibrovascular proliferation invading the cornea, not only influences facial beauty, but affects visual acuity and causes ocular dyskinesia. Surgical removal is the main treatment option. However, the recurrence rate is high(20%-40%. Many explanations are put forward by scientists, but the mechanism of pterygium still remains unclear. It is of great importance to study the pathogenesis of pterygium so as to prevent its occurrence and development. In this paper, we make a review about the domestic and international studies of the inhibition of apoptosis, matrix metalloproteinase, oxidative stress and immunity in pterygium.

  11. The Pathogenesis of Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, Timothy John

    2008-01-01

    Autism is well known as a complex developmental disorder with a seemingly confusing and uncertain pathogenesis. The definitive mechanisms that promote autism are poorly understood and mostly unknown, yet available theories do appear to focus on the disruption of normal cerebral development and its subsequent implications on the functional brain unit. This mini-review aims solely to discuss and evaluate the most prominent current theories regarding the pathogenesis of autism. The main conclusi...

  12. Association of progerin-interactive partner proteins with lamina proteins:Mel18 is associated with emerin in HGPS%Progerin作用的伴侣蛋白和核纤层蛋白问的相互作用:在早老症中Mel18与emerin的相互作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-na JU; W. Ted BROWN; Nanbert ZHONG

    2009-01-01

    Objective :The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS or progeria) is a childhood disorder with features of premature aging and is caused by mutations in the lamin A gene resulting in the production of an abnormal protein, termed progerin. To investigate the underlying pathogenic mecha-nism, we studied the nuclear co-localization and association of progerin interactive partner proteins (PIPPs) with lamina proteins. Methods:Both wild-type (WT) and progeria fibroblasts were studied by various methods including eonfocal microscopy, immunopreeipitation and Western blot. Results:All PIPPs discovered so-far co-localized with lamin A/C. In addition, the PIPPs were selectively associated with lamina proteins. An increased immunofluorescent staining signal was found for Mel18 in HGPS as com-pared to WT cells. An association of Me118 with emerin was observed in HGPS, but not in WT cells.Conclusion: Based on these findings, we propose that PIPPs, along with associated lamina proteins may form a pathogenic progerin-containing protein complex.

  13. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  14. Molecular Pathogenesis of Spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing

    This dissertation includes a presentation of knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis achieved through a PhD programme at Aalborg University from 1.12.2011 - 1.12.2014. Work was carried out in the Laboratory of Medical Mass Spectrometry, headed by: Professor Svend Birkelund...

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease: pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Zhen; Li, Yong-Yu

    2014-01-07

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. It has been a worldwide health-care problem with a continually increasing incidence. It is thought that IBD results from an aberrant and continuing immune response to the microbes in the gut, catalyzed by the genetic susceptibility of the individual. Although the etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, it involves a complex interaction between the genetic, environmental or microbial factors and the immune responses. Of the four components of IBD pathogenesis, most rapid progress has been made in the genetic study of gut inflammation. The latest internationally collaborative studies have ascertained 163 susceptibility gene loci for IBD. The genes implicated in childhood-onset and adult-onset IBD overlap, suggesting similar genetic predispositions. However, the fact that genetic factors account for only a portion of overall disease variance indicates that microbial and environmental factors may interact with genetic elements in the pathogenesis of IBD. Meanwhile, the adaptive immune response has been classically considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of IBD, as new studies in immunology and genetics have clarified that the innate immune response maintains the same importance in inducing gut inflammation. Recent progress in understanding IBD pathogenesis sheds lights on relevant disease mechanisms, including the innate and adaptive immunity, and the interactions between genetic factors and microbial and environmental cues. In this review, we provide an update on the major advances that have occurred in above areas.

  16. Pathogenesis of Tourette's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckman, J F; Peterson, B S; Anderson, G M; Arnsten, A F; Pauls, D L; Cohen, D J

    1997-01-01

    This review presents a models of disease pathogenesis in the context of CNS development. It begins with an exploration of the clinical features and natural history of Tourette's syndrome. This is followed by a consideration of the role of genetic and nongenetic factors. An effort is then made to review the anatomical organization of the basal ganglia and related cortical sites. These circuits are intimately involved in the normal processing of sensorimotor, cognitive, and emotionally laden information. Evidence implicating these circuits in the pathobiology of Tourette's syndrome is then considered. The review closes with the prospects for advances in interdisciplinary research and therapeutics using this model as a guide.

  17. Pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, A L

    2005-05-01

    The pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon is not fully understood. However, the last 20 yr have witnessed enormous increases in our understanding of different mechanisms which, singly or in combination, may contribute. A key point is that Raynaud's phenomenon can be either primary (idiopathic) or secondary to a number of underlying conditions, and that the pathogenesis and pathophysiology vary between these conditions. This review concentrates upon those subtypes of Raynaud's phenomenon of most interest to rheumatologists: systemic sclerosis-related Raynaud's phenomenon, primary Raynaud's phenomenon and Raynaud's phenomenon secondary to hand-arm vibration syndrome. In this review, I shall discuss the main mechanisms thought to be important in pathophysiology under the three broad headings of 'vascular', 'neural' and 'intravascular'. While these are false distinctions because all interrelate, they facilitate discussion of the key elements: the blood vessel wall (particularly the endothelium), the neural control of vascular tone, and the many circulating factors which can impair blood flow and/or cause endothelial injury. Vascular abnormalities include those of both structure and function. Neural abnormalities include deficiency of the vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (released from sensory afferents), alpha(2)-adrenoreceptor activation (possibly with up-regulation of the normally 'silent' alpha(2C)-adrenoreceptor) and a central nervous system component. Intravascular abnormalities include platelet activation, impaired fibrinolysis, increased viscosity and probably oxidant stress. As our understanding of the pathophysiology of Raynaud's phenomenon increases, so do our possibilities for identifying effective treatments.

  18. Pemphigus: Epidemiology and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelda Karıncaoğlu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus, a group of bullous diseases affecting the oral mucosa and the skin, is caused by antibody-mediated autoimmune reaction to desmogleins (Dsg, desmosomal transmembrane glycoproteins, leading to acantholysis. Pemphigus has a worldwide distribution but the incidence in patients of Jewish origin is higher. The disease has a peak incidence of occurrence between the 4th and 6th decades. While various environmental factors have been implicated as triggering agents, HLA association is probably the most important predisposing factor. Pemphigus, is caused by antibody-mediated autoimmune reaction to desmosomal cadherins, Dsg1, and Dsg3. Recent molecular studies have shown that acantholysis can occur also in the presence of antibodies against 9a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Pemphigus is currently divided into three distinct varieties, i.e., pemphigus vulgaris (PV, pemphigus foliaceus (PF and other variants of pemphigus, depending on clinical features, the level of separation in the epidermis, and immunologic characteristics of auto-antigens. Blistering pathogenesis differ for each of the types of pemphigus. PV is characterized by IgG autoantibodies against Dsg 3, whereas the target of PF is Dsg1, although about 50% of PV patients also have Dsg1 autoantibodies. Lesion distribution is related to the location of the antigen (Dgs 3 and/or Dgs 1 in the epithelium and specific autoantibody production. This article reviews the epidemiology and pathogenesis of pemphigus.

  19. Molecular Pathogenesis of NASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Caligiuri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is the main cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world and a major health problem, owing to its close association with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. NASH progression results from numerous events originating within the liver, as well as from signals derived from the adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. In a fraction of NASH patients, disease may progress, eventually leading to advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding the mechanisms leading to NASH and its evolution to cirrhosis is critical to identifying effective approaches for the treatment of this condition. In this review, we focus on some of the most recent data reported on the pathogenesis of NASH and its fibrogenic progression, highlighting potential targets for treatment or identification of biomarkers of disease progression.

  20. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Walker, David H

    2012-10-09

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host's immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  1. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Walker

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae, is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  2. Pathogenesis of Takotsubo syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Masarone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo syndrome (TTS is an enigmatic disease with a multifactorial and still unresolved pathogenesis. Postulated mechanisms include catecholamine excess, coronary artery spasm, and microvascular dysfunction, however catecholamines seem to play a central role in the pathophysiology of TTS. In facts catecholamines have relevant effects on the vasculature and myocardium. Toxic direct effects of catecholamine on myocardium are mediated by multiple pathway including functional hypoxia, metabolic changes and changes in membrane permeability leading to various electrolytic imbalances. Recently report of familial cases has suggested a genetic component. Further research is required to help clarify the proposed hypotheses and to increase our understanding of the cardiovascular responses to acute stress and the pathophysiology underpinning TTS.

  3. Molecular Pathogenesis of NASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiuri, Alessandra; Gentilini, Alessandra; Marra, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the main cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world and a major health problem, owing to its close association with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. NASH progression results from numerous events originating within the liver, as well as from signals derived from the adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. In a fraction of NASH patients, disease may progress, eventually leading to advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding the mechanisms leading to NASH and its evolution to cirrhosis is critical to identifying effective approaches for the treatment of this condition. In this review, we focus on some of the most recent data reported on the pathogenesis of NASH and its fibrogenic progression, highlighting potential targets for treatment or identification of biomarkers of disease progression. PMID:27657051

  4. [Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branimir Anić; Miroslav Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic disease that primarily affects joints. Etiology and the pathogenesis of RA are complex, involving many types of cells, among others macrophages, T and B cells, fibro- blasts, chondrocytes and dendritic cells. Despite well documented role of many genes and epigenetic modifications in the development and evolution of the disease, in most RA patients there is no clear predisposing factor present. Environmental factors involved in RA pathogenesis are cigarette smoke, industrial pollutants like silica crystals, disturbances of intestinal, lung, and oral microbiota and some specific bacterial and viral infectious agents and their components. In the initial disease stage there are qualitative and quantitative disturbances ofpeptide citrulination as well as other protein modifications, followed by antigen presenting cell (APC) (macrophages and dendritic cells) and fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS) activation. Some microbes foster this processes by APC and FLS direct and indirect activation. In the second stage APC's elicit specific humoral B cell re- sponse resulting in specific antibodies production and T cell autoreactivity. Inherited and acquired defects in T and B cell responses caused by repeated activation of innate immunity as well as loss of tolerance, elicit chronic autoimmune inflammation, primarily of synovial membranes, and development of cellular panus. Pathologic activation of the osteoclasts and release of the immune system effector molecules and the proteolytic enzymes damage the cartilage, bone and tendons composition and structure. Persistent inflammation through its complex mechanisms results in many systemic and extraarticular RA manifestations of almost all organ systems, resulting in severe complications and comorbidities such as rheumatoid lung, carditis, vasculitis, cahexia, anemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebrovascular vascular disease, lymphoma, osteoporosis, depression etc

  5. Pathogenesis of bone metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdinc Nayir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastases are more frequently seen as a complication of cancer than primary bone tumors. For example, it can be seen in as many as 70% of advanced stage breast and prostate cancer cases. Metastatic bone disease is generally categorized as osteoblastic, and osteolytic disease. However most of the cancer types demonstrate a wide spectrum between these two extremes. Paracrine interaction between parathyroid hormone–related protein (PTHrP which increases the rate of bone osteolysis, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β plays a role in osteolytic metastasis. Increased local bone PTHrP concentration increases expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL with resultant activation of osteoclastogenesis. Endothelin – 1 (ET-1, and dickkopf homolog -1 (DKK-1 produced by tumor involve in osteoblastic metastasis. DKK-1 is the central regulator of osteoblastic activity, and osteoblastic bone metastasis. For the elaboration of treatment strategies against frequently seen complication, that is, bone metastases, targets involving in pathogenesis of these complications should be taken into consideration.

  6. Recent progress in melasma pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ai-Young

    2015-11-01

    Melasma is a common skin pigmentation condition. Given therapeutic difficulty as one of the biggest concerns, understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of melasma becomes essential. UV irradiation, female sex hormones, and inflammatory processes are addressed as triggering factors with genetic predisposition. The mechanism of UV-induced melanogenesis has been extensively investigated as a model system to study melasma pathogenesis. Hitherto, treatment modalities for melasma are similar to other hyperpigmentation disorders. However, individual triggering factors induce a separate pigmentation disease, whose pathogenic mechanisms and clinical phenotypes are different from the ones encountered in melasma. Fortunately, there have been ongoing updates on melasma pathogenesis with regard to major triggering factors. Presence of certain factors working independently of UV exposure and role of dermal factors and microRNAs are being identified as novel discoveries about melasma pathogenesis. In this review, the melasma pathogenesis is reviewed in association with updated and new findings.

  7. Progress in investigating the pathogenesis of hepatopulmonary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Jie Zhang; hang-Qing Yang

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of hepatopulmonary syn-drome is complicated and remains unknown. This review aims to provide an updated knowledge about the pathogenesis of the syndrome. DATA SOURCES: Five medical databases, MEDLINE, Science-Direct, OVID, Springer Link, and Wiley InterScience were searched for articles on "hepatopulmonary syndrome","cirrhosis","angiogenesis","intestinal endotoxemia","nitric oxide","carbon monoxide", and other related subjects. RESULTS:Currently, imbalance between vasodilation and vasoconstriction, intestinal bacterial translocation, intestinal endotoxemia, and activation of the lung monocyte/macrophage system may play important roles in the pathogenesis of hepatopulmonary syndrome. Recent studies found that angiogenesis is also an important factor in the pathogenesis of experimental hepatopulmonary syndrome. CONCLUSION: Angiogenesis inhibition may be a potential approach for the treatment of hepatopulmonary syndrome in the future.

  8. Pathogenesis of achalasia cardia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Uday C Ghoshal; Sunil B Daschakraborty; Renu Singh

    2012-01-01

    Achalasia cardia is one of the common causes of motor dysphagia.Though the disease was first described more than 300 years ago,exact pathogenesis of this condition still remains enigmatic.Pathophysiologically,achalasia cardia is caused by loss of inhibitory ganglion in the myenteric plexus of the esophagus.In the initial stage,degeneration of inhibitory nerves in the esophagus results in unopposed action of excitatory neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine,resulting in high amplitude non-peristaltic contractions (vigorous achalasia); progressive loss of cholinergic neurons over time results in dilation and low amplitude simultaneous contractions in the esophageal body (classic achaiasia).Since the initial description,several studies have attempted to explore initiating agents that may cause the disease,such as viral infection,other environmental factors,autoimmunity,and genetic factors.Though Chagas disease,which mimics achalasia,is caused by an infective agent,available evidence suggests that infection may not be an independent cause of primary achalasia.A genetic basis for achalasia is supported by reports showing occurrence of disease in monozygotic twins,siblings and other first-degree relatives and occurrence in association with other genetic diseases such as Down's syndrome and Parkinson's disease.Polymorphisms in genes encoding for nitric oxide synthase,receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide,interleukin 23 and the ALADIN gene have been reported.However,studies on larger numbers of patients and controls from different ethnic groups are needed before definite conclusions can be obtained.Currently,the disease is believed to be multi-factorial,with autoimmune mechanisms triggered by infection in a genetically predisposed individual leading to degeneration of inhibitory ganglia in the wall of the esophagus.

  9. Osteoblast role in osteoarthritis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruotti, Nicola; Corrado, Addolorata; Cantatore, Francesco P

    2017-11-01

    Even if osteoarthritis pathogenesis is still poorly understood, numerous evidences suggest that osteoblasts dysregulation plays a key role in osteoarthritis pathogenesis. An abnormal expression of OPG and RANKL has been described in osteoarthritis osteoblasts, which is responsible for abnormal bone remodeling and decreased mineralization. Alterations in genes expression are involved in dysregulation of osteoblast function, bone remodeling, and mineralization, leading to osteoarthritis development. Moreover, osteoblasts produce numerous transcription factors, growth factors, and other proteic molecules which are involved in osteoarthritis pathogenesis. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal Ha; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-03-16

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment.

  11. [Pseudomembranous colitis: pathogenesis, prevention, treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, N V; Fil', T S

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews a pathogenesis of Pseudomembranous colitis. Questions of prevention and treatment of Clostridium difficile--associated diarrhea are shown by the Evidence-based medicine. There is an accent on the rational prescription of antibiotics.

  12. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo

    OpenAIRE

    Ghada F. Mohammed; Gomaa, Amal HA; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune ...

  13. Molecular mechanisms of rosacea pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davydova A.M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents possible molecular mechanisms for rosacea pathogenesis from current domestic and foreign clinical observations and laboratory research: regulation and expression defects of antimicrobial peptides, vascular endothelial growth factor, the effect of serine proteases, oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species and ferritin on the occurrence and course of rosacea. New developments in molecular biology and genetics are advanced for researching the interaction of multiple factors involved in rosacea pathogenesis, as well as providing the bases for potentially new therapies.

  14. Huntington disease: pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayalu, Praveen; Albin, Roger L

    2015-02-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motor, behavioral, and cognitive decline, culminating in death. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene. Even years before symptoms become overt, mutation carriers show subtle but progressive striatal and cerebral white matter atrophy by volumetric MRI. Although there is currently no direct treatment of HD, management options are available for several symptoms. A better understanding of HD pathogenesis, and more sophisticated clinical trials using newer biomarkers, may lead to meaningful treatments. This article reviews the current knowledge of HD pathogenesis and treatment.

  15. [Asteatotic dermatitis: etiology and pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-juan; Lyu, Zhong-fa

    2015-07-01

    Asteatotic dermatitis (AsD) is a common skin disease characterized by dry skin, itching, erythema, peeling and other skin lesions. It results from the damage in cutaneous barrier related to age, seasonal climate and bathing habits, and presents dysfunction of sebaceous, sweat glands and the increase of transepidermal water loss. The pathogenesis of AsD is not clear. Previous studies mainly focused on the relationship between skin barrier damage and bathing habits, age or gender. Recently, more studies focus on its relationship with other systematic diseases and drugs. This paper reviews etiology and pathogenesis of AsD to provide new ideas for the diagnosis and treatment of AsD.

  16. Pathogenesis of motor neuron disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuefei Wang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize and analyze the factors and theories related to the attack of motor neuron disease, and comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease.DATA SOURCES: A search of Pubmed database was undertaken to identify articles about motor neuron disease published in English from January 1994 to June 2006 by using the keywords of "neurodegenerative diseases". Other literatures were collected by retrieving specific journals and articles.STUDY SELECTION: The data were checked primarily, articles related to the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease were involved, and those obviously irrelated to the articles were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 54 articles were collected, 30 of them were involved, and the other 24 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: The pathogenesis of motor neuron disease has multiple factors, and the present related theories included free radical oxidation, excitotoxicity, genetic and immune factors, lack of neurotrophic factor,injury of neurofilament, etc. The studies mainly come from transgenic animal models, cell culture in vitro and patients with familial motor neuron disease, but there are still many restrictions and disadvantages.CONCLUSION: It is necessary to try to find whether there is internal association among different mechanisms,comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis of motor neuron diseases, in order to provide reliable evidence for the clinical treatment.

  17. On the pathogenesis of IDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nerup, J; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Helqvist, S

    1994-01-01

    A model of the pathogenesis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, i.e. the initial phase of beta-cell destruction, is proposed: in a cascade-like fashion efficient antigen presentation, unbalanced cytokine, secretion and poor beta-cell defence result in beta-cell destruction by toxic free...

  18. Progress in Pathogenesis of Proteinuria

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    Aihua Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Proteinuria not only is a sign of kidney damage, but also is involved in the progression of renal diseases as an independent pathologic factor. Clinically, glomerular proteinuria is most commonly observed, which relates to structural and functional anomalies in the glomerular filtration barrier. The aim of this paper was to describe the pathogenesis of glomerular proteinuria. Data Sources. Articles on glomerular proteinuria retrieved from Pubmed and MEDLINE in the recent 5 years were reviewed. Results. The new understanding of the roles of glomerular endothelial cells and the glomerular basement membrane (GBM in the pathogenesis of glomerular proteinuria was gained. The close relationships of slit diaphragm (SD molecules such as nephrin, podocin, CD2-associated protein (CD2AP, a-actinin-4, transient receptor potential cation channel 6 (TRPC6, Densin and membrane-associated guanylate kinase inverted 1 (MAGI-1, α3β1 integrin, WT1, phospholipase C epsilon-1 (PLCE1, Lmx1b, and MYH9, and mitochondrial disorders and circulating factors in the pathogenesis of glomerular proteinuria were also gradually discovered. Conclusion. Renal proteinuria is a manifestation of glomerular filtration barrier dysfunction. Not only glomerular endothelial cells and GBM, but also the glomerular podocytes and their SDs play an important role in the pathogenesis of glomerular proteinuria.

  19. Pathogenesis of postoperative adhesion formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellebrekers, B.W.J.; Kooistra, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Current views on the pathogenesis of adhesion formation are based on the "classical concept of adhesion formation", namely that a reduction in peritoneal fibrinolytic activity following peritoneal trauma is of key importance in adhesion development. Methods: A non-systematic literature

  20. Biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui Ruqaiyyah; Khan Naveed

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and ev...

  1. Correlation between mitochondrial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yu LIU

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. A growing number of studies have shown that mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. Therefore, this review will mainly discuss the research progress on the correlation between PD and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial autophapy as well as mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial complex Ⅰ inhibition.doi:10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.02.012

  2. An Upregulation in the Expression of Vanilloid Transient Potential Channels 2 Enhances Hypotonicity-Induced Cytosolic Ca2+ Rise in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Model of Hutchinson Gillford Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jenny Chung-Yee; Siu, Chung-Wah; Cheung, Sin-Ying; Tang, Nelson L.; Yu, Shan; Tse, Hung-Fat; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a fatal genetic disorder characterized by premature aging in multiple organs including the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. It is believed that an increased mechanosensitivity of HGPS cells is a causative factor for vascular cell death and vascular diseases in HGPS patients. However, the exact mechanism is unknown. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are cationic channels that can act as cellular sensors for mechanical stimuli. The aim of this present study was to examine the expression and functional role of TRP channels in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs) from the patients with HGPS. The mRNA and protein expression of TRP channels in HGPS and control (IMR90) iPSC-ECs were examined by semi-quantitative RT-PCRs and immunoblots, respectively. Hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) rise in iPSC-ECs was measured by confocal microscopy. RT-PCRs and immunoblots showed higher expressional levels of TRPV2 in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients than those from normal individuals. In functional studies, hypotonicity induced a transient [Ca2+]i rise in iPSC-ECs from normal individuals but a sustained [Ca2+]i elevation in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients. A nonselective TRPV inhibitor, ruthenium red (RuR, 20 µM), and a specific TRPV2 channel inhibitor, tranilast (100 µM), abolished the sustained phase of hypotonicity-induced [Ca2+]i rise in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients, and also markedly attenuated the transient phase of the [Ca2+]i rise in these cells. Importantly, a short 10 min hypotonicity treatment caused a substantial increase in caspase 8 activity in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients but not in cells from normal individuals. Tranilast could also inhibit the hypotonicity-induced increase in caspase 8 activity. Taken together, our data suggest that an up-regulation in TRPV2 expression causes a sustained [Ca2+]i elevation in HGPS-iPSC-ECs under hypotonicity, consequently

  3. An upregulation in the expression of vanilloid transient potential channels 2 enhances hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca²⁺ rise in human induced pluripotent stem cell model of Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yin Lo

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a fatal genetic disorder characterized by premature aging in multiple organs including the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. It is believed that an increased mechanosensitivity of HGPS cells is a causative factor for vascular cell death and vascular diseases in HGPS patients. However, the exact mechanism is unknown. Transient receptor potential (TRP channels are cationic channels that can act as cellular sensors for mechanical stimuli. The aim of this present study was to examine the expression and functional role of TRP channels in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs from the patients with HGPS. The mRNA and protein expression of TRP channels in HGPS and control (IMR90 iPSC-ECs were examined by semi-quantitative RT-PCRs and immunoblots, respectively. Hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca²⁺ ([Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs was measured by confocal microscopy. RT-PCRs and immunoblots showed higher expressional levels of TRPV2 in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients than those from normal individuals. In functional studies, hypotonicity induced a transient [Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs from normal individuals but a sustained [Ca²⁺](i elevation in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients. A nonselective TRPV inhibitor, ruthenium red (RuR, 20 µM, and a specific TRPV2 channel inhibitor, tranilast (100 µM, abolished the sustained phase of hypotonicity-induced [Ca²⁺](i rise in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients, and also markedly attenuated the transient phase of the [Ca²⁺](i rise in these cells. Importantly, a short 10 min hypotonicity treatment caused a substantial increase in caspase 8 activity in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients but not in cells from normal individuals. Tranilast could also inhibit the hypotonicity-induced increase in caspase 8 activity. Taken together, our data suggest that an up-regulation in TRPV2 expression causes a sustained [Ca²⁺](i elevation in HGPS

  4. An upregulation in the expression of vanilloid transient potential channels 2 enhances hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca²⁺ rise in human induced pluripotent stem cell model of Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chun-Yin; Tjong, Yung-Wui; Ho, Jenny Chung-Yee; Siu, Chung-Wah; Cheung, Sin-Ying; Tang, Nelson L; Yu, Shan; Tse, Hung-Fat; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gillford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a fatal genetic disorder characterized by premature aging in multiple organs including the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. It is believed that an increased mechanosensitivity of HGPS cells is a causative factor for vascular cell death and vascular diseases in HGPS patients. However, the exact mechanism is unknown. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are cationic channels that can act as cellular sensors for mechanical stimuli. The aim of this present study was to examine the expression and functional role of TRP channels in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs) from the patients with HGPS. The mRNA and protein expression of TRP channels in HGPS and control (IMR90) iPSC-ECs were examined by semi-quantitative RT-PCRs and immunoblots, respectively. Hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca²⁺ ([Ca²⁺](i)) rise in iPSC-ECs was measured by confocal microscopy. RT-PCRs and immunoblots showed higher expressional levels of TRPV2 in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients than those from normal individuals. In functional studies, hypotonicity induced a transient [Ca²⁺](i) rise in iPSC-ECs from normal individuals but a sustained [Ca²⁺](i) elevation in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients. A nonselective TRPV inhibitor, ruthenium red (RuR, 20 µM), and a specific TRPV2 channel inhibitor, tranilast (100 µM), abolished the sustained phase of hypotonicity-induced [Ca²⁺](i) rise in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients, and also markedly attenuated the transient phase of the [Ca²⁺](i) rise in these cells. Importantly, a short 10 min hypotonicity treatment caused a substantial increase in caspase 8 activity in iPSC-ECs from HGPS patients but not in cells from normal individuals. Tranilast could also inhibit the hypotonicity-induced increase in caspase 8 activity. Taken together, our data suggest that an up-regulation in TRPV2 expression causes a sustained [Ca²⁺](i) elevation in HGPS

  5. Pathogenesis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by arenaviruses belong to the most devastating emerging human diseases and represent serious public health problems. Arenavirus VHFs in humans are acute diseases characterized by fever and, in severe cases, different degrees of hemorrhages associated with a shock syndrome in the terminal stage. Over the past years, much has been learned about the pathogenesis of arenaviruses at the cellular level, in particular their ability to subvert the host cell's innate antiviral defenses. Clinical studies and novel animal models have provided important new information about the interaction of hemorrhagic arenaviruses with the host's adaptive immune system, in particular virus-induced immunosuppression, and have provided the first hints towards an understanding of the terminal hemorrhagic shock syndrome. The scope of this article is to review our current knowledge on arenavirus VHF pathogenesis with an emphasis on recent developments.

  6. Nutritional rickets: pathogenesis and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettifor, John M

    2013-06-01

    Nutritional rickets remains a public health concern in many areas of the world despite cheap and effective means of preventing the disease. The roles of vitamin D deficiency, low dietary calcium intakes and the interrelationships between the two in the pathogenesis of the disease are discussed. It is now recognized that vitamin D deficiency in the pregnant and lactating mother predisposes to the development of rickets in the breastfed infant, and that cultural and social factors are important in the pathogenesis of the disease during the adolescent growth spurt. Prevention of rickets is dependent on the awareness of the medical profession and the general public of the need to ensure adequate intakes of vitamin D in at-risk populations, and of the importance of increasing dietary intakes of calcium using locally available and inexpensive foods in communities in which dietary calcium deficiency rickets is prevalent.

  7. Vitiligo: symptoms, pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafourian, A; Ghafourian, S; Sadeghifard, N; Mohebi, R; Shokoohini, Y; Nezamoleslami, S; Hamat, R A

    2014-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired cutaneous disorder of pigmentation, with an incidence of 0.5% to 2% worldwide. There are three major hypotheses for the pathogenesis of vitiligo that are not exclusive of each other: biochemical/cytotoxic, neural and autoimmune. Recent data provide strong evidence supporting an autoimmune pathogenesis of vitiligo. As vitiligo can have a major effect on quality of life, treatment can be considered and should preferably begin early when then disease is active. Current treatment modalities are directed towards stopping progression of the disease and achieving repigmentation. Therapies include corticosteroids, topical immunomodulators, photo(chemo)therapy, surgery, combination therapies and depigmentation of normally pigmented skin. It seems that traditional Chinese medicine could be more effective than the current treatment for vitligo.

  8. Molecular pathogenesis of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Jason L; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2005-03-01

    Parkinson disease (PD), the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, is characterized by an extensive and progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. One of the pathological hallmarks of PD is the presence of Lewy bodies, intracellular inclusions of aggregated alpha-synuclein. Although the cause and pathogenesis of selective loss of dopamine neurons and the accumulation of alpha-synuclein in PD remain elusive, growing lines of evidence from environmental risk factors and early-onset genetics point to a convergence between energy metabolism and the disposal of damaged proteins in the development of PD. These findings suggest that impairments in mitochondrial and ubiquitin-proteasome system function can significantly contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. This review will summarize recent insights gained from genetic and environmental studies of PD that underscore this association.

  9. [Pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Carratalà, Jordi

    2012-03-01

    Invasive fungal infections remain a life-threatening disease. The development of invasive fungal disease is dependent on multiple factors, such us colonization and efficient host immune response. We aimed to review the pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections, in particular, those caused by Candida and Aspergillus. For this we propose, to describe the fungal characteristics, to detail the host defence mechanisms against fungus and to analyse the host risk factors for invasive fungal infection.

  10. Pathogenesis of listeriosis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Keith P; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2013-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes causes several clinical manifestations in humans and domestic animals. This bacterium is a saprophyte in soil and ensiled feeds, which are sources of infection for food producing animals (i.e. ruminants). The most common route of infection for people is via ingestion of contaminated ready-to-eat food products such as produce, soft cheeses and deli meats. In the United States, L. monocytogenes causes relatively few cases of clinical disease compared to other food-borne pathogens. However, clinical listeriosis is associated with high mortality, especially in immunocompromised patients, pregnant women, neonates, and the elderly. Listeria is an intracellular pathogen, which has been widely used in basic research to elucidate mechanisms of molecular pathogenesis and protective cell-mediated immunity. Despite the sizeable knowledge on L. monocytogenes pathogenesis, key points regarding listeriosis during pregnancy and the perinatal period remain unknown. This review summarizes listeriosis in humans and domestic animals during pregnancy, and animal models used to study the pathogenesis and immune response to L. monocytogenes infection during these periods.

  11. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin, E-mail: Kliu@gru.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College of Georgia, and Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States)

    2013-06-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  12. Some aspects of periodontitis pathogenesis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shcherbina I.N.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory processes in the tissues surrounding tooth root are frequent enough and develop as the direct complication of caries. As acute periodontitis is manifested with grinding toothache and violation of ph¬y¬sio¬logical act of chewing, symptoms of general intoxication, the continuous sluggish chronic periodontitis is harmful and dangerous to the organism as well. It forms the state of chronic оdontogenetic intoxication and chroneosepsis with wrong functioning of some internal organs and body systems. The like complications can cause significant disturbance to the function of kidneys, liver, heart, joints and their treatment without ablating focus of inflammation is often in- effective; this must be taken into account by doctors-interns. However, scanning of the oral cavity by conservative means has its difficulties mostly because of ignoring pathogenesis of such inflammation. That is why activity of ferments of blood dehydrogenases from the periapical tissues of the teeth affected with the chronic periodontitis was studied. The level of succinate dehydrogenase and alpha-glycerophosphate degydrogenase of lymphocytes of 110 schoolchildren aged 13-17 years old was studied. The main group of examined individuals included those of infected with tuber¬culousis – 50 individuals, and the control group (60 individuals – clinically healthy ones without tuberculousis desease. All schoolchildren had 1 or 2 teeth affected with chronic periodontitis of the apical localization. The researchers found that a significant inhibition of activity of succinate dehydrogenase and alpha-glycerophosphate degydrogenase ferments occurs in the inflammatory periodontal tissues, which indicates to local immunity decline, and as a consequence, pathogenic bacteria activation. In people infected with tuberculousis these violations were more developed. Such features of periodontitis pathogenesis must be taken into account when providing a combined treatment.

  13. Biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui Ruqaiyyah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary processes makes it an attractive model organism. There is a significant emphasis on Acanthamoeba as a Trojan horse of other microbes including viral, bacterial, protists and yeast pathogens.

  14. Psoriatic arthritis: genetics and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mathieu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis is a complex disease affecting primarily peripheral and axial joints and entheses together with the skin. The pathogenesis is characterized by a genetic background and by inflammatory mechanisms which may be triggered by environmental factors. Several susceptibility genes have been investigated; they include HLA genes, genes within the HLA region and genes outside the HLA region. T cells, including the recently described subset Th17, are thought to play an important role in the acute and chronic phases of the disease. Some of these findings allowed novel therapeutic interventions or opened new promising approaches in treatment. The most relevant data of the literature are summarized and discussed.

  15. Pathogenesis of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom Jin Lim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS is characterized by focal and segmental obliteration of glomerular capillary tufts with increased matrix. FSGS is classified as collapsing, tip, cellular, perihilar and not otherwise specified variants according to the location and character of the sclerotic lesion. Primary or idiopathic FSGS is considered to be related to podocyte injury, and the pathogenesis of podocyte injury has been actively investigated. Several circulating factors affecting podocyte permeability barrier have been proposed, but not proven to cause FSGS. FSGS may also be caused by genetic alterations. These genes are mainly those regulating slit diaphragm structure, actin cytoskeleton of podocytes, and foot process structure. The mode of inheritance and age of onset are different according to the gene involved. Recently, the role of parietal epithelial cells (PECs has been highlighted. Podocytes and PECs have common mesenchymal progenitors, therefore, PECs could be a source of podocyte repopulation after podocyte injury. Activated PECs migrate along adhesion to the glomerular tuft and may also contribute to the progression of sclerosis. Markers of activated PECs, including CD44, could be used to distinguish FSGS from minimal change disease. The pathogenesis of FSGS is very complex; however, understanding basic mechanisms of podocyte injury is important not only for basic research, but also for daily diagnostic pathology practice.

  16. Pathogenesis of varicelloviruses in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwendijk, Werner J D; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2015-01-01

    Varicelloviruses in primates comprise the prototypic human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and its non-human primate homologue, simian varicella virus (SVV). Both viruses cause varicella as a primary infection, establish latency in ganglionic neurons and reactivate later in life to cause herpes zoster in their respective hosts. VZV is endemic worldwide and, although varicella is usually a benign disease in childhood, VZV reactivation is a significant cause of neurological disease in the elderly and in immunocompromised individuals. The pathogenesis of VZV infection remains ill-defined, mostly due to the species restriction of VZV that impedes studies in experimental animal models. SVV infection of non-human primates parallels virological, clinical, pathological and immunological features of human VZV infection, thereby providing an excellent model to study the pathogenesis of varicella and herpes zoster in its natural host. In this review, we discuss recent studies that provided novel insight in both the virus and host factors involved in the three elementary stages of Varicellovirus infection in primates: primary infection, latency and reactivation.

  17. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Three decades have passed since Warren and Marshall described the successful isolation and culture of Helicobacter pylori, the Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of half the human population worldwide. Although it is documented that H. pylori infection is implicated in a range of disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, as well as associated organs, many aspects relating to host colonization, successful persistence and the pathophysiological mechanisms of this bacteria still remain controversial and are constantly being explored. Unceasing efforts to decipher the pathophysiology of H. pylori infection have illuminated the crucially important contribution of multifarious bacterial factors for H. pylori pathogenesis, in particular the cag pathogenicity island (PAI), the effector protein CagA and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA. In addition, recent studies have provided insight into the importance of the gastrointestinal microbiota on the cumulative pathophysiology associated with H. pylori infections. This review focuses on the key findings of publications related to the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection published during the last year, with an emphasis on factors affecting colonization efficiency, cag PAI, CagA, VacA and gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:26372819

  18. Molecular Pathogenesis of Neuromyelitis Optica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Wajih; Barnett, Michael H; Prain, Kerri; Broadley, Simon A

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a rare autoimmune disorder, distinct from multiple sclerosis, causing inflammatory lesions in the optic nerves and spinal cord. An autoantibody (NMO IgG) against aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel expressed on astrocytes is thought to be causative. Peripheral production of the antibody is triggered by an unknown process in genetically susceptible individuals. Anti-AQP4 antibody enters the central nervous system (CNS) when the blood brain barrier is made permeable and has high affinity for orthogonal array particles of AQP4. Like other autoimmune diseases, Th17 cells and their effector cytokines (such as interleukin 6) have been implicated in pathogenesis. AQP4 expressing peripheral organs are not affected by NMO IgG, but the antibody causes extensive astrocytic loss in specific regions of the CNS through complement mediated cytotoxicity. Demyelination occurs during the inflammatory process and is probably secondary to oligodendrocyte apoptosis subsequent to loss of trophic support from astrocytes. Ultimately, extensive axonal injury leads to severe disability. Despite rapid advances in the understanding of NMO pathogenesis, unanswered questions remain, particularly with regards to disease mechanisms in NMO IgG seronegative cases. Increasing knowledge of the molecular pathology is leading to improved treatment strategies. PMID:23202933

  19. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Wang [Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Chaoshu, Tang [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Health Sciences Center, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Medicine, Ministry of Education (China); Hongfang, Jin, E-mail: jinhongfang51@126.com [Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Junbao, Du, E-mail: junbaodu1@126.com [Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China)

    2010-05-28

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, complex, and progressive pathological process in large and medium sized arteries. The exact mechanism of this process remains unclear. Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a novel gasotransmitter, was confirmed as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases. It plays a role in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and apoptosis, participates in the progress of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY), inhibits atherogenic modification of LDL, interferes with vascular calcification, intervenes with platelet function, and there are interactions between H{sub 2}S and inflammatory processes. The role of H{sub 2}S in atherosclerotic pathogenesis highlights the mysteries of atherosclerosis and inspires the search for innovative therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the studies to date that have considered the role of H{sub 2}S in atherosclerosis.

  20. Molecular pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jesper Bøje

    2014-01-01

    underlying the diversity of growth patterns of this malignancy remain a clinical concern. It is crucial to advance our present understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CCA to improve current clinical strategies and patient outcome. This will facilitate the delineation of patient subsets...... explores the recent advances in defining the molecular pathways implicated in the development of this devastating disease and, which present putative clinical strategies....... with no apparent etiological background. The impact of the stromal compartment on tumor progression as well as resistance to therapy is in vogue, and the epithelial-stromal crosstalk may present a target for novel treatment strategies. As such, the complexity of tumor cellularity and the molecular mechanisms...

  1. Pathogenesis of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Aslam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of diabetes is rising globally and, as a result, its associated complications are also rising. Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN is a well-known complication of diabetes and the most common cause of all neuropathic pain. About one-third of all diabetes patients suffer from PDN. It has a huge effect on a person’s daily life, both physically and mentally. Despite huge advances in diabetes and neurology, the exact mechanism of pain causation in PDN is still not clear. The origin of pain could be in the peripheral nerves of the central nervous system. In this review, we discuss various possible mechanisms of the pathogenesis of pain in PDN. We discuss the role of hyperglycaemia in altering the physiology of peripheral nerves. We also describe central mechanisms of pain.

  2. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, Vania; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Touati, Eliette

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for the most commonly found infection in the world's population. It is the major risk factor for gastric cancer development. Numerous studies published over the last year provide new insights into the strategies employed by H. pylori to adapt to the extreme acidic conditions of the gastric environment, to establish persistent infection and to deregulate host functions, leading to gastric pathogenesis and cancer. In this review, we report recent data on the mechanisms involved in chemotaxis, on the essential role of nickel in acid resistance and gastric colonization, on the importance of adhesins and Hop proteins and on the role of CagPAI-components and CagA. Among the host functions, a special focus has been made on the escape from immune response, the ability of bacteria to induce genetic instability and modulate telomeres, the mechanism of autophagy and the deregulation of micro RNAs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Raynaud's phenomenon: pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakst, Richard; Merola, Joseph F; Franks, Andrew G; Sanchez, Miguel

    2008-10-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a common clinical disorder for which patients frequently seek the expertise and care of dermatologists. It is manifested by recurrent vasospasm of the fingers and toes, often associated with exposure to cold temperature or emotional stress. The phenomenon is named after Maurice Raynaud, who, as a medical student, defined the first case in 1862 as episodic, symmetric, acral vasospasm characterized by pallor, cyanosis, suffusion, and a sense of fullness or tautness, which may be painful. Despite more than 140 years of research, the pathophysiology of Raynaud's phenomenon continues to elude investigators. Accordingly, although many pharmacologic treatments have been reported, there is still no cure or gold standard therapy. Further, response to treatment varies and is difficult to predict. Recently, there has been renewed interest in finding the pathogenetic mechanisms of Raynaud's phenomenon, an effort that has led to more potential targeted therapeutics. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent breakthroughs in the pathogenesis and treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon.

  4. Ion channelopathies and migraine pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albury, Cassie L; Stuart, Shani; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-08-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder that affects approximately 12-20% of the general adult population. Migraine pathogenesis is complex and not wholly understood. Molecular genetic investigations, imaging and biochemical studies, have unveiled a number of interconnected neurological pathways which seem to have a cause and effect component integral to its cause. Much weight of migraine attack initiation can be placed on the initial trigger and the pathways involved in its neuronal counter reaction. Ion channels play a large role in the generation, portrayal and mitigation of the brains response to external triggers. Several genetic studies have identified and implicated a number of ion channelopathy genes which may contribute to this generalised process. This review will focus on the genetics of migraine with particular emphasis placed on the potentially important role genes HEPH (responsible for iron transport and homeostasis) and KCNK18 (important for the transport and homeostasis of potassium) play in migraine cause.

  5. Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0408 TITLE: Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0408 5c... pathogenesis of RA that can ultimately be targeted to prevent RA. This project has proposed to use a unique set of serum samples and clinical data

  6. Type 1 diabetes pathogenesis - Prevention???

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C S Muralidhara Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes is multi-faceted, including, autoimmunity, genetics and environment. Autoimmunity directed against pancreatic islet cells results in slowly progressive selective beta-cell destruction ("Primary autoimmune insulitis", culminating over years in clinically manifested insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM. Circulating serum autoantibodies directed against the endocrine cells of the islets of Langerhans (Islet cell autoantibodies - ICAb are an important hallmark of this disease. Assays for islet cell autoantibodies have facilitated the investigation and understanding of several facets in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes. Their applications have extended into clinical practice and have opened new avenues for early preclinical prediction and preventive prophylaxis in IDDM/type 1 DM. Recently, surprisingly, differences in insulin content between T1DM islets, as well as, ′patchy′ or ′lobular′ destruction of islets have been described. These unique pathobiological phenomena, suggest that beta cell destruction may not always be inexorable and inevitably complete/total, and thus raise hopes for possible therapeutic interruption of beta cell autoimmunity - destruction and cure of type 1 diabetes. "Recurrent or secondary autoimmune insulitis" refers to the rapid reappearance of islet cell autoantibodies post pancreas transplant, and selective islet beta cell destruction in the grafted pancreas [never forgetting or "anamnestic" beta cell destructive memory], in the absence of any graft pancreas rejection [monozygotic twin to twin transplantation]. The one definite environmental factor is congenital rubella, because of which a subset of children subsequently develop type 1 diabetes. The putative predisposing factors are viruses, gluten and cow′s milk. The putative protective factors include gut flora, helminths, viral infections, and Vitamin D. Prevention of T1DM can include: Primary prevention strategies

  7. Molecular Pathogenesis of MALT Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Troppan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 8% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas are extranodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT, also known as MALT lymphoma, which was first described in 1983 by Isaacson and Wright. MALT lymphomas arise at a wide range of different extranodal sites, with the highest frequency in the stomach, followed by lung, ocular adnexa, and thyroid, and with a low percentage in the small intestine. Interestingly, at least 3 different, apparently site-specific, chromosomal translocations and missense and frameshift mutations, all pathway-related genes affecting the NF-κB signal, have been implicated in the development and progression of MALT lymphoma. However, these genetic abnormalities alone are not sufficient for malignant transformation. There is now increasing evidence suggesting that the oncogenic product of translocation cooperates with immunological stimulation in oncogenesis, that is, the association with chronic bacterial infection or autoaggressive process. This review mainly discusses MALT lymphomas in terms of their genetic aberration and association with chronic infections and summarizes recent advances in their molecular pathogenesis.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of Ebola pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Andrea; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-11-01

    Ebola viruses (EBOVs) and Marburg viruses (MARVs) are among the deadliest human viruses, as highlighted by the recent and widespread Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, which was the largest and longest epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in history, resulting in significant loss of life and disruptions across multiple continents. Although the number of cases has nearly reached its nadir, a recent cluster of 5 cases in Guinea on March 17, 2016, has extended the enhanced surveillance period to June 15, 2016. New, enhanced 90-d surveillance windows replaced the 42-d surveillance window to ensure the rapid detection of new cases that may arise from a missed transmission chain, reintroduction from an animal reservoir, or more important, reemergence of the virus that has persisted in an EVD survivor. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of EBOV pathogenesis, describe vaccine and therapeutic candidates in clinical trials, and discuss mechanisms of viral persistence and long-term health sequelae for EVD survivors. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  9. The pathogenesis of Charcot neuroarthropathy: current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly A. M. Larson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN has been poorly understood by clinicians and scientists alike. Current researchers have made progress toward understanding the cause of CN and possible treatment options. The authors review the current literature on the pathogenesis of this debilitating disorder and attempt to explain the roles of inflammation, bone metabolism, and advanced glycation end products.

  10. Protection against retrovirus pathogenesis by SR protein inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Keriel

    Full Text Available Indole derivatives compounds (IDC are a new class of splicing inhibitors that have a selective action on exonic splicing enhancers (ESE-dependent activity of individual serine-arginine-rich (SR proteins. Some of these molecules have been shown to compromise assembly of HIV infectious particles in cell cultures by interfering with the activity of the SR protein SF2/ASF and by subsequently suppressing production of splicing-dependent retroviral accessory proteins. For all replication-competent retroviruses, a limiting requirement for infection and pathogenesis is the expression of the envelope glycoprotein which strictly depends on the host splicing machinery. Here, we have evaluated the efficiency of IDC on an animal model of retroviral pathogenesis using a fully replication-competent retrovirus. In this model, all newborn mice infected with a fully replicative murine leukemia virus (MLV develop erythroleukemia within 6 to 8 weeks of age. We tested several IDC for their ability to interfere ex vivo with MLV splicing and virus spreading as well as for their protective effect in vivo. We show here that two of these IDC, IDC13 and IDC78, selectively altered splicing-dependent production of the retroviral envelope gene, thus inhibiting early viral replication in vivo, sufficiently to protect mice from MLV-induced pathogenesis. The apparent specificity and clinical safety observed here for both IDC13 and IDC78 strongly support further assessment of inhibitors of SR protein splicing factors as a new class of antiretroviral therapeutic agents.

  11. [Pathogenesis of lipodystrophy and metabolic syndromes associated with HIV infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sanz, Agustín; Rodríguez-Vidigal, Francisco F; Domingo, Pere

    2006-09-30

    Lipodystrophy, and the metabolic alterations (dislipemia, insulin-resistance) associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, is a multifactorial syndrome due to the interaction of host related factors (cellular immune status, diet, gene mutations), viral factors (cytokine synthesis, polyunsaturated fatty acid or PUFA depletion), and pharmacological effects (mitochondrial DNA-polymerase inhibition, lipolysis inhibition, adiponectin synthesis reduction). HIV probably modifies the adipocyte differentiation and the lipid metabolism. This retroviral effect is mediated by proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor) and the participation of other factors (drugs, diet), all in the context of a particular host genetic setting. The adipocyte (and several cellular receptors, fatty acids, membrane proteins, and cytokines) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated lipodystrophy.

  12. [Enzyme studies on the pathogenesis of experimental mycoplasma arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, G

    1975-01-01

    Biochemical studies of rats with mycoplasma arthritis revealed new findings in pathogenesis and pathophysiology. Preliminary examinations showed that mycoplasmas release specific endonucleases and exonucleases. In evaluating the isoenzymes of the lactate dehydrogenases, malate dehydrogenases as well as of the esterases, which provide certain parallels with human rheumatoid arthritis we made several new observations. Thus a mycoplasma infection which resembles rheumatoid arthritis, leads to an inhibition of the DNA repair. We were able to proof this enzymekinetically and autoradiographically. We also observed for the first time the occurrence of DNA antibodies in this type of arthritis. It is possible that there is a relation between inhibition of DNA repair and the occurrence of DNA antibodies. Thus mycoplasma infection seems to influence DNA metabolism. There are interesting parallels concerning DNA antibodies and DNA-repair between experimental micoplasma arthritis and human systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Paul; Waidner, Barbara; Hofman, Véronique; Bereswill, Stefan; Brest, Patrick; Kist, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    Research in the last year has provided new insights into the function of the the cag-associated type IV secretion system and the vacuolating toxin VacA. A quite new aspect was disclosed by the finding that Helicobacter pylori in Mongolian gerbils colonizes a very distinct topology in the gastric mucous layer, obviously providing optimal conditions for long-term survival. Further research activities focused on H. pylori ammonia and metal metabolism as well as on bacterial stress defence mechanisms. Differential expression of approximately 7% of the bacterial genome was found at low pH suggesting that H. pylori has evolved a multitude of acid-adaptive mechanisms. VacA was shown to interrupt phagosome maturation in macrophage cell lines as well as to modulate and interfere with T lymphocyte immunological functions. Gastric mucosa as well as the H. pylori-infected epithelial cell line AGS strongly express IL-8 receptor A and B, which might contribute to the augmentation of the inflammatory response. Accumulating evidence implicates genetic variation in the inflammatory response to H. pylori in the etiology of the increased risk of gastric cancer after H. pylori infection. The chronic imbalance between apoptosis and cell proliferation is the first step of gastric carcinogenesis. In this regard, it was demonstrated that coexpression of two H. pylori proteins, CagA and HspB, in AGS cells, caused an increase in E2F transcription factor, cyclin D3, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein. Taken together, we now have a better understanding of the role of different virulence factors of H. pylori. There is still a lot to be learned, but the promising discoveries summarized here, demonstrate that the investigation of the bacterial survival strategies will give novel insights into pathogenesis and disease development.

  14. The Pathogenesis of Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Considerations from a Developmental Psychopathology Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muris, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent psychiatric problems in children and adolescents. The present article summarizes the main evidence that has accumulated on the pathogenesis of childhood anxiety disorders during the past two decades. Various risk and vulnerability factors (e.g., genetics, behavioral inhibition, disgust sensitivity,…

  15. An Odyssey to Viral Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldstone, Michael B A

    2016-05-23

    polishing by Karl Habel (a superb senior virologist who left the National Institutes of Health and came to Scripps), and the gifted postdoctoral fellows who joined my laboratory over four decades form the log of my scientific voyage. The strong friendships and collaborations developed with other young but growing experimentalists like Bernie Fields and Abner Notkins are the fabric of the tale I will weave and were pivotal in the establishment of viral pathogenesis as a discipline.

  16. Ophthalmic lymphoma: epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjö, Lene Dissing

    2009-02-01

    with relapse. Furthermore, we found that the frequency of translocations involving the MALT1- and IGH-gene loci is low in ocular region MALT lymphoma (2 of 42, 5%), but may predict increased risk of relapse (Sjo et al. 2008b). In conclusion the incidence of ophthalmic lymphoma is increasing at a high rate in Denmark. Ophthalmic lymphoma consists primarily of MALT lymphoma. The molecular pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma arising in the ocular region rarely involves translocations in the MALT1- and IGH-gene loci.

  17. Current understanding in pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess McPherson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been advances in our understanding of the complex pathogenesis of atopic eczema over the past few decades. This article examines the multiple factors which are implicated in this process.

  18. Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0408 TITLE: Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kevin D. Deane, MD/PhD...order to understand two major factors: 1) how biomarker changes in preclinical RA can be used to accurately predict the future development of RA in...will be performed. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prediction of future rheumatoid arthritis; pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  19. Autophagy in lung disease pathogenesis and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W. Ryter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a cellular pathway for the degradation of damaged organelles and proteins, has gained increasing importance in human pulmonary diseases, both as a modulator of pathogenesis and as a potential therapeutic target. In this pathway, cytosolic cargos are sequestered into autophagosomes, which are delivered to the lysosomes where they are enzymatically degraded and then recycled as metabolic precursors. Autophagy exerts an important effector function in the regulation of inflammation, and immune system functions. Selective pathways for autophagic degradation of cargoes may have variable significance in disease pathogenesis. Among these, the autophagic clearance of bacteria (xenophagy may represent a crucial host defense mechanism in the pathogenesis of sepsis and inflammatory diseases. Our recent studies indicate that the autophagic clearance of mitochondria, a potentially protective program, may aggravate the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by activating cell death programs. We report similar findings with respect to the autophagic clearance of cilia components, which can contribute to airways dysfunction in chronic lung disease. In certain diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, autophagy may confer protection by modulating proliferation and cell death. In other disorders, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis, impaired autophagy may contribute to pathogenesis. In lung cancer, autophagy has multiple consequences by limiting carcinogenesis, modulating therapeutic effectiveness, and promoting tumor cell survival. In this review we highlight the multiple functions of autophagy and its selective autophagy subtypes that may be of significance to the pathogenesis of human disease, with an emphasis on lung disease and therapeutics.

  20. Pathogenesis of Alzheimer′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell H Swerdlow

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Russell H SwerdlowDepartment of Neurology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USAAbstract: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is incredibly common. Increasing longevity ensures its prevalence will rise even further. Ongoing efforts to understand AD pathogenesis reveal numerous tantalizing leads. Formulating a comprehensive AD pathogenesis theory capable of incorporating these disparate leads, though, has proven difficult. This review discusses current attempts to formulate a comprehensive AD pathogenesis theory. In doing so, it focuses on clinical and molecular relationships between AD and aging. A better understanding of these relationships could inform and impact future development of AD-directed treatment strategies.Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, aging, amyloid, cascade, mitochondria

  1. Trichomonas vaginalis Pathogenesis: a Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Arab-Mazar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the latest articles which were published during 2013-2014, Trichomonas vaginalis (T. vaginalis was mentioned as a neglected sexual transmission disease (STD, while the exact mechanism of its pathogenesis has not been cleared yet. Although trichomonasiasis is easy curable, there is concern that resistance to drug are increasing. This common infection as concerning the important public health implications needs more research to be done for understanding the diagnosis, treatment, immunology and pathogenesis. In this review we searched all valuable and relevant information considering the pathogenesis of T. vaginalis. We referred to the information databases of Medline, PubMed, Scopus and Google scholar. The used keywords were the combinations of T. vaginalis and words associated with pathogenicity. This review discusses the host-parasite interaction and pathogenicity of this parasite.

  2. Bone marrow fibrosis in myelofibrosis: pathogenesis, prognosis and targeted strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahr, Abdallah Abou; Salama, Mohamed E.; Carreau, Nicole; Tremblay, Douglas; Verstovsek, Srdan; Mesa, Ruben; Hoffman, Ronald; Mascarenhas, John

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow fibrosis is a central pathological feature and World Health Organization major diagnostic criterion of myelofibrosis. Although bone marrow fibrosis is seen in a variety of malignant and non-malignant disease states, the deposition of reticulin and collagen fibrosis in the bone marrow of patients with myelofibrosis is believed to be mediated by the myelofibrosis hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, contributing to an impaired microenvironment favoring malignant over normal hematopoiesis. Increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, lysyl oxidase, transforming growth factor-β, impaired megakaryocyte function, and aberrant JAK-STAT signaling have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone marrow fibrosis. A number of studies indicate that bone marrow fibrosis is an adverse prognostic variable in myeloproliferative neoplasms. However, modern myelofibrosis prognostication systems utilized in risk-adapted treatment approaches do not include bone marrow fibrosis as a prognostic variable. The specific effect on bone marrow fibrosis of JAK2 inhibition, and other rationally based therapies currently being evaluated in myelofibrosis, has yet to be fully elucidated. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapeutic approach that reliably results in resolution of bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelofibrosis. Here we review the pathogenesis, biological consequences, and prognostic impact of bone marrow fibrosis. We discuss the rationale of various anti-fibrogenic treatment strategies targeting the clonal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, aberrant signaling pathways, fibrogenic cytokines, and the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27252511

  3. Prion pathogenesis is faithfully reproduced in cerebellar organotypic slice cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppe Falsig

    Full Text Available Prions cause neurodegeneration in vivo, yet prion-infected cultured cells do not show cytotoxicity. This has hampered mechanistic studies of prion-induced neurodegeneration. Here we report that prion-infected cultured organotypic cerebellar slices (COCS experienced progressive spongiform neurodegeneration closely reproducing prion disease, with three different prion strains giving rise to three distinct patterns of prion protein deposition. Neurodegeneration did not occur when PrP was genetically removed from neurons, and a comprehensive pharmacological screen indicated that neurodegeneration was abrogated by compounds known to antagonize prion replication. Prion infection of COCS and mice led to enhanced fodrin cleavage, suggesting the involvement of calpains or caspases in pathogenesis. Accordingly, neurotoxicity and fodrin cleavage were prevented by calpain inhibitors but not by caspase inhibitors, whereas prion replication proceeded unimpeded. Hence calpain inhibition can uncouple prion replication from its neurotoxic sequelae. These data validate COCS as a powerful model system that faithfully reproduces most morphological hallmarks of prion infections. The exquisite accessibility of COCS to pharmacological manipulations was instrumental in recognizing the role of calpains in neurotoxicity, and significantly extends the collection of tools necessary for rigorously dissecting prion pathogenesis.

  4. Progress in the pathogenesis of pterygium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Liu, Yangwuyue; Xie, Lin; He, Xiangge; Bai, Ji

    2013-12-01

    Pterygium is a type of benign uncontrolled growth of the conjunctive tissue that lays over the sclera. It can significantly alter visual function in advanced cases and become inflamed, leading to redness and irritation in the area. Although the exact etiology of pterygium remains uncertain, recent advances have provided important insight into the pathogenesis of pterygium. These studies indicate that tumor suppressor gene p53 and other genes associated with DNA repair, cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis are critical for the development of pterygium. In addition, Human papillomavirus infection has been shown to be a risk factor in some populations. In this article, the current understanding of the pathogenesis of pterygium is reviewed.

  5. Hepatic encephalopathy: etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Melissa; Cortes, Yonaira

    2013-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a manifestation of clinical signs that may result from a variety of liver diseases. In small animals, HE is most commonly a result of portosystemic shunting. The pathogenesis is not completely understood, although it is likely multifactorial. Theories of pathogenesis include altered ammonia metabolism and glutamine and glutamate transmission, an increase in gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists and benzodiazepine-like substances, alterations of the serotonergic system and amino acid metabolism, elevated taurine levels, contributions from inflammatory mediators, and toxic effects of manganese. An understanding of the underlying mechanisms that result in HE may lead to new treatments in the future.

  6. The role of EBV in MS pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove

    2006-01-01

    Environmental factors operate on a background of genetic susceptibility in the pathogenesis of MS. Human herpesviruses, notably Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and human endogenous retroviruses are factors associated with MS. EBV association is found in epidemiological surveys where late EBV infection ....... EBV cannot stand alone as a causal factor of MS, but is likely to play an indirect role as an activator of the underlying disease process.......Environmental factors operate on a background of genetic susceptibility in the pathogenesis of MS. Human herpesviruses, notably Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and human endogenous retroviruses are factors associated with MS. EBV association is found in epidemiological surveys where late EBV infection...

  7. Contribution of pertussis toxin to the pathogenesis of pertussis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonetti, Nicholas H

    2015-11-01

    Pertussis toxin (PT) is a multisubunit protein toxin secreted by Bordetella pertussis, the bacterial agent of the disease pertussis or whooping cough. PT in detoxified form is a component of all licensed acellular pertussis vaccines, since it is considered to be an important virulence factor for this pathogen. PT inhibits G protein-coupled receptor signaling through Gi proteins in mammalian cells, an activity that has led to its widespread use as a cell biology tool. But how does this activity of PT contribute to pertussis, including the severe respiratory symptoms of this disease? In this minireview, the contribution of PT to the pathogenesis of pertussis disease will be considered based on evidence from both human infections and animal model studies. Although definitive proof of the role of PT in humans is lacking, substantial evidence supports the idea that PT is a major contributor to pertussis pathology, including the severe respiratory symptoms associated with this disease.

  8. [Role of gasotransmitters in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-fei; Jin, Hong-fang; Tang, Chao-shu; Du, Jun-bao

    2006-06-18

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complicated and important pathological process in the development of a variety of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, and directly affects the development of the diseases and their prognosis. but its mechanisms are still not fully understood. Therefore, to clarify the mechanisms is an important task in this field. Nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) have special significance in pulmonary circulation as compared with other organs for their special biological properties including continuous production, fast transmission and extensive action, etc, which attracts great attention in the life science research and initiates the new research field of gasotransmitters. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which has been recognized as a toxic gas, can be endogenously produced in the body. We considered it to be a new cardiovascular regulatory gasotransmitter based on the studies of its synthesis and distribution in cardiovascular system and cardiovascular effects under physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions. We found it exerted a general regulatory significance in cardiovascular diseases. Based on the research of the three gasotransmitters in hypoxic and high pulmonary blood flow-induced pulmonary hypertension, it was found that the dysfunction of the gasotransmitter pathways was involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension and the supplement of gasotransmitters could alleviate pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling. The mechanisms included that they could regulate vessel dilation, correct the imbalance between smooth muscle cell proliferation and apoptosis, inhibit the excess synthesis and stimulate the degradation of collagen, therefore inhibiting abnormal accumulation of collagen, etc. All these results indicated the significant regulatory effects of gasotransmitters in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension.

  9. Infantile Haemangioma: Pathogenesis, Evaluation, and Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R. Janmohamed (Sherief)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis contains of: 1) Studies describing the pathogenesis of infantile haemangioma 2) The development of a novel scoring system for infantile haemangioma activity 3) Studies evaluating different therapy options for infantile haemangioma Hypoxia is important in th

  10. Pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, van L.J.M.; Vromans, M.E.W.; Dolstra, C.H.; Bossers, A.; Zijderveld, van F.G.

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep was studied by immunohistochemical detection of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrPSc) in the gastrointestinal, lymphoid and neural tissues following oral inoculation with BSE brain homogenate. First accumulation of PrPSc was dete

  11. Etiology and pathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlösser, Tom P C; Colo, Dino; Castelein, RM

    2015-01-01

    Despite many years of dedicated research into the etio-pathogenesis, not one single cause for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis has been identified. The purpose of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the current evidence and main etiological theories. Intrinsic causal mechanisms are fou

  12. Psoriasis: Pathogenesis, Assessment, and Therapeutic Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Stephen M

    2016-07-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic condition that affects more than 7 million Americans. This article explores the pathogenesis and physical signs of psoriasis. Over the past 2 decades enhanced understanding of the immunologic basis of psoriasis has led to the development of new systemic agents that have revolutionized the management of this disease, and these modalities, along with traditional therapies, are described.

  13. Frontoethmoidal encephaloceles, a study of their pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Eelco; Vermeij-Keers, C

    1997-01-01

    A prospective clinical study of 30 patients with frontoethmoidal encephaloceles was performed in order to find support for a proposed theory concerning its pathogenesis, based on a previously performed embryological study and relevant findings in the literature. According to this proposed theory the

  14. [Purulent corneal ulcers: etiology, pathogenesis, classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparova, Evg A

    2015-01-01

    Advanced purulent corneal ulcer, as well as abscess, is a serious vision-threatening condition notable for its fulminant course and possible loss of the eye due to endophthalmitis. Its leading causes, pathogenesis, and classifications are described and analyzed in this paper.

  15. Osteonecrosis. Part 1. Risk factors and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Valeriyevna Ilyinykh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers different risk factors for osteonecrosis (ON and some aspects of its pathogenesis: impairments in the differentiation of stromal cells, the vascular provision of intraand extravasal genesis, the quality of proper bone tissue due to generalized or local osteoporosis, intravascular coagulation factors contributing to microthrombogenesis. The basic types of ON are identified.

  16. Catamenial migraine: epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Gromova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a review of the literature, the authors consider the pathogenesis, diagnosis, epidemiology, and clinical features of catamenial migraine. The view that catamenial migraine attacks are severest receives more and more support. The criteria that may be used to predict a severer course of catamenial migraine attacks in a specific patient are to be further defined.

  17. Insights in the pathogenesis of Dobermann hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandigers, Paulus Justinus Johannes

    2005-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Dobermann hepatitis has been under debate for several years. In this thesis two hypotheses were formulated and discussed. Hypothesis 1: In Dobermann dogs exists an autosomal genetic error in metabolism that leads to an abnormal copper metabolism which results in an increased he

  18. Infantile Haemangioma: Pathogenesis, Evaluation, and Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R. Janmohamed (Sherief)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis contains of: 1) Studies describing the pathogenesis of infantile haemangioma 2) The development of a novel scoring system for infantile haemangioma activity 3) Studies evaluating different therapy options for infantile haemangioma Hypoxia is important in th

  19. Etiology and pathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlösser, Tom P C; Colo, Dino; Castelein, RM

    2015-01-01

    Despite many years of dedicated research into the etio-pathogenesis, not one single cause for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis has been identified. The purpose of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the current evidence and main etiological theories. Intrinsic causal mechanisms are

  20. Pathogenesis of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus due to chronic administration of lithium in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    S. Christensen; Kusano, E; Yusufi, A N; Murayama, N; Dousa, T P

    1985-01-01

    A polyuric syndrome with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a frequent consequence of prolonged administration of lithium (Li) salts. Studies in the past, mainly the acute and in vitro experiments, indicated that Li ions can inhibit hydroosmotic effect of [8-arginine]vasopressin (AVP) at the step of cAMP generation in vitro. However, the pathogenesis of the NDI due to chronic oral administration of low therapeutic doses of Li salts is not yet clarified. We conducted a comprehensive study...

  1. How Viruses Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisse, Ellen; Wouters, Carine H; Andrei, Graciela; Matthys, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening, hyperinflammatory syndrome, characterized by the uncontrolled activation of macrophages and T cells, eliciting key symptoms such as persistent fever, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, hemophagocytosis, hyperferritinemia, and coagulopathy. Viral infections are frequently implicated in the onset of active HLH episodes, both in primary, genetic HLH as in the secondary, acquired form. Infections with herpesviruses such as Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus are the most common. In autoimmune diseases, a link between viral infections and autoreactive immune responses has been recognized for a considerable time. However, the mechanisms by which viruses contribute to HLH pathogenesis remain to be clarified. In this viewpoint, different factors that may come into play are discussed. Viruses, particularly larger DNA viruses such as herpesviruses, are potent modulators of the immune response. By evading immune recognition, interfering with cytokine balances and inhibiting apoptotic pathways, viruses may increase the host's susceptibility to HLH development. In particular cases, a direct connection between the viral infection and inhibition of natural killer cell or T cell cytotoxicity was reported, indicating that viruses may create immunological deficiencies reminiscent of primary HLH.

  2. How Viruses Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Brisse

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a life-threatening, hyperinflammatory syndrome, characterized by the uncontrolled activation of macrophages and T cells, eliciting key symptoms such as persistent fever, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, hemophagocytosis, hyperferritinemia, and coagulopathy. Viral infections are frequently implicated in the onset of active HLH episodes, both in primary, genetic HLH as in the secondary, acquired form. Infections with herpesviruses such as Epstein–Barr virus and cytomegalovirus are the most common. In autoimmune diseases, a link between viral infections and autoreactive immune responses has been recognized for a considerable time. However, the mechanisms by which viruses contribute to HLH pathogenesis remain to be clarified. In this viewpoint, different factors that may come into play are discussed. Viruses, particularly larger DNA viruses such as herpesviruses, are potent modulators of the immune response. By evading immune recognition, interfering with cytokine balances and inhibiting apoptotic pathways, viruses may increase the host’s susceptibility to HLH development. In particular cases, a direct connection between the viral infection and inhibition of natural killer cell or T cell cytotoxicity was reported, indicating that viruses may create immunological deficiencies reminiscent of primary HLH.

  3. [Necrotizing enterocolitis. Pathogenesis and iatrogenic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, M

    1986-08-01

    Following clinical observations, measurements of osmolarity of liquid drugs, and determination of blood loss due to sampling in very low birthweight infants, the following hypothesis on iatrogenic factors contributing to the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis is proposed: Due to diagnostic blood sampling during intensive care, premature infants may become severely anemic. Therefore their intestinal perfusion is reduced, causing hypoxia and hypoperfusion in the submucosa. Especially in infants with oral feeding and hyperosmolar medication, mechanical factors, hyperosmolarity and infection can affect the mucosa from the luminal side. Simultaneous hypoperfusion and hyperosmolar load may contribute to the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis. This hypothesis, which needs experimental verification, explains the different incidence of the disease in different hospitals.

  4. Progress of research on pterygial pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Yun Jin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pterygium is one of the most common ocular surface diseases. Its exact etiology and pathogenesis are not completely understood. At present, it is considered that its occurrence and development is the result of many factors.Current studies have indicated that the occurrence of pterygium is closely related to the environmental factors.Long time exposure to sunlight,dust, pollen and other long-term chronic stimulation are the main incentive factors.Various factors have caused limbal barrier dysfunction, induced the level of a variety of growth factors and inflammatory factors increased, so that the conjunctival tissue degenerate and proliferate to the cornea in the formation of pterygium. In this paper, the research progress of the pathogenesis of pterygium is reviewed.

  5. Helicobacter pylori virulence and cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is human gastric pathogen that causes chronic and progressive gastric mucosal inflammation and is responsible for the gastric inflammation-associated diseases, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Specific outcomes reflect the interplay between host-, environmental- and bacterial-specific factors. Progress in understanding putative virulence factors in disease pathogenesis has been limited and many false leads have consumed scarce resources. Few in vitro-in vivo correlations or translational applications have proved clinically relevant. Reported virulence factor-related outcomes reflect differences in relative risk of disease rather than specificity for any specific outcome. Studies of individual virulence factor associations have provided conflicting results. Since virulence factors are linked, studies of groups of putative virulence factors are needed to provide clinically useful information. Here, the authors discuss the progress made in understanding the role of H. pylori virulence factors CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin, OipA and DupA in disease pathogenesis and provide suggestions for future studies.

  6. Aetio-pathogenesis of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Haruna Abdulkareem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a literature review on the aetiology and pathogenesis of breast cancer, which is the most common cancer worldwide, and the second leading cause of cancer death, especially in Western countries. Several aetiological factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, and include age, genetics, family history, diet, alcohol, obesity, lifestyle, physical inactivity, as well as endocrine factors. These factors act separately or together in the causation of breast cancer. More recently, triple negative breast cancer has been described in certain categories of patients and is associated with poorer prognosis and earlier recurrence compared with the conventional breast cancer. Therefore, adequate knowledge of these factors is important in identifying high risk groups and individuals, which will help in screening, early detection and follow-up. This will help to decrease the morbidity and mortality from this life-threatening disease.

  7. Pathogenesis of drug induced acneform eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobo Audrey

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the pathogenesis of drug induced acneform eruption (DAE, 44 patients were evaluated clinically and representative samples histologically. INAH and corticosteroids were the main offenders in 38.6 percent and 36.4 percent patients respectively. Chloroquin precipitated lesions in 9.1 percent of the patients. There were significant differences in the duration of drug-intake before onset, morphology and severity of lesions. Histological differences with different drugs were also noted. Based on clinical and histological findings, pathogenesis of lesions caused by different drugs could be suggested. Keratinization of follicular epithelium was the main effect with corticosteroids and INAH. Suppuration of follicular epithelium was an additional early event with corticosteroids. Type III allergic reaction was responsible for iodine lesions and delayed hypersensitivity for chlorpromazine and chloroquine induced lesions.

  8. The epigenetic paradigm in periodontitis pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsi Lavu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenome refers to "epi" meaning outside the "genome." Epigenetics is the field of study of the epigenome. Epigenetic modifications include changes in the promoter CpG Islands, modifications of histone protein structure, posttranslational repression by micro-RNA which contributes to the alteration of gene expression. Epigenetics provides an understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions on disease phenotype especially in complex multifactorial diseases. Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that affects the supporting structures of the tooth. The role of the genome (in terms of genetic polymorphisms in periodontitis pathogenesis has been examined in numerous studies, and chronic periodontitis has been established as a polygenic disorder. The potential role of epigenetic modifications in the various facets of pathogenesis of periodontitis is discussed in this paper based on the available literature.

  9. The evolution of patients' theories of pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, S H

    1994-01-01

    The author views the patient's theory of pathogenesis as a compromise formation to which both patient and analyst contribute in important ways. Unlike conventional autobiography or case histories, the patient's theory of pathogenesis is an ever-evolving product of the analytic collaboration that is subject to ongoing analysis and self-inquiry. Like any explanatory theory, it both opens and constrains interpretive possibilities. The collaborative attempt to arrive at the best possible explanatory narratives entails both uncovering and joint construction. Explanatory efforts that are anchored in consensually agreed-upon present experiences of resistances and transferences are more closely related to therapeutic action and are more likely to be verifiable than explanatory theories tied to distant past events. The open-ended nature of the life historical and explanatory narratives leads to an emphasis on continued self-analytic activities after termination.

  10. Alopecia areata: pathogenesis and potential for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Shapiro, Jerry; Yu, Mei; Barekatain, Armin; Lo, Blanche; Finner, Andreas; McElwee, Kevin

    2006-06-20

    Although the complete picture for alopecia areata (AA) pathogenesis has yet to be determined, recent research has made much progress in our understanding of the disease mechanism. Numerous circumstantial evidence supports the notion that AA is fundamentally a disease mediated by inflammatory cells and may be autoimmune in nature. Recent research has shown the hair-loss phenotype is precipitated predominantly by CD8+ lymphocytes, but the disease mechanism is driven by CD4+ lymphocytes. Although genetic susceptibility is a key contributor to disease development, disease onset and phenotypic presentation are probably modified by complex environmental interplay. On the basis of our current understanding of AA disease pathogenesis, several experimental and theoretical therapeutic approaches might be possible. However, the pathogenetic disease mechanism is particularly robust and the development of a cure for AA will be a significant challenge.

  11. Pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) leads to a wide spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from an asymptomatic carrier state to self-limited acute or fulminant hepatitis to chronic hepatitis with progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Infection with HBV is one of the most common viral diseases affecting man. Both viral factors as well as the host immune response have been implicated in the pathogenesis and clinical outcome of HBV infection. In this review, we will discuss the impact of virus-host interactions for the pathogenesis of HBV infection and liver disease. These interactions include the relevance of naturally occurring viral variants for clinical disease, the role of virus-induced apoptosis for HBV-induced liver cell injury and the impact of antiviral immune responses for outcome of infection.

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis: where are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchi, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is presently one of the most investigated human disorders. Expansion of knowledge of its pathophysiology has helped in developing novel medications to combat gut inflammation with a considerably degree of success. Despite this progress, much more remains to be done in regard to gaining a more profound understanding of IBD pathogenesis, detecting inflammation before it clinically manifests, implementing lifestyle modifications, and developing agents that can modify the natural course of the disease. One of the limitations to achieve these goals is the lack of integration of the major components of IBD pathogenesis, that is the exposome, the genome, the gut microbiome, and the immunome. An "IBD integrome" approach that takes advantage of all functional information derived from the detailed investigation of each single pathogenic component through the use of systems biology may offer the solution to understand IBD and cure it. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Facial dysostoses: Etiology, pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Paul A; Andrews, Brian T

    2013-11-01

    Approximately 1% of all live births exhibit a minor or major congenital anomaly. Of these approximately one-third display craniofacial abnormalities which are a significant cause of infant mortality and dramatically affect national health care budgets. To date, more than 700 distinct craniofacial syndromes have been described and in this review, we discuss the etiology, pathogenesis and management of facial dysostoses with a particular emphasis on Treacher Collins, Nager and Miller syndromes. As we continue to develop and improve medical and surgical care for the management of individual conditions, it is essential at the same time to better characterize their etiology and pathogenesis. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of the development of facial dysostosis with a view towards early in utero identification and intervention which could minimize the manifestation of anomalies prior to birth. The ultimate management for any craniofacial anomaly however, would be prevention and we discuss this possibility in relation to facial dysostosis.

  14. Acne Scars: Pathogenesis, Classification and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Fabbrocini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acne has a prevalence of over 90% among adolescents and persists into adulthood in approximately 12%–14% of cases with psychological and social implications. Possible outcomes of the inflammatory acne lesions are acne scars which, although they can be treated in a number of ways, may have a negative psychological impact on social life and relationships. The main types of acne scars are atrophic and hypertrophic scars. The pathogenesis of acne scarring is still not fully understood, but several hypotheses have been proposed. There are numerous treatments: chemical peels, dermabrasion/microdermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, dermal grafting, needling and combined therapies for atrophic scars: silicone gels, intralesional steroid therapy, cryotherapy, and surgery for hypertrophic and keloidal lesions. This paper summarizes acne scar pathogenesis, classification and treatment options.

  15. The role of EBV in MS pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove

    2006-01-01

    Environmental factors operate on a background of genetic susceptibility in the pathogenesis of MS. Human herpesviruses, notably Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and human endogenous retroviruses are factors associated with MS. EBV association is found in epidemiological surveys where late EBV infection....... EBV cannot stand alone as a causal factor of MS, but is likely to play an indirect role as an activator of the underlying disease process....

  16. [The pathogenesis of small-plaque parapsoriasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olisova, O Iu; Kop'eva, T N

    1994-01-01

    The paper deals with the origin of parapsoriasis nodularis, which in its micronodular variant belongs to chronic dermatosis and has a clear-cut clinical and histological appearance. The disease arises most frequently after stress and occurs for the most part in middle-aged males. The leading role in pathogenesis of parapsoriasis nodularis is played by cellular immunity as indicated by reduced count of T-lymphocytes, active T-lymphocytes as well as the emergence of delayed hypersensitivity.

  17. Pathogenesis of columnar-lined esophagus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamal E Bani-Hani; Bayan K Bani-Hani

    2006-01-01

    Since its initial description, the pathogenesis of the columnar-lined esophagus (CLE) has been surrounded by many controversies. The first controversy is related to the existence of the condition itself. The second controversy centers on whether the CLE is a congenital or an acquired condition. In this article, we review the congenital and acquired theories of development of CLE and discuss the various factors in acquisition of CLE. The bulk of evidence in the literature suggests that CLE is an acquired condition.

  18. [Pathogenesis and treatment of slow transit constipation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongxu; Zhu, Anlong

    2016-12-25

    Slow transit constipation (STC) is generally considered as a complex idiopathic disease affected by multiple factors synergistically. Primarily caused by the condition of gut dysmotility, the transit of intestinal contents turned so slow that the moisture absorption increases, defecation frequency decreases, bowel movement is weakened or even disappeared with or without abdominal distension, dry and hard stool. Its etiology and pathogenesis remains unclear.Recently some researches reported the pathogenesis may be associated with the changes of the enteric nervous system (ENS), such as the change or degeneration of intestinal nerve cells, gut glial cell damage and neurotransmitter changes. Besides, intestinal myopathy, ICC reduction, immune factors, endocrine factors, laxative, mental psychological factors, diet and exercise habits may also be associated with the occurrence and aggravation of STC. The current understanding of STC mechanism can not meet the needs of clinical diagnosis and treatment. Conservative treatment is the main treatment of STC nowadays. For those receiving normative medical treatment but with little effect, surgery is necessary. "Jingling procedure" and "antiperistaltic anastomosis" can both get good efficacy. Treatment aiming at causes of disease will be uncovered as the development of the researches on the pathogenesis and treatment of slow transit constipation.

  19. Autoimmune pathogenesis in dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Wan, Shu-Wen; Cheng, Hsien-Jen; Lei, Huan-Yao; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenic mechanisms of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) caused by dengue virus (DV) infection remain unresolved. Patients with DHF/DSS are characterized by several manifestations, including severe thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and hepatomegaly. In addition to the effect of virus load and virus variation, abnormal immune responses of the host after DV infection may also account for the progression of DHF/DSS. Actually, viral autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous viral infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus, human hepatitis C virus, human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Epstein- Barr virus, and DV. In this review, we discuss the implications of autoimmunity in dengue pathogenesis. Antibodies directed against DV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) showed cross-reactivity with human platelets and endothelial cells, which lead to platelet and endothelial cell damage and inflammatory activation. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that anti-DV NS1 is involved in the pathogenesis of DF and DHF/DSS, and this may provide important information in dengue vaccine development.

  20. Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Golubev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a common complication of many diseases. Its polyetiological pattern determines the specific features of lung morphological changes and the clinical course of ARDS. Objective: to analyze the pathogenesis of ARDS in the context of the general pathological processes underlying its development. Material and methods. More than 200 lungs from the people who had died from severe concomitant injury or ARDS-complicated pneumonia were investigated. More than 150 rat experiments simulated various types of lung injury: ventilator-induced lung injury with different ventilation parameters; reperfusion injuries (systemic circulation blockade due to 12-minute vascular fascicle ligation, followed by the recovery of cardiac performance and breathing; microcirculatory disorder (injection of a thromboplastin solution into the jugular vein; blood loss; betaine-pepsin aspiration; and closed chest injury. Different parts of the right and left lungs were histologically examined 1 and 3 hours and 1 and 3 days after initiation of the experiment. Lung pieces were fixed in 10% neutral formalin solution and embedded in paraffin. Histological sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and using the van Gieson and Weigert procedures; the Schiff test was used. Results. The influence of aggression factors (trauma, blood loss, aspiration, infection, etc. results in damage to the lung and particularly air-blood barrier structures (endothelium, alveolar epithelium, their basement membrane. In turn the alteration of cellular and extracellular structures is followed by the increased permeability of hemomicrocirculatory bed vessels, leading to the development of non-cardiogenic (interstitial, alveolar pulmonary edema that is a central component in the pathogenesis of ARDS. Conclusion. The diagnosis of the early manifestations of ARDS must account for the nature of an aggression factor, the signs confirming the alteration of the lung

  1. The fascinating germ theories on cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoucalas, G; Laios, K; Karamanou, M; Gennimata, V; Androutsos, G

    2014-01-01

    For more than 100 years, the germ theory of cancer, proposing that microorganisms were at the origin of the disease, dominated medicine. Several eminent scientists like Etienne Burnet, Mikhail Stepanovich Voronin, Charles-Louis Malassez, and Francis-Peyton Rous argued on the pathogenesis presenting their theories that implicated cocci, fungi and parasites. The impact of these theories was culminated by the Nobel Prize in 1926 that was attributed to the Danish scientist Johannes Fibiger for his work on the nematode Spiroptera as a causative agent in cancer. Even if those theories were the result of fantasy and misinterpretation, they paved the way for the scientific research in oncology.

  2. The molecular pathogenesis of dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Sakamoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dedifferentiated chondrosarcomas are cartilaginous tumors that consist of two distinguishable components, a lowgrade chondrosarcoma (chondrogenic component and a highgrade dedifferentiated (anaplastic component. The tumor cells in both components seem to originate from a single precursor, but there are a substantial number of genetic alterations in the anaplastic component. The underlying mechanism of dedifferentiation is unknown, but cell cycle regulators p16, p53 and retinoblastoma appear to have important roles in tumor development and dedifferentiation. In this article, molecular pathogenesis of dedifferentiated chondrosarcomas is reviewed.

  3. News in Pathogenesis of Chronic Venous Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazuchova J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This review article is concentrating on the news in the pathophysiology of chronic venous insufficiency (CVD. Despite ongoing progress in understanding the molecular aspects of CVD the exact mechanism of its development remains unclear. Many different factors may play role in the pathogenesis of CVD, including changes in hydrostatic pressure, valvular incompetence, increased capillary permeability, endothelial dysfunction, activation of leukocytes, deep venous obstruction, capillary microthrombosis, ineffective function of calf muscle pump, biochemical and structural changes in the vessel wall, extracellular matrix alteration, and several other mechanisms. A better understanding of the pathophysiology is an important step in the finding of new potential treatment.

  4. Pathogenesis and management of Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Hepatolenticular degeneration, commonly known as Wilson disease, is an autosomal recessive inherited disease of abnormal copper metabolism, characterized by the accumulation of copper in the body due to decreased biliary excretion of copper from hepatocytes. Wilson disease protein, ATP7B, functions in copper excretion into bile and in copper secretion to the bloodstream coupled with ceruloplasmin synthesis. Various kinds of mutations of ATP7B cause Wilson disease. Wilson disease is a rare genetic disease that can be treated pharmacologically. Recognition and prompt diagnosis are very important, because Wilson disease is fatal if left untreated. In this review, I summarize the pathogenesis and management of Wilson disease.

  5. [Some aspects of pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdes, Sh

    2011-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease of the spine (spondylitis) and sacroiliac joints (sacroileitis) associated in many cases with inflammatory affection of the peripheral joints (arthritis), entesises (entesitis), eyes (uveitis), intestine (enteritis) and aortic root (aortitis). AS is considered now as a prototype of diseases from the group of seronegative spondyloarthritis. AS is a hereditary disease. Predisposition to AS (90%) is associated with genetic factors the key gene of which is HLA-B27. As pathogenesis of AS is not still verified, three hypotheses are considered basing on HLA-B27 biology. The role of environmental factors involved in AS development (tension in enteses and infection) are discussed.

  6. Urinary Tract Infection: Pathogenesis and Outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Lisa K; Hunstad, David A

    2016-11-01

    The clinical syndromes comprising urinary tract infection (UTI) continue to exert significant impact on millions of patients worldwide, most of whom are otherwise healthy women. Antibiotic therapy for acute cystitis does not prevent recurrences, which plague up to one fourth of women after an initial UTI. Rising antimicrobial resistance among uropathogenic bacteria further complicates therapeutic decisions, necessitating new approaches based on fundamental biological investigation. In this review, we highlight contemporary advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis and how these might inform both our clinical perspective and future scientific priorities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Huntingtin processing in pathogenesis of Huntington disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenghong QIN; Zhenlun GU

    2004-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expansion of the polyglutamine tract in the protein named huntingtin.The expansion of polyglutamine tract induces selective degeneration of striatal projection neurons and cortical pyramidal neurons. The bio-hallmark of HD is the formation of intranuclear inclusions and cytoplasmic aggregates in association with other cellular proteins in vulnerable neurons. Accumulation of N-terminal mutant huntingtin in HD brains is prominent. These pathological features are related to protein misfolding and impairments in protein processing and degradation in neurons. This review focused on the role of proteases in huntingtin cleavage and degradation and the contribution of altered processing of mutant huntingtin to HD pathogenesis.

  8. Chronic spontaneous urticaria: etiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Sarbjit S

    2014-02-01

    Urticaria affects individuals of all ages and is commonplace. Nearly 1 in 5 individuals will experience an episode of urticaria in their lifetime, while the chronic form of disease has an estimated annual prevalence of approximately 1% of the population. Given the similarity of chronic urticaria symptoms to those seen in patients suffering an allergic reaction, the condition often leads to a search for an external cause. In most cases, no external trigger factor is identified. At present several theories of pathogenesis exist, none of which is firmly established.

  9. [Overactive bladder syndrome: etiology, pathogenesis, treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, V H

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes the causes of hyperactive detrusory contractions, considered etiopathogenesis and treatment of patients with overactive bladder syndrome (OBS). Two groups of patients with overactive bladder syndrome were examined, analyzed etiology, pathogenesis and treatment. A new method for increasing the threshold sensitivity of spinal centers under the OBS by using the local lesions of the mucous membrane of the bladder by electrical coagulation or local microwave hyperthermia of the prostate are proposed. The high efficiency of these methods in dealing with OBS is shown.

  10. [Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Seitsonen, Sanna; Paimela, Tuomas; Meri, Seppo; Immonen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a multiform disease of the macula, the region responsible for detailed central vision. In recent years, plenty of new knowledge of the pathogenesis of this disease has been obtained, and the treatment of exudative macular degeneration has greatly progressed. The number of patients with age-related macular degeneration will multiply in the following decades, because knowledge of mechanisms of development of macular degeneration that could be subject to therapeutic measures is insufficient. Central underlying factors are genetic inheritance, exposure of the retina to chronic oxidative stress and accumulation of inflammation-inducing harmful proteins into or outside of retinal cells.

  11. [Endothelin-1 in pathogenesis of Raynaud's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik-Kordecka, M; Adamiec, R; Ciosek, W

    2001-06-01

    Endothelin is an endogenous vasoconstrictor and plays an important role in pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon. Plasma endothelin-1 (ET-1) and von Willebrand factor (vWF) concentrations following cold exposure in 52 patients with Raynaud's phenomenon were measured. Statistically significant increase of ET-1 and vWF was found in the study group in compare to healthy volunteers. There was positive correlation between ET-1 and vWF in those cases. The dates suggest that ET-changes indicates a vasospastic effect on vascular injury. Treatment with endothelin-receptor antagonist may prevent structural changes in vessel well.

  12. NEW ASPECTS OF THE PATHOGENESIS OF EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rano Bahodirovna Azizova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We studied 52 patients with epilepsy with the average age of 36.2±14.7 years old. Of them, 38 patients had idiopathic epilepsy, 14 patients had symptomatic epilepsy. Our study has shown that epilepsy is accompanied with increased levels of autoantibodies to NF-200, GFAP, S100, MBP, DNA, GABA and dopamine receptors, testifying to the important role of autoimmune disturbances in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. More severe attacks are accompanied by worsening of neuroimmune dysregulation. The degree and duration of autoimmune process can serve additional diagnostic and prognostic criteria for epilepsies.

  13. [Etiology and pathogenesis of primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Mika; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2017-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism(pHPT)is a frequent endocrine disease in which abnormal calcium(Ca)regulation leads to hypercalcemia. The most frequent cause of pHPT in more than 80% of patients is an adenoma, followed by hyperplasia in about 15%, and cancer in 1~5%. Although most cases of pHPT are sporadic, a few are familial(hereditary), and this is known as familial hyperparathyroidism(FHPT). Gene abnormalities that affect cyclin D1 signaling(CCND1, CDC73, CDKN1B), Wnt/β-catenin signaling(MEN1), and calcium-sensing receptor signaling(CaSR, GNA11, AP2S1)play a role in the etiology and pathogenesis of pHPT. Vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency and CaSR dysfunction also play a role in pHPT severity. Continued elucidation of the etiology and pathogenesis of pHPT may lead to development of new treatments for pHPT as well as further understanding of Ca regulation.

  14. [Bronchial asthma pathogenesis and genetic prognosis development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmasova, I P; Sepiashvili, R I; Sepiashvili, Ia R; Malova, E S

    2014-01-01

    The review is dedicated to an actual problem--genetic prognosis of risk of bronchial asthma development that is quite a complex aspect of studies from a methodological viewpoint. Bronchial asthma--heterogeneous disease by both etiology and clinical characteristics. At the same time genetic prognosis is based on the unity of pathogenetic mechanisms of development, though in immunological reactions that are the base of this disease, alternative variants are possible. The aim of this review is carrying out parallels between modern achievements in the field of deciphering trigger mechanisms of bronchial asthma pathogenesis and object of genetic studies based on these mechanisms. Among the examined conceptions--role of epithelial tissue in trigger mechanisms of bronchial asthma, variants of key role of immune system cells, first of all, T-helpers of various types for further development of inflammatory-effector reactions with damage characteristic for this disease. Compliance of contemporary approaches of genetic studies and novel concepts of bronchial asthma pathogenesis is shown.

  15. Acute pancreatitis: Etiology and common pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Jun Wang; Chun-Fang Gao; Dong Wei; Cun Wang; Si-Qin Ding

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The etiology and pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have been intensively investigated for centuries worldwide. Many causes of acute pancreatitis have been discovered, but the pathogenetic theories are controversial. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstone impacting the distal common bile-pancreatic duct. The majority of investigators accept that the main factors for acute billiary pancreatitis are pancreatic hyperstimulation and bile-pancreatic duct obstruction which increase pancreatic duct pressure and active trypsin reflux. Acute pancreatitis occurs when intracellular protective mechanisms to prevent trypsinogen activation or reduce trypsin activity are overwhelmed. However, little is known about the other acute pancreatitis. We hypothesize that acute biliary pancreatitis and other causes of acute pancreatitis possess a common pathogenesis. Pancreatic hyperstimulation and pancreatic duct obstruction increase pancreatic duct pressure, active trypsin reflux, and subsequent unregulated activation of trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells. Enzyme activation within the pancreas leads to auto-digestion of the gland and local inflammation. Once the hypothesis is confirmed, traditional therapeutic strategies against acute pancreatitis may be improved. Decompression of pancreatic duct pressure should be advocated in the treatment of acute pancreatitits which may greatly improve its outcome.

  16. [Risk factors and pathogenesis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknys, Gintaras; Kondrotas, Anatolijus Juozas; Kevelaitis, Egidijus

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on Hashimoto's thyroiditis and its pathogenesis and to introduce the readers to the basic concept of autoimmune thyroid disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease are different expressions of a basically similar autoimmune process, and the clinical appearance reflects the spectrum of the immune response in a particular patient. During this response, cytotoxic autoantibodies, stimulatory autoantibodies, blocking autoantibodies, or cell-mediated autoimmunity may be observed. Persons with classic Hashimoto's thyroiditis have serum antibodies reacting with thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase. These antibodies (particularly antibodies against thyroid peroxidase) are complement-fixing immunoglobulins and may be cytotoxic. In addition, many patients have cell-mediated immunity directed against thyroid antigens. Cell mediated-immunity is also a feature of experimental thyroiditis induced in animals by injection of thyroid antigen with adjuvants. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is predominantly the clinical expression of cell-mediated immunity leading to destruction of thyroid cells, which in its severest form causes thyroid failure. The significance of genetic component and nongenetic risk factors (pregnancy, drugs, age, sex, infection, and irradiation) in the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is also reviewed. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that the genetic component is important in the pathogenesis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, although the pattern of inheritance is non-Mendelian and is likely to be influenced by subtle variations in the functions of multiple genes. Nongenetic risk factors (environmental factors) are also etiologically important, because the concordance rate in monozygotic twins is below 1.

  17. Epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management of takotsubo syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y-Hassan, Shams; Tornvall, Per

    2017-09-15

    Takotsubo syndrome is a recently recognized acute cardiac disease entity with a clinical presentation resembling that of an acute coronary syndrome. The typical takotsubo syndrome patient has a unique circumferential left (bi-) ventricular contraction abnormality profile that extends beyond a coronary artery supply territory and appears to follow the anatomical cardiac sympathetic innervation. The syndrome predominantly affects postmenopausal women and is often preceded by emotional or physical stress. Patients with predisposing factors such as malignancy and other chronic comorbidities are more prone to suffer from takotsubo syndrome. The pathogenesis of takotsubo syndrome is elusive. Several pathophysiological mechanisms involving myocardial ischemia (multivessel coronary artery spasm, microvascular dysfunction, aborted myocardial infarction), left ventricular outlet tract obstruction, blood-borne catecholamine myocardial toxicity, epinephrine-induced switch in signal trafficking, and autonomic nervous system dysfunction have been proposed. The syndrome is usually reversible; nevertheless, during the acute stage, a substantial number of patients develop severe complications such as arrhythmias, heart failure including pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock, thromboembolism, cardiac arrest, and rupture. Treatment of precipitating factors, predisposing diseases, and complications is fundamental during the acute stage of the disease. The epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management of takotsubo syndrome are reviewed in this paper.

  18. Pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ding-mei; LU Jia-hai; ZHONG Nan-shan

    2008-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) first emerged in Guangdong province,China in November2002.During the following 3 months,it spread rapidly across the world,resulting in approximately 800 deaths.In 2004,subsequent sporadic cases emerged in Singapore and China.A novel coronavims,SARS-CoV,was identified as the etiological agent of SARS.1,2 This virus belongs to a family of large,positive,single-stranded RNA viruses.Nevertheless,genomic characterization shows that the SARS-CoV is only moderately related to other known coronaviruses.3 In contrast with previously described coronaviruses,SARS-CoV infection typically causes severe symptoms related to the lower respiratory tract.The SARS-CoV genome includes 14 putative open reading frames encoding 28 potential proteins,and the functions of many of these proteins are not known.4 A number of complete and partial autopsies of SARS patients have been reported since the first outbreak in 2003.The predominant pathological finding in these cases was diffuse alveolar damage (DAD).This severe pulmonary injury of SARS patients is caused both by direct viral effects and immunopathogenetic factors.5 Many important aspects of the pathogenesis of SARS have not yet been fully clarified.In this article,we summarize the most important mechanisms involved in the complex pathogenesis of SARS,including clinical characters,host and receptors,immune system response and genetic factors.

  19. Pathogenesis and treatment modalities of localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valančienė, Greta; Jasaitienė, Daiva; Valiukevičienė, Skaidra

    2010-01-01

    Localized scleroderma is a chronic inflammatory disease primarily of the dermis and subcutaneous fat that ultimately leads to a scar-like sclerosis of connective tissue. The disorder manifests as various plaques of different shape and size with signs of skin inflammation, sclerosis, and atrophy. This is a relatively rare inflammatory disease characterized by a chronic course, unknown etiology, and insufficiently clear pathogenesis. Many factors may influence its appearance: trauma, genetic factors, disorders of the immune system or hormone metabolism, viral infections, toxic substances or pharmaceutical agents, neurogenic factors, and Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Various therapeutic modalities are being used for the treatment of localized scleroderma. There is no precise treatment scheme for this disease. A majority of patients can be successfully treated with topical pharmaceutical agents and phototherapy, but some of them with progressive, disseminated, and causing disability localized scleroderma are in need of systemic treatment. The aim of this article is not only to dispute about the clinical and morphological characteristics of localized scleroderma, but also to present the newest generalized data about the possible origin, pathogenesis, and treatment modalities of this disease.

  20. Etiology and Pathogenesis of Idiopathic Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Amanda; Behar, Jose

    2017-03-01

    This review examines the etiology and pathogenesis of idiopathic achalasia. This disease is clinically characterized by dysphagia of solids and liquids due to the presence of simultaneous or absent esophageal contractions and impaired or absent relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. It includes a review of (a) etiology and pathogenesis of this inflammatory process that damage the ganglion cells of the Auerbach plexus that is limited to the esophagus; (b) genetic abnormalities and polymorphisms associated with this disease that may help explain its heterogeneity expressed by the different motility abnormalities of its phenotypes as well as differences in its clinical progression. These different genetic abnormalities may be responsible for the slow progression of types I or II phenotypes; (c) indirect evidence of viruses present in these patients that may initiate its development; (d) the abnormalities of the muscle layer that may be responsible for the dilation of the body of the esophagus that ultimately causes the sigmoid-like esophagus in the very last phase of this disease. This progression to the end-stage phase tends to occur in about 5% of patients. And, (e) the chronic inflammatory abnormalities in the squamous mucosa that may be the cause of the dysplastic and neoplastic changes that may lead to squamous cell carcinoma whose incidence in this disease is increased. These mucosal abnormalities are usually present in patients with markedly dilated body of the esophagus and severe food stasis.

  1. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Marisa N; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-07-20

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission.

  2. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa N. Madison

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission.

  3. Channelopathy Pathogenesis in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina eSchmunk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a syndrome that affects normal brain development and is characterized by impaired social interaction as well as verbal and non-verbal communication and by repetitive, stereotypic behavior. ASD is a complex disorder arising from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors that are independent from racial, ethnic and socioeconomical status. The high heritability of ASD suggests a strong genetic basis for the disorder. Furthermore, a mounting body of evidence implies a role of various ion channel gene defects (channelopathies in the pathogenesis of autism. Indeed, recent genome-wide association, and whole exome- and whole- genome resequencing studies linked polymorphisms and rare variants in calcium, sodium and potassium channels and their subunits with susceptibility to ASD, much as they do with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders, and animal models with these genetic variations recapitulate endophenotypes considered to be correlates of autistic behavior seen in patients. An ion flux across the membrane regulates a variety of cell functions, from generation of action potentials to gene expression and cell morphology, thus it is not surprising that channelopathies have profound effects on brain functions. In the present work, we summarize existing evidence for the role of ion channel gene defects in the pathogenesis of autism with a focus on calcium signaling and its downstream effects.

  4. An updated review of melasma pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Young Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Melasma is a pigmentation disorder characterized by common clinical findings. However, the pathogenic mechanisms involved are heterogeneous in different individuals and ethnic groups. We have reviewed the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in melasma. Although the pathogenesis has not entirely been elucidated thus far, new findings are being identified by research groups. Epidemiologic studies may provide clues on the involvement of genetic factor(s, UV irradiation, or hormones in melasma. Some of the mechanisms of altered skin pigmentation, such as UV-induced pigmentation, may also be applicable to the pathogenesis of melasma. In fact, an increase in similar keratinocyte-derived melanogenic factors and their receptors occur in both UV-induced melanogenesis and melasma. Increased expression of female sex hormone receptors and the identification of the PDZ domain containing 1 (PDZK1 signaling mechanism provide insights to further our understanding of melasma. In addition to keratinocyte-derived paracrine factors, the role of paracrine factors from dermal fibroblasts, such as stem cell factor (SCF and Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1, is elucidated in melasma. Furthermore, the involvement of ion exchangers and microRNAs (miRNAs, such as H19 miRNA (miR-675, are also suggested.

  5. Feline Coronaviruses: Pathogenesis of Feline Infectious Peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekes, G; Thiel, H-J

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) belongs to the few animal virus diseases in which, in the course of a generally harmless persistent infection, a virus acquires a small number of mutations that fundamentally change its pathogenicity, invariably resulting in a fatal outcome. The causative agent of this deadly disease, feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), arises from feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). The review summarizes our current knowledge of the genome and proteome of feline coronaviruses (FCoVs), focusing on the viral surface (spike) protein S and the five accessory proteins. We also review the current classification of FCoVs into distinct serotypes and biotypes, cellular receptors of FCoVs and their presumed role in viral virulence, and discuss other aspects of FIPV-induced pathogenesis. Our current knowledge of genetic differences between FECVs and FIPVs has been mainly based on comparative sequence analyses that revealed "discriminatory" mutations that are present in FIPVs but not in FECVs. Most of these mutations result in amino acid substitutions in the S protein and these may have a critical role in the switch from FECV to FIPV. In most cases, the precise roles of these mutations in the molecular pathogenesis of FIP have not been tested experimentally in the natural host, mainly due to the lack of suitable experimental tools including genetically engineered virus mutants. We discuss the recent progress in the development of FCoV reverse genetics systems suitable to generate recombinant field viruses containing appropriate mutations for in vivo studies.

  6. CD40 signaling and Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, T; Tan, J; Mullan, M

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between CD40 and its cognate ligand, CD40 ligand, is a primary regulator of the peripheral immune response, including modulation of T lymphocyte activation, B lymphocyte differentiation and antibody secretion, and innate immune cell activation, maturation, and survival. Recently, we and others have identified CD40 expression on a variety of CNS cells, including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, astroglia and microglia, and have found that, on many of these cells, CD40 expression is enhanced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. Importantly, the CD40-CD40 ligand interaction on microglia triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that are discussed, beginning with Src-family kinase activation and culminating in microglial activation as evidenced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion. Based on the involvement of microglial activation and brain inflammation in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, we have investigated co-stimulation of microglia, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells with CD40 ligand in the presence of low doses of freshly solubilized amyloid-beta peptides. Data reviewed herein show that CD40 ligand and amyloid-beta act synergistically to promote pro-inflammatory responses by these cells, including secretion of interleukin-1 beta by endothelial cells and tumor necrosis factor-alpha by microglia. As these cytokines have been implicated in neuronal injury, a comprehensive model of pro-inflammatory CD40 ligand and amyloid-beta initiated Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis (mediated by multiple CNS cells) is proposed.

  7. Novel pathogenesis: regulation of apoptosis by Apelin/APJ system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaqi; Liu, Meiqing; Chen, Linxi

    2017-06-01

    Apelin is the endogenous peptide APJ receptor, while APJ is a member of the G protein-coupled receptors family. Recent evidence strongly suggests that Apelin/APJ system influences apoptosis in various diseases through different signal pathways. In this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms by which the Apelin/APJ system inhibits apoptosis, including the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, ERK1/2, caspase signaling, and autophagy pathway. We also summarize the role of Apelin/APJ system in apoptosis in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, pulmonary artery hypertension, retinal neovascular disease, acute renal injury, skeletal homeostasis, and gastrointestinal diseases. Apelin/APJ system decreases myocardial infarction size and alleviates myocardial I/R injury by inhibiting cardiomyocytes apoptosis. However, Apelin/APJ system improves pulmonary artery hypertension via increasing apoptosis. Apelin/APJ system exerts neuroprotective effect by blocking apoptosis and participates in the recovery of retinal neovascular disease by suppressing apoptosis. Apelin/APJ system also shows anti-apoptotic effect against acute renal injury and plays a role in regulating skeletal homeostasis. In gastrointestinal disease, Apelin/APJ system plays a potential physiological role in gastrointestinal cytoprotection by regulating apoptosis. We hope that a better understanding of the Apelin/APJ system will help to discover new disease pathogenesis and find possible therapeutic targets of the Apelin/APJ system essential for various diseases. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Cancer anorexia: clinical implications, pathogenesis, and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviano, Alessandro; Meguid, Michael M; Rossi-Fanelli, Filippo

    2003-11-01

    Anorexia and reduced food intake are important issues in the management of patients with cancer because they contribute to the development of malnutrition, increase morbidity and mortality, and impinge on quality of life. Accumulating evidence indicates that cancer anorexia is multifactorial in its pathogenesis, and most of the hypothalamic neuronal signalling pathways modulating energy intake are likely to be involved. Several factors are considered to be putative mediators of cancer anorexia, including hormones (eg, leptin), neuropeptides (eg, neuropeptide Y), cytokines (eg, interleukin 1 and 6, and tumour necrosis factor), and neurotransmitters (eg, serotonin and dopamine). These pathways are not isolated and distinct pathogenic mechanisms but are closely inter-related. However, convincing evidence suggests that cytokines have a vital role, triggering the complex neurochemical cascade which leads to the onset of cancer anorexia. Increased expression of cytokines during tumour growth prevents the hypothalamus from responding appropriately to peripheral signals, by persistently activating anorexigenic systems and inhibiting prophagic pathways. Hypothalamic monoaminergic neurotransmission may contribute to these effects. Thus, the optimum therapeutic approach to anorectic cancer patients should include changes in dietary habits, achieved via nutritional counselling, and drug therapy, aimed at interfering with cytokine expression or hypothalamic monoaminergic neurotransmission.

  9. Adipose tissue and ceramide biosynthesis in the pathogenesis of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Fahumiya; Badeanlou, Leylla; Shah, Charmi; Yang, Guang

    2011-01-01

    Although obesity is a complex metabolic disorder often associated with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia and Type 2 diabetes, as well as with accelerated atherosclerosis, the molecular changes in obesity that promote these disorders are not completely understood. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain how increased adipose tissue mass affects whole body insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk. One theory is that increased adipose derived inflammatory cytokines induces a chronic inflammatory state that not only increases cardiovascular risk, but also antagonizes insulin signaling and mitochondrial function and thereby impair glucose hemostasis. Another suggests that lipid accumulation in nonadipose tissues not suited for fat storage leads to the buildup of bioactive lipids that inhibit insulin signaling and metabolism. Recent evidence demonstrates that sphingolipid metabolism is dysregulated in obesity and specific sphingolipids may provide a common pathway that link excess nutrients and inflammation to increased metabolic and cardiovascular risk. This chapter will focus primarily on the expression and regulation of adipose and plasma ceramide biosynthesis in obesity and, its potential contribution to the pathogenesis of obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

  10. Autophagy Is Associated with Pathogenesis of Haemophilus parasuis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaning; Li, Yufeng; Yuan, Wentao; Xia, Yuting; Shen, Yijuan

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis (H. parasuis) is a common commensal Gram-negative extracellular bacterium in the upper respiratory tract of swine, which can cause Glässer's disease in stress conditions. Research on the pathogenicity of H. parasuis has mainly focused on immune evasion and bacterial virulence factors, while few studies have examined the interactions of H. parasuis and its host. Autophagy is associated with the replication and proliferation of many pathogenic bacteria, but whether it plays a role during infection by H. parasuis is unknown. In this study, an adenovirus construct expressing GFP, RFP, and LC3 was used to infect H. parasuis. Western blotting, laser confocal microscopy, and electron microscopy showed that Hps5 infection induced obvious autophagy in PK-15 cells. In cells infected with strains of H. parasuis differing in invasiveness, the levels of autophagy were positively correlated with the presence of alive bacteria in PK-15 cells. In addition, autophagy inhibited the invasion of Hps5 in PK-15 cells. Autophagy related genes Beclin, Atg5 and Atg7 were silenced with RNA interference, the results showed that autophagy induced by H. parasuis infection is a classical pathway. Our observations demonstrate that H. parasuis can induce autophagy and that the levels of autophagy are associated with the presence of alive bacteria in cells, which opened novel avenues to further our understanding of H. parasuis-host interplay and pathogenesis. PMID:27703447

  11. Role of Regulatory Peptide in Pathogenesis of Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董林旺; 常英姿; 佟利家; 汤健; 苏静怡; 唐朝枢

    1994-01-01

    The present study evaluated the pathogenetic roles of three kinds of regulatory peptide. The results showed that (i) plasma endothelin(ET) level elevated significantly in septic shock rats, persistent intravenous drip of low doses ET caused development of shock state in normal rats and the irreversible outcome of light hemorrhagic shock. Furthermore, i. v. administration of specific ET-antiserum was significantly effective to septic shock rats, (Ⅱ) Plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) increased by 260% in septic shock rats, i. v. drip of low doses CGRP both in early and late sepsis were effective to shock rats, (Ⅱi) An-giotensin-Ⅱ (ANG-Ⅱ) contents of heart and aorta increased dramatically both in early and late septic shock, and inhibiting its increase with Captopril in late sepsis significantly improved the shock state, but results were inverse in early sepsis. It could be concluded that ET was one of the most important factors participating in the pathogenesis of shock, CGRP had a compens

  12. Stiff person syndrome: advances in pathogenesis and therapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2009-03-01

    Stiff person syndrome (SPS) varies from mild to severe, but if untreated it can be progressive and disabling. Although progress has been made in understanding and treating SPS, the disease remains underdiagnosed, delaying treatment. Antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase provide an excellent diagnostic marker, but their role in disease pathogenesis is uncertain. Research focused on identifying new autoantigens has provided evidence that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor-associated protein (GABARAP), a 14-kD protein localized at the postsynaptic regions of GABAergic synapses, is an antigenic target. Circulating anti-GABARAP antibodies that inhibit GABA(A) receptor expression on GABAergic neurons have been found in up to 65% of SPS patients. The impairment of GABAergic pathways and reduction of brain GABA results in clinical manifestations of stiffness, spasms, and phobias. Increased awareness of SPS among practicing physicians is necessary to recognize the disease early and prevent permanent disability. Most patients with SPS respond to GABA-enhancing drugs, but the high doses required cause unacceptable adverse effects. The disease clearly responds to intravenous immunoglobulin, but repeated infusions are needed to maintain response. New immunomodulating agents are being explored to treat difficult cases and to induce long-lasting remissions.

  13. Ebola haemorrhagic fever virus: pathogenesis, immune responses, potential prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Nazimek, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Ebola zoonotic RNA filovirus represents human most virulent and lethal pathogens, which induces acute hemorrhagic fever and death within few days in a range of 60-90% of symptomatic individuals. Last outbreak in 2014 in West Africa caused panic that Ebola epidemic can be spread to other continents. Number of deaths in late December reached almost 8,000 individuals out of more than 20,000 symptomatic patients. It seems that only a coordinated international response could counteract the further spread of Ebola. Major innate immunity mechanisms against Ebola are associated with the production of interferons, that are inhibited by viral proteins. Activation of host NK cells was recognized as a leading immune function responsible for recovery of infected people. Uncontrolled cell infection by Ebola leads to an impairment of immunity with cytokine storm, coagulopathy, systemic bleeding, multi-organ failure and death. Tested prevention strategies to induce antiviral immunity include: i. recombinant virus formulations (vaccines); ii. cocktail of monoclonal antibodies (serotherapy); iii. alternative RNA-interference-based antiviral methods. Maintaining the highest standards of aseptic and antiseptic precautions is equally important. Present brief review summarizes a current knowledge concerning pathogenesis of Ebola hemorrhagic disease and the virus interaction with the immune system and discusses recent advances in prevention of Ebola infection by vaccination and serotherapy.

  14. Advances in the pathogenesis and treatment of patients with stiff person syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-01-01

    Advances in the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, pathogenesis, and therapies for stiff person syndrome (SPS), based on observations in more than 50 consecutive patients, are presented. The syndrome varies from mild to severe, but if untreated it can be progressive and disabling. SPS remains a largely underdiagnosed condition. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies provide an excellent diagnostic marker, but their role in disease pathogenesis is uncertain. Research focused on identifying new autoantigens has provided evidence that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor-associated protein (GABARAP), a 14-kD protein localized at the postsynaptic regions of GABAergic synapses, is a new antigenic target. In up to 65% of SPS patients, there are circulating anti-GABARAP antibodies that inhibit the GABA(A) receptor expression on GABAergic neurons. This review examines the diagnostic criteria for SPS, SPS variants, common errors in diagnosis, and a step-by-step therapeutic approach, including new advances in therapy.

  15. Neuromyelitis optica pathogenesis and aquaporin 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerr Douglas

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is a severe, debilitating human disease that predominantly features immunopathology in the optic nerves and the spinal cord. An IgG1 autoantibody (NMO-IgG that binds aquaporin 4 (AQP4 has been identified in the sera of a significant number of NMO patients, as well as in patients with two related neurologic conditions, bilateral optic neuritis (ON, and longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis (LETM, that are generally considered to lie within the NMO spectrum of diseases. NMO-IgG is not the only autoantibody found in NMO patient sera, but the correlation of pathology in central nervous system (CNS with tissues that normally express high levels of AQP4 suggests NMO-IgG might be pathogenic. If this is the case, it is important to identify and understand the mechanism(s whereby an immune response is induced against AQP4. This review focuses on open questions about the "events" that need to be understood to determine if AQP4 and NMO-IgG are involved in the pathogenesis of NMO. These questions include: 1 How might AQP4-specific T and B cells be primed by either CNS AQP4 or peripheral pools of AQP4? 2 Do the different AQP4-expressing tissues and perhaps the membrane structural organization of AQP4 influence NMO-IgG binding efficacy and thus pathogenesis? 3 Does prior infection, genetic predisposition, or underlying immune dysregulation contribute to a confluence of events which lead to NMO in select individuals? A small animal model of NMO is essential to demonstrate whether AQP4 is indeed the incipient autoantigen capable of inducing NMO-IgG formation and NMO. If the NMO model is consistent with the human disease, it can be used to examine how changes in AQP4 expression and blood-brain barrier (BBB integrity, both of which can be regulated by CNS inflammation, contribute to inductive events for anti-AQP4-specific immune response. In this review, we identify reagents and experimental questions that need to be

  16. Kaposi's sarcoma: etiology and pathogenesis, inducing factors, causal associations, and treatments: facts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, Eleonora; Ruocco, Vincenzo; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Gambardella, Alessio; Wolf, Ronni; Buonaguro, Franco M

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), an angioproliferative disorder, has a viral etiology and a multifactorial pathogenesis hinged on an immune dysfunction. The disease is multifocal, with a course ranging from indolent, with only skin manifestations to fulminant, with extensive visceral involvement. In the current view, all forms of KS have a common etiology in human herpesvirus (HHV)-8 infection, and the differences among them are due to the involvement of various cofactors. In fact, HHV-8 infection can be considered a necessary but not sufficient condition for the development of KS, because further factors (genetic, immunologic, and environmental) are required. The role of cofactors can be attributed to their ability to interact with HHV-8, to affect the immune system, or to act as vasoactive agents. In this contribution, a survey of the current state of knowledge on many and various factors involved in KS pathogenesis is carried out, in particular by highlighting the facts and controversies about the role of some drugs (quinine analogues and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors) in the onset of the disease. Based on these assessments, it is possible to hypothesize that the role of cofactors in KS pathogenesis can move toward an effect either favoring or inhibiting the onset of the disease, depending on the presence of other agents modulating the pathogenesis itself, such as genetic predisposition, environmental factors, drug intake, or lymph flow disorders. It is possible that the same agents may act as either stimulating or inhibiting cofactors according to the patient's genetic background and variable interactions. Treatment guidelines for each form of KS are outlined, because a unique standard therapy for all of them cannot be considered due to KS heterogeneity. In most cases, therapeutic options, both local and systemic, should be tailored to the patient's peculiar clinical conditions.

  17. Molecular pathogenesis of mantle cell lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jares, Pedro; Colomer, Dolors; Campo, Elias

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is a B cell malignancy in which constitutive dysregulation of cyclin D1 and the cell cycle, disruption of DNA damage response pathways, and activation of cell survival mechanisms contribute to oncogenesis. A small number of tumors lack cyclin D1 overexpression, suggesting that its dysregulation is always not required for tumor initiation. Some cases have hypermutated IGHV and stable karyotypes, a predominant nonnodal disease, and an indolent clinical evolution, which suggests that they may correspond to distinct subtypes of the disease. In this review, we discuss the molecular pathways that contribute to pathogenesis, and how improved understanding of these molecular mechanisms offers new perspectives for the treatment of patients. PMID:23023712

  18. Psoriatic arthritis: from pathogenesis to therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a multigenic autoimmune disease that involves synovial tissue, entheseal sites and skin, and that may result in significant joint damage. Although there are no diagnostic tests for psoriatic arthritis, research has identified consistent features that help to distinguish the condition from other common rheumatic diseases. Comparison of HLA-B and HLA-C regions in psoriatic arthritis with those in psoriasis without joint involvement demonstrates significant differences, such that psoriatic arthritis cannot be viewed simply as a subset of genetically homogeneous psoriasis. T-cell receptor phenotypic studies have failed to identify antigen-driven clones, and an alternative hypothesis for CD8 stimulation involving innate immune signals is proposed. Finally, imaging studies have highlighted entheseal involvement in psoriatic arthritis, and it is possible that entheseal-derived antigens may trigger an immune response that is critically involved in disease pathogenesis.

  19. Mechanisms of pathogenesis: differences amongst Leishmania species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenares, Maria; Kar, Sujata; Goldsmith-Pestana, Karen; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2002-04-01

    One of the features of the genus Leishmania is the diversity of tropism/disease resulting from infection. With notable exceptions, the form (visceral, cutaneous, diffuse cutaneous, mucocutaneous) and severity of disease is a function of the infecting Leishmania species together with host genetics and consequent inflammatory and immune responses. It has become evident from genetic and immunological studies using the murine model that the various members of the genus Leishmania differ in aspects of their 'approach' to the host immune system. We are just beginning to appreciate the complexities of these interactions, which have import for the development of a vaccine against leishmaniasis. In this paper, what is currently understood concerning the mechanisms of leishmanial pathogenesis (based upon studies employing the murine model) is briefly summarized.

  20. Protein contact dermatitis: allergens, pathogenesis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Cheryl; Warshaw, Erin

    2008-01-01

    Protein contact dermatitis is an allergic skin reaction induced principally by proteins of either animal or plant origin. The clinical presentation is that of a chronic dermatitis, and it is often difficult to differentiate between allergic contact dermatitis and other eczematous dermatoses. One distinguishing clinical feature is that acute flares of pruritus, urticaria, edema, or vesiculation are noted minutes after contact with the causative substances. Additionally, the patch-test result is typically negative, and the scratch- or prick-test result is positive. The pathogenesis of protein contact dermatitis is unclear but may involve a type I (immunoglobulin E [IgE], immediate) hypersensitivity reaction, type IV (cell-mediated delayed) hypersensitivity reaction, and/or a delayed reaction due to IgE-bearing Langerhans' cells. Management involves avoidance of the allergen.

  1. Pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.L. Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections with Salmonella serotypes are a major cause of food-borne diseases worldwide. Animal models other than the mouse have been employed for the study of nontyphoidal Salmonella infections because the murine model is not suitable for the study of Salmonella-induced diarrhea. The microbe has developed mechanisms to exploit the host cell machinery to its own purpose. Bacterial proteins delivered directly into the host cell cytosol cause cytoskeletal changes and interfere with host cell signaling pathways, which ultimately enhance disease manifestation. Recently, marked advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular interactions between Salmonella serotypes and their hosts. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enteritis.

  2. Origin and pathogenesis of antiphospholipid antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Celli

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL are a heterogeneous group of antibodies that are detected in the serum of patients with a variety of conditions, including autoimmune (systemic lupus erythematosus, infectious (syphilis, AIDS and lymphoproliferative disorders (paraproteinemia, myeloma, lymphocytic leukemias. Thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, recurrent fetal loss and other clinical complications are currently associated with a subgroup of aPL designating the antiphospholipid syndrome. In contrast, aPL from patients with infectious disorders are not associated with any clinical manifestation. These findings led to increased interest in the origin and pathogenesis of aPL. Here we present the clinical features of the antiphospholipid syndrome and review the origin of aPL, the characteristics of experimentally induced aPL and their historical background. Within this context, we discuss the most probable pathogenic mechanisms induced by these antibodies.

  3. Foodborne Campylobacter: Infections, Metabolism, Pathogenesis and Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon V. R. Epps

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter species are a leading cause of bacterial-derived foodborne illnesses worldwide. The emergence of this bacterial group as a significant causative agent of human disease and their propensity to carry antibiotic resistance elements that allows them to resist antibacterial therapy make them a serious public health threat. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are considered to be the most important enteropathogens of this genus and their ability to colonize and survive in a wide variety of animal species and habitats make them extremely difficult to control. This article reviews the historical and emerging importance of this bacterial group and addresses aspects of the human infections they cause, their metabolism and pathogenesis, and their natural reservoirs in order to address the need for appropriate food safety regulations and interventions.

  4. Pathogenesis of Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad A. Abdul-Ghani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is manifested by decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and results from impaired insulin signaling and multiple post-receptor intracellular defects including impaired glucose transport, glucose phosphorylation, and reduced glucose oxidation and glycogen synthesis. Insulin resistance is a core defect in type 2 diabetes, it is also associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Recent studies have reported a mitochondrial defect in oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle in variety of insulin resistant states. In this review, we summarize the cellular and molecular defects that contribute to the development of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  5. Foodborne Campylobacter: Infections, Metabolism, Pathogenesis and Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Sharon V. R.; Harvey, Roger B.; Hume, Michael E.; Phillips, Timothy D.; Anderson, Robin C.; Nisbet, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter species are a leading cause of bacterial-derived foodborne illnesses worldwide. The emergence of this bacterial group as a significant causative agent of human disease and their propensity to carry antibiotic resistance elements that allows them to resist antibacterial therapy make them a serious public health threat. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are considered to be the most important enteropathogens of this genus and their ability to colonize and survive in a wide variety of animal species and habitats make them extremely difficult to control. This article reviews the historical and emerging importance of this bacterial group and addresses aspects of the human infections they cause, their metabolism and pathogenesis, and their natural reservoirs in order to address the need for appropriate food safety regulations and interventions. PMID:24287853

  6. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anisia J.; Benitez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity. PMID:26845681

  7. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisia J Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity.

  8. [Traction maculopathies--pathogenesis and diagnostics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylegała, Edward; Woyna-Orlewicz, Anna; Piłat, Jarosław; Teper, Sławomir; Ludyga, Aneta

    2006-01-01

    Traction maculopathies are a group of age-related degenerative diseases characterized by pathology of vitreomacular interface including idiopathic epimacular membranes, vitreomacular traction syndrome and idiopathic macular hole. The disorders develop due to mechanical forces caused by focal condensation or incomplete detachement of vitreous and shrinkage of pathological membranes. The forces can be tangential to retinal surface in epiretinal membranes, anterior-posterior in vitreomacular traction syndrome and oblique (trampoline) in idiopathic macular hole. Authors discuss pathogenesis and diagnostics of traction maculopathies with use of optical coherence tomography and microperimetry, based on current literature. This work presents also idiopathic macular hole classification with use of optical coherence tomography images compared with biomicroscopic classification by Gass.

  9. Pathogenesis of diabetic cerebral vascular diseasecomplication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren-Shi Xu

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most potent independentrisk factors for the development of diabetic cerebralvascular disease (CVD). Many evidences suggested thathyperglycemia caused excess free fatty acids, the lossof endothelium-derived nitric oxide, insulin resistance,the prothrombotic state, endothelial dysfunction,the abnormal release of endothelial vasoactivators,vascular smooth muscle dysfunction, oxidative stress,and the downregulation of miRs participated in vesselgeneration and recovery as well as the balance ofendotheliocytes. In turn, these abnormalities, mainly viaphosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, mitogen-activated proteinkinase, polyol, hexosamine, protein kinase C activation,and increased generation of advanced glycosylation endproducts pathway, play an important role in inducingdiabetic CVD complication. A deeper comprehensionof pathogenesis producing diabetic CVD could offerbase for developing new therapeutic ways preventingdiabetic CVD complications, therefore, in the paper wemainly reviewed present information about the possiblepathogenesis of diabetic CVD complication.

  10. Pathogenesis and Molecular Mechanisms of Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Shriddha; Lei, Jun; Pekosz, Andrew; Klein, Sabra; Burd, Irina

    2016-09-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is one of the most important emerging viruses of 2016. A developing outbreak in the Americas has demonstrated an association between the virus and serious clinical manifestations, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults and congenital malformations in infants born to infected mothers. Pathogenesis and mechanisms of neurologic or immune disease by ZIKV have not been clearly delineated. However, several pathways have been described to explain viral involvement in brain and immune system as well as other organ systems such as eye, skin, and male and female reproductive tracts. ZIKV activates toll-like receptor 3 and several pathways have been described to explain the mechanisms at a molecular level. The mechanism of microcephaly has been more difficult to demonstrate experimentally, likely due to the multifactorial and complex nature of the phenotype. This article provides an overview of existing literature on ZIKV pathogenicity and possible molecular mechanisms of disease as outlined to date.

  11. Etiology and pathogenesis of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, Anthony H V

    2009-08-01

    The etiology of Parkinson disease (PD) is multifactorial and is likely to involve different causes in different patients. Several different genes have been identified as causes of familial PD, including alpha-synuclein gene mutations and multiplications, and mutations of parkin, PINK1, DJ1, and LRRK2. The biochemical consequences of these mutations have served to reinforce the relevance of the pathways to pathogenesis previously characterized, for example, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and protein misfolding and aggregation. The recognition that glucocerebrosidase mutations represent a significant risk factor for PD has focused attention on lysosomal function and autophagy as relevant to PD. Several environmental factors have also been shown to influence the risk for PD, although odds ratios remain relatively modest. Specific toxins can cause dopaminergic cell death in man and animals, but they probably have limited relevance to the etiology of PD.

  12. Lacrimal Sac Dacryoliths-Pathogenesis and Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Özer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Main objective of the present study is to review the literature about the chemical composition and the formation of dacryoliths. Dacryoliths are calculi of the lacrimal system observed incidentally during dacryocystorhinostomy. Theories about the formation of dacryoliths mainly suppose that dacryoliths are simply a secondary phenomenon resulting from a lacrimal pathway obstruction and accumulation of debris. Inflammation caused by fungi, most commonly Candida albicans, an eyelash within the sac, or adrenalin use are also considered to be potential causes. It was also reported that the unstable concentrations of electrolytes rather than the supersaturation of some electrolytes are related to the pathogenesis of dacryoliths. Chemical analysis of the dacryoliths in studies had revealed calcium, magnesium, potassium, sulfur, and some phosphorus. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric investigations demonstrated organic proteins and, to a much lesser extent, inorganic material. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 186-9

  13. Pathogenesis of Thromboembolism and Endovascular Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Behravesh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, a disease that includes deep venous thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE, is associated with high mortality, morbidity, and costs. It can result in long-term complications that include postthrombotic syndrome (PTS adding to its morbidity. VTE affects 1/1000 patients, costs $13.5 billion annually to treat, and claims 100,000 lives annually in the US. The current standard of care for VTE is anticoagulation, though thrombolysis may be performed in patients with PE and threatened limb. This review discusses pathogenesis and medical treatment of VTE and then focuses on endovascular treatment modalities. Mechanical- and catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT is discussed, as well as patient selection criteria, and complications. The first prospective study (CaVenT comparing CDT with anticoagulation alone in acute DVT, despite study shortcomings, corroborates the existing literature indicating improved outcomes with CDT. The potential of the ongoing prospective, multicenter, randomized ATTRACT trial is also highlighted.

  14. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anisia J; Benitez, Jorge A

    2016-02-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity.

  15. Snapshot of HIV pathogenesis in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nitin; K; SAKSENA; Bin; WANG; Megan; STEAIN; Rong; Ge; YANG; Lin; Qi; ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Several reviews have focused on the nature of HIV infection and its spread in various geographical regions of China.In contrast, this review provides a comprehensive update on the prevalence of multiple HIV-1 subtypes, consequent emergence of recombinant and novel forms of HIV-1 in China, and the implications this may have on HIV diversity and the development of effective vaccines. In addition it also examines the dissemination of primary drug resistance in therapy na(i)ve patients, as well as co-infections with two other important viruses-hepatitis B and C. The main purpose of this review is to provide a current snapshot of HIV-1 pathogenesis in China and possibly shed some light on the future of HIV evolution, and potential challenges for future vaccine and anti-retroviral therapeutics against HIV strains in this area.

  16. Pathogenesis of Thromboembolism and Endovascular Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behravesh, Sasan; Hoang, Peter; Nanda, Alisha; Wallace, Alex; Sheth, Rahul A.; Deipolyi, Amy R.; Memic, Adnan; Naidu, Sailendra

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), a disease that includes deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is associated with high mortality, morbidity, and costs. It can result in long-term complications that include postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) adding to its morbidity. VTE affects 1/1000 patients, costs $13.5 billion annually to treat, and claims 100,000 lives annually in the US. The current standard of care for VTE is anticoagulation, though thrombolysis may be performed in patients with PE and threatened limb. This review discusses pathogenesis and medical treatment of VTE and then focuses on endovascular treatment modalities. Mechanical- and catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is discussed, as well as patient selection criteria, and complications. The first prospective study (CaVenT) comparing CDT with anticoagulation alone in acute DVT, despite study shortcomings, corroborates the existing literature indicating improved outcomes with CDT. The potential of the ongoing prospective, multicenter, randomized ATTRACT trial is also highlighted. PMID:28154761

  17. Innate immunity in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, Cheryl M

    2011-12-01

    Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated inflammatory skin disorder. T helper(h)1 and Th17 lymphocytes contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis through the release of inflammatory cytokines that promote further recruitment of immune cells, keratinocyte proliferation and sustained inflammation. The innate immune system is the first line of defence against infection and plays a crucial role in the initiation of the adaptive immune response. The presence of innate immune cells and their products in psoriatic skin plaques suggests a role for innate immunity in this disease. In addition, the innate immune system can direct the development of pathogenic Th cells in psoriasis. In this article, we will summarise the role of the innate immune system in psoriasis with particular emphasis on the role of cytokines, signalling pathways and cells of the innate immune system.

  18. [Pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranami, Toshimasa; Yamamura, Takashi

    2013-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is considered to be a demyelinating autoimmune disorder in the peripheral nervous system. Concerning cellular immune response, activity of IFN-gamma producing Th1 and IL-17 producing Th17 cells might be accelerated in patients with CIDP, while regulatory function of CD4+ CD25(high) Foxp3+ regulatory T cells might be diminished. Humoral immune responses against several myelin components such as myelin protein zero and gangliosides such as GM1 might be also induced in a part of patients with CIDP. Besides, growing body of evidences suggest that immune response against several molecules expressed in the noncompact myelin might be involved in the pathogenesis of CIDP.

  19. Pathogenesis of Goodpasture syndrome: a molecular perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Neilson, Eric G; Hudson, Billy G

    2003-11-01

    Goodpasture (GP) syndrome is a form of anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease, in which autoantibodies bind to alpha3(IV) collagen in GBM causing rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and pulmonary hemorrhage. The conformational GP epitopes have been mapped to 2 regions within the noncollagenous (NC1) domain of the alpha3(IV) chain. Recently, we described the molecular organization of the autoantigen in the native alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen network of the GBM. The crystal structure of the NC1 domain has revealed how the GP epitopes are sequestered in the native GBM. Further insight into the pathogenesis of disease has been obtained from better animal models. These advances provide a foundation for the development of new specific therapies.

  20. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of chikungunya pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Fok-Moon; Ng, Lisa F P

    2015-08-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus that causes chikungunya fever, a disease characterized by the onset of fever and rashes, with arthralgia as its hallmark symptom. CHIKV has re-emerged over the past decade, causing numerous outbreaks around the world. Since late 2013, CHIKV has reached the shores of the Americas, causing more than a million cases of infection. Despite concentrated efforts to understand the pathogenesis of the disease, further outbreaks remain a threat. This review highlights important findings regarding CHIKV-associated immunopathogenesis and offers important insights into future directions. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "Chikungunya discovers the New World." Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Pathogenesis and Clinical Examination of Autoinflammatory Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Hiroaki

    2015-10-01

    Autoinflammatory syndrome is characterized by: 1) episodes of seemingly unprovoked inflammation, 2) the absence of a high titer of autoantibodies or auto-reactive T cells, and 3) an inborn error of innate immunity. In this decade, many autoinflammatory syndromes have been reported in Japan, and so many Japanese physicians have become aware of this syndrome. Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes present with excessive systemic inflammation including fever, rashes, arthritis, and organ-specific inflammation and are caused by defects in single genes encoding proteins that regulate innate inflammatory pathways. The main monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes are familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), Blau syndrome, and syndrome of pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA). We diagnosed these syndromes as clinical manifestations and performed genetic screening. Many serum cytokines are elevated in patients with autoinflammatory syndrome, but this is not disease-specific. The pathogeneses of many autoinflammatory syndromes are known to be related to inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that serve as a platform for caspase 1 activation and interleukin-1β(IL-1β) and IL-18 maturation. Especially, NLRP3 inflammasomes may play a crucial role in the initiation and progression of FMF and CAPS. Recently, it was reported that NETs (neutrophil extracellular traps) derived from neutrophils may also play an important role in the pathogenesis of FMF. In the future, we hope to discover new clinical examinations which can provide evidence of inflammasome activation independent of genetic screening. In this issue, I introduce autoinflammatory syndromes and discuss the pathogenesis and clinical examination of these syndromes.

  2. Irritable bowel syndrome: Diagnosis and pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdy El-Salhy

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that considerably reduces the quality of life.It further represents an economic burden on society due to the high consumption of healthcare resources and the non-productivity of IBS patients.The diagnosis of IBS is based on symptom assessment and the Rome Ⅲ criteria.A combination of the Rome Ⅲ criteria,a physical examination,blood tests,gastroscopy and colonoscopy with biopsies is believed to be necessary for diagnosis.Duodenal chromogranin A cell density is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of IBS.The pathogenesis of IBS seems to be multifactorial,with the following factors playing a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS:heritability and genetics,dietary/intestinal microbiota,low-grade inflammation,and disturbances in the neuroendocrine system (NES) of the gut.One hypothesis proposes that the cause of IBS is an altered NES,which would cause abnormal GI motility,secretions and sensation.All of these abnormalities are characteristic of IBS.Alterations in the NES could be the result of one or more of the following:genetic factors,dietary intake,intestinal flora,or low-grade inflammation.Post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease-associated IBS (IBD-IBS) represent a considerable subset of IBS cases.Patients with PI-and IBD-IBS exhibit low-grade mucosal inflammation,as well as abnormalities in the NES of the gut.

  3. Research advances in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Hu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has been developing rapidly in recent years and has become one of the most common liver diseases. However, its pathogenesis remains unclear, and there are no widely accepted therapeutic regimens. NAFLD has a complex pathogenesis with multiple factors involved, including insulin resistance, oxidative stress, bile acid metabolic disorders, and autophagy. This article reviews the pathogenesis of NAFLD in order to provide a reference for further research and clinical treatment in the future.

  4. Native pears of Sardinia affect Penicillium expansum pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubaiu, L; Azara, E; Ladu, G; Venditti, T; D'Hallewin, G

    2013-01-01

    affect P. expansum pathogenesis and inhibit patulin production. Further researches are necessary to assess the mechanism of this biocontrol activity.

  5. Minireview: Inflammation and Obesity Pathogenesis: The Hypothalamus Heats Up

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thaler, Joshua P; Schwartz, Michael W

    2010-01-01

    .... In addition to its implications for obesity pathogenesis, this hypothesis suggests that centrally targeted antiinflammatory therapies may prove effective in prevention and treatment of this disorder...

  6. [Endothelial dysfunction in pathogenesis of duodenal ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparin, A G; Oparin, A A

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that in patients with ulcer associated with Helicobacter pylori (HP) there is a close correlation between the severity of the lesion of gastroduodenal protective mucous barrier and that of endothelial dysfunction manifesting in elevated level of endothelin-1, serum levels of TBK-active products, inhibition of blood flow and narrowing of the celiac trunk. The correlation becomes stronger with expanding contamination of gastroduodenal mucosa with HP. Thus, HP may participate in breaking the protective mucous barrier in endothelial dysfunction.

  7. Naegleria fowleri: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Eddie; Asbill, Scott; Virga, Kris

    2015-11-01

    Naegleria fowleri has generated tremendous media attention over the last 5 years due to several high-profile cases. Several of these cases were followed very closely by the general public. N. fowleri is a eukaryotic, free-living amoeba belonging to the phylum Percolozoa. Naegleria amoebae are ubiquitous in the environment, being found in soil and bodies of freshwater, and feed on bacteria found in those locations. While N. fowleri infection appears to be quite rare compared to other diseases, the clinical manifestations of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis are devastating and nearly always fatal. Due to the rarity of N. fowleri infections in humans, there are no clinical trials to date that assess the efficacy of one treatment regimen over another. Most of the information regarding medication efficacy is based on either case reports or in vitro studies. This review will discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, pharmacotherapy, and prevention of N. fowleri infections in humans, including a brief review of all survivor cases in North America.

  8. Infantile hemangiomas: from pathogenesis to clinical features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenblatt A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Adena Rosenblatt,1 Erin F Mathes,2 Kristina W Rosbe31Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, 2Division of Pediatric Dermatology, Departments of Dermatology and Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, 3Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Infantile hemangiomas (IH are benign vascular tumors consisting of a collection of immature cells, including progenitor stem cells and disorganized blood vessels. They are the most common benign tumors in childhood. Recently, there have been significant, exciting advancements in the understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of infantile hemangiomas, which are discussed in this review. The decision to initiate treatment for IH is based on many factors, including size and location, functional compromise, psychosocial implications, and risks and benefits of the proposed therapy. For most families of children with hemangiomas, education about the natural history of IH and reassurance are often the only "treatment" required. A minority of patients with large, complex lesions or lesions that cause functional compromise require early intervention. These patients and families benefit from a multidisciplinary approach to care in vascular birthmark centers. Ongoing multi-institutional clinical trials will provide further important data on the efficacy and safety of hemangioma treatments.Keywords: progenitor stem cell, glucose transporter 1, PHACES, LUMBAR, infantile hemangioma

  9. Adult zebrafish model for pneumococcal pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saralahti, Anni; Piippo, Hannaleena; Parikka, Mataleena; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Rämet, Mika; Rounioja, Samuli

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a leading cause of community acquired pneumonia, septicemia, and meningitis. Due to incomplete understanding of the host and bacterial factors contributing to these diseases optimal treatment and prevention methods are lacking. In the present study we examined whether the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) can be used to investigate the pathophysiology of pneumococcal diseases. Here we show that both intraperitoneal and intramuscular injections of the pneumococcal strain TIGR4 cause a fulminant, dose-dependent infection in adult zebrafish, while isogenic mutant bacteria lacking the polysaccharide capsule, autolysin, or pneumolysin are attenuated in the model. Infection through the intraperitoneal route is characterized by rapid expansion of pneumococci in the bloodstream, followed by penetration of the blood-brain barrier and progression to meningitis. Using Rag1 mutant zebrafish, which are devoid of somatic recombination and thus lack adaptive immune responses, we show that clearance of pneumococci in adult zebrafish depends mainly on innate immune responses. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that the adult zebrafish can be used as a model for a pneumococcal infection, and that it can be used to study both host and bacterial factors involved in the pathogenesis. However, our results do not support the use of the zebrafish in studies on the role of adaptive immunity in pneumococcal disease or in the development of new pneumococcal vaccines.

  10. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata, E-mail: mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-02-24

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  11. Neisseria prophage repressor implicated in gonococcal pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Nadine; Yu, Chunxiao; McClure, Ryan; Gudino, Cynthia; Reed, George W; Genco, Caroline A

    2013-10-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, can infect and colonize multiple mucosal sites in both men and women. The ability to cope with different environmental conditions requires tight regulation of gene expression. In this study, we identified and characterized a gonococcal transcriptional regulatory protein (Neisseria phage repressor [Npr]) that was previously annotated as a putative gonococcal phage repressor protein. Npr was found to repress transcription of NGNG_00460 to NGNG_00463 (NGNG_00460-00463), an operon present within the phage locus NgoΦ4. Npr binding sites within the NGNG_00460-00463 promoter region were found to overlap the -10 and -35 promoter motifs. A gonococcal npr mutant demonstrated increased adherence to and invasion of human endocervical epithelial cells compared to a wild-type gonococcal strain. Likewise, the gonococcal npr mutant exhibited enhanced colonization in a gonococcal mouse model of mucosal infection. Analysis of the gonococcal npr mutant using RNA sequence (RNA-seq) analysis demonstrated that the Npr regulon is limited to the operon present within the phage locus. Collectively, our studies have defined a new gonococcal phage repressor protein that controls the transcription of genes implicated in gonococcal pathogenesis.

  12. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Nandy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, insulin-like growth factor (IGF, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, epidermal growth factor (EGF, and transforming growth factor (TGF in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  13. Hypertensive Nephrosclerosis Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyrier Alain

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrovasculopathies are an increasing cause of end-stage renal failure. Hypertensive nephroscierosis is an old concept. In fact, the renal vascular lesions corresponding to this term can result from aging or a host of parenchymal renal diseases in the absence of elevated blood pressure. Nephrosclerosis is overdiagnosed. The diagnosis should rest only on renal biopsy, which is not usually done in an elderly patient with chronic renal insufficiency, hypertension and atrophic kidneys. Atherosclerotic renal disease and renal cholesterol crystal embolism are often misdiagnosed for nephro-sclerosis. The classical picture of nephrosclerosis is the patient with primary hypertension accompanied by arterio-and arteriolonephrosclerosis, focal and segmental glomerulo-sclerosis leading to glomerular obsolescence, interstitial fibrosis and inflammatory infiltrates. However, similar lesions can be observed in animal models as well as in some humans, especially blacks, in the absence of, or preceding the onset of hypertension. This suggests that nephrosclerosis might stem from a genetic defect in the renal vascular bed, a defect closely associated with the hypertensive trait. Recent data regarding the link between low birthweight and hypertension of early onset might have bearing on future developments in understanding the pathogenesis of nephrosclerosis. Treatment pursues two goals: normalizing blood pressure according to international recommendations and retarding sclerosis with a regimen essentially based on angiotensin II antagonists.

  14. Zika virus genome biology and molecular pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anyou; Thurmond, Stephanie; Islas, Leonel; Hui, Kingyung; Hai, Rong

    2017-03-22

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging RNA virus in the widespread Flavivirus genus. Recently, ZIKV has rapidly spread around the world and has been implicated in human disease, including neurological disorders, triggering public and scientific attention. Understanding how ZIKV causes disease is the highest priority, yet little is known about this virus. Here we examine the currently published data from ZIKV studies to provide the latest understanding of ZIKV genome biology and molecular pathogenesis. The ZIKV genome evolved rapidly from the Flavivirus genus and diverged from the members of this genus, even within the dengue virus cluster to which ZIKV belongs. Genome variations and divergences also exist among ZIKV strains/isolates. These genome divergences might account for the uniqueness of Zika disease. ZIKV infection activates not only the antiviral immune response but also the pro-inflammatory responses associated with disease symptoms. Strikingly, ZIKV activates protein complexes that are functionally associated with disease process, such as glial cell activation and proliferation (for example, Toll-like receptors), apoptosis and cell death, and inflammation. The activation of these complexes may critically contribute to Zika disease. The novel insights into ZIKV genome divergence and disease mechanisms summarized in this review will help accelerate the development of anti-ZIKV strategies.

  15. [Transthyretin: it's miracle function and pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Yukio

    2009-03-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) was previously called prealbumin because the band it formed on agarose gel electrophoresis at pH 8.6 was at the prealbumin position. However, it has been well documented that TTR of rodents does not show a prealbumin position on electrophoresis. Now, its name describes its function, binding to retinol binding protein (RBP) and T4. The serum concentration of the protein is 20-40 mg/dl, and TTR forms a tetramer. The plasma half life of the protein is 1.9 days. TTR is synthesized by the liver, retina, pancreas, and choroid plexus. In cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), it is the second most abundant protein, and is considered as an important protein in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, depression, and lead intoxication. In addition, TTR is a tryptophan-rich protein, it is used as one of the nutrition assessment proteins, it acts as an anti acute phase protein, and its plasma concentration decreases during inflammation and bacterial infection. Since TTR is a highly amyloidogenic protein because it contains a beta-sheet structure, it becomes a precursor protein in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy(FAP). Moreover, TTR plays important roles in various CNS disorders, diabetes melitus, and lipid metabolism.

  16. Pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keulen, L J M; Vromans, M E W; Dolstra, C H; Bossers, A; van Zijderveld, F G

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep was studied by immunohistochemical detection of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in the gastrointestinal, lymphoid and neural tissues following oral inoculation with BSE brain homogenate. First accumulation of PrP(Sc) was detected after 6 months in the tonsil and the ileal Peyer's patches. At 9 months postinfection, PrP(Sc) accumulation involved all gut-associated lymphoid tissues and lymph nodes as well as the spleen. At this time point, PrP(Sc) accumulation in the peripheral neural tissues was first seen in the enteric nervous system of the caudal jejunum and ileum and in the coeliac-mesenteric ganglion. In the central nervous system, PrP(Sc) was first detected in the dorsal motor nucleus of the nervus Vagus in the medulla oblongata and in the intermediolateral column in the spinal cord segments T7-L1. At subsequent time points, PrP(Sc) was seen to spread within the lymphoid system to also involve all non-gut-associated lymphoid tissues. In the enteric nervous system, further spread of PrP(Sc) involved the neural plexi along the entire gastrointestinal tract and in the CNS the complete neuraxis. These findings indicate a spread of the BSE agent in sheep from the enteric nervous system through parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves to the medulla oblongata and the spinal cord.

  17. JNK pathway in osteosarcoma: pathogenesis and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Sheng; Deng, Zhen-Han; Zeng, Chao; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2016-10-01

    The c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase super family. JNK can phosphorylate a number of activator protein-1 components, activating several transcription factors, and thus, JNK signaling pathway is being involved in several carcinogenic mechanisms. In this study, we have reviewed the recent updates of the association of JNK pathway with osteosarcoma (OS), which is one of the most common and aggressive bone malignancies. In this review, we have explored the databases like PubMed, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, etc., and collected the most relevant papers of JNK signaling pathway involved in the pathogenesis and therapeutics of OS. Evidence showed that JNK is a master protein kinase that plays an important role in osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Interesting reports showed that chemical JNK inhibitors reduce OS cell proliferation and metastasis. Many of the components of this pathway have now been identified and the application of JNK inhibitors has been proven to work in vivo in human and in animal models; however, JNK pathway has not been translated into clinical use. Therapeutic interventions of potent and selective inhibitors of JNK might provide promising therapeutic approaches for the treatment of OS, and could improve the survival rate and quality of life of OS patients.

  18. Pain and the pathogenesis of biceps tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Elise B; Thankam, Finosh G; Dilisio, Matthew F; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-01-01

    Biceps tendinopathy is a relatively common ailment that typically presents as pain, tenderness, and weakness in the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii. Though it is often associated with degenerative processes of the rotator cuff and the joint, this is not always the case, thus, the etiology remains considerably unknown. There has been recent interest in elucidating the pathogenesis of tendinopathy, since it can be an agent of chronic pain, and is difficult to manage. The purpose of this article is to critically evaluate relevant published research that reflects the current understanding of pain and how it relates to biceps tendinopathy. A review of the literature was conducted to create an organized picture of how pain arises and manifests itself, and how the mechanism behind biceps tendinopathy possibly results in pain. Chronic pain is thought to arise from neurogenic inflammation, central pain sensitization, excitatory nerve augmentation, inhibitory nerve loss, and/or dysregulation of supraspinal structures; thus, the connections of these theories to the ones regarding the generation of biceps tendinopathy, particularly the neural theory, are discussed. Pain mediators such as tachykinins, CGRP, and alarmins, in addition to nervous system ion channels, are highlighted as possible avenues for research in tendinopathy pain. Recognition of the nociceptive mechanisms and molecular of biceps tendinopathy might aid in the development of novel treatment strategies for managing anterior shoulder pain due to a symptomatic biceps tendon. PMID:28670360

  19. Pathogenesis of spinally mediated hyperalgesia in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Khara M; Jiang, Yun; Svensson, Camilla I; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2007-06-01

    Hyperalgesia to noxious stimuli is accompanied by increased spinal cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 protein in diabetic rats. The present studies were initiated to establish causality between increased spinal COX-2 activity and hyperalgesia during diabetes and to assess the potential involvement of polyol pathway activity in the pathogenesis of spinally mediated hyperalgesia. Rats with 1, 2, or 4 weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes exhibited significantly increased levels of spinal COX-2 protein and activity, along with exaggerated paw flinching in response to 0.5% paw formalin injection. Increased flinching of diabetic rats was attenuated by intrathecal pretreatment with a selective COX-2 inhibitor immediately before formalin injection, confirming the involvement of COX-2 activity in diabetic hyperalgesia. Chronic treatment with insulin or ICI222155, an aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) previously shown to prevent spinal polyol accumulation and formalin-evoked hyperalgesia in diabetic rats, prevented elevated spinal COX-2 protein and activity in diabetic rats. In contrast, the ARI IDD676 had no effect on spinal polyol accumulation, elevated spinal COX-2, or hyperalgesia to paw formalin injection. In the spinal cord, aldose reductase immunoreactivity was present solely in oligodendrocytes, which also contained COX-2 immunoreactivity. Polyol pathway flux in spinal oligodendrocytes provides a pathogenic mechanism linking hyperglycemia to hyperalgesia in diabetic rats.

  20. The pathogenesis of bornaviral diseases in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizard, Ian; Ball, Judith; Stoica, George; Payne, Susan

    2016-12-01

    Natural bornavirus infections and their resulting diseases are largely restricted to horses and sheep in Central Europe. The disease also occurs naturally in cats, and can be induced experimentally in laboratory rodents and numerous other mammals. Borna disease virus-1 (BoDV-1), the cause of most cases of mammalian Borna disease, is a negative-stranded RNA virus that replicates within the nucleus of target cells. It causes severe, often lethal, encephalitis in susceptible species. Recent events, especially the discovery of numerous new species of bornaviruses in birds and a report of an acute, lethal bornaviral encephalitis in humans, apparently acquired from squirrels, have revived interest in this remarkable family of viruses. The clinical manifestations of the bornaviral diseases are highly variable. Thus, in addition to acute lethal encephalitis, they can cause persistent neurologic disease associated with diverse behavioral changes. They also cause a severe retinitis resulting in blindness. In this review, we discuss both the pathological lesions observed in mammalian bornaviral disease and the complex pathogenesis of the neurologic disease. Thus infected neurons may be destroyed by T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. They may die as a result of excessive inflammatory cytokine release from microglia. They may also die as a result of a 'glutaminergic storm' due to a failure of infected astrocytes to regulate brain glutamate levels.

  1. [About etiology and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitruk, S K

    2013-01-01

    On the ground own researches and researches of other authors etiology and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis are proved and refuted existing concept about leading role of disturbance of lipid exchange and atherogenicity of lipoproteins of low and very low density. Established basic etiological factors of damage intima of artery and reason of penetration of lipoproteins in intima after her damage. Is determined that development and progression of atherosclerosis do not depend also from quantitative content of lipoproteins of low density in blood and from normalization of them under influence of drugs. According to our researches atherosclerosis is the polyetiological chronic disease basis of pathogeny which is infringement of blood supply (chronic microcirculatory insufficiency) in arterial wall causing damage of it, and in first place, damage of intima with her most vulnerable microcirculation; inflammation intima hence influence of endogenous and exogenous factors; destruction of antiaggregatic and fibrinolytic properties of intima in places of her damage; formation atherosclerotic plaque with level-by-level imposing of lipoproteins in result of cyclic process of restoration or balance between coagulation and anticoagulation of blood systems.

  2. Achondroplasia: pathogenesis and implications for future treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laederich, Melanie B; Horton, William A

    2010-08-01

    Although the genetic defect underlying achondroplasia has been known for over a decade, no effective therapies to stimulate bone growth have emerged. Here we review the recent literature and summarize the molecular mechanisms underlying disease pathology and examine their potential as therapeutic targets. Currently used preclinical models are discussed in the context of recent advances with a special focus on C-type natriuretic peptide. Research on the mutation in Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3) that causes achondroplasia suggests that disease results from increased signal transduction from the mutant receptor. Thus, current therapeutic strategies have focused on reducing signals emanating from FGFR3. First-generation therapies directly targeting FGFR3, such as kinase inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies, designed for targeting FGFR3 in cancer, are still in the preclinical phase and have yet to translate into the management of achondroplasia. Counteracting signal transduction pathways downstream of FGFR3 holds promise with the discovery that administration of C-type natriuretic peptide to achondroplastic mice ameliorates their clinical phenotype. However, more research into long-term effectiveness and safety of this strategy is needed. Direct targeting of therapeutic agents to growth plate cartilage may enhance efficacy and minimize side effects of these and future therapies. Current research into the pathogenesis of achondroplasia has expanded our understanding of the mechanisms of FGFR3-induced disease and has increased the number of approaches that we may use to potentially correct it. Further research is needed to validate these approaches in preclinical models of achondroplasia.

  3. Pathogenesis of Multiple Organ Failure in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a severe critical illness syndrome that arises from infectious insults. While the host immune system is generally beneficial, an overshooting and unregulated immune response can cause serious organ tissue injury. During sepsis, systemic hypotension, disturbed perfusion of the microcirculation, and direct tissue-toxicity caused by inflammatory immune reaction can occur and contribute to organ failure. The failure of two or more vital organ systems is termed multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and resembles a very critical condition associated with high morbidity and mortality. Importantly, no specific treatment strategy exists to efficiently prevent the development of MODS during sepsis. In this review, we aim to identify the relevant molecular immunological pathways involved in the pathogenesis of MODS during sepsis. We believe that a detailed understanding of this mechanism is necessary for the development of new treatment approaches for septic patients. In particular, knowledge of the endogenous regulators keeping the balance between necessary immune system activation to combat infections and prevention of host tissue damage would greatly improve the chances for the development of effective interventions.

  4. Premature ovarian insufficiency: Pathogenesis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna J Fenton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term premature ovarian insufficiency (POI describes a continuum of declining ovarian function in a young woman, resulting in an earlier than average menopause. It is a term that reflects the variable nature of the condition and is substantially less emotive than the formerly used "premature ovarian failure" which signaled a single event in time. Contrary to the decline in the age of menarche seen over the last 3-4 decades there has been no similar change in the age of menopause. In developed nations, the average age for cessation of menstrual cycles is 50-52 years. The age is younger among women from developing nations. Much has been written about POI despite a lack of good data on the incidence of this condition. It is believed that 1% of women under the age of 40 years and 0.1% under the age of 30 years will develop POI. Research is increasingly providing information about the pathogenesis and treatments are being developed to better preserve ovarian function during cancer treatment and to improve fertility options. This narrative review summarizes the current literature to provide an approach to best practice management of POI.

  5. The aetiology and pathogenesis of craniofacial deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poswillo, D

    1988-01-01

    Craniofacial malformations have been recorded since time immemorial. While observational studies have assisted in the recognition of syndromes, little light has been shed on the causal mechanisms which interfere with craniofacial development. Animal studies in which malformations occur spontaneously or have been induced by teratogenic agents have permitted step-by-step investigation of such common deformities as cleft lip and palate. The role of the ectomesenchymal cells of the neural crest and the possible phenomenon of disorganized spontaneous cell death are described in relation to lip clefts. The factors associated with isolated cleft palate, Pierre Robin syndrome and submucous clefts are described by reference to animal models. The haemorrhagic accident preceding the onset of craniofacial microsomia is discussed as is the distinctly different phenomenon of disturbance to the migration or differentiation of neural crest cells in the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome. The more severe anomalies of the calvarium such as plagiocephaly, Crouzon and Apert syndrome still defy explanation, in the absence of an appropriate animal system to study; some thoughts on the likely mechanism of abnormal sutural fusions are discussed.

  6. Pathogenesis of immune-mediated neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune neuropathies occur when immunologic tolerance to myelin or axonal antigens is lost. Even though the triggering factors and the underling immunopathology have not been fully elucidated in all neuropathy subsets, immunological studies on the patients' nerves, transfer experiments with the patients' serum or intraneural injections, and molecular fingerprinting on circulating autoantibodies or autoreactive T cells, indicate that cellular and humoral factors, either independently or in concert with each other, play a fundamental role in their cause. The review is focused on the main subtypes of autoimmune neuropathies, mainly the Guillain-Barré syndrome(s), the Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP), the Multifocal Motor Neuropathy (MMN), and the IgM anti-MAG-antibody mediated neuropathy. It addresses the factors associated with breaking tolerance, examines the T cell activation process including co-stimulatory molecules and key cytokines, and discusses the role of antibodies against peripheral nerve glycolipids or glycoproteins. Special attention is given to the newly identified proteins in the nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions as potential antigenic targets that could best explain conduction failure and rapid recovery. New biological agents against T cells, cytokines, B cells, transmigration and transduction molecules involved in their immunopathologic network, are discussed as future therapeutic options in difficult cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis.

  7. Obesity, cholesterol metabolism, and breast cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Donald P; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E; Chang, Ching-Yi; Norris, John D; Guyton, John R; Nelson, Erik R

    2014-09-15

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition, significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor in macrophages and possibly other cells, is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. Cancer Res; 74(18); 4976-82. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Fibromyalgia Pathogenesis and Treatment Options Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Steven; Caldwell, William; Gritsenko, Karina

    2016-04-01

    This review article presents and summarizes up-to-date literature on the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, pathophysiological mechanisms, and treatment options for fibromyalgia patients. First, the most recent diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, as put forth by the American College of Rheumatology will be summarized. Clinical features, including chronic widespread pain, hyperalgesia, mood disorders, anxiety, and disturbed sleep patterns will be explored in-depth. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of fibromyalgia involves alterations in multiple ascending and descending central nervous system pathways, as well as peripheral pathways, leading to heightened pain sensitivity. Risk factors have been studied extensively, and the most recent research focuses on various genetic influences and the contributions of stress and poor sleep. Lastly, the discussion in this article focuses on treatment options for fibromyalgia; some have been mainstay options for many years. Pharmacological agents include tricyclic antidepressants, anti-epileptic drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitors, as well as some investigational agents. The evidence behind non-pharmacologic treatments, including massage therapy, exercise, and acupuncture, are discussed.

  9. Systemic sclerosis: from pathogenesis to targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) leads to morbidity and mortality through a combination of inflammation, fibrosis and vascular damage leading to internal organ complications affecting the heart, lung, kidneys and bowel. More than half of those diagnosed ultimately die from the disease. Current treatments focus on broad spectrum immunosuppression or organ-based therapy for complication such as lung fibrosis, pulmonary or systemic hypertension. Targeting peptide mediators such as endothelin-1 have already led to licensed effective therapies for SSc vasculopathy. Outcomes are improving but as well as providing a major clinical challenge there are great opportunities for research translation that can be expected to improve understanding of the pathogenesis of SSc and also develop better and more targeted therapy. Key pathways and mediators can be identified within the skin and blood vessels and these are now being examined in early stage clinical trials. Promising results are emerging from targeting cytokine signalling, including IL-6, and from other immune-inflammatory therapies including lipid mediators such as LPA1. Other approaches to modulate TGFbeta and other profibrotic pathways also have potential although safety and toxicity remain to be determined. Since many profibrotic pathways have important physiological roles the assessment of safety and toxicity will be paramount. Nevertheless, advances in understanding the interplay between different pathological processes and progress in clinical trial design and patients stratification mean that targeted therapies are emerging and likely to be further developed and refined to have application in other important clinical contexts such as lung fibrosis.

  10. [Etiology and pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukáš, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Zdenek Mařatka has been the first physician, who had brought a new information for the Czech medical community with topic of inflammatory bowel diseases, which had been systematic studied for him. He had prepared an original theory - two component hypothesis about origin of ulcerative colitis, which had been developed and innovated by him for long time. From the international point of view, Mařatka has had an extraordinary impact and significant contribution for recognition of ulcerative colitis and Crohn´s disease. Despite the fact that the true origin of ulcerative colitis and Crohn´s disease (UC) still remain elusive, basic as well as clinical research bring many new data on etiology and pathogenesis of this inflammatory condition. It seems clear that IBD originate from interaction of several intrinsic and extrinsic factors that contribute individually in a particular patient. Among internal factors the genes play an important role, because its influence on the mucosal immunity system and immunological response. Among the external factors importance are recognized the gut microbiota content, cigarette smoking and psychological stress.

  11. Obesity, Cholesterol Metabolism and Breast Cancer Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Donald P.; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T.; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E.; Chang, Ching-yi; Norris, John D.; Guyton, John R.; Nelson, Erik R.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor (LXR) in macrophages and possibly other cells is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor (ER) agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. PMID:25060521

  12. Apoptosis in cancer: from pathogenesis to treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Rebecca SY

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Apoptosis is an ordered and orchestrated cellular process that occurs in physiological and pathological conditions. It is also one of the most studied topics among cell biologists. An understanding of the underlying mechanism of apoptosis is important as it plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In some, the problem is due to too much apoptosis, such as in the case of degenerative diseases while in others, too little apoptosis is the culprit. Cancer is one of the scenarios where too little apoptosis occurs, resulting in malignant cells that will not die. The mechanism of apoptosis is complex and involves many pathways. Defects can occur at any point along these pathways, leading to malignant transformation of the affected cells, tumour metastasis and resistance to anticancer drugs. Despite being the cause of problem, apoptosis plays an important role in the treatment of cancer as it is a popular target of many treatment strategies. The abundance of literature suggests that targeting apoptosis in cancer is feasible. However, many troubling questions arise with the use of new drugs or treatment strategies that are designed to enhance apoptosis and critical tests must be passed before they can be used safely in human subjects.

  13. Raynaud's phenomenon: from molecular pathogenesis to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prete, Marcella; Fatone, Maria Celeste; Favoino, Elvira; Perosa, Federico

    2014-06-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is a well defined clinical syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of digital vasospasm triggered by exposure to physical/chemical or emotional stress. RP has been classified as primary or secondary, depending on whether it occurs as an isolated condition (pRP) or is associated to an underlying disease, mainly a connective tissue disease (CTD-RP). In both cases, it manifests with unique "triple" (pallor, cyanosis and erythema), or "double" color changes. pRP is usually a benign condition, while sRP can evolve and be complicated by acral digital ulcers and gangrene, which may require surgical treatment. The pathogenesis of RP has not yet been entirely clarified, nor is it known whether autoantibodies have a role in RP. Even so, recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology have highlighted novel potential therapeutic targets. The aim of this review is to discuss the etiology, epidemiology, risk factors, clinical manifestations, recently disclosed pathogenic mechanisms underlying RP and their correlation with the available therapeutic options, focusing primarily on pRP and CTD-RP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Prion Pathogenesis is Independent of Caspase-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Andrew D; Hetz, Claudio; Yi, Caroline H; Jackson, Walker S; Borkowski, Andrew W; Yuan, Junying; Wollmann, Robert H

    2007-01-01

    The pathogenic mechanism(s) underlying neurodegenerative diseases associated with protein misfolding is unclear. Several studies have implicated ER stress pathways in neurodegenerative conditions, including prion disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and many others. The ER stress response and upregulation of ER stress-responsive chaperones is observed in the brains of patients affected with Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease and in mouse models of prion diseases. In particular, the processing of caspase-12, an ER-localized caspase, correlates with neuronal cell death in prion disease. However, the contribution of caspase-12 to neurodegeneration has not been directly addressed in vivo. We confirm that ER stress is induced and that caspase-12 is proteolytically processed in a murine model of infectious prion disease. To address the causality of caspase-12 in mediating infectious prion pathogenesis, we inoculated mice deficient in caspase-12 with prions. The survival, behavior, pathology and accumulation of proteinase K-resistant PrP are indistinguishable between caspase-12 knockout and control mice, suggesting that caspase-12 is not necessary for mediating the neurotoxic effects of prion protein misfolding. PMID:19164919

  15. The Pathogenesis of Ebola Virus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baseler, Laura; Chertow, Daniel S; Johnson, Karl M; Feldmann, Heinz; Morens, David M

    2017-01-24

    For almost 50 years, ebolaviruses and related filoviruses have been repeatedly reemerging across the vast equatorial belt of the African continent to cause epidemics of highly fatal hemorrhagic fever. The 2013-2015 West African epidemic, by far the most geographically extensive, most fatal, and longest lasting epidemic in Ebola's history, presented an enormous international public health challenge, but it also provided insights into Ebola's pathogenesis and natural history, clinical expression, treatment, prevention, and control. Growing understanding of ebolavirus pathogenetic mechanisms and important new clinical observations of the disease course provide fresh clues about prevention and treatment approaches. Although viral cytopathology and immune-mediated cell damage in ebolavirus disease often result in severe compromise of multiple organs, tissue repair and organ function recovery can be expected if patients receive supportive care with fluids and electrolytes; maintenance of oxygenation and tissue perfusion; and respiratory, renal, and cardiovascular support. Major challenges for managing future Ebola epidemics include establishment of early and aggressive epidemic control and earlier and better patient care and treatment in remote, resource-poor areas where Ebola typically reemerges. In addition, it will be important to further develop Ebola vaccines and to adopt policies for their use in epidemic and pre-epidemic situations.

  16. Necrotizing enterocolitis. New thoughts about pathogenesis and potential treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKendrick, W; Caplan, M

    1993-10-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. An incomplete understanding of its pathogenesis has hampered efforts to devise an effective preventative strategy. New insights into the pathogenesis of NEC, particularly at the cellular and biochemical level, however, offer a rational basis for the development of new approaches to this disease.

  17. Dendritic Cells Endocytose Bacillus Anthracis Spores: Implications for Anthrax Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Dendritic Cells Endocytose Bacillus anthracis Spores: Implications for Anthrax Pathogenesis1 Katherine C. Brittingham,* Gordon Ruthel,* Rekha G...germination and dissemination of spores. Found in high frequency throughout the respiratory track, dendritic cells (DCs) routinely take up foreign...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dendritic cells endocytose Bacillus anthracis spores: implications for anthrax pathogenesis, The Journal of

  18. Pathogenesis of Nervous and Mental Diseases in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Ernest, Ed.

    Major pathogenic sources of mental diseases in children and a classification of these diseases are considered. Contributions include the following: pathogenesis of mental diseases in childhood by Ernest Harms, organ inferiority and psychiatric disorders by Bernard Shulman and Howard Klapman, pathogenesis of neurological disorders by George Gold,…

  19. INVOLVEMENT OF SYNAPTIC GENES IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS: THE CASE OF SYNAPSINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eGiovedi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in social interaction and social communication, restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. Many synaptic protein genes are linked to the pathogenesis of ASDs, making them prototypical synaptopathies. An array of mutations in the synapsin (Syn genes in humans have been recently associated with ASD and epilepsy, diseases that display a frequent comorbidity. Synapsins are presynaptic proteins regulating synaptic vesicle traffic, neurotransmitter release and short-term synaptic plasticity. In doing so, Syn isoforms control the tone of activity of neural circuits and the balance between excitation and inhibition. As ASD pathogenesis is believed to result from dysfunctions in the balance between excitatory and inhibitory transmissions in neocortical areas, Syns are novel ASD candidate genes. Accordingly, deletion of single Syn genes in mice, in addition to epilepsy, causes core symptoms of ASD by affecting social behavior, social communication and repetitive behaviors. Thus, Syn knockout mice represent a good experimental model to define synaptic alterations involved in the pathogenesis of ASD and epilepsy.

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Action of Keratinocyte-Derived Vaspin: Relevance for the Pathogenesis of Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saalbach, Anja; Tremel, Jenny; Herbert, Diana; Schwede, Katharina; Wandel, Elke; Schirmer, Christine; Anderegg, Ulf; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Heiker, John T; Schultz, Stephan; Magin, Thomas; Simon, Jan C

    2016-03-01

    Impaired cross talk between keratinocytes (KCs) and immune cells is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory skin diseases, such as psoriasis. We have previously identified KCs as a rich source of the serpin protease inhibitor vaspin (serpinA12), originally described as an adipokine in adipose tissue. Herein, we studied whether dysregulated vaspin expression in KCs contributes to the pathogenesis of psoriasis. We found vaspin expression to be closely associated to epidermal differentiation, with low levels in proliferating KCs and high levels in differentiated cells. Consistently, in human psoriasis and in a mouse model of a psoriasis-like skin inflammation, epidermal vaspin expression was significantly down-regulated. Down-regulation of vaspin in KCs resulted in decreased expression of differentiation-associated genes and up-regulation of interferon-inducible and inflammation-associated psoriasis signature genes. Vaspin was also shown to modulate the communication between KCs and inflammatory cells under co-culture conditions. A decrease in vaspin expression in KCs stimulated the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 by co-cultured dendritic cells, macrophages, monocytes, and neutrophils. Consequently, the application of vaspin inhibited myeloid cell infiltration in a mouse model of a psoriasis-like skin inflammation. In conclusion, vaspin expression by maturing KCs modulates cutaneous immune responses and may be involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  1. The NOTCH signaling pathway: role in the pathogenesis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and implication for therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL) is characterized by aberrant activation of NOTCH1 in over 60% of T-ALL cases. The high prevalence of activating NOTCH1 mutations highlights the critical role of NOTCH signaling in the pathogenesis of this disease and has prompted the development of therapeutic approaches targeting the NOTCH signaling pathway. Small molecule gamma secretase inhibitors (GSIs) can effectively inhibit oncogenic NOTCH1 and are in clinical testing for the treatme...

  2. Pathogenesis of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Mediated Development of Lymphoma Is Associated with Increased Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, Christoph F. A.; Li, Wen; Sciullo, Eric; Newman, John; Hammock, Bruce; Reader, J. Rachel; Tuscano, Joseph; Matsumura, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to environmental pollutants such as pesticides and dioxins leads to the pathogenesis of lymphoma and leukemia. Here, we show that activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) resulted in loss of the programmed cell death (apoptosis) response in three different lymphoma cell lines, which plays a key role in the development of cancer, especially lymphoma and leukemia. The AhR-mediated inhibition of...

  3. The Role of the spv Genes in Salmonella Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald G. Guiney

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella strains cause three main types of diseases in people: gastroenteritis, enteric (typhoid fever, and non-typhoid extra-intestinal disease with bacteremia. Genetic analysis indicates that each clinical syndrome requires distinct sets of virulence genes, and Salmonella isolates differ in their constellation of virulence traits. The spv locus is strongly associated with strains that cause non-typhoid bacteremia, but are not present in typhoid strains. The spv region contains three genes required for the virulence phenotype in mice: the positive transcriptional regulator spvR and two structural genes spvB and spvC. SpvB and SpvC are translocated into the host cell by the SPI-2 type-three secretion system. SpvB prevents actin polymerization by ADP-ribosylation of actin monomers, while SpvC has phosphothreonine lyase activity and has been shown to inhibit MAP kinase signaling. The exact mechanisms by which SpvB and SpvC act in concert to enhance virulence are still unclear. SpvB exhibits a cytotoxic effect on host cells and is required for delayed cell death by apoptosis following intracellular infection. Strains isolated from systemic infections of immune compromised patients, particularly HIV patients, usually carry the spv locus, strongly suggesting that CD4 T cells are required to control disease due to Salmonella that are spv positive. This association is not seen with typhoid fever, indicating that the pathogenesis and immunology of typhoid have fundamental differences from the syndrome of non-typhoid bacteremia.

  4. Possible Involvement of Palmitate in Pathogenesis of Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikama, Yosuke; Kudo, Yasusei; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Funaki, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by decreased insulin sensitivity and higher concentrations of free fatty acids (FFAs) in plasma. Among FFAs, saturated fatty acids (SFAs), such as palmitate, have been suggested to promote inflammatory responses. Although many epidemiological studies have shown a link between periodontitis and T2D, little is known about the clinical significance of SFAs in periodontitis. In this study, we showed that gingival fibroblasts have cell-surface expression of CD36, which is also known as FAT/fatty acid translocase. Moreover, CD36 expression was increased in gingival fibroblasts of high-fat diet-induced T2D model mice, compared with gingival fibroblasts of mice fed a normal diet. DNA microarray analysis revealed that palmitate increased mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Consistent with these results, we confirmed that palmitate-induced interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and CXCL1 secretion in HGF, using a cytokine array and ELISA. SFAs, but not an unsaturated fatty acid, oleate, induced IL-8 production. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which is one of the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, significantly suppressed palmitate-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production. Treatment of HGF with a CD36 inhibitor also inhibited palmitate-induced pro-inflammatory responses. Finally, we demonstrated that Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) lipopolysaccharide and heat-killed P.g. augmented palmitate-induced chemokine secretion in HGF. These results suggest a potential link between SFAs in plasma and the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  5. Pathogenesis-related proteins protect extrafloral nectar from microbial infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Eilmus, Sascha; Muck, Alexander; Svatos, Ales; Heil, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Plants in more than 300 genera produce extrafloral nectar (EFN) to attract carnivores as a means of indirect defence against herbivores. As EFN is secreted at nectaries that are not physically protected from the environment, and contains carbohydrates and amino acids, EFN must be protected from infestation by micro-organisms. We investigated the proteins and anti-microbial activity in the EFN of two Central American Acacia myrmecophytes (A. cornigera and A. hindsii) and two related non-myrmecophytes (A. farnesiana and Prosopis juliflora). Acacia myrmecophytes secrete EFN constitutively at high rates to nourish the ants inhabiting these plants as symbiotic mutualists, while non-myrmecophytes secrete EFN only in response to herbivore damage to attract non-symbiotic ants. Thus, the quality and anti-microbial protection of the EFN secreted by these two types of plants were likely to differ. Indeed, myrmecophyte EFN contained significantly more proteins than the EFN of non-myrmecophytes, and was protected effectively from microbial infestation. We found activity for three classes of pathogenesis-related (PR) enzymes: chitinase, beta-1,3-glucanase and peroxidase. Chitinases and beta-1,3-glucanases were significantly more active in myrmecophyte EFN, and chitinase at the concentrations found in myrmecophyte EFN significantly inhibited yeast growth. Of the 52 proteins found in A. cornigera EFN, 28 were annotated using nanoLC-MS/MS data, indicating that chitinases and glucanases contribute more than 50% of the total protein content in the EFN of this myrmecophyte. Our study demonstrates that PR enzymes play an important role in protecting EFN from microbial infestation.

  6. The MicroRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Metabolic Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xueyu; Liao, Yunfei; Chen, Lulu; Liu, Geng; Feng, Yong; Zeng, Tianshu; Zhang, Jingjing

    2015-09-01

    "Metabolic memory" is identified as a phenomenon that previous exposure to hyperglycemia results in the long-lasting deleterious effects on cardiovascular events. More and more researches show that epigenetics plays an important role in the pathogenesis of metabolic memory. It remains unclear whether microRNA (miRNA) dysfunctions participate in the event. In this study, the miRNA arrays on human aortic endothelial cells were adopted to seek the miRNAs that may be involved in the metabolic memory and were verified in vivo and in vitro. Sixteen miRNAs were found differentially expressed. Among these miRNAs, the expressions of miR-125b, miR-146a-5p, and miR-29a-3p were associated with persistent impaired endothelial function and altered proinflammatory gene expressions, including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) subunit p65. Direct inhibition of miR-125b expression or increased miR-146a-5p expression blunted NF-κB signals and improved the endothelial function. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed the biochemical relationship for miR-125b targeting on TNF-α-induced protein 3 and miR-146a-5p targeting on TNF receptor-associated factor 6 and IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 during the activation of NF-κB pathway. Thus, our findings demonstrate that glucose induced changes in miR-125b and miR-146a-5p are related to the long-lasting activation of NF-κB pathway and contribute to follow-up metabolic memory.

  7. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development.

  8. Celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naiyana Gujral; Hugh J Freeman; Alan BR Thomson

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases,resulting from both environmental (gluten) and genetic factors [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and nonHLA genes].The prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5%-1% in different parts of the world.However,the population with diabetes,autoimmune disorder or relatives of CD individuals have even higher risk for the development of CD,at least in part,because of shared HLA typing.Gliadin gains access to the basal surface of the epithelium,and interact directly with the immune system,via both bans-and para-cellular routes.From a diagnostic perspective,symptoms may be viewed as either "typical" or "atypical'; In both positive serological screening results suggestive of CD,should lead to small bowel biopsy followed by a favourable clinical and serological response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) to confirm the diagnosis.Positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody or antiendomysial antibody during the clinical course helps to confirm the diagnosis of CD because of their over 99% specificities when small bowel villous atrophy is present on biopsy.Currently,the only treatment available for CD individuals is a strict life-long GFD.A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of CD allows alternative future CD treatments to hydrolyse toxic gliadin peptide,prevent toxic gliadin peptide absorption,blockage of selective deamidation of specific glutamine residues by tissue,restore immune tolerance towards gluten,modulation of immune response to dietary gliadin,and restoration of intestinal architecture.

  9. Pathogenesis of Noroviruses, Emerging RNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M. Karst

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Human noroviruses in the family Caliciviridae are a major cause of epidemic gastroenteritis. They are responsible for at least 95% of viral outbreaks and over 50% of all outbreaks worldwide. Transmission of these highly infectious plus-stranded RNA viruses occurs primarily through contaminated food or water, but also through person-to-person contact and exposure to fomites. Norovirus infections are typically acute and self-limited. However, disease can be much more severe and prolonged in infants, elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Norovirus outbreaks frequently occur in semi-closed communities such as nursing homes, military settings, schools, hospitals, cruise ships, and disaster relief situations. Noroviruses are classified as Category B biodefense agents because they are highly contagious, extremely stable in the environment, resistant to common disinfectants, and associated with debilitating illness. The number of reported norovirus outbreaks has risen sharply since 2002 suggesting the emergence of more infectious strains. There has also been increased recognition that noroviruses are important causes of childhood hospitalization. Moreover, noroviruses have recently been associated with multiple clinical outcomes other than gastroenteritis. It is unclear whether these new observations are due to improved norovirus diagnostics or to the emergence of more virulent norovirus strains. Regardless, it is clear that human noroviruses cause considerable morbidity worldwide, have significant economic impact, and are clinically important emerging pathogens. Despite the impact of human norovirus-induced disease and the potential for emergence of highly virulent strains, the pathogenic features of infection are not well understood due to the lack of a cell culture system and previous lack of animal models. This review summarizes the current understanding of norovirus pathogenesis from the histological to the molecular level, including

  10. Pathogenesis of splenic marginal zone lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Qing Du

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL is a distinct low grade B-cell lymphoma with an immunophenotype similar to that of splenic marginal zone B-cells. Like the normal splenic marginal zone B-cells, SMZLs also show variable features in somatic mutations of their rearranged immunoglobulin genes, with ∼90% of cases harbouring somatic mutations but at remarkably variable degrees, suggesting that SMZL may have multiple cell of origins, deriving from the heterogeneous B-cells of the splenic marginal zone. Notably, ∼30% of SMZLs show biased usage of IGHV1-2*04, with the expressed BCR being potentially polyreactive to autoantigens. Recent exome and targeted sequencing studies have identified a wide spectrum of somatic mutations in SMZL with the recurrent mutations targeting multiple signalling pathways that govern the development of splenic marginal zone B-cells. These recurrent mutations occur in KLF2 (20–42%, NOTCH2 (6.5–25%, NF-κB (CARD11 ∼7%, IKBKB ∼7%, TNFAIP3 7–13%, TRAF3 5%, BIRC3 6.3% and TLR (MYD88 5–13% signalling pathways. Interestingly, the majority of SMZL with KLF2 mutation have both 7q32 deletion and IGHV1-2 rearrangement, and these cases also have additional mutations in NOTCH2, or TNFAIP3, or TRAF3. There is a potential oncogenic cooperation among concurrent genetic changes, for example between the IGHV1-2 expressing BCR and KLF2 mutation in activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway, and between KLF2 and TRAF3 mutations in activation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway. These novel genetic findings have provided considerable insights into the pathogenesis of SMZL and will stimulate the research in both normal and malignant marginal zone B-cells.

  11. Obesity Pathogenesis: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael W; Seeley, Randy J; Zeltser, Lori M; Drewnowski, Adam; Ravussin, Eric; Redman, Leanne M; Leibel, Rudolph L

    2017-08-01

    Obesity is among the most common and costly chronic disorders worldwide. Estimates suggest that in the United States obesity affects one-third of adults, accounts for up to one-third of total mortality, is concentrated among lower income groups, and increasingly affects children as well as adults. A lack of effective options for long-term weight reduction magnifies the enormity of this problem; individuals who successfully complete behavioral and dietary weight-loss programs eventually regain most of the lost weight. We included evidence from basic science, clinical, and epidemiological literature to assess current knowledge regarding mechanisms underlying excess body-fat accumulation, the biological defense of excess fat mass, and the tendency for lost weight to be regained. A major area of emphasis is the science of energy homeostasis, the biological process that maintains weight stability by actively matching energy intake to energy expenditure over time. Growing evidence suggests that obesity is a disorder of the energy homeostasis system, rather than simply arising from the passive accumulation of excess weight. We need to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this "upward setting" or "resetting" of the defended level of body-fat mass, whether inherited or acquired. The ongoing study of how genetic, developmental, and environmental forces affect the energy homeostasis system will help us better understand these mechanisms and are therefore a major focus of this statement. The scientific goal is to elucidate obesity pathogenesis so as to better inform treatment, public policy, advocacy, and awareness of obesity in ways that ultimately diminish its public health and economic consequences. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  12. Immunopathology of primary hypophysitis: implications for pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenberg, A; Buslei, R; Fahlbusch, R; Buchfelder, M; Brück, W

    2005-03-01

    The etiology of primary hypophysitis is still not fully elucidated. Histologically, primary hypophysitis includes three different main subtypes: lymphocytic (LYH), granulomatous (GRH), and xanthomatous (XH) hypophysitis. Clinical and laboratory findings suggest an autoimmune basis in primary hypophysitis. Controversy still exists about the composition of the inflammatory infiltrate and the relevant immunopathogenic effector mechanisms. Therefore, 21 cases of primary hypophysitis of different subtypes were analyzed with respect to the expression of lymphocyte and macrophage antigens as well as MHC class I and II molecules of the inflammatory infiltrate and the resident pituitary acinar cells. Lymphocyte infiltration in LYH (n = 15), but also in GRH (n = 4) and XH (n = 2), mainly consisted of T cells, while B cells were rare. Independent from the histopathologic subtype, T cell subsets showed equal ratios of CD4+ to CD8+ T cells. Highest numbers of activated CD8+ T cells were observed in LYH presenting during pregnancy, surrounding or even infiltrating preserved pituitary acinar cells. Moreover, an increased rate of activated CD8+ T cells correlated with a shorter duration of clinical symptoms. In LYH, aberrant expression of MHC class II antigens as well as overexpression of MHC class I molecules on pituitary cells were observed. Independent of the histologic subtype, macrophages mostly expressed markers of chronic activation and showed MHC class II positivity. LYH, GRH, and XH, although heterogeneous in their histologic appearance and in age distribution, exhibit a similar if not identical immunohistologic profile. It is highly likely that direct T cell-mediated cytotoxicity through CD8+ T cells, with the initial help of CD4+ T cells, is pivotal in the pathogenesis of primary hypophysitis, implicating a target autoantigen expressed by pituitary cells.

  13. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  14. The pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy in Friedreich ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnulf H Koeppen

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia (FA is an autosomal recessive disease with a complex neurological phenotype, but the most common cause of death is heart failure. This study presents a systematic analysis of 15 fixed and 13 frozen archival autopsy tissues of FA hearts and 10 normal controls (8 frozen by measurement of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy; tissue frataxin assay; X-ray fluorescence (XRF of iron (Fe and zinc (Zn in polyethylene glycol-embedded samples of left and right ventricular walls (LVW, RVW and ventricular septum (VS; metal quantification in bulk digests by inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES; Fe histochemistry; and immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence of cytosolic and mitochondrial ferritins and of the inflammatory markers CD68 and hepcidin. FA cardiomyocytes were significantly larger than normal and surrounded by fibrotic endomysium. Frataxin in LVW was reduced to less than 15 ng/g wet weight (normal 235.4 ± 75.1 ng/g. All sections displayed characteristic Fe-reactive inclusions in cardiomyocytes, and XRF confirmed significant regional Fe accumulation in LVW and VS. In contrast, ICP-OES analysis of bulk extracts revealed normal total Fe levels in LVW, RVW, and VS. Cardiac Zn remained normal by XRF and assay of bulk digests. Cytosolic and mitochondrial ferritins exhibited extensive co-localization in cardiomyocytes, representing translational and transcriptional responses to Fe, respectively. Fe accumulation progressed from a few small granules to coarse aggregates in phagocytized cardiomyocytes. All cases met the "Dallas criteria" of myocarditis. Inflammatory cells contained CD68 and cytosolic ferritin, and most also expressed the Fe-regulatory hormone hepcidin. Inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of FA cardiomyopathy but may be more evident in advanced stages of the disease. Hepcidin-induced failure of Fe export from macrophages is a likely contributory cause of damage to the heart in FA

  15. Ammonia and Its Role in the Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Parth J; Balart, Luis A

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a commonly encountered sequela of chronic liver disease and cirrhosis with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Although ammonia is implicated in the pathogenesis of HE, the exact underlying mechanisms still remain poorly understood. Its role in the urea cycle, astrocyte swelling, and glutamine and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid systems suggests that the pathogenesis is multifaceted. Greater understanding in its underlying mechanism may offer more targeted therapeutic options in the future, and thus further research is necessary to fully understand the pathogenesis of HE.

  16. the Pathogenesis of acute on Chronic Hepatitis B liver Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure is a characteristic clinical liver syndrome, which should be differentiated from acute liver failure, acute decompensated liver cirrhosis and chronic liver failure. The pathogenesis of ACLF is not fully understood yet. Viral factors and immune injury have been reported to be the two major pathogenesis. This paper reviewed the researches on the pathogenesis of acute on chronic hepatitis B liver failure in recent years, to provide theoretical basis for prompt and accurate diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome. This would beneift for the prognosis and raise the survival rate of patients.

  17. Role of perfumes in pathogenesis of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagasra, Omar; Golkar, Zhabiz; Garcia, Miranda; Rice, Lakya N; Pace, Donald Gene

    2013-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are developmental conditions characterized by deficits in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, and obsessive/stereotyped patterns of behavior. Although there is no reliable neurophysiological marker associated with ASDs, dysfunction of the parieto-frontal mirror neuron system and underdeveloped olfactory bulb (OB) has been associated with the disorder. It has been reported that the number of children who have ASD has increased considerably since the early 1990 s. In developed countries, it is now reported that 1-1.5% of children have ASD, and in the US it is estimated that one in 88 children suffer from ASD. Currently, there is no known cause for ASD. During the last three decades, the most commonly accepted paradigm about autism is that it is a genetically inherited disease. The recent trio analyses, in which both biological parents and the autistic child's exomes are sequenced, do not support this paradigm. On the other hand, the environmental factors that may induce genetic mutations in vitro have not been clearly identified, and there is little irrefutable evidence that pesticides, water born chemicals, or food preservatives play critical roles in inducing the genetic mutations associated with known intellectual deficiencies that have been linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here, we hypothesize and provide scientific evidence that ASD is the result of exposure to perfumes and cosmetics. The highly mutagenic, neurotoxic, and neuromodulatory chemicals found in perfumes are often overlooked and ignored as a result of a giant loophole in the Federal Fair Packaging and Labeling Act of 1973, which explicitly exempts fragrance producers from having to disclose perfume ingredients on product labels. We hypothesize that perfumes and cosmetics may be important factors in the pathogenesis of ASD. Synthetic perfumes have gained global utility not only as perfumes but also as essential chemicals in detergents

  18. Secrecy and the Pathogenesis of Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi Ettner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature supporting a relationship between emotions and regulation of blood pressure dates back to the early 1900s. Theoretical explanations of the pathophysiology of the correlation have centered on several possible trajectories, the most likely being cardiovascular reactivity to stress. Prospective studies have demonstrated that chronic stress and enduring traits such as defensiveness and anxiety, impacts the development of hypertension. An analysis of 195 genetic males seeking contrary hormones for treatment of gender dysphoria revealed a significantly increased prevalence of hypertension in this cohort. The authors attribute this increased prevalence to the known effects of emotional disclosure on health and conclude that the inhibition of emotional expressiveness is significant in the etiology and maintenance of essential hypertension in this population. As hypertension is associated with morbidity and mortality, the implications for the family medicine physician treating gender nonconforming individuals and other patients in the context of a general medical practice will be discussed.

  19. Nifuroxazide inhibits survival of multiple myeloma cells by directly inhibiting STAT3

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the transcription factor STAT3 contributes to the pathogenesis of many cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM). Since STAT3 is dispensable in most normal tissue, targeted inhibition of STAT3 is an attractive therapy for patients with these cancers. To identify STAT3 inhibitors, we developed a transcriptionally based assay and screened a library of compounds known to be safe in humans. We found the drug nifuroxazide to be an effective inhibitor of STAT3 function. Ni...

  20. Inhibition of Innate Immune Responses Is Key to Pathogenesis by Arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Bjoern; Ly, Hinh

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian arenaviruses are zoonotic viruses that cause asymptomatic, persistent infections in their rodent hosts but can lead to severe and lethal hemorrhagic fever with bleeding and multiorgan failure in human patients. Lassa virus (LASV), for example, is endemic in several West African countries, where it is responsible for an estimated 500,000 infections and 5,000 deaths annually. There are currently no FDA-licensed therapeutics or vaccines available to combat arenavirus infection. A hallmark of arenavirus infection (e.g., LASV) is general immunosuppression that contributes to high viremia. Here, we discuss the early host immune responses to arenavirus infection and the recently discovered molecular mechanisms that enable pathogenic viruses to suppress host immune recognition and to contribute to the high degree of virulence. We also directly compare the innate immune evasion mechanisms between arenaviruses and other hemorrhagic fever-causing viruses, such as Ebola, Marburg, Dengue, and hantaviruses. A better understanding of the immunosuppression and immune evasion strategies of these deadly viruses may guide the development of novel preventative and therapeutic options.

  1. Novel insights into the effect of CCR5 inhibition on HIV treatment, pathogenesis and cure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symons, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341771686

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in 1996 has significantly reduced HIV related morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Recent advances in antiretroviral treatment have resulted in a life expectancy of effectively treated HIV infected patients, comparable to those h

  2. Novel insights into the effect of CCR5 inhibition on HIV treatment, pathogenesis and cure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symons, J.

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in 1996 has significantly reduced HIV related morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Recent advances in antiretroviral treatment have resulted in a life expectancy of effectively treated HIV infected patients, comparable to those h

  3. Carbamazepine inhibits angiotensin I-converting enzyme, linking it to the pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, S S; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, M G; Guimarães, P B; Wasinski, F; Pereira, F E G; Canzian, M; Centeno, R S; Carrete, H; Yacubian, E M; Carmona, A K; Vieira, R F F; Nakaie, C R; Sabatini, R A; Perosa, S R; Bacurau, R F P; Gouveia, T L F; Gallo, G; Würtele, M; Cavalheiro, E A; Silva, J A; Pesquero, J B; Araujo, R C

    2012-01-01

    We find that a common mutation that increases angiotensin I-converting enzyme activity occurs with higher frequency in male patients suffering from refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. However, in their brains, the activity of the enzyme is downregulated. As an explanation, we surprisingly find that carbamazepine, commonly used to treat epilepsy, is an inhibitor of the enzyme, thus providing a direct link between epilepsy and the renin–angiotensin and kallikrein–kinin systems. PMID:22832858

  4. Pathogenesis and Individualized Treatment for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Rui Xu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The pathogenesis of POTS is multifactorial, including hypovolemia, abnormal catecholamine state, and vascular dysfunction. Biomarker-directed individualized treatment is an important strategy for the management of POTS children.

  5. Aetio-pathogenesis of breast cancer | Abdulkareem | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a literature review on the aetiology and pathogenesis of breast cancer, ... diet, alcohol, obesity, lifestyle, physical inactivity, as well as endocrine factors. ... in certain categories of patients and is associated with poorer prognosis and ...

  6. [Idiopathic epiretinal membrane: definition, classification, current understanding of pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomareva, E N; Kazarian, A A

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic epiretinal membrane is a result of a complex biomechanical interaction of the retina and vitreous. This paper discusses classification problems, epidemiological data of multicenter studies, and current hypotheses of epiretinal membrane pathogenesis.

  7. Water hardness influences Flavobacterium columnare pathogenesis in channel catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted to determine aspects of water chemistry responsible for large differences in pathogenesis and mortality rates in challenges of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus with Flavobacterium columnare; challenges were conducted in water supplying the Stuttgart National Aquaculture Res...

  8. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rajesh Vijayvergiya Ramalingam Vadivelu

    2015-01-01

    ... dysfunction, contribute in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Studies have shown a positive relations between Cytotoxic associated gene-A positive strains of Helicobacter pylori and vascular diseases such as coronary artery disease and stroke...

  9. Biochemical responses during the pathogenesis of Sclerotium rolfsii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subhadfip Nandi

    Key words: Cowpea, Sclerotium rolfsii, defense-related enzymes, phenolics, pathogenesis related proteins, scanning .... as substrate for enzymatic reaction of SOD according to the modified ..... clear evidence of a higher respiration rate.

  10. A Mitochondrial Perspective of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadel, Gerald S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) encompasses several clinical syndromes, most notably emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Most of the current treatments fail to attenuate severity and progression of the disease, thereby requiring better mechanistic understandings of pathogenesis to develop disease-modifying therapeutics. A number of theories on COPD pathogenesis have been promulgated wherein an increase in protease burden from chronic inflammation, exaggerated production of reactive oxygen species and the resulting oxidant injury, or superfluous cell death responses caused by enhanced cellular injury/damage were proposed as the culprit. These hypotheses are not mutually exclusive and together likely represent the multifaceted biological processes involved in COPD pathogenesis. Recent studies demonstrate that mitochondria are involved in innate immune signaling that plays important roles in cigarette smoke-induced inflammasome activation, pulmonary inflammation and tissue remodeling responses. These responses are reviewed herein and synthesized into a view of COPD pathogenesis whereby mitochondria play a central role.

  11. Oral candidiasis: pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalla, Rajesh V; Patton, Lauren L; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Oral candidiasis is a clinical fungal infection that is the most common opportunistic infection affecting the human oral cavity. This article reviews the pathogenesis, clinical presentations, diagnosis and treatmentstrategies for oral candidiasis.

  12. Recent advances in dengue pathogenesis and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Cameron P; McPherson, Kirsty; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Hoai Tam, D T; Young, Paul; Mackenzie, Jason; Wills, Bridget

    2015-12-10

    This review describes and commentates on recent advances in the understanding of dengue pathogenesis and immunity, plus clinical research on vaccines and therapeutics. We expand specifically on the role of the dermis in dengue virus infection, the contribution of cellular and humoral immune responses to pathogenesis and immunity, NS1 and mechanisms of virus immune evasion. Additionally we review a series of therapeutic intervention trials for dengue, as well as recent clinical research aimed at improving clinical diagnosis, risk prediction and disease classification.

  13. Proteomic insights into Acinetobacter baumannii drug resistance and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Quanxin; Huang, Changwu; Liao, Pu; Xie, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunist pathogen, due to severe antibiotic resistance and nosocomial infection. The epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of A.baumannii have been extensively reviewed, but the pathogenesis and virulence remain unclear. Proteomics analysis has been applied to study the mechanism of drug resistance, biofilm, micronutrient acquisition, and the extracellular compartment. This review summarizes applications of proteomics in A. baumannii, aiming to summarize novel insights into the mechanism of A. baumannii pathogenesis and drug resistance.

  14. Genetic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of tropical calcific pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Swapna Mahurkar; D Nageshwar Reddy; G Venkat Rao; Giriraj Ratan Chandak

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is known to be a heterogeneous disease with varied etiologies. Tropical calcific pancreatitis (TCP) is a severe form of chronic pancreatitis unique to developing countries. With growing evidence of genetic factors contributing to the pathogenesis of TCP, this review is aimed at compiling the available information in this field. We also propose a two hit model to explain the sequence of events in the pathogenesis of TCP.

  15. Etiology and pathogenesis of pectus excavatum in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Kulik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Funnel chest is the most common chest deformity characterized by the depression of sternum and rib cartilages. In spite of the centuries-old history of pectus excavatum investigation, plenty of publications on etiology and pathogenesis and many theories on this theme no one of them is generally accepted. This article is to summarize the modern views on the etiology and pathogenesis of funnel chest.

  16. The Other T Helper Cells in Asthma Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Vock

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex phenotype of allergic bronchial asthma involves a variable degree of bronchoobstruction, increased mucus production, and airway remodeling. So far it is suggested that it arises from multiple interactions of infiltrating and structural cells in the context of chronic airway inflammation that is orchestrated by T helper 2 (TH2 cells. By secreting a plethora of typical mediators such as interleukin (IL 4, IL-5, and IL-13, these cells hold a key position in asthma pathogenesis. However, therapeutic approaches targeting these TH2-type mediators failed to improve asthma symptoms and impressively showed that asthma pathogenesis cannot be reduced by TH2 cell functions. Recently, other T helper cells, that is, TH9 and TH17 cells, have been identified and these cells also contribute to asthma pathogenesis, the processes leading to formation or aggravation of asthma. Furthermore, TH25 cells, TH3 cells, and regulatory T cells have also been implicated in asthma pathogenesis. This paper aims at summarizing recent insights about these new T helper cells in asthma pathogenesis.

  17. Epigenetics, the holy grail in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altorok, Nezam; Almeshal, Nawaf; Wang, Yongqing; Kahaleh, Bashar

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this review is to present evidence that supports the central role of epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis of SSc. SSc is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by immune activation, fibrosis of the skin and internal organs and obliterative vasculopathy affecting predominantly the microvessels. Remarkable progress has been made in the past few years emphasizing the importance of epigenetic modifications in the pathogenesis of many disorders, including SSc. Current evidence demonstrates alterations in DNA methylation, histone code modifications and changes in microRNA (miRNA) expression levels in SSc cells. Recent reports have described the differential expression of numerous regulatory miRNAs in SSc, mainly in SSc fibroblasts, a number of which are important in TGF-β pathways and downstream signalling cascades. While studies to date have revealed the significant role of epigenetic modifications in the pathogenesis of SSc, the causal nature of epigenetic alterations in SSc pathogenesis remains elusive. Additional longitudinal and comprehensive epigenetic studies designed to evaluate the effect of environmental epigenetic factors on disease pathogenesis are needed.

  18. Duckweed (Lemna minor as a model plant system for the study of human microbial pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant infection models provide certain advantages over animal models in the study of pathogenesis. However, current plant models face some limitations, e.g., plant and pathogen cannot co-culture in a contained environment. Development of such a plant model is needed to better illustrate host-pathogen interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe a novel model plant system for the study of human pathogenic bacterial infection on a large scale. This system was initiated by co-cultivation of axenic duckweed (Lemna minor plants with pathogenic bacteria in 24-well polystyrene cell culture plate. Pathogenesis of bacteria to duckweed was demonstrated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus as two model pathogens. P. aeruginosa PAO1 caused severe detriment to duckweed as judged from inhibition to frond multiplication and chlorophyll formation. Using a GFP-marked PAO1 strain, we demonstrated that bacteria colonized on both fronds and roots and formed biofilms. Virulence of PAO1 to duckweed was attenuated in its quorum sensing (QS mutants and in recombinant strains overexpressing the QS quenching enzymes. RN4220, a virulent strain of S. aureus, caused severe toxicity to duckweed while an avirulent strain showed little effect. Using this system for antimicrobial chemical selection, green tea polyphenols exhibited inhibitory activity against S. aureus virulence. This system was further confirmed to be effective as a pathogenesis model using a number of pathogenic bacterial species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that duckweed can be used as a fast, inexpensive and reproducible model plant system for the study of host-pathogen interactions, could serve as an alternative choice for the study of some virulence factors, and could also potentially be used in large-scale screening for the discovery of antimicrobial chemicals.

  19. Interleukin-13 and transforming growth factor β synergise in the pathogenesis of human intestinal fistulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharl, Michael; Frei, Sandra; Pesch, Theresa; Kellermeier, Silvia; Arikkat, Joba; Frei, Pascal; Fried, Michael; Weber, Achim; Jehle, Ekkehard; Rühl, Anne; Rogler, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of fistulae, a common clinical complication of Crohn's disease (CD). TGFβ and interleukin-13 (IL-13) have been correlated with the onset of EMT-associated organ fibrosis and high levels of TGFβ have been shown in transitional cells (TCs) lining CD fistula tracts. This study investigated whether IL-13 could be involved in the pathogenesis of CD-associated fistulae. Protein or mRNA levels in HT29 intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) or colonic lamina propria fibroblasts (CLPFs) were studied by western blotting or real-time PCR. CLPFs were isolated from non-inflammatory disease controls or patients with CD with or without fistulae and IL-13 levels were analysed in surgically removed fistula specimens by immunohistochemistry. TGFβ induced IL-13 secretion in CLPFs from patients with fistulising CD. In fistula specimens high levels of IL-13 were detected in TCs covering fistula tracts. In HT29 IEC monolayers, IL-13 induced SLUG and β6-integrin mRNA, which are associated with cell invasion. HT29 spheroids completely disintegrated when treated with TGFβ for 7 days, whereas IL-13-treated spheroids did not show morphological changes. Here, TGFβ induced mRNA expression of SNAIL1 and IL-13, whereas IL-13 elevated SLUG and β6-integrin mRNA. An anti-IL-13 antibody was able to prevent IL-13-induced SLUG expression in HT29 IECs. TGFβ induces IL-13 expression and an EMT-like phenotype of IECs, while IL-13 promotes the expression of genes associated with cell invasion. These findings suggest that TGFβ and IL-13 play a synergistic role in the pathogenesis of fistulae and inhibition of IL-13 might represent a novel therapeutic approach for fistula treatment.

  20. Which Organ is Responsible for the Pathogenesis of Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, A; Le Roux, C W; Docherty, N G

    2016-04-11

    Obesity is associated with significant complications and healthcare costs, but our ability to treat obesity has been limited by our understanding of its pathogenesis. We surveyed diabetologists and obesity related health care professionals asking them which organ they believed to be responsible for the pathogenesis of obesity. Participants favoured a central nervous system (CNS) aetiology. The response echoes evidence from genome wide association studies identifying a link between obesity and CNS loci. Our most successful obesity therapies involve the manipulation of subcortical area of the brain involved in energy balance. Future success in the management of obesity will be determined by our ability to define the pathogenesis of the disease in individual cases, moving from a one-size-fits-all, to more focused interventions.

  1. Pathogenesis of Bacterial Vaginosis: Discussion of Current Hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzny, Christina A; Schwebke, Jane R

    2016-08-15

    In April 2015, the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases hosted an experts technical consultation on bacterial vaginosis (BV), where data regarding controversies over the pathogenesis of BV were discussed. The discussion on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of BV is presented here, and several hypotheses on its pathogenesis are critiqued. Rigorous hypothesis-driven studies are needed to ultimately determine the cause of BV. This information is vital for the prevention and control of this important infection and its adverse public health consequences. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Multiple Factors Involved in the Pathogenesis of White Matter Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Wang, Dilong; Lan, Linfang

    2017-01-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs), also known as leukoaraiosis (LA) or white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), are characterized mainly by hyperintensities on T2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. With the aging of the population and the development of imaging technology, the morbidity and diagnostic rates of WMLs are increasing annually. WMLs are not a benign process. They clinically manifest as cognitive decline and the subsequent development of dementia. Although WMLs are important, their pathogenesis is still unclear. This review elaborates on the advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of WMLs, focusing on anatomy, cerebral blood flow autoregulation, venous collagenosis, blood brain barrier disruption, and genetic factors. In particular, the attribution of WMLs to chronic ischemia secondary to venous collagenosis and cerebral blood flow autoregulation disruption seems reasonable. With the development of gene technology, the effect of genetic factors on the pathogenesis of WMLs is gaining gradual attention. PMID:28316994

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction and defective autophagy in the pathogenesis of collagen VI muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Paolo; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2013-05-01

    Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem Myopathy (BM), and Congenital Myosclerosis are diseases caused by mutations in the genes encoding the extracellular matrix protein collagen VI. A dystrophic mouse model, where collagen VI synthesis was prevented by targeted inactivation of the Col6a1 gene, allowed the investigation of pathogenesis, which revealed the existence of a Ca(2+)-mediated dysfunction of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum, and of defective autophagy. Key events are dysregulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, an inner membrane high-conductance channel that for prolonged open times causes mitochondrial dysfunction, and inadequate removal of defective mitochondria, which amplifies the damage. Consistently, the Col6a1(-/-) myopathic mice could be cured through inhibition of cyclophilin D, a matrix protein that sensitizes the pore to opening, and through stimulation of autophagy. Similar defects contribute to disease pathogenesis in patients irrespective of the genetic lesion causing the collagen VI defect. These studies indicate that permeability transition pore opening and defective autophagy represent key elements for skeletal muscle fiber death, and provide a rationale for the use of cyclosporin A and its nonimmunosuppressive derivatives in patients affected by collagen VI myopathies, a strategy that holds great promise for treatment.

  4. Pathogenesis and immunobiology of brucellosis: review of Brucella-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueiredo, Paul; Ficht, Thomas A; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Rossetti, Carlos A; Adams, L Garry

    2015-06-01

    This review of Brucella-host interactions and immunobiology discusses recent discoveries as the basis for pathogenesis-informed rationales to prevent or treat brucellosis. Brucella spp., as animal pathogens, cause human brucellosis, a zoonosis that results in worldwide economic losses, human morbidity, and poverty. Although Brucella spp. infect humans as an incidental host, 500,000 new human infections occur annually, and no patient-friendly treatments or approved human vaccines are reported. Brucellae display strong tissue tropism for lymphoreticular and reproductive systems with an intracellular lifestyle that limits exposure to innate and adaptive immune responses, sequesters the organism from the effects of antibiotics, and drives clinical disease manifestations and pathology. Stealthy brucellae exploit strategies to establish infection, including i) evasion of intracellular destruction by restricting fusion of type IV secretion system-dependent Brucella-containing vacuoles with lysosomal compartments, ii) inhibition of apoptosis of infected mononuclear cells, and iii) prevention of dendritic cell maturation, antigen presentation, and activation of naive T cells, pathogenesis lessons that may be informative for other intracellular pathogens. Data sets of next-generation sequences of Brucella and host time-series global expression fused with proteomics and metabolomics data from in vitro and in vivo experiments now inform interactive cellular pathways and gene regulatory networks enabling full-scale systems biology analysis. The newly identified effector proteins of Brucella may represent targets for improved, safer brucellosis vaccines and therapeutics.

  5. Complement System in Pathogenesis of AMD: Dual Player in Degeneration and Protection of Retinal Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milosz P. Kawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most common cause of blindness among the elderly, especially in Western countries. Although the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical course of the disease are well described, its pathogenesis is not entirely elucidated. AMD is associated with a variety of biochemical abnormalities, including complement components deposition in the retinal pigment epithelium-Bruch’s membrane-choriocapillaris complex. Although the complement system (CS is increasingly recognized as mediating important roles in retinal biology, its particular role in AMD pathogenesis has not been precisely defined. Unrestricted activation of the CS following injury may directly damage retinal tissue and recruit immune cells to the vicinity of active complement cascades, therefore detrimentally causing bystander damage to surrounding cells and tissues. On the other hand, recent evidence supports the notion that an active complement pathway is a necessity for the normal maintenance of the neurosensory retina. In this scenario, complement activation appears to have beneficial effect as it promotes cell survival and tissue remodeling by facilitating the rapid removal of dying cells and resulting cellular debris, thus demonstrating anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this review, we discuss both the beneficial and detrimental roles of CS in degenerative retina, focusing on the diverse aspects of CS functions that may promote or inhibit macular disease.

  6. Complement system in pathogenesis of AMD: dual player in degeneration and protection of retinal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Milosz P; Machalinska, Anna; Roginska, Dorota; Machalinski, Boguslaw

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness among the elderly, especially in Western countries. Although the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical course of the disease are well described, its pathogenesis is not entirely elucidated. AMD is associated with a variety of biochemical abnormalities, including complement components deposition in the retinal pigment epithelium-Bruch's membrane-choriocapillaris complex. Although the complement system (CS) is increasingly recognized as mediating important roles in retinal biology, its particular role in AMD pathogenesis has not been precisely defined. Unrestricted activation of the CS following injury may directly damage retinal tissue and recruit immune cells to the vicinity of active complement cascades, therefore detrimentally causing bystander damage to surrounding cells and tissues. On the other hand, recent evidence supports the notion that an active complement pathway is a necessity for the normal maintenance of the neurosensory retina. In this scenario, complement activation appears to have beneficial effect as it promotes cell survival and tissue remodeling by facilitating the rapid removal of dying cells and resulting cellular debris, thus demonstrating anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this review, we discuss both the beneficial and detrimental roles of CS in degenerative retina, focusing on the diverse aspects of CS functions that may promote or inhibit macular disease.

  7. Thioredoxin/Txnip: Redoxisome, As a Redox Switch for the Pathogenesis of Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji eYoshihara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past few decades, it has been widely recognized that reducing-oxidizing (Redox responses occurring at the intra- and extra-cellular levels are one of most important biological phenomena and dysregulated redox responses are involved in the initiation and progression of multiple diseases. Thioredoxin 1 (Trx1 and Thioredoxin 2 (Trx2, mainly located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria, respectively, are ubiquitously expressed in variety of cells and control cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS by reducing the disulfides into thiol groups. Thioredoxin interacting protein (Txnip/TBP-2/VDUP1 directly binds to Trx1 & Trx2 (Trx and inhibit the reducing activity of Trx through their disulfide exchange. Recent studies have revealed that Trx1 and Txnip are involved in some critical redox-dependent signal pathways including NLRP3 inflammasome activation in a redox-dependent manner. Therefore, Trx/Txnip, a redox-sensitive signaling complex is a regulator of cellular redox status and has emerged as a key component in the link between redox-regulation and the pathogenesis of diseases. Here, we review the novel functional concept of the redox-related protein complex, named Redoxisome, consisting of Trx/Txnip, as a critical regulator for intra- and extra-cellular redox signaling, involved in the pathogenesis of various diseases such as cancer, autoimmune disease, and diabetes.

  8. Inflammasome activation by cystine crystals: implications for the pathogenesis of cystinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prencipe, Giusi; Caiello, Ivan; Cherqui, Stephanie; Whisenant, Thomas; Petrini, Stefania; Emma, Francesco; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2014-06-01

    Intralysosomal cystine crystal accumulation, due to mutations in the CTNS gene, is a hallmark of nephropathic cystinosis, but the role of these crystals in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. We hypothesized that, similar to other host-derived crystalline moieties, cystine crystals can induce IL-1β production through inflammasome activation. Thus, we investigated the proinflammatory effects of cystine crystals in primary human PBMCs. LPS-primed PBMCs stimulated with cystine crystals secreted IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly to IL-1β secretion induced by other crystalline inflammasome activators, cystine crystal-induced IL-1β secretion required activation of caspase-1. Additionally, exogenous cystine crystals were internalized by monocytes, and inhibition of phagocytosis, cathepsin B leakage, generation of reactive oxygen species, and potassium efflux reduced cystine crystal-induced IL-1β secretion. Patients with cystinosis had higher levels of circulating IL-1β and IL-18 compared with controls. Analysis of inflammasome-related gene expression in PBMCs from patients with cystinosis revealed a significant increase in IL-1β and CASP-1 transcript levels compared with controls. Moreover, knockout of cystinosin in mice led to significant increases in serum IL-18 levels and kidney expression of inflammasome-related genes (Casp-1, Pycard, Il-18, Il18r1, Il1r1, and Il1rl2). Taken together, these data demonstrate that cystine crystals are endogenous inflammasome-activating stimuli, suggesting a novel role for cystine crystals in the pathogenesis of nephropathic cystinosis.

  9. Effects of histone acetylation on superoxide dismutase 1 gene expression in the pathogenesis of senile cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Xianfang; Qiu, Xiaodi; Jiang, Yongxiang; Li, Dan; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Yinglei; Lu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation plays key roles in gene expression, but its effects on superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) expression in senile cataract remains unknown. To address this problem, the study was to investigate the influence of histone acetylation on SOD1 expression and its effects in the pathogenesis of senile cataract. Senile cataract was classified into three types—nuclear cataract (NC), cortical cataract (CC), and posterior subcapsular cataract (SC)—using the Lens Opacities Classification System III. In senile cataracts, SOD1 expression decreased significantly. Both H3 and H4 were deacetylated at −600 bp of the SOD1 promoter of cataract lenses, and hypoacetylated at −1500, −1200, and −900 bp. In hypoacetylated histones, the hypoacetylation pattern differed among the cataracts. In vitro, anacardic acid (AA) significantly reduced H3 and H4 acetylation at the SOD1 promoter, decreased protein expression, and induced cataract formation in rabbits. AA also inhibited HLEC viability and increased cell apoptosis. In contrast, trichostatin A (TSA) was able to efficaciously stop AA’s effects on both rabbit lenses and HLECs. Decreased histone acetylation at the SOD1 promoter is associated with declined SOD1 expression in senile cataracts. Histone acetylation plays an essential role in the regulation of SOD1 expression and in the pathogenesis of senile cataracts. PMID:27703255

  10. RssAB-FlhDC-ShlBA as a major pathogenesis pathway in Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuan-Sheng; Horng, Jim-Tong; Yang, Chun-Hung; Tsai, Yu-Huan; Su, Lin-Hui; Wei, Chia-Fong; Chen, Chang-Chieh; Hsieh, Shang-Chen; Lu, Chia-Chen; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2010-11-01

    Serratia marcescens has long been recognized as an important opportunistic pathogen, but the underlying pathogenesis mechanism is not completely clear. Here, we report a key pathogenesis pathway in S. marcescens comprising the RssAB two-component system and its downstream elements, FlhDC and the dominant virulence factor hemolysin ShlBA. Expression of shlBA is under the positive control of FlhDC, which is repressed by RssAB signaling. At 37°C, functional RssAB inhibits swarming, represses hemolysin production, and promotes S. marcescens biofilm formation. In comparison, when rssBA is deleted, S. marcescens displays aberrant multicellularity favoring motile swarming with unbridled hemolysin production. Cellular and animal infection models further demonstrate that loss of rssBA transforms this opportunistic pathogen into hypervirulent phenotypes, leading to extensive inflammatory responses coupled with destructive and systemic infection. Hemolysin production is essential in this context. Collectively, a major virulence regulatory pathway is identified in S. marcescens.

  11. Idiopathic Guttate Hypomelanosis: A Review of its Etiology, Pathogenesis, Findings, and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntongjin, Premjit; Laosakul, Kulwadee

    2016-08-01

    Idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis is a common acquired leukoderma characterized by multiple, discrete round or oval, porcelain-white macules on sun-exposed areas, especially on the extensor surface of forearms and pretibial areas. It usually affects individuals aged over 40 years and the likelihood of acquiring it increases with age. The exact pathogenesis remains controversial. However, there are several factors that are believed to be involved such as aging, ultraviolet exposure, trauma, genetic factors, autoimmunity, and local inhibition of melanogenesis. Despite the benign course of progression, many patients visit medical centers owing to cosmetic concerns and to confirm the natural course of idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis. Because there is no standard therapy for this condition, numerous medical and surgical treatments including intralesional corticosteroids, topical retinoids, topical calcineurin inhibitors, phenol peeling, cryotherapy, superficial dermabrasion, skin grafting, and ablative and non-ablative lasers have been tested with mixed results. This article will thoroughly review the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentations, histologic, dermoscopic, and ultrastructural findings, and the treatment of idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis.

  12. Immunomodulatory role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tyler A; Kirkpatrick, Daniel R; Kovilam, Oormila; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, preeclampsia is a significant health risk to both pregnant women and their unborn children. Despite scientific advances, the exact pathogenesis of preeclampsia is not yet fully understood. Meanwhile, the incidence of preeclampsia is expected to increase. A series of potential etiologies for preeclampsia has been identified, including endothelial dysfunction, immunological dysregulation and trophoblastic invasion. In this literature review, we have critically reviewed existing literature regarding the research findings that link the role of vitamin D to the pathogenesis and immunoregulation of preeclampsia. The relationship of vitamin D with the suspected etiologies of preeclampsia underscores its clinical potential in the diagnosis and treatment of preeclampsia.

  13. Role of viruses in the pathogenesis of acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, T

    2000-05-01

    To date there is ample evidence suggesting a crucial role for respiratory viruses in the pathogenesis of AOM. Respiratory viral infection appears to initiate the cascade of events that finally leads to development of AOM (Fig. 1). The pathogenesis of AOM is complicated, involving a network of factors, some probably not yet identified, which affect each other in a time-dependent manner. Increased knowledge of the detailed mechanisms of viral infection, the host inflammatory response during URI and the interaction between viruses and bacteria could lead to major advances in the prevention of AOM.

  14. The epidemiology, pathogenesis and histopathology of fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levene, Adam P; Goldin, Robert D

    2012-08-01

    Fatty liver disease includes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic liver disease (ALD), each of which is increasing in prevalence. Each represents a histological spectrum that extends from isolated steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is associated with obesity, diabetes, and insulin resistance, and is considered to be the liver manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of NAFLD and ALD involves cytokines, adipokines, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Histopathology is the gold standard for assessing the severity of liver damage in NAFLD and ALD. We have reviewed the literature, and described and compared the epidemiology, natural disease history, pathogenesis and histopathology of NAFLD and ALD.

  15. Preliminary Study on the Pathogenesis and Treatment in Simian AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    AIDSis a severe immunodeficiency and autoimmunity disease caused by HIVin human beings.It ruins some areaintheworld.About200macaques were usedtoinvestigatethe pathogenesis of simian AIDS(SAIDS)by means of pathological andim-munological processes.There are some data of SAIDS pathogenesis as bellows:1.Primary SIVinfection in monkeys.When SIVentered into CD4+Tlymphocytes,it replicated and delivered intobloodto be high viremia.Some SIV-CD4+Tlymphocyte went tothe lymphoidtissue.The level of SIVantibody ele-vated...

  16. Modern views on the epidemiology, etiology and pathogenesis of gynecomastia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Yashina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with one of the pressing andrological issues – gynecomastia, its etiology and pathogenesis. Based on the current epidemiological and experimental data, most common etiological factors of gynecomastia were investigated. A multiple-valued role of various causes of gynecomastia in several age-groups was revealed. Literature data show that gynecomastia may be a manifestation of various diseases: endocrine, genetic, systematic. As well as that, gynecomastia may occur in patients with oncological diseases. However, gynecomastia can be an iatrogenic complication. Currently, we continue to make insights to the problem of gynecomastia in order to be able to classify its etiological factors and determine its basic pathogenesis pathways.

  17. Peptic Ulcer Disease Different Pathogenesis of Duodenal and Gastric Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Koncoro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite decrease frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori due to eradication therapy, peptic ulcer disease as a manifestation of this infection is still remain a health burden. Understanding the physiology of gastric acid secretion and its alteration by H. pylori induced inflammation will aid physician in differentiating peptic ulcer disease based on its location. Duodenal ulcer and gastric ulcer disease are two common condition that usually found in peptic ulcer. Recognition of symptoms and its pathogenesis may lead physician to understand the fate of each condition in the future. This article reviews concept of peptic ulcer pathogenesis according to ulcer etiology.

  18. The Paradox of Feline Coronavirus Pathogenesis: A Review

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    Luciana Wanderley Myrrha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Feline coronavirus (FCoV is an enveloped single-stranded RNA virus, of the family Coronaviridae and the order Nidovirales. FCoV is an important pathogen of wild and domestic cats and can cause a mild or apparently symptomless enteric infection, especially in kittens. FCoV is also associated with a lethal, systemic disease known as feline infectious peritonitis (FIP. Although the precise cause of FIP pathogenesis remains unclear, some hypotheses have been suggested. In this review we present results from different FCoV studies and attempt to elucidate existing theories on the pathogenesis of FCoV infection.

  19. Virus receptors: implications for pathogenesis and the design of antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C

    1995-04-01

    A virus initiates infection by attaching to its specific receptor on the surface of a susceptible host cell. This prepares the way for the virus to enter the cell. Consequently, the expression of the receptor on specific cells and tissues of the host is a major determinant of the route of entry of the virus into the host and of the patterns of virus spread and pathogenesis in the host. This review emphasizes the virus-receptor interactions of human immunodeficiency virus, the rhinoviruses, the herpesviruses, and the coronaviruses. These interactions are often found to be complex and dynamic, involving multiple sites or factors on both the virus and the host cell. Also, the receptor may play an important role in virus entry per se in addition to its role in virus binding. In the cases of human immunodeficiency virus and the rhinoviruses, ingenious approaches to therapeutic strategies based on inhibiting virus attachment and entry are under development and in clinical trials.

  20. Pathogenesis and preventive treatment for animal disease due to locoweed poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenchen, Wu; Wenlong, Wang; Xiaoxue, Liu; Feng, Ma; Dandan, Cao; Xiaowen, Yang; Shanshan, Wang; Pengshuai, Geng; Hao, Lu; Baoyu, Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Locoweeds are perennial herbaceous plants included in Astragalus spp. and Oxytropis spp. that contain the toxic indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine. The livestock that consume locoweed feeding can suffer from a type of toxicity called "locoism." There are aliphatic nitro compounds, selenium, selenium compounds and alkaloids in locoweed. The toxic component in locoweeds has been identified as swainsonine, an indolizidine alkaloid. Swainsonine inhibits lysosomal α-mannosidase and mannosidase II, resulting in altered oligosaccharide degradation and incomplete glycoprotein processing. As a result, livestock that consume locoweeds exhibit several symptoms, including dispirited behavior, staggering gait, chromatopsia, trembling, ataxia, and cellular vacuolar degeneration of most tissues by pathological observation. Locoism results in significant annual economic losses. Recently, locoweed populations have increased domestically in China and abroad, resulting in an increase in the incidence of poisoning. Therefore, in this paper, we review the current research on locoweed, including on species variation, pathogenesis, damage and poisoning prevention measures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Understanding and treatment strategy of the pathogenesis of periodontal disease based on chronic inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tomohiko

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged inflammation continuously promotes the infiltration of macrophages in the organization and chronically induces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF and IL-1. In periodontal tissues, these inflammatory cytokines enhance the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts, which cause destruction of the alveolar bone. Therefore, inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production leads to the prevention or treatment of periodontal disease. IL-1 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that strongly enhances the bone-resorbing activity of osteoclasts. Elucidation of mechanisms for the production of IL-1 is critical for understanding the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. This paper reviews recent findings of the molecular mechanisms regulating IL-1 production and focuses on inflammasome.

  2. Further data to the aetiology, pathogenesis and therapy of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, A; Vandersmissen, E; Kapp, P

    1989-01-01

    Out of a total of 224 bovine eye secretions, 126 Moraxella bovis and 64 Neisseria ovis strains were isolated. The pathogenesis and histological lesions caused by Neisseria ovis have been studied on the eyes of three calves naturally affected with IBK, using electron microscopy. Neisseria ovis caused in 1-12 weeks old calves acute, transient and mostly benign serous conjunctivitis with only slight affection of the cornea. More rarely erosions and even ulceration of the cornea have been observed. Moraxella bovis and Neisseria ovis strains proved nearly unanimously sensitive in vitro to chloramphenicol, neomycin, oxytetracyclin, nitrofurantoin, erythromycin and cefoperazone. Other antibiotics and chemotherapeutics inhibited the growth of these agents only partly or were ineffective. Experimental therapy has been carried out using a single i.m. injection of Terramycin/LA inj. (Pfizer) in a dose of 20 mg/kg body mass, repeated if necessary after 72-96 h. This formulation proved more effective and practical than treatments used earlier.

  3. The role of Th17-associated cytokines in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Deming; Liang, Dongchun; Kaplan, Henry J; Shao, Hui

    2015-07-01

    The proinflammatory and pathogenic function of Th17 cells in autoimmune diseases have been established but the mechanism by which such cells cause disease remains to be determined. Inflammatory cytokines produced by Th17 cells may either promote or inhibit disease development. The major cytokines produced by the uveitogenic T cells, such as IL-17 and IL-22, are not always pathogenic, and the disease-inducing ability of pathogenic T cells is not immediately correlated to the amount of cytokine they produce. Future studies identifying factors causing increased Th17 responses and determining the types of cells that regulating Th17 autoreactive T cells should facilitate our effort of understanding Th17-mediated disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Role of Viral Mutation in the Pathogenesis of Chronic Viral Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-ming WANG; Lin LIU

    2008-01-01

    The quasispecies nature of hepatitis B and C virus (HBV, HCV) plays an important role in the pathogenesis, immune escape and drug resistance during chronic infection. Although there is still a lack of effective treatment for hepatitis C, a series of nucleoside analogs (NA) have been developed for the treatment of hepatitis B. NA resistant HBV mutants can accumulate during prolonged therapy and lead to the failure of anti-HBV therapy. Switching to other sensitive NAs can inhibit the emerged resistant mutants. Therefore, understanding the evolution of viral quasispecies under drug pressure is crucial for the establishment of antiviral strategy and the monitoring of antiviral process. Immune response and escape are complicated process, during which both host and virus factors may play their roles. Further understanding of the interaction and interrelationship between host and these viruses may lead to optimized prevention, diagnosis and treatment for chronic hepatitis.

  5. Quorum sensing inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, T.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Nielsen, J.

    2005-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems comprise a new therapeutic target potentially substitutive or complementary to traditional antibiotic treatment of chronic diseases. One route to disrupt the previously established interrelationship between pathogenesis and QS is by blocking the dual functioning signal...

  6. The NLRP3 Inflammasome is Involved in the Pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhijuan; Liu, Chanchan; Ji, Suqiong; Yang, Qingmei; Ye, Hongxiang; Han, Haiyan; Xue, Zheng

    2017-02-28

    The etiology and pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are complicated and have not been fully elucidated, but an important association has been identified between inflammation and PD. In this study, we investigated the role of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain, leucine rich repeat and pyrin domain-containing (NLRP) 3 inflammasome, consisting of NLRP3, caspase-1 and cytokines of the IL-1 family, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced PD rats. Microinjection of different doses of caspase-1 inhibitor (Ac-YVAD-CMK, 300 or 1200 ng/rat) was performed for seven consecutive days. Then, rotational behavior, the number of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), and the mRNA and protein expression levels of NLRP3 inflammasome components were measured 14 days after the microinjection setup was established. Results showed that high mRNA and protein expression levels of NLRP3 inflammasome components were observed in the injected side of the LPS- and 6-OHDA-induced PD rats; Ac-YVAD-CMK inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of NLRP3 inflammasome components in both LPS- and 6-OHDA-induced PD rats. Moreover, the number of rotations was significantly decreased, and the number of DA neurons in the SNc improved. Our data indicate that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in the pathogenesis of PD and that inhibiting the downstream pathway of the NLRP3/caspase-1/IL-1β axis can alleviate the occurrence of PD symptoms, providing a new basis for the prevention and treatment of PD.

  7. Pathogenesis of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae : role of toxins and fimbriae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, B.K.H.L. (Bouke Karel Hendrik Laurentius)

    2003-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae causes porcine pleuropneumonia, a disease that occurs world-wide and affects growing pigs of all ages. Infection of pigs with A. pleuropneumoniae can result in high morbidity and mortality. The present work contributes to the understanding of the pathogenesis of A.

  8. Pathogenesis of pancreatic encephalopathy in severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ping Zhang; Hua Tian

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreatic encephalopathy (PE) is a serious complication of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). In recent years, more and more PE cases have been reported worldwide, and the onset PE in the early stage was regarded as a poor prognosis sign of SAP, but the pathogenesis of PE in SAP still has not been clariifed in the past decade. The purpose of this review is to elucidate the possible pathogenesis of PE in SAP. DATA SOURCES:The English-language literature concern-ing PE in this review came from the Database of MEDLINE (period of 1991-2005), and the keywords of severe acute pancreatitis and pancreatic encephalopathy were used in the searching. RESULTS:Many factors were involved in the pathogenesis of PE in SAP. Pancreatin activation, excessive release of cytokines and oxygen free radicals, microcirculation abnormalities of hemodynamic disturbance, ET-1/NO ratio, hypoxemia, bacterial infection, water and electrolyte imbalance, and vitamin B1 deifciency participated in the development of PE in SAP. CONCLUSIONS:The pathogenesis of PE in SAP has not yet been fully understood. The development of PE in SAP may be a multi-factor process. To ifnd out the possible inducing factor is essential to the clinical management of PE in SAP.

  9. Pathogenesis and Cerebrospinal Fluid Hydrodynamics of the Chiari I Malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buell, Thomas J; Heiss, John D; Oldfield, Edward H

    2015-10-01

    This article summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the Chiari I malformation that is based on observations of the anatomy visualized by modern imaging with MRI and prospective studies of the physiology of patients before and after surgery. The pathogenesis of a Chiari I malformation of the cerebellar tonsils is grouped into 4 general mechanisms.

  10. Hidradenitis suppurativa : From pathogenesis to emerging treatment options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickinson-Blok, Janine Louise

    2015-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic skin disease that is characterized by inflammation of the hair follicles. The cause of HS is largely unknown and the disease remains difficult to treat. Mrs. Janine Dickinson-Blok studied the pathogenesis of HS and the efficacy of existing and emerging ther

  11. Pathogenesis: common pathways between hidradenitis suppurativa and Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Martínez, F J; Menchén, L

    2016-09-01

    Both hidradenitis suppurativa and Crohn disease are considered chronic inflammatory diseases due to immune dysregulation. The high prevalence of Crohn disease patients diagnosed with hidradenitis suppurativa suggests the existence of common pathogenic links. The present literature review analyses the similarities and differences in the pathogenesis of the two diseases, in the search for new research and knowledge targets.

  12. [AETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS GASTRO-DUODENALES ULCERATIVE LESIONS IN ELDERLY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernekhovskaya, N E; Povalayev, A V; Layshenko, G A

    2015-01-01

    In review today conceptions of view to aetiology and pathogenesis gastro-duodenales ulcerative lesions in elderly. Atherosclerosis, ischemic disease of the heart and hypertension are reasons of acute ulcers and erosions in elderly. The breaking of microcirculation are very importance.

  13. Deciphering the pathogenesis of tendinopathy: a three-stages process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Sai-Chuen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Our understanding of the pathogenesis of "tendinopathy" is based on fragmented evidences like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. We propose a "failed healing theory" to knit these fragments together, which can explain previous observations. We also propose that albeit "overuse injury" and other insidious "micro trauma" may well be primary triggers of the process, "tendinopathy" is not an "overuse injury" per se. The typical clinical, histological and biochemical presentation relates to a localized chronic pain condition which may lead to tendon rupture, the latter attributed to mechanical weakness. Characterization of pathological "tendinotic" tissues revealed coexistence of collagenolytic injuries and an active healing process, focal hypervascularity and tissue metaplasia. These observations suggest a failed healing process as response to a triggering injury. The pathogenesis of tendinopathy can be described as a three stage process: injury, failed healing and clinical presentation. It is likely that some of these "initial injuries" heal well and we speculate that predisposing intrinsic or extrinsic factors may be involved. The injury stage involves a progressive collagenolytic tendon injury. The failed healing stage mainly refers to prolonged activation and failed resolution of the normal healing process. Finally, the matrix disturbances, increased focal vascularity and abnormal cytokine profiles contribute to the clinical presentations of chronic tendon pain or rupture. With this integrative pathogenesis theory, we can relate the known manifestations of tendinopathy and point to the "missing links". This model may guide future research on tendinopathy, until we could ultimately decipher the complete pathogenesis process and provide better treatments.

  14. Deciphering the pathogenesis of tendinopathy: a three-stages process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of "tendinopathy" is based on fragmented evidences like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. We propose a "failed healing theory" to knit these fragments together, which can explain previous observations. We also propose that albeit "overuse injury" and other insidious "micro trauma" may well be primary triggers of the process, "tendinopathy" is not an "overuse injury" per se. The typical clinical, histological and biochemical presentation relates to a localized chronic pain condition which may lead to tendon rupture, the latter attributed to mechanical weakness. Characterization of pathological "tendinotic" tissues revealed coexistence of collagenolytic injuries and an active healing process, focal hypervascularity and tissue metaplasia. These observations suggest a failed healing process as response to a triggering injury. The pathogenesis of tendinopathy can be described as a three stage process: injury, failed healing and clinical presentation. It is likely that some of these "initial injuries" heal well and we speculate that predisposing intrinsic or extrinsic factors may be involved. The injury stage involves a progressive collagenolytic tendon injury. The failed healing stage mainly refers to prolonged activation and failed resolution of the normal healing process. Finally, the matrix disturbances, increased focal vascularity and abnormal cytokine profiles contribute to the clinical presentations of chronic tendon pain or rupture. With this integrative pathogenesis theory, we can relate the known manifestations of tendinopathy and point to the "missing links". This model may guide future research on tendinopathy, until we could ultimately decipher the complete pathogenesis process and provide better treatments. PMID:21144004

  15. Early and late pathogenesis of natural scrapie infection in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, van L.J.M.; Vromans, M.E.W.; Zijderveld, van F.G.

    2002-01-01

    The pathogenesis of scrapie infection was studied in sheep carrying the PrPVRQ/PrPVRQ genotype, which is associated with a high susceptibility for natural scrapie. The sheep were killed at sequential time points during a scrapie infection covering both the early and late stages of scrapie pathogenes

  16. Variant surface antigens, virulence genes and the pathogenesis of malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deitsch, Kirk W; Hviid, Lars

    2004-01-01

    increasingly more complicated, with further interactions, receptors, ligands and functional domains". Furthermore, they cautioned that "the challenge will be not to lose ourselves in the molecular detail, but remain focused on the role of [the var genes and other multigene families] in pathogenesis of malaria...

  17. Advances in understanding the pathogenesis of pneumococcal otitis media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonnaer, E.L.G.M.; Graamans, K.; Sanders, E.A.M.; Curfs, J.H.A.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this review, a state of the art on otitis media research is provided with emphasis on the role of Streptococcus pneumoniae in the pathogenesis of this disease. Articles have been selected by MEDLINE search supplemented with a manual crosscheck of bibliographies. Pathogenic mechanisms in middle

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the limelight of Parkinson's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rebecca; Starkov, Anatoly A; Beal, M Flint; Thomas, Bobby

    2009-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder with unknown etiology. It is marked by widespread neurodegeneration in the brain with profound loss of A9 midbrain dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta. Several theories of biochemical abnormalities have been linked to pathogenesis of PD of which mitochondrial dysfunction due to an impairment of mitochondrial complex I and subsequent oxidative stress seems to take the center stage in experimental models of PD and in postmortem tissues of sporadic forms of illness. Recent identification of specific gene mutations and their influence on mitochondrial functions has further reinforced the relevance of mitochondrial abnormalities in disease pathogenesis. In both sporadic and familial forms of PD abnormal mitochondrial paradigms associated with disease include impaired functioning of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, aging associated damage to mitochondrial DNA, impaired calcium buffering, and anomalies in mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. Here we provide an overview of specific mitochondrial functions affected in sporadic and familial PD that play a role in disease pathogenesis. We propose to utilize these gained insights to further streamline and focus the research to better understand mitochondria's role in disease development and exploit potential mitochondrial targets for therapeutic interventions in PD pathogenesis.

  19. The early pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the early pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is of critical importance to ongoing and future efforts to decrease the impact of FMD in endemic regions and prevent incursions to disease-free territories. The importance of the early phase of virus-host interaction lies in two ke...

  20. The puzzle of polymorphous light eruption : Patients and pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schornagel, I.J.

    2007-01-01

    Polymorphous light eruption (PLE) is a photosensitivity disorder of which the pathogenesis is not fully understood. Patient history in PLE is important since lesions are transient and often not present at time of consultation. Phototesting is done to reproduce the PLE skin lesions and to obtain

  1. [Polonium-210 acute and chronic pathomorphology and pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvacheva, Yu E

    2015-01-01

    In the present review, the data on the pathology of acute and chronic polonium injuries available from the an open-access domestic and foreign literature are primarily systemized and analyzed. The historical background of the research is presented in brief. On the basis of clinical and experimental generalizations, the current concept regarding the pathogenesis of polonium intoxication has been developed.

  2. The pathogenesis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The greatest segment of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) clinical research has been dedicated to elucidating pathogenesis and enhancing vaccine protection in cattle with less efforts invested in studies that are specific to pigs. However, accumulated evidence from FMD outbreaks and experimental invest...

  3. Pathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis: A unifying model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elias Kouroumalis; George Notas

    2006-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a disease of unknown etiology leading to progressive destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts and eventually to liver cirrhosis and failure. It is characterised by female predominance and serum auto-antibodies to mitochondrial antigens targeting the E2 components of the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complex. Although they are associated with disease pathogenesis, no concrete evidence has been presented so far. Epidemiological data indicate that a geographical clustering of cases and possible environmental factors are implicated in pathogenesis. A number of genetic factors play a role in determining disease susceptibility or progression, although no definitive conclusion has been reached so far. A key factor to immune pathogenesis is considered to be the breakdown of immune tolerance, either through molecular mimicry or through the so called determinant density model. Tn this review, the available data regarding the pathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis are described and discussed. A new unifying hypothesis based on early endothelin overproduction in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is presented and discussed.

  4. Foot-and-mouth disease: Host range and pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Søren; Mowat, N.

    2005-01-01

    In this chapter the host range of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) under natural and experimental conditions is reviewed. The routes and sites of infection, incubation periods and clinical and pathological findings are described and highlighted in relation to progress in understanding the pathogenesis...

  5. THE PATHOGENESIS OF SYRINGOMYELIA IN SPINAL-CORD EPENDYMOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LOHLE, PNM; WURZER, HAL; HOOGLAND, PH; SEELEN, PJ; GO, KG

    1994-01-01

    A spinal cord ependymoma with syringomyelia is presented. The pathogenesis of syrinx formation, associated with intramedullary tumors is not fully understood. In order to examine the mechanism of formation of the tumor-associated syrinx, syrinx fluid was obtained during surgery and concentrations of

  6. The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of glaucoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohra, Rupali; Tsai, James C; Kolko, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    specialists have acknowledged that elevated IOP is the most important risk factor for glaucoma, but does not define the disease. Other factors such as genetics, blood flow, and excitotoxicity are suggested as potential causal factors for progressive RGC death observed in glaucoma. We review recent studies...... elucidating a possible role of low-grade inflammation as a causal factor in the pathogenesis of glaucoma....

  7. Therapeutic effect of berberine on TDP-43-related pathogenesis in FTLD and ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Fu; Lee, Yi-Chao; Lee, Kuen-Haur; Lin, Hui-Ching; Chen, Chia-Ling; Shen, Che-Kun James; Huang, Chi-Chen

    2016-10-21

    In the central nervous system regions of the sporadic and familial FTLD and ALS patients, TDP-43 has been identified as the major component of UBIs inclusions which is abnormally hyperphosphorylated, ubiquitinated, and cleaved into C-terminal fragments to form detergent-insoluble aggregates. So far, the effective drugs for FTLD and ALS neurodegenerative diseases are yet to be developed. Autophagy has been demonstrated as the major metabolism route of the pathological TDP-43 inclusions, hence activation of autophagy is a potential therapeutic strategy for TDP-43 pathogenesis in FTLD and ALS. Berberine, a traditional herbal medicine, is an inhibitor of mTOR signal and an activator for autophagy. Berberine has been implicated in several kinds of diseases, including the neuronal-related pathogenesis, such as Parkinson's, Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the therapeutic effect of berberine on FTLD or ALS pathology has never been investigated. Here we studied the molecular mechanism of berberine in cell culture model with TDP-43 proteinopathies, and found that berberine is able to reverse the processing of insoluble TDP-43 aggregates formation through deregulation of mTOR/p70S6K signal and activation of autophagic degradation pathway. And inhibition of autophagy by specific autophagosome inhibitor, 3-MA, reverses the effect of berberine on reducing the accumulation of insoluble TDP-43 and aggregates formation. These results gave us the notion that inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA reverses the effect of berberine on TDP-43 pathogenesis, and activation of mTOR-regulated autophagy plays an important role in berberine-mediated therapeutic effect on TDP-43 proteinopathies. We supported an important notion that the traditional herb berberine is a potential alternative therapy for TDP-43-related neuropathology. Here we demonstrated that berberine is able to reverse the processing of insoluble TDP-43 aggregates formation through deregulation of mTOR/p70S6K signal

  8. Truncated prelamin A expression in HGPS-like patients: a transcriptional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthelemy, F.; Navarro, C; Fayek, R.; Silva, N.; Roll, P.; Sigaudy, S.; Oshima, J.; Bonne, G.; Papadopoulou-Legbelou, K.; Evangeliou, A.E.; Spilioti, M.; Lemerrer, M.; Wevers, R.A.; Morava, E.; Robaglia-Schlupp, A.; Levy, N.; Bartoli, M.; Sandre-Giovannoli, A. De

    2015-01-01

    Premature aging syndromes are rare genetic disorders mimicking clinical and molecular features of aging. A recently identified group of premature aging syndromes is linked to mutation of the LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C, and is associated with nuclear deformation and dysfunction. Hutchinson-Gil

  9. Truncated prelamin A expression in HGPS-like patients: a transcriptional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthelemy, F.; Navarro, C; Fayek, R.; Silva, N.; Roll, P.; Sigaudy, S.; Oshima, J.; Bonne, G.; Papadopoulou-Legbelou, K.; Evangeliou, A.E.; Spilioti, M.; Lemerrer, M.; Wevers, R.A.; Morava, E.; Robaglia-Schlupp, A.; Levy, N.; Bartoli, M.; Sandre-Giovannoli, A. De

    2015-01-01

    Premature aging syndromes are rare genetic disorders mimicking clinical and molecular features of aging. A recently identified group of premature aging syndromes is linked to mutation of the LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C, and is associated with nuclear deformation and dysfunction. Hutchinson-Gil

  10. Lysyl Oxidase, A Critical Intra- and Extra-Cellular Target in the Lung for Cigarette Smoke Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke (CS, a complex chemical mixture, contains more than 4,800 different compounds, including oxidants, heavy metals, and carcinogens, that individually or in combination initiate or promote pathogenesis in the lung accounting for 82% of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD deaths and 87% of lung cancer deaths. Lysyl oxidase (LO, a Cu-dependent enzyme, oxidizes peptidyl lysine residues in collagen, elastin and histone H1, essential for stabilization of the extracellular matrix and cell nucleus. Considerable evidences have shown that LO is a tumor suppressor as exemplified by inhibiting transforming activity of ras, a proto oncogene. CS condensate (CSC, 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK and cadmium (Cd, major components of CS, down-regulate LO expression at such multiple levels as mRNA, protein and catalytic activity in lung cells in vitro and in vivo indicating LO as a critical intra- and extracellular target for CS pathogenesis in the lung. In view of multiple biological functions and regulation characteristics of the LO gene, molecular mechanisms for CS damage to lung LO and its role in emphysema and cancer pathogenesis are discussed in this review.

  11. Role of the serine-rich surface glycoprotein Srr1 of Streptococcus agalactiae in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Seong Seo

    Full Text Available The binding of bacteria to fibrinogen and platelets are important events in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. Srr1 is a serine-rich repeat glycoprotein of Streptococcus agalactiae that binds directly to the Aα chain of human fibrinogen. To assess the impact of Srr1 on the pathogenesis of endocarditis due to S. agalactiae, we first examined the binding of this organism to immobilized human platelets. Strains expressing Srr1 had significantly higher levels of binding to human platelets in vitro, as compared with isogenic Δsrr1 mutants. In addition, platelet binding was inhibited by pretreatment with anti-fibrinogen IgG or purified Srr1 binding region. To assess the contribution of Srr1 to pathogenicity, we compared the relative virulence of S. agalactiae NCTC 10/84 strain and its Δsrr1 mutant in a rat model of endocarditis, where animals were co-infected with the WT and the mutant strains at a 1:1 ratio. At 72 h post-infection, bacterial densities (CFU/g of the WT strain within vegetations, kidneys, and spleens were significantly higher, as compared with the Δsrr1 mutant. These results indicate that Srr1 contributes to the pathogenesis of endocarditis due to S. agalactiae, at least in part through its role in fibrinogen-mediated platelet binding.

  12. ω-Hydroxyemodin Limits Staphylococcus aureus Quorum Sensing-Mediated Pathogenesis and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Seth M.; Elmore, Bradley O.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Triplett, Kathleen D.; Figueroa, Mario; Raja, Huzefa A.; El-Elimat, Tamam; Crosby, Heidi A.; Femling, Jon K.; Cech, Nadja B.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant pathogens are a global health threat. Small molecules that inhibit bacterial virulence have been suggested as alternatives or adjuncts to conventional antibiotics, as they may limit pathogenesis and increase bacterial susceptibility to host killing. Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of invasive skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in both the hospital and community settings, and it is also becoming increasingly antibiotic resistant. Quorum sensing (QS) mediated by the accessory gene regulator (agr) controls virulence factor production essential for causing SSTIs. We recently identified ω-hydroxyemodin (OHM), a polyhydroxyanthraquinone isolated from solid-phase cultures of Penicillium restrictum, as a suppressor of QS and a compound sought for the further characterization of the mechanism of action. At concentrations that are nontoxic to eukaryotic cells and subinhibitory to bacterial growth, OHM prevented agr signaling by all four S. aureus agr alleles. OHM inhibited QS by direct binding to AgrA, the response regulator encoded by the agr operon, preventing the interaction of AgrA with the agr P2 promoter. Importantly, OHM was efficacious in a mouse model of S. aureus SSTI. Decreased dermonecrosis with OHM treatment was associated with enhanced bacterial clearance and reductions in inflammatory cytokine transcription and expression at the site of infection. Furthermore, OHM treatment enhanced the immune cell killing of S. aureus in vitro in an agr-dependent manner. These data suggest that bacterial disarmament through the suppression of S. aureus QS may bolster the host innate immune response and limit inflammation. PMID:25645827

  13. Role of connexin-43 hemichannels in the pathogenesis of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez Almonacid, L A; Tafuri, S; Dipineto, L; Matteoli, G; Fiorillo, E; Della Morte, R; Fioretti, A; Menna, L F; Staiano, N

    2009-12-01

    Connexin (Cx) channels are sites of cytoplasmic communication between contacting cells. Evidence indicates that the opening of hemichannels occurs under both physiological and pathological conditions. In this paper, the involvement of Cx-43 hemichannels is demonstrated in the pathogenesis of Yersinia. Parental HeLa cells and transfected HeLa cells stably expressing Cx-43 (HCx43) were infected with Yersiniaenterocolitica, and bacterial uptake was measured by the colony-forming unit method. Bacterial uptake was higher in HCx43 cells than in parental cells and was inhibited by the Cx channel blocker, 18-alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid (AGA). The inhibitory effect of AGA was more pronounced on the Y. enterocolitica uptake by HCx43 cells than by parental cells. The ability of HCx43 cells to incorporate the permeable fluorescent tracer Lucifer Yellow (LY) was assessed. Dye incorporation was inhibited by AGA, whereas Y. enterocolitica infection of HCx43 cells increased LY incorporation. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that Y. enterocolitica infection of HCx43 cells induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Cx-43, thus supporting a critical role for Cx-43 in the strategies exploited by bacterial pathogens to invade non-phagocytic cells.

  14. Fibulin-1 regulates the pathogenesis of tissue remodeling in respiratory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Cooley, Marion A.; Jarnicki, Andrew G.; Hsu, Alan C-Y.; Nair, Prema M.; Haw, Tatt Jhong; Fricker, Michael; Gellatly, Shaan L.; Kim, Richard Y.; Inman, Mark D.; Tjin, Gavin; Wark, Peter A.B.; Walker, Marjorie M.; Horvat, Jay C.; Oliver, Brian G.; Argraves, W. Scott; Knight, Darryl A.; Burgess, Janette K.; Hansbro, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway and/or lung remodeling, involving exaggerated extracellular matrix (ECM) protein deposition, is a critical feature common to pulmonary diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Fibulin-1 (Fbln1), an important ECM protein involved in matrix organization, may be involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases. We found that Fbln1 was increased in COPD patients and in cigarette smoke–induced (CS-induced) experimental COPD in mice. Genetic or therapeutic inhibition of Fbln1c protected against CS-induced airway fibrosis and emphysema-like alveolar enlargement. In experimental COPD, this occurred through disrupted collagen organization and interactions with fibronectin, periostin, and tenascin-c. Genetic inhibition of Fbln1c also reduced levels of pulmonary inflammatory cells and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines (TNF-α, IL-33, and CXCL1) in experimental COPD. Fbln1c–/– mice also had reduced airway remodeling in experimental chronic asthma and pulmonary fibrosis. Our data show that Fbln1c may be a therapeutic target in chronic respiratory diseases. PMID:27398409

  15. Identification of TDP-43 as an oncogene in melanoma and its function during melanoma pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qinghai; Cao, Ke; Liu, Rui; Huang, Jinhua; Xia, Kun; Tang, Jintian; Chen, Xiang; Zhou, Ming; Xie, Huiqing; Zhou, Jianda

    2017-01-02

    Although recent studies have revealed TAR (trans-activating response region) DNA binding protein (TDP-43) as a potential therapeutic target for cancers, its role and clinical association with melanoma have not been explored. To identify the role and function of TDP-43 during melanoma pathogenesis. Firstly, the relationship between TDP-43 expression and patient survival was explored. Then TDP-43 expression level in melanoma tissue and different melanoma cell lines was measured. After silencing TDP-43 expression in melanoma cells, the impacts of TDP-43 on cellular proliferation, metastasis, glucose uptake, and glucose transporters levels were studied. In the end, effect of TDP-43 depletion on tumorigenicity of melanoma cells was tested in vivo. Our results showed that TDP-43 was overexpressed in melanoma paraffin samples compared with that in nevi tissues. The high expression level of TDP-43 was associated with poor patient survival. By silencing TDP-43, we saw significant inhibition of cell proliferation and metastasis in A375 and WM451 cells. TDP-43 knockdown could suppress glucose transporter type-4 (GLUT4) expression and reduce glucose uptake. And downregulation of GLUT4 in melanoma cells induced inhibition of cell proliferation and metastasis. TDP-43 knockdown significantly slowed down tumor growth and decreased GLUT4 expression in vivo. TDP-43 is a novel oncogene in melanoma and regulates melanoma proliferation and metastasis potentially through modulation of glucose metabolism.

  16. Pathogenesis and molecular targeted therapy of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Haruhiko; Katsuno, Masahisa; Suzuki, Keisuke; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2012-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), also known as Kennedy's disease, is an adult-onset, X-linked motor neuron disease characterized by muscle atrophy, weakness, contraction fasciculations, and bulbar involvement. SBMA is caused by the expansion of a CAG triplet repeat, encoding a polyglutamine tract within the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The histopathological finding in SBMA is the loss of lower motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord as well as in the brainstem motor nuclei. There is no established disease-modifying therapy for SBMA. Animal studies have revealed that the pathogenesis of SBMA depends on the level of serum testosterone, and that androgen deprivation mitigates neurodegeneration through inhibition of nuclear accumulation and/or stabilization of the pathogenic AR. Heat shock proteins, the ubiquitin-proteasome system and transcriptional regulation are also potential targets for development of therapy for SBMA. Among these therapeutic approaches, the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue, leuprorelin, prevents nuclear translocation of aberrant AR proteins, resulting in a significant improvement of disease phenotype in a mouse model of SBMA. In a phase 2 clinical trial of leuprorelin, the patients treated with this drug exhibited decreased mutant AR accumulation in scrotal skin biopsy. Phase 3 clinical trial showed the possibility that leuprorelin treatment is associated with improved swallowing function particularly in patients with a disease duration less than 10 years. These observations suggest that pharmacological inhibition of the toxic accumulation of mutant AR is a potential therapy for SBMA.

  17. Animal Models of Zika Virus Infection, Pathogenesis, and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Thomas E; Diamond, Michael S

    2017-04-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-transmitted flavivirus that now causes epidemics affecting millions of people on multiple continents. The virus has received global attention because of some of its unusual epidemiological and clinical features, including persistent infection in the male reproductive tract and sexual transmission, an ability to cross the placenta during pregnancy and infect the developing fetus to cause congenital malformations, and its association with Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. This past year has witnessed an intensive effort by the global scientific community to understand the biology of ZIKV and to develop pathogenesis models for the rapid testing of possible countermeasures. Here, we review the recent advances in and utility and limitations of newly developed mouse and nonhuman primate models of ZIKV infection and pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. HIV and mucosal barrier interactions: consequences for transmission and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgener, Adam; McGowan, Ian; Klatt, Nichole R

    2015-10-01

    The mucosal barrier plays an integral function in human health as it is the primary defense against pathogens, and provides a critical transition between the external environment and the human internal body. In the context of HIV infection, the most relevant mucosal surfaces include those of the gastrointestinal (GI) and genital tract compartments. Several components help maintain the effectiveness of this mucosal surface, including the physical anatomy of the barrier, cellular immunity, soluble factors, and interactions between the epithelial barrier and the local microenvironment, including mucus and host microbiota. Any defects in barrier integrity or function can rapidly lead to an increase in acquisition risk, or with established infection may result in increased pathogenesis, morbidities, or mortality. Indeed, a key feature to all aspects of HIV infection from transmission to pathogenesis is disruption and/or dysfunction of mucosal barriers. Herein, we will detail the host-pathogen relationship of HIV and mucosal barriers in both of these scenarios.

  19. Using 'omics' to define pathogenesis and biomarkers of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudle, W Michael; Bammler, Theo K; Lin, Yvonne; Pan, Sheng; Zhang, Jing

    2010-06-01

    Although great effort has been put forth to uncover the complex molecular mechanisms exploited in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease, a satisfactory explanation remains to be discovered. The emergence of several -omics techniques, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics, have been integral in confirming previously identified pathways that are associated with dopaminergic neurodegeneration and subsequently Parkinson's disease, including mitochondrial and proteasomal function and synaptic neurotransmission. Additionally, these unbiased techniques, particularly in the brain regions uniquely associated with the disease, have greatly enhanced our ability to identify novel pathways, such as axon-guidance, that are potentially involved in Parkinson's pathogenesis. A comprehensive appraisal of the results obtained by different -omics has also reconfirmed the increase in oxidative stress as a common pathway likely to be critical in Parkinson's development/progression. It is hoped that further integration of these techniques will yield a more comprehensive understanding of Parkinson's disease etiology and the biological pathways that mediate neurodegeneration.

  20. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases.

  1. Role of ammonia in the pathogenesis of brain edema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiwara,Masachika

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of hyperammonemia in the pathogenesis of cerebral edema was investigated using mongrel dogs to develop a treatment for cerebral edema in acute hepatic failure. Intravenous infusion of ammonium acetate alone into dogs did not induce brain edema, although blood ammonia reached unphysiologically high levels. However, ammonium acetate infusion during mannitol-induced reversible (osmotic opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB effectively induced cytotoxic brain edema. Pretreatment with a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA; valine, leucine and isoleucine solution prevented an increase in intracranial pressure (ICP and brain water content, and caused a decrease in brain ammonia content and an increase in brain BCAA and glutamic acid. The results suggest that ammonia plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cerebral edema during acute hepatic failure and that BCAAs accelerate ammonia detoxification in the brain.

  2. Molecular biology and pathogenesis of hepatitis E virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek Chandra; Shikha Taneja; Manjula Kalia; Shahid Jameel

    2008-11-01

    The hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a small RNA virus and the etiological agent for hepatitis E, a form of acute viral hepatitis. The virus has a feco-oral transmission cycle and is transmitted through environmental contamination, mainly through drinking water. Recent studies on the isolation of HEV-like viruses from animal species also suggest zoonotic transfer of the virus. The absence of small animal models of infection and efficient cell culture systems has precluded virological studies on the replication cycle and pathogenesis of HEV. A vaccine against HEV has undergone successful clinical testing and diagnostic tests are available. This review describes HEV epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, molecular virology and the host response to HEV infection. The focus is on published literature in the past decade.

  3. Comparative Aspects of Osteosarcoma Pathogenesis in Humans and Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy M. Fan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is a primary and aggressive bone sarcoma affecting the skeleton of two principal species, human beings and canines. The biologic behavior of OS is conserved between people and dogs, and evidence suggests that fundamental discoveries in OS biology can be facilitated through detailed and comparative studies. In particular, the relative genetic homogeneity associated with specific dog breeds can provide opportunities to facilitate the discovery of key genetic drivers involved in OS pathogenesis, which, to-date, remain elusive. In this review, known causative factors that predispose to the development OS in human beings and dogs are summarized in detail. Based upon the commonalities shared in OS pathogenesis, it is likely that foundational discoveries in one species will be translationally relevant to the other and emphasizes the unique opportunities that might be gained through comparative scientific approaches.

  4. MODERN IDEA ON THE PATHOGENESIS OF SPONDYLOARTHRITIS: MOLECULAR MECHANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Nasonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As of now, impaired immune homeostasis of the intestinal mucosa in genetically predisposed individuals is considered to be one of the major components in the pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis (SpA, which leads to systemic chronic inflammation. The results of recent studies may suggest that the interleukin-23/interleukin-17 (IL-23/IL-17 axis plays a leading role in the development of these diseases. The multifactorial components of the pathogenesis of SpA are characterized by not only the hyperproduction of IL-23, but also by the change in cell target susceptibility to this cytokine with aconcurrent increase in their number, resulting in the chronic autoinflammatory process that occurs via a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of different types of SpA

  5. Role of stem cells in spondyloarthritis: Pathogenesis, treatment and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rebecca S Y

    2015-10-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a family of interrelated inflammatory arthritis that includes ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis, arthritis related to inflammatory bowel disease and undifferentiated SpA. The classification, epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of SpA have been extensively reviewed in the published literature. Reviews on the use of stem cells in various autoimmune diseases in general are also common. However, a review on the role of stem cells in SpA is currently lacking. This review focuses on the involvement of stem cells in the pathogenesis of SpA and the application of different types of stem cells in the treatment of SpA. It also addresses some of the complications which may arise as a result of the use of stem cells in the treatment of SpA.

  6. Inflammatory bowel diseases: from pathogenesis to laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Daniela; Zambon, Carlo-Federico; Plebani, Mario

    2014-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), which comprise the two major clinical subtypes, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, incur high morbidity and potential mortality. The present study reviews data on the pathogenesis and diagnosis of IBDs. The pathogenesis depends on complex interactions between susceptibility genes, environmental factors, and innate and adaptive immunity, the understanding of which is crucial to discovering novel laboratory biomarkers. Traditional laboratory tests for the diagnosis, prognosis and assessment of disease activity of IBDs are reported on, and the biochemical properties, pre-analytical and analytical aspects and clinical utility of the fecal markers lactoferrin and calprotectin are described. DNA testing and established (ASCA and pANCA) and emerging (ACCA, ALCA, AMCA, OmpC) serum markers are described; a further aspect to be addressed is the clinical use of pharmacogenetics for the treatment of IBDs.

  7. [Etiology and pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, P; Holz, F G; Charbel Issa, P

    2013-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness in Germany. Due to the demographic development a further increase of affected patients is to be expected. Improved understanding of AMD pathogenesis resulted from the molecular biological approaches in recent years and showed an association of genetic factors with AMD. The complement factor H gene and the second high-risk locus ARMS2 in particular were found to contribute a significant risk for development of the disease. Ageing and environmental factors, such as smoking, modulate the individual genetic risk profile. A detailed understanding of the complex AMD pathogenesis is also relevant in ophthalmological practice to understand new treatment strategies. In this review we aim to give an overview of the interplay of ageing, external environmental factors and genetic risk variants leading to AMD.

  8. [Ulcer disease: challenging problems of etiology, pathogenesis, differential treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimmerman, Ia S

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes the data of Russian and foreign authors as well as the results of original studies on etiology pathogenesis, and differential treatment of ulcer disease (UD). The author's original concepts of UD pathogenesis and relations between man and Helicobacter pylori are discussed. The pathogenetic role of disturbances in the system of gastroduodental self-regulatory function and psychosomatic mechanisms as well as immune deficiency and impaired antioxidatve protection is considered. Peculiarities and results of UD eradication therapy intended to eliminate H. pylori infection are described. The importance of the choice of the UD treatment strategy on an individual basis is emphasized as opposed to the use of universal standards and therapeutic modalities influencing only local pathogenic factors, such as acidopeptic ones and H. pylori infection.

  9. Comparative Pathogenesis and Systems Biology for Biodefense Virus Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin C. Bowick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing vaccines to biothreat agents presents a number of challenges for discovery, preclinical development, and licensure. The need for high containment to work with live agents limits the amount and types of research that can be done using complete pathogens, and small markets reduce potential returns for industry. However, a number of tools, from comparative pathogenesis of viral strains at the molecular level to novel computational approaches, are being used to understand the basis of viral attenuation and characterize protective immune responses. As the amount of basic molecular knowledge grows, we will be able to take advantage of these tools not only to rationally attenuate virus strains for candidate vaccines, but also to assess immunogenicity and safety in silico. This review discusses how a basic understanding of pathogenesis, allied with systems biology and machine learning methods, can impact biodefense vaccinology.

  10. Genetic determinants of pathogenesis by feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Meredith A

    2011-10-15

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, immune-augmented, and progressive viral disease of cats associated with feline coronavirus (FCoV). Viral genetic determinants specifically associated with FIPV pathogenesis have not yet been discovered. Viral gene signatures in the spike, non-structural protein 3c, and membrane of the coronavirus genome have been shown to often correlate with disease manifestation. An "in vivo mutation transition hypothesis" is widely accepted and postulates that de novo virus mutation occurs in vivo giving rise to virulence. The existence of "distinct circulating avirulent and virulent strains" is an alternative hypothesis of viral pathogenesis. It may be possible that viral dynamics from both hypotheses are at play in the occurrence of FIP. Epidemiologic data suggests that the genetic background of the cat contributes to the manifestation of FIP. Further studies exploring both viral and host genetic determinants of disease in FIP offer specific opportunities for the management of this disease.

  11. Uveitis and glaucoma: new insights in the pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sng, Chelvin C A; Ang, Marcus; Barton, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding complication of uveitis, where intraocular inflammation, secondary corticosteroid response, and varying types and degrees of angle abnormalities contribute to its pathogenesis. Management of uveitic glaucoma remains challenging. Treatment is targeted at reducing the inflammation and lowering the intraocular pressure. Recent studies have highlighted the role of viruses, such as cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, and more recently Ebola virus, in the pathogenesis of uveitic glaucoma. Antiviral therapy may be beneficial in eyes with detectable viral DNA. The success of glaucoma surgery is decreased in eyes with uveitic glaucoma, and surgical interventions are associated with a higher incidence of postoperative complications. Novel glaucoma surgical and laser treatments may improve the predictability of surgery for uveitic glaucoma, but these require further evaluation.

  12. The roles of tumor-derived exosomes in cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenjie; Robbins, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    Exosomes are endosome-derived, 30-100 nm small membrane vesicles released by most cell types including tumor cells. They are enriched in a selective repertoire of proteins and nucleic acids from parental cells and are thought to be actively involved in conferring intercellular signals. Tumor-derived exosomes have been viewed as a source of tumor antigens that can be used to induce antitumor immune responses. However, tumor-derived exosomes also have been found to possess immunosuppressive properties and are able to facilitate tumor growth, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance. These different effects of tumor-derived exosomes contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer. This review will discuss the roles of tumor-derived exosomes in cancer pathogenesis, therapy, and diagnostics.

  13. The Roles of Tumor-Derived Exosomes in Cancer Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjie Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are endosome-derived, 30–100 nm small membrane vesicles released by most cell types including tumor cells. They are enriched in a selective repertoire of proteins and nucleic acids from parental cells and are thought to be actively involved in conferring intercellular signals. Tumor-derived exosomes have been viewed as a source of tumor antigens that can be used to induce antitumor immune responses. However, tumor-derived exosomes also have been found to possess immunosuppressive properties and are able to facilitate tumor growth, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance. These different effects of tumor-derived exosomes contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer. This review will discuss the roles of tumor-derived exosomes in cancer pathogenesis, therapy, and diagnostics.

  14. Juvenile Dermatomyositis: New Developments in Pathogenesis, Assessment and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a rare, potentially life-threatening systemic autoimmune disease primarily affecting muscle and skin. Recent advances in the recognition, standardised assessment and treatment of JDM have been greatly facilitated by large collaborative research networks. Through these networks, a number of immunogenetic risk factors have now been defined, as well as a number of potential pathways identified in the aetio-pathogenesis of JDM. Myositis-associated and myositis-sp...

  15. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: Pathogenesis and Clinical Picture

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is a zoonosis endemic in eastern Asia, especially in China. The reservoir host of HTNV is field mouse (Apodemus agraricus). The main manifestation of HFRS, including acute kidney injury, increases vascular permeability, and coagulation abnormalities. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HFRS including virus factor, immunity factor and host genetic factors. Furthermore, the treatmen...

  16. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome:pathogenesis and clinical picture

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is a zoonosis endemic in eastern Asia, especially in China. The reservoir host of HTNV is field mouse (Apodemus agraricus). The main manifestation of HFRS, including acute kidney injury, increases vascular permeability and coagulation abnormalities. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HFRS including virus factor, immunity factor and host genetic factors. Furthermore, the treatmen...

  17. Pathogenesis of Avian Bornavirus in Experimentally Infected Cockatiels

    OpenAIRE

    Piepenbring, Anne K.; Enderlein, Dirk; Herzog, Sibylle; Kaleta, Erhard F.; Heffels-Redmann, Ursula; Ressmeyer, Saskia; Herden, Christiane; Lierz, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Avian bornavirus (ABV) is the presumed causative agent of proventricular dilatation disease (PDD), a major fatal disease in psittacines. However, the influencing factors and pathogenesis of PDD are not known and natural ABV infection exhibits remarkable variability. We investigated the course of infection in 18 cockatiels that were intracerebrally and intravenously inoculated with ABV. A persistent ABV infection developed in all 18 cockatiels, but, as in natural infection, clinical disease pa...

  18. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis can be classified into fibrous, fibro-osseous and bony ankylosis. It is still a huge challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons due to the technical difficulty and high incidence of recurrence. The poor outcome of disease may be partially attributed to the limited understanding of its pathogenesis. The purpose of this article was to comprehensively review the literature and summarise results from both human and animal studies related to the genesis of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25189735

  19. [Pathogenesis of phantom limb syndrome and its treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naryshkin, A G; Gurchin, F A; Samoĭlov, K A; Kirsanova, G V; Vasilevskaia, L S; Shvets, Ia M

    1989-08-01

    The spinal mechanism of the phantom pain origin is proved. The underlying factors are: segmentary spinal denervation hypersensitivity and attenuation of the descending inhibitory influence. The pathogenetic treatment of phantom pains is proposed by means of an associated treatment by GABA-ergic drug--Baclofen and alpha-2--adrenomimetic--Clofelin. Good effects of the proposed scheme of treatment confirm the correctness of the presented ideas of pathogenesis of phantom pains.

  20. Research progresses in the pathogenesis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Lan Shi; Xiao-Wen Tang; De-Pei Wu

    2011-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a distinct subset of T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. As a consequence of its low incidence, general pathogenic consideration of ALCL is lacking. In this review, we summarize the pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of ALCL, so as to better understand key stages of the development of this disease and provide valuable information for future treatment.

  1. The fundamental role of endothelial cells in hantavirus pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jussi eHepojoki; Antti eVaheri; Tomas eStrandin

    2014-01-01

    Hantavirus, a genus of rodent- and insectivore-borne viruses in the family Bunyaviridae, is a group of emerging zoonotic pathogens. Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome in man, often with severe consequences. Vascular leakage is evident in severe hantavirus infections, and increased permeability contributes to the pathogenesis. This review summarizes the current knowledge on hantavirus interactions with hematopoietic and endothelial ...

  2. Minireview: Inflammation and Obesity Pathogenesis: The Hypothalamus Heats Up

    OpenAIRE

    Thaler, Joshua P.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity induced by high-fat (HF) feeding is associated with low-grade inflammation in peripheral tissues that predisposes to insulin resistance. Recent evidence suggests the occurrence of a similar process in the hypothalamus, which favors weight gain through impairment of leptin and insulin signaling. In addition to its implications for obesity pathogenesis, this hypothesis suggests that centrally targeted antiinflammatory therapies may prove effective in prevention and treatment of this dis...

  3. Understanding mechanisms of the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Metin; Basaranoglu; Serra; Kayacetin; Nevin; Yilmaz; Ertugrul; Kayacetin; Orhan; Tarcin; Abdullah; Sonsuz

    2010-01-01

    A central issue in the understanding of the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the problem of the underlying mechanisms which are not fully understood.In the setting of excessive central adiposity,insulin resistance is the major underlying cause of fat accumulation in hepatocytes.Because of the difficulties with human trials,several animal models have been developed for this purpose mainly characterized as follows:genetically disturbed or murine fatty liver,methionine-choline deficient diet...

  4. [Proliferative vitreoretinopathy: modern view on etiology and pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artem'eva, O V; Samoĭlov, A N; Zhernakov, S V

    2014-01-01

    Studies on etiology and pathogenesis of proliferative vitreoretinopathy are necessitated by the absence of a unified theory, which would provide a clear understanding of causes and mechanisms of the disease. The results of recent investigations allow to consider proliferative vitreoretinopathy as an uncontrollable plastic process caused by certain changes in the retina aimed at survival of its cells under oxidative stress. This approach enables preclinical indication of the process and development of new therapies.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Pathogenesis Differ in Krabbe Disease Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spratley, Samantha J; Hill, Chris H; Viuff, Agnete H;

    2016-01-01

    Krabbe disease is a severe, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by defects in the lysosomal enzyme galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The correct targeting of GALC to the lysosome is essential for the degradation of glycosphingolipids including the primary lipid component of myelin. Over 100 differ...... to bind essential cofactors. The classification of disease pathogenesis presented here provides a molecular framework for appropriate targeting of future Krabbe disease therapies....

  6. UTIs in small animal patients: part 1: etiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, Nicole; Loyd, Kimberly; Grauer, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how urinary tract infections (UTIs) can occur and how to classify them can help the practitioner to make a plan for treatment. This review summarizes the etiology, pathogenesis, and host defense mechanisms associated with bacterial UTIs in dogs and cats. UTIs in Small Animal Patients: Part 2: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Complications will appear in the March/April 2013 issue of the Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association.

  7. [Celiacia and hypolactasia in adults: etiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimmerman, Ia S

    2011-01-01

    A review of current data on the most widespread clinical forms of intestinal enzymopathies is presented with emphasis on celiacia and hypolactasia in adult patients. An alternative definition of these diseases is proposed, their prevalence in different countries and ethnic groups is discussed. Their etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical variants in different age groups are analysed. The clinical classification of celiacia, informative value of different diagnostic methods, their specificity and sensitivity, potential for dietetic and medicamental therapy are considered.

  8. Studying Herpesvirus Pathogenesis Using SCID Mice Implanted With Human Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marvin; Sommer; Shannon; Taylor; Stacey; Leisenfelder; Robert; Morton; Ann; Arvin; Jennifer; Moffat

    2005-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus(HCMV)and Varicella Zoster virus(VZV)are belongto herpesvirusfamily.HCMVrarelycaus-es symptomatic diseaseinanimmunocompetent host;however,itis a major cause of infectious morbidityand mortalityinimmunocompromised individuals and developingfetuses.VZVinfectioncauses chickenpoxandshingles.Sincethese spe-cies-specific herpesviruses do notinfect other animals,noanimal model is availablefor pathogenesis studies.Severe com-binedimmunodeficient(SCID)mice implanted with humantissues(SCID-hu)pro...

  9. New Concepts in the Diagnosis and Pathogenesis of Trichomonas vaginalis

    OpenAIRE

    Renuka Bhatt; Mary Abraham; Dino Petrin; Garber, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis infection is the most commonly encountered sexually transmitted disease. There is a need for more accurate and rapid laboratory diagnostic methods, leading to better control and treatment strategies. Various virulence factors such as adherence, contact-independent factors, hemolysis and acquisition of host macromolecules have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of this infection. Detection of the factors that are only present in the pathogenic isolates of trich...

  10. Understanding Zika virus pathogenesis: an interview with Catherine Spong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Catherine Y

    2016-06-06

    A recent outbreak of Zika virus has been linked to fetal abnormalities in pregnant women who have been infected. The scientific community is working toward understanding Zika virus pathogenesis to better manage affected women and children. In an interview with Dr. Catherine Spong, we discuss the aims and challenges of a forthcoming longitudinal study of a cohort of pregnant women in areas of current active Zika virus transmission.

  11. Rosacea: part I. Introduction, categorization, histology, pathogenesis, and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two, Aimee M; Wu, Wiggin; Gallo, Richard L; Hata, Tissa R

    2015-05-01

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects approximately 16 million Americans. Four distinct subtypes of rosacea have been recognized, with transient and nontransient facial flushing, telangiectasia, and inflammatory papules and pustules being among the more commonly recognized features. Although the exact pathogenesis of rosacea is unknown, dysregulation of the innate immune system, overgrowth of commensal skin organisms, and aberrant neurovascular signaling may all have a role in promoting the clinical features of rosacea.

  12. Experimental study on the pathogenesis of epithelial tumors (VI report)

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiki, Hirota; Ichikawa, Koichi; Yamagiwa, Katsusaburo; Maruyama, Koshichiro; Lee, Kunsei; Fukuda,Tamotsu; Kinoshita, Riojun; Kashiwagi, Masatoshi; Ogawa, Juntaro

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cancer and inflammation has a long history. Virchow's irritation theory based on human cancer engendered the essential role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. Drs. Yamagiwa and Ichikawa first published a comprehensive paper entitled “Experimental study on the pathogenesis of epithelial tumors” (I report) in 1915 in German, and went on to publish five more reports (1915–1924) under the same title. They succeeded in demonstrating that inflammation is an important carcinogenic fac...

  13. Understanding Anaplasmataceae pathogenesis using ‘Omics’ approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic ePruneau

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how Omics approaches improve our understanding of Anaplasmataceae pathogenesis, through a global and integrative strategy to identify genes and proteins involved in biochemical pathways key for pathogen-host-vector interactions.The Anaplasmataceae family comprises obligate intracellular bacteria mainly transmitted by arthropods. These bacteria are responsible for major human and animal endemic and emerging infectious diseases with important economic and public health impacts. In order to improve disease control strategies, it is essential to better understand their pathogenesis. Our work focused on four Anaplasmataceae, which cause important animal, human and zoonotic diseases: Anaplasma marginale, A. phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia chaffeensis and E. ruminantium. Wolbachia spp. an endosymbiont of arthropods was also included in this review as a model of a non-pathogenic Anaplasmataceae.A gap analysis on Omics approaches on Anaplasmataceae was performed, which highlighted a lack of studies on the genes and proteins involved in the infection of hosts and vectors. Furthermore, most of the studies have been done on the pathogen itself, mainly on infectious free-living forms and rarely on intracellular forms. In order to perform a transcriptomic analysis of the intracellular stage of development, researchers developed methods to enrich bacterial transcripts from infected cells. These methods are described in this paper. Bacterial genes encoding outer membrane proteins, post-translational modifications, eukaryotic repeated motif proteins, proteins involved in osmotic and oxidative stress and hypothetical proteins have been identified to play a key role in Anaplasmataceae pathogenesis. Further investigations on the function of these outer membrane proteins and hypothetical proteins will be essential to confirm their role in the pathogenesis. Our work underlines the need for further studies in this domain and on host and vector responses

  14. [EBOLA HEMORRHAGIC FEVER; ETIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS, AND CLINICAL SYMPTOMS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, K W; Zakharenko, S M; Kovalenko, A N; Semenov, A V; Fusin, A Ya

    2015-01-01

    The data on the prevalence of disease caused by Ebola virus, biological features of its pathogen, character of the epidemiological process, pathogenesis and clinical symptoms are presented. The disease is characterized by suppression of protective immunological mechanisms and systemic inflammatory reaction accounting for the lesions of vascular endothelium, hemostatic and immune systems. It eventually leads to polyorgan insufficiency and severe shock. Lethality amounts to 50%.

  15. Targeting Protein Prenylation in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stephen G.; Yang, Shao H.; Davies, Brandon S. J.; Jung, Hea-Jin; Fong, Loren G.

    2013-01-01

    A clinical trial of a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor (lonafarnib) for the treatment of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) was recently completed. Here, we discuss the mutation that causes HGPS, the rationale for inhibiting protein farnesyltransferase, the potential limitations of this therapeutic approach, and new potential strategies for treating the disease. PMID:23390246

  16. Targeting Protein Prenylation in Progeria

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Stephen G.; Yang, Shao H.; Davies, Brandon S.J.; Jung, Hea-Jin; Fong, Loren G.

    2013-01-01

    A clinical trial of a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor (lonafarnib) for the treatment of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) was recently completed. Here, we discuss the mutation that causes HGPS, the rationale for inhibiting protein farnesyltransferase, the potential limitations of this therapeutic approach, and new potential strategies for treating the disease.

  17. Targeting protein prenylation in progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stephen G; Yang, Shao H; Davies, Brandon S J; Jung, Hea-Jin; Fong, Loren G

    2013-02-06

    A clinical trial of a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor (lonafarnib) for the treatment of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) was recently completed. Here, we discuss the mutation that causes HGPS, the rationale for inhibiting protein farnesyltransferase, the potential limitations of this therapeutic approach, and new potential strategies for treating the disease.

  18. T cell-dependence of Lassa fever pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Flatz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV, the causative agent of Lassa fever (LF, is endemic in West Africa, accounting for substantial morbidity and mortality. In spite of ongoing research efforts, LF pathogenesis and mechanisms of LASV immune control remain poorly understood. While normal laboratory mice are resistant to LASV, we report that mice expressing humanized instead of murine MHC class I (MHC-I failed to control LASV infection and develop severe LF. Infection of MHC-I knockout mice confirmed a key role for MHC-I-restricted T cell responses in controlling LASV. Intriguingly we found that T cell depletion in LASV-infected HHD mice prevented disease, irrespective of high-level viremia. Widespread activation of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, manifest through inducible NO synthase expression, and elevated IL-12p40 serum levels indicated a systemic inflammatory condition. The absence of extensive monocyte/macrophage activation in T cell-depleted mice suggested that T cell responses contribute to deleterious innate inflammatory reactions and LF pathogenesis. Our observations in mice indicate a dual role for T cells, not only protecting from LASV, but also enhancing LF pathogenesis. The possibility of T cell-driven enhancement and immunopathogenesis should be given consideration in future LF vaccine development.

  19. T cell-dependence of Lassa fever pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatz, Lukas; Rieger, Toni; Merkler, Doron; Bergthaler, Andreas; Regen, Tommy; Schedensack, Mariann; Bestmann, Lukas; Verschoor, Admar; Kreutzfeldt, Mario; Brück, Wolfgang; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Günther, Stephan; Pinschewer, Daniel D

    2010-03-26

    Lassa virus (LASV), the causative agent of Lassa fever (LF), is endemic in West Africa, accounting for substantial morbidity and mortality. In spite of ongoing research efforts, LF pathogenesis and mechanisms of LASV immune control remain poorly understood. While normal laboratory mice are resistant to LASV, we report that mice expressing humanized instead of murine MHC class I (MHC-I) failed to control LASV infection and develop severe LF. Infection of MHC-I knockout mice confirmed a key role for MHC-I-restricted T cell responses in controlling LASV. Intriguingly we found that T cell depletion in LASV-infected HHD mice prevented disease, irrespective of high-level viremia. Widespread activation of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, manifest through inducible NO synthase expression, and elevated IL-12p40 serum levels indicated a systemic inflammatory condition. The absence of extensive monocyte/macrophage activation in T cell-depleted mice suggested that T cell responses contribute to deleterious innate inflammatory reactions and LF pathogenesis. Our observations in mice indicate a dual role for T cells, not only protecting from LASV, but also enhancing LF pathogenesis. The possibility of T cell-driven enhancement and immunopathogenesis should be given consideration in future LF vaccine development.

  20. New advances in the pathogenesis and therapy of essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Ross L; Heaney, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET) is a hematopoietic disorder that manifests clinically as thrombocytosis, and patients with ET are at increased risk for developing thrombosis, myelofibrosis, and transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. Although ET was recognized as a distinct clinical syndrome more than 6 decades ago and was classified as a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) by William Dameshek in 1951, the molecular pathogenesis of ET remained unknown until 2005, when activating mutations in the JAK2 tyrosine kinase (JAK2V617F) were identified in a significant proportion of patients with ET, polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). In addition, subsequent studies have identified gain-of-function mutations in the thrombopoietin receptor (MPL) in a subset of patients with JAK2V617F-negative ET, suggesting that JAK2 activation by distinct mechanisms contributes to the pathogenesis of ET. Despite these important observations, important questions remain regarding the role of JAK2/MPL mutations in ET pathogenesis, the etiology of JAK2/MPL negative ET, the factors that distinguish ET from other MPNs with the JAK2V617F mutation, and the role of JAK2-targeted therapies for the treatment of these MPNs.

  1. Concept of the pathogenesis and treatment of cholelithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich

    2012-02-27

    Gallstone disease (GD) is a chronic recurrent hepatobiliary disease, the basis for which is the impaired metabolism of cholesterol, bilirubin and bile acids, which is characterized by the formation of gallstones in the hepatic bile duct, common bile duct, or gallbladder. GD is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal diseases with a substantial burden to health care systems. GD can result in serious outcomes, such as acute gallstone pancreatitis and gallbladder cancer. The epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of GD are discussed in this review. The prevalence of GD varies widely by region. The prevalence of gallstone disease has increased in recent years. This is connected with a change in lifestyle: reduction of motor activity, reduction of the physical load and changes to diets. One of the important benefits of early screening for gallstone disease is that ultrasonography can detect asymptomatic cases, which results in early treatment and the prevention of serious outcomes. The pathogenesis of GD is suggested to be multifactorial and probably develops from complex interactions between many genetic and environmental factors. It suggests that corticosteroids and oral contraceptives, which contain hormones related to steroid hormones, may be regarded as a model system of cholelithiasis development in man. The achievement in the study of the physiology of bile formation and the pathogenesis of GD has allowed expanding indications for therapeutic treatment of GD.

  2. Novel Insights into the Pathogenesis of Hirschsprung's-associated Enterocolitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Lei Jiao; Xu-Yong Chen; Jie-Xiong Feng

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To systematically summary the updated results about the pathogenesis of Hirschsprung's-associated enterocolitis (HAEC).Besides,we discussed the research key and direction based on these results.Data Sources:Our data cited in this review were obtained mainly from PubMed from 1975 to 2015,with keywords "Hirschsprungenterocolitis","Hirschsprung's enterocolitis","Hirschsprung's-associated enterocolitis","Hirschsprung-associated enterocolitis","HAEC",and "EC".Study Selection:Articles regarding the pathogenesis of HAEC were selected,and the articles mainly regarding the diagnosis,surgical approach,treatment,and follow-up were excluded.Results:Several factors,mainly including mucus barrier,intestinal microbiota,and immune function,as well as some other factors such as genetic variations and surgical reasons,have been found to be related to the pathogenesis of HAEC.Changed quantity and barrier property of mucus,different composition of microbiota,and an abnormal immtme state work together or separately trigger HAEC.Conclusions:The maintenance of intestinal homeostasis is due to a well cooperation of microbiota,mucus barrier,and immune system.If any part presents abnormal,intestinal homeostasis will be broken.Meanwhile,for patients with Hirschsprung's disease or HAEC,dysfunction of these parts has been found.Thus,the happening of HAEC may be mainly attributed to the disorders of intestinal microbiota,mucus barrier,and immune system.

  3. [Colonic diverticulosis and its complications: pathogenesis, classification and clinical implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rahden, B H A; Germer, C-T

    2013-12-01

    Current understanding of the pathogenesis of colonic diverticulosis and its complications has certain implications for current therapy concepts, which are summarised here. Colonic diverticula in the Western world are pseudodiverticula predominating in the sigmoid colon. Pathogenesis is multifactorial and includes low-fibre diet, dysmotility, increased intraluminal pressure and morphological changes. Uncomplicated diverticulitis results from microperforations, contradicting the hypothesis of the "abscessed diverticulum". Administration of antibiotics for treatment is controversial. Complicated sigmoid diverticulitis is characterised by an intensive inflammatory infiltrate with macrophages. Immunosuppression and especially steroid intake are identified as risk factors. Nowadays, elective or emergency resection is generally recommended as therapy of first choice. However, contrary concepts with merely conservative treatment or drainage--even for perforated diverticulitis--are emerging. The pathogenesis of chronically recurrent diverticulitis is poorly understood and concepts are changing. Resection after the second episode is replaced by a risk-adapted strategy. Diverticular bleeding occurs due to rupture of a vas rectum at the fundus of the diverticulum. Conservative and endoscopic management is the first line and surgical resection plays a role as salvage-strategy in case of recurrent and life-threatening bleeding. Localising the bleeding, i.e., with angiography, is crucial prior to surgery. The pathophysiology of colonic diverticulosis is complex and incompletely understood and linked with several controversial issues, regarding treatment strategies.

  4. Gallbladder cancer epidemiology, pathogenesis and molecular genetics: Recent update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aarti; Sharma, Kiran Lata; Gupta, Annapurna; Yadav, Alka; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-06-14

    Gallbladder cancer is a malignancy of biliary tract which is infrequent in developed countries but common in some specific geographical regions of developing countries. Late diagnosis and deprived prognosis are major problems for treatment of gallbladder carcinoma. The dramatic associations of this orphan cancer with various genetic and environmental factors are responsible for its poorly defined pathogenesis. An understanding to the relationship between epidemiology, molecular genetics and pathogenesis of gallbladder cancer can add new insights to its undetermined pathophysiology. Present review article provides a recent update regarding epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular genetics of gallbladder cancer. We systematically reviewed published literature on gallbladder cancer from online search engine PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed). Various keywords used for retrieval of articles were Gallbladder, cancer Epidemiology, molecular genetics and bullion operators like AND, OR, NOT. Cross references were manually searched from various online search engines (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed,https://scholar.google.co.in/, http://www.medline.com/home.jsp). Most of the articles published from 1982 to 2015 in peer reviewed journals have been included in this review.

  5. Complement receptor 1 and the molecular pathogenesis of malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi Monika

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a pathogenic infection caused by protozoa of the genus plasmodium. It is mainly confined to sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and South America. This disease claims the life of over 1.5 to 2.7 million people per year. Owing to such a high incidence of malarial infections, there is an urgent need for the development of suitable vaccines. For the development of ideal vaccines, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of malarial pathogenesis and the factors that lead to malaria infection. Genetic factors have been proposed to play an important role in malarial pathogenesis. Complement receptor 1 (CR1 is an important host red blood cell protein involved in interaction with malarial parasite. Various polymorphic forms of CR1 have been found to be involved in conferring protection or increasing susceptibility to malaria infections. Low-density allele (L of CR1 gave contradictory results in different set of studies. In addition, Knops polymorphic forms Sl (a + and McC (a have been found to contribute more towards the occurrence of cerebral malaria in malaria endemic regions compared to individuals with Sl (a - / McC (a/b genotype. This article reviews the research currently going on in this area and throws light on as yet unresolved mysteries of the role of CR1 in malarial pathogenesis.

  6. Current Overview of Allergens of Plant Pathogenesis Related Protein Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mau Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis related (PR proteins are one of the major sources of plant derived allergens. These proteins are induced by the plants as a defense response system in stress conditions like microbial and insect infections, wounding, exposure to harsh chemicals, and atmospheric conditions. However, some plant tissues that are more exposed to environmental conditions like UV irradiation and insect or fungal attacks express these proteins constitutively. These proteins are mostly resistant to proteases and most of them show considerable stability at low pH. Many of these plant pathogenesis related proteins are found to act as food allergens, latex allergens, and pollen allergens. Proteins having similar amino acid sequences among the members of PR proteins may be responsible for cross-reactivity among allergens from diverse plants. This review analyzes the different pathogenesis related protein families that have been reported as allergens. Proteins of these families have been characterized in regard to their biological functions, amino acid sequence, and cross-reactivity. The three-dimensional structures of some of these allergens have also been evaluated to elucidate the antigenic determinants of these molecules and to explain the cross-reactivity among the various allergens.

  7. Current Overview of Allergens of Plant Pathogenesis Related Protein Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mau; Singh, Rashmi Prabha; Kushwaha, Gajraj Singh; Iqbal, Naseer; Singh, Avinash; Kaushik, Sanket; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis related (PR) proteins are one of the major sources of plant derived allergens. These proteins are induced by the plants as a defense response system in stress conditions like microbial and insect infections, wounding, exposure to harsh chemicals, and atmospheric conditions. However, some plant tissues that are more exposed to environmental conditions like UV irradiation and insect or fungal attacks express these proteins constitutively. These proteins are mostly resistant to proteases and most of them show considerable stability at low pH. Many of these plant pathogenesis related proteins are found to act as food allergens, latex allergens, and pollen allergens. Proteins having similar amino acid sequences among the members of PR proteins may be responsible for cross-reactivity among allergens from diverse plants. This review analyzes the different pathogenesis related protein families that have been reported as allergens. Proteins of these families have been characterized in regard to their biological functions, amino acid sequence, and cross-reactivity. The three-dimensional structures of some of these allergens have also been evaluated to elucidate the antigenic determinants of these molecules and to explain the cross-reactivity among the various allergens. PMID:24696647

  8. Mutual interaction between iron homeostasis and obesity pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonorov, Alexandr A; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Tinkov, Alexey A; Skalny, Anatoly V

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is identified as an important medical problem. One of the pathologic conditions observed in obesity is systemic iron deficiency and hypoferremia. Along with a large number of studies indicating disturbed iron homeostasis in obesity, recent data indicate a cause-effect relationship between iron status and obesity-related pathologies. The primary objective of the article is to consider two aspects of the iron-obesity interplay: (1) the mechanisms leading to impaired iron balance, and (2) the pathways of iron participation in obesity-related pathogenesis. While considering disturbance of iron homeostasis in obesity, a number of potential mechanisms of hypoferremia are proposed. At the same time, the inflammation of obesity and obesity-related hepcidin and lipocalin 2 hyperproduction seem to be the most probable reasons of obesity-related hypoferremia. Oversecretion of these proteins leads to iron sequestration in reticuloendothelial system cells. The latter also leads to increased adipose tissue iron content, thus producing preconditions for adverse effects of local iron overload. Being a redox-active metal, iron is capable of inducing oxidative stress as well as endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation and adipose tissue endocrine dysfunction. Iron-mediated mechanisms of toxicity may influence aspects of obesity pathogenesis possibly even leading to obesity aggravation. Thus, a mutual interaction between disturbance in iron homeostasis and obesity pathogenesis is proposed. All sides of this interaction should be considered to design new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of disturbed iron homeostasis in obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. The outcome of Cryptococcus neoformans intracellular pathogenesis in human monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirofski Liise-anne

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated yeast that is a facultative intracellular pathogen. The interaction between macrophages and C. neoformans is critical for extrapulmonary dissemination of this pathogenic yeast. C. neoformans can either lyse macrophages or escape from within them through a process known as phagosomal extrusion. However, most studies of intracellular pathogenesis have been made with mouse cells and their relevance to human infection is uncertain. In this study we extended studies of C. neoformans-macrophage cellular interaction/s to human peripheral blood monocytes. Results This study demonstrated that C. neoformans can shed polysaccharide within human monocytes, spread from cell to cell, and be extruded from them. Furthermore, human monocytes responded to ingestion of C. neoformans with cell cycle progression from G1 to S. Conclusion Similarities between mouse and human cells support the suitability of mouse cells for the study of intracellular pathogenesis mechanisms. Given that these hosts diverged over 70 million years ago, the similar pathogenic strategies for C. neoformans in murine and human cells supports the hypothesis that the mechanism that underlies the mammalian intracellular pathogenesis of C. neoformans originated from interactions with a third host, possibly soil amoeboid predators, before the mammalian radiation.

  10. [Research progress on the etiology and pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Can; Ke, Xiao-Yan

    2012-12-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma originated outside the lymph nodes is low grade malignant B cell lymphoma. It is the most frequent type of marginal zone non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, that usually occurs in the stomach, salivary gland, thyroid gland and orbital adnexa. Gastric MALT lymphoma accounts for 50% of MALT lymphoma. Gastric MALT lymphoma has been confirmed to relate with Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection, its main pathogenesis is immune reaction, but some patients with chromosome translocation have no response to HP eradication, suggesting presence of other unknown pathogenesis. The chromosome translocations in MALT lymphoma are t(11;18)(q21;q21), t(1;14)(p22;q32), t(14;18)(q32;q21), t(3;14)(p14.1;q32). Recent studies show some new chromosomal abnormalities such as 6q23.3/A20 and so on, which have some effects on clinical course and prognosis. MALT lymphoma with chromosome abnormalities usually activate common NF-κB molecular pathway, and persistent active NF-κB pathway drives tumor cell proliferative and active, resulting in lymphoma incidence. In this article, the advances in the etiology and pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma were reviewed.

  11. Autoimmune inflammatory neuropathies: updates in pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anna Hiu Yi; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-10-01

    The present review aims at discussing the recent advances in pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of major subtypes of autoimmune inflammatory neuropathies. Concerning pathogenesis, further evidence has proved that antibodies to nodal proteins are pathogenic in inflammatory neuropathies. The presence of these antibodies is related to distinctive clinical features. Disruption of blood-nerve barrier mediated by cytokines and chemokines also plays an important role in the pathogenesis. The new terminology of 'nodopathies' describes immune-mediated attack beginning and limited to the nodal region, and this phenomenon can be found in both acute and chronic inflammatory neuropathies. Recent trials comparing intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin confirm that subcutaneous immunoglobulin is not only cost-effective, but also improves patients' satisfaction and quality of life compared to intravenous immunoglobulin. Although immunotherapies are effective in most of the inflammatory neuropathies, accurate predictors and biomarkers of treatment response are lacking. Moreover, some patients do not respond to current immunotherapies and continue to relapse after discontinuation of treatment. More studies are required to understand the exact antigenic targets and mechanism in inflammatory neuropathies, so as to develop more novel immunotherapies.

  12. Semi-automated confocal imaging of fungal pathogenesis on plants: microscopic analysis of macroscopic specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contextualizing natural genetic variation in plant disease resistance in terms of pathogenesis can provide information about the function of causal genes. Cellular mechanisms associated with pathogenesis can be elucidated with confocal microscopy, but systematic phenotyping platforms—from sample pro...

  13. DMPD: Role of Toll-like receptor responses for sepsis pathogenesis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18086373 Role of Toll-like receptor responses for sepsis pathogenesis. Weighardt H, Holzmann B. Immunobiolog... responses for sepsis pathogenesis. Authors Weighardt H, Holzmann B. Publication Immunobiology

  14. The pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina eStenfeldt

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The greatest proportion of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD clinical research has been dedicated to elucidating pathogenesis and enhancing vaccine protection in cattle with less efforts invested in studies specific to pigs. However, accumulated evidence from FMD outbreaks and experimental investigations suggest that critical components of FMD pathogenesis, immunology, and vaccinology cannot be extrapolated from investigations performed in cattle to explain or predict outcomes of infection or vaccination in pigs. Furthermore, it has been shown that failure to account for these differences may have substantial consequences when FMD outbreaks occur in areas with dense pig populations. Recent experimental studies have confirmed some aspects of conventional wisdom by demonstrating that pigs are more susceptible to FMD virus (FMDV infection via exposure of the upper gastrointestinal tract (oropharynx than through inhalation of virus. The infection spreads rapidly within groups of pigs that are housed together, although efficiency of transmission may vary depending on virus strain and exposure intensity. Multiple investigations have demonstrated that physical separation of pigs is sufficient to prevent virus transmission under experimental conditions. Detailed pathogenesis studies have recently demonstrated that specialized epithelium within porcine oropharyngeal tonsils constitute the primary infection sites following simulated-natural virus exposure. Furthermore, epithelium of the tonsil of the soft palate supports substantial virus replication during the clinical phase of infection, thus providing large amounts of virus that can be shed into the environment. Due to massive amplification and shedding of virus, acutely infected pigs constitute a considerable source of contagion. FMDV infection results in modulation of several components of the host immune response. The infection is ultimately cleared in association with a strong humoral response and, in

  15. Modern views on etiology and pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.V. Kutsak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze the specialized scientific literature for data generalization concerning current views on etiology and pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD. PD is a chronic progressive CNS disease, mainly associated with degeneration of brain’s dopamine-producing neurons, motor and non-motor violations and resulting in persistent disability. Although the PD is the most studied disease among all parkinsonism disorders, there is no consensus on its nature until now. The basis of PD pathomorphology and neurological degeneration is a violation of a-synuclein protein with Lewy’s bodies accumulation in the cells. The formation of pathological a-synuclein is connected with features of genotype, environmental agents and internal processes in the body. The review presents the current data about etiological and pathogenic mechanisms of PD development. Special attention is paid to the role of genetics, the influence of exogenous agents and the basic factors in the pathogenesis of the disease. Conclusions. A number of questions of PD etiology and pathogenesis are not quite certain for today. Pathogenetic mechanism of degeneration in PD is heterogeneous: mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, of proteolytic functions violations (ubiquitin-proteasome system. The reasons which start the degenerative process are varied, and can be both external and internal, as well as their interaction also is possible, which determines the probability of PD development. Sporadic forms of PD pathogenesis are noticeably different from disease with hereditary predisposition. Verification of risk factors if genes predisposing to the disease development are present has a key role for the complex preventive measures formation in patients with a predisposition to the disease. Despite the fact that genetics has the primary importance in the process initiation for persons with a family history, varied clinical scenario of PD with the presence of identical genetic

  16. The pathogenesis of oligoarticular/polyarticular vs systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Tsan; Wang, Chen-Ti; Gershwin, M Eric; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2011-06-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has had a long and difficult problem with classification. It is clearly a heterogeneous and multi-factorial autoimmune disease but all too often the distinctions among subtypes were unclear. In fact, there is now increasing evidence of a distinct pathogenesis of oligo/polyarticular JIA compared to systemic JIA. Oligo/polyarticular JIA is an antigen-driven lymphocyte-mediated autoimmune disease with abnormality in the adaptive immune system. Cartilage-derived auto-antigens activate autoreactive T cells including Th1 and Th17 cells with production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and IL-17. On the other hand, the inhibition of regulatory T (Treg) cells including natural Foxp3(+) Treg and self-heat shock protein-induced Treg cells with decreased anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 results in the loss of immune tolerance. Imbalance between autoreactive Th1/Th17 and Treg cells leads to the failure of T cell tolerance to self-antigens, which contributes to the synovial inflammation of oligo/polyarticular JIA. By contrast, systemic JIA is an autoinflammatory disease with abnormality in the innate immune system. A loss of control of the alternative secretory pathway leading to aberrant activation of phagocytes including monocytes, macrophages and neutrophils seems to be involved in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, IL-18 and pro-inflammatory S100-proteins, which contribute to the multisystem inflammation of systemic JIA. Markedly distinct pathogenesis of oligo/polyarticular JIA and systemic JIA implies that they might need different treatment strategies.

  17. Study on the role of Interleukine-8 in the pathogenesis of endometriosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lijie; Leng Jinhua; Lang Jinghe

    2004-01-01

    Objective:To determine the role of Interleukine-8 in the pathogenesis of endometriosis(EM).Methods:36 patients with endometriosis were selected as study group.20 patients without endometriosis served as control group. IL-8 concentration in peritoneal fluid(PF) and serum of both groups were detected by ELISA.The correlation between IL-8 concentration and the severity of EM were performed.The differences of IL-8 mRNA expression in eutopic endometrium of patients between with and without endometriosis, and the differences among different endometriotic lesions were further studied by Northern Blot;Cultured endometrial stromal cells(CESC) were divided into groups. IL-8 and anti-IL-8 were used to treat these cells.Results:(1)The PF and serum from patients with EM contained significantly greater amounts of IL-8 than those in controls. A significant correlation between PF IL-8 content and the severity of disease was noted but there were no evidences of a relationship between concentrations of serum IL-8 and PF IL-8.(2) It was showed that the expression density of IL-8 mRNA of Eu were significantly higher than that of En. Among the three different endometriotic lesions, the highest IL-8 mRNA expression density was found in RPL(red peritoneal lesion), while the lowest IL-8mRNA expression density was detected in ULN(uterosacral ligament module).(3) There was a dose-dependent stimulatory effect of IL-8 on the survival of ESC. At 1ng/ml, anti-IL-8 significantly inhibited the survival of endometrial cells.Conclusion:IL-8 may be one of the essential factors for the pathogenesis of endometriosis.

  18. Effects of astragaloside IV on pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-en XU; Shang-zhi XIAO; Yong-hong SUN; Yang OU-YANG; Xiao-xiang ZHENG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the diverse pharmacological actions of astragaloside Ⅳ from the perspective of metabolic syndrome, and to investigate the effect of the drug on the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Methods: Adipogenesis was used as an indicator of the effect of astragaloside Ⅳ on preadipocyte differentiation,and was measured by using an oil red O assay. Glucose uptake was determined by measuring the transport of [2-3H]-deoxyglucose into the cells. The concentrations of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and aP2 mRNA were determined by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Apoptosis and viability loss of endothelial cells were detected by using flow cytometry and the WST- 1 assay, respectively. Intracellular free Ca2+ was labeled with Fluo-3 AM and measured by using a laser scanning confocal microscope. Results:Astragaloside Ⅳ can significantly potentiate insulin-induced preadipocyte differentiation at concentrations of 3, 10, and 30 μg/mL, improve high glucose-induced insulin resistance in adipocytes at a concentration of 30 μg/mL, and prevent tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced apoptosis and viability loss at concentrations of 10 and 30 μg/mL, and 30 μg/mL, respectively, in endothelial cells. Furthermore, we found that these effects were partly due to the promotion of PPARγ expression and to the inhibition of abnormal TNF-α-induced intracellular free Ca2+ accumulation in endothelial cells. Conclusion: The diverse pharmacological actions of astragaloside Ⅳ can all be linked to metabolic syndrome pathogenesis. Our study provides a new insight into the mechanism by which astragaloside Ⅳ exerts its effect.

  19. PafR, a Novel Transcription Regulator, Is Important for Pathogenesis in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Mordechai; Watad, Mobarak; Smith, Sara N.; Alteri, Christopher J.; Gordon, Noa; Rosenshine, Ilan; Mobley, Harry L.

    2014-01-01

    The metV genomic island in the chromosome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) encodes a putative transcription factor and a sugar permease of the phosphotransferase system (PTS), which are predicted to compose a Bgl-like sensory system. The presence of these two genes, hereby termed pafR and pafP, respectively, has been previously shown to correlate with isolates causing clinical syndromes. We show here that deletion of both genes impairs the ability of the resulting mutant to infect the CBA/J mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection compared to that of the parent strain, CFT073. Expressing the two genes in trans in the two-gene knockout mutant complemented full virulence. Deletion of either gene individually generated the same phenotype as the double knockout, indicating that both pafR and pafP are important to pathogenesis. We screened numerous environmental conditions but failed to detect expression from the promoter that precedes the paf genes in vitro, suggesting that they are in vivo induced (ivi). Although PafR is shown here to be capable of functioning as a transcriptional antiterminator, its targets in the UPEC genome are not known. Using microarray analysis, we have shown that expression of PafR from a heterologous promoter in CFT073 affects expression of genes related to bacterial virulence, biofilm formation, and metabolism. Expression of PafR also inhibits biofilm formation and motility. Taken together, our results suggest that the paf genes are implicated in pathogenesis and that PafR controls virulence genes, in particular biofilm formation genes. PMID:25069986

  20. The use of animal infection models to study the pathogenesis of melioidosis and glanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Donald E

    2002-11-01

    The use of animal infection models is central to the study of microbial pathogenesis. In combination with genetic, immunological and antigen purification techniques, much can be learned regarding the pathogenesis of diseases caused by microorganisms. This update focuses on the recent use of animal infection models to study the pathogenesis of melioidosis and glanders.

  1. The role of Src kinase in the biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui Ruqaiyyah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acanthamoeba species are the causative agents of fatal granulomatous encephalitis in humans. Haematogenous spread is thought to be a primary step, followed by blood–brain barrier penetration, in the transmission of Acanthmaoeba into the central nervous system, but the associated molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we evaluated the role of Src, a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase in the biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba. Methods Amoebistatic and amoebicidal assays were performed by incubating amoeba in the presence of Src kinase-selective inhibitor, PP2 (4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl-7-(t-butylpyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine and its inactive analog, PP3 (4-amino-7-phenylpyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine. Using this inhibitor, the role of Src kinase in A. castellanii interactions with Escherichia coli was determined. Zymographic assays were performed to study effects of Src kinase on extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. The human brain microvascular endothelial cells were used to determine the effects of Src kinase on A. castellanii adhesion to and cytotoxicity of host cells. Results Inhibition of Src kinase using a specific inhibitor, PP2 (4-amino-5-(4 chlorophenyl-7-(t-butylpyrazolo [3,4-d] pyrimidine but not its inactive analog, PP3 (4-amino-7-phenylpyrazolo[3,4-d] pyrimidine, had detrimental effects on the growth of A. castellanii (keratitis isolate, belonging to the T4 genotype. Interestingly, inhibition of Src kinase hampered the phagocytic ability of A. castellanii, as measured by the uptake of non-invasive bacteria, but, on the contrary, invasion by pathogenic bacteria was enhanced. Zymographic assays revealed that inhibition of Src kinases reduced extracellular protease activities of A. castellanii. Src kinase inhibition had no significant effect on A. castellanii binding to and cytotoxicity of primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which constitute the blood–brain barrier

  2. Arecoline inhibits endothelial cell growth and migration and the attachment to mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuei-Kuen Tseng

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Arecoline impaired vascular endothelial cells by inhibiting their growth and migration and their adhesion to U937 mononuclear cells. These results reveal that arecoline may contribute to the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis and cardiovascular diseases by affecting endothelial cell function in BQ chewers.

  3. Inhibition of classical complement activation attenuates liver ischaemia and reperfusion injury in a rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.H.M. Heijnen; I.H. Straatsburg; N.D. Padilla; G.J. Mierlo; C.E. Hack; T.M. van Gulik

    2006-01-01

    Activation of the complement system contributes to the pathogenesis of ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We evaluated inhibition of the classical pathway of complement using C1-inhibitor (C1-inh) in a model of 70% partial liver I/R injury in male Wistar rats (n = 35). C1-inh was administered at 10

  4. Pathogenesis and Management of Pruritus in PBC and PSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Andreas E; Namer, Barbara; Bolier, Ruth; Fischer, Michael J; Oude Elferink, Ronald P; Beuers, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Pruritus is a preeminent symptom in patients with chronic cholestatic liver disorders such as primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. More than two-thirds of these patients experience itching during the course of their disease. This symptom is also frequently observed in patients with other causes of cholestasis such as cholangiocarcinoma, inherited forms of cholestasis and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, but may accompany almost any other liver disease. The pathogenesis of pruritus of cholestasis remains largely elusive. Increased concentrations of bile salts, histamine, serotonin, progesterone metabolites and endogenous opioids have been controversially discussed as potential pruritogens. However, for these molecules, neither a correlation with itch intensity nor a causative link could be established. The G protein-coupled receptor for bile salts, TGR5, has been shown to be expressed in dorsal root ganglia and give rise to itch in rodents, albeit upon stimuli with suprapathological concentrations of bile salts. The potent neuronal activator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and its forming enzyme, autotaxin (ATX), could be identified in the serum of patients with cholestatic pruritus. ATX activity correlated with itch severity and effectiveness of several anti-pruritic therapeutic interventions in cholestatic patients. Thus, the ATX-LPA-axis may represent a key element in the pathogenesis of this agonizing symptom. Treatment options for pruritus of cholestasis remain limited to a few evidence-based and several experimental medical and interventional therapies. The current guideline-based recommendations include the anion exchange resins colestyramine, the pregnane X receptor-agonist and enzyme inducer rifampicin, the μ-opioid antagonist naltrexone, and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors sertraline. Still, a considerable part of patients is unresponsive to these drugs and requires experimental approaches including phototherapy

  5. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A., E-mail: oasojo@unmc.edu [College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States); Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie [L2 Diagnostics LLC, 300 George Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  6. Biomarkers in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molteni S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Silvia Molteni, Eva RealiLaboratory of Translational Immunology, Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Development of psoriasis results from a complex interplay between genetically predisposing factors and environmental triggers that give rise to a self-sustaining pathogenic cycle involving T cells, dendritic cells, connective tissue, and skin epithelium. From 5% to 40% of patients with psoriasis also develop psoriatic arthritis, and increasing evidence indicates an association with other systemic manifestations, including cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome. In psoriatic disease, there is a need for development of biomarkers for assessment of disease severity, for prediction of the outcome of therapeutic interventions, and for distinction between the different clinical variants of the disease. A field of great importance is identification of biomarkers for prediction of development of comorbidities, such as arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and the metabolic syndrome. Genetic determinants of psoriasis and their products not only give an important insight into the pathogenesis of the disease, but may also function as markers of risk for developing cutaneous psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. So far, there are limited validation data to support the use of candidate biomarkers in clinical practice. Here we review the data from several studies on some of the most promising candidate biomarkers for cutaneous psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, for the detection of systemic inflammation, and for use as endpoints for therapeutic interventions. Attention is focused on the molecules that take part in the interplay giving rise to psoriasis and on gene products that may represent a link between predisposing genetic factors and the immune and inflammatory processes involved in pathogenesis of the disease. Finally, we provide an overview on how biomarkers can offer insights into the pathogenesis and natural history of psoriasis

  7. Hemoglobinopathies: slicing the Gordian knot of Plasmodium falciparum malaria pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steve M; Cerami, Carla; Fairhurst, Rick M

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria kills over 500,000 children every year and has been a scourge of humans for millennia. Owing to the co-evolution of humans and P. falciparum parasites, the human genome is imprinted with polymorphisms that not only confer innate resistance to falciparum malaria, but also cause hemoglobinopathies. These genetic traits--including hemoglobin S (HbS), hemoglobin C (HbC), and α-thalassemia--are the most common monogenic human disorders and can confer remarkable degrees of protection from severe, life-threatening falciparum malaria in African children: the risk is reduced 70% by homozygous HbC and 90% by heterozygous HbS (sickle-cell trait). Importantly, this protection is principally present for severe disease and largely absent for P. falciparum infection, suggesting that these hemoglobinopathies specifically neutralize the parasite's in vivo mechanisms of pathogenesis. These hemoglobin variants thus represent a "natural experiment" to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which P. falciparum produces clinical morbidity, which remain partially obscured due to the complexity of interactions between this parasite and its human host. Multiple lines of evidence support a restriction of parasite growth by various hemoglobinopathies, and recent data suggest this phenomenon may result from host microRNA interference with parasite metabolism. Multiple hemoglobinopathies mitigate the pathogenic potential of parasites by interfering with the export of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) to the surface of the host red blood cell. Few studies have investigated their effects upon the activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, although recent murine studies suggest a role for heme oxygenase-1 in protection. Ultimately, the identification of mechanisms of protection and pathogenesis can inform future therapeutics and preventive measures. Hemoglobinopathies slice the "Gordian knot" of host and parasite

  8. Multidisciplinary approach to understand the pathogenesis of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Shang; AS Pe(n)a

    2005-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma remains a common disease worldwide with a dismal prognosis. Therefore, it represents a very important health problem. It occurs with a high incidence in Asia and is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the world. Although the incidence and mortality of gastric carcinoma are decreasing in many countries,gastric cancer still represents the second most frequent malignancies in the world and the fourth in Europe. The 5-year survival rate of gastric carcinoma is low. The etiology and pathogenesis are not yet fully known. The study of gastric cancer is important in clinical medicine as well as in public health. Over the past 15 years,integrated research in molecular pathology has clarified the details of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities of cancer-related genes in the course of the development and progression of gastric cancer. Gastric cancer, as all cancers, is the end result of the interplay of many risk factors as well as protective factors. Although epidemiological evidence indicates that environmental factors play a major role in gastric carcinogenesis, the role of immunological, genetic, and immunogenetic factors are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma. Among the environmental factors,diet and Helicobacter pylori are more amenable to intervention aimed at the prevention of gastric cancer.The aim of the present paper is to review and include the most recent published evidence to demonstrate that only a multidisciplinary approach will lead to the advancement of the pathogenesis and prevention of gastric cancer. On the immunogenetic research it is clear that evidence is accumulating to suggest that a genetic profile favoring the proinflammatory response increases the risk of gastric carcinoma.

  9. Recent advances in autoimmune pancreatitis: concept, diagnosis, and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Kazuichi; Uchida, Kazushige; Fukui, Toshiro

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances support the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) as a unique systemic disease, because it shows occasional extrapancreatic lesions such as sclerosing cholangitis, sclerosing sialoadenitis, and retroperitoneal fibrosis, pathological features similar to those of fibrosis, and abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells, and it is steroid responsive. Based on these findings, several diagnostic criteria have been proposed. Although AIP is accepted worldwide as a unique clinical entity, its pathogenetic mechanism remains unclear. To clarify its pathogenesis, its genetic background, humoral immunity, candidate target antigens including self-antigens and molecular mimicry by microbes, and cellular immunity including regulatory T cells, the complement system, and experimental models are reviewed. On the basis of this review, we hypothesize that the pathogenesis of AIP involves a biphasic mechanism consisting of "induction" and "progression." In the early stage, the initial response to self-antigens [lactoferrin, carbonic anhydrase (CA)-II, CA-IV, pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor, and alpha-fodrin] and molecular mimicry (Helicobacter pylori) are induced by decreased naïve regulatory T cells (Tregs), and T-helper (Th) 1 cells release proinflammatory cytokines [interferon-gamma, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha]. In the chronic stage, progression is supported by increased memory Tregs and Th2 immune responses. The classical complement system pathway may be activated by the IgG1 immune complex. As Tregs seem to play an important role in progression as well as in induction of the disease, further studies are necessary to clarify the pathogenesis of AIP.

  10. Hemoglobinopathies: Slicing the Gordian Knot of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steve M.; Cerami, Carla; Fairhurst, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria kills over 500,000 children every year and has been a scourge of humans for millennia. Owing to the co-evolution of humans and P. falciparum parasites, the human genome is imprinted with polymorphisms that not only confer innate resistance to falciparum malaria, but also cause hemoglobinopathies. These genetic traits—including hemoglobin S (HbS), hemoglobin C (HbC), and α-thalassemia—are the most common monogenic human disorders and can confer remarkable degrees of protection from severe, life-threatening falciparum malaria in African children: the risk is reduced 70% by homozygous HbC and 90% by heterozygous HbS (sickle-cell trait). Importantly, this protection is principally present for severe disease and largely absent for P. falciparum infection, suggesting that these hemoglobinopathies specifically neutralize the parasite's in vivo mechanisms of pathogenesis. These hemoglobin variants thus represent a “natural experiment” to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which P. falciparum produces clinical morbidity, which remain partially obscured due to the complexity of interactions between this parasite and its human host. Multiple lines of evidence support a restriction of parasite growth by various hemoglobinopathies, and recent data suggest this phenomenon may result from host microRNA interference with parasite metabolism. Multiple hemoglobinopathies mitigate the pathogenic potential of parasites by interfering with the export of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) to the surface of the host red blood cell. Few studies have investigated their effects upon the activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, although recent murine studies suggest a role for heme oxygenase-1 in protection. Ultimately, the identification of mechanisms of protection and pathogenesis can inform future therapeutics and preventive measures. Hemoglobinopathies slice the “Gordian knot” of host and parasite

  11. The role of DJ-1 in the pathogenesis of endometriosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Rai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disease causing pelvic pain and infertility in 10% of reproductive-aged women. Despite a long history of the disease the pathogenesis of endometriosis is poorly understood. It is known that the expression of several proteins is either up or down regulated during endometriosis, but their precise role remains to be determined. DJ-1 is one such protein that is upregulated in eutopic endometrium of women having endometriosis suggesting that DJ-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The role of DJ-1 in the pathogenesis of endometriosis was investigated. For this purpose the influence of DJ-1 on endometrial cell survival, attachment, proliferation, migration, and invasion either by overexpressing DJ-1 in normal endometrial cells or by knocking down DJ-1 expression in endometriotic cells using siRNA was investigated. The results indicated that DJ-1 protects endometrial cells from oxidative stress mediated apoptosis. Overexpression of DJ-1 in normal endometrial epithelial cells increases the adhesion on collagen type IV. However, no significant difference was observed incase of stromal cells. It was further demonstrated that DJ-1 regulates cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in normal endometrial and endometriotic epithelial cells whereas in the case of normal endometrial and endometriotic stromal cells, it regulates cell proliferation and invasion but not migration. Furthermore, the present study also indicated that DJ-1 regulates these cellular processes by modulating PI3K/Akt pathway by interacting and negatively regulating PTEN. CONCLUSIONS: Abnormally high levels of DJ-1 expression may be involved in endometriosis, possibly by stimulating endometrial cell survival, proliferation, migration, and invasion.

  12. Necrotic enteritis in broilers: an updated review on the pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbermont, L; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2011-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis and related subclinical disease have become economically significant problems for the broiler industry. Fortunately, scientific interest in this topic has grown: new C. perfringens virulence factors have been discovered and new insight gained about the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis. It has been shown that alpha toxin, for a long time thought to be the key virulence factor, is not essential for the development of the disease. Moreover, it is now clearly established that only certain C. perfringens strains are capable of inducing necrotic enteritis under specific conditions that predispose to the disease and they constitute only a minority in the intestinal tract of healthy chickens. A novel pore-forming toxin, NetB, has been identified in these virulent avian C. perfringens strains. Using a gene knockout mutant, it has been shown that NetB is a critical virulence factor in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis in broilers. In addition to toxin production, other factors have been described that contribute to the ability of certain C. perfringens strains to cause necrotic enteritis in broilers. It has been suggested that proteolytic enzymes play an important role in the initial stages of necrotic enteritis since the villi are first affected at the level of the basement membrane and the lateral domain of the enterocytes. In field outbreaks of necrotic enteritis, a single clone of C. perfringens is dominant in intestines of all affected birds, as opposed to the mixture of different C. perfringens strains that can be isolated from healthy bird intestines. It has been proposed that bacteriocin production is responsible for the dominance of a single strain in necrotic enteritis cases. Furthermore, it has been shown that virulent strains are more able to adhere to extracellular matrix molecules than non-virulent strains. The current knowledge on the pathogenesis of the disease has been summarized in this short review.

  13. The developmental etiology and pathogenesis of Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler Tjaden, Naomi E; Trainor, Paul A

    2013-07-01

    The enteric nervous system is the part of the autonomic nervous system that directly controls the gastrointestinal tract. Derived from a multipotent, migratory cell population called the neural crest, a complete enteric nervous system is necessary for proper gut function. Disorders that arise as a consequence of defective neural crest cell development are termed neurocristopathies. One such disorder is Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), also known as congenital megacolon or intestinal aganglionosis. HSCR occurs in 1/5000 live births and typically presents with the inability to pass meconium, along with abdominal distension and discomfort that usually requires surgical resection of the aganglionic bowel. This disorder is characterized by a congenital absence of neurons in a portion of the intestinal tract, usually the distal colon, because of a disruption of normal neural crest cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, survival, and/or apoptosis. The inheritance of HSCR disease is complex, often non-Mendelian, and characterized by variable penetrance. Extensive research has identified a number of key genes that regulate neural crest cell development in the pathogenesis of HSCR including RET, GDNF, GFRα1, NRTN, EDNRB, ET3, ZFHX1B, PHOX2b, SOX10, and SHH. However, mutations in these genes account for only ∼50% of the known cases of HSCR. Thus, other genetic mutations and combinations of genetic mutations and modifiers likely contribute to the etiology and pathogenesis of HSCR. The aims of this review are to summarize the HSCR phenotype, diagnosis, and treatment options; to discuss the major genetic causes and the mechanisms by which they disrupt normal enteric neural crest cell development; and to explore new pathways that may contribute to HSCR pathogenesis.

  14. Hemoglobinopathies: slicing the Gordian knot of Plasmodium falciparum malaria pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve M Taylor

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum malaria kills over 500,000 children every year and has been a scourge of humans for millennia. Owing to the co-evolution of humans and P. falciparum parasites, the human genome is imprinted with polymorphisms that not only confer innate resistance to falciparum malaria, but also cause hemoglobinopathies. These genetic traits--including hemoglobin S (HbS, hemoglobin C (HbC, and α-thalassemia--are the most common monogenic human disorders and can confer remarkable degrees of protection from severe, life-threatening falciparum malaria in African children: the risk is reduced 70% by homozygous HbC and 90% by heterozygous HbS (sickle-cell trait. Importantly, this protection is principally present for severe disease and largely absent for P. falciparum infection, suggesting that these hemoglobinopathies specifically neutralize the parasite's in vivo mechanisms of pathogenesis. These hemoglobin variants thus represent a "natural experiment" to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which P. falciparum produces clinical morbidity, which remain partially obscured due to the complexity of interactions between this parasite and its human host. Multiple lines of evidence support a restriction of parasite growth by various hemoglobinopathies, and recent data suggest this phenomenon may result from host microRNA interference with parasite metabolism. Multiple hemoglobinopathies mitigate the pathogenic potential of parasites by interfering with the export of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1 to the surface of the host red blood cell. Few studies have investigated their effects upon the activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, although recent murine studies suggest a role for heme oxygenase-1 in protection. Ultimately, the identification of mechanisms of protection and pathogenesis can inform future therapeutics and preventive measures. Hemoglobinopathies slice the "Gordian knot" of host and

  15. A new direction in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolb Martin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent review article suggested that idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a disease that is associated more with abnormal wound healing than with inflammation. Data derived from transgenic and gene transfer rodent models suggest that lung inflammation may be a necessary but insufficient component of IPF, and that at some point in the natural history of the disease IPF becomes no longer dependent on the inflammatory response for propagation. Altered microenvironment and involvement of epithelial cell/mesenchymal cell interaction are the most likely contributors to the pathogenesis of this chronic progressive disorder.

  16. Sirtuins as novel players in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kultigin; Turkmen; Ali; Karagoz; Adem; Kucuk

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus(DM) is a systemic and complex disease with micro and macrovascular complications that result from impaired metabolic pathways and genetic susceptibilities. DM has been accepted as an epidemic worldwide during the last two decades. A substantial gap in our knowledge exists regarding the pathophysiology of this metabolic disorder despite the improved diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches. Sirtuins are a group of NAD+ dependent enzymes that are involved in cellular homeostasis due to their deacetylating activity. In the present review, we aimed to discuss the role of associated sirtuins in the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  17. Elevated cerebral lactate: Implications in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosoi, Cristina R; Rose, Christopher F

    2014-12-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome, is a frequent complication of liver failure/disease. Increased concentrations of lactate are commonly observed in HE patients, in the systemic circulation, but also in the brain. Traditionally, increased cerebral lactate is considered a marker of energy failure/impairment however alterations in lactate homeostasis may also lead to a rise in brain lactate and result in neuronal dysfunction. The latter may involve the development of brain edema. This review will target the significance of increased cerebral lactate in the pathogenesis of HE.

  18. New insights into SMA pathogenesis: immune dysfunction and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguise, Marc-Olivier; Kothary, Rashmi

    2017-07-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by motor neuron degeneration, although defects in multiple cell types and tissues have also been implicated. Three independent laboratories recently identified immune organ defects in SMA. We therefore propose a novel pathogenic mechanism contributory to SMA, resulting in higher susceptibility to infection and exacerbated disease progression caused by neuroinflammation. Overall, compromised immune function could significantly affect survival and quality of life of SMA patients. We highlight the recent findings in immune organ defects, their potential consequences on patients, our understanding of neuroinflammation in SMA, and new research hypotheses in SMA pathogenesis.

  19. Patterns of molecular evolution in pathogenesis-related proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer,Nicole M.; Thompson,Claudia E.; Freitas,Loreta B.; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Salzano,Francisco M.

    2005-01-01

    The genes encoding 13 classes of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins were examined for positive selection using maximum-likelihood (ML) models of codon substitution. The study involved 194 sequences from 54 species belonging to 37 genera. Although the sizes of the sequences examined varied from 237 bp for PR12 to 1,110 bp for PR7, most classes (9 out of 13) contained sequences made up of more than 400 nucleotides. Signs of positive selection were obtained for sites in PR proteins 4, 6, 8, 9 an...

  20. Anthrax lethal and edema toxins in anthrax pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shihui; Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H

    2014-06-01

    The pathophysiological effects resulting from many bacterial diseases are caused by exotoxins released by the bacteria. Bacillus anthracis, a spore-forming bacterium, is such a pathogen, causing anthrax through a combination of bacterial infection and toxemia. B. anthracis causes natural infection in humans and animals and has been a top bioterrorism concern since the 2001 anthrax attacks in the USA. The exotoxins secreted by B. anthracis use capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2) as the major toxin receptor and play essential roles in pathogenesis during the entire course of the disease. This review focuses on the activities of anthrax toxins and their roles in initial and late stages of anthrax infection.

  1. The pathogenesis of tendinopathy: balancing the response to loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, S Peter; Jørgensen, Henning Langberg; Kjaer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    , such as tendinopathy, which is characterized by pain during activity, localized tenderness upon palpation, swelling and impaired performance. Tendon histological changes include reduced numbers and rounding of fibroblasts, increased content of proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans and water, hypervascularization......, thus implying that one or more 'weak links' are present in the structure. Understanding how tendon tissue adapts to mechanical loading will help to unravel the pathogenesis of tendinopathy.......Tendons are designed to withstand considerable loads. Mechanical loading of tendon tissue results in upregulation of collagen expression and increased synthesis of collagen protein, the extent of which is probably regulated by the strain experienced by the resident fibroblasts (tenocytes...

  2. The Sympathetic Nervous System in the Pathogenesis of Takotsubo Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittstein, Ilan S

    2016-10-01

    Takotsubo syndrome is a unique clinical condition of acute heart failure and reversible left ventricular dysfunction frequently precipitated by sudden emotional or physical stress. There is growing evidence that exaggerated sympathetic stimulation is central to the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Precisely how catecholamines mediate myocardial stunning in takotsubo syndrome remains incompletely understood; but possible mechanisms include epicardial spasm, microvascular dysfunction, direct adrenergic-receptor-mediated myocyte injury, and systemic vascular effects that alter ventricular-arterial coupling. Risk factors that increase sympathetic tone and/or catecholamine sensitivity may render individuals particularly susceptible to takotsubo syndrome during episodes of acute stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The HBZ gene, a key player in HTLV-1 pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Patrick L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL and is also associated with a variety of lymphocyte-mediated diseases. The HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper (HBZ gene, found to be consistently expressed in ATL, has recently been the subject of intensive research efforts. In this review, we summarize recent findings about HBZ and discuss its roles and functions not only in the virus life cycle, but also in HTLV-1 disease pathogenesis.

  4. Animal models for studying dengue pathogenesis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Watanabe, Satoru; Kavishna, Ranmali; Alonso, Sylvie; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2015-11-01

    Development of a suitable animal model for dengue virus disease is critical for understanding pathogenesis and for preclinical testing of antiviral drugs and vaccines. Many laboratory animal models of dengue virus infection have been investigated, but the challenges of recapitulating the complete disease still remain. In this review, we provide a comprehensive coverage of existing models, from man to mouse, with a specific focus on recent advances in mouse models for addressing the mechanistic aspects of severe dengue in humans. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on flavivirus drug discovery.

  5. MicroRNAs in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glud, M; Gniadecki, R

    2013-01-01

    characteristics, histopathological features and mutation patterns within NRAS and BRAF genes. Recent data indicate that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma. MiRNAs are small, non-coding, regulatory RNA molecules expressed in a tissue and cell specific manner and are known...... to play a crucial role in cell homeostasis and carcinogenesis. MiRNAs might prove to be powerful cancer biomarkers and future therapeutic targets. In this review, we focused on the miRNA involvement in four molecular pathways known to be deregulated in malignant melanoma, including the RAS...

  6. [Juvenil idiopathic arthritis. Part 1: diagnosis, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espada, Graciela

    2009-10-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is not a single disease and constitutes an heterogeneous group of illnesses or inflammatory disorders. This new nomenclature encompasses different disease categories, each of which has different presentation, clinical signs, symptoms, and outcome. The cause of the disease is still unknown but both environmental and genetic factors seem to be related to its pathogenesis. Is the most common chronic rheumatic disease in children and an important cause of short-term and long-term disability. In this article, clinical manifestation, new classification and approach to diagnosis are reviewed.

  7. [Pathogenesis and target therapy of acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, V V; Vlasenko, A V; Golubev, A M

    2014-01-01

    The paper summarizes results of experimental studies and clinical observations of the pathogenesis and effectiveness of respiratory, non-respiratory and pharmacological treatment methods for acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by direct and indirect damaging factors. The article deals with differences and peculiarities of morphological changes and lung functional disorders, clinical, laboratory and instrumental signs of various origins in ARDS and justifies necessity of differential diagnosis and differential treatment of ARDS, depending on the reasons for its development. Furthermore the article discusses an algorithm for differential diagnosis and differential treatment for ARDS caused by direct and indirect damaging factors.

  8. Cerebral malaria: insight into pathogenesis, complications and molecular biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Farah Hafiz; Hafiz, Muhammad Yusuf; Shoaib, Maria; Ahmed, Syed Ahsanuddin

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a medical emergency. All patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria with neurologic manifestations of any degree should be urgently treated as cases of cerebral malaria. Pathogenesis of cerebral malaria is due to damaged vascular endothelium by parasite sequestration, inflammatory cytokine production and vascular leakage, which result in brain hypoxia, as indicated by increased lactate and alanine concentrations. The levels of the biomarkers’ histidine-rich protein II, angiopoietin-Tie-2 system and plasma osteoprotegrin serve as diagnostic and prognostic markers. Brain imaging may show neuropathology around the caudate and putamen. Mortality is high and patients who survive sustain brain injury which manifests as long-term neurocognitive impairments. PMID:28203097

  9. Oculogyric crises: A review of phenomenology, etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slow, Elizabeth J; Lang, Anthony E

    2017-02-01

    Oculogyric crises are a rare movement disorder characterized by paroxysmal, conjugate, tonic, usually upwards, deviation of the eyes. Causes for oculogyric crises are limited and include complications of dopamine-receptor blocking medications and neurometabolic disorders affecting dopamine metabolism, suggesting that an underlying hypodopaminergic state is important to the pathogenesis. Mimickers of oculogyric crises exist, and we propose diagnostic criteria to distinguish true oculogyric crises. Recognition of oculogyric crises is important for the diagnosis and appropriate treatment of rare disorders, and an approach to investigations in oculogyric crises is proposed. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  10. [Recent advances in dry eye: etiology, pathogenesis and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yi; Pan, Zhi-qiang

    2013-09-01

    Dry eye is one of the most common and multifactorial disease of the ocular surface that results in ocular discomfort, blurred vision, reduced quality of life, and decreased productivity. Recent advances in our knowledge of the causation of dry eye open opportunities for improving diagnosis , and disease management and for developing new, more effective therapies to manage this widely prevalent and debilitating disease state. In light of the above knowledge, the present article reviews the newer theories and reports on etiology , pathogenesis and management of dry eye.

  11. Legg-Calve-Perthes disease: etiology, pathogenesis, and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Harry K W

    2011-09-01

    Legg-Calve-Perthes disease is a complex pediatric hip disorder with many uncertainties. Various theories on its etiology have been proposed but none have been validated conclusively. Through experimental studies, however, some insight into the pathogenesis of a femoral head deformity after ischemic necrosis has been gained. These studies reveal that mechanical and biological factors contribute to the development of the femoral head deformity. Better understanding of the pathobiology of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease will lead to the development of more effective treatments, which are able to specifically target the pathogenic processes.

  12. Pathogenesis, developmental consequences, and clinical correlations of human embryo fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Victor Y; Browne, Richard W; Bloom, Michael S; Sakkas, Denny; Alikani, Mina

    2011-03-15

    This narrative review summarizes the current state of knowledge about human embryo fragmentation during IVF. The clinical relevance of fragmentation is discussed and evidence supporting a central role for the oocyte in the pathogenesis of fragmentation is presented. A mechanism of fragmentation as aberrant cell division involving the cytoskeleton is described along with the novel concept of membrane instability in relation to follicular high-density lipoprotein metabolism and cholesterol transport. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Update on Genetic Susceptibility and Pathogenesis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Herlin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a multifactorial disease with a pathogenesis which remains inexplicable. However, genome-wide association studies brought forward within recent years have discovered several new susceptibility genes, and accumulating evidence supports genetic variability as playing a key role in JIA development. This review summarises the present knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA and non-HLA polymorphisms conferring disease susceptibility, and discusses the areas in JIA genetics, which are still to be investigated in order to apply JIA genetics in a clinical setting.

  14. [Immunologic disorders in pathogenesis of chronic generalized parodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volozhin, A I; Poriadin, G V; Kazimiski, T I; Barer, G M; Askerova, S Sh; Salmasi, Zh M

    2005-01-01

    Systemic immunity was studied in patients with chronic generalized parodontitis. This group of patients had distinct changes in immunologic system: depression of T- and stimulation of B-cellular immunity without accumulation of plasma cells and initiation of effective humoral response. Increased peripheral blood number of lymphocytes expressing induction of apoptosis CD95 receptors and ligand for this receptor CD95L (Fas-L) can lead to intensification of lymphocyte apoptosis and may be the reason for T-cell deficit development. The results of the study confirm the important role of immune system disturbances in pathogenesis of chronic generalized parodontitis.

  15. Current concept of pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Ning Wu

    2000-01-01

    @@ The pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis is very complicated. It is a multifactorial as well as multifaceted disease. First of all, the etiologic agents initiate the pancreatic acinar injury by release of pancreatic enzymes and overstimulation of macrophages and neutrophils, then the cytokines and inflammatory mediators are liberated. There is also interaction between neutrophils and endothelial cells producing free radicals, the cytokines cause increasing vascular permeability, activating complement component, resulting in microcirculatory impairment and imbalance of thrombo-fibrinolytic system. Many of these events occur not only in the pancreas itself, but also in the other vital organs and tissues, leading to severe acute pancreatitis and complications. The sequencial events are as follows.

  16. The molecular pathogenesis of migraine: new developments and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zameel Cader, M

    2013-10-15

    Migraine is a prevalent, debilitating and costly disorder with an ongoing unmet medical need. Human genetic studies have provided considerable insights into the molecular underpinnings of this complex brain disorder. Classical linkage studies have revealed the causes of familial hemiplegic migraine, while more recently genome-wide association studies have identified several susceptibility loci for typical migraine. New ways of accessing neurons and other cells directly from patients with migraine through the use of induced pluripotent stem cells offer exciting opportunities to understand the molecular pathogenesis. In conjunction with next generation omics, there are unprecedented opportunities to reveal key molecular players in the disease process and discover new drug targets.

  17. Functional analysis of miR-181a and Fas involved in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Chengcheng; Chen, Juan; Chen, Ke; Wang, Sen; Cao, Yiyi; Zhang, Jinnan; Sheng, Yanrui; Huang, Ailong; Tang, Hua, E-mail: tanghua86162003@aliyun.com

    2015-02-15

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is responsible for most of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, whether HBV plays an important role during hepatocarcinogenesis through effecting miRNAs remains unknown. Here, we reported that HBV up-regulated microRNA-181a (miR-181a) by enhancing its promoter activity. Simultaneously, we found that miR-181a inhibited apoptosis in vitro and promoted tumor cell growth in vivo. TNF receptor superfamily member 6 (Fas) was further identified as a target of miR-181a. We also found that Fas could reverse the apoptosis-inhibition effect induced by miR-181a. Moreover, HBV could inhibit cell apoptosis by down-regulating Fas expression, which could be reversed by miR-181a inhibitor. Our data demonstrated that HBV suppressed apoptosis of hepatoma cells by up-regulating miR-181a expression and down-regulating Fas expression, which may provide a new understanding of the mechanism in HBV-related HCC pathogenesis. - Highlights: • HBV could up-regulate miR-181a expression by interacting with nt−800 to +240 in its promoter region in HCC cell lines. • HBV could down-regulate Fas expression and suppress apoptosis of hepatoma cells, which could be reversed by miR-181a inhibitor. • Up-regulation of miR-181a promoted proliferation of hepatoma cells and repressed apoptosis, which could be reversed by Fas. • Our study provides a new understanding of the mechanism in HBV-related HCC pathogenesis.

  18. A hypusine-eIF5A-PEAK1 switch regulates the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Ken; Wright, Tracy; Strnadel, Jan; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Metildi, Cristina; Lowy, Andrew M; Bouvet, Michael; Kelber, Jonathan A; Klemke, Richard L

    2014-11-15

    Deregulation of protein synthesis is a hallmark of cancer cell proliferation, survival, and metastatic progression. eIF5A1 and its highly related isoform eIF5A2 are translation initiation factors that have been implicated in a range of human malignancies, but how they control cancer development and disease progression is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated how eIF5A proteins regulate pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) pathogenesis. eIF5A proteins are the only known proteins regulated by a distinct posttranslational modification termed hypusination, which is catalyzed by two enzymes, deoxyhypusine synthase (DHPS) and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH). The highly selective nature of the hypusine modification and its amenability to pharmacologic inhibition make eIF5A proteins attractive therapeutic targets. We found that the expression and hypusination of eIF5A proteins are upregulated in human PDAC tissues and in premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia tissues isolated from Pdx-1-Cre: LSL-KRAS(G12D) mice. Knockdown of eIF5A proteins in PDAC cells inhibited their growth in vitro and orthotopic tumor growth in vivo, whereas amplification of eIF5A proteins increased PDAC cell growth and tumor formation in mice. Small-molecule inhibitors of DHPS and DOHH both suppressed eIF5A hypusination, preventing PDAC cell growth. Interestingly, we found that eIF5A proteins regulate PDAC cell growth by modulating the expression of PEAK1, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase essential for PDAC cell growth and therapy resistance. Our findings suggest that eIF5A proteins utilize PEAK1 as a downstream effector to drive PDAC pathogenesis and that pharmacologic inhibition of the eIF5A-hypusine-PEAK1 axis may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to combat this deadly disease. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. The pathogenesis of bone erosions in gouty arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Naomi; Thiele, Ralf G

    2010-11-01

    The characteristic radiographic hallmarks of chronic gouty arthritis are the presence of macroscopic tophi and erosions with overhanging edges and relative preservation of the joint space. In recent years there has been more insight into the processes underlying the development of bone erosions in gouty arthritis. This review discusses the mechanical, pathological, cellular and immunological factors that may have a role in the pathogenesis of bone erosions in gouty arthritis. It highlights the evidence suggesting that monosodium urate crystal deposition is associated with the presence of underlying osteoarthritis and the important role of osteoclasts and the receptor for activation of nuclear factor κ B (RANK) and RANK ligand (RANK-RANKL) pathway in the pathogenesis of gouty erosions. Gouty arthritis is primarily driven by interleukin 1β (IL-1β). IL-1β has been implicated in bone destruction and erosions in other inflammatory arthridities. Thus, future IL-1 inhibitors may prevent and treat erosion formation due to tophaceous gouty arthritis. This review discusses imaging modalities and highlights ultrasongraphic evidence suggesting a significant relationship between the presence of the gouty tophus and bone erosions as well as the frequent presence of persistent low-grade inflammation in asymptomatic chronic tophaceous gouty arthritis on high-resolution ultrasonography. It is the tophus eroding the underlying bone that is pivotal for the development of bone erosions in gouty arthritis.

  20. [The role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak-Gołąb, Agnieszka; Olszanecka-Glinianowicz, Magdalena; Kocełak, Piotr; Chudek, Jerzy

    2014-01-24

    Obesity is a disease that develops as a result of long-term positive energy balance. In recent years, the influence of gut microflora composition, as a potential factor affecting the energy balance and contributing to fat accumulation, has been studied. It seems that bacteria can affect host energy balance through several mechanisms, such as increased fermentation of undigested polysaccharides and obtaining extra energy from the portion of food, reduced expression of FIAF (fasting-induced adipocyte factor) in the enterocytes with inhibitory activity towards intestinal lipoprotein lipase, and the increased release of peptide YY that slows the intestinal motility. It is also believed that changes in the composition of gut microflora may be one of the factors that induce systemic microinflammation in the obese, an important link in the pathogenesis of obesity related complications, including dyslipidaemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes. However, the results of previous studies are inconclusive. Many of them have been carried out in an animal model and were not confirmed in studies involving humans. These discrepancies may be due to different composition of the diet, distinct physiological gut microflora and the methodology used in these studies. The present article reviews the current literature on the potential role of gut microflora in the pathogenesis of obesity.

  1. The role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Żak-Gołąb

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a disease that develops as a result of long-term positive energy balance. In recent years, the influence of gut microflora composition, as a potential factor affecting the energy balance and contributing to fat accumulation, has been studied. It seems that bacteria can affect host energy balance through several mechanisms, such as increased fermentation of undigested polysaccharides and obtaining extra energy from the portion of food, reduced expression of FIAF (fasting-induced adipocyte factor in the enterocytes with inhibitory activity towards intestinal lipoprotein lipase, and the increased release of peptide YY that slows the intestinal motility. It is also believed that changes in the composition of gut microflora may be one of the factors that induce systemic microinflammation in the obese, an important link in the pathogenesis of obesity related complications, including dyslipidaemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes. However, the results of previous studies are inconclusive. Many of them have been carried out in an animal model and were not confirmed in studies involving humans. These discrepancies may be due to different composition of the diet, distinct physiological gut microflora and the methodology used in these studies. The present article reviews the current literature on the potential role of gut microflora in the pathogenesis of obesity.

  2. Glia: silent partners in energy homeostasis and obesity pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, John D; Dorfman, Mauricio D; Thaler, Joshua P

    2017-02-01

    Body weight stability requires homeostatic regulation to balance energy intake and energy expenditure. Research on this system and how it is affected by obesity has largely focused on the role of hypothalamic neurons as integrators of information about long-term fuel storage, short-term nutrient availability and metabolic demand. Recent studies have uncovered glial cells as additional contributors to energy balance regulation and obesity pathogenesis. Beginning with early work on leptin signalling in astrocytes, this area of research rapidly emerged after the discovery of hypothalamic inflammation and gliosis in obese rodents and humans. Current studies have revealed the involvement of a wide variety of glial cell types in the modulation of neuronal activity, regulation of hormone and nutrient availability, and participation in the physiological regulation of feeding behaviour. In addition, one glial type, microglia, has recently been implicated in susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. Together, these exciting new findings deepen our understanding of energy homeostasis regulation and raise the possibility of identifying novel mechanisms that contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity.

  3. Fetal/Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia: Pathogenesis, Diagnostics and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brojer, Ewa; Husebekk, Anne; Dębska, Marzena; Uhrynowska, Małgorzata; Guz, Katarzyna; Orzińska, Agnieszka; Dębski, Romuald; Maślanka, Krystyna

    2016-08-01

    Fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a relatively rare condition (1/1000-1/2000) that was granted orphan status by the European Medicines Agency in 2011. Clinical consequences of FNAIT, however, may be severe. A thrombocytopenic fetus or new-born is at risk of intracranial hemorrhage that may result in lifelong disability or death. Preventing such bleeding is thus vital and requires a solution. Anti-HPA1a antibodies are the most frequent cause of FNAIT in Caucasians. Its pathogenesis is similar to hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) due to anti-RhD antibodies, but is characterized by platelet destruction and is more often observed in the first pregnancy. In 75 % of these women, alloimmunization by HPA-1a antigens, however, occurs at delivery, which enables development of antibody-mediated immune suppression to prevent maternal immunization. As for HDN, the recurrence rate of FNAIT is high. For advancing diagnostic efforts and treatment, it is thereby crucial to understand the pathogenesis of FNAIT, including cellular immunity involvement. This review presents the current knowledge on FNAIT. Also described is a program for HPA-1a screening in identifying HPA-1a negative pregnant women at risk of immunization. This program is now performed at the Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine in cooperation with the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education in Warsaw as well as the UiT The Arctic University of Norway.

  4. Update on ankylosing spondylitis: current concepts in pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is an insidiously progressive and debilitating form of arthritis involving the axial skeleton. The long delay in diagnosis and insufficient response to currently available therapeutics both advocate for a greater understanding of disease pathogenesis. Genome-wide association studies of this highly genetic disease have implicated specific immune pathways, including the interleukin (IL)-17/IL-23 pathway, control of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation, amino acid trimming for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen presentation, and other genes controlling CD8 and CD4 T cell subsets. The relevance of these pathways has borne out in animal and human subject studies, in particular, the response to novel therapeutic agents. Genetics and the findings of autoantibodies in ankylosing spondylitis revisit the question of autoimmune vs. autoinflammatory etiology. As environmental partners to genetics, recent attention has focused on the roles of microbiota and biomechanical stress in initiating and perpetuating inflammation. Herein, we review these current developments in the investigation of ankylosing spondylitis pathogenesis.

  5. Pathogenesis and Individualized Treatment for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome in Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Rui Xu; Hong-Fang Jin; Jun-Bao Du

    2016-01-01

    Objective:Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is one of the major causes of orthostatic intolerance in children.We systematically reviewed the pathogenesis and the progress of individualized treatment for POTS in children.Data Sources:The data analyzed in this review are mainly from articles included in PubMed and EMBASE.Study Selection:The original articles and critical reviews about POTS were selected for this review.Results:Studies have shown that POTS might be related to several factors including hypovolemia,high catecholamine status,abnormal local vascular tension,and decreased skeletal muscle pump activity.In addition to exercise training,the first-line treatments mainly include oral rehydration salts,beta-adrenoreceptor blockers,and alpha-adrenoreceptor agonists.However,reports about the effectiveness of various treatments are diverse.By analyzing the patient's physiological indexes and biomarkers before the treatment,the efficacy of medication could be well predicted.Conclusions:The pathogenesis of POTS is multifactorial,including hypovolemia,abnormal catecholamine state,and vascular dysfunction.Biomarker-directed individualized treatment is an important strategy for the management of POTS children.

  6. Multiple Sclerosis: Pathogenesis, Symptoms, Diagnoses and Cell-Based Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazem Ghasemi,

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by central nervous system (CNS lesions that can lead to severe physical or cognitive disability as well as neurological defects. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of MS remains unclear, the present documents illustrate that the cause of MS is multifactorial and include genetic predisposition together with environmental factors such as exposure to infectious agents, vitamin deficiencies, and smoking. These agents are able to trigger a cascade of events in the immune system which lead to neuronal cell death accompanied by nerve demyelination and neuronal dysfunction. Conventional therapies for MS are based on the use of anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory drugs, but these treatments are not able to stop the destruction of nerve tissue. Thus, other strategies such as stem cell transplantation have been proposed for the treatment of MS. Overall, it is important that neurologists be aware of current information regarding the pathogenesis, etiology, diagnostic criteria, and treatment of MS. Thus, this issue has been discussed according to recent available information.

  7. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Autoimmune or Immune-mediated Pathogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghui Wen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, is still unclear, but both autoimmune and immune-mediated phenomena are involved. Autoimmune phenomena include the presence of serum and mucosal autoantibodies against intestinal epithelial cells in either form of IBD, and against human tropomyosin fraction five selectively in UC. In addition, perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA are common in UC, whereas antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA are frequently found in CD. Immune-mediate phenomena include a variety of abnormalities of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and a generalized enhanced reactivity against intestinal bacterial antigens in both CD and UC. It is currently believed that loss of tolerance against the indigenous enteric flora is the central event in IBD pathogenesis. Various complementary factors probably contribute to the loss of tolerance to commensal bacteria in IBD. They include defects in regulatory T-cell function, excessive stimulation of mucosal dendritic cells, infections or variants of proteins critically involved in bacterial antigen recognition, such as the products of CD-associated NOD2/CARD15 mutations.

  8. Renin-angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Regina Maria Pereira; Robson Augusto Souza dos Santos; Filipi Leles da Costa Dias; Mauro Martins Teixeira; Ana Cristina Sim(o)es e Silva

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is considered a common response to many chronic hepatic injuries. It is a multifunctional process that involves several cell types, cytokines, chemokines and growth factors leading to a disruption of homeostatic mechanisms that maintain the liver ecosystem. In spite of many studies regarding the development of fibrosis, the understanding of the pathogenesis remains obscure. The hepatic tissue remodeling process is highly complex, resulting from the balance between collagen degradation and synthesis. Among the many mediators that take part in this process, the components of the Renin angiotensin system (RAS) have progressively assumed an important role. Angiotensin (Ang) Ⅱ acts as a profibrotic mediator and Ang-(1-7), the newly recognized RAS component, appears to exert a counter-regulatory role in liver tissue. We briefly review the liver fibrosis process and current aspects of the RAS. This review also aims to discuss some experimental evidence regarding the participation of RAS mediators in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis,focusing on the putative role of the ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas receptor axis.

  9. Neutralizing Antibodies and Pathogenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Stoll-Keller

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. The interplay between the virus and host innate and adaptive immune responses determines the outcome of infection. There is increasing evidence that host neutralizing responses play a relevant role in the resulting pathogenesis. Furthermore, viral evasion from host neutralizing antibodies has been revealed to be an important contributor in leading both to viral persistence in acute liver graft infection following liver transplantation, and to chronic viral infection. The development of novel model systems to study HCV entry and neutralization has allowed a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms of virus-host interactions during antibody-mediated neutralization. The understanding of these mechanisms will ultimately contribute to the development of novel antiviral preventive strategies for liver graft infection and an urgently needed vaccine. This review summarizes recent concepts of the role of neutralizing antibodies in viral clearance and protection, and highlights consequences of viral escape from neutralizing antibodies in the pathogenesis of HCV infection.

  10. An update on necrotizing enterocolitis: pathogenesis and preventive strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Hoon Lee

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is one of the most critical morbidities in preterm infants. The incidence of NEC is 7% in very-low-birthweight infants, and its mortality is 15 to 30%. Infants who survive NEC have various complications, such as nosocomial infection, malnutrition, growth failure, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, and neurodevelopmental delays. The most important etiology in the pathogenesis of NEC is structural and immunological intestinal immaturity. In preterm infants with immature gastrointestinal tracts, development of NEC may be associated with a variety of factors, such as colonization with pathogenic bacteria, secondary ischemia, genetic polymorphisms conferring NEC susceptibility, anemia with red blood cell transfusion, and sensitization to cow milk proteins. To date, a variety of preventive strategies has been accepted or attempted in clinical practice with regard to the pathogenesis of NEC. These strategies include the use of breast feeding, various feeding strategies, probiotics, prebiotics, glutamine and arginine, and lactoferrin. There is substantial evidence for the efficacy of breast feeding and the use of probiotics in infants with birth weights above 1,000 g, and these strategies are commonly used in clinical practice. Other preventive strategies, however, require further research to establish their effect on NEC.

  11. Pathogenesis of water and sodium retention in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P Y; Schrier, R W

    1997-06-01

    The pathogenesis of renal sodium and water retention in cirrhosis involves extrarenal mechanisms because when kidneys from cirrhotic patients are transplanted into persons with normal livers, renal sodium and water retention no longer occurs. Cirrhosis is accompanied by portal hypertension, which leads to a hyperdynamic circulatory state. The Peripheral Arterial Vasodilation Hypothesis incriminates a relative underfilling of the arterial vascular compartment, which leads to the same neurohumoral responses that occurs in low cardiac output. Activation of the renain-angiotensin-aldosterone axis and the sympathetic system as well as non-osmotic release of vasopressin are well documented in cirrhosis. This sequence of events results in renal water and sodium retention, failure to escape from the sodium-retaining effect of aldosterone, and renal resistance to atrial natriuretic peptide. Dilutional hyponatremia is the strongest predictor of the occurrence of hepatorenal syndrome. The pathogenesis of the peripheral arterial vasodilation is not completely elucidated, but there is evidence for a major role of nitric oxide (NO). Increased vascular NO production has been demonstrated in cirrhosis. In the rat model of cirrhosis, normalization of vascular NO production with a NOS inhibitor corrects the hyperdynamic circulation, improves sodium and water excretion, and decreases neurohumoral activation. This insight into the mechanism(s) of the peripheral arterial vasodilation in cirrhosis should provide new tools in the treatment of edema and ascites, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cirrhosis.

  12. Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy: new insights into its pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floreani, Annarosa; Caroli, Diego; Lazzari, Roberta; Memmo, Alessia; Vidali, Elisa; Colavito, Davide; D'Arrigo, Antonello; Leon, Alberta; Romero, Roberto; Gervasi, Maria Teresa

    2013-09-01

    To search a specific gene expression profile in women with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) and to evaluate the maternal and foetal outcome. We consecutively enrolled 12 women with ICP and 12 healthy pregnant controls. The gene expression profile was assayed with the microarray technique including a panel of 5541 human genes. Microarray data were validated by real-time PCR technique. Caesarean delivery was performed in eight patients with ICP versus three controls (p = 0.05). ICP women delivered at earlier gestational age than control (p < 0.001). Foetal distress was recorded in two babies, but we failed to find any correlation between bile salt concentration and foetal distress. Twenty genes potentially correlated with ICP were found differentially expressed (p < 0.05). Among these, three belong to genetic classes involved in pathogenic mechanisms of ICP: (1) pathophysiology of pruritus (GABRA2, cases versus controls = 2, upregulated gene); (2) lipid metabolism and bile composition (HLPT, cases versus controls = 0.6, down-regulated gene) and (3) protein trafficking and cytoskeleton arrangement (KIFC3, cases versus controls = 0.5, down-regulated gene). Different gene expression may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of ICP. An upregulation of GABRA2 receptor may indicate that GABA may play a role in the pathogenesis of pruritus in this condition.

  13. The Role of Neutrophil Activation in Pathogenesis of Preeclampsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the effect of neutrophil activation on pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia, neutrophil activation was examined by using flow cytometry to assess the CD11b expression and the levels of plasma endothelin-1 (ET-1) and serum NO-2 were also measured by using non-equilibrium radioimmunoassay and by Griess assay in 29 pregnant women with pre-eclampsia and 31 normal pregnant women at third trimester. The expression of neutrophil CD11b was significantly elevated in women with pre-eclampsia as compared with that of normal pregnant women at third trimester. The mean fluorescence index of CD11b was 438.38±179.91 and 326.97±170.14 respectively (P<0.05). The plasma ET-1 level and serum NO 2 concentration in pre-eclampsic women (63.69±48.33 pg/ml and 20.03±4.77 μmol/L, respectively) were both significantly increased as compared with those in the normal pregnancy women (29.98±20.25 pg/ml and 15.47±5.47 μmol/L, respectively, P<0.01). The neutrophil CD11b expression was significantly elevated in pre-eclampsia. The increased neutrophil activation may cause the damage of vascular endothelium and result in NO release compensatory increase in endothelial cells, suggesting that the neutrophil activation may play a key role in pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia.

  14. Abnormal placentation, angiogenic factors, and the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silasi, Michelle; Cohen, Bruce; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Rana, Sarosh

    2010-06-01

    Preeclampsia is a common complication of pregnancy with potentially devastating consequences to both the mother and the baby.It is the leading cause of maternal deaths in developing countries. In developed countries it is the major cause of iatrogenic premature delivery and contributes significantly to increasing health care cost associated with prematurity. There is currently no known treatment for preeclampsia; ultimate treatment involves delivery of the placenta. Although there are several risk factors (such as multiple gestation or chronic hypertension), most patients present with no obvious risk factors. The molecular pathogenesis of preeclampsia is just now being elucidated. It has been proposed that abnormal placentation and an imbalance in angiogenic factors lead to the clinical findings and complications seen in preeclampsia. Preeclampsia is characterized by high levels of circulating antiangiogenic factors such as soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and soluble endoglin, which induce maternal endothelial dysfunction. These soluble factors are altered not only at the time of clinical disease but also several weeks before the onset of clinical signs and symptoms. Many methods of prediction and surveillance have been proposed to identify women who will develop preeclampsia, but studies have been inconclusive. With the recent discovery of the role of angiogenic factors in preeclampsia, novel methods of prediction and diagnosis are being developed to aid obstetricians and midwives in clinical practice. This article discusses the role of angiogenic factors in the pathogenesis, prediction, diagnosis, and possible treatment of preeclampsia.

  15. The role of obesity in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, Yolanda E; Linas, Stuart

    2009-02-01

    The rapid rise in the incidence and prevalence of obesity and the concomitant increase in the incidence and prevalence of hypertension have fueled investigation into the role of obesity in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The genetic background that predisposes obese individuals to hypertension is being elucidated, and the importance of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ in the pathogenesis of hypertension is increasingly being recognized. Visceral adipose tissue is critical in the production of pathologic cytokines that are thought to mediate obesity-induced hypertension. Changes in the types and levels of adipocytokines that result from the accumulation of aberrant adipose tissue directly leads to alterations in systemic vascular resistance, sodium retention and sympathetic nervous system activity. Key changes in adipocytokine levels seen in obesity-induced hypertension include increased leptin and adiponectin levels. Another important mechanism in obesity-induced hypertension is the generation of angiotensin II and direct stimulation of aldosterone production. The increased sympathetic nervous system activity seen in obesity-associated hypertension leads to increased renal sodium retention and increased systemic vascular resistance. Increased systemic vascular resistance can also occur directly in obese individuals through vascular fibrosis and lipid deposition. Obesity should no longer be simply considered as a marker of cardiovascular risk but should be regarded as an important and primary contributor to the pathophysiology of hypertension.

  16. The pathogenesis of Achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnan, Bruno; Bondi, Manuel; Pierantoni, Silvia; Samaila, Elena

    2014-09-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a degenerative, not an inflammatory, condition. It is prevalent in athletes involved in running sports. A systematic literature review on Achilles tendon tendinopathy has been performed according to the intrinsic (age, sex, body weight, tendon temperature, systemic diseases, muscle strength, flexibility, previous injuries and anatomical variants, genetic predisposition and blood supply) and extrinsic risk factors (drugs and overuse), which can cause tendon suffering and degeneration. Different theories have been found: Neurogenic, Angiogenic, Impingement and "Iceberg" Hypotheses. Multiple databases were utilized for articles published between 1964 and 2013. The different hypothesis were analyzed, differently considering those concerning the pathogenesis of tendinopathy and those concerning the etiology of complaints in patients. This review of the literature demonstrates the heterogeneity of Achilles tendinopathy pathogenesis. Various risk factors have been identified and have shown an interaction between them such as genes, age, circulating and local cytokine production, sex, biomechanics and body composition. Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chromosomal rearrangements and the pathogenesis of differentiated thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan K.G. Grebe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The majority of thyroid cancers arise from the follicular cells of the thyroid gland, which yield a wide variety of distinct morphotypes, ranging from relatively indolent lesions to the most malignant forms of cancer known. The remaining primary thyroid cancers arise from C cells within the gland and result primarily from mutations of the RET protooncogene, germ line mutations of which give rise to the various forms of multiple endocrine neoplasia. The most common of the follicular cell-derived cancers are papillary carcinomas, (PTC, followed by follicular carcinomas (FTC and its Hurthle cell variant (HCC and finally anaplastic carcinomas (ATC. The pathogenesis of many thyroid cancers, of both PTC and FTC morphotype, involves chromosomal translocations. Rearrangements of the RET protoconcogene are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of ca. 50% of PTC. A similar proportion of FTC have been associated with a t(2;3(q13;p25 translocation, fusing the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ nuclear receptor, a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor. These rearrangements have analogy with translocations in erythropoetic cells, which form the only other known group of human malignancies that are largely the result of chromosomal translocation events. In this review we compare and contrast the oncogenic properties of thyroid and erythroid chromosomal transformations and speculate on mechanisms leading to their formation.

  18. Role of mitochondria in the pathogenesis and treatment of glaucoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xue-jiao; GE Jian; ZHUO Ye-hong

    2013-01-01

    Objective To gain insight into the potential mechanism of mitochondria dysfunction in pathogenesis,progression and therapeutic management of glaucoma.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly published in English from 2000 to present obtained from PubMed.The search terms were "mitochondria","glaucoma" and 'trabecular meshwork" or "retinal ganglion cells".Study selection Articles studying the mitochondria-related pathologic mechanism and treatment of glaucoma were selected and reviewed.Results Mitochondrial dysfunction or injury was demonstrated in different eye tissue of glaucoma.A variety of potential injuries (light,toxic materials,oxidative injury,mechanical stress,aging,etc.) and the inherent DNA defects are deemed to cause mitochondrial structural and functional destruction in trabecular meshwork cells,retinal ganglion cells,etc.of glaucoma.In addition,various new experimental and therapeutic interventions were used to preserve mitochondrial function,which may be useful for protecting against optic nerve degeneration or reducing the death of retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma.Conclusions Mitochondria play an important role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma,various strategies targeting mitochondrial protection might provide a promising way to delay the onset of glaucoma or protect RGCs against glaucomatous damage.

  19. Role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Peizhou; Le, Weidong

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in maintaining the cellular homeostasis. One of its functions is to degrade unnecessary organelles and proteins for energy recycling or amino-acids for cell survival. Ablation of autophagy leads to neurodegeneration. Multiple sclerosis (MS), a permanent neurological impairment typical of chronic inflammatory demyelinating disorder, is an auto-immune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Autophagy is tightly linked to the innate and adaptive immune systems during the autoimmune process, and several studies have shown that autophagy directly participates in the progress of MS or experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of MS). Dysfunction of mitochondria that intensively influences the autophagy pathway is one of the important factors in the pathogenesis of MS. Autophagy-related gene (ATG) 5 and immune-related GTPase M (IRGM) 1 are increased, while ATG16L2 is decreased, in T-cells in EAE and active relapsing-remitting MS brains. Administration of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin ( mTOR), ameliorates relapsing-remitting EAE. Inflammation and oxidative stress are increased in MS lesions and EAE, but Lamp2 and the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio are decreased. Furthermore, autophagy in various glial cells plays important roles in regulating neuro-inflammation in the CNS, implying potential roles in MS. In this review, we discuss the role of autophagy in the peripheral immune system and the CNS in neuroinflammation associated with the pathogenesis of MS.

  20. Expression of NDUFA13 in asthenozoospermia and possible pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Cheng, Laiyang; Wang, Ying; Han, Yilong; Liu, Jin; Deng, Xiaohui; Chao, Lan

    2017-01-01

    Asthenozoospermia is a common cause of male infertility, which is characterized by reduced forward motility of spermatozoa. The cause and pathogenesis of asthenozoospermia are not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) 1 alpha subcomplex, 13 (NDUFA13) in the spermatozoa of men with asthenozoospermia and its possible pathogenesis. Protein content of NDUFA13 in spermatozoa was measured by Western blot analysis. The results showed that NDUFA13 expression in spermatozoa was significantly lower in men with asthenozoospermic than in men with normozoospermia (P asthenozoospermia. NDUFA13-specific small interfering RNA was used in the mouse spermatocyte GC2-spd cell line to down-regulate the expression of NDUFA13. The knockdown of NDUFA13 in the GC2-spd cells caused a collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, an increase in ROS level and more apoptotic cells. Our study showed that NDUFA13 deficiency may be associated with asthenozoospermia through the disturbance of spermatozoa mitochondrial membrane potential and by increasing apoptosis and intracellular ROS.

  1. Phosphate starvation enhances the pathogenesis of Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Somya; Somani, Vikas Kumar; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2015-09-01

    Identifying the factors responsible for survival and virulence of Bacillus anthracis within the host is prerequisite for the development of therapeutics against anthrax. Host provides several stresses as well as many advantages to the invading pathogen. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation within the host has been considered as one of the major contributing factors in the establishment of infection by pathogenic microorganisms. Here, we report for the first time that Pi fluctuation encountered by B. anthracis at different stages of its life cycle within the host, contributes significantly in its pathogenesis. In this study, Pi starvation was found to hasten the onset of infection cycle by promoting spore germination. After germination, it was found to impede cell growth. In addition, phosphate starved bacilli showed more antibiotic tolerance. Interestingly, phosphate starvation enhanced the pathogenicity of B. anthracis by augmenting its invasiveness in macrophages in vitro. B. anthracis grown under phosphate starvation were also found to be more efficient in establishing lethal infections in mouse model as well. Phosphate starvation increased B. anthracis virulence by promoting the secretion of primary virulence factors like protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF). Thus, this study affirms that besides other host mediated factors, phosphate limitation may also contribute B. anthracis for successfully establishing itself within the host. This study is a step forward in delineating its pathophysiology that might help in understanding the pathogenesis of anthrax.

  2. Pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune disease: the role of cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Leví, Ana Maria; Marazuela, Mónica

    2016-10-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and Graves' disease (GD) are two very common organ-specific autoimmune diseases which are characterized by circulating antibodies and lymphocyte infiltration. Although humoral and cellular mechanisms have been classically considered separately in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), recent research suggests a close reciprocal relationship between these two immune pathways. Several B- and T-cell activation pathways through antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and cytokine production lead to specific differentiation of T helper (Th) and T regulatory (Treg) cells. This review will focus on the cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AITD. Specifically, it will provide reasons for discarding the traditional simplistic dichotomous view of the T helper type 1 and 2 pathways (Th1/Th2) and will focus on the role of the recently characterized T cells, Treg and Th17 lymphocytes, as well as B lymphocytes and APCs, especially dendritic cells (DCs). Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular Pathogenesis of Liver Steatosis Induced by Hepatitis C Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun; Cheng; Min; Li; Ping; Gao; Jin-ling; Dong; Qi; Wang

    2012-01-01

    Liver steatosis is a pathological hallmark in patients with chronic hepatitis C(CHC).Increased lipid uptake,decreased lipid secretion,increased lipid synthesis and decreased lipid degradation are all involved in pathogenesis of steatosis induced by hepatitic C virus(HCV) infection.Level of low density lipoprotein receptor(LDL-R) and activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor(PPAR) α is related to liver uptake of lipid from circulation,and affected by HCV.Secretion via microsomal triglyceride transfer protein(MTTP),and formation of very low density lipoprotein(VLDL) have been hampered by HCV infection.Up-regulation of lipid synthesis related genes,such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein(SREBP)-1,SREBP-2,SREBP-1c,fatty acid synthase(FASN),HMG CoA reductase(HMGCR),liver X receptor(LXR),acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1(ACC1),hepatic CB(1) receptors,retinoid X receptor(RXR) α,were the main stay of liver steatosis pathogenesis.Degradation of lipid in liver is decreased in patients with CHC.There is strong evidence that heterogeneity of HCV core genes of different genotypes affect their effects of liver steatosis induction.A mechanism in which steatosis is involved in HCV life cycle is emerging.

  4. Complement in different stages of HIV infection and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Cornelia; Stoiber, Heribert; Dierich, Manfred P

    2003-04-01

    The complement system is one of the most important weapons of innate immunity and is involved in all infectious processes. It is not only a mechanism for direct protection against an invading pathogen but it also interacts with the adaptive immunity to optimize the pathogen-specific humoral and cellular defence cascade in the body. One of the greatest challenges for the complement system is infection by HIV with its chronic course and sequential destruction of immune cells and immune organs. Due to its dual role as direct effector and as fine tuner of adaptive immunity, we focussed on complement in this review and analysed in detail the contribution of complement to the antiviral defence and to HIV pathogenesis on the one hand and the complement evasion strategies of the virus on the other hand. In the present review, this interplay between complement and the virus is illuminated for the three different stages of HIV pathogenesis and for events during therapy: (1) the acute infection process with the early events in mucosa and serum; (2) the asymptomatic stage with the complex interplay between complement-induced lysis and viral evasion strategies; (3) the symptomatic infection and AIDS stage with progressive destruction of the lymph nodes, opportunistic infections and development of neuropathogenesis, and (4) finally, during highly active antiretroviral therapy and in vaccination approaches. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Cell tropism and pathogenesis of measles virus in monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sei-ich eKato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Measles virus (MV is an enveloped negative strand RNA virus belonging to the family of Paramyxoviridae, genus Morbillivirus, and causes one of the most contagious diseases in humans. Experimentally infected non-human primates are used as animal models for studies of the pathogenesis of human measles. We established a reverse genetics system based on a highly pathogenic wild-type MV (IC-B strain. Infection of monkeys with recombinant MV strains generated by reverse genetics enabled analysis of the molecular basis of MV pathogenesis. In addition, recombinant wild-type MV strains expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein enable visual tracking of MV-infected cells in vitro and in vivo. To date, 3 different molecules have been identified as receptors for MV. Signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM, also called CD150, expressed on immune cells, is a major receptor for MV. CD46, ubiquitously expressed in all nucleated cells in humans and monkeys, is a receptor for vaccine and laboratory strains of MV. The newly identified nectin-4 (also called PVRL4 is an epithelial cell receptor for MV. The impact of MV receptor usage in vivo on disease outcomes is now under investigation.

  6. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE PATHOGENESIS AND TREATMENT OF SEPSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Jereb

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Severe sepsis and septic shock are the most important causes of death in patients in intensive care units. In the last decades the incidence of sepsis increased and the case-fatality rate of septic shock did not decreased significantly despite improved intensive care medicine. Clinical presentations of severe sepsis and septic shock are predominantly a result of dysregulation of the immune system caused by parts of the bacterial cell wall, endotoxins and exotoxins. Inflammatory cascade and cytokines plays an important role in the pathogenesis of sepsis.Conclusions. Early and appropriate antimicrobial treatment as well as surgical removal of an septic focus improve the survival of patients with sepsis. In the past, various immunomodulatory therapies (antiendotoxins, antimediator interventions and immunostimulation therapy did not decreased the mortality of patients with sepsis. In the last years, however, some interventions in selected patients with severe sepsis and septic shock have shown significantly improved survival. These interventions include treatment with activated protein C, early goal-directed therapy, intensive treatment with insulin, low-dose corticosteroid treatment and use of low tidal volumes in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this article new developments in pathogenesis and therapy of sepsis are reviewed.

  7. Role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George Kolios; Vassilis Valatas; Elias Kouroumalis

    2006-01-01

    Kupffer cells, the resident liver macrophages have long been considered as mostly scavenger cells responsible for removing particulate material from the portal circulation. However, evidence derived mostly from animal models, indicates that Kupffer cells may be implicated in the pathogenesis of various liver diseases including viral hepatitis, steatohepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, intrahepatic cholostasis, activation or rejection of the liver during liver transplantation and liver fibrosis. There is accumulating evidence, reviewed in this paper, suggesting that Kupffer cells may act both as effector cells in the destruction of hepatocytes by producing harmful soluble mediators as well as antigen presenting cells during viral infections of the liver. Moreover they may represent a significant source of chemoattractant molecules for cytotoxic CD8 and regulatory T cells. Their role in fibrosis is well established as they are one of the main sources of TGFβ1 production, which leads to the transformation of stellate cells into myofibroblasts. Whether all these variable functions in the liver are mediated by different Kupffer cell subpopulations remains to be evaluated. In this review we propose a model that demonstrates the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of liver disease.

  8. The Blood Nucleome in the Pathogenesis of SLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisetsky, David S.; Ullal, Anirudh J.

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is prototypic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to DNA among other nuclear molecules. These antibodies can form immune complexes that promote pathogenesis by stimulating cytokine production and depositing in the kidney to instigate nephritis. The antigens that form these complexes arise from the blood nucleome, a pool of circulating macromolecules comprised of DNA, RNA and nuclear proteins released from cells. Cell death is a major source of these molecules, releasing DNA in a process that can be modeled in mice by the administration of cells killed ex vivo. In the mouse model, the appearance of blood DNA requires macrophages and differs between males and females. This finding raises the possibility that augmented levels of extracellular DNA and other nuclear antigens can contribute to the increased frequency of SLE in females. Extracellular DNA can occur in both a soluble and particulate form, with microparticles generated in vitro displaying antigenically active DNA. Together, these findings suggest that cell death is an important event in lupus pathogenesis and can provide a supply of blood DNA essential for immune complex formation. PMID:20659590

  9. Pathogenesis of a Model Gammaherpesvirus in a Natural Host ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David J.; Kipar, Anja; Sample, Jeffery T.; Stewart, James P.

    2010-01-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) infection of laboratory mice (Mus musculus) is an established model of gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis. The fact that M. musculus is not a host in the wild prompted us to reassess MHV-68 infection in wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus), a natural host. Here, we report significant differences in MHV-68 infection in the two species: (i) following intranasal inoculation, MHV-68 replicated in the lungs of wood mice to levels approximately 3 log units lower than in BALB/c mice; (ii) in BALB/c mice, virus replication in alveolar epithelial cells was accompanied by a diffuse, T-cell-dominated interstitial pneumonitis, whereas in wood mice it was restricted to focal granulomatous infiltrations; (iii) within wood mice, latently infected lymphocytes were abundant in inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue that was not apparent in BALB/c mice; (iv) splenic latency was established in both species, but well-delineated secondary follicles with germinal centers were present in wood mice, while only poorly delineated follicles were seen in BALB/c mice; and, perhaps as a consequence, (v) production of neutralizing antibody was significantly higher in wood mice. These differences highlight the value of this animal model in the study of MHV-68 pathogenesis. PMID:20130062

  10. Pathogenesis of ligaments ossification in spondyloarthritis: insights and doubts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, Anna; Maruotti, Nicola; Corrado, Addolorata; Cantatore, Francesco Paolo

    2017-05-01

    Despite intensive research in spondyloarthritis pathogenesis, some important questions still remain unanswered, particularly concerning enthesis new bone formation. Several evidences suggest that it prevalently occurs by endochondral ossification, however it remains to identify factors that can induce and influence its initiation and progression. Recent progress, achieved in animal models and in vitro and genetic association studies, has led us to hypothesize that several systemic factors (adipokines and gut hormones) and local factors (BMP and Wnt signaling) as well as angiogenesis and mechanical stress are involved. We critically review and summarize the available data and delineate the possible mechanisms involved in enthesis ossification, particularly at spinal ligament level. KEY MESSAGES Complete understanding of spondyloarthritis pathophysiology requires insights into inflammation, bone destruction and bone formation, which are all located in entheses and lead all together to ankylosis and functional disability. Several factors probably play a role in the pathogenesis of bone formation in entheses including not only cytokines but also several systemic factors such as adipokines and gut hormones, and local factors, such as BMP and Wnt signaling, as well as angiogenesis and mechanical stress. Data available about pathophysiology of new bone formation in spondyloarthritis are limited and often conflicting and future studies are needed to better delineate it and to develop new therapeutic approaches.

  11. Pathogenesis and Individualized Treatment for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen-Rui; Jin, Hong-Fang; Du, Jun-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is one of the major causes of orthostatic intolerance in children. We systematically reviewed the pathogenesis and the progress of individualized treatment for POTS in children. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review are mainly from articles included in PubMed and EMBASE. Study Selection: The original articles and critical reviews about POTS were selected for this review. Results: Studies have shown that POTS might be related to several factors including hypovolemia, high catecholamine status, abnormal local vascular tension, and decreased skeletal muscle pump activity. In addition to exercise training, the first-line treatments mainly include oral rehydration salts, beta-adrenoreceptor blockers, and alpha-adrenoreceptor agonists. However, reports about the effectiveness of various treatments are diverse. By analyzing the patient's physiological indexes and biomarkers before the treatment, the efficacy of medication could be well predicted. Conclusions: The pathogenesis of POTS is multifactorial, including hypovolemia, abnormal catecholamine state, and vascular dysfunction. Biomarker-directed individualized treatment is an important strategy for the management of POTS children. PMID:27625098

  12. An update on necrotizing enterocolitis: pathogenesis and preventive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang Hoon

    2011-09-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is one of the most critical morbidities in preterm infants. The incidence of NEC is 7% in very-low-birth-weight infants, and its mortality is 15 to 30%. Infants who survive NEC have various complications, such as nosocomial infection, malnutrition, growth failure, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, and neurodevelopmental delays. The most important etiology in the pathogenesis of NEC is structural and immunological intestinal immaturity. In preterm infants with immature gastrointestinal tracts, development of NEC may be associated with a variety of factors, such as colonization with pathogenic bacteria, secondary ischemia, genetic polymorphisms conferring NEC susceptibility, anemia with red blood cell transfusion, and sensitization to cow milk proteins. To date, a variety of preventive strategies has been accepted or attempted in clinical practice with regard to the pathogenesis of NEC. These strategies include the use of breast feeding, various feeding strategies, probiotics, prebiotics, glutamine and arginine, and lactoferrin. There is substantial evidence for the efficacy of breast feeding and the use of probiotics in infants with birth weights above 1,000 g, and these strategies are commonly used in clinical practice. Other preventive strategies, however, require further research to establish their effect on NEC.

  13. Arginine Metabolism in Bacterial Pathogenesis and Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Xiong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial resistance to infectious diseases is a significant global concern for health care organizations; along with aging populations and increasing cancer rates, it represents a great burden for government healthcare systems. Therefore, the development of therapies against bacterial infection and cancer is an important strategy for healthcare research. Pathogenic bacteria and cancer have developed a broad range of sophisticated strategies to survive or propagate inside a host and cause infection or spread disease. Bacteria can employ their own metabolism pathways to obtain nutrients from the host cells in order to survive. Similarly, cancer cells can dysregulate normal human cell metabolic pathways so that they can grow and spread. One common feature of the adaption and disruption of metabolic pathways observed in bacterial and cancer cell growth is amino acid pathways; these have recently been targeted as a novel approach to manage bacterial infections and cancer therapy. In particular, arginine metabolism has been illustrated to be important not only for bacterial pathogenesis but also for cancer therapy. Therefore, greater insights into arginine metabolism of pathogenic bacteria and cancer cells would provide possible targets for controlling of bacterial infection and cancer treatment. This review will summarize the recent progress on the relationship of arginine metabolism with bacterial pathogenesis and cancer therapy, with a particular focus on arginase and arginine deiminase pathways of arginine catabolism.

  14. Hidradenitis suppurativa: from pathogenesis to diagnosis and treatment

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    Napolitano M

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Maddalena Napolitano,1 Matteo Megna,2 Elena A Timoshchuk,3 Cataldo Patruno,2 Nicola Balato,2 Gabriella Fabbrocini,2 Giuseppe Monfrecola2 1Dipartimento di Medicina e Scienze della Salute “Vincenzo Tiberio”, Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, 2Section of Dermatology, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy; 3Department of Dermatovenereology, Saint Petersburg State Pediatric Medical University, Saint Petersburg, Russia Abstract: Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS is a chronic inflammatory skin disease primarily affecting apocrine gland-rich areas of the body and presenting with painful nodules, abscesses, sinus tracts, and scarring. HS is a multifactorial disease in which genetic and environmental factors play a key role. The primary defect in HS pathophysiology involves follicular occlusion of the folliculopilosebaceous unit, followed by follicular rupture, and immune responses (perifollicular lympho-histiocytic inflammation, finally leading to the development of clinical HS lesions. HS has a destructive impact on the patient’s quality of life, being a very challenging disease. Available treatments are limited, mostly off-label and with high variability in the reported efficacy. Fortunately, a monoclonal antibody against tumor necrosis factor alpha has been recently approved for treatment of moderate to severe HS, offering patients a promising new option. This review focuses on the main features of HS, including epidemiology, clinical aspects, pathogenesis, severity classifications, comorbidities, and currently available treatments. Keywords: hidradenitis suppurativa, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment

  15. Scleroderma: nomenclature, etiology, pathogenesis, prognosis, and treatments: facts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fett, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Scleroderma refers to a heterogeneous group of autoimmune fibrosing disorders. The nomenclature of scleroderma has changed dramatically in recent years, with morphea (localized scleroderma), limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis, diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis, and systemic sclerosis sine scleroderma encompassing the currently accepted disease subtypes. Major advances have been made in the molecular studies of morphea and systemic sclerosis; however, their etiologies and pathogenesis remain incompletely understood. Although morphea and systemic sclerosis demonstrate activation of similar inflammatory and fibrotic pathways, important differences in signaling pathways and gene signatures indicate they are likely biologically distinct processes. Morphea can cause significant morbidity but does not affect mortality, whereas systemic sclerosis has the highest disease-specific mortality of all autoimmune connective tissue diseases. Treatment recommendations for morphea and systemic sclerosis are based on limited data and largely expert opinions. Current collaborative efforts in morphea and systemic sclerosis research will hopefully lead to better understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of these rare and varied diseases and improved treatment options.

  16. Epigenetic regulation of development and pathogenesis in fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Akanksha; Jeon, Junhyun

    2017-08-01

    Evidently, epigenetics is at forefront in explaining the mechanisms underlying the success of human pathogens and in the identification of pathogen-induced modifications within host plants. However, there is a lack of studies highlighting the role of epigenetics in the modulation of the growth and pathogenicity of fungal plant pathogens. In this review, we attempt to highlight and discuss the role of epigenetics in the regulation of the growth and pathogenicity of fungal phytopathogens using Magnaporthe oryzae, a devastating fungal plant pathogen, as a model system. With the perspective of wide application in the understanding of the development, pathogenesis and control of other fungal pathogens, we attempt to provide a synthesized view of the epigenetic studies conducted on M. oryzae to date. First, we discuss the mechanisms of epigenetic modifications in M. oryzae and their impact on fungal development and pathogenicity. Second, we highlight the unexplored epigenetic mechanisms and areas of research that should be considered in the near future to construct a holistic view of epigenetic functioning in M. oryzae and other fungal plant pathogens. Importantly, the development of a complete understanding of the modulation of epigenetic regulation in fungal pathogens can help in the identification of target points to combat fungal pathogenesis. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  17. [Genetic aspects of the pathogenesis of aortic abdominal aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, Krzysztof; Słomski, Ryszard; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Majewski, Wacław

    2005-01-01

    In industrialized countries the number of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is continuously rising. In recent years the mortality rate tripled and it is the number 13 cause of death in United States. Despite many identified risk factors and understanding of their pathomechanisms, the pathogenesis of AAA remains unclear. Thanks to the epidemiological researches and improvement of molecular techniques it was noted that AAA may have a genetic bases. The diversity between the possible genomic defects that could lead to the development of aneurytic changes was also suggested. This has a direct relationship with the complexity of the aortic wall structure and therefore with the number of potential injury locations. Current genetic research confirms the changes in expression and the many polymorphic variants of genes coding structural and enzymatic proteins. Thus, AAA seems to be a disease with multifactor pathogenesis and numerous possible genome anomaly variants. Hence, it seems that the complete understanding of the genetic bases of AAA continuous to be distant. However, efforts in this matter remain valuable, giving hope for an improved diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of this disease. This article is a review of the available knowledge regarding the genetic origin of AAA.

  18. Immunogenetics and genetic susceptibility in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Anup K

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available vAutoimmune hepatitis is a progressive liver disease. Its pathogenesis is unclear, but needs a ‘trigger’ to initiate the disease in a genetically susceptible person. The susceptibility is partly related to MHCII class genes, and more so with human leukocyte antigen (HLA. Several mechanisms have been proposed which, however, cannot fully explain the immunologic findings in autoimmune hepatitis. The susceptibility to any autoimmune disease is determined by several factors where genetic and immunological alterations, along with, environmental factor are active. MHCII antigens as a marker for AIH, or a predictor of treatment response and prognosis has been investigated. Since MHCII antigens show significant ethnic heterogeneity, mutations in MHCII may merely act as only precursors of the surface markers of immune cells, which can be of significance, because the changes in HLA and MHC are missing in certain populations. One such marker is the CTLA-4 (CD152 gene mutation, reported in the phenotypes representing susceptibility to AIH. Other candidate genes of cytokines, TNF, TGF-beta1 etc, have also been investigated but with unvalidated results. Paediatric AIH show differences in genetic susceptibility. Genetic susceptibility or resistance to AIH may be associated with polypeptides in DRB1 with certain amino-acid sequences. Understanding which genes are implicated in genesis and/or disease progression will obviously help to identify key pathways in AIH and provide better insights into its pathogenesis. But studies to identify responsible genes are complex because of the complex trait of AIH.

  19. Inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses hepatic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Maribel; Shang, Na; Ding, Xianzhong; Yong, Sherri; Cotler, Scott J; Denning, Mitchell F; Shimamura, Takashi; Breslin, Peter; Lüscher, Bernhard; Qiu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Liver fibrosis can progress to cirrhosis and result in serious complications of liver disease. The pathogenesis of liver fibrosis involves the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the underlying mechanisms of which are not fully known. Emerging evidence suggests that the classic histone deacetylases play a role in liver fibrosis, but the role of another subfamily of histone deacetylases, the sirtuins, in the development of hepatic fibrosis remains unknown. In this study, we found that blocking the activity of sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) by using inhibitors or shRNAs significantly suppressed fibrogenic gene expression in HSCs. We further demonstrated that inhibition of SIRT2 results in the degradation of c-MYC, which is important for HSC activation. In addition, we discovered that inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses the phosphorylation of ERK, which is critical for the stabilization of c-MYC. Moreover, we found that Sirt2 deficiency attenuates the hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and thioacetamide (TAA). Furthermore, we showed that SIRT2, p-ERK, and c-MYC proteins are all overexpressed in human hepatic fibrotic tissues. These data suggest a critical role for the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis in promoting hepatic fibrogenesis. Inhibition of the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis represents a novel strategy to prevent and to potentially treat liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

  20. Inhibition of Complement Retards Ankylosing Spondylitis Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chaoqun; Ding, Peipei; Wang, Qingkai; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Jianquan; Xu, Enjie; Wang, Na; Chen, Jianfeng; Yang, Guang; Hu, Weiguo; Zhou, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) resulting in back pain and progressive spinal ankyloses. Currently, there are no effective therapeutics targeting AS largely due to elusive pathogenesis mechanisms, even as potential candidates such as HLA-B27 autoantigen have been identified. Herein, we employed a proteoglycan (PG)-induced AS mouse model together with clinical specimens, and found that the complement system was substantially activated in the spinal bone marrow, accompanied by a remarkable proportion alteration of neutrophils and macrophage in bone marrow and spleen, and by the significant increase of TGF-β1 in serum. The combined treatment with a bacteria-derived complement inhibitor Efb-C (C-terminal of extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus) remarkably retarded the progression of mouse AS by reducing osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that two important modulators involved in AS disease, TGF-β1 and RANKL, were elevated upon in vitro complement attack in osteoblast and/or osteoclast cells. These findings further unravel that complement activation is closely related with the pathogenesis of AS, and suggest that complement inhibition may hold great potential for AS therapy. PMID:27698377

  1. Efficacy of ALK5 inhibition in myelofibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wanke; Ho, Wanting Tina; Han, Ying; Murdun, Cem; Mailloux, Adam W.; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Xuefeng; Budhathoki, Anjali; Pradhan, Kith; Rapaport, Franck; Wang, Huaquan; Shao, Zonghong; Ren, Xiubao; Steidl, Ulrich; Levine, Ross L.; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe; Verma, Amit; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K.

    2017-01-01

    Myelofibrosis (MF) is a bone marrow disorder characterized by clonal myeloproliferation, aberrant cytokine production, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and bone marrow fibrosis. Although somatic mutations in JAK2, MPL, and CALR have been identified in the pathogenesis of these diseases, inhibitors of the Jak2 pathway have not demonstrated efficacy in ameliorating MF in patients. TGF-β family members are profibrotic cytokines and we observed significant TGF-β1 isoform overexpression in a large cohort of primary MF patient samples. Significant overexpression of TGF-β1 was also observed in murine clonal MPLW515L megakaryocytic cells. TGF-β1 stimulated the deposition of excessive collagen by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) by activating the TGF-β receptor I kinase (ALK5)/Smad3 pathway. MSCs derived from MPLW515L mice demonstrated sustained overproduction of both collagen I and collagen III, effects that were abrogated by ALK5 inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, use of galunisertib, a clinically active ALK5 inhibitor, significantly improved MF in both MPLW515L and JAK2V617F mouse models. These data demonstrate the role of malignant hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)/TGF-β/MSC axis in the pathogenesis of MF, and provide a preclinical rationale for ALK5 blockade as a therapeutic strategy in MF.

  2. Mortalin inhibition in experimental Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasserini, Davide; Tozzi, Alessandro; de Iure, Antonio; Tantucci, Michela; Susta, Federica; Orvietani, Pier Luigi; Koya, Keizo; Binaglia, Luciano; Calabresi, Paolo

    2011-08-01

    Among heat shock proteins, mortalin has been linked to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In the present work a rat model of Parkinson's disease was used to analyze the expression of striatal proteins and, more specifically, mortalin expression. The possible involvement of mortalin in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis was further investigated by utilizing an electrophysiological approach and pharmacological inhibition of mortalin in both the physiological and the parkinsonian states. Proteomic analysis was used to investigate changes in striatal protein expression in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease. The electrophysiological effects of MKT-077, a rhodamine-123 analogue acting as an inhibitor of mortalin, were measured by field potential recordings from corticostriatal brain slices obtained from control, sham-operated, and 6-hydroxydopamine-denervated animals. Slices in the presence of rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, were also analyzed. Proteomic analysis revealed downregulation of mortalin in the striata of 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats in comparison with sham-operated animals. MKT-077 reduced corticostriatal field potential amplitude in physiological conditions, inducing membrane depolarization and inward current in striatal medium spiny neurons. In addition, we observed that concentrations of MKT-077 not inducing any electrophysiological effect in physiological conditions caused significant changes in striatal slices from parkinsonian animals as well as in slices treated with a submaximal concentration of rotenone. These findings suggest a critical link between mortalin function and mitochondrial activity in both physiological and pathological conditions mimicking Parkinson's disease.

  3. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, René E; Wu, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. It is associated with a poor prognosis and has limited treatment options. Sorafenib, a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, is the only available systemic agent for treatment of HCC that improves overall survival for patients with advanced stage disease; unfortunately, an effective second-line agent for the treatment of progressive or sorafenib-resistant HCC has yet to be identified. This review focuses on components of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, its role in HCC pathogenesis, and dual mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic option with potential efficacy in advanced HCC. There are several important upstream and downstream signals in the mTOR pathway, and alternative tumor-promoting pathways are known to exist beyond mTORC1 inhibition in HCC. This review analyzes the relationships of the upstream and downstream regulators of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling; it also provides a comprehensive global picture of the interaction between mTORC1 and mTORC2 which demonstrates the pre-clinical relevance of the mTOR pathway in HCC pathogenesis and progression. Finally, it provides scientific rationale for dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibition in the treatment of HCC. Clinical trials utilizing mTORC1 inhibitors and dual mTOR inhibitors in HCC are discussed as well. The mTOR pathway is comprised of two main components, mTORC1 and mTORC2; each has a unique role in the pathogenesis and progression of HCC. In phase III studies, mTORC1 inhibitors demonstrate anti-tumor activity in advanced HCC, but dual mTOR (mTORC1 and mTORC2) inhibition has greater therapeutic potential in HCC treatment which warrants further clinical investigation. PMID:25429315

  4. Myriocin significantly increases the mortality of a non-mammalian model host during Candida pathogenesis.

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    Nadja Rodrigues de Melo

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a major human pathogen whose treatment is challenging due to antifungal drug toxicity, drug resistance and paucity of antifungal agents available. Myrocin (MYR inhibits sphingosine synthesis, a precursor of sphingolipids, an important cell membrane and signaling molecule component. MYR also has dual immune suppressive and antifungal properties, potentially modulating mammalian immunity and simultaneously reducing fungal infection risk. Wax moth (Galleria mellonella larvae, alternatives to mice, were used to establish if MYR suppressed insect immunity and increased survival of C. albicans-infected insects. MYR effects were studied in vivo and in vitro, and compared alone and combined with those of approved antifungal drugs, fluconazole (FLC and amphotericin B (AMPH. Insect immune defenses failed to inhibit C. albicans with high mortalities. In insects pretreated with the drug followed by C. albicans inoculation, MYR+C. albicans significantly increased mortality to 93% from 67% with C. albicans alone 48 h post-infection whilst AMPH+C. albicans and FLC+C. albicans only showed 26% and 0% mortalities, respectively. MYR combinations with other antifungal drugs in vivo also enhanced larval mortalities, contrasting the synergistic antifungal effect of the MYR+AMPH combination in vitro. MYR treatment influenced immunity and stress management gene expression during C. albicans pathogenesis, modulating transcripts putatively associated with signal transduction/regulation of cytokines, I-kappaB kinase/NF-kappaB cascade, G-protein coupled receptor and inflammation. In contrast, all stress management gene expression was down-regulated in FLC and AMPH pretreated C. albicans-infected insects. Results are discussed with their implications for clinical use of MYR to treat sphingolipid-associated disorders.

  5. Dysregulated Lysine Acetyltransferase 2B Promotes Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pathogenesis Through Transcriptional Repression of Interleukin-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Alfa H C; Wu, William K K; Xu, Liangliang; Wong, Sunny H; Go, Minnie Y; Chan, Anthony W H; Harbord, Marcus; Zhang, Shenghong; Chen, Minhu; Wu, Justin C Y; Chan, Michael W Y; Chan, Matthew T V; Chan, Francis K L; Sung, Joseph J Y; Yu, Jun; Cheng, Alfred S L; Ng, Siew C

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating evidence supports epigenetic modifications in mediating intestinal immunity in inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] pathogenesis. This study aimed to identify key dysregulated epigenetic modulators and the molecular downstream pathways in IBD. Expression of 116 well-defined epigenetic modulators was profiled and validated in 96 intestinal tissues from patients with Crohn's disease [CD], ulcerative colitis [UC], and healthy controls using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction [QRT-PCR], western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Dysregulation of histone modifications and IBD-related cytokines were examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation, luciferase activity, and gene expression analyses in normal colonic epithelial cell line, NCM460, upon small-molecule inhibition or RNA interference, followed by validation in primary colonic tissues. Targeted expression profiling uncovered seven differentially expressed epigenetic modulators, of which the down-regulation of lysine acetyltransferase 2B [KAT2B] mRNA and protein was the most significant and was consequently validated in inflamed CD and UC compared with healthy colonic tissues. KAT2B protein localised abundantly in nuclei of normal colonic epithelium but diminished in paired inflamed CD and UC tissues. Pharmacological inhibition of KAT2B by anacardic acid in NCM460 cells reduced the levels of histone H4 lysine 5 acetylation [H4K5ac] and interleukin-10 [IL-10] in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of KAT2B reduced the IL-10 promoter occupancy of KAT2B and H4K5ac, resulting in transcriptional silencing. IL-10 level was also diminished in inflamed IBD tissues. Our findings demonstrated a novel epigenetic mechanism of IL-10 dysregulation in IBD. Down-regulation of KAT2B may disrupt the innate and adaptive inflammatory responses due to the suppression of this crucial anti-inflammatory cytokine. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University

  6. Tumor Suppressor Inactivation in the Pathogenesis of Adult T-Cell Leukemia

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    Christophe Nicot

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor functions are essential to control cellular proliferation, to activate the apoptosis or senescence pathway to eliminate unwanted cells, to link DNA damage signals to cell cycle arrest checkpoints, to activate appropriate DNA repair pathways, and to prevent the loss of adhesion to inhibit initiation of metastases. Therefore, tumor suppressor genes are indispensable to maintaining genetic and genomic integrity. Consequently, inactivation of tumor suppressors by somatic mutations or epigenetic mechanisms is frequently associated with tumor initiation and development. In contrast, reactivation of tumor suppressor functions can effectively reverse the transformed phenotype and lead to cell cycle arrest or death of cancerous cells and be used as a therapeutic strategy. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is an aggressive lymphoproliferative disease associated with infection of CD4 T cells by the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-I. HTLV-I-associated T-cell transformation is the result of a multistep oncogenic process in which the virus initially induces chronic T-cell proliferation and alters cellular pathways resulting in the accumulation of genetic defects and the deregulated growth of virally infected cells. This review will focus on the current knowledge of the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms regulating the inactivation of tumor suppressors in the pathogenesis of HTLV-I.

  7. Vulnerability of Gastric Mucosa in Diabetic Rats, Its Pathogenesis and Amelioration by Cuminum cyminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vador, N; Jagtap, Aarti G; Damle, Archana

    2012-09-01

    Various studies have indicated that peptic ulcers occurring during the course of diabetic state are more severe and often associated with complications such as gastrointestinal bleeding. This study is the first attempt to understand the pathogenesis of gastric ulcers occurring during the diabetic state considering alternate biochemical pathways using suitable markers and its amelioration by Cuminum cyminum. In this study, diabetic rats showed a progressive increase in the stomach advanced glycated end products formation, gastric mucosal tumour necrosis factor-α and Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels as compared to normal control (nondiabetic) rats. There was decrease in gastric mucosal content, antioxidant enzymes and cellular ATPase enzyme levels of diabetic gastric mucosa when compared to the normal control group. mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor was found to be significantly higher as compared to normal control animals. Further methanol extract of Cuminum cyminum treatment to diabetic animals caused a reduction in blood glucose, and ulcer score when compared to diabetic control rats. It significantly increased gastric mucus content, antioxidant status and cellular ATPase enzyme levels as compared to diabetic control animals. Methanol extract of Cuminum cyminum inhibited advanced glycated end products formation in vitro as well as in vivo.

  8. Vulnerability of gastric mucosa in diabetic rats, its pathogenesis and amelioration by Cuminum cyminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Vador

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various studies have indicated that peptic ulcers occurring during the course of diabetic state are more severe and often associated with complications such as gastrointestinal bleeding. This study is the first attempt to understand the pathogenesis of gastric ulcers occurring during the diabetic state considering alternate biochemical pathways using suitable markers and its amelioration by Cuminum cyminum. In this study, diabetic rats showed a progressive increase in the stomach advanced glycated end products formation, gastric mucosal tumour necrosis factor-α and Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels as compared to normal control (nondiabetic rats. There was decrease in gastric mucosal content, antioxidant enzymes and cellular ATPase enzyme levels of diabetic gastric mucosa when compared to the normal control group. mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor was found to be significantly higher as compared to normal control animals. Further methanol extract of Cuminum cyminum treatment to diabetic animals caused a reduction in blood glucose, and ulcer score when compared to diabetic control rats. It significantly increased gastric mucus content, antioxidant status and cellular ATPase enzyme levels as compared to diabetic control animals. Methanol extract of Cuminum cyminum inhibited advanced glycated end products formation in vitro as well as in vivo.

  9. Interaction between endogenous nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the interaction between nitric oxygenase (NOS)/ nitric oxide (NO) and heme oxygenase (HO)/ carbon monoxide (CO) system in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. On a rat model of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, the pulmonary artery pressure was measured, and NO formation and expression of NOS in pulmonary tissues were examined after treatment with ZnPP-IX, an HO-1 inhibitor. The pulmonary artery pressure, CO formation and expression of HO-1 in pulmonary tissues were examined after treatment with L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. We found that pulmonary hypertension developed after 2-week hypoxia, while the concentration of NO in the pulmonary tissue homogenates and the expression of NOS in intrapulmonary artery endothelial cells decreased markedly. ZnPP-IX worsened pulmonary hypertension of hypoxic rats. However, it increased endogenous production of NO and the expression of NOS obviously. The concentration of CO in the pulmonary tissue homogenates and the expression of HO-1 in intrapulmonary artery smooth muscle cells increased markedly with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. L-NAME worsened pulmonary hypertension of hypoxic rats, but inhibited CO formation and HO-1 expression (P < 0.01). The results of this study suggested that endogenous NOS/NO and HO/CO systems might interact with each other and therefore play an important regulating role in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and effect of calcium dobesilate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Min Gui; Ming Zhao; Jie Ding

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and effect of calcium dobesilate.Methods:A total of 120 diabetic retinopathy patients treated in our hospital from January 2010 to September 2015 were enrolled in this article. The serum endoplasmic reticulum stress protein and interleukin protein expression levels were analyzed before and after calcium dobesilate treatment. A total of 55 cases of healthy subjects receiving physical examination in our hospital during the same period were taken as control group.Results:Serum endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins PERK, CHOP and IRE as well as interleukin proteins IL1, IL2, IL6 and IL10 expression significantly increased, serum MDA level significantly increased while SOD, CAT and GSHpx levels significantly decreased in diabetic retinopathy patients, and compared with control group (P<0.01); after calcium dobesilate treatment, above factors were significantly restored (P<0.01).Conclusions: Diabetic retinopathy is closely related to endoplasmic reticulum stress and calcium dobesilate treatment may improve diabetic retinopathy by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  11. Elevation of Twist expression by arecoline contributes to the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Hsien; Yang, Li-Chiu; Hu, Fang-Wei; Peng, Chih-Yu; Yu, Chuan-Hang; Yu, Cheng-Chia

    2016-05-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), a chronic progressive scarring disease, has been considered as a precancerous condition of oral mucosa. In this study, we investigated the functional role of Twist, an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) transcriptional factor, in myofibroblastic differentiation activity of OSF. Arecoline, a major areca nut alkaloid, was used to explore whether expression of Twist could be changed dose-dependently in human primary buccal mucosal fibroblasts (BMFs). Collagen gel contraction and migration capability in arecoline-stimulated BMFs and primary oral submucous fibrosis-derived fibroblasts (OSFs) with Twist knockdown was presented. We observed that the treatment of arecoline dose-dependently increased Twist expression transcript and protein levels in BMFs. The myofibroblast activity including collagen gel contraction and migration capability also induced by arecoline, while knockdown of Twist reversed these phenomena. Importantly, inhibition of Twist led to the suppression collagen contraction and wound healing capability of primary cultivated OSFs. Clinically, Twist transcript and protein expression was higher in areca quid chewing-associated OSF tissues than in normal oral mucosa tissues. This evidence suggests that upregulation of Twist might be involved in the pathogenesis of areca quid-associated OSF through dysregulation of myofibroblast activity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Heme oxygenase-1 and carbon monoxide suppress the pathogenesis of experimental cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Ana; Ferreira, Ana; Balla, József; Jeney, Viktória; Balla, György; Epiphanio, Sabrina; Chora, Angelo; Rodrigues, Cristina D; Gregoire, Isabel Pombo; Cunha-Rodrigues, Margarida; Portugal, Silvia; Soares, Miguel P; Mota, Maria M

    2007-06-01

    Cerebral malaria claims more than 1 million lives per year. We report that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) prevents the development of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). BALB/c mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA upregulated HO-1 expression and activity and did not develop ECM. Deletion of Hmox1 and inhibition of HO activity increased ECM incidence to 83% and 78%, respectively. HO-1 upregulation was lower in infected C57BL/6 compared to BALB/c mice, and all infected C57BL/6 mice developed ECM (100% incidence). Pharmacological induction of HO-1 and exposure to the end-product of HO-1 activity, carbon monoxide (CO), reduced ECM incidence in C57BL/6 mice to 10% and 0%, respectively. Whereas neither HO-1 nor CO affected parasitemia, both prevented blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, brain microvasculature congestion and neuroinflammation, including CD8(+) T-cell brain sequestration. These effects were mediated by the binding of CO to hemoglobin, preventing hemoglobin oxidation and the generation of free heme, a molecule that triggers ECM pathogenesis.

  13. THE ROLE OF CALCIUM ION IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF HUMAN PITUITARY GH-SECRETING ADENOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓洁英; 史轶蘩; 尹娟娟

    1996-01-01

    To study the role of Ca2+ in the pathogenesis of pituitary growth hormone secreting adenornas,the function of Ca2+ in 23 cases of human pituitary GH-secreting adenoma was investigated in monolayer cell culture.It was found that Ca2- channel blockers nicardipin and nifedipin inhibited hasal and growth hormone releasing hormone (GRH)-stimulated GH secretion in 87.5% and 100.0% of the GH adenomas.respectively,demonstrating that in most human pituitary GH agonist octreotide regulated the processes of GH secretion via Ca2+ had defects in different steps including receptor.postreceptor Ca2+ channel and Ca2+-GH secreting coupling in 6(66.6%)and 5(55.5%) cases of 9 GH adenomas respectively.Among them,the defects in GRH receptor and SRIF regulated Ca2+ channel are the main causes of the dysfunction of GH adenomas.These defects may be related to GH hypersecretion in GH adenomas.Our data provides advance evidences for intrinsic defects of GH adenomas.

  14. Role of ice nucleation and antifreeze activities in pathogenesis and growth of snow molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, C S; Hsiang, T; Zhao, G; Griffith, M

    2000-04-01

    ABSTRACT We examined the ability of snow molds to grow at temperatures from -5 to 30 degrees C and to influence the growth of ice through assays for ice nucleation and antifreeze activities. Isolates of Coprinus psychromorbidus (low temperature basidiomycete variant), Microdochium nivale, Typhula phacorrhiza, T. ishikariensis, T. incarnata, and T. canadensis all grew at -5 degrees C, whereas Sclerotinia borealis and S. homoeocarpa did not grow at temperatures below 4 degrees C. The highest threshold ice nucleation temperature was -7 degrees C. Because snow molds are most damaging to their hosts at temperatures above this, our results imply that the pathogenesis of these fungi is not dependent on ice nucleation activity to cause freeze-wounding of host plants. All snow molds that grew at subzero temperatures also exhibited antifreeze activity in the growth medium and in the soluble and insoluble hyphal fractions, with the exception of M. nivale and one isolate of T. canadensis. The lack of high ice nucleation activity combined with the presence of antifreeze activity in all fungal fractions indicates that snow molds can moderate their environment to inhibit or modify intra- and extracellular ice formation, which helps explain their ability to grow at subzero temperatures under snow cover.

  15. The role of vitamin D and melatonin in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Absatarova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on new possible mechanisms of pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome. In the past years there have been a lot of studies on the effect of vitamin D on the development of insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism. The amount of evidence for of the correlation between vitamin D deficiency and obesity is growing. The search for genetic markers predisposing to polycystic ovary syndrome among vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms seems quite premising. Considering of detected connections, therapy with vitamin D may be an effective treatment for this disease. In addition to the influence on reproductive function vitamin D is involved in the regulation of circadian rhythm, and it’s disturbance may lead to the development of anovulation. Another important factor in control of sleep and wakefulness cycles is melatonin. It’s participation in development and maturation of follicles by inhibiting of oxidative stress was proved, and the use of melatonin in women as a treatment for infertility helped to improve reproductive function. Thus, further studies of the role of vitamin D and melatonin may allow developing principally new approaches and medical guidelines for clinical practice.

  16. Genetic alterations in Krebs cycle and its impact on cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajnani, Karishma; Islam, Farhadul; Smith, Robert Anthony; Gopalan, Vinod; Lam, Alfred King-Yin

    2017-04-01

    Cancer cells exhibit alterations in many cellular processes, including oxygen sensing and energy metabolism. Glycolysis in non-oxygen condition is the main energy production process in cancer rather than mitochondrial respiration as in benign cells. Genetic and epigenetic alterations of Krebs cycle enzymes favour the shift of cancer cells from oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolysis. Mutations in genes encoding aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and citrate synthase are noted in many cancers. Abnormalities of Krebs cycle enzymes cause ectopic production of Krebs cycle intermediates (oncometabolites) such as 2-hydroxyglutarate, and citrate. These oncometabolites stabilize hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1), nuclear factor like 2 (Nrf2), inhibit p53 and prolyl hydroxylase 3 (PDH3) activities as well as regulate DNA/histone methylation, which in turn activate cell growth signalling. They also stimulate increased glutaminolysis, glycolysis and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, genetic alterations in Krebs cycle enzymes are involved with increased fatty acid β-oxidations and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) induction. These altered phenomena in cancer could in turn promote carcinogenesis by stimulating cell proliferation and survival. Overall, epigenetic and genetic changes of Krebs cycle enzymes lead to the production of oncometabolite intermediates, which are important driving forces of cancer pathogenesis and progression. Understanding and applying the knowledge of these mechanisms opens new therapeutic options for patients with cancer.

  17. Role of histone deacetylases in pancreas: Implications for pathogenesis and therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eckhard; Klieser; Stefan; Swierczynski; Christian; Mayr; Johanna; Schmidt; Daniel; Neureiter; Tobias; Kiesslich; Romana; Illig

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, our knowledge of the pathogenesis in acute and chronic pancreatitis(AP/CP) as well as in pancreatic cancerogenesis has significantly diversified. Nevertheless, the medicinal therapeutic options are still limited and therapeutic success and patient outcome are poor. Epigenetic deregulation of gene expression is known to contribute to development and progression of AP and CP as well as of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, the selective inhibition of aberrantly active epigenetic regulators can be an effective option for future thera-pies. Histone deacetylases(HDACs) are enzymes that remove an acetyl group from histone tails, thereby causing chromatin compaction and repression of transcri-ption. In this review we present an overview of the currently available literature addressing the role of HDACs in the pancreas and in pancreatic diseases. In pancreatic cancerogenesis, HDACs play a role in the important process of epithelial-mesenchymal-transition, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and, hypoxia-inducible-factor-1-angiogenesis. Finally, we focus on HDACs as potential therapeutic targets by summarizing currently available histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  18. Role of tumor-associated macrophages in renal cell carcinoma pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kovaleva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of tumor stroma in malignant tumor pathogenesis cannot be disputed. Macrophages are one of the crucial elements of tumor stroma. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are type 2-activated macrophages (M2. They were first described in 1992. They carry CD206, CD163, FXIIIa, βIG-H3, stabilin 1, YKL-39, SI-CLP, tenascin С, LOX-1, fibronectin, MARCO, interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA and other markers. Unlike proinflammatory macrophages (M1, М2 display high anti-inflammatory activity and are responsible for inflammation reaction suppression and tissue recovery in inflamed area. TAMs significantly contribute to tumor progression by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and suppression of antitumor immune response. Identification of macrophages in renal tumors involves a limited number of markers, which doesn’t allow making a conclusive answer about their function. However, a correlation between TAMs content and a negative disease prognosis can be considered proven. Studies of M1 and M2 using different markers have shown that renal tumors contain high levels of TAMs with mixed M1/M2 phenotype. TAMs in renal tumors are highly proangiogenic and immunosuppressive. TAMs density can be used as a prognostic marker, but development of an effective treatment strategy aimed at inhibition of TAMs antitumor activity requires systemic research involving a wide panel of M1 and M2 macrophage markers. 

  19. mTOR Overactivation and Compromised Autophagy in the Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Song Gui

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway in pulmonary fibrosis was investigated in cell and animal models. mTOR overactivation in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs was achieved in the conditional and inducible Tsc1 knock-down mice SPC-rtTA/TetO-Cre/Tsc1(fx/+ (STT. Doxycycline caused Tsc1 knock-down and consequently mTOR activation in AECs for the STT mice. Mice treated with bleomycin exhibited increased mortality and pulmonary fibrosis compared with control mice. In wild-type C57BL/6J mice, pretreatment with rapamycin attenuated the bleomycin-mediated mortality and fibrosis. Rapamycin-mediated mouse survival benefit was inhibited by chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor. Autophagosomes were decreased in the lungs after bleomycin exposure. Rapamycin induced the production of autophagosomes and diminished p62. We concluded that mTOR overactivation in AECs and compromised autophagy in the lungs are involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. The suppression of mTOR and enhancement of autophagy may be used for treatment of pulmonary fibrosis.

  20. Effect of Ozone Produced from Antibody-catalyzed Water Oxidation on Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Jun PENG; Yu-Shan HUANG; Li-Na AN; Xiao-Qun HAN; Jing-Ge ZHANG; Qiu-Lin WANG; Jing SUN; Shu-Ren WANG

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that antibodies can catalyze the generation of unknown oxidants including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ozone (O3) from singlet oxygen (1O2) and water. This study is aimedto detect the effect of antibody-catalyzed water oxidation on atherosclerosis. Our results showed that both H2O2 and O3 were produced in human leukemia THP- 1 monocytes incubated with human immunoglobulin G and phorbol myristate acetate. In the THP-1 monocytes incubated with human immunoglobulin G, phorbol myristate acetate and low density lipoprotein, the intracellular total cholesterol, free cholesterol, cholesteryl ester and lipid peroxides clearly increased, and a larger number of foam cells were observed by oil red O staining. The accumulation of all intracellular lipids was significantly inhibited by vinylbenzoic acid, and only slightly affected by catalase. These findings suggested that the production of O3, rather than H2O2, might be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis through the antibody-catalyzed water oxidation pathway.