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Sample records for hghrh transgenic mice

  1. Effects of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) on GH and insulin-like growth factor I levels in transgenic mice overexpressing the human GHRH gene, an animal model of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, M; Kineman, R D; Schally, A V; Zarandi, M; Groot, K; Frohman, L A

    1997-11-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing the human GH-releasing hormone (hGHRH) gene, an animal model of acromegaly, were used to investigate the effects of potent GHRH antagonists MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 on the excessive GH and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) secretion caused by overproduction of hGHRH. Because metallothionein (MT)-GHRH mice express the hGHRH transgene in various tissues, including the pituitary and hypothalamus, initial experiments focused on the effectiveness of the GHRH antagonists in blocking basal and stimulated GH secretion from pituitary cells in vitro. Both MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 suppressed basal release of GH from superfused MT-GHRH pituitary cells, apparently by blocking the action of endogenously produced hGHRH. In addition, these antagonists effectively eliminated the response to stimulatory action of exogenous hGHRH(1-29)NH2 (30 and 100 nM). To ascertain whether MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 could antagonize the effect of hGHRH hyperstimulation in vivo, each antagonist was administered to MT-GHRH transgenic mice in a single iv dose of 10-200 microg. Both compounds decreased serum GH levels in transgenic mice by 39-72% at 1 h after injection. The inhibitory effect of 50 microg MZ-5-156 was maintained for 5 h. Twice daily ip administration of 100 microg MZ-5-156 for 3 days suppressed the highly elevated serum GH and IGF-I concentrations in transgenic mice by 56.8% and 39.0%, respectively. This treatment also reduced IGF-I messenger RNA levels in the liver by 21.8% but did not affect the level of GH messenger RNA in the pituitary. Our results demonstrate that GHRH antagonists MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 can inhibit elevated GH levels caused by overproduction of hGHRH. The suppression of circulating GH concentrations induced by the antagonists seems to be physiologically relevant, because both IGF-I secretion and synthesis also were reduced. Our findings, showing the suppression of GH and IGF-I secretion with GHRH antagonists, suggest that this class of analogs

  2. Transgenic mice in developmental toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woychik, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in molecular biology and embryology are being utilized for the generation of transgenic mice, animals that contain specific additions, deletions, or modifications of genes or sequences in their DNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells and homologous recombination procedures have made it possible to target specific DNA structural alterations to highly localized region in the host chromosomes. The majority of the DNA structural rearrangements in transgenic mice can be passed through the germ line and used to establish new genetic traits in the carrier animals. Since the use of transgenic mice is having such an enormous impact on so many areas of mammalian biological research, including developmental toxicology, the objective of this review is to briefly describe the fundamental methodologies for generating transgenic mice and to describe one particular application that has direct relevance to the field of genetic toxicology.

  3. Transgenic mice in developmental toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woychik, R.P.

    1992-12-31

    Advances in molecular biology and embryology are being utilized for the generation of transgenic mice, animals that contain specific additions, deletions, or modifications of genes or sequences in their DNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells and homologous recombination procedures have made it possible to target specific DNA structural alterations to highly localized region in the host chromosomes. The majority of the DNA structural rearrangements in transgenic mice can be passed through the germ line and used to establish new genetic traits in the carrier animals. Since the use of transgenic mice is having such an enormous impact on so many areas of mammalian biological research, including developmental toxicology, the objective of this review is to briefly describe the fundamental methodologies for generating transgenic mice and to describe one particular application that has direct relevance to the field of genetic toxicology.

  4. Transgenic Mice for cGMP Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunemann, Martin; Wen, Lai; Hillenbrand, Matthias; Vachaviolos, Angelos; Feil, Susanne; Ott, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxing; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.; Russwurm, Michael; de Wit, Cor; Feil, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Cyclic GMP (cGMP) is an important intracellular signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system, but its spatiotemporal dynamics in vivo is largely unknown. Objective To generate and characterize transgenic mice expressing the fluorescence resonance energy transfer–based ratiometric cGMP sensor, cGMP indicator with an EC50 of 500 nmol/L (cGi500), in cardiovascular tissues. Methods and Results Mouse lines with smooth muscle–specific or ubiquitous expression of cGi500 were generated by random transgenesis using an SM22α promoter fragment or by targeted integration of a Cre recombinase–activatable expression cassette driven by the cytomegalovirus early enhancer/chicken β-actin/β-globin promoter into the Rosa26 locus, respectively. Primary smooth muscle cells isolated from aorta, bladder, and colon of cGi500 mice showed strong sensor fluorescence. Basal cGMP concentrations were 3 µmol/L could also be monitored in blood vessels of the isolated retina and in the cremaster microcirculation of anesthetized mice. Moreover, with the use of a dorsal skinfold chamber model and multiphoton fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy, nitric oxide–stimulated vascular cGMP signals associated with vasodilation were detected in vivo in an acutely untouched preparation. Conclusions These cGi500 transgenic mice permit the visualization of cardiovascular cGMP signals in live cells, tissues, and mice under normal and pathological conditions or during pharmacotherapy with cGMP-elevating drugs. PMID:23801067

  5. Studies of an expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, P.; Wang, S.; Merry, D. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by expansion of a trinucleotide repeat in the androgen receptor gene (AR{sup exp}). AR{sup exp} repeats expand further or contract in approximately 25% of transmissions. Analogous {open_quotes}dynamic mutations{close_quotes} have been reported in other expanded trinucleotide repeat disorders. We have been developing a mouse model of this disease using a transgenic approach. Expression of the SBMA AR was documented in transgenic mice with an inducible promoter. No phenotypic effects of transgene expression were observed. We have extended our previous results on stability of the expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice in two lines carrying AR{sup exp}. Tail DNA was amplified by PCR using primers spanning the repeat on 60 AR{sup exp} transgenic mice from four different transgenic lines. Migration of the PCR product through an acrylamide gel showed no change of the 45 CAG repeat length in any progeny. Similarly, PCR products from 23 normal repeat transgenics showed no change from the repeat length of the original construct. Unlike the disease allele in humans, the expanded repeat AR cDNA in transgenic mice showed no change in repeat length with transmission. The relative stability of CAG repeats seen in the transgenic mice may indicate either differences in the fidelity of replicative enzymes, or differences in error identification and repair between mice and humans. Integration site or structural properties of the transgene itself might also play a role.

  6. Transcription-dependent silencing of inducible convergent transgenes in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calero-Nieto Fernando J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silencing of transgenes in mice is a common phenomenon typically associated with short multi-copy transgenes. We have investigated the regulation of the highly inducible human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating-factor gene (Csf2 in transgenic mice. Results In the absence of any previous history of transcriptional activation, this transgene was expressed in T lineage cells at the correct inducible level in all lines of mice tested. In contrast, the transgene was silenced in a specific subset of lines in T cells that had encountered a previous episode of activation. Transgene silencing appeared to be both transcription-dependent and mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Silencing was accompanied by loss of DNase I hypersensitive sites and inability to recruit RNA polymerase II upon stimulation. This pattern of silencing was reflected by increased methylation and decreased acetylation of histone H3 K9 in the transgene. We found that silenced lines were specifically associated with a single pair of tail-to-tail inverted repeated copies of the transgene embedded within a multi-copy array. Conclusions Our study suggests that epigenetic transgene silencing can result from convergent transcription of inverted repeats which can lead to silencing of an entire multi-copy transgene array. This mechanism may account for a significant proportion of the reported cases of transgene inactivation in mice.

  7. Reduction of choline acetyltransferase activities in APP770 transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing the 770-amino acid isoform of human Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein exhibit extracellular b -amyloid deposits in brain regions including cerebral cortex and hippocampus, which are severely affected in Alzheimer's disease patients. Significant reduction in choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activities has been observed in both cortical and hippocampal brain regions in the transgenic mice at the age of 10 months compared with the age-matched non-transgenic mice, but such changes have not been observed in any brain regions of the transgenic mice under the age of 5 months. These results suggest that deposition of b -amyloid can induce changes in the brain cholinergic system of the transgenic mice.

  8. Efforts of Transgene Oncostatin M on the Development of Retinal Neuron in Transgenic Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobo Xia; Qin Chen

    2003-01-01

    Purpose:Oncostatin M(OSM) is a cytokine released by macrophages and lymphocytesthat can function as a growth regulator. A current study shows that leukemia inhibitoryfactor (LIF), a homologue of OSM, can prevent photoreceptor cell death when expressedin the lens of transgenic mice. We determined the efforts of lens-specific overexpressionof OSM on the development of eye.Methods: A truncated mouse OSM cDNA ( ~ 660 bp) was linked to the αA-crytallinpromoter, and injected into single-cell embryos with microinjection. Then, transgenic micewere established. The mRNA expression of transgene OSM was detected by in situhybridization. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of syntaxin, glialfibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), synaptophysin in the retinas of transgenic mice.Results: At embryonic day (E 17.5), the expression of the syntaxin at the inner and midportion of the retinas of transgenic mice was much higher than that of the retinas ofnon-transgenic mice. The expression of GFAP was detected in the retinas of transgenicmice, while no expression in non-transgenic normal FVB(FVB/N) mice was detected inthis stage. At postnatal day one (P1), the expression of synaptophysin was detected inthe retinas of transgenic mice, but there was no such expression in FVB/N mice.Conclusions: Lens-specific overexpression of OSM induces premature differentiation ofamacrine cells, gial cells, and photoreceptors in vivo.

  9. ADAM 12 protease induces adipogenesis in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Nobuko; Xu, Xiufeng; Tajima, Rie

    2002-01-01

    in the perivascular space in muscle tissue of 1- to 2-week-old transgenic mice whereas mature lipid-laden adipocytes were seen at 3 to 4 weeks. Moreover, female transgenics expressing ADAM 12-S exhibited increases in body weight, total body fat mass, abdominal fat mass, and herniation, but were normoglycemic and did......-anchored protein, ADAM 12-L, and a shorter secreted form, ADAM 12-S. Here we report the occurrence of adipocytes in the skeletal muscle of transgenic mice in which overexpression of either form is driven by the muscle creatine kinase promoter. Cells expressing a marker of early adipogenesis were apparent...... not exhibit increased serum insulin, cholesterol, or triglycerides. Male transgenics were slightly overweight and also developed herniation but did not become obese. Transgenic mice expressing a truncated form of ADAM 12-S lacking the prodomain and the metalloprotease domain did not develop this adipogenic...

  10. Enhanced Malignant Tumorigenesis in Cdk4-Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Macias, Everardo; Conti, Claudio J.; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2010-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that overexpression of CDK4 in mouse epidermis results in epidermal hyperplasia, hypertrophy and severe dermal fibrosis. In this study, we have investigated the susceptibility to skin tumor formation by forced expression of CDK4. Skin tumors from transgenic mice showed a dramatic increase in the rate of malignant progression to squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in an initiation-promotion protocol. Histopathological analysis of papillomas from transgenic mice showed an elevated number of premalignant lesions characterized by dysplasia and marked atypia. Interestingly, transgenic mice also developed tumors in initiated but not promoted skin, demonstrating that CDK4 replaced the action of tumor promoters. These results suggest that expression of cyclin D1 upon ras activation synergizes with CDK4 overexpression. However, cyclin D1 transgenic mice and double transgenic mice for cyclin D1 and CDK4 did not show increased malignant progression in comparison to CDK4 transgenic mice. Biochemical analysis of tumors showed that CDK4 sequesters the CDK2 inhibitors p27Kip1 and p21Cip1 suggesting that indirect activation of CDK2 plays an important role in tumor development. These results indicate that, contrary to the general assumption, the catalytic subunit, CDK4, has higher oncogenic activity than cyclin D1, revealing a potential use of CDK4 as therapeutic target. PMID:14647432

  11. CCK Response Deficiency in Synphilin-1 Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanli W Smith

    Full Text Available Previously, we have identified a novel role for the cytoplasmic protein, synphilin-1(SP1, in the controls of food intake and body weight in both mice and Drosophila. Ubiquitous overexpression of human SP1 in brain neurons in transgenic mice results in hyperphagia expressed as an increase in meal size. However, the mechanisms underlying this action of SP1 remain to be determined. Here we investigate a potential role for altered gut feedback signaling in the effects of SP1 on food intake. We examined responses to peripheral administration of cholecytokinin (CCK, amylin, and the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4. Intraperitoneal administration of CCK at doses ranging from 1-10 nmol/kg significantly reduced glucose intake in wild type (WT mice, but failed to affect intake in SP1 transgenic mice. Moreover, there was a significant attenuation of CCK-induced c-Fos expression in the dorsal vagal complex in SP1 transgenic mice. In contrast, WT and SP1 transgenic mice were similarly responsive to both amylin and exendin-4 treatment. These studies demonstrate that SP1 results in a CCK response deficiency that may contribute to the increased meal size and overall hyperphagia in synphillin-1 transgenic mice.

  12. CCK Response Deficiency in Synphilin-1 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Wanli W; Smith, Megan; Yang, Dejun; Choi, Pique P; Moghadam, Alexander; Li, Tianxia; Moran, Timothy H

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have identified a novel role for the cytoplasmic protein, synphilin-1(SP1), in the controls of food intake and body weight in both mice and Drosophila. Ubiquitous overexpression of human SP1 in brain neurons in transgenic mice results in hyperphagia expressed as an increase in meal size. However, the mechanisms underlying this action of SP1 remain to be determined. Here we investigate a potential role for altered gut feedback signaling in the effects of SP1 on food intake. We examined responses to peripheral administration of cholecytokinin (CCK), amylin, and the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, exendin-4. Intraperitoneal administration of CCK at doses ranging from 1-10 nmol/kg significantly reduced glucose intake in wild type (WT) mice, but failed to affect intake in SP1 transgenic mice. Moreover, there was a significant attenuation of CCK-induced c-Fos expression in the dorsal vagal complex in SP1 transgenic mice. In contrast, WT and SP1 transgenic mice were similarly responsive to both amylin and exendin-4 treatment. These studies demonstrate that SP1 results in a CCK response deficiency that may contribute to the increased meal size and overall hyperphagia in synphillin-1 transgenic mice.

  13. Lactogenic immunity in transgenic mice producing recombinant antibodies neutralizing coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla, J; Sola, I; Pintado, B; Sánchez-Morgado, J M; Enjuanes, L

    1998-01-01

    Protection against coronavirus infections can be provided by the oral administration of virus neutralizing antibodies. To provide lactogenic immunity, eighteen lines of transgenic mice secreting a recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibody (rIgG1) and ten lines of transgenic mice secreting recombinant IgA monoclonal antibodies (rIgA) neutralizing transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) into the milk were generated. Genes encoding the light and heavy chains of monoclonal antibody (MAb) 6A.C3 were expressed under the control of regulatory sequences derived from the mouse genomic DNA encoding the whey acidic protein (WAP) and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), which are highly abundant milk proteins. The MAb 6A.C3 binds to a highly conserved epitope present in coronaviruses of several species. This MAb does not allow the selection of neutralization escaping virus mutants. The antibody was expressed in the milk of transgenic mice with titers of one million as determined by RIA, and neutralized TGEV infectivity by one million fold corresponding to immunoglobulin concentrations of 5 to 6 mg per ml. Matrix attachment regions (MAR) sequences were not essential for rIgG1 transgene expression, but co-microinjection of MAR and antibody genes led to a twenty to ten thousand-fold increase in the antibody titer in 50% of the rIgG1 transgenic animals generated. Co-microinjection of the genomic BLG gene with rIgA light and heavy chain genes led to the generation of transgenic mice carrying the three transgenes. The highest antibody titers were produced by transgenic mice that had integrated the antibody and BLG genes, although the number of transgenic animals generated does not allow a definitive conclusion on the enhancing effect of BLG co-integration. Antibody expression levels were transgene copy number independent and integration site dependent. The generation of transgenic animals producing virus neutralizing antibodies in the milk could be a general approach to provide protection

  14. Transgenic studies on homeobox genes in nervous system development: spina bifida in Isl1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappen, Claudia; Yaworsky, Paul J; Muller, Yunhua L; Salbaum, J Michael

    2013-04-01

    To develop in vivo assays for homeobox gene function in neural development, we generated transgenic mice in which the expression of a homeobox gene is altered only within the nervous system, in neurons or neuronal precursor cells. Transgenic expression of Hoxc8 did not result in gross abnormalities, while a Hoxd4 transgene caused death shortly after birth. In neural progenitor cells, the motorneuron-specific homeodomain transcription factor Isl1 induced early developmental defects, including absence of anterior neural structures, profound defects in the neuroepithelium and defective neural tube closure. A fraction of Isl1 transgenic mice exhibited spina bifida. Isl1 transgene expression was also associated with decreased proliferation and increased Pbx1 expression in the ventral neural tube. Our results suggest a function for some homeobox genes in development of the nervous system, and that cell-type- and region-specific transgenic models will be useful to identify the cellular and molecular targets of homeobox transcription factors in nervous system development.

  15. [Generation of transgenic mice expressing human lysozyme in mammary gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hua; Li, Guo-cai; Sun, Huai-chang

    2005-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of generating animal mammary gland bioreactors expressing human lysozyme (hLYZ). The recombinant vector p205C3-hLYZ, as a result of connecting the hLYZ cDNA with the mammry gland expression vector p205C3, was used to generate transfer genic mice by microinjection. A total of 136 F0 mice were obtained, of which 7 (2 females and 5 males) and 4 (1 females and 3 males) were found to contain the transfer-gene by PCR and Southern blotting respectively. The results of Western blotting indicated that the expressed protein had the same molecular weight as that of normal hLYZ. From the F1 generation on, the mice mated only with their brothers or sisters and a colony of F7 transgenic mice was obtained. Among the offspring, the female transgenic mice maintained and expressed the transfer-gene stably with an expression level as high as 750 mg/L. The expressed protein had strong tissue specificity, and in addition to the mammary glands, some degree of ectropic expression in the spleens and intestines of the transgenic mice was confirmed by dot blotting assay. These data indicate that the mice mammary gland bioreactors expressing hLYZ have been successfully generated.

  16. Generation of the regulatory protein rtTA transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kang Xu; Xin-Yan Deng; Ying Yue; Zhong-Min Guo; Bing Huang; Xun Hong; Dong Xiao; Xi-Gu Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To translate Tet-on system into a conditional mouse model, in which hepatitis B or C virus (HBV or HCV) gene could be spatiotemporally expressed to overcome "immune tolerance" formed during the embryonic development and "immune escape" against hepatitis virus antigen(s), an effector mouse, carrying the reverse tetracycline-responsive transcriptional activator (rtTA) gene under the tight control of liver-specific human apoE promoter, is required to be generated. METHODS: To address this end, rtTA fragment amplified by PCR was effectively inserted into the vector of pLiv.7 containing apoE promoter to create the rtTA expressing vector, I.e., pApoE-rtTA. ApoE-rtTA transgenic fragment (-6.9 kb) released from pApoE-rtTA was transferred into mice by pronucleus injection, followed by obtaining one transgene (+) founder animal from microinjection through PCR and Southern blot analysis.RESULTS: rtTA transgene which could be transmitted to subsequent generation (F1) derived from founder was expressed in a liver-specific fashion. CONCLUSION: Taken together, these findings demonstrate that rtTA transgenic mice, in which rtTA expression is appropriately targeted to the murine liver, are successfully produced, which lays a solid foundation to 'off-on-off' regulate expression of target gene (s) (e.g., HBV and/or HCV) in transgenic mice mediated by Tet-on system.

  17. Hyperactive hypothalamus, motivated and non-distractible chronic overeating in ADAR2 transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    ADAR2 transgenic mice misexpressing the RNA editing enzyme ADAR2 (Adenosine Deaminase that act on RNA) show characteristics of overeating and experience adult onset obesity. Behavioral patterns and brain changes related to a possible addictive overeating in these transgenic mice were explored as transgenic mice display chronic hyperphagia. ADAR2 transgenic mice were assessed in their food preference and motivation to overeat in a competing reward environment with ad lib access to a running wh...

  18. Application of Echocardiography on Transgenic Mice with Cardiomyopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies are common cardiac disorders that primarily affect cardiac muscle resulting in cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Transgenic mouse disease models have been developed to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying heart failure and sudden cardiac death observed in cardiomyopathy cases and to explore the therapeutic outcomes in experimental animals in vivo. Echocardiography is an essential diagnostic tool for accurate and noninvasive assessment of cardiac structure and function in experimental animals. Our laboratory has been among the first to apply high-frequency research echocardiography on transgenic mice with cardiomyopathies. In this work, we have summarized our and other studies on assessment of systolic and diastolic dysfunction using conventional echocardiography, pulsed Doppler, and tissue Doppler imaging in transgenic mice with various cardiomyopathies. Estimation of embryonic mouse hearts has been performed as well using this high-resolution echocardiography. Some technical considerations in mouse echocardiography have also been discussed.

  19. Transmission of multiple system atrophy prions to transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Joel C; Giles, Kurt; Oehler, Abby; Middleton, Lefkos; Dexter, David T; Gentleman, Steve M; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2013-11-26

    Prions are proteins that adopt alternative conformations, which become self-propagating. Increasing evidence argues that prions feature in the synucleinopathies that include Parkinson's disease, Lewy body dementia, and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Although TgM83(+/+) mice homozygous for a mutant A53T α-synuclein transgene begin developing CNS dysfunction spontaneously at ∼10 mo of age, uninoculated TgM83(+/-) mice (hemizygous for the transgene) remain healthy. To determine whether MSA brains contain α-synuclein prions, we inoculated the TgM83(+/-) mice with brain homogenates from two pathologically confirmed MSA cases. Inoculated TgM83(+/-) mice developed progressive signs of neurologic disease with an incubation period of ∼100 d, whereas the same mice inoculated with brain homogenates from spontaneously ill TgM83(+/+) mice developed neurologic dysfunction in ∼210 d. Brains of MSA-inoculated mice exhibited prominent astrocytic gliosis and microglial activation as well as widespread deposits of phosphorylated α-synuclein that were proteinase K sensitive, detergent insoluble, and formic acid extractable. Our results provide compelling evidence that α-synuclein aggregates formed in the brains of MSA patients are transmissible and, as such, are prions. The MSA prion represents a unique human pathogen that is lethal upon transmission to Tg mice and as such, is reminiscent of the prion causing kuru, which was transmitted to chimpanzees nearly 5 decades ago.

  20. Application of a nuclear localization signal gene in transgene mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Efficient gene transfer by cytoplasm co-injec- tion will offer a powerful means for transgenic animals. Using co-injection in cytoplasm, two independent gene constructs, including bovine (?-s1-casein-hG-CSF and a mammal expression vector expressing a nuclear localization signal (mNLS), were introduced into fertilized mouse eggs. The target gene construct was docked into host nucleus probably by the nuclear localization signal. Transgene mice have been obtained at 58% (29/50) of integration ratio. Expression level of the positive transgene mice was detected by Western blotting. Maximal expression of human G-CSF was estimated about 540 mg/L of milk. The expression ratio was up to 75% (9/12). The results here have important practical implications for the generation of mammary gland bioreactors and other transgene studies. Co-injection of a target gene with an expression vector of a mammal nuclear localization signal by cytoplasm appears to be a useful, efficient and easy strategy for generating transgenic animals, which may be able to substitute the routine method of pronucleus-injection of fertilized eggs.

  1. Evaluating cerebellar functions using optogenetic transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, John P.; Turecek, Josef; Turner, Eric E.

    2013-03-01

    We employed a transgenic mouse having conditional expression of ChR2(H134R) in neurons of the inferior olive to facilitate understanding of the role of electrical coupling and oscillation in central nervous system function. Two-photon excitation of ChR2-expressing neurons using 64 laser beams restricted to single inferior olive cell bodies depolarized neurons and evoked voltage deflections in neighboring neurons demonstrating electrical coupling. Broader illumination of neuronal ensembles using blue light induced an optical clamp of endogenous electrical rhythms in the inferior olive of acutely-prepared brain slices, which when applied in vivo directly modulated the local field potential activity and induced tremor. The experiments demonstrate novel methods to optically manipulate electrically coupled potentials and rhythmogenesis within a neuronal ensemble. From a functional perspective, the experiments shed light on the cellular and circuitry mechanisms of essential tremor, a prevalent neurological condition, by indicating time- and frequencydependence of tremor upon varying rhythms of inferior olive stimulation. The experiments indicate analog control of a brain rhythm that may be used to enhance our understanding of the functional consequences of central rhythmogenesis.

  2. Immunological Prevention of Spontaneous Mammary Carcinoma in Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    developed more slowly by transgenic FVB Anatomia Patologica, Ospedale S.S. Annunziata, Via Valignani, 66100 female mice carrying the wild-type proto...coopted (Pezzella et al., 1997). Anatomia Patologica. Ospedale SS. Annunziata, Via Valignani, 66100 Chieti, Italy. Fax: 39 0871 330471. E-mail: musiani...lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Milan, Italy; and Reprints: Piero Musiani, G. d’ Annunzio University of Chieti, Anatomia Department of Experimental

  3. Building of hFⅨ transgenic mice by spermatogenic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ning; CHEN Xiaoguang; CHEN Li; YAO Jihua; CHEN Haoming; SHEN Qi; XUE Jinglun

    2003-01-01

    Human FⅨ expression vector pCMVⅨ was packaged by EffecteneTM reagent and injected into mice seminiferous tubules with glass pipettes. The expressional frame of pCMVⅨ was examined by PCR and Southern blotting among 41 progenies. There were 2 (4%) mice being integrated with hFⅨ gene into chromosomes. 4.6 ng/mL of hFⅨ protein was expressed in plasma of one mouse, which was tested by ELISA. We demonstrated that building of transgenic animals by spermatogonial stem cells is an efficient method. Meanwhile, it has also been proved to be an alternative choice for mammary gland bioreactor.

  4. Transgenic Mice Convert Carbohydrates to Essential Fatty Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, Victor J.; Bin Wang; Xiangyong Li; Lin Wu; Kang, Jing X.

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mice (named “Omega mice”) were engineered to carry both optimized fat-1 and fat-2 genes from the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans and are capable of producing essential omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids from saturated fats or carbohydrates. When maintained on a high-saturated fat diet lacking essential fatty acids or a high-carbohydrate, no-fat diet, the Omega mice exhibit high tissue levels of both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, with a ratio of ∼1∶1. This study thus presents an in...

  5. Aberrant phenotypes of transgenic mice expressing dimeric human erythropoietin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Seong-Jo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dimeric human erythropoietin (dHuEPO peptides are reported to exhibit significantly higher biological activity than the monomeric form of recombinant EPO. The objective of this study was to produce transgenic (tg mice expressing dHuEPO and to investigate the characteristics of these mice. Methods A dHuEPO-expressing vector under the control of the goat beta-casein promoter, which produced a dimer of human EPO molecules linked by a 2-amino acid peptide linker (Asp-Ile, was constructed and injected into 1-cell fertilized embryos by microinjection. Mice were screened using genomic DNA samples obtained from tail biopsies. Blood samples were obtained by heart puncture using heparinized tubes, and hematologic parameters were assessed. Using the microarray analysis tool, we analyzed differences in gene expression in the spleens of tg and control mice. Results A high rate of spontaneous abortion or death of the offspring was observed in the recipients of dHuEPO embryos. We obtained 3 founder lines (#4, #11, and #47 of tg mice expressing the dHuEPO gene. However, only one founder line showed stable germline integration and transmission, subsequently establishing the only transgenic line (#11. We obtained 2 F1 mice and 3 F2 mice from line #11. The dHuEPO protein could not be obtained because of repeated spontaneous abortions in the tg mice. Tg mice exhibited symptoms such as short lifespan and abnormal blood composition. The red blood cell count, white blood cell count, and hematocrit levels in the tg mice were remarkably higher than those in the control mice. The spleens of the tg mice (F1 and F2 females were 11- and -21-fold larger than those of the control mice. Microarray analysis revealed 2,672 spleen-derived candidate genes; more genes were downregulated than upregulated (849/764. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR were used for validating the results of the microarray

  6. Functional screening of an asthma QTL in YAC transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symula, Derek J.; Frazer, Kelly A.; Ueda, Yukihiko; Denefle, Patrice; Stevens, Mary E.; Wang, Zhi-En; Locksley, Richard; Rubin, Edward M.

    1999-07-02

    While large numbers of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to genetically complex conditions have been discovered, few causative genes have been identified. This is mainly due to the large size of QTLs and the subtle connection between genotype and quantitative phenotype associated with these conditions. While large numbers of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to genetically complex conditions have been discovered, few causative genes have been identified. This is mainly due to the large size of QTLs and the subtle connection between genotype and quantitative phenotype associated with these conditions. To screen for genes contributing to an asthma QTL mapped to human chromosome 5q33, the authors characterized a panel of large-insert 5q31 transgenics based on studies demonstrating that altering gene dosage frequently affects quantitative phenotypes normally influenced by that gene. This panel of human YAC transgenics, propagating a one megabase interva2048 chromosome 5q31 containing 23 genes, was screened for quantitative changes in several asthma-associated phenotypes. Multiple independent transgenic lines with altered IgE response to antigen treatment shared a 180 kb region containing 5 genes, including human interleukin 4 (IL4) and interleukin 13 (IL13), which induce IgE class switching in B cells5. Further analysis of these mice and mice transgenic for only murine Il4 and Il13 demonstrated that moderate changes in murine Il4 and Il13 expression affect asthma-associated phenotypes in vivo. This functional screen of large-insert transgenics enabled them to sift through multiple genes in the 5q3 asthma QTL without prior consideration of assumed individual gene function and identify genes that influence the QTL phenotype in vivo.

  7. N-glycans and metastasis in galectin-3 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Shyam K; Srinivasan, Nithya; Budnar, Srikanth; Bane, Sanjay M; Upadhya, Archana; Thorat, Rahul A; Ingle, Arvind D; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V; Kalraiya, Rajiv D

    2015-05-01

    Poly-N-acetyl-lactosamine (polyLacNAc) on N-glycans facilitate lung specific metastasis of melanoma cells by serving as high affinity ligands for galectin-3, expressed in highest amounts in the lungs, on almost all its tissue compartments including on the surface of vascular endothelium. PolyLacNAc not only aids in initial arrest on the organ endothelium but in all the events of extravasation. Inhibition of polyLacNAc synthesis, or competitive inhibition of its interaction with galectin-3 all inhibited these processes and experimental metastasis. Transgenic galectin-3 mice, viz., gal-3(+/+) (wild type), gal-3(+/-) (hemizygous) and gal-3(-/-) (null) have been used to prove that galectin-3/polyLacNAc interactions are indeed critical for lung specific metastasis. Gal-3(+/-) mice which showed metastasis. However, surprisingly, the number and size of metastatic colonies in gal-3(-/-) mice was very similar as that seen in gal-3(+/+) mice. The levels of lactose binding lectins on the lungs and the transcripts of other galectins (galectin-1, -8 and -9) which are expressed on lungs and have similar sugar binding specificities as galectins-3, remain unchanged in gal-3(+/+) and gal-3(-/-) mice. Further, inhibition of N-glycosylation with Swainsonine (SW) which drastically reduces metastasis of B16F10 cells in gal-3(+/+) mice, did not affect lung metastasis when assessed in gal-3(-/-) mice. Together, these results rule out the possibility of some other galectin taking over the function of galectin-3 in gal-3(-/-) mice. Chimeric mice generated to assess if absence of any effect on metastasis is due to compromised tumor immunity by replacing bone marrow of gal-3(-/-) mice with that from gal-3(+/+) mice, also failed to impact melanoma metastasis. As galectin-3 regulates several immune functions including maturation of different immune cells, compromised tumor immunity could be the major determinant of melanoma metastasis in gal-3(-/-) mice and warrants thorough investigation.

  8. [Premature immunosenescence in triple-transgenic mice for Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mate, Ianire; Cruces, Julia; Vida, Carmen; Sanfeliu, Coral; Manassra, Rashed; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    A deterioration of the neuroimmunoendocrine network has been observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the peripheral immune response has hardly been investigated in this pathology. Since some immune function parameters have been established as good markers of the rate of ageing, and can predict longevity, the aim of the present work was to study some of these functions in splenic leucocytes in transgenic mice for AD of different ages. Young female (4 ± 1 months), adult (9 ± 1 months), and mature (12 ± 1 months) triple-transgenic mice for AD (3 xTgAD) and non-transgenic (NTg) control mice of the same ages were used. The chemotaxis, the anti-tumour activity of « natural killer » (NK) cells and the lymphoproliferative response in the presence of the mitogens concanavalin A and lipopolysaccharide, functions that decrease with age, were determined in splenic leucocytes. In addition, the differences in lifespan between 3 xTgAD and NTg were studied in parallel using other animals, until their death through natural causes. In 3 xTgAD, with respect to NTg, chemotaxis decreased at all ages studied, whereas in lymphoproliferative response this reduction was shown at 4 months and 9 months. NK activity was diminished only in young 3 xTgAD with respect to NTg. The 3 xTgAD showed a shorter lifespan than the NTg control group. The 3 xTgAD mice show a premature immunosenescence, which could explain their early mortality. The determination of these immune functions at peripheral level could serve as a marker of the progression of the Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2013 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Mammary gland tumor formation in transgenic mice overexpressing stromelysin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sympson, Carolyn J; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

    1995-06-01

    An intact basement membrane (BM) is essential for the proper function, differentiation and morphology of many epithelial cells. The disruption or loss of this BM occurs during normal development as well as in the disease state. To examine the importance of BM during mammary gland development in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that inappropriately express autoactivating isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. The mammary glands from these mice are both functionally and morphologically altered throughout development. We have now documented a dramatic incidence of breast tumors in several independent lines of these mice. These data suggest that overexpression of stromelysin-1 and disruption of the BM may be a key step in the multi-step process of breast cancer.

  10. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Boorman, Gary A. [Covance, Chantilly, VA 20151 (United States); Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P. [Laboratory of Toxicology and Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, RTP, NC 27713 (United States); Melnyk, Stepan B. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72201 (United States); Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  11. Expression of recombinant human lysozyme in the milk of transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhengquan; FAN Baoliang; DAI Yunping; ZHENG Ming; NIU Huiling; WANG Meili; WANG Lili; FEI Jing; LI Ning

    2003-01-01

    Human lysozyme is a 130-aa (amino acid) alkaline polypeptide, and has both anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties which make it an important component of human natural immunity system. As a first step toward the ultimate goal ofimproving the anti-bacterial properties of bovine and ovine milk, a transgenic mouse that contains the genomic DNA sequence of the human lysozme gene has been generated for the first time. From 83 mice generated by microinjection, a total of 6 positive transgenic mice were identified by PCR and Southern blot. F1 mice positive for transgene in lines were also detected by PCR. This shows that transgene could be transmitted from founder transgenic mice to their offspring. Recombinant human lysozyme (rHlys) was found in the whey of 3 female positive transgenic mice by Western blot. The highest concentration of rHlys for transgenic micewas 0.2 mg/mL. The antibacterial activity of the whey for transgenic mice was highly enhanced up to 0.4 times as much as that of human, while that of non-transgenic mouse was very low. Although the lysozyme activity of transgenic mice is still lower than that of human, the rHlys exhibits the same specific activity as that of human lysozyme. It provides a strong basis for further studies into the possible application of rHlys express in mammary gland.

  12. Brain phenotype of transgenic mice overexpressing cystathionine β-synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinciane Régnier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cystathionine β-synthase (CBS gene, located on human chromosome 21q22.3, is a good candidate for playing a role in the Down Syndrome (DS cognitive profile: it is overexpressed in the brain of individuals with DS, and it encodes a key enzyme of sulfur-containing amino acid (SAA metabolism, a pathway important for several brain physiological processes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we have studied the neural consequences of CBS overexpression in a transgenic mouse line (60.4P102D1 expressing the human CBS gene under the control of its endogenous regulatory regions. These mice displayed a ∼2-fold increase in total CBS proteins in different brain areas and a ∼1.3-fold increase in CBS activity in the cerebellum and the hippocampus. No major disturbance of SAA metabolism was observed, and the transgenic mice showed normal behavior in the rotarod and passive avoidance tests. However, we found that hippocampal synaptic plasticity is facilitated in the 60.4P102D1 line. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that CBS overexpression has functional consequences on hippocampal neuronal networks. These results shed new light on the function of the CBS gene, and raise the interesting possibility that CBS overexpression might have an advantageous effect on some cognitive functions in DS.

  13. Expression Analysis of CB2-GFP BAC Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmöle, Anne-Caroline; Lundt, Ramona; Gennequin, Benjamin; Schrage, Hanna; Beins, Eva; Krämer, Alexandra; Zimmer, Till; Limmer, Andreas; Zimmer, Andreas; Otte, David-Marian

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a retrograde messenger system, consisting of lipid signaling molecules that bind to at least two G-protein-coupled receptors, Cannabinoid receptor 1 and 2 (CB1 and 2). As CB2 is primarily expressed on immune cells such as B cells, T cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and microglia, it is of great interest how CB2 contributes to immune cell development and function in health and disease. Here, understanding the mechanisms of CB2 involvement in immune-cell function as well as the trafficking and regulation of CB2 expressing cells are crucial issues. Up to now, CB2 antibodies produce unclear results, especially those targeting the murine protein. Therefore, we have generated BAC transgenic GFP reporter mice (CB2-GFPTg) to trace CB2 expression in vitro and in situ. Those mice express GFP under the CB2 promoter and display GFP expression paralleling CB2 expression on the transcript level in spleen, thymus and brain tissue. Furthermore, by using fluorescence techniques we show that the major sources for GFP-CB2 expression are B cells in spleen and blood and microglia in the brain. This novel CB2-GFP transgenic reporter mouse line represents a powerful resource to study CB2 expression in different cell types. Furthermore, it could be used for analyzing CB2-mediated mobilization and trafficking of immune cells as well as studying the fate of recruited immune cells in models of acute and chronic inflammation.

  14. Expression Analysis of CB2-GFP BAC Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Caroline Schmöle

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system (ECS is a retrograde messenger system, consisting of lipid signaling molecules that bind to at least two G-protein-coupled receptors, Cannabinoid receptor 1 and 2 (CB1 and 2. As CB2 is primarily expressed on immune cells such as B cells, T cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and microglia, it is of great interest how CB2 contributes to immune cell development and function in health and disease. Here, understanding the mechanisms of CB2 involvement in immune-cell function as well as the trafficking and regulation of CB2 expressing cells are crucial issues. Up to now, CB2 antibodies produce unclear results, especially those targeting the murine protein. Therefore, we have generated BAC transgenic GFP reporter mice (CB2-GFPTg to trace CB2 expression in vitro and in situ. Those mice express GFP under the CB2 promoter and display GFP expression paralleling CB2 expression on the transcript level in spleen, thymus and brain tissue. Furthermore, by using fluorescence techniques we show that the major sources for GFP-CB2 expression are B cells in spleen and blood and microglia in the brain. This novel CB2-GFP transgenic reporter mouse line represents a powerful resource to study CB2 expression in different cell types. Furthermore, it could be used for analyzing CB2-mediated mobilization and trafficking of immune cells as well as studying the fate of recruited immune cells in models of acute and chronic inflammation.

  15. Characterization of atherosclerotic lesions in apo E3-leiden transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leppänen, P.; Luoma, J.S.; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.; Ylä-Herttuala, S.

    1998-01-01

    Apo E3-leiden transgenic mice express human dysfunctional apo E variant and develop hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis on a high fat/high cholesterol diet. We characterized diet-induced atherosclerotic lesions in apo E3-leiden transgenic mice using immunocytochemical methods in order to examine foam

  16. Progression and regression of atherosclerosis in APOE3-Leiden transgenic mice : An immunohistochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijbels, M.J.J.; Cammen, M. van der; Laan, L.J.W. van der; Emeis, J.J.; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.; Kraal, G.

    1999-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E3-Leiden (APOE3-Leiden) transgenic mice develop hyperlipidemia and are highly susceptible to diet-induced atherosclerosis. We have studied the progression and regression of atherosclerosis using immunohistochemistry. Female transgenic mice were fed a moderate fat diet to study athero

  17. Characterization of atherosclerotic lesions in apo E3-leiden transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leppänen, P.; Luoma, J.S.; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.; Ylä-Herttuala, S.

    1998-01-01

    Apo E3-leiden transgenic mice express human dysfunctional apo E variant and develop hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis on a high fat/high cholesterol diet. We characterized diet-induced atherosclerotic lesions in apo E3-leiden transgenic mice using immunocytochemical methods in order to examine foam

  18. Both core and F proteins of hepatitis C virus could enhance cell proliferation in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wen-Ta [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Li, Hui-Chun [Department of Biochemistry, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lee, Shen-Kao; Ma, Hsin-Chieh; Yang, Chee-Hing; Chen, Hung-Ling [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lo, Shih-Yen, E-mail: losylo@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Department of Laboratory Medicine, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Hualien, Taiwan (China)

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •HCV core and F proteins could induce hepatocyte proliferation in the transgenic mice. •β-Catenin signaling pathway was activated by core protein in the transgenic mice. •β-Catenin signaling pathway was activated by myc-F protein in the transgenic mice. •Expression of SMA protein was enhanced by core but not myc-F protein. -- Abstract: The role of the protein encoded by the alternative open reading frame (ARF/F/core+1) of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome in viral pathogenesis remains unknown. The different forms of ARF/F/core+1 protein were labile in cultured cells, a myc-tag fused at the N-terminus of the F protein made it more stable. To determine the role of core and F proteins in HCV pathogenesis, transgenic mice with either protein expression under the control of Albumin promoter were generated. Expression of core protein and F protein with myc tag (myc-F) could be detected by Western blotting analysis in the livers of these mice. The ratio of liver to body weight is increased for both core and myc-F transgenic mice compared to that of wild type mice. Indeed, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein, a proliferation marker, was up-regulated in the transgenic mice with core or myc-F protein. Further analyses by microarray and Western blotting suggested that β-catenin signaling pathway was activated by either core or myc-F protein in the transgenic mice. These transgenic mice were further treated with either Diethynitrosamine (a tumor initiator) or Phenobarbital (a tumor promoter). Phenobarbital but not Diethynitrosamine treatment could increase the liver/body weight ratio of these mice. However, no tumor formation was observed in these mice. In conclusion, HCV core and myc-F proteins could induce hepatocyte proliferation in the transgenic mice possibly through β-catenin signaling pathway.

  19. Pituitary mammosomatotroph adenomas develop in old mice transgenic for growth hormone-releasing hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asa, S L; Kovacs, K; Stefaneanu, L

    1990-01-01

    It has been shown that mice transgenic for human growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) develop hyperplasia of pituitary somatotrophs and mammosomatotrophs, cells capable of producing both growth hormone and prolactin, by 8 months of age. We now report for the first time that old GRH-transgenic m......-transgenic mice, 16 to 24 months of age, develop pituitary mammosomatotroph adenomas. These findings provide conclusive evidence that protracted stimulation of secretory activity can cause proliferation, hyperplasia and adenoma of adenohypophysial cells....

  20. Enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in transgenic mice overexpressing BCL-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M L; Pierce, R H; Vail, M E; White, C C; Tonge, R P; Kavanagh, T J; Fausto, N; Nelson, S D; Bruschi, S A

    2001-11-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in the cell death induced by many drugs, including hepatotoxicity from overdose of the popular analgesic, acetaminophen (APAP). To investigate mitochondrial alterations associated with APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, the subcellular distribution of proapoptotic BAX was determined. Based on the antiapoptotic characteristics of BCL-2, we further hypothesized that if a BAX component was evident then BCL-2 overexpression may be hepatoprotective. Mice, either with a human bcl-2 transgene (-/+) or wild-type mice (WT; -/-), were dosed with 500 or 600 mg/kg (i.p.) APAP or a nonhepatotoxic isomer, N-acetyl-m-aminophenol (AMAP). Immunoblot analyses indicated increased mitochondrial BAX-beta content very early after APAP or AMAP treatment. This was paralleled by disappearance of BAX-alpha from the cytosol of APAP treated animals and, to a lesser extent, with AMAP treatment. Early pathological evidence of APAP-induced zone 3 necrosis was seen in bcl-2 (-/+) mice, which progressed to massive panlobular necrosis with hemorrhage by 24 h. In contrast, WT mice dosed with APAP showed a more typical, and less severe, centrilobular necrosis. AMAP-treated bcl-2 (-/+) mice displayed only early microvesicular steatosis without progression to extensive necrosis. Decreased complex III activity, evident as early as 6 h after treatment, correlated well with plasma enzyme activities at 24 h (AST r(2) = 0.89, ALT r(2) = 0.87) thereby confirming a role for mitochondria in APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity. In conclusion, these data suggest for the first time that BAX may be an early determinant of APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity and that BCL-2 overexpression unexpectedly enhances APAP hepatotoxicity.

  1. Spontaneous generation of infectious prion disease in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Juan-María; Castilla, Joaquín; Pintado, Belén; Gutiérrez-Adan, Alfonso; Andréoletti, Olivier; Aguilar-Calvo, Patricia; Arroba, Ana-Isabel; Parra-Arrondo, Beatriz; Ferrer, Isidro; Manzanares, Jorge; Espinosa, Juan-Carlos

    2013-12-01

    We generated transgenic mice expressing bovine cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) with a leucine substitution at codon 113 (113L). This protein is homologous to human protein with mutation 102L, and its genetic link with Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome has been established. This mutation in bovine PrP(C) causes a fully penetrant, lethal, spongiform encephalopathy. This genetic disease was transmitted by intracerebral inoculation of brain homogenate from ill mice expressing mutant bovine PrP to mice expressing wild-type bovine PrP, which indicated de novo generation of infectious prions. Our findings demonstrate that a single amino acid change in the PrP(C) sequence can induce spontaneous generation of an infectious prion disease that differs from all others identified in hosts expressing the same PrP(C) sequence. These observations support the view that a variety of infectious prion strains might spontaneously emerge in hosts displaying random genetic PrP(C) mutations.

  2. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Induces Neurotransmitter Switching in Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, Bruce A.; Masters, Brian A.; Hoyle, Gary W.; Brinster, Ralph L.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    1994-08-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a cytokine growth factor that induces rat sympathetic neurons to switch their neurotransmitter phenotype from noradrenergic to cholinergic in vitro. To test whether LIF can influence neuronal differentiation in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that expressed LIF in pancreatic islets under the control of the insulin promoter and evaluated the neurotransmitter phenotype of the pancreatic sympathetic innervation. We also used the insulin promoter to coexpress nerve growth factor in the islets, which greatly increased the density of sympathetic innervation and facilitated analysis of the effects of LIF. Our data demonstrate that tyrosine hydroxylase and catecholamines declined and choline acetyltransferase increased in response to LIF. We conclude that LIF can induce neurotransmitter switching of sympathetic neurons in vivo.

  3. Photoacoustic imaging of vascular networks in transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, J. G.; Cleary, J. O.; Zhang, E. Z.; Lythgoe, M. F.; Beard, P. C.

    2010-02-01

    The preferential absorption of near infrared light by blood makes photoacoustic imaging well suited to visualising vascular structures in soft tissue. In addition, the spectroscopic specificity of tissue chromophores can be exploited by acquiring images at multiple excitation wavelengths. This allows the quantification of endogenous chromophores, such as oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin, and hence blood oxygenation, and the detection of exogenous chromophores, such as functionalised contrast agents. More importantly, this approach has the potential to visualise the spatial distribution of low concentrations of functionalised contrast agents against the strong background absorption of the endogenous chromophores. This has a large number of applications in the life sciences. One example is the structural and functional phenotyping of transgenic mice for the study of the genetic origins of vascular malformations, such as heart defects. In this study, photoacoustic images of mouse embryos have been acquired to study the development of the vasculature following specific genetic knockouts.

  4. Bacterial xylanase expression in mammalian cells and transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, C M; Ali, S; Gilbert, H J; Hazlewood, G P; Hirst, B H; Hall, J

    1999-06-11

    The energy which simple-stomached livestock can derive from dietary plant material is limited by the lack of plant polysaccharide degrading enzymes in their gastro-intestinal (GI) tract and the inefficient microbial fermentation of such material in their hind-gut. In poultry the non-starch polysaccharides found in cereal grains can also impair normal digestive function as they form viscous gels in the GI tract inhibiting the breakdown and absorption of nutrients. The nutrition of such livestock could, therefore, be improved by the introduction of enzymes able to degrade plant polysaccharides in the small intestine. We describe the expression of a xylanase, XYLY', from the bacterium Clostridium thermocellum in mammalian cells and the exocrine pancreas of transgenic mice. The enzyme is synthesised, secreted and functionally active in the eukaryote system. This work demonstrates the feasibility of generating animals with the endogenous capacity to depolymerise the xylan component of hemi-cellulose.

  5. The human apoE7 and apoE4 transgenic mice models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙明增; 琦祖和

    2001-01-01

    To scrutinize the disorders caused by human mutant apoE7/apoE4, human apoE4 and E7 transgenic mice were established with microinjection technique to examine molecular genetic phenomena in vivo. The integration and expression of h-apoE mutant genes in transgenic mice were determined with Southern blot, Northern blot and ELISA. The current studies indicated that the transgenes and the phenotypes regarding expression of transgenes could be transmitted stably in transgenic lines. The levels of serum lipid in transgenic mice showed the characteristics of hyperlipidemia. Besides, behavior tests demonstrated the degeneration of learning and memory in transgenic mice. Short life span was observed in 2 transgenic lines. After fed with high lipid food high serum lipid was found both in normal and transgenic mice, but their mechanism regulating lipid metabolism was different. It was also verified that the human apoE mutants located at either N-terminal or C-terminal had the same pathogenesis regarding disorders of lipid metabolism in murine.

  6. Identification of the growth hormone-releasing hormone analogue [Pro1, Val14]-hGHRH with an incomplete C-term amidation in a confiscated product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Simone; Deventer, Koen; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a modified version of the 44 amino acid human growth hormone-releasing hormone (hGHRH(1-44)) containing an N-terminal proline extension, a valine residue in position 14, and a C-terminus amidation (sequence: PYADAIFTNSYRKVVLGQLSARKLLQDIMSRQQGESNQERGARARL-NH2 ) has been identified in a confiscated product by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Investigation of the product suggests also an incomplete C-term amidation. Similarly to other hGHRH analogues, available in black markets, this peptide can potentially be used as performance-enhancing drug due to its growth hormone releasing activity and therefore it should be considered as a prohibited substance in sport. Additionally, the presence of partially amidated molecule reveals the poor pharmaceutical quality of the preparation, an aspect which represents a big concern for public health as well.

  7. Transgenic mice overexpressing γ-aminobutyric acid transporter subtype I develop obesity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Transgenic mice ubiquitously overexpressing murine γaminobutyric acid transporter subtype I were created. Unexpectedly, these mice markedly exhibited heritable obesity,which features significantly increased body weight and fat deposition. Behavioral examination revealed that transgenic mice have slightly reduced spontaneous locomotive capacity and altered feeding pattern. This preliminary finding indicates that the inappropriate level of γ-aminobutyric acid transporters may be directly or indirectly involved in the pathogenic mechanism underlying certain types of obesity.

  8. Improved method to raise polyclonal antibody using enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianke Ren; Long Wang; Guoxiang Liu; Wen Zhang; Zhejin Sheng; Zhugang Wang; Jian Fei

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant fusion protein is widely used as an antigen to raise antibodies against the epitope of a target protein. However, the concomitant anticarrier antibody in resulting antiserum reduces the production of the desired antibody and brings about unwanted non-specific immune reactions. It is proposed that the carrier protein transgenic animal could be used to solve this problem. To validate this hypothesis, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgenic mice were produced. By immunizing the mice with fusion protein His6HAtag-EGFP, we showed that the antiserum from the transgenic mice had higher titer antibody against His6HA tag and lower titer antibody against EGFP compared with that from wild-type mice. Therefore, this report describes an improved method to raise high titer antipeptide polyclonal antibody using EGFP transgenic mice that could have application potential in antibodypreparation.

  9. Establishment of transgenic mice carrying gene encoding human zinc finger protein 191

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Xia; Yang, Hua; Wang, Shui-Liang; Gong, Xue-Lian; Feng, Hao; Guo, Bao-Yu; Yu, Long; Wang, Zhu-Gang; Fu, Ji-Liang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Human zinc finger protein 191 (ZNF191) was cloned and characterized as a Krüppel-like transcription factor, which might be relevant to many diseases such as liver cancer, neuropsychiatric and cardiovascular diseases. Although progress has been made recently, the biological function of ZNF191 remains largely unidentified. The aim of this study was to establish a ZNF 191 transgenic mouse model, which would promote the functional study of ZNF191. METHODS: Transgene fragments were microinjected into fertilized eggs of mice. The manipulated embryos were transferred into the oviducts of pseudo-pregnant female mice. The offsprings were identified by PCR and Southern blot analysis. ZNF 191 gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR. Transgenic founder mice were used to establish transgenic mouse lineages. The first generation (F1) and the second generation (F2) mice were identified by PCR analysis. Ten-week transgenic mice were used for pathological examination. RESULTS: Four mice were identified as carrying copies of ZNF191 gene. The results of RT-PCR showed that ZNF 191 gene was expressed in the liver, testis and brain in one of the transgenic mouse lineages. Genetic analysis of transgenic mice demonstrated that ZNF 191 gene was integrated into the chromosome at a single site and could be transmitted stably. Pathological analysis showed that the expression of ZNF 191 did not cause obvious pathological changes in multiple tissues of transgenic mice. CONCLUSION: ZNF 191 transgenic mouse model would facilitate the investigation of biological functions of ZNF191 in vivo. PMID:14716836

  10. Hepatocellular alterations and dysregulation of oncogenic pathways in the liver of transgenic mice overexpressing growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquet, Johanna G; Freund, Thomas; Martinez, Carolina S; González, Lorena; Díaz, María E; Micucci, Giannina P; Zotta, Elsa; Boparai, Ravneet K; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Sotelo, Ana I

    2013-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) overexpression throughout life in transgenic mice is associated with the development of liver tumors at old ages. The preneoplastic pathology observed in the liver of young adult GH-overexpressing mice is similar to that present in humans at high risk of hepatic cancer. To elucidate the molecular pathogenesis underlying the pro-oncogenic liver pathology induced by prolonged exposure to elevated GH levels, the activation and expression of several components of signal transduction pathways that have been implicated in hepatocellular carcinogenesis were evaluated in the liver of young adult GH-transgenic mice. In addition, males and females were analyzed in parallel in order to evaluate sexual dimorphism. Transgenic mice from both sexes exhibited hepatocyte hypertrophy with enlarged nuclear size and exacerbated hepatocellular proliferation, which were higher in males. Dysregulation of several oncogenic pathways was observed in the liver of GH-overexpressing transgenic mice. Many signaling mediators and effectors were upregulated in transgenic mice compared with normal controls, including Akt2, NFκB, GSK3β, β-catenin, cyclin D1, cyclin E, c-myc, c-jun and c-fos. The molecular alterations described did not exhibit sexual dimorphism in transgenic mice except for higher gene expression and nuclear localization of cyclin D1 in males. We conclude that prolonged exposure to GH induces in the liver alterations in signaling pathways involved in cell growth, proliferation and survival that resemble those found in many human tumors.

  11. Robust generation of transgenic mice by simple hypotonic solution mediated delivery of transgene in testicular germ cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Abul; Ganguli, Nirmalya; Jain, Subodh K; Ganguli, Nilanjana; Sarkar, Rajesh Kumar; Choubey, Mayank; Shukla, Mansi; Sarkar, Hironmoy; Majumdar, Subeer S

    2016-01-01

    Our ability to decipher gene sequences has increased enormously with the advent of modern sequencing tools, but the ability to divulge functions of new genes have not increased correspondingly. This has caused a remarkable delay in functional interpretation of several newly found genes in tissue and age specific manner, limiting the pace of biological research. This is mainly due to lack of advancements in methodological tools for transgenesis. Predominantly practiced method of transgenesis by pronuclear DNA-microinjection is time consuming, tedious, and requires highly skilled persons for embryo-manipulation. Testicular electroporation mediated transgenesis requires use of electric current to testis. To this end, we have now developed an innovative technique for making transgenic mice by giving hypotonic shock to male germ cells for the gene delivery. Desired transgene was suspended in hypotonic Tris-HCl solution (pH 7.0) and simply injected in testis. This resulted in internalization of the transgene in dividing germ-cells residing at basal compartment of tubules leading to its integration in native genome of mice. Such males generated transgenic progeny by natural mating. Several transgenic animals can be generated with minimum skill within short span of time by this easily adaptable novel technique. PMID:27933305

  12. Evolution of somatic mutations in mammary tumors in transgenic mice is influenced by the inherited genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic mice develop mammary hyperplasia early in development, followed by the appearance of solitary mammary tumors with a high proportion of cells expressing early lineage markers and many myoepithelial cells. The occurrence of tumors is accelerated in experiments that activate FGF proto-oncogenes or remove the tumor suppressor genes Pten or P53, implying that secondary oncogenic events are required for progression from mammary hyperplasia to carcinoma. It is not known, however, which oncogenic pathways contribute to Wnt1-induced tumorigenesis – further experimental manipulation of these mice is needed. Secondary events also appear to be required for mammary tumorigenesis in MMTV-Neu transgenic mice because the transgene in the tumors usually contains an acquired mutation that activates the Neu protein-tyrosine kinase. Methods cDNA or DNA from the mammary glands and mammary tumors from MMTV-Wnt1, MMTV-Wnt1/p53-/-, MMTV-Neu transgenic mice, and newly generated MMTV-Wnt1/MMTV-Neu bitransgenic mice, was sequenced to seek activating mutations in H-Ras, K-Ras, and N-Ras genes, or in the MMTV-Neu transgene. In addition, tumors from bitransgenic animals were examined to determine the cellular phenotype. Results We found activating mutations at codons 12, 13, and 61 of H-Ras in just over half of the mammary tumors in MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic mice, and we confirmed the high frequency of activating mutations of Neu in tumors in MMTV-Neu transgenic mice. Tumors appeared earlier in bitransgenic MMTV-Wnt1/MMTV-Neu mice, but no Ras or MMTV-Neu mutations were found in these tumors, which were phenotypically similar to those arising in MMTV-Wnt1 mice. In addition, no Ras mutations were found in the mammary tumors that arise in MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic mice lacking an intact P53 gene. Conclusions Tumorigenic properties of cells undergoing functionally significant secondary mutations in H-Ras or the MMTV-Neu transgene allow selection

  13. A protocol for generation of transgenic mice by manipulating spermatogonial stem cells in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Lalit Sehgal, Rahul Thorat, Nileema Khapare, Amitabha Mukhopadhaya, Mugdha Sawant & Sorab Dalal ### Abstract This protocol describes a technique for the generation of transgenic mice by in-vivo manipulation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) with a high rate of success. In this study SSCs in pre-pubescent animals were infected in vivo with recombinant lentiviruses expressing EGFP-f and mated with normal females. All male pre-founder mice produced transgenic pups with an ...

  14. Caffeine suppresses β-amyloid levels in plasma and brain of Alzheimer’s transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Chuanhai; Cirrito, John R.; Lin, Xiaoyang; Wang, Lilly; Verges, Deborah K.; Dickson, Alexander; Mamcarz, Malgorzata; Zhang, Chi; Mori, Takashi; Arendash, Gary W.; Holtzman, David M.; Potter, Huntington

    2009-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies suggest that caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Supportive of this premise, our previous studies have shown that moderate caffeine administration protects/restores cognitive function and suppresses brain β-amyloid (Aβ) production in AD transgenic mice. In the present study, we report that acute caffeine administration to both young adult and aged AD transgenic mice rapidly reduces Aβ levels in both brain interstitial fluid and plasma with...

  15. Live imaging of protein kinase activities in transgenic mice expressing FRET biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamioka, Yuji; Sumiyama, Kenta; Mizuno, Rei; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Hirata, Eishu; Kiyokawa, Etsuko; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Genetically-encoded biosensors based on the principle of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been widely used in biology to visualize the spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling molecules. Despite the increasing multitude of these biosensors, their application has been mostly limited to cultured cells with transient biosensor expression, due to particular difficulties in the development of transgenic mice that express FRET biosensors. In this study, we report the efficient generation of transgenic mouse lines expressing heritable and functional biosensors for ERK and PKA. These transgenic mice were created by the cytoplasmic co-injection of Tol2 transposase mRNA and a circular plasmid harbouring Tol2 recombination sites. High expression of the biosensors in a wide range of cell types allowed us to screen newborn mice simply by inspection. Observation of these transgenic mice by two-photon excitation microscopy yielded real-time activity maps of ERK and PKA in various tissues, with greatly improved signal-to-background ratios. Our transgenic mice may be bred into diverse genetic backgrounds; moreover, the protocol we have developed paves the way for the generation of transgenic mice that express other FRET biosensors, with important applications in the characterization of physiological and pathological signal transduction events in addition to drug development and screening.

  16. Expression of human apolipoprotein B and assembly of lipoprotein(a) in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callow, M.J.; Stoltzfus, L.J.; Rubin, E.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Lawn, R.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-03-15

    The atherogenic macromolecule lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] has resisted in vivo analyses partly because it is found in a limited number of experimental animals. Although transgenic mice expressing human apolipoprotein (a) [apo(a)] have previously been described, they failed to assemble Lp(a) particles because of the inability of human apo(a) to associate with mouse apolipoprotein B (apoB). The authors isolated a 90-kilobase P1 phagemid containing the human apoB gene and with this DNA generated 13 lines of transgenic mice of which 11 expressed human apoB. The human apoB transcript was expressed and edited in the liver of the transgenic mice. Plasma concentrations of human apoB, as well as low density lipoprotein (LDL), were related to transgene copy number; the transgenic line with the most copies of human apoB had a >4-fold increase in LDL cholesterol compared with nontransgenics and a lipoprotein profile similar to that of humans. When human apoB and apo(a) transgenic mice were bred together, plasma apo(a) in mice expressing both human proteins was tightly associated with lipoproteins in the LDL density region. These studies demonstrate the successful expression of human apoB and the efficient assembly of Lp(a) in mice.

  17. Enhancement of germ cell apoptosis induced by ethanol in transgenic mice overexpressing Fas Ligand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HENG CHUAN XIA; FENG LI; ZHEN LI; ZU CHUAN ZHANG

    2003-01-01

    It was suggested that chronic ethanol exposure could result in testicular germ cell apoptosis, but the mechanism is still unclear. In the present study, we use a model of transgenic mice ubiquitously overexpressing human FasL to investigate whether Fas ligand plays a role in ethanol-induced testicular germ cell apoptosis. Both wild-type (WT)mice and transgenic (TG) mice were treated with acute ethanol (20% v/v) by introperitoneal injection for five times.After ethanol injection, WT mice displayed up-regulation of Fas ligand in the testes, which was shown by FITCconjugated flow cytometry and western blotting. Moreover, TG mice exhibited significantly more apoptotic germ cells than WT mice did after ethanol injection, which was demonstrated by DNA fragmentation, PI staining flow cytometry and TUNEL staining. In addition, histopathological examination revealed that degenerative changes of epithelial component of the tubules occurred in FasL overexpressing transgenic mice while testicular morphology was normal in wild-type mice after acute ethanol exposure, suggesting FasL expression determines the sensitivity of testes to ethanol in mice. In summary, we provide the direct evidences that Fas ligand mediates the apoptosis of testicular germ cells induced by acute ethanol using FasL transgenic mice.

  18. CMV-hFasL transgenic mice prevent from experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhen-lin; LIN Bo; YU Lu-yang; GUO Li-he

    2005-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that the role of Fas ligand (FasL) is not consistent in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroiditis. This study was designed to investigate the effects of FasL on the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) using CMV-human FasL (hFasL) transgenic mice. Methods Transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing hFasL were used as an animal model of EAT by injection of porcine thyroglobulin (pTg). Expression of hFasL was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. The activity of hFasL transgenic thyrocytes killing Jurket cells was determined. CMV-hFasL transgenic mice and wild type (WT) mice were immunized with pTg and killed 28 days later to evaluate the lymphocytic infiltration of their thyroids. The number of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes from the spleen was detected using FACS. The serum interferon-γ (IFN-γ) concentration was measured by ELISA. Results hFasL expression in the thyroid of CMV-hFasL transgenic mice was confirmed. After co-incubation of Jurket thymocytes with thyroid tissues of CMV-hFasL transgenic mice, the percentage of apoptotic cells in the CMV-hFasL transgenic thyroid group was significantly higher than that of the control WT thyroid group [(23.4±4.3)% vs (6.6±2.5)%, P<0.01]. On day 28 after immunization with pTg, the infiltration index of lymphocytes in thyroids of the CMV-hFasL transgenic mice was significantly lower than that of the WT mice [(1.0±0.5) vs (2.1±0.7), P<0.001]. Moreover, the number of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes of the spleen and serum IFN-γ concentration were significantly decreased in the CMV-hFasL transgenic mice. Conclusions FasL plays an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroiditis. Transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing hFasL may strongly inhibit lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid of EAT and ameliorate the course of this disease.

  19. Collagenlα1 promoter drives the expression of Cre recombinase in osteoblasts of transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Osteoblasts participate in bone formation,bone mineralization,osteoclast differentiation and many pathological processes.To study the function of genes in osteoblasts using Cre-LoxP system,we generated a mouse line expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the rat Collagenlal (Coilal) promoter(Coilatl-Cre).Two founders were identified by genomic PCR from 16 offsprings.and the integration efficiency is 12.5%.In order tO determine the tissue distribution and the activity of Cre rccombinase in the transgenic mice,the Collal-Cre transgenic mice were bred with the ROSA26 reporter strain and a mouse strain that carries Smad4 conditional alleles (Smad4co/co).Multiple tissue PCR of Collal-Cre;Smad4co/+mice revealed the restricted Cre activity in bone tissues containing osteoblasts and tendon.LacZ staining in the Coilal-Cre;ROSA26 double transgenic mice revealed that the Cre recombinase began to express in the osteoblasts of calvaria at E14.5.Cre activity was observed in the osteoblasts and osteocytes of P10 double transgenic mice.All these data indicated that the Collal-Cre transgenic mice could Serve as a valuabletool for osteoblast lineage analysis and conditional gene knockout in osteoblasts.

  20. Reduction of Abeta amyloid pathology in APPPS1 transgenic mice in the absence of gut microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harach, T.; Marungruang, N.; Duthilleul, N.; Cheatham, V.; Mc Coy, K. D.; Frisoni, G.; Neher, J. J.; Fåk, F.; Jucker, M.; Lasser, T.; Bolmont, T.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia in the western world, however there is no cure available for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Despite clinical and experimental evidence implicating the intestinal microbiota in a number of brain disorders, its impact on Alzheimer’s disease is not known. To this end we sequenced bacterial 16S rRNA from fecal samples of Aβ precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse model and found a remarkable shift in the gut microbiota as compared to non-transgenic wild-type mice. Subsequently we generated germ-free APP transgenic mice and found a drastic reduction of cerebral Aβ amyloid pathology when compared to control mice with intestinal microbiota. Importantly, colonization of germ-free APP transgenic mice with microbiota from conventionally-raised APP transgenic mice increased cerebral Aβ pathology, while colonization with microbiota from wild-type mice was less effective in increasing cerebral Aβ levels. Our results indicate a microbial involvement in the development of Abeta amyloid pathology, and suggest that microbiota may contribute to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28176819

  1. T cell activation and proliferation characteristic for HIV-Nef transgenic mice is lymphopenia induced

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, Paul G. F.; Hofhuis, Frans M.; Osterwegel, Mariette A.; Tesselaar, Kiki

    2007-01-01

    The HIV-Nef protein has been implicated in generating high viral loads and T cell activation. Transgenic (tg) mice with constitutive T cell-specific Nef expression show a dramatic reduction in T cell number and highly increased T cell turnover. Previous studies in Nef tg mice attributed this T cell

  2. Olmesartan and pravastatin additively reduce development of atherosclerosis in APOE*3Leiden transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, J.W.A. van der; Kleemann, R.; Havekes, L.M.; Kooistra, T.; Princen, H.M.G.; Jukema, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: This study was designed to investigate the effect of the angiotensin II receptor blocker olmesartan alone, or in combination with standard treatment with a statin, pravastatin, on atherosclerosis development in APOE*3Leiden transgenic mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: Four groups of 15 mice received

  3. The cytomegalovirus-encoded chemokine receptor US28 promotes intestinal neoplasia in transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, G.; Maussang, D.; Muniz, L.R.; Noriega, V.M.; Fraile-Ramos, A.; Barker, N.; Marchesi, F.; Thirunarayanan, N.; Vischer, H.F.; Qin, L.; Mayer, L.; Harpaz, N.; Leurs, R.; Furtado, G.C.; Clevers, H.; Tortorella, D.; Smit, M.J.; Lira, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    US28 is a constitutively active chemokine receptor encoded by CMV (also referred to as human herpesvirus 5), a highly prevalent human virus that infects a broad spectrum of cells, including intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). To study the role of US28 in vivo, we created transgenic mice (VS28 mice)

  4. Adenohypophysial changes in mice transgenic for human growth hormone-releasing factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefaneanu, L; Kovacs, K; Horvath, E

    1989-01-01

    The effect of protracted GH-releasing factor (GRF) stimulation on adenohypophysial morphology was investigated in six mice transgenic for human GRF (hGRF). All animals had significantly higher plasma levels of GH and GRF and greater body weights than controls. Eight-month-old mice were killed...

  5. Development of atopic dermatitis in mice transgenic for human apolipoprotein C1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerken, L.; Verzaal, P.; Lagerweij, T.; Persoon-Deen, C.; Berbee, J.F.P.; Prens, E.P.; Havekes, L.M.; Oranje, A.P.

    2008-01-01

    Mice with transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein C1 (APOC1) in liver and skin have strongly increased serum levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and free fatty acids, indicative of a disturbed lipid metabolism. Importantly, these mice display a disturbed skin barrier function, evident from i

  6. Human apoB contributes to increased serum total apo(a level in LPA transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teivainen Päivi A

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Lp(a lipoprotein (Lp(a consists of the polymorphic glycoprotein apolipoprotein(a (apo(a, which is attached by a disulfide bond to apolipoprotein B (apoB. Apo(a, which has high homology with plasminogen, is present only in primates and hedgehogs. However, transgenic mice and rabbits with high serum apo(a levels exist. Liver is the main site for apo(a synthesis, but the site of removal is uncertain. To examine differences between transgenic mice expressing the LPA gene and mice capable of forming Lp(a particles, LPA-YAC transgenic mice and hAPOB transgenic mice were crossed and their offspring examined. Results Comparison of LPA-YAC with LPA-YAC/hAPOB transgenic mice showed that LPA-YAC/hAPOB transgenic mice have higher serum total apo(a and total cholesterol level than mice lacking the hAPOB gene. However, hepatic apo(a mRNA level was higher in LPA-YAC transgenic mice than in LPA-YAC/hAPOB transgenic mice. Feeding of a high-cholesterol/high-fat diet to male LPA-YAC transgenic mice with or without the hAPOB gene resulted in reduced serum total apo(a and hepatic apo(a mRNA level. Conclusion In conclusion, the higher serum total apo(a level in LPA-YAC/hAPOB transgenic mice than in LPA-YAC transgenic mice is not caused by increased apo(a synthesis. Lower hepatic apo(a mRNA level in LPA-YAC/hAPOB than in LPA-YAC transgenic mice may suggest that the increase in total apo(a level is a result of apo(a accumulation in serum. Furthermore, observed higher serum total cholesterol level in LPA-YAC/hAPOB transgenic mice than either in wild type or LPA-YAC transgenic mice may further suggest that human APOB transgenicity is a factor that contributes to increased serum total apo(a and cholesterol levels. Our results on reduced serum total apo(a and hepatic apo(a mRNA levels in HCHF fed male LPA-YAC transgenic mice confirm earlier findings in females, and show that there are no sex difference in mechanisms for lowering apo(a level in

  7. A simplified method to prepare PCR template DNA for screening of transgenic and knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, S; Li, M; Cai, H; Hudgins, S; Furth, P A

    2001-03-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of DNA is the most widely used technique for screening of large numbers of genetically engineered transgenic or knockout mice (Mus musculus). In this report, we present a new DNA preparation procedure for running diagnostic PCR. In this procedure, mouse ear tissue was used directly for PCR after the tissue underwent brief digestion in a solution containing only proteinase K. Using this method, we have successfully screened several lines of single, double, and triple transgenic and knockout mice. The results are reliable and reproducible. The advantage of this new method is that DNA purification by organic extraction or isolation kit was omitted. DNA purification is the limiting factor in terms of time and money when screening transgenic and knockout mice by PCR. In addition, using ear instead of tail tissue can reduce distress of animals because the samples can be obtained when the mice are labeled by ear punch.

  8. Somatostatin receptor 1 and 5 double knockout mice mimic neurochemical changes of Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmesh S Rajput

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective degeneration of medium spiny neurons and preservation of medium sized aspiny interneurons in striatum has been implicated in excitotoxicity and pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD. However, the molecular mechanism for the selective sparing of medium sized aspiny neurons and vulnerability of projection neurons is still elusive. The pathological characteristic of HD is an extensive reduction of the striatal mass, affecting caudate putamen. Somatostatin (SST positive neurons are selectively spared in HD and Quinolinic acid/N-methyl-D-aspartic acid induced excitotoxicity, mimic the model of HD. SST plays neuroprotective role in excitotoxicity and the biological effects of SST are mediated by five somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To delineate subtype selective biological responses we have here investigated changes in SSTR1 and 5 double knockout mice brain and compared with HD transgenic mouse model (R6/2. Our study revealed significant loss of dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32 and comparable changes in SST, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors subtypes, calbindin and brain nitric oxide synthase expression as well as in key signaling proteins including calpain, phospho-extracellular-signal-regulated kinases1/2, synapsin-IIa, protein kinase C-α and calcineurin in SSTR1/5(-/- and R6/2 mice. Conversely, the expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes, enkephalin and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases were strain specific. SSTR1/5 appears to be important in regulating NMDARs, DARPP-32 and signaling molecules in similar fashion as seen in HD transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first comprehensive description of disease related changes upon ablation of G- protein coupled receptor gene. Our results indicate that SST and SSTRs might play an important role in regulation of neurodegeneration and targeting this pathway can provide a novel insight in understanding the

  9. Dynamics of oligodendrocyte responses to anterograde axonal (Wallerian) and terminal degeneration in normal and TNF-transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drøjdahl, Nina; Fenger, Christina; Nielsen, Helle H

    2004-01-01

    degeneration and lesion-induced axonal sprouting in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in TNF-transgenic mice with the response in genetically normal mice. Transectioning of the entorhino-dentate perforant path axonal projection increased hippocampal TNF mRNA expression in both types of mice, but to significantly...... larger levels in the TNF-transgenics. At 5 days after axonal transection, numbers of oligodendrocytes and myelin basic protein (MBP) mRNA expression in the denervated dentate gyrus in TNF-transgenic mice had increased to the same extent as in nontransgenic littermates. At this time, transgenics showed...

  10. Establishment of transgenic mice carrying the gene of human nuclear receptor NRSA2 (hB1F)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui-Liang Wang; Hua Yang; You-Hua Xie; Yuan Wang; Jian-Zhong Li; Long Wang; Zhu-Gang Wang; Ji-Liang Fu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Human hepatitis B virus enhancer Ⅱ B1 binding factor (hB1F) was cloned and characterized as a novel member of the Ftz-F1 (NRSA) nuclear receptor subfamily. Although progresses have recently been made, its biological function remains largely unidentified. The aim of this study was to establish an hB1F transgenic mouse model to promote the functional study of hB1F. METHODS: Transgene fragments were microinjected into fertilized eggs of mice. The manipulated embryos were transferred into the oviducts of pseudopregnant female mice.The offsprings were identified by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Transgene expression was analyzed with RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Transgenic founder mice were used to establish transgenic mouse lineages. The F1 and F2mice were identified by PCR analysis. RESULTS: Seven mice were identified as carrying copies of transgene. RT-PCR and Western blotting results showed that the transgene was expressed in heart, liver, lung, kidney and stomach in one of the transgenic mouse lineages.Genetic analysis of the transgenic mice demonstrated that the transgene was integrated into the chromosome at a single site, and was transmitted stably. CONCLUSION: In this study we established an hB1F transgenic mouse model, which will facilitate the investigation of the biological function of hB1F in vivo.

  11. Transgenic mice for MTCP1 develop T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, C; Dastot, H; Soulier, J; Janin, A; Daniel, M T; Madani, A; Grimber, G; Briand, P; Sigaux, F; Stern, M H

    1998-07-15

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare form of mature T-cell leukemia associated with chromosomal rearrangements implicating MTCP1 or TCL1 genes. These genes encode two homologous proteins, p13(MTCP1) and p14(TCL1), which share no similarity with other known protein. To determine the oncogenic role of MTCP1, mice transgenic for MTCP1 under the control of CD2 regulatory regions (CD2-p13 mice) were generated. No abnormality was detected during the first year after birth. A late effect of the transgene was searched for in a cohort of 48 CD2-p13 mice aged 15 to 20 months, issued from 3 independent founders. Lymphoid hemopathies, occurring in the three transgenic lines, were characterized by lymphoid cells with an irregular nucleus, a unique and prominent nucleolus, condensed chromatin, a basophilic cytoplasm devoid of granules, and an immunophenotype of mature T cells. The molecular characterization of Tcrb rearrangements demonstrated the monoclonal origin of these populations. Histopathological analysis of the cohort demonstrated early splenic and hepatic infiltrations, whereas lymphocytosis and medullar infiltrations were found infrequently. The engraftment of these proliferations in H2-matched animals demonstrated their malignant nature. Cumulative incidence of the disease at 20 months was 100%, 50%, and 21% in F3, F4, and F7 lines, respectively, and null in the control group. The level of expression of the transgene, as estimated by Western blotting in the transgenic lines correlated with the tumoral incidence, with the highest expression of p13(MTCP1) being found in F3 mice. CD2-p13 transgenic mice developed an hemopathy similar to human T-PLL. These data demonstrate that p13(MTCP1) is an oncoprotein and that CD2-p13 transgenic mice represent the first animal model for mature T-PLL.

  12. CTRP9 transgenic mice are protected from diet-induced obesity and metabolic dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jonathan M.; Wei, Zhikui; Seldin, Marcus M.; Byerly, Mardi S.; Aja, Susan

    2013-01-01

    CTRP9 is a secreted multimeric protein of the C1q family and the closest paralog of the insulin-sensitizing adipokine, adiponectin. The metabolic function of this adipose tissue-derived plasma protein remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the circulating levels of CTRP9 are downregulated in diet-induced obese mice and upregulated upon refeeding. Overexpressing CTRP9 resulted in lean mice that dramatically resisted weight gain induced by a high-fat diet, largely through decreased food intake and increased basal metabolism. Enhanced fat oxidation in CTRP9 transgenic mice resulted from increases in skeletal muscle mitochondrial content, expression of enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation (LCAD and MCAD), and chronic AMPK activation. Hepatic and skeletal muscle triglyceride levels were substantially decreased in transgenic mice. Consequently, CTRP9 transgenic mice had a greatly improved metabolic profile with markedly reduced fasting insulin and glucose levels. The high-fat diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis observed in wild-type mice were prevented in transgenic mice. Consistent with the in vivo data, recombinant protein significantly enhanced fat oxidation in L6 myotubes via AMPK activation and reduced lipid accumulation in H4IIE hepatocytes. Collectively, these data establish CTRP9 as a novel metabolic regulator and a new component of the metabolic network that links adipose tissue to lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle and liver. PMID:23842676

  13. Inhibitory effect of oxymatrine on serum hepatitis B virus DNA in HBV transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lun-Gen Lu; Min-De Zeng; Yi-Min Mao; Jing-Yuan Fang; Yu-Lin Song; Zhao-Hui Shen; Ai-Ping Cao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the inhibitory effect of oxymatrine on serum hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in HBV transgenic mice.METHODS: HBV transgenic mice model was established by microinjection, and identified by HBV DNA integration and replication. Transgenic mice with replicating HBV were divided into 3 groups, and injected with normal saline (group A, n=9), 50 mg/kg (group B, n=8) and 100 mg/kg (group C, n=9) oxymatrine intraperitoneally once a day for 30 d, respectively. Quantitation of serum HBV DNA in HBV transgenic mice was performed by competitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in combination with DNA hybridization quantitative detection technique before and after treatment.RESULTS: Compared with pre-treatment, the serum HBV DNA in group A (F=1.04, P=0.9612) and group B (F=1.13,P=0.8739) had no changes after treatment. However, in group C serum HBV DNA was significantly decreased (F=13.97,P=0.0012). The serum HBV DNA after treatment was lower in group C than in groups B and A (F=8.65, P=0.0068;F=12.35, P=0.0018; respectively). The serum HBV DNA after treatment was lower in group B than in group A, but there was no statistical significance (F=1.43, P=0.652).CONCLUSION: Oxymatrine has inhibitory effects on serum HBV DNA in HBV transgenic mice.

  14. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-1 transgenic mice are not protected from ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Leypoldt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methylated arginines are endogenous analogues of L-arginine, the substrate for nitric oxide (NO synthase. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA interferes with NO formation, causing endothelial dysfunction. ADMA is a predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality in humans. It is eliminated primarily by enzymatic activity of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated whether human DDAH-1 (hDDAH-1 transgenicity protects from ischemic tissue damage in temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO in mice. Infarct sizes did not significantly differ between hDDAH-1 transgenic (TG mice and wild-type littermates (WT. As expected, ADMA plasma concentrations were significantly decreased, cerebral hDDAH expression and protein significantly increased in transgenic animals. Interestingly, neither brain tissue DDAH activity nor ADMA concentrations were different between TG and WT mice. In contrast, muscular DDAH activity was generally lower than in brain but significantly increased in TG mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study demonstrates that hDDAH-1 transgenic mice are not protected from ischemic cerebral tissue damage in tMCAO. This lack of protection is due to high basal cerebral DDAH activity, which is not further increasable by transgenic overexpression of DDAH.

  15. Transgenic knockout mice with exclusively human sickle hemoglobinand sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paszty, C.; Brion, C.; Manci, E.; Witkowska, E.; Stevens, M.; Narla, M.; Rubin, E.

    1997-06-13

    To create mice expressing exclusively human sicklehemoglobin (HbS), transgenic mice expressing human alpha-, gamma-, andbeta[S]-globin were generated and bred with knockout mice that haddeletions of the murine alpha- and beta-globin genes. These sickle cellmice have the major features (irreversibly sickled red cells, anemia,multiorgan pathology) found in humans with sickle cell disease and, assuch, represent a useful in vivo system to accelerate the development ofimproved therapies for this common genetic disease.

  16. Matrix attachment regions included in a bicistronic vector enhances and stabilizes follistatin gene expressions in both transgenic cells and transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming HU,Jing GUO,Chunling BAI,Zhuying WEI,Li GAO,Tingmao HU,Shorgan BOU,Guangpeng LI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, follistatin (FST gene expression vectors with either a bicistronic gene transfer cassette alone, or a bicistron gene cassette carrying a matrix attachment region (MAR were constructed and transfected to bovine fetal fibroblasts. Evaluations of both the integration and expression of exogenous FST indicated that the pMAR-CAG-FST-IRES-AcGFP1-polyA-MAR (pMAR-FST vector had higher capacity to form monoclonal transgenic cells than the vector without MAR, though transient transfection and integration efficiency were similar with either construct. Remarkably, protein expression in transgenic cells with the pMAR-FST vector was significantly higher than that from the bicistronic vector. Exogenous FST was expressed in all of the pMAR-FST transgenic mice at F0, F1 and F2. Total muscle growth in F0 mice was significantly greater than in wild-type mice, with larger muscles in fore and hind limbs of transgenic mice. pMAR-FST transgenic mice were also found with more evenly distributed muscle bundles and thinner spaces between sarcolemma, which suggests a correlation between transgene expression-associated muscle development and the trend of muscle growth. In conclusion, a pMAR-FST vector, which excluded the resistant genes and frame structure, enhances and stabilizes FST gene expressions in both transfected cells and transgenic mice.

  17. Effect of 5'-flanking sequence deletions on expression of the human insulin gene in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromont-Racine, M; Bucchini, D; Madsen, O;

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the human insulin gene was examined in transgenic mouse lines carrying the gene with various lengths of DNA sequences 5' to the transcription start site (+1). Expression of the transgene was demonstrated by 1) the presence of human C-peptide in urine, 2) the presence of specific tra...... of the transgene was observed in cell types other than beta-islet cells.......Expression of the human insulin gene was examined in transgenic mouse lines carrying the gene with various lengths of DNA sequences 5' to the transcription start site (+1). Expression of the transgene was demonstrated by 1) the presence of human C-peptide in urine, 2) the presence of specific......, and -168 allowed correct initiation of the transcripts and cell specificity of expression, while quantitative expression gradually decreased. Deletion to -58 completely abolished the expression of the gene. The amount of human product that in mice harboring the longest fragment contributes up to 50...

  18. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagozdzon Agnieszka M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study. Results A new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal. Conclusions We have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  19. Chronic active hepatitis in transgenic mice expressing interferon-gamma in the liver.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Interferon-gamma may play an important role in the immune response and in inflammatory diseases, including chronic active hepatitis. To understand the role of interferon-gamma in the regulation of inflammation and to establish a mouse model of chronic active hepatitis, we produced transgenic mice in which the mouse interferon-gamma gene was regulated by a liver-specific promoter, the serum amyloid P component gene promoter. Four transgenic mouse lines were generated, and two of these lines ex...

  20. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zagozdzon, Agnieszka M

    2012-05-30

    AbstractBackgroundNumerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study.ResultsA new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice) expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal.ConclusionsWe have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and\\/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  1. Effect of 5'-flanking sequence deletions on expression of the human insulin gene in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromont-Racine, M; Bucchini, D; Madsen, O

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the human insulin gene was examined in transgenic mouse lines carrying the gene with various lengths of DNA sequences 5' to the transcription start site (+1). Expression of the transgene was demonstrated by 1) the presence of human C-peptide in urine, 2) the presence of specific......, and -168 allowed correct initiation of the transcripts and cell specificity of expression, while quantitative expression gradually decreased. Deletion to -58 completely abolished the expression of the gene. The amount of human product that in mice harboring the longest fragment contributes up to 50...... of the transgene was observed in cell types other than beta-islet cells....

  2. Generation of fad2 transgenic mice that produce omega-6 fatty acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qing; LIU Qing; WU ZhiFang; WANG ZongYi; GOU KeMian

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acid desaturase-2 (FAD2)introduces a double bond in position △12 in oleic acid (18:1)to form linoleic acid (18:2 n-6)in higher plants and microbes.A new transgenic expression cassette,containing CMV promoter/fad2 cDNA/SV40 polyA,was constructedto produce transgenic mice.Among 63 healthy offspring,10 founders (15.9%)integrated the cotton fad2 transgene into their genomes,as demonstrated by PCR and Southern blotting analysis.All founder mice were fertile and heterozygous fad2 female and nontransgenic littermates were used for fatty acid analysis using gas chromatography.One fad2 transgenic line showed substantial differences in the fatty acid profiles and the level of linoleic acid was increased 19% (P<0.05)in transgenic muscles compared to their nontransgenic littermates.Moreover,it exhibited an 87% and a 9% increase (P<0.05)in arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6)in muscles and liver,compared to their nontransgenic littermates.The results indicate that the plant fad2 gene can be functionally expressed in transgenic mice and may playan active role in conversion of oleic acid into linoleic acid.

  3. Generation of fad2 transgenic mice that produce omega-6 fatty acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acid desaturase-2 (FAD2) introduces a double bond in position 12 in oleic acid (18:1) to form linoleic acid (18:2 n-6) in higher plants and microbes. A new transgenic expression cassette, containing CMV promoter/fad2 cDNA/SV40 polyA, was constructedto produce transgenic mice. Among 63 healthy offspring, 10 founders (15.9%) integrated the cotton fad2 transgene into their genomes, as demonstrated by PCR and Southern blotting analysis. All founder mice were fertile and heterozygous fad2 female and nontransgenic littermates were used for fatty acid analysis using gas chromatography. One fad2 transgenic line showed substantial differences in the fatty acid profiles and the level of linoleic acid was increased 19% (P<0.05) in transgenic muscles compared to their nontransgenic littermates. Moreover, it exhibited an 87% and a 9% increase (P<0.05) in arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) in muscles and liver, compared to their nontransgenic littermates. The results indicate that the plant fad2 gene can be functionally expressed in transgenic mice and may playan active role in conversion of oleic acid into linoleic acid.

  4. Tumor prevention in HPV8 transgenic mice by HPV8-E6 DNA vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Awerkiew, Sabine; Hufbauer, Martin; Schädlich, Lysann; Gissmann, Lutz; Eming, Sabine; Pfister, Herbert

    2014-06-01

    The genus beta human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in individuals with epidermodysplasia verruciformis. Immunosuppressed transplant recipients are prone to harbor particularly high betapapillomavirus DNA loads, which may contribute to their highly increased risk of SCC. Tumor induction in HPV8 transgenic mice correlates with increased expression of viral oncogenes E6 and E2. In an attempt to prevent skin tumor development, we evaluated an HPV8-E6-DNA vaccine, which was able to stimulate a detectable HPV8-E6-specific cell-mediated immune response in 8/15 immunized mice. When skin of HPV8 transgenic mice was grafted onto non-transgenic littermates, the grafted HPV8 transgenic tissue was not rejected and papillomas started to grow within 14 days all over the transplant of 9/9 non-vaccinated and 7/15 not successfully vaccinated mice. In contrast, no papillomas developed in 6/8 successfully vaccinated mice. In the other two of these eight mice, a large ulcerative lesion developed within the initial papilloma growth or papilloma development was highly delayed. As the vaccine completely or partially prevented papilloma development without rejecting the transplanted HPV8 positive skin, the immune system appears to attack only keratinocytes with increased levels of E6 protein, which would give rise to papillomas.

  5. Lymphoma induction by heterocyclic amines in Eu-pim-1 transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ilona Kryspin; Kristiansen, E.; Mortensen, Alicja

    1997-01-01

    The usefulness of transgenic E mu-pim-1 mice bearing in their genome the pim-1 oncogene supplemented with an upstream immunoglobulin enhancer and a downstream murine leukaemia virus long terminal repeat, as sensitive test organisms was studied in two short-term carcinogenicity studies. The mice...... to bacteria and cultured mammalian cells. PhIP is a potent mouse lymphomagen, while IQ is a liver, lung and forestomach carcinogen in mice. We found that transgenic E mu-pim-1 mice are highly susceptible to PhIP induced lymphomagenesis but do not respond to IQ treatment. PhIP feeding of E mu-pim-1 mice...... not only increased the total number of T-cell lymphomas but also decreased the latency time compared to either transgenic or wild-type controls. The effect was most pronounced in the treated female E mu-pim-1 mice, which showed a higher incidence of PhIP induced T-cell lymphomas than transgenic males...

  6. ADAM12-S stimulates bone growth in transgenic mice by modulating chondrocyte proliferation and maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Marie; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Rudkjaer, Lise

    2006-01-01

    ADAM12-S transgenic mice exhibit a pronounced increase in the length of bones, such as femur, tibia, and vertebrae. The effect of ADAM12-S on longitudinal bone growth involves the modulation of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation, likely through proteolytic activities and altered cell......-extracellular matrix interactions in the growth plate. INTRODUCTION: The disintegrin and metalloprotease ADAM12 is expressed in both osteoblasts and osteoclasts, suggesting a regulatory role of ADAM12 in bone. However, thus far, no in vivo function of ADAM12 in the skeleton has been reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS......-extracellular matrix interactions. RESULTS: ADAM12-S transgenic mice exhibit increased longitudinal bone growth. The increased bone length is progressive and age dependent, with a maximum increase of 17% seen in the femur from 6-month-old transgenic mice. The effect is gene dose dependent, being more pronounced...

  7. Global view of transcriptome in the brains of aged NR2B transgenic mice*****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunxia Li; Men Su; Huimin Wang; Yinghe Hu

    2013-01-01

    NR2B subunits are involved in regulating aging, in particular, age-related learning and memory deficits. We examined 19-month-old NR2B transgenic mice and their littermate controls. First, we detected expression of the NR2B subunit gene, Grin2b, in the neocortex of transgenic mice using real-time PCR. Next, we used microarrays to examine differences in neocortical gene expression. Pathway and signal-net analyses identified multiple pathways altered in the transgenic mice, in-cluding the P53, Jak-STAT, Wnt, and Notch pathways, as wel as regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions. Further signal-net analysis highlighted the P53 and insulin-like growth factor pathways as key regulatory pathways. Our results provide new insight into understanding the molecular mechanisms of NR2B regulated age-related memory storage, normal organismal aging and age-related disease.

  8. Islet neogenesis associated protein transgenic mice are resistant to hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Fishwick, David A; Bowman, Angela; Hamblet, Natasha; Bernard, Paul; Harlan, David M; Vinik, Aaron I

    2006-09-01

    Islet neogenesis associated protein (INGAP) is a protein factor that can stimulate new islet mass from adult pancreatic progenitor cells. In models of islet neogenesis, INGAP expression is elevated in pancreatic acinar cells. Using a transgenic model to drive a sustained expression of INGAP in pancreatic acinar cells, we have identified a protection to chemical-induced hyperglycemia. A sustained expression of INGAP during development did not perturb islet development or basal blood glucose homeostasis, although beta-cell mass and pancreatic insulin content were significantly increased in the INGAP transgenic mice. When challenged with a diabetogenic dose of streptozotocin (STZ), mice carrying the INGAP transgene did not become hyperglycemic. In contrast, wild-type mice became and remained hyperglycemic, blood glucose > 550 mg/dl. The serum insulin levels and islet morphology were preserved in the transgenic mice after STZ treatment. These data suggest that the sustained expression of INGAP in the acinar pancreas confers resistance to a diabetogenic insult. The INGAP transgenic mouse provides a new model to uncover factors that are protective to diabetes onset and biomarkers to track beta-cell pathology.

  9. Expression of SV40 T antigen under control of rabbit uteroglobin promoter in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMayo, F J; Finegold, M J; Hansen, T N; Stanley, L A; Smith, B; Bullock, D W

    1991-08-01

    The rabbit uteroglobin gene is expressed in the lungs and reproductive tracts of male and female rabbits. To examine whether the promoter region of the uteroglobin gene could be used to target a heterologous gene to the lungs of transgenic mice, a fusion gene consisting of 3.3 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the rabbit uteroglobin gene and the large T antigen gene of the SV40 virus was constructed and microinjected into the pronuclei of one-cell mouse embryos. Eleven founder transgenic mice (5 female and 6 male) were generated. Seven of these mice developed bronchioalveolar neoplasms. Four of the founder males also developed primitive undifferentiated urogenital tract tumors. One founder female and one female offspring of a founder male developed glandular paraovarian tumors. Northern analysis revealed that the predominant site of expression of the transgene was the lung. Immunohistochemical staining showed T antigen predominantly in epithelial cells lining the bronchioles, the submucosal glands of the trachea, and the neoplasms. There appeared to be a high level of mosaicism for the transgene in the founder mice, with poor transmission of the transgene to subsequent generations. This suggests that, under the control of the uteroglobin promoter, the T antigen gene may be lethal to the fetus.

  10. Hyperactive hypothalamus, motivated and non-distractible chronic overeating in ADAR2 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akubuiro, A; Bridget Zimmerman, M; Boles Ponto, L L; Walsh, S A; Sunderland, J; McCormick, L; Singh, M

    2013-04-01

    ADAR2 transgenic mice misexpressing the RNA editing enzyme ADAR2 (Adenosine Deaminase that act on RNA) show characteristics of overeating and experience adult onset obesity. Behavioral patterns and brain changes related to a possible addictive overeating in these transgenic mice were explored as transgenic mice display chronic hyperphagia. ADAR2 transgenic mice were assessed in their food preference and motivation to overeat in a competing reward environment with ad lib access to a running wheel and food. Metabolic activity of brain and peripheral tissue were assessed with [(18) F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and RNA expression of feeding related genes, ADAR2, dopamine and opiate receptors from the hypothalamus and striatum were examined. The results indicate that ADAR2 transgenic mice exhibit, (1) a food preference for diets with higher fat content, (2) significantly increased food intake that is non-distractible in a competing reward environment, (3) significantly increased messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of ADAR2, serotonin 2C receptor (5HT2C R), D1, D2 and mu opioid receptors and no change in corticotropin-releasing hormone mRNAs and significantly reduced ADAR2 protein expression in the hypothalamus, (4) significantly increased D1 receptor and altered bioamines with no change in ADAR2, mu opioid and D2 receptor mRNA expression in the striatum and (5) significantly greater glucose metabolism in the hypothalamus, brain stem, right hippocampus, left and right mid brain regions and suprascapular peripheral tissue than controls. These results suggest that highly motivated and goal-oriented overeating behaviors of ADAR2 transgenic mice are associated with altered feeding, reward-related mRNAs and hyperactive brain mesolimbic region.

  11. Hyperactive hypothalamus, motivated and non-distractible chronic overeating in ADAR2 transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akubuiro, Ashley; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Walsh, Susan A.; Sunderland, John; McCormick, Laurie; Singh, Minati

    2013-01-01

    ADAR2 transgenic mice misexpressing the RNA editing enzyme ADAR2 (Adenosine Deaminase that act on RNA) show characteristics of overeating and experience adult onset obesity. Behavioral patterns and brain changes related to a possible addictive overeating in these transgenic mice were explored as transgenic mice display chronic hyperphagia. ADAR2 transgenic mice were assessed in their food preference and motivation to overeat in a competing reward environment with ad lib access to a running wheel and food. Metabolic activity of brain and peripheral tissue were assessed with [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and RNA expression of feeding related genes, ADAR2, dopamine and opiate receptors from the hypothalamus and striatum were examined. The results indicate that ADAR2 transgenic mice exhibit, (1) a food preference for diets with higher fat content, (2) significantly increased food intake that is non-distractible in a competing reward environment, (3) significantly increased mRNA expressions of ADAR2, serotonin 2C receptor (5HT2CR), D1, D2, and mu opioid receptors and no change in CRH mRNAs and significantly reduced ADAR2 protein expression in the hypothalamus, (4) significantly increased D1 receptor and altered bioamines with no change in ADAR2, mu opioid and D2 receptor mRNA expression in the striatum, and (5) significantly greater glucose metabolism in the hypothalamus, brain stem, right hippocampus, left and right mid brain regions and suprascapular peripheral tissue than controls. These results suggest that highly motivated and goal-oriented overeating behaviors of ADAR2 transgenic mice are associated with altered feeding, reward-related mRNAs, and hyperactive brain mesolimbic region. PMID:23323881

  12. Reduced metastasis of transgenic mammary cancer in urokinase-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almholt, Kasper; Lund, L.R.; Rygaard, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    A prominent phenotype of plasmin deficiency in mice is reduced metastasis in the MMTV-PymT transgenic breast cancer model. Proteolytically active plasmin is generated from inactive plasminogen by one of 2 activators, uPA or tPA. We now find that uPA deficiency alone significantly reduces metastasis...... >7-fold in the MMTV-PymT model. We studied a cohort of 55 MMTV-PymT transgenic mice, either uPA-deficient or wild-type controls. Tumor incidence, latency, growth rate and final primary tumor burden were not significantly affected by uPA deficiency. In contrast, average lung metastasis volume...

  13. Pituitary adenomas in mice transgenic for growth hormone-releasing hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asa, S L; Kovacs, K; Stefaneanu, L

    1992-01-01

    It has been shown that mice transgenic for human GH-releasing hormone (GRH) develop hyperplasia of pituitary somatotrophs, lactotrophs, and mammosomatotrophs, cells capable of producing both GH and PRL, by 8 months of age. We now report that GRH transgenic mice 10-24 months of age develop pituita...... somatotrophs or mammosomatotrophs to cells with features of the glycoprotein hormone cell line. These findings provide conclusive evidence that protracted GRH stimulation of secretory activity can result in proliferation, hyperplasia, and adenoma of adenohypophysial cells....

  14. Peripheral neuropathy is linked to a severe form of myotonic dystrophy in transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Panaite, P.A.; Kielar, M.; Kraftsik, R.; Gourdon, G; Kuntzer, T; Barakat-Walter, I.

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystem disorder with a variable phenotype. The involvement of peripheral nerves in DM1 disease is controversial. The DM1 animal model DM300 transgenic mice that carry 350 to 500 CTG repeats express a mild DM1 phenotype but do not exhibit motor or sensory pathology. Here, we investigated the presence or absence of peripheral neuropathy in transgenic mice (DMSXL) that carry more than 1,300 CTG repeats and display a severe form of DM1. Electrophysiologic...

  15. Rescuing impairment of long-term potentiation in fyn-deficient mice by introducing Fyn transgene

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    To examine the physiological role of the Fyn tyrosine kinase in neurons, we generated transgenic mice that expressed a fyn cDNA under the control of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα promoter. With this promoter, we detected only low expression of Fyn in the neonatal brain. In contrast, there was strong expression of the fyn-transgene in neurons of the adult forebrain. To determine whether the impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP) observed in adult fyn-deficient mice wa...

  16. The mesenchymal stem cells derived from transgenic mice carrying human coagulation factor VIII can correct phenotype in hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Gong, Xiuli; Gong, Zhijuan; Ren, Xiaoyie; Ren, Zhaorui; Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Yitao

    2013-12-20

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by coagulant factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency. Previous studies showed that introduction of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modified by FVIII-expressing retrovirus may result in phenotypic correction of HA animals. This study aimed at the investigation of an alternative gene therapy strategy that may lead to sustained FVIII transgene expression in HA mice. B-domain-deleted human FVIII (hFVIIIBD) vector was microinjected into single-cell embryos of wild-type mice to generate a transgenic mouse line, from which hFVIIIBD-MSCs were isolated, followed by transplantation into HA mice. RT-PCR and real-time PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of hFVIIIBD in multi-organs of recipient HA mice. Immunohistochemistry showed the presence of hFVIIIBD positive staining in multi-organs of recipient HA mice. ELISA indicated that plasma hFVIIIBD level in recipient mice reached its peak (77 ng/mL) at the 3rd week after implantation, and achieved sustained expression during the 5-week observation period. Plasma FVIII activities of recipient HA mice increased from 0% to 32% after hFVIIIBD-MSCs transplantation. APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) value decreased in hFVIIIBD-MSCs transplanted HA mice compared with untreated HA mice (45.5 s vs. 91.3 s). Our study demonstrated an effective phenotypic correction in HA mice using genetically modified MSCs from hFVIIIBD transgenic mice. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Intramaze and extramaze cue processing in adult APPSWE Tg2576 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Philip; Hale, Gemma; Good, Mark

    2004-12-01

    The present study examined spatial and nonspatial learning in adult Tg2576 mice. Transgenic mice were impaired in acquisition of a T-maze forced-choice alternation task. However, mutant mice were as sensitive as control mice to the introduction of retention intervals and proactive interference, and this suggested that short-term memory processes were intact in Tg2576 mice. Probe trials revealed that the Tg2576 mice did not use an allocentric strategy to navigate to the goal arm. However, mutant mice acquired an intramaze brightness discrimination, a simple room discrimination, and a contextual biconditional left-right discrimination in a T maze. Results suggest that Tg2576 mice are able to process both intramaze and extramaze stimuli but are impaired in forming an allocentric representation of their environment.

  18. Effect of Hypertriglyceridemia on Beta Cell Mass and Function in ApoC3 Transgenic Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-Zi; Cheng, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Ting; Lee, Sojin; Yamauchi, Jun; Xiao, Xiangwei; Gittes, George; Qu, Shen; Jiang, Chun-Lei; Dong, H. Henry

    2016-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia results from increased production and decreased clearance of triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoproteins, a pathological condition that accounts for heightened risk of ischemic vascular diseases in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Despite its intimate association with insulin resistance, whether hypertriglyceridemia constitutes an independent risk for beta cell dysfunction in diabetes is unknown. Answering this fundamental question is stymied by the fact that hypertriglyceridemia is intertwined with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in obese and diabetic subjects. To circumvent this limitation, we took advantage of apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC3)-transgenic mice, a model with genetic predisposition to hypertriglyceridemia. We showed that ApoC3-transgenic mice, as opposed to age/sex-matched wild-type littermates, develop hypertriglyceridemia with concomitant elevations in plasma cholesterol and non-esterified fatty acid levels. Anti-insulin and anti-glucagon dual immunohistochemistry in combination with morphometric analysis revealed that ApoC3-transgenic and wild-type littermates had similar beta cell and alpha cell masses as well as islet size and architecture. These effects correlated with similar amplitudes of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and similar degrees of postprandial glucose excursion in ApoC3-transgenic versus wild-type littermates. Oil Red O histology did not visualize lipid infiltration into islets, correlating with the lack of ectopic triglyceride and cholesterol depositions in the pancreata of ApoC3-transgenic versus wild-type littermates. ApoC3-transgenic mice, despite persistent hypertriglyceridemia, maintained euglycemia under both fed and fasting conditions without manifestation of insulin resistance and fasting hyperinsulinemia. Thus, hypertriglyceridemia per se is not an independent risk factor for beta cell dysfunction in ApoC3 transgenic mice. PMID:27226540

  19. Effect of Hypertriglyceridemia on Beta Cell Mass and Function in ApoC3 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-Zi; Cheng, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Ting; Lee, Sojin; Yamauchi, Jun; Xiao, Xiangwei; Gittes, George; Qu, Shen; Jiang, Chun-Lei; Dong, H Henry

    2016-07-08

    Hypertriglyceridemia results from increased production and decreased clearance of triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoproteins, a pathological condition that accounts for heightened risk of ischemic vascular diseases in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Despite its intimate association with insulin resistance, whether hypertriglyceridemia constitutes an independent risk for beta cell dysfunction in diabetes is unknown. Answering this fundamental question is stymied by the fact that hypertriglyceridemia is intertwined with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in obese and diabetic subjects. To circumvent this limitation, we took advantage of apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC3)-transgenic mice, a model with genetic predisposition to hypertriglyceridemia. We showed that ApoC3-transgenic mice, as opposed to age/sex-matched wild-type littermates, develop hypertriglyceridemia with concomitant elevations in plasma cholesterol and non-esterified fatty acid levels. Anti-insulin and anti-glucagon dual immunohistochemistry in combination with morphometric analysis revealed that ApoC3-transgenic and wild-type littermates had similar beta cell and alpha cell masses as well as islet size and architecture. These effects correlated with similar amplitudes of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and similar degrees of postprandial glucose excursion in ApoC3-transgenic versus wild-type littermates. Oil Red O histology did not visualize lipid infiltration into islets, correlating with the lack of ectopic triglyceride and cholesterol depositions in the pancreata of ApoC3-transgenic versus wild-type littermates. ApoC3-transgenic mice, despite persistent hypertriglyceridemia, maintained euglycemia under both fed and fasting conditions without manifestation of insulin resistance and fasting hyperinsulinemia. Thus, hypertriglyceridemia per se is not an independent risk factor for beta cell dysfunction in ApoC3 transgenic mice. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  20. Non-motor and motor features in LRRK2 transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë Bichler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-motor symptoms are increasingly recognized as important features of Parkinson's disease (PD. LRRK2 mutations are common causes of familial and sporadic PD. Non-motor features have not been yet comprehensively evaluated in LRRK2 transgenic mouse models. OBJECTIVE: Using a transgenic mouse model overexpressing the R1441G mutation of the human LRRK2 gene, we have investigated the longitudinal correlation between motor and non-motor symptoms and determined if specific non-motor phenotypes precede motor symptoms. METHODOLOGY: We investigated the onset of motor and non-motor phenotypes on the LRRK2(R1441G BAC transgenic mice and their littermate controls from 4 to 21 month-old using a battery of behavioral tests. The transgenic mutant mice displayed mild hypokinesia in the open field from 16 months old, with gastrointestinal dysfunctions beginning at 6 months old. Non-motor features such as depression and anxiety-like behaviors, sensorial functions (pain sensitivity and olfaction, and learning and memory abilities in the passive avoidance test were similar in the transgenic animals compared to littermate controls. CONCLUSIONS: LRRK2(R1441G BAC transgenic mice displayed gastrointestinal dysfunction at an early stage but did not have abnormalities in fine behaviors, olfaction, pain sensitivity, mood disorders and learning and memory compared to non-transgenic littermate controls. The observations on olfaction and gastrointestinal dysfunction in this model validate findings in human carriers. These mice did recapitulate mild Parkinsonian motor features at late stages but compensatory mechanisms modulating the progression of PD in these models should be further evaluated.

  1. Inducible overexpression of porcine homeobox A10 in the endometrium of transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Rui-yi; WU Di; ZHAO Chang-zhi; CHEN Shang-shang; XIAO Qian; LI Xin-yun; ZHAO Shu-hong

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox A10 (HOXA10) is a wel-known transcription factor that plays an important role in directing endometrial differ-entiation and establishing the conditions required for implantation. Interestingly, the expression level ofHOXA10 may be associated with litter size. To study the effects of the porcineHOXA10 promoter fragment on the expression ofHOXA10 genein vivo, we generated a transgenic mouse model using pronuclear microinjection, and measured the expression of HOXA10 in the endometrium. There was no difference in the expression level ofHOXA10 between transgenic and wild-type mice in the absence of hormone stimulation. However, folowing treatment with progesterone and estradiol benzoate, the expression level ofHOXA10 was signiifcantly increased in transgenic mice compared with that of wild-type mice. Fur-thermore, the litter size of transgenic females was larger than that of wild-type females (7.02±1.73vs. 6.48±1.85;P=0.14). Moreover, the difference of litter size was greater in the later parities (7.33±1.62vs. 6.37±2.02; P=0.08) compared with the ifrst parity (6.76±1.81vs. 6.61±1.67;P=0.77) between transgenic and wild-type mice. Therefore, our transgenic mouse model provides exciting insights regarding the actions ofHOXA10 and its hormone-inducible promoterin vivo. The present study offers valuable proof of principle to develop transgenic pigs with a hormone-inducible promoter regulatingHOXA10 to alter litter size.

  2. Use of the viral 2A peptide for bicistronic expression in transgenic mice

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    Trichas Georgios

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic animals are widely used in biomedical research and biotechnology. Multicistronic constructs, in which several proteins are encoded by a single messenger RNA, are commonly used in genetically engineered animals. This is currently done by using an internal ribosomal entry site to separate the different coding regions. 2A peptides result in the co-translational 'cleavage' of proteins and are an attractive alternative to the internal ribosomal entry site. They are more reliable than the internal ribosomal entry site and lead to expression of multiple cistrons at equimolar levels. They work in a wide variety of eukaryotic cells, but to date have not been demonstrated to function in transgenic mice in an inheritable manner. Results To test 2A function in transgenic mice and uncover any possible toxicity of widespread expression of the 2A peptide, we made a bicistronic reporter construct containing the coding sequence for a membrane localised red fluorescent protein (Myr-TdTomato and a nuclear localised green fluorescent protein (H2B-GFP, separated by a 2A sequence. When this reporter is transfected into HeLa cells, the two fluorescent proteins correctly localise to mutually exclusive cellular compartments, demonstrating that the bicistronic construct is a reliable readout of 2A function. The two fluorescent proteins also correctly localise when the reporter is electroporated into chick neural tube cells. We made two independent transgenic mouse lines that express the bicistronic reporter ubiquitously. For both lines, transgenic mice are born in Mendelian frequencies and are found to be healthy and fertile. Myr-TdTomato and H2B-GFP segregate to mutually exclusive cellular compartments in all tissues examined from a broad range of developmental stages, ranging from embryo to adult. One transgenic line shows X-linked inheritance of the transgene and mosaic expression in females but uniform expression in males, indicating

  3. Time-Dependent Increase of Chitinase1 in APP/PS1 Double Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qian; Shi, Rui; Yang, Wenxiu; Zou, Yan; Du, Yinshi; Zhang, Man; Yu, Weihua; Lü, Yang

    2016-07-01

    It is reported that chitinase1 increases in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the alteration of chitinase1 in the progress of AD is still unclear. Thus, we designed the present study to detect chitinase1 level in different stages of APP/PS1 double transgenic mice. Experimental models were APP/PS1 double transgenic mice with 4, 12 and 22 months. Cognitive function was detected by Morris water maze test in APP/PS1 mice as well as controls. ELISA and the quantitative RT-PCR were used to detect chitinase1 level in different groups. The study displayed that expression of chitinase1 gradually increased in a time-dependent manner in APP/PS1 mice, while there were no statistical differences among the wild-type mice in varies ages. Moreover, chitnase1 increased significantly in APP/PS1 mice aged 12 and 22 months compared with the age matched wild-type group, respectively. However, no difference of chitnase1 was found between 4 months-old APP/PS1 mice and wild-type mice. Comparing with the age matched wild type group, the consequences of mRNA on the increase in chitnase1 is in accordance with protein in APP/PS1 mice. Furthermore, Morris water maze showed that 4 months-old APP/PS1 mice have normal spatial learning and impaired spatial memory; both spatial learning and spatial memory in 12 and 22 months-old APP/PS1 mice were declined. Time-dependent increase of chitnase1 in APP/PS1 double transgenic mice indicates that the level of chitinase1 is associated with decline of cognition. Therefore, chitinase1 might be a biomarker of disease progression in AD.

  4. Immunoglobulin gene expression and regulation of rearrangement in kappa transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    Transgenic mice were produced by microinjection of the functionally rearranged immunoglobulin kappa gene from the myeloma MOPC-21 into the male pronucleus of fertilized mouse eggs, and implantation of the microinjected embryos into foster mothers. Mice that integrated the injected gene were detected by hybridizing tail DNA dots with radioactively labelled pBR322 plasmid DNA, which detects pBR322 sequences left as a tag on the microinjected DNA. Mice that integrated the injected gene (six males) were mated and the DNA, RNA and serum kappa chains of their offspring were analyzed. A rabbit anti-mouse kappa chain antiserum was also produced for use in detection of mouse kappa chains on protein blots. Hybridomas were produced from the spleen cells of these kappa transgenic mice to immortalize representative B cells and to investigate expression of the transgenic kappa gene, its effect on allelic exclusion, and its effect on the control of light chain gene rearrangement and expression. The results show that the microinjected DNA is integrated as concatamers in unique single or, rarely, two separate sites in the genome. The concatamers are composed of several copies (16 to 64) of injected DNA arranged in a head to tail fashion. The transgene is expressed into protein normally and in a tissue specific fashion. For the first time in these transgenic mice, all tissues contain a functionally rearranged and potentially expressible immunoglobulin gene. The transgene is expressed only in B cells and not in hepatocytes, for example. This indicates that rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes is necessary but not sufficient for the tissue specific expression of these genes by B cells.

  5. Insulin-sensitive regulation of glucose transport and GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle of GLUT1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etgen, G J; Zavadoski, W J; Holman, G D; Gibbs, E M

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle glucose transport was examined in transgenic mice overexpressing the glucose transporter GLUT1 using both the isolated incubated-muscle preparation and the hind-limb perfusion technique. In the absence of insulin, 2-deoxy-d-glucose uptake was increased approximately 3-8-fold in isolated fast-twitch muscles of GLUT1 transgenic mice compared with non-transgenic siblings. Similarly, basal glucose transport activity was increased approximately 4-14-fold in perfused fast-twitch muscles of transgenic mice. In non-transgenic mice insulin accelerated glucose transport activity approximately 2-3-fold in isolated muscles and to a much greater extent ( approximately 7-20-fold) in perfused hind-limb preparations. The observed effect of insulin on glucose transport in transgenic muscle was similarly dependent upon the technique used for measurement, as insulin had no effect on isolated fast-twitch muscle from transgenic mice, but significantly enhanced glucose transport in perfused fast-twitch muscle from transgenic mice to approximately 50-75% of the magnitude of the increase observed in non-transgenic mice. Cell-surface glucose transporter content was assessed via 2-N-4-(l-azi-2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)benzoyl-1,3-bis-(d -mannos-4-yloxy)-2-propylamine photolabelling methodology in both isolated and perfused extensor digitorum longus (EDL). Cell-surface GLUT1 was enhanced by as much as 70-fold in both isolated and perfused EDL of transgenic mice. Insulin did not alter cell-surface GLUT1 in either transgenic or non-transgenic mice. Basal levels of cell-surface GLUT4, measured in either isolated or perfused EDL, were similar in transgenic and non-transgenic mice. Interestingly, insulin enhanced cell-surface GLUT4 approximately 2-fold in isolated EDL and approximately 6-fold in perfused EDL of both transgenic and non-transgenic mice. In summary, these results reveal differences between isolated muscle and perfused hind-limb techniques, with the latter method showing a

  6. Targeted expression of Cre recombinase provokes placental-specific DNA recombination in transgenic mice.

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    Cissy Chenyi Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inadequate placental development is associated with a high incidence of early embryonic lethality and serious pregnancy disorders in both humans and mice. However, the lack of well-defined trophoblast-specific gene regulatory elements has hampered investigations regarding the role of specific genes in placental development and fetal growth. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By random assembly of placental enhancers from two previously characterized genes, trophoblast specific protein α (Tpbpa and adenosine deaminase (Ada, we identified a chimeric Tpbpa/Ada enhancer that when combined with the basal Ada promoter provided the highest luciferase activity in cultured human trophoblast cells, in comparison with non-trophoblast cell lines. We used this chimeric enhancer arrangement to drive the expression of a Cre recombinase transgene in the placentas of transgenic mice. Cre transgene expression occurred throughout the placenta but not in maternal organs examined or in the fetus. SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, we have provided both in vitro and in vivo evidence for a novel genetic system to achieve placental transgene expression by the use of a chimeric Tpbpa/Ada enhancer driven transgene. The availability of this expression vector provides transgenic opportunities to direct the production of desired proteins to the placenta.

  7. Expression of cartilage developmental genes in Hoxc8- and Hoxd4-transgenic mice.

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    Claudia Kruger

    Full Text Available Hox genes encode transcription factors, which regulate skeletal patterning and chondrocyte differentiation during the development of cartilage, the precursor to mature bone. Overexpression of the homeobox transcription factors Hoxc8 and Hoxd4 causes severe cartilage defects due to delay in cartilage maturation. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs and fibroblastic growth factors (FGFs are known to play important roles in skeletal development and endochondral bone formation and remodeling. In order to investigate whether these molecules are aberrantly expressed in Hoxc8- and/or Hoxd4-transgenic cartilage, we performed quantitative RT-PCR on chondrocytes from Hox-transgenic mice. Gene expression levels of Bmp4, Fgf8, Fgf10, Mmp9, Mmp13, Nos3, Timp3, Wnt3a and Wnt5a were altered in Hoxc8-transgenic chondrocytes, and Fgfr3, Ihh, Mmp8, and Wnt3a expression levels were altered in Hoxd4-transgenic chondrocytes, respectively. Notably, Wnt3a expression was elevated in Hoxc8- and reduced in Hoxd4-transgenic cartilage. These results suggest that both transcription factors affect cartilage maturation through different molecular mechanisms, and provide the basis for future studies into the role of these genes and possible interactions in pathogenesis of cartilage defects in Hoxc8- and Hoxd4-transgenic mice.

  8. Transgenic mice expressing human glucocerebrosidase variants: utility for the study of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Angela; Hemmelgarn, Harmony; Melrose, Heather L; Hein, Leanne; Fuller, Maria; Clarke, Lorne A

    2013-08-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessively inherited storage disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase, acid β-glucosidase. The disease manifestations seen in Gaucher patients are highly heterogeneous as is the responsiveness to therapy. The elucidation of the precise factors responsible for this heterogeneity has been challenging as the development of clinically relevant animal models of Gaucher disease has been problematic. Although numerous murine models for Gaucher disease have been described each has limitations in their specific utility. We describe here, transgenic murine models of Gaucher disease that will be particularly useful for the study of pharmacological chaperones. We have produced stable transgenic mouse strains that individually express wild type, N370S and L444P containing human acid β-glucosidase and show that each of these transgenic lines rescues the lethal phenotype characteristic of acid β-glucosidase null mice. Both the N370S and L444P transgenic models show early and progressive elevations of tissue sphingolipids with L444P mice developing progressive splenic Gaucher cell infiltration. We demonstrate the potential utility of these new transgenic models for the study of Gaucher disease pathogenesis. In addition, since these mice produce only human enzyme, they are particularly relevant for the study of pharmacological chaperones that are specifically targeted to human acid β-glucosidase and the common mutations underlying Gaucher disease.

  9. The effects of enhanced zinc on spatial memory and plaque formation in transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkous, D.H.; Adlard, P.A.; Wanschura, P.B.; Conko, K.M.; Flinn, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable evidence suggesting that metals play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Reports suggest that elevated dietary metals may both precipitate and potentiate an Alzheimer's disease phenotype. Despite this, there remain few studies that have examined the behavioral consequences of elevated dietary metals in wild type and Alzheimer's disease animals. To further investigate this in the current study, two separate transgenic models of AD (Tg2576 and TgCRND8), together with wild type littermates were administered 10 ppm (0.153 mM) Zn. Tg2576 animals were maintained on a zinc-enriched diet both pre- and postnatally until 11 months of age, while TgCRND8 animals were treated for five months following weaning. Behavioral testing, consisting of "Atlantis" and "moving" platform versions of the Morris water maze, were conducted at the end of the study, and tissues were collected for immunohistochemical analysis of amyloid-β burden. Our data demonstrate that the provision of a zinc-enriched diet potentiated Alzheimer-like spatial memory impairments in the transgenic animals and was associated with reduced hippocampal amyloid-β plaque deposits. Zinc-related behavioral deficits were also demonstrated in wild type mice, which were sometimes as great as those present in the transgenic animals. However, zinc-related cognitive impairments in transgenic mice were greater than the summation of zinc effects in the wild type mice and the transgene effects.

  10. Comparative analysis of gastrointestinal microbiota between normal and caudal-related homeobox 2 (cdx2) transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hirotsugu; Asahara, Takashi; Chonan, Osamu; Yuki, Norikatsu; Mutoh, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Shunji; Yamamoto, Hironori; Sugano, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Caudal-related homeobox 2 (Cdx2) is expressed in the human intestinal metaplastic mucosa and induces intestinal metaplastic mucosa in the Cdx2 transgenic mouse stomach. Atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia commonly lead to gastric achlorhydria, which predisposes the stomach to bacterial overgrowth. In the present study, we determined the differences in gut microbiota between normal and Cdx2 transgenic mice, using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Twelve normal (control) and 12 Cdx2 transgenic mice were sacrificed, and the gastric, jejunal, ileac, cecal and colonic mucosa, and feces were collected. To quantitate bacterial microbiota, we used real-time qRTPCR with 16S rRNA gene-targeted, species-specific primers. The total numbers of bacteria in the gastric, jejunal, ileac, cecal, and colonic mucosa of the Cdx2 transgenic mice were significantly higher than those of the normal mice. The Bacteroides fragilis group and also Prevotella were not detected in the stomach of the normal mice, although they were detected in the Cdx2 transgenic mice. Moreover, the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, Bacteroides fragilis group, and Prevotella were not detected in the jejunum or ileum of the normal mice, although they were detected in the Cdx2 transgenic mice. The fecal microbiota of the normal mice was similar to that of the Cdx2 transgenic mice. Our results showed the differences in composition of gut microbiota between normal and Cdx2 transgenic mice, which may be caused by the development of gastric achlorhydria and intestinal metaplasia in Cdx2 transgenic mice.

  11. Effective generation of transgenic pigs and mice by linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih Ping Yao

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic animals have become valuable tools for both research and applied purposes. The current method of gene transfer, microinjection, which is widely used in transgenic mouse production, has only had limited success in producing transgenic animals of larger or higher species. Here, we report a linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer method (LB-SMGT that greatly improves the production efficiency of large transgenic animals. Results The linker protein, a monoclonal antibody (mAb C, is reactive to a surface antigen on sperm of all tested species including pig, mouse, chicken, cow, goat, sheep, and human. mAb C is a basic protein that binds to DNA through ionic interaction allowing exogenous DNA to be linked specifically to sperm. After fertilization of the egg, the DNA is shown to be successfully integrated into the genome of viable pig and mouse offspring with germ-line transfer to the F1 generation at a highly efficient rate: 37.5% of pigs and 33% of mice. The integration is demonstrated again by FISH analysis and F2 transmission in pigs. Furthermore, expression of the transgene is demonstrated in 61% (35/57 of transgenic pigs (F0 generation. Conclusions Our data suggests that LB-SMGT could be used to generate transgenic animals efficiently in many different species.

  12. Search Strategies Used by "APP" Transgenic Mice during Navigation in the Morris Water Maze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    TgCRND8 mice represent a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, with onset of cognitive impairment and increasing amyloid-[beta] plaques in their brains at 12 weeks of age. In this study, the spatial memory in 25- to 30-week-old TgCRND8 mice was analyzed in two reference and one working memory Morris water maze (MWM) tests. In reference…

  13. Chymase activities and survival in endotoxin-induced human chymase transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Kazi; Fan, Yu-Yan; Sherajee, Shamshad J; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Matsuura, Junji; Hase, Naoki; Mori, Hirohito; Nakano, Daisuke; Kobara, Hideki; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Masaki, Tsutomu; Urata, Hidenori; Nishiyama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of overexpressed human chymase on survival and activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice. Human chymase transgenic (Tg) and wild-type C57BL/6 (WT) mice were treated with LPS (0.03, 0.1 and 0.3 mg/day; intraperitoneal) for 2 weeks. Treatment with 0.03 mg LPS did not affect survival in either WT or Tg mice. WT mice were not affected by 0.1 mg/day of LPS, whereas 25% of Tg mice died. Survival of mice treated with 0.3 mg/day of LPS was 87.5% and 0% in WT and Tg, respectively. LPS-induced increases in chymase activity in the heart and skin were significantly greater in Tg than WT mice. These data suggest a possible contribution of human chymase activation to LPS-induced mortality.

  14. The PHEX transgene corrects mineralization defects in 9-month-old hypophosphatemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskey, Adele; Frank, Aaron; Fujimoto, Yukiji; Spevak, Lyudmila; Verdelis, Kostas; Ellis, Bruce; Troiano, Nancy; Philbrick, William; Carpenter, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    Hypophosphatemia is an X-linked dominant disorder resulting from a mutation in the PHEX gene. While osteoblast-specific expression of the PHEX transgene has been reported to decrease the phosphate wasting associated with the disease in male hypophosphatemic (HYP) mice, there are reports that the mineralization defect is only partially corrected in young animals. To test the hypothesis that osteoblast-specific expression of the PHEX gene for a longer time would correct the mineralization defect, this study examined the bones of 9-month-old male and female HYP mice and their wild-type controls with or without expression of the transgene under a collagen type I promoter. Serum phosphate levels, alkaline phosphatase activity, and FGF23 levels were also measured. Mineral analyses based on wide-angle X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and FT-IR imaging confirmed the decreased mineral content and increased mineral crystal size in male HYP humerii compared to wild-type males and females with or without the transgene and in female HYP mice with or without the transgene. There was a significant increase in mineral content and a decrease in crystallinity in the HYP males' bones with the transgene, compared to those without. Of interest, expression of the transgene in wild-type animals significantly increased the mineral content in both males and females without having a detectable effect on crystallinity or carbonate content. In contrast to the bones, based on micro-computed tomography and FT-IR imaging, at 9 months there were no significant differences between the HYP and the WT teeth, precluding analysis of the effect of the transgene.

  15. bcl-xl over-expression in transgenic mice reduces cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Furong Wang; Yongsheng Jiang; Yan Liu; Wenwu Xiao; Suming Zhang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Basal cell lymphoma-extra large (bcl-xl) can inhibit neuronal apoptosis by stabilizing the mitochondrial membrane and suppressing cytochrome C release into the cytoplasm. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to further investigate the cascade reaction pathway of cellular apoptosis. We established an ischemia/dreperfusion model by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in transgenic and wild-type mice, and observed changes in the number and distribution of apoptotic neural cells, differences in cerebral infarct volume, in neurological function score, and in cytochrome C expression in the ischemic cerebral cortex, at different time points, DESIGN AND SETTING: The present gene engineering and cell biology experiment was performed at the Laboratory of Biology, Hubei Academy of Agricultural Sciences and at the Laboratory of Immunology, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology. MATERIALS: Male bcl-xl over-expression Kunming mice aged 8 weeks and age-matched male wild-type mice were used for this study. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) kits were purchased from Boliman, France. Cytochrome C antibody and Bcl-x immunohistochemical kit were purchased from PharMingen, USA and Santa Cruz Biotechnology, USA, respectively. METHODS: Following MCAO and reperfusion, apoptosis in the ischemic cerebral cortex was detected by the TUNEL assay. Prior to MCAO and 3 hours after reperfusion, the Bcl-xl protein level in the ischemic cerebral cortex was measured by immunohistochemistry. At 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours after reperfusion, the level of cytochrome C in the ischemic cerebral cortex was examined by western blot analysis. Subsequent to MCAO, cerebral infarct volume measurement and neurological examination were performed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Neural cell apoptosis and cytochrome C expression in the ischemic cerebral cortex; cerebral infarct volume and neurological function score. RESULTS: Twenty-four hours after

  16. Caffeine suppresses amyloid-beta levels in plasma and brain of Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chuanhai; Cirrito, John R; Lin, Xiaoyang; Wang, Li; Wang, Lilly; Verges, Deborah K; Dickson, Alexander; Mamcarz, Malgorzata; Zhang, Chi; Mori, Takashi; Arendash, Gary W; Holtzman, David M; Potter, Huntington

    2009-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies suggest that caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD). Supportive of this premise, our previous studies have shown that moderate caffeine administration protects/restores cognitive function and suppresses brain amyloid-beta (Abeta) production in AD transgenic mice. In the present study, we report that acute caffeine administration to both young adult and aged AD transgenic mice rapidly reduces Abeta levels in both brain interstitial fluid and plasma without affecting Abeta elimination. Long-term oral caffeine treatment to aged AD mice provided not only sustained reductions in plasma Abeta, but also decreases in both soluble and deposited Abeta in hippocampus and cortex. Irrespective of caffeine treatment, plasma Abeta levels did not correlate with brain Abeta levels or with cognitive performance in individual aged AD mice. Although higher plasma caffeine levels were strongly associated with lower plasma Abeta1-40 levels in aged AD mice, plasma caffeine levels were also not linked to cognitive performance. Plasma caffeine and theophylline levels were tightly correlated, both being associated with reduced inflammatory cytokine levels in hippocampus. Our conclusion is two-fold: first, that both plasma and brain Abeta levels are reduced by acute or chronic caffeine administration in several AD transgenic lines and ages, indicating a therapeutic value of caffeine against AD; and second, that plasma Abeta levels are not an accurate index of brain Abeta levels/deposition or cognitive performance in aged AD mice.

  17. T-cell independent Thy-1 allo-antibody response with the use of transgenic mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K-I. Isobe; G. Kollias (George); A-B. Kolsto; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractWe have introduced a mouse Thy-1.1 gene into the germline of Thy-1.2 mice. The introduced gene was shown to be expressed at very high levels in thymocytes when compared with the endogenous gene. Transgenic thymocytes were shown to evoke a higher than normal primary anti-Thy-1.1 antibody

  18. Delayed allograft rejection in mice transgenic for a soluble form of the IL-4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliszewski, C R; Morrissey, P J; Fanslow, W C; Sato, T A; Willis, C; Davison, B

    1992-09-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that in serum and other biological fluids, cytokine binding is a property associated with soluble proteins, including a high-affinity soluble version of the IL-4 receptor (sIL-4R). While it is tempting to speculate that sIL-4R might act as a serum carrier protein or serve to inhibit or modulate IL-4 action, specific biological roles for sIL-4R remain to be established. To further assess the immunoregulatory and therapeutic potential of sIL-4R and other soluble receptors, we have created transgenic mice which constitutively express elevated levels of biologically active sIL-4R. Phenotypic characterization of lymphoid organs in sIL-4R transgenic mice revealed normal numbers of B and T cells and normal surface marker expression. Splenic lymphocytes displayed normal in vitro activities as measured by the PFC response and generation of cytotoxic T cells. In addition, antigen-specific IgE and IgG1 in vivo responses were similar in control and transgenic mice. Despite the apparent developmental normality of the sIL-4R transgenic mice, these animals were markedly deficient in the ability to reject cardiac allografts, suggesting that IL-4 is critical for the generation of alloreactivity. The results further suggest that the ability of sIL-4R to regulate IL-4 activities may be under the control of complex interactions that remain to be elucidated.

  19. Expression of human transferrin can be regulated effectively by rabbit transferrin regulatory elements in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jingbin; Gong, Xiuli; Pan, Shubiao; Guo, Xinbing; Ren, Zhaorui; Zeng, Yitao

    2014-06-01

    Human transferrin (hTF) belongs to the iron-binding glycoprotein family. It plays an important role in iron transport throughout the body. Transgenic mice are a good model to study how to produce functional hTF on a large-scale. We have improved the expression of hTF and investigated its regulatory mechanism in transgenic mice. Three expression constructs were prepared in which hTF expression was controlled by different regulatory cassettes of rabbit transferrin (rTF). hTF was secreted into serum of transgenic mice when its expression was controlled by the rTF promoter and enhancer, whereas the rTF enhancer in tandem with the rTF promoter repressed hTF secretion into milk. A significant inverse relationship between methylation of the rTF promoter and hTF expression was observed in liver, heart, mammary gland, and muscle of transgenic mice. The highest concentration of hTF was 700 μg/ml in milk.

  20. Effects of fenofibrate on hyperlipidemia and postprandial triglyceride metabolism in human apolipoprotein C1 transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M.C.; Dahlmans, V.E.H.; Princen, H.M.G.; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    To study the in vivo role of apolipoprotein (apo) C1 in lipoprotein metabolism, we have generated transgenic mice expressing the human apo C1 gene. Apo C1 is a small 6.6 kDa protein that is primarily synthesized by the liver and is present on chylomicrons, very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and hi

  1. Effects of fenofibrate on hyperlipidemia and postprandial triglyceride metabolism in human apolipoprotein C1 transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M.C.; Dahlmans, V.E.H.; Princen, H.M.G.; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    To study the in vivo role of apolipoprotein (apo) C1 in lipoprotein metabolism, we have generated transgenic mice expressing the human apo C1 gene. Apo C1 is a small 6.6 kDa protein that is primarily synthesized by the liver and is present on chylomicrons, very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and

  2. Adjuvanted multi-epitope vaccines protect HLA-A*1101 transgenic mice against Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    We created and tested multi-epitope DNA or protein vaccines with TLR4 ligand emulsion adjuvant (gluco glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant in a stable emulsion (GLA-SE)) for their ability to protect against Toxoplasma gondii in HLA transgenic mice. Our constructs each included five of our best down selecte...

  3. Transgenic mice overexpressing renin exhibit glucose intolerance and diet-genotype interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Fletcher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous animal and clinical investigations have pointed to a potential role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS in the development of insulin resistance and diabetes in conditions of expanded fat mass. However, the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. We used a transgenic mouse model overexpressing renin in the liver (RenTgMK to examine the effects of chronic activation of RAS on adiposity and insulin sensitivity. Hepatic overexpression of renin resulted in constitutively elevated plasma angiotensin II (4-6-fold increase vs. wild type. Surprisingly, RenTgMK mice developed glucose intolerance despite low levels of adiposity and insulinemia. The transgenics also had lower plasma triglyceride levels. Glucose intolerance in transgenic mice fed a low-fat diet was comparable to that observed in high fat-fed wild type mice. Glucose intolerance was exacerbated by high-fat feeding, only in female transgenic mice. These studies demonstrate that overexpression of renin and associated hyperangiotensinemia impair glucose tolerance in a diet-dependent manner and further support a consistent role of RAS in the pathogenesis of diabetes and insulin resistance, independent of changes in fat mass.

  4. E2F-1-Induced p53-independent apoptosis in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Christian Henrik; Helin, K.; Sehested, M.;

    1998-01-01

    involving increased apoptosis in the germinal epithelium. This effect was potentiated by simultaneous overexpression of DP-1. Testicular atrophy as a result of overexpression of E2F-1 and DP-1 is independent of functional p53, since p53-nullizygous transgenic mice overexpressing E2F-1 and DP-1 also suffered...

  5. Developmental regulation of a complete 70kb human β-globin locus in transgenic mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Strouboulis (John); N.O. Dillon (Niall); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWe have used a linker-based ligation strategy to combine two 35-kb cosmid inserts from the human beta-globin locus into one linear fragment containing the entire locus. This 70-kb fragment was introduced into transgenic mice by microinjection of fertilized eggs. Southern blot analysis sh

  6. Studies on the pathophysiological aspects of the metabolic syndrome in transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Lihui

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis we aimed to expand our knowledge on the pathophysiological aspects of the metabolic syndrome in transgenic mice. The metabolic syndrome involves multiple aspects and has a major impact on cardiovascular diseases. In the first part of thesis the role of PAI-1 in the development of insu

  7. Transgenic mice expressing constitutive active MAPKAPK5 display gender-dependent differences in exploration and activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moens Ugo

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitogen-activated protein kinases, MAPKs for short, constitute cascades of signalling pathways involved in the regulation of several cellular processes that include cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. They also intervene in neurological processes like fear conditioning and memory. Since little remains known about the MAPK-Activated Protein Kinase, MAPKAPK5, we constructed the first MAPKAPK knockin mouse model, using a constitutive active variant of MAPKAPK5 and analyzed the resulting mice for changes in anxiety-related behaviour. Methods We performed primary SHIRPA observations during background breeding into the C57BL/6 background and assessed the behaviour of the background-bred animals on the elevated plus maze and in the light-dark test. Our results were analyzed using Chi-square tests and homo- and heteroscedatic T-tests. Results Female transgenic mice displayed increased amounts of head dips and open arm time on the maze, compared to littermate controls. In addition, they also explored further into the open arm on the elevated plus maze and were less active in the closed arm compared to littermate controls. Male transgenic mice displayed no differences in anxiety, but their locomotor activity increased compared to non-transgenic littermates. Conclusion Our results revealed anxiety-related traits and locomotor differences between transgenic mice expressing constitutive active MAPKAPK5 and control littermates.

  8. Functional imaging of interleukin 1 beta expression in inflammatory process using bioluminescence imaging in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhihui

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β plays an important role in a number of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases. To understand the role of IL-1β in disease processes and develop an in vivo screening system for anti-inflammatory drugs, a transgenic mouse line was generated which incorporated the transgene firefly luciferase gene driven by a 4.5-kb fragment of the human IL-1β gene promoter. Luciferase gene expression was monitored in live mice under anesthesia using bioluminescence imaging in a number of inflammatory disease models. Results In a LPS-induced sepsis model, dramatic increase in luciferase activity was observed in the mice. This transgene induction was time dependent and correlated with an increase of endogenous IL-1β mRNA and pro-IL-1β protein levels in the mice. In a zymosan-induced arthritis model and an oxazolone-induced skin hypersensitivity reaction model, luciferase expression was locally induced in the zymosan injected knee joint and in the ear with oxazolone application, respectively. Dexamethasone suppressed the expression of luciferase gene both in the acute sepsis model and in the acute arthritis model. Conclusion Our data suggest that the transgenic mice model could be used to study transcriptional regulation of the IL-1β gene expression in the inflammatory process and evaluation the effect of anti-inflammatory drug in vivo.

  9. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of Alzheimer’s disease in transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakman, Niels

    2008-01-01

    The thesis describes the application of several different magnetic resonance (MR) techniques to study the effects of the progression of disease in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's. Using MR imaging, the amyloid plaque deposition was visualized and the plaque load quantified in the same mice

  10. Establishment of La-tPA/G-CSF dual transgenic mice and expression in their mammary gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢一凡; 田靫; 邓继先; 程萱; 黄培堂

    1999-01-01

    Expression vectors of human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSG) and long acting tissue plasminogen activator (La-tPA) in mammary gland were constructed using promoters of mouse whey acid protein gene (WAP) and sheep β-lactoglobulin gene (BLG) with sizes of 2.6 and 5 kb respectively. Two kinds of transgenic mice of G-CSF and La-tPA were produced with microinjection. The expression of G-CSF and La-tPA was achieved in mammary glands of transgenic mice, respectively. In order to establish dual transgenic mice of La-tPA/G-CSF, transgenic mice carrying G-CSF and La-tPA gene characterized with specific expression in mammary gland were mated. La-tPA/G-CSF dual transgenic mice were screened out from the hybrid offspring by Once-PCR. The co-expression of La-tPA and G-CSF in mammary gland of the dual transgenic mice was confirmed by the milk assayed and Northern blot analysis. Some parameters about the dual transgenic mice indicated that there were fewer litters than that of normal mice. The ratio of du

  11. Propagation of ovine prions from "poor" transmitter scrapie isolates in ovine PrP transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackray, Alana M; Hopkins, Lee; Lockey, Richard; Spiropoulos, John; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2012-02-01

    Ovine prion strains have typically been identified by their transmission properties, which include incubation time and lesion profile, in wild type mice. The existence of scrapie isolates that do not propagate in wild type mice, defined here as "poor" transmitters, are problematic for conventional prion strain typing studies as no incubation time or neuropathology can be recorded. This may arise because of the presence of an ovine prion strain within the original inoculum that does not normally cross the species barrier into wild type mice or the presence of a low dose of an infectious ovine prion strain that does. Here we have used tg59 and tg338 mouse lines, which are transgenic for ovine ARQ or VRQ PrP, respectively, to strain type "poor" transmitter ovine scrapie isolates. ARQ and VRQ homozygous "poor" transmitter scrapie isolates were successfully propagated in both ovine PrP transgenic mouse lines. We have used secondary passage incubation time, PrPSc immunohistochemistry and molecular profile, to show that different prion strains can be isolated from different "poor" transmitter samples during serial passage in ovine PrP transgenic mice. Our observations show that poor or inadequate transmissibility of some classical scrapie isolates in wild type mice is associated with unique ovine prion strains in these particular sheep scrapie samples. In addition, the analysis of the scrapie isolates used here revealed that the tg338 mouse line was more versatile and more robust at strain typing ovine prions than tg59 mice. These novel observations in ovine PrP transgenic mice highlight a new approach to ovine prion strain typing.

  12. APP/PS1 transgenic mice treated with aluminum: an update of Alzheimer's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q L; Jia, L; Jiao, X; Guo, W L; Ji, J W; Yang, H L; Niu, Q

    2012-01-01

    There is still no animal model available that can mimic all the cognitive, behavioral, biochemical, and histopathological abnormalities observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We undertook to consider the interaction between genetic factors, including amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1), and environmental factors, such as Aluminum (Al) in determining susceptibility outcomes when studying the pathogenesis of AD. In this article, we provide an AD model in APP/PS1 transgenic mice triggered by Al. The animal model was established via intracerebral ventricular microinjection of aluminum chloride once a day for 5 days in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Twenty wild type (WT) mice and 20 APP/PS1 transgenic (TG) mice were separately divided into 2 groups (control and Al group), and a stainless steel injector with stopper was used for microinjection into the left-lateral cerebral ventricle of each mouse. The Morris water maze task was used to evaluate behavioral function of learning and memory ability on the 20th day after the last injection. This AD model's brain was analyzed by: (1) amyloid beta immunohistochemical staining; (2) Tunnel staining; (3) apoptotic rates; (4) caspase-3 gene expression. Here, decrease of cognitive ability and neural cells loss were shown in APP/PS1 transgenic mice exposed to Al, which were more extensive than those in APP/PS1 TG alone and WT mice exposed to Al alone. These findings indicate that there is a close relationship between over-expression of APP and PS1 genes and Al overload. It is also suggested that APP/PS1 TG mice exposed to Al have potential value for improving AD models.

  13. Induction of proteinuria by cannabinoid receptors 1 signaling activation in CB1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yung-Chien; Lei, Chen-Chou; Shih, Ya-Hsueh; Ho, Cheng; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2015-02-01

    Proteinuria is not only a sign of kidney damage but is also involved in the progression of renal disease as an independent pathologic factor. Although patients with mutated type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1) polymorphism are associated with renal microvascular damage, the biologic role of CB1 signaling in proteinuria remains uncharacterized till now. Herein, we investigate whether CB1 participates in glomerular proteinuria in CB1 transgenic mice and treatment with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 rat, neither of which are diabetic models. The CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 had higher kidney weight and urinary protein concentrations but not blood glucose levels compared with the wild-type group. A combination of laser-capture microsdissection, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and immunohistochemical validation revealed that CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 had higher vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in renal glomeruli than that of the wild-type group. Geneticorpharmacological activation of CB1 by transgenic CB1 mice or treatment with WIN55212-2 reduced nephrin expression in the renal glomeruli compared with that of the wild-type group in the glomerular mesanglium. Taken together, CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 induced proteinuria with upregulation of CB1 resulting in impaired nephrin expression, by inducing excess VEGF reaction in the renal glomeruli. Genetic and pharmacological manipulation of CB1 signaling revealed VEGF-dependent nephrin depression of glomerulopathy. Controlling CB1 activity can be used an alternative strategy for sustaining renal function in the presence of CB1 activation.

  14. Comparison of acetaminophen toxicity in primary hepatocytes isolated from transgenic mice with different appolipoprotein E alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezera, V; Kucera, O; Moravcova, A; Peterova, E; Rousar, T; Rychtrmoc, D; Sobotka, O; Cervinkova, Z

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor, important for combating electrophilic and oxidative stress in the liver and other organs. This encompasses detoxification of hepatotoxic drugs, including acetaminophen (APAP). Recently, an association between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype and Nrf2 expression was described. We compared the toxicity of APAP on primary culture hepatocytes isolated from transgenic mice carrying two different human ApoE alleles and wild-type controls. The cells were exposed to APAP in concentrations from 0.5 to 4 mM for up to 24 hours. APAP led to a dose-dependent hepatotoxicity from 1 mM after 16 h exposure in all mice tested. The toxicity was higher in hepatocytes isolated from both transgenic strains than in wild-type controls and most pronounced in ApoE3 mice. Concurrently, there was a decline in mitochondrial membrane potential, especially in ApoE3 hepatocytes. The formation of reactive oxygen species was increased after 24 hours with 2.5 mM APAP in hepatocytes of all strains tested, with the highest increase being in the ApoE3 genotype. The activity of caspases 3 and 7 did not differ among groups and was minimal after 24 hour incubation with 4 mM APAP. We observed higher lipid accumulation in hepatocytes isolated from both transgenic strains than in wild-type controls. The expression of Nrf2-dependent genes was higher in ApoE3 than in ApoE4 hepatocytes and some of these genes were induced by APAP treatment. In conclusion, transgenic mice with ApoE4 and ApoE3 alleles displayed higher susceptibility to acute APAP toxicity in vitro than wild-type mice. Of the two transgenic genotypes tested, ApoE3 allele carriers were more prone to injury.

  15. Formation and persistence of O6-ethylguanine in genomic and transgene DNA in liver and brain of λlacZ transgenic mice treated with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mientjes, E.J.; Hochleitner, K.; Luiten-Schuite, A.; Delft, J.H.M. van; Thomale, J.; Berends, F.; Rajewsky, M.F.; Lohman, P.H.M.; Baan, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    LacZ transgenic mice are suitable for short-term mutagenicity studies in vivo. Mutagenicity in these mice is determined in the lacZ transgene. Since the lacZ gene is of bacterial origin the question has been raised whether DNA-adduct formation and repair in the transgene are comparable to those in t

  16. Elevated PC responsive B cells and anti-PC antibody production in transgenic mice harboring anti-PC immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkert, C A; Manz, J; Linton, P J; Klinman, N R; Storb, U

    1989-12-01

    The rearrangement of heavy and light chain immunoglobulin genes is necessary for the production of functional antibody molecules. The myeloma MOPC 167 produces specific antibodies to the antigen phosphorylcholine (PC), which is present on bacterial surfaces, fungi and other environmental contaminants. Rearranged heavy and light chain immunoglobulin genes cloned from MOPC 167 were microinjected into mouse eggs. Within the resulting transgenic mice, expression of the transgenes were limited to lymphoid tissues. Transgenic mice produced elevated levels of anti-PC antibodies constitutively, at 16 days of age, when normal non-transgenic mice were not fully immunocompetent. A triggering antigenic stimulus was not necessary to evoke anti-PC immunoglobulin production. Additionally, the frequency of PC-responsive B cells in these transgenic mice was further increased upon specific immunization.

  17. Immune selection of tumor cells in TCR β-chain transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silaeva, Yulia Yu; Grinenko, Tatyana S; Vagida, Murad S; Kalinina, Anastasia A; Khromykh, Ludmila M; Kazansky, Dmitry B

    2014-10-01

    The concept of immunological surveillance implies that immunogenic variants of tumor cells arising in the organism can be recognized by the immune system. Tumor progression is provided by somatic evolution of tumor cells under the pressure of the immune system. The loss of MHC Class I molecules on the surface of tumor cells is one of the most known outcomes of immune selection. This study developed a model of immune selection based on the immune response of TCR 1d1 single β-chain transgenic B10.D2(R101) (K(d)I(d)D(b)) mice to allogeneic EL4 (H-2(b)) thymoma cells. In wild-type B10.D2(R101) mice, immunization with EL4 cells induced a vigorous CTL response targeted to the H-2K(b) molecule and results in full rejection of the tumor cells. In contrast, transgenic mice developed a compromised proliferative response in mixed-lymphocyte response assays and were unable to reject transplanted allogeneic EL4 cells. During the immune response to EL4 cells, CD8(+) T-lymphocytes with endogenous β-chains accumulated predominantly in the spleen of transgenic mice and only a small part of the T-lymphocytes expressing transgenic β-chains became CD8(+)CD44(+)CD62L(-) effectors. Then, instead of a full elimination of tumor cells as in wild-type mice, a reproducible prolonged equilibrium phase and subsequent escape was observed in transgenic mice that resulted in death of 90% of the mice in 40-60 days after grafting. Prolonged exposure of tumor cells to the pressure of the immune system in transgenic mice in vivo resulted in a stable loss of H-2K(b) molecules on the EL4 cell surface. Genetic manipulation of the T-lymphocyte repertoire was sufficient to reproduce the classic pattern of interactions between tumor cells and the immune system, usually observed in reliable syngeneic models of anti-tumor immunity. This newly-developed model could be used in further studies of immunoregulatory circuits common for transplantational and anti-tumor immune responses.

  18. Bridging the species divide: transgenic mice humanized for type-I interferon response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Harari

    Full Text Available We have generated transgenic mice that harbor humanized type I interferon receptors (IFNARs enabling the study of type I human interferons (Hu-IFN-Is in mice. These "HyBNAR" (Hybrid IFNAR mice encode transgenic variants of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 with the human extracellular domains being fused to transmembrane and cytoplasmic segments of mouse sequence. B16F1 mouse melanoma cells harboring the HyBNAR construct specifically bound Hu-IFN-Is and were rendered sensitive to Hu-IFN-I stimulated anti-proliferation, STAT1 activation and activation of a prototypical IFN-I response gene (MX2. HyBNAR mice were crossed with a transgenic strain expressing the luciferase reporter gene under the control of the IFN-responsive MX2 promoter (MX2-Luciferase. Both the HyBNAR and HyBNAR/MX2-Luciferase mice were responsive to all Hu-IFN-Is tested, inclusive of IFNα2A, IFNβ, and a human superagonist termed YNSα8. The mice displayed dose-dependent pharmacodynamic responses to Hu-IFN-I injection, as assessed by measuring the expression of IFN-responsive genes. Our studies also demonstrated a weak activation of endogenous mouse interferon response, especially after high dose administration of Hu-IFNs. In sharp contrast to data published for humans, our pharmacodynamic readouts demonstrate a very short-lived IFN-I response in mice, which is not enhanced by sub-cutaneous (SC injections in comparison to other administration routes. With algometric differences between humans and mice taken into account, the HyBNAR mice provides a convenient non-primate pre-clinical model to advance the study of human IFN-Is.

  19. Regulation of human clotting factor IX cDNA expression in transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡以平; 邱信芳; 薛京伦; 刘祖洞

    1995-01-01

    To study the expression of human dotting factor IX cDNA in transgenic mice,Which is an es-sential work on gene therapy for hemophilia B,3 recombinant constructions containing different lengths ofhuman dotting factor IX cDNA have been introduced into the cultured cells.All of the recombinant constructionswere found to he expressed well in vitro.They were then microinjected into the male pronudei of the fertilizedmouse eggs respectively for generating trahsgenic mice.Unfortunately,none of them was expressed in any transgenicmice.These results show that the expression of the human clotting factor IX cDNA in the transgenic mice canbe determined by cis regulatory element(s).As compared With the results from other related works,it is sug-gested that the cis regulatory element(s)is resided in the 5’-end non-coding region.

  20. Relationship between expression of epidermal growth factor and simian virus 40 T antigen in a line of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafond, R E; Giammalvo, J T; Norkin, L C

    1995-09-01

    The pattern of expression of the simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen gene and resultant dysplasia were re-examined in a line of transgenic mice in which the T antigen gene was under the control of the SV40 early promoter. We found that T antigen expression in the kidney, and resulting dysplastic lesions, occurred exclusively in the distal convoluted tubules and the ascending limbs of Henle. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) expression in the kidney of normal mice was similarly immunolocalized. The correlation between high EGF immunoreactivity in normal mouse tissues and T antigen expression in the transgenic counterpart was also seen in the choroid plexus epithelium and in the submandibular glands of male mice. T antigen was not found in the submandibular gland of transgenic females. Similarly, EGF was only rarely detected in the normal female submandibular gland. In contrast to the correlation between T antigen expression in the transgenic mice and EGF expression in the corresponding tissues of the normal mice, within the dysplastic lesions of the transgenic mice EGF expression was severely diminished. Adenocarcinomas of the male submandibular gland from another line of transgenic mice that expresses the Int-1 transgene, showed similarly reduced levels of immunostaining for EGF. Thus, reduced expression of EGF might be a general feature of dysplasia and tumorigenesis in those tissues that normally express EGF.

  1. Pulmonary malformation in transgenic mice expressing human keratinocyte growth factor in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonet, W S; DeRose, M L; Bucay, N; Nguyen, H Q; Wert, S E; Zhou, L; Ulich, T R; Thomason, A; Danilenko, D M; Whitsett, J A

    1995-01-01

    Expression of human keratinocyte growth factor (KGF/FGF-7) was directed to epithelial cells of the developing embryonic lung of transgenic mice disrupting normal pulmonary morphogenesis during the pseudoglandular stage of development. By embryonic day 15.5(E15.5), lungs of transgenic surfactant protein C (SP-C)-KGF mice resembled those of humans with pulmonary cystadenoma. Lungs were cystic, filling the thoracic cavity, and were composed of numerous dilated saccules lined with glycogen-containing columnar epithelial cells. The normal distribution of SP-C proprotein in the distal regions of respiratory tubules was disrupted. Columnar epithelial cells lining the papillary structures stained variably and weakly for this distal respiratory cell marker. Mesenchymal components were preserved in the transgenic mouse lungs, yet the architectural relationship of the epithelium to the mesenchyme was altered. SP-C-KGF transgenic mice failed to survive gestation to term, dying before E17.5. Culturing mouse fetal lung explants in the presence of recombinant human KGF also disrupted branching morphogenesis and resulted in similar cystic malformation of the lung. Thus, it appears that precise temporal and spatial expression of KGF is likely to play a crucial role in the control of branching morphogenesis during fetal lung development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8618921

  2. Bovine growth hormone-transgenic mice have major alterations in hepatic expression of metabolic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Bob; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Brusehed, Ola; Isaksson, Olle G P; Ahrén, Bo; Olofsson, Sven-Olof; Oscarsson, Jan; Törnell, Jan

    2003-09-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing growth hormone (GH) have been extensively used to study the chronic effects of elevated serum levels of GH. GH is known to have many acute effects in the liver, but little is known about the chronic effects of GH overexpression on hepatic gene expression. Therefore, we used DNA microarray to compare gene expression in livers from bovine GH (bGH)-transgenic mice and littermates. Hepatic expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) and genes involved in fatty acid activation, peroxisomal and mitochondrial beta-oxidation, and production of ketone bodies was decreased. In line with this expression profile, bGH-transgenic mice had a reduced ability to form ketone bodies in both the fed and fasted states. Although the bGH mice were hyperinsulinemic, the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1 and most lipogenic enzymes regulated by SREBP-1 was reduced, indicating that these mice are different from other insulin-resistant models with respect to expression of SREBP-1 and its downstream genes. This study also provides several candidate genes for the well-known association between elevated GH levels and cardiovascular disease, e.g., decreased expression of scavenger receptor class B type I, hepatic lipase, and serum paraoxonase and increased expression of serum amyloid A-3 protein. We conclude that bGH-transgenic mice display marked changes in hepatic genes coding for metabolic enzymes and suggest that GH directly or indirectly regulates many of these hepatic genes via decreased expression of PPARalpha and SREBP-1.

  3. APP intracellular domain impairs adult neurogenesis in transgenic mice by inducing neuroinflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Ghosal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A devastating aspect of Alzheimer's disease (AD is the progressive deterioration of memory due to neuronal loss. Amyloid precursor protein (APP occupies a central position in AD and APP-derived amyloid-beta (Abeta peptides are thought to play a pivotal role in disease pathogenesis. Nonetheless, it is becoming clear that AD etiology is highly complex and that factors other than Abeta also contribute to AD pathogenesis. APP intracellular domain (AICD is generated together with Abeta and we recently showed that AICD transgenic mice recapitulate pathological features of AD such as tau hyperphosphorylation, memory deficits and neurodegeneration without increasing the Abeta levels. Since impaired adult neurogenesis is shown to augment memory deficits in AD mouse models, here we examined the status of adult neurogenesis in AICD transgenic mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We previously generated transgenic mice co-expressing 59-residue long AICD fragment and its binding partner Fe65. Hippocampal progenitor cell proliferation was determined by BrdU incorporation at 1.5, 3 and 12 months of age. Only male transgenic and their respective wilt type littermate control mice were used. We find age-dependent decrease in BrdU incorporation and doublecortin-positive cells in the dentate gyrus of AICD transgenic mice suggesting impaired adult neurogenesis. This deficit resulted from decreased proliferation and survival, whereas neuronal differentiation remained unaffected. Importantly, this impairment was independent of Abeta since APP-KO mice expressing AICD also exhibit reduced neurogenesis. The defects in adult neurogenesis are prevented by long-term treatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents ibuprofen or naproxen suggesting that neuroinflammation is critically involved in impaired adult neurogenesis in AICD transgenic mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Since adult neurogenesis is crucial for spatial memory, which is particularly

  4. Transgenic mice for a tamoxifen-induced, conditional expression of the Cre recombinase in osteoclasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Arantzazu Sanchez-Fernandez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies on osteoclasts, the bone resorbing cells, have remained limited due to the lack of transgenic mice allowing the conditional knockout of genes in osteoclasts at any time during development or adulthood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We report here on the generation of transgenic mice which specifically express a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase in osteoclasts. These mice, generated on C57BL/6 and FVB background, express a fusion Cre recombinase-ERT2 protein whose expression is driven by the promoter of cathepsin K (CtsK, a gene highly expressed in osteoclasts. We tested the cellular specificity of Cre activity in CtsKCreERT2 strains by breeding with Rosa26LacZ reporter mice. PCR and histological analyses of the CtsKCreERT2LacZ positive adult mice and E17.5 embryos show that Cre activity is restricted largely to bone tissue. In vitro, primary osteoclasts derived from the bone marrow of CtsKCreERT2+/-LacZ+/- adult mice show a Cre-dependent β-galactosidase activity after tamoxifen stimulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have generated transgenic lines that enable the tamoxifen-induced, conditional deletion of loxP-flanked genes in osteoclasts, thus circumventing embryonic and postnatal gene lethality and avoiding gene deletion in other cell types. Such CtsKCreERT2 mice provide a convenient tool to study in vivo the different facets of osteoclast function in bone physiology during different developmental stages and adulthood of mice.

  5. Function of chymase in the heart angiotensin Ⅱ forma- tion in transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The myosin light chain 2 promoter-human heart chymase (MLC2-hChymase) transgenic mice founded by our laboratory were used as the model to study the function of chymase in the heart angiotension Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) formation and heart remodeling. Tissue-specific expression of human heart chymase gene and transcriptional expression of typeⅠ and type Ⅲ collagens genes were analyzed by RT-PCR. Activities of chymase, ACE and the levels of AngⅡ in heart and plasma were determined with radioimmunoassay (RIA) kit. Activity of heart matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was detected using gelatin zymography. The cardiac hypertrophic phenotypes were also observed with the physiological and morphological methods. The results in the MLC2-hChymase transgenic mice indicated: (ⅰ) human heart chymase gene was expressed specially in the heart; (ⅱ) heart chymase activity increased markedly in the transgenic mice vs non-transgenic mice (control) (0.27±0.07 U/mg vs. 0.15±0.02 U/mg, P<0.05) with no significant difference in ACE activity (0.17±0.03 U/mg vs. 0.18±0.02 U/mg); (ⅲ) heart AngⅡ content increased 3-fold (1984±184 vs. 568±88 pg/g protein, P<0.05) but was unchanged in plasma (218±106 vs. 234±66 pg/mL); (ⅳ) both MMP-9 activity and collagen Ⅰ mRNA level increased significantly in the heart (P<0.05) but there was neither significant increase in colla-gen Ⅲ mRNA nor in the ratio of Ⅰ/ Ⅲ collagen mRNA levels; (ⅴ) the MLC2-hChymase transgenic mice showed no significant changes in blood pressure, heart-rate, ratio of heart/body weight and cardiomyocyte diameter compared to the control. This suggests that heart AngⅡ formation cata-lyzed through overexpression of human heart chymase gene in the heart of transgenic mice might activate MMP-9 to influence collagen metabolism in cardiac interstitial and to be involved in the process of heart remodeling.

  6. Glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in growth hormone-transgenic mice: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boparai, Ravneet K; Arum, Oge; Khardori, Romesh; Bartke, Andrzej

    2010-10-01

    In contrast to its stimulatory effects on musculature, bone, and organ development, and its lipolytic effects, growth hormone (GH) opposes insulin effects on glucose metabolism. Chronic GH overexposure is thought to result in insulin insensitivity and decreased blood glucose homeostatic control. Yet, despite the importance of this concept for basic biology, as well as human conditions of GH excess or deficiency, no systematic assessment of the impact of GH over- expression on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity has been conducted. We report that male and female adult GH transgenic mice have enhanced glucose tolerance compared to littermate controls and this effect is not dependent on age or on the particular heterologous GH transgene used. Furthermore, increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, augmented insulin sensitivity, and muted gluconeogenesis were also observed in bovine GH overexpressing mice. These results show that markedly increased systemic GH concentration in GH-transgenic mice exerts unexpected beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis, presumably via a compensatory increase in insulin release. The counterintuitive nature of these results challenges previously held presumptions of the physiology of these mice and other states of GH overexpression or suppression. In addition, they pose intriguing queries about the relationships between GH, endocrine control of metabolism, and aging.

  7. Resistance to alcohol withdrawal-induced behaviour in Fyn transgenic mice and its reversal by ifenprodil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, Oliver; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Stork, Simone; Kume, Nobuko; Obata, Kunihiko

    2002-09-30

    Recent studies suggest that the protein tyrosine kinase Fyn constitutes a determinant of fear and anxiety as well as alcohol sensitivity in mice. We investigated these functions and their relatedness in mice with transgenic over-expression of native or mutated, constitutively active Fyn. Fear- and anxiety-related behaviour of these animals were normal under varying levels of stress, but under withdrawal from alcohol both types of transgenic mice failed to show any increase of anxiety-like behaviour or reduction of exploratory activity as seen in their wild-type littermates. This apparent lack of alcohol withdrawal-induced behavioural effects was associated with increased Fyn activity and tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins including the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B in the different mutant lines. NR2B phosphorylation itself remained unaffected by the chronic alcohol ingestion and subsequent withdrawal, but challenge with an NR2B antagonist, ifenprodil, restored a normal behavioural response in alcohol-withdrawn fyn mutants. Moreover, both types of transgenic mice showed a reduction of voluntary alcohol consumption compared to their wild-type littermates. Together, these results suggest that Fyn can modulate alcohol consumption and prevent behavioural changes during alcohol withdrawal, possibly via phosphorylation of NR2B.

  8. Expression of human erythropoietin directed by mWAP promoter in mammary gland of transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The present work has generated transgenic mice with a hybrid gene construct consisting of genomic sequences encoding human erythropoietin (hEPO) and governed by regulatory sequences of mouse whey acidic protein (mWAP). The construct proved effective by transient expression in lactating animal. After introducing hybrid gene construct into single-cell embryo via pronuclear microinjection, surviving embryo are reimplanted into pseudopregnant foster mother mouse. 58 mice of 86 generation zero mice obtained were identified to be positive by PCR-Southern blot and genomic DNA Southern blot methods. The integration rate is 67%. hEPO was expressed in the milk of 16 mice of 39 mice measured by hEPO ELISA kit .The expression level gets over 15 m g/mL.

  9. Inhibiting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase attenuates cerebral ischemic injury in Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangyu Zou; Haiyan Qin; Yitao He; Heming Huang; Yi Lu; Xiaofan Chu

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia was induced using photothrombosis 1 hour after intraperitoneal injection of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor SB239063 into Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP/SWE) transgenic and non-transgenic mice. The number of surviving neurons in the penumbra was quantified using Nissl staining, and the activity of p38 MAPKs was measured by western blotting. The number of surviving neurons in the penumbra was significantly reduced in APP/SWE transgenic mice compared with non-transgenic controls 7 days after cerebral ischemia, but the activity of p38 MAPKs was significantly elevated compared with the non-ischemic hemisphere in the APP/SWE transgenic mice. SB239063 prevented these changes. The APP/SWE mutation exacerbated ischemic brain injury, and this could be alleviated by inhibiting p38 MAPK activity.

  10. Hepatic fibrosis, glomerulosclerosis, and a lipodystrophy-like syndrome in PEPCK-TGF-beta1 transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Clouthier, D.E; Comerford, S A; Hammer, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing a constitutively active human TGF-beta1 under control of the rat phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase regulatory sequences developed fibrosis of the liver, kidney, and adipose tissue, and exhibited a severe reduction in body fat. Expression of the transgene in hepatocytes resulted in increased collagen deposition, altered lobular organization, increased hepatocyte turnover, and in extreme cases, hemorrhage and thrombosis. Renal expression of the transgene was local...

  11. Salivary gland tumors in transgenic mice with targeted PLAG1 proto-oncogene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, Jeroen; Van Dyck, Frederik; Braem, Caroline V; Van Valckenborgh, Isabelle C; Voz, Marianne; Wassef, Michel; Schoonjans, Luc; Van Damme, Boudewijn; Fiette, Laurence; Van de Ven, Wim J M

    2005-06-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) proto-oncogene overexpression is implicated in various human neoplasias, including salivary gland pleomorphic adenomas. To further assess the oncogenic capacity of PLAG1, two independent PLAG1 transgenic mouse strains were established, PTMS1 and PTMS2, in which activation of PLAG1 overexpression is Cre mediated. Crossbreeding of PTMS1 or PTMS2 mice with MMTV-Cre transgenic mice was done to target PLAG1 overexpression to salivary and mammary glands, in the P1-Mcre/P2-Mcre offspring. With a prevalence of 100% and 6%, respectively, P1-Mcre and P2-Mcre mice developed salivary gland tumors displaying various pleomorphic adenoma features. Moreover, histopathologic analysis of salivary glands of 1-week-old P1-Mcre mice pointed at early tumoral stages in epithelial structures. Malignant characteristics in the salivary gland tumors and frequent lung metastases were found in older tumor-bearing mice. PLAG1 overexpression was shown in all tumors, including early tumoral stages. The tumors revealed an up-regulation of the expression of two distinct, imprinted gene clusters (i.e., Igf2/H19 and Dlk1/Gtl2). With a latency period of about 1 year, 8% of the P2-Mcre mice developed mammary gland tumors displaying similar histopathologic features as the salivary gland tumors. In conclusion, our results establish the strong and apparently direct in vivo tumorigenic capacity of PLAG1 and indicate that the transgenic mice constitute a valuable model for pleomorphic salivary gland tumorigenesis and potentially for other glands as well.

  12. The temporal expression pattern of alpha-synuclein modulates olfactory neurogenesis in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian R Schreglmann

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis mirrors the brain´s endogenous capacity to generate new neurons throughout life. In the subventricular zone/ olfactory bulb system adult neurogenesis is linked to physiological olfactory function and has been shown to be impaired in murine models of neuronal alpha-Synuclein overexpression. We analyzed the degree and temporo-spatial dynamics of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis in transgenic mice expressing human wild-type alpha-Synuclein (WTS under the murine Thy1 (mThy1 promoter, a model known to have a particularly high tg expression associated with impaired olfaction.Survival of newly generated neurons (NeuN-positive in the olfactory bulb was unchanged in mThy1 transgenic animals. Due to decreased dopaminergic differentiation a reduction in new dopaminergic neurons within the olfactory bulb glomerular layer was present. This is in contrast to our previously published data on transgenic animals that express WTS under the control of the human platelet-derived growth factor β (PDGF promoter, that display a widespread decrease in survival of newly generated neurons in regions of adult neurogenesis, resulting in a much more pronounced neurogenesis deficit. Temporal and quantitative expression analysis using immunofluorescence co-localization analysis and Western blots revealed that in comparison to PDGF transgenic animals, in mThy1 transgenic animals WTS is expressed from later stages of neuronal maturation only but at significantly higher levels both in the olfactory bulb and cortex.The dissociation between higher absolute expression levels of alpha-Synuclein but less severe impact on adult olfactory neurogenesis in mThy1 transgenic mice highlights the importance of temporal expression characteristics of alpha-Synuclein on the maturation of newborn neurons.

  13. Production of transgenic mice by random recombination of targeted genes in female germline stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Zhang; Ji Xiong; Jie Xiang; Ji Wu; Zhaojuan Yang; Yunze Yang; Shuzeng Wang; Lingjun Shi; Wenhai Xie; Kejing Sun; Kang Zou; Lei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Oocyte production in most mammalian species is believed to cease before birth. However, this idea has been challenged with the finding that postnatal mouse ovaries possess mitotically active germ cells. A recent study showed that female germline stem cells (FGSCs) from adult mice were isolated, cultured long term and produced oocytes and progeny after transplantation into infertile mice. Here, we demonstrate the successful generation of transgenic or gene knock-down mice using FGSCs. The FGSCs from ovaries of 5-day-old and adult mice were isolated and either infected with recombinant viruses carrying green fluorescent protein, Oocyte-G1 or the mouse dynein axonemal intermediate chain 2 gene, or transfected with the Oocyte-G1 specific shRNA expression vector (pRS shOocyte-G1 vector), and then transplanted into infertile mice. Transplanted cells in the ovaries underwent oogenesis and produced heterozygous offspring after mating with wild-type male mice. The offspring were genetically characterized and the biological functions of the transferred or knock-down genes were investigated. Efficiency of genetransfer or gene knock-down was 29%-37% and it took 2 months to produce transgenic offspring. Gene manipulation of FGSCs is a rapid and efficient method of animal transgenesis and may serve as a powerful tool for biomedical science and biotechnology.

  14. Tyrosine 705 Phosphorylation of STAT3 Is Associated with Phenotype Severity in TGFβ1 Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Guadagnin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1 is a key player in skeletal muscle degenerative and regenerative processes. We previously showed that conditionally overexpressing TGFβ1 in skeletal muscles caused myofiber atrophy and endomysial fibrosis in mice. However, the disease severity varied significantly among individual mice. While 40% of mice developed severe muscle pathology and lost body weight within 2 weeks of TGFβ1 transgene induction in muscles, the rest showed milder or no phenotype. This study aims at determining whether signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 plays a role in the phenotypic difference and whether it can be activated by TGFβ1 directly in muscle cells. Our results show that while total STAT3 was not differentially expressed between the two groups of mice, there was significantly higher pSTAT3 (Tyr705 in the muscles of the mice with severe phenotype. Immunohistochemistry showed that pSTAT3 (Tyr705 was localized in approximately 50% of the nuclei of the muscles. We further showed that TGFβ1 induced Tyr705 phosphorylation of STAT3 in C2C12 cells within 30 minutes of treatment while total STAT3 was not affected. Our findings suggest that TGFβ1 alone can induce Tyr705 phosphorylation of STAT3 in skeletal muscle cells and contribute to disease severity in transgenic TGFβ1 mice.

  15. Germ cell mutagenesis in lambdalacZ transgenic mice treated with ethylnitrosourea : comparison with specific-locus test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, J.H.M. van; Baan, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    Germ cell mutagenesis was studied in male λlacZ transgenic mice in such a way that the data can be compared with literature data for germ cell mutagenesis obtained with the specific-locus test. This comparison is of interest for validation of the transgenic mouse model. We studied mutagenesis induce

  16. An extensive phenotypic characterization of the hTNFα transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugusheva Marina

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα is implicated in a wide variety of pathological and physiological processes, including chronic inflammatory conditions, coronary artery disease, diabetes, obesity, and cachexia. Transgenic mice expressing human TNFα (hTNFα have previously been described as a model for progressive rheumatoid arthritis. In this report, we describe extensive characterization of an hTNFα transgenic mouse line. Results In addition to arthritis, these hTNFα transgenic mice demonstrated major alterations in body composition, metabolic rate, leptin levels, response to a high-fat diet, bone mineral density and content, impaired fertility and male sexual function. Many phenotypes displayed an earlier onset and a higher degree of severity in males, pointing towards a significant degree of sexual dimorphism in response to deregulated expression of TNFα. Conclusion These results highlight the potential usefulness of this transgenic model as a resource for studying the progressive effects of constitutively expressed low levels of circulating TNFα, a condition mimicking that observed in a number of human pathological conditions.

  17. Overexpression of dystrophin in transgenic mdx mice eliminates dystrophic symptoms without toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G A; Cole, N M; Matsumura, K; Phelps, S F; Hauschka, S D; Campbell, K P; Faulkner, J A; Chamberlain, J S

    1993-08-19

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD and BMD) are X-linked recessive diseases caused by defective expression of dystrophin. The mdx mouse, an animal model for DMD, has a mutation that eliminates expression of the 427K muscle and brain isoforms of dystrophin. Although these animals do not display overt muscle weakness or impaired movement, the diaphragm muscle of the mdx mouse is severely affected and shows progressive myofibre degeneration and fibrosis which closely resembles the human disease. Here we explore the feasibility of gene therapy for DMD by examining the potential of a full-length dystrophin transgene to correct dystrophic symptoms in mdx mice. We find that expression of dystrophin in muscles of transgenic mdx mice eliminates the morphological and immunohistological symptoms of muscular dystrophy. In addition, overexpression of dystrophin prevents the development of the abnormal mechanical properties associated with dystrophic muscle without causing deleterious side effects. Our results provide functional evidence for the feasibility of gene therapy for DMD.

  18. FHL1 reduces dystrophy in transgenic mice overexpressing FSHD muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Feeney

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1.

  19. Beta-cell lines derived from transgenic mice expressing a hybrid insulin gene-oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efrat, S; Linde, S; Kofod, Hans

    1988-01-01

    Three pancreatic beta-cell lines have been established from insulinomas derived from transgenic mice carrying a hybrid insulin-promoted simian virus 40 tumor antigen gene. The beta tumor cell (beta TC) lines maintain the features of differentiated beta cells for about 50 passages in culture. The ...... both to immortalize a rare cell type and to provide a selection for the maintenance of its differentiated phenotype....

  20. Role of SLAM in NKT cell development revealed by transgenic complementation in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Margaret A; Fletcher, Julie M; Jose, Roby; Chowdhury, Shahead; Gerlach, Nicole; Allison, Janette; Baxter, Alan G

    2011-04-01

    Allelic variation of SLAM expression on CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes has been proposed to play a major role in NKT cell development. In this article, this hypothesis is tested by the production of subcongenic mouse strains and Slamf1 transgenic lines. The long isoform of the C57BL/6 allele of Slamf1 was transgenically expressed on CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes under control of an hCD2 minigene. NOD.Nkrp1b.Tg(Slamf1)1 mice, which had a 2-fold increase in SLAM protein expression on CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes, had a 2-fold increase in numbers of thymic NKT cells. The additional thymic NKT cells in NOD.Nkrp1b.Tg(Slamf1)1 mice were relatively immature, with a similar subset distribution to those of congenic NOD.Nkrp1b.Nkt1 and NOD.Nkrp1b.Slamf1 mice, which also express increased levels of SLAM on CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes and produce larger numbers of NKT cells. Transgenic enhancement of SLAM expression also increased IL-4 and IL-17 production in response to TCR-mediated stimulation. Paradoxically, NOD.Nkrp1b.Tg(Slamf1)2 mice, which had a 7-fold increase in SLAM expression, showed no significant increase in NKT cells numbers; on the contrary, at high transgene copy number, SLAM expression levels correlated inversely with NKT cell numbers, consistent with a contribution to negative selection. These data confirm a role for SLAM in controlling NKT cell development and are consistent with a role in both positive and negative thymic selection of NKT cells.

  1. Overexpression of Id1 in transgenic mice promotes mammary basal stem cell activity and breast tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Dong-Hui; Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Won, Hee-Young; Jang, Ki-Seok; MIN, KYUENG-WHAN; Jang, Si-Hyong; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kong, Gu

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding (Id)1 is a crucial regulator of mammary development and breast cancer progression. However, its effect on stemness and tumorigenesis in mammary epithelial cells remains undefined. Herein, we demonstrate that Id1 induces mammary tumorigenesis by increasing normal and malignant mammary stem cell (MaSC) activities in transgenic mice. MaSC-enriched basal cell expansion and increased self-renewal and in vivo regenerative capacity of MaSCs are observed in th...

  2. Compensation of the AKT signaling by ERK signaling in transgenic mice hearts overexpressing TRIM72

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Young-Mi, E-mail: youngmi_ham@hms.harvard.edu [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Mahoney, Sarah Jane [Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    The AKT and ERK signaling pathways are known to be involved in cell hypertrophy, proliferation, survival and differentiation. Although there is evidence for crosstalk between these two signaling pathways in cellulo, there is less evidence for cross talk in vivo. Here, we show that crosstalk between AKT and ERK signaling in the hearts of TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice (TRIM72-Tg) with alpha-MHC promoter regulates and maintains their heart size. TRIM72, a heart- and skeletal muscle-specific protein, downregulates AKT-mTOR signaling via IRS-1 degradation and reduces the size of rat cardiomyocytes and the size of postnatal TRIM72-Tg hearts. TRIM72 expression was upregulated by hypertrophic inducers in cardiomyocytes, while IRS-1 was downregulated by IGF-1. TRIM72 specifically regulated IGF-1-dependent AKT-mTOR signaling, resulting in a reduction of the size of cardiomyocytes. Postnatal TRIM72-Tg hearts were smaller than control-treated hearts with inhibition of AKT-mTOR signaling. However, adult TRIM72-Tg hearts were larger than of control despite the suppression of AKT-mTOR signaling. Activation of ERK, PKC-α, and JNK were observed to be elevated in adult TRIM72-Tg, and these signals were mediated by ET-1 via the ET receptors A and B. Altogether, these results suggest that AKT signaling regulates cardiac hypertrophy in physiological conditions, and ERK signaling compensates for the absence of AKT signaling during TRIM72 overexpression, leading to pathological hypertrophy. -- Highlights: • TRIM72 inhibits AKT signaling through ubiquitination of IRS-1 in cardiac cells. • TRIM72 regulates the size of cardiac cells. • TRIM72 regulates size of postnatal TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice hearts. • Adult TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice hearts showed cardiac dysfunction. • Adult TRIM72 transgenic mice hearts showed higher expression of endothelin receptors.

  3. Absence of cardiac lipid accumulation in transgenic mice with heart-specific HSL overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, J; Shen, W J; Nelson, B D; Patel, S; Veerkamp, J H; Selwood, S P; Murphy, G M; Reaven, E; Kraemer, F B

    2001-10-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) hydrolyzes triglyceride (TG) in adipose tissue. HSL is also expressed in heart. To explore the actions of cardiac HSL, heart-specific, tetracycline (Tc)-controlled HSL-overexpressing mice were generated. Tc-responsive element-HSL transgenic (Tg) mice were generated and crossed with myosin heavy chain (MHC)alpha-tTA Tg mice, which express the Tc-responsive transactivator (tTA) in the heart. The double-Tg mice (MHC-HSL) were maintained with doxycycline (Dox) to suppress Tg HSL. Upon removal of Dox, cardiac HSL activity and protein increased 12- and 8-fold, respectively, and the expression was heart specific. Although cardiac TG content increased twofold in control mice after an overnight fast, it did not increase in HSL-induced mice. Electron microscopy showed numerous lipid droplets in the myocardium of fasted control mice, whereas fasted HSL-induced mice showed virtually no droplets. Microarray analysis showed altered expression of cardiac genes for fatty acid oxidation, transcription factors, signaling molecules, cytoskeletal proteins, and histocompatibility antigens in HSL-induced mice. Thus cardiac HSL plays a role in controlling accumulation of triglyceride droplets and can affect the expression of a number of cardiac genes.

  4. CHIP Enhances Angiogenesis and Restores Cardiac Function After Infarction in Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Xu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP is a chaperone/ubiquitin ligase that plays an important role in stress-induced apoptosis. However, the effect of CHIP on angiogenesis, cardiac function and survival 4 weeks after myocardial infarction (MI remain to be explored. Methods: Wild-type (WT and transgenic mice (TG with cardiac-specific overexpression of CHIP were used for coronary artery ligation. The cardiac function, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, inflammation and angiogenesis were examined by echocardiography, histological analysis, real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Results: At 4 weeks of after coronary artery ligation, echocardiography demonstrated that cardiac remodeling and dysfunction were prevented in TG mice compared with WT mice. The infarct size, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and inflammation were significantly reduced in TG mice than in WT mice. The survival rate after MI in TG mice was higher than that of WT mice. Furthermore, the levels of p53 protein was markedly decreased, but the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, and the formation of capillary and arteriole after MI were significantly enhanced in TG mice compared with WT mice. Conclusion: We report the first in vivo evidence that CHIP enhances angiogenesis, inhibits inflammation, restores cardiac function, and improves survival at 4 weeks after MI. The present study expands on previous results and defines a novel mechanism. Thus, increased CHIP level may provide a novel therapeutic approach for left ventricular dysfunction after MI.

  5. Activity of peroxisomal enzymes, and levels of polyamines in LPA-transgenic mice on two different diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rønning Helle

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In man, elevated levels of plasma lipoprotein (a(Lp(a is a cardiovascular risk factor, and oxidized phospholipids are believed to play a role as modulators of inflammatory processes such as atherosclerosis. Polyamines are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents. It was therefore of interest to examine polyamines and their metabolism in LPA transgenic mice. Concentration of the polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine as well as the activity of peroxisomal polyamine oxidase and two other peroxisomal enzymes, acyl-CoA oxidase and catalase were measured. The mice were fed either a standard diet or a diet high in fat and cholesterol (HFHC. Some of the mice in each feeding group were in addition given aminoguanidine (AG, a specific inhibitor of diamine oxidase, which catalyses degradation of putrescine, and also inhibits non-enzymatic glycosylation of protein which is implicated in the aetiology of atherosclerosis in diabetic patients. Non-transgenic mice were used as controls. Results Intestinal peroxisomal polyamine oxidase activity was significantly higher in LPA transgenic mice than in the non-transgenic mice, while intestinal peroxisomal catalase activity was significantly lower. Hepatic β-oxidation increased in Lp(a transgenic mice fed the HFHC diet, but not in those on standard diet. Hepatic spermidine concentration was increased in all mice fed the HFHC diet compared to those fed a standard diet, while spermine concentration was decreased. With exception of the group fed only standard diet, transgenic mice showed a lower degree of hepatic steatosis than non-transgenic mice. AG had no significant effect on hepatic steatosis. Conclusion The present results indicate a connection between peroxisomal enzyme activity and the presence of the human LPA gene in the murine genome. The effect may be a result of changes in oxidative processes in lipid metabolism rather than resulting from a direct effect of the LPA

  6. Differential gene expression in ADAM10 and mutant ADAM10 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postina Rolf

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease (AD, cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP by the α-secretase ADAM10 prevented amyloid plaque formation, and alleviated cognitive deficits. Furthermore, ADAM10 overexpression increased the cortical synaptogenesis. These results suggest that upregulation of ADAM10 in the brain has beneficial effects on AD pathology. Results To assess the influence of ADAM10 on the gene expression profile in the brain, we performed a microarray analysis using RNA isolated from brains of five months old mice overexpressing either the α-secretase ADAM10, or a dominant-negative mutant (dn of this enzyme. As compared to non-transgenic wild-type mice, in ADAM10 transgenic mice 355 genes, and in dnADAM10 mice 143 genes were found to be differentially expressed. A higher number of genes was differentially regulated in double-transgenic mouse strains additionally expressing the human APP[V717I] mutant. Overexpression of proteolytically active ADAM10 affected several physiological pathways, such as cell communication, nervous system development, neuron projection as well as synaptic transmission. Although ADAM10 has been implicated in Notch and β-catenin signaling, no significant changes in the respective target genes were observed in adult ADAM10 transgenic mice. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed a downregulation of genes coding for the inflammation-associated proteins S100a8 and S100a9 induced by moderate ADAM10 overexpression. Overexpression of the dominant-negative form dnADAM10 led to a significant increase in the expression of the fatty acid-binding protein Fabp7, which also has been found in higher amounts in brains of Down syndrome patients. Conclusion In general, there was only a moderate alteration of gene expression in ADAM10 overexpressing mice. Genes coding for pro-inflammatory or pro-apoptotic proteins were not over-represented among differentially regulated genes. Even a decrease of

  7. Trichostatin A suppresses lung adenocarcinoma development in Grg1 overexpressing transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ju, E-mail: ju.liu@sdu.edu.cn [Medical Research Center, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, 16766 Jingshi Road, Jinan (China); Molecular and Cellular Biology Division, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Li, Yan [Children' s Health Care Center, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, 16766 Jingshi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250014 (China); Dong, Fengyun; Li, Liqun [Medical Research Center, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, 16766 Jingshi Road, Jinan (China); Masuda, Takahiro; Allen, Thaddeus D. [Molecular and Cellular Biology Division, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Lobe, Corrinne G. [Molecular and Cellular Biology Division, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Miami Mice Research Corp., MaRS Centre, Heritage Bldg., 101 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada)

    2015-08-07

    Trichostatin A (TSA) is a histone deacetylase inhibitor and a potential therapeutic for various malignancies. The in vivo effect of TSA, however, has not been investigated in a transgenic lung cancer model. Previously, we generated transgenic mice with overexpression of Groucho-related-gene 1 (Grg1) and these mice all developed mucinous lung adenocarcinoma. Grg1 is a transcriptional co-repressor protein, the function of which is thought to depend on HDAC activity. However, functions outside the nucleus have also been proposed. We tested the supposition that Grg1-induced tumorigenesis is HDAC-dependent by assaying the therapeutic effect of TSA in the Grg1 transgenic mouse model. We found that TSA significantly inhibited lung tumorigenesis in Grg1 transgenic mice (p < 0.01). TSA did not affect overall Grg1 protein levels, but instead reduced ErbB1 and ErbB2 expression, which are upregulated by Grg1 in the absence of TSA. We confirmed this effect in A549 cells. Furthermore, lapatinib, an inhibitor of both ErbB1 and ErbB2, effectively masked the effect of TSA on the inhibition of A549 cell proliferation and migration, suggesting TSA does work, at least in part, by downregulating ErbB receptors. We additionally found that TSA reduced the expression of VEGF and VEGFR2, but not basic FGF and FGFR1. Our findings indicate that TSA effectively inhibits Grg1-induced lung tumorigenesis through the down-regulation of ErbB1 and ErbB2, as well as reduced VEGF signaling. This suggests TSA and other HDAC inhibitors could have therapeutic value in the treatment of lung cancers with Grg1 overexpression. - Highlights: • TSA suppresses lung tumorigenesis in Grg1 overexpressing transgenic mice. • TSA does not affect overall Grg1 protein levels in the mice and in A549 cells. • TSA reduces ErbB1 and ErbB2 expression in the mice and in A549 cells. • Lapatinib masks TSA-induced inhibition of A549 cell proliferation and migration. • TSA inhibits VEGF signaling, but not basic FGF

  8. Morphologic effects of hGRH gene expression on the pituitary, liver, and pancreas of MT-hGRH transgenic mice. An in situ hybridization analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, R. V.; Jin, L; A.; Chang; Kulig, E.; Camper, S A; Ross, B. D.; Downs, T. R.; Frohman, L A

    1992-01-01

    Morphologic changes in the pituitary, liver, and pancreas of mice with the metallothionein-human growth hormone--releasing hormone (MT-hGRH) transgene were analyzed by in situ hybridization histochemistry (ISH). There was progression from somatotroph hyperplasia to neoplasia in pituitaries of transgenic mice. Pituitary neoplasms were present between 9 to 12 months of age in some mice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) readily identified enlarged pituitaries in MT-hGRH transgenic mice. Serum mo...

  9. Loss of renal microvascular integrity in postnatal Crim1 hypomorphic transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Lorine; Gilbert, Thierry; Sipos, Arnold; Toma, Ildiko; Pennisi, David J; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Little, Melissa H

    2009-12-01

    Crim1 is a cell-surface, transmembrane protein that binds to a variety of cystine knot-containing growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor A. In the developing renal glomerulus, Crim1 acts to tether vascular endothelial growth factor A to the podocyte cell surface, thus regulating its release to glomerular endothelial cells. The hypomorphic transgenic mouse (Crim1(KST264/KST264)) has glomerular cysts and severe glomerular vascular defects because of the lack of functional Crim1 in the glomerulus. Adult transgenic mice have a reduced glomerular filtration rate and glomerular capillary defects. We now show that, in these adult transgenic mice, renal vascular defects are not confined to the glomerulus but also extend to the peritubular microvasculature, as live imaging revealed leakiness of both glomerular and peritubular capillaries. An ultrastructural analysis of the microvasculature showed an abnormal endothelium and collagen deposition between the endothelium and the tubular basement membrane, present even in juvenile mice. Overt renal disease, including fibrosis and renin recruitment, was not evident until adulthood. Our study suggests that Crim1 is involved in endothelial maintenance and integrity and its loss contributes to a primary defect in the extraglomerular vasculature.

  10. Lysostaphin expression in mammary glands confers protection against staphylococcal infection in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, D E; Plaut, K; Bramley, A J; Williamson, C M; Lax, A J; Moore, K; Wells, K D; Wall, R J

    2001-01-01

    Infection of the mammary gland, in addition to causing animal distress, is a major economic burden of the dairy industry. Staphylococcus aureus is the major contagious mastitis pathogen, accounting for approximately 15-30% of infections, and has proved difficult to control using standard management practices. As a first step toward enhancing mastitis resistance of dairy animals, we report the generation of transgenic mice that secrete a potent anti-staphylococcal protein into milk. The protein, lysostaphin, is a peptidoglycan hydrolase normally produced by Staphylococcus simulans. When the native form is secreted by transfected eukaryotic cells it becomes glycosylated and inactive. However, removal of two glycosylation motifs through engineering asparagine to glutamine codon substitutions enables secretion of Gln(125,232)-lysostaphin, a bioactive variant. Three lines of transgenic mice, in which the 5'-flanking region of the ovine beta-lactoglobulin gene directed the secretion of Gln(125,232)-lysostaphin into milk, exhibit substantial resistance to an intramammary challenge of 104 colony-forming units (c.f.u.) of S. aureus, with the highest expressing line being completely resistant. Milk protein content and profiles of transgenic and nontransgenic mice are similar. These results clearly demonstrate the potential of genetic engineering to combat the most prevalent disease of dairy cattle.

  11. Antiviral effects of Stichopus japonicus acid mucopolysaccharide on hepatitis B virus transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yongning; Li, Wei; Lu, Linlin; Zhou, Li; Victor, David W.; Xuan, Shiying

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a significant global pathogen and efficient cure for HBV patients is still a challenging goal. We previously reported that acidic mucopolysaccharide from stichopus japonicus selenka (SJAMP) could inhibit HBsAg and HBeAg expression in vitro. However, the potential anti-HBV effects of SJAMP in vivo have not yet been explored. In this study, we show that SJAMP exhibits potent anti-HBV activity in HBV transgenic mice in a dose-dependent manner. Specifically, sixty HBV transgenic male BALB/c mice were randomly selected to receive the treatment of PBS, low dose SJAMP (30 mg kg-1), middle dose SJAMP (40 mg kg-1), high dose SJAMP (50 mg kg-1) and IFN (45 IU kg-1) for 30 d. SJAMP treatment suppressed serum HBV-DNA, and liver HBsAg and HBcAg levels in HBV-transgenic mice. The present study highlights the potential application of SJAMP in HBV therapy.

  12. Brain beta-amyloid accumulation in transgenic mice expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bradley J; Li, Qiao-Xin; Laughton, Katrina M; Masters, Colin L; Lopes, Elizabeth C; Atkin, Julie D; Cheema, Surindar S

    2004-12-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in both the deposition and pathogenesis of beta-amyloid (Abeta) protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accordingly, overexpression of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) in neuronal cells and transgenic AD mice reduces Abeta toxicity and accumulation. In contrast, mutations in SOD1 associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) confer enhanced pro-oxidative enzyme activities. We therefore examined whether ALS-linked mutant SOD1 overexpression in motor neuronal cells or transgenic ALS mice modulates Abeta toxicity or its accumulation in the brain. Aggregated, but not freshly solubilised, substrate-bound Abeta peptides induced degenerative morphology and cytotoxicity in motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells. Transfection of NSC-34 cells with human wild-type SOD1 attenuated Abeta-induced toxicity, however this neuroprotective effect was also observed for ALS-linked mutant SOD1. Analysis of the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cerebellum and olfactory bulb from transgenic SOD1G93A mice using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of acid-guanidine extracts revealed age-dependent elevations in Abeta levels, although not significantly different from wild-type mouse brain. In addition, brain amyloid protein precursor (APP) levels remained unaltered as a consequence of mutant SOD1 expression. We therefore conclude that mutant SOD1 overexpression promotes neither Abeta toxicity nor brain accumulation in these ALS models.

  13. Vaccine Development to Treat Alzheimer’s Disease Neuropathology in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Carrera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel vaccine addressing the major hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, senile plaque-like deposits of amyloid beta-protein (Aβ, neurofibrillary tangle-like structures, and glial proinflammatory cytokines, has been developed. The present vaccine takes a new approach to circumvent failures of previous ones tested in mice and humans, including the Elan-Wyeth vaccine (AN1792, which caused massive T-cell activation, resulting in a meningoencephalitis-like reaction. The EB101 vaccine consists of A1-42 delivered in a novel immunogen-adjuvant composed of liposomes-containing sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P. EB101 was administered to APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice before and after AD-like pathological symptoms were detectable. Treatment with EB101 results in a marked reduction of Aβ plaque burden, decrease of neurofibrillary tangle-like structure density, and attenuation of astrocytosis. In this transgenic mouse model, EB101 reduces the basal immunological interaction between the T cells and immune activation markers in the affected hippocampal/cortical areas, consistent with decreased amyloidosis-induced inflammation. Therefore, immunization with EB101 prevents and reverses AD-like neuropathology in a significant manner by halting disease progression without developing behavioral spatial deficits in transgenic mice.

  14. Cardiac Characteristics of Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Refsum Disease Gene-Associated Protein within the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, J T; Choi, H H; Ahn, K Y; Kim, J U; Kim, J H; Chun, J Y; Baik, Y H; Kim, K K

    2001-09-01

    Arrhythmia is a common cardiac symptom of Refsum disease. Recently, we identified a novel neuron-specific PAHX-associated protein (PAHX-AP1), which binds to the Refsum disease gene (PAHX). In this report, we developed heart-targeted transgenic (TG) mice under the control of alpha-myosin heavy chain promoter to determine whether cardiac overexpression of PAHX-AP1 provokes cardiac involvement symptoms. Northern and in situ hybridization analyses revealed PAHX-AP1 transcript was overexpressed in TG atrium, especially in the sinoatrial node. TG mice showed tachycardia, and tachyarrhythmia was observed in 20% of TG mice. Isolated TG atria showed higher frequency beating and were more sensitive to aconitine-induced tachyarrhythmia than the wild-type, and 40% of the TG atria showed irregular beating. Action potential duration in TG atrial fiber was shortened much more than the wild-type. Systemic administration of arrhythmogenic agents induced arrhythmia in TG mice, while no arrhythmia with the same dose in nonTG mice. Our results indicate that the chronic atrial tachycardia by overexpressed neuron-specific PAHX-AP1 transgene in atrium may be responsible for the increased susceptibility to arrhythmia.

  15. Evaluation of APP695 Transgenic Mice Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Neural Differentiation for Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Jia, Yanjie; Zhang, John; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Even though there is a therapeutic potential to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD) with neural cell replenishment and replacement, immunological rejections of stem cell transplantation remain a challenging risk. Autologous stem cells from AD patients however may prove to be a promising candidate. Therefore, we studied the neuronal differentiation efficiency of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from APP695 transgenic mice, which share features of human AD. Cultured MSCs from APP695 transgenic mice are used; neuronal differentiation was assessed by immunocytochemistry and Western blot. Correlation with Notch signaling was examined. Autophage flux was assessed by western blot analysis. MSCs from APP695 mice have higher neuronal differentiation efficiency than MSCs from wild type mice (WT MSCs). The expression of Notch-1 signaling decreased during the differentiation process. However, autophagy flux, which is essential for neuronal cell survival and neuronal function, was impaired in the neuronally differentiated counterparts of APP695 MSCs (APP695 MSCs-n). These results suggested autologous MSCs of APP690 mice may not be a good candidate for cell transplantation.

  16. Lymphoma induction by heterocyclic amines in Eu-pim-1 transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ilona Kryspin; Kristiansen, E.; Mortensen, Alicja

    1997-01-01

    The usefulness of transgenic E mu-pim-1 mice bearing in their genome the pim-1 oncogene supplemented with an upstream immunoglobulin enhancer and a downstream murine leukaemia virus long terminal repeat, as sensitive test organisms was studied in two short-term carcinogenicity studies. The mice...... were fed standard diet Altromin 1314 supplemented either with 0.03% 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) for 7 months or with 0.03% 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) for 6 months. PhIP and IQ are heterocyclic amines formed during cooking of meat and fish and are mutagenic...... to bacteria and cultured mammalian cells. PhIP is a potent mouse lymphomagen, while IQ is a liver, lung and forestomach carcinogen in mice. We found that transgenic E mu-pim-1 mice are highly susceptible to PhIP induced lymphomagenesis but do not respond to IQ treatment. PhIP feeding of E mu-pim-1 mice...

  17. Behavioral improvement after chronic administration of coenzyme Q10 in P301S transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elipenahli, Ceyhan; Stack, Cliona; Jainuddin, Shari; Gerges, Meri; Yang, Lichuan; Starkov, Anatoly; Beal, M Flint; Dumont, Magali

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a key component of the electron transport chain which plays an essential role in ATP production and also has antioxidant effects. Neuroprotective effects of coenzyme Q10 have been reported in both in vitro and in vivo models of neurodegenerative diseases. However, its effects have not been studied in cells or in animals with tau induced pathology. In this report, we administered coenzyme Q10 to transgenic mice with the P301S tau mutation, which causes fronto-temporal dementia in man. These mice develop tau hyperphosphorylation and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Coenzyme Q10 improved survival and behavioral deficits in the P301S mice. There was a modest reduction in phosphorylated tau in the cortex of P301S mice. We also examined the effects of coenzyme Q10 treatment on the electron transport chain enzymes, the mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. There was a significant increase in complex I activity and protein levels, and a reduction in lipid peroxidation. Our data show that coenzyme Q10 significantly improved behavioral deficits and survival in transgenic mice with the P301S tau mutation, upregulated key enzymes of the electron transport chain, and reduced oxidative stress.

  18. Peripheral neuropathy is linked to a severe form of myotonic dystrophy in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaite, Petrica-Adrian; Kielar, Marie; Kraftsik, Rudolf; Gourdon, Geneviève; Kuntzer, Thierry; Barakat-Walter, Ibtissam

    2011-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystem disorder with a variable phenotype. The involvement of peripheral nerves in DM1 disease is controversial. The DM1 animal model DM300 transgenic mice that carry 350 to 500 CTG repeats express a mild DM1 phenotype but do not exhibit motor or sensory pathology. Here, we investigated the presence or absence of peripheral neuropathy in transgenic mice (DMSXL) that carry more than 1,300 CTG repeats and display a severe form of DM1. Electrophysiologic, histologic, and morphometric methods were used to investigate the structure and function of peripheral nerves. We observed lower compound muscle action potentials recorded from hind limb muscles and slowing of sciatic nerve conduction velocity in DMSXL versus control mice. Morphometric analyses showed an axonopathy and neuronopathy in the DMSXL mice characterized by a decrease in numbers of myelinated motor axons in sciatic nerve and in spinal cord motor neurons. Pathologic alterations in the structure of hind limb neuromuscular junctions were also detected in the DMSXL mice. These results suggest that peripheral neuropathy can be linked to a large CTG expansion and a severe form of DM1.

  19. Immune responses of IL-5 transgenic mice to parasites and aeroallergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LA Dent

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils have long been thought to be effectors of immunity to helminths but have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. Patterns of cytokine production in the host may influence the pathogenesis of these diseases by regulating the activities of eosinophils and other components of the immune response. Mice which constitutively over-express IL-5 have profound and life-long eosinophilia in a restricted number of tissues. Although eosinophils from IL-5 transgenics are functionally competent for a number of parameters considered to be important in inflammation, untreated animals are overtly normal and free of disease. In addition, the responses of these animals when exposed to aeroallergens and helminths present a number of apparent paradoxes. Eosinophil accumulation in tissues adjacent to major airways is rapid and extensive in transgenics exposed to the aeroallergen, but even after treatment with antigen over many months these mice show no evidence of respiratory distress or pathology. Helminth-infected IL-5 transgenics and their non-transgenic littermates develop similar inflammatory responses at mucosal sites and are comparable for a number of T cell and antibody responses, but they differ considerably in their ability to clear some parasite species. The life-cycle of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis is significantly inhibited in IL-5 transgenics, but that of Toxocara canis is not. Our results also suggest that eosinophilia and/or over-expression of IL-5 may actually impair host resistance to Schistosoma mansoni and Trichinella spiralis. The pathogenesis of diseases in which eosinophils are involved may therefore be more complex than previously thought.

  20. Production and characterization of transgenic mice systemically expressing endo-beta-galactosidase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Misawa, Masako; Matsuzaki, Takashi; Sakurai, Takayuki; Muramatsu, Takashi; Yokomine, Taka-Aki; Sato, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    The alphaGal epitope (Galalpha1-3Gal) is a sugar structure expressed on the cell surface of almost all organisms except humans and old-world-monkeys, which express natural anti-alphaGal antibodies. The presence of these antibodies elicits a hyper acute rejection (HAR) upon xenotransplantation of cellular materials, such as from pigs to human beings. Endo-beta-galactosidase C (EndoGalC), an enzyme isolated from Clostridium perfringens, removes the alphaGal epitope by cleaving the Galbeta1-4GlcNAc linkage in the Galalpha1-3Galbeta1-4GlcNAc sequence. To explore the possibility that cells or organs from transgenic pigs systemically expressing EndoGalC might be suitable for xenotransplantation, we first introduced the EndoGalC transgene into the mouse genome via pronuclear injection. The progeny of the resulting transgenics expressed EndoGalC mRNA and protein. Flow cytometry and histochemical analyses revealed a dramatic reduction in the expression of the alphaGal epitope in these mice. They also exhibited abnormal phenotypes, such as occasional death immediately after birth, growth retardation, and transient skin lesions. Interestingly, the phenotypic abnormalities seen in these transgenics were similar to those observed in beta1,4-galactosyltransferase 1 (beta4GalT-1) knockout (KO) mice. Most probably, these phenotypes were caused by exposure of the internal N-acetylglucosamine residue at the end of the sugar chain on the cell surface. The present findings also provide some basis for evaluating possible application of the transgenic approach for xenotranplantation.

  1. Genetic biomarkers for ALS disease in transgenic SOD1(G93A mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C Calvo

    Full Text Available The pathophysiological mechanisms of both familial and sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS are unknown, although growing evidence suggests that skeletal muscle tissue is a primary target of ALS toxicity. Skeletal muscle biopsies were performed on transgenic SOD1(G93A mice, a mouse model of ALS, to determine genetic biomarkers of disease longevity. Mice were anesthetized with isoflurane, and three biopsy samples were obtained per animal at the three main stages of the disease. Transcriptional expression levels of seventeen genes, Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbxo32, Gsr, Impa1, Mef2c, Mt2, Myf5, Myod1, Myog, Nnt, Nogo A, Pax7, Rrad, Sln and Snx10, were tested in each muscle biopsy sample. Total RNA was extracted using TRIzol Reagent according to the manufacturer's protocol, and variations in gene expression were assayed by real-time PCR for all of the samples. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine the linear correlation between transcriptional expression levels throughout disease progression and longevity. Consistent with the results obtained from total skeletal muscle of transgenic SOD1(G93A mice and 74-day-old denervated mice, five genes (Mef2c, Gsr, Col19a1, Calm1 and Snx10 could be considered potential genetic biomarkers of longevity in transgenic SOD1(G93A mice. These results are important because they may lead to the exploration of previously unexamined tissues in the search for new disease biomarkers and even to the application of these findings in human studies.

  2. Doxycycline-Induced Expression of Transgenic Human Tumor Necrosis Factor α in Adult Mice Results in Psoriasis-like Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retser, Eugen; Schied, Tanja; Skryabin, Boris V; Vogl, Thomas; Kanczler, Janos M; Hamann, Nina; Niehoff, Anja; Hermann, Sven; Eisenblätter, Michel; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Pap, Thomas; van Lent, Peter L E M; Loser, Karin; Roth, Johannes; Zaucke, Frank; Ludwig, Stephan; Wixler, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    Objective To generate doxycycline-inducible human tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)–transgenic mice to overcome a major disadvantage of existing transgenic mice with constitutive expression of TNFα, which is the limitation in crossing them with various knockout or transgenic mice. Methods A transgenic mouse line that expresses the human TNFα cytokine exclusively after doxycycline administration was generated and analyzed for the onset of diseases. Results Doxycycline-inducible human TNFα–transgenic mice developed an inflammatory arthritis– and psoriasis-like phenotype, with fore and hind paws being prominently affected. The formation of “sausage digits” with characteristic involvement of the distal interphalangeal joints and nail malformation was observed. Synovial hyperplasia, enthesitis, cartilage and bone alterations, formation of pannus tissue, and inflammation of the skin epidermis and nail matrix appeared as early as 1 week after the treatment of mice with doxycycline and became aggravated over time. The abrogation of human TNFα expression by the removal of doxycycline 6 weeks after beginning stimulation resulted in fast resolution of the most advanced macroscopic and histologic disorders, and 3–6 weeks later, only minimal signs of disease were visible. Conclusion Upon doxycycline administration, the doxycycline-inducible human TNFα–transgenic mouse displays the major features of inflammatory arthritis. It represents a unique animal model for studying the molecular mechanisms of arthritis, especially the early phases of disease genesis and tissue remodeling steps upon abrogation of TNFα expression. Furthermore, unlimited crossing of doxycycline-inducible human TNFα–transgenic mice with various knockout or transgenic mice opens new possibilities for unraveling the role of various signaling molecules acting in concert with TNFα. PMID:23740547

  3. Stable Skin-specific Overexpression of Human CTLA4-Ig in Transgenic Mice through Seven Generations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong WANG; Yong NI; Hong WEI; Feng-Chao WANG; Liang-Peng GE; Xiang GAO

    2006-01-01

    Skin graft rejection is a typical cellular immune response, mainly mediated by T cells. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen 4-immunoglobin (CTLA4-Ig) extends graft survival by blocking the T cell co-stimulation pathway and inhibiting T cell activation. To investigate the efficacy of CTLA4-Ig in prolonging skin graft survival, human CTLA4-Ig (hCTLA4-Ig) was engineered to overexpress in mouse skin by transgenesis using the K14 promoter. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot assay indicated that the expression of CTLA4-Ig remained skin-specific and relatively constant compared to the internal control protein, AKT, through seven generations. The presence and concentration of the hCTLA4-Ig protein in transgenic mouse sera was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the results indicated that the serum CTLA4-Ig concentration also remained constant through generations. Survival of transgenic mouse skins grafted onto rat wounds was remarkably prolonged compared to that of wild-type skins from the same mouse strain, and remained comparable among all seven generations. This suggested that the bioactive hCTLA4-Ig protein was stably expressed in transgenical mice through at least seven generations, which was consistent with the stable skin-specific CTLA4-Ig expression.The results demonstrated that the transgenic expression of hCTLA4-Ig in skin driven by the K14 promoter remained constant through generations, and a transgenic line can be established to provide transgenic skin with extended survival reproducibly.

  4. Dynamics of testicular germ cell apoptosis in normal mice and transgenic mice overexpressing rat androgen-binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrusz Peter

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The number and type of testicular germ cells undergoing apoptosis in different age groups of mice (from 7 to 360 days of age was determined and compared in age-matched wild type (WT control and in a transgenic (TG mice homozygous to rat androgen binding protein (ABP using flow cytometry. Flow cytometric quantification revealed that the total number of germ cells undergoing apoptosis did not differ significantly in WT and TG mice up to Day 14. From Day 21 to Day 60, the number of germ cells undergoing apoptosis was consistently higher in TG than in WT mice. Starting from Day 90, the number of germ cells undergoing apoptosis in TG mice was lower than controls until Day 360. In 21–60 days old TG mice, spermatogonia, S-Phase cells, and primary spermatocytes are the cell types undergoing apoptosis at significantly greater numbers than those in WT mice. However, starting from day 60, the total number of spermatids undergoing apoptosis was significantly lower in TG mice than in age-matched WT controls. TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL in testicular sections from TG mice of 21 and 30 days of age confirmed the presence of increased numbers of apoptotic germ cells compared to their age matched controls. These data indicate that the continuous presence of greater than physiological concentrations of ABP in the mouse testis has a biphasic effect on the frequency of apoptosis in germ cells. The initial pre-pubertal increase in testicular germ cell apoptosis may result from direct or indirect actions of ABP and is likely to determine the subsequent life-death balance of germ cell populations in TG mice, whereas the subsequent reduction may result from maturation depletion. A wave of apoptosis during the pre-pubertal period is required for normal spermatogenesis to develop, and our data indicate that this apoptotic wave may be regulated by ABP and/or androgens.

  5. Generation of human MHC (HLA-A11/DR1) transgenic mice for vaccine evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yang; Gao, Tongtong; Zhao, Guangyu; Jiang, Yuting; Yang, Yi; Yu, Hong; Kou, Zhihua; Lone, Yuchun; Sun, Shihui; Zhou, Yusen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rapid occurrence of emerging infectious diseases demonstrates an urgent need for a new preclinical experimental model that reliably replicates human immune responses. Here, a new homozygous humanized human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A11/DR1 transgenic mouse (HLA-A11+/+/DR01+/+/H-2-β2m−/−/IAβ−/−) was generated by crossing HLA-A11 transgenic (Tg) mice with HLA-A2+/+/DR01+/+/H-2-β2m−/−/IAβ−/− mice. The HLA-A11-restricted immune response of this mouse model was then examined. HLA-A11 Tg mice expressing a chimeric major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule comprising the α1, α2, and β2m domains of human HLA-A11 and the α3 transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of murine H-2Db were generated. The correct integration of HLA-A11 and HLA-DR1 into the genome of the HLA-A11/DR1 Tg mice (which lacked the expression of endogenous H-2-I/II molecules) was then confirmed. Immunizing mice with a recombinant HBV vaccine or a recombinant HIV-1 protein resulted in the generation of IFN-γ-producing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antigen-specific antibodies. The HLA-A11-restricted CTL response was directed at HLA immunodominant epitopes. These mice represent a versatile animal model for studying the immunogenicity of HLA CTL epitopes in the absence of a murine MHC response. The established animal model will also be useful for evaluating and optimizing T cell-based vaccines and for studying differences in antigen processing between mice and humans. PMID:26479036

  6. Reduced striatal dopamine DA D2 receptor function in dominant-negative GSK-3 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Sintes, Raquel; Bortolozzi, Analia; Artigas, Francesc; Lucas, José J

    2014-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a serine/threonine kinase with constitutive activity involved in cellular architecture, gene expression, cell proliferation, fate decision and apoptosis, among others. GSK-3 expression is particularly high in brain where it may be involved in neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer׳s disease, bipolar disorder and major depression. A link with schizophrenia is suggested by the antipsychotic drug-induced GSK-3 regulation and by the involvement of the Akt/GSK-3 pathway in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Taking advantage of the previous development of dominant negative GSK-3 transgenic mice (Tg) showing a selective reduction of GSK-3 activity in forebrain neurons but not in dopaminergic neurons, we explored the relationship between GSK-3 and dopaminergic neurotransmission in vivo. In microdialysis experiments, local quinpirole (DA D2-R agonist) in dorsal striatum reduced dopamine (DA) release significantly less in Tg mice than in wild-type (WT) mice. However, local SKF-81297 (selective DA D1-R agonist) in dorsal striatum reduced DA release equally in both control and Tg mice indicating a comparable function of DA D1-R in the direct striato-nigral pathway. Likewise, systemic quinpirole administration - acting preferentially on presynaptic DA D2- autoreceptors to modulate DA release-reduced striatal DA release similarly in both control and Tg mice. Quinpirole reduced locomotor activity and induced c-fos expression in globus pallidus (both striatal DA D2-R-mediated effects) significantly more in WT than in Tg mice. Taking together, the present results show that dominant negative GSK-3 transgenic mice show reduced DA D2-R-mediated function in striatum and further support a link between dopaminergic neurotransmission and GSK-3 activity.

  7. Osthole Upregulates BDNF to Enhance Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Xue, Xinhong; Shi, Huijian; Qi, Lifeng; Gong, Dianrong

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis occurs in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the mouse hippocampus, and plays roles in learning and memory progresses. In amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilin 1 (PS1) transgenic mice, a rodent model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), severe impairment of neurogenesis in the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ) of the DG has been reported. Osthole, an active constituent of Cnidium monnieri (L.) CUSSON, has been reported to exert neuroprotective effects and may promote neural stem cell proliferation. However, whether osthole ameliorates spatial memory deficits and improves hippocampal neurogenesis in APP/PS1 mice remains unknown. In this study we found that osthole (30 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) once daily) treatment dramatically ameliorated the cognitive impairments by Morris Water Maze test and passive avoidance test, and augmented neurogenesis in the DG of hippocampus in APP/PS1 mice. Furthermore, osthole treatment upregulated expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and enhanced activation of the BDNF receptor tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) following increased phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), indicating that osthole improves neurogenesis via stimulating BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

  8. Spontaneous colitis occurrence in transgenic mice with altered B7-mediated costimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gisen; Turovskaya, Olga; Levin, Matthew; Byrne, Fergus R; Whoriskey, John S; McCabe, James G; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-10-15

    The B7 costimulatory molecules govern many aspects of T cell immune responses by interacting with CD28 for costimulation, but also with CTLA-4 for immune suppression. Although blockade of CTLA-4 with Ab in humans undergoing cancer immune therapy has led to some cases of inflammatory bowel disease, spontaneous animal models of colitis that depend upon modulation of B7 interactions have not been previously described. In this study, we demonstrate that mice expressing a soluble B7-2 Ig Fc chimeric protein spontaneously develop colitis that is dependent on CD28-mediated costimulation of CD4(+) T cells. We show that the chimeric protein has mixed agonistic/antagonist properties, and that it acts in part by blocking the cell intrinsic effects on T cell activation of engagement of CTLA-4. Disease occurred in transgenic mice that lack expression of the endogenous B7 molecules (B7 double knock-out mice), because of the relatively weak costimulatory delivered by the chimeric protein. Surprisingly, colitis was more severe in this context, which was associated with the decreased number of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in transgenic B7 double knock-out mice. This model provides an important tool for examining how B7 molecules and their effects on CTLA-4 modulate T cell function and the development of inflammatory diseases.

  9. Adipose tissues differentiated by adipose-derived stemcells harvested from transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Feng; GAO Jian-hua; Rei Ogawa; Hiroshi Mizuro; Hiki Hykusoku

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To induce adipocyte differentiation in vitro by adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) harvested from transgenic mice with green fluorescent protein (GFP)and assess the possibility of constructing adipose tissues via attachment of ASCs to type Ⅰ collagen scaffolds.Methods: Inguinal fat pads from GFP transgenic mice were digested by enzymes for isolation of ASCs (primary culture). After expansion to three passages of ASCs, the cells were incubated in an adipogenic medium for two weeks, and the adipocyte differentiation by ASCs in vitro was assessed by morphological observation and Oil Red O staining. Then they were attached to collagen scaffolds and co-cultured for 12 hours, followed by hypodermic implantation to the dorsal skin of nude mice for 2 months. The newly-formed tissues were detected by HE staining.Results: The cultured primary stem cells were fibroblast-like and showed active proliferation. After being incubated in an adipocyte differentiation medium, the lipid droplets in the cytoplasm accumulated gradually and finally developed into mature adipocytes, which showed positive in Oil Red O staining. A 0.5-cm3 new tissue clot was found under the dorsal skin of the nude mice and it was confirmed as mature adipose tissues by fluorescent observation and HE staining.Conclusions: ASCs can successfully differentiate adipose tissues into mature adipocytes, which exhibit an adipocyte-like morphology and express as intracytoplasmic lipid droplets. It is an efficient model of adipose tissues engineered with ASCs and type Ⅰ collagen scaffolds.

  10. Ablation of the Locus Coeruleus Increases Oxidative Stress in Tg-2576 Transgenic but Not Wild-Type Mice

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    Orest Hurko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mice transgenic for production of excessive or mutant forms of beta-amyloid differ from patients with Alzheimer's disease in the degree of inflammation, oxidative damage, and alteration of intermediary metabolism, as well as the paucity or absence of neuronal atrophy and cognitive impairment. Previous observers have suggested that differences in inflammatory response reflect a discrepancy in the state of the locus coeruleus (LC, loss of which is an early change in Alzheimer's disease but which is preserved in the transgenic mice. In this paper, we extend these observations by examining the effects of the LC on markers of oxidative stress and intermediary metabolism. We compare four groups: wild-type or Tg2576 A transgenic mice injected with DSP4 or vehicle. Of greatest interest were metabolites different between ablated and intact transgenics, but not between ablated and intact wild-type animals. The Tg2576_DSP4 mice were distinguished from the other three groups by oxidative stress and altered energy metabolism. These observations provide further support for the hypothesis that Tg2576 A transgenic mice with this ablation may be a more congruent model of Alzheimer's disease than are transgenics with an intact LC.

  11. Regulation of an Autoimmune Model for Multiple Sclerosis in Th2-Biased GATA3 Transgenic Mice

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    Viromi Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available T helper (Th2 cells have been proposed to play a neuroprotective role in multiple sclerosis (MS. This is mainly based on “loss-of-function” studies in an animal model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, using blocking antibodies against Th2 related cytokines, and knockout mice lacking Th2-related molecules. We tested whether an increase of Th2 responses (“gain-of-function” approach could alter EAE, the approach of novel GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3-transgenic (tg mice that overexpress GATA3, a transcription factor required for Th2 differentiation. In EAE induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35−55 peptide, GATA3-tg mice had a significantly delayed onset of disease and a less severe maximum clinical score, compared with wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Histologically, GATA3-tg mice had decreased levels of meningitis and demyelination in the spinal cord, and anti-inflammatory cytokine profiles immunologically, however both groups developed similar levels of MOG-specific lymphoproliferative responses. During the early stage, we detected higher levels of interleukin (IL-4 and IL-10, with MOG and mitogen stimulation of regional lymph node cells in GATA3-tg mice. During the late stage, only mitogen stimulation induced higher IL-4 and lower interferon-γ and IL-17 production in GATA3-tg mice. These results suggest that a preexisting bias toward a Th2 immune response may reduce the severity of inflammatory demyelinating diseases, including MS.

  12. Long tract of untranslated CAG repeats is deleterious in transgenic mice.

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    Ren-Jun Hsu

    Full Text Available The most frequent trinucleotide repeat found in human disorders is the CAG sequence. Expansion of CAG repeats is mostly found in coding regions and is thought to cause diseases through a protein mechanism. Recently, expanded CAG repeats were shown to induce toxicity at the RNA level in Drosophila and C. elegans. These findings raise the possibility that CAG repeats may trigger RNA-mediated pathogenesis in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing EGFP transcripts with long CAG repeats in the 3' untranslated region develop pathogenic features. Expression of the transgene was directed to the muscle in order to compare the resulting phenotype to that caused by the CUG expansion, as occurs in myotonic dystrophy. Transgenic mice expressing 200, but not those expressing 0 or 23 CAG repeats, showed alterations in muscle morphology, histochemistry and electrophysiology, as well as abnormal behavioral phenotypes. Expression of the expanded CAG repeats in testes resulted in reduced fertility due to defective sperm motility. The production of EGFP protein was significantly reduced by the 200 CAG repeats, and no polyglutamine-containing product was detected, which argues against a protein mechanism. Moreover, nuclear RNA foci were detected for the long CAG repeats. These data support the notion that expanded CAG repeat RNA can cause deleterious effects in mammals. They also suggest the possible involvement of an RNA mechanism in human diseases with long CAG repeats.

  13. Utrophin up-regulation by an artificial transcription factor in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Mattei

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is a severe muscle degenerative disease, due to absence of dystrophin. There is currently no effective treatment for DMD. Our aim is to up-regulate the expression level of the dystrophin related gene utrophin in DMD, complementing in this way the lack of dystrophin functions. To this end we designed and engineered several synthetic zinc finger based transcription factors. In particular, we have previously shown that the artificial three zinc finger protein named Jazz, fused with the appropriate effector domain, is able to drive the transcription of a test gene from the utrophin promoter "A". Here we report on the characterization of Vp16-Jazz-transgenic mice that specifically over-express the utrophin gene at the muscular level. A Chromatin Immunoprecipitation assay (ChIP demonstrated the effective access/binding of the Jazz protein to active chromatin in mouse muscle and Vp16-Jazz was shown to be able to up-regulate endogenous utrophin gene expression by immunohistochemistry, western blot analyses and real-time PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a transgenic mouse expressing an artificial gene coding for a zinc finger based transcription factor. The achievement of Vp16-Jazz transgenic mice validates the strategy of transcriptional targeting of endogenous genes and could represent an exclusive animal model for use in drug discovery and therapeutics.

  14. Cosmetics-triggered percutaneous remote control of transgene expression in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Ye, Haifeng; Xie, Mingqi; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the rational design of trigger-inducible gene switches that program cellular behavior in a reliable and predictable manner. Capitalizing on genetic componentry, including the repressor PmeR and its cognate operator OPmeR, that has evolved in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000 to sense and resist plant-defence metabolites of the paraben class, we have designed a set of inducible and repressible mammalian transcription-control devices that could dose-dependently fine-tune transgene expression in mammalian cells and mice in response to paraben derivatives. With an over 60-years track record as licensed preservatives in the cosmetics industry, paraben derivatives have become a commonplace ingredient of most skin-care products including shower gels, cleansing toners and hand creams. As parabens can rapidly reach the bloodstream of mice following topical application, we used this feature to percutaneously program transgene expression of subcutaneous designer cell implants using off-the-shelf commercial paraben-containing skin-care cosmetics. The combination of non-invasive, transdermal and orthogonal trigger-inducible remote control of transgene expression may provide novel opportunities for dynamic interventions in future gene and cell-based therapies. PMID:25943548

  15. Green Tea Polyphenols Control Dysregulated Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Transgenic Mice by Hijacking the ADP Activation Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Changhong; Li, Ming; Chen, Pan; Narayan, Srinivas; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Bennett, Michael J.; Stanley, Charles A.; Smith, Thomas J. (CH-PA); (UPENN); (Danforth)

    2012-05-09

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and, in animals, is extensively regulated by a number of metabolites. Gain of function mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS), resulting in increased pancreatic {beta}-cell responsiveness to leucine and susceptibility to hypoglycemia following high protein meals. We have previously shown that two of the polyphenols from green tea (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate (ECG)) inhibit GDH in vitro and that EGCG blocks GDH-mediated insulin secretion in wild type rat islets. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that ECG binds to the same site as the allosteric regulator, ADP. Perifusion assays using pancreatic islets from transgenic mice expressing a human HHS form of GDH demonstrate that the hyperresponse to glutamine caused by dysregulated GDH is blocked by the addition of EGCG. As observed in HHS patients, these transgenic mice are hypersensitive to amino acid feeding, and this is abrogated by oral administration of EGCG prior to challenge. Finally, the low basal blood glucose level in the HHS mouse model is improved upon chronic administration of EGCG. These results suggest that this common natural product or some derivative thereof may prove useful in controlling this genetic disorder. Of broader clinical implication is that other groups have shown that restriction of glutamine catabolism via these GDH inhibitors can be useful in treating various tumors. This HHS transgenic mouse model offers a highly useful means to test these agents in vivo.

  16. Cosmetics-triggered percutaneous remote control of transgene expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Ye, Haifeng; Xie, Mingqi; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-08-18

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the rational design of trigger-inducible gene switches that program cellular behavior in a reliable and predictable manner. Capitalizing on genetic componentry, including the repressor PmeR and its cognate operator OPmeR, that has evolved in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000 to sense and resist plant-defence metabolites of the paraben class, we have designed a set of inducible and repressible mammalian transcription-control devices that could dose-dependently fine-tune transgene expression in mammalian cells and mice in response to paraben derivatives. With an over 60-years track record as licensed preservatives in the cosmetics industry, paraben derivatives have become a commonplace ingredient of most skin-care products including shower gels, cleansing toners and hand creams. As parabens can rapidly reach the bloodstream of mice following topical application, we used this feature to percutaneously program transgene expression of subcutaneous designer cell implants using off-the-shelf commercial paraben-containing skin-care cosmetics. The combination of non-invasive, transdermal and orthogonal trigger-inducible remote control of transgene expression may provide novel opportunities for dynamic interventions in future gene and cell-based therapies.

  17. Green tea polyphenols control dysregulated glutamate dehydrogenase in transgenic mice by hijacking the ADP activation site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changhong; Li, Ming; Chen, Pan; Narayan, Srinivas; Matschinsky, Franz M; Bennett, Michael J; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2011-09-30

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and, in animals, is extensively regulated by a number of metabolites. Gain of function mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS), resulting in increased pancreatic β-cell responsiveness to leucine and susceptibility to hypoglycemia following high protein meals. We have previously shown that two of the polyphenols from green tea (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate (ECG)) inhibit GDH in vitro and that EGCG blocks GDH-mediated insulin secretion in wild type rat islets. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that ECG binds to the same site as the allosteric regulator, ADP. Perifusion assays using pancreatic islets from transgenic mice expressing a human HHS form of GDH demonstrate that the hyperresponse to glutamine caused by dysregulated GDH is blocked by the addition of EGCG. As observed in HHS patients, these transgenic mice are hypersensitive to amino acid feeding, and this is abrogated by oral administration of EGCG prior to challenge. Finally, the low basal blood glucose level in the HHS mouse model is improved upon chronic administration of EGCG. These results suggest that this common natural product or some derivative thereof may prove useful in controlling this genetic disorder. Of broader clinical implication is that other groups have shown that restriction of glutamine catabolism via these GDH inhibitors can be useful in treating various tumors. This HHS transgenic mouse model offers a highly useful means to test these agents in vivo.

  18. H-Ferritin ferroxidase induces cytoprotective pathways and inhibits microvascular stasis in transgenic sickle mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M Vercellotti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemolysis, oxidative stress, inflammation, vaso-occlusion and organ infarction are hallmarks of sickle cell disease (SCD. We have previously shown that increases in heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 activity detoxify heme and inhibit vaso-occlusion in transgenic mouse models of SCD. HO-1 releases Fe2+ from heme, and the ferritin heavy chain (FHC ferroxidase oxidizes iron to catalytically-inactive Fe3+ inside ferritin. FHC overexpression has been shown to be cytoprotective. In this study, we hypothesized that overexpression of FHC and its ferroxidase activity will inhibit inflammation and microvascular stasis in transgenic sickle mice in response to stroma-free hemoglobin. We utilized a Sleeping Beauty transposase plasmid to deliver a human wild-type-ferritin heavy chain (wt-hFHC transposable element by hydrodynamic tail vein injections to NY1DD SCD mice. Control mice were infused with the same volume of lactated Ringer's solution (LRS or a triple missense human FHC (ms-hFHC plasmid with no ferroxidase activity. Eight weeks later, LRS-injected mice had ~40% microvascular stasis (% non-flowing venules when infused with stroma-free hemoglobin at 1 h, while mice overexpressing wt-hFHC had only 5% stasis (p< 0.05, and ms-hFHC mice had 33% stasis suggesting vascular protection by ferroxidase active wt-hFHC. The wt-hFHC SCD mice had marked increases in splenic hFHC mRNA and hepatic hFHC protein, light chain ferritin, 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase (5-ALA-synthase, heme content, ferroportin, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, nuclear hFHC, and microsomal HO-1 activity and protein, and a decrease in activated nuclear phosho-nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB p65. HO-1 activity was not essential for the protection by FHC. We conclude that wt-hFHC ferroxidase activity enhances cytoprotective Nrf2-regulated proteins including HO-1, thereby resulting in decreased NF-κB-activation, inflammation and microvascular stasis in transgenic SCD mice.

  19. H-ferritin ferroxidase induces cytoprotective pathways and inhibits microvascular stasis in transgenic sickle mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercellotti, Gregory M; Khan, Fatima B; Nguyen, Julia; Chen, Chunsheng; Bruzzone, Carol M; Bechtel, Heather; Brown, Graham; Nath, Karl A; Steer, Clifford J; Hebbel, Robert P; Belcher, John D

    2014-01-01

    Hemolysis, oxidative stress, inflammation, vaso-occlusion, and organ infarction are hallmarks of sickle cell disease (SCD). We have previously shown that increases in heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) activity detoxify heme and inhibit vaso-occlusion in transgenic mouse models of SCD. HO-1 releases Fe(2+) from heme, and the ferritin heavy chain (FHC) ferroxidase oxidizes Fe(2+) to catalytically inactive Fe(3+) inside ferritin. FHC overexpression has been shown to be cytoprotective. In this study, we hypothesized that overexpression of FHC and its ferroxidase activity will inhibit inflammation and microvascular stasis in transgenic SCD mice in response to plasma hemoglobin. We utilized a Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase plasmid to deliver a human wild-type-ferritin heavy chain (wt-hFHC) transposable element by hydrodynamic tail vein injections into NY1DD SCD mice. Control SCD mice were infused with the same volume of lactated Ringer's solution (LRS) or a human triple missense FHC (ms-hFHC) plasmid with no ferroxidase activity. 8 weeks later, LRS-injected mice had ~40% microvascular stasis (% non-flowing venules) 1 h after infusion of stroma-free hemoglobin, while mice overexpressing wt-hFHC had only 5% stasis (p < 0.05), and ms-hFHC mice had 33% stasis suggesting vascular protection by ferroxidase active wt-hFHC. The wt-hFHC SCD mice had marked increases in splenic hFHC mRNA and hepatic hFHC protein, ferritin light chain (FLC), 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS), heme content, ferroportin, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and HO-1 activity and protein. There was also a decrease in hepatic activated nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) phospho-p65 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Inhibition of HO-1 activity with tin protoporphyrin demonstrated HO-1 was not essential for the protection by wt-hFHC. We conclude that wt-hFHC ferroxidase activity enhances cytoprotective Nrf2-regulated proteins including HO-1, thereby resulting in decreased NF

  20. Lens specific RLIP76 transgenic mice show a phenotype similar to microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Mukesh; Sharma, Rajendra; Yadav, Sushma; Wakamiya, Maki; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Awasthi, Sanjay; Awasthi, Yogesh C

    2014-01-01

    RALBP1/RLIP76 is a ubiquitously expressed protein, involved in promotion and regulation of functions initiated by Ral and R-Ras small GTPases. Presence of multiple domains in its structure enables RLIP76 to be involved in a number of physiological processes such as endocytosis, exocytosis, mitochondrial fission, actin cytoskeleton remodeling, and transport of exogenous and endogenous toxicants. Previously, we have established that RLIP76 provides protection to ocular tissues against oxidative stress by transporting the glutathione-conjugates of the toxic, electrophilic products of lipid peroxidation generated during oxidative stress. Therefore, we developed lens specific RLIP76 transgenic mice (lensRLIP76 Tg) to elucidate the role of RLIP76 in protection against oxidative stress, but these transgenic mice showed impaired lens development and a phenotype with small eyes similar to that observed in microphthalmia. These findings prompted us to investigate the mechanisms via which RLIP76 affects lens and eye development. In the present study, we report engineering of lensRLIP76 Tg mice, characterization of the associated phenotype, and the possible molecular mechanisms that lead to the impaired development of eye and lens in these mice. The results of microarray array analysis indicate that the genes involved in pathways for G-Protein signaling, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, endocytosis, and apoptosis are affected in these transgenic mice. The expression of transcription factors, Pax6, Hsf1, and Hsf4b known to be involved in lens development is down regulated in the lens of these Tg mice. However, the expression of heat shock proteins (Hsps), the downstream targets of Hsfs, is differentially affected in the lens showing down regulation of Hsp27, Hsp40, up regulation of Hsp60, and no effect on Hsp70 and Hsp90 expression. The disruption in the organization of actin cytoskeleton of these Tg mice was associated with the inhibition of the activation of Cdc42 and

  1. Postnatal development of numbers and mean sizes of pancreatic islets and beta-cells in healthy mice and GIPR(dn transgenic diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Herbach

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine postnatal islet and beta-cell expansion in healthy female control mice and its disturbances in diabetic GIPR(dn transgenic mice, which exhibit an early reduction of beta-cell mass. Pancreata of female control and GIPR(dn transgenic mice, aged 10, 45, 90 and 180 days were examined, using state-of-the-art quantitative-stereological methods. Total islet and beta-cell volumes, as well as their absolute numbers increased significantly until 90 days in control mice, and remained stable thereafter. The mean islet volumes of controls also increased slightly but significantly between 10 and 45 days of age, and then remained stable until 180 days. The total volume of isolated beta-cells, an indicator of islet neogenesis, and the number of proliferating (BrdU-positive islet cells were highest in 10-day-old controls and declined significantly between 10 and 45 days. In GIPR(dn transgenic mice, the numbers of islets and beta-cells were significantly reduced from 10 days of age onwards vs. controls, and no postnatal expansion of total islet and beta-cell volumes occurred due to a reduction in islet neogenesis whereas early islet-cell proliferation and apoptosis were unchanged as compared to control mice. Insulin secretion in response to pharmacological doses of GIP was preserved in GIPR(dn transgenic mice, and serum insulin to pancreatic insulin content in response to GLP-1 and arginine was significantly higher in GIPR(dn transgenic mice vs. controls. We could show that the increase in islet number is mainly responsible for expansion of islet and beta-cell mass in healthy control mice. GIPR(dn transgenic mice show a disturbed expansion of the endocrine pancreas, due to perturbed islet neogenesis.

  2. Postnatal development of numbers and mean sizes of pancreatic islets and beta-cells in healthy mice and GIPR(dn) transgenic diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbach, Nadja; Bergmayr, Martina; Göke, Burkhard; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Ruediger

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine postnatal islet and beta-cell expansion in healthy female control mice and its disturbances in diabetic GIPR(dn) transgenic mice, which exhibit an early reduction of beta-cell mass. Pancreata of female control and GIPR(dn) transgenic mice, aged 10, 45, 90 and 180 days were examined, using state-of-the-art quantitative-stereological methods. Total islet and beta-cell volumes, as well as their absolute numbers increased significantly until 90 days in control mice, and remained stable thereafter. The mean islet volumes of controls also increased slightly but significantly between 10 and 45 days of age, and then remained stable until 180 days. The total volume of isolated beta-cells, an indicator of islet neogenesis, and the number of proliferating (BrdU-positive) islet cells were highest in 10-day-old controls and declined significantly between 10 and 45 days. In GIPR(dn) transgenic mice, the numbers of islets and beta-cells were significantly reduced from 10 days of age onwards vs. controls, and no postnatal expansion of total islet and beta-cell volumes occurred due to a reduction in islet neogenesis whereas early islet-cell proliferation and apoptosis were unchanged as compared to control mice. Insulin secretion in response to pharmacological doses of GIP was preserved in GIPR(dn) transgenic mice, and serum insulin to pancreatic insulin content in response to GLP-1 and arginine was significantly higher in GIPR(dn) transgenic mice vs. controls. We could show that the increase in islet number is mainly responsible for expansion of islet and beta-cell mass in healthy control mice. GIPR(dn) transgenic mice show a disturbed expansion of the endocrine pancreas, due to perturbed islet neogenesis.

  3. Protective Effects of Overexpression of bcl-xl Gene on Local Cerebral Infarction in Transgenic Mice Undergoing Permanent Occlusion of Middle Cerebral Artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Furong WANG; Yongsheng JIANG; Suming ZHANG; Wenwu XIAO; Suiqiang ZHU

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate the protective effects of the overexpression of bcl-xl gene on local cerebral infarction in the transgenic mice subject to permanent occlusion of middle cerebral artery, the models of bcl-xl transgenic mice were established and subjected to cerebral infarction by intralu- minal occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. The infarct volume and the neurological scores were observed and comparison between the wild type mice and the transgenic mice was made. It was found that the infarct volume and the neurological scores in the transgenic mice were significantly decreased as compared with those in the wild type mice. It was suggested that the overexpression of bcl-xl gene in transgenic mice could reduce the infarct volume and improve the neurological function of the mice.

  4. Transmissibility of H-Type Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy to Hamster PrP Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Okada

    Full Text Available Two distinct forms of atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathies (H-BSE and L-BSE can be distinguished from classical (C- BSE found in cattle based on biochemical signatures of disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc. H-BSE is transmissible to wild-type mice-with infected mice showing a long survival period that is close to their normal lifespan-but not to hamsters. Therefore, rodent-adapted H-BSE with a short survival period would be useful for analyzing H-BSE characteristics. In this study, we investigated the transmissibility of H-BSE to hamster prion protein transgenic (TgHaNSE mice with long survival periods. Although none of the TgHaNSE mice manifested the disease during their lifespan, PrPSc accumulation was observed in some areas of the brain after the first passage. With subsequent passages, TgHaNSE mice developed the disease with a mean survival period of 220 days. The molecular characteristics of proteinase K-resistant PrPSc (PrPres in the brain were identical to those observed in first-passage mice. The distribution of immunolabeled PrPSc in the brains of TgHaNSE mice differed between those infected with H-BSE as compared to C-BSE or L-BSE, and the molecular properties of PrPres in TgHaNSE mice infected with H-BSE differed from those of the original isolate. The strain-specific electromobility, glycoform profiles, and proteolytic cleavage sites of H-BSE in TgHaNSE mice were indistinguishable from those of C-BSE, in which the diglycosylated form was predominant. These findings indicate that strain-specific pathogenic characteristics and molecular features of PrPres in the brain are altered during cross-species transmission. Typical H-BSE features were restored after back passage from TgHaNSE to bovinized transgenic mice, indicating that the H-BSE strain was propagated in TgHaNSE mice. This could result from the overexpression of the hamster prion protein.

  5. Transmissibility of H-Type Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy to Hamster PrP Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Masujin, Kentaro; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Two distinct forms of atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathies (H-BSE and L-BSE) can be distinguished from classical (C-) BSE found in cattle based on biochemical signatures of disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc). H-BSE is transmissible to wild-type mice-with infected mice showing a long survival period that is close to their normal lifespan-but not to hamsters. Therefore, rodent-adapted H-BSE with a short survival period would be useful for analyzing H-BSE characteristics. In this study, we investigated the transmissibility of H-BSE to hamster prion protein transgenic (TgHaNSE) mice with long survival periods. Although none of the TgHaNSE mice manifested the disease during their lifespan, PrPSc accumulation was observed in some areas of the brain after the first passage. With subsequent passages, TgHaNSE mice developed the disease with a mean survival period of 220 days. The molecular characteristics of proteinase K-resistant PrPSc (PrPres) in the brain were identical to those observed in first-passage mice. The distribution of immunolabeled PrPSc in the brains of TgHaNSE mice differed between those infected with H-BSE as compared to C-BSE or L-BSE, and the molecular properties of PrPres in TgHaNSE mice infected with H-BSE differed from those of the original isolate. The strain-specific electromobility, glycoform profiles, and proteolytic cleavage sites of H-BSE in TgHaNSE mice were indistinguishable from those of C-BSE, in which the diglycosylated form was predominant. These findings indicate that strain-specific pathogenic characteristics and molecular features of PrPres in the brain are altered during cross-species transmission. Typical H-BSE features were restored after back passage from TgHaNSE to bovinized transgenic mice, indicating that the H-BSE strain was propagated in TgHaNSE mice. This could result from the overexpression of the hamster prion protein.

  6. Atypical scrapie prions from sheep and lack of disease in transgenic mice overexpressing human prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Joiner, Susan; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne; Spiropoulos, John; Simmons, Marion M; Griffiths, Peter C; Groschup, Martin H; Hope, James; Brandner, Sebastian; Asante, Emmanuel A; Collinge, John

    2013-11-01

    Public and animal health controls to limit human exposure to animal prions are focused on bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), but other prion strains in ruminants may also have zoonotic potential. One example is atypical/Nor98 scrapie, which evaded statutory diagnostic methods worldwide until the early 2000s. To investigate whether sheep infected with scrapie prions could be another source of infection, we inoculated transgenic mice that overexpressed human prion protein with brain tissue from sheep with natural field cases of classical and atypical scrapie, sheep with experimental BSE, and cattle with BSE. We found that these mice were susceptible to BSE prions, but disease did not develop after prolonged postinoculation periods when mice were inoculated with classical or atypical scrapie prions. These data are consistent with the conclusion that prion disease is less likely to develop in humans after exposure to naturally occurring prions of sheep than after exposure to epizootic BSE prions of ruminants.

  7. Butylhydroxytoluene (BHT) increases susceptibility of transgenic rasH2 mice to lung carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, T; Kodama, Y; Hioki, K; Inoue, T; Nomura, T; Kurokawa, Y

    2001-10-01

    Transgenic mice carrying the human prototype c-Ha-ras gene (rasH2 mice) are highly susceptible to lung carcinogens. In order to investigate the possibility of developing a rapid in vivo assay for lung carcinogens, we examined whether the tumor-promoting activity of butylhydroxytoluene (BHT) is efficacious in rasH2 mice. rasH2 mice and wild littermates of both genders were pre-treated with carcinogens [urethane (UR), 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) or diethylnitrosamine (DEN)], and, one day later, given a 400 mg/kg dose of BHT. Six weeks after the initiation treatment, evidence of carcinogenicity could be detected in male and female rasH2 mice that had received UR doses of > or = 250 mg/kg and > or = 125 mg/kg, respectively, prior to exposure to BHT, whereas only 500 mg/kg of UR was sufficient to induce tumors in female rasH2 mice given the carcinogen alone. The carcinogenicity of 15 mg/kg of 4NQO could be detected after 9 weeks in male rasH2 mice given the carcinogen followed by BHT. Similarly, the carcinogenicity of 60 mg/kg of DEN could be detected after 9 weeks and 6 weeks, respectively, in male and female rasH2 mice given the carcinogen followed by BHT. No carcinogenicity could be demonstrated through the experimental period with doses of 4NQO or DEN given alone. These results indicate that BHT administration increases the susceptibility of rasH2 mice to lung carcinogens, and suggest that the use of BHT in rasH2 mice might lead to the establishment of a rapid in vivo assay for lung carcinogens.

  8. Effects of Blueberry Extract on Antioxidant Capacity in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long TAN; Hai-qiang LI; Hong-peng YANG; Wei PANG; Wei LIU; Shou-dan SUN; Yu-gang JIANG

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate the effects of blueberry extract on antioxidant capacity in mice with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methods APP/PS1 double transgenic mice were adopted as the AD model and groups AD, AD+BB and control (CT) were set with ten mice in each group. The mice were given blueberry extract(BB) or saline for 16 weeks. The body weight gain and the food consumption were recorded weekly. The morphological changes in cortex were detected, and the activities of SOD, GSH-Px and the levels of GSH and MDA in the brain, liver, kidney and serum were determined.Results The food consumption did not show any significant difference among the three groups, and the AD mice treated with BB obtained a remarkable body weight gain during the experimental period. The morphological examination showed that an obvious neuronal loss appeared in the cortex of AD mice and improvement was noted in mice treated with BB. The biochemical detection showed that the activities of SOD and GSH-Px, and levels of GSH in the brain, liver and serum were significantly declined while the levels of MDA in these tissues and serum were increased in AD mice. After BB administration, the activity of SOD in brain was elevated significantly and the activities of GSH-Px and the levels of GSH in liver and serum were also recovered to some extent. Meanwhile, the levels of MDA in the brain, liver and serum were decreased obviously. However, the activities of antioxidant enzymes and the level of MDA did not show significant change in kidney. Conclusion Brain is susceptive to oxidative stress in AD mice. Blueberry extract is effective in alleviating the oxidative damage in AD mice.

  9. Isoflurane exposure during mid-adulthood attenuates age-related spatial memory impairment in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diansan Su

    Full Text Available Many in vitro findings suggest that isoflurane exposure might accelerate the process of Alzheimer Disease (AD; however, no behavioral evidence exists to support this theory. In the present study, we hypothesized that exposure of APP/PS1 transgenic mice to isoflurane during mid-adulthood, which is the pre-symptomatic phase of amyloid beta (Abeta deposition, would alter the progression of AD. Seven-month-old Tg(APPswe,PSEN1dE985Dbo/J transgenic mice and their wild-type littermates were exposed to 1.1% isoflurane for 2 hours per day for 5 days. Learning and memory ability was tested 48 hours and 5 months following isoflurane exposure using the Morris Water Maze and Y maze, respectively. Abeta deposition and oligomers in the hippocampus were measured by immunohistochemistry or Elisa 5 months following isoflurane exposure. We found that the performance of both the transgenic and wild-type mice in the Morris Water Maze significantly improved 48 hours following isoflurane exposure. The transgenic mice made significantly fewer discrimination errors in the Y maze following isoflurane exposure, and no differences were found between wild-type littermates 5 months following isoflurane exposure. For the transgenic mice, the Abeta plaque and oligomers in the hippocampus was significantly decreased in the 5 months following isoflurane exposure. In summary, repeated isoflurane exposure during the pre-symptomatic phase not only improved spatial memory in both the APP/PS1 transgenic and wild-type mice shortly after the exposure but also prevented age-related decline in learning and memory and attenuated the Abeta plaque and oligomers in the hippocampus of transgenic mice.

  10. Downregulation of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in transgenic mice overexpressing GH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Marina C; Burghi, Valeria; Miquet, Johanna G; Giani, Jorge F; Banegas, Ricardo D; Toblli, Jorge E; Fang, Yimin; Wang, Feiya; Bartke, Andrzej; Dominici, Fernando P

    2014-05-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a crucial role in the regulation of physiological homeostasis and diseases such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, and chronic renal failure. In this cascade, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin II (Ang II)/AT1 receptor axis induces pathological effects, such as vasoconstriction, cell proliferation, and fibrosis, while the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis is protective for end-organ damage. The altered function of the RAS could be a contributing factor to the cardiac and renal alterations induced by GH excess. To further explore this issue, we evaluated the consequences of chronic GH exposure on the in vivo levels of Ang II, Ang-(1-7), ACE, ACE2, and Mas receptor in the heart and the kidney of GH-transgenic mice (bovine GH (bGH) mice). At the age of 7-8 months, female bGH mice displayed increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), a high degree of both cardiac and renal fibrosis, as well as increased levels of markers of tubular and glomerular damage. Angiotensinogen abundance was increased in the liver and the heart of bGH mice, along with a concomitant increase in cardiac Ang II levels. Importantly, the levels of ACE2, Ang-(1-7), and Mas receptor were markedly decreased in both tissues. In addition, Ang-(1-7) administration reduced SBP to control values in GH-transgenic mice, indicating that the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis is involved in GH-mediated hypertension. The data indicate that the altered expression profile of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in the heart and the kidney of bGH mice could contribute to the increased incidence of hypertension, cardiovascular, and renal alterations observed in these animals.

  11. Novel behavioural characteristics of female APPSwe/PS1ΔE9 double transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, David; Low, Jac Kee; Logge, Warren; Garner, Brett; Karl, Tim

    2014-03-01

    Murine models are commonly used to evaluate progression of Alzheimer's disease. APPSwe/PS1ΔE9 (APPxPS1) mice have previously been reported to demonstrate impaired learning and memory in the Morris water maze test. However, this paradigm introduces a variety of behaviours that may confound performance of the mice, thus an alternative was sought. A battery of behavioural tests (light-dark test, elevated plus maze, novel object recognition task, social recognition test, cheeseboard task and prepulse inhibition) was used to investigate various behavioural and cognitive domains with relevance to Alzheimer's disease. We found 9-month old female APPxPS1 mice exhibited impaired spatial memory in the reversal cheeseboard task. In addition, task-dependent hyperlocomotion and anxiolytic-like behaviours were observed in the light-dark test. Female APPxPS1 demonstrated intact object recognition memory and sensorimotor gating was not significantly decreased compared to control mice except for one particular interstimulus interval. The social recognition test failed to detect preference for social novelty in control females. In conclusion, this is the first study to describe a memory deficit in female APPxPS1 mice in the hidden cheeseboard task. Transgenic females also exhibited task-dependent reduction in anxiety behaviours and hyperlocomotion. These novel findings enhance our understanding of the behavioural phenotype of APPxPS1 females and present the cheeseboard as a valid alternative to other established spatial memory tests. Furthermore, the task-dependency of some of our findings suggests that behavioural profiling of APPxPS1 transgenic mice should be assessed using a variety of behavioural paradigms.

  12. Transgenic carrot expressing fusion protein comprising M. tuberculosis antigens induces immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permyakova, Natalia V; Zagorskaya, Alla A; Belavin, Pavel A; Uvarova, Elena A; Nosareva, Olesya V; Nesterov, Andrey E; Novikovskaya, Anna A; Zav'yalov, Evgeniy L; Moshkin, Mikhail P; Deineko, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L.) genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice) when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  13. Transgenic Carrot Expressing Fusion Protein Comprising M. tuberculosis Antigens Induces Immune Response in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Permyakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L. genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  14. Generation and characterization of transgenic mice expressing tamoxifen-inducible cre-fusion protein specifically in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huan-Zhang; Chen, Jian-Quan; Cheng, Guo-Xiang; Xue, Jing-Lun

    2003-08-01

    To establish transgenic mice expressing tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ERt recombinase specifically in the liver and to provide an efficient animal model for studying gene function in the liver and creating various mouse models mimicking human diseases. Alb-Cre-ERt transgenic mice were produced by microinjecting the construct with Cre-ERt fusion gene of DNA fragments into fertilized eggs derived from inbred C57BL/6 strain. Transgenic mice were identified by using PCR and Southern blotting. Expression of Cre-ERt fusion gene was analyzed in the liver, kidney, brain and lung from F1 generation transgenic mice at 8 weeks of age by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Four hundred and fourteen fertilized eggs of C57 BL/6 mice were microinjected with recombinant Alb-Cre-ERt DNA fragments, and 312 survival eggs injected were transferred to the oviducts of 12 pseudopregnant recipient mice, 6 of 12 recipient mice became pregnant and gave birth to 44 offsprings. Of the 44 offsprings, two males and one female carried the hybrid Cre-ERt fusion gene. Three mice were determined as founders, and were back crossed to set up F1 generations with other inbred C57BL/6 mice. Transmission of Cre-ERt fusion gene in F1 offspring followed Mendelian rules. The expression of Cre-ERt mRNA was detected only in the liver of F1 offspring from two of three founder mice. Transgenic mice expressing tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ERt recombinase under control of the liver-specific promoter are preliminary established.

  15. Reduced p75NTRexpression delays disease onset only in female mice of a transgenic model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Küst, B.M.; Brouwer, N.; Mantingh, I.J.; Boddeke, H.W.G.M.; Copray, J.C.V.M.

    2003-01-01

    hSOD1 (G93A) transgenic mice develop pathological changes similar to those in patients with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). In particular, the progressive degeneration of motoneurons is charactered in this mouse model. One feature of stressed motoneurons in ALS and the hSOD1 mice is t

  16. Reduced p75NTRexpression delays disease onset only in female mice of a transgenic model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Küst, B.M.; Brouwer, N.; Mantingh, I.J.; Boddeke, H.W.G.M.; Copray, J.C.V.M.

    2003-01-01

    hSOD1 (G93A) transgenic mice develop pathological changes similar to those in patients with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). In particular, the progressive degeneration of motoneurons is charactered in this mouse model. One feature of stressed motoneurons in ALS and the hSOD1 mice is

  17. Reduced p75NTRexpression delays disease onset only in female mice of a transgenic model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Küst, B.M.; Brouwer, N.; Mantingh, I.J.; Boddeke, H.W.G.M.; Copray, J.C.V.M.

    2003-01-01

    hSOD1 (G93A) transgenic mice develop pathological changes similar to those in patients with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). In particular, the progressive degeneration of motoneurons is charactered in this mouse model. One feature of stressed motoneurons in ALS and the hSOD1 mice is t

  18. GFAP expression and social deficits in transgenic mice overexpressing human sAPPα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Antoinette R; Hou, Huayan; Song, Min; Obregon, Demian F; Portis, Samantha; Barger, Steven; Shytle, Doug; Stock, Saundra; Mori, Takashi; Sanberg, Paul G; Murphy, Tanya; Tan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Autistic individuals display impaired social interactions and language, and restricted, stereotyped behaviors. Elevated levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein-alpha (sAPPα), the product of α-secretase cleavage of APP, are found in the plasma of some individuals with autism. The sAPPα protein is neurotrophic and neuroprotective and recently showed a correlation to glial differentiation in human neural stem cells (NSCs) via the IL-6 pathway. Considering evidence of gliosis in postmortem autistic brains, we hypothesized that subsets of patients with autism would exhibit elevations in CNS sAPPα and mice generated to mimic this observation would display markers suggestive of gliosis and autism-like behavior. Elevations in sAPPα levels were observed in brains of autistic patients compared to controls. Transgenic mice engineered to overexpress human sAPPα (TgsAPPα mice) displayed hypoactivity, impaired sociability, increased brain glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, and altered Notch1 and IL-6 levels. NSCs isolated from TgsAPPα mice, and those derived from wild-type mice treated with sAPPα, displayed suppressed β-tubulin III and elevated GFAP expression. These results suggest that elevations in brain sAPPα levels are observed in subsets of individuals with autism and TgsAPPα mice display signs suggestive of gliosis and behavioral impairment. PMID:23840007

  19. Mantle cell lymphoma in cyclin D1 transgenic mice with Bim-deficient B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Samuel G; Labelle, James L; Meng, Hailong; Valeriano, Regina P; Fisher, Jill K; Sun, Heather; Rodig, Scott J; Kleinstein, Steven H; Walensky, Loren D

    2014-02-06

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a highly aggressive B-cell lymphoma resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Although defined by the characteristic t(11;14) translocation, MCL has not been recapitulated in transgenic mouse models of cyclin D1 overexpression alone. Indeed, several genetic aberrations have been identified in MCL that may contribute to its pathogenesis and chemoresistance. Of particular interest is the frequent biallelic deletion of the proapoptotic BCL-2 family protein BIM. BIM exerts its pro-death function via its α-helical BH3 death domain that has the dual capacity to inhibit antiapoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 and MCL-1 and directly trigger proapoptotic proteins such as the mitochondrial executioner protein BAX. To evaluate a functional role for Bim deletion in the pathogenesis of MCL, we generated cyclin D1-transgenic mice harboring Bim-deficient B cells. In response to immunization, Eμ(CycD1)CD19(CRE)Bim(fl/fl) mice manifested selective expansion of their splenic mantle zone compartment. Three distinct immune stimulation regimens induced lymphomas with histopathologic and molecular features of human MCL in a subset of mice. Thus, deletion of Bim in B cells, in the context of cyclin D1 overexpression, disrupts a critical control point in lymphoid maturation and predisposes to the development of MCL. This genetic proof of concept for MCL pathogenesis suggests an opportunity to reactivate the death pathway by pharmacologic mimicry of proapoptotic BIM.

  20. Characterization of Fam20C expression in odontogenesis and osteogenesis using transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Er-Xia Du; Xiao-Fang Wang; Wu-Chen Yang; Deborah Kaback; Siu-Pok Yee; Chun-Lin Qin; Anne George; Jian-Jun Hao

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that Fam20C promotes differentiation and mineralization of odontoblasts, ameloblasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes during tooth and bone development. Ablation of the Fam20C gene inhibits bone and tooth growth by increasing fibroblast growth factor 23 in serum and causing hypophosphatemia in conditional knockout mice. However, control and regulation of the expression of Fam20C are still unknown. In this study, we generated a transgenic reporter model which expresses green fluorescence protein (GFP) driven by the Fam20C promoter. Recombineering was used to insert a 16 kb fragment of the mouse Fam20C gene (containing the 15 kb promoter and 1.1 kb of exon 1) into a pBluescript SK vector with the topaz variant of GFP and a bovine growth hormone polyadenylation sequence. GFP expression was subsequently evaluated by histomorphometry on cryosections from E14 to adult mice. Fluorescence was evident in the bone and teeth as early as E17.5. The GFP signal was maintained stably in odontoblasts and osteoblasts until 4 weeks after birth. The expression of GFP was significantly reduced in teeth, alveolar bone and muscle by 8 weeks of age. We also observed colocalization of the GFP signal with the Fam20C antibody in postnatal 1-and 7-day-old animals. Successful generation of Fam20C-GFP transgenic mice will provide a unique model for studying Fam20C gene expression and the biological function of this gene during odontogenesis and osteogenesis.

  1. Geniposide attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction and memory deficits in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Cui; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Hongjuan; Chen, Tong; Zhang, Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction appear early and contribute to the disease progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD), which can be detected extensively in AD patients brains as well as in transgenic AD mice brains. Thus, treatments that result in attenuation of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction may hold potential for AD treatment. Geniposide, a pharmacologically active component purified from gardenia fruit, exhibits anti-oxidative, antiinflammatory and other important therapeutic properties. However, whether geniposide has any protective effect on oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in AD transgenic mouse model has not yet been reported. Here, we demonstrate that intragastric administration of geniposide significantly reduces oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in addition to improving learning and memory in APP/PS1 mice. Geniposide exerts protective effects on mitochondrial dysfunction in APP/PS1 mice through suppressing the mitochondrial oxidative damage and increasing the mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of cytochrome c oxidase. These studies indicate that geniposide may attenuate memory deficits through the suppression of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Thus, geniposide may be a potential therapeutic reagent for halting and preventing AD progress.

  2. Overexpression of Id1 in transgenic mice promotes mammary basal stem cell activity and breast tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Hui; Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Won, Hee-Young; Jang, Ki-Seok; Min, Kyueng-Whan; Jang, Si-Hyong; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kong, Gu

    2015-07-10

    Inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding (Id)1 is a crucial regulator of mammary development and breast cancer progression. However, its effect on stemness and tumorigenesis in mammary epithelial cells remains undefined. Herein, we demonstrate that Id1 induces mammary tumorigenesis by increasing normal and malignant mammary stem cell (MaSC) activities in transgenic mice. MaSC-enriched basal cell expansion and increased self-renewal and in vivo regenerative capacity of MaSCs are observed in the mammary glands of MMTV-Id1 transgenic mice. Furthermore, MMTV-Id1 mice develop ductal hyperplasia and mammary tumors with highly expressed basal markers. Id1 also increases breast cancer stem cell (CSC) population and activity in human breast cancer lines. Moreover, the effects of Id1 on normal and malignant stem cell activities are mediated by the Wnt/c-Myc pathway. Collectively, these findings provide in vivo genetic evidence of Id1 functions as an oncogene in breast cancer and indicate that Id1 regulates mammary basal stem cells by activating the Wnt/c-Myc pathway, thereby contributing to breast tumor development.

  3. Characterization of Fam20C expression in odontogenesis and osteogenesis using transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Er-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Yang, Wu-Chen; Kaback, Deborah; Yee, Siu-Pok; Qin, Chun-Lin; George, Anne; Hao, Jian-Jun

    2015-06-26

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that Fam20C promotes differentiation and mineralization of odontoblasts, ameloblasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes during tooth and bone development. Ablation of the Fam20C gene inhibits bone and tooth growth by increasing fibroblast growth factor 23 in serum and causing hypophosphatemia in conditional knockout mice. However, control and regulation of the expression of Fam20C are still unknown. In this study, we generated a transgenic reporter model which expresses green fluorescence protein (GFP) driven by the Fam20C promoter. Recombineering was used to insert a 16 kb fragment of the mouse Fam20C gene (containing the 15 kb promoter and 1.1 kb of exon 1) into a pBluescript SK vector with the topaz variant of GFP and a bovine growth hormone polyadenylation sequence. GFP expression was subsequently evaluated by histomorphometry on cryosections from E14 to adult mice. Fluorescence was evident in the bone and teeth as early as E17.5. The GFP signal was maintained stably in odontoblasts and osteoblasts until 4 weeks after birth. The expression of GFP was significantly reduced in teeth, alveolar bone and muscle by 8 weeks of age. We also observed colocalization of the GFP signal with the Fam20C antibody in postnatal 1- and 7-day-old animals. Successful generation of Fam20C-GFP transgenic mice will provide a unique model for studying Fam20C gene expression and the biological function of this gene during odontogenesis and osteogenesis.

  4. Therapeutic effect of the anti-Fas antibody on arthritis in HTLV-1 tax transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, K; Asahara, H; Okamoto, K; Aono, H; Hasunuma, T; Kobata, T; Iwakura, Y; Yonehara, S; Sumida, T; Nishioka, K

    1996-07-15

    We have recently demonstrated Fas-mediated apoptosis in the synovium, of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and suggested that it may be one factor responsible for the regression of RA. To examine whether the induction of apoptosis caused by anti-Fas mAb may play a potential role as a new therapeutic strategy for RA, we investigated the effect of anti-Fas mAb (RK-8) on synovitis in an animal model of RA, the human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) tax transgenic mice. We report here that administration of anti-Fas mAb into mice intra-articularly improved the paw swelling and arthritis within 48 h. Immunohistochemical study and in vitro culture studies showed that 35% of synovial fibroblasts, 75% of mononuclear cells, and some of polymorphonuclear leukocytes infiltrating in synovium underwent apoptosis by anti-Fas mAb. In situ nick end labeling analysis and electron microscope analysis clearly showed that many cells in synovium were induced apoptosis by anti-Fas mAb administration. However, local administration of anti-Fas mAb did not produce systemic side effects. Results demonstrated that administration of anti-Fas mAb in arthritic joints of the HTLV-1 tax transgenic mice produced improvement of arthritis. These findings suggest that local administration of anti-Fas mAb may represent a useful therapeutic strategy for proliferative synovitis such as RA.

  5. Detection of allergenic compounds using an IL-4/luciferase/CNS-1 transgenic mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chang Joon; Lee, Jae Won; Bae, Hee Sook; Shim, Sun Bo; Jee, Seung Wan; Lee, Su Hae; Lee, Chang Kyu; Hong, Jin Tae; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2011-04-01

    The interleukin-4 (IL-4) signaling cascade has been identified as a potentially important pathway in the development of allergies. The principal objective of this study was to produce novel transgenic (Tg) mice harboring the luciferase gene under the control of the human IL-4 promoter and the enhancer of IL-4 (CNS-1), in an effort to evaluate three types of allergens including a respiratory sensitizer, vaccine additives, and crude extracts of natural allergens in vivo. A new lineage of Tg mice was generated by the microinjection of pIL-4/Luc/CNS-1 constructs into a fertilized mice egg. The luciferase activity was successfully regulated by the IL-4 promoter in splenocytes cultured from IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice. From the first five founder lines, one (#57) evidencing a profound response to ovalbumin was selected for use in evaluating the allergens. Additionally, the lungs, thymus, and lymph nodes of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice evidenced high luciferase activity in response to allergens such as phthalic anhydride (PA), trimellitic anhydride, ovalbumin, gelatin, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus extracts, and Japanese cedar pollen, whereas key allergy-related indicators including ear thickness, Immunoglobulin E concentration, and the infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes in response to PA were unaltered in the Tg mice relative to the non-Tg mice. Furthermore, the expression levels of endogenous type 2 helper T cells cytokines and proinflammatory cytokines were similarly increased in these organs of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice in response to allergens. These results indicate that IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice may be used as an animal model for the evaluation and prediction of the human body response to a variety of allergens originating from the environment and from certain industrial products.

  6. RAP-011, an activin receptor ligand trap, increases hemoglobin concentration in hepcidin transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Jacqueline M; Barkataki, Sangjucta; Berger, Alan E; Cheadle, Chris; Xue, Qian-Li; Sung, Victoria; Roy, Cindy N

    2015-01-01

    Over expression of hepcidin antimicrobial peptide is a common feature of iron-restricted anemia in humans. We investigated the erythroid response to either erythropoietin or RAP-011, a "murinized" ortholog of sotatercept, in C57BL/6 mice and in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 over expressing mice. Sotatercept, a soluble, activin receptor type IIA ligand trap, is currently being evaluated for the treatment of anemias associated with chronic renal disease, myelodysplastic syndrome, β-thalassemia, and Diamond Blackfan anemia and acts by inhibiting signaling downstream of activin and other Transforming Growth Factor-β superfamily members. We found that erythropoietin and RAP-011 increased hemoglobin concentration in C57BL/6 mice and in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 over expressing mice. While erythropoietin treatment depleted splenic iron stores in C57BL/6 mice, RAP-011 treatment did not deplete splenic iron stores in mice of either genotype. Bone marrow erythroid progenitors from erythropoietin-treated mice exhibited iron-restricted erythropoiesis, as indicated by increased median fluorescence intensity of transferrin receptor immunostaining by flow cytometry. In contrast, RAP-011-treated mice did not exhibit the same degree of iron-restricted erythropoiesis. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that RAP-011 can improve hemoglobin concentration in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 transgenic mice. Our data support the hypothesis that RAP-011 has unique biologic effects which prevent or circumvent depletion of mouse splenic iron stores. RAP-011 may, therefore, be an appropriate therapeutic for trials in human anemias characterized by increased expression of hepcidin antimicrobial peptide and iron-restricted erythropoiesis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Synaptotrophic effects of human amyloid beta protein precursors in the cortex of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucke, L; Masliah, E; Johnson, W B; Ruppe, M D; Alford, M; Rockenstein, E M; Forss-Petter, S; Pietropaolo, M; Mallory, M; Abraham, C R

    1994-12-15

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) because its degradation products accumulate abnormally in AD brains and APP mutations are associated with early onset AD. However, its role in health and disease appears to be complex, with different APP derivatives showing either neurotoxic or neurotrophic effects in vitro. To elucidate the effects APP has on the brain in vivo, cDNAs encoding different forms of human APP (hAPP) were placed downstream of the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) promoter. In multiple lines of NSE-hAPP transgenic mice neuronal overexpression of hAPP was accompanied by an increase in the number of synaptophysin immunoreactive (SYN-IR) presynaptic terminals and in the expression of the growth-associated marker GAP-43. In lines expressing moderate levels of hAPP751 or hAPP695, this effect was more prominent in homozygous than in heterozygous transgenic mice. In contrast, a line with several-fold higher levels of hAPP695 expression showed less increase in SYN-IR presynaptic terminals per amount of hAPP expressed than the lower expressor lines and a decrease in synaptotrophic effects in homozygous compared with heterozygous offspring. Transgenic mice (2-24 months of age) showed no evidence for amyloid deposits or neurodegeneration. These findings suggest that APP may be important for the formation/maintenance of synapses in vivo and that its synaptotrophic effects may be critically dependent on the expression levels of different APP isoforms. Alterations in APP expression, processing or function could contribute to the synaptic pathology seen in AD.

  8. Induction of epithelial mesenchimal transition and vasculogenesis in the lenses of Dbl oncogene transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Fardin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Dbl family of proteins represents a large group of proto-oncogenes involved in cell growth regulation. The numerous domains that are present in many Dbl family proteins suggest that they act to integrate multiple inputs in complicated signaling networks involving the Rho GTPases. Alterations of the normal function of these proteins lead to pathological processes such as developmental disorders and neoplastic transformation. We generated transgenic mice introducing the cDNA of Dbl oncogene linked to the metallothionein promoter into the germ line of FVB mice and found that onco-Dbl expression in mouse lenses affected proliferation, migration and differentiation of lens epithelial cells. RESULTS: We used high density oligonucleotide microarray to define the transcriptional profile induced by Dbl in the lenses of 2 days, 2 weeks, and 6 weeks old transgenic mice. We observed modulation of genes encoding proteins promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, such as down-regulation of epithelial cell markers and up-regulation of fibroblast markers. Genes encoding proteins involved in the positive regulation of apoptosis were markedly down regulated while anti-apoptotic genes were strongly up-regulated. Finally, several genes encoding proteins involved in the process of angiogenesis were up-regulated. These observations were validated by histological and immunohistochemical examination of the transgenic lenses where vascularization can be readily observed. CONCLUSION: Onco-Dbl expression in mouse lens correlated with modulation of genes involved in the regulation of EMT, apoptosis and vasculogenesis leading to disruption of the lens architecture, epithelial cell proliferation, and aberrant angiogenesis. We conclude that onco-Dbl has a potentially important, previously unreported, capacity to dramatically alter epithelial cell migration, replication, polarization and differentiation and to induce vascularization of an epithelial

  9. A soluble form of Siglec-9 provides an antitumor benefit against mammary tumor cells expressing MUC1 in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomioka, Yukiko, E-mail: ytomi@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp [Division of Disease Model Innovation, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0815 (Japan); Avian Zoonosis Research Center, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); Morimatsu, Masami, E-mail: mmorimat@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Division of Disease Model Innovation, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0815 (Japan); Laboratory of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine, Department of Disease Control, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0818 (Japan); Nishijima, Ken-ichi, E-mail: nishijma@nubio.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Usui, Tatsufumi, E-mail: usutatsu@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp [Avian Zoonosis Research Center, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); Yamamoto, Sayo, E-mail: ysayo@anim.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Center of Biomedical Research, Research Center for Human Disease Modeling, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Suyama, Haruka, E-mail: sharuka@anim.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Center of Biomedical Research, Research Center for Human Disease Modeling, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Ozaki, Kinuyo, E-mail: k-ozaki@anim.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Center of Biomedical Research, Research Center for Human Disease Modeling, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Ito, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshiito@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp [Avian Zoonosis Research Center, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); and others

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Tumor-associated antigen MUC1 binds to Siglec-9. • Soluble Siglec-9 reduced proliferation of MUC1-positive tumor in transgenic mice. • Soluble Siglec-9 and MUC1 on tumor cells were colocalized in transgenic mice. • MUC1 expression on tumor cells were reduced in soluble Siglec-9 transgenic mice. - Abstract: Tumor-associated MUC1 binds to Siglec-9, which is expected to mediate tumor cell growth and negative immunomodulation. We hypothesized that a soluble form of Siglec-9 (sSiglec-9) competitively inhibits a binding of MUC1 to its receptor molecules like human Siglec-9, leading to provide antitumor benefit against MUC1-expressing tumor, and generated transgenic mouse lines expressing sSiglec-9 (sSiglec-9 Tg). When mammary tumor cells expressing MUC1 were intraperitoneally transplanted into sSiglec-9 Tg, tumor proliferation was slower with the lower histological malignancy as compared with non-transgenic mice. The sSiglec-9 was detected in the ascites caused by the tumor in the sSiglec-9 Tg, and sSiglec-9 and MUC1 were often colocalized on surfaces of the tumor cells. PCNA immunohistochemistry also revealed the reduced proliferation of the tumor cells in sSiglec-9 Tg. In sSiglec-9 Tg with remarkable suppression of tumor proliferation, MUC1 expressions were tend to be reduced. In the ascites of sSiglec-9 Tg bearing the tumor, T cells were uniformly infiltrated, whereas aggregations of degenerative T cells were often observed in the non-transgenic mice. These results suggest that sSiglec-9 has an antitumor benefit against MUC1-expressing tumor in the transgenic mice, which may avoid the negative immunomodulation and/or suppress tumor-associated MUC1 downstream signal transduction, and subsequent tumor proliferation.

  10. Effects of (-epicatechin on the pathology of APP/PS1 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueqin eZeng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alzheimer’s disease is a multifactorial disorder characterized by the progressive deterioration of neuronal networks. The clearance of Aβ from the brain and anti-inflammation are potential important strategies to prevent and treat disease. In a previous study, we demonstrated the grape seed extract (GSE could reduce brain Aβ burden and microglia activation,but which polyphenol plays a major role in these events is not known. Here we tested pharmacological effects of (-epicatechin, one principle polyphenol compound in GSE, on transgenic AD mice.Methods: APP/PS1 transgenic mice were fed with (-epicatechin diet(40mg/kg/d and curcumin diet (47mg/kg/d at 3 months of age for 9 months, the function of liver, Aβ levels in the brain and serum, AD-type neuropathology, plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines were measured.Results: Towards the end of the experiment we found long-term feeding of (- epicatechin diet was well tolerated without fatality, changes in food consumption, body weight or liver function. (-Epicatechin significantly reduced total Aβ in brain and serum by 39% and 40%, respectively, compared with control diet. Microgliosis and astrocytosis in the brain of Alzheimer’s mice were also reduced by 38% and 35%, respectively. The (-epicatechin diet did not alter learning and memory behaviors in AD mice.Conclusions: This study has provided evidence on the beneficial role of (-epicatechin in ameliorating amyloid-induced AD-like pathology in AD mice, but the impact of (-epicatechin on tau pathology is not clear, also the mechanism needs further research.

  11. Assessment of the mutagenic potential of arecoline in gpt delta transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengjun; Xing, Guozhen; Qi, Xinming; Feng, Chenchen; Liu, Mingxia; Gong, Likun; Luan, Yang; Ren, Jin

    2012-10-09

    Chewing the areca nut is carcinogenic to humans. Arecoline, a major alkaloid in areca nut, is suspected to be a carcinogenic component. It has been shown to have genotoxic potential in various in vitro systems; but information on its in vivo genotoxicity is limited. To investigate the organ-specific mutagenic potential of arecoline, we employed gpt delta transgenic mice to analyze the mutagenicity of arecoline in the oral tissues and liver. Male gpt delta mice were given arecoline hydrobromide in drinking water at 300 and 700μg/mL for 6 weeks. 4-Nitroquinoline-1 (4-NQO) was used as a positive control. Two weeks after the last treatment, mutation frequencies in the oral tissues (a mixture of gingival, buccal, pharyngeal and sublingual tissue) and liver were detected and mutation spectra were analyzed. There were no statistically significant differences in the average mutation frequencies between arecoline-treated and untreated groups in both the oral tissues and liver. However, in the oral tissues, one mouse in arecoline-300μg/mL group and two mice in arecoline-700μg/mL group showed more than 2.5-fold higher mutation frequencies than the untreated group; they also exhibited unique mutation spectra compared to spontaneous mutation types. In these three mice, all mutations occurred at G:C sites, where G:C→T:A transversions were most frequent, followed by G:C→A:T transitions and G:C→C:G transversions. The main type of spontaneous mutation in both the oral tissues and liver was G:C→A:T transition. These results suggest that arecoline poses a mutagenic hazard in the oral tissues of gpt delta transgenic mice. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Metastasis of transgenic breast cancer in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almholt, Kasper; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Frandsen, Thomas Leth;

    2003-01-01

    of metastasizing breast cancer. In these tumors, the expression pattern of uPA and PAI-1 resembles that of human ductal breast cancer and plasminogen is required for efficient metastasis. In a cohort of 63 transgenic mice that were either PAI-1-deficient or wild-type sibling controls, primary tumor growth...... limiting for tumor vascularization and metastasis, or that there is a functional redundancy between PAI-1 and other inhibitors of the uPA/plasmin system, masking the effect of PAI-1 deficiency....

  13. Assessing the susceptibility of transgenic mice overexpressing deer prion protein to bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, Christopher M; Lockey, Richard; Holder, Thomas M; Thorne, Leigh; Beck, Katy E; Wilson, Christina; Denyer, Margaret; Sheehan, John; Marsh, Sarah; Webb, Paul R; Dexter, Ian; Norman, Angela; Popescu, Emma; Schneider, Amanda; Holden, Paul; Griffiths, Peter C; Plater, Jane M; Dagleish, Mark P; Martin, Stuart; Telling, Glenn C; Simmons, Marion M; Spiropoulos, John

    2014-02-01

    Several transgenic mouse models have been developed which facilitate the transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) of cervids and allow prion strain discrimination. The present study was designed to assess the susceptibility of the prototypic mouse line, Tg(CerPrP)1536(+/-), to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions, which have the ability to overcome species barriers. Tg(CerPrP)1536(+/-) mice challenged with red deer-adapted BSE resulted in 90% to 100% attack rates, and BSE from cattle failed to transmit, indicating agent adaptation in the deer.

  14. Transgenic expression of CYP7A1 in LDL receptor-deficient mice blocks diet-induced hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Eric P; Gutierrez, Alejandra; Davis, Roger A

    2006-07-01

    Constitutive expression of a cholesterol-7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) transgene in LDL receptor-deficient mice blocked the ability of a cholesterol-enriched diet to increase plasma levels of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. LDL receptor-deficient mice expressing the CYP7A1 transgene exhibited complete resistance to diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and to the accumulation of cholesterol in the liver. Hepatic mRNA expression of liver X receptor-inducible ABCG5 and ABCG8 was decreased in CYP7A1 transgenic, LDL receptor-deficient mice fed a cholesterol-enriched diet. Thus, increased biliary cholesterol excretion could not account for the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. CYP7A1 transgenic, LDL receptor-deficient mice fed the cholesterol-enriched diet exhibited decreased jejunal Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 protein (NPC1L1) mRNA expression, an important mediator of intestinal cholesterol absorption. A taurocholate-enriched diet also decreased NPC1L1 mRNA expression in a farnesoid X receptor-independent manner. Reduced expression of NPC1L1 mRNA was associated with decreased cholesterol absorption ( approximately 20%; P CYP7A1 transgenic LDL receptor-deficient mice fed the cholesterol-enriched diet. The combined data show that enhanced expression of CYP7A1 is an effective means to prevent the accumulation of cholesterol in the liver and of atherogenic apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in plasma.

  15. Depletion of conventional mature B cells and compromised specific antibody response in bovine immunoglobulin μ heavy-chain transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min ZHANG,Xueqian CHENG,Dan CHU,Jingwen LIANG,Yi SUN,Li MA,Beilei XU,Min ZHENG,Meili WANG,Liming REN,Xiaoxiang HU,Qingyong MENG,Ran ZHANG,Ying GUO,Yunping DAI,Robert AITKEN,Ning LI,Yaofeng ZHAO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduced the bovine immunoglobulin μ heavy-chain gene (the orphaned gene on BTA11 into mouse germline cells. Bovine IgM was highly expressed in selected transgenic lines, and it largely inhibited rearrangements of the endogenous immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH genes in these lines. The forced expression of bovine IgM resulted in reduced numbers of pro- and pre-B cells but increased the number of immature B cells in the transgenic mice. Bovine IgM-expressing B cells can migrate from the bone marrow to the spleen, but most of the cells are arrested at the T1 transitional B cell stage, leading to a significantly lower number of T2 transitional and mature B cells in the spleen. Although the serum concentrations of endogenous IgM and IgG in the transgenic mice were significantly decreased, the IgA levels were slightly increased compared to the WT mice. The bovine IgM level in the serum was only one-tenth to one-fifth of that of endogenous mouse IgM, suggesting that most of the serum immunoglobulin were contributed by endogenous IgH gene-expressing B cells. These transgenic mice also exhibited a lower frequency of unique complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3 sequences in their VH repertoire and V&Kgr; repertoire but exhibited an increased frequency of unique CDR3 in their V&Lgr; repertoire. Compared to the WT mice, the transgenic mice had a significantly higher percentage of mouse IgM-expressing B cells that expressed &Lgr; chains. Finally, we showed that the transgenic mice were deficient in a specific antibody response to antigen stimulation.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Gastrointestinal Microbiota Between Normal and Caudal-Related Homeobox 2 (Cdx2) Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sakamoto, Hirotsugu; Asahara, Takashi; Chonan, Osamu; Yuki, Norikatsu; Mutoh, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Shunji; Yamamoto, Hironori; Sugano, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Caudal-related homeobox 2 (Cdx2) is expressed in the human intestinal metaplastic mucosa and induces intestinal metaplastic mucosa in the Cdx2 transgenic mouse stomach. Atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia commonly lead to gastric achlorhydria, which predisposes the stomach to bacterial overgrowth. In the present study, we determined the differences in gut microbiota between normal and Cdx2 transgenic mice, using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reac...

  17. Riboflavin supplementation does not attenuate hyperoxic lung injury in transgenic (spc-mt)hGR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyob, Kathryn M; Rogers, Lynette K; Tipple, Trent E; Welty, Stephen E

    2011-04-01

    The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that mice expressing mitochondrially targeted human glutathione reductase (GR) driven by a surfactant protein C promoter ((spc-mt)hGR) are functionally riboflavin deficient and that this deficiency exacerbates hyperoxic lung injury. The authors further hypothesized that dietary supplementation with riboflavin (FADH) will improve the bioactivity of GR, thus enhancing resistance to hyperoxic lung injury. Transgenic (mt-spc)hGR mice and their nontransgenic littermates were fed control or riboflavin-supplemented diets upon weaning. At 6 weeks of age the mice were exposed to either room air (RA) or >95% O(2) for up to 84 hours. GR activities (with and without exogenous FADH) and GR protein levels were measured in lung tissue homogenates. Glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) concentrations were assayed to identify changes in GR activity in vivo. Lung injury was assessed by right lung to body weight ratios and bronchoalveolar lavage protein concentrations. The data showed that enhanced GR activity in the mitochondria of lung type II cells does not protect adult mice from hyperoxic lung injury. Furthermore, the addition of riboflavin to the diets of (spc-mt)hGR mice neither enhances GR activities nor offers protection from hyperoxic lung injury. The results indicated that modulation of mitochondrial GR activity in lung type II cells is not an effective therapy to minimize hyperoxic lung injury.

  18. Riboflavin supplementation does not attenuate hyperoxic lung injury in transgenic spc–mthGR mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyob, Kathryn M.; Rogers, Lynette K.; Tipple, Trent E.; Welty, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that mice expressing mitochondrially targeted human glutathione reductase (GR) driven by a surfactant protein C promoter (spc–mthGR) are functionally riboflavin deficient and that this deficiency exacerbates hyperoxic lung injury. The authors further hypothesized that dietary supplementation with riboflavin (FADH) will improve the bioactivity of GR, thus enhancing resistance to hyperoxic lung injury. Transgenic mt–spchGR mice and their nontransgenic littermates were fed control or riboflavin-supplemented diets upon weaning. At 6 weeks of age the mice were exposed to either room air (RA) or >95% O2 for up to 84 hours. GR activities (with and without exogenous FADH) and GR protein levels were measured in lung tissue homogenates. Glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) concentrations were assayed to identify changes in GR activity in vivo. Lung injury was assessed by right lung to body weight ratios and bronchoalveolar lavage protein concentrations. The data showed that enhanced GR activity in the mitochondria of lung type II cells does not protect adult mice from hyperoxic lung injury. Furthermore, the addition of riboflavin to the diets of spc–mthGR mice neither enhances GR activities nor offers protection from hyperoxic lung injury. The results indicated that modulation of mitochondrial GR activity in lung type II cells is not an effective therapy to minimize hyperoxic lung injury. PMID:21128861

  19. Deposition of BACE-1 Protein in the Brains of APP/PS1 Double Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main causes of Alzheimer’s disease remain elusive. Previous data have implicated the BACE-1 protein as a central player in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. However, many inhibitors of BACE-1 have failed during preclinical and clinical trials for AD treatment. Therefore, uncovering the exact role of BACE-1 in AD may have significant impact on the future development of therapeutic agents. Three- and six-month-old female APP/PS1 double transgenic mice were used to study abnormal accumulation of BACE-1 protein in brains of mice here. Immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, and western blot were performed to measure the distributing pattern and expression level of BACE-1. We found obvious BACE-1 protein accumulation in 3-month-old APP/PS1 mice, which had increased by the time of 6 months. Coimmunostaining results showed BACE-1 surrounded amyloid plaques in brain sections. The abnormal protein expression might not be attributable to the upregulation of BACE-1 protein, as no significant difference of protein expression was observed between wild-type and APP/PS1 mice. With antibodies against BACE-1 and CD31, we found a high immunoreactive density of BACE-1 protein on the outer layer of brain blood vessels. The aberrant distribution of BACE-1 in APP/PS1 mice suggests BACE-1 may be involved in the microvascular abnormality of AD.

  20. Comparison of Cbln1 and Cbln2 functions using transgenic and knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yongqi; Wei, Peng; Parris, Jennifer; Guo, Hong; Pattarini, Roberto; Correia, Kristen; Li, Leyi; Kusnoor, Sheila V; Deutch, Ariel Y; Morgan, James I

    2012-02-01

    Cerebellin precursor protein 1 (Cbln1) is the prototype of a family of secreted neuronal glycoproteins (Cbln1-4) and its genetic elimination results in synaptic alterations in cerebellum (CB) and striatum. In CB, Cbln1 acts as a bi-functional ligand bridging pre-synaptic β-neurexins on granule cells to post-synaptic Grid2 on Purkinje neurons. Although much is known concerning the action of Cbln1, little is known of the function of its other family members. Here, we show that Cbln1 and Cbln2 have similar binding activities to β-neurexins and Grid2 and the targeted ectopic expression of Cbln2 to Purkinje cells in transgenic mice rescues the cerebellar deficits in Cbln1-null animals: suggesting that the two proteins have redundant function mediated by their common receptor binding properties. Cbln1 and Cbln2 are also co-expressed in the endolysosomal compartment of the thalamic neurons responsible for the synaptic alterations in striatum of Cbln1-null mice. Therefore, to determine whether the two family members have similar functions, we generated Cbln2-null mice. Cbln2-null mice do not show the synaptic alterations evident in striatum of Cbln1-null mice. Thus, Cbln2 can exhibit functional redundancy with Cbln1 in CB but it does not have the same properties as Cbln1 in thalamic neurons, implying one or both utilize different receptors/mechanisms in this brain region.

  1. Aβ42 gene vaccine prevents Aβ42 deposition in brain of double transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Bao-Xi; Xiang, Qun; Li, Liping; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Hynan, Linda S.; Rosenberg, Roger N.

    2008-01-01

    Aβ42 peptide aggregation and deposition is an important component of the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Gene-gun mediated gene vaccination targeting Aβ42 is a potential method to prevent and treat AD. APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic (Tg) mice were immunized with an Aβ42 gene construct delivered by the gene gun. The vaccinated mice developed Th2 antibodies (IgG1) against Aβ42. The Aβ42 levels in brain were decreased by 41% and increased in plasma 43% in the vaccinated compared with control mice as assessed by ELISA analysis. Aβ42 plaque deposits in cerebral cortex and hippocampus were reduced by 51% and 52%, respectively, as shown by quantitative immunolabeling. Glial cell activation was also significantly attenuated in vaccinated compared with control mice. One rhesus monkey was vaccinated and developed anti-Aβ42 antibody. These new findings advance significantly our knowledge that gene-gun mediated Aβ42 gene immunization effectively induces a Th2 immune response and reduces the Aβ42 levels in brain in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice. Aβ42 gene vaccination may be safe and efficient immunotherapy for AD. PMID:17574274

  2. Antiviral treatment of hepatitis B virus-transgenic mice by a marine organism, Styela plicata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Wang; Zhen-Lan Du; Wen-Jun Duan; Xin Zhang; Fan-Lin Zeng; Xin-Xiang Wan

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antiviral effect of the effective ingredient of Styela plicata in a murine model of hepatitis B virus carrier.METHODS: HBV-transgenic mice were divided into 3 groups (control group, lamivudine treatment group and the effective ingredient of Styela plicata treatment group) and assigned to receive normal diet, lamivudine or the effective ingredient of Styela plicata for consecutive weeks. Serum hepatitis B surface antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Serum HBV DNA was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Serum T helper (h) 1 cytokine interleukin (IL)-2 and Th2 cytokine IL-6 were detected by the quantitative sandwich enzyme immunoassay technique. Another group of HBV-transgenic mice was assigned to receive the effective ingredient of Styela plicata for consecutive weeks. The histology of liver tissue was evaluated before and after treatment.RESULTS: Twelve weeks after starting the therapy, serum hepatitis B surface antigen was significantly lowered in Styela plicata -treated mice and lamivudine-treated mice compared with the mice receiving normal diet (F12wk = 88.81, P12wk = 0.000 < 0.01). Serum HBV DNA was significantly lowered in Styela plicata -treated mice and lamivudine-treated mice compared with the mice receiving normal diet (F12wk = 20.71, P12wk = 0.000 < 0.01). However, like lamivudine, the effective ingredient of Styela plicata could not inhibit the replication of HBV completely. A rebound phenomenon of hepatitis B sur-face antigen and HBV DNA in sera could be found 4 wk after withdrawal of medication. Eight weeks after starting the therapy, serum levels before and after Styela plicata treatment of IL-2 were 2.41 ± 0.38 and 10.56 ± 0.78 ng/L, respectively (t8wk = -16.51, P8wk = 0.000 < 0.01).Compared with the serum levels of IL-2 in the normal diet-treated mice (2.48 ± 0.17 ng/L; t8wk = 13.23, P8wk = 0.000 < 0.01). Serum levels before and after Styela plicata treatment

  3. The human apoE7 and apoE4 transgenic mice models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Mingzeng; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Weisgraber, K. H., Apolipoprotein E: Structure-function relationships, Adv. Pro. Chem., 1994, 45: 249-302.[2]Center, G. F., Paoletti, E. G., Apolipoprotein function in health and disease: Insights from natural mutations, Europ. J. Clin. Invest., 1996, 26: 733-746.[3]Browner, J. D., van Dormal, J. J., Muskiet, A. J., Clinical chemistry of common apolipoproteins, J. Chromat. B, 1996, 678: 623-641.[4]Maeda, H., Nakamura, H., Shozo, K. et al., Identification of human apolipoprotein E variant gene: Apolipoprotein E7 (Glu244, 245 Lys244, 245), J. Biochm., 1989, 105: 51-54.[5]Taylor, J. M., Downstream regulatory elements stimulate expression of the human plipoprotein E gene in the liver and suppress expression in the kidney of transgenic mice, Transassoc. Am. Physicians, 1990, 103: 119-128.[6]Smith, J. D., Plump, A. S., Breslow, J. L. et al., Accumulation of human apolipoprotein E in the plasma of transgenic mice, J. Biol. Chem., 1990, 265(25): 14709-14712.[7]Tazio, S., Lee, Y. L., Ji, Z. S. et al., Type III hyperlipoproteinemic phenotype in transgenic mice expressing dysfunctional apolipoprotein E, J. Clin. Invest., 1993, 92(3): 1497-1503.[8]Arn, M. J., Maagdenberg, M., Hofker, M. N. et al., Transgenic mice carrying the apolipoprotein E3-Leiden gene exhibit hyperlipoproteinemia, The J. Biol. Chem., 1993, 268(14): 10540-10545.[9]Qi, Z. H., Ru, K., Sun, M. Z. et al., The gene expression of pME in mouse NIH/3T3 cells and construction of the h-apoE transgenic mice, Chinese Biochem. J., 1997, 13(1): 24-28.[10]Sambrook, J., Fritsch, E. F., Maniatis, T., Molecular Cloning, A Laboratory Manual, New York: CSH Press, 1989, 81.[11]Hogan, B. L., Manipulation the mouse embryo, A Laboratory Manual, New York: CSH Press, 1989, 89.[12]Wandell, M. R., Rall, S. C., Brennan, S. Jr et al., Apolipoprotein E2-Dunedin (228 Arg-Cys): Anapolipoprotein E2 variant with normal receptor-binding activity, J. Lip. Res., 1990, 31: 534-543.[13

  4. Three distinct stages of lens opacification in transgenic mice expressing the HIV-1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumminia, S J; Clark, J I; Richiert, D M; Mitton, K P; Duglas-Tabor, Y; Kowalak, J A; Garland, D L; Russell, P

    2001-02-01

    Scanning electron microscopy of the lenses from transgenic mice (TG(72)) containing the HIV-1 protease linked to the lens alphaA-crystallin promoter showed structural changes around postnatal day 16. Frank opacification of the lens was observed at day 24. To relate the biochemical and biophysical changes that occur during the process of cataract development, high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D), quantitative image analysis and ion measurements were carried out on lenses from postnatal day 10 and on days 15-24. The phase separation temperature (Tc), a measure of molecular interactions between proteins, was also determined for normal and transgenic lenses. A comparison of the transgenic and normal lenses on day 10 revealed no significant differences in any of the measured parameters. However, starting around day 16 or the first stage of observed structural changes, the TG(72)crystallin profiles of the alphaA- alphaB-, betaA3-, betaA4-, betaB3 and one gamma-crystallin began to deviate from the normal. By postnatal day 20, a second stage was initiated with an influx of calcium and sodium ions that was accompanied by modifications of betaB1- and betaB2-crystallin. In the third and final stage of the cataract process, a large increase in the proteolysis of crystallins was accompanied by the appearance of the frank cataract on day 24. The Tc initially increased in all of the mouse lenses until just prior to eyelid opening. After that time, the Tc decreased in all lenses. Although the Tc continued to decrease in the normal lenses with age, for the homozygous transgenic mice it exhibited a dramatic increase that began on day 20. Thus, in the TG(72)transgenic mouse, cataract formation occurs in a three-stage process. Tc and other biophysical parameters previously measured appeared to be insensitive to the modifications that occur during stage 1. However, during the second stage of cataract formation, there was a correspondence between abnormal Tc and the

  5. [Commonly used cre transgenic mice and their applications in hematopoietic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lu-Yun; Cheng, Tao; Yuan, Wei-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Cre-lox recombination system consists of two elements: Cre recombinase enzyme and lox sites. Cre recombinase can recombine the lox site sequences by specifically detecting and cutting them. The direction and position of lox sites determine the functional effects of Cre enzyme such as deletion, inversion or chromosomal translocation. The hematopoietic system of mouse consists of multi-lineages and various developmental stage hematopoietic cells that are differentiated from hematopoietic stem cells (hematopoietic stem cells, HSC). The hematopoietic stem cells are maintained in the bone marrow microenvironment (niche). Currently, a variety of floxed conditional-knockout mice, recognized by Cre-lox recombination system, are used for the study of the hematopoietic system. This review summarizes the commonly used Cre transgenic mice and their applications in the study of hematopoietic system.

  6. Transgenic overexpression of ADAM12 suppresses muscle regeneration and aggravates dystrophy in aged mdx mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Wewer, Ulla M;

    2007-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are characterized by insufficient restoration and gradual replacement of the skeletal muscle by fat and connective tissue. ADAM12 has previously been shown to alleviate the pathology of young dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The observed...... effect of ADAM12 was suggested to be mediated via a membrane-stabilizing up-regulation of utrophin, alpha7B integrin, and dystroglycans. Ectopic ADAM12 expression in normal mouse skeletal muscle also improved regeneration after freeze injury, presumably by the same mechanism. Hence, it was suggested...... overexpressing ADAM12 (ADAM12(+)/mdx mice), even though their utrophin levels were mildly elevated compared with age-matched controls. Thus, membrane stabilization was not sufficient to provide protection during prolonged disease. Consequently, we reinvestigated skeletal muscle regeneration in ADAM12 transgenic...

  7. Acute-phase responses in transgenic mice with CNS overexpression of IL-1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundkvist, J; Sundgren-Andersson, A K; Tingsborg, S; Ostlund, P; Engfors, C; Alheim, K; Bartfai, T; Iverfeldt, K; Schultzberg, M

    1999-03-01

    The interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) is an endogenous antagonist that blocks the effects of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1alpha and IL-1beta by occupying the type I IL-1 receptor. Here we describe transgenic mice with astrocyte-directed overexpression of the human secreted IL-1ra (hsIL-1ra) under the control of the murine glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter. Two GFAP-hsIL-1ra strains have been generated and characterized further: GILRA2 and GILRA4. These strains show a brain-specific expression of the hsIL-1ra at the mRNA and protein levels. The hsIL-1ra protein was approximated to approximately 50 ng/brain in cytosolic fractions of whole brain homogenates, with no differences between male and female mice or between the two strains. Furthermore, the protein is secreted, inasmuch as the concentration of hsIL-1ra in the cerebrospinal fluid was 13 (GILRA2) to 28 (GILRA4) times higher in the transgenic mice than in the control animals. To characterize the transgenic phenotype, GILRA mice and nontransgenic controls were injected with recombinant human IL-1beta (central injection) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, peripheral injection). The febrile response elicited by IL-1beta (50 ng/mouse icv) was abolished in hsIL-1ra-overexpressing animals, suggesting that the central IL-1 receptors were occupied by antagonist. The peripheral LPS injection (25 micrograms/kg ip) triggered a fever in overexpressing and control animals. Moreover, no differences were found in LPS-induced (100 and 1,000 micrograms/kg ip; 1 and 6 h after injection) IL-1beta and IL-6 serum levels between GILRA and wild-type mice. On the basis of these results, we suggest that binding of central IL-1 to central IL-1 receptors is not important in LPS-induced fever or LPS-induced IL-1beta and IL-6 plasma levels.

  8. INFLUENCE OF CHEMOTHERAPEUTANTS AND CYTOKINES ON GROWTH AND TRANSGENE EXPRESSION OF BONE MARROW CELLS FROM MT/P210bcr-ab1 TRANSGENIC MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hanchun; Andrew Pierce; Tony Whetton

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of chemotherapeutic agents and cytokines on growth of bone marrow cells from MT/p210 bcr-ab1 transgenic mice.Methods: The bone marrow cells of transgenic chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) model mice carrying metallothionein (MT) promoter/enhancer, bcr-abl (p210)cDNA and SV40 splicing/poly (A) signal sequences were cultured in liquid and soft agar with hydroxyurea (Hu),5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), mouse stem cell factor (mSCF)and mouse interleukin-3 (mIL-3) independently or collectively. The cells and colonies were counted. The levels of transgene expression were detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results: The cell proliferation, colony formation and transgene expression of the bone marrow cells were stimulated with mSCF and mIL-3, but there was little growth without any growth factors, or when mSCF,mIL-3 and Hu or 5-Fu were added. Conclusion: The combined utilization of chemotherapeutants and cytokines is a potentially effective strategy of clinical treatment for CML.

  9. Nucleus-targeted Dmp1 transgene fails to rescue dental defects in Dmp1 null mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Xian Lin; Qi Zhang; Hua Zhang; Kevin Yan; Leanne Ward; Yong-Bo Lu; Jian-Quan Feng

    2014-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is essential to odontogenesis. Its mutations in human subjects lead to dental problems such as dental deformities, hypomineralization and periodontal impairment. Primarily, DMP1 is considered as an extracellular matrix protein that promotes hydroxyapatite formation and activates intracellular signaling pathway via interacting with avb3 integrin. Recent in vitro studies suggested that DMP1 might also act as a transcription factor. In this study, we examined whether full-length DMP1 could function as a transcription factor in the nucleus and regulate odontogenesis in vivo. We first demonstrated that a patient with the DMP1 M1V mutation, which presumably causes a loss of the secretory DMP1 but does not affect the nuclear translocation of DMP1, shows a typical rachitic tooth defect. Furthermore, we generated transgenic mice expressing NLSDMP1, in which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) entry signal sequence of DMP1 was replaced by a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, under the control of a 3.6 kb rat type I collagen promoter plus a 1.6 kb intron 1. We then crossbred the NLSDMP1 transgenic mice with Dmp1 null mice to express the NLSDMP1 in Dmp1-deficient genetic background. Although immunohistochemistry demonstrated that NLSDMP1 was localized in the nuclei of the preodontoblasts and odontoblasts, the histological, morphological and biochemical analyses showed that it failed to rescue the dental and periodontal defects as well as the delayed tooth eruption in Dmp1 null mice. These data suggest that the full-length DMP1 plays no apparent role in the nucleus during odontogenesis.

  10. Nucleus-targeted Dmp1 transgene fails to rescue dental defects in Dmp1 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Xian; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hua; Yan, Kevin; Ward, Leanne; Lu, Yong-Bo; Feng, Jian-Quan

    2014-09-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is essential to odontogenesis. Its mutations in human subjects lead to dental problems such as dental deformities, hypomineralization and periodontal impairment. Primarily, DMP1 is considered as an extracellular matrix protein that promotes hydroxyapatite formation and activates intracellular signaling pathway via interacting with αvβ3 integrin. Recent in vitro studies suggested that DMP1 might also act as a transcription factor. In this study, we examined whether full-length DMP1 could function as a transcription factor in the nucleus and regulate odontogenesis in vivo. We first demonstrated that a patient with the DMP1 M1V mutation, which presumably causes a loss of the secretory DMP1 but does not affect the nuclear translocation of DMP1, shows a typical rachitic tooth defect. Furthermore, we generated transgenic mice expressing (NLS)DMP1, in which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) entry signal sequence of DMP1 was replaced by a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, under the control of a 3.6 kb rat type I collagen promoter plus a 1.6 kb intron 1. We then crossbred the (NLS)DMP1 transgenic mice with Dmp1 null mice to express the (NLS)DMP1 in Dmp1-deficient genetic background. Although immunohistochemistry demonstrated that (NLS)DMP1 was localized in the nuclei of the preodontoblasts and odontoblasts, the histological, morphological and biochemical analyses showed that it failed to rescue the dental and periodontal defects as well as the delayed tooth eruption in Dmp1 null mice. These data suggest that the full-length DMP1 plays no apparent role in the nucleus during odontogenesis.

  11. MSH2 ATPase domain mutation affects CTG*CAG repeat instability in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Tomé

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is associated with one of the most highly unstable CTG*CAG repeat expansions. The formation of further repeat expansions in transgenic mice carrying expanded CTG*CAG tracts requires the mismatch repair (MMR proteins MSH2 and MSH3, forming the MutSbeta complex. It has been proposed that binding of MutSbeta to CAG hairpins blocks its ATPase activity compromising hairpin repair, thereby causing expansions. This would suggest that binding, but not ATP hydrolysis, by MutSbeta is critical for trinucleotide expansions. However, it is unknown if the MSH2 ATPase activity is dispensible for instability. To get insight into the mechanism by which MSH2 generates trinucleotide expansions, we crossed DM1 transgenic mice carrying a highly unstable >(CTG(300 repeat tract with mice carrying the G674A mutation in the MSH2 ATPase domain. This mutation impairs MSH2 ATPase activity and ablates base-base MMR, but does not affect the ability of MSH2 (associated with MSH6 to bind DNA mismatches. We found that the ATPase domain mutation of MSH2 strongly affects the formation of CTG expansions and leads instead to transmitted contractions, similar to a Msh2-null or Msh3-null deficiency. While a decrease in MSH2 protein level was observed in tissues from Msh2(G674 mice, the dramatic reduction of expansions suggests that the expansion-biased trinucleotide repeat instability requires a functional MSH2 ATPase domain and probably a functional MMR system.

  12. Nucleus-targeted Dmp1 transgene fails to rescue dental defects in Dmp1 null mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Xian; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hua; Yan, Kevin; Ward, Leanne; Lu, Yong-Bo; Feng, Jian-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is essential to odontogenesis. Its mutations in human subjects lead to dental problems such as dental deformities, hypomineralization and periodontal impairment. Primarily, DMP1 is considered as an extracellular matrix protein that promotes hydroxyapatite formation and activates intracellular signaling pathway via interacting with αvβ3 integrin. Recent in vitro studies suggested that DMP1 might also act as a transcription factor. In this study, we examined whether full-length DMP1 could function as a transcription factor in the nucleus and regulate odontogenesis in vivo. We first demonstrated that a patient with the DMP1 M1V mutation, which presumably causes a loss of the secretory DMP1 but does not affect the nuclear translocation of DMP1, shows a typical rachitic tooth defect. Furthermore, we generated transgenic mice expressing NLSDMP1, in which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) entry signal sequence of DMP1 was replaced by a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, under the control of a 3.6 kb rat type I collagen promoter plus a 1.6 kb intron 1. We then crossbred the NLSDMP1 transgenic mice with Dmp1 null mice to express the NLSDMP1 in Dmp1-deficient genetic background. Although immunohistochemistry demonstrated that NLSDMP1 was localized in the nuclei of the preodontoblasts and odontoblasts, the histological, morphological and biochemical analyses showed that it failed to rescue the dental and periodontal defects as well as the delayed tooth eruption in Dmp1 null mice. These data suggest that the full-length DMP1 plays no apparent role in the nucleus during odontogenesis. PMID:25105818

  13. Effectiveness of a novel immunogenic nanoparticle platform for Toxoplasma peptide vaccine in HLA transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bissati, Kamal; Zhou, Ying; Dasgupta, Debleena; Cobb, Drew; Dubey, Jitender P; Burkhard, Peter; Lanar, David E; McLeod, Rima

    2014-05-30

    We created and produced a novel self-assembling nanoparticle platform for delivery of peptide epitopes that induces CD8(+) and CD4(+)T cells that are protective against Toxoplasma gondii infection. These self-assembling polypeptide nanoparticles (SAPNs) are composed of linear peptide (LP) monomers which contain two coiled-coil oligomerization domains, the dense granule 7 (GRA720-28 LPQFATAAT) peptide and a universal CD4(+)T cell epitope (derived from PADRE). Purified LPs assemble into nanoparticles with icosahedral symmetry, similar to the capsids of small viruses. These particles were evaluated for their efficacy in eliciting IFN-γ by splenocytes of HLA-B*0702 transgenic mice and for their ability to protect against subsequent T. gondii challenge. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using this platform approach with a CD8(+) epitope that binds HLA-B7 and tests the biological activity of potentially protective peptides restricted by human major histocompatibility complex (HLA) class I molecules in HLA transgenic mice.

  14. Lin28a transgenic mice manifest size and puberty phenotypes identified in human genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hao; Shah, Samar; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Shinoda, Gen; Einhorn, William S; Viswanathan, Srinivas R; Takeuchi, Ayumu; Grasemann, Corinna; Rinn, John L; Lopez, Mary F; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Palmert, Mark R; Daley, George Q

    2010-07-01

    Recently, genome-wide association studies have implicated the human LIN28B locus in regulating height and the timing of menarche. LIN28B and its homolog LIN28A are functionally redundant RNA-binding proteins that block biogenesis of let-7 microRNAs. lin-28 and let-7 were discovered in Caenorhabditis elegans as heterochronic regulators of larval and vulval development but have recently been implicated in cancer, stem cell aging and pluripotency. The let-7 targets Myc, Kras, Igf2bp1 and Hmga2 are known regulators of mammalian body size and metabolism. To explore the function of the Lin28-Let-7 pathway in vivo, we engineered transgenic mice to express Lin28a and observed in them increased body size, crown-rump length and delayed onset of puberty. Investigation of metabolic and endocrine mechanisms of overgrowth in these transgenic mice revealed increased glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Here we report a mouse that models the human phenotypes associated with genetic variation in the Lin28-Let-7 pathway.

  15. T cell mediated cerebral hemorrhages and microhemorrhages during passive Aβ immunization in APPPS1 transgenic mice

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    de Calignon Alix

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunization against amyloid-β (Aβ, the peptide that accumulates in the form of senile plaques and in the cerebrovasculature in Alzheimer's disease (AD, causes a dramatic immune response that prevents plaque formation and clears accumulated Aβ in transgenic mice. In a clinical trial of Aβ immunization, some patients developed meningoencephalitis and hemorrhages. Neuropathological investigations of patients who died after the trial showed clearance of amyloid pathology, but also a powerful immune response involving activated T cells probably underlying the negative effects of the immunization. Results To define the impact of T cells on this inflammatory response we used passive immunization and adoptive transfer to separate the effect of IgG and T cell mediated effects on microhemorrhage in APPPS1 transgenic mice. Neither anti Aβ IgG nor adoptively transferred T cells, alone, led to increased cerebrovascular damage. However, the combination of adoptively transferred T cells and passive immunization led to massive cerebrovascular bleeding that ranged from multiple microhemorrhages in the parenchyma to large hematomas. Conclusions Our results indicate that vaccination can lead to Aβ and T cell induced cerebral micro-hemorrhages and acute hematomas, which are greatly exacerbated by T cell mediated activity.

  16. Transgenic Tobacco Expressing a Modified VP6 Gene Protects Mice Against Rotavirus Infection

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    Jiang-Li DONG; Bo ZHOU; Gang SHENG; Tao WANG

    2005-01-01

    Elevated expression of the rotavirus VP6 antigen in transgenic plants is a critical factor in the development of a safe and effective rotavirus vaccine. Using codon optimization, a gene that encodes the inner capsid protein VP6 of the human group A rotavirus was synthesized (sVP6). The VP6 and sVp6genes were transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The expression level of the sVP6 gene in transgenic plants was 3.8-34-fold higher than that of controls containing the non-modified VP6 gene, accounting for up to 0.34% of the total soluble protein (TSP). Then, BALB/c female mice that had been gavaged weekly with 10 mg TSP containing 34 μg VP6 protein, in which VP6-specific serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibodies were investigated. The severity and duration of diarrhea caused by simian rotavirus SA-11 challenge were reduced significantly in passively immunized pups, which indicates that anti-VP6 antibodies generated in orally immunized female mice can be passed onto pups and provide heterotypic protection. An edible vaccine based on the VP6 of human rotavirus group A could provide a means to protect children and young animals from severe acute diarrhea.

  17. Gene expression analysis of pancreatic cystic neoplasm in SV40Tag transgenic mice model

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    Jie Feng; Qiang Sun; Cheng Gao; Juan Dong; Xiao-Luan Wei; Hua Xing; Hou-Da Li

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the gene expression changes in pancreatic cystic neoplasm in SV40Tag transgenic mice model and to provide information about the prevention,clinical diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic cancer.METHODS: Using the pBC-SV40Tag transgenic mice model of pancreatic cystic neoplasm, we studied the gene expression changes by applying high-density microarrays. Validation of part gene expression profiling data was performed using real-time PCR.RESULTS: By using high-density oligonucleotide microarray, of 14113 genes, 453 were increased and 760 decreased in pancreatic cystic neoplasm, including oncogenes, cell-cycle-related genes, signal transduction-related genes, skeleton-related genes and metabolism-related genes. Among these, we confirmed the changes in Igf, Shh and Wnt signal pathways with real-time PCR.The results of real-time PCR showed similar expression changes in gene chip.CONCLUSION: all the altered expression genes are associated with cell cycle, DNA damage and repair, signal pathway, and metabolism. SV40Tag may cooperate with several proteins in promoting tumorigenesis.

  18. What have gonadotrophin overexpressing transgenic mice taught us about gonadal function?

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    Rulli, Susana B; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo

    2005-09-01

    The two gonadotrophins, follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone, are pivotal regulators of the development and maintenance of normal fertility by maintaining testicular and ovarian endocrine function and gametogenesis. Too low gonadotrophin secretion, i.e. hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, is a common cause of infertility. But there are also physiological and pathophysiological conditions where gonadotrophin secretion and/or action are either transiently or chronically elevated, such as pregnancy, pituitary tumours, polycystic ovarian syndrome, activating gonadotrophin receptor mutations, perimenopause and menopause. These situations can be either the primary or secondary cause of infertility and gonadal pathologies in both sexes. Also the role of gonadotrophins as tumour promoters is possible. Recently, the possibility to combine information from genetically modified mice and human phenotypes in connection with mutations of gonadotrophin or gonadotrophin receptor genes has elucidated many less well known mechanisms involved in dysregulation of gonadotrophin function. Among the genetically modified mouse models, transgenic mice with gonadotrophin hypersecretion have been developed during the last few years. In this review, we describe the key findings on transgenic mouse models overexpressing gonadotrophins and present their possible implications in related human pathologies. In addition, we provide examples of genetic mouse models with secondary effects on gonadotrophin production and, consequently, on gonadal function.

  19. Gene modulation associated with inhibition of liver regeneration in hepatitis B virus X transgenic mice

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    Malgorzata Sidorkiewicz; Jean-Philippe Jais; Guilherme Tralhao; Serban Morosan; Carlo Giannini; Nicolas Brezillon; Patrick Soussan; Oona Delpuech; Dina Kremsdorf

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the modulation of gene expression profile associated with inhibition of liver regeneration in hepatitis B X (HBx)-expressing transgenic mice.METHODS: Microarray technology was performed on liver tissue obtained from 4 control (LacZ) and 4 transgenic mice (HBx-LacZ), 48 h after partial hepatectomy. The significance of the normalized log-ratios was assessed for each gene, using robust Mests under an empirical Bayes approach. Microarray hybridization data was verified on selected genes by quantitative PCR.RESULTS: The comparison of gene expression patterns showed a consistent modulation of the expression of 26 genes, most of which are implicated in liver regeneration. Up-regulated genes included DNA repair proteins (Rad-52, MSH6) and transmembrane proteins (syndecan 4, tetraspanin), while down-regulated genes were connected to the regulation of transcription (histone deacetylase, Zfp90, MyoDl) and were involved in the cholesterol metabolic pathway and isoprenoidbiosynthesis (farnesyl diphosphate synthase, Cyp7b1, geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, SAA3).CONCLUSION: Our results provide a novel insight into the biological activities of HBx, implicated in the inhibition of liver regeneration.

  20. Increased abscess formation and defective chemokine regulation in CREB transgenic mice.

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    Andy Y Wen

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB is a transcription factor implicated in growth factor-dependent cell proliferation and survival, glucose homeostasis, spermatogenesis, circadian rhythms, and synaptic plasticity associated with memory. To study the phenotype of CREB overexpression in vivo, we generated CREB transgenic (TG mice in which a myeloid specific hMRP8 promoter drives CREB expression. CREB TG mice developed spontaneous skin abscesses more frequently than wild type (WT mice. To understand the role of CREB in myeloid function and innate immunity, chemokine expression in bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs from CREB TG mice were compared with BMDMs from WT mice. Our results demonstrated decreased Keratinocyte-derived cytokine (KC in CREB TG BMDMs but not TNFα protein production in response to lipid A (LPA. In addition, mRNA expression of KC and IL-1β (Interleukin-1β was decreased in CREB TG BMDMs; however, there was no difference in the mRNA expression of TNFα, MCP-1, IL-6 and IL-12p40. The mRNA expression of IL-1RA and IL-10 was decreased in response to LPA. Nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB expression and a subset of its target genes were upregulated in CREB TG mouse BMDMs. Although neutrophil migration was the same in both CREB TG and WT mice, Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase activity was significantly increased in neutrophils from CREB TG mice. Taken together, CREB overexpression in myeloid cells results in increased abscess formation in vivo and aberrant cytokine and chemokine response, and neutrophil function in vitro.

  1. Apolipoprotein D Transgenic Mice Develop Hepatic Steatosis through Activation of PPARγ and Fatty Acid Uptake.

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    Marilyne Labrie

    Full Text Available Transgenic mice (Tg overexpressing human apolipoprotein D (H-apoD in the brain are resistant to neurodegeneration. Despite the use of a neuron-specific promoter to generate the Tg mice, they expressed significant levels of H-apoD in both plasma and liver and they slowly develop hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. We show here that hepatic PPARγ expression in Tg mice is increased by 2-fold compared to wild type (WT mice. Consequently, PPARγ target genes Plin2 and Cide A/C are overexpressed, leading to increased lipid droplets formation. Expression of the fatty acid transporter CD36, another PPARgamma target, is also increased in Tg mice associated with elevated fatty acid uptake as measured in primary hepatocytes. Elevated expression of AMPK in the liver of Tg leads to phosphorylation of acetyl CoA carboxylase, indicating a decreased activity of the enzyme. Fatty acid synthase expression is also induced but the hepatic lipogenesis measured in vivo is not significantly different between WT and Tg mice. In addition, expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1, the rate-limiting enzyme of beta-oxidation, is slightly upregulated. Finally, we show that overexpressing H-apoD in HepG2 cells in presence of arachidonic acid (AA, the main apoD ligand, increases the transcriptional activity of PPARγ. Supporting the role of apoD in AA transport, we observed enrichment in hepatic AA and a decrease in plasmatic AA concentration. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the hepatic steatosis observed in apoD Tg mice is a consequence of increased PPARγ transcriptional activity by AA leading to increased fatty acid uptake by the liver.

  2. Extended lifespan, reduced body size and leg skeletal muscle mass, and decreased mitochondrial function in clk-1 transgenic mice.

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    Takahashi, Kazuhide; Noda, Yoshihiro; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Shirasawa, Takuji; Takahashi, Mayumi

    2014-10-01

    Mutational inactivation of clk-1, which encodes an enzyme necessary for the biosynthesis of coenzyme Q (CoQ), extends the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. However, whether mammalian clk-1 regulates the lifespan of mice is not known because clk-1-deficiencies are embryonic lethal. Here, we investigated the lifespan of clk-1 transgenic mice (Tg96/I), which were rescued from embryonic lethality via the transgenic expression of mouse clk-1. Tg96/I mice lived longer and had smaller bodies than wild-type mice, but Tg96/I mice had CoQ levels equivalent to wild-type mice. The small-sized Tg96/I mice exhibited reduced whole-body oxygen consumption (VO2) during the dark period, and lean leg skeletal muscles with reduced mitochondrial VO2 and ATP content compared with wild-type mice. These findings indicate a close relationship between lifespan extension and decreased mitochondrial function, which was induced by the transgenic expression of clk-1, in leg skeletal muscles that exhibit high metabolic activity.

  3. Myeloid Engraftment in Humanized Mice: Impact of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Treatment and Transgenic Mouse Strain.

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    Coughlan, Alice M; Harmon, Cathal; Whelan, Sarah; O'Brien, Eóin C; O'Reilly, Vincent P; Crotty, Paul; Kelly, Pamela; Ryan, Michelle; Hickey, Fionnuala B; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Little, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Poor myeloid engraftment remains a barrier to experimental use of humanized mice. Focusing primarily on peripheral blood cells, we compared the engraftment profile of NOD-scid-IL2Rγc(-/-) (NSG) mice with that of NSG mice transgenic for human membrane stem cell factor (hu-mSCF mice), NSG mice transgenic for human interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and stem cell factor (SGM3 mice). hu-mSCF and SGM3 mice showed enhanced engraftment of human leukocytes compared to NSG mice, and this was reflected in the number of human neutrophils and monocytes present in these strains. Importantly, discrete classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocyte populations were identifiable in the blood of NSG and hu-mSCF mice, while the nonclassical population was absent in the blood of SGM3 mice. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) treatment increased the number of blood monocytes in NSG and hu-mSCF mice, and neutrophils in NSG and SGM3 mice; however, this effect appeared to be at least partially dependent on the stem cell donor used to engraft the mice. Furthermore, GCSF treatment resulted in a preferential expansion of nonclassical monocytes in both NSG and hu-mSCF mice. Human tubulointerstitial CD11c(+) cells were present in the kidneys of hu-mSCF mice, while monocytes and neutrophils were identified in the liver of all strains. Bone marrow-derived macrophages prepared from NSG mice were most effective at phagocytosing polystyrene beads. In conclusion, hu-mSCF mice provide the best environment for the generation of human myeloid cells, with GCSF treatment further enhancing peripheral blood human monocyte cell numbers in this strain.

  4. Gene expression profile of cervical and skin tissues from human papillomavirus type 16 E6 transgenic mice

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    Lambert PF

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although K14E6 transgenic mice develop spontaneous tumors of the skin epithelium, no spontaneous reproductive tract malignancies arise, unless the transgenic mice were treated chronically with 17β-estradiol. These findings suggest that E6 performs critical functions in normal adult cervix and skin, highlighting the need to define E6-controlled transcriptional programs in these tissues. Methods We evaluated the expression profile of 14,000 genes in skin or cervix from young K14E6 transgenic mice compared with nontransgenic. To identify differentially expressed genes a linear model was implemented using R and the LIMMA package. Two criteria were used to select the set of relevant genes. First a set of genes with a Log-odds ≥ 3 were selected. Then, a hierarchical search of genes was based on Log Fold Changes. Results Microarray analysis identified a total of 676 and 1154 genes that were significantly up and down-regulated, respectively, in skin from K14E6 transgenic mice. On the other hand, in the cervix from K14E6 transgenic mice we found that only 97 and 252 genes were significantly up and down-regulated, respectively. One of the most affected processes in the skin from K14E6 transgenic mice was the cell cycle. We also found that skin from transgenic mice showed down-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes and genes related to the immune response. In the cervix of K14E6 transgenic mice, we could not find affected any gene related to the cell cycle and apoptosis pathways but did observe alterations in the expression of immune response genes. Pathways such as angiogenesis, cell junction and epidermis development, also were altered in their gene expression profiles in both tissues. Conclusion Expression of the HPV16 E6 oncoprotein in our model alters expression of genes that fell into several functional groups providing insights into pathways by which E6 deregulate cell cycle progression, apoptosis, the host resistance to infection

  5. A deregulated immune response to gliadin causes a decreased villus height in DQ8 transgenic mice.

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    D'Arienzo, Rossana; Stefanile, Rosita; Maurano, Francesco; Luongo, Diomira; Bergamo, Paolo; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Salvatore; David, Chella; Rossi, Mauro

    2009-12-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an enteropathy triggered by gluten and mediated by CD4+ T cells. A complete understanding of CD immunopathogenesis has been hindered due to the lack of adequate in vivo models. Here, we explored the effect of the inhibition of COX by indomethacin in wheat gliadin-sensitized transgenic mice expressing the HLA-DQ8 heterodimer, a molecule associated with CD. Treated mice showed a gliadin-specific immune response with a significant reduction of villus height, not linked to crypt hyperplasia and to expansion of intraepithelial T cells. Notably, treated mice showed increased numbers of CD25+ and apoptotic cells in the lamina propria, whereas high basal levels of IFN-gamma secretion, along with a reduced gliadin-specific IL-2 expression were detected in MLN. Biochemical assessment of the lesion revealed increased mRNA of Lamb3 and Adamts2, encoding for ECM proteins, and enhanced activities of metalloproteinases MMP1, 2 and 7. We conclude that an intestinal sensitivity to gliadin, in connection with COX inhibition, caused a decreased villus height in DQ8 tg mice. The lesion was induced by a deregulated mucosal cell immunity to gliadin, thus triggering activation of a specific ECM protein pathway responsible for lamina propria remodeling.

  6. Phenobarbital-mediated tumor promotion in transgenic mice with humanized CAR and PXR.

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    Braeuning, Albert; Gavrilov, Alina; Brown, Susan; Wolf, C Roland; Henderson, Colin J; Schwarz, Michael

    2014-08-01

    The nuclear receptors CAR (constitutive androstane receptor) and possibly PXR (pregnane X receptor) mediate the hepatic effects of phenobarbital (PB) and similar-acting compounds. Although PB is a potent nongenotoxic tumor promoter in rodent liver, epidemiological data from epilepsy patients treated with phenobarbital do not show a specific role of PB in human liver cancer risk. That points to species differences in the susceptibility to tumor promotion by PB, which might be attributed to divergent functions of the PB receptors CAR and PXR in mice and humans. In the present study, male transgenic mice expressing human CAR and PXR were used to detect possible differences between wild-type (WT) and humanized mice in their response to CAR activation in a tumor initiation/promotion experiment with a single injection of the tumor initiator N-nitrosodiethylamine preceding chronic PB treatment for 10 months. Analysis of liver tumor burden revealed that PB strongly promoted the outgrowth of hepatocellular adenoma driven by activated β-catenin in WT mice, whereas the tumor-promoting effect of PB was much less pronounced in the humanized group. In conclusion, the present findings demonstrate that human CAR and PXR support tumor promotion by PB in mouse liver, but to a significantly lesser extent than the WT murine receptors. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Tcf4 transgenic female mice display delayed adaptation in an auditory latent inhibition paradigm.

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    Brzózka, M M; Rossner, M J; de Hoz, L

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a severe mental disorder affecting about 1 % of the human population. Patients show severe deficits in cognitive processing often characterized by an improper filtering of environmental stimuli. Independent genome-wide association studies confirmed a number of risk variants for SZ including several associated with the gene encoding the transcription factor 4 (TCF4). TCF4 is widely expressed in the central nervous system of mice and humans and seems to be important for brain development. Transgenic mice overexpressing murine Tcf4 (Tcf4tg) in the adult brain display cognitive impairments and sensorimotor gating disturbances. To address the question of whether increased Tcf4 gene dosage may affect cognitive flexibility in an auditory associative task, we tested latent inhibition (LI) in female Tcf4tg mice. LI is a widely accepted translational endophenotype of SZ and results from a maladaptive delay in switching a response to a previously unconditioned stimulus when this becomes conditioned. Using an Audiobox, we pre-exposed Tcf4tg mice and their wild-type littermates to either a 3- or a 12-kHz tone before conditioning them to a 12-kHz tone. Tcf4tg animals pre-exposed to a 12-kHz tone showed significantly delayed conditioning when the previously unconditioned tone became associated with an air puff. These results support findings that associate TCF4 dysfunction with cognitive inflexibility and improper filtering of sensory stimuli observed in SZ patients.

  8. Early cognitive/social deficits and late motor phenotype in conditional wild-type TDP-43 transgenic mice.

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    Julio Armando Alfieri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are two neurodegenerative diseases associated to mislocalization and aggregation of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43. To investigate in depth the behavioral phenotype associated with this proteinopathy, we used as a model transgenic mice conditionally overexpressing human wild-type TDP 43 protein (hTDP-43-WT in forebrain neurons. We previously characterized these mice at the neuropathological level and found progressive neurodegeneration and other features that evoke human TDP-43 proteinopathies of the FTD/ALS spectrum. In the present study we analyzed the behavior of mice at multiple domains, including motor, social and cognitive performance. Our results indicate that young hTDP-43-WT transgenic mice (1 month after post-weaning transgene induction present a normal motor phenotype compared to control littermates, as assessed by accelerated rotarod performance, spontaneous locomotor activity in the open field test and a mild degree of spasticity shown by a clasping phenotype. Analysis of social and cognitive behavior showed a rapid installment of deficits in social interaction, working memory (Y-maze test and recognition memory (novel object recognition test in the absence of overt motor abnormalities. To investigate if the motor phenotype worsen with age, we analyzed the behavior of mice after long-term (up to 12 months transgene induction. Our results reveal a decreased performance on the rotarod test and in the hanging wire test, indicating a motor phenotype that was absent in younger mice. In addition, long-term hTDP-43-WT expression led to hyperlocomotion in the open field test. In sum, these results demonstrate a time-dependent emergence of a motor phenotype in older hTDP-43-WT transgenic mice, recapitulating aspects of clinical FTD presentations with motor involvement in human patients, and providing a complementary animal model for studying TDP-43 proteinopathies.

  9. Muscle-directed gene therapy for phenylketonuria (PKU): Development of transgenic mice with muscle-specific phenylalanine hydroxylase expression

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    Harding, C.O.; Messing, A.; Wolff, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an attractive target for gene therapy because of shortcomings in current therapy including lifelong commitment to a difficult and expensive diet, persistent mild cognitive deficits in some children despite adequate dietary therapy, and maternal PKU syndrome. Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is normally expressed only in liver, but we propose to treat PKU by introducing the gene for PAH into muscle. In order to evaluate both the safety and efficacy of this approach, we have a developed a trangenic mouse which expresses PAH in both cardiac and skeletal muscle. The transgene includes promoter and enhancer sequences from the mouse muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene fused to the mouse liver PAH cDNA. Mice which have inherited the transgene are healthy, active, and do not exhibit any signs of muscle weakness or wasting. Ectopic PAH expression in muscle is not detrimental to the health, neurologic function, or reproduction of the mice. Pah{sup enu2} hyperphenylalaninemic mice, a model of human PAH deficiency, bred to carry the transgene have substantial PAH expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle but none in liver. Muscle PAH expression alone does not complement the hyperphenylalaninemic phenotype of Pah{sup enu2} mice. However, administration of reduced tetrahydrobiopterin to transgenic Pah{sup enu2} mice is associated with a 25% mean decrease in serum phenylalanine levels. We predict that ectopic expression of PAH in muscle along with adequate muscle supplies of reduced biopterin cofactor will decrease hyperphenylalaninemia in PKU.

  10. Beta-catenin accelerates human papilloma virus type-16 mediated cervical carcinogenesis in transgenic mice.

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    Gülay Bulut

    Full Text Available Human papilloma virus (HPV is the principal etiological agent of cervical cancer in women, and its DNA is present in virtually all of these tumors. However, exposure to the high-risk HPV types alone is insufficient for tumor development. Identifying specific collaborating factors that will lead to cervical cancer remains an unanswered question, especially because millions of women are exposed to HPV. Our earlier work using an in vitro model indicated that activation of the canonical Wnt pathway in HPV-positive epithelial cells was sufficient to induce anchorage independent growth. We therefore hypothesized that constitutive activation of this pathway might function as the "second hit." To address this possibility, we developed two double-transgenic (DT mouse models, K14-E7/ΔN87βcat and K14-HPV16/ΔN87βcat that express either the proteins encoded by the E7 oncogene or the HPV16 early region along with constitutively active β-catenin, which was expressed by linking it to the keratin-14 (K14 promoter. We initiated tumor formation by treating all groups with estrogen for six months. Invasive cervical cancer was observed in 11% of the K14-ΔN87βcat mice, expressing activated β-catenin and in 50% of the animals expressing the HPV16 E7 oncogene. In double-transgenic mice, coexpression of β-catenin and HPV16 E7 induced invasive cervical cancer at about 7 months in 94% of the cases. We did not observe cervical cancer in any group unless the mice were treated with estrogen. In the second model, K14-HPV16 mice suffered cervical dysplasias, but this phenotype was not augmented in HPV16/ΔN87βcat mice. In summary, the phenotypes of the K14-E7/ΔN87βcat mice support the hypothesis that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in HPV-associated premalignant lesions plays a functional role in accelerating cervical carcinogenesis.

  11. Expression of complement system components during aging and amyloid deposition in APP transgenic mice

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    Wiederhold Karl-Heinz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A causal role of the complement system in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis has been postulated based on the identification of different activated components up to the membrane attack complex at amyloid plaques in brain. However, histological studies of amyloid plaque bearing APP transgenic mice provided only evidence for an activation of the early parts of the complement cascade. To better understand the contribution of normal aging and amyloid deposition to the increase in complement activation we performed a detailed characterization of the expression of the major mouse complement components. Methods APP23 mice expressing human APP751 with the Swedish double mutation as well as C57BL/6 mice were used at different ages. mRNA was quantified by Realtime PCR and the age- as well as amyloid induced changes determined. The protein levels of complement C1q and C3 were analysed by Western blotting. Histology was done to test for amyloid plaque association and activation of the complement cascade. Results High mRNA levels were detected for C1q and some inhibitory complement components. The expression of most activating components starting at C3 was low. Expression of C1q, C3, C4, C5 and factor B mRNA increased with age in control C57BL/6 mice. C1q and C3 mRNA showed a substantial additional elevation during amyloid formation in APP23 mice. This increase was confirmed on the protein level using Western blotting, whereas immunohistology indicated a recruitment of complement to amyloid plaques up to the C3 convertase. Conclusion Early but not late components of the mouse complement system show an age-dependent increase in expression. The response to amyloid deposition is comparatively smaller. The low expression of C3 and C5 and failure to upregulate C5 and downstream components differs from human AD brain and likely contributes to the lack of full complement activation in APP transgenic mice.

  12. CaMKIIα underlies spontaneous and evoked pain behaviors in Berkeley sickle cell transgenic mice.

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    He, Ying; Chen, Yan; Tian, Xuebi; Yang, Cheng; Lu, Jian; Xiao, Chun; DeSimone, Joseph; Wilkie, Diana J; Molokie, Robert E; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    2016-12-01

    Pain is one of the most challenging and stressful conditions to patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and their clinicians. Patients with SCD start experiencing pain as early as 3 months old and continue having it throughout their lives. Although many aspects of the disease are well understood, little progress has been made in understanding and treating pain in SCD. This study aimed to investigate the functional involvement of Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIα) in the persistent and refractory pain associated with SCD. We found that nonevoked ongoing pain as well as evoked hypersensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli were present in Berkeley sickle cell transgenic mice (BERK mice), but not nonsickle control littermates. Prominent activation of CaMKIIα was observed in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord dorsal horn region of BERK mice. Intrathecal administration of KN93, a selective inhibitor of CaMKII, significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in BERK mice. Meanwhile, spinal inhibition of CaMKII elicited conditioned place preference in the BERK mice, indicating the contribution of CaMKII in the ongoing spontaneous pain of SCD. We further targeted CaMKIIα by siRNA knockdown. Both evoked pain and ongoing spontaneous pain were effectively attenuated in BERK mice. These findings elucidated, for the first time, an essential role of CaMKIIα as a cellular mechanism in the development and maintenance of spontaneous and evoked pain in SCD, which can potentially offer new targets for pharmacological intervention of pain in SCD.

  13. Tumorigenic potential of pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG in vivo investigated using a transgenic mouse model, and effects of cross breeding with p53 (+/− transgenic mice

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    Fong Miranda Y

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pituitary tumor-transforming gene (PTTG is an oncogene that is overexpressed in variety of tumors and exhibits characteristics of a transforming gene. Previous transgenic mouse models to access the tumorigenic potential in the pituitary and ovary have resulted in dysplasia without formation of visible tumors, possibly due to the insufficient expression of PTTG. PTTG expression level is critical for ovarian tumorigenesis in a xenograft model. Therefore, the tumorigenic function of PTTG in vivo remains unclear. We generated a transgenic mouse that overexpresses PTTG driven by the CMV promoter to determine whether PTTG functions as a transforming oncogene that is capable of initiating tumorigenesis. Methods Transgenic animals were generated by microinjection of PTTG transgene into the male pronucleus of FVB 0.5 day old embryos. Expression levels of PTTG in tissues of transgenic animals were analyzed using an immunohistochemical analysis. H&E staining and immunohistostaining were performed to examine the type of tumor in transgenic and PTTG transgenic/p53+/- animals. Results PTTG transgenic offspring (TgPTTG were monitored for tumor development at various ages. H&E analysis was performed to identify the presence of cancer and hyperplastic conditions verified with the proliferation marker PCNA and the microvessel marker CD31. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine transgene expression, revealing localization to the epithelium of the fallopian tube, with more generalized expression in the liver, lung, kidney, and spleen. At eight months of age, 2 out of 15 TgPTTG developed ovarian cancer, 2 out of 15 developed benign tumors, 2 out of 15 developed cervical dysplasia, and 3 out of 15 developed adenomyosis of the uterus. At ten months of age, 2 out of 10 TgPTTG developed adenocarcinoma of the ovary, 1 out of 10 developed a papillary serous adenocarcinoma, and 2 out of 10 presented with atypia of ovarian epithelial cells

  14. Studies on the correlation with olfactory dysfunction in a transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease

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    Rasheed, Ameer; Lee, Ji Hye; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Moon, Cheil

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressively debilitating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presence of proteinaceous deposits in the brain. AD often results in olfactory dysfunction and impaired olfactory perceptual acuity may be a potential biomarker for early diagnosis of AD. Until recently, there is no Alzheimer's nanoscope or any other high-end microscope developed to be capable of seeing buried feature of AD clearly. Modern neuroimaging techniques are more effective only after the occurrence of cognitive impairment. Therefore, early detection of Alzheimer's disease is critical in developing effective treatment of AD. H and E (Haematoxyline and Eosin) staining is performed for examining gross morphological changes, while TUNEL (transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) staining for monitoring neuronal death in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Furthermore, immunohistochemistry and western blot are performed to examine β-amyloid protein expression. AD model animals were Tg2576 (transgenic mice that overexpress a mutated form of the Aβ precursor protein), and 6 month (before onset of AD symptoms) and 14 month (after onset of AD symptoms) old WT (wild type) and transgenic mice were compared in their olfactory system. We found that in OE of Tg2576 mice, thickness and total number of cells were decreased, while the numbers of TUNEL-positive neurons, caspase-3 activation were significantly increased compared with age-matched WT. Our results demonstrate that the olfactory system may get deteriorated before onset of AD symptoms. Our findings imply that an olfactory biopsy could be served as an early and relatively simple diagnostic tool for potential AD patients.

  15. Mangifera indica L. extract (Vimang improves the aversive memory in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Maurmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: The spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA-2 is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder without specific therapy identified, and it is related to the loss of function in the cerebellum, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and neurotoxic processes. Scientific evidence indicates that Mangifera indica L. aqueous extract (MiE and its major constituent (mangiferin display antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. Aims: To investigate the MiE and mangiferin effects on behavioral outcomes of neurological function in SCA-2 transgenic mice. Methods: The SCA-2 transgenic mice were daily and orally administered during 12 months with MiE (10, 50, and 100 mg/kg, mangiferin (10 mg/kg or vehicle. It was evaluated locomotion (open-field, aversive memory (inhibitory avoidance and declarative memory (object recognition. To explore possible cellular mechanisms underlying the in vivo effects was also evaluated their effects on nerve grow factor (NGF and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α levels in the human glioblastoma cell line U138-MG supernatant. Results: MiE administration did not affect the object recognition memory, but mangiferin did. The natural extract improved selectively the aversive memory in SCA-2 mice, indicating that MiE can affect behavioral parameters regarding fear-related memory. MiE also induced a significant increase in supernatant levels of NGF and TNF-α in vitro in human U138-MG glioblastoma cells. Conclusions: The results suggest that MiE enhances the aversive memory through a mechanism that might involve an increase in neurotrophin and cytokine levels. These findings constitute the basis for the use of the natural extract in the prevention/treatment of memory deficits in SCA-2.

  16. Nuclear and neuritic distribution of serine-129 phosphorylated alpha-synuclein in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, H; Hasegawa, T; Neumann, M; Kahle, P J

    2009-06-02

    Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies are very frequent neurological disorders of the elderly. Mutations in the alpha-synuclein (alphaSYN) gene cause Parkinson's disease, often associated with dementia. Neuropathologically these diseases are characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, intraneuronal inclusions mostly composed of alphaSYN protein fibrils. Moreover, alphaSYN is phosphorylated at S129 (phospho-serine-129 [PSer129]) in neuropathological lesions. Using our (Thy1)-[A30P]alphaSYN transgenic mouse model that develops age-dependent impairment in fear conditioning behavior, we investigated PSer129 immunostaining in the brain. We found distinct staining patterns using new, sensitive monoclonal antibodies. Somal and nuclear PSer129 immunoreactivity increased with age in hippocampal and cortical areas as well as the lateral/basolateral amygdalar nuclei and was present also in young, pre-symptomatic mice, but not wild-type controls. The tendency of PSer129 immunostaining to accumulate in the nucleus was confirmed in cell culture. (Thy1)-[A30P]alphaSYN transgenic mice further developed age-dependent, specific neuritic/terminal alphaSYN pathology in the medial parts of the central amygdalar nucleus and one of its projection areas, the lateral hypothalamus. Interestingly, this type of PSer129 neuropathology was thioflavine S negative, unlike the Lewy-like neuropathology present in the brain stem of (Thy1)-[A30P]alphaSYN mice. Thus, alphaSYN becomes phosphorylated in distinct parts of the brain in this alpha-synucleinopathy mouse model, showing age-dependent increases of nuclear PSer129 in cortical brain areas and the formation of neuritic/terminal PSer129 neuropathology with variable amyloid quality within the fear conditioning circuitry and the brain stem.

  17. [Study on distribution of neural stem cells in the brain of Alzheimer disease transgenic mice through caudal vein transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yan-qiang; Wang, Fu-rong; Li, Feng-guang; Xing, Bian-zhi; Fang, Xin; Zhang, Su-ming

    2007-07-03

    To observe whether neural stem cells (NSCs) can successfully permeate into the brain through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of Alzheimer disease (AD) transgenic mice and explore the methods of distribution and migration. NSCs were isolated from 12-day-old fetal mice, cultured, labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and then transplanted into 10 AD transgenic mice and normal mice as controls through caudal vein. The mice were killed 48 h, 1 w, 2 w, and 4 w after transplantation respectively. The brains of the mice were made into continual frozen sections, the distribution and migration of the eGFP-labeled NSCs were studied under fluorescence microscope. At different time points after transplantation the eGFP-labeled NSCs were diffusely distributed in the brain: distributed around the blood vessels in the first 48 h, and then migrated gradually towards the hippocampus and cortex until 4 weeks later. There were no obvious abnormal complications occurring after transplantation. NSCs can successfully permeate into the brain through the BBB of AD transgenic mice, and migrate into the brain parenchyma gradually.

  18. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  19. Chemoprevention of HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma by the combined product of resveratrol and silymarin in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chuan Hsieh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground: Patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection are at a high risk to develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Recently, metabolic syndrome has been found to carry a risk for HCC development. Considering the limitation of chemotherapeutic drugs for HCCs, the development of chemopreventive agents for high risk chronic HBV carriers is urgently demanded. In this study, we used combined silymarin and resveratrol extract which have been shown to exhibit biologic effects on activating peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPAR and inhibiting mTOR signaling in a transgenic mice model harboring HBV viral oncoproteins.Methods: The transgenic mice model harboring HBx and pre-S2 mutant constructs which develop HCC was adopted. First, we in vitro tested the ideal combination dosages of the silymarin and resveratrol product, and then we fed the natural product to the transgenic mice.The chemopreventive effects on preventing the development of HCC were evaluated.Results: MTT assay showed an enhanced effect of the combined silymarin and resveratrol product on the reduction of cell proliferation in two hepatoma cell lines, Huh-7 and Hep G2. In vitro reporter assay and Western blot analyses revealed that the combined product couldactivate PPAR/PGC-1 signaling and inhibit mTOR expression. In vivo, the combined products could significantly ameliorate fatty liver and reduce HCCs in transgenic miceharboring HBV oncoproteins.Conclusions: The combined silymarin and resveratrol product exhibits a synergistic effect on the reduction of HCC development in transgenic mice model and may represent a potential agent for the prevention of HCC in high risk chronic HBV carriers.Key words: HBV, HCC, Transgenic mice, Chemoprevention

  20. Transgenic expression of human INS gene in Ins1/Ins2 double knockout mice leads to insulin underproduction and diabetes in some male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Melis; Durel, Béatrice; Languille, Laëtitia; Lamotte, Luciane; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Leroux, Loïc; Abou Sleymane, Gretta; Saint-Just, Susan; Bucchini, Danielle; Ktorza, Alain; Joshi, Rajiv L

    2007-01-01

    We have generated transgenic mouse lines expressing exclusively a human INS transgene on an Ins1/Ins2 double knockout (mIKO) background. The transgene expression was driven by either a 4000 bp or a 353 bp promoter. These transgenic lines, designated mIKO:INS4000 and mIKO:INS353, were viable and fertile. Determination of the amounts of insulin transcripts and total pancreatic insulin content revealed relative insulin underproduction in both lines, from birth to adulthood. Total pancreatic insulin stores in mIKO:INS4000 and mIKO:INS353 mice represented only about 50% and 27%, respectively, as compared to wild-type mice. Morphometric analysis of pancreas did not show any compensatory beta-cell hyperplasia. The majority of animals in both lines remained normoglycemic throughout their lives. Nevertheless, glucose tolerance tests revealed glucose intolerance in nearly half of mIKO:INS4000 male mice, likely due to impaired insulin secretion detected in those animals. In addition, a small fraction (2-4%) of male mice in both lines spontaneously developed diabetes with very distinct pathophysiological features. Diabetes was never seen in female animals. The diabetes developed by mIKO:INS353 mice was rapidly lethal, accompanied by a dramatic depletion of pancreatic insulin stores whereas the mIKO:INS4000 diabetic animals could live for several months. This suggests a possible link between the structure of the human INS gene promoter and the type of diabetes developed in these lines.

  1. Methanol teratogenicity in mutant mice with deficient catalase activity and transgenic mice expressing human catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Michelle T; Wiley, Michael J; Wells, Peter G

    2013-04-01

    The role of catalase in methanol (MeOH) teratogenesis is unclear. In rodents it both detoxifies reactive oxygen species (ROS) and metabolizes MeOH and its formic acid (FA) metabolite. We treated pregnant mice expressing either high (hCat) or low catalase activity (aCat), or their wild-type (WT) controls, with either MeOH (4g/kg ip) or saline. hCat mice and WTs were similarly susceptible to MeOH-initiated ophthalmic abnormalities and cleft palates. aCat and WT mice appeared resistant, precluding assessment of the developmental impact of catalase deficiency. Catalase activity was respectively increased at least 1.5-fold, and decreased by at least 35%, in hCat and aCat embryos and maternal livers. MeOH and FA pharmacokinetic profiles were similar among hCat, aCat and WT strains. Although the hCat results imply no ROS involvement, embryo culture studies suggest this may be confounded by maternal factors and/or a requirement for higher catalase activity in the hCat mice.

  2. Impact of transgenic overexpression of SH2-containing inositol 5'-phosphatase 2 on glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Syota; Soeda, Yoshiyuki; Ishihara, Hajime; Oya, Takeshi; Sasahara, Masakiyo; Yaguchi, Saori; Oshita, Ryo; Wada, Tsutomu; Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2008-02-01

    SH2-containing inositol 5'-phosphatase 2 (SHIP2) is a 5'-lipid phosphatase hydrolyzing the phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase product PI(3,4,5)P(3) to PI(3,4)P(2) in the regulation of insulin signaling, and is shown to be increased in peripheral tissues of diabetic C57BL/KSJ-db/db mice. To clarify the impact of SHIP2 in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance with type 2 diabetes, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing SHIP2. The body weight of transgenic mice increased by 5.0% (P Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were mildly but significantly impaired in the transgenic mice only when maintained on the normal chow diet, as shown by 1.2-fold increase in glucose area under the curve over control levels at 9 months old. Insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt was decreased in the SHIP2-overexpressing fat, skeletal muscle, and liver. In addition, the expression of hepatic mRNAs for glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was increased, that for sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 was unchanged, and that for glucokinase was decreased. Consistently, hepatic glycogen content was reduced in the 9-month-old transgenic mice. Structure and insulin content were histologically normal in the pancreatic islets of transgenic mice. These results indicate that increased abundance of SHIP2 in vivo contributes, at least in part, to the impairment of glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity on a normal chow diet, possibly by attenuating peripheral insulin signaling and by altering hepatic gene expression for glucose homeostasis.

  3. Bone turnover in wild type and pleiotrophin-transgenic mice housed for three months in the International Space Station (ISS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavella, Sara; Ruggiu, Alessandra; Giuliani, Alessandra; Brun, Francesco; Canciani, Barbara; Manescu, Adrian; Marozzi, Katia; Cilli, Michele; Costa, Delfina; Liu, Yi; Piccardi, Federica; Tasso, Roberta; Tromba, Giuliana; Rustichelli, Franco; Cancedda, Ranieri

    2012-01-01

    Bone is a complex dynamic tissue undergoing a continuous remodeling process. Gravity is a physical force playing a role in the remodeling and contributing to the maintenance of bone integrity. This article reports an investigation on the alterations of the bone microarchitecture that occurred in wild type (Wt) and pleiotrophin-transgenic (PTN-Tg) mice exposed to a near-zero gravity on the International Space Station (ISS) during the Mice Drawer System (MDS) mission, to date, the longest mice permanence (91 days) in space. The transgenic mouse strain over-expressing pleiotrophin (PTN) in bone was selected because of the PTN positive effects on bone turnover. Wt and PTN-Tg control animals were maintained on Earth either in a MDS payload or in a standard vivarium cage. This study revealed a bone loss during spaceflight in the weight-bearing bones of both strains. For both Tg and Wt a decrease of the trabecular number as well as an increase of the mean trabecular separation was observed after flight, whereas trabecular thickness did not show any significant change. Non weight-bearing bones were not affected. The PTN-Tg mice exposed to normal gravity presented a poorer trabecular organization than Wt mice, but interestingly, the expression of the PTN transgene during the flight resulted in some protection against microgravity's negative effects. Moreover, osteocytes of the Wt mice, but not of Tg mice, acquired a round shape, thus showing for the first time osteocyte space-related morphological alterations in vivo. The analysis of specific bone formation and resorption marker expression suggested that the microgravity-induced bone loss was due to both an increased bone resorption and a decreased bone deposition. Apparently, the PTN transgene protection was the result of a higher osteoblast activity in the flight mice.

  4. Renoprotection From Diabetic Complications in OVE Transgenic Mice by Endothelial Cell Specific Overexpression of Metallothionein: A TEM Stereological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Edward C; Chhoun, Jennifer M; Grove, Bryon D; Laturnus, Donna I; Zheng, Shirong; Epstein, Paul N; Tan, Yi

    2017-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that OVE transgenic diabetic mice are susceptible to chronic complications of diabetic nephropathy (DN) including substantial oxidative damage to the renal glomerular filtration barrier (GFB). Importantly, the damage was mitigated significantly by overexpression of the powerful antioxidant, metallothionein (MT) in podocytes. To test our hypothesis that GFB damage in OVE mice is the result of endothelial oxidative insult, a new JTMT transgenic mouse was designed in which MT overexpression was targeted specifically to endothelial cells. At 60 days of age, JTMT mice were crossed with age-matched OVE diabetic mice to produce bi-transgenic OVE-JTMT diabetic progeny that carried the endothelial targeted JTMT transgene. Renal tissues from the OVE-JTMT progeny were examined by unbiased TEM stereometry for possible GFB damage and other alterations from chronic complications of DN. In 150 day-old OVE-JTMT mice, blood glucose and HbA1c were indistinguishable from age-matched OVE mice. However, endothelial-specific MT overexpression in OVE-JTMT mice mitigated several DN complications including significantly increased non-fenestrated glomerular endothelial area, and elimination of glomerular basement membrane thickening. Significant renoprotection was also observed outside of endothelial cells, including reduced podocyte effacement, and increased podocyte and total glomerular cell densities. Moreover, when compared to OVE diabetic animals, OVE-JTMT mice showed significant mitigation of nephromegaly, glomerular hypertrophy, increased mesangial cell numbers and increased total glomerular cell numbers. These results confirm the importance of oxidative stress to glomerular damage in DN, and show the central role of endothelial cell injury to the pathogenesis of chronic complications of diabetes. Anat Rec, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Anat Rec, 300:560-576, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Bone turnover in wild type and pleiotrophin-transgenic mice housed for three months in the International Space Station (ISS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Tavella

    Full Text Available Bone is a complex dynamic tissue undergoing a continuous remodeling process. Gravity is a physical force playing a role in the remodeling and contributing to the maintenance of bone integrity. This article reports an investigation on the alterations of the bone microarchitecture that occurred in wild type (Wt and pleiotrophin-transgenic (PTN-Tg mice exposed to a near-zero gravity on the International Space Station (ISS during the Mice Drawer System (MDS mission, to date, the longest mice permanence (91 days in space. The transgenic mouse strain over-expressing pleiotrophin (PTN in bone was selected because of the PTN positive effects on bone turnover. Wt and PTN-Tg control animals were maintained on Earth either in a MDS payload or in a standard vivarium cage. This study revealed a bone loss during spaceflight in the weight-bearing bones of both strains. For both Tg and Wt a decrease of the trabecular number as well as an increase of the mean trabecular separation was observed after flight, whereas trabecular thickness did not show any significant change. Non weight-bearing bones were not affected. The PTN-Tg mice exposed to normal gravity presented a poorer trabecular organization than Wt mice, but interestingly, the expression of the PTN transgene during the flight resulted in some protection against microgravity's negative effects. Moreover, osteocytes of the Wt mice, but not of Tg mice, acquired a round shape, thus showing for the first time osteocyte space-related morphological alterations in vivo. The analysis of specific bone formation and resorption marker expression suggested that the microgravity-induced bone loss was due to both an increased bone resorption and a decreased bone deposition. Apparently, the PTN transgene protection was the result of a higher osteoblast activity in the flight mice.

  6. Characterization of human antiviral adaptive immune responses during hepatotropic virus infection in HLA-transgenic human immune system mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billerbeck, Eva; Horwitz, Joshua A; Labitt, Rachael N; Donovan, Bridget M; Vega, Kevin; Budell, William C; Koo, Gloria C; Rice, Charles M; Ploss, Alexander

    2013-08-15

    Humanized mice have emerged as a promising model to study human immunity in vivo. Although they are susceptible to many pathogens exhibiting an almost exclusive human tropism, human immune responses to infection remain functionally impaired. It has recently been demonstrated that the expression of HLA molecules improves human immunity to lymphotropic virus infections in humanized mice. However, little is known about the extent of functional human immune responses in nonlymphoid tissues, such as in the liver, and the role of HLA expression in this context. Therefore, we analyzed human antiviral immunity in humanized mice during a hepatotropic adenovirus infection. We compared immune responses of conventional humanized NOD SCID IL-2Rγ-deficient (NSG) mice to those of a novel NOD SCID IL-2Rγ-deficient strain transgenic for both HLA-A*0201 and a chimeric HLA-DR*0101 molecule. Using a firefly luciferase-expressing adenovirus and in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we demonstrate a human T cell-dependent partial clearance of adenovirus-infected cells from the liver of HLA-transgenic humanized mice. This correlated with liver infiltration and activation of T cells, as well as the detection of Ag-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. When infected with a hepatitis C virus NS3-expressing adenovirus, HLA-transgenic humanized mice mounted an HLA-A*0201-restricted hepatitis C virus NS3-specific CD8(+) T cell response. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the generation of partial functional antiviral immune responses against a hepatotropic pathogen in humanized HLA-transgenic mice. The adenovirus reporter system used in our study may serve as simple in vivo method to evaluate future strategies for improving human intrahepatic immune responses in humanized mice.

  7. Puerarin alleviates cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanyan; Xie, Ning; Li, Libo; Zou, Yu; Zhang, Xiaojie; Dong, Miaoxian

    2014-04-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that β-amyloid (Aβ) elicits oxidative stress, which contributes to the pathogenesis and disease progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thus, there is interest in developing antioxidant therapies for the prevention/treatment of cognitive decline during AD. We reported previously that puerarin has antioxidative properties in vitro. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether puerarin improves cognitive function and reduces oxidative stress in amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 (APP/PS1) mice, a well established AD mouse model, and explore its potential mechanism. Our results show that oral administration of puerarin significantly ameliorates cognitive impairment in APP/PS1 mice assessed by the Morris water maze (MWM) test. This was accompanied by a significant decrease in the levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) through, at least in part, induction of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) target gene heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice at 9 months of age, but without altering brain Aβ burden. Furthermore, puerarin significantly activated Akt, reduced activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), and induced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice but did not alter ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Thus, puerarin may improve cognitive performance in APP/PS1 mice through activation of the Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway. These findings suggest that puerarin might be an attractive agent for prevention and treatment of cognitive impairment and dementia.

  8. A humanin derivative reduces amyloid beta accumulation and ameliorates memory deficit in triple transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Niikura

    Full Text Available Humanin (HN, a 24-residue peptide, was identified as a novel neuroprotective factor and shows anti-cell death activity against a wide spectrum of Alzheimer's disease (AD-related cytotoxicities, including exposure to amyloid beta (Abeta, in vitro. We previously demonstrated that the injection of S14G-HN, a highly potent HN derivative, into brain ameliorated memory loss in an Abeta-injection mouse model. To fully understand HN's functions under AD-associated pathological conditions, we examined the effect of S14G-HN on triple transgenic mice harboring APP(swe, tau(P310L, and PS-1(M146V that show the age-dependent development of multiple pathologies relating to AD. After 3 months of intranasal treatment, behavioral analyses showed that S14G-HN ameliorated cognitive impairment in male mice. Moreover, ELISA and immunohistochemical analyses showed that Abeta levels in brains were markedly lower in S14G-HN-treated male and female mice than in vehicle control mice. We also found the expression level of neprilysin, an Abeta degrading enzyme, in the outer molecular layer of hippocampal formation was increased in S14G-HN-treated mouse brains. NEP activity was also elevated by S14G-HN treatment in vitro. These findings suggest that decreased Abeta level in these mice is at least partly attributed to S14G-HN-induced increase of neprilysin level. Although HN was identified as an anti-neuronal death factor, these results indicate that HN may also have a therapeutic effect on amyloid accumulation in AD.

  9. Nuclear Expression of a Mitochondrial DNA Gene: Mitochondrial Targeting of Allotopically Expressed Mutant ATP6 in Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Dunn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear encoding of mitochondrial DNA transgenes followed by mitochondrial targeting of the expressed proteins (allotopic expression; AE represents a potentially powerful strategy for creating animal models of mtDNA disease. Mice were created that allotopically express either a mutant (A6M or wildtype (A6W mt-Atp6 transgene. Compared to non-transgenic controls, A6M mice displayed neuromuscular and motor deficiencies (wire hang, pole, and balance beam analyses; P0.05. This study illustrates a mouse model capable of circumventing in vivo mitochondrial mutations. Moreover, it provides evidence supporting AE as a tool for mtDNA disease research with implications in development of DNA-based therapeutics.

  10. Euploidy in somatic cells from R6/2 transgenic Huntington's disease mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewénius Ylva

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HD gene. The huntingtin protein expressed from HD has an unknown function but is suggested to interact with proteins involved in the cell division machinery. The R6/2 transgenic mouse is the most widely used model to study HD. In R6/2 fibroblast cultures, a reduced mitotic index and high frequencies of multiple centrosomes and aneuploid cells have recently been reported. Aneuploidy is normally a feature closely connected to neoplastic disease. To further explore this unexpected aspect of HD, we studied cultures derived from 6- and 12-week-old R6/2 fibroblasts, skeletal muscle cells, and liver cells. Results Cytogenetic analyses revealed a high frequency of polyploid cells in cultures from both R6/2 and wild-type mice with the greatest proportions of polyploid cells in cultures derived from skeletal muscle cells of both genotypes. The presence of polyploid cells in skeletal muscle in vivo was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation with centromeric probes. Enlarged and supernumerary centrosomes were found in cultures from both R6/2 and wild-type mice. However, no aneuploid cells could be found in any of the tissues. Conclusion We conclude that polyploid cells are found in fibroblast and skeletal muscle cultures derived from both R6/2 and wild-type littermate mice and that aneuploidy is unlikely to be a hallmark of HD.

  11. Metallothionein-I overexpression decreases brain pathology in transgenic mice with astrocyte-targeted expression of interleukin-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molinero, Amalia; Penkowa, Milena; Hernández, Joaquín;

    2003-01-01

    Transgenic expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the CNS under the control of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene promoter (GFAP-IL6 mice) causes significant damage and alters the expression of many genes, including a dramatic upregulation of metallothionein-I (MT-I). The findings in ...

  12. Resistance to chronic wasting disease in transgenic mice expressing a naturally occurring allelic variant of deer prion protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meade-White, K.; Race, B.; Trifilo, M.; Bossers, A.; Favara, C.; Lacasse, R.; Miller, M.; Williams, E.; Oldstone, M.; Race, R.; Chesebro, B.

    2007-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP) is a required factor for susceptibility to transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion diseases. In transgenic mice, expression of prion protein (PrP) from another species often confers susceptibility to prion disease from that donor species. For example, expression of deer

  13. Conditional E2F1 activation in transgenic mice causes testicular atrophy and dysplasia mimicking human CIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Karl; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Holmberg, Christian;

    2005-01-01

    E2F1 is a crucial downstream effector of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) pathway. To address the consequences of short-term increase in E2F1 activity in adult tissues, we generated transgenic mice expressing the human E2F1 protein fused to the oestrogen receptor (ER) ligand-binding domain...

  14. Human Leukocyte Antigen-DQ8 Transgenic Mice: A Model to Examine the Toxicity of Aerosolized Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-30

    inser- tion of HLA-DQ10301 and HLA-DQ10302 gene fragments created the HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice. The C57BL/6 embryos were inserted into (C57BL/6 DBA...enterotoxin B. Toxicol. Pathol. 31:373–378. 31. Stevens, D. L. 2000. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome associated with necrotizing fasciitis . Annu. Rev. Med

  15. Methylene Blue Modulates β-Secretase, Reverses Cerebral Amyloidosis, and Improves Cognition in Transgenic Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takashi; Koyama, Naoki; Segawa, Tatsuya; Maeda, Masahiro; Maruyama, Nobuhiro; Kinoshita, Noriaki; Hou, Huayan; Tan, Jun; Town, Terrence

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) proteolysis is required for production of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that comprise β-amyloid plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Here, we tested whether the experimental agent methylene blue (MB), used for treatment of methemoglobinemia, might improve AD-like pathology and behavioral deficits. We orally administered MB to the aged transgenic PSAPP mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis and evaluated cognitive function and cerebral amyloid pathology. Beginning at 15 months of age, animals were gavaged with MB (3 mg/kg) or vehicle once daily for 3 months. MB treatment significantly prevented transgene-associated behavioral impairment, including hyperactivity, decreased object recognition, and defective spatial working and reference memory, but it did not alter nontransgenic mouse behavior. Moreover, brain parenchymal and cerebral vascular β-amyloid deposits as well as levels of various Aβ species, including oligomers, were mitigated in MB-treated PSAPP mice. These effects occurred with inhibition of amyloidogenic APP proteolysis. Specifically, β-carboxyl-terminal APP fragment and β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 protein expression and activity were attenuated. Additionally, treatment of Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing human wild-type APP with MB significantly decreased Aβ production and amyloidogenic APP proteolysis. These results underscore the potential for oral MB treatment against AD-related cerebral amyloidosis by modulating the amyloidogenic pathway. PMID:25157105

  16. TRANSGENIC STRATEGY FOR IDENTIFYING SYNAPTIC CONNECTIONS IN MICE BY FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION (GRASP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito eYamagata

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the "GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners" (GRASP method, non-fluorescent fragments of GFP are expressed in two different neurons; the fragments self-assemble at synapses between the two to form a fluorophore. GRASP has proven useful for light microscopic identification of synapses in two invertebrate species, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, but has not yet been applied to vertebrates. Here, we describe GRASP constructs that function in mammalian cells and implement a transgenic strategy in which a Cre-dependent gene switch leads to expression of the two fragments in mutually exclusive neuronal subsets in mice. Using a transgenic line that expresses Cre selectively in rod photoreceptors, we demonstrate labeling of synapses in the outer plexiform layer of the retina. Labeling is specific, in that synapses made by rods remain labeled for at least 6 months whereas nearby synapses made by intercalated cone photoreceptors on many of the same interneurons remain unlabeled. We also generated antisera that label reconstituted GFP but neither fragment in order to amplify the GRASP signal and thereby increase the sensitivity of the method.

  17. Generation of NSE-MerCreMer transgenic mice with tamoxifen inducible Cre activity in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Ka Man Kam

    Full Text Available To establish a genetic tool for conditional deletion or expression of gene in neurons in a temporally controlled manner, we generated a transgenic mouse (NSE-MerCreMer, which expressed a tamoxifen inducible type of Cre recombinase specifically in neurons. The tamoxifen inducible Cre recombinase (MerCreMer is a fusion protein containing Cre recombinase with two modified estrogen receptor ligand binding domains at both ends, and is driven by the neural-specific rat neural specific enolase (NSE promoter. A total of two transgenic lines were established, and expression of MerCreMer in neurons of the central and enteric nervous systems was confirmed. Transcript of MerCreMer was detected in several non-neural tissues such as heart, liver, and kidney in these lines. In the background of the Cre reporter mouse strain Rosa26R, Cre recombinase activity was inducible in neurons of adult NSE-MerCreMer mice treated with tamoxifen by intragastric gavage, but not in those fed with corn oil only. We conclude that NSE-MerCreMer lines will be useful for studying gene functions in neurons for the conditions that Cre-mediated recombination resulting in embryonic lethality, which precludes investigation of gene functions in neurons through later stages of development and in adult.

  18. Diverse hematological malignancies including hodgkin-like lymphomas develop in chimeric MHC class II transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke H Raffegerst

    Full Text Available A chimeric HLA-DR4-H2-E (DR4 homozygous transgenic mouse line spontaneously develops diverse hematological malignancies with high frequency (70%. The majority of malignancies were distributed equally between T and B cell neoplasms and included lymphoblastic T cell lymphoma (LTCL, lymphoblastic B cell lymphoma (LBCL, diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL, the histiocyte/T cell rich variant of DLBCL (DLBCL-HA/T cell rich DLBCL, splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL, follicular B cell lymphoma (FBL and plasmacytoma (PCT. Most of these neoplasms were highly similar to human diseases. Also, some non-lymphoid malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML and histiocytic sarcoma were found. Interestingly, composite lymphomas, including Hodgkin-like lymphomas, were also detected that had CD30(+ Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (H/RS-like cells, representing a tumor type not previously described in mice. Analysis of microdissected H/RS-like cells revealed their origin as germinal center B cells bearing somatic hypermutations and, in some instances, crippled mutations, as described for human Hodgkin lymphoma (HL. Transgene integration in an oncogene was excluded as an exclusive driving force of tumorigenesis and age-related lymphoma development suggests a multi-step process. Thus, this DR4 line is a useful model to investigate common molecular mechanisms that may contribute to important neoplastic diseases in man.

  19. A preliminary assessment of the toxic and mutagenic potential of steroidal alkaloids in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, L; Myhr, B

    1995-03-01

    Impregnated CD2 transgenic mice, which contain multiple copies of a lambda gt10lacZ construct integrated into the genome of each cell, were given a predetermined estimated maximum tolerated dose of several steroidal alkaloids: Solanum glycoalkaloids from potato, alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine; aglycones, solanidine and solasodine, and a Veratrum alkaloid, jervine. Observations were made of dams and foetuses for indications of toxicity and/or terata; some dam livers and foetuses were assayed for mutagenicity using the lacZ gene. Other dams were gavaged with a single dose of 75 mg all-trans-retinol/kg to serve as a reference teratogen. Unexpectedly, this level of retinol was not clearly teratogenic. The results of both positive and non-positive selection systems showed that the mutation frequencies in the livers of the dams dosed with alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine and solanidine were three to four times higher than historically normal in the livers of this transgenic mouse strain.

  20. Age-associated and cell-type-specific neurofibrillary pathology in transgenic mice expressing the human midsized neurofilament subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, J C; Morrison, J H; Friedrich, V L; Elder, G A; Perl, D P; Katz, R N; Lazzarini, R A

    1994-09-01

    Alterations in neurofilaments are a common occurrence in neurons of the human nervous system during aging and diseases associated with aging. Such pathologic changes may be attributed to species-specific properties of human neurofilaments as well as cell-type-specific regulation of this element of the cytoskeleton. The development of transgenic animals containing human neurofilament subunits offers an opportunity to study the effects of aging and other experimental conditions on the human-specific form of these proteins in a rodent model. The present study shows that mice from the transgenic line NF(M)27, which express the human midsized neurofilament subunit at low levels (2-25% of the endogenous NF-M), develop neurofilamentous accumulations in specific subgroups of neurons that are age dependent, affecting 78% of transgenic mice over 12 months of age. Similar accumulations do not occur in age-matched, wild-type littermates or in 3-month-old transgenic mice. In 12-month-old transgenic mice, somatic neurofilament accumulations resembling neurofibrillary tangles were present predominantly in layers III and V of the neocortex, as well as in select subpopulations of subcortical neurons. Intraperikaryal, spherical neurofilamentous accumulations were particularly abundant in cell bodies in layer II of the neocortex, and neurofilament-containing distentions of Purkinje cell proximal axons occurred in the cerebellum. These pathological accumulations contained mouse as well as human NF subunits, but could be distinguished by their content of phosphorylation-dependent NF epitopes. These cytoskeletal alterations closely resemble the cell-type-specific alterations in neurofilaments that occur during normal human aging and in diseases associated with aging, indicating that these transgenic animals may serve as models of some aspects of the pathologic features of human neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Tissue-specific and neural activity-regulated expression of human BDNF gene in BAC transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palm Kaia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a small secreted protein that has important roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Altered expression or changes in the regulation of the BDNF gene have been implicated in a variety of human nervous system disorders. Although regulation of the rodent BDNF gene has been extensively investigated, in vivo studies regarding the human BDNF gene are largely limited to postmortem analysis. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice harboring the human BDNF gene and its regulatory flanking sequences constitute a useful tool for studying human BDNF gene regulation and for identification of therapeutic compounds modulating BDNF expression. Results In this study we have generated and analyzed BAC transgenic mice carrying 168 kb of the human BDNF locus modified such that BDNF coding sequence was replaced with the sequence of a fusion protein consisting of N-terminal BDNF and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The human BDNF-BAC construct containing all BDNF 5' exons preceded by different promoters recapitulated the expression of endogenous BDNF mRNA in the brain and several non-neural tissues of transgenic mice. All different 5' exon-specific BDNF-EGFP alternative transcripts were expressed from the transgenic human BDNF-BAC construct, resembling the expression of endogenous BDNF. Furthermore, BDNF-EGFP mRNA was induced upon treatment with kainic acid in a promotor-specific manner, similarly to that of the endogenous mouse BDNF mRNA. Conclusion Genomic region covering 67 kb of human BDNF gene, 84 kb of upstream and 17 kb of downstream sequences is sufficient to drive tissue-specific and kainic acid-induced expression of the reporter gene in transgenic mice. The pattern of expression of the transgene is highly similar to BDNF gene expression in mouse and human. This is the first study to show that human BDNF gene is regulated by neural activity.

  2. Reduced Mid1 expression and delayed neuromotor development in daDREAM transgenic mice

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    Mara eDierssen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator is a Ca2+-binding protein that binds DNA and represses transcription in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Previous work has shown a role for DREAM in cerebellar function regulating the expression of the sodium/calcium exchanger 3 (NCX3 in cerebellar granular neurons to control Ca2+ homeostasis and survival of these neurons. To achieve a global view of the genes regulated by DREAM in the cerebellum, we performed a genome-wide analysis in transgenic cerebellum expressing a Ca2+-insensitive/CREB-independent dominant active mutant DREAM (daDREAM. Here we show that DREAM regulates the expression of the midline 1 (Mid1 gene early after birth. As a consequence, daDREAM mice exhibit a significant shortening of the rostro-caudal axis of the cerebellum and a severe delay in neuromotor development early after birth. Our results indicate a role for DREAM in cerebellar function.

  3. Vascular dysfunctions in the isolated aorta of double-transgenic hypertensive mice developing aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waeckel, L.; Badier-Commander, C.; Damery, T.

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-II and oxidative stress are involved in the genesis of aortic aneurysms, a phenomenon exacerbated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) deletion or uncoupling. The purpose of this work was to study the endothelial function in wild-type C57BL/6 (BL) and transgenic mice expressing...... not affected in BLSL and AR. However, in ARSL, endothelium-dependent relaxations (acetylcholine, UK-14304) were significantly reduced, and this dysfunction was similar in aortae without or with aneurysms. The endothelial impairment was unaffected by catalase, superoxide-dismutase mimetic, radical scavengers......, cyclooxygenase inhibition, or TP-receptor blockade and could not be attributed to sGC oxidation. Thus, ARSL is a severe hypertension model developing aortic aneurysm. A vascular dysfunction, involving both endothelial (reduced role of NO) and smooth muscle cells, precedes aneurysms formation and, paradoxically...

  4. mBin1b transgenic mice show enhanced resistance to epididymal infection by bacteria challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Z; Hu, S; Xiao, L; Zhou, J; Diao, H; Yu, H; Fang, S; Wang, Y; Wan, Y; Wang, W; He, Y; Wang, C; Xu, G; Wang, Z; Zhang, Y; Fei, J

    2012-09-01

    The mBin1b is a beta-defensin gene identified in the mouse epididymis. In the current report, its expression pattern and antibacterial activities were characterized, and a transgenic (TG) mouse model was developed in which mBin1b was exclusively overexpressed by up to 50-fold over normal levels in the caput epididymis. The experimental animals are healthy with normal reproductive activity, but are more resistant to epididymal infection from Escherichia coli than normal animals. The expression of IL1α and IL1β in the epididymis was decreased in the TG mice, which suggests that mBin1b has a role in the regulation of inflammatory response in the epididymis.

  5. Spontaneous metastasis in congenic mice with transgenic breast cancer is unaffected by plasminogen gene ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almholt, Kasper; Juncker-Jensen, Anna; Lærum, Ole Didrik;

    2013-01-01

    , suggesting that there is a functional redundancy with other proteases. To explore this functional overlap in the transgenic MMTV-PyMT breast cancer metastasis model, we have combined Plg deficiency and a pharmacological metalloprotease inhibitor, which is known to reduce metastasis in this model, and has...... been shown to synergistically inhibit other tissue remodeling events in Plg-deficient mice. While metalloprotease inhibition dramatically reduced metastasis, we found no effect of Plg deficiency on metastasis, either independently or in combination with metalloprotease inhibition. We further show...... that Plg gene deficiency is of no significant consequence in this metastasis model, when analyzed in two different congenic strains: the FVB strain, and a F1 hybrid of the FVB and C57BL/6J strains. We suggest that the extensive backcrossing performed prior to our studies has eliminated the confounding...

  6. Manipulation of the repertoire of digestive enzymes secreted into the gastrointestinal tract of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J; Ali, S; Surani, M A; Hazlewood, G P; Clark, A J; Simons, J P; Hirst, B H; Gilbert, H J

    1993-03-01

    In non-ruminant livestock the energy which can be derived from dietary cellulose and xylan is limited by the inefficient microbial fermentation of these polymers in the hind-gut. Furthermore, in poultry, cereal-derived plant structural polysaccharides impair normal digestive function through the formation of gel-like structures, which trap nutrients rendering them unavailable to the animal. The nutrition of non-ruminant livestock could be significantly improved by the depolymerization of plant structural polysaccharides, through the introduction of cellulase activity into the small intestines of these animals. Here we describe the expression of Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase E in the exocrine pancreas of transgenic mice. A non-glycosylated active enzyme is secreted into the small intestines, and is resistant to proteolytic inactivation, demonstrating the feasibility of generating non-ruminant animals with the endogenous capacity to depolymerize plant structural polysaccharides in the small intestines.

  7. Expression of plant sweet protein brazzein in the milk of transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Yan

    Full Text Available Sugar, the most popular sweetener, is essential in daily food. However, excessive sugar intake has been associated with several lifestyle-related diseases. Finding healthier and more economical alternatives to sugars and artificial sweeteners has received increasing attention to fulfill the growing demand. Brazzein, which comes from the pulp of the edible fruit of the African plant Pentadiplandra brazzeana Baill, is a protein that is 2,000 times sweeter than sucrose by weight. Here we report the production of transgenic mice that carry the optimized brazzein gene driven by the goat Beta-casein promoter, which specifically directs gene expression in the mammary glands. Using western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that brazzein could be efficiently expressed in mammalian milk, while retaining its sweetness. This study presents the possibility of producing plant protein-sweetened milk from large animals such as cattle and goats.

  8. Selective WGA uptake in the hippocampus from the locus coeruleus of DBH-WGA transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan G eWalling

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We generated transgenic mice in which a transsynaptic tracer, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA, was specifically expressed in the locus coeruleus neurons under the control of the dopamine-β-hydroxylase gene promoter. WGA protein was produced in more than 95% of the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive locus coeruleus neurons sampled. Transynaptic transfer of WGA was most evident in CA3 neurons of the hippocampus, but appeared absent in CA1 neurons. Faint but significant WGA immunoreactivity was observed surrounding the nuclei of dentate granule cells. Putative hilar mossy cells, identified by the presence of calretinin in the ventral hippocampus, appeared uniformly positive for transynaptically transferred WGA protein. GAD67-positive interneurons in the hilar and CA3 regions tended to be WGA-positive, although a subset of them did not show WGA co-localization. The same mixed WGA uptake profile was apparent when examining co-localization with parvalbumin. The selective uptake of WGA by dentate granule cells, mossy cells and CA3 pyramidal neurons is consistent with evidence for a large proportion of conventional synapses adjacent to locus coeruleus axonal varicosities in these regions. The lack of WGA uptake in the CA1 region and its relatively sparse innervation by dopamine-β-hydroxylase-positive fibers suggest that a majority of the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive classical synapses revealed by electron microscopy in that region may be producing dopamine. The overall pattern of WGA uptake in these transgenic mice suggests a selective role for the granule cell-mossy cell-CA3 network in processing novelty or the salient environmental contingency changes signaled by locus coeruleus activity.

  9. Silencing mutant ataxin-3 rescues motor deficits and neuropathology in Machado-Joseph disease transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clévio Nóbrega

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease (MJD or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 is an autosomal dominantly-inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the over-repetition of a CAG codon in the MJD1 gene. This expansion translates into a polyglutamine tract that confers a toxic gain-of-function to the mutant protein--ataxin-3, leading to neurodegeneration in specific brain regions, with particular severity in the cerebellum. No treatment able to modify the disease progression is available. However, gene silencing by RNA interference has shown promising results. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether lentiviral-mediated allele-specific silencing of the mutant ataxin-3 gene, after disease onset, would rescue the motor behavior deficits and neuropathological features in a severely impaired transgenic mouse model of MJD. For this purpose, we injected lentiviral vectors encoding allele-specific silencing-sequences (shAtx3 into the cerebellum of diseased transgenic mice expressing the targeted C-variant of mutant ataxin-3 present in 70% of MJD patients. This variation permits to discriminate between the wild-type and mutant forms, maintaining the normal function of the wild-type allele and silencing only the mutant form. Quantitative analysis of rotarod performance, footprint and activity patterns revealed significant and robust alleviation of gait, balance (average 3-fold increase of rotarod test time, locomotor and exploratory activity impairments in shAtx3-injected mice, as compared to control ones injected with shGFP. An important improvement of neuropathology was also observed, regarding the number of intranuclear inclusions, calbindin and DARPP-32 immunoreactivity, fluorojade B and Golgi staining and molecular and granular layers thickness. These data demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of gene silencing in blocking the MJD-associated motor-behavior and neuropathological abnormalities after the onset of the disease, supporting the use of

  10. Autoradiography and radioscintigraphy of technetium-99m-sestamibi in c-neu transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, P D; Onthank, D C; Bourque, C R; Heminway, S J; Mazaika, T J; Leav, I; Zambuto, G F; Lazewatsky, J L; Villamil-Perez, L; Carroll, T R

    1995-10-01

    Intratumor distribution patterns of 99mTc-sestamibi and 14C-2-deoxy-D-glucose were compared in the c-neu OncoMouse, a transgenic mouse that spontaneously develops breast tumors. Thirty or 60 min after intravenous injection of 5 muCi 14C-2-deoxy-D-glucose and 3 mCi 99mTc-sestamibi into mice (n = 3 per time point) bearing mammary tumors (0.3-1.5 cm), the animals were analyzed for organ and tumor distribution using dual-label, whole-body autoradiography. The retention patterns of the two compounds were related to tumor morphology and viability, based on H&E-stained adjacent sections. For imaging studies, the transgenic mice (n = 9) were anesthetized with pentobarbital, injected intravenously with 5-20 mCi 99mTc-sestamibi and imaged for 60 min using a gamma camera equipped with a 1-mm pinhole collimator. All positively stained tumors retained both agents, with a mean 99mTc-sestamibi tumor retention of 0.38% +/- 0.2% ID/g at 30 min compared to 4.18% +/- 0.62% ID/g for 14C-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Tumor retention of the agents remained the same at 60 min, and neither compound localized within necrotic or cystic regions of the neoplasms. Repeat imaging at 2-8-day intervals indicated a predicted sensitivity to detect a 30% difference in tumor retention of a test versus reference compound in preclinical screening. The c-neu OncoMouse is a useful model for in vivo imaging and provides a spontaneous tumor model for preclinical screening of breast tumor imaging agents.

  11. Methyl bromide causes DNA methylation in rats and mice but fails to induce somatic mutations in λlacZ transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pletsa, V.; Steenwinkel, M.-J.S.T.; Delft, J.H.M. van; Baan, R.A.; Kyrtopoulos, S.A.

    1998-01-01

    Following single or multiple oral treatments of rats or λlacZ transgenic mice with methyl bromide, methylated DNA adducts (N7- and/or O6-methylguanine) were found at comparable levels in various tissues, including among others the glandular stomach, the forestomach and the liver. Multiple rat treatm

  12. Analysis of the effects of overexpression of metallothionein-I in transgenic mice on the reproductive toxicology of cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, T.; Kai Fu; Andrews, G.K. [Univ. of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Enders, G.C.; Palmiter, R.D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Exposure to low levels of cadmium reduces fertility. In male mice spermatogensis is highly sensitive to cadmium, whereas in females the peri-implantation period of pregnancy is sensitive. To examine the potential roles of the cadmium-binding protein, metallothionein (MT), in the reproductive toxicology of cadmium, we examined a transgenic mouse strain that overexpresses metallothionein-I (MT-I). These mice had dramatically increased steady-state levels of MT-I mRNA and MT in the testes and in the female reproductive tract during the peri-implantation period of pregnancy, and this overexpression occurred in a cell-specific and temporally regulated manner similar to that of the endogenous MT-I gene. Transgenic and control males were injected with cadmium, and the histology of the testes was examined. An injection of 7.5 {mu}mol Cd/Kg had no effect on histology of the testes in either transgenic or control mice. In contrast, an injection of 10 {mu}mol Cd/kg caused rapid changes in the histology of the testes and resulted in pronounced testicular necrosis in both control and transgenic mice. Female transgenic and control mice were mated and then injected with cadmium (30-45 {mu}mol Cd/kg) on the day of blastocyst implantation (day 4). In both of these groups, injection of cadmium reduced pregnancy rate, and no dramatic protection was afforded by maternal and/or embryonic overexpression of MT. Thus, overexpression of MT-I does not significantly protect against either of these cadmium-induced effects on fertility. 65 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Transgenic mice designed to express human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase in combination of human DAF and CD59 to avoid xenograft rejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The expression of human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (HT) or complement regulatory proteins has been proved as an strategy to overcome hypercute rejection in discordant xenogeneic organ transplantation. In this study, we examined whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from polytransgenic mice expressing the human HT, and complement regulatory proteins (DAF and CD59), can provide more effective protection against xenograft rejection. Transgenic mice were produced by co-injection of gene constructs for human HT, DAF and/or CD59. Flow Cytometry (FCM) was used to screen the positive transgenic mice. PBMCs from transgenic mice were incubated with 15% human serum to evaluate natural antibody binding, complement activation and expression of adhesion molecules. Three transgenes were strongly expressed in PBMCs of transgenic mice, and HT expression signifi- cantly reduced expression of the major xenoepitope galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal). Functional studies with PBMCs showed that co-expression of HT and DAF or CD59 markedly increased their re- sistance to human serum-mediated cytolysis when compared with single transgenic PBMCs. Moreover, the combined expression of triple transgenes in PBMCs led to the greatest protection against human serum-mediated cytolysis, avoided hyperacute rejection and reduced expression of adhesion mole- cules. Strong co-expression of triple transgenes was completely protected from xenograft hyperacute rejection and partially inhibited acute vascular rejection. The studies suggest that engineering mice to express triple molecules represents an critical step toward prolonging xenograft survival and might be more suitable for xenotransplantation.

  14. Transgenic mice designed to express human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase in combination of human DAF and CD59 to avoid xenograft rejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU BingQian; CHENG ChuanYu; WU YuDong; WEI JinXing; LI GuangSan; MA TengXiang

    2008-01-01

    The expression of human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (HT) or complement regulatory proteins has been proved as an strategy to overcome hypercute rejection in discordant xenogeneic organ transplantation.In this study, we examined whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from polytransgenic mice expressing the human HT, and complement regulatory proteins (DAF and CD59), can provide more effective protection against xenograft rejection. Transgenic mice were produced by co-injection of gene constructs for human HT, DAF and/or CD59. Flow Cytometry (FCM) was used to screen the positive transgenic mice. PBMCs from transgenic mice were incubated with 15% human serum to evaluate natural antibody binding, complement activation and expression of adhesion molecules.Three transgenes were strongly expressed in PBMCs of transgenic mice, and HT expression significantly reduced expression of the major xenoepitope galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal). Functional studies with PBMCs showed that co-expression of HT and DAF or CD59 markedly increased their resistance to human serum-mediated cytolysis when compared with single transgenic PBMCs. Moreover,the combined expression of triple transgenes in PBMCs led to the greatest protection against human serum-mediated cytolyais, avoided hyperacute rejection and reduced expression of adhesion molecules. Strong co-expression of triple transgenes was completely protected from xenograft hyperacute rejection and partially inhibited acute vascular rejection. The studies suggest that engineering mice to express triple molecules represents an critical step toward prolonging xenograft survival and might be more suitable for xenotransplantation.

  15. Intraductal delivery of adenoviruses targets pancreatic tumors in transgenic Ela-myc mice and orthotopic xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Miguel Camacho-Sánchez, Juan; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p less than 0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors.

  16. Accelerated fracture healing in transgenic mice overexpressing an anabolic isoform of fibroblast growth factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Marja M; Adams, Douglas J; Wang, Liping; Jiang, Xi; Burt, Patience Meo; Du, Erxia; Xiao, Liping

    2016-03-01

    The effect of targeted expression of an anabolic isoform of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) in osteoblastic lineage on tibial fracture healing was assessed in mice. Closed fracture of the tibiae was performed in Col3.6-18 kDaFgf2-IRES-GFPsaph mice in which a 3.6 kb fragment of type I collagen promoter (Col3.6) drives the expression of only the 18 kD isoform of FGF2 (18 kDaFgf2/LMW) with green fluorescent protein-sapphire (GFPsaph) as well as Vector mice (Col3.6-IRES-GFPsaph, Vector) that did not harbor the FGF2 transgene. Radiographic, micro-CT, DEXA, and histologic analysis of fracture healing of tibiae harvested at 3, 10 and 20 days showed a smaller fracture callus but accelerated fracture healing in LMWTg compared with Vector mice. At post fracture day 3, FGF receptor 3 and Sox 9 mRNA were significantly increased in LMWTg compared with Vector. Accelerated fracture healing was associated with higher FGF receptor 1, platelet derived growth factors B, C, and D, type X collagen, vascular endothelial cell growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase 9, tartrate resistant acid phosphatase, cathepsin K, runt-related transcription factor-2, Osterix and Osteocalcin and lower Sox9, and type II collagen expression at 10 days post fracture. We postulate that overexpression of LMW FGF2 accelerated the fracture healing process due to its effects on factors that are important in chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation and vascular invasion.

  17. Effect of dipterinyl calcium pentahydrate on hepatitis B virus replication in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchs Dietmar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dipterinyl calcium pentahydrate (DCP has previously been shown to inhibit MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenographs in nude mice in a manner correlated with increases in plasma IL-12 and IL-4 concentrations, and decreases in plasma IL-6 levels. DCP also inhibits indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, an immuno-inhibitory enzyme, in human PBMCs (Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells. Methods In the present study, DCP was administered per os, once daily for 14 days to hepatitis B virus (HBV transgenic mice at 23, 7.3, and 2.3 mg/(kg d. Multivariate stepwise regression and MANOVA analyses, by gender and treatment, of liver HBV DNA and RNA measures, liver core and serum HBe antigen assays, serum cytokine/chemokine profiles, and IDO metabolite measurements were performed. Results DCP caused a significant dose-response reduction of log liver HBV DNA as measured by PCR in the female HBV mice. The gender dependence of the anti-HBV DNA activity was explained by the DCP Effects Model (DCP-EM (p = .001 which includes three serum biomarker changes caused by DCP: 1 decreased MCP-1; 2 decreased Kyn/Trp (an estimation of IDO activity; and 3 increased GM-CSF. Conclusions Immunomodulation via IDO or TDO (tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase pathways, along with serum MCP-1 and GM-CSF are proposed to play roles in the anti-HBV mechanism of DCP based upon their coordinated modulation in the reduction of viral DNA replication in HBV mice.

  18. Xanthohumol Prevents Atherosclerosis by Reducing Arterial Cholesterol Content via CETP and Apolipoprotein E in CETP-Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi Hirata; Yimin; Shuichi Segawa; Moeko Ozaki; Naoyuki Kobayashi; Tatsuro Shigyo; Hitoshi Chiba

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Xanthohumol is expected to be a potent anti-atherosclerotic agent due to its inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). In this study, we hypothesized that xanthohumol prevents atherosclerosis in vivo and used CETP-transgenic mice (CETP-Tg mice) to evaluate xanthohumol as a functional agent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two strains of mice, CETP-Tg and C57BL/6N (wild-type), were fed a high cholesterol diet with or without 0.05% (w/w) xanthohumol ad libitum for 18 ...

  19. Combined micro-PET/micro-CT imaging of lung tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rodt

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic mice develop disseminated and circumscribed lung adenocarcinoma respectively, allowing for assessment of carcinogenesis and treatment strategies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the technical feasibility, the correlation of initial findings to histology and the administered radiation dose of combined micro-PET/micro-CT in these animal models. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 14 C57BL/6 mice (4 nontransgenic, 4 SPC-raf transgenic, 6 SPC-myc transgenic were examined using micro-CT and (18F-Fluoro-deoxyglucose micro-PET in-vivo. Micro-PET data was corrected for random events and scatter prior to reconstruction with a 3D-FORE/2D-OSEM iterative algorithm. Rigid micro-PET/micro-CT registration was performed. Tumour-to-non-tumour ratios were calculated for different lung regions and focal lesions. Diffuse tumour growth was quantified using a semiautomated micro-CT segmentation routine reported earlier. Regional histologic tumour load was assessed using a 4-point rating scale. Gamma radiation dose was determined using thermoluminescence dosimeters. RESULTS: Micro-CT allowed visualisation of diffuse and circumscribed tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic animals along with morphology, while micro-PET provided information on metabolism, but lacked morphologic detail. Mean tumour-to-non-tumour ratio was 2.47 for circumscribed lesions. No significant correlation could be shown between histological tumour load and tumour-to-nontumour ratio for diffuse tumours in SPC-raf transgenic animals. Calculation of the expected dose based on gamma dosimetry yielded approximately 140 mGy/micro-PET examination additional to approximately 200 mGy due to micro-CT. CONCLUSIONS: Combined micro-PET/micro-CT imaging allows for in-vivo assessment of lung tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic mice. The technique has potential for the evaluation of carcinogenesis and treatment strategies in circumscribed lung tumours.

  20. Combined micro-PET/micro-CT imaging of lung tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodt, Thomas; Luepke, Matthias; Boehm, Claudia; Hueper, Katja; Halter, Roman; Glage, Silke; Hoy, Ludwig; Wacker, Frank; Borlak, Juergen; von Falck, Christian

    2012-01-01

    SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic mice develop disseminated and circumscribed lung adenocarcinoma respectively, allowing for assessment of carcinogenesis and treatment strategies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the technical feasibility, the correlation of initial findings to histology and the administered radiation dose of combined micro-PET/micro-CT in these animal models. 14 C57BL/6 mice (4 nontransgenic, 4 SPC-raf transgenic, 6 SPC-myc transgenic) were examined using micro-CT and (18)F-Fluoro-deoxyglucose micro-PET in-vivo. Micro-PET data was corrected for random events and scatter prior to reconstruction with a 3D-FORE/2D-OSEM iterative algorithm. Rigid micro-PET/micro-CT registration was performed. Tumour-to-non-tumour ratios were calculated for different lung regions and focal lesions. Diffuse tumour growth was quantified using a semiautomated micro-CT segmentation routine reported earlier. Regional histologic tumour load was assessed using a 4-point rating scale. Gamma radiation dose was determined using thermoluminescence dosimeters. Micro-CT allowed visualisation of diffuse and circumscribed tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic animals along with morphology, while micro-PET provided information on metabolism, but lacked morphologic detail. Mean tumour-to-non-tumour ratio was 2.47 for circumscribed lesions. No significant correlation could be shown between histological tumour load and tumour-to-nontumour ratio for diffuse tumours in SPC-raf transgenic animals. Calculation of the expected dose based on gamma dosimetry yielded approximately 140 mGy/micro-PET examination additional to approximately 200 mGy due to micro-CT. Combined micro-PET/micro-CT imaging allows for in-vivo assessment of lung tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic mice. The technique has potential for the evaluation of carcinogenesis and treatment strategies in circumscribed lung tumours.

  1. Targeted expression of SV40 T antigen in the hair follicle of transgenic mice produces an aberrant hair phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keough, R; Powell, B; Rogers, G

    1995-03-01

    Directed expression of SV40 large T antigen (TAg) in transgenic mice can induce tissue-specific tumorigenesis and useful cell lines exhibiting differentiated characteristics can be established from resultant tumor cells. In an attempt to produce an immortalised mouse hair follicle cortical cell line for the study of hair keratin gene control, SV40 TAg expression was targeted to the hair follicles of transgenic mice using a sheep hair gene promoter. Expression of SV40 TAg in the follicle cortex disrupted normal fiber ultrastructure, producing a marked phenotypic effect. Affected hairs were wavy or severely kinked (depending on the severity of the phenotype) producing an appearance ranging from a ruffled coat to a stubble covering the back of the mouse. The transgenic hairs appeared to be weakened at the base of the fibers, leading to premature hair-loss and a thinner pelage, or regions of temporary nudity. No follicle tumors or neoplasia were apparent and immortalisation of cortical cells could not be established in culture. In situ hybridisation studies in the hair follicle using histone H3 as a cell proliferation marker suggested that cell proliferation had ceased prior to commencement of K2.10-TAg expression and was not re-established in the differentiating cortical cells. Hence, TAg was unable to induce cell immortalisation at that stage of cortical cell differentiation. However, transgenic mice developed various other abnormalities including vertebral abnormalities and bladder, liver and intestinal tumors, which resulted in reduced life expectancy.

  2. Alteration of Methamphetamine-induced stereotypic behaviour in transgenic mice expressing HIV-1 envelope protein gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Amanda J; Maung, Ricky; Sejbuk, Natalia E; Ake, Christopher; Kaul, Marcus

    2010-02-15

    The use of drugs for recreational purposes, in particular Methamphetamine, is associated with an increased risk of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1. HIV-1 infection in turn can lead to HIV-associated neurological disorders (HAND) that range from mild cognitive and motor impairment to HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Interestingly, post mortem brain specimens from HAD patients and transgenic (tg) mice expressing the viral envelope protein gp120 in the central nervous system display similar neuropathological signs. In HIV patients, the use of Methamphetamine appears to aggravate neurocognitive alterations. In the present study, we injected HIV/gp120tg mice and non-transgenic littermate control animals with Methamphetamine dissolved in Saline or Saline vehicle and assessed locomotion and stereotyped behaviour. We found that HIVgp120-transgenic mice differ significantly from non-transgenic controls in certain domains of their behavioural response to Methamphetamine. Thus this experimental model system may be useful to further study the mechanistic interaction of both the viral envelope protein and the psychostimulant drug in behavioural alterations and neurodegenerative disease.

  3. Chronic administration of R-flurbiprofen attenuates learning impairments in transgenic amyloid precursor protein mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koo Edward H

    2007-07-01

    in Tg2576 mice. Given its ability to selectively target Aβ42 production and improve cognitive impairments in transgenic APP mice, as well as promising data from a phase 2 human clinical trial, future studies are needed to investigate the utility of R-flurbiprofen as an AD therapeutic and its possible mechanisms of action.

  4. Elevated global SUMOylation in Ubc9 transgenic mice protects their brains against focal cerebral ischemic damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Ja Lee

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that a massive increase in global SUMOylation occurs during torpor in ground squirrels, and that overexpression of Ubc9 and/or SUMO-1 in cell lines and cortical neurons protects against oxygen and glucose deprivation. To examine whether increased global SUMOylation protects against ischemic brain damage, we have generated transgenic mice in which Ubc9 is expressed strongly in all tissues under the chicken β-actin promoter. Ubc9 expression levels in 10 founder lines ranged from 2 to 30 times the endogenous level, and lines that expressed Ubc9 at modestly increased levels showed robust resistance to brain ischemia compared to wild type mice. The infarction size was inversely correlated with the Ubc9 expression levels for up to five times the endogenous level. Although further increases showed no additional benefit, the Ubc9 expression level was highly correlated with global SUMO-1 conjugation levels (and SUMO-2,3 levels to a lesser extent up to a five-fold Ubc9 increase. Most importantly, there were striking reciprocal relationships between SUMO-1 (and SUMO-2,3 conjugation levels and cerebral infarction volumes among all tested animals, suggesting that the limit in cytoprotection by global SUMOylation remains undefined. These results support efforts to further augment global protein SUMOylation in brain ischemia.

  5. Interleukin-32γ transgenic mice resist LPS-mediated septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Jong; Lee, Siyoung; Kwak, Areum; Kim, Eunsom; Jo, Seunghyun; Bae, Suyoung; Lee, Youngmin; Ryoo, Soyoon; Choi, Jida; Kim, Soohyun

    2014-08-01

    Interleukin-32 (IL-32) is a cytokine and inducer of various proinflammatory cytokines such as TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 as well as chemokines. There are five splicing variants (α, β, γ, delta, and epsilon) and IL-32γ is the most active isoform. We generated human IL-32γ transgenic (IL-32γ TG) mice to express high level of IL-32γ in various tissues, including immune cells. The pathology of sepsis is based on the systemic inflammatory response that is characterized by upregulating inflammatory cytokines in whole body, particularly in response to gram-negative bacteria. We investigated the role of IL-32γ in a mouse model of experimental sepsis by using lipopolysaccharides (LPS). We found that IL-32γTG mice resisted LPS-induced lethal endotoxemia. IL-32γ reduced systemic cytokines release after LPS administration but not the local immune response. IL-32γTG increased neutrophil influx into the initial foci of the primary injected site, and prolonged local cytokines and chemokines production. These results suggest that neutrophil recruitment in IL-32γTG occurred as a result of the local induction of chemokines but not the systemic inflammatory cytokine circulation. Together, our results suggest that IL-32γ enhances an innate immune response against local infection but inhibits the spread of immune responses, leading to systemic immune disorder.

  6. Absence of hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting in transgenic mice overexpressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, X; Suri, C; Knusel, B; Noebels, J L

    2001-05-01

    Excess neuronal activity upregulates the expression of two neurotrophins, nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in adult hippocampus. Nerve growth factor has been shown to contribute the induction of aberrant hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, however the role of prolonged brain-derived neurotrophic factor exposure is uncertain. We examined the distribution and plasticity of mossy fibers in transgenic mice with developmental overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Despite 2--3-fold elevated BDNF levels in the hippocampus sufficient to increase the intensity of neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity in interneurons, no visible changes in mossy fiber Timm staining patterns were observed in the inner molecular layer of adult mutant hippocampus compared to wild-type mice. In addition, no changes of the mRNA expression of two growth-associated proteins, GAP-43 and SCG-10 were found. These data suggest that early and persistent elevations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in granule cells are not sufficient to elicit this pattern of axonal plasticity in the hippocampus.

  7. Aluminum modulates brain amyloidosis through oxidative stress in APP transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praticò, Domenico; Uryu, Kunihiro; Sung, Syan; Tang, Sei; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2002-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have implicated aluminum (Al) exposure in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, other studies have failed to confirm these results. Oxidative stress is a feature of AD, and Al can exacerbate oxidative events. This biological property has been suggested as a possible mechanism by which this metal could influence the onset and/or evolution of the disease. To test this hypothesis, we fed transgenic mice that over express human amyloid precursor protein (Tg2576) with a diet enriched in Al and measured isoprostane levels, sensitive and specific markers of in vivo oxidative stress, as well as amyloid b peptide formation and deposition. Here, we show an increase in brain isoprostane levels that correlated with increased amyloid b levels and accelerated plaque deposition in Tg2576 mice but not in wild-type (WT) littermates fed with high dietary Al. Significantly, these in vivo effects of Al were reversed by vitamin E, as judged by a reduction of isoprostane production, amyloid b levels, and plaque deposition. These results indicate that dietary Al can modulate in vivo AD-like amyloidosis in Tg2576 by increasing brain oxidative stress.

  8. Na/Ca(2+) exchanger 1 transgenic mice display increased relaxation in the distal colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Kazuhiro; Morioka, Ai; Kita, Satomi; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger 1 (NCX1) is a plasma membrane transporter involved in regulating intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. NCX1 is critical for Ca(2+) regulation in cardiac muscle, vascular smooth muscle and nerve fibers. However, little is known about the physiological role of NCX1 in gastrointestinal motility. To determine the role of NCX1 in gastrointestinal tissues, we examined electric field stimulation (EFS)-induced responses in the longitudinal smooth muscle of the distal colon in smooth muscle-specific NCX1 transgenic mice (Tg). Tg show that NCX1 protein was overexpressed in the distal colon at a level twofold greater than that of endogenous NCX1. We found that the amplitudes of EFS-induced relaxation that persisted during EFS were greater in Tg than in wild-type mice (WT). Under the nonadrenergic, noncholinergic condition, the EFS-induced relaxation in Tg was also greater than that in WT. Inhibition of NO synthase, CO synthase, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), and protein kinase G (PKG) all attenuated the enhanced relaxation in Tg, demonstrating the importance of NCX1 in NO/sGC/PKG signaling. The action of NOR-1, an NO donor, induced enhanced relaxation in Tg compared with that in WT. Unlike NOR-1, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide and vasoactive intestinal peptide induced a similar relaxation in Tg compared with that in WT. In this study, we demonstrate that NCX1 plays an important role in smooth muscle motility in the mouse distal colon.

  9. Enhanced neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease transgenic (PDGF-APPSw,Ind) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kunlin; Galvan, Veronica; Xie, Lin; Mao, Xiao Ou; Gorostiza, Olivia F; Bredesen, Dale E; Greenberg, David A

    2004-09-07

    Neurogenesis continues in the adult brain and is increased in certain pathological states. We reported recently that neurogenesis is enhanced in hippocampus of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We now report that the effect of AD on neurogenesis can be reproduced in a transgenic mouse model. PDGF-APP(Sw,Ind) mice, which express the Swedish and Indiana amyloid precursor protein mutations, show increased incorporation of BrdUrd and expression of immature neuronal markers in two neuroproliferative regions: the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. These changes, consisting of approximately 2-fold increases in the number of BrdUrd-labeled cells, were observed at age 3 months, when neuronal loss and amyloid deposition are not detected. Because enhanced neurogenesis occurs in both AD and an animal model of AD, it seems to be caused by the disease itself and not by confounding clinical factors. As neurogenesis is increased in PDGF-APP(Sw,Ind) mice in the absence of neuronal loss, it must be triggered by more subtle disease manifestations, such as impaired neurotransmission. Enhanced neurogenesis in AD and animal models of AD suggests that neurogenesis may be a compensatory response and that measures to enhance neurogenesis further could have therapeutic potential.

  10. Isolation of Murine Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells using Twist2 Cre Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaling; Wang, Liping; Fatahi, Reza; Kronenberg, Mark; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rowe, David; Li, Yingcui; Maye, Peter

    2010-01-01

    While human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are of great interest for their potential therapeutic value, its murine equivalent remains an important basic research model that can provide critical insights into the biology of this progenitor cell population. Here we present a novel transgenic strategy that allowed for the selective identification and isolation of murine BMSCs at the early stages of stromal cell culture. This strategy involved crossing Twist2 –Cre mice with Cre reporter mice such as Z/EG or Ai9, which express EGFP or Tomato fluorescent protein, respectively, upon Cre mediated excision of a stop sequence. Using this approach, we identified an adherent fluorescent protein+ cell population (T2C+) that is present during the earliest stages of colony formation and by day 5 of culture represents ~20% of the total cell population. Cell surface profiling by flow cytometry showed that T2C+ cells are highly positive for SCA1 and CD29 and negative for CD45, CD117, TIE2, and TER119. Isolation of T2C+ cells by FACS selected for a cell population with skeletal potential that can be directed to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, or chondrocytes. We also demonstrated in a calvarial bone defect model that T2C+ cells retain a strong efficacy for osteogenic repair and can support a hematopoietic environment. Collectively, these studies provide evidence that the Twist2-Cre x Cre reporter breeding strategy can be used to positively identify and isolate multipotent murine BMSCs. PMID:20673822

  11. Passive Immunization in JNPL3 Transgenic Mice Using an Array of Phospho-Tau Specific Antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina d'Abramo

    Full Text Available Recent work from our lab and few others have strongly suggested that immunotherapy could be an effective means of preventing the development of tau accumulation in JNPL3 transgenic mice, carrying the human P301L mutation. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of a variety of specific tau monoclonal antibodies in JNPL3. Starting at 3 months of age, mice were treated for 4 months with weekly intraperitoneal injections of saline or purified tau monoclonal antibodies (10 mg/Kg different in specificity for pathological tau: CP13 (pSer202, RZ3 (pThr231 and PG5 (pSer409. As expected, not all the antibodies tested showed efficacy at preventing the development of tau pathology at the described dose, with some of them even worsening the pathological scenario. Only by targeting the pSer202 epitope with CP13 was a conspicuous reduction of insoluble or soluble tau in cortex and hindbrain obtained. Here we report about the importance of screening in vivo multiple tau antibodies in order to select the antibodies to direct into future clinical studies.

  12. Amniotic fluid stem cells from EGFP transgenic mice attenuate hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Tao Wen

    Full Text Available High concentrations of oxygen aggravate the severity of lung injury in patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Although mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to effectively attenuate various injured tissues, there is limited information regarding a role for amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs in treating acute lung injury. We hypothesized that intravenous delivery of AFSCs would attenuate lung injury in an experimental model of hyperoxia-induced lung injury. AFSCs were isolated from EGFP transgenic mice. The in vitro differentiation, surface markers, and migration of the AFSCs were assessed by specific staining, flow cytometry, and a co-culture system, respectively. The in vivo therapeutic potential of AFSCs was evaluated in a model of acute hyperoxia-induced lung injury in mice. The administration of AFSCs significantly reduced the hyperoxia-induced pulmonary inflammation, as reflected by significant reductions in lung wet/dry ratio, neutrophil counts, and the level of apoptosis, as well as reducing the levels of inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α and early-stage fibrosis in lung tissues. Moreover, EGFP-expressing AFSCs were detected and engrafted into a peripheral lung epithelial cell lineage by fluorescence microscopy and DAPI stain. Intravenous administration of AFSCs may offer a new therapeutic strategy for acute lung injury (ALI, for which efficient treatments are currently unavailable.

  13. Production of functional human nerve growth factor from the saliva of transgenic mice by using salivary glands as bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Fang Zeng; Zicong Li; Qingchun Zhu; Rui Dong; Chengcheng Zhao; Guoling Li; Guo Li; Wenchao Gao; Gelong Jiang; Enqin Zheng; Gengyuan Cai; Stefan Moisyadi; Johann Urschitz; Huaqiang Yang; Dewu Liu

    2017-01-01

    The salivary glands of animals have great potential to act as powerful bioreactors to produce human therapeutic proteins. Human nerve growth factor (hNGF) is an important pharmaceutical protein that is clinically effective in the treatment of many human neuronal and non-neuronal diseases. In this study, we generated 18 transgenic (TG) founder mice each carrying a salivary gland specific promoter-driven hNGF transgene. A TG mouse line secreting high levels of hNGF protein in its saliva (1.36 μ...

  14. Msx2 -/- transgenic mice develop compound amelogenesis imperfecta, dentinogenesis imperfecta and periodental osteopetrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aïoub, M; Lézot, F; Molla, M; Castaneda, B; Robert, B; Goubin, G; Néfussi, J R; Berdal, A

    2007-11-01

    The physiological function of the transcription factor Msx2 in tooth and alveolar bone was analysed using a knock-in transgenic mouse line. In this mouse line, the beta-galactosidase gene was used to disrupt Msx2: thus, beta-galactosidase expression was driven by the Msx2 promoter, but Msx2 was not produced. This allowed to monitor Msx2 expression using a beta-galactosidase assay. Msx2 transgenic mice ubiquitously and continuously expressed the mutated Msx2-nlacZ gene in cells of the complex formed by tooth and alveolar bone. Msx2 -/- homozygous mice displayed a wide spectrum of alterations in tooth eruption and morphology as well as dental and periodontal defects from the first post-natal weeks up to 6 months. These defects culminated with the formation of an odontogenic tumour at the mandibular third molar site. This study suggests that bone resorption is a functional target of Msx2 in the alveolar compartment, since Msx2 was expressed in osteoclasts, with the highest expression levels found in the active sites of bone modelling associated with tooth eruption and root elongation. The RANK osteoclast differentiation pathway was affected in microdissected Msx2 -/- mouse alveolar bone (as inferred by RANK ligand mRNA levels) compared to basal bone and wild-type controls. Decreased alveolar osteoclast activity was observed in Msx2 -/- mice, similar to that seen in osteopetrosis, another condition in which osteoclast activity is impaired and odontogenic tumours form. These data suggest a pleiotropic role for Msx2 in oral bone growth from birth until adult homeostasis. RANK pathway appeared to be modulated by Msx2, in addition to the previously reported modulations of BMP4 and laminin5alpha3 in early tooth development. Non-overlapping Msx1 and Msx2 expression patterns suggested that these two homeogenes play non-redundant roles in skeletal growth, with Msx1 targeting basal bone and Msx2 targeting alveolar bone. This study provides a detailed analysis of the phenotype

  15. Effects of anabolic steroids and high-intensity aerobic exercise on skeletal muscle of transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Fontana

    Full Text Available In an attempt to shorten recovery time and improve performance, strength and endurance athletes occasionally turn to the illicit use of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS. This study evaluated the effects of AAS treatment on the muscle mass and phenotypic characteristics of transgenic mice subjected to a high-intensity, aerobic training program (5d/wk for 6 weeks. The transgenic mice (CETP(+/-LDLr(-/+ were engineered to exhibit a lipid profile closer to humans. Animals were divided into groups of sedentary (Sed and/or training (Ex mice (each treated orally with AAS or gum arabic/vehicle: Sed-C, Sed-M, ex-C, ex-M. The effects of AAS (mesterolone: M on specific phenotypic adaptations (muscle wet weight, cross-sectional area, and fiber type composition in three hindlimb muscles (soleus:SOL, tibialis anterior:TA and gastrocnemius:GAS were assessed. In order to detect subtle changes in fiber type profile, the entire range of fiber types (I, IC, IIAC, IIA, IIAD, IID, IIDB, IIB was delineated using mATPase histochemistry. Body weight gain occurred throughout the study for all groups. However, the body weight gain was significantly minimized with exercise. This effect was blunted with mesterolone treatment. Both AAS treatment (Sed-M and high-intensity, aerobic training (ex-C increased the wet weights of all three muscles and induced differential hypertrophy of pure and hybrid fibers. Combination of AAS and training (ex-M resulted in enhanced hypertrophy. In the SOL, mesterolone treatment (Sed-M and ex-M caused dramatic increases in the percentages of fiber types IC, IIAC, IIAD, IID, with concomitant decrease in IIA, but had minimal impact on fiber type percentages in the predominantly fast muscles. Overall, the AAS-induced differential adaptive changes amounted to significant fiber type transformations in the fast-to-slow direction in SOL. AAS treatment had a significant effect on muscle weights and fiber type composition in SOL, TA and GAS which was

  16. Estrogen and progesterone receptors have distinct roles in the establishment of the hyperplastic phenotype in PR-A transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simian, Marina; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Shyamala, Gopalan

    2009-05-11

    Expression of the A and B forms of progesterone receptor (PR) in an appropriate ratio is critical for mammary development. Mammary glands of PR-A transgenic mice, carrying an additional A form of PR as a transgene, exhibit morphological features associated with the development of mammary tumors. Our objective was to determine the roles of estrogen (E) and progesterone (P) in the genesis of mammary hyperplasias/preneoplasias in PR-A transgenics. We subjected PR-A mice to hormonal treatments and analyzed mammary glands for the presence of hyperplasias and used BrdU incorporation to measure proliferation. Quantitative image analysis was carried out to compare levels of latency-associated peptide and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF{beta}1) between PR-A and PR-B transgenics. Basement membrane disruption was examined by immunofluorescence and proteolytic activity by zymography. The hyperplastic phenotype of PR-A transgenics is inhibited by ovariectomy, and is reversed by treatment with E + P. Studies using the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 or antiprogestins RU486 or ZK 98,299 show that the increase in proliferation requires signaling through E/estrogen receptor alpha but is not sufficient to give rise to hyperplasias, whereas signaling through P/PR has little impact on proliferation but is essential for the manifestation of hyperplasias. Increased proliferation is correlated with decreased TGF{beta}1 activation in the PR-A transgenics. Analysis of basement membrane integrity showed loss of laminin-5, collagen III and collagen IV in mammary glands of PR-A mice, which is restored by ovariectomy. Examination of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) showed that total levels of MMP-2 correlate with the steady-state levels of PR, and that areas of laminin-5 loss coincide with those of activation of MMP-2 in PR-A transgenics. Activation of MMP-2 is dependent on treatment with E and P in ovariectomized wild-type mice, but is achieved only by treatment with P in PR-A mice. These data

  17. Copper and Zinc Metallation Status of Copper Zinc Superoxide Dismutase form Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Transgenic Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelie, H.L.; Miller, L.; Liba, A.; Bourassa, M.W.; Chattopadhyay, M.; Chan, P.K.; Gralla, E.B.; Borchelt, D.R.; et al

    2010-09-24

    Mutations in the metalloenzyme copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause one form of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and metals are suspected to play a pivotal role in ALS pathology. To learn more about metals in ALS, we determined the metallation states of human wild-type or mutant (G37R, G93A, and H46R/H48Q) SOD1 proteins from SOD1-ALS transgenic mice spinal cords. SOD1 was gently extracted from spinal cord and separated into insoluble (aggregated) and soluble (supernatant) fractions, and then metallation states were determined by HPLC inductively coupled plasma MS. Insoluble SOD1-rich fractions were not enriched in copper and zinc. However, the soluble mutant and WT SOD1s were highly metallated except for the metal-binding-region mutant H46R/H48Q, which did not bind any copper. Due to the stability conferred by high metallation of G37R and G93A, it is unlikely that these soluble SOD1s are prone to aggregation in vivo, supporting the hypothesis that immature nascent SOD1 is the substrate for aggregation. We also investigated the effect of SOD1 overexpression and disease on metal homeostasis in spinal cord cross-sections of SOD1-ALS mice using synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy. In each mouse genotype, except for the H46R/H48Q mouse, we found a redistribution of copper between gray and white matters correlated to areas of high SOD1. Interestingly, a disease-specific increase of zinc was observed in the white matter for all mutant SOD1 mice. Together these data provide a picture of copper and zinc in the cell as well as highlight the importance of these metals in understanding SOD1-ALS pathology.

  18. Expression of human hormone-sensitive lipase in white adipose tissue of transgenic mice increases lipase activity but does not enhance in vitro lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Stéphanie; Tavernier, Geneviève; Tiraby, Claire; Mairal, Aline; Langin, Dominique

    2003-01-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the hydrolysis of acylglycerols and cholesteryl esters (CEs). The enzyme is highly expressed in adipose tissues (ATs), where it is thought to play an important role in fat mobilization. The purpose of the present work was to study the effect of a physiological increase of HSL expression in vivo. Transgenic mice were produced with a 21 kb human genomic fragment encompassing the exons encoding the adipocyte form of HSL. hHSL mRNA was expressed at 3-fold higher levels than murine HSL mRNA in white adipocytes. Transgene expression was also observed in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and skeletal muscle. The human protein was detected in ATs of transgenic (Tg) mice. The hydrolytic activities against triacylglycerol (TG), diacylglycerol (DG) analog, and CE were increased in transgenic mouse AT. However, cAMP-inducible adipocyte lipolysis was lower in transgenic animals. In the B6CBA genetic background, transgenic mice up to 14 weeks of age showed lower body weight and fat mass. The phenotype was not observed in older animals and in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). In the OF1 genetic background, there was no difference in fat mass of mice fed ad libitum. However, transgenic mice became leaner than their wild-type (WT) littermates after a 4 day calorie restriction. The data show that overexpression of HSL, despite increased lipase activity, does not lead to enhanced lipolysis.

  19. ZyFISH: A simple, rapid and reliable zygosity assay for transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Donal McHugh; Tracy O'Connor; Juliane Bremer; Adriano Aguzzi

    2012-01-01

    Microinjection of DNA constructs into fertilized mouse oocytes typically results in random transgene integration at a single genomic locus. The resulting transgenic founders can be used to establish hemizygous transgenic mouse lines. However, practical and experimental reasons often require that such lines be bred to homozygosity. Transgene zygosity can be determined by progeny testing assays which are expensive and time-consuming, by quantitative Southern blotting which is labor-intensive, o...

  20. Dopaminergic neuronal loss, reduced neurite complexity and autophagic abnormalities in transgenic mice expressing G2019S mutant LRRK2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ramonet

    Full Text Available Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant familial Parkinson's disease (PD and also contribute to idiopathic PD. LRRK2 mutations represent the most common cause of PD with clinical and neurochemical features that are largely indistinguishable from idiopathic disease. Currently, transgenic mice expressing wild-type or disease-causing mutants of LRRK2 have failed to produce overt neurodegeneration, although abnormalities in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotransmission have been observed. Here, we describe the development and characterization of transgenic mice expressing human LRRK2 bearing the familial PD mutations, R1441C and G2019S. Our study demonstrates that expression of G2019S mutant LRRK2 induces the degeneration of nigrostriatal pathway dopaminergic neurons in an age-dependent manner. In addition, we observe autophagic and mitochondrial abnormalities in the brains of aged G2019S LRRK2 mice and markedly reduced neurite complexity of cultured dopaminergic neurons. These new LRRK2 transgenic mice will provide important tools for understanding the mechanism(s through which familial mutations precipitate neuronal degeneration and PD.

  1. Ectopic expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice causes obesity, features of type II diabetes, and yellow fur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klebig, M.L.; Woychik, R.P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilkinson, J.E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Geisler, J.G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-05-23

    Mice that carry the lethal yellow (A{sup y}) or viable yellow (A{sup vy}) mutation, two dominant mutations of the agouti (a) gene in mouse chromosome 2, exhibit a phenotype that includes yellow fur, marked obesity, a form of type II diabetes associated with insulin resistance, and an increased susceptibility to tumor development. Molecular analyses of these and several other dominant {open_quotes}obese yellow{close_quotes} a-locus mutations suggested that ectopic expression of the normal agouti protein gives rise to this complex pleiotropic phenotype. We have now tested this hypothesis directly by generating transgenic mice that ectopically express an agouti cDNA clone encoding the normal agouti protein in all tissues examined. Transgenic mice of both sexes have yellow fur, become obese, and develop hyperinsulinemia. In addition, male transgenic mice develop hyperglycemia by 12-20 weeks of age. These results demonstrate conclusively that the ectopic agouti expression is responsible for most, if not all, of the phenotypic traits of the dominant, obese yellow mutants. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Bovine PrP expression levels in transgenic mice influence transmission characteristics of atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rona; Hart, Patricia; Piccardo, Pedro; Hunter, Nora; Casalone, Cristina; Baron, Thierry; Barron, Rona M

    2012-05-01

    Until recently, transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) disease in cattle was thought to be caused by a single agent strain, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) (classical BSE or BSE-C). However, due to the initiation of a large-scale surveillance programme throughout Europe, two atypical BSE strains, bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy (BASE, also named BSE-L) and BSE-H have since been discovered. These atypical BSE isolates have been previously transmitted to a range of transgenic mouse models overexpressing PrP from different species at different levels, on a variety of genetic backgrounds. To control for genetic background and expression level in the analysis of these isolates, we performed here a comprehensive comparison of the neuropathological and molecular properties of all three BSE agents (BASE, BSE-C and BSE-H) upon transmission into the same gene-targeted transgenic mouse line expressing the bovine prion protein (Bov6) and a wild-type control of the same genetic background. Significantly, upon challenge with these BSE agents, we found that BASE did not produce shorter survival times in these mice compared with BSE-C, contrary to previous studies using overexpressing bovine transgenic mice. Amyloid plaques were only present in mice challenged with atypical BSE and neuropathological features, including intensity of PrP deposition in the brain and severity of vacuolar degeneration were less pronounced in BASE compared with BSE-C-challenged mice.

  3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis of neurochemical changes in the atrophic hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shengxiang; Huang, Jia; Liu, Weilin; Jin, Hao; Li, Long; Zhang, Xiufeng; Nie, Binbin; Lin, Ruhui; Tao, Jing; Zhao, Shujun; Shan, Baoci; Chen, Lidian

    2017-09-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neuropathological changes and progressive cognitive decline, which is associated with the volume loss and neurochemical alterations. However, the specific neurochemical alterations in cerebral regions that contribute to cognitive decline still remain unknown. In the present study, we measured cerebral morphological and neurochemical alterations using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) in an AD model of APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis indicated atrophy of the hippocampus, motor cortex, striatum, amygdaloid body, septal area, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and accumbens nucleus in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Furthermore, the hippocampus was selected as a region of interest (ROI) to explore neurochemical metabolism. The results showed that the ratios of N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) and glutamate/creatine (Glu/Cr) were reduced, while myo-inositol/creatine (mIn/Cr) was increased in APP/PS1 transgenic mice compared to the wild type mice and accompanied by a decline in learning and memory. Taken together, the present study suggests that hippocampal atrophy and neurochemical changes in NAA, Glu and mIn may play a causative role in the cognitive decline associated with AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss, Reduced Neurite Complexity and Autophagic Abnormalities in Transgenic Mice Expressing G2019S Mutant LRRK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Brian M.; Stafa, Klodjan; Kim, Jaekwang; Banerjee, Rebecca; Westerlund, Marie; Pletnikova, Olga; Glauser, Liliane; Yang, Lichuan; Liu, Ying; Swing, Deborah A.; Beal, M. Flint; Troncoso, Juan C.; McCaffery, J. Michael; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Galter, Dagmar; Thomas, Bobby; Lee, Michael K.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Moore, Darren J.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant familial Parkinson's disease (PD) and also contribute to idiopathic PD. LRRK2 mutations represent the most common cause of PD with clinical and neurochemical features that are largely indistinguishable from idiopathic disease. Currently, transgenic mice expressing wild-type or disease-causing mutants of LRRK2 have failed to produce overt neurodegeneration, although abnormalities in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotransmission have been observed. Here, we describe the development and characterization of transgenic mice expressing human LRRK2 bearing the familial PD mutations, R1441C and G2019S. Our study demonstrates that expression of G2019S mutant LRRK2 induces the degeneration of nigrostriatal pathway dopaminergic neurons in an age-dependent manner. In addition, we observe autophagic and mitochondrial abnormalities in the brains of aged G2019S LRRK2 mice and markedly reduced neurite complexity of cultured dopaminergic neurons. These new LRRK2 transgenic mice will provide important tools for understanding the mechanism(s) through which familial mutations precipitate neuronal degeneration and PD. PMID:21494637

  5. Crohn's disease adherent-invasive Escherichia coli colonize and induce strong gut inflammation in transgenic mice expressing human CEACAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Frédéric A; Barnich, Nicolas; Sivignon, Adeline; Darcha, Claude; Chan, Carlos H F; Stanners, Clifford P; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2009-09-28

    Abnormal expression of CEACAM6 is observed at the apical surface of the ileal epithelium in Crohn's disease (CD) patients, and CD ileal lesions are colonized by pathogenic adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC). We investigated the ability of AIEC reference strain LF82 to colonize the intestinal mucosa and to induce inflammation in CEABAC10 transgenic mice expressing human CEACAMs. AIEC LF82 virulent bacteria, but not nonpathogenic E. coli K-12, were able to persist in the gut of CEABAC10 transgenic mice and to induce severe colitis with reduced survival rate, marked weight loss, increased rectal bleeding, presence of erosive lesions, mucosal inflammation, and increased proinflammatory cytokine expression. The colitis depended on type 1 pili expression by AIEC bacteria and on intestinal CEACAM expression because no sign of colitis was observed in transgenic mice infected with type 1 pili-negative LF82-Delta fimH isogenic mutant or in wild-type mice infected with AIEC LF82 bacteria. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that in CD patients having an abnormal intestinal expression of CEACAM6, AIEC bacteria via type 1 pili expression can colonize the intestinal mucosa and induce gut inflammation. Thus, targeting AIEC adhesion to gut mucosa represents a new strategy for clinicians to prevent and/or to treat ileal CD.

  6. Transgenic expression of an expanded (GCG)13 repeat PABPN1 leads to weakness and coordination defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Patrick; Shanmugam, Vijayalakshmi; Gaspar, Claudia; Messaed, Christiane; Meijer, Inge; Toulouse, André; Laganiere, Janet; Roussel, Julie; Rochefort, Daniel; Laganiere, Simon; Allen, Carol; Karpati, George; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Brais, Bernard; Rouleau, Guy A

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a late-onset disorder caused by a (GCG)n trinucleotide repeat expansion in the poly(A) binding protein nuclear-1 (PABPN1) gene, which in turn leads to an expanded polyalanine tract in the protein. We generated transgenic mice expressing either the wild type or the expanded form of human PABPN1, and transgenic animals with the expanded form showed clear signs of abnormal limb clasping, muscle weakness, coordination deficits, and peripheral nerves alterations. Analysis of mitotic and postmitotic tissues in those transgenic animals revealed ubiquitinated PABPN1-positive intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in neuronal cells. This latter observation led us to test and confirm the presence of similar INIs in postmortem brain sections from an OPMD patient. Our results indicate that expanded PABPN1, presumably via the toxic effects of its polyalanine tract, can lead to inclusion formation and neurodegeneration in both the mouse and the human.

  7. Early Cognitive/Social Deficits and Late Motor Phenotype in Conditional Wild-Type TDP-43 Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, Julio A.; Silva, Pablo R.; Igaz, Lionel M.

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are two neurodegenerative diseases associated to mislocalization and aggregation of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43). To investigate in depth the behavioral phenotype associated with this proteinopathy, we used as a model transgenic (Tg) mice conditionally overexpressing human wild-type TDP 43 protein (hTDP-43-WT) in forebrain neurons. We previously characterized these mice at the neuropathological level and found progressive neurodegeneration and other features that evoke human TDP-43 proteinopathies of the FTD/ALS spectrum. In the present study we analyzed the behavior of mice at multiple domains, including motor, social and cognitive performance. Our results indicate that young hTDP-43-WT Tg mice (1 month after post-weaning transgene induction) present a normal motor phenotype compared to control littermates, as assessed by accelerated rotarod performance, spontaneous locomotor activity in the open field test and a mild degree of spasticity shown by a clasping phenotype. Analysis of social and cognitive behavior showed a rapid installment of deficits in social interaction, working memory (Y-maze test) and recognition memory (novel object recognition test) in the absence of overt motor abnormalities. To investigate if the motor phenotype worsen with age, we analyzed the behavior of mice after long-term (up to 12 months) transgene induction. Our results reveal a decreased performance on the rotarod test and in the hanging wire test, indicating a motor phenotype that was absent in younger mice. In addition, long-term hTDP-43-WT expression led to hyperlocomotion in the open field test. In sum, these results demonstrate a time-dependent emergence of a motor phenotype in older hTDP-43-WT Tg mice, recapitulating aspects of clinical FTD presentations with motor involvement in human patients, and providing a complementary animal model for studying TDP-43 proteinopathies. PMID:28066234

  8. A Genome-wide Gene-Expression Analysis and Database in Transgenic Mice during Development of Amyloid or Tau Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Matarin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We provide microarray data comparing genome-wide differential expression and pathology throughout life in four lines of “amyloid” transgenic mice (mutant human APP, PSEN1, or APP/PSEN1 and “TAU” transgenic mice (mutant human MAPT gene. Microarray data were validated by qPCR and by comparison to human studies, including genome-wide association study (GWAS hits. Immune gene expression correlated tightly with plaques whereas synaptic genes correlated negatively with neurofibrillary tangles. Network analysis of immune gene modules revealed six hub genes in hippocampus of amyloid mice, four in common with cortex. The hippocampal network in TAU mice was similar except that Trem2 had hub status only in amyloid mice. The cortical network of TAU mice was entirely different with more hub genes and few in common with the other networks, suggesting reasons for specificity of cortical dysfunction in FTDP17. This Resource opens up many areas for investigation. All data are available and searchable at http://www.mouseac.org.

  9. Synaptophysin expression in motor neurons of transgenic mice with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Liu; Dawei Zang; Surindar Cheema

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Affected signal convection of synaptophysin on motor neurons may Cause injury of motor neurons and then induce neurodegeneration and cell death in the end.OBJECTTVE: To investigate the number and density of synaptophysin on motor neurons in the anterior horn of lumbar spinal cord and sensorimotor cortex of the transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS).DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal study.SETTTNG: Brain Injury and Repair Group, HFI Institute of Melbourne University.MATERIALS: Transgenic mice expressing a mutated human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD-1) were taken as ALS group (n =36), while those dedved from the B6SJL-TgN gene line were taken as control group (n =36),according to the difference of gender and three postnatal time points (postnatal 60, 90 and 120 days), twelve mice of either gender were allocated in each subgroup.METHODS: The experiment was carried out in Brain Injury and Repair Group, HFI Institute of Melbourne University from November 2003 to June 2004. ① Fluorogold labeling was used for the motor neurons in the lumbar and sensorimotor cortex. ② Immunofluorescence was applied for the labeling of synaptophysin; positive control sections were represented by adding the synaptophysin antibody and the staining, showing a positive result. For negative controls, the synaptophysin antibody was omitted. ③ Stereological counting system was adopted in the statistical analysis.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Fluorogold labeling of motor neurons; ② number of synaptophysin on the motor neurons.RESULTS: ① Fluorogold labeling of motor neurons: The motor neurons in the lumbar and sensorimotor cortex were clearly labeled by fluorogold under the detection of fluorescent microscope. ② The number of synaptophysin on the motor neurons: The number statistically decreased at the mid stage (postnatal 90 days)and late stage (postnatal 120 days) [motor neuron somas at lumbar spinal cord: (0.75±0.06), (0.59±0.09)/μm;motor neuron

  10. Study on Alzheimer's disease in transgenic mice%阿尔茨海默病转基因鼠模型的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖峥嵘; 雷宇华; 赵娟; 吕雨虹; 王忠海; 张凤云; 赵俊霞

    2011-01-01

    目的 建立阿尔茨海默病(AD)双转基因鼠,为进一步研究AD发病机制提供较为理想的实验动物.方法 将人载脂蛋白E4转基因鼠和突变APP转基因鼠杂交.结果 经PCR初筛,对阳性小鼠基因组DNA作进一步的Southern杂交鉴定,获得2只双转基因小鼠,之后传代建系.结论 为进一步研究多个基因对AD的致病作用提供较为理想的实验动物.%Objective To establish animal model of Alzheimer' s disease (AD) in transgenic mice and investigate the mechanism of AD.Methods To establish AD bi-transgenic mice by ApoE4 and APP transgenic mice intercrossing.The PCR and Southern blot hybridization techniques were used for identification of transgenic mice.Results Two ApoE4/APP transgenic mice were bom and young mice were bred.Conclusions ApoE4 and APP transgenic mice is a good AD animal model.

  11. EVIDENCE THAT INTESTINAL IGA PLASMA-CELLS IN MU,CHI TRANSGENIC MICE ARE DERIVED FROM B-1 (LY-1 B) CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KROESE, FGM; AMMERLAAN, WAM; KANTOR, AB

    1993-01-01

    B6-Sp6 transgenic mice carry fully rearranged (BALB/c-derived. Igh-C(a) allotype) mu heavy chain and kappa light chain transgenes, specific for trinitrophenyl, on a C57BL background (Igh-C(b) allotype). FACS analyses show that the majority of B cells in peripheral lymphoid organs and bone marrow (BM

  12. Mice transgenic for equine cyclin T1 and ELR1 are susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Cheng; Ma, Jian; Liu, Qiang; Li, Yun-Fei; He, Xi-Jun; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Meng, Qing-Wen; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-04-28

    As a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) protein superfamily, equine lentivirus receptor 1 (ELR1) has been shown to be expressed in various equine cells that are permissive for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) replication. The EIAV Tat protein (eTat) activates transcription initiated at the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter through a unique mechanism that requires the recruitment of the equine cyclin T1 (eCT1) cofactor into the viral TAR RNA target element. In vitro studies have demonstrated that mouse fibroblast cell lines (e.g., NIH 3T3 cells) that express the EIAV receptor ELR1 and eCT1 support the productive replication of EIAV. Therefore, we constructed transgenic eCT1- and ELR1-expressing mice to examine whether they support in vivo EIAV replication. For the first time, we constructed mice transgenic for ELR1 and eCT1. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis confirmed that ELR1 and eCT1 were expressed in the transgenic mouse tissues, particularly in the intestines, spleen and lymph nodes. Consistent with the results of EIAV infection in NIH 3T3 cells expressing ELR1 and eCT1, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from the transgenic mice could support EIAV replication. More importantly, this virus could infect and replicate in mouse blood monocyte-derived macrophages (mMDMs). Macrophages are the principle target cell of EIAV in its natural hosts. Furthermore, after the transgenic mice were inoculated with EIAV, the virus could be detected not only in the plasma of the circulating blood but also in multiple organs, among which, the spleen and lymph nodes were the predominant sites of EIAV replication. Finally, we found that consistent with high viral replication levels, the relevant pathological changes occurred in the spleen and lymph nodes. Our results show that mice transgenic for ELR1 and eCT1 are susceptible to EIAV infection and replication. Further, EIAV infection can cause

  13. Osteoprotegerin-deficient male mice as a model for severe alveolar bone loss: comparison with RANKL-overexpressing transgenic male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Masanori; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Ninomiya, Tadashi; Nakamura, Midori; Yasuda, Hisataka; Arai, Yoshinori; Okahashi, Nobuo; Yoshinari, Nobuo; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Udagawa, Nobuyuki

    2013-02-01

    Periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of periodontal tissues, is characterized by excessive alveolar bone resorption. An increase in the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) to osteoprotegerin (OPG) ratio is thought to reflect the severity of periodontitis. Here, we examined alveolar bone loss in OPG-deficient (OPG(-/-)) mice and RANKL-overexpressing transgenic (RANKL-Tg) mice. Alveolar bone loss in OPG(-/-) mice at 12 weeks was significantly higher than that in RANKL-Tg mice. OPG(-/-) but not RANKL-Tg mice exhibited severe bone resorption especially in cortical areas of the alveolar bone. An increased number of osteoclasts was observed in the cortical areas in OPG(-/-) but not in RANKL-Tg mice. Immunohistochemical analyses showed many OPG-positive signals in osteocytes but not osteoblasts. OPG-positive osteocytes in the cortical area of alveolar bones and long bones were abundant in both wild-type and RANKL-Tg mice. This suggests the resorption in cortical bone areas to be prevented by OPG produced locally. To test the usefulness of OPG(-/-) mice as an animal model for screening drugs to prevent alveolar bone loss, we administered an antimouse RANKL antibody or risedronate, a bisphosphonate, to OPG(-/-) mice. They suppressed alveolar bone resorption effectively. OPG(-/-) mice are useful for screening therapeutic agents against alveolar bone loss.

  14. Modification of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and preparation of intact BAC DNA for generation of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shiaoching; Yang, X William

    2005-05-01

    BAC transgenesis is a powerful tool for the study of gene expression and gene function in the mouse in vivo. In this unit, detailed protocols are provided for modification (i.e., marker gene insertion, deletion, or point mutation) of BACs by homologous recombination in E. coli. This method utilizes a shuttle vector that allows transient expression of the E. coli RecA gene to support homologous recombination in the BAC host bacteria. In addition, two protocols are provided for purification of BAC DNA for microinjection to generate transgenic mice. Since BAC DNA is prone to degradation, which may introduce positional effects in transgenic mice, two methods are given for purification of intact BAC DNA for subsequent microinjection.

  15. Erythropoietin and the use of a transgenic model of erythropoietin-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichon A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aurélien Pichon,1–3 Florine Jeton,1,2 Raja El Hasnaoui-Saadani,4 Luciana Hagström,5 Thierry Launay,6 Michèle Beaudry,1 Dominique Marchant,1 Patricia Quidu,1 Jose-Luis Macarlupu,7 Fabrice Favret,8 Jean-Paul Richalet,1,2 Nicolas Voituron1,2 1Laboratory “Hypoxia and Lung” EA 2363, University Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny Cedex, 2Laboratory of Excellence GR-Ex, Paris, 3Laboratory MOVE EA 6314, FSS, Poitiers University, Poitiers, France; 4Research Unit, College of Medicine, Princess Noura University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 5Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Biociências, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, Brazil; 6Unité de Biologie Intégrative des Adaptations à l'Exercice, University Paris Saclay and Genopole®, University Sorbonne-Paris-Cité, Paris, France; 7High Altitude Unit, Laboratories for Research and Development, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru; 8Laboratory “Mitochondrie, Stress Oxydant et Protection Musculaire” EA 3072, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France Abstract: Despite its well-known role in red blood cell production, it is now accepted that erythropoietin (Epo has other physiological functions. Epo and its receptors are expressed in many tissues, such as the brain and heart. The presence of Epo/Epo receptors in these organs suggests other roles than those usually assigned to this protein. Thus, the aim of this review is to describe the effects of Epo deficiency on adaptation to normoxic and hypoxic environments and to suggest a key role of Epo on main physiological adaptive functions. Our original model of Epo-deficient (Epo-TAgh mice allowed us to improve our knowledge of the possible role of Epo in O2 homeostasis. The use of anemic transgenic mice revealed Epo as a crucial component of adaptation to hypoxia. Epo-TAgh mice survive well in hypoxic conditions despite low hematocrit. Furthermore, Epo plays a key role in neural control of ventilatory acclimatization and response to

  16. Effect of catalpol on senile plaques and spatial learning and memory ability in amyloid-β protein precursor/presenilin 1 double transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋冲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether catalpol affects senile plaque formation and spatial learning and memory ability in the amyloid-βprotein precursor/presenilin 1(APP/PS1)double transgenic mice.Methods

  17. Influence of chlorpyrifos oxon on the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurological disorder and the most common form of dementia. Until date, the cause of AD eludes us, but a number of hypotheses have been put forward to try and understand the mechanisms involved. A series of studies have indicated that environmental factors, such as pesticides, heavy metals, and others can contribute to the development and progression of AD. Based on these data, we determined the impact of pesticides (chlorpyrifos oxon [CPO] on AD-like pathogenesis in amyloid precursor protein (APP transgenic mice. Methods: APP mice were treated at various times with low-dose CPO (1 mg/kg/day, in utero (3-week of gestation, during lactation (3-week, or as young adults (continuous dosing. Results: Exposure to CPO at all times enhanced neuro-inflammation and exacerbated oxidative stress in the brain prior to amyloid deposition. CPO-treated APP mice showed a decrease in memory and learning compared with untreated APP mice; furthermore, analyses of brain tissue sections and extracts showed an increase in Ab levels and C-terminal fragment-b levels, a decrease in soluble APPa (sAPPa levels, and an increase in plaque load. In addition, CPO-treated APP transgenic mice showed a significant decrease in neurotrophic factor levels (nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotrophin-3 compared to vehicle-treated APP transgenic animals. Treatment with galantamine attenuated the effects of CPO by reducing amyloid b levels and amyloid load. Conclusion: CPO accelerated and exacerbated the disease development and progression in the APP mice suggesting that pesticides may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of AD.

  18. Induction of somatic mutations but not methylated DNA adducts in λlacZ transgenic mice by dichlorvos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pletsa, V.; Steenwinkel, M.-J.S.T.; Delft, J.H.M. van; Baan, R.A.; Kyrtopoulos, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    In order to examine the in vivo genotoxic activity of dichlorvos, λlacZ transgenic mice (Muta(TM)Mouse) were treated i.p. with single (4.4 or 11 mg/kg) or multiple (5x11 mg/kg) doses of this agent and sacrificed 4 h or 14 days post-treatment for DNA adduct measurement or mutant frequency analysis, r

  19. DNA adducts, mutant frequencies and mutation spectra in λlacZ transgenic mice treated with N-nitrosodimethylamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souliotis, V.L.; Delft, J.H.M. van; Steenwinkel, M.-J.S.T.; Baan, R.A.; Kyrtopoulos, S.A.

    1998-01-01

    Groups of λlacZ transgenic mice were treated i.p. with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) as single doses of 5 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg or as 10 daily doses of 1 mg/kg and changes in DNA N7- or O6-methylguanine or the repair enzyme O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) were followed for up to 14 days in va

  20. Dataset for the role of sustained attention in memory formation of transgenic mice for Alzheimer׳s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Mendes Schöwe; Eduardo Moreira de Oliveira; Hudson Sousa Buck; Tania Araujo Viel

    2016-01-01

    Weekly submission of rats to active avoidance apparatus can be considered a neurostimulation strategy, once it can improve memory and can increase the density of receptors from different neurotransmitter systems in brain areas related to memory. These benefits were observed in rats chronically infused with amyloid-β peptide. In the present work it is presented that the same benefit for memory was observed in five months old transgenic mice for Alzheimer’s disease (TG-PDGFB-APPSw,Ind). However...

  1. DNA adducts, mutant frequencies and mutation spectra in λlacZ transgenic mice treated with N-nitrosodimethylamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souliotis, V.L.; Delft, J.H.M. van; Steenwinkel, M.-J.S.T.; Baan, R.A.; Kyrtopoulos, S.A.

    1998-01-01

    Groups of λlacZ transgenic mice were treated i.p. with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) as single doses of 5 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg or as 10 daily doses of 1 mg/kg and changes in DNA N7- or O6-methylguanine or the repair enzyme O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) were followed for up to 14 days in

  2. Transgenic mice for interleukin 3 develop motor neuron degeneration associated with autoimmune reaction against spinal cord motor neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Chavany, Christine; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos; Miller, Georgina; Jendoubi, Moncef

    1998-01-01

    Interleukin 3 (IL-3) stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of various haematopoietic progenitor cells. Recently, IL-3 and other cytokines were reported to exert a neurotrophic activity and to be associated with neurological disorders, suggesting their complex role in the central nervous system. We now show that overexpression of IL-3 in transgenic mice causes a motor neuron disease with several features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and progressive muscular atrophy. These animal...

  3. Aberrant Proliferation of Differentiating Alveolar Cells Induces Hyperplasia in Resting Mammary Glands of SV40-TAg Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Quante, Timo; Wegwitz, Florian; Abe, Julia; Rossi, Alessandra; Deppert, Wolfgang; Bohn, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    WAP-T1 transgenic mice express SV40-TAg under control of the whey acidic protein (WAP) promoter, which directs activity of this strong viral oncogene to luminal cells of the mammary gland. Resting uniparous WAP-T1 glands develop hyperplasia composed of TAg positive cells prior to appearance of advanced tumor stages. We show that cells in hyperplasia display markers of alveolar differentiation, suggesting that TAg targets differentiating cells of the alveolar compartment. The glands show signi...

  4. Aberrant proliferation of differentiating alveolar cells induces hyperplasia in resting mammary glands of SV40-TAg transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang eBohn; Timo eQuante

    2014-01-01

    WAP-T1 transgenic mice express SV40-TAg under control of the WAP promoter (Whey Acidic Protein) which directs activity of this strong viral oncogene to luminal cells of the mammary gland. Resting uniparous WAP-T1 glands develop hyperplasia composed of TAg positive cells prior to appearance of advanced tumor stages. We show that cells in hyperplasia display markers of alveolar differentiation, suggesting that TAg targets differentiating cells of the alveolar compartment. The glands show signif...

  5. Organotypic brain slice cultures of adult transgenic P301S mice--a model for tauopathy studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Mewes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Organotypic brain slice cultures represent an excellent compromise between single cell cultures and complete animal studies, in this way replacing and reducing the number of animal experiments. Organotypic brain slices are widely applied to model neuronal development and regeneration as well as neuronal pathology concerning stroke, epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease (AD. AD is characterized by two protein alterations, namely tau hyperphosphorylation and excessive amyloid β deposition, both causing microglia and astrocyte activation. Deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau, called neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs, surrounded by activated glia are modeled in transgenic mice, e.g. the tauopathy model P301S. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we explore the benefits and limitations of organotypic brain slice cultures made of mature adult transgenic mice as a potential model system for the multifactorial phenotype of AD. First, neonatal (P1 and adult organotypic brain slice cultures from 7- to 10-month-old transgenic P301S mice have been compared with regard to vitality, which was monitored with the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH- and the MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays over 15 days. Neonatal slices displayed a constant high vitality level, while the vitality of adult slice cultures decreased significantly upon cultivation. Various preparation and cultivation conditions were tested to augment the vitality of adult slices and improvements were achieved with a reduced slice thickness, a mild hypothermic cultivation temperature and a cultivation CO(2 concentration of 5%. Furthermore, we present a substantial immunohistochemical characterization analyzing the morphology of neurons, astrocytes and microglia in comparison to neonatal tissue. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Until now only adolescent animals with a maximum age of two months have been used to prepare organotypic brain slices. The current study

  6. Transgenic mice with -6A haplotype of the human angiotensinogen gene have increased blood pressure compared with -6G haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sudhir; Tillinger, Andrej; Mopidevi, Brahmaraju; Pandey, Varunkumar G; Chauhan, Chetankumar K; Fiering, Steven N; Warming, Soren; Kumar, Ashok

    2010-12-24

    Hypertension is a serious risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and the angiotensinogen (AGT) gene locus is associated with human essential hypertension. The human AGT (hAGT) gene has an A/G polymorphism at -6, and the -6A allele is associated with increased blood pressure. However, transgenic mice containing 1.2 kb of the promoter with -6A of the hAGT gene show neither increased plasma AGT level nor increased blood pressure compared with -6G. We have found that the hAGT gene has three additional SNPs (A/G at -1670, C/G at -1562, and T/G at -1561). Variants -1670A, -1562C, and -1561T almost always occur with -6A, and variants -1670G, -1562G, and -1561G almost always occur with -6G. Therefore, the hAGT gene may be subdivided into either -6A or -6G haplotypes. We show that these polymorphisms affect the binding of HNF-1α and glucocorticoid receptor to the promoter, and a reporter construct containing a 1.8-kb hAGT gene promoter with -6A haplotype has 4-fold increased glucocorticoid-induced promoter activity as compared with -6G haplotype. In order to understand the physiological significance of these haplotypes in an in vivo situation, we have generated double transgenic mice containing either the -6A or -6G haplotype of the hAGT gene and the human renin gene. Our ChIP assay shows that HNF-1α and glucocorticoid receptor have stronger affinity for the chromatin obtained from the liver of transgenic mice containing -6A haplotype. Our studies also show that transgenic mice containing -6A haplotype have increased plasma AGT level and increased blood pressure as compared with -6G haplotype. Our studies explain the molecular mechanism involved in association of the -6A allele of the hAGT gene with hypertension.

  7. Farnesyl transferase inhibitors induce extended remissions in transgenic mice with mature B cell lymphomas

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    Refaeli Yosef

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used a mouse model based on overexpression of c-Myc in B cells genetically engineered to be self-reactive to test the hypothesis that farnesyl transferase inhibitors (FTIs can effectively treat mature B cell lymphomas. FTIs are undergoing clinical trials to treat both lymphoid and non-lymphoid malignancies and we wished to obtain evidence to support the inclusion of B cell lymphomas in future trials. Results We report that two FTIs, L-744,832 and SCH66336, blocked the growth of mature B cell lymphoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The FTI treatment affected the proliferation and survival of the transformed B cells to a greater extent than naïve B cells stimulated with antigen. In syngeneic mice transplanted with the transgenic lymphoma cells, L-744,832 treatment prevented the growth of the tumor cells and the morbidity associated with the resulting lymphoma progression. Tumors that arose from transplantation of the lymphoma cells regressed with as little as three days of treatment with L-744,832 or SCH66336. Treatment of these established lymphomas with L-744,832 for seven days led to long-term remission of the disease in approximately 25% of animals. Conclusion FTI treatment can block the proliferation and survival of self-reactive transformed B cells that overexpress Myc. In mice transplanted with mature B cell lymphomas, we found that FTI treatment led to regression of disease. FTIs warrant further consideration as therapeutic agents for mature B cell lymphomas and other lymphoid tumors.

  8. Immunomodulatory activity of recombinant α-gliadin conjugated to cholera toxin in DQ8 transgenic mice.

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    Rossi, Stefano; Luongo, Diomira; Maurano, Francesco; Bergamo, Paolo; Rossi, Mauro

    2017-07-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is characterized by an intestinal lesion sustained by an abnormal mucosal T-cell response to wheat gliadin. An immunological approach that is able to suppress this immune response is a perspective worth pursuing. Several strategies of antigen administration have been aimed at the downregulation of pathogenic T-cells. In particular, we previously reported a significant suppression of the systemic cell-mediated response toward wheat gliadin in DQ8 transgenic mice receiving nasally a recombinant α-gliadin. To gain further insight about the cellular mechanisms underlying the tolerogenic properties of this molecule, we analysed different preparations of the recombinant α-gliadin, alone or conjugated to the adjuvant cholera toxin (CT), by in vitro challenge with spleen CD4(+) T cells from gliadin-sensitized DQ8 tg mice. We found that a partially purified preparation of recombinant α-gliadin (r-gliadin) induced a significantly higher production of IFN-γ than native gliadin as well as HPLC purified r-gliadin. Interestingly, r-gliadin, but not HPLC purified r-gliadin, stimulated the gliadin-specific expression of IL-10 in CD4(+) T cells. No significant cytotoxic effect was induced by r-gliadin in MODE-K cells, a murine model of enterocytes. Notably, a conjugate CT-r-gliadin failed in stimulating IFN-γ, whereas IL-10 secretion was still induced in gliadin-specific CD4(+) T cells. In conclusion, our results showed that DCs, pulsed with CT-r-gliadin in vitro, could modulate the ongoing Th1-like T cell response toward wheat gliadin. This finding provides new insight into the design of immunomodulatory protocols potentially useful for CD. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Progressive inflammatory pathology in the retina of aluminum-fed 5xFAD transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, A I; Dua, P; Hill, J M; Lukiw, W J

    2015-11-01

    At least 57 murine transgenic models for Alzheimer's disease (Tg-AD) have been developed to overexpress the 42 amino acid amyloid-beta (Aβ42) peptide in the central nervous system (CNS). These 'humanized murine Tg-AD models' have greatly expanded our understanding of the contribution of Aβ42 peptide-mediated pro-inflammatory neuropathology to the AD process. A number of independent laboratories using different amyloid-overexpressing Tg-AD models have shown that supplementation of murine Tg-AD diets and/or drinking water with aluminum significantly enhances Aβ42 peptide-mediated inflammatory pathology and AD-type cognitive change compared to animals receiving control diets. In humans AD-type pathology appears to originate in the limbic system and progressively spreads into primary processing and sensory regions such as the retina. In these studies, for the first time, we assess the propagation of Aβ42 and inflammatory signals into the retina of 5xFAD Tg-AD amyloid-overexpressing mice whose diets were supplemented with aluminum. The two most interesting findings were (1) that similar to other Tg-AD models, there was a significantly accelerated development of Aβ42 and inflammatory pathology in 5xFAD Tg-AD mice fed aluminum; and (2) in aluminum-supplemented animals, markers for inflammatory pathology appeared in both the brain and the retina as evidenced by an evolving presence of Aβ42 peptides, and accompanied by inflammatory markers - cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The results indicate that in the 5xFAD Tg-AD model aluminum not only enhances an Aβ42-mediated inflammatory degeneration of the brain but also appears to induce AD-type pathology in an anatomically-linked primary sensory area that involves vision.

  10. Incubation and application of transgenic green fluorescent nude mice in visualization studies on glioma tissue remodeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Jun; LAN Qing; HUANG Qiang; DAI Xing-liang; LU Zhao-hui; FEI Xi-feng; CHEN Hua; ZHANG Quan-bin; ZHAO Yao-dong; WANG Zhi-min; WANG Ai-dong

    2012-01-01

    Background The primary reasons for local recurrence and therapeutic failure in the treatment of malignant gliomas are the invasion and interactions of tumor cells with surrounding normal brain cells.However,these tumor cells are hard to be visualized directly in histopathological preparations,or in experimental glioma models.Therefore,we developed an experimental human dual-color in vivo glioma model,which made tracking solitary invasive glioma cells possible,for the purpose of visualizing the interactions between red fluorescence labeled human glioma cells and host brain cells.This may offer references for further studying the roles of tumor microenvironment during glioma tissue remodeling.Methods Transgenic female C57BL/6 mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were crossed with male Balb/c nude mice.Then sib mating was allowed to occur continuously in order to establish an inbred nude mice strain with 50% of their offspring that are EGFP positive.Human glioma cell lines U87-MG and SU3 were transfected with red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene,and a rat C6 glioma cell line was stained directly with CM-Dil,to establish three glioma cell lines emitting red fluorescence (SU3-RFP,U87-RFP,and C6-CM-Dil).Red fluorescence tumor cells were inoculated via intra-cerebral injection into caudate nucleus of the EGFP nude mice.Tumor-bearing mice were sacrificed when their clinical symptoms appeared,and the whole brain was harvested and snap frozen for further analysis.Confocal laser scanning microscopy was performed to monitor the mutual interactions between tumor cells and host brain cells.Results Almost all the essential tissues of the established EGFP athymic Balb/c nude mice,except hair and erythrocytes,fluoresced green under excitation using a blue light-emitting flashlight with a central peak of 470 nm,approximately 50% of the offsprings were nu/nu EGFP+.SU3-RFP,U87-RFP,and C6-CM-Dil almost 100% expressed red fluorescence under the fluorescence

  11. Transgenic bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jänne, J; Alhonen, L; Hyttinen, J M; Peura, T; Tolvanen, M; Korhonen, V P

    1998-01-01

    Since the generation of the first transgenic mice in 1980, transgene technology has also been successfully applied to large farm animals. Although this technology can be employed to improve certain production traits of livestock, this approach has not been very successful so far owing to unwanted effects encountered in the production animals. However, by using tissue-specific targeting of the transgene expression, it is possible to produce heterologous proteins in the extracellular space of large transgenic farm animals. Even though some recombinant proteins, such as human hemoglobin, have been produced in the blood of transgenic pigs, in the majority of the cases mammary gland targeted expression of the transgene has been employed. Using production genes driven by regulatory sequences of milk protein genes a number of valuable therapeutic proteins have been produced in the milk of transgenic bioreactors, ranging from rabbits to dairy cattle. Unlike bacterial fermentors, the mammary gland of transgenic bioreactors appear to carry out proper postsynthetic modifications of human proteins required for full biological activity. In comparison with mammalian cell bioreactors, transgenic livestock with mammary gland targeted expression seems to be able to produce valuable human therapeutic proteins at very low cost. Although not one transgenically produced therapeutic protein is yet on the market, the first such proteins have recently entered or even completed clinical trials required for their approval.

  12. Longitudinal noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging of brain microhemorrhages in BACE inhibitor-treated APP transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Nicolau; Doelemeyer, Arno; Zurbruegg, Stefan; Bigot, Karine; Theil, Diethilde; Frieauff, Wilfried; Kolly, Carine; Moulin, Pierre; Neddermann, Daniel; Kreutzer, Robert; Perrot, Ludovic; Brzak, Irena; Jacobson, Laura H; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Neumann, Ulf; Shimshek, Derya R

    2016-09-01

    Currently, several immunotherapies and BACE (Beta Site APP Cleaving Enzyme) inhibitor approaches are being tested in the clinic for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. A crucial mechanism-related safety concern is the exacerbation of microhemorrhages, which are already present in the majority of Alzheimer patients. To investigate potential safety liabilities of long-term BACE inhibitor therapy, we used aged amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice (APP23), which robustly develop cerebral amyloid angiopathy. T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a translational method applicable in preclinical and clinical studies, was used for the detection of microhemorrhages throughout the entire brain, with subsequent histological validation. Three-dimensional reconstruction based on in vivo MRI and serial Perls' stained sections demonstrated a one-to-one matching of the lesions thus allowing for their histopathological characterization. MRI detected small Perls' positive areas with a high spatial resolution. Our data demonstrate that volumetric assessment by noninvasive MRI is well suited to monitor cerebral microhemorrhages in vivo. Furthermore, 3 months treatment of aged APP23 with the potent BACE-inhibitor NB-360 did not exacerbate microhemorrhages in contrast to Aβ-antibody β1. These results substantiate the safe use of BACE inhibitors regarding microhemorrhages in long-term clinical studies for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Congenital hydrocephalus and abnormal subcommissural organ development in Sox3 transgenic mice.

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    Kristie Lee

    Full Text Available Congenital hydrocephalus (CH is a life-threatening medical condition in which excessive accumulation of CSF leads to ventricular expansion and increased intracranial pressure. Stenosis (blockage of the Sylvian aqueduct (Aq; the narrow passageway that connects the third and fourth ventricles is a common form of CH in humans, although the genetic basis of this condition is unknown. Mouse models of CH indicate that Aq stenosis is associated with abnormal development of the subcommmissural organ (SCO a small secretory organ located at the dorsal midline of the caudal diencephalon. Glycoproteins secreted by the SCO generate Reissner's fibre (RF, a thread-like structure that descends into the Aq and is thought to maintain its patency. However, despite the importance of SCO function in CSF homeostasis, the genetic program that controls SCO development is poorly understood. Here, we show that the X-linked transcription factor SOX3 is expressed in the murine SCO throughout its development and in the mature organ. Importantly, overexpression of Sox3 in the dorsal diencephalic midline of transgenic mice induces CH via a dose-dependent mechanism. Histological, gene expression and cellular proliferation studies indicate that Sox3 overexpression disrupts the development of the SCO primordium through inhibition of diencephalic roof plate identity without inducing programmed cell death. This study provides further evidence that SCO function is essential for the prevention of hydrocephalus and indicates that overexpression of Sox3 in the dorsal midline alters progenitor cell differentiation in a dose-dependent manner.

  14. In vivo Echocardiographic Assessment of Left Ventricular Function in Transgenic and Gene-Targeted Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoit, B D; Walsh, R A

    1997-05-01

    Manipulation of the mammalian genome with transgenic and gene-targeting techniques is a powerful method for unambiguously identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying cardiac development and function. Although the small size of the mouse heart and the rapid heart rates encountered have limited echocardiographic assessment of the murine heart in the past, the use of sophisticated transducers operating at a high frequency results in highly reliable and reproducible image quality. M-mode echocardiography has been shown to provide a good correlation with gravimetrically determined left ventricular mass (LV) and to estimate accurately LV dimensions and systolic function. Doppler interrogation of transvalvular flows permits assessment of global LV systolic and diastolic function independent of ventricular geometry. Linear stress-shortening relations can be determined in the adult mouse with the use of pharmacologically induced changes in systemic arterial pressure, and these relations are capable of detecting changes in myocardial contractility in vivo, relatively independent of loading conditions. The present review focuses on the current advantages and limitations of M-mode and Doppler echocardiography to evaluate cardiac function in mice. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:129-134). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  15. Impaired electro-genesis in skeletal muscle fibers of transgenic Alzheimer mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamedyarov, Marat Alexandrovich; Volkov, Evgeniy Mikhailovich; Khaliullina, Dilyara Fanisovna; Grigoryev, Pavel Nikolaevich; Zefirov, Andrey Lvovich; Palotás, András

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory decline, but is often associated with non-cognitive symptoms, including muscular dysfunction. In the majority of cases these motor disturbances are seen when other neuro-degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease overlap dementia, however these can also be directly related to AD itself. Although the patho-mechanism remains largely unclear, β-amyloid peptide (βAP) is thought to be a key role-player in both the brain and periphery. Here we studied the electro-genesis of skeletal muscle fibers in a mouse transgenic AD model. Membrane potential was recorded by standard electro-physiological techniques. Compared to wild-type rodents, AD mice show severe disturbances in skeletal muscle electro-genesis manifested by significant depolarization of myo-fibers. These changes are not affected by short-term βAP treatment, the mark of a chronic degenerative process in the periphery directly related to AD whereby ion pumps on muscle membranes exhibit reduced activity. This phenomenon may explain ionic imbalance and cellular dysfunction both in the neuro-muscular system and in the brain. The observed motor disturbances might play a key role in impaired activities of daily living, and addressing the muscular patho-physiology could improve quality of life in AD.

  16. Unraveling the complexity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: recent advances from the transgenic mutant SOD1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peviani, M; Caron, I; Pizzasegola, C; Gensano, F; Tortarolo, M; Bendotti, C

    2010-08-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), which accounts for the majority of motor neuron disorders, is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease leading to complete paralysis of skeletal muscles and premature death usually from respiratory failure. About 10% of all ALS cases are inherited, with the responsible gene having been identified in approximately 25% of these individuals. Mutations in the copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene were the first to be recognized nearly twenty years ago, and since then different animal models, in particular transgenic rodents, have been developed. They replicate many of the clinical, neuropathological and molecular features of ALS patients and have contributed significantly to our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of this disease. Although results obtained so far with mutant SOD1 mice have not translated into effective therapies in ALS patients, these models still represent the only experimentally accessible system to study multiple aspects of disease pathogenesis and to provide proof-of-principle for the development of new therapeutic strategies. This review will examine the most recent discoveries obtained from these animal models in an attempt to elucidate the complex mechanisms of the disease. In particular it will focus on the contribution of multiple cell types in governing the disease development and progression.

  17. Modulating dopamine release by optogenetics in transgenic mice reveals terminal dopaminergic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Driscoll, Nicolette; Ozden, Ilker; Yu, Zeyang; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2015-07-01

    Dopamine (DA) release and uptake dynamics in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) have important implications for neurological diseases and mammalian animal behaviors. We demonstrate here the use of cell-type-specific optogenetic targeting in conjunction with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry applied to brain slices prepared from specifically tailored transgenic mice, which conditionally express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) through dopamine transporter (DAT)-Cre. Terminal dopaminergic dynamics and the direct manipulation of induced DA release level by controlling light intensity, pulse width, and the shape of stimulation waveforms were studied. Effective cell terminal-targeting optogenetic induction of DA release at physiological levels in NAc is demonstrated and discussed. It was found that delivering more light energy by increasing stimulation intensity and length is not the only way to control DA release; the temporal shape of the stimulus waveform at light onset is also critically related to induced DA concentrations. In addition, DA uptake dynamics as well as the recovery of the presynaptic releasable DA pool are studied and modeled. More broadly, our experimental findings provide important further evidence for effectively applying optogenetics to induce neurotransmitter release in the behaviorally relevant region of the brain in a highly cell-type selective context.

  18. Detection of amyloid plaques targeted by bifunctional USPIO in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice using magnetic resonance microimaging.

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    Youssef Zaim Wadghiri

    Full Text Available Amyloid plaques are a key pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The detection of amyloid plaques in the brain is important for the diagnosis of AD, as well as for following potential amyloid targeting therapeutic interventions. Our group has developed several contrast agents to detect amyloid plaques in vivo using magnetic resonance microimaging (µMRI in AD transgenic mice, where we used mannitol to enhance blood brain barrier (BBB permeability. In the present study, we used bifunctional ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO nanoparticles, chemically coupled with Aβ1-42 peptide to image amyloid plaque deposition in the mouse brain. We coupled the nanoparticles to polyethylene glycol (PEG in order to improve BBB permeability. These USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 nanoparticles were injected intravenously in AD model transgenic mice followed by initial in vivo and subsequent ex vivo μMRI. A 3D gradient multi-echo sequence was used for imaging with a 100 µm isotropic resolution. The amyloid plaques detected by T2*-weighted μMRI were confirmed with matched histological sections. The region of interest-based quantitative measurement of T2* values obtained from the in vivo μMRI showed contrast injected AD Tg mice had significantly reduced T2* values compared to wild-type mice. In addition, the ex vivo scans were examined with voxel-based analysis (VBA using statistical parametric mapping (SPM for comparison of USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 injected AD transgenic and USPIO alone injected AD transgenic mice. The regional differences seen by VBA in the USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 injected AD transgenic correlated with the amyloid plaque distribution histologically. Our results indicate that USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 can be used for amyloid plaque detection in vivo by intravenous injection without the need to co-inject an agent which increases permeability of the BBB. This technique could aid the development of novel amyloid targeting drugs by allowing therapeutic effects

  19. Transgenic mice overexpressing arginase 1 in monocytic cell lineage are affected by lympho-myeloproliferative disorders and disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astigiano, Simonetta; Morini, Monica; Damonte, Patrizia; Fraternali Orcioni, Giulio; Cassanello, Michela; Puglisi, Andrea; Noonan, Douglas M; Bronte, Vincenzo; Barbieri, Ottavia

    2015-11-01

    Arginase (ARG) is a metabolic enzyme present in two isoforms that hydrolyze l-arginine to urea and ornithine. In humans, ARG isoform 1 is also expressed in cells of the myeloid lineage. ARG activity promotes tumour growth and inhibits T lymphocyte activation. However, the two ARG transgenic mouse lines produced so far failed to show such effects. We have generated, in two different genetic backgrounds, transgenic mice constitutively expressing ARG1 under the control of the CD68 promoter in macrophages and monocytes. Both heterozygous and homozygous transgenic mice showed a relevant increase in mortality at early age, compared with wild-type siblings (67/267 and 48/181 versus 8/149, respectively, both P < 0.005). This increase was due to high incidence of haematologic malignancies, in particular myeloid leukaemia, myeloid dysplasia, lymphomas and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), diseases that were absent in wild-type mice. Atrophy of lymphoid organs due to reduction in T-cell compartment was also detected. Our results indicate that ARG activity may participate in the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative and myeloproliferative disorders, suggest the involvement of alterations of L-arginine metabolism in the onset of DIC and confirm a role for the enzyme in regulating T-cell homeostasis.

  20. An Lck-cre transgene accelerates autoantibody production and lupus development in (NZB × NZW)F1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R K; Gould, K A

    2016-02-01

    Lupus is an autoimmune disease characterized by the development of antinuclear autoantibodies and immune complex-mediated tissue damage. T cells in lupus patients appear to undergo apoptosis at an increased rate, and this enhanced T cell apoptosis has been postulated to contribute to lupus pathogenesis by increasing autoantigen load. However, there is no direct evidence to support this hypothesis. In this study, we show that an Lck-cre transgene, which increases T cell apoptosis as a result of T cell-specific expression of cre recombinase, accelerates the development of autoantibodies and nephritis in lupus-prone (NZB × NZW)F1 mice. Although the enhanced T cell apoptosis in Lck-cre transgenic mice resulted in an overall decrease in the relative abundance of splenic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, the proportion of activated CD4(+) T cells was increased and no significant change was observed in the relative abundance of suppressive T cells. We postulate that the Lck-cre transgene promoted lupus by enhancing T cell apoptosis, which, in conjunction with the impaired clearance of apoptotic cells in lupus-prone mice, increased the nuclear antigen load and accelerated the development of anti-nuclear autoantibodies. Furthermore, our results also underscore the importance of including cre-only controls in studies using the cre-lox system.

  1. Induction of focal epithelial hyperplasia in tongue of young bk6-E6/E7 HPV16 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocadiz-Delgado, Rodolfo; Marroquin-Chavira, Alberto; Hernandez-Mote, Ruth; Valencia, Concepción; Manjarrez-Zavala, M Eugenia; Covarrubias, Luis; Gariglio, Patricio

    2009-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity is one of the most common neoplasms in the world. During the past 2 decades, the role of high-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) has been studied and the data supporting HPV as a one of the causative agents in the development and progression of a sub-set of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) has accumulated. In order to investigate the role of HR-HPV oncogene expression in early epithelial alterations in vivo, we produced transgenic mice expressing HPV16 early region genes from the promoter of the bovine keratin 6 gene (Tg[bK6-E6/E7]). In this article, we demonstrate that E6/E7 transgene was abundantly expressed and cellular proliferation was increased in the middle tongue epithelia of transgenic mice, and that in the same region young (27 weeks old) Tg[bK6-E6/E7] mice spontaneously developed histological alterations, mainly focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH).

  2. Behavioral evidence for photophobia and stress-related ipsilateral head pain in transgenic Cacna1a mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Mona Lisa; Tuttle, Alexander H; Baran, Inna; Atlin, Cori; Guindi, Daniella; Hathaway, Georgia; Israelian, Nyrie; Levenstadt, Jeremy; Low, Daniel; Macrae, Lynn; O'Shea, Louise; Silver, Alex; Zendegui, Elaina; Mariette Lenselink, A; Spijker, Sabine; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2013-08-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent, disabling and complex episodic brain disorder whose pathogenesis is poorly understood, due in part to the lack of valid animal models. Here we report behavioral evidence of hallmark migraine features, photophobia and unilateral head pain, in transgenic knock-in mice bearing human familial hemiplegic migraine, type 1 (FHM-1) gain-of-function missense mutations (R192Q or S218L) in the Cacna1a gene encoding the CaV2.1 calcium channel α1 subunit. Photophobia was demonstrated using a modified elevated plus maze in which the safe closed arms were brightly illuminated; mutant mice avoided the light despite showing no differences in the standard (anxiety) version of the test. Multiple behavioral measures suggestive of spontaneous head pain were found in 192Q mutants subjected to novelty and/or restraint stress. These behaviors were: (1) more frequent in mutant versus wildtype mice; (2) lateralized in mutant but not in wildtype mice; (3) more frequent in females versus males; and (4) dose-dependently normalized by systemic administration of 2 different acute analgesics, rizatriptan and morphine. Furthermore, some of these behaviors were found to be more frequent and severe in 218L compared to 192Q mutants, consistent with the clinical presentation in humans. We suggest that Cacna1a transgenic mice can experience migraine-related head pain and can thus serve as unique tools to study the pathogenesis of migraine and test novel antimigraine agents.

  3. Haplodeficiency of Cathepsin D does not affect cerebral amyloidosis and autophagy in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaowu; Wani, Willayat Y; Hottman, David A; Jeong, Angela; Cao, Dongfeng; LeBlanc, Kyle J; Saftig, Paul; Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Ling

    2017-07-01

    Autophagy and lysosomal function are important for protein homeostasis and their dysfunction have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased immunoreactivities of an important lysosomal protease, cathepsin D (Cat D), are evident in amyloid plaques and neurons in patients with AD. This study tests the hypothesis that deleting one allele of the cathepsin D gene (Ctsd) impacts cerebral β-amyloidosis in amyloid-β precursor protein (APP)sw/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1) double transgenic mice. Despite a significant 38% decrease in Cat D level in APP/PS1/Ctsd+/- compared with APP/PS1/Ctsd+/+ mice, no changes in steady state levels and deposition of Aβ were found in the brain. There were also no differences in APP processing, the levels of two other Aβ-degrading proteases, the levels of autophagy related protein, such as LAMP2, P62, LC3-I, LC3-II, and Beclin-1, or the markers of neuroinflammation, observed between the APP/PS1/Ctsd+/+ and APP/PS1/Ctsd+/- mice. Our findings demonstrate that in wild-type mice, Cat D protein levels are either in excess or redundant with other factors in the brain, and at least one allele of Ctsd is dispensable for cerebral β-amyloidosis and autophagy in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. Targeting activated microglia in Alzheimer's pathology by intraventricular delivery of a phagocytosable MRI contrast agent in APP23 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Adrian P; Winter, Christine; Mueller, Susanne; Wuerfel, Jens; Tysiak, Eva; Schnorr, Jörg; Taupitz, Matthias; Heinz, Andreas; Juckel, Georg

    2009-06-01

    The role of phagocytosing immune cells in Alzheimer's pathology can be studied experimentally in APP23 transgenic mice. This present study intended to label phagocytosing immune cells in the plaque periphery of APP23 mice in vivo by intraventricular injection of VSOP-C184, a phagocytosable iron oxide nanoparticle MRI contrast agent. Firstly, the dosages of 0.1, 1.0 and 10 micromol Fe/kg body weight dissolved in 500 nl of artificial cerebrospinal fluid, delivered by stereotaxic surgery were evaluated 4 h after surgery in 7 wild type mice using 7 T MRI. Secondly, the dosage of 1.0 micromol Fe/kg body weight was investigated in 6 APP23 mice. The distribution of iron oxide particles was evaluated histologically. The injection of 0.1 micromol Fe/kg body weight did not result in any signal alterations, 10 micromol resulted in strong signal artifacts. The delivery of 1.0 micromol Fe/kg body weight in wild type mice resulted in MRI signal alterations throughout the ventricular system without large artifacts. It was regarded superior to other dosages for the study of the transgenic mice. There was no difference in MRI signal alterations and the distribution of iron particles in the histology between APP23 and wild type mice using the dosage of 1.0 micromol Fe/kg body weight. Upon intraventricular injection, the phagocytosable contrast agent VSOP-C184 distributes throughout the ventricular system, whereas it does not reach the periphery of amyloid plaques in APP23 mice in a concentration sufficient to cause MRI signal alterations.

  5. Over-Expression of Porcine Myostatin Missense Mutant Leads to A Gender Difference in Skeletal Muscle Growth between Transgenic Male and Female Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezun Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin, a transforming growth factor-β family member, is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle development and growth. Piedmontese cattle breeds have a missense mutation, which results in a cysteine to tyrosine substitution in the mature myostatin protein (C313Y. This loss-of-function mutation in myostatin results in a double-muscled phenotype in cattle. Myostatin propeptide is an inhibitor of myostatin activity and is considered a potential agent to stimulate muscle growth in livestock. In this study, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing porcine myostatin missense mutant (pmMS, C313Y, and wild-type porcine myostatin propeptide (ppMS, respectively, to examine their effects on muscle growth in mice. Enhanced muscle growth was observed in both pmMS and ppMS transgenic female mice and also in ppMS transgenic male mice. However, there was no enhanced muscle growth observed in pmMS transgenic male mice. To explore why there is such a big difference in muscle growth between pmMS and ppMS transgenic male mice, the expression level of androgen receptor (AR mutant AR45 was measured by Western blot. Results indicated that AR45 expression significantly increased in pmMS transgenic male mice while it decreased dramatically in ppMS transgenic male mice. Our data demonstrate that both pmMS and ppMS act as myostatin inhibitors in the regulation of muscle growth, but the effect of pmMS in male mice is reversed by an increased AR45 expression. These results provide useful insight and basic theory to future studies on improving pork quality by genetically manipulating myostatin expression or by regulating myostatin activity.

  6. Over-Expression of Porcine Myostatin Missense Mutant Leads to A Gender Difference in Skeletal Muscle Growth between Transgenic Male and Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dezun; Gao, Pengfei; Qian, Lili; Wang, Qingqing; Cai, Chunbo; Jiang, Shengwang; Xiao, Gaojun; Cui, Wentao

    2015-08-24

    Myostatin, a transforming growth factor-β family member, is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle development and growth. Piedmontese cattle breeds have a missense mutation, which results in a cysteine to tyrosine substitution in the mature myostatin protein (C313Y). This loss-of-function mutation in myostatin results in a double-muscled phenotype in cattle. Myostatin propeptide is an inhibitor of myostatin activity and is considered a potential agent to stimulate muscle growth in livestock. In this study, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing porcine myostatin missense mutant (pmMS), C313Y, and wild-type porcine myostatin propeptide (ppMS), respectively, to examine their effects on muscle growth in mice. Enhanced muscle growth was observed in both pmMS and ppMS transgenic female mice and also in ppMS transgenic male mice. However, there was no enhanced muscle growth observed in pmMS transgenic male mice. To explore why there is such a big difference in muscle growth between pmMS and ppMS transgenic male mice, the expression level of androgen receptor (AR) mutant AR45 was measured by Western blot. Results indicated that AR45 expression significantly increased in pmMS transgenic male mice while it decreased dramatically in ppMS transgenic male mice. Our data demonstrate that both pmMS and ppMS act as myostatin inhibitors in the regulation of muscle growth, but the effect of pmMS in male mice is reversed by an increased AR45 expression. These results provide useful insight and basic theory to future studies on improving pork quality by genetically manipulating myostatin expression or by regulating myostatin activity.

  7. Expression of mutant TDP-43 induces neuronal dysfunction in transgenic mice

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    Dickson Dennis W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal distribution, modification and aggregation of transactivation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43 are the hallmarks of multiple neurodegenerative diseases, especially frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Researchers have identified 44 mutations in the TARDBP gene that encode TDP-43 as causative for cases of sporadic and familial ALS http://www.molgen.ua.ac.be/FTDMutations/. Certain mutant forms of TDP-43, such as M337V, are associated with increased low molecular weight (LMW fragments compared to wild-type (WT TDP-43 and cause neuronal apoptosis and developmental delay in chick embryos. Such findings support a direct link between altered TDP-43 function and neurodegeneration. Results To explore the pathogenic properties of the M337V mutation, we generated and characterized two mouse lines expressing human TDP-43 (hTDP-43M337V carrying this mutation. hTDP-43M337V was expressed primarily in the nuclei of neurons in the brain and spinal cord, and intranuclear and cytoplasmic phosphorylated TDP-43 aggregates were frequently detected. The levels of TDP-43 LMW products of ~25 kDa and ~35 kDa species were also increased in the transgenic mice. Moreover, overexpression of hTDP-43M337V dramatically down regulated the levels of mouse TDP-43 (mTDP-43 protein and RNA, indicating TDP-43 levels are tightly controlled in mammalian systems. TDP-43M337V mice displayed reactive gliosis, widespread ubiquitination, chromatolysis, gait abnormalities, and early lethality. Abnormal cytoplasmic mitochondrial aggregates and abnormal phosphorylated tau were also detected in the mice. Conclusion Our novel TDP-43M337V mouse model indicates that overexpression of hTDP-43M337V alone is toxic in vivo. Because overexpression of hTDP-43 in wild-type TDP-43 and TDP-43M337V mouse models produces similar phenotypes, the mechanisms causing pathogenesis in the mutant

  8. Presence of subclinical infection in gene-targeted human prion protein transgenic mice exposed to atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rona; Dobie, Karen; Hunter, Nora; Casalone, Cristina; Baron, Thierry; Barron, Rona M

    2013-12-01

    The transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to humans, leading to variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease has demonstrated that cattle transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) can pose a risk to human health. Until recently, TSE disease in cattle was thought to be caused by a single agent strain, BSE, also known as classical BSE, or BSE-C. However, due to the initiation of a large-scale surveillance programme throughout Europe, two atypical BSE strains, bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy (BASE, also named BSE-L) and BSE-H have since been discovered. To model the risk to human health, we previously inoculated these two forms of atypical BSE (BASE and BSE-H) into gene-targeted transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the human prion protein (PrP) (HuTg) but were unable to detect any signs of TSE pathology in these mice. However, despite the absence of TSE pathology, upon subpassage of some BASE-challenged HuTg mice, a TSE was observed in recipient gene-targeted bovine PrP Tg (Bov6) mice but not in HuTg mice. Disease transmission from apparently healthy individuals indicates the presence of subclinical BASE infection in mice expressing human PrP that cannot be identified by current diagnostic methods. However, due to the lack of transmission to HuTg mice on subpassage, the efficiency of mouse-to-mouse transmission of BASE appears to be low when mice express human rather than bovine PrP.

  9. Low CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio associated with inflammatory arthropathy in human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax transgenic mice.

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    Takeo Ohsugi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1 can cause an aggressive malignancy known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL as well as inflammatory diseases such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. A transgenic mouse that expresses HTLV-1 Tax also develops T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and an inflammatory arthropathy that resembles rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to identify the primary T-cell subsets involved in the development of arthropathy in Tax transgenic mice. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By 24 months of age, Tax transgenic mice developed severe arthropathy with a cumulative incidence of 22.8%. The pathological findings of arthropathy in Tax transgenic mice were similar to those seen in human rheumatoid arthritis or mouse models of rheumatoid arthritis, with synovial proliferation and a positive rheumatoid factor. Before the onset of spontaneous arthropathy, young and old Tax transgenic mice were not sensitive to collagen and did not develop arthritis after immunization with type II collagen. The arthropathic Tax transgenic mice showed a significantly decreased proportion of splenic CD4(+ T cells, whereas the proportion of splenic CD8(+ T cells was increased. Regulatory T cells (CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ were significantly decreased and CD8(+ T cells that expressed the chemokine receptor CCR4 (CD8(+CCR4(+ were significantly increased in arthropathic Tax transgenic mice. The expression of tax mRNA was strong in the spleen and joints of arthropathic mice, with a 40-fold increase compared with healthy transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings reveal that Tax transgenic mice develop rheumatoid-like arthritis with proliferating synovial cells in the joints; however, the proportion of different splenic T-cell subsets in these mice was completely different from other commonly used animal models of rheumatoid arthritis. The crucial T-cell subsets in arthropathic Tax transgenic mice appear to resemble

  10. Effect of dietary supplementation of dates in Alzheimer's disease APPsw/2576 transgenic mice on oxidative stress and antioxidant status.

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    Subash, Selvaraju; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Al-Adawi, Samir; Vaishnav, Ragini; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2015-08-01

    Oxidative stress may play a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. Changes in the oxidative stress, antioxidants, and membrane-bound enzymes were investigated in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of AD transgenic mice model after long-term dietary supplementation of date palm fruits from Oman. The 4-month-old mice with double Swedish APP mutation (APPsw/Tg2576) were purchased from Taconic Farm, NY, USA; mice were fed two different doses of dates (such as 4 and 2%) or control diet for 15 months and then assessed for the influence of diet on oxidative stress. Significant increase in oxidative stress in terms of enhanced levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonyls and parallel decrease in the activity of antioxidant enzymes were observed in control diet-treated Tg2576 AD mice. Dates (4 and 2%) treated APPsw/Tg2576 AD mice exhibited significantly attenuated oxidative damage, evidenced by decreased LPO and protein carbonyl levels and restoration in the activities of the antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione, and glutathione reductase). The activities of membrane-bound enzymes (Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and acetyl cholinesterase) were altered in control diet-treated APPsw/Tg2576 AD mice brain regions. Meanwhile, both the percentages of date supplementation were able to restore the activity of enzymes to comparable values observed in controls. In summary, we have shown that chronic dietary supplementation of date palm fruits grown in Oman showed possible beneficial effects concomitant with oxidative stress reduction and increased antioxidant enzymes in AD transgenic mice model. These results warrant further exploration of how anti-reactive oxygen species properties of dates offer such beneficial effects on the AD-like brain.

  11. Redox Proteomic Profiling of Specifically Carbonylated Proteins in the Serum of Triple Transgenic Alzheimer’s Disease Mice

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    Liming Shen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a key event in the onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To investigate the role of oxidative stress in AD and to search for potential biomarkers in peripheral blood, serums were collected in this study from the 3-, 6-, and 12-month-old triple transgenic AD mice (3×Tg-AD mice and the age- and sex-matched non-transgenic (non-Tg littermates. The serum oxidized proteins were quantified by slot-blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to investigate the total levels of serum protein carbonyl groups. Western blotting, in conjunction with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-Oxyblot, was employed to identify and quantify the specifically-carbonylated proteins in the serum of 3×Tg-AD mice. The results showed that the levels of serum protein carbonyls were increased in the three month old 3×Tg-AD mice compared with the non-Tg control mice, whereas no significant differences were observed in the six and 12 months old AD mice, suggesting that oxidative stress is an early event in AD progression. With the application of 2D-Oxyblot analysis, (immunoglobin Ig gamma-2B chain C region (IGH-3, Ig lambda-2 chain C region (IGLC2, Ig kappa chain C region (IGKC, and Ig kappa chain V-V region HP R16.7 were identified as significantly oxidized proteins compared with the control. Among them IGH-3 and IGKC were validated via immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis. Identification of oxidized proteins in the serums of 3×Tg-AD mice can not only reveal potential roles of those proteins in the pathogenesis of AD but also provide potential biomarkers of AD at the early stage.

  12. Balanced Diet-Fed Fat-1 Transgenic Mice Exhibit Lower Hindlimb Suspension-Induced Soleus Muscle Atrophy.

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    Marzuca-Nassr, Gabriel Nasri; Murata, Gilson Masahiro; Martins, Amanda Roque; Vitzel, Kaio Fernando; Crisma, Amanda Rabello; Torres, Rosângela Pavan; Mancini-Filho, Jorge; Kang, Jing Xuan; Curi, Rui

    2017-10-06

    The consequences of two-week hindlimb suspension (HS) on skeletal muscle atrophy were investigated in balanced diet-fed Fat-1 transgenic and C57BL/6 wild-type mice. Body composition and gastrocnemius fatty acid composition were measured. Skeletal muscle force, cross-sectional area (CSA), and signaling pathways associated with protein synthesis (protein kinase B, Akt; ribosomal protein S6, S6, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, 4EBP1; glycogen synthase kinase3-beta, GSK3-beta; and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1/2, ERK 1/2) and protein degradation (atrophy gene-1/muscle atrophy F-box, atrogin-1/MAFbx and muscle RING finger 1, MuRF1) were evaluated in the soleus muscle. HS decreased soleus muscle wet and dry weights (by 43% and 26%, respectively), muscle isotonic and tetanic force (by 29% and 18%, respectively), CSA of the soleus muscle (by 36%), and soleus muscle fibers (by 45%). Fat-1 transgenic mice had a decrease in the ω-6/ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) ratio as compared with C57BL/6 wild-type mice (56%, p Fat-1 mice had lower soleus muscle dry mass loss (by 10%) and preserved absolute isotonic force (by 17%) and CSA of the soleus muscle (by 28%) after HS as compared with C57BL/6 wild-type mice. p-GSK3B/GSK3B ratio was increased (by 70%) and MuRF-1 content decreased (by 50%) in the soleus muscle of Fat-1 mice after HS. Balanced diet-fed Fat-1 mice are able to preserve in part the soleus muscle mass, absolute isotonic force and CSA of the soleus muscle in a disuse condition.

  13. Gene expression profiling of R6/2 transgenic mice with different CAG repeat lengths reveals genes associated with disease onset and progression in Huntington's disease.

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    Tang, Bin; Seredenina, Tamara; Coppola, Giovanni; Kuhn, Alexandre; Geschwind, Daniel H; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Thomas, Elizabeth A

    2011-06-01

    R6/2 transgenic mice with expanded CAG repeats (>300) have a surprisingly prolonged disease progression and longer lifespan than prototypical parent R6/2 mice (carrying 150 CAGs); however, the mechanism of this phenotype amelioration is unknown. We compared gene expression profiles in the striatum of R6/2 transgenic mice carrying ~300 CAG repeats (R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice) to those carrying ~150 CAG repeats (R6/2(Q150) transgenic mice) and littermate wildtype controls in order to identify genes that may play determinant roles in the time course of phenotypic expression in these mice. Of the top genes showing concordant expression changes in the striatum of both R6/2 lines, 85% were decreased in expression, while discordant expression changes were observed mostly for genes upregulated in R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice. Upregulated genes in the R6/2(Q300) mice were associated with the ubiquitin ligase complex, cell adhesion, protein folding, and establishment of protein localization. We qPCR-validated increases in expression of genes related to the latter category, including Lrsam1, Erp29, Nasp, Tap1, Rab9b, and Pfdn5 in R6/2(Q300) mice, changes that were not observed in R6/2 mice with shorter CAG repeats, even in late stages (i.e., 12 weeks of age). We further tested Lrsam1 and Erp29, the two genes showing the greatest upregulation in R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice, for potential neuroprotective effects in primary striatal cultures overexpressing a mutated human huntingtin (htt) fragment. Overexpression of Lrsam1 prevented the loss of NeuN-positive cell bodies in htt171-82Q cultures, concomitant with a reduction of nuclear htt aggregates. Erp29 showed no significant effects in this model. This is consistent with the distinct pattern of htt inclusion localization observed in R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice, in which smaller cytoplasmic inclusions represent the major form of insoluble htt in the cell, as opposed to large nuclear inclusions observed in R6/2(Q150) transgenic mice

  14. Histological examination on osteoblastic activities in the alveolar bone of transgenic mice with induced ablation of osteocytes.

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    Li, Minqi; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Hogo, Hiromi; Tatsumi, Sawako; Liu, Zhusheng; Guo, Ying; Sasaki, Muneteru; Tabata, Chihiro; Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki; Ikeda, Kyoji; Amizuka, Norio

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine histological alterations on osteoblasts from the alveolar bone of transgenic mice with targeted ablation of osteoctyes. Eighteen weeks-old transgenic mice based on the diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor-mediated cell knockout (TRECK) system were used in these experiments. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with 50 µg/kg of DT in PBS, or only PBS as control. Two weeks after injections, mice were subjected to transcardiac perfusion with 4% paraformaldehyde in 0.1M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4), and the available alveolar bone was removed for histochemical analyses. Approximately 75% of osteocytes from alveolar bones became apoptotic after DT administration, and most osteocytic lacunae became empty. Osteoblastic numbers and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were markedly reduced at the endosteum of alveolar bone after DT administration compared with the control. Osteoblastic ALP activity in the periodontal ligament region, on the other hand, hardly showed any differences between the two groups even though numbers were reduced in the experiment group. Silver impregnation showed a difference in the distribution of bone canaliculi between the portions near the endosteum and the periodontal ligament: the former appeared regularly arranged in contrast to the latter's irregular distribution. Under transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the osteoblasts in the periodontal ligament showed direct contact with the Sharpey's fibers. Thus, osteoblastic activity was affected by osteocyte ablation in general, but osteoblasts in contact with the periodontal ligament were less affected than endosteal osteoblasts.

  15. c-RET molecule in malignant melanoma from oncogenic RET-carrying transgenic mice and human cell lines.

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    Yuichiro Ohshima

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive cancers and its incidence worldwide has been increasing at a greater rate than that of any other cancer. We previously reported that constitutively activated RFP-RET-carrying transgenic mice (RET-mice spontaneously develop malignant melanoma. In this study, we showed that expression levels of intrinsic c-Ret, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf and Gdnf receptor alpha 1 (Gfra1 transcripts in malignant melanomas from RET-transgenic mice were significantly upregulated compared with those in benign melanocytic tumors. These results suggest that not only introduced oncogenic RET but also intrinsic c-Ret/Gdnf are involved in murine melanomagenesis in RET-mice. We then showed that c-RET and GDNF transcript expression levels in human malignant melanoma cell lines (HM3KO and MNT-1 were higher than those in primary cultured normal human epithelial melanocytes (NHEM, while GFRa1 transcript expression levels were comparable among NHEM, HM3KO and MNT-1. We next showed c-RET and GFRa1 protein expression in HM3KO cells and GDNF-mediated increased levels of their phosphorylated c-RET tyrosine kinase and signal transduction molecules (ERK and AKT sited potentially downstream of c-RET. Taken together with the finding of augmented proliferation of HM3KO cells after GDNF stimulation, our results suggest that GDNF-mediated c-RET kinase activation is associated with the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma.

  16. Tau-targeted immunization impedes progression of neurofibrillary histopathology in aged P301L tau transgenic mice.

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    Mian Bi

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease (AD brains, the microtubule-associated protein tau and amyloid-β (Aβ deposit as intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs and extracellular plaques, respectively. Tau deposits are furthermore found in a significant number of frontotemporal dementia cases. These diseases are characterized by progressive neurodegeneration, the loss of intellectual capabilities and behavioral changes. Unfortunately, the currently available therapies are limited to symptomatic relief. While active immunization against Aβ has shown efficacy in both various AD mouse models and patients with AD, immunization against pathogenic tau has only recently been shown to prevent pathology in young tau transgenic mice. However, if translated to humans, diagnosis and treatment would be routinely done when symptoms are overt, meaning that the histopathological changes have already progressed. Therefore, we used active immunization to target pathogenic tau in 4, 8, and 18 months-old P301L tau transgenic pR5 mice that have an onset of NFT pathology at 6 months of age. In all age groups, NFT pathology was significantly reduced in treated compared to control pR5 mice. Similarly, phosphorylation of tau at pathological sites was reduced. In addition, increased astrocytosis was found in the oldest treated group. Taken together, our data suggests that tau-targeted immunization slows the progression of NFT pathology in mice, with practical implications for human patients.

  17. Xanthohumol prevents atherosclerosis by reducing arterial cholesterol content via CETP and apolipoprotein E in CETP-transgenic mice.

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    Hiroshi Hirata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xanthohumol is expected to be a potent anti-atherosclerotic agent due to its inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP. In this study, we hypothesized that xanthohumol prevents atherosclerosis in vivo and used CETP-transgenic mice (CETP-Tg mice to evaluate xanthohumol as a functional agent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two strains of mice, CETP-Tg and C57BL/6N (wild-type, were fed a high cholesterol diet with or without 0.05% (w/w xanthohumol ad libitum for 18 weeks. In CETP-Tg mice, xanthohumol significantly decreased accumulated cholesterol in the aortic arch and increased HDL cholesterol (HDL-C when compared to the control group (without xanthohumol. Xanthohumol had no significant effect in wild-type mice. CETP activity was significantly decreased after xanthohumol addition in CETP-Tg mice compared with the control group and it inversely correlated with HDL-C (% (P<0.05. Furthermore, apolipoprotein E (apoE was enriched in serum and the HDL-fraction in CETP-Tg mice after xanthohumol addition, suggesting that xanthohumol ameliorates reverse cholesterol transport via apoE-rich HDL resulting from CETP inhibition. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest xanthohumol prevents cholesterol accumulation in atherogenic regions by HDL-C metabolism via CETP inhibition leading to apoE enhancement.

  18. The targeted overexpression of a Claudin mutant in the epidermis of transgenic mice elicits striking epidermal and hair follicle abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, Tammy-Claire; Turksen, Kursad

    2007-06-01

    Skin is one of the largest organs of the body, and is formed during development through a highly orchestrated process involving mesenchymal-epithelial interactions, cell commitment, and terminal differentiation. It protects against microorganism invasion and UV irradiation, inhibits water loss, regulates body temperature, and is an important part of the immune system. Using transgenic mouse technology, we have demonstrated that Claudin (Cldn)-containing tight junctions (TJs) are intricately involved in cell signaling during epidermal differentiation and that an epidermal suprabasal overexpression of Cldn6 results in a perturbed epidermal terminal differentiation program with distinct phenotypic abnormalities. To delineate the role of the Cldn cytoplasmic tail domain in epidermal differentiation, we engineered transgenic mice targeting the overexpression of a Cldn6 cytoplasmic tail-truncation mutant in the epidermis. Transgenic mice were characterized by a lethal barrier dysfunction in addition to the existence of hyperproliferative squamous invaginations/cysts replacing hair follicles. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed an epidermal cytoplasmic accumulation of Cldn6, Cldn11, Cldn12, and Cldn18, downregulation of Cldn1 and aberrant expression of various classical markers of epidermal differentiation; namely the basal keratins as well as K1, involucrin, loricrin, and filaggrin. Collectively these studies suggest an important role for Cldns in epidermal/hair follicle differentiation programs likely involving cross talk to signaling pathways (e.g., Notch) directing cell fate selection and differentiation.

  19. Effects of synaptic modulation on beta-amyloid, synaptophysin, and memory performance in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

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    Tampellini, Davide; Capetillo-Zarate, Estibaliz; Dumont, Magali; Huang, Zhenyong; Yu, Fangmin; Lin, Michael T; Gouras, Gunnar K

    2010-10-27

    Accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) and loss of synapses are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). How synaptic activity relates to Aβ accumulation and loss of synapses is a current topic of major interest. Synaptic activation promotes Aβ secretion, and chronic reduction of synaptic activity reduced Aβ plaques in an AD transgenic mouse model. This suggested beneficial effects of reducing synaptic activity in AD. We now show that reduced synaptic activity causes detrimental effects on synapses and memory despite reducing plaques using two different models of chronic synaptic inhibition: deafferentation of the barrel cortex and administration of benzodiazepine. An interval of prolonged synaptic inhibition exacerbated loss of synaptophysin compared with synaptically more active brain in AD transgenic but not wild-type mice. Furthermore, an interval of benzodiazepine treatment, followed by a washout period, exacerbated memory impairment in AD transgenic mice. Exacerbation of synaptic and behavioral abnormalities occurred in the setting of reduced Aβ plaques but elevated intraneuronal Aβ immunoreactivity. These data support beneficial effects of synaptic activation on Aβ-related synaptic and behavioral impairment in AD.

  20. Involvement of host stroma cells and tissue fibrosis in pancreatic tumor development in transgenic mice.

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    Itai Spector

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Stroma cells and extracellular matrix (ECM components provide the pivotal microenvironment for tumor development. The study aimed to evaluate the importance of the pancreatic stroma for tumor development. METHODS: Pancreatic tumor cells were implanted subcutaneously into green fluorescent protein transgenic mice, and stroma cells invading the tumors were identified through immunohistochemistry. Inhibition of tumor invasion by stroma cells was achieved with halofuginone, an inhibitor of TGFβ/Smad3 signaling, alone or in combination with chemotherapy. The origin of tumor ECM was evaluated with species-specific collagen I antibodies and in situ hybridization of collagen α1(I gene. Pancreatic fibrosis was induced by cerulean injection and tumors by spleen injection of pancreatic tumor cells. RESULTS: Inhibition of stroma cell infiltration and reduction of tumor ECM levels by halofuginone inhibited development of tumors derived from mouse and human pancreatic cancer cells. Halofuginone reduced the number only of stroma myofibroblasts expressing both contractile and collagen biosynthesis markers. Both stroma myofibroblasts and tumor cells generated ECM that contributes to tumor growth. Combination of treatments that inhibit stroma cell infiltration, cause apoptosis of myofibroblasts and inhibit Smad3 phosphorylation, with chemotherapy that increases tumor-cell apoptosis without affecting Smad3 phosphorylation was more efficacious than either treatment alone. More tumors developed in fibrotic than in normal pancreas, and prevention of tissue fibrosis greatly reduced tumor development. CONCLUSIONS: The utmost importance of tissue fibrosis and of stroma cells for tumor development presents potential new therapy targets, suggesting combination therapy against stroma and neoplastic cells as a treatment of choice.

  1. Effect of dietary carbohydrate source on the development of obesity in agouti transgenic mice.

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    Morris, Kristin L; Zemel, Michael B

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effects of a qualitative change in dietary carbohydrate source on body weight and adiposity in a rodent model of diet-induced obesity. We evaluated the effects of high-fat diets (basal) varying in carbohydrate source in aP2-agouti transgenic mice. In the ad libitum study, animals were given free access to the basal diet or one of four test diets for 6 weeks. In two of the diets, dietary carbohydrate was derived from a single source: mung bean noodles (MUNG) or rolled oats (ROLL). The remaining diets were designed to mimic commercially available instant oatmeal with added sugar (IO-S) or flavored instant oatmeal (IO-F). In the energy-restricted study, animals were given ad libitum access to the basal diet for 6 weeks. Subsequently, animals were assigned to one of six treatment groups for 6 weeks. One group was continued on the basal diet ad libitum. The remaining groups were maintained with energy restriction (70% ad libitum) on either the basal, MUNG, ROLL, IO-S, or IO-F diet. Subcutaneous fat pad mass was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the energy-restricted basal and IO-S groups compared with the energy-restricted ROLL diet. Similarly, visceral fat pad mass was significantly lower with ROLL and MUNG diets (p<0.05 for both) compared with basal and IO-S diets, and the insulin:glucose ratio was reduced (by 23% to 34%, p<0.05) in these two diets compared with all others. In ad libitum-fed animals, liver fatty acid synthase expression was 43% to 62% lower (p<0.05) with ROLL and MUNG diets compared with all others. These data suggest that a qualitative change in dietary carbohydrate source modulates body weight and adiposity.

  2. Temporal profile of the renal transcriptome of HIV-1 transgenic mice during disease progression.

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    Ying Fan

    Full Text Available Profiling of temporal changes of gene expression in the same kidney over the course of renal disease progression is challenging because repeat renal biopsies are rarely indicated in clinical practice. Here, we profiled the temporal change in renal transcriptome of HIV-1 transgenic mice (Tg26, an animal model for human HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN, and their littermates at three different time points (4, 8, and 12 weeks of age representing early, middle, and late stages of renal disease by serial kidney biopsy. We analyzed both static levels of gene expression at three stages of disease and dynamic changes in gene expression between different stages. Analysis of static and dynamic changes in gene expression revealed that up-regulated genes at the early and middle stages are mostly involved in immune response and inflammation, whereas down-regulated genes mostly related to fatty acid and retinoid metabolisms. We validated the expression of a selected panel of genes that are up-regulated at the early stage (CCL2, CCL5, CXCL11, Ubd, Anxa1, and Spon1 by real-time PCR. Among these up-regulated genes, Spon1, which is a previously identified candidate gene for hypertension, was found to be up-regulated in kidney of human with diabetic nephropathy. Immunostaining of human biopsy samples demonstrated that protein expression of Spon1 was also markedly increased in kidneys of patients with both early and late HIVAN and diabetic nephropathy. Our studies suggest that analysis of both static and dynamic changes of gene expression profiles in disease progression avails another layer of information that could be utilized to gain a more comprehensive understanding of disease progression and identify potential biomarkers and drug targets.

  3. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein impairs liver regeneration through enhanced expression of IL-6 in transgenic mice.

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    Quétier, Ivan; Brezillon, Nicolas; Duriez, Marion; Massinet, Hélène; Giang, Eric; Ahodantin, James; Lamant, Céline; Brunelle, Marie-Noëlle; Soussan, Patrick; Kremsdorf, Dina

    2013-08-01

    Conflicting results have been reported regarding the impact of hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) expression on liver regeneration triggered by partial hepatectomy (PH). In the present report we investigated the mechanisms by which HBx protein alters hepatocyte proliferation after PH. PH was performed on a transgenic mouse model in which HBx expression is under the control of viral regulatory elements and liver regeneration was monitored. LPS, IL-6 neutralizing antibody, and SB203580 were injected after PH to evaluate IL-6 participation during liver regeneration. Cell cycle progression of hepatocytes was delayed in HBx transgenic mice compared to WT animals. Moreover, HBx induced higher secretion of IL-6 soon after PH. Upregulation of IL-6 was associated with an elevation of STAT3 phosphorylation, SOCS3 transcript accumulation and a decrease in ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the livers of HBx transgenic mice. The involvement of IL-6 overexpression in cell cycle deregulation was confirmed by the inhibition of liver regeneration in control mice after the upregulation of IL-6 expression using LPS. In addition, IL-6 neutralization with antibodies was able to restore liver regeneration in HBx mice. Finally, the direct role of p38 in IL-6 secretion after PH was demonstrated using SB203580, a pharmacological inhibitor. HBx is able to induce delayed hepatocyte proliferation after PH, and HBx-induced IL-6 overexpression is involved in delayed liver regeneration. By modulating IL-6 expression during liver proliferation induced by stimulation of the cellular microenvironment, HBx may participate in cell cycle deregulation and progression of liver disease. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of Autoactivated Stromelysin-1 in Mammary Glands of Transgenic Mice Leads to a Reactive Stroma During Early Development

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    Thomasset, N.; Lochter, A.; Sympson, C.J.; Lund, L.R.; Williams, D.R.; Behrendtsen, O.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

    1998-04-24

    Extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-degrading matrix metalloproteinases play a key role in interactions between the epithelium and the mesenchyme during mammary gland development and disease. In patients with breast cancer, the mammary mesenchyme undergoes a stromal reaction, the etiology of which is unknown. We previously showed that targeting of an autoactivating mutant of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1 to mammary epithelia of transgenic mice resulted in reduced mammary function during pregnancy and development of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Here we examine the cascade of alterations before breast tumor formation in the mammary gland stroma once the expression of the stromelysin-1 transgene commences. Beginning in postpubertal virgin animals, low levels of transgene expression in mammary epithelia led to increased expression of endogenous stromelysin-1 in stromal fibroblasts and up-regulation of other matrix metalloproteinases, without basement membrane disruption. These changes were accompanied by the progressive development of a compensatory reactive stroma, characterized by increased collagen content and vascularization in glands from virgin mice. This remodeling of the gland affected epithelial-mesenchymal communication as indicated by inappropriate expression of tenascin-C starting by day 6 of pregnancy. This, together with increased transgene expression, led to basement membrane disruption starting by day 15 of pregnancy. We propose that the highly reactive stroma provides a prelude to breast epithelial tumors observed in these animals. Epithelial development depends on an exquisite series of inductive and instructive interactions between the differentiating epithelium and the mesenchymal (stromal) compartment. The epithelium, which consists of luminal and myoepithelial cells, is separated from the stroma by a basement membrane (BM), which plays a central role in mammary gland homeostasis and gene expression. In vivo, stromal

  5. In Vivo Determination of Vitamin D Function Using Transgenic Mice Carrying a Human Osteocalcin Luciferase Reporter Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Nakanishi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is an essential factor for ossification, and its deficiency causes rickets. Osteocalcin, which is a noncollagenous protein found in bone matrix and involved in mineralization and calcium ion homeostasis, is one of the major bone morphogenetic markers and is used in the evaluation of osteoblast maturation and osteogenic activation. We established transgenic mouse line expressing luciferase under the control of a 10-kb osteocalcin enhancer/promoter sequence. Using these transgenic mice, we evaluated the active forms of vitamins D2 and D3 for their bone morphogenetic function by in vivo bioluminescence. As the result, strong activity for ossification was observed with 1α,25-hydroxyvitamin D3. Our mouse system can offer a feasible detection method for assessment of osteogenic activity in the development of functional foods and medicines by noninvasive screening.

  6. Both lipolysis and hepatic uptake of VLDL are impaired in transgenic mice coexpressing human apolipoprotein E*3Leiden and human apolipoprotein C1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M.C.; Dahlmans, V.E.H.; Gorp, P.J.J. van; Breuer, M.L.; Mol, M.J.T.M.; Zee, A. van der; Frants, R.R.; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.

    1996-01-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing human APOE*3Leiden are highly susceptible to diet-induced hyperlipoproteinemia and atherosclerosis due to a defect in hepatic uptake of remnant lipoproteins. In addition to the human APOE*3Leiden gene, these mice carry the human APOC1 gene (APOE*3Leiden- C1). To

  7. p53-stabilizing agent CP-31398 prevents growth and invasion of urothelial cancer of the bladder in transgenic UPII-SV40T mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madka, Venkateshwar; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Qian; Mohammed, Altaf; Sindhwani, Puneet; Lightfoot, Stan; Wu, Xue-Re; Kopelovich, Levy; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2013-08-01

    The high prevalence of bladder cancer and its recurrence make it an important target for chemoprevention. About half of invasive urothelial tumors have mutations in p53. We determined the chemopreventive efficacy of a p53-stabilizing agent, CP-31398, in a transgenic UPII-SV40T mouse model of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) that strongly resembles human TCC. After genotyping, six-week-old UPII-SV40T mice (n = 30/group) were fed control (AIN-76A) or experimental diets containing 150 or 300 ppm of CP-31398 for 34 weeks. Progression of bladder cancer growth was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging. At 40 weeks of age, all mice were killed; urinary bladders were collected to determine weights, tumor incidence, and histopathology. There was a significant increase in bladder weights of transgenic versus wild-type mice (male: 140.2 mg vs 27.3 mg, P CP-31398-treated mice. Invasive papillary TCC incidence was 100% in transgenic mice fed control diet. Both male and female mice exposed to CP-31398 showed inhibition of invasive TCC. CP-31398 (300 ppm) completely blocked invasion in female mice. Molecular analysis of the bladder tumors showed an increase in apoptosis markers (p53, p21, Bax, and Annexin V) with a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor in transgenic mice fed CP-31398. These results suggest that p53-modulating agents can serve as potential chemopreventive agents for bladder TCC.

  8. ZyFISH: a simple, rapid and reliable zygosity assay for transgenic mice.

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    Donal McHugh

    Full Text Available Microinjection of DNA constructs into fertilized mouse oocytes typically results in random transgene integration at a single genomic locus. The resulting transgenic founders can be used to establish hemizygous transgenic mouse lines. However, practical and experimental reasons often require that such lines be bred to homozygosity. Transgene zygosity can be determined by progeny testing assays which are expensive and time-consuming, by quantitative Southern blotting which is labor-intensive, or by quantitative PCR (qPCR which requires transgene-specific design. Here, we describe a zygosity assessment procedure based on fluorescent in situ hybridization (zyFISH. The zyFISH protocol entails the detection of transgenic loci by FISH and the concomitant assignment of homozygosity using a concise and unbiased scoring system. The method requires small volumes of blood, is scalable to at least 40 determinations per assay, and produces results entirely consistent with the progeny testing assay. This combination of reliability, simplicity and cost-effectiveness makes zyFISH a method of choice for transgenic mouse zygosity determinations.

  9. Mutagenicity testing with transgenic mice. Part I: Comparison with the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test

    OpenAIRE

    Wahnschaffe U; Bitsch A; Kielhorn J; Mangelsdorf I

    2005-01-01

    Abstract As part of a larger literature study on transgenic animals in mutagenicity testing, test results from the transgenic mutagenicity assays (lacI model; commercially available as the Big Blue® mouse, and the lacZ model; commercially available as the Muta™Mouse), were compared with the results on the same substances in the more traditional mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. 39 substances were found which had been tested in the micronucleus assay and in the above transgenic mouse system...

  10. Aluminum exposure through the diet: metal levels in AbetaPP transgenic mice, a model for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Mercedes; Esparza, José L; Cabré, María; García, Tania; Domingo, José L

    2008-07-30

    Aluminum (Al), iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) cause have been implicated in the etiology of certain neurodegenerative disorders. Moreover, these elements cause the conformational changes of Alzheimer's amyloid beta protein. In this study, we determined the concentrations of Al, Cu, Zn, Fe, and Mn in various tissues of Tg 2576 (AbetaPP transgenic) Al-treated mice. Female Tg 2576 mice and wild-type littermates were exposed through the diet to 1mg Al/g for 6 months. At 11 months of age, metal concentrations were measured in various tissues. In brain, Al levels were higher in hippocampus than in cortex and cerebellum. In hippocampus, Cu concentrations decreased in non-treated Tg 2576 mice, while Zn levels were higher in Al-treated mice. Copper, Zn, Mn and Fe concentrations in liver, kidney and bone were not affected by Al exposure. The current results show that Al exposure of Tg 2576 and wild-type mice did not produce important metal changes related with the genotype, responding similarly both groups of animals. As Tg 2576 mice have been considered as a potential model for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the present results would not support the hypothetical role of Al in the etiology of AD.

  11. Running Exercise Reduces Myelinated Fiber Loss in the Dentate Gyrus of the Hippocampus in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Fenglei; Zhang, Lei; Luo, Yanmin; Xiao, Qian; Lv, Fulin; He, Qi; Zhou, Chunni; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Lin; Jiang, Rong; Gu, Hengwei; Tang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of running exercise on myelinated fibers in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus during Alzheimer's disease (AD), 6-month-old male APP/PS1 transgenic mice were randomly assigned to control or running groups. The running group mice were subjected to a running protocol for four months. The behaviors of the mice from both group mice were then assessed using the Morris water maze, and the total volume of the DG and the related quantitative parameters with characteristics of the myelinated nerve fiber and the myelin sheath in the DG were investigated using unbiased stereological techniques and electron microscopy. Learning and spatial memory performances were both significantly increased in the running group compared with the control group. There was no significant difference in the gratio of the myelinated axons between the two groups. However, the DG volume, the myelinated fiber length and volume in the DG, and the myelin sheath volume and thickness in the DG were all significantly increased in the running group mice compared with the control group mice. These results indicated that running exercise was able to prevent DG atrophy and delay the progression of the myelinated fiber loss and the demyelination of the myelin sheaths in the DG in an AD mouse model, which may underlie the running-induced improvement in learning and spatial memory. Taken together, these results demonstrated that running exercise could delay the progression of AD.

  12. Production of functional human nerve growth factor from the saliva of transgenic mice by using salivary glands as bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fang; Li, Zicong; Zhu, Qingchun; Dong, Rui; Zhao, Chengcheng; Li, Guoling; Li, Guo; Gao, Wenchao; Jiang, Gelong; Zheng, Enqin; Cai, Gengyuan; Moisyadi, Stefan; Urschitz, Johann; Yang, Huaqiang; Liu, Dewu; Wu, Zhenfang

    2017-01-01

    The salivary glands of animals have great potential to act as powerful bioreactors to produce human therapeutic proteins. Human nerve growth factor (hNGF) is an important pharmaceutical protein that is clinically effective in the treatment of many human neuronal and non-neuronal diseases. In this study, we generated 18 transgenic (TG) founder mice each carrying a salivary gland specific promoter-driven hNGF transgene. A TG mouse line secreting high levels of hNGF protein in its saliva (1.36 μg/mL) was selected. hNGF protein was successfully purified from the saliva of these TG mice and its identity was verified. The purified hNGF was highly functional as it displayed the ability to induce neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells. Furthermore, it strongly promoted proliferation of TF1 cells, above the levels observed with mouse NGF. Additionally, saliva collected from TG mice and containing unpurified hNGF was able to significantly enhance the growth of TF1 cells. This study not only provides a new and efficient approach for the synthesis of therapeutic hNGF but also supports the concept that salivary gland from TG animals is an efficient system for production of valuable foreign proteins. PMID:28117418

  13. Multi-Organ Damage in Human Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Transgenic Mice Infected with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus.

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    Guangyu Zhao

    Full Text Available The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV causes severe acute respiratory failure and considerable extrapumonary organ dysfuction with substantial high mortality. For the limited number of autopsy reports, small animal models are urgently needed to study the mechanisms of MERS-CoV infection and pathogenesis of the disease and to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutics against MERS-CoV infection. In this study, we developed a transgenic mouse model globally expressing codon-optimized human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (hDPP4, the receptor for MERS-CoV. After intranasal inoculation with MERS-CoV, the mice rapidly developed severe pneumonia and multi-organ damage, with viral replication being detected in the lungs on day 5 and in the lungs, kidneys and brains on day 9 post-infection. In addition, the mice exhibited systemic inflammation with mild to severe pneumonia accompanied by the injury of liver, kidney and spleen with neutrophil and macrophage infiltration. Importantly, the mice exhibited symptoms of paralysis with high viral burden and viral positive neurons on day 9. Taken together, this study characterizes the tropism of MERS-CoV upon infection. Importantly, this hDPP4-expressing transgenic mouse model will be applicable for studying the pathogenesis of MERS-CoV infection and investigating the efficacy of vaccines and antiviral agents designed to combat MERS-CoV infection.

  14. Distinct temporal and anatomical distributions of amyloid-β and tau abnormalities following controlled cortical impact in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hien T Tran

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major environmental risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Intracellular accumulations of amyloid-β and tau proteins have been observed within hours following severe TBI in humans. Similar abnormalities have been recapitulated in young 3xTg-AD mice subjected to the controlled cortical impact model (CCI of TBI and sacrificed at 24 h and 7 days post injury. This study investigated the temporal and anatomical distributions of amyloid-β and tau abnormalities from 1 h to 24 h post injury in the same model. Intra-axonal amyloid-β accumulation in the fimbria was detected as early as 1 hour and increased monotonically over 24 hours following injury. Tau immunoreactivity in the fimbria and amygdala had a biphasic time course with peaks at 1 hour and 24 hours, while tau immunoreactivity in the contralateral CA1 rose in a delayed fashion starting at 12 hours after injury. Furthermore, rapid intra-axonal amyloid-β accumulation was similarly observed post controlled cortical injury in APP/PS1 mice, another transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Acute increases in total and phospho-tau immunoreactivity were also evident in single transgenic Tau(P301L mice subjected to controlled cortical injury. These data provide further evidence for the causal effects of moderately severe contusional TBI on acceleration of acute Alzheimer-related abnormalities and the independent relationship between amyloid-β and tau in this setting.

  15. Experimental transmission of two young and one suspended bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) cases to bovinized transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Takashi; Masujin, Kentaro; Yamakawa, Yoshio; Sata, Tetsutaro; Murayama, Yuichi; Shu, Yujing; Okada, Hiroyuki; Mohri, Shirou; Shinagawa, Morikazu

    2007-09-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is caused by a prion that primarily consists of an abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Since PrP(Sc) is partially resistant to proteolytic digestion, the routine diagnosis of BSE is based on the immunological detection of the proteinase K (PK)-resistant moiety of PrP(Sc) (PrP(core)). However, transmission studies are indispensable in order to demonstrate prion infectivity and to analyze prion characteristics. Transmission experiments were accordingly performed on 2 young BSE cases (BSE/JP8, BSE/JP9) and 1 suspected BSE case (Suspended-1) that were detected by the BSE screening program in Japan. In this study, we attempted to transmit the prion from these 3 animals by using transgenic mice overexpressing bovine PrP (TgBoPrP). In spite of the use of BSE-sensitive transgenic mice, none of the mice developed neurological signs nor accumulated PrP(Sc) in their brains for more than 600 days post-inoculation, even with subsequent blind passages. The results of a dilution experiment using the classical BSE prion indicated that prion infectivity in these 3 cattle was below the detection limit of 10(3.0) LD(50)/g.

  16. Production of functional human nerve growth factor from the saliva of transgenic mice by using salivary glands as bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fang; Li, Zicong; Zhu, Qingchun; Dong, Rui; Zhao, Chengcheng; Li, Guoling; Li, Guo; Gao, Wenchao; Jiang, Gelong; Zheng, Enqin; Cai, Gengyuan; Moisyadi, Stefan; Urschitz, Johann; Yang, Huaqiang; Liu, Dewu; Wu, Zhenfang

    2017-01-24

    The salivary glands of animals have great potential to act as powerful bioreactors to produce human therapeutic proteins. Human nerve growth factor (hNGF) is an important pharmaceutical protein that is clinically effective in the treatment of many human neuronal and non-neuronal diseases. In this study, we generated 18 transgenic (TG) founder mice each carrying a salivary gland specific promoter-driven hNGF transgene. A TG mouse line secreting high levels of hNGF protein in its saliva (1.36 μg/mL) was selected. hNGF protein was successfully purified from the saliva of these TG mice and its identity was verified. The purified hNGF was highly functional as it displayed the ability to induce neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells. Furthermore, it strongly promoted proliferation of TF1 cells, above the levels observed with mouse NGF. Additionally, saliva collected from TG mice and containing unpurified hNGF was able to significantly enhance the growth of TF1 cells. This study not only provides a new and efficient approach for the synthesis of therapeutic hNGF but also supports the concept that salivary gland from TG animals is an efficient system for production of valuable foreign proteins.

  17. Duration and level of transgene expression after gene electrotransfer to skin in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, A; Eriksen, Jens Ole; Hojman, P

    2010-01-01

    . Level and duration of transgene expression after gene electrotransfer to skin is essential and here we present data from two independent quantitative studies. Using in vivo bioimaging of a far-red fluorescent molecule, Katushka, allowing for continuous monitoring of local gene expression, compared...... with measurements of a systemic transgene, that is, serum erythropoietin (EPO) after gene electrotransfer with EPO to skin, we found a significant increase in transgene expression (Pafter transfection. Duration of expression could be 3-4 weeks, which...... electrotransfer is that choice of tissue can determine the duration of transgene expression. With gene electrotransfer to muscle, long-term expression, that is beyond 1 year, can be obtained, whereas gene electrotransfer to skin gives short-term expression, which is desirable in, for example, DNA vaccinations...

  18. Detailed immunohistochemical characterization of temporal and spatial progression of Alzheimer's disease-related pathologies in male triple-transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowers William J

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several transgenic animal models genetically predisposed to develop Alzheimer's disease (AD-like pathology have been engineered to facilitate the study of disease pathophysiology and the vetting of potential disease-modifying therapeutics. The triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD harbors three AD-related genetic loci: human PS1M146V, human APPswe, and human tauP301L. These mice develop both amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangle-like pathology in a progressive and age-dependent manner, while these pathological hallmarks are predominantly restricted to the hippocampus, amygdala, and the cerebral cortex the main foci of AD neuropathology in humans. This model represents, at present, one of the most advanced preclinical tools available and is being employed ever increasingly in the study of mechanisms underlying AD, yet a detailed regional and temporal assessment of the subtleties of disease-related pathologies has not been reported. Methods and results In this study, we immunohistochemically documented the evolution of AD-related transgene expression, amyloid deposition, tau phosphorylation, astrogliosis, and microglial activation throughout the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, primary motor cortex, and amygdala over a 26-month period in male 3xTg-AD mice. Intracellular amyloid-beta accumulation is detectable the earliest of AD-related pathologies, followed temporally by phospho-tau, extracellular amyloid-beta, and finally paired helical filament pathology. Pathology appears to be most severe in medial and caudal hippocampus. While astrocytic staining remains relatively constant at all ages and regions assessed, microglial activation appears to progressively increase temporally, especially within the hippocampal formation. Conclusion These data fulfill an unmet need in the ever-widening community of investigators studying 3xTg-AD mice and provide a foundation upon which to design future experiments that seek to

  19. A haplotype of human angiotensinogen gene containing -217A increases blood pressure in transgenic mice compared with -217G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sudhir; Vinukonda, Govindaiah; Fiering, Steven N; Kumar, Ashok

    2008-12-01

    The human angiotensinogen (hAGT) gene contains an A/G polymorphism at -217, and frequency of -217A allele is increased in African-American hypertensive patients. The hAGT gene has seven polymorphic sites in the 1.2-kb region of its promoter, and variant -217A almost always occurs with -532T, -793A, and -1074T, whereas variant -217G almost always occurs with -532C, -793G, and -1074G. Since allele -6A is the predominant allele in African-Americans, the AGT gene can be subdivided into two main haplotypes, -6A:-217A (AA) and -6A:-217G (AG). To understand the role of these haplotypes on hAGT gene expression and on blood pressure regulation in an in vivo situation, we have generated double transgenic mice containing human renin gene and either AA or AG haplotype of the hAGT gene using knock-in strategy at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase locus. We show here that 1) hAGT mRNA level is increased in the liver by 60% and in the kidney by 40%; and 2) plasma AGT level is increased by approximately 40%, and plasma angiotensin II level is increased by approximately 50% in male double transgenic mice containing AA haplotype of the hAGT gene compared with the AG haplotype. In addition, systolic blood pressure is increased by 8 mmHg in transgenic mice containing the AA haplotype compared with the AG haplotype. This is the first report to show the effect of polymorphisms in the promoter of a human gene on its transcription in an in vivo situation that ultimately leads to an increase in blood pressure.

  20. Biomarkers of aging, life span and spontaneous carcinogenesis in the wild type and HER-2 transgenic FVB/N female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, Andrey V; Popovich, Irina G; Trashkov, Alexandr P; Egormin, Peter A; Yurova, Maria N; Tyndyk, Margarita L; Gubareva, Ekaterina A; Artyukin, Ilia N; Vasiliev, Andrey G; Khaitsev, Nikolai V; Zabezhinski, Mark A; Anisimov, Vladimir N

    2016-04-01

    FVB/N wild type and transgenic HER-2/neu FVB/N female mice breed at N.N. Petrov Research Institute of Oncology were under observation until natural death without any special treatment. Age-related dynamics of body weight, food consumption and parameters of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, level of nitric oxide, malonic dialdehyde, catalase, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase, vascular endothelial growth factor were studied in both mice strains. The parameters of life span and tumor pathology were studied as well. Cancer-prone transgenic HER-2/neu mice developed in 100 % multiple mammary adenocarcinomas and died before the age of 1 year. Forty tree percent of long-lived wild type mice survived the age of 2 years and 19 %-800 days. The total tumor incidence in wild type mice was 34 %. The age-associated changes in the level of serum IGF-1, glucose and insulin started much earlier in transgene HER-2/neu mice as compared with wild type FVB/N mice. It was suggested that transgenic HER-2/neu involves in initiation of malignization of mammary epithelial cells but also in acceleration of age-related hormonal and metabolic changes in turn promoting mammary carcinogenesis.

  1. Mutagenicity testing with transgenic mice. Part I: Comparison with the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahnschaffe U

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As part of a larger literature study on transgenic animals in mutagenicity testing, test results from the transgenic mutagenicity assays (lacI model; commercially available as the Big Blue® mouse, and the lacZ model; commercially available as the Muta™Mouse, were compared with the results on the same substances in the more traditional mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. 39 substances were found which had been tested in the micronucleus assay and in the above transgenic mouse systems. Although, the transgenic animal mutation assay is not directly comparable with the micronucleus test, because different genetic endpoints are examined: chromosome aberration versus gene mutation, the results for the majority of substances were in agreement. Both test systems, the transgenic mouse assay and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test, have advantages and they complement each other. However, the transgenic animal assay has some distinct advantages over the micronucleus test: it is not restricted to one target organ and detects systemic as well as local mutagenic effects.

  2. Dataset for the role of sustained attention in memory formation of transgenic mice for Alzheimer׳s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Mendes Schöwe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Weekly submission of rats to active avoidance apparatus can be considered a neurostimulation strategy, once it can improve memory and can increase the density of receptors from different neurotransmitter systems in brain areas related to memory. These benefits were observed in rats chronically infused with amyloid-β peptide. In the present work it is presented that the same benefit for memory was observed in five months old transgenic mice for Alzheimer’s disease (TG-PDGFB-APPSw,Ind. However, at this age, no change in density of nicotinic receptors was observed.

  3. Hepatic expression of mature transforming growth factor beta 1 in transgenic mice results in multiple tissue lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Sanderson, N.; Factor, V; Nagy, P; Kopp, J; Kondaiah, P; WAKEFIELD, L.; Roberts, A B; Sporn, M B; Thorgeirsson, S S

    1995-01-01

    Aberrant expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) has been implicated in a number of disease processes, particularly those involving fibrotic and inflammatory lesions. To determine the in vivo effects of overexpression of TGF-beta 1 on the function and structure of hepatic as well as extrahepatic tissues, transgenic mice were generated containing a fusion gene (Alb/TGF-beta 1) consisting of modified porcine TGF-beta 1 cDNA under the control of the regulatory elements of th...

  4. Dataset for the role of sustained attention in memory formation of transgenic mice for Alzheimer׳s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöwe, Natalia Mendes; de Oliveira, Eduardo Moreira; Buck, Hudson Sousa; Viel, Tania Araujo

    2016-03-01

    Weekly submission of rats to active avoidance apparatus can be considered a neurostimulation strategy, once it can improve memory and can increase the density of receptors from different neurotransmitter systems in brain areas related to memory. These benefits were observed in rats chronically infused with amyloid-β peptide. In the present work it is presented that the same benefit for memory was observed in five months old transgenic mice for Alzheimer's disease (TG-PDGFB-APPSw,Ind). However, at this age, no change in density of nicotinic receptors was observed.

  5. Remodeling of excitation-contraction coupling in transgenic mice expressing ATP-insensitive sarcolemmal KATP channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flagg, Thomas P; Charpentier, Flavien; Manning-Fox, Jocelyn; Remedi, Maria Sara; Enkvetchakul, Decha; Lopatin, Anatoli; Koster, Joseph; Nichols, Colin

    2004-04-01

    Reducing the ATP sensitivity of the sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel is predicted to lead to active channels in normal metabolic conditions and hence cause shortened ventricular action potentials and reduced myocardial inotropy. We generated transgenic (TG) mice that express an ATP-insensitive K(ATP) channel mutant [Kir6.2(deltaN2-30,K185Q)] under transcriptional control of the alpha-myosin heavy chain promoter. Strikingly, myocyte contraction amplitude was increased in TG myocytes (15.68 +/- 1.15% vs. 10.96 +/- 1.49%), even though K(ATP) channels in TG myocytes are very insensitive to inhibitory ATP. Under normal metabolic conditions, steady-state outward K(+) currents measured under whole cell voltage clamp were elevated in TG myocytes, consistent with threshold K(ATP) activation, but neither the monophasic action potential measured in isolated hearts nor transmembrane action potential measured in right ventricular muscle preparations were shortened at physiological pacing cycles. Taken together, these results suggest that there is a compensatory remodeling of excitation-contraction coupling in TG myocytes. Whereas there were no obvious differences in other K(+) conductances, peak L-type Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) density (-16.42 +/- 2.37 pA/pF) in the TG was increased compared with the wild type (-8.43 +/- 1.01 pA/pF). Isoproterenol approximately doubled both I(Ca) and contraction amplitude in wild-type myocytes but failed to induce a significant increase in TG myocytes. Baseline and isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP concentrations were not different in wild-type and TG hearts, suggesting that the enhancement of I(Ca) in the latter does not result from elevated cAMP. Collectively, the data demonstrate that a compensatory increase in I(Ca) counteracts a mild activation of ATP-insensitive K(ATP) channels to maintain the action potential duration and elevate the inotropic state of TG hearts.

  6. Stress kinases involved in tau phosphorylation in Alzheimer's disease, tauopathies and APP transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, I

    2004-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation and accumulation of tau in neurons (and glial cells) is one of the main pathologic hallmarks in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies, including Pick's disease (PiD), progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, argyrophilic grain disease and familial frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 due to mutations in the tau gene (FTDP-17-tau). Recent studies have shown increased expression of select active kinases, including stress-activated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) and kinase p38 in brain homogenates in all the tauopathies. Strong active SAPK/JNK and p38 immunoreactivity has been observed restricted to neurons and glial cells containing hyperphosphorylated tau, as well as in dystrophic neurites of senile plaques in AD. Moreover, SAPK/JNK- and p38-immunoprecipitated sub-cellular fractions enriched in abnormal hyperphosphorylated tau have the capacity to phosphorylate recombinat tau and c-Jun and ATF-2 which are specific substrates of SAPK/JNK and p38 in AD and PiD. Interestingly, increased expression of phosphorylated SAPK/JNK and p38 in association with hyperphosphorylated tau containing neurites have been observed around betaA4 amyloid deposits in the brain of transgenic mice (Tg2576)carrying the double APP Swedish mutation. These findings suggest that betaA4 amyloid has the capacity to trigger the activation of stress kinases which, in turn, phosphorylate tau in neurites surrounding amyloid deposits. Reduction in the amyloid burden and decreased numbers of amyloid plaques but not of neurofibrillary degeneration has been observed in the brain of two AD patients who participated in an amyloid-beta immunization trial. Activation of stress kinases SAPK/JNK and p38 were reduced together with decreased tau hyperphosphorylation of aberrant neurites in association with decreased amyloid plaques. These findings support the amyloid cascade hypothesis of tau phosphorylation mediated by stress

  7. Neural Crest Cells Isolated from the Bone Marrow of Transgenic Mice Express JCV T-Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Gordon

    Full Text Available JC virus (JCV, a common human polyomavirus, is the etiological agent of the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. In addition to its role in PML, studies have demonstrated the transforming ability of the JCV early protein, T-antigen, and its association with some human cancers. JCV infection occurs in childhood and latent virus is thought to be maintained within the bone marrow, which harbors cells of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages. Here we show that non-hematopoietic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs isolated from the bone marrow of JCV T-antigen transgenic mice give rise to JCV T-antigen positive cells when cultured under neural conditions. JCV T-antigen positive cells exhibited neural crest characteristics and demonstrated p75, SOX-10 and nestin positivity. When cultured in conditions typical for mesenchymal cells, a population of T-antigen negative cells, which did not express neural crest markers arose from the MSCs. JCV T-antigen positive cells could be cultured long-term while maintaining their neural crest characteristics. When these cells were induced to differentiate into neural crest derivatives, JCV T-antigen was downregulated in cells differentiating into bone and maintained in glial cells expressing GFAP and S100. We conclude that JCV T-antigen can be stably expressed within a fraction of bone marrow cells differentiating along the neural crest/glial lineage when cultured in vitro. These findings identify a cell population within the bone marrow permissible for JCV early gene expression suggesting the possibility that these cells could support persistent viral infection and thus provide clues toward understanding the role of the bone marrow in JCV latency and reactivation. Further, our data provides an excellent experimental model system for studying the cell-type specificity of JCV T-antigen expression, the role of bone marrow-derived stem cells in the pathogenesis of JCV-related diseases

  8. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35-55)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is ameliorated in interleukin-32 alpha transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jaesuk; Gu, Sun Mi; Yun, Hyung Mun; Son, Dong Ju; Park, Mi Hee; Lee, Moon Soon; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), also known as disseminated sclerosis or encephalomyelitis disseminate, is an inflammatory disease in which myelin in the spinal cord and brain are damaged. IL-32α is known as a critical molecule in the pathophysiology of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, chronic pulmonary disease, and cancers. However, the role of IL-32α on spinal cord injuries and demyelination is poorly understood. Recently, we reported that the release of proinflammatory cytokines were reduced in IL-32α-overexpressing transgenic mice. In this study, we investigated whether IL-32α plays a role on MS using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an experimental mouse model of MS, in human IL-32α Tg mice. The Tg mice were immunized with MOG35-55 suspended in CFA emulsion followed by pertussis toxin, and then EAE paralysis of mice was scored. We observed that the paralytic severity and neuropathology of EAE in IL-32α Tg mice were significantly decreased compared with that of non-Tg mice. The immune cells infiltration, astrocytes/microglials activation, and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6) levels in spinal cord were suppressed in IL-32α Tg mice. Furthermore, NG2 and O4 were decreased in IL-32α Tg mice, indicating that spinal cord damaging was suppressed. In addition, in vitro assay also revealed that IL-32α has a preventive role against Con A stimulation which is evidenced by decrease in T cell proliferation and inflammatory cytokine levels in IL-32α overexpressed Jurkat cell. Taken together, our findings suggested that IL-32α may play a protective role in EAE by suppressing neuroinflammation in spinal cord.

  9. Salt-Sensitive Hypertension and Cardiac Hypertrophy in Transgenic Mice Expressing a Corin Variant Identified in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Cui, Yujie; Shen, Jianzhong; Jiang, Jingjing; Chen, Shenghan; Peng, Jianhao; Wu, Qingyu

    2012-01-01

    African Americans represent a high risk population for salt-sensitive hypertension and heart disease but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Corin is a cardiac protease that regulates blood pressure by activating natriuretic peptides. A corin gene variant (T555I/Q568P) was identified in African Americans with hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, we test the hypothesis that the corin variant contributes to the hypertensive and cardiac hypertrophic phenotype in vivo. Transgenic mice were generated to express wild-type or T555I/Q568P variant corin in the heart under the control of α-myosin heavy chain promoter. The mice were crossed into a corin knockout background to create KO/TgWT and KO/TgV mice that expressed WT or variant corin, respectively, in the heart. Functional studies showed that KO/TgV mice had significantly higher levels of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide in the heart compared with that in control KO/TgWT mice, indicating that the corin variant was defective in processing natriuretic peptides in vivo. By radiotelemetry, corin KO/TgV mice were found to have hypertension that was sensitive to dietary salt loading. The mice also developed cardiac hypertrophy at 12–14 months of age when fed a normal salt diet or at a younger age when fed a high salt diet. The phenotype of salt-sensitive hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in KO/TgV mice closely resembles the pathological findings in African Americans who carry the corin variant. The results indicate that corin defects may represent an important mechanism in salt-sensitive hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in African Americans. PMID:22987923

  10. Unique food-entrained circadian rhythm in cysteine414-alanine mutant mCRY1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Satoshi; Yasui, Akira; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Nakajima, Osamu

    Food availability is a potent environmental cue that directs circadian locomotor activity in rodents. Daily scheduled restricted feeding (RF), in which the food available time is restricted for several hours each day, elicits anticipatory activity. This food-anticipatory activity (FAA) is controlled by a food-entrainable oscillator (FEO) that is distinct from the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master pacemaker in mammals. In an earlier report, we described generation of transgenic (Tg) mice ubiquitously overexpressing cysteine414-alanine mutant mCRY1. The Tg mice displayed long locomotor free-running periods (approximately 28 h) with rhythm splitting. Furthermore, their locomotor activity immediately re-adjusted to the advance of light-dark cycles (LD), suggesting some disorder in the coupling of SCN neurons. The present study examined the restricted feeding cycle (RF)-induced entrainment of locomotor activity in Tg mice in various light conditions. In LD, wild-type controls showed both FAA and LD-entrained activities. In Tg mice, almost all activity was eventually consolidated to a single bout before the feeding time. The result suggests a possibility that in Tg mice the feeding cycle dominates the LD cycle as an entrainment agent. In constant darkness (DD), wild-type mice exhibited robust free-run activity and FAA during RF. For Tg mice, only the rhythm entrained to RF was observed in DD. Furthermore, after returning to free feeding, the free-run started from the RF-entrained phase. These results suggest that the SCN of Tg mice is entrainable to RF and that the mCRY1 mutation alters the sensitivity of SCN to the cycle of nonphotic zeitgebers.

  11. Altered heart rate control in transgenic mice carrying the KCNJ6 gene of the human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignon, Jacques M; Bichler, Zoë; Hivert, Bruno; Gannier, François E; Cosnay, Pierre; del Rio, José A; Migliore-Samour, Danièle; Malécot, Claire O

    2008-04-22

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) are common in Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21). Recently, cardiac sympathetic-parasympathetic imbalance has also been documented in DS adults free of any CHD. The KCNJ6 gene located on human chromosome 21 encodes for the Kir3.2/GIRK2 protein subunits of G protein-regulated K(+) (K(G)) channels and could contribute to this altered cardiac regulation. To elucidate the role of its overexpression, we used homozygous transgenic (Tg(+/+)) mice carrying copies of human KCNJ6. These mice showed human Kir3.2 mRNA expression in the heart and a 2.5-fold increased translation in the atria. Phenotypic alterations were assessed by recording electrocardiogram of urethane anesthetized mice. Chronotropic responses to direct (carbachol) and indirect (methoxamine) muscarinic stimulation were enhanced in Tg(+/+) mice with respect to wild-type (WT) mice. Alternating periods of slow and fast rhythm induced by CCPA (2-chloro-N-cyclopentyl-adenosine) were amplified in Tg(+/+) mice, resulting in a reduced negative chronotropic effect. These drugs reduced the atrial P wave amplitude and area. P wave variations induced by methoxamine and CCPA were respectively increased and reduced in the Tg(+/+) mice, while PR interval and ventricular wave showed no difference between Tg(+/+) and WT. These results indicate that Tg(+/+) mice incorporating the human KCNJ6 exhibit altered Kir3.2 expression and responses to drugs that would activate K(G) channels. Moreover, these altered expression and responses are limited to sino-atrial node and atria that normally express large amounts of K(G) channels. These data suggest that KCNJ6 could play an important role in altered cardiac regulation in DS patients.

  12. Cloned origin of DNA replication in c-myc gene can function and be transmitted in transgenic mice in an episomal state.

    OpenAIRE

    Sudo, Katsuko; Ogata, Masaaki; Sato, Yoshinari; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    1990-01-01

    The c-myc protein has recently been shown to interact with a region possessing putative origin of DNA replication and enhancer activities located 2 kb upstream of the c-myc gene itself. Transgenic mice were obtained by injecting constructs containing this region, termed pmyc(H-P), into fertilized mouse eggs. The transgenic elements were capable of efficient replication in all mouse tissues examined and were maintained in an episomal state even in highly differentiated cells. Moreover, pmyc(H-...

  13. Behavioral phenotype and BDNF differences related to apoE isoforms and sex in young transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reverte, Ingrid; Klein, Anders Bue; Ratner, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays an important role in lipid transport and distribution, being involved in neurite growth and neuroprotection in the brain. In humans, the apoE4 isoform is a risk factor for developing Azheimer's disease (AD), while apoE2 seems to provide neuroprotection. However......, very little information is available on apoE2 genotype. In the present study, we have characterized behavioral and learning phenotypes in young transgenic mice apoE2, apoE3 and apoE4 of both sexes. We have also determined the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor Trk......B in cortex and hippocampus of male and female mice carrying either genotype. Our results show a worse performance of apoE4 and apoE2 mice in the acquisition of a spatial task compared to apoE3 mice, and a worse retention in apoE2 mice compared to the other two genotypes. On the other hand, an increase...

  14. Reduction of VLDL secretion decreases cholesterol excretion in niemann-pick C1-like 1 hepatic transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Marshall

    Full Text Available An effective way to reduce LDL cholesterol, the primary risk factor of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, is to increase cholesterol excretion from the body. Our group and others have recently found that cholesterol excretion can be facilitated by both hepatobiliary and transintestinal pathways. However, the lipoprotein that moves cholesterol through the plasma to the small intestine for transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE is unknown. To test the hypothesis that hepatic very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL support TICE, antisense oligonucleotides (ASO were used to knockdown hepatic expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP, which is necessary for VLDL assembly. While maintained on a high cholesterol diet, Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 hepatic transgenic (L1Tg mice, which predominantly excrete cholesterol via TICE, and wild type (WT littermates were treated with control ASO or MTP ASO. In both WT and L1Tg mice, MTP ASO decreased VLDL triglyceride (TG and cholesterol secretion. Regardless of treatment, L1Tg mice had reduced biliary cholesterol compared to WT mice. However, only L1Tg mice treated with MTP ASO had reduced fecal cholesterol excretion. Based upon these findings, we conclude that VLDL or a byproduct such as LDL can move cholesterol from the liver to the small intestine for TICE.

  15. Reduction of VLDL secretion decreases cholesterol excretion in niemann-pick C1-like 1 hepatic transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Stephanie M; Kelley, Kathryn L; Davis, Matthew A; Wilson, Martha D; McDaniel, Allison L; Lee, Richard G; Crooke, Rosanne M; Graham, Mark J; Rudel, Lawrence L; Brown, J Mark; Temel, Ryan E

    2014-01-01

    An effective way to reduce LDL cholesterol, the primary risk factor of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, is to increase cholesterol excretion from the body. Our group and others have recently found that cholesterol excretion can be facilitated by both hepatobiliary and transintestinal pathways. However, the lipoprotein that moves cholesterol through the plasma to the small intestine for transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) is unknown. To test the hypothesis that hepatic very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) support TICE, antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) were used to knockdown hepatic expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), which is necessary for VLDL assembly. While maintained on a high cholesterol diet, Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 hepatic transgenic (L1Tg) mice, which predominantly excrete cholesterol via TICE, and wild type (WT) littermates were treated with control ASO or MTP ASO. In both WT and L1Tg mice, MTP ASO decreased VLDL triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol secretion. Regardless of treatment, L1Tg mice had reduced biliary cholesterol compared to WT mice. However, only L1Tg mice treated with MTP ASO had reduced fecal cholesterol excretion. Based upon these findings, we conclude that VLDL or a byproduct such as LDL can move cholesterol from the liver to the small intestine for TICE.

  16. Intracerebral injection of preformed synthetic tau fibrils initiates widespread tauopathy and neuronal loss in the brains of tau transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeraer, Eve; Bottelbergs, Astrid; Van Kolen, Kristof; Stancu, Ilie-Cosmin; Vasconcelos, Bruno; Mahieu, Michel; Duytschaever, Hilde; Ver Donck, Luc; Torremans, An; Sluydts, Ellen; Van Acker, Nathalie; Kemp, John A; Mercken, Marc; Brunden, Kurt R; Trojanowski, John Q; Dewachter, Ilse; Lee, Virginia M Y; Moechars, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated fibrillized tau are found in numerous tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease. Increasing evidence suggests that tau pathology can be transmitted from cell-to-cell; however the mechanisms involved in the initiation of tau fibrillization and spreading of disease linked to progression of tau pathology are poorly understood. We show here that intracerebral injections of preformed synthetic tau fibrils into the hippocampus or frontal cortex of young tau transgenic mice expressing mutant human P301L tau induces tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation around the site of injection, as well as a time-dependent propagation of tau pathology to interconnected brain areas distant from the injection site. Furthermore, we show that the tau pathology as a consequence of injection of tau preformed fibrils into the hippocampus induces selective loss of CA1 neurons. Together, our data confirm previous studies on the seeded induction and the spreading of tau pathology in a different tau transgenic mouse model and reveals neuronal loss associated with seeded tau pathology in tau transgenic mouse brain. These results further validate the utility of the tau seeding model in studying disease transmission, and provide a more complete in vivo tauopathy model with associated neurodegeneration which can be used to investigate the mechanisms involved in tau aggregation and spreading, as well as aid in the search for disease modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The development of modified human Hsp70 (HSPA1A) and its production in the milk of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurskiy, Yaroslav G; Garbuz, David G; Soshnikova, Nataliya V; Krasnov, Aleksey N; Deikin, Alexei; Lazarev, Vladimir F; Sverchinskyi, Dmitry; Margulis, Boris A; Zatsepina, Olga G; Karpov, Vadim L; Belzhelarskaya, Svetlana N; Feoktistova, Evgenia; Georgieva, Sofia G; Evgen'ev, Michael B

    2016-11-01

    The production of major human heat shock protein Hsp70 (HSPA1A) in a eukaryotic expression system is needed for testing and possible medical applications. In this study, transgenic mice were produced containing wild-type human Hsp70 allele in the vector providing expression in the milk. The results indicated that human Hsp70 was readily expressed in the transgenic animals but did not apparently preserve its intact structure and, hence, it was not possible to purify the protein using conventional isolation techniques. It was suggested that the protein underwent glycosylation in the process of expression, and this quite common modification for proteins expressed in the milk complicated its isolation. To check this possibility, we mutated all presumptive sites of glycosylation and tested the properties of the resulting modified Hsp70 expressed in E. coli. The investigation demonstrated that the modified protein exhibited all beneficial properties of the wild-type Hsp70 and was even superior to the latter for a few parameters. Based on these results, a transgenic mouse strain was obtained which expressed the modified Hsp70 in milk and which was easy to isolate using ATP columns. Therefore, the developed construct can be explored in various bioreactors for reliable manufacture of high quality, uniform, and reproducible human Hsp70 for possible medical applications including neurodegenerative diseases and cancer.

  18. An industry perspective on the utility of short-term carcinogenicity testing in transgenic mice in pharmaceutical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Richard D; Sistare, Frank D; Reddy, M Vijayaraj; DeGeorge, Joseph J

    2010-01-01

    International guidelines allow for use of a short-term cancer bioassay (twenty-six weeks) in transgenic mice as a substitute for one of the two required long-term rodent bioassays in the preclinical safety evaluation of pharmaceuticals. The two models that have gained the widest acceptance by sponsors and regulatory authorities are the CB6F1-RasH2 mouse hemizygous for a human H-ras transgene and the B6.129N5-Trp53 mouse heterozygous for a p53 null allele. The p53(+/-) model is of particular value for compounds with residual concern that genotoxic activity may contribute to tumorigenesis. The rasH2 model is an appropriate alternative without regard to evidence of genotoxic potential. Since results from a short-term bioassay can be obtained relatively early in drug development, there is the potential for more timely assessment of cancer risk for individuals in long-term clinical trials. Use of these models in preclinical safety evaluation also significantly reduces animal use, time, and manpower. Preliminary findings indicate that prediction of two-year rat bioassay outcomes based on data from chronic rat toxicity studies, together with early assessment of carcinogenic potential in short-term transgenic models, may have the potential to increase the timeliness and efficiency of strategies for the identification of human carcinogenic hazards.

  19. Striatal medium-sized spiny neurons: identification by nuclear staining and study of neuronal subpopulations in BAC transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Matamales

    Full Text Available Precise identification of neuronal populations is a major challenge in neuroscience. In the striatum, more than 95% of neurons are GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs, which form two intermingled populations distinguished by their projections and protein content. Those expressing dopamine D(1-receptors (D1Rs project preferentially to the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr, whereas those expressing dopamine D(2- receptors (D2Rs project preferentially to the lateral part of the globus pallidus (LGP. The degree of segregation of these populations has been a continuous subject of debate, and the recent introduction of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice expressing fluorescent proteins driven by specific promoters was a major progress to facilitate striatal neuron identification. However, the fraction of MSNs labeled in these mice has been recently called into question, casting doubt on the generality of results obtained with such approaches. Here, we performed an in-depth quantitative analysis of striatal neurons in drd1a-EGFP and drd2-EGFP mice. We first quantified neuronal and non-neuronal populations in the striatum, based on nuclear staining with TO-PRO-3, and immunolabeling for NeuN, DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein Mr approximately 32,000, and various markers for interneurons. TO-PRO-3 staining was sufficient to identify MSNs by their typical nuclear morphology and, with a good probability, interneuron populations. In drd1a-EGFP/drd2-EGFP double transgenic mice all MSNs expressed EGFP, which was driven in about half of them by drd1a promoter. Retrograde labeling showed that all MSNs projecting to the SNr expressed D1R and very few D2R (<1%. In contrast, our results were compatible with the existence of some D1R-EGFP-expressing fibers giving off terminals in the LGP. Thus, our study shows that nuclear staining is a simple method for identifying MSNs and other striatal neurons. It also

  20. Liver-specific expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice promotes liver carcinogenesis in the absence of obesity and diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuklin, Alexander [ORNL; Mynatt, Randall [ORNL; Klebig, Mitch [ORNL; Kiefer, Laura [Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC; Wilkison, William O [Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC; Woychik, Richard P [Jackson Laboratory, The, Bar Harbor, ME; Michaud III, Edward J [ORNL

    2004-01-01

    Background: The agouti protein is a paracrine factor that is normally present in the skin of many species of mammals. Agouti regulates the switch between black and yellow hair pigmentation by signalling through the melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r) on melanocytes. Lethal yellow (Ay) and viable yellow (Avy) are dominant regulatory mutations in the mouse agouti gene that cause the wild- ype protein to be produced at abnormally high levels throughout the body. Mice harboring these mutations exhibit a pleiotropic syndrome characterized by yellow coat color, obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and increased susceptibility to hyperplasia and carcinogenesis in numerous tissues, including the liver. The goal of this research was to determine if ectopic expression of the agouti gene in the liver alone is sufficient to recapitulate any aspect of this syndrome. For this purpose, we generated lines of transgenic mice expressing high levels of agouti in the liver under the regulatory control of the albumin promoter. Expression levels of the agouti transgene in the liver were quantified by Northern blot analysis. Functional agouti protein in the liver of transgenic mice was assayed by its ability to inhibit binding of the -melanocyte stimulating hormone ( MSH) to the Mc1r. Body weight, plasma insulin and blood glucose levels were analyzed in control and transgenic mice. Control and transgenic male mice were given a single intraperitoneal injection (10 mg/kg) of the hepatocellular carcinogen, diethylnitrosamine (DEN), at 15 days of age. Mice were euthanized at 36 or 40 weeks after DEN injection and the number of tumors per liver and total liver weights were recorded. Results: The albumin-agouti transgene was expressed at high levels in the livers of mice and produced a functional agouti protein. Albumin-agouti transgenic mice had normal body weights and normal levels of blood glucose and plasma insulin, but responded to chemical initiation of the liver with an increased number

  1. Liver-specific expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice promotes liver carcinogenesis in the absence of obesity and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiefer Laura L

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The agouti protein is a paracrine factor that is normally present in the skin of many species of mammals. Agouti regulates the switch between black and yellow hair pigmentation by signalling through the melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r on melanocytes. Lethal yellow (Ay and viable yellow (Avy are dominant regulatory mutations in the mouse agouti gene that cause the wild-type protein to be produced at abnormally high levels throughout the body. Mice harboring these mutations exhibit a pleiotropic syndrome characterized by yellow coat color, obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and increased susceptibility to hyperplasia and carcinogenesis in numerous tissues, including the liver. The goal of this research was to determine if ectopic expression of the agouti gene in the liver alone is sufficient to recapitulate any aspect of this syndrome. For this purpose, we generated lines of transgenic mice expressing high levels of agouti in the liver under the regulatory control of the albumin promoter. Expression levels of the agouti transgene in the liver were quantified by Northern blot analysis. Functional agouti protein in the liver of transgenic mice was assayed by its ability to inhibit binding of the α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH to the Mc1r. Body weight, plasma insulin and blood glucose levels were analyzed in control and transgenic mice. Control and transgenic male mice were given a single intraperitoneal injection (10 mg/kg of the hepatocellular carcinogen, diethylnitrosamine (DEN, at 15 days of age. Mice were euthanized at 36 or 40 weeks after DEN injection and the number of tumors per liver and total liver weights were recorded. Results The albumin-agouti transgene was expressed at high levels in the livers of mice and produced a functional agouti protein. Albumin-agouti transgenic mice had normal body weights and normal levels of blood glucose and plasma insulin, but responded to chemical initiation of the liver

  2. Receptor-associated protein (RAP plays a central role in modulating Abeta deposition in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilian Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Receptor associated protein (RAP functions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to assist in the maturation of several membrane receptor proteins, including low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP and lipoprotein receptor 11 (SorLA/LR11. Previous studies in cell and mouse model systems have demonstrated that these proteins play roles in the metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein (APP, including processes involved in the generation, catabolism and deposition of beta-amyloid (Abeta peptides. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice transgenic for mutant APPswe and mutant presenilin 1 (PS1dE9 were mated to mice with homozygous deletion of RAP. Unexpectedly, mice that were homozygous null for RAP and transgenic for APPswe/PS1dE9 showed high post-natal mortality, necessitating a shift in focus to examine the levels of amyloid deposition in APPswe/PS1dE9 that were hemizygous null for RAP. Immunoblot analysis confirmed 50% reductions in the levels of RAP with modest reductions in the levels of proteins dependent upon RAP for maturation [LRP trend towards a 20% reduction ; SorLA/LR11 statistically significant 15% reduction (p<0.05]. Changes in the levels of these proteins in the brains of [APPswe/PS1dE9](+/-/RAP(+/- mice correlated with 30-40% increases in amyloid deposition by 9 months of age. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Partial reductions in the ER chaperone RAP enhance amyloid deposition in the APPswe/PS1dE9 model of Alzheimer amyloidosis. Partial reductions in RAP also affect the maturation of LRP and SorLA/LR11, which are each involved in several different aspects of APP processing and Abeta catabolism. Together, these findings suggest a central role for RAP in Alzheimer amyloidogenesis.

  3. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei [Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Ouyang, Pin, E-mail: ouyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associat