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Sample records for hgcdte photovoltaic detector

  1. DRIFT EFFECTS IN HGCDTE DETECTORS

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    B. PAVAN KUMAR

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of temporal drift in spectral responsivity of HgCdTe photodetectors is investigated and found to have an origin different from what has been reported in literature. Traditionally, the literature attributes the cause of drift due to the deposition of thin film of ice water on the active area of the cold detector. The source of drift as proposed in this paper is more critical owing to the difficulties in acquisition of infrared temperature measurements. A model explaining the drift phenomenon in HgCdTe detectors is described by considering the deep trapping of charge carriers and generation of radiation induced deep trap centers which are meta-stable in nature. A theoretical model is fitted to the experimental data. A comparison of the model with the experimental data shows that the radiation induced deep trap centers and charge trapping effects are mainly responsible for the drift phenomenon observed in HgCdTe detectors.

  2. The Effect of Metal-Semiconductor Contact on the Transient Photovoltaic Characteristic of HgCdTe PV Detector

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    Haoyang Cui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The transient photovoltaic (PV characteristic of HgCdTe PV array is studied using an ultrafast laser. The photoresponse shows an apparent negative valley first, then it evolves into a positive peak. By employing a combined theoretical model of pn junction and Schottky potential, this photo-response polarity changing curves can be interpreted well. An obvious decreasing of ratio of negative valley to positive peak can be realized by limiting the illumination area of the array electrode. This shows that the photoelectric effect of Schottky barrier at metal-semiconductor (M/S interface is suppressed, which will verify the correctness of the model. The characteristic parameters of transient photo-response induced from p-n junction and Schottky potential are extracted by fitting the response curve utilizing this model. It shows that the negative PV response induced by the Schottky barrier decreases the positive photovoltage generated by the pn junction.

  3. The effect of metal-semiconductor contact on the transient photovoltaic characteristic of HgCdTe PV detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haoyang; Xu, Yongpeng; Yang, Junjie; Tang, Naiyun; Tang, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    The transient photovoltaic (PV) characteristic of HgCdTe PV array is studied using an ultrafast laser. The photoresponse shows an apparent negative valley first, then it evolves into a positive peak. By employing a combined theoretical model of pn junction and Schottky potential, this photo-response polarity changing curves can be interpreted well. An obvious decreasing of ratio of negative valley to positive peak can be realized by limiting the illumination area of the array electrode. This shows that the photoelectric effect of Schottky barrier at metal-semiconductor (M/S) interface is suppressed, which will verify the correctness of the model. The characteristic parameters of transient photo-response induced from p-n junction and Schottky potential are extracted by fitting the response curve utilizing this model. It shows that the negative PV response induced by the Schottky barrier decreases the positive photovoltage generated by the pn junction.

  4. Determination of charge-carrier diffusion length in the photosensing layer of HgCdTe n-on-p photovoltaic infrared focal plane array detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnyakov, A. V.; Stuchinsky, V. A., E-mail: stuchin@isp.nsc.ru; Brunev, D. V.; Zverev, A. V.; Dvoretsky, S. A. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Russian Academy of Science, Siberian Division, 13, Acad. Lavrent' ev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-03

    In the present paper, we propose a method for evaluating the bulk diffusion length of minority charge carriers in the photosensing layer of photovoltaic focal plane array (FPA) photodetectors. The method is based on scanning a strip-shaped illumination spot with one of the detector diodes at a low level of photocurrents j{sub ph} being registered; such scanning provides data for subsequent analysis of measured spot-scan profiles within a simple diffusion model. The asymptotic behavior of the effective (at j{sub ph} ≠ 0) charge-carrier diffusion length l{sub d} {sub eff} as a function of j{sub ph} for j{sub ph} → 0 inferred from our experimental data proved to be consistent with the behavior of l{sub d} {sub eff} vs j{sub ph} as predicted by the model, while the obtained values of the bulk diffusion length of minority carriers (electrons) in the p-HgCdTe film of investigated HgCdTe n-on-p FPA photodetectors were found to be in a good agreement with the previously reported carrier diffusion-length values for HgCdTe.

  5. HgCdTe barrier infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytko, M.; Rogalski, A.

    2016-05-01

    In the last decade, new strategies to achieve high-operating temperature (HOT) detectors have been proposed, including barrier structures such as nBn devices, unipolar barrier photodiodes, and multistage (cascade) infrared detectors. The ability to tune the positions of the conduction and valence band edges independently in a broken-gap type-II superlattices is especially helpful in the design of unipolar barriers. This idea has been also implemented in HgCdTe ternary material system. However, the implementation of this detector structure in HgCdTe material system is not straightforward due to the existence of a valence band discontinuity (barrier) at the absorber-barrier interface. In this paper we present status of HgCdTe barrier detectors with emphasis on technological progress in fabrication of MOCVD-grown HgCdTe barrier detectors achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology. Their performance is comparable with state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. From the perspective of device fabrication their important technological advantage results from less stringent surface passivation requirements and tolerance to threading dislocations.

  6. Experimental Determination of Effective Minority Carrier Lifetime in HgCdTe Photovoltaic Detectors Using Optical and Electrical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyang Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experiment measurements of minority carrier lifetime using three different methods including modified open-circuit voltage decay (PIOCVD method, small parallel resistance (SPR method, and pulse recovery technique (PRT on pn junction photodiode of the HgCdTe photodetector array. The measurements are done at the temperature of operation near 77 K. A saturation constant background light and a small resistance paralleled with the photodiode are used to minimize the influence of the effect of junction capacitance and resistance on the minority carrier lifetime extraction in the PIOCVD and SPR measurements, respectively. The minority carrier lifetime obtained using the two methods is distributed from 18 to 407 ns and from 0.7 to 110 ns for the different Cd compositions. The minority carrier lifetime extracted from the traditional PRT measurement is found in the range of 4 to 20 ns for x=0.231–0.4186. From the results, it can be concluded that the minority carrier lifetime becomes longer with the increase of Cd composition and the pixels dimensional area.

  7. MBE HgCdTe heterostructure detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Joel N.; Wu, Owen K.

    1990-01-01

    HgCdTe has been the mainstay for medium (3 to 5 micron) and long (10 to 14 micron) wavelength infrared detectors in recent years. Conventional growth and processing techniques are continuing to improve the material. However, the additional ability to tailor composition and placement of doped layers on the tens of angstroms scale using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) provides the opportunity for new device physics and concepts to be utilized. MBE-based device structures to be discussed here can be grouped into two categories: tailored conventional structures and quantum structures. The tailored conventional structures are improvements on familiar devices, but make use of the ability to create layers of varying composition, and thus band gap, at will. The heterostructure junction can be positioned independently of doping p-n junctions. This allows the small band gap region in which the absorption occurs to be separated from a larger band gap region in which the electric field is large and where unwanted tunneling can occur. Data from hybrid MBE/liquid phase epitaxy (LPE)/bulk structures are given. Quantum structures include the HgTe-CdTe superlattice, in which the band gap and transport can be controlled by alternating thin layers (tens of angstroms thick) of HgTe and CdTe. The superlattice has been shown to exhibit behavior which is non-alloy like, including very high hole mobilities, two-dimensional structure in the absorption coefficient, resonant tunneling, and anisotropic transport.

  8. HgCdTe detector technology at Kunming Institute of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Junhong; Zeng, Gehong

    1996-09-01

    HgCdTe detector and thermal image system laboratories at Kunming Institute of Physics have been carrying the research and development of HgCdTe detectors and thermal imaging systems for a wide range applications for over 20 years. During this period, significant progress has been made in many areas such as HgCdTe material, detector, miniature dewar and cooler to meet the requirements of civil and military operations. This paper describes these activities and present status of HgCdTe technology at Kunming Institute of Physics, and some of the problems we faced and how they were solved.

  9. Numerical Device Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization of Extended-SWIR HgCdTe Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, J.; DeWames, R. E.; DeCuir, E. A.; Bellotti, E.; Dhar, N.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.

    2016-09-01

    Imaging in the extended short-wavelength infrared (eSWIR) spectral band (1.7-3.0 μm) for astronomy applications is an area of significant interest. However, these applications require infrared detectors with extremely low dark current (less than 0.01 electrons per pixel per second for certain applications). In these detectors, sources of dark current that may limit the overall system performance are fundamental and/or defect-related mechanisms. Non-optimized growth/device processing may present material point defects within the HgCdTe bandgap leading to Shockley-Read-Hall dominated dark current. While realizing contributions to the dark current from only fundamental mechanisms should be the goal for attaining optimal device performance, it may not be readily feasible with current technology and/or resources. In this regard, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory performed physics-based, two- and three-dimensional numerical modeling of HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detectors designed for operation in the eSWIR spectral band. The underlying impetus for this capability and study originates with a desire to reach fundamental performance limits via intelligent device design.

  10. Progress in MOCVD growth of HgCdTe epilayers for HOT infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebłowski, A.; Gawron, W.; Martyniuk, P.; Stepień, D.; Kolwas, K.; Piotrowski, J.; Madejczyk, P.; Kopytko, M.; Piotrowski, A.; Rogalski, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present progress in MOCVD growth of (100) HgCdTe epilayers achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology and Vigo System S.A. It is shown that MOCVD technology is an excellent tool in fabrication of different HgCdTe detector structures with a wide range of composition, donor/acceptor doping and without post grown annealing. Particular progress has been achieved in the growth of (100) HgCdTe epilayers for long wavelength infrared photoconductors operated in HOT conditions. The (100) HgCdTe photoconductor optimized for 13-μm attain detectivity equal to 6.5x109 Jones and therefore outperform its (111) counterpart. The paper also presents technological progress in fabrication of MOCVD-grown (111) HgCdTe barrier detectors. The barrier device performance is comparable with state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. The detectivity of HgCdTe detectors is close to the value marked HgCdTe photodiodes. Dark current densities are close to the values given by "Rule 07".

  11. Can graphene make better HgCdTe infrared detectors?

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    Shi Yanli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We develop a simple and low-cost technique based on chemical vapor deposition from which large-size graphene films with 5-10 graphene layers can be produced reliably and the graphene films can be transferred easily onto HgCdTe (MCT thin wafers at room temperature. The proposed technique does not cause any thermal and mechanical damages to the MCT wafers. It is found that the averaged light transmittance of the graphene film on MCT thin wafer is about 80% in the mid-infrared bandwidth at room temperature and 77 K. Moreover, we find that the electrical conductance of the graphene film on the MCT substrate is about 25 times larger than that of the MCT substrate at room temperature and 77 K. These experimental findings suggest that, from a physics point of view, graphene can be utilized as transparent electrodes as a replacement for metal electrodes while producing better and cheaper MCT infrared detectors.

  12. HgCdTe Infrared Avalanche Photodiode Single Photon Detector Arrays for the LIST and Other Decadal Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop a HgCdTe avalanche photodiode (APD)  SWIR/IR linear mode photon counting (LMPC) array detector system in support of the LIST lidar. Provide a new type...

  13. Proton irradiation results for long-wave HgCdTe infrared detector arrays for NEOCam

    CERN Document Server

    Dorn, M; McMurtry, C; Hartman, S; Mainzer, A; McKelvey, M; McMurray, R; Chevara, D; Rosser, J

    2016-01-01

    HgCdTe detector arrays with a cutoff wavelength of ~10 ${\\mu}$m intended for the NEOCam space mission were subjected to proton beam irradiation at the University of California Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory. Three arrays were tested - one with 800 $\\mu$m substrate intact, one with 30 $\\mu$m substrate, and one completely substrate-removed. The CdZnTe substrate, on which the HgCdTe detector is grown, has been shown to produce luminescence in shorter wave HgCdTe arrays that causes elevated signal in non-hit pixels when subjected to proton irradiation. This testing was conducted to ascertain whether or not full substrate removal is necessary. At the dark level of the dewar, we detect no luminescence in non-hit pixels during proton testing for both the substrate-removed detector array and the array with 30 ${\\mu}$m substrate. The detector array with full 800 ${\\mu}$m substrate exhibited substantial photocurrent for a flux of 103 protons/cm$^2$-s at a beam energy of 18.1 MeV (~ 750 e$^-$/s) and 34.4 MeV ($\\sim$ 6...

  14. Theoretical Study of Midwave Infrared HgCdTe nBn Detectors Operating at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Nima Dehdashti; Jolley, Gregory; Umana-Membreno, Gilberto A.; Antoszewski, Jarek; Faraone, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    We report a theoretical study of mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) unipolar n-type/barrier/ n-type (nBn) detectors for midwave infrared (MWIR) applications at elevated temperatures. The results obtained indicate that the composition, doping, and thickness of the barrier layer in MWIR HgCdTe nBn detectors can be optimized to yield performance levels comparable with those of ideal HgCdTe p- n photodiodes. It is also shown that introduction of an additional barrier at the back contact layer of the detector structure (nBnn+) leads to substantial suppression of the Auger generation-recombination (GR) mechanism; this results in an order-of-magnitude reduction in the dark current level compared with conventional nBn or p- n junction-based detectors, thus enabling background-limited detector operation above 200 K.

  15. Single-Photon-Sensitive HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode Detector

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    Huntington, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to develop single-photon-sensitive short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) and mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) avalanche photodiode (APD) receivers based on linear-mode HgCdTe APDs, for application by NASA in light detection and ranging (lidar) sensors. Linear-mode photon-counting APDs are desired for lidar because they have a shorter pixel dead time than Geiger APDs, and can detect sequential pulse returns from multiple objects that are closely spaced in range. Linear-mode APDs can also measure photon number, which Geiger APDs cannot, adding an extra dimension to lidar scene data for multi-photon returns. High-gain APDs with low multiplication noise are required for efficient linear-mode detection of single photons because of APD gain statistics -- a low-excess-noise APD will generate detectible current pulses from single photon input at a much higher rate of occurrence than will a noisy APD operated at the same average gain. MWIR and LWIR electron-avalanche HgCdTe APDs have been shown to operate in linear mode at high average avalanche gain (M > 1000) without excess multiplication noise (F = 1), and are therefore very good candidates for linear-mode photon counting. However, detectors fashioned from these narrow-bandgap alloys require aggressive cooling to control thermal dark current. Wider-bandgap SWIR HgCdTe APDs were investigated in this program as a strategy to reduce detector cooling requirements.

  16. Thermal cycling reliability of indirect hybrid HgCdTe infrared detectors

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    Chen, Xing; He, Kai; Wang, Jian-xin; Zhang, Qin-yao

    2013-09-01

    Thermal cycling reliability is one of the most important issues whether the HgCdTe infrared focal plane array detectors can be applied to both military and civil fields. In this paper, a 3D finite element model for indirect hybrid HgCdTe infrared detectors is established. The thermal stress distribution and thermally induced warpage of the detector assembly as a function of the distance between the detector chip and Si-ROIC, the thickness and the materials properties of electrical lead board in cryogenic temperature are analyzed. The results show that all these parameters have influences on the thermal stress distribution and warpage of the detector assembly, especially the coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE) of electrical lead board. The thermal stress and warpage in the assembly can be avoided or minimized by choosing the appropriate electrical lead board. Additionally, the warpage of some indirect hybrid detectors assembly samples is measured in experiment. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation results, which verifies that the results are calculated by finite element method are reasonable.

  17. HgCdTe and silicon detectors and FPAs for remote sensing applications

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    D'Souza, Arvind I.; Stapelbroek, Maryn G.; Robinson, James E.

    2004-02-01

    Photon detectors and focal plane arrays (FPAs) are fabricated from HgCdTe and silicon in many varieties. With appropriate choices for bandgap in HgCdTe, detector architecture, dopants, and operating temperature, HgCdTe and silicon can cover the spectral range from ultraviolet to the very-long-wavelength infrared (VLWIR), exhibit high internal gain to allow photon counting over this broad spectral range, and can be made in large array formats for imaging. DRS makes HgCdTe and silicon detectors and FPAs with unique architectures for a variety of applications. Detector characteristics of High Density Vertically Integrated Photodiode (HDVIP) HdCdTe detectors as well as Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) are presented in this paper. MWIR[λc(78 K) = 5 μm] HDVIP detectors RoA performance was measured to within a factor or two or three of theoretical. In addition, 256 x 256 detector arrays were fabricated. Initial measurements had seven out of ten FPAs having operabilities greater than 99.45% with the best 256 x 256 array having only two inoperable pixels. LWIR [λc(78K)~10 μm] 640 X 480 arrays and a variety of single color linear arrays have also been fabricated. In addition, two-color arrays have been fabricated. DRS has explored HgCdTe avalanche photo diodes (APDs) in the λc = 2.2 μm to 5 μm range. The λc = 5 μm APDs have greater than 200 DC gain values at 8 Volts bias. Large-format to 10242 Arsenic-doped (Si:As, λc ~ 28 μm), Blocked-Impurity-Band (BIB) detectors have been developed for a variety of pixel formats and have been optimized for low, moderate, and high infrared backgrounds. Antimony-doped silicon (Si:Sb) BIB arrays having response to wavelengths > 40 μm have also been demonstrated. Avalanche processes in Si:As at low temperatures (~ 8 K) have led to two unique solid-state photon-counting detectors adapted to infrared and visible wavelengths. The infrared device is the solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM). A related device optimized for the visible spectral

  18. (55)Fe X-ray Response of HgCdTe NIR Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ori; Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2008-01-01

    Conversion gain is a fundamental parameter in detector characteristics that is used to measure many identifying detector properties, including read noise, dark current, and quantum efficiency (QE). Charge coupling effects, such as inter-pixel capacitance, attenuate photon shot noise and result in an overestimation of of conversion gain when implementing the photon transfer technique. The (55)Fe X-ray technique is a direct and simple method by which to measure the conversion gain by comparing the observed instrumental counts (ADU) to the known charge (e-) liberated by a single X-ray photon. Here we present the calibrated pair production energy for 1.7 micron HgCdTe infrared detectors.

  19. Status of HgCdTe Barrier Infrared Detectors Grown by MOCVD in Military University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytko, M.; Jóźwikowski, K.; Martyniuk, P.; Gawron, W.; Madejczyk, P.; Kowalewski, A.; Markowska, O.; Rogalski, A.; Rutkowski, J.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present the status of HgCdTe barrier detectors with an emphasis on technological progress in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology. It is shown that MOCVD technology is an excellent tool for HgCdTe barrier architecture growth with a wide range of composition, donor /acceptor doping, and without post-grown annealing. The device concept of a specific barrier bandgap architecture integrated with Auger-suppression is as a good solution for high-operating temperature infrared detectors. Analyzed devices show a high performance comparable with the state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. Dark current densities are close to the values given by "Rule 07" and detectivities of non-immersed detectors are close to the value marked for HgCdTe photodiodes. Experimental data of long-wavelength infrared detector structures were confirmed by numerical simulations obtained by a commercially available software APSYS platform. A detailed analysis applied to explain dark current plots was made, taking into account Shockley-Read-Hall, Auger, and tunneling currents.

  20. HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode Detectors for Airborne and Spaceborne Lidar at Infrared Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James B.; Beck, Jeffrey D.; Mitra, Pradip; Reiff, Kirk; Yang, Guangning

    2017-01-01

    We report results from characterizing the HgCdTe avalanche photodiode (APD) sensorchip assemblies (SCA) developed for lidar at infrared wavelength using the high density vertically integrated photodiodes (HDVIP) technique. These devices demonstrated high quantum efficiency, typically greater than 90 between 0.8 micrometers and the cut-off wavelength, greater than 600 APD gain, near unity excess noise factor, 6-10 MHz electrical bandwidth and less than 0.5 fW/Hz(exp.1/2) noise equivalent power (NEP). The detectors provide linear analog output with a dynamic range of 2-3 orders of magnitude at a fixed APD gain without averaging, and over 5 orders of magnitude by adjusting the APD and preamplifier gain settings. They have been successfully used in airborne CO2 and CH4 integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar as a precursor for space lidar applications.

  1. Development of megapixel HgCdTe detector arrays with 15 micron cutoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, William J.; McMurtry, Craig W.; Dorn, Meghan; Pipher, Judith; Cabrera, Mario S.

    2016-10-01

    I. HistoryHgCdTe is a versatile II-VI semiconductor with a direct-bandgap tunable via the Hg:Cd ratio. Hg:Cd ratio = 53:47 (2.5 micron cutoff) was used on the NICMOS instrument on HST and the 2MASS. Increasing Hg:Cd ratio to 70:30 leads to a 5.4 micron cutoff, utilized in NEOWISE and many JWST instruments. Bailey, Wu et al. (1998) motivated extending this technology to 10 microns and beyond. Bacon, McMurtry et al. (2003, 2004) indicated significant progress toward this longwave (LW) goal.Warm-Spitzer has pioneered passive cooling to below 30 K in space, enabling the JWST mission.II. CurrentNASA's proposed NEOcam mission selected HgCdTe with a 10.6 micron cutoff because it promises natural Zodiacal background limited sensitivity with modest cooling (40 K). Teledyne Imaging Systems (TIS) is producing megapixel arrays with excellent performance (McMurtry, Lee, Dorn et al. (2013)) for this mission.III. FutureModest cooling requirements (circa 30 K) coupled with megapixel arrays and LW sensitivity in the thermal IR make HgCdTe attractive for many infrared instruments. For instance, the spectral signature of a terrestrial planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a nearby star will be the deep and wide absorption by CO_2 centered at 15 microns (Seager and Deming, 2010). LW instruments can enhance Solar System missions, such as exploration of the Enceladus geysers (Spencer, Buratti et al. 2006). Passive cooling will be adequate for these missions. Modern ground-based observatories will benefit from infrared capability out to the N band (7.5-13.6 microns). The required detector temperatures (30-40 K) are easily achievable using commercially available mechanical cryo-coolers (refrigerators).IV. Progress to dateTIS is developing megapixel HgCdTe arrays sensitive out to 15 microns under the direction of the University of Rochester. As a first step, we have produced arrays with a 13 micron cutoff. The initial measurements indicate very promising performance. We will present the

  2. Proton irradiation results for long-wave HgCdTe infrared detector arrays for Near-Earth Object Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Meghan L.; Pipher, Judith L.; McMurtry, Craig; Hartman, Spencer; Mainzer, Amy; McKelvey, Mark; McMurray, Robert; Chevara, David; Rosser, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    HgCdTe detector arrays with a cutoff wavelength of ˜10 μm intended for the Near-Earth Object Camera (NEOCam) space mission were subjected to proton-beam irradiation at the University of California Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory. Three arrays were tested-one with 800-μm substrate intact, one with 30-μm substrate, and one completely substrate-removed. The CdZnTe substrate, on which the HgCdTe detector is grown, has been shown to produce luminescence in shorter wave HgCdTe arrays that causes an elevated signal in nonhit pixels when subjected to proton irradiation. This testing was conducted to ascertain whether or not full substrate removal is necessary. At the dark level of the dewar, we detect no luminescence in nonhit pixels during proton testing for both the substrate-removed detector array and the array with 30-μm substrate. The detector array with full 800-μm substrate exhibited substantial photocurrent for a flux of 103 protons/cm2 s at a beam energy of 18.1 MeV (˜750 e-/s) and 34.4 MeV (˜65 e-/s). For the integrated space-like ambient proton flux level measured by the Spitzer Space Telescope, the luminescence would be well below the NEOCam dark current requirement of <200 e-/s, but the pattern of luminescence could be problematic, possibly complicating calibration.

  3. Performances of a HGCDTE APD Based Detector with Electric Cooling for 2-μm DIAL/IPDA Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, A.; Rothman, J.; Gibert, F.; Lasfargues, G.; Zanatta, J.-P.; Edouart, D.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we report on design and testing of an HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detector assembly for lidar applications in the Short Wavelength Infrared Region (SWIR : 1,5 - 2 μm). This detector consists in a set of diodes set in parallel -making a 200 μm large sensitive area- and connected to a custom high gain TransImpedance Amplifier (TIA). A commercial four stages Peltier cooler is used to reach an operating temperature of 185K. Crucial performances for lidar use are investigated : linearity, dynamic range, spatial homogeneity, noise and resistance to intense illumination.

  4. Passivation Effect of Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 Film on HgCdTe Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Sun, Chang-Hong; Chen, Yi-Yu; Zhang, Tian-Ning; Chen, Xin; Lin, Chun; Ding, Ring-Jun; He, Li

    2016-09-01

    The passivation effect of atomic layer deposition of (ALD) Al2O3 film on a HgCdTe infrared detector was investigated in this work. The passivation effect of Al2O3 film was evaluated by measuring the minority carrier lifetime, capacitance versus voltage ( C- V) characteristics of metal-insulator-semiconductor devices, and resistance versus voltage ( R- V) characteristics of variable-area photodiodes. The minority carrier lifetime, C- V characteristics, and R- V characteristics of HgCdTe devices passivated by ALD Al2O3 film was comparable to those of HgCdTe devices passivated by e-beam evaporation of ZnS/CdTe film. However, the baking stability of devices passivated by Al2O3 film is inferior to that of devices passivated by ZnS/CdTe film. In future work, by optimizing the ALD Al2O3 film growing process and annealing conditions, it may be feasible to achieve both excellent electrical properties and good baking stability.

  5. HgCdTe Detectors for Space and Science Imaging: General Issues and Latest Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravrand, O.; Rothman, J.; Cervera, C.; Baier, N.; Lobre, C.; Zanatta, J. P.; Boulade, O.; Moreau, V.; Fieque, B.

    2016-09-01

    HgCdTe (MCT) is a very versatile material system for infrared (IR) detection, suitable for high performance detection in a wide range of applications and spectral ranges. Indeed, the ability to tailor the cutoff frequency as close as possible to the needs makes it a perfect candidate for high performance detection. Moreover, the high quality material available today, grown either by molecular beam epitaxy or liquid phase epitaxy, allows for very low dark currents at low temperatures, suitable for low flux detection applications such as science imaging. MCT has also demonstrated robustness to the aggressive environment of space and faces, therefore, a large demand for space applications. A satellite may stare at the earth, in which case detection usually involves a lot of photons, called a high flux scenario. Alternatively, a satellite may stare at outer space for science purposes, in which case the detected photon number is very low, leading to low flux scenarios. This latter case induces very strong constraints onto the detector: low dark current, low noise, (very) large focal plane arrays. The classical structure used to fulfill those requirements are usually p/ n MCT photodiodes. This type of structure has been deeply investigated in our laboratory for different spectral bands, in collaboration with the CEA Astrophysics lab. However, another alternative may also be investigated with low excess noise: MCT n/ p avalanche photodiodes (APD). This paper reviews the latest achievements obtained on this matter at DEFIR (LETI and Sofradir common laboratory) from the short wave infrared (SWIR) band detection for classical astronomical needs, to long wave infrared (LWIR) band for exoplanet transit spectroscopy, up to very long wave infrared (VLWIR) bands. The different available diode architectures ( n/ p VHg or p/ n, or even APDs) are reviewed, including different available ROIC architectures for low flux detection.

  6. Monolithic dual-band HgCdTe infrared detector structure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Parish, G

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available A monolithic HgCdTe photoconductive device structure is presented that is suitable for dual-band optically registered infrared photodetection in the two atmospheric transmission windows of 3-5 mu m and 8-12 mu m, which correspond to the mid...

  7. Engineering steps for optimizing high temperature LWIR HgCdTe photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madejczyk, Pawel; Gawron, Waldemar; Martyniuk, Piotr; Keblowski, Artur; Pusz, Wioletta; Pawluczyk, Jaroslaw; Kopytko, Malgorzata; Rutkowski, Jaroslaw; Rogalski, Antoni; Piotrowski, Jozef

    2017-03-01

    The authors report on energy gap engineering solutions to improve the high-temperature performance of long-wave infrared (LWIR) HgCdTe photodiodes. Metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) technology with a wide range of composition and donor/acceptor doping and without ex-situ post grown annealing seems to be an excellent tool for HgCdTe heterostructure epitaxial growth. The heterojunction HgCdTe photovoltaic device based on epitaxial graded gap structures integrated with Auger-suppression is a magnificent solution for high operating temperature (HOT) infrared detectors. The thickness, composition and doping of HgCdTe heterostructure were optimized with respect to photoelectrical parameters like dark current, the responsivity and the response time. In this paper we focus on graded interface abruptness in the progressive optimization.

  8. Development of non-hybridised HgCdTe detectors for the next generation of astronomical instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Gavin B.; Dennis, Peter N.; Lees, David J.; Hall, David J.; Cairns, John W.; Gordon, Neil T.; Hails, Janet E.; Giess, Jean

    2008-07-01

    The superb image quality that is predicted, and even demanded, for the next generation of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT) presents a potential crisis in terms of the sheer number of detectors that may be required. Developments in infrared technology have progressed dramatically in recent years, but a substantial reduction in the cost per pixel of these IR arrays will be necessary to permit full exploitation of the capabilities of these telescopes. Here we present an outline and progress report of an initiative to develop a new generation of astronomical grade Cadmium Mercury Telluride (HgCdTe) array detectors using a novel technique which enables direct growth of the sensor diodes onto the Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC). This technique removes the need to hybridise the detector material to a separate Silicon readout circuit and provides a route to very large monolithic arrays. We present preliminary growth and design simulation results for devices based on this technique, and discuss the prospects for deployment of this technology in the era of extremely large telescopes.

  9. Ultra-Low Dark Current HgCdTe Detector in SWIR for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, C.; Boulade, O.; Gravrand, O.; Lobre, C.; Guellec, F.; Sanson, E.; Ballet, P.; Santailler, J. L.; Moreau, V.; Zanatta, J. P.; Fieque, B.; Castelein, P.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents recent developments at Commissariat à l'Energie atomique, Laboratoire d'Electronique et de Technologie de l'Information infrared laboratory on processing and characterization of p-on-n HgCdTe (MCT) planar infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) in short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectral band for the astrophysics applications. These FPAs have been grown using both liquid phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy on a lattice-matched CdZnTe substrate. This technology exhibits lower dark current and lower series resistance in comparison with n-on-p vacancy-doped architecture and is well adapted for low flux detection or high operating temperature. This architecture has been evaluated for space applications in long-wave infrared and very-long-wave infrared spectral bands with cut-off wavelengths from 10 μm up to 17 μm at 78 K and is now evaluated for the SWIR range. The metallurgical nature of the absorbing layer is also examined and both molecular beam epitaxy and liquid phase epitaxy have been investigated. Electro-optical characterizations have been performed on individual photodiodes from test arrays, whereas dark current investigation has been performed with a fully functional readout integrated circuit dedicated to low flux operations.

  10. Visible to SWIR response of HgCdTe HDVIP detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, A. I.; Robinson, E. W.; Stapelbroek, M. G.; Wong, W.; Skokan, M.; Shih, H.-D.

    2009-05-01

    Detectors that have broadband response from the visible (~ 400 nm) to near infrared (~ 2.5 μm) have remote sensing hyperspectral applications on a single chip. 2.2 and 2.5 μm cutoff detectors permit operation in the 200 K range. The DRS HDVIP detector technology is a front side illuminated detector technology. Consequently, there is no substrate to absorb the visible photons as in backside-illuminated detectors and these 2.2 and 2.5-μm-cutoff detectors should be well suited to respond to visible light. However, HDVIP detectors are passivated using CdTe that absorbs the visible light photons. CdTe with a direct bandgap ~ 1.6 eV strongly absorbs photons of wavelength shorter than about 800 nm. Detectors in 320 x 6 arrays with varying thickness of CdTe passivation layers were fabricated to investigate the visible response of the 2.5-μm-cutoff detectors. The SWIR HDVIP detectors have well known high quantum efficiency (QE) in the near infrared region. Focus here was in acquiring array level data in the visible region of the spectrum. 320 x 6 FPA QE and NEI data was acquired using a 642 nm narrow band filter with 50 % points at 612 nm and 698 nm. The array QE average is ~ 70 % for the array with CdTe passivation thickness = 44.5 nm. The NEI is ~ 5 x 1010 ph/cm2/s at a flux Φ = 5.36 x 1013 ph/cm2/s. QE for an array with CdTe passivation thickness = 44.5 nm is ~ 10 % higher than an array with CdTe passivation thickness = 79.3 nm. In addition, a model that takes into account the complex optical properties of every layer in the HDVIP photodiode architecture was developed to predict the QE of the detectors in the near infrared and visible wavelength regions as a function of CdTe thickness. Measured QE as a function of wavelength is not a good match to the model QE probably due to limitations in the measured QE and knowledge of optical constants that are input into the model.

  11. A 4K x 4K HgCdTe astronomical camera enabled by the JWST NIR detector development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Donald N. B.; Luppino, Gerard; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Garnett, James D.; Loose, Markus; Zandian, Majid

    2004-09-01

    The ambitious science goals of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) have driven spectacular advances in λco ~ 5um detector technology over the past five years. This paper reviews both the UH/RSC team"s Phase A development and evaluation of 2Kx2K arrays exceeding the detector requirements for JWST"s near infrared instruments and also the hardware integration of these into a 4Kx4K (16Mpxl) close packed mosaic focal plane array housed in an Ultra Low Background test facility. Both individual first generation 2Kx2K SCA"s and 4Kx4K mosaic focal planes have been extensively characterized in the laboratory and, since September 2003, a NIR camera utilizing the 4Kx4K mosaic focal plane has been in use for nearly 100 nights at the UH 2.2 m telescope on Mauna Kea. Typical test results for the first generation 2Kx2K arrays and their integration into 4Kx4K mosaic focal planes are reported. Demonstration of the design concepts and both array and mosaic focal plane performance in actual hardware, as described here, has provided the foundation for design iterations leading to later generations of 2Kx2K arrays and 4Kx4K mosaic focal planes. Four major technology developments leading to first generation hardware demonstrations of both 2Kx2K SCA"s and a 4Kx4K mosaic FPA are reviewed. These are: 1) improvement in test equipment and procedures to characterize the detectors against JWST requirements and goals, primarily at 37K but with the capability to test from 30K to 100K; 2) optimization of λc ~ 5 um MBE HgCdTe material on a CZT substrate for low dark current (goal of 0.003 e-/sec at 37K) with high quantum efficiency, low cross-talk and greatly reduced image persistence; 3) development of the 2Kx2K HAWAII-2RG multiplexer designed specifically to take full advantage of these detector characteristics for a wide range of astronomical applications (and fully compatible with an ASIC controller developed under the JWST Instrument Technology Development initiative) and 4) development of

  12. A discrete element model of laser beam induced current (LBIC) due to the lateral photovoltaic effect in open-circuit HgCdTe photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fynn, K.A.; Faraone, L. [Univ. of Western Australia, Nedlands (Australia). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Bajaj, J. [Rockwell International Science Center, Thousand Oaks, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The non-destructive optical characterization technique of Laser-Beam-Induced-Current (LBIC) imaging has proven useful in qualitatively assessing electrically active defects and localized non-uniformities in HgCdTe materials and devices used for infrared photovoltaic arrays. To further the development of a quantitative working model for LBIC, this paper focuses on the application of the technique to photovoltaic structures that are represented by a discrete element equivalent circuit. For this particular case the LBIC signal arises due to the lateral photovoltaic effect in non-uniformly illuminated open-circuit photodiodes. The outcomes of the model predict all of the experimentally observed geometrical features of the LBIC image and signal. Furthermore, the model indicates that the LBIC signal has an extremely weak dependence on the p-n junction reverse saturation current, and shows a linear dependence with laser power. This latter feature may be useful for non-contact measurement of the quantum efficiency of individual photodiodes within a large two-dimensional focal plane array. The decay of the LBIC signal outside the physical boundary of the p-n junction is of the same form as the roll-off in the short circuit photoresponse and, therefore, can be used to extract the diffusion length of minority carriers. Experimental data are obtained from an arsenic implanted p-on-n junction fabricated on MBE grown Hg{sub 1{minus}x}Cd{sub x}Te material with an x-value of 0.3. The p-on-n diode is shown to be uniform and of high quality with an R{sub o}A product of 1 {times} 10{sup 8} {Omega}{center_dot}cm{sup 2} at 77 K. The validity of the simple model developed in this paper, is confirmed by the excellent agreement with experimental results. Consequently, the LBIC technique is shown to be an appropriate diagnostic tool for non-contact quantitative analysis of semiconductor materials and devices.

  13. Investigation of a background suppression transimpedance amplifier for photovoltaic detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Ferdinand J., Jr.

    1992-12-01

    The current generation of transimpedance amplifier based detector systems are limited by opamp saturation when operating at a high gain or in the presence of a large background signal. To eliminate saturation, an amplifier that is frequency dependent is developed. Additionally, the noise sources in the conventional transimpedance amplifier and photovoltaic detector are quantified for comparison to any modified circuit. Initial results indicate that the frequency dependent detector system is a viable system, however, further development is required. Further research of this technology is expected to support future infrared and long range detection applications.

  14. Characterization of HgCdTe and HgCdSe Materials for Third Generation Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    etched HgCdTe photodiode .................................. 13 1.6 (a) Hybrid IR FPA, (b) cross section of structure, (c) indium bumps on Si...to areas of approximately 30 cm2. At this size, the wafers used for growth are unable to accommodate more than two 1024 × 1024 FPAs.3 For more...clear advantages over the other substrates because of its low cost, large wafer size, and a thermal-expansion coefficient that perfectly matches

  15. A compensated fission detector based on photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, M. [CEA/DAM Ile-de-France, DPTA/Service de Physique Nucleaire, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Ethvignot, T. [CEA/DAM Ile-de-France, DPTA/Service de Physique Nucleaire, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Granier, T. [CEA/DAM Ile-de-France, DPTA/Service de Physique Nucleaire, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)]. E-mail: thierry.granier@cea.fr; Haight, R.C. [LANSCE-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); O' Donnell, J.M. [LANSCE-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Rochman, D. [LANSCE-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wender, S.A. [LANSCE-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bond, E.M. [C-INC, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS J514, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bredeweg, T.A. [C-INC, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS J514, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Vieira, D.J. [C-INC, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS J514, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wilhelmy, J.B. [C-INC, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS J514, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Danon, Y. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Standard techniques of event-by-event detection of fission may fail when operated in high {gamma}-ray or particle radiation environments. This is the case within the 800MeV proton-driven lead slowing-down neutron spectrometer at LANSCE where standard fission detectors are found to be inoperable for microseconds to milliseconds after each proton pulse. To overcome this problem, a simple fission fragment detector based on compensated photovoltaic cells has been developed. The compensated detector has lower susceptibility to the strong {gamma}-flash and can recover much faster than an uncompensated detector. This detector is well adapted to applications involving the detection of fission in regions where high intensity {gamma}-ray and/or particle radiation fields exist.

  16. A compensated fission detector based on photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, M.; Ethvignot, T.; Granier, T.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rochman, D.; Wender, S. A.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Danon, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Standard techniques of event-by-event detection of fission may fail when operated in high γ-ray or particle radiation environments. This is the case within the 800 MeV proton-driven lead slowing-down neutron spectrometer at LANSCE where standard fission detectors are found to be inoperable for microseconds to milliseconds after each proton pulse. To overcome this problem, a simple fission fragment detector based on compensated photovoltaic cells has been developed. The compensated detector has lower susceptibility to the strong γ-flash and can recover much faster than an uncompensated detector. This detector is well adapted to applications involving the detection of fission in regions where high intensity γ-ray and/or particle radiation fields exist.

  17. Evaluation of HgCdTe on GaAs Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy for High-Operating-Temperature Infrared Detector Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenisch, J.; Schirmacher, W.; Wollrab, R.; Eich, D.; Hanna, S.; Breiter, R.; Lutz, H.; Figgemeier, H.

    2015-09-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of HgCdTe (MCT) on alternative substrates enables production of both cheaper and more versatile (third-generation) infrared (IR) detectors. After rapid progress in the development of MBE-grown MCT on GaAs in recent years, the question of whether the considerable benefits of this material system are also applicable to high-operating-temperature (HOT) applications demands attention. In this paper, we present a mid-wavelength-IR 640 × 512 pixel, 15- μm-pitch focal-plane array with operability of 99.71% at operating temperature of 120 K and low dark current density. In the second part of the paper, MBE growth of short-wavelength IR material with Cd fraction of up to 0.8 is investigated as the basis for future evaluation of the material for low-light-level imaging HOT applications.

  18. Microtextured Silicon Surfaces for Detectors, Sensors & Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, JE; Mazur, E

    2005-05-19

    With support from this award we studied a novel silicon microtexturing process and its application in silicon-based infrared photodetectors. By irradiating the surface of a silicon wafer with intense femtosecond laser pulses in the presence of certain gases or liquids, the originally shiny, flat surface is transformed into a dark array of microstructures. The resulting microtextured surface has near-unity absorption from near-ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths well below the band gap. The high, broad absorption of microtextured silicon could enable the production of silicon-based photodiodes for use as inexpensive, room-temperature multi-spectral photodetectors. Such detectors would find use in numerous applications including environmental sensors, solar energy, and infrared imaging. The goals of this study were to learn about microtextured surfaces and then develop and test prototype silicon detectors for the visible and infrared. We were extremely successful in achieving our goals. During the first two years of this award, we learned a great deal about how microtextured surfaces form and what leads to their remarkable optical properties. We used this knowledge to build prototype detectors with high sensitivity in both the visible and in the near-infrared. We obtained room-temperature responsivities as high as 100 A/W at 1064 nm, two orders of magnitude higher than standard silicon photodiodes. For wavelengths below the band gap, we obtained responsivities as high as 50 mA/W at 1330 nm and 35 mA/W at 1550 nm, close to the responsivity of InGaAs photodiodes and five orders of magnitude higher than silicon devices in this wavelength region.

  19. Solution processable organic/inorganic hybrid ultraviolet photovoltaic detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Guo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV photodetector is a kind of important optoelectronic device which can be widely used in scientific and engineering fields including astronomical research, environmental monitoring, forest-fire prevention, medical analysis, and missile approach warning etc. The development of UV detector is hindered by the acquirement of stable p-type materials, which makes it difficult to realize large array, low-power consumption UV focal plane array (FPA detector. Here, we provide a novel structure (Al/Poly(9,9-di-n-octylfuorenyl-2,7-diyl(PFO/ZnO/ITO to demonstrate the UV photovoltaic (PV response. A rather smooth surface (RMS roughness: 0.28 nm may be reached by solution process, which sheds light on the development of large-array, light-weight and low-cost UV FPA detectors.

  20. Threading and misfit-dislocation motion in molecular-beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe epilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, M.; Lee, D.; Zandian, M.; Phillips, J.; Arias, J.

    2003-07-01

    Lattice mismatch between the substrate and the absorber layer in single-color HgCdTe infrared (IR) detectors and between band 1 and band 2 in two-color detectors results in the formation of crosshatch lines on the surface and an array of misfit dislocations at the epi-interfaces. Threading dislocations originating in the substrate can also bend into the interface plane and result in misfit dislocations because of the lattice mismatch. The existence of dislocations threading through the junction region of HgCdTe IR-photovoltaic detectors can greatly affect device performance. High-quality CdZnTe substrates and controlled molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of HgCdTe can result in very low threading-dislocation densities as measured by the etch-pit density (EPD ˜ 104cm-2). However, dislocation gettering to regions of high stress (such as etched holes, voids, and implanted-junction regions) at elevated-processing temperatures can result in a high density of dislocations in the junction region that can greatly reduce detector performance. We have performed experiments to determine if the dislocations that getter to these regions of high stress are misfit dislocations at the substrate/absorber interface that have a threading component extending to the upper surface of the epilayer, or if the dislocations originate at the cap/absorber interface as misfit dislocations. The preceding mechanisms for dislocation motion are discussed in detail, and the possible diode-performance consequences are explored.

  1. Analysis of the auger recombination rate in P+N-n-N-N HgCdTe detectors for HOT applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, J.; Tennant, W. E.; Bellotti, E.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.

    2016-05-01

    Infrared (IR) photon detectors must be cryogenically cooled to provide the highest possible performance, usually to temperatures at or below ~ 150K. Such low operating temperatures (Top) impose very stringent requirements on cryogenic coolers. As such, there is a constant push in the industry to engineer new detector architectures that operate at higher temperatures, so called higher operating temperature (HOT) detectors. The ultimate goal for HOT detectors is room temperature operation. While this is not currently possibly for photon detectors, significant increases in Top are nonetheless beneficial in terms of reduced size, weight, power and cost (SWAP-C). The most common HgCdTe IR detector architecture is the P+n heterostructure photodiode (where a capital letter indicates a wide band gap relative to the active layer or "AL"). A variant of this architecture, the P+N-n-N-N heterostructure photodiode, should have a near identical photo-response to the P+n heterostructure, but with significantly lower dark diffusion current. The P+N-n-N-N heterostructure utilizes a very low doped AL, surrounded on both sides by wide-gap layers. The low doping in the AL, allows the AL to be fully depleted, which drastically reduces the Auger recombination rate in that layer. Minimizing the Auger recombination rate reduces the intrinsic dark diffusion current, thereby increasing Top. Note when we use the term "recombination rate" for photodiodes, we are actually referring to the net generation and recombination of minority carriers (and corresponding dark currents) by the Auger process. For these benefits to be realized, these devices must be intrinsically limited and well passivated. The focus of this proceeding is on studying the fundamental physics of the intrinsic dark currents in ideal P+N-n-N-N heterostructures, namely Auger recombination. Due to the complexity of these devices, specifically the presence of multiple heterojunctions, numerical device modeling techniques must be

  2. Visible response of λc=2.5´m HgCdTe HDVIP detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelbroek, Maryn G.; Guptill, Matthew; D'Souza, Arvind I.; Bryan, Elizabeth R.; Beck, J. D.; Kinch, M. A.; Robinson, James E.

    2004-08-01

    Cu-doped HDVIP detectors with different cut-off wavelengths are routinely manufactured. The DRS HDVIP detector technology is a front-side-illuminated detector technology. There is no substrate to absorb the visible photons as in backside-illuminated detectors and these detectors should be well suited to respond to visible light. However, HDVIP detectors are passivated using CdTe that absorbs the visible light photons. CdTe strongly absorbs photons of wavelength shorter than about 800 nm. Detectors with varying thickness of CdTe passivation layers were fabricated to investigate the visible response of the 2.5-μm-cutoff detectors. A model was developed to predict the quantum efficiency of the detectors in the near infrared and visible wavelength regions as a function of CdTe thickness. Individual photodiodes (λc = 2.5 μm) in test bars were examined. Measurements of the quantum efficiency as a function of wavelength region will be presented and compared to the model predictions.

  3. Active Pixel HgCdTe Detectors With Built-in Dark Current Reduction for Near-Room Temperature Operation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High sensitivity HgCdTe infrared arrays operating at 77K can now be tailored in a wide range of wavelengths from 1 to 14 microns. However, due to the cooling...

  4. Active Pixel HgCdTe Detectors With Built-in Dark Current Reduction for Near-Room Temperature Operation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High sensitivity HgCdTe infrared arrays operating at 77K can now be tailored in a wide range of wavelengths from 1 to14 um. However, the cooling requirements make...

  5. Measuring extended red sensitivity in a 1.7μm-cutoff HgCdTe detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Monson, Andrew J.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad; Halverson, Samuel P.; Ramsey, Larry

    2016-08-01

    Infrared detectors with cutoff wavelengths of 1.7 μm have much lower sensitivity to thermal background contamination than those with longer cutoff wavelengths. This low sensitivity offers the attractive possibility of reducing the need for fully cryogenic systems for YJH-band work, offering the potential for "warm-pupil" instrumentation that nonetheless reduces detected thermal background to the level of dark current. However, residual sensitivity beyond the cutoff wavelength is not well characterized, and may preclude the implementation of such warm-pupil instruments. We describe an experiment to evaluate the long-wavelength sensitivity tail of a 1.7 µm-cutoff HAWAII-2RG array using a thermal blocking filter. Our results suggest the possibility of measurable red sensitivity beyond 2 μm. Ongoing improvements will confirm and refine this measurement. The thermal blocking filter offers the prospect of warm-pupil NIR instrument operation, which is particularly valuable for cost-effective and efficient testing systems: it has facilitated NIR detector characterization and will enable crucial laboratory tests of laser frequency comb calibration systems and other NIR calibration sources.

  6. Chlorine doped graphene quantum dots: Preparation, properties, and photovoltaic detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jianhong; Xiang, Jinzhong, E-mail: jzhxiang@ynu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Tang, Libin, E-mail: scitang@163.com; Ji, Rongbin, E-mail: jirongbin@gmail.com; Yuan, Jun; Zhao, Jun; Yu, Ruiyun; Tai, Yunjian; Song, Liyuan [Kunming Institute of Physics, Kunming 650223 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are becoming one of the hottest advanced functional materials because of the opening of the bandgap due to quantum confinement effect, which shows unique optical and electrical properties. The chlorine doped GQDs (Cl-GQDs) have been fabricated by chemical exfoliation of HCl treated carbon fibers (CFs), which were prepared from degreasing cotton through an annealing process at 1000 °C for 30 min. Raman study shows that both G and 2D peaks of GQDs may be redshifted (softened) by chlorine doping, leading to an n-type doping. The first vertical (Cl)-GQDs based photovoltaic detectors have been demonstrated, both the light absorbing and electron-accepting roles for (Cl)-GQDs in photodetection have been found, resulting in an exceptionally big ratio of photocurrent to dark current as high as ∼10{sup 5} at room temperature using a 405 nm laser irradiation under the reverse bias voltage. The study expands the application of (Cl)-GQDs to the important optoelectronic detection devices.

  7. Photovoltaic x-ray detectors based on the GaAs epitaxial structures

    CERN Document Server

    Akhmadullin, R A; Dvoryankina, G G; Dikaev, Y M; Ermakov, M G; Ermakova, O N; Krikunov, A I; Kudryashov, A A; Petrov, A G; Telegin, A A

    2002-01-01

    The new photovoltaic detector of the X-ray radiation is proposed on the basis of the GaAs epitaxial structures, which operates with high efficiency of the charge carriers collection without shift voltage and at the room temperature. The structures are grown by the method of the gas-phase epitaxy on the n sup + -type highly-alloyed substrates. The range of sensitivity to the X-ray radiation is within the range of effective energies from 8 up to 120 keV. The detector maximum response in the current short circuit mode is determined

  8. Recent progress in MBE grown HgCdTe materials and devices at UWA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, R.; Lei, W.; Antoszewski, J.; Madni, I.; Umana-Menbreno, G.; Faraone, L.

    2016-05-01

    HgCdTe has dominated the high performance end of the IR detector market for decades. At present, the fabrication costs of HgCdTe based advanced infrared devices is relatively high, due to the low yield associated with lattice matched CdZnTe substrates and a complicated cooling system. One approach to ease this problem is to use a cost effective alternative substrate, such as Si or GaAs. Recently, GaSb has emerged as a new alternative with better lattice matching. In addition, implementation of MBE-grown unipolar n-type/barrier/n-type detector structures in the HgCdTe material system has been recently proposed and studied intensively to enhance the detector operating temperature. The unipolar nBn photodetector structure can be used to substantially reduce dark current and noise without impeding photocurrent flow. In this paper, recent progress in MBE growth of HgCdTe infrared material at the University of Western Australia (UWA) is reported, including MBE growth of HgCdTe on GaSb alternative substrates and growth of HgCdTe nBn structures.

  9. Activation of Organic Photovoltaic Light Detectors Using Bend Leakage from Optical Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Matthew J; Willis, Matthew S; Kumar, Pankaj; Holdsworth, John L; Bezuidenhout, Henco; Zhou, Xiaojing; Belcher, Warwick; Dastoor, Paul C

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the detection and subsequent utilization of leaked light from bends in a silica optical fiber using organic photovoltaic detectors. The optic power lost by single mode and multimode silica optical fibers was calibrated for bend radii between 1 and 7 mm for 532 and 633 nm light, exhibiting excellent agreement with previous theoretical solutions. The spatial location of maximum power leakage on the exterior of the fiber was found to exist in the same plane as the fiber, with a 10° offset from the normal. Two different organic photovoltaic detectors fabricated using a poly(3-hexylthiophene):indene-C60-bisadduct donor-acceptor blend cast from chloroform and chlorobenzene were fabricated to detect the leaked light. The two detectors exhibited different photovoltaic performances, predominantly due to different active layer thicknesses. Both devices showed sensitivity to leakage light, exhibiting voltages between 200 and 300 mV in response to leaked light from the fiber. The temporal responses of the devices were observed to differ, with a rise time from 10% to 90% of maximum voltage of 1430 μs for the chlorobenzene device, and a corresponding rise time of 490 μs for the higher performing chloroform device. The two OPVs were used to simultaneously detect leaked light from induced bends in the optical fiber, with the differing temporal profiles employed to create a unique time-correlated detection signal with enhanced security. The delay between detection of each OPV voltage could be systematically varied, allowing for either a programmable and secure single detection signal or triggering of multiple events with variable time resolution. The results reported in this study present exciting avenues toward the deployment of this simple and noninvasive optical detection system in a range of different applications.

  10. MBE Growth and Transfer of HgCdTe Epitaxial Films from InSb Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lyon, T. J.; Rajavel, R. D.; Nosho, B. Z.; Terterian, S.; Beliciu, M. L.; Patterson, P. R.; Chang, D. T.; Boag-O'Brien, M. F.; Holden, B. T.; Jacobs, R. N.; Benson, J. D.

    2010-07-01

    An investigation of the heteroepitaxial growth of HgCdTe films onto InSb(211)B substrates is reported. High-quality HgCdTe(211)B single-crystal films have been successfully deposited onto InSb(211)B substrates and have been characterized with x-ray diffraction rocking curve analysis, etch pit density analysis, and surface void defect mapping. X-ray rocking curve (422) reflection full-width at half-maximum of 60 arcsec has been obtained for 7- μm-thick x = 0.22 HgCdTe epitaxial films, and etch pit densities of 3 × 106 cm-2 to 3 × 107 cm-2 have been observed. A significant reduction in HgCdTe void defect densities to 100 cm-2 to 200 cm-2 has been observed on InSb, including a complete absence of large “void cluster” defects that are often observed for growth on CdZnTe. Wafer bow induced by the growth of HgCdTe on InSb is less than 1 μm for 2-inch-diameter substrates. Significant diffusion of In into HgCdTe is observed for HgCdTe/InSb wafers that are subjected to Hg anneals at 250°C to 300°C. A preliminary investigation of the transfer of HgCdTe films from InSb onto Si substrates has also been undertaken, using an adhesive wafer bonding approach evaluated with scanning acoustic microscopy. The infrared transmission characteristics of the bonding adhesive have been investigated with respect to postgrowth annealing procedures to establish the compatibility of the bonding approach with HgCdTe device processing and detector operation.

  11. CdS/PbSe heterojunction for high temperature mid-infrared photovoltaic detector applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Binbin, E-mail: binbinweng@ou.edu, E-mail: shi@ou.edu; Qiu, Jijun; Zhao, Lihua; Chang, Caleb [The School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Shi, Zhisheng, E-mail: binbinweng@ou.edu, E-mail: shi@ou.edu [The School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Nanolight, Inc., Norman, Oklahoma 73069 (United States)

    2014-03-24

    n-CdS/p-PbSe heterojunction is investigated. A thin CdS film is deposited by chemical bath deposition on top of epitaxial PbSe film by molecular beam epitaxy on Silicon. Current-voltage measurements demonstrate very good junction characteristics with rectifying ratio of ∼178 and ideality factor of 1.79 at 300 K. Detectors made with such structure exhibit mid-infrared spectral photoresponse at room temperature. The peak responsivity R{sub λ} and specific detectivity D{sup *} are 0.055 A/W and 5.482 × 10{sup 8} cm·Hz{sup 1/2}/W at λ = 4.7 μm under zero-bias photovoltaic mode. Temperature-dependent photoresponse measurements show abnormal intensity variation below ∼200 K. Possible reasons for this phenomenon are also discussed.

  12. Modeling and optimization of InGaAs infrared photovoltaic detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Piotrowski, J; Reginski, K

    2000-01-01

    The performance of In sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As detectors operating in the 2-3.4 mu m spectral range and temperature of 300 K has been analyzed theoretically as a function of wavelength, band gap and doping level with special emphasis on 2-2.5 mu m and 3-3.5 mu m atmospheric window devices. The calculations show that the dominant generation-recombination mechanism in p-type, intrinsic and in a lightly doped n-type InGaAs is the spin split-off band Auger process (AS). Since the AS generation increases with the square of the hole concentration, the minimum thermal generation and the best performance can be obtained using moderately doped n-type material as the absorber region of a photovoltaic device. In principle, the ultimate performance can be achieved in the optimized homojunction devices with relatively thick n-type absorber region forming n-p junction with a thin p-type material. N-type doping of absorber region of InGaAs photodiodes at 300 K changes from 1x10 sup 1 sup 4 to 5.2x10 sup 1 sup 5 cm sup ...

  13. GaN-based MSM photovoltaic ultraviolet detector structure modeling and its simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yiren; Song Hang; Li Dabing; Sun Xiaojuan; Li Zhiming; Jiang Hong; Miao Guoqing

    2011-01-01

    Based on the principles of metal-semiconductor-metal Schottky barrier photodetectors (MSM-PD),using the carrier rate equations,the circuit simulation model ofa GaN-based MSM photovoltaic ultraviolet detector is constructed through an appropriately equivalent process.By using the Pspice analytical function of Cadence soft on the model,the relationship between the photocurrent and the terminal voltage under different UV light powers is analyzed.The result shows that under the given UV power,the photocurrent increases and tends to become saturated gradually as the terminal voltage of the device increases,and that under different UV powers,the photocurrent increases with increasing incident power.Then the analysis of the relationship between the photocurrent and the terminal voltage under the different ratios of interdigital electrode space and width is carried out when the UV power is given.The results show that when the ratio of interdigital electrode space and width (L/W) equals 1,the photocurrent tends to be at a maximum.

  14. Real-Time Monitoring and Control of HgCdTe MBE Using an Integrated Multi-Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    layer composition, and effusion cell flux during MBE growth of HgCdTe epilayers for advanced IR detectors. Substrate temperature is measured and...HgCdTe MBE growth of high performance IR detector structures over a wide range of compositions, layer thickness and substrate temperature.

  15. Growth, properties and applications of HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, J. L.

    1983-12-01

    This paper provides primarily a review of the methods used to grow HgCdTe with a summary of some of its basic properties and applications. Methods of crystal growth fall generally into three classes: growth from the melt, from solution and from the vapor phase. All three methods have been and are being used to grow HgCdTe. The high vapor pressure of HgCdTe at the melting point, combined with a large segregation coefficient, have effectively limited the use of Czochralski or zone melting techniques, but two melt growth techniques have survived: (1) a variation of Bridgman growth called quench-anneal wherein a dendritic crystal is formed by quenching the melt and is homogenized by solid state recrystallization below the melting point, (2) a variation of freezing from a large volume called slush-growth wherein a melt is held in a temperature gradient for several weeks while a crystal grows. Growth from solution has taken the form of liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) on CdTe with the LPE systems including growth from Hg-rich, HgTe-rich and Te-rich solutions and using tipping, vertical dipping, vertical sliding and horizontal sliding. Vapor phase growth is very promising but is not yet in production. Techniques include growth by isothermal close spaced epitaxy in which HgTe is transported isothermally by chemical potential onto CdTe, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) in which elements are evaporated in a high vacuum, and metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in which some of the metal atoms are carried to the substrate bound to organic radicals before being freed by pyrolysis. In all these methods, control of Hg pressure is a major concern. The fundamental properties discussed briefly are those of prime interest to detector manufacturers: energy gap ( Eg), intrinsic carrier concentration ( ni), and electrical activity of dopants. A reasonable fit to the Eg data from ˜ 20 papers is given by Eg = -0.302+1.93x+5.35×10 -4T(1-2x)-0.810x 2+0.832x 3. This gap, combined with k

  16. Dislocation reduction in HgCdTe grown on CdTe/Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.

    2016-05-01

    Bulk-grown CdZnTe (Zn = 3%) substrates are the natural choice for HgCdTe epitaxy since it is lattice matched to long wave LW-HgCdTe alloy. However, lack of large area CdZnTe substrates, high production costs, and more importantly, the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between CdZnTe and silicon Read out Integrated Circuits (ROIC) are some of the inherent drawbacks of CdZnTe substrates. Consequently, Hg1-xCdxTe detectors fabricated on silicon substrates are an attractive alternative. Recent developments in the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) buffer layer growth technology on Si substrates has revolutionized the HgCdTe research and offered a new dimension to HgCdTe-based IR technology. Si substrates provide advantages in terms of relatively large area (3 to 6-inch diameter is easily obtained) compared to CZT substrate materials, durability during processing, and reliability to thermal cycling. Innovations in Si-based composite substrates made it possible to fabricate very large-format IR arrays that offer higher resolution, low-cost arrays and more dies per wafer. Between Si substrates and HgCdTe has large lattice mismatch of 19%. This leads to dislocation densities of low-107 cm-2 for optimal growth of HgCdTe on silicon-based substrates as compared to the mid-104 cm-2 dislocation density of HgCdTe grown on CdZnTe. This paper present dislocation reduction by two orders of magnitude using thermal cycle anneal under Hg environment on HgCdTe grown on Si substrates and as well as defect reduction in Cd(Se)Te buffer layers grown on Si Substrates.

  17. Broadband ultrafast photovoltaic detectors based on large-scale topological insulator Sb2Te3/STO heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Honghui; Jiang, Tian; Zang, Yunyi; Zheng, Xin; Gong, Yan; Yan, Yong; Xu, Zhongjie; Liu, Yu; Fang, Liang; Cheng, Xiang'ai; He, Ke

    2017-07-13

    Topological insulators (TIs) are new states of quantum matter in which the spin-momentum-locked surface states reside in the bulk insulating gap and have triggered extensive investigations on fundamental properties and potential applications. Herein, we report scalable, broadband photovoltaic detectors based on the topological insulator Sb2Te3/strontium titanate (STO) heterostructure. Large-scale (2 mm × 5 mm), high crystalline quality p-type Sb2Te3 films were fabricated on an n-type STO substrate by the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) method. The Sb2Te3/STO heterostructures exhibited pronounced photovoltaic behavior in a wide range of temperatures as a result of a strong built-in field at the hetero-interface. Superior performances of broadband (from visible to infrared, 405 nm-1550 nm) and ultrafast (rise time ∼30 μs, fall time ∼95 μs) photoresponses were achieved under ambient conditions. The prominent repeatability and stability indicated that our photodetectors can operate effectively in harsh circumstances. These results show that stacking the topological insulator thin films on a strongly correlated oxide substrate using the MBE approach holds great promise for high performance optoelectronic applications.

  18. A New Bragg Reflector Enhanced UV Solar-Blind Photovoltaic Detector on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    The objective of this project is to study MBE growth of PbSrSe with different Sr composition and the potential for detector applications. The PbSrSe...Preliminary MBE growth was successful. Future work will be focused on new detector structures on 110 orientation.

  19. Candidate 10 micron HgCdTe arrays for the NEOCam space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtry, Craig W.; Dorn, Meghan; Cabrera, Mario S.; Pipher, Judith L.; Forrest, William J.; Mainzer, Amy K.; Wong, Andre

    2016-08-01

    The Near Earth Object Camera (NEOCam, Mainzer et al. 2015) is one of five NASA Discovery Class mission experiments selected for Phase A: down-select to one or two experiments will take place late in 2016. NEOCam will survey the sky in search of asteroids and comets, particularly those close to the Earth's orbit. The NEOCam infrared telescope will have two infrared (IR) channels; one covering 4 to 5 microns, and one covering 6-10 microns. Both IR cameras will use multiple 2Kx2K pixel format HAWAII-2RG arrays with different cutoff wavelength HgCdTe detectors from Teledyne Imaging Sensors. Past development work by the University of Rochester with Teledyne Imaging Sensors and JPL (McMurtry et al. 2013, Dorn et al. 2016) focused upon bringing the 10 micron HgCdTe detector technology up to NASA TRL 6+. This work extends that development program to push the format from 1Kx1K to the larger 2Kx2K pixel array. We present results on the first 2Kx2K candidate 10 micron cutoff HgCdTe arrays, where we measured the dark current, read noise, and total noise.

  20. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-01: Nanometric Organic Photovoltaic Thin Film X-Ray Detectors for Clinical KVp Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elshahat, Bassem; Gill, Hardeep; Kumar, Jayant; Sajo, Erno [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Lowell, MA (United States); Filipyev, Ilya; Zygmanski, Piotr [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Shrestha, Suman [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (United States); Hesser, Jurgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany); Karellas, Andrew [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To fabricate and test nanometric organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells made of various active-layer/electrode thicknesses and sizes; to determine the optimal material combinations and geometries suitable for dose measurements in clinical kilovoltage x-ray beams. Methods: The OPV consisted of P3HT:PCBM photoactive materials sandwiched between aluminum and Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) electrodes. Direct conversion of xrays in the active layer composed of donor and acceptor semiconducting organic materials generated signal in photovoltaic mode (without external voltage bias). OPV cells were fabricated with different active layer thicknesses (150, 270, 370 nm) and electrode areas (0.4, 0.7, 0.9, 1.4, 2.6 cm{sup 2}). A series of experiments were preformed in the energy range of 60–150 kVp. The net current per unit area (nA/cm{sup 2}) was measured using 200 mAs time-integrated beam current. Results: The net OPV current as function of beam energy (kVp) was proportional to ∼E{sup 0,4} {sup 5} when adjusted for beam output. The best combination of parameters for these cells was 270 nm active layer thicknesses for 0.7 cm{sup 2} electrode area. The measured current ranged from 0.69 to 2.43 nA/cm{sup 2} as a function of x-ray energy between 60 and 150 kVp, corresponding to 0.09 – 0.06 nA/cm{sup 2}/mGy, respectively, when adjusted for the beam output. Conclusion: The experiments indicate that OPV detectors possessing 270 nm active layer and 0.7 cm{sup 2} Al electrode areas have sensitivity by a factor of 2.5 greater than commercial aSi thin film PV. Because OPV can be made flexible and they do not require highvoltage bias supply, they open the possibility for using as in-vivo detectors in radiation safety in x-ray imaging beams.

  1. ROIC for HgCdTe e-APD FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zhang, Junling; Wang, Pan; Zhou, Jie; Gao, Lei; Ding, Ruijun

    2013-08-01

    Ultra-low light imaging and passive/active dual mode imaging require very low noise optical receivers to achieve detection of fast and weak optical signal. HgCdTe electrons initiated avalanche photodiodes (e-APDs) in linear multiplication mode is the detector of choice thanks to its high quantum efficiency, high gain at low bias, high bandwidth and low noise factor. In my work, a passive/active dual mode readout integrated circuit (ROIC) of e-APD focal plane array (FPA) is designed. Unit cell circuit architecture of ROIC includes a capacitance feedback transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) as preamplifier of ROIC, a high voltage protection module, a comparator, a Sample-Hold circuit module, and output driver stage. There is a protection module in every unit cell circuit which can avoid ROIC to be damaged from avalanche breakdown of some diodes of detector. Conventional 5V CMOS process is applied to implement the high voltage protection with the small area rather than Laterally Diffused Metal Oxide Semiconductor (LDMOS) in high voltage BCD process in the limited 100um×100um pitch area. In CTIA module, three integration capacitances are included in the CTIA module, two of them are switchable to provide different well capacity and noise. Constraints such as pixel area, stability and power lead us design toward a simple one-stage cascade operational transconductance amplifier (OTA) as pre-amplifier. High voltage protection module can protect ROIC to be damaged because of breakdown of some avalanche diodes.

  2. 中波HgCdTe光导探测器组件的故障树和失效研究%Study on HgCdTe Detector Assemble Fault Tree and Failure Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王韡; 许金通; 周青; 张立瑶; 李向阳

    2012-01-01

    Discussed are the reliability problems of HgCdTe(MCT) infrared photoconductive detectors working at near room temperature,including package failure,chip bonding failure and performance attenuation.Based on collecting the failure data of the detectors,fault tree analysis(FTA) was built by analyzing the failure mechanism of physics and chemistry,manufacturing process and parameters of the detectors.Minimal cut sets of FTA were obtained from qualitative analysis and the failure probability of top event was calculated.The failure modes in detectors,structures and process were analyzed.%讨论了近室温工作的HgCdTe中波光导探测器组件的可靠性问题,包括组件封装失效、引线键合失效和探测器的性能衰减等。通过收集探测器组件的失效信息,对其失效物理化学机制、制造工艺和探测器参数进行了分析,建立了组件的故障树(FTA),为探测器组件的失效分析提供了理论依据。由FTA定性分析得出探测器组件FTA的最小割集;计算了顶事件的失效几率。通过计算底事件概率重要度,得出组件封装失效是探测器组件失效的主要故障途径;同时实验发现,失效组件探测器的少子寿命值有较大的衰减,这可能起源于失效探测器的表面钝化层退化。

  3. Technical Note: Nanometric organic photovoltaic thin film detectors for dose monitoring in diagnostic x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elshahat, Bassem [Medical Physics Program, Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 and Department of Medical Imaging, Royal Jubilee Hospital, Vancouver Island Health Authority, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 1J8 (Canada); Gill, Hardeep Singh; Kumar, Jayant [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Filipyev, Ilya; Zygmanski, Piotr [Harvard Medical School, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Hesser, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, Mannheim 68167 (Germany); Sajo, Erno [Medical Physics Program, Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To fabricate organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells with nanometric active layers sensitive to ionizing radiation and measure their dosimetric characteristics in clinical x-ray beams in the diagnostic tube potential range of 60–150 kVp. Methods: Experiments were designed to optimize the detector’s x-ray response and find the best parameter combination by changing the active layer thickness and the area of the electrode. The OPV cell consisted of poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl): [6,6]-phenyl C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester photoactive donor and acceptor semiconducting organic materials sandwiched between an aluminum electrode as an anode and an indium tin oxide electrode as a cathode. The authors measured the radiation-induced electric current at zero bias voltage in all fabricated OPV cells. Results: The net OPV current as a function of beam potential (kVp) was proportional to kVp{sup −0.5} when normalized to x-ray tube output, which varies with kVp. Of the tested configurations, the best combination of parameters was 270 nm active layer thicknesses with 0.7 cm{sup 2} electrode area, which provided the highest signal per electrode area. For this cell, the measured current ranged from approximately 0.7 to 2.4 nA/cm{sup 2} for 60–150 kVp, corresponding to about 0.09 nA–0.06 nA/mGy air kerma, respectively. When compared to commercial amorphous silicon thin film photovoltaic cells irradiated under the same conditions, this represents 2.5 times greater sensitivity. An additional 40% signal enhancement was observed when a 1 mm layer of plastic scintillator was attached to the cells’ beam-facing side. Conclusions: Since both OPVs can be produced as flexible devices and they do not require external bias voltage, they open the possibility for use as thin film in vivo detectors for dose monitoring in diagnostic x-ray imaging.

  4. DUAL-BAND INFRARED DETECTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    As the infrared technology continues to advance, there is a growing demand for multispectral detectors for advanced IR systems with better target discrimination and identification. Both HgCdTe detectors and quantum well GaAs/AlGaAs photodetectors offer wavelength flexibility from medium wavelength to very long wavelength and multicolor capability in these regions. The main challenges facing all multicolor devices are more complicated device structtures, thicker and multilayer material growth, and more difficult device fabrication, especially when the array size gets larger and pixel size gets smaller. In the paper recent progress in development of two-color HgCdTe photodiodes and quantum well infrared photodetectors is presented.More attention is devoted to HgCdTe detectors. The two-color detector arrays are based upon an n-P-N (the capital letters mean the materials with larger bandgap energy) HgCdTe triple layer heterojunction design. Vertically stacking the two p-n junctions permits incorporation of both detectros into a single pixel. Both sequential mode and simultaneous mode detectors are fabricated. The mode of detection is determined by the fabrication process of the multilayer materials.Also the performances of stacked multicolor QWIPs detectors are presented. For multicolor arrays, QWIP's narrow band spectrum is an advantage, resulting in low spectral crosstalk. The major challenge for QWIP is developing broadband or multicolor optical coupling structures that permit efficient absorption of all required spectral bands.

  5. HgCdTe technology in Germany: the past, the present, and the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanski, W.; Ziegler, J.

    2009-05-01

    The first HgCdTe (MCT) activities at AEG-Telefunken in Germany were started in 1976. As part of the closing of AEG, the Heilbronn based IR-technology division was established as a spin-off company in 1995, under the brand name of AIM Infrarot-Module GmbH. A rapidly growing team of scientists focused on the detector-dewar-cooler technology and the development of linear photoconductive MCT arrays by applying the solid-state-recrystallization (SSR) technique for MCT growth, depositing and thinning MCT on sapphire substrates and oxide passivation. In 1979, after successful development of an own MCT-technology base, AEG-Telefunken entered into a license agreement with Texas Instruments for US Common Module (CM) technology in order to speed up the entry into full scale production with a transfer of MCT-material, dewar and cooler processes. CMs are still manufactured in small numbers. At the same time, a proprietary pc-MCT technology, independent of the CM production line, was developed and continuously matured and is today successfully applied in various custom designs like detectors for smart ammunition, for commercial and space applications. In 1982 started the development of 2nd Gen. photovoltaic MCT detectors, based on liquid-phase-epitaxy (LPE) in tilting and dipping technique and on planar array technology with Hg-Diffusion and ion implantation for pn-junction formation and CdTe/ZnS passivation. Linear MCT arrays in the 8-10,5 μm wavelength range with state of the art electro-optical performance have rapidly been demonstrated. Within the frame of the European anti-tank program TRIGAT, a two-way know-how-transfer between AEGTelefunken and SOFRADIR was established for linear LW MCT array processing, flip-chip-technology and dewar technology. Today, AIM's 2nd Gen. portfolio is based on MCT-LPE in dipping technique on CdZnTe substrates, characterized by a very low defect and dislocation density for 0,9 μm to 15μm wavelength application. Array processing is performed

  6. Recent progress for HGCDTE quantum detection in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravrand, O.; Destefanis, G.

    2013-07-01

    Due to its tuneable narrow band gap, HgCdTe (MCT) is a material of choice for high complexity IR focal plane arrays (FPAs). Being a strategic defence technology, MCT detector developments is totally mastered at every stage of fabrication at LETI and Sofradir, from the lattice matched CZT substrate growth, the active layer MCT growth, to PV technology, silicon ROIC design and flip chip hybridization. Within the last few years, MCT devices have considerably evolved in terms of device complexity, performances, and field of action. n/p standard technology has been developed in all spectral ranges, from VLWIR (20 μm) down SWIR (1.7 μm). MCT photodiode sensibility goes even lower, down to visible and even UV with a constant quantum efficiency. Moreover, MCT material provides us with high and noiseless avalanche gains inside the photodiode itself, which we are now fully able to use for the optimization of FPA performances. Besides, p/n diode structure is a new emerging process which improves detector performances by several orders of magnitude in terms of dark current, by comparison with the n/p historical structure. This technology has been successfully demonstrated from VLWIR (15 μm cut off) down to the SWIR range (2 μm cut off) where ultra low dark currents are recorded at low temperatures (0.4 e/s). In the same time, first dual band FPAs are delivered, which are expected to be the 3rd generation of IR detectors. At last, considerable efforts are made in order to increase the operational temperature, going from 100 K to 150 K for MWIR FPAs at constant performances, optimizing all technological steps, especially growth issues. Going at even higher operating temperatures (HOTs) is also under active study.

  7. An investigation for the HgCdTe cleaning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tian-Yi; Wang, Nili; Zhao, Shuiping; Liu, Shi-Jia; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2014-11-01

    A new cleaning process for HgCdTe was designed - which used the improved SC-1,SC-2 and Br2- C2H5OH solutions as the main cleaning fluid and applied mega sound waves in the cleaning process. By analyzing the test results carried out on the HgCdTe surface, it was found that the material of HgCdTe for the application of new cleaning process was better than the one for the application of conventional cleaning process in the minority carrier lifetime, residual organic contamination, responsivity and specific detectivity.

  8. Non-uniformly doped graded-gap Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As X-ray detectors with high photovoltaic response

    CERN Document Server

    Silenas, A; Smith, K M; Pozela, K; Jasutis, V; Dapkus, L; Juciene, V

    2002-01-01

    Graded-gap Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As/GaAs X-ray detectors with photovoltaic response have been designed and fabricated. A charge collection efficiency of 100% has been achieved in an Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As layer with a thickness of 15 mu m without application of any bias voltage to the layer. Experimentally, the measured sensitivity achieves 0.9 A/W. Amplification of the photocurrent takes place in the thin (15 mu m) Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As layer, and an efficiency of 5x10 sup 5 V/W is attained at an absorbed power of 10 sup - sup 7 W. The possibilities of using the new detectors for observation of X-ray images are considered.

  9. Developments in MOVPE HgCdTe arrays for passive and active infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ian; Maxey, Chris; Hipwood, Les; Weller, Harald; Thorne, Peter

    2012-09-01

    SELEX Galileo Infrared Ltd has developed a range of 3rd Generation infrared detectors based on HgCdTe grown by Metal Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE) on low cost GaAs substrates. There have been four key development aims: reducing the cost especially for large arrays, extending the wavelength range, improving the operating temperature for lower power, size and weight cameras and increasing the functionality. Despite a 14% lattice mismatch between GaAs and HgCdTe MOVPE arrays show few symptoms of misfit dislocations even in longwave detectors. The key factors in the growth and device technology are described in this paper to explain at a scientific level the radiometric quality of MOVPE arrays. A feature of the past few years has been the increasingly sophisticated products that are emerging thanks to custom designed silicon readout devices. Three devices are described as examples: a multifunctional device that can operate as an active or passive imager with built-in range finder, a 3-side buttable megapixel array and an ultra-low noise device designed for scientific applications.

  10. Receiver Performance of CO2 and CH4 Lidar with Low Noise HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X.; Abshire, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is currently developing CO2 lidars at 1.57 μm wavelength for the Active Sensing of CO2 Emission over Days, Nights, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. One of the major technical challenges is the photodetectors that have to operate in short wave infrared (SWIR) wavelength region and sensitive to received laser pulses of only a few photons. We have been using InGaAs photocathode photomultiplier tubes (PMT) in our airborne simulator of the CO2 lidar that can detect single photon with up to 10% quantum efficiency at photodetector for our CO2 lidars. The new HgCdTe APDs have typically a >50% quantum efficiency, including the effect of fill-factor, from 0.9 to 4.5 μm wavelength. DRS RSTA will integrate a low noise read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) with the HgCdTe APD array into a low noise analog SWIR detector with near single photon sensitivity. The new HgCdTe APD SWIR detector assembly is expected to improve the receiver sensitivity of our CO2 lidar by at least a factor of two and provide a sufficient wide signal dynamic range. The new SWIR detector systems can also be used in the CH4 lidars at 1.65 μm wavelength currently being developed at GSFC. The near infrared PMTs have diminishing quantum efficiency as the wavelength exceeds 1.6 μm. InGaAs APDs have a high quantum efficiency but too high an excess noise factor to achieve near quantum limited performance. The new HgCdTe APDs is expected to give a much superior performance than the PMTs and the InGaAs APDs. In this paper, we will give a brief description of the new HgCdTe APD assembly and present a receiver performance analysis of our CO2 lidar and a CH4 lidar with the new detector system in comparison to the near infrared PMTs and InGaAs APDs.

  11. HgCdTe探测器应力的多重晶X射线衍射分析%Multiple crystal X - ray diffraction analysis of stress in HgCdTe photovoltaic detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙涛; 王庆学; 陈文桥; 梁晋穗; 陈兴国; 胡晓宁; 李言谨; 何力

    2004-01-01

    HgCdTe光伏探测器的钝化介质膜应力常常限制其低温性能,利用高分辨率多重晶X射线衍射仪中的三重晶衍射技术和倒易空间作图对钝化介质膜应力进行了表征,发现在较高溅射能量下沉积的钝化膜,由于应力的作用,HgCdTe晶片出现弯曲,并有大量镶嵌结构,而在较低的溅射能量下和热蒸发下沉积的钝化膜,晶面未出现明显弯曲,可获得较低应力的钝化介质层.

  12. Dry etched SiO2 Mask for HgCdTe Etching Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Ye, Z. H.; Sun, C. H.; Deng, L. G.; Zhang, S.; Xing, W.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; He, L.

    2016-09-01

    A highly anisotropic etching process with low etch-induced damage is indispensable for advanced HgCdTe (MCT) infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) detectors. The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) enhanced reactive ion etching technique has been widely adopted in manufacturing HgCdTe IRFPA devices. An accurately patterned mask with sharp edges is decisive to accomplish pattern duplication. It has been reported by our group that the SiO2 mask functions well in etching HgCdTe with high selectivity. However, the wet process in defining the SiO2 mask is limited by ambiguous edges and nonuniform patterns. In this report, we patterned SiO2 with a mature ICP etching technique, prior to which a thin ZnS film was deposited by thermal evaporation. The SiO2 film etching can be terminated at the auto-stopping point of the ZnS layer thanks to the high selectivity of SiO2/ZnS in SF6 based etchant. Consequently, MCT etching was directly performed without any other treatment. This mask showed acceptable profile due to the maturity of the SiO2 etching process. The well-defined SiO2 pattern and the etched smooth surfaces were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. This new mask process could transfer the patterns exactly with very small etch-bias. A cavity with aspect-ratio (AR) of 1.2 and root mean square roughness of 1.77 nm was achieved first, slightly higher AR of 1.67 was also get with better mask profile. This masking process ensures good uniformity and surely benefits the delineation of shrinking pixels with its high resolution.

  13. COMPARISON OF CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES IN P-ON-N HgCdTe LWIR PHOTODIODES TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper standard techniques for characterization of HgCdTe liquid phase epitaxial layers (LPE) were presented. The performance of long wavelength p-on-n HgCdTe photodiodes fabricated by arsenic diffusion was described. The correlation between LPE HgCdTe material parameters and properties of the infrared photodiodes was demonstrated.

  14. Beam diagnostics at DAFNE with fast uncooled IR detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bocci, A; Drago, A; Grilli, A; Marcelli, A; Piccinini, M; Raco, A; Sorchetti, R; Gambicorti, L; De Sio, A; Pace, E; Piotrowski, J

    2008-01-01

    Bunch-by-bunch longitudinal diagnostics is a key issue of modern accelerators. To face up this challenging demand, tests of mid-IR compact uncooled photoconductive HgCdTe detectors have been recently performed at DAFNE. Different devices were used to monitor the emission of e- bunches. The first experiments allowed recording of 2.7 ns long e- bunches with a FWHM of a single pulse of about 600 ps. These results address the possibility to improve diagnostics at DAFNE and to this purpose an exit port on a bending magnet of the positron ring has been set-up. An HV chamber, hosting a gold-coated plane mirror that collects and deflects the radiation through a ZnSe window, is the front-end of this port. After the window, a simple optical layout in air allows focusing IR radiation on different detectors. The instrumentation will allow comparison in the sub-ns time domain between the two rings and to identify and characterize bunch instabilities. Moreover, to improve performances tests of new photovoltaic detectors wi...

  15. Development of an infrared detector: Quantum well infrared photodetector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wei; LI Ling; ZHENG HongLou; XU WenLan; XIONG DaYuan

    2009-01-01

    The progress in the quantum well infrared photo-detector (QWIP) based on quantum confinement in semiconductor in recent 10 years has been reviewed. The differences between QWlP and the HgCdTe (HCT) infrared detector as well as their compensation are analyzed. The outlook for near-future trends in QWIP technologies is also presented.

  16. Development of an infrared detector: Quantum well infrared photodetector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The progress in the quantum well infrared photo-detector (QWIP) based on quantum confinement in semiconductor in recent 10 years has been reviewed. The differences between QWIP and the HgCdTe (HCT) infrared detector as well as their compensation are analyzed. The outlook for near-future trends in QWIP technologies is also presented.

  17. High-Operating Temperature HgCdTe: A Vision for the Near Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Carmody, M.; Piquette, E.; Dreiske, P.; Chen, A.; Yulius, A.; Edwall, D.; Bhargava, S.; Zandian, M.; Tennant, W. E.

    2016-09-01

    We review recent advances in the HgCdTe material quality and detector performance achieved at Teledyne using molecular beam epitaxy growth and the double-layer planar hetero-junction (DLPH) detector architecture. By using an un-doped, fully depleted absorber, Teledyne's DLPH architecture can be extended for use in high operating temperatures and other applications. We assess the potential achievable performance for long wavelength infrared (LWIR) hetero-junction p-lightly-doped n or p-intrinsic- n (p-i-n) detectors based on recently reported results for 10.7 μm cutoff 1 K × 1 K focal plane arrays (FPAs) tested at temperatures down to 30 K. Variable temperature dark current measurements show that any Shockley-Read-Hall currents in the depletion region of these devices have lifetimes that are reproducibly greater than 100 ms. Under the assumption of comparable lifetimes at higher temperatures, it is predicted that fully-depleted background radiation-limited performance can be expected for 10- μm cutoff detectors from room temperature to well below liquid nitrogen temperatures, with room-temperature dark current nearly 400 times lower than predicted by Rule 07. The hetero-junction p-i-n diode is shown to have numerous other significant potential advantages including minimal or no passivation requirements for pBn-like processing, low 1/ f noise, compatibility with small pixel pitch while maintaining high modulation transfer function, low crosstalk and good quantum efficiency. By appropriate design of the FPA dewar shielding, analysis shows that dark current can theoretically be further reduced below the thermal equilibrium radiative limit. Modeling shows that background radiation-limited LWIR HgCdTe operating with f/1 optics has the potential to operate within √2 of background-limited performance at 215 K. By reducing the background radiation by 2/3 using novel shielding methods, operation with a single-stage thermo-electric-cooler may be possible. If the

  18. Multi-color IRFPAs made from HgCdTe grown by MOVPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. L.; Hipwood, L. G.; Price, J.; Shaw, C. J.; Abbott, P.; Maxey, C. D.; Lau, H. W.; Catchpole, R. A.; Ordish, M.; Knowles, P.; Gordon, N. T.

    2007-04-01

    The drive towards improved target recognition has led to an increasing interest in detection in more than one infrared band. This paper describes the design, fabrication and performance of two-colour and three-colour infrared detectors made from HgCdTe grown by Metal Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). The detectors are staring, focal plane arrays consisting of HgCdTe mesa-diode arrays bump bonded to silicon read-out integrated circuits (ROICs). Each mesa diode has one connection to the ROIC and the colours are selected by varying the applied bias. Results will be presented for both two-colour and three-colour devices. In a two-colour n-p-n design the cut-off wavelengths are defined by the compositions of the two n-type absorbers and the doping and composition of the p-type layer are chosen to prevent transistor action. The bias polarity is used to switch the output between colours. This design has been used to make MW/LW detectors with a MW band covering 3 to 5 μm and a LW band covering 5 to 10 μm. In a three-colour n-p-n design the cut-off wavelengths are defined by the compositions of the two n-type absorbers and the p-type absorber, which has an intermediate cut-off wavelength. The absorbers are separated from each other by electronic barriers consisting of wide band-gap material. At low applied bias these barriers prevent photo-electrons generated in the p-type absorber from escaping and the device then gives an output from one of the n-type absorbers. At high applied bias the electronic barrier is pulled down and the device gives an output from both the p-type absorber and one of the n-type absorbers. Thus by varying the polarity and magnitude of the bias it is possible to obtain three-colours from a two-terminal device. This design has been used to make a SW/MW/MW detector with cut-off wavelengths of approximately 3, 4 and 6 μm.

  19. 640 X 480 Pace HgCdTe FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Lester J.; Bailey, Robert B.; Cabelli, Scott A.; Cooper, Donald E.; McComas, Gail D.; Vural, Kadri; Tennant, William E.

    1992-12-01

    A hybrid HgCdTe 640 X 480 infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) that meets the sensitivity, resolution, and field-of-view requirements of high-performance medium wavelength infrared (MWIR) imaging systems has been developed. The key technology making this large, high sensitivity device producible is the epitaxial growth of HgCdTe on a CdTe-buffered, sapphire substrate (referred to as PACE, for Producible Alternative to CdTe for Epitaxy; PACE-I refers to sapphire). The device offers TV resolution with excellent sensitivity at temperatures below 120 K. Mean NE(Delta) T as low as 13 mK has been achieved at operating temperatures nonuniformity compensation.

  20. HOT MWIR HgCdTe performance on CZT and alternative substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Joseph G.; DeWames, Roger; Perconti, Philip; Billman, Curtis; Maloney, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Mid wave infrared (MWIR) imaging in the 3-5 um spectral band has traditionally been performed by InSb sensors. InSb technology is presently limited to a near 80K operating temperature and the hunt has been on for a higher operating temperature (HOT) technology that does as well at 150K as InSb at 80K, but with reduced power requirements. Amongst these alternative technologies are photovoltaic sensors consisting of heterostructures of HgCdTe (MCT). In previous work we assessed the device performance of several alternative MWIR HOT technologies (MCT on Si, MCT on GaAs) as a function of operating temperature. In this work we compare the NEDT histograms for these alternative technologies with InSb to better understand how their performance can be improved at higher temperatures. We also present analysis formalism for quantitatively assessing the number of FPA pixels which reside in the central versus the shoulder portions of the histogram.Begin the Introduction two lines below the Keywords. The manuscript should not have headers, footers, or page numbers. It should be in a onecolumn format. References are often noted in the text1 and cited at the end of the paper.

  1. Improved CO [lidar detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, P.L.; Busch, G.E.; Thompson, D.C.; Remelius, D.K.; Wells, F.D.

    1999-07-18

    A high sensitivity, CO{sub 2} lidar detector, based on recent advances in ultra-low noise, readout integrated circuits (ROIC), is being developed. This detector will combine a high speed, low noise focal plane array (FPA) with a dispersive grating spectrometer. The spectrometer will filter the large background flux, thereby reducing the limiting background photon shot noise. In order to achieve the desired low noise levels, the HgCdTe FPA will be cooled to {approximately}50K. High speed, short pulse operation of the lidar system should enable the detector to operate with the order of a few noise electrons in the combined detector/ ROIC output. Current receiver design concepts will be presented, along with their expected noise performance.

  2. Detectors and cooling technology for direct spectroscopic biosignature characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, Bernard J; Moseley, S H; Sadleir, John E; Stevenson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Direct spectroscopic biosignature characterization (hereafter "biosignature characterization") will be a major focus for future space observatories equipped with coronagraphs or starshades. Our aim in this article is to provide an introduction to potential detector and cooling technologies for biosignature characterization. We begin by reviewing the needs. These include nearly noiseless photon detection at flux levels as low as $<0.001~\\textrm{photons}~s^{-1}~\\textrm{pixel}^{-1}$ in the visible and near-IR. We then discuss potential areas for further testing and/or development to meet these needs using non-cryogenic detectors (EMCCD, HgCdTe array, HgCdTe APD array), and cryogenic single photon detectors (MKID arrays and TES microcalorimeter arrays). Non-cryogenic detectors are compatible with the passive cooling that is strongly preferred by coronagraphic missions, but would add non-negligible noise. Cryogenic detectors would require active cooling, but in return deliver nearly quantum limited performance....

  3. Doping and Diffusion in HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-28

    In’i, -InT. Te - 1.8 ( - 3 .5 )h ( + 2.9 - 6/) TeT1’- Tej . 4 Hg rich HgCdTe Hg - 1.8 + 1.2 + 1.4 - 2p H - ’g, - H g j.. ’TI - tetrahedral position...A. Anderson, Appl. Phys. Lett. 53, 11.81 (1988). B. D. Patterson, Rev. Mod. Phys. 60, 69 (1988). 60 V. A. Singh , C. Weigel, J. W. Corbett, and L. M

  4. Crystal Growth of Solid Solution HgCdTe Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1997-01-01

    The growth of homogenous crystals of HgCdTe alloys is complicated by the large separation between their liquidus and solidus temperatures. Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te is representative of several alloys which have electrical and optical properties that can be compositionally tuned for a number of applications. Limitations imposed by gravity during growth and results from growth under reduced conditions are described. The importance of residual accelerations was demonstrated by dramatic differences in compositional distribution observed for different attitudes of the space shuttle that resulted in different steady acceleration components.

  5. Photovoltaic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Jason A; Keenihan, James R; Gaston, Ryan S; Kauffmann, Keith L; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo; Maak, Kevin D; Mills, Michael E; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R

    2017-03-21

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  6. Photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  7. Photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  8. Characteristics of HgCdTe epilayer grown by LPE using horizontal slider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J K Radhakrishnan; S Sitharaman; S C Gupta

    2002-11-01

    The characteristics of HgCdTe epilayers grown in a modified horizontal slider system, are reported here. The surface morphology of the grown layers, their IR transmission characteristics, depth and lateral compositional uniformity, structural and electrical characteristics are discussed.

  9. Low-Roughness Plasma Etching of HgCdTe Masked with Patterned Silicon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Z. H.; Hu, W. D.; Yin, W. T.; Huang, J.; Lin, C.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; Chen, X. S.; Lu, W.; He, L.

    2011-08-01

    A novel mask technique utilizing patterned silicon dioxide films has been exploited to perform mesa etching for device delineation and electrical isolation of HgCdTe third-generation infrared focal-plane arrays (IRFPAs). High-density silicon dioxide films were deposited at temperature of 80°C, and a procedure for patterning and etching of HgCdTe was developed by standard photolithography and wet chemical etching. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the surfaces of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etched samples were quite clean and smooth. Root-mean-square (RMS) roughness characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was less than 1.5 nm. The etching selectivity between a silicon dioxide film and HgCdTe in the samples masked with patterned silicon dioxide films was greater than 30:1. These results show that the new masking technique is readily available and promising for HgCdTe mesa etching.

  10. Ultra-low Noise, High Bandwidth, 1550nm HgCdTe APD Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Voxtel Inc. proposes to optimize the design of a large area, 1.55?m sensitive HgCdTe avalanche photodiode (APD) that achieves high gain with nearly no excess noise....

  11. HgZnTe-based detectors for LWIR NASA applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Elizabeth A.; Kalisher, Murray H.

    1990-01-01

    The initial goal was to grow and characterize HgZnTe and determine if it indeed had the advantageous properties that were predicted. Researchers grew both bulk and liquid phase epitaxial HgZnTe. It was determined that HgZnTe had the following properties: (1) microhardness at least 50 percent greater than HgCdTe of equivalent bandgap; (2) Hg annealing rates of at least 2 to 4 times longer than HgCdTe; and (3) higher Hg vacancy formation energies. This early work did not focus on one specific composition (x-value) of HgZnTe since NASA was interested in HgZnTe's potential for a variety of applications. Since the beginning of 1989, researchers have been concentrating, however, on the liquid phase growth of very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) HgZnTe (cutoff approx. equals 17 microns at 65K) to address the requirements of the Earth Observing System (EOS). Since there are no device models to predict the advantages in reliability one can gain with increased microhardness, surface stability, etc., one must fabricate HgZnTe detectors and assess their relative bake stability (accelerated life test behavior) compared with HgCdTe devices fabricated in the same manner. Researchers chose to fabricate HIT detectors as a development vehicle for this program because high performance in the VLWIR has been demonstrated with HgCdTe HIT detectors and the HgCdTe HIT process should be applicable to HgZnTe. HIT detectors have a significant advantage for satellite applications since these devices dissipate much less power than conventional photoconductors to achieve the same responsivity.

  12. Photovoltaic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolis Kiela

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with an overview of photovoltaic cells that are currently manufactured and those being developed, including one or several p-n junction, organic and dye-sensitized cells using quantum dots. The paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of various photovoltaic cells, identifies the main parameters, explains the main reasons for the losses that may occur in photovoltaic cells and looks at the ways to minimize them.Article in Lithuanian

  13. Minority carrier lifetimes in different doped LWIR HgCdTe grown by LPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, GuangYin; Wei, YanFeng; Sun, QuanZhi; Yang, JianRong

    2012-10-01

    The carrier lifetimes of different types of p-type doped HgCdTe(x~0.23) long wavelength infrared (LWIR) epilayers were measured which were Hg-vacancy, Au and arsenic doped ones prepared by Te-rich Liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE). By comparing the lifetimes of Hg-vacancy and extrinsic doped HgCdTe, we focus on three primary mechanisms limiting the lifetimes in these different p-type HgCdTe samples: radiative recombination, Auger recombination and Schokley-Read- Hall (SRH) Recombination. The recombination mechanism in p-type HgCdTe is the SRH recombination at low temperatures and Auger and radiative recombination at high temperature. It is found that the lifetime of As-doped and Au-doped HgCdTe is far longer than that of Hg-vacancy-doped sample which is caused by the deep energy level of the Hg-vacancy acceptor that is considered as a recombination center in HgCdTe. Also we found lifetime in those p-type doped HgCdTe LWIR epilayers is limited by SRH by comparing the experimental lifetimes with the calculated data. Impurity doping was found to have a main effect on minority carrier lifetime.

  14. Development activities on NIR large format MCT detectors for astrophysics and space science at CEA and SOFRADIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulade, Olivier; Moreau, Vincent; Mulet, Patrick; Gravrand, Olivier; Cervera, Cyril; Zanatta, Jean-Paul; Castelein, Pierre; Guellec, Fabrice; Fièque, Bruno; Chorier, Philippe; Roumegoux, Julien

    2016-07-01

    CEA and SOFRADIR have been manufacturing and characterizing near infrared detectors in the frame of ESA's near infrared large format sensor array roadmap to develop a 2Kx2K large format low flux low noise device for space applications such as astrophysics. These detectors use HgCdTe as the absorbing material and p/n diode technology. The technological developments (photovoltaic technology, readout circuit, ...) are shared between CEA/LETI and SOFRADIR, both in Grenoble, while most of the performances are evaluated at CEA/IRFU in Saclay where a dedicated test facility has been developed, in particular to measure very low dark currents. The paper will present the current status of these developments at the end of ESA's NIRLFSA phase 2. The performances of the latest batch of devices meet or are very close to all the requirements (quantum efficiency, dark current, cross talk, readout noise, ...) even though a glow induced by the ROIC prevents the accurate measurement of the dark current. The current devices are fairly small, 640x512 15μm pixels, and the next phase of activity will target the development of a full size 2Kx2K detector. From the design and development, to the manufacturing and finally the testing, that type of detector requests a high level of mastering. An appropriate manufacturing and process chain compatible with such a size is needed at industrial level and results obtained with CEA technology coupled with Sofradir industrial experience and work on large dimension detector allow French actors to be confident to address this type of future missions.

  15. Measurements of Low Frequency Noise of Infrared Photo-Detectors with Transimpedance Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciura Łukasz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the method and results of low-frequency noise measurements of modern mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors. A type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice based detector with nBn barrier architecture is compared with a high operating temperature (HOT heterojunction HgCdTe detector. All experiments were made in the range 1 Hz - 10 kHz at various temperatures by using a transimpedance detection system, which is examined in detail. The power spectral density of the nBn’s dark current noise includes Lorentzians with different time constants while the HgCdTe photodiode has more uniform 1/f - shaped spectra. For small bias, the low-frequency noise power spectra of both devices were found to scale linearly with bias voltage squared and were connected with the fluctuations of the leakage resistance. Leakage resistance noise defines the lower noise limit of a photodetector. Other dark current components give raise to the increase of low-frequency noise above this limit. For the same voltage biasing devices, the absolute noise power densities at 1 Hz in nBn are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than in a MCT HgCdTe detector. In spite of this, low-frequency performance of the HgCdTe detector at ~ 230K is still better than that of InAs/GaSb superlattice nBn detector.

  16. Photovoltaic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell module including a plurality of serially connected photovoltaic cells on a common substrate, each including a first electrode, a printed light-harvesting layer and a printed second electrode, wherein at least one of the electrodes is transparent, and wherein the second electrode...

  17. Photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kurtz, Sarah

    1984-11-27

    In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

  18. US photovoltaic patents: 1991--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohle, L

    1995-03-01

    This document contains US patents on terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) power applications, including systems, components, and materials as well as manufacturing and support functions. The patent entries in this document were issued from 1991 to 1993. The entries were located by searching USPA, the database of the US Patent Office. The final search retrieved all patents under the class ``Batteries, Thermoelectric and Photoelectric`` and the subclasses ``Photoelectric,`` ``Testing,`` and ``Applications.`` The search also located patents that contained the words ``photovoltaic(s)`` or ``solar cell(s)`` and their derivatives. After the initial list was compiled, most of the patents on the following subjects were excluded: space photovoltaic technology, use of the photovoltaic effect for detectors, and subjects only peripherally concerned with photovoltaic. Some patents on these three subjects were included when ft appeared that those inventions might be of use in terrestrial PV power technologies.

  19. InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice infrared detectors: three decades of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.; Kopytko, M.; Martyniuk, P.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, there has been considerable progress towards III-V antimonide-based low dimensional solids development and device design innovations. From a physics point of view, the type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice is an extremely attractive proposition. Their development results from two primary motivations: the perceived challenges of reproducibly fabricating high-operability HgCdTe FPAs at reasonable cost and theoretical predictions of lower Auger recombination for type-II superlattice (T2SL) detectors compared to HgCdTe. Lower Auger recombination should be translated into a fundamental advantage for T2SL over HgCdTe in terms of lower dark current and/or higher operating temperature, provided other parameters such as Shockley-Read-Hall lifetime are equal. Based on these promising results it is obvious now that the InAs/GaSb superlattice technology is competing with HgCdTe third generation detector technology with the potential advantage of standard III-V technology to be more competitive in costs and as a consequence series production pricing. Comments to the statement whether the superlattice IR photodetectors can outperform the "bulk" narrow gap HgCdTe detectors is one of the most important questions for the future of IR photodetectors presented by Rogalski at the April 2006 SPIE meeting in Orlando, Florida, are more credible today and are presented in this paper. It concerns the trade-offs between two most competing IR material technologies: InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices and HgCdTe ternary alloy system.

  20. Photovoltaic technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Bagnall, Darren M.; Boreland, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Photovoltaics is already a billion dollar industry. It is experiencing rapid growth as concerns over fuel supplies and carbon emissions mean that governments and individuals are increasingly prepared to ignore its current high costs. It will become truly mainstream when its costs are comparable to other energy sources. At the moment, it is around four times too expensive for competitive commercial production. Three generations of photovoltaics have been envisaged that will take solar power in...

  1. Mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) passivation by advanced thin conformal Al2O3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Richard; Pattison, James; Chen, Andrew; Nayfeh, Osama

    2012-06-01

    HgCdTe passivation process must be performed at low temperature in order to reduce Hg depletion. Low temperature plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) is an emerging deposition technology for thin highly conformal films to meet the demand. Room temperature PE-ALD Al2O3 film's passivation on HgCdTe has been studied. Conformal film was investigated through SEM images of the Al2O3 film deposited onto high aspect ratio features dry etched into HgCdTe. Minority carrier lifetime was measured and compared by photoconductive decay transients of HgCdTe before and after deposition. Room temperature ALD Al2O3 film increased the minority carrier lifetime of HgCdTe.

  2. Ion Beam Nanostructuring of HgCdTe Ternary Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Aleksey B.; Savkina, Rada K.; Udovytska, Ruslana S.; Gudymenko, Oleksandr I.; Kladko, Vasyl P.; Korchovyi, Andrii A.

    2017-05-01

    Systematic study of mercury cadmium telluride thin films subjected to the ion beam bombardment was carried out. The evolution of surface morphology of (111) Hg1 - x Cd x Te ( x 0.223) epilayers due to 100 keV B+ and Ag+ ion irradiation was studied by AFM and SEM methods. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction methods were used for the investigation of the chemical compound and structural properties of the surface and subsurface region. It was found that in the range of nanoscale, arrays of holes and mounds on Hg0.777Cd0.223Te (111) surface as well as the polycrystalline Hg1 - x Cd x Te cubic phase with alternative compound ( x 0.20) have been fabricated using 100 keV ion beam irradiation of the basic material. Charge transport investigation with non-stationary impedance spectroscopy method has shown that boron-implanted structures are characterized by capacity-type impedance whereas for silver-implanted structures, an inductive-type impedance (or "negative capacitance") is observed. A hybrid system, which integrates the nanostructured ternary compound (HgCdTe) with metal-oxide (Ag2O) inclusions, was fabricated by Ag+ ion bombardment. The sensitivity of such metal-oxide-semiconductor hybrid structure for sub-THz radiation was detected with NEP 4.5 × 10-8 W/Hz1/2at ν ≈ 140 GHz and 296 K without amplification.

  3. Simulation of Small-Pitch HgCdTe Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, Marco; Goano, Michele; Bertazzi, Francesco; Ghione, Giovanni; Schirmacher, Wilhelm; Hanna, Stefan; Figgemeier, Heinrich

    2017-09-01

    Recent studies indicate as an important technological step the development of infrared HgCdTe-based focal plane arrays (FPAs) with sub-wavelength pixel pitch, with the advantage of smaller volume, lower weight, and potentially lower cost. In order to assess the limits of pixel pitch scaling, we present combined three-dimensional optical and electrical simulations of long-wavelength infrared HgCdTe FPAs, with 3 μm, 5 μm, and 10 μm pitch. Numerical simulations predict significant cavity effects, brought by the array periodicity. The optical and electrical contributions to spectral inter-pixel crosstalk are investigated as functions of pixel pitch, by illuminating the FPAs with Gaussian beams focused on the central pixel. Despite the FPAs being planar with 100% pixel duty cycle, our calculations suggest that the total crosstalk with nearest-neighbor pixels could be kept acceptably small also with pixels only 3 μ m wide and a diffraction-limited optical system.

  4. Spatial noise limited NETD performance of a HgCdTe hybrid focal plane array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Vishnu

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a model for theoretically estimating the residual spatial noise in a direct injection readout hybrid focal plane array (FPA) consisting of photovoltaic detectors. The procedure consists of computing the response of the pixels after taking into account the nonlinearity induced by the transfer function in the hybrid configuration and the estimated r.m.s. response nonuniformity from the known input parameters of the detector and readout arrays. A linear two point nonuniformity compensation algorithm is applied to the computed pixel responses to calculate the residual spatial noise. Signal-to-spatial noise ratio is then used to estimate the spatial noise limited NETD performance of MWIR and LWIR Hg 1- x Cd x Te hybrid FPAs.

  5. Photovoltaic spectral responsivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Dunlavy, D.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the various elemental random and nonrandom error sources in typical spectral responsivity measurement systems. The authors focus specifically on the filter and grating monochrometer-based spectral responsivity measurement systems used by the Photovoltaic (PV) performance characterization team at NREL. A variety of subtle measurement errors can occur that arise from a finite photo-current response time, bandwidth of the monochromatic light, waveform of the monochromatic light, and spatial uniformity of the monochromatic and bias lights; the errors depend on the light source, PV technology, and measurement system. The quantum efficiency can be a function of he voltage bias, light bias level, and, for some structures, the spectral content of the bias light or location on the PV device. This paper compares the advantages and problems associated with semiconductor-detector-based calibrations and pyroelectric-detector-based calibrations. Different current-to-voltage conversion and ac photo-current detection strategies employed at NREL are compared and contrasted.

  6. Photocapacitive MIS infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, A.; Lu, S. S.-M.; Moriarty, J. A.; Crouch, R. K.; Miller, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    A new class of room-temperature infrared detectors has been developed through use of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) or metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal (MISIM) slabs. The detectors, which have been fabricated from Si, Ge and GaAs, rely for operation on the electrical capacitance variations induced by modulated incident radiation. The peak detectivity for a 1000-A Si MISIM detector is comparable to that of a conventional Si detector functioning in the photovoltaic mode. Optimization of the photocapacitive-mode detection sensitivity is discussed.

  7. Applied photovoltaics

    CERN Document Server

    Wenham, Stuart R; Watt, Muriel E; Corkish, Richard; Sproul, Alistair

    2013-01-01

    The new edition of this thoroughly considered textbook provides a reliable, accessible and comprehensive guide for students of photovoltaic applications and renewable energy engineering. Written by a group of award-winning authors it is brimming with information and is carefully designed to meet the needs of its readers. Along with exercises and references at the end of each chapter, it features a set of detailed technical appendices that provide essential equations, data sources and standards. The new edition has been fully updated with the latest information on photovoltaic cells,

  8. Real Time Monitor and Control of MBE Growth of HgCdTe by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    The primary goal of this contract develop a real-time monitoring capability for HgCdTe composition during MBE growth . This goal was realized by...methodology for acquiring and analyzing insitu SE data in the MBE growth environment. These improvements and developments are part of an extensive

  9. Thermal Cycle Annealing and its Application to Arsenic-Ion Implanted HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-26

    doping profile, as shown in Figure 3. The TCA treatment on the unimplanted epilayers showed an exponential defect reduction proportional to the...Chamonal, P. Castelein, J. Zanatta, M. Tchagaspanian, A. Papon, J. Barnes, F. Henry, S. Gout , G. Bourgeois, C. Pautet and P. Fougeres, "HgCdTe FPAs

  10. Arsenic complexes optical signatures in As-doped HgCdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemain, F.; Robin, I. C.; Brochen, S.; Ballet, P.; Gravrand, O.; Feuillet, G. [CEA-LETI Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2013-04-08

    In this paper, the optical signatures of arsenic complexes in As-doped HgCdTe samples grown by molecular beam epitaxy are clearly identified using comparison between photoluminescence spectra, Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure, and Hall measurements. The ionization energies of the different complexes are measured both by photoluminescence and Hall measurements.

  11. Influence of photoresist feature geometry on ECR plasma-etched HgCdTe trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, J. David; Stoltz, Andrew J., Jr.; Kaleczyc, Andrew W.; Martinka, Mike; Almeida, Leo A.; Boyd, Phillip R.; Dinan, John H.

    2002-12-01

    Factors that affect width and aspect ratio in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) etched HgCdTe trenches are investigated. The ECR etch bias and anisotropy are determined by photoresist feature erosion rate. The physical characteristics of the trenches are attributed to ECR plasma etch chemistry.

  12. Temperature-driven massless Kane fermions in HgCdTe crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teppe, F.; Marcinkiewicz, M.; Krishtopenko, S. S.; Ruffenach, S.; Consejo, C.; Kadykov, A. M.; Desrat, W.; But, D.; Knap, W.; Ludwig, J.; Moon, S.; Smirnov, D.; Orlita, M.; Jiang, Z.; Morozov, S. V.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretskii, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    It has recently been shown that electronic states in bulk gapless HgCdTe offer another realization of pseudo-relativistic three-dimensional particles in condensed matter systems. These single valley relativistic states, massless Kane fermions, cannot be described by any other relativistic particles. Furthermore, the HgCdTe band structure can be continuously tailored by modifying cadmium content or temperature. At critical concentration or temperature, the bandgap collapses as the system undergoes a semimetal-to-semiconductor topological phase transition between the inverted and normal alignments. Here, using far-infrared magneto-spectroscopy we explore the continuous evolution of band structure of bulk HgCdTe as temperature is tuned across the topological phase transition. We demonstrate that the rest mass of Kane fermions changes sign at critical temperature, whereas their velocity remains constant. The velocity universal value of (1.07+/-0.05) × 106 m s-1 remains valid in a broad range of temperatures and Cd concentrations, indicating a striking universality of the pseudo-relativistic description of the Kane fermions in HgCdTe.

  13. Photovoltaic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    In 1989, the U.S. photovoltaic industry enjoyed a growth rate of 30 percent in sales for the second year in a row. This sends a message that the way we think about electricity is changing. Instead of big energy projects that perpetuate environmental and economic damage, there is a growing trend toward small renewable technologies that are well matched to end-user needs and operating conditions. As demand grows and markets expand, investment capital will be drawn to the industry and new growth trends will emerge. The photovoltaic industry around the world achieved record shipments also. Worldwide shipments of photovoltaic (PV) modules for 1989 totaled more than 40 megawatts (MW), nearly a 20 percent increase over last year's shipments. The previous two years showed increases in worldwide shipments of 23 and 25 percent, respectively. If this growth rate continues through the 1990s, as industry back orders would indicate, 300 to 1000 MW of PV-supplied power could be on line by 2000. Photovoltaic systems have low environmental impact and they are inexpensive to operate and maintain. Using solid-state technology, PV systems directly convert sunlight to electricity without high-temperature fluids or moving parts that could cause mechanical failure. This makes the technology very reliable.

  14. Linearity Testing of Photovoltaic Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinegar, S.; Nalley, D.; Emery, K.

    2006-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices are rated in terms of their power output or efficiency with respect to a specific spectrum, total irradiance, and temperature. In order to rate photovoltaic devices, a reference detector whose response is linear with total irradiance is needed. This procedure documents a procedure to determine if a detector is linear over the irradiance range of interest. Testing the short circuit current versus the total irradiance is done by illuminating a reference cell candidate with two lamps that are fitted with programmable filter wheels. The purpose is to reject nonlinear samples as determined by national and international standards from being used as primary reference cells. A calibrated linear reference cell tested by the two lamp method yields a linear result.

  15. Linearity Testing of Photovoltaic Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinegar, S.; Nalley, D.; Emery, K.

    2006-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices are rated in terms of their power output or efficiency with respect to a specific spectrum, total irradiance, and temperature. In order to rate photovoltaic devices, a reference detector whose response is linear with total irradiance is needed. This procedure documents a procedure to determine if a detector is linear over the irradiance range of interest. Testing the short circuit current versus the total irradiance is done by illuminating a reference cell candidate with two lamps that are fitted with programmable filter wheels. The purpose is to reject nonlinear samples as determined by national and international standards from being used as primary reference cells. A calibrated linear reference cell tested by the two lamp method yields a linear result.

  16. Photovoltaic fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-22

    during wire fabrication. Weaving was demonstrated for both military-type nylon -cotton blend (NYCO) warp fibers and cotton-polyester warp fibers. A...Lowell, MA 01852 14. ABSTRACT This report describes a project to improve photovoltaic fabrics. It had four objectives: 1) Efficiency – make PV wires on...a continuous basis that exhibit 7% efficiency; 2) Automated Welding – demonstrate an automated means of interconnecting the electrodes of one wire

  17. Photovoltaic Wire Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will investigate a new architecture for photovoltaic devices based on nanotechnology: photovoltaic wire. The...

  18. Roof Photovoltaic Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In order to accurately predict the annual energy production of photovoltaic systems for any given geographical location, building orientation, and photovoltaic cell...

  19. Investigation of Substrate Effects on Interface Strain and Defect Generation in MBE-Grown HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, R.; Lei, W.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L.

    2016-09-01

    Si, Ge, and GaAs have been extensively investigated as alternative substrates for molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of HgCdTe and, at present, are widely used for HgCdTe-based infrared focal-plane arrays. However, the problem of high dislocation density in HgCdTe layers grown on these lattice-mismatched substrates has yet to be resolved. In this work, we investigated another alternative substrate, GaSb, which has a significantly smaller lattice mismatch with HgCdTe in comparison with Si, Ge, and GaAs, and is readily available as large-area, epiready wafers at much lower cost in comparison with lattice-matched CdZnTe substrates. The resultant stress due to lattice and thermal mismatch between the HgCdTe epilayer and various substrates has been calculated in this work using the elasticity matrix, and the corresponding stress distribution simulated using ANSYS. The simulated structures were matched by experimental samples involving MBE growth of HgCdTe on GaAs, GaSb, and CdZnTe substrates, and were characterized via reflection high-energy electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction analysis, followed by etch pit density (EPD) analysis. In comparison with other alternative substrates, GaSb is shown to have lower interface stress and lower EPD, rendering it an interesting and promising alternative substrate material for HgCdTe epitaxy.

  20. Advanced Microstructural Characterization for Development of Improved HgCdTe Detectors and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-21

    2701-1 J. Chai, O. C. Noriega , A. Dedigama, J. J. Kim, A. A. Savage, K. Doyle, C. Smith, N. Chau, J. Pena, J. H. Dinan, D. J. Smith, T. H. Myers...Chai, O.C. Noriega , J.H. Dinan, J.J. Kim, D.J. Smith, and T.H. Myers, presented at 2012 U.S. Workshop on Physics and Chemistry of II-VI Materials...were also examined for comparison purposes. 6 J. Chai, O.C. Noriega , A. Dedigama, J.J. Kim, A.A. Savage, K. Doyle, C. Smith, N. Chau, J.H. Dinan

  1. Characterization of HgCdTe and Related Materials and Substrates for Third Generation Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Markunas. J. D. Benson, and D. J. Smith, J. Electron. Mater. (2012). submitted. 5 J. Chai, O. C. Noriega , J. H. Dinan, and T. H. Myers, J. Electron...127 110 REFERENCES 1 J. Chai, O. C. Noriega , J. H. Dinan, and T. H. Myers, J. Electron. Mater. 41...3001(2012) 2 J. Chai, O.C. Noriega , J. H. Dinan, J. J. Kim, D. J. Smith, and T. H. Myers, J. Electron. Mater. (2012), submitted. 3 Y.-H. Zhang

  2. Si Based Large Area Substrates for HgCdTe Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    journals (N/A for none) M. C. Debnath, T. D. Mishima , M. B. Santos, K. Hossain, and O. W. Holland, Growth of InSb epilayers and quantum wells on Ge(001...publications (other than abstracts): M. C. Debnath, T. D. Mishima , M. B. Santos, K. Hossain, and O. W. Holland, InSb-based epilayers and quantum wells on

  3. Single Photon Sensitive HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode Detector (APD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A linear mode HgCdT electron-initiated avalanche photodiode (EAPD) capable of 1570nm photon detection efficiency (PDE) at >10 MHz will be developed. The Phase I...

  4. Single Photon Sensitive HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode Detector (APD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging Phase I SBIR successes, in Phase II, a single photon sensitive LIDAR receiver will be fabricated and delivered to NASA. In Phase I, high-gain,...

  5. Latest developments of 10μm pitch HgCdTe diode array from the legacy to the extrinsic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péré-Laperne, Nicolas; Berthoz, Jocelyn; Taalat, Rachid; Rubaldo, Laurent; Kerlain, Alexandre; Carrère, Emmanuel; Dargent, Loïc.

    2016-05-01

    Sofradir recently presented Daphnis, its latest 10 μm pitch product family. Both Daphnis XGA and HD720 are 10μm pitch mid-wave infrared focal plane array. Development of small pixel pitch is opening the way to very compact products with a high spatial resolution. This new product is taking part in the HOT technology competition allowing reductions in size, weight and power of the overall package. This paper presents the recent developments achieved at Sofradir to make the 10μm pitch HgCdTe focal plane array based on the legacy technology. Electrical and electro-optical characterizations are presented to define the appropriate design of 10μm pitch diode array. The technological tradeoffs are explained to lower the dark current, to keep high quantum efficiency with a high operability above 110K, F/4. Also, Sofradir recently achieved outstanding Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) demonstration at this pixel pitch, which clearly demonstrates the benefit to users of adopting 10μm pixel pitch focal plane array based detectors. Furthermore, the HgCdTe technology has demonstrated an increase of the operating temperature, plus 40K, moving from the legacy to the P-on-n one at a 15μm pitch in mid-wave band. The first realizations using the extrinsic P-on-n technology and the characterizations of diodes with a 10μm pitch neighborhood will be presented in both mid-wave and long-wave bands.

  6. Investigation of possibility of VLWIR lasing in HgCdTe based heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, S. V.; Rumyantsev, V. V.; Kadykov, A. M.; Dubinov, A. A.; Antonov, A. V.; Kudryavtsev, K. E.; Kuritsin, D. I.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretskii, S. A.; Teppe, F.; Gavrilenko, V. I.

    2015-10-01

    The optical properties of a number of Hg1-xCdxTe bulk epilayers (x = 0.152 - 0.23) and heterostructures with quantum wells (QW) based on narrow gap HgCdTe are examined aiming to reveal the prospects of such structures for laser development in long wave infrared and very long wave infrared ranges. Experimental evidence of long wavelength superluminescence, i.e. amplification of spontaneous emission, at 8.4 μm in narrow gap HgCdTe bulk epitaxial film at 100 K is reported. Employing heterostructures with QW is demonstrated to be promissory for furthering the radiation wavelength to 10 - 30 μm range.

  7. Linear Mode HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiodes for Photon Counting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, William, III; Beck, Jeffrey; Scritchfield, Richard; Skokan, Mark; Mitra, Pradip; Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James; Carpenter, Darren; Lane, Barry

    2015-01-01

    An overview of recent improvements in the understanding and maturity of linear mode photon counting with HgCdTe electron-initiated avalanche photodiodes is presented. The first HgCdTe LMPC 2x8 format array fabricated in 2011 with 64 micron pitch was a remarkable success in terms of demonstrating a high single photon signal to noise ratio of 13.7 with an excess noise factor of 1.3-1.4, a 7 ns minimum time between events, and a broad spectral response extending from 0.4 micron to 4.2 micron. The main limitations were a greater than 10x higher false event rate than expected of greater than 1 MHz, a 5-7x lower than expected APD gain, and a photon detection efficiency of only 50% when greater than 60% was expected. This paper discusses the reasons behind these limitations and the implementation of their mitigations with new results.

  8. Nanostructured photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lan; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Energy and the environment are two of the most important global issues that we currently face. The development of clean and sustainable energy resources is essential to reduce greenhouse gas emission and meet our ever-increasing demand for energy. Over the last decade photovoltaics, as one of the leading technologies to meet these challenges, has seen a continuous increase in research, development and investment. Meanwhile, nanotechnology, which is considered to be the technology of the future, is gradually revolutionizing our everyday life through adaptation and incorporation into many traditional technologies, particularly energy-related technologies, such as photovoltaics. While the record for the highest efficiency is firmly held by multijunction III-V solar cells, there has never been a shortage of new research effort put into improving the efficiencies of all types of solar cells and making them more cost effective. In particular, there have been extensive and exciting developments in employing nanostructures; features with different low dimensionalities, such as quantum wells, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoparticles and quantum dots, have been incorporated into existing photovoltaic technologies to enhance their performance and/or reduce their cost. Investigations into light trapping using plasmonic nanostructures to effectively increase light absorption in various solar cells are also being rigorously pursued. In addition, nanotechnology provides researchers with great opportunities to explore the new ideas and physics offered by nanostructures to implement advanced solar cell concepts such as hot carrier, multi-exciton and intermediate band solar cells. This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains selected papers on nanostructured photovoltaics written by researchers in their respective fields of expertise. These papers capture the current excitement, as well as addressing some open questions in the field, covering topics including the

  9. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Clews, Peggy J.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2015-09-08

    A process including forming a photovoltaic solar cell on a substrate, the photovoltaic solar cell comprising an anchor positioned between the photovoltaic solar cell and the substrate to suspend the photovoltaic solar cell from the substrate. A surface of the photovoltaic solar cell opposite the substrate is attached to a receiving substrate. The receiving substrate may be bonded to the photovoltaic solar cell using an adhesive force or a metal connecting member. The photovoltaic solar cell is then detached from the substrate by lifting the receiving substrate having the photovoltaic solar cell attached thereto and severing the anchor connecting the photovoltaic solar cell to the substrate. Depending upon the type of receiving substrate used, the photovoltaic solar cell may be removed from the receiving substrate or remain on the receiving substrate for use in the final product.

  10. Update on Linear Mode Photon Counting with the HgCdTe Linear Mode Avalanche Photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jeffrey D.; Kinch, Mike; Sun, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of the gain-voltage characteristic of the mid-wavelength infrared cutoff HgCdTe linear mode avalanche photodiode (e-APD) is discussed both experimentally and theoretically as a function of the width of the multiplication region. Data are shown that demonstrate a strong dependence of the gain at a given bias voltage on the width of the n- gain region. Geometrical and fundamental theoretical models are examined to explain this behavior. The geometrical model takes into account the gain-dependent optical fill factor of the cylindrical APD. The theoretical model is based on the ballistic ionization model being developed for the HgCdTe APD. It is concluded that the fundamental theoretical explanation is the dominant effect. A model is developed that combines both the geometrical and fundamental effects. The model also takes into account the effect of the varying multiplication width in the low bias region of the gain-voltage curve. It is concluded that the lower than expected gain seen in the first 2 × 8 HgCdTe linear mode photon counting APD arrays, and higher excess noise factor, was very likely due to the larger than typical multiplication region length in the photon counting APD pixel design. The implications of these effects on device photon counting performance are discussed.

  11. Update on Linear Mode Photon Counting with the HgCdTe Linear Mode Avalanche Photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jeffrey D.; Kinch, Mike; Sun, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of the gain-voltage characteristic of the mid-wavelength infrared cutoff HgCdTe linear mode avalanche photodiode (e-APD) is discussed both experimentally and theoretically as a function of the width of the multiplication region. Data are shown that demonstrate a strong dependence of the gain at a given bias voltage on the width of the n- gain region. Geometrical and fundamental theoretical models are examined to explain this behavior. The geometrical model takes into account the gain-dependent optical fill factor of the cylindrical APD. The theoretical model is based on the ballistic ionization model being developed for the HgCdTe APD. It is concluded that the fundamental theoretical explanation is the dominant effect. A model is developed that combines both the geometrical and fundamental effects. The model also takes into account the effect of the varying multiplication width in the low bias region of the gain-voltage curve. It is concluded that the lower than expected gain seen in the first 2 × 8 HgCdTe linear mode photon counting APD arrays, and higher excess noise factor, was very likely due to the larger than typical multiplication region length in the photon counting APD pixel design. The implications of these effects on device photon counting performance are discussed.

  12. Recent progress in the doping of MBE HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivananthan, Sivalingam; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Faurie, Jean-Pierre

    1995-09-01

    We present a review of the recent progress in the doping of HgCdTe grown by molecular beam epitaxy. A detailed analysis of the unintentional/intrinsic, n-type, and p-type doping is presented. Our results show that CdZnTe substrates should be carefully screened to reduce the out-diffusion of impurities from the substrate. N-type HgCdTe layers exhibit excellent Hall characteristics down to indium levels of 2 X 10(superscript 15) cm(superscript -3). Electron mobilities in the range of (2 - 3) X 10(superscript 5) cm(superscript 2)/vs at 23 K were obtained. Measured lifetime data fits very well with the intrinsic band-to-band recombination. However, below 2 X 10(superscript 15) cm(superscript -3) doping levels, minority carrier lifetime is limited by Schockley-Reed recombination. We have implemented planar doping with arsenic as p-type dopant during MBE growth. Our results clearly indicate that arsenic incorporates as an acceptor dopant during the growth of MBE HgCdTe.

  13. Organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna; Krebs, Frederik C.; Chen, Hongzheng

    2013-12-01

    Energy inflation, the constant encouragement to economize on energy consumption and the huge investments in developing alternative energy resources might seem to suggest that there is a global shortage of energy. Far from it, the energy the Sun beams on the Earth each hour is equivalent to a year's supply, even at our increasingly ravenous rate of global energy consumption [1]. But it's not what you have got it's what you do with it. Hence the intense focus on photovoltaic research to find more efficient ways to harness energy from the Sun. Recently much of this research has centred on organic solar cells since they offer simple, low-cost, light-weight and large-area flexible photovoltaic structures. This issue with guest editors Frederik C Krebs and Hongzheng Chen focuses on some of the developments at the frontier of organic photovoltaic technology. Improving the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic systems, while maintaining the inherent material, economic and fabrication benefits, has absorbed a great deal of research attention in recent years. Here significant progress has been made with reports now of organic photovoltaic devices with efficiencies of around 10%. Yet operating effectively across the electromagnetic spectrum remains a challenge. 'The trend is towards engineering low bandgap polymers with a wide optical absorption range and efficient hole/electron transport materials, so that light harvesting in the red and infrared region is enhanced and as much light of the solar spectrum as possible can be converted into an electrical current', explains Mukundan Thelakkat and colleagues in Germany, the US and UK. In this special issue they report on how charge carrier mobility and morphology of the active blend layer in thin film organic solar cells correlate with device parameters [2]. The work contributes to a better understanding of the solar-cell characteristics of polymer:fullerene blends, which form the material basis for some of the most

  14. Modeling of high-precision wavefront sensing with new generation of CMT avalanche photodiode infrared detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gousset, Silvère; Petit, Cyril; Michau, Vincent; Fusco, Thierry; Robert, Clelia

    2015-12-01

    Near-infrared wavefront sensing allows for the enhancement of sky coverage with adaptive optics. The recently developed HgCdTe avalanche photodiode arrays are promising due to their very low detector noise, but still present an imperfect cosmetic that may directly impact real-time wavefront measurements for adaptive optics and thus degrade performance in astronomical applications. We propose here a model of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront measurement in the presence of residual fixed pattern noise and defective pixels. To adjust our models, a fine characterization of such an HgCdTe array, the RAPID sensor, is proposed. The impact of the cosmetic defects on the Shack-Hartmann measurement is assessed through numerical simulations. This study provides both a new insight on the applicability of cadmium mercury telluride (CMT) avalanche photodiodes detectors for astronomical applications and criteria to specify the cosmetic qualities of future arrays.

  15. A 1.5k x 1.5k class photon counting HgCdTe linear avalanche photo-diode array for low background space astronomy in the 1-5micron infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Donald

    Under a current award, NASA NNX 13AC13G "EXTENDING THE ASTRONOMICAL APPLICATION OF PHOTON COUNTING HgCdTe LINEAR AVALANCHE PHOTODIODE ARRAYS TO LOW BACKGROUND SPACE OBSERVATIONS" UH has used Selex SAPHIRA 320 x 256 MOVPE L-APD HgCdTe arrays developed for Adaptive Optics (AO) wavefront (WF) sensing to investigate the potential of this technology for low background space astronomy applications. After suppressing readout integrated circuit (ROIC) glow, we have placed upper limits on gain normalized dark current of 0.01 e-/sec at up to 8 volts avalanche bias, corresponding to avalanche gain of 5, and have operated with avalanche gains of up to several hundred at higher bias. We have also demonstrated detection of individual photon events. The proposed investigation would scale the format to 1536 x 1536 at 12um (the largest achievable in a standard reticule without requiring stitching) while incorporating reference pixels required at these low dark current levels. The primary objective is to develop, produce and characterize a 1.5k x 1.5k at 12um pitch MOVPE HgCdTe L-APD array, with nearly 30 times the pixel count of the 320 x 256 SAPHIRA, optimized for low background space astronomy. This will involve: 1) Selex design of a 1.5k x 1.5k at 12um pitch ROIC optimized for low background operation, silicon wafer fabrication at the German XFab foundry in 0.35 um 3V3 process and dicing/test at Selex, 2) provision by GL Scientific of a 3-side close-buttable carrier building from the heritage of the HAWAII xRG family, 3) Selex development and fabrication of 1.5k x 1.5k at 12 um pitch MOVPE HgCdTe L-APD detector arrays optimized for low background applications, 4) hybridization, packaging into a sensor chip assembly (SCA) with initial characterization by Selex and, 5) comprehensive characterization of low background performance, both in the laboratory and at ground based telescopes, by UH. The ultimate goal is to produce and eventually market a large format array, the L

  16. Organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demming, Anna; Krebs, Frederik C; Chen, Hongzheng

    2013-01-01

    parameters [2]. The work contributes to a better understanding of the solar-cell characteristics of polymer:fullerene blends, which form the material basis for some of the most successful solution processable organic photovoltaic devices at present. Andrey E Rudenko, Sangtaik Noh, and Barry C Thompson...... not surprise us that he had such remarkable foresight, nor that the present generation of innovators are 'tackling' the opportunity with such promise and success, as the work in this special issue clearly demonstrates. References [1] http...... Influence of selenophene on the properties of semi-random polymers and their blends with PC61BM Nanotechnology 24 484002 [4] Zhang K, Hu Z, Duan C, Ying L, Huang F and Cao Y 2013 The effect of methanol treatment on the performance of polymer solar cells Nanotechnology 24 484003 [5] Meng B, Fang G, Fu Y, Xie...

  17. US Photovoltaic Patents, 1988--1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    This document contains US patents on terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) power applications, including systems, components, and materials, as well as manufacturing and support functions. The patent entries in this document were issued from 1988 through 1990. The entries were located by searching USPA, the data base of the US Patent Office. The final search retrieved all patents under the class ``Batteries, Thermoelectric and Photoelectric`` and the subclasses ``Photoelectric,`` ``Testing,`` and ``Applications.`` The search also located patents that contained the words ``photovoltaic(s)`` or ``solar cell(s)`` and their derivatives. A manual search of the patents in the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) patent file augmented the data base search. After the initial list was compiled, most of the patents on the following subjects were excluded: space photovoltaic technology, use of the photovoltaic effect for detectors and subjects only peripherally concerned with photovoltaics. Some patents on these three subjects were included when it appeared that those inventions might be of use in terrestrial PV power technologies.

  18. Numerical modeling of HgCdTe solidification: effects of phase diagram double-diffusion convection and microgravity level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1997-07-01

    A numerical model of HgCdTe solidification was implemented using finite the element code FIDAP. Model verification was done using both experimental data and numerical test problems. The model was used to eluate possible effects of double- diffusion convection in molten material, and microgravity level on concentration distribution in the solidified HgCdTe. Particular attention was paid to incorporation of HgCdTe phase diagram. It was found, that below a critical microgravity amplitude, the maximum convective velocity in the melt appears virtually independent on the microgravity vector orientation. Good agreement between predicted interface shape and an interface obtained experimentally by quenching was achieved. The results of numerical modeling are presented in the form of video film.

  19. Progress in cooled IR detectors and new developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribolet, Philippe; Vuillermet, Michel

    2008-03-01

    Cooled IR detectors are produced at mass production level at Sofradir for years based on its mature and proven HgCdTe technology. However, following the market needs, a lot of progress have been made and allow Sofradir to offer new product designs mainly dealing with the simplification of the detector use as well as reliability improvements. In addition to the conventional technologies used at mass production level, the Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) approach has been under investigation for several years to prepare both the very large array fabrication and the new (3rd) generation developments. CEA-Leti, in cooperation with Sofradir, obtained very good results on 4-inches wafer size which confirms the mastering of this growth process. Very high qualities FPAs (1280×1024), with pitches as small as 15μm, were demonstrated as well as bicolor and dual band FPAs which use more complex multi hetero-junctions architectures. A very new development at CEA-Leti concerns avalanche photodiodes (APD) made with HgCdTe which presents a unique feature among all the over semiconductors: extremely high avalanche gains can be obtained on n on p photodiodes without absolutely any noise excess. These results open new interesting fields of investigation for low flux applications and fast detectors. The cooled IR detector field is progressing very rapidly and new developments will offer a lot of system simplification and enhancements.

  20. A photovoltaic module

    OpenAIRE

    Krebs, Frederik C.; Sommer-Larsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a photovoltaic module comprising a carrier substrate, said carrier substrate carrying a purely printed structure comprising printed positive and negative module terminals, a plurality of printed photovoltaic cell units each comprising one or more printed photovoltaic cells, wherein the plurality of printed photovoltaic cell units are electrically connected in series between the positive and the negative module terminals such that any two neighbouring photovolt...

  1. Thermionic photovoltaic energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, D. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A thermionic photovoltaic energy conversion device comprises a thermionic diode mounted within a hollow tubular photovoltaic converter. The thermionic diode maintains a cesium discharge for producing excited atoms that emit line radiation in the wavelength region of 850 nm to 890 nm. The photovoltaic converter is a silicon or gallium arsenide photovoltaic cell having bandgap energies in this same wavelength region for optimum cell efficiency.

  2. High density photovoltaic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haigh, R.E.; Jacobson, G.F.; Wojtczuk, S. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

    1997-10-14

    Photovoltaic technology can directly generate high voltages in a solid state material through the series interconnect of many photovoltaic diodes. We are investigating the feasibility of developing an electrically isolated, high-voltage power supply using miniature photovoltaic devices that convert optical energy to electrical energy.

  3. Photovoltaic device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleereman, Robert; Lesniak, Michael J.; Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joe A.; Gaston, Ryan; Eurich, Gerald K.; Boven, Michelle L.

    2015-11-24

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PVD") and method of use, more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with an integral locator and electrical terminal mechanism for transferring current to or from the improved photovoltaic device and the use as a system.

  4. Photovoltaic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational

  5. JWST Near-Infrared Detector Degradation: Finding the Problem, Fixing the Problem, and Moving Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Stahle, Carl; Hill, Bob; Greenhouse, Matt; Beletic, James; Babu, Sachidananda; Blake, Peter; Cleveland, Keith; Cofie, Emmanuel; Eegholm, Bente; Engelbracht, Chad; Hall, Don; Hoffman, Alan; Jeffers, Basil; Jhabvala, Christine; Kimble, Randy; Kopp, Robert; Lee, Don; Leidecker, Henning; Lindler, Don; McMurray, Bob; Mott, D. Brent; Ohl, Ray; Polis, Don; Pontius, Jim

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST will be an infrared optimized telescope, with an approximately 6.5 m diameter primary mirror, that is located at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Three of JWST's four science instruments use Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG (H2RG) near infrared detector arrays. During 2010, the JWST Project noticed that a few of its 5 micron cutoff H2RG detectors were degrading during room temperature storage, and NASA chartered a "Detector Degradation Failure Review Board" (DD-FRB) to investigate. The DD-FRB determined that the root cause was a design flaw that allowed indium to interdiffuse with the gold contacts and migrate into the HgCdTe detector layer. Fortunately, Teledyne already had an improved design that eliminated this degradation mechanism. During early 2012, the improved H2RG design was qualified for flight and JWST began making additional H2RGs. In this article we present the two public DD-FRB "Executiye Summaries" that: (1) determined the root cause of the detector degradation and (2) defined tests to determine whether the existing detectors are qualified for flight. We supplement these with a brief introduction to H2RG detector arrays, and a discussion of how the JWST Project is using cryogenic storage to retard the degradation rate of the existing flight spare H2RGs.

  6. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  7. Photovoltaic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4

  8. Analysis of carrier concentration, lifetime, and electron mobility on p-type HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sang Dong; Kwack, Kae Dal

    1998-03-01

    Minority carrier transport characteristics of vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe such as carrier concentration, lifetime, and mobility are investigated. In the calculation of the carrier concentration two acceptor levels—a donor level and a trap level—were taken into account. The acceptor levels have been described by two models—two independent singly ionized levels and a divalent level with two ionization energies. When each model was examined by calculating electron mobility as a function of temperature, the latter was found to be more accurate. Electron mobility as a function of majority carrier concentration was also presented for both n-type and p-type HgCdTe with 0.225 Cd mole fraction. Steady state electron lifetime was computed assuming the acceptor levels and the trap level would act as Schokley-Read-Hall type recombination centers. The calculated results using the divalent acceptor model were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. RF magnetron sputtering deposition of CdTe passivation on HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Jaroslaw; Adamiec, Krzysztof; Rogalski, Antoni

    1998-04-01

    In this study, we report the RF magnetron sputtering growth and characterization of CdTe passivant on bulk n-type HgCdTe. Our investigations include the HgCdTe surface preparation and in-situ pretreatment, deposition-induced surface damage, interface charge, CdTe film stoichiometry, and thermal stability. The metal-insulator-semiconductor test structures are processed and their electrical properties are measured by capacitance-voltage characteristics. The heterostructures are also characterized by reflectance measurement. In order to investigate the passivation properties of CdTe/HgCdTe heterostructures, we have modeled the band diagram of abrupt CdTe/HgCdTe heterojunction. The effect of sputtering growth condition parameters is also reported. The sputtering CdTe layers, exhibit excellent dielectric, insulating and mechano- chemical properties, as well as interface properties. The interfaces are characterized by slight accumulation and a small hysteresis. A carefully controlled growth process and surface pretreatment tailored to the specific material are required in order to obtain near flat band conditions on n- type materials. Additional informations on surface limitations are obtained from analyzing the I-V characteristics of photodiodes with metal gates covering the p-n junction surface location.

  10. Diffusion Mechanism for Arsenic in Intrinsic and Extrinsic Conditions in HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenouilloux, T.; Ferron, A.; Péré-Laperne, N.; Mathiot, D.

    2017-09-01

    Due to its low diffusivity and high activation rate, arsenic has become the dopant of choice in p/n HgCdTe high operating temperature technology. Its diffusion mechanism, however, remains imprecise. In this work, arsenic diffusion was studied in molecular beam epitaxy HgCdTe structures consisting of alternatively As-doped and intrinsic layers grown on a CdZnTe substrate. The diffusion coefficient of As was extracted from secondary ion mass spectroscopy concentration profiles. Annealings were performed for different temperatures, mercury partial pressures ( P Hg), annealing times and cadmium atomic fractions. Fermi-level effect on diffusion was observed, indicating extrinsic conditions for diffusion at high As concentration. Based on the variation of As diffusivity with P Hg and As concentration, we propose that As diffusion occurs on both II and VI sublattices. Our results are consistent with the fact that AsVI diffusion is assisted by the Te interstitial, introducing donor levels in the bandgap, while AsII diffusion is assisted by the cation vacancy.

  11. High-Performance MWIR HgCdTe on Si Substrate Focal Plane Array Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommena, R.; Ketharanathan, S.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Dhar, N. K.; Kodama, R.; Zhao, J.; Buurma, C.; Bergeson, J. D.; Aqariden, F.; Velicu, S.

    2015-09-01

    The development of low noise-equivalent differential temperature (NEDT), high-operability midwave infrared (MWIR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) fabricated from molecular beam epitaxial (MBE)-grown HgCdTe on Si-based substrates is reported. High-quality n-type MWIR HgCdTe layers with a cutoff wavelength of 4.90 μm at 77 K and a carrier concentration of 1-2 × 1015 cm-3 were grown on CdTe/Si substrates by MBE. Highly uniform composition and thickness over 3-inch areas were demonstrated, and low surface defect densities (voids ~5 × 102 cm-2, micro-defects ~5 × 103 cm-2) and etch pit density (~3.5 × 106 cm-2) were measured. This material was used to fabricate 320 × 256, 30 μm pitch FPAs with planar device architecture; arsenic implantation was used to achieve p-type doping. Radiometric and noise characterization was also performed. A low NEDT of 13.8 m K at 85 K for a 1 ms integration time with f/#2 optics was measured. The NEDT operability was 99% at 120 K with a mean dark current noise of 8.14 × 10-13 A/pixel. High-quality thermal images were obtained from the FPA up to a temperature of 150 K.

  12. Molecular beam epitaxy of CdTe and HgCdTe on large-area Si(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporken, R.; Lange, M. D.; Faurie, Jean-Pierre

    1991-09-01

    The current status of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of CdTe and HgCdTe on Si(100) is reviewed. CdTe and HgCdTe grow in the (111)B orientation on Si(100); monocrystalline films with two domains are obtained on most nominal Si(100) substrates, single domain films are grown on misoriented substrates and on nominal Si(100) preheated to 900-950 degree(s)C. Double-crystal x-ray rocking curves (DCRCs) with full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) as low as 110 arcsec are reported for HgCdTe on silicon; these layers are n-type, and electron mobilities higher than 5 X 104 cm2V-2s-1 are measured at 23 K for x equals 0.26. Excellent thickness and composition uniformity is obtained: standard deviation of the CdTe thickness 0.4% of the average thickness on 2-in. and 2.3% on 5-in., standard deviation of the Cd concentration in the HgCdTe layers 0.6% of the average concentration on 3-in. and 2.4% on 5-in. First results regarding growth of CdTe on patterned Si substrates are also reported.

  13. Photovoltaic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational

  14. InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice infrared detectors: Future prospect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.; Martyniuk, P.; Kopytko, M.

    2017-09-01

    Investigations of antimonide-based materials began at about the same time as HgCdTe ternary alloys—in the 1950s, and the apparent rapid success of their technology, especially low-dimensional solids, depends on the previous five decades of III-V materials and device research. However, the sophisticated physics associated with the antimonide-based bandgap engineering concept started at the beginning of 1990s gave a new impact and interest in development of infrared detector structures within academic and national laboratories. The development of InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices (T2SLs) results from two primary motivations: the perceived challenges of reproducibly fabricating high-operability HgCdTe focal plane arrays (FPAs) at reasonable cost and the theoretical predictions of lower Auger recombination for type T2SL detectors compared with HgCdTe. Second motivation—lower Auger recombination should be translated into a fundamental advantage for T2SL over HgCdTe in terms of lower dark current and/or higher operating temperature, provided other parameters such as Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) lifetime are equal. InAs/GaSb T2SL photodetectors offer similar performance to HgCdTe at an equivalent cut-off wavelength, but with a sizeable penalty in operating temperature, due to the inherent difference in SRH lifetimes. It is predicted that since the future infrared (IR) systems will be based on the room temperature operation of depletion-current limited arrays with pixel densities that are fully consistent with background- and diffraction-limited performance due to the system optics, the material system with long SRH lifetime will be required. Since T2SLs are very much resisted in attempts to improve its SRH lifetime, currently the only material that meets this requirement is HgCdTe. Due to less ionic chemical bonding, III-V semiconductors are more robust than their II-VI counterparts. As a result, III-V-based FPAs excel in operability, spatial uniformity, temporal stability

  15. US Photovoltaic Patents, 1988--1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    This document contains US patents on terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) power applications, including systems, components, and materials, as well as manufacturing and support functions. The patent entries in this document were issued from 1988 through 1990. The entries were located by searching USPA, the data base of the US Patent Office. The final search retrieved all patents under the class Batteries, Thermoelectric and Photoelectric'' and the subclasses Photoelectric,'' Testing,'' and Applications.'' The search also located patents that contained the words photovoltaic(s)'' or solar cell(s)'' and their derivatives. A manual search of the patents in the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) patent file augmented the data base search. After the initial list was compiled, most of the patents on the following subjects were excluded: space photovoltaic technology, use of the photovoltaic effect for detectors and subjects only peripherally concerned with photovoltaics. Some patents on these three subjects were included when it appeared that those inventions might be of use in terrestrial PV power technologies.

  16. A photovoltaic module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a photovoltaic module comprising a carrier substrate, said carrier substrate carrying a purely printed structure comprising printed positive and negative module terminals, a plurality of printed photovoltaic cell units each comprising one or more printed...... photovoltaic cells, wherein the plurality of printed photovoltaic cell units are electrically connected in series between the positive and the negative module terminals such that any two neighbouring photovoltaic cell units are electrically connected by a printed interconnecting electrical conductor....... The carrier substrate comprises a foil and the total thickness of the photovoltaic module is below 500 [mu]m. Moreover, the nominal voltage level between the positive and the negative terminals is at least 5 kV DC....

  17. Photovoltaics - The endless spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the developments in the photovoltaic field over the past decade or two is presened. Accomplishments in the terrestrial field are reviewed along with projections and challenges toward meeting cost goals. The contrasts and commonality of space and terrestrial photovoltaics are presented. Finally, a strategic philosophy of photovoltaics research highlighting critical factors, appropriate directions, emerging opportunities, and challenges of the future is given.

  18. Photovoltaics: The endless spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the developments in the photovoltaic field over the past decade or two is presented. Accomplishments in the terrestrial field are reviewed along with projections and challenges toward meeting cost goals. The contrasts and commonality of space and terrestrial photovoltaics are presented. Finally, a strategic philosophy of photovoltaics research highlighting critical factors, appropriate directions, emerging opportunities, and challenges of the future is given.

  19. Current and future photovoltaics

    OpenAIRE

    Boreland, M.B.; Bagnall, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Photovoltaics, now a billion-dollar industry, is experiencing staggering growth as increased concerns over fuel supply and carbon emissions have encouraged governments and environmentalists to become increasingly prepared to offset the extra cost of solar energy. Three 'generations' of photovoltaics have been envisaged that will take solar power into the mainstream. Photovoltaic production is currently 90% 'first-generation' or '1G' solar cells that rely on expensive bulk multi-crystalline or...

  20. Photovoltaic technology assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    After a brief review of the history of photovoltaic devices and a discussion of the cost goals set for photovoltaic modules, the status of photovoltaic technology is assessed. Included are discussions of: current applications, present industrial production, low-cost silicon production techniques, energy payback periods for solar cells, advanced materials research and development, concentrator systems, balance-of-system components. Also discussed are some nontechnical aspects, including foreign markets, US government program approach, and industry attitudes and approaches. (LEW)

  1. Photovoltaic System in Progress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shoro, Ghulam Mustafa; Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Sera, Dezso

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive update on photovoltaic (PV) technologies and the materials. In recent years, targeted research advancement has been made in the photovoltaic cell technologies to reduce cost and increase efficiency. Presently, several types of PV solar panels are commercially...... utilized and playing an important role in the market. Three generations of photovoltaic technologies are investigated and discussed; Crystalline Silicon Technology categorized as first generation of PV technology, Thin Film Technologies are second generation of PV technologies and Multi-junction Cells...... structure. Silicon remains the prominent semiconductor within photovoltaic....

  2. Characterization of Photovoltaic Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitier, V.; Cressault, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses photovoltaic panel systems and reviews their electrical properties and use in several industrial fields. We explain how different photovoltaic panels may be characterized by undergraduate students at university using simple methods to retrieve their electrical properties (power, current and voltage) and compare these values…

  3. Handbook for photovoltaic cabling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, D. N.

    1980-08-01

    This volume, originally written as part of the Interim Performance Criteria Document Development Implementation Plan and Procedures for Photovoltaic Energy Systems, is an analysis of the several factors to be considered in selecting cabling for photovoltaic purposes. These factors, correspoonding to chapter titles, are electrical, structural, safety, durability/reliability, and installation. A glossary of terms used within the volume is included for reference.

  4. Solar Photovoltaic Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenreich, Henry; Martin, John H.

    1979-01-01

    The goals of solar photovoltaic technology in contributing to America's future energy needs are presented in this study conducted by the American Physical Society. Although the time needed for photovoltaics to become popular is several decades away, according to the author, short-range applications are given. (Author/SA)

  5. Photovoltaics for residential applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-02-01

    Information is given about the parts of a residential photovoltaic system and considerations relevant to photovoltaic power use in homes that are also tied to utility lines. In addition, factors are discussed that influence implementation, including legal and environmental factors such as solar access and building codes, insurance, utility buyback, and system longevity. (LEW)

  6. Residential use of photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, E.C. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Residential electricity demand data and forecasts for France, Japan and the United States are presented as background information pertinent to the market for solar photovoltaic power systems. Current residential photovoltaic system development activities in the United States are reviewed. Issues related to the eventual adoption of such systems are discussed.

  7. Photovoltaics for residential applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-02-01

    Information is given about the parts of a residential photovoltaic system and considerations relevant to photovoltaic power use in homes that are also tied to utility lines. In addition, factors are discussed that influence implementation, including legal and environmental factors such as solar access and building codes, insurance, utility buyback, and system longevity. (LEW)

  8. Solar Photovoltaic Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenreich, Henry; Martin, John H.

    1979-01-01

    The goals of solar photovoltaic technology in contributing to America's future energy needs are presented in this study conducted by the American Physical Society. Although the time needed for photovoltaics to become popular is several decades away, according to the author, short-range applications are given. (Author/SA)

  9. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  10. Urban photovoltaic electricity policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-10-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 10 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at urban photovoltaic electricity policies. The mission of the Photovoltaic Power Systems Programme is to enhance the international collaboration efforts which accelerate the development and deployment of photovoltaic solar energy as a significant and sustainable renewable energy option. The objective of Task 10 is stated as being to enhance the opportunities for wide-scale, solution-oriented application of photovoltaics in the urban environment. The goal of the study presented was to evaluate a standardised basis for urban policies regarding photovoltaic integration in a set of cities in the countries participating in the IEA's Task 10, Urban Scale PV. The investigation was focused on three topics: the present state of the policies, the prospects for future policies fostering photovoltaic deployment and the prospects for future policies to cope with large-scale photovoltaic integration. The first section analyses the state of the policies; this analysis is then confirmed in section 2, which deals with present obstacles to PV deployment and solutions to overcome them. The third section investigates future prospects for PV deployment with the question of mastering large scale integration. The report concludes that cities could formulate urban solutions by developing integrated, specific provisions for PV deployment in their urban infrastructure planning.

  11. Photovoltaics industry profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    A description of the status of the US photovoltaics industry is given. Principal end-user industries are identified, domestic and foreign market trends are discussed, and industry-organized and US government-organized trade promotion events are listed. Trade associations and trade journals are listed, and a photovoltaic product manufacturers list is included. (WHK)

  12. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  13. Operation and performance of new NIR detectors from SELEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, D.; Bezawada, N.; Hipwood, L. G.; Shorrocks, N.; Milne, H.

    2012-07-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has funded SELEX Galileo, Southampton, UK to develop large format near infrared (NIR) detectors for its future space and ground based programmes. The UKATC has worked in collaboration with SELEX Galileo to test and characterise the new detectors produced during phase-1 of the development. In order to demonstrate the detector material performance, the HgCdTe (MCT) detector diodes (grown on GaAs substrate through MOVPE process in small 320×256, 24μm pixel format) are hybridised to the existing SELEX Galileo SWALLOW CMOS readout chip. The substrate removed and MCT thinned detector arrays were then tested and evaluated at the UKATC following screening tests at SELEX. This paper briefly describes the test setup, the operational aspects of the readout multiplexer and presents the performance parameters of the detector arrays including: conversion gain, detector dark current, read noise, linearity, quantum efficiency and persistence for various detector temperatures between 80K and 140K.

  14. Electrical and Optical Studies of Defect Structure of HgCdTe Films Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świątek, Z.; Ozga, P.; Izhnin, I. I.; Fitsych, E. I.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Korotaev, A. G.; Mynbaev, K. D.; Varavin, V. S.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Yakushev, M. V.; Bonchyk, A. Yu.; Savytsky, H. V.

    2016-07-01

    Electrical and optical studies of defect structure of HgCdTe films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are performed. It is shown that the peculiarity of these films is the presence of neutral defects formed at the growth stage and inherent to the material grown by MBE. It is assumed that these neutral defects are the Te nanocomplexes. Under ion milling, they are activated by mercury interstitials and form the donor centers with the concentration of 1017 cm-3, which makes it possible to detect such defects by measurements of electrical parameters of the material. Under doping of HgCdTe with arsenic using high temperature cracking, the As2 dimers are present in the arsenic flow and block the neutral Te nanocomplexes to form donor As2Te3 complexes. The results of electrical studies are compared with the results of studies carried out by micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  15. Photovoltaic effect in organic polymer-iodine complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, A. M.; Rembaum, A.

    1967-01-01

    Certain charge transfer complexes formed from organic polymers and iodine generate appreciable voltages at relatively low impedances upon exposure to light. These films show promise in applications requiring chemically and electrically stable films as detectors of optical radiation and as energy converters in photovoltaic cells.

  16. Performance of hybrid photovoltaic collector

    OpenAIRE

    Garbisu Eugui, Josu

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present project is the study of the performance of a combined photovoltaic-thermal plant, called also hybrid system, located in south Italy, evaluating the efficiency of the photovoltaic and thermal systems and the advantage respect to the two single plants (photovoltaic and thermal ). This research project has two objectives fundamentals of efficiency improvement energy from solar photovoltaic panels. On one hand, increase photovoltaic efficiency, at the same time an...

  17. Fast sub-electron detectors review for interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-Luc; Bério, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    New disruptive technologies are now emerging for detectors dedicated to interferometry. The detectors needed for this kind of applications need antonymic characteristics: the detector noise must be very low, especially when the signal is dispersed but at the same time must also sample the fast temporal characteristics of the signal. This paper describes the new fast low noise technologies that have been recently developed for interferometry and adaptive optics. The first technology is the Avalanche PhotoDiode (APD) infrared arrays made of HgCdTe. In this paper are presented the two programs that have been developed in that field: the Selex Saphira 320x256 [1] and the 320x255 RAPID detectors developed by Sofradir/CEA LETI in France [2], [3], [4]. Status of these two programs and future developments are presented. Sub-electron noise can now be achieved in the infrared using this technology. The exceptional characteristics of HgCdTe APDs are due to a nearly exclusive impaction ionization of the electrons, and this is why these devices have been called "electrons avalanche photodiodes" or e-APDs. These characteristics have inspired a large effort in developing focal plan arrays using HgCdTe APDs for low photon number applications such as active imaging in gated mode (2D) and/or with direct time of flight detection (3D imaging) and, more recently, passive imaging for infrared wave front correction and fringe tracking in astronomical observations. In addition, a commercial camera solution called C-RED, based on Selex Saphira and commercialized by First Light Imaging [5], is presented here. Some groups are also working with instruments in the visible. In that case, another disruptive technology is showing outstanding performances: the Electron Multiplying CCDs (EMCCD) developed mainly by e2v technologies in UK. The OCAM2 camera, commercialized by First Light Imaging [5], uses the 240x240 EMMCD from e2v and is successfully implemented on the VEGA instrument on the CHARA

  18. Clean electricity from photovoltaics

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    The second edition of Clean Electricity from Photovoltaics , first published in 2001, provides an updated account of the underlying science, technology and market prospects for photovoltaics. All areas have advanced considerably in the decade since the first edition was published, which include: multi-crystalline silicon cell efficiencies having made impressive advances, thin-film CdTe cells having established a decisive market presence, and organic photovoltaics holding out the prospect of economical large-scale power production. Contents: The Past and Present (M D Archer); Limits to Photovol

  19. Survey of photovoltaic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    In developing this survey of photovoltaic systems, the University of Alabama in Huntsville assembled a task team to perform an extensive telephone survey of all known photovoltaic manufacturers. Three US companies accounted for 77% of the total domestic sales in 1978. They are Solarex Corporation, Solar Power Croporation, and ARCO Solar, Inc. This survey of solar photovoltaic (P/V) manufacturers and suppliers consists of three parts: a catalog of suppliers arranged alphabetically, data sheets on specific products, and typical operating, installation, or maintenance instructions and procedures. This report does not recommend or endorse any company product or information presented within as the results of this survey.

  20. Organic photovoltaic films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Nelson

    2002-05-01

    The last two years have seen an unprecedented growth of interest in solar cells made from organic electronic materials. This is partly due to the rapid growth of the photovoltaic market1, which has stimulated research into longer term, more innovative photovoltaic technologies, and partly to the development of organic electronic materials for display applications. The rapid progress in optoelectronic molecular materials has introduced a range of potential new photovoltaic materials, as well as an improved understanding of the capabilities of such materials and confidence in their application2.

  1. Comparing and Contrasting Detectors: JWST NIR vs HST WFC3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2015-01-01

    In many ways, WFC3s IR channel is a good indicator for what to expect with JWST. There are some differences, most of which should be beneficial in JWST- JWSTs lower operating temperature will freeze out charge traps that would affect WFC3. Benefits should include lower dark current, lower persistence, and better reciprocity- JWSTs more recent HgCdTe process has lower defect density. The benefits are as described above- JWST uses better indium barriers. The benefits should include fewer RC type pixels. One area where more study might be beneficial is stability. The detector electronics play a significant role in determining how stable a detector system is(v.s. bias drifts and photometry). JWSTs SIDECARs are completely WFC3s Ball electronics- Studies comparing the bias and photometric stability of WFC3 and JWST might be useful to informing data acquisition and calibration strategies for JWST.

  2. Photovoltaic module and interlocked stack of photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, Brian S.

    2014-09-02

    One embodiment relates to an arrangement of photovoltaic modules configured for transportation. The arrangement includes a plurality of photovoltaic modules, each photovoltaic module including a frame. A plurality of individual male alignment features and a plurality of individual female alignment features are included on each frame. Adjacent photovoltaic modules are interlocked by multiple individual male alignment features on a first module of the adjacent photovoltaic modules fitting into and being surrounded by corresponding individual female alignment features on a second module of the adjacent photovoltaic modules. Other embodiments, features and aspects are also disclosed.

  3. Photovoltaic solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J

    2014-05-20

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electricity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  4. Photovoltaic solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2013-11-26

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electicity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  5. Photovoltaic solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2013-11-26

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electicity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  6. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  7. The SNAP near infrared detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarle, G.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bercovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, Anne; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.; Harvey, P.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Lampton, M.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; Miguel, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tomasch, A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will measure precisely the cosmological expansion history over both the acceleration and deceleration epochs and thereby constrain the nature of the dark energy that dominates our universe today. The SNAP focal plane contains equal areas of optical CCDs and NIR sensors and an integral field spectrograph. Having over 150 million pixels and a field-of-view of 0.34 square degrees, the SNAP NIR system will be the largest yet constructed. With sensitivity in the range 0.9-1.7 {micro}m, it will detect Type Ia supernovae between z = 1 and 1.7 and will provide follow-up precision photometry for all supernovae. HgCdTe technology, with a cut-off tuned to 1.7 {micro}m, will permit passive cooling at 140 K while maintaining noise below zodiacal levels. By dithering to remove the effects of intrapixel variations and by careful attention to other instrumental effects, we expect to control relative photometric accuracy below a few hundredths of a magnitude. Because SNAP continuously revisits the same fields we will be able to achieve outstanding statistical precision on the photometry of reference stars in these fields, allowing precise monitoring of our detectors. The capabilities of the NIR system for broadening the science reach of SNAP are discussed.

  8. Plastic photovoltaic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Niyazi Serdar Sariciftci

    2004-01-01

    The development of organic, polymer-based photovoltaic elements has introduced the possibility of obtaining cheap and easy-to-produce energy from light. Photoinduced electron transfer from donor-type semiconducting polymers onto acceptor-type polymers or molecules, such as C60, is the basic phenomenon utilized in these photovoltaic devices. This process mimics the early photo-effects in natural photosynthesis. The polymeric semiconductors combine the photoelectrical properties of inorganic se...

  9. Photovoltaic systems and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Abstracts are given of presentations given at a project review meeting held at Albuquerque, NM. The proceedings cover the past accomplishments and current activities of the Photovoltaic Systems Research, Balance-of-System Technology Development and System Application Experiments Projects at Sandia National Laboratories. The status of intermediate system application experiments and residential system analysis is emphasized. Some discussion of the future of the Photovoltaic Program in general, and the Sandia projects in particular is also presented.

  10. Photovoltaic barometer; Barometre photovoltaique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2009-04-15

    spain and Germany set the pace for the world photovoltaic market in 2008, which grew to more than twice its 2007 size. The European Union continued to drive photocell installation with an additional 4 592.3 MWp in 2008, or 151.6% growth over 2007. However, European growth prospects for the photovoltaic market in 2009 are being dampened by the global financial crisis and the scheduled slow-down of the Spanish market. (author)

  11. Solar photovoltaic; Solaire photovoltaique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bal, J.L. [Agence de l' Environnement et de la Maitrise de l' Energie, ADEME, 75 - Paris (France); Jedliczka, M. [Hespul, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Ricaus, A. [Cythelia, 73 - Le Bourget du Lac (France); Primeau-Fourcade, N.

    2004-08-01

    This document devoted to the photovoltaic industry takes stock on this renewable energy form, which increasingly appears on the energy market. After a brief presentation of the cells technologies, the author details the difficult french administrative connection to the electrical network. He presents also the new and promising technology as the black silicon and an evaluation of the photovoltaic implementation in France, Germany and Japan.

  12. Improved mid infrared detector for high spectral or spatial resolution and synchrotron radiation use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Mbaye; Bordessoule, Michel; Kanouté, Brahim; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Manceron, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    When using bright, small effective size sources, such as synchrotron radiation light beam, for broadband spectroscopy at spectral or spatial high resolution for mid-IR FTIR measurements, a marked detectivity improvement can be achieved by setting up a device matching the detector optical étendue to that of the source. Further improvement can be achieved by reducing the background unmodulated flux and other intrinsic noise sources using a lower temperature cryogen, such as liquid helium. By the combined use of cooled apertures, cold reimaging optics, filters and adapted detector polarization, and preamplification electronics, the sensitivity of a HgCdTe photoconductive IR detector can be improved by a significant factor with respect to standard commercial devices (more than one order of magnitude on average over 6-20 μm region) and the usable spectral range extended to longer wavelengths. The performances of such an optimized detector developed on the AILES Beamline at SOLEIL are presented here.

  13. Customized color patterning of photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Lentine, Anthony L.; Resnick, Paul J.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2016-11-15

    Photovoltaic cells and photovoltaic modules, as well as methods of making and using such photovoltaic cells and photovoltaic modules, are disclosed. More particularly, embodiments of the photovoltaic cells selectively reflect visible light to provide the photovoltaic cells with a colorized appearance. Photovoltaic modules combining colorized photovoltaic cells may be used to harvest solar energy while providing a customized appearance, e.g., an image or pattern.

  14. Photovoltaic mounting/demounting unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a photovoltaic arrangement comprising a photovoltaic assembly comprising a support structure defining a mounting surface onto which a photovoltaic module is detachably mounted; and a mounting/demounting unit comprising at least one mounting/demounting apparatus...... which when the mounting/demounting unit is moved along the mounting surface, causes the photovoltaic module to be mounted or demounted to the support structure; wherein the photovoltaic module comprises a carrier foil and wherein a total thickness of the photo voltaic module is below 500 muiotaeta....... The present invention further relates to an associated method for mounting/demounting photovoltaic modules....

  15. A New nBn IR Detection Concept Using HgCdTe Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravrand, O.; Boulard, F.; Ferron, A.; Ballet, Ph.; Hassis, W.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new HgCdTe-based heterostructure to perform quantum infrared detection. The structure is based on the unipolar barrier concept, introduced by White in the 1980s for HgCdTe. The driving concept is the use of a large gap barrier layer to impede the flow of majority carriers (electrons on the conduction band in the case of n-type material) while facilitating the transport of minority (photo) carriers (holes on the valence band). The issue encountered here is the formation of a small potential barrier on the valence band, blocking photocarriers and therefore killing the quantum efficiency. The idea is to optimize the structure with an asymmetric barrier: abrupt on the contact side to efficiently block the majority carriers, and gradual on the absorption layer side to plane down the remaining potential barrier for the collected photocarriers. The concept has been studied by finite element modeling simulation and showed promising results. An optimal design has been identified in the middle wave band and molecular beam epitaxy layers have been grown then processed. First experimental characterization of the electro-optical properties of such structures showed promising features: 60% quantum efficiency and low turn-on voltage have been measured on single pixels.

  16. Two-color HgCdTe infrared staring focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward P.; Pham, Le T.; Venzor, Gregory M.; Norton, Elyse; Newton, Michael; Goetz, Paul; Randall, Valerie; Pierce, Gregory; Patten, Elizabeth A.; Coussa, Raymond A.; Kosai, Ken; Radford, William A.; Edwards, John; Johnson, Scott M.; Baur, Stefan T.; Roth, John A.; Nosho, Brett; Jensen, John E.; Longshore, Randolph E.

    2003-12-01

    Raytheon Vision Systems (RVS) in collaboration with HRL Laboratories is contributing to the maturation and manufacturing readiness of third-generation two-color HgCdTe infrared staring focal plane arrays (FPAs). This paper will highlight data from the routine growth and fabrication of 256x256 30μm unit-cell staring FPAs that provide dual-color detection in the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) spectral regions. FPAs configured for MWIR/MWIR, MWIR/LWIR and LWIR/LWIR detection are used for target identification, signature recognition and clutter rejection in a wide variety of space and ground-based applications. Optimized triple-layer-heterojunction (TLHJ) device designs and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth using in-situ controls has contributed to individual bands in all two-color FPA configurations exhibiting high operability (>99%) and both performance and FPA functionality comparable to state-of-the-art single-color technology. The measured spectral cross talk from out-of-band radiation for either band is also typically less than 10%. An FPA architecture based on a single mesa, single indium bump, and sequential mode operation leverages current single-color processes in production while also providing compatibility with existing second-generation technologies.

  17. Performance and Calibration of H2RG Detectors and SIDECAR ASICs for the RATIR Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ori D.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Rapchun, David A.; Klein, Christopher R.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Bloom, Josh; de Diego, Jos A.; Simn Farah, Alejandro D.; Gehrels, Neil A.; Georgiev, Leonid; Gonzlez-Hernandez, J. Jess; Lee, William H.; Loose, Markus; Lotkin, Gennadiy; Moseley, Samuel H.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Richer, Michael G.; Robinson, Frederick D.; Romn-Zuniga, Carols; Samuel, Mathew V.; Sparr, Leroy M.; Watson, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    The Reionization And Transient Infra,.Red (RATIR) camera has been built for rapid Gamma,.Ray Burst (GRE) followup and will provide simultaneous optical and infrared photometric capabilities. The infrared portion of this camera incorporates two Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG detectors, controlled by Teledyne's SIDECAR ASICs. While other ground-based systems have used the SIDECAR before, this system also utilizes Teledyne's JADE2 interface card and IDE development environment. Together, this setup comprises Teledyne's Development Kit, which is a bundled solution that can be efficiently integrated into future ground-based systems. In this presentation, we characterize the system's read noise, dark current, and conversion gain.

  18. Benchmarking concentrating photovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr, Fabian; Muthirayan, Buvaneshwari; Meuret, Youri; Thienpont, Hugo

    2010-08-01

    Integral to photovoltaics is the need to provide improved economic viability. To achieve this goal, photovoltaic technology has to be able to harness more light at less cost. A large variety of concentrating photovoltaic concepts has provided cause for pursuit. To obtain a detailed profitability analysis, a flexible evaluation is crucial for benchmarking the cost-performance of this variety of concentrating photovoltaic concepts. To save time and capital, a way to estimate the cost-performance of a complete solar energy system is to use computer aided modeling. In this work a benchmark tool is introduced based on a modular programming concept. The overall implementation is done in MATLAB whereas Advanced Systems Analysis Program (ASAP) is used for ray tracing calculations. This allows for a flexible and extendable structuring of all important modules, namely an advanced source modeling including time and local dependence, and an advanced optical system analysis of various optical designs to obtain an evaluation of the figure of merit. An important figure of merit: the energy yield for a given photovoltaic system at a geographical position over a specific period, can be calculated.

  19. International Photovoltaic Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

    1979-12-01

    The International Photovoltaics Program Plan is in direct response to the Solar Photovoltaic Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (PL 95-590). As stated in the Act, the primary objective of the plan is to accelerate the widespread use of photovoltaic systems in international markets. Benefits which could result from increased international sales by US companies include: stabilization and expansion of the US photovoltaic industry, preparing the industry for supplying future domestic needs; contribution to the economic and social advancement of developing countries; reduced world demand for oil; and improvements in the US balance of trade. The plan outlines programs for photovoltaic demonstrations, systems developments, supplier assistance, information dissemination/purchaser assistance, and an informaion clearinghouse. Each program element includes tactical objectives and summaries of approaches. A program management office will be established to coordinate and manage the program plan. Although the US Department of Energy (DOE) had the lead responsibility for preparing and implementing the plan, numerous federal organizations and agencies (US Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, Treasury; Agency for International Development; ACTION; Export/Import Bank; Federal Trade Commission; Small Business Administration) were involved in the plan's preparation and implementation.

  20. Laser generated nanoparticles based photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, C; Savva, K; Kymakis, E; Stratakis, E

    2017-03-01

    The exploitation of nanoparticles (NP), synthesized via laser ablation in liquids, in photovoltaic devices is reviewed. In particular, the impact of NPs' incorporation into various building blocks within the solar cell architecture on the photovoltaic performance and stability is presented and analysed for the current state of the art photovoltaic technologies.

  1. Commentary: JWST near-infrared detector degradation— finding the problem, fixing the problem, and moving forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard J. Rauscher

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST will be an infrared-optimized telescope, with an approximately 6.5 m diameter primary mirror, that is located at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Three of JWST’s four science instruments use Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG (H2RG near infrared detector arrays. During 2010, the JWST Project noticed that a few of its 5 μm cutoff H2RG detectors were degrading during room temperature storage, and NASA chartered a “Detector Degradation Failure Review Board” (DD-FRB to investigate. The DD-FRB determined that the root cause was a design flaw that allowed indium to interdiffuse with the gold contacts and migrate into the HgCdTe detector layer. Fortunately, Teledyne already had an improved design that eliminated this degradation mechanism. During early 2012, the improved H2RG design was qualified for flight and JWST began making additional H2RGs. In this article, we present the two public DD-FRB “Executive Summaries” that: (1 determined the root cause of the detector degradation and (2 defined tests to determine whether the existing detectors are qualified for flight. We supplement these with a brief introduction to H2RG detector arrays, some recent measurements showing that the performance of the improved design meets JWST requirements, and a discussion of how the JWST Project is using cryogenic storage to retard the degradation rate of the existing flight spare H2RGs.

  2. Photovoltaic barometer; Barometre photovoltaique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2011-04-15

    The photovoltaic sector is continuing on track, just as the extent of solar energy's electricity-generating potential is dawning on the public mind. The annual global installation figure was up more than twofold in 2010 (rising from just short of 7000 MWp in 2009). It leapt to over 16000 MWp, bringing worldwide installed photovoltaic capacity close to 38000 MWp. The photovoltaic power generated in the European Union at the end of 2010 reached 22.5 TWh which means an additional capacity of 13023 MWp during 2010. Concerning the cumulated installed capacity, Germany and Spain rank first and second in the European Union with respectively 17370 MWp and 3808 MWp

  3. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surek, Thomas; Catalano, Anthony

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1992 progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)-formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Crystalline Materials and Advanced Concepts project, the Polycrystalline Thin Films project, Amorphous Silicon Research project, the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, PV Module and System Performance and Engineering project, and the PV Analysis and Applications Development project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1992, and future research directions.

  4. Photovoltaic systems in Patagonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawand, T.A. [McGill Univ., Ste. Anne de Bellevue, PQ (Canada). Brace Research Inst., Macdonald Coll; Rapallini, A. [MR Consultores, Buenos Aires, (Argentina); Pedro, G. [Ente Provincial de Energia del Neuquen, Neuquen, (Argentina)

    1998-05-01

    The feasibility of using of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems in the remote cold areas of the Neuquen province in Argentina was discussed. A program was developed by the local public utility to provide schools with electricity using photovoltaic panels. The PV systems have replaced expensive diesel generators which had become unreliable. In the first phase of the program, 27 schools were electrified using photovoltaic panels, battery storage systems and simple control panels. A review of the performance of the system components under the harsh climatic conditions of the region was discussed. The program has been expanded to include about 50 family systems. Another 150 are projected for the near future. 3 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Photovoltaic programme - edition 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This publication issued by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy's Photovoltaics (PV) Programme presents an overview (in English) of activities and projects in the photovoltaics research and pilot and demonstration area in Switzerland. Progress in the area of future solar cell technologies, modules and building integration, system technologies, planning and operating aids is summarised. Also, PV for applications in developing countries, thermo-photovoltaics and international co-operation are commented on. In the area of pilot and demonstration projects, component development, PV integration in sloping roofs, on flat roofs and noise barriers as well as further PV plant are looked at. Also, measurement campaigns, studies, statistics and further PV-related topics are summarised. This volume also presents the abstracts of reports made by the project managers of 73 research and pilot and demonstration projects in these areas for 2002.

  6. Interface morphology studies of liquid phase epitaxy grown HgCdTe films by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, M.; George, M. A.; Burger, A.; Collins, W. E.; Silberman, E.

    1994-04-01

    In this paper we report an investigation of the morphology of the interfaces of liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) grown HgCdTe thin films on CdTe and CdZnTe substrates by atomic force microscopy (AFM) on freshly cleaved (110) crystallographic planes. An empirical observation which may be linked to lattice mismatch was indicated by an angle between the cleavage steps of the substrate to those of the film. The precipitates with size ranging from 5 nm to 20 nm were found to be most apparent near the interface.

  7. Distributed photovoltaic grid transformers

    CERN Document Server

    Shertukde, Hemchandra Madhusudan

    2014-01-01

    The demand for alternative energy sources fuels the need for electric power and controls engineers to possess a practical understanding of transformers suitable for solar energy. Meeting that need, Distributed Photovoltaic Grid Transformers begins by explaining the basic theory behind transformers in the solar power arena, and then progresses to describe the development, manufacture, and sale of distributed photovoltaic (PV) grid transformers, which help boost the electric DC voltage (generally at 30 volts) harnessed by a PV panel to a higher level (generally at 115 volts or higher) once it is

  8. The DOE photovoltaics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferber, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    The considered program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has the objective to provide federal support for research and development work related to photovoltaics. According to definitions of policy in 1981, a strong emphasis is to be placed on long-term, high-risk research and development that industry could not reasonably be expected to perform using their own funds. Attention is given to the program structure, the photovoltaics program management organization, the advanced research and development subprogram, the collector research and development subprogram, flat-plate collectors, concentrator collectors, and the systems research and technology subprogram.

  9. Photovoltaic array performance model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochvil, Jay A.; Boyson, William Earl; King, David L.

    2004-08-01

    This document summarizes the equations and applications associated with the photovoltaic array performance model developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, 'translation' of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

  10. Photovoltaic Solar Energy Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzberger, Adolf; Hoffmann, Volker U.

    This comprehensive description and discussion of photovoltaics (PV) is presented at a level that makes it accessible to the interested academic. Starting with an historical overview, the text outlines the relevance of photovoltaics today and in the future. Then follows an introduction to the physical background of solar cells and the most important materials and technologies, with particular emphasis placed on future developments and prospects. The book goes beyond technology by also describing the path from the cell to the module to the system, proceeding to important applications such as grid-connected and stand-alone systems.

  11. Asphaltene based photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chianelli, Russell R.; Castillo, Karina; Gupta, Vipin; Qudah, Ali M.; Torres, Brenda; Abujnah, Rajib E.

    2016-03-22

    Photovoltaic devices and methods of making the same, are disclosed herein. The cell comprises a photovoltaic device that comprises a first electrically conductive layer comprising a photo-sensitized electrode; at least one photoelectrochemical layer comprising metal-oxide particles, an electrolyte solution comprising at least one asphaltene fraction, wherein the metal-oxide particles are optionally dispersed in a surfactant; and a second electrically conductive layer comprising a counter-electrode, wherein the second electrically conductive layer comprises one or more conductive elements comprising carbon, graphite, soot, carbon allotropes or any combinations thereof.

  12. Three-dimensional photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Bryan; Bernardi, Marco; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2010-03-01

    The concept of three-dimensional (3D) photovoltaics is explored computationally using a genetic algorithm to optimize the energy production in a day for arbitrarily shaped 3D solar cells confined to a given area footprint and total volume. Our simulations demonstrate that the performance of 3D photovoltaic structures scales linearly with height, leading to volumetric energy conversion, and provides power fairly evenly throughout the day. Furthermore, we show that optimal 3D shapes are not simple box-like shapes, and that design attributes such as reflectivity can be optimized in new ways using three-dimensionality.

  13. Photovoltaic systems overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Selected photovoltaic systems currently under user-environment field test by the U.S. Department of Energy Photovoltaics Program are discussed, and operational results are summarized. There are many systems in the stand-alone sector that are cost effective now. As proven products become available, distributed residential, commercial, institutional and industrial on-site systems should be able to displace significant amounts of centrally-generated electricity throughout most of the United States. Finally, utilities should ultimately be able to augment their generating capacity with larger-scale systems. Field experience and industry interface has led to excellent overall product performance.

  14. Concentrating photovoltaic solar panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashion, Steven A; Bowser, Michael R; Farrelly, Mark B; Hines, Braden E; Holmes, Howard C; Johnson, Jr., Richard L; Russell, Richard J; Turk, Michael F

    2014-04-15

    The present invention relates to photovoltaic power systems, photovoltaic concentrator modules, and related methods. In particular, the present invention features concentrator modules having interior points of attachment for an articulating mechanism and/or an articulating mechanism that has a unique arrangement of chassis members so as to isolate bending, etc. from being transferred among the chassis members. The present invention also features adjustable solar panel mounting features and/or mounting features with two or more degrees of freedom. The present invention also features a mechanical fastener for secondary optics in a concentrator module.

  15. Infrared detectors for Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, K.; Davis, R. P.; Knowles, P.; Shorrocks, N.

    2016-05-01

    IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer), developed by CNES and launched since 2006 on the Metop satellites, is established as a major source of data for atmospheric science and weather prediction. The next generation - IASI NG - is a French national contribution to the Eumetsat Polar System Second Generation on board of the Metop second generation satellites and is under development by Airbus Defence and Space for CNES. The mission aim is to achieve twice the performance of the original IASI instrument in terms of sensitivity and spectral resolution. In turn, this places very demanding requirements on the infrared detectors for the new instrument. Selex ES in Southampton has been selected for the development of the infrared detector set for the IASI-NG instruments. The wide spectral range, 3.6 to 15.5 microns, is covered in four bands, each served by a dedicated detector design, with a common 4 x 4 array format of 1.3 mm square macropixels. Three of the bands up to 8.7 microns employ photovoltaic MCT (mercury cadmium telluride) technology and the very long wave band employs photoconductive MCT, in common with the approach taken between Airbus and Selex ES for the SEVIRI instrument on Second Generation Meteosat. For the photovoltaic detectors, the MCT crystal growth of heterojunction photodiodes is by the MOVPE technique (metal organic vapour phase epitaxy). Novel approaches have been taken to hardening the photovoltaic macropixels against localised crystal defects, and integrating transimpedance amplifiers for each macropixel into a full-custom silicon read out chip, which incorporates radiation hard design.

  16. Photovoltaics fundamentals, technology and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Mertens, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    Concise introduction to the basic principles of solar energy, photovoltaic systems, photovoltaic cells, photovoltaic measurement techniques, and grid connected systems, overviewing the potential of photovoltaic electricity for students and engineers new to the topic After a brief introduction to the topic of photovoltaics' history and the most important facts, Chapter 1 presents the subject of radiation, covering properties of solar radiation, radiation offer, and world energy consumption. Chapter 2 looks at the fundamentals of semiconductor physics. It discusses the build-up of semiconducto

  17. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  18. Infrared limb sounding of Titan with the Cassini Composite InfraRed Spectrometer: effects of the mid-IR detector spatial responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Conor A; Teanby, Nicholas A; Calcutt, Simon B; Aslam, Shahid; Jennings, Donald E; Kunde, Virgil G; Flasar, F Michael; Irwin, Patrick G; Taylor, Fredric W; Glenar, David A; Smith, Michael D

    2009-04-01

    The composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) instrument on board the Cassini Saturn orbiter employs two 1x10 HgCdTe detector arrays for mid-infrared remote sensing of Titan's and Saturn's atmospheres. In this paper we show that the real detector spatial response functions, as measured in ground testing before launch, differ significantly from idealized "boxcar" responses. We further show that neglecting this true spatial response function when modeling CIRS spectra can have a significant effect on interpretation of the data, especially in limb-sounding mode, which is frequently used for Titan science. This result has implications not just for CIRS data analysis but for other similar instrumental applications.

  19. Minority carrier lifetime in iodine-doped molecular beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madni, I.; Umana-Membreno, G. A.; Lei, W.; Gu, R.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2015-11-02

    The minority carrier lifetime in molecular beam epitaxy grown layers of iodine-doped Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Te (x ∼ 0.3) on CdZnTe substrates has been studied. The samples demonstrated extrinsic donor behavior for carrier concentrations in the range from 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} without any post-growth annealing. At a temperature of 77 K, the electron mobility was found to vary from 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/V s to 7 × 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/V s and minority carrier lifetime from 1.6 μs to 790 ns, respectively, as the carrier concentration was increased from 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. The diffusion of iodine is much lower than that of indium and hence a better alternative in heterostructures such as nBn devices. The influence of carrier concentration and temperature on the minority carrier lifetime was studied in order to characterize the carrier recombination mechanisms. Measured lifetimes were also analyzed and compared with the theoretical models of the various recombination processes occurring in these materials, indicating that Auger-1 recombination was predominant at higher doping levels. An increase in deep-level generation-recombination centers was observed with increasing doping level, which suggests that the increase in deep-level trap density is associated with the incorporation of higher concentrations of iodine into the HgCdTe.

  20. Two-color detector: Mercury-cadmium-telluride as a terahertz and infrared detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizov, F.; Zabudsky, V.; Petryakov, V.; Golenkov, A.; Andreyeva, K.; Tsybrii, Z. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine); Dvoretskii, S. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics of SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, issues associated with the development of infrared (IR) and terahertz (THz) radiation detectors based on HgCdTe are discussed. Two-color un-cooled and cooled to 78 K narrow-gap mercury-cadmium-telluride semiconductor thin layers with antennas were considered both as sub-THz (sub-THz) direct detection bolometers and 3–10 μm IR photoconductors. The noise equivalent power (NEP) for one of the detectors studied at ν ≈ 140 GHz reaches NEP{sub 300 K} ≈ 4.5 × 10{sup −10} W/Hz{sup 1/2} and NEP{sub 78 K} ≈ 5 × 10{sup −9} W/Hz{sup 1/2}. The same detector used as an IR photoconductor showed the responsivity at temperatures T = 78 K and 300 K with signal-to-noise ratio S/N ≈ 750 and 50, respectively, under illumination by using IR monochromator and globar as a thermal source.

  1. Infrared detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalski, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This second edition is fully revised and reorganized, with new chapters concerning third generation and quantum dot detectors, THz detectors, cantilever and antenna coupled detectors, and information on radiometry and IR optics materials. Part IV concerning focal plane arrays is significantly expanded. This book, resembling an encyclopedia of IR detectors, is well illustrated and contains many original references … a really comprehensive book.-F. Sizov, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine

  2. Air Stable Photovoltaic Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    A method of forming a conducting polymer based photovoltaic device comprising the steps of : (a) providing a transparent first electrode; (b) providing the transparent first electrode with a layer of metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein the metal oxide is selected from the group consisting of : TiO...

  3. Modelling the Photovoltaic Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsanevakis, Markos

    2011-01-01

    This paper refers into various ways in simulation the Photovoltaic (PV) module behaviour under any combination of solar irradiation and ambient temperature. There are three different approaches presented here briefly and one of them is chosen because of its good accuracy and relatively low...

  4. BMDO photovoltaics program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caveny, Leonard H.; Allen, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    This is an overview of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) Photovoltaic Program. Areas discussed are: (1) BMDO advanced Solar Array program; (2) Brilliant Eyes type satellites; (3) Electric propulsion; (4) Contractor Solar arrays; (5) Iofee Concentrator and Cell development; (6) Entech linear mini-dome concentrator; and (7) Flight test update/plans.

  5. Photovoltaics in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, K.

    1985-01-01

    Report surveys status of research and development on photovoltaics in Japan. Report based on literature searches, private communications, and visits by author to Japanese facilities. Included in survey are Sunshine Project, national program to develop energy sources; industrial development at private firms; and work at academic institutions.

  6. Introduction to photovoltaic technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides a concise overview of the developments in photovoltaic (PV) solar energy. It has taken nearly 60 years for the PV industry to develop into a multibillion business, and it will take further tens of years to reach trillion levels, which are needed in the realization of a society

  7. Photovoltaic solar; Solaire photovoltaique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    This study aims to observe, from european examples, the local governments policies in matter of the photovoltaic development. This approach is very different for each town. The first part evaluates the initiatives, the second part is devoted to the global situation in Europe and the third part brings recommendations. (A.L.B.)

  8. Interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öner, S.Z.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with material interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics. Interface properties between the absorbing semiconductor and other employed materials are crucial for an efficient solar cell. While the optical properties are largely unaffected by a few nanometer thin layer, the electronic prop

  9. Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2011-10-13

    DOE works with national labs, academia, and industry to support the domestic photovoltaics (PV) industry and research enterprise. SunShot aims to achieve widespread, unsubsidized cost-competitiveness through an applied research and development (R&D) portfolio spanning PV materials, devices, and manufacturing technologies.

  10. Interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öner, S.Z.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with material interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics. Interface properties between the absorbing semiconductor and other employed materials are crucial for an efficient solar cell. While the optical properties are largely unaffected by a few nanometer thin layer, the electronic prop

  11. Autonomous photovoltaic lighting system

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed A. A. Hafez; Montesinos Miracle, Daniel; Sudrià Andreu, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a comparison between the conventional and Photovoltaic (PV) lighting systems. A simple sizing procedure for a PV stand-alone system was advised. The paper also proposes a novel PV lighting system. The proposed system is simple, compact and reliable. The system operation was investigated by thoroughly mathematical and simulation work.

  12. The ^{55}Fe X-ray Energy Response of Mercury Cadmium Telluride Near-Infrared Detector Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Ori D; Wen, Yiting; Foltz, Roger D; Hill, Robert J; Kimble, Randy A; Malumuth, Eliot; Rauscher, Bernard J

    2009-01-01

    A technique involving ^{55}Fe X-rays provides a straightforward method to measure the response of a detector. The detector's response can lead directly to a calculation of the conversion gain (e^- ADU^{-1}), as well as aid detector design and performance studies. We calibrate the ^{55}Fe X-ray energy response and pair production energy of HgCdTe using 8 HST WFC3 1.7 \\micron flight grade detectors. The results show that each K$\\alpha$ X-ray generates 2273 \\pm 137 electrons, which corresponds to a pair-production energy of 2.61 \\pm 0.16 eV. The uncertainties are dominated by our knowledge of the conversion gain. In future studies, we plan to eliminate this uncertainty by directly measuring conversion gain at very low light levels.

  13. Studies on a novel mask technique with high selectivity and aspect-ratio patterns for HgCdTe trenches ICP etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Z. H.; Hu, W. D.; Li, Y.; Huang, J.; Yin, W. T.; Lin, C.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; Chen, X. S.; Lu, W.; He, L.

    2012-06-01

    A novel mask technique, combining high selectivity silicon dioxide patterns over high aspect-ratio photoresist (PR) patterns has been exploited to perform mesa etching for device delineation and electrical isolation of HgCdTe third-generation infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs). High-density silicon dioxide film covering high aspect-ratio PR patterns was deposited at the temperature of 80°C and silicon dioxide film patterns over high aspect-ratio PR patterns of HgCdTe etching samples was developed by standard photolithography and wet chemical etch. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the surfaces of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etched samples are quite clean and smooth. The etching selectivity between the novel mask and HgCdTe of the samples is increased to above 32: 1 while the side-wall impact of etching plasma is suppressed by the high aspect ratio patterns. These results show that the combined patterning of silicon dioxide film and thick PR film is a readily available and promising masking technique for HgCdTe mesa etching.

  14. General Situations of Development of Photovoltaic Agriculture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohang; ZHANG; Shoufu; CUI; Fuping; LIU

    2015-01-01

    This paper firstly introduced policy of photovoltaic agriculture in China. It discussed significance of developing photovoltaic agriculture. Then,it introduced progress in application of photovoltaic agriculture at both home and abroad. Finally,it pointed out existing problems in photovoltaic agriculture and came up with recommendations for development of photovoltaic agriculture in China.

  15. Gaseous Detectors: Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, H J

    2011-01-01

    Gaseous Detectors in 'Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Subsection '3.1.2 Gaseous Detectors' of Section '3.1 Charged Particle Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.1.2 Gaseous Detectors 3.1.2.1 Introduction 3.1.2.2 Basic Processes 3.1.2.2.1 Gas ionization by charged particles 3.1.2.2.1.1 Primary clusters 3.1.2.2.1.2 Cluster size distribution 3.1.2.2.1.3 Total number of ion pairs 3.1.2.2.1.4 Dependence of energy deposit on particle velocity 3.1.2.2.2 Transport of...

  16. Photovoltaic module and interlocked stack of photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, Brian S.

    2012-09-04

    One embodiment relates to an arrangement of photovoltaic modules configured for transportation. The arrangement includes a plurality of photovoltaic modules, each photovoltaic module including a frame having at least a top member and a bottom member. A plurality of alignment features are included on the top member of each frame, and a plurality of alignment features are included on the bottom member of each frame. Adjacent photovoltaic modules are interlocked by the alignment features on the top member of a lower module fitting together with the alignment features on the bottom member of an upper module. Other embodiments, features and aspects are also disclosed.

  17. Three-phase Photovoltaic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerekes, Tamas; Sera, Dezso; Máthé, Lászlo

    2015-01-01

    the grid through a three-phase power electronic converter are now well on the way to becoming a major player in the power system in many countries. Therefore, this article gives an overview of photovoltaic systems with a focus on three-phase applications, presenting these both from a hardware point of view......Photovoltaic technology has experienced unprecedented growth in the last two decades, transforming from mainly off-grid niche generation to a major renewable energy technology, reaching approximately 180 GW of capacity worldwide at the end of 2014. Large photovoltaic power plants interfacing......, detailing the different photovoltaic inverter structures and topologies as well as discussing the different control layers within a grid-connected photovoltaic plant. Modulation schemes for various photovoltaic inverter topologies, grid synchronization, current control, active and reactive power control...

  18. Photovoltaic solar energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Gottfried H

    2015-01-01

    This concise primer on photovoltaic solar energy conversion invites readers to reflect on the conversion of solar light into energy at the most fundamental level and encourages newcomers to the field to help find meaningful answers on how photovoltaic solar energy conversion can work (better), eventually contributing to its ongoing advancement. The book is based on lectures given to graduate students in the Physics Department at the University of Oldenburg over the last two decades, yet also provides an easy-to-follow introduction for doctoral and postdoctoral students from related disciplines such as the materials sciences and electrical engineering. Inspired by classic textbooks in the field, it reflects the author’s own ideas on how to understand, visualize and eventually teach the microscopic physical mechanisms and effects, while keeping the text as concise as possible so as to introduce interested readers to the field and balancing essential knowledge with open questions.

  19. Plastic photovoltaic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyazi Serdar Sariciftci

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of organic, polymer-based photovoltaic elements has introduced the possibility of obtaining cheap and easy-to-produce energy from light. Photoinduced electron transfer from donor-type semiconducting polymers onto acceptor-type polymers or molecules, such as C60, is the basic phenomenon utilized in these photovoltaic devices. This process mimics the early photo-effects in natural photosynthesis. The polymeric semiconductors combine the photoelectrical properties of inorganic semiconductors with the large-scale, low-cost technology of polymeric ‘plastic’ materials. To date, devices with power conversion efficiencies of ∼5% have been reported. Several companies and research institutions are focusing on this field now, making power conversion efficiencies up to 8-10% highly likely in the near future.

  20. Inverted organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Chang; Meng, Tianyu; Yi, Chao; Gong, Xiong

    2016-05-21

    The advance in lifestyle, modern industrialization and future technological revolution are always at high expense of energy consumption. Unfortunately, there exist serious issues such as limited storage, high cost and toxic contamination in conventional fossil fuel energy sources. Instead, solar energy represents a renewable, economic and green alternative in the future energy market. Among the photovoltaic technologies, organic photovoltaics (OPVs) demonstrate a cheap, flexible, clean and easy-processing way to convert solar energy into electricity. However, OPVs with a conventional device structure are still far away from industrialization mainly because of their short lifetime and the energy-intensive deposition of top metal electrode. To address the stability and cost issue simultaneously, an inverted device structure has been introduced into OPVs, bridging laboratory research with practical application. In this review, recent progress in device structures, working mechanisms, functions and advances of each component layer as well their correlations with the efficiency and stability of inverted OPVs are reviewed and illustrated.

  1. Photovoltaic Solar Energy Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Lotsch, H.K.V; U.Hoffmann, Volker; Rhodes, William T; Asakura, Toshimitsu; Brenner, Karl-Heinz; Hänsch, Theodor W; Kamiya, Takeshi; Krausz, Ferenc; Monemar, Bo; Venghaus, Herbert; Weber, Horst; Weinfurter, Harald

    2005-01-01

    This comprehensive description and discussion of photovoltaics (PV) is presented at a level that makes it accessible to the interested academic. Starting with an historical overview, the text outlines the relevance of photovoltaics today and in the future. Then follows an introduction to the physical background of solar cells and the most important materials and technologies, with particular emphasis placed on future developments and prospects. The book goes beyond technology by also describing the path from the cell to the module to the system, proceeding to important applications, such as grid-connected and stand-alone systems. The composition and development of the markets and the role of PV in future energy systems are also considered. Finally, the discussion turns to the future structure of energy supplies, expected to comprise more distributed generation, and addresses synergies and competition from other carbon-free energy sources.

  2. Photovoltaic prospects in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, M. R.

    The economics of solar cells is reviewed with an eye to potential cost reductions in processing, and potential markets are explored. Current solar cell systems costs are noted to be on the road to achieving the U.S. DoE goals of $0.40/kWp by 1990. Continued progress will depend on technical developments in cheaper materials and processes, scaling up production, and the success of sales programs. Various consumer and professional markets are outlined, with a prediction that a 12 MWp deman will be reached as a steady state by 1995. Photovoltaic panels may conceivably replace conventional roofing materials, resulting in the projection that, if grid-supplied power continues to inflate in price, then all new European homes would be equipped with photovoltaics by the year 2000. Further, accomplishment of the cost goals could generate a 1 GWp/yr industrial market at the same time.

  3. Pixel Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wermes, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    Pixel detectors for precise particle tracking in high energy physics have been developed to a level of maturity during the past decade. Three of the LHC detectors will use vertex detectors close to the interaction point based on the hybrid pixel technology which can be considered the state of the art in this field of instrumentation. A development period of almost 10 years has resulted in pixel detector modules which can stand the extreme rate and timing requirements as well as the very harsh...

  4. Photovoltaic sources modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Petrone, Giovanni; Spagnuolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive guide surveys all available models for simulating a photovoltaic (PV) generator at different levels of granularity, from cell to system level, in uniform as well as in mismatched conditions. Providing a thorough comparison among the models, engineers have all the elements needed to choose the right PV array model for specific applications or environmental conditions matched with the model of the electronic circuit used to maximize the PV power production.

  5. Photovoltaic cell array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, J. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell array consisting of parallel columns of silicon filaments is described. Each fiber is doped to produce an inner region of one polarity type and an outer region of an opposite polarity type to thereby form a continuous radial semi conductor junction. Spaced rows of electrical contacts alternately connect to the inner and outer regions to provide a plurality of electrical outputs which may be combined in parallel or in series.

  6. Increased voltage photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, B.; Bickler, D. B.; Gallagher, B. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell, such as a solar cell, is provided which has a higher output voltage than prior cells. The improved cell includes a substrate of doped silicon, a first layer of silicon disposed on the substrate and having opposite doping, and a second layer of silicon carbide disposed on the first layer. The silicon carbide preferably has the same type of doping as the first layer.

  7. Photovoltaic systems. Program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-12-01

    Each of the Department of Energy's Photovoltaic Systems Program projects funded and/or in existence during fiscal year 1978 (October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1978) are described. The project sheets list the contractor, principal investigator, and contract number and funding and summarize the programs and status. The program is divided into various elements: program assessment and integration, research and advanced development, technology development, system definition and development, system application experiments, and standards and performance criteria. (WHK)

  8. Design of photovoltaic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Laso Martínez, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) harvesting of solar energy is based on capturing sunlight and transforming it into electricity. This type of electricity generation does not pollute the environment as much as other types of energy production, that is why nowadays some engineers would like to improve it. To carry out this change we use solar cells made of semiconductor materials (Silicon) in which it is artificially created a permanent electric field. These cells are connected in series or par...

  9. Photovoltaics. III - Concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, C. E.

    1980-02-01

    Photovoltaic concentration systems that redirect sunlight falling on a surface to a smaller solar-cell surface concentrating the intensity of sunlight many times are examined. It is noted that solar cells for concentrating systems must be designed for low internal resistance as well as for high sunlight intensities. Two designs of silicon cells are presented that perform well at high concentrations; these are interdigitated back-contact cells and vertical multijunction cells. Attention is given to heat tapping of reemitted light.

  10. Photovoltaic energy barometer; Barometre photovoltaique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2007-03-15

    The european photovoltaic market once again reached the heights in 2006, thanks to the dynamism of the German market. White paper objectives have thus been fulfilled four years ahead of schedule. The european photovoltaic sector remains however very heterogeneous with both an ultra-dominant German market (estimated at 1150 MWp in 2006) and other countries of the European Union that vary from a few kWP to a few dozen MWp. This analysis provides statistical data on the market, the capacity installed during 2005 and 2006, the photovoltaic parks and the evolution of the photovoltaic cell production. (A.L.B.)

  11. Solar photovoltaics for development applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepperd, L.W. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (United States); Richards, E.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This document introduces photovoltaic technology to individuals and groups specializing in development activities. Examples of actual installations illustrate the many services supplied by photovoltaic systems in development applications, including water pumping, lighting, health care, refrigeration, communications, and a variety of productive uses. The various aspects of the technology are explored to help potential users evaluate whether photovoltaics can assist them in achieving their organizational goals. Basic system design, financing techniques, and the importance of infrastructure are included, along with additional sources of information and major US photovoltaic system suppliers.

  12. Do photovoltaics have a future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    There is major concern as to the economic practicality of widespread terrestrial use because of the high cost of the photovoltaic arrays themselves. Based on their high efficiency, photovoltaic collectors should be one of the cheapest forms of energy generators known. Present photovoltaic panels are violating the trend of lower costs with increasing efficiency due to their reliance on expensive materials. A medium technology solution should provide electricity competitive with the existing medium to high technology energy generators such as oil, coal, gas, and nuclear fission thermal plants. Programs to reduce the cost of silicon and develop reliable thin film materials have a realistic chance of producing cost effective photovoltaic panels.

  13. Photovoltaic research needs industry perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, K. V.

    1982-01-01

    An industries perspective of photovoltaic research needs is presented. Objectives and features of industry needs are discussed for the materials, devices, processes, and reliability research categories.

  14. Quantum Dot Based Photovoltaics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hybrid photovoltaic cells that combine nanostructured inorganic semiconductors with organic conductors such as the cell proposed, show promise for energy generation...

  15. Photovoltaic self-assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavin, Judith; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2010-10-01

    This late-start LDRD was focused on the application of chemical principles of self-assembly on the ordering and placement of photovoltaic cells in a module. The drive for this chemical-based self-assembly stems from the escalating prices in the 'pick-and-place' technology currently used in the MEMS industries as the size of chips decreases. The chemical self-assembly principles are well-known on a molecular scale in other material science systems but to date had not been applied to the assembly of cells in a photovoltaic array or module. We explored several types of chemical-based self-assembly techniques, including gold-thiol interactions, liquid polymer binding, and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions designed to array both Si and GaAs PV chips onto a substrate. Additional research was focused on the modification of PV cells in an effort to gain control over the facial directionality of the cells in a solvent-based environment. Despite being a small footprint research project worked on for only a short time, the technical results and scientific accomplishments were significant and could prove to be enabling technology in the disruptive advancement of the microelectronic photovoltaics industry.

  16. Quo Vadis photovoltaics 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger-Waldau, A.

    2011-10-01

    Since more than 10 years photovoltaics is one of the most dynamic industries with growth rates well beyond 40% per annum. This growth is driven not only by the progress in materials knowledge and processing technology, but also by market introduction programmes in many countries around the world. Despite the negative impacts on the economy by the financial crisis since 2009, photovoltaics is still growing at an extraordinary pace and had in 2010 an extraordinary success, as both production and markets doubled. The open question is what will happen in 2011 and the years after as the situation is dominated by huge manufacturing overcapacities and an increasing unpredictability of policy support. How can the PV industry continue their cost reduction to ensure another 10 to 20 years of sustained and strong growth necessary to make PV to one of the main pillars of a sustainable energy supply in 2030. Despite the fact, that globally the share of electricity from photovoltaic systems is still small, at local level it can be already now above 30% of the demand at certain times of the year. Future research in PV has to provide intelligent solutions not only on the solar cell alone, but also on the module and the system integration level in order to permit a 5 to 10% share of electricity in 2020.

  17. Quo Vadis photovoltaics 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jäger-Waldau A.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Since more than 10 years photovoltaics is one of the most dynamic industries with growth rates well beyond 40% per annum. This growth is driven not only by the progress in materials knowledge and processing technology, but also by market introduction programmes in many countries around the world. Despite the negative impacts on the economy by the financial crisis since 2009, photovoltaics is still growing at an extraordinary pace and had in 2010 an extraordinary success, as both production and markets doubled. The open question is what will happen in 2011 and the years after as the situation is dominated by huge manufacturing overcapacities and an increasing unpredictability of policy support. How can the PV industry continue their cost reduction to ensure another 10 to 20 years of sustained and strong growth necessary to make PV to one of the main pillars of a sustainable energy supply in 2030. Despite the fact, that globally the share of electricity from photovoltaic systems is still small, at local level it can be already now above 30% of the demand at certain times of the year. Future research in PV has to provide intelligent solutions not only on the solar cell alone, but also on the module and the system integration level in order to permit a 5 to 10% share of electricity in 2020.

  18. Photocurrent of Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, Seth; McIntyre, Max; Cossel, Raquel; Bowser, Chris; Tzolov, Marian

    Photovoltaic cells can be used to harness clean, renewable energy from light. Examined in this project were photovoltaic cells based on a bulk heterojunction between PCPDTBT and PCBM sandwiched between an ITO anode and an Al cathode. Current-voltage characteristics and impedance spectra for multiple photovoltaic devices were taken under varying DC electrical bias and different level of illumination. This data was interpreted in terms of an equivalent circuit with linear elements, e.g. capacitance, series resistance, and parallel resistance. A physical interpretation of each circuit element will be presented. The spectral response of the devices was characterized by optical transmission and photocurrent spectroscopy using a spectrometer in the spectral range from 300 to 900 nm. The DC measurements confirmed that the devices are electrically rectifying. The AC measurements allowed modeling of the devices as a dielectric between two electrodes with injection current passing through it. The characteristic peaks for both PCBDTBT and PCBM are clearly visible in both the photocurrent and transmission data. The good correlation between the photocurrent and transmission data indicates photocurrent generation due to absorption in both materials constituting the heterojunction.

  19. Photovoltaic module reliability workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrig, L. (ed.)

    1990-01-01

    The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986--1990. The reliability Photo Voltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warranties available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

  20. Metal Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  1. Optical Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbert, Bernd; Goushcha, Alexander

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  2. Type-II indium arsenide/gallium antimonide superlattices for infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Hooman

    In this work, the unique properties of type-II InAs/GaSb heterojunctions were utilized for the realization of novel infrared photodetectors with higher operating temperature, detectivity and uniformity than the commonly available infrared detectors. This effort was concentrated on two major devices: uncooled infrared detectors in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) range, and cooled devices in the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) range. Uncooled infrared (IR) detectors are required for low-cost, lightweight sensor systems that have many industrial and medical applications. Commercially available uncooled IR sensors use ferroelectric or microbolometer detectors. These sensors are inherently slow and cannot detect rapid signal changes needed for high-speed infrared systems. Some of the applications which require a fast detector (tau LIDARs. Although photon detectors have frequency responses in the megahertz range, their high temperature detectivity is severely degraded due to high Auger recombination rates. Bandgap engineering was used in order to suppress Auger recombination at room temperature in type-II superlattices. Our experimental results demonstrated nearly one order of magnitude lower Auger recombination rate at room temperature in these type-II superlattices compared to typical intrinsic detectors, such as HgCdTe, with similar bandgap. Uncooled detectors based on the engineered superlattices showed a detectivity of 1.3 x 108g cmHz 1/2/W at 11 Et m, which is comparable to microbolometers. However, the measured response time of the detectors was more than five orders of magnitude faster than microbolometers. In parallel, devices for operation in the VLWIR were developed. High-performance infrared detectors with cutoff wavelength above 14 mum are highly needed for many space-based applications. Commonly used detectors are extrinsic silicon and HgCdTe. However, the former has to be cooled below 10K, and the latter do not have good uniformity in the VLWIR

  3. Study of Morphological Defects on Dual-Band HgCdTe on CdZnTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.; Radford, W. A.; Lofgreen, D. D.; Olsson, K. R.; Peterson, J. M.; Johnson, S. M.

    2014-08-01

    HgCdTe dual-band epitaxial layers on lattice-matched CdZnTe substrates often have morphological defects. These defects, unlike normal void and microvoid defects, do not contain a polycrystalline core and, therefore, do not offer a good contrast for observation using optical and electron microscopes. This paper reports a way of identifying these defects by using a Nomarski optical microscopy image overlay on focused ion beam microscopy images for preparation of thin cross-sectional foils of these defects. Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the defect cross-sections to identify the origin and evolution of the morphological defects and their effect on the epitaxial layer. This paper reports cross-sectional analysis of four morphological defects of different shape and size.

  4. Cross-Sectional Study of Macrodefects in MBE Dual-Band HgCdTe on CdZnTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.; Lofgreen, D. D.; Jones, K. A.; Peterson, J. M.; Radford, W. A.; Benson, J. D.; Johnson, S. M.

    2013-11-01

    HgCdTe dual-band mid-wave infrared/long-wave infrared focal-plane arrays on CdZnTe are a key component in advanced electrooptic sensor applications. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been used successfully for growth of dual-band layers on larger CdZnTe substrates. However, the macrodefect density, which is known to reduce the pixel operability and its run-to-run variation, is larger when compared with layers grown on Si substrate. This paper reports the macrodefect density versus size signature of a well-optimized MBE dual-band growth and a cross-sectional study of a macrodefect that represents the most prevalent class using focused ion beam, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results show that the macrodefect originates from a void, which in turn is associated with a pit on the CdZnTe substrate.

  5. Photovoltaic conversion of laser energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirn, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The Schottky barrier photovoltaic converter is suggested as an alternative to the p/n junction photovoltaic devices for the conversion of laser energy to electrical energy. The structure, current, output, and voltage output of the Schottky device are summarized. The more advanced concepts of the multilayer Schottky barrier cell and the AMOS solar cell are briefly considered.

  6. Photovoltaics: solar electric power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-02-01

    The operation and uses of solar cells and the National Photovoltaic Program are briefly described. Eleven DOE photovoltaic application projects are described including forest lookout towers; Wilcox Memorial Hospital in Hawaii; WBNO daytime AM radio station; Schuchuli Indian Village; Meade, Nebraska, agricultural experiment; Mt. Laguna Air Force Station; public schools and colleges; residential applications; and Sea World of Florida. (WHK)

  7. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  8. Steady-State Screening-Photovoltaic Spatial Solitons in the Biased Photorefractive-Photovoltaic Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ke-Qing; ZHANG Yan-Peng; TANG Tian-Tong; LU Zhi-Xian; LIU Lin

    2001-01-01

    The theory of the screening-photovoltaic solitons is improved in biased photorefractive-photovoltaic crystals. When the photovoltaic effect is negligible, the screening-photovoltaic solitons are the screening ones, and their space-charge field is the space-charge field of the screening solitons. If the external field is absent, the screening photovoltaic solitons are the photovoltaic ones on the open- and closed-circuit conditions, and their space-charge field is of the photovoltaic solitons. We also show theoretically that the screening and the photovoltaic solitons on the open- and closed-circuit conditions may be studies together as the screening-photovoltaic solitons.

  9. Photovoltaic evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G.; Heikkilae, M.; Melasuo, T.; Spanner, S.

    Realizing the value and potential of PV-power as well as the growing need for increased cooperation and sharing of knowledge in the field of photovoltaics, FINNIDA and UNICEF decided to undertake a study of selected PV-projects. There were two main objectives for the study: To gather, compile, evaluate and share information on the photovoltaic technology appropriate to developing countries, and to promote the interest and competence of Finnish research institutes, consultants and manufacturers in photovoltaic development. For this purpose a joint evaluation of significant, primarily UN-supported projects providing for the basic needs of rural communities was undertaken. The Gambia and Kenya offered a variety of such projects, and were chosen as target countries for the study. The projects were chosen to be both comparable and complimentary. In the Gambia, the main subject was a partially integrated health and telecommunications project, but a long-operating drinking water pumping system was also studied. In Kenya, a health project in the Turkana area was examined, and also a large scale water pumping installation for fish farming. Field visits were made in order to verify and supplement the data gathered through document research and earlier investigations. Individual data gathering sheets for the project form the core of this study and are intended to give the necessary information in an organized and accessible format. The findings could practically be condensed into one sentence: PV-systems work very well, if properly designed and installed, but the resources and requirements of the recipients must be considered to a higher degree.

  10. Technology for advanced focal plane arrays of HgCdTe and AIGaN

    CERN Document Server

    He, Li; Ni, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces the basic framework of advanced focal plane technology based on the third-generation infrared focal plane concept. The essential concept, research advances, and future trends in advanced sensor arrays are comprehensively reviewed. Moreover, the book summarizes recent research advances in HgCdTe/AlGaN detectors for the infrared/ultraviolet waveband, with a particular focus on the numerical method of detector design, material epitaxial growth and processing, as well as Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Transistor readout circuits. The book offers a unique resource for all graduate students and researchers interested in the technologies of focal plane arrays or electro-optical imaging sensors.

  11. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Malcolm P.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Stancel, Robert

    2013-03-19

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  12. Photovoltaic Degradation Risk: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-04-01

    The ability to accurately predict power delivery over the course of time is of vital importance to the growth of the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Important cost drivers include the efficiency with which sunlight is converted into power, how this relationship changes over time, and the uncertainty in this prediction. An accurate quantification of power decline over time, also known as degradation rate, is essential to all stakeholders - utility companies, integrators, investors, and researchers alike. In this paper we use a statistical approach based on historical data to quantify degradation rates, discern trends and quantify risks related to measurement uncertainties, number of measurements and methodologies.

  13. Photovoltaic research and development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cummings, F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available t & S t r a t e g i c R e l a t i o n s h i p M a n a g e m e n t National Cleaner Production Centre (NCPC) Finance Human Resources Management Services Communications Aerospace Industry Support Initiative (AISI) EMERGING... buyers. Introduction to Photovoltaics © CSIR 2007 www.csir.co.za head2right Solar powered lights and other solar powered products are very easy to install. This is because there are few wiring issues and little need to ever...

  14. Optical waveguide enhanced photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühle, Sven; Greenwald, Shlomit; Koren, Elad; Zaban, Arie

    2008-12-22

    Enhanced light to electric power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells with a low absorbance was achieved using waveguide integration. We present a proof of concept using a very thin dye-sensitized solar cell which absorbed only a small fraction of the light at normal incidence. The glass substrate in conjunction with the solar cells reflecting back contact formed a planar waveguide, which lead to more than four times higher conversion efficiency compared to conventional illumination at normal incidence. This illumination concept leads to a new type of multi-junction PV systems based on enforced spectral splitting along the waveguide.

  15. Photovoltaic system reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maish, A.B.; Atcitty, C. [Sandia National Labs., NM (United States); Greenberg, D. [Ascension Technology, Inc., Lincoln Center, MA (United States)] [and others

    1997-10-01

    This paper discusses the reliability of several photovoltaic projects including SMUD`s PV Pioneer project, various projects monitored by Ascension Technology, and the Colorado Parks project. System times-to-failure range from 1 to 16 years, and maintenance costs range from 1 to 16 cents per kilowatt-hour. Factors contributing to the reliability of these systems are discussed, and practices are recommended that can be applied to future projects. This paper also discusses the methodology used to collect and analyze PV system reliability data.

  16. Lifetime of organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corazza, Michael; Krebs, Frederik C; Gevorgyan, Suren A.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive outdoor study of polymer solar cells and modules for duration of one year was conducted. Different sample geometries and encapsulations were employed in order to study the spread in the lifetimes. The study is a complimentary report to previous work that focused on indoor ageing...... tests. Comparison of the indoor and outdoor lifetimes was performed by means of the o-diagram, which constitutes the initial steps towards establishing a method for predicting the lifetime of an organic photovoltaic device under real operational conditions based on a selection of accelerated indoor...

  17. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Brown, Malcolm P.; Stancel, Robert

    2012-06-05

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  18. Incoherently Coupled Grey Photovoltaic Spatial Soliton Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-Cheng; SHE Wei-Long

    2005-01-01

    @@ A theory is developed for incoherently coupled grey photovoltaic soliton families in unbiased photovoltaic crystals.Both the properties and the forming conditions of these soliton families are discussed in detail The theory canalso be used to investigate the dark photovoltaic soliton families. Some relevant examples are presented, in which the photovoltaic-photorefractive crystal is of lithium niobate type.

  19. Photovoltaic Product Directory and Buyers Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, R.L.; Smith, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Lee, V.E.

    1984-04-01

    The directory guide explains photovoltaic systems briefly and shows what products are available off-the-shelf. Information is given to assist in designing a photovoltaic system and on financial incentives. Help is given for determining if photovoltaic products can meet a particular buyer's needs, and information is provided on actual photovoltaic user's experiences. Detailed information is appended on various financial incentives available from state and federal governments, sources of additional information on photovoltaics, sources of various photovoltaic products, and a listing of addresses of photovoltaic products suppliers. (LEW)

  20. DUMAND detector

    CERN Multimedia

    This object is one of the 256 other detectors of the DUMAND (Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detection) experiment. The goal of the experiment was the construction of the first deep ocean high energy neutrino detector, to be placed at 4800 m depth in the Pacific Ocean off Keahole Point on the Big Island of Hawaii. A few years ago, a European conference with Cosmic experiments was organized at CERN as they were projects like DUMAND in Hawaii. Along with the conference, a temporary exhibition was organised as well. It was a collaboration of institutions from Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the U.S.A. CERN had borrowed equipment and objects from different institutes around the world, including this detector of the DUMAND experiment. Most of the equipment were sent back to the institutes, however this detector sphere was offered to a CERN member of the personnel.

  1. Fast, High-Precision Readout Circuit for Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, David M.; Hancock, Bruce R.; Key, Richard W.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Wrigley, Chris J.; Seshadri, Suresh; Sander, Stanley P.; Blavier, Jean-Francois L.

    2013-01-01

    The GEO-CAPE mission described in NASA's Earth Science and Applications Decadal Survey requires high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution measurements to monitor and characterize the rapidly changing chemistry of the troposphere over North and South Americas. High-frame-rate focal plane arrays (FPAs) with many pixels are needed to enable such measurements. A high-throughput digital detector readout integrated circuit (ROIC) that meets the GEO-CAPE FPA needs has been developed, fabricated, and tested. The ROIC is based on an innovative charge integrating, fast, high-precision analog-to-digital circuit that is built into each pixel. The 128×128-pixel ROIC digitizes all 16,384 pixels simultaneously at frame rates up to 16 kHz to provide a completely digital output on a single integrated circuit at an unprecedented rate of 262 million pixels per second. The approach eliminates the need for off focal plane electronics, greatly reducing volume, mass, and power compared to conventional FPA implementations. A focal plane based on this ROIC will require less than 2 W of power on a 1×1-cm integrated circuit. The ROIC is fabricated of silicon using CMOS technology. It is designed to be indium bump bonded to a variety of detector materials including silicon PIN diodes, indium antimonide (InSb), indium gallium arsenide (In- GaAs), and mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) detector arrays to provide coverage over a broad spectral range in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet spectral ranges.

  2. Compact dewar and electronics for large-format infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manissadjian, A.; Magli, S.; Mallet, E.; Cassaigne, P.

    2011-06-01

    Infrared systems cameras trend is to require higher performance (thanks to higher resolution) and in parallel higher compactness for easier integration in systems. The latest developments at SOFRADIR / France on HgCdTe (Mercury Cadmium Telluride / MCT) cooled IR staring detectors do show constant improvements regarding detector performances and compactness, by reducing the pixel pitch and optimizing their encapsulation. Among the latest introduced detectors, the 15μm pixel pitch JUPITER HD-TV format (1280×1024) has to deal with challenging specifications regarding dewar compactness, low power consumption and reliability. Initially introduced four years ago in a large dewar with a more than 2kg split Stirling cooler compressor, it is now available in a new versatile compact dewar that is vacuum-maintenance-free over typical 18 years mission profiles, and that can be integrated with the different available Stirling coolers: K548 microcooler for light solution (less than 0.7 kg), K549 or LSF9548 for split cooler and/or higher reliability solution. The IDDCAs are also required with simplified electrical interface enabling to shorten the system development time and to standardize the electronic boards definition with smaller volumes. Sofradir is therefore introducing MEGALINK, the new compact Command & Control Electronics compatible with most of the Sofradir IDDCAs. MEGALINK provides all necessary input biases and clocks to the FPAs, and digitizes and multiplexes the video outputs to provide a 14 bit output signal through a cameralink interface, in a surface smaller than a business card.

  3. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; Merritt, Scott; Beck, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of three novel photon counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride avalanche array made by DRS Inc. 2) a commercial 2880 silicon avalanche photodiode array and 3) a prototype resonant cavity silicon avalanche photodiode array. We will present and compare dark count, photon detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We discuss system wavelength trades and architectures for optimizing overall communication link sensitivity, data rate and cost performance. The HgCdTe APD array has photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50 were routinely demonstrated across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70. High resolution pixel-surface spot scans were performed and the junction diameters of the diodes were measured. The junction diameter was decreased from 31 m to 25 m resulting in a 2x increase in e-APD gain from 470 on the 2010 array to 1100 on the array delivered to NASA GSFC. Mean single photon SNRs of over 12 were demonstrated at excess noise factors of 1.2-1.3.The commercial silicon APD array has a fast output with rise times of 300ps and pulse widths of 600ps. Received and filtered signals from the entire array are multiplexed onto this single fast output. The prototype resonant cavity silicon APD array is being developed for use at 1 micron wavelength.

  4. High-performance MCT and QWIP IR detectors at Sofradir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibel, Yann; Rubaldo, Laurent; Manissadjian, Alain; Billon-Lanfrey, David; Rothman, Johan; de Borniol, Eric; Destéfanis, Gérard; Costard, E.

    2012-11-01

    Cooled IR technologies are challenged for answering new system needs like compactness and reduction of cryo-power which is key feature for the SWaP (Size, Weight and Power) requirements. This paper describes the status of MCT IR technology in France at Leti and Sofradir. A focus will be made on hot detector technology for SWAP applications. Sofradir has improved its HgCdTe technology to open the way for High Operating Temperature systems that release the Stirling cooler engine power consumption. Solutions for high performance detectors such as dual bands, much smaller pixel pitch or megapixels will also be discussed. In the meantime, the development of avalanche photodiodes or TV format with digital interface is key to bringing customers cutting-edge functionalities. Since 1997, Sofradir has been working with Thales and Research Technologies (TRT) to develop and produce Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors (QWIP) as a complementary offer with MCT, to provide large LW staring arrays. A dualband MW-LW QWIP detector (25μm pitch 384×288 IDDCA) is currently under development. We will present in this paper its latest results.

  5. Photovoltaics information user study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marie, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1980-10-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on photovoltaics (PV) are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. The report is 1 of 10 discussing study results. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. It covers these technological areas: photovoltaics, passive solar heating and cooling, active solar heating and cooling, biomass energy, solar thermal electric power, solar industrial and agricultural process heat, wind energy, ocean energy, and advanced energy storage. An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from seven PV groups respondents are analyzed in this report: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Researchers Working for Manufacturers, Representatives of Other Manufacturers, Representatives of Utilities, Electric Power Engineers, and Educators.

  6. Nanocarbon-based photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Marco; Lohrman, Jessica; Kumar, Priyank V; Kirkeminde, Alec; Ferralis, Nicola; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Ren, Shenqiang

    2012-10-23

    Carbon materials are excellent candidates for photovoltaic solar cells: they are Earth-abundant, possess high optical absorption, and maintain superior thermal and photostability. Here we report on solar cells with active layers made solely of carbon nanomaterials that present the same advantages of conjugated polymer-based solar cells, namely, solution processable, potentially flexible, and chemically tunable, but with increased photostability and the possibility to revert photodegradation. The device active layer composition is optimized using ab initio density functional theory calculations to predict type-II band alignment and Schottky barrier formation. The best device fabricated is composed of PC(70)BM fullerene, semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes, and reduced graphene oxide. This active-layer composition achieves a power conversion efficiency of 1.3%-a record for solar cells based on carbon as the active material-and we calculate efficiency limits of up to 13% for the devices fabricated in this work, comparable to those predicted for polymer solar cells employing PCBM as the acceptor. There is great promise for improving carbon-based solar cells considering the novelty of this type of device, the high photostability, and the availability of a large number of carbon materials with yet untapped potential for photovoltaics. Our results indicate a new strategy for efficient carbon-based, solution-processable, thin film, photostable solar cells.

  7. Photovoltaic programme, edition 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This comprehensive publication issued by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy's Photovoltaics (PV) Programme presents an overview (in English) of activities and projects in the photovoltaics research and pilot and demonstration areas in Switzerland for the year 2003. Progress in future solar cell technologies as well as in the area of modules, building integration and system technologies is summarised. Also, national and international co-operation and multi-national pilot and demonstration projects are commented on. Associated projects such as eco-balances for PV systems, forecasting and modelling tools as well as system monitoring tools are discussed. In the area of pilot and demonstration projects, component development, PV integration in sloping roofs, on flat roofs and on facades as well as further PV plant are looked at. Also, measurement campaigns, studies, statistics and other PV-related topics are summarised. This volume presents a list of 92 projects in the PV area including the appropriate Internet links and is completed with a collection of project abstracts.

  8. Parametric study of laser photovoltaic energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, G. H.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    Photovoltaic converters are of interest for converting laser power to electrical power in a space-based laser power system. This paper describes a model for photovoltaic laser converters and the application of this model to a neodymium laser silicon photovoltaic converter system. A parametric study which defines the sensitivity of the photovoltaic parameters is described. An optimized silicon photovoltaic converter has an efficiency greater than 50 percent for 1000 W/sq cm of neodymium laser radiation.

  9. Effects of Gravity on the Double-Diffusive Convection during Directional Solidification of a Non-Dilute Alloy with Application to the HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bune, Andris; Gillies, Donald; Lehoczky, Sandor

    1999-01-01

    General 2-D and 3-D finite element model of non-dilute alloy solidification was used to simulate growth of HgCdTe in terrestrial and microgravity conditions. Parametric research was undertaken to investigate effects of gravity level, gravity vector orientation and growth velocity on the pattern of melt convection, shape of crystal/melt interface and radial thermal gradient. Verification of the model was undertaken by comparison with previously published results. For low growth velocities plane front solidification occurs. The location and the shape of the interface was determined using melting temperatures obtained from the HgCdTe liquidus curve. The low thermal conductivity of the solid HgCdTe causes thermal short circuit through the ampoule walls, resulting in curved isotherms in the vicinity of the interface. Double-diffusive convection in the melt is caused by radial temperature gradients and by material density inversion with temperature. Cooling from below and the rejection at the solid-melt interface of the heavier HgTe-rich solute each tend to reduce convection. Because of these complicating factors dimensional rather then non-dimensional modeling was performed. For gravity levels higher then 10(exp -7) of terrestrial one it was found that the maximum convection velocity is extremely sensitive to gravity vector orientation and can be reduced at least by 50% by choosing proper orientation of the ampoule. The predicted interface shape is in agreement with one obtained experimentally by quenching.

  10. Effects of Gravity on the Double-Diffusive Convection During Directional Solidification of a Non-Dilute Alloy with Application to HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1999-01-01

    A general 2-D and 3-D finite element model of non-dilute alloy solidification was used to simulate growth of HgCdTe in terrestrial and microgravity conditions. Verification of the 3-D model was undertaken by comparison with previously published results on convection in an inclined cylinder. For low growth velocities, plane front solidification occurs. The location and the shape of the interface were determined using melting temperatures obtained from the HgCdTe liquidus curve. The low thermal conductivity of the solid HgCdTe causes a thermal short circuit through the ampoule walls, resulting in curved isotherms in the vicinity of the interface. Double-diffusive convection in the melt is caused by radial temperature gradients and by material density inversion due to the combined effects of composition and temperature. Cooling from below and the rejection at the solid-melt interface of the heavier HgTe-rich solute each tend to reduce convection. Because of these complicating factors, dimensional rather than non-dimensional modeling was performed. the predicted interface shape is in agreement with one obtained experimentally by quenching.

  11. Nondestructive Characterization of Residual Threading Dislocation Density in HgCdTe Layers Grown on CdZnTe by Liquid-Phase Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourreau, Y.; Pantzas, K.; Patriarche, G.; Destefanis, V.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT)-based infrared (IR) focal-plane arrays is closely related to the crystalline perfection of the HgCdTe thin film. In this work, Te-rich, (111)B-oriented HgCdTe epilayers grown by liquid-phase epitaxy on CdZnTe substrates have been studied. Surface atomic steps are shown on as-grown MCT materials using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and white-light interferometry (WLI), suggesting step-flow growth. Locally, quasiperfect surface spirals are also evidenced. A demonstration is given that these spirals are related to the emergence of almost pure screw threading dislocations. A nondestructive and quantitative technique to measure the threading dislocation density is proposed. The technique consists of counting the surface spirals on the as-grown MCT surface from images obtained by either AFM or WLI measurements. The benefits and drawbacks of both destructive—chemical etching of HgCdTe dislocations—and nondestructive surface imaging techniques are compared. The nature of defects is also discussed. Finally, state-of-the-art threading dislocation densities in the low 104 cm-2 range are evidenced by both etch pit density (EPD) and surface imaging measurements.

  12. MTF study of planar small pixel pitch quantum IR detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravrand, O.; Baier, N.; Ferron, A.; Rochette, F.; Berthoz, J.; Rubaldo, L.; Cluzel, R.

    2014-06-01

    The actual trend in quantum IR detector development is the design of very small pixel pitch large arrays. From previously 30μm pitch, the standard pixel pitch is today 15μm and is expected to decrease to 12μm in the next few years. Furthermore, focal plane arrays (FPA) with pixel pitch as small as small as 10μm has been demonstrated. Such ultra-small pixel pitches are very small compared to the typical length ruling the electrical characteristics of the absorbing materials, namely the minority carrier diffusion length. As an example for low doped N type HgCdTe or InSb material, this diffusion length is of the order of 30 to 50μm, i.e. 3 to 5 times the targeted pixel pitches. This has strong consequences on the modulation transfer function (MTF) for planar structures, where the lateral extension of the photodiode is limited by diffusion. For such aspect ratios, the self-confinement of neighboring diodes may not be efficient enough to maintain optimal MTF. Therefore, this issue has to be addressed in order to take full benefits of the pixel pitch reduction in terms of image resolution. This paper aims at investigating the MTF evolution of HgCdTe and InSb FPAs decreasing the pixel pitch below 15μm. Both experimental measurements and finite element simulations are used to discuss this issue. Different scenarii will be compared, namely deep mesa etch between pixels, internal drift, surface recombination, thin absorbing layers.

  13. Silicon processing for photovoltaics II

    CERN Document Server

    Khattak, CP

    2012-01-01

    The processing of semiconductor silicon for manufacturing low cost photovoltaic products has been a field of increasing activity over the past decade and a number of papers have been published in the technical literature. This volume presents comprehensive, in-depth reviews on some of the key technologies developed for processing silicon for photovoltaic applications. It is complementary to Volume 5 in this series and together they provide the only collection of reviews in silicon photovoltaics available.The volume contains papers on: the effect of introducing grain boundaries in silicon; the

  14. Optimization of photovoltaic power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rekioua, Djamila

    2012-01-01

    Photovoltaic generation is one of the cleanest forms of energy conversion available. One of the advantages offered by solar energy is its potential to provide sustainable electricity in areas not served by the conventional power grid. Optimisation of Photovoltaic Power Systems details explicit modelling, control and optimisation of the most popular stand-alone applications such as pumping, power supply, and desalination. Each section is concluded by an example using the MATLAB(R) and Simulink(R) packages to help the reader understand and evaluate the performance of different photovoltaic syste

  15. Photovoltaic barometer; Le barometre photovoltaique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-12-15

    This annual evaluation is a synthesis of works published in 2006. Comparisons are presented between the wind power performances and European Commission White Paper and Biomass action plan objectives. The european Union photovoltaic market reached the limits of the sector supply capacity for the first time. Meanwhile the prospects of growth in the photovoltaic market are still just as good as before. Silicon producers have finally responded to the expectations of the photovoltaic industry by announcing new production capacities. These extensions led to massively investing in new production capacities, in phase with ever greater demand. This increase in demand remains, however dependent upon the energy policy. (A.L.B.)

  16. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  17. Characterisation activities of new NIR to VLWIR detectors from Selex ES Ltd at the UK ATC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezawada, Naidu; Atkinson, David; Shorrocks, Nick; Hipwood, Les; Weller, Harald; Bryson, Ian; Jackson, Malcolm; Davis, Ray P.; Barnes, Keith; Baker, Ian

    2014-07-01

    The UKATC has undertaken to test and evaluate new infrared detectors being developed at Selex ES Ltd, Southampton in the UK for astronomy and space applications. Current programmes include: the evaluation of large format (1280×1024), near-infrared detectors for astronomy, the characterisation of shortwave infrared detectors (up to 2.5μm) for satellite-based earth observation, long wavelength (8 to 11μm) and very long wavelength (10 to 14.5μm cut-off) devices for cosmos applications. Future programmes include the evaluation of large format, avalanche photodiode arrays for photon-level sensing and high speed applications. Custom test facilities are being setup in order to drive and characterise the detectors at the ATC under conditions representative of the applications. In this paper the test facilities will be described along with the associated challenges to evaluate the performance of these detectors. The paper also includes an overview of the Selex ES detectors, including the ROICs and the MOVPE HgCdTe arrays, and will present the latest results from the characterisation program.

  18. Chalcogenide perovskites for photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Yang; Agiorgousis, Michael L; Zhang, Peihong; Zhang, Shengbai

    2015-01-14

    Chalcogenide perovskites are proposed for photovoltaic applications. The predicted band gaps of CaTiS3, BaZrS3, CaZrSe3, and CaHfSe3 with the distorted perovskite structure are within the optimal range for making single-junction solar cells. The predicted optical absorption properties of these materials are superior compared with other high-efficiency solar-cell materials. Possible replacement of the alkaline-earth cations by molecular cations, e.g., (NH3NH3)(2+), as in the organic-inorganic halide perovskites (e.g., CH3NH3PbI3), are also proposed and found to be stable. The chalcogenide perovskites provide promising candidates for addressing the challenging issues regarding halide perovskites such as instability in the presence of moisture and containing the toxic element Pb.

  19. Photovoltaics Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-02-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Photovoltaics (PV) subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Solar Energy Technologies Office works with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies to advance solar PV, which is the direct conversion of sunlight into electricity by a semiconductor, in support of the goals of the SunShot Initiative. SunShot supports research and development to aggressively advance PV technology by improving efficiency and reliability and lowering manufacturing costs. SunShot’s PV portfolio spans work from early-stage solar cell research through technology commercialization, including work on materials, processes, and device structure and characterization techniques.

  20. Polymer Photovoltaic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhui Hou; Chunhe Yang; Erjun Zhou; Chang He; Zhan'ao Tan; Youjun He; Yongfang Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Polymer photovoltaic cells (PPVCs) have attracted much attention recently because of its easy fabrication, low cost and possibility to make flexible devices[1]. PPVC is composed of a conjugated polymer/C60blend layer (photosensitive layer) sandwiched between a transparent ITO electrode and a metal electrode.When a light through ITO electrode irradiates on the photosensitive layer, the photons with appropriate energy will be absorbed by the conjugated polymer (CP) and excitons (electron-hole pair) are produced. The excitons move to the interface of CP/C60 where the electrons transfer to the LUMO of C60 and holes leave on the HOMO of the CP. The separated electrons migrate through the C60 network to and are collected by the metal electrode, and the holes migrate through the CP network to and are collected by the ITO electrode, so that the photocurrent and photovoltage are attained.

  1. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Gupta, Vipin P.; Okandan, Murat; Watts, Michael R.

    2016-03-15

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  2. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2012-12-11

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  3. Photovoltaic cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavis, Leonard C.; Panitz, Janda K. G.; Sharp, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    A photovoltaic assembly for converting high intensity solar radiation into lectrical energy in which a solar cell is separated from a heat sink by a thin layer of a composite material which has excellent dielectric properties and good thermal conductivity. This composite material is a thin film of porous Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in which the pores have been substantially filled with an electrophoretically-deposited layer of a styrene-acrylate resin. This composite provides electrical breakdown strengths greater than that of a layer consisting essentially of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and has a higher thermal conductivity than a layer of styrene-acrylate alone.

  4. All-Oxide Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühle, Sven; Anderson, Assaf Y; Barad, Hannah-Noa; Kupfer, Benjamin; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Rosh-Hodesh, Eli; Zaban, Arie

    2012-12-20

    Recently, a new field in photovoltaics (PV) has emerged, focusing on solar cells that are entirely based on metal oxide semiconductors. The all-oxide PV approach is very attractive due to the chemical stability, nontoxicity, and abundance of many metal oxides that potentially allow manufacturing under ambient conditions. Already today, metal oxides (MOs) are widely used as components in PV cells such as transparent conducting front electrodes or electron-transport layers, while only very few MOs have been used as light absorbers. In this Perspective, we review recent developments of all-oxide PV systems, which until today were mostly based on Cu2O as an absorber. Furthermore, ferroelectric BiFeO3-based PV systems are discussed, which have recently attracted considerable attention. The performance of all-oxide PV cells is discussed in terms of general PV principles, and directions for progress are proposed, pointing toward the development of novel metal oxide semiconductors using combinatorial methods.

  5. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2012-12-11

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  6. Photovoltaic module mounting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miros, Robert H. J.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Seery, Martin N.; Holland, Rodney H.

    2012-04-17

    A solar array mounting system having unique installation, load distribution, and grounding features, and which is adaptable for mounting solar panels having no external frame. The solar array mounting system includes flexible, pedestal-style feet and structural links connected in a grid formation on the mounting surface. The photovoltaic modules are secured in place via the use of attachment clamps that grip the edge of the typically glass substrate. The panel mounting clamps are then held in place by tilt brackets and/or mid-link brackets that provide fixation for the clamps and align the solar panels at a tilt to the horizontal mounting surface. The tilt brackets are held in place atop the flexible feet and connected link members thus creating a complete mounting structure.

  7. Photovoltaic building blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanberg, Peter Jesper; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2014-01-01

    it directcompetitive with fossil energy sources a further reduction is needed. By increasing the efficiency of the solar cells one gain an advantage through the whole chain of cost. So that per produced Watt of power less material is spent, installation costs are lower, less area is used etc. With an average...... efficiency of about 15% for commercial Silicon solar cells there is still much to gain. DTU Danchip provides research facilities, equipment and expertise for the building blocks that comprises fabricating the efficient solar cell. In order to get more of the sun light into the device we provide thin film......Photovoltaics (PV), better known as solar cells, are now a common day sight on many rooftops in Denmark.The installed capacity of PV systems worldwide is growing exponentially1 and is the third most importantrenewable energy source today. The cost of PV is decreasing fast with ~10%/year but to make...

  8. Photovoltaic sources modeling and emulation

    CERN Document Server

    Piazza, Maria Carmela Di

    2012-01-01

    This book offers an extensive introduction to the modeling of photovoltaic generators and their emulation by means of power electronic converters will aid in understanding and improving design and setup of new PV plants.

  9. On the plasmonic photovoltaic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubeen, Syed; Lee, Joun; Lee, Woo-Ram; Singh, Nirala; Stucky, Galen D; Moskovits, Martin

    2014-06-24

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity by photovoltaics is currently a mature science and the foundation of a lucrative industry. In conventional excitonic solar cells, electron-hole pairs are generated by light absorption in a semiconductor and separated by the "built in" potential resulting from charge transfer accompanying Fermi-level equalization either at a p-n or a Schottky junction, followed by carrier collection at appropriate electrodes. Here we report a stable, wholly plasmonic photovoltaic device in which photon absorption and carrier generation take place exclusively in the plasmonic metal. The field established at a metal-semiconductor Schottky junction separates charges. The negative carriers are high-energy (hot) electrons produced immediately following the plasmon's dephasing. Some of the carriers are energetic enough to clear the Schottky barrier or quantum mechanically tunnel through it, thereby producing the output photocurrent. Short circuit photocurrent densities in the range 70-120 μA cm(-2) were obtained for simulated one-sun AM1.5 illumination with devices based on arrays of parallel gold nanorods, conformally coated with 10 nm TiO2 films and fashioned with a Ti metal collector. For the device with short circuit currents of 120 μA cm(-2), the internal quantum efficiency is ∼2.75%, and its wavelength response tracks the absorption spectrum of the transverse plasmon of the gold nanorods indicating that the absorbed photon-to-electron conversion process resulted exclusively in the Au, with the TiO2 playing a negligible role in charge carrier production. Devices fabricated with 50 nm TiO2 layers had open-circuit voltages as high as 210 mV, short circuit current densities of 26 μA cm(-2), and a fill factor of 0.3. For these devices, the TiO2 contributed a very small but measurable fraction of the charge carriers.

  10. Calorimeter detectors

    CERN Document Server

    de Barbaro, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Although the instantaneous and integrated luminosity in HL-LHC will be far higher than the LHC detectors were originally designed for, the Barrel calorimeters of the four experiments are expected to continue to perform well  throughout the Phase II program. The conditions for the End-Cap calorimeters are far more challenging and whilst some detectors will require relatively modest changes, others require far more substantial upgrades. We present the results of longevity and performance studies for the calorimeter systems of the four main LHC experiments and outline the upgrade options under consideration. We include a discussion of the R&D required to make the final technology choices for the upgraded detectors.

  11. Pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Passmore, M S

    2001-01-01

    positions on the detector. The loss of secondary electrons follows the profile of the detector and increases with higher energy ions. studies of the spatial resolution predict a value of 5.3 lp/mm. The image noise in photon counting systems is investigated theoretically and experimentally and is shown to be given by Poisson statistics. The rate capability of the LAD1 was measured to be 250 kHz per pixel. Theoretical and experimental studies of the difference in contrast for ideal charge integrating and photon counting imaging systems were carried out. It is shown that the contrast differs and that for the conventional definition (contrast = (background - signal)/background) the photon counting device will, in some cases, always give a better contrast than the integrating system. Simulations in MEDICI are combined with analytical calculations to investigate charge collection efficiencies (CCE) in semiconductor detectors. Different pixel sizes and biasing conditions are considered. The results show charge shari...

  12. Photovoltaic energy barometer; Barometre photovoltaique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2006-03-15

    The european market showed all of its strength and soundness in 2005. The 2005 installed cells growth could have been even greater if the market had not been continually curbed by a lack of raw materials. Germany remained the leading photovoltaic market in the world in 2005, positioned far ahead of Japan and the USA. This unabashed success inspired both Spain and Italy, which set up conditions in order to rapidly develop their photovoltaic sectors. (A.L.B.)

  13. Photovoltaic sub-cell interconnects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Swinger Platt, Heather Anne

    2017-05-09

    Photovoltaic sub-cell interconnect systems and methods are provided. In one embodiment, a photovoltaic device comprises a thin film stack of layers deposited upon a substrate, wherein the thin film stack layers are subdivided into a plurality of sub-cells interconnected in series by a plurality of electrical interconnection structures; and wherein the plurality of electrical interconnection structures each comprise no more than two scribes that penetrate into the thin film stack layers.

  14. Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30,l 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  15. Photovoltaic array mounting apparatus, systems, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jack Raymond; Atchley, Brian; Hudson, Tyrus Hawkes; Johansen, Emil

    2015-04-14

    A photovoltaic array, including: (a) supports laid out on a surface in rows and columns; (b) photovoltaic modules positioned on top of the supports; and (c) fasteners connecting the photovoltaic modules to the supports, wherein the supports have an upper pedestal surface and a lower pedestal surface such that the photovoltaic modules are positioned at a non-horizontal angle when edges of the photovoltaic modules are positioned on top of the upper and lower pedestal surfaces, and wherein a portion of the fasteners rotate to lock the photovoltaic modules onto the supports.

  16. XMASS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Hiraide, K; Hirano, S; Kishimoto, Y; Kobayashi, K; Moriyama, S; Nakagawa, K; Nakahata, M; Nishiie, H; Ogawa, H; Oka, N; Sekiya, H; Shinozaki, A; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takachio, O; Ueshima, K; Umemoto, D; Yamashita, M; Yang, B S; Tasaka, S; Liu, J; Martens, K; Hosokawa, K; Miuchi, K; Murata, A; Onishi, Y; Otsuka, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Kim, Y H; Lee, K B; Lee, M K; Lee, J S; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Nishitani, Y; Masuda, K; Takiya, H; Uchida, H; Kim, N Y; Kim, Y D; Kusaba, F; Motoki, D; Nishijima, K; Fujii, K; Murayama, I; Nakamura, S

    2013-01-01

    The XMASS project aims to detect dark matter, pp and $^{7}$Be solar neutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay using ultra pure liquid xenon. The first phase of the XMASS experiment searches for dark matter. In this paper, we describe the XMASS detector in detail, including its configuration, data acquisition equipment and calibration system.

  17. XMASS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hieda, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Hiraide, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hirano, S. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Moriyama, S. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Nakagawa, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Nakahata, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Nishiie, H. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Ogawa, H. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); and others

    2013-07-11

    The XMASS project aims to detect dark matter, pp and {sup 7}Be solar neutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay using ultra pure liquid xenon. The first phase of the XMASS experiment searches for dark matter. In this paper, we describe the XMASS detector in detail, including its configuration, data acquisition equipment and calibration system.

  18. Effect of surface fields on the dynamic resistance of planar HgCdTe mid-wavelength infrared photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kai; Zhou, Song-Min; Li, Yang; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yi-Yu; Xie, Xiao-Hui; Lin, Chun; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Jian-Xin; Zhang, Qin-Yao

    2015-05-01

    This work investigates the effect of surface fields on the dynamic resistance of a planar HgCdTe mid-wavelength infrared photodiode from both theoretical and experimental aspects, considering a gated n-on-p diode with the surface potential of its p-region modulated. Theoretical models of the surface leakage current are developed, where the surface tunnelling current in the case of accumulation is expressed by modifying the formulation of bulk tunnelling currents, and the surface channel current for strong inversion is simulated with a transmission line method. Experimental data from the fabricated devices show a flat-band voltage of V F B = - 5.7 V by capacitance-voltage measurement, and then the physical parameters for bulk properties are determined from the resistance-voltage characteristics of the diode working at a flat-band gate voltage. With proper values of the modeling parameters such as surface trap density and channel electron mobility, the theoretical R 0 A product and corresponding dark current calculated from the proposed model as functions of the gate voltage Vg demonstrate good consistency with the measured values. The R 0 A product remarkably degenerates when Vg is far below or above VFB because of the surface tunnelling current or channel current, respectively; and it attains the maximum value of 5.7 × 10 7 Ω . cm 2 around the transition between surface depletion and weak inversion when V g ≈ - 4 V , which might result from reduced generation-recombination current.

  19. TEQUILA: NIR camera/spectrograph based on a Rockwell 1024x1024 HgCdTe FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Elfego; Sohn, Erika; Cruz-Gonzales, Irene; Salas, Luis; Parraga, Antonio; Perez, Manuel; Torres, Roberto; Cobos Duenas, Francisco J.; Gonzalez, Gaston; Langarica, Rosalia; Tejada, Carlos; Sanchez, Beatriz; Iriarte, Arturo; Valdez, J.; Gutierrez, Leonel; Lazo, Francisco; Angeles, Fernando

    1998-08-01

    We describe the configuration and operation modes of the IR camera/spectrograph: TEQUILA based on a 1024 X 1024 HgCdTe FPA. The optical system will allow three possible modes of operation: direct imaging, low and medium resolution spectroscopy and polarimetry. The basic system is being designed to consist of the following: 1) A LN(subscript 2) dewar that allocates the FPA together with the preamplifiers and a 24 filter position cylinder. 2) Control and readout electronics based on DSP modules linked to a workstation through fiber optics. 3) An opto-mechanical assembly cooled to -30 degrees that provides an efficient operation of the instrument in its various modes. 4) A control module for the moving parts of the instrument. The opto-mechanical assembly will have the necessary provision to install a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer and an adaptive optics correction system. The final image acquisition and control of the whole instrument is carried out in a workstation to provide the observer with a friendly environment. The system will operate at the 2.1 m telescope at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional in San Pedro Martir, B.C. (Mexico), and is intended to be a first-light instrument for the new 7.8m Mexican IR-Optical Telescope.

  20. Semiconductor Detectors; Detectores de Semiconductores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina, E.

    2007-07-01

    Particle detectors based on semiconductor materials are among the few devices used for particle detection that are available to the public at large. In fact we are surrounded by them in our daily lives: they are used in photoelectric cells for opening doors, in digital photographic and video camera, and in bar code readers at supermarket cash registers. (Author)

  1. Optimizing Grid Patterns on Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    CELCAL computer program helps in optimizing grid patterns for different photovoltaic cell geometries and metalization processes. Five different powerloss phenomena associated with front-surface metal grid pattern on photovoltaic cells.

  2. Photovoltaic product directory and buyers guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, R.L.; Smith, S.A.; Mazzucchi, R.P.

    1981-06-01

    Basic information on photovoltaic conversion technology is provided for those unfamiliar with the field. Various types of photovoltaic products and systems currently available off-the-shelf are described. These include products without batteries, battery chargers, power packages, home electric systems, and partial systems. Procedures are given for designing a photovoltaic system from scratch. A few custom photovoltaic systems are described, and a list is compiled of photovoltaic firms which can provide custom systems. Guidance is offered for deciding whether or not to use photovoltaic products. A variety of installations are described and their performance is appraised by the owners. Information is given on various financial incentives available from state and federal governments. Sources of additional information on photovoltaics are listed. A matrix is provided indicating the sources of various types of photovoltaic products. The addresses of suppliers are listed. (LEW)

  3. ULTRA BARRIER TOPSHEET (UBT) FOR FLEXIBLE PHOTOVOLTAICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeScioli, Derek

    2013-06-01

    This slide-show presents 3M photovoltaic-related products, particularly flexible components. Emphasis is on the 3M Ultra Barrier Solar Films. Topics covered include reliability and qualification testing and flexible photovoltaic encapsulation costs.

  4. Transparent contacts for stacked compound photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Cederberg, Jeffrey; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2016-11-29

    A microsystems-enabled multi-junction photovoltaic (MEM-PV) cell includes a first photovoltaic cell having a first junction, the first photovoltaic cell including a first semiconductor material employed to form the first junction, the first semiconductor material having a first bandgap. The MEM-PV cell also includes a second photovoltaic cell comprising a second junction. The second photovoltaic cell comprises a second semiconductor material employed to form the second junction, the second semiconductor material having a second bandgap that is less than the first bandgap, the second photovoltaic cell further comprising a first contact layer disposed between the first junction of the first photovoltaic cell and the second junction of the second photovoltaic cell, the first contact layer composed of a third semiconductor material having a third bandgap, the third bandgap being greater than or equal to the first bandgap.

  5. Mounting support for a photovoltaic module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Gregory Michael; Barsun, Stephan K.; Coleman, Nathaniel T.; Zhou, Yin

    2013-03-26

    A mounting support for a photovoltaic module is described. The mounting support includes a foundation having an integrated wire-way ledge portion. A photovoltaic module support mechanism is coupled with the foundation.

  6. Photovoltaic Incentive Design Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, T. E.

    2006-12-01

    Investments in customer-owned grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) energy systems are growing at a steady pace. This is due, in part, to the availability of attractive economic incentives offered by public state agencies and utilities. In the United States, these incentives have largely been upfront lump payments tied to the system capacity rating. While capacity-based ''buydowns'' have stimulated the domestic PV market, they have been criticized for subsidizing systems with potentially poor energy performance. As a result, the industry has been forced to consider alternative incentive structures, particularly ones that pay based on long-term measured performance. The industry, however, lacks consensus in the debate over the tradeoffs between upfront incentive payments versus longer-term payments for energy delivery. This handbook is designed for agencies and utilities that offer or intend to offer incentive programs for customer-owned PV systems. Its purpose is to help select, design, and implement incentive programs that best meet programmatic goals. The handbook begins with a discussion of the various available incentive structures and then provides qualitative and quantitative tools necessary to design the most appropriate incentive structure. It concludes with program administration considerations.

  7. Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, David

    2015-01-01

    Firefly Technologies, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, developed synthesis methods for highly strained nanowires. Two synthesis routes resulted in successful nanowire epitaxy: direct nucleation and growth on the substrate and a novel selective-epitaxy route based on nanolithography using diblock copolymers. The indium-arsenide (InAs) nanowires are implemented in situ within the epitaxy environment-a significant innovation relative to conventional semiconductor nanowire generation using ex situ gold nanoparticles. The introduction of these nanoscale features may enable an intermediate band solar cell while simultaneously increasing the effective absorption volume that can otherwise limit short-circuit current generated by thin quantized layers. The use of nanowires for photovoltaics decouples the absorption process from the current extraction process by virtue of the high aspect ratio. While no functional solar cells resulted from this effort, considerable fundamental understanding of the nanowire epitaxy kinetics and nanopatterning process was developed. This approach could, in principle, be an enabling technology for heterointegration of dissimilar materials. The technology also is applicable to virtual substrates. Incorporating nanowires onto a recrystallized germanium/metal foil substrate would potentially solve the problem of grain boundary shunting of generated carriers by restricting the cross-sectional area of the nanowire (tens of nanometers in diameter) to sizes smaller than the recrystallized grains (0.5 to 1 micron(exp 2).

  8. Grounds of two positions photovoltaic panels

    OpenAIRE

    Castán Fortuño, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this Master Thesis is to find the optimum positioning for a two positions photovoltaic panel. Hence, it will be implemented a model in order to optimize the energy of the sun that the photovoltaic panel is receiving by its positioning. Likewise this project will include the comparison with other photovoltaic panel systems as the single position photovoltaics panels. Ultimately, it is also going to be designed a system array for the optimized model of two positions photovoltai...

  9. Dynamics of Incoherent Photovoltaic Spatial Solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi-Qi; LU Ke-Qing; ZHANG Mei-Zhi; LI Ke-Hao; LIU Shuang; ZHANG Yan-Peng

    2009-01-01

    Propagation properties of bright and dark incoherent beams are numerically studied in photovoltaic-photorefractive crystal by using coherent density approach for the first time.Numerical simulations not only exhibit that bright incoherent photovoltaic quasi-soliton,grey-like incoherent photovoltaic soliton,incoherent soliton doublet and triplet can be established under proper conditions,but also display that the spatial coherence properties of these incoherent beams can be significantly affected during propagation by the photovoltaic field.

  10. Process Development for Nanostructured Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic manufacturing is an emerging industry that promises a carbon-free, nearly limitless source of energy for our nation. However, the high-temperature manufacturing processes used for conventional silicon-based photovoltaics are extremely energy-intensive and expensive. This high cost imposes a critical barrier to the widespread implementation of photovoltaic technology. Argonne National Laboratory and its partners recently invented new methods for manufacturing nanostructured photovoltaic devices that allow dramatic savings in materials, process energy, and cost. These methods are based on atomic layer deposition, a thin film synthesis technique that has been commercialized for the mass production of semiconductor microelectronics. The goal of this project was to develop these low-cost fabrication methods for the high efficiency production of nanostructured photovoltaics, and to demonstrate these methods in solar cell manufacturing. We achieved this goal in two ways: 1) we demonstrated the benefits of these coatings in the laboratory by scaling-up the fabrication of low-cost dye sensitized solar cells; 2) we used our coating technology to reduce the manufacturing cost of solar cells under development by our industrial partners.

  11. INCOHERENTLY COUPLED SCREENING-PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLITON FAMILIES IN BIASED PHOTOVOLTAIC PHOTOREFRACTIVE CRYSTALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU CHUN-FENG; LI BIN; SUN XIU-DONG; JIANG YONG-YUAN; XU KE-BIN

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that the existence of incoherently coupled screening-photovoltaic soliton families is possible in biased photovoltaic photorefractive crystals under steady-state conditions. These screening-photovoltaic soliton families can be established provided the multiple incident beams have the same polarization and wavelength, and are mutually incoherent. Such soliton families reduce to screening-photovoltaic soliton pairs when they contain only two components. Relevant examples are presented where the photovoltaic photorefractive crystal is of the lithium niobate type.

  12. The Future of Infrared; III-Vs or HgCdTe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinch, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    For reasons associated with size, weight, power consumption, and cost, the future of infrared systems for all spectral bands is being driven towards megapixel formats operating under diffraction- and background-limited conditions with ever-smaller pixel pitches and ever-higher operating temperatures. The performance requirements of such systems with regard to both optical and detector limitations are examined for the materials technologies and device architectures that are in vogue today. At elevated operating temperatures, available noise equivalent temperature difference values for diffraction-limited operation are found to be strongly dependent on the available pixel pitch, optimizing at values ˜ λ/4, where λ is the operating wavelength. The possibility for extending the operation of mid- and long-wavelength focal plane arrays to room temperature with diffraction- and background-limited performance is discussed, together with the potential issues that must be addressed in order to achieve this ultimate goal.

  13. Production and Characterization of Novel Photovoltaic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Marvin [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-07

    This project has three major objectives: exploring the potential nanostructured materials in photovoltaic applications; providing photovoltaic research experiences to NCCU students, who are largely members of underrepresented minority groups; and enhancing the photovoltaic research infrastructure at NCCU to increase faculty and student competitiveness. Significant progress was achieved in each of these areas during the project period, as summarized in this report.

  14. International photovoltaic products and manufacturers directory, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepperd, L.W. [ed.] [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This international directory of more than 500 photovoltaic-related manufacturers is intended to guide potential users of photovoltaics to sources for systems and their components. Two indexes help the user to locate firms and materials. A glossary describes equipment and terminology commonly used in the photovoltaic industry.

  15. A MARKETING STRATEGY ON PHOTOVOLTAIC MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coita Dorin Cristian

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic is an increasingly important energy technology. Deriving energy from the sun offers numerous environmental benefits. It is an extremely clean energy source, and few other power-generating technologies have as little environmental impact as photovoltaic. In this article we explored some dimensions of photovoltaic market and suggested a marketing strategy for solar panels manufacturers

  16. The design of cathode for organic photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, De; Shi, Feng; Xia, Xuan; Li, Ye; Duanmu, Qingduo

    2016-11-01

    We have discussed the effect of the residual gas in the Al metal cathode deposition process and consequently influence the performance of organic photovoltaic devices (such as organic photoelectron detector or solar cell). We believe that the origin of degradation in Jsc and FF from the Al cathode device should be the formation of AlOx in the C60-Al interface, which contaminate the interface and plays a role like an energy barrier that block the charge collect process. To solve this problem the Ag and Alq3 layer had been inserted before the Al. Owing to the advantageous of Alq3 and Ag layer, the device which Al cathode prepared at a lower vacuum condition exhibits a comparable performance to that device which Al cathode deposited in regular situation. As an additional benefit, since the introducing of Alq3/Ag layer in the VOPc/C60 organic photovoltaic device performs a better near-infrared response, this phenomenon has been confirmed by means of both simulation and experimental data. So the design of our new cathode structure provides a degree of freedom to modulate the light absorption for organic photovoltaic devices in short-wave and long-wave.

  17. 长波碲镉汞材料 As 掺杂激活研究%Research on arsenic-doping activation in LW HgCdTe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张舟; 陈慧卿; 朱西安

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-doped long-wavelength HgCdTe was realized by ion implantation.As doping medium,arsenic shows amphiprotic doping property.When Arsenic only occupies Te-site to be acceptor,P type HgdTe material can be formed.After the arsenic-doped HgCdTe is annealed in the mercury atmosphere,the change of electrical property which is caused by annealing is analyzed.And the effect of mercury pressure,temperature and time on arsenic activa-tion is studied.The activation effect is analyzed by Hall measurement and SIMS.In the end,when the arsenic-doped HgCdTe is annealed in the high temperature and high mercury atmosphere,arsenic activation is achieved.%利用离子注入工艺实现长波碲镉汞材料的 As 掺杂,As 作为掺杂介质表现出两性掺杂行为,而 As 只有占据 Te 位成为受主才能形成 P 型碲镉汞材料。通过对砷掺杂碲镉汞材料在汞气氛中进行退火,分析注入退火引起的样品电学性质的变化,对砷激活退火采用的汞压、温度及时间进行了研究,利用霍尔测试和二次离子质谱仪(SIMS)等手段分析激活效果,研究发现,高温富汞热退火可以实现碲镉汞 As 激活。

  18. Photovoltaics characterization: Beyond the horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L.

    1997-04-01

    This paper examines current photovoltaic test, measurement, and characterization techniques and makes evaluations and predictions of the next-generation technologies needed to meet the evolving requirements of photovoltaics. The range of support and research areas, from array through atomic-level analysis, are cited. The specific requirements of research and manufacturing sectors are addressed, including the need for more rapid response, new and photovoltaic-specific measurement techniques, manufacturing-environment measurement capabilities, and electronic-based centralized facilities. The integration and cohesion of analytical services with the evolving capabilities of the information highway are discussed and anticipated. To ensure the security of both intellectual and product property, the increased demands of protection of data are emphasized. Trends toward greater accuracy, precision, smaller- and larger-area analysis, and more-versatile measurement technologies are discussed.

  19. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program, FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1991 (October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991) progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) -- formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, the University Participation Program, and the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1991, and future research directions.

  20. 10-kilowatt Photovoltaic Concentrator Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, R.L.; Broadbent, S.

    1978-05-01

    Martin Marietta has designed a Photovoltaic Concentrator Array (PCA) for Sandia Laboratories, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico. The PCA is based on the use of an acrylic Fresnel lens to concentrate sunlight on high intensity solar cells. The objective of the development was to obtain economical photovoltaic power generation by replacing relatively high priced solar cells with low cost lenses. Consequently, a major task of the program was to optimize the design for minimum cost per unit power output. Major design aspects considered for optimization were the concentration ratio, size and shape of the Fresnel lens, array size and shape, structure minimization, tracking and control and the practical aspects of operation and maintenance. In addition to design of the complete array, several porototype photovoltaic concentrator module subassemblies were fabricated and delivered to Sandia for evaluation. These prototypes exceed the 9.0% efficiency requirement established for this program.

  1. Interband Cascade Photovoltaic Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rui Q. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Santos, Michael B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Johnson, Matthew B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2014-09-24

    In this project, we are performing basic and applied research to systematically investigate our newly proposed interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) cells [1]. These cells follow from the great success of infrared IC lasers [2-3] that pioneered the use of quantum-engineered IC structures. This quantum-engineered approach will enable PV cells to efficiently convert infrared radiation from the sun or other heat source, to electricity. Such cells will have important applications for more efficient use of solar energy, waste-heat recovery, and power beaming in combination with mid-infrared lasers. The objectives of our investigations are to: achieve extensive understanding of the fundamental aspects of the proposed PV structures, develop the necessary knowledge for making such IC PV cells, and demonstrate prototype working PV cells. This research will focus on IC PV structures and their segments for utilizing infrared radiation with wavelengths from 2 to 5 μm, a range well suited for emission by heat sources (1,000-2,000 K) that are widely available from combustion systems. The long-term goal of this project is to push PV technology to longer wavelengths, allowing for relatively low-temperature thermal sources. Our investigations address material quality, electrical and optical properties, and their interplay for the different regions of an IC PV structure. The tasks involve: design, modeling and optimization of IC PV structures, molecular beam epitaxial growth of PV structures and relevant segments, material characterization, prototype device fabrication and testing. At the end of this program, we expect to generate new cutting-edge knowledge in the design and understanding of quantum-engineered semiconductor structures, and demonstrate the concepts for IC PV devices with high conversion efficiencies.

  2. Amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    All-carbon solar cells have attracted attention as candidates for innovative photovoltaic devices. Carbon-based materials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and amorphous carbon (aC) have the potential to present physical properties comparable to those of silicon-based materials with advantages such as low cost and higher thermal stability.In particular a-C structures are promising systems in which both sp2 and sp3 hybridization coordination are present in different proportions depending on the specific density, providing the possibility of tuning their optoelectronic properties and achieving comparable sunlight absorption to aSi. In this work we employ density functional theory to design suitable device architectures, such as bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) or pn junctions, consisting of a-C as the active layer material.Regarding BHJ, we study interfaces between aC and C nanostructures (such as CNT and fullerene) to relate their optoelectronic properties to the stoichiometry of aC. We demonstrate that the energy alignment between the a-C mobility edges and the occupied and unoccupied states of the CNT or C60 can be widely tuned by varying the aC density to obtain a type II interface.To employ aC in pn junctions we analyze the p- and n-type doping of a-C focusingon an evaluation of the Fermi level and work function dependence on doping.Our results highlight promising features of aC as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  3. Photovoltaic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiser, H.W.; Memory, S.B.; Veziroglu, T.N.; Padin, J. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This is a new project, which started in June 1995, and involves photovoltaic hydrogen production as a fuel production method for the future. In order to increase the hydrogen yield, it was decided to use hybrid solar collectors to generate D.C. electricity, as well as high temperature steam for input to the electrolyzer. In this way, some of the energy needed to dissociate the water is supplied in the form of heat (or low grade energy), to generate steam, which results in a reduction of electrical energy (or high grade energy) needed. As a result, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency is increased. In the above stated system, the collector location, the collector tracking sub-system (i.e., orientation/rotation), and the steam temperature have been taken as variables. Five locations selected - in order to consider a variety of latitudes, altitudes, cloud coverage and atmospheric conditions - are Atlanta, Denver, Miami, Phoenix and Salt Lake City. Plain PV and hybrid solar collectors for a stationary south facing system and five different collector rotation systems have been analyzed. Steam temperatures have been varied between 200{degrees}C and 1200{degrees}C. During the first year, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiencies have been considered. The results show that higher steam temperatures, 2 dimensional tracking system, higher elevations and dryer climates causes higher conversion efficiencies. Cost effectiveness of the sub-systems and of the overall system will be analyzed during the second year. Also, initial studies will be made of an advanced high efficiency hybrid solar hydrogen production system.

  4. A Photovoltaic System Payback Calculator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Daniel M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fleming, Jeffrey E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gallegos, Gerald R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The Roof Asset Management Program (RAMP) is a DOE NNSA initiative to manage roof repairs and replacement at NNSA facilities. In some cases, installation of a photovoltaic system on new roofs may be possible and desired for financial reasons and to meet federal renewable energy goals. One method to quantify the financial benefits of PV systems is the payback period, or the length of time required for a PV system to generate energy value equivalent to the system's cost. Sandia Laboratories created a simple spreadsheet-based solar energy valuation tool for use by RAMP personnel to quickly evaluate the estimated payback period of prospective or installed photovoltaic systems.

  5. The Harvard organic photovoltaic dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Steven A.; Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Simm, Gregor N.; Lutzow, Trevor; Li, Kewei; Seress, Laszlo R.; Hachmann, Johannes; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-09-01

    The Harvard Organic Photovoltaic Dataset (HOPV15) presented in this work is a collation of experimental photovoltaic data from the literature, and corresponding quantum-chemical calculations performed over a range of conformers, each with quantum chemical results using a variety of density functionals and basis sets. It is anticipated that this dataset will be of use in both relating electronic structure calculations to experimental observations through the generation of calibration schemes, as well as for the creation of new semi-empirical methods and the benchmarking of current and future model chemistries for organic electronic applications.

  6. The solar photovoltaic; Solaire photovoltaique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bal, J.L. [Agence de l' Environnement et de la Maitrise de l' Energie, ADEME, 75 - Paris (France)

    2004-08-01

    This document presents the main topics discussed during the european conference on the solar photovoltaic, which took place at Paris in June 2004. The different cells technologies, the connected systems to the network, the different integration systems and the development and sellback tariffs are discussed. The photovoltaic industry in Germany, Japan and California is detailed. A special interest is given to the black silicon, a more absorbent silicon. This silicon is elaborated from crystalline silicon, by an exposition to a pulse laser (1000 milliards of watt) in halogen gaseous atmosphere. (A.L.B.)

  7. Macromolecular architectures for organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popere, Bhooshan C; Della Pelle, Andrea M; Poe, Ambata; Thayumanavan, S

    2012-03-28

    Research in the field of organic photovoltaics has gained considerable momentum in the last two decades owing to the need for developing low-cost and efficient energy harvesting systems. Elegant molecular architectures have been designed, synthesized and employed as active materials for photovoltaic devices thereby leading to a better molecular structure-device property relationship understanding. In this perspective, we outline new macromolecular scaffolds that have been designed within the purview of each of the three fundamental processes involving light harvesting, charge separation and charge transport.

  8. The Harvard organic photovoltaic dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Steven A.; Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Simm, Gregor N.; Lutzow, Trevor; Li, Kewei; Seress, Laszlo R.; Hachmann, Johannes; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-01-01

    The Harvard Organic Photovoltaic Dataset (HOPV15) presented in this work is a collation of experimental photovoltaic data from the literature, and corresponding quantum-chemical calculations performed over a range of conformers, each with quantum chemical results using a variety of density functionals and basis sets. It is anticipated that this dataset will be of use in both relating electronic structure calculations to experimental observations through the generation of calibration schemes, as well as for the creation of new semi-empirical methods and the benchmarking of current and future model chemistries for organic electronic applications. PMID:27676312

  9. Photovoltaic cell and production thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Srinivasamohan; Kumar, Bikash

    2008-07-22

    An efficient photovoltaic cell, and its process of manufacture, is disclosed wherein the back surface p-n junction is removed from a doped substrate having an oppositely doped emitter layer. A front surface and edges and optionally the back surface periphery are masked and a back surface etch is performed. The mask is not removed and acts as an anti-reflective coating, a passivating agent, or both. The photovoltaic cell retains an untextured back surface whether or not the front is textured and the dopant layer on the back surface is removed to enhance the cell efficiency. Optionally, a back surface field is formed.

  10. Voltage Regulators for Photovoltaic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delombard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Two simple circuits developed to provide voltage regulation for highvoltage (i.e., is greater than 75 volts) and low-voltage (i.e., is less than 36 volts) photovoltaic/battery power systems. Use of these circuits results in voltage regulator small, low-cost, and reliable, with very low power dissipation. Simple oscillator circuit controls photovoltaic-array current to regulate system voltage and control battery charging. Circuit senses battery (and system) voltage and adjusts array current to keep battery voltage from exceeding maximum voltage.

  11. Field Guide for Testing Existing Photovoltaic Systems for Ground Faults and Installing Equipment to Mitigate Fire Hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, William [Brooks Engineering, Vacaville, CA (United States); Basso, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Coddington, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Ground faults and arc faults are the two most common reasons for fires in photovoltaic (PV) arrays and methods exist that can mitigate the hazards. This report provides field procedures for testing PV arrays for ground faults, and for implementing high resolution ground fault and arc fault detectors in existing and new PV system designs.

  12. System tests and applications photovoltaic program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-05-01

    A summary of all the photovoltaic system tests and application experiments that have been initiated since the start of the US DOE Photovoltaics Program in 1975 is presented. They are organized in the following manner for ease of reference: (1) application experiments: these are independently designed and constructed projects which are funded by DOE; (2) system field tests: projects designed and monitored by the national laboratories involved in the photovoltaic program; (3) exhibits: designed to acquaint the general public to photovoltaics; (4) component field tests: real time endurance testing conducted to monitor module reliability under actual environmental conditions; and (5) test facilities: descriptions of the four national laboratories involved in the photovoltaic program.

  13. Rapid screening buffer layers in photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, III, Frederick Alyious; Tuncer, Enis

    2014-09-09

    An apparatus and method of testing electrical impedance of a multiplicity of regions of a photovoltaic surface includes providing a multi-tipped impedance sensor with a multiplicity of spaced apart impedance probes separated by an insulating material, wherein each impedance probe includes a first end adapted for contact with a photovoltaic surface and a second end in operable communication with an impedance measuring device. The multi-tipped impedance sensor is used to contact the photovoltaic surface and electrical impedance of the photovoltaic material is measured between individual first ends of the probes to characterize the quality of the photovoltaic surface.

  14. Combination solar photovoltaic heat engine energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A combination solar photovoltaic heat engine converter is proposed. Such a system is suitable for either terrestrial or space power applications. The combination system has a higher efficiency than either the photovoltaic array or the heat engine alone can attain. Advantages in concentrator and radiator area and receiver mass of the photovoltaic heat engine system over a heat-engine-only system are estimated. A mass and area comparison between the proposed space station organic Rankine power system and a combination PV-heat engine system is made. The critical problem for the proposed converter is the necessity for high temperature photovoltaic array operation. Estimates of the required photovoltaic temperature are presented.

  15. Photovoltaic Systems Test Facilities: Existing capabilities compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmer, K.

    1982-01-01

    A general description of photovoltaic systems test facilities (PV-STFs) operated under the U.S. Department of Energy's photovoltaics program is given. Descriptions of a number of privately operated facilities having test capabilities appropriate to photovoltaic hardware development are given. A summary of specific, representative test capabilities at the system and subsystem level is presented for each listed facility. The range of system and subsystem test capabilities available to serve the needs of both the photovoltaics program and the private sector photovoltaics industry is given.

  16. Effect of surface fields on the dynamic resistance of planar HgCdTe mid-wavelength infrared photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Kai; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yi-Yu [Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, Song-Min; Xie, Xiao-Hui; Lin, Chun, E-mail: chun-lin@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Jian-Xin; Zhang, Qin-Yao, E-mail: qinyao@mail.sitp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Li, Yang [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-05-28

    This work investigates the effect of surface fields on the dynamic resistance of a planar HgCdTe mid-wavelength infrared photodiode from both theoretical and experimental aspects, considering a gated n-on-p diode with the surface potential of its p-region modulated. Theoretical models of the surface leakage current are developed, where the surface tunnelling current in the case of accumulation is expressed by modifying the formulation of bulk tunnelling currents, and the surface channel current for strong inversion is simulated with a transmission line method. Experimental data from the fabricated devices show a flat-band voltage of V{sub FB}=−5.7 V by capacitance-voltage measurement, and then the physical parameters for bulk properties are determined from the resistance-voltage characteristics of the diode working at a flat-band gate voltage. With proper values of the modeling parameters such as surface trap density and channel electron mobility, the theoretical R{sub 0}A product and corresponding dark current calculated from the proposed model as functions of the gate voltage V{sub g} demonstrate good consistency with the measured values. The R{sub 0}A product remarkably degenerates when V{sub g} is far below or above V{sub FB} because of the surface tunnelling current or channel current, respectively; and it attains the maximum value of 5.7×10{sup 7} Ω · cm{sup 2} around the transition between surface depletion and weak inversion when V{sub g}≈−4 V, which might result from reduced generation-recombination current.

  17. The role of nanostructures and quantum dots in detectors and solar cells for radiation hardened space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Edward W.

    2006-08-01

    Highly efficient IR detectors and photo-voltaic solar cells that incorporate nanotechnology composed of nanostructures and nanoparticles (including quantum dots) will play an important role in advanced photonic space applications. While the development of Si-based solar cells has successfully evolved into an efficient and economical technology these devices are predicted to soon reach their theoretical 29% limit efficiency. Alternative organic/polymer solar cells and IR detectors incorporating quantum dots and various nanoparticle or nanostructure materials are emerging which are expected to eventually outperform current state-of-the-art detectors and solar cell devices. By tailoring the QD design wavelength-optimized detectors and detector arrays operating over the UV-IR range can be realized. Specific examples for achieving near-IR photovoltaic and photoconductive detectors with high quantum efficiencies are presented along with brief examples of empirical data reported for assessing the radiation resistance of QD nanocrystalline devices for application in space environments.

  18. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program, FY 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, K.A. (ed.)

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaics Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The SERI subcontracted PV research and development represents most of the subcontracted R D that is funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program. This report covers fiscal year (FY) 1990: October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990. During FY 1990, the SERI PV program started to implement a new DOE subcontract initiative, entitled the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project.'' Excluding (PVMaT) because it was in a start-up phase, in FY 1990 there were 54 subcontracts with a total annualized funding of approximately $11.9 million. Approximately two-thirds of those subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of over $3.3 million. Cost sharing by industry added another $4.3 million to that $11.9 million of SERI PV subcontracted R D. The six technical sections of this report cover the previously ongoing areas of the subcontracted program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, and the University Participation Program. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs discuss approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1990, and future research directions. Another section introduces the PVMaT project and reports the progress since its inception in FY 1990. Highlights of technology transfer activities are also reported.

  19. Photovoltaics radiometric issues and needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D.R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents a summary of issues discussed at the photovoltaic radiometric measurements workshop. Topics included radiometric measurements guides, the need for well-defined goals, documentation, calibration checks, accreditation of testing laboratories and methods, the need for less expensive radiometric instrumentation, data correlations, and quality assurance.

  20. Photovoltaic energy barometer; Barometre photovoltaique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2008-03-15

    Thanks to a german market at its peak associated with the rise in importance of the spanish and italian markets, the european union established a new record for photovoltaic installations. According to first estimates, 1541,2 MWp were installed in 2007 (+57% with respect to 2006), bringing total EU installed capacity up 4689,5 MWp. (A.L.B.)

  1. Photovoltaic systems: an economic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirillo, E.; Lazzarin, R.; Fato, I. (Bari Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Tecnica e Impianti Termotecnici)

    Costs and benefits of a photovoltaic plant intended for residential utilization and connected to the supply mains are evaluated. Three types of panels (mono, polycrystalline and amorphous silicon) are considered in determining the optimum economical size. Criteria for estimating the economically convenient peak watt cost compared with the mains supply cost are suggested.

  2. NREL Photovoltaic Program FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This report reviews the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R&D) activities under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic (PV) Program from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993 (fiscal year [FY] 1993). The NREL PV Program is part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE Photovoltaics Program Plan, FY 1991 - FY 1995. The FY 1993 budget authority (BA) for carrying out the NREL PV Program was $40.1 million in operating funds and $0.9 million in capital equipment funds. An additional $4.8 million in capital equipment funds were made available for the new Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF) that will house the in-house PV laboratories beginning in FY 1994. Subcontract activities represent a major part of the NREL PV Program, with more than $23.7 million (nearly 59%) of the FY 1993 operating funds going to 70 subcontractors. In FY 1993, DOE assigned certain other PV subcontracting efforts to the DOE Golden Field Office (DOE/GO), and assigned responsibility for their technical support to the NREL PV Program. An example is the PV:BONUS (Building Opportunities in the U.S. for Photovoltaics) Project. These DOE/GO efforts are also reported in this document.

  3. 2017 NREL Photovoltaic Reliability Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Sarah [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-15

    NREL's Photovoltaic (PV) Reliability Workshop (PVRW) brings together PV reliability experts to share information, leading to the improvement of PV module reliability. Such improvement reduces the cost of solar electricity and promotes investor confidence in the technology -- both critical goals for moving PV technologies deeper into the electricity marketplace.

  4. SAM Photovoltaic Model Technical Reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, P. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-05-27

    This manual describes the photovoltaic performance model in the System Advisor Model (SAM). The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory maintains and distributes SAM, which is available as a free download from https://sam.nrel.gov. These descriptions are based on SAM 2015.1.30 (SSC 41).

  5. Encapsulation of polymer photovoltaic prototypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C

    2006-01-01

    A simple and efficient method for the encapsulation of polymer and organic photovoltaic prototypes is presented. The method employs device preparation on glass substrates with subsequent sealing using glass fiber reinforced thermosetting epoxy (prepreg) against a back plate. The method allows...

  6. Emissions from photovoltaic life cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fthenakis, V.M.; Kim, H.C.; Alsema, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) technologies have shown remarkable progress recently in terms of annual production capacity and life cycle environmental performances, which necessitate timely updates of environmental indicators. Based on PV production data of 2004–2006, this study presents the life-cycle greenhou

  7. Graded Recombination Layers for Multijunction Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Koleilat, Ghada I.

    2012-06-13

    Multijunction devices consist of a stack of semiconductor junctions having bandgaps tuned across a broad spectrum. In solar cells this concept is used to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic harvesting, while light emitters and detectors use it to achieve multicolor and spectrally tunable behavior. In series-connected current-matched multijunction devices, the recombination layers must allow the hole current from one cell to recombine, with high efficiency and low voltage loss, with the electron current from the next cell. We recently reported a tandem solar cell in which the recombination layer was implemented using a progression of n-type oxides whose doping densities and work functions serve to connect, with negligible resistive loss at solar current densities, the constituent cells. Here we present the generalized conditions for design of efficient graded recombination layer solar devices. We report the number of interlayers and the requirements on work function and doping of each interlayer, to bridge an work function difference as high as 1.6 eV. We also find solutions that minimize the doping required of the interlayers in order to minimize optical absorption due to free carriers in the graded recombination layer (GRL). We demonstrate a family of new GRL designs experimentally and highlight the benefits of the progression of dopings and work functions in the interlayers. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  8. Photovoltaic power generation system free of bypass diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2015-07-28

    A photovoltaic power generation system that includes a solar panel that is free of bypass diodes is described herein. The solar panel includes a plurality of photovoltaic sub-modules, wherein at least two of photovoltaic sub-modules in the plurality of photovoltaic sub-modules are electrically connected in parallel. A photovoltaic sub-module includes a plurality of groups of electrically connected photovoltaic cells, wherein at least two of the groups are electrically connected in series. A photovoltaic group includes a plurality of strings of photovoltaic cells, wherein a string of photovoltaic cells comprises a plurality of photovoltaic cells electrically connected in series. The strings of photovoltaic cells are electrically connected in parallel, and the photovoltaic cells are microsystem-enabled photovoltaic cells.

  9. Advanced Rainbow Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, Nick; Shields, Virgil

    2003-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays of the rainbow type, equipped with light-concentrator and spectral-beam-splitter optics, have been investigated in a continuing effort to develop lightweight, high-efficiency solar electric power sources. This investigation has contributed to a revival of the concept of the rainbow photovoltaic array, which originated in the 1950s but proved unrealistic at that time because the selection of solar photovoltaic cells was too limited. Advances in the art of photovoltaic cells since that time have rendered the concept more realistic, thereby prompting the present development effort. A rainbow photovoltaic array comprises side-by-side strings of series-connected photovoltaic cells. The cells in each string have the same bandgap, which differs from the bandgaps of the other strings. Hence, each string operates most efficiently in a unique wavelength band determined by its bandgap. To obtain maximum energy-conversion efficiency and to minimize the size and weight of the array for a given sunlight input aperture, the sunlight incident on the aperture is concentrated, then spectrally dispersed onto the photovoltaic array plane, whereon each string of cells is positioned to intercept the light in its wavelength band of most efficient operation. The number of cells in each string is chosen so that the output potentials of all the strings are the same; this makes it possible to connect the strings together in parallel to maximize the output current of the array. According to the original rainbow photovoltaic concept, the concentrated sunlight was to be split into multiple beams by use of an array of dichroic filters designed so that each beam would contain light in one of the desired wavelength bands. The concept has since been modified to provide for dispersion of the spectrum by use of adjacent prisms. A proposal for an advanced version calls for a unitary concentrator/ spectral-beam-splitter optic in the form of a parabolic curved Fresnel-like prism

  10. Background limited mid-infrared photodetection with photovoltaic HgTe colloidal quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe, E-mail: pgs@uchicago.edu; Roberts, John Andris [James Franck Institute, 929 E. 57th Street, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-12-21

    The photovoltaic response of thin films of HgTe colloidal quantum dots in the 3–5 μm range is observed. With no applied bias, internal quantum efficiency exceeding 40%, specific detectivity above 10{sup 10} Jones and microseconds response times are obtained at 140 K. The cooled devices detect the ambient thermal radiation. A detector with 5.25 μm cut-off achieves Background Limited Infrared Photodetection at 90 K.

  11. Radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2017-06-27

    Alpha particle detecting devices are disclosed that have a chamber that can hold a fluid in a tensioned metastable state. The chamber is tuned with a suitable fluid and tension such that alpha emitting materials such as radon and one or more of its decay products can be detected. The devices can be portable and can be placed in areas, such as rooms in dwellings or laboratories and used to measure radon in these areas, in situ and in real time. The disclosed detectors can detect radon at and below 4 pCi/L in air; also, at and below 4,000 pCi/L or 300 pCi/L in water.

  12. CLIC Detector Power Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, A

    2013-01-01

    An estimate for the CLIC detector power requirements is outlined starting from the available data on power consumptions of the four LHC experiments and considering the differences between a typical LHC Detector (CMS) and the CLIC baseline detector concept. In particular the impact of the power pulsing scheme for the CLIC Detector electronics on the overall detector consumption is considered. The document will be updated with the requirements of the sub-detector electronics once they are more defined.

  13. Pixel Vertex Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wermes, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Pixel vertex detectors are THE instrument of choice for the tracking of charged particles close to the interaction point at the LHC. Hybrid pixel detectors, in which sensor and read-out IC are separate entities, constitute the present state of the art in detector technology. Three of the LHC detectors use vertex detectors based on this technology. A development period of almost 10 years has resulted in pixel detector modules which can stand the extreme rate and timing requirements as well as ...

  14. Case Study - Monitoring the Photovoltaic Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PACURAR Ana Talida

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The photovoltaic cell represents one of the most dynamic and attractive way to converts renewable energy sources in electricity production. That means to convert solar energy into electricity. In this paper is presented a analogy between two types of photovoltaic panels installed, with educational role for students. Also the objective of this paper is to estimate the performance of photovoltaic panels and to provide the best solution for industry. These two types of photovoltaic panels were monitored at the same time and taking into account the same weather conditions. In introduction of this paper is a short description regarding the silicon, because it is considered to be the most frequently used material for photovoltaic cell production at industrial level. In this context are mentioned below photovoltaic cells: mono-crystalline, polycrystalline, ribbon silicon and amorphous silicon (thin film cells. It is also presented for all these types of cells the structure, the function, the advantages and the disadvantages.

  15. ROIC with on-chip sigma-delta AD converter for HgCdTe e-APD FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zhang, Junling; Wang, Pan; Zhou, Jie; Gao, Lei; Ding, Ruijun

    2013-10-01

    HgCdTe electron injection avalanche photodiodes (e-APDs) work at linear mode. A weak optical current signal is amplified orders of magnitude due to the internal avalanche mechanism and it has been demonstrated to be one of the most promising methods to focal-plane arrays (FPAs) for low-flux like hyper-spectral imaging and high-speed applications such as active imaging. This paper presents the design of a column-shared ADC for cooled e-APDs FPA. Designing a digital FPA requires fulfilling very stringent requirements in terms of power consumption, silicon area and speed. Among the various ADC architectures sigma-delta conversion is a promising solution for high-performance and medium size FPA such as 128×128. The performance of Sigma-delta ADC rather relies on the modulator structure which set over-sampling and noise shaping characteristics than on critical analog circuits. This makes them quite robust and flexible. A multistage noise shaping (MASH) 2-1 single bit architecture sigma-delta conversion with switched-capacitor circuits is designed for column-shared ADC, which is implanted in the GLOBALFOUNDRIES 0.35um CMOS process with 4-poly and 4-metal on the basis of a 100um pixel pitch. It operates under 3.3V supply and the output range of the quantizer is 2V. A quantization noise subtraction circuit in modulator is designed to subtract the quantization noise of first-stage modulator. The quantization noise of the modulator is shaped by a high-pass filter. The silicon area and power consumption are mainly determined by the decimation low pass filter. A cascaded integrator-comb (CIC) filter is designed as the digital decimator filter. CIC filter requires no multipliers and use limited storage thereby leading to more economical hardware implementation. The register word length of the filter in each stage is carefully dimensioned in order to minimize the required hardware. Furthermore, the digital filters operate with a reduced supply voltage to 1.5V. Simulation

  16. Recent progress in space photovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Flood, Dennis J.; Weinberg, Irving

    1987-01-01

    Key issues and opportunities in space photovoltaic research and technology relative to future NASA mission requirements and drivers are addressed. Examples are given of space missions and/or operational capabilities on NASA's planning horizon presenting major technology challenges to the use of photovoltaic power generation in space. The status of cell R and D and the performance goals to be met by space photovoltaic power systems to remain competitive are described.

  17. Photovoltaic power in less developed countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.V.

    1977-03-24

    The potential of solar photovoltaic power in the third world (less developed countries) is analyzed. Application of irrigation systems powered by photovoltaics in Bangladesh, Chad, India, and Pakistan, plus an economic analysis of a photovoltaic-powered village in northern India indicate solar energy is competitive with the least-cost fossil-fuel alternatives. The most cost-effective method for specific geographical locations can be determined by field testing based on the case history data reported.

  18. A Review of Solar Photovoltaic Concentrators

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrdad Khamooshi; Hana Salati; Fuat Egelioglu; Ali Hooshyar Faghiri; Judy Tarabishi; Saeed Babadi

    2014-01-01

    Throughout the recent centuries, the limits of using energy resources due to the cost and environmental issues became one of the scientists’ concerns. Because of the huge amount of energy received by the Earth from the sun, the application of photovoltaic solar cells has become popular in the world. The photovoltaic (PV) efficiency can be increased by several factors; concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) system is one of the important tools for efficiency improvement and enables for a reduction i...

  19. Photovoltaic Energy Program Overview Fiscal Year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    Significant activities in the National Photovoltaic Program are reported for each of the three main program elements. In Research and Development, advances in thin-film materials and crystalline silicon materials are described. The Technology Development report describes activities in photovoltaic manufacturing technology, industrial expansion, module and array development, and testing photovoltaic system components. Systems Engineering and Applications projects described include projects with government agencies, projects with utilities, documentation of performance for international applications, and product certification.

  20. Advances in photovoltaics part 4

    CERN Document Server

    Willeke, Gerhard P

    2015-01-01

    Advances in Photovoltaics: Part Four provides valuable information on the challenges faced during the transformation of our energy supply system to more efficient, renewable energies. The volume discusses the topic from a global perspective, presenting the latest information on photovoltaics, a cornerstone technology. It covers all aspects of this important semiconductor technology, reflecting on the tremendous and dynamic advances that have been made on this topic since 1975, when the first book on solar cells-written by Harold J. Hovel of IBM-was published as volume 11 in the now famous series on Semiconductors and Semimetals. Readers will gain a behind the scenes look at the continuous and rapid scientific development that leads to the necessary price and cost reductions in global industrial mass-production. Written by leading, internationally known experts on his topic Provides an in-depth overview of the current status and perspectives of thin film PV technologies Discusses the challenges faced during th...

  1. Photovoltaic research opportunities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macaleer, B.; Bowers, J.; Hurlburt, B.

    1985-11-19

    The purpose of this study is to identify opportunities for photovoltaic (PV) research projects to capitalize on related but non-PV research. The study is performed under the assumption that a considerable body of ongoing semiconductor research in non-PV areas could be of value to its PV Program and the PV community in general. Research related to III-V compounds, thin films, and crystalline silicon materials is included. Research that is known to be PV-related or sponsored by DOE was excluded from consideration. The study resulted in 11 recommendations (research areas) and a subset of 58 specific research projects. In addition, over 75 non-PV research managers in the semiconductor field are identified as potential sources of ideas which could benefit photovoltaics.

  2. Photovoltaic research opportunities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macaleer, B.; Bowers, J.; Hurlburt, B.

    1985-11-19

    The purpose of this study is to identify opportunities for photovoltaic (PV) research projects to capitalize on related but non-PV research. The study is performed under the assumption that a considerable body of ongoing semiconductor research in non-PV areas could be of value to its PV Program and the PV community in general. Research related to III-V compounds, thin films, and crystalline silicon materials is included. Research that is known to be PV-related or sponsored by DOE was excluded from consideration. The study resulted in 11 recommendations (research areas) and a subset of 58 specific research projects. In addition, over 75 non-PV research managers in the semiconductor field are identified as potential sources of ideas which could benefit photovoltaics.

  3. Semiconductor electrolyte photovoltaic energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W. W.; Anderson, L. B.

    1975-01-01

    Feasibility and practicality of a solar cell consisting of a semiconductor surface in contact with an electrolyte are evaluated. Basic components and processes are detailed for photovoltaic energy conversion at the surface of an n-type semiconductor in contact with an electrolyte which is oxidizing to conduction band electrons. Characteristics of single crystal CdS, GaAs, CdSe, CdTe and thin film CdS in contact with aqueous and methanol based electrolytes are studied and open circuit voltages are measured from Mott-Schottky plots and open circuit photo voltages. Quantum efficiencies for short circuit photo currents of a CdS crystal and a 20 micrometer film are shown together with electrical and photovoltaic properties. Highest photon irradiances are observed with the GaAs cell.

  4. Performance of photovoltaic electrolysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve, D.; Ganibal, C.; Steinmetz, D.; Vialaron, A.

    A photovoltaic generator with concentrated light is combined with a water electrolysis cell in an effort to further the development of solar energy utilization. SOPHOCLE, a photovoltaic generator with limited concentration of energy, is a heliostat of the altazimuth type, consisting of an optical device to focus the sunlight on the photocells, a tracking device to follow the position of the sun, and a cooling device to allow dissipation of thermal energy. The combined cost and performance of SOPHOCLE gives an overall efficiency of 9 percent (for direct solar radiation). A power conditioning device matches the generator photocell characteristics with the electrolysis cell to give maximum hydrogen production. Hydrogen can be produced by this method with an overall efficiency of 7 percent.

  5. Bimolecular recombination in organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhwani, Girish; Rao, Akshay; Friend, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    The recombination of electrons and holes is a major loss mechanism in photovoltaic devices that controls their performance. We review scientific literature on bimolecular recombination (BR) in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices to bring forward existing ideas on the origin and nature of BR and highlight both experimental and theoretical work done to quantify its extent. For these systems, Langevin theory fails to explain BR, and recombination dynamics turns out to be dependent on mobility, temperature, electric field, charge carrier concentration, and trapped charges. Relationships among the photocurrent, open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and morphology are discussed. Finally, we highlight the recent emergence of a molecular-level picture of recombination, taking into account the spin and delocalization of charges. Together with the macroscopic picture of recombination, these new insights allow for a comprehensive understanding of BR and provide design principles for future materials and devices.

  6. Photovoltaic performance and reliability workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrig, L. [ed.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was the sixth in a series of workshops sponsored by NREL/DOE under the general subject of photovoltaic testing and reliability during the period 1986--1993. PV performance and PV reliability are at least as important as PV cost, if not more. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities, and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in the field were brought together to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this evolving field of PV reliability. The papers presented here reflect this effort since the last workshop held in September, 1992. The topics covered include: cell and module characterization, module and system testing, durability and reliability, system field experience, and standards and codes.

  7. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    DT As announced in the previous Bulletin MU DT completed the installation of the vertical chambers of barrel wheels 0, +1 and +2. 242 DT and RPC stations are now installed in the negative barrel wheels. The missing 8 (4 in YB-1 and 4 in YB-2) chambers can be installed only after the lowering of the two wheels into the UX cavern, which is planned for the last quarter of the year. Cabling on the surface of the negative wheels was finished in May after some difficulties with RPC cables. The next step was to begin the final commissioning of the wheels with the final trigger and readout electronics. Priority was giv¬en to YB0 in order to check everything before the chambers were covered by cables and services of the inner detectors. Commissioning is not easy since it requires both activity on the central and positive wheels underground, as well as on the negative wheels still on the surface. The DT community is requested to commission the negative wheels on surface to cope with a possible lack of time a...

  8. Development of Type-II superlattice VLWIR detectors in JAXA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Michito; Murooka, Jumpei; Kumeta, Ayaka; Kimura, Toshiyoshi; Inada, Hiroshi; Iguchi, Yasuhiro; Hiroe, Yuta; Kimata, Masafumi

    2017-02-01

    One of JAXA's future missions, using an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), requires the focal plane array (FPA) that has high sensitivity up to the very long-wavelength infrared (VLWIR) region. Since a Type-II superlattice (T2SL) is the only known infrared material to exhibit performance that is theoretically predicted to be higher than that of HgCdTe additionally the cutoff wavelength can be tailored in the wavelength region of 3-30 μm, we started the research and development of the T2SL detector in 2009. In order to confirm our final goal, which is to realize the FPA with a cutoff wavelength of 15 μm, we first fabricated the 320 × 256 (QVGA format) InAs/GaInSb T2SL FPA with a cutoff wavelength of 15 μm, and the large-format 640 × 512 (VGA format) T2SL FPA is followed because the other missions, using an infrared imager, require the large-format FPA. The noise-equivalent delta temperature measured with F1.4 optics was 0.15 K for QVGA format T2SL FPA at 77 K. It was 0.35 K for VGA format T2SL FPA at 77 K, but there is non-uniformity, and further improvements are necessary to achieve high performance FPAs.

  9. A vision for photovoltaic technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinke, W.C. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Perezagua, E. [Isofoton, Madrid (Spain); Demarcq, F.; Bal, J.L. [ADEME, Paris (France); Alferov, Z.I.; Andreev, V. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); De Segundo, K. [Shell International Renewables, London (United Kingdom); Dimmler, B. [Wuerth Solar GMBH und Co.KG, Marbach am Neckar (Germany); Goetzberger, A. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Freiburg (Germany); Itoiz Beunza, C. [Energia Hidroelectrica de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Lojkowski, W. [High Pressure Research Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa (Poland); Nowak, S. [NET Nowak nergy and Technology Ltd, St. Ursen (Switzerland); Vleuten, P. van der [Free Energy International, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Van Zolingen, R.J.C. [Shell Solar, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-02-01

    The report identifies the major technical and non-technical barriers to the uptake of the technology and outlines a strategic research agenda designed to ensure a breakthrough of PV (photovoltaics) and an increase in deployment in the Union and worldwide. The Council proposes the use of a European Technology Platform as a mechanism to implement the strategy and achieve the wider goals defined in the vision.

  10. Photovoltaic plants: an experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirillo, E.; Fato, I.; Lazzarin, R.

    A photovoltaic unit, designed at the University of Bari and already in operation, is described as well as the methodology followed to measure the main characteristic parameters of its operation. The experimental results, compared with those obtained by applying semi-empirical calculations, suggest that load intermittence should be taken into account by introducing a parameter (N) into the calculation, and that intervention of the solar section control device should be considered.

  11. Photovoltaic power plants: production calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirillo, E.; Lazzarin, R.

    Rational sizing of a photovoltaic plant requires a good evaluation of the obtainable electric energy as a function of the many meteorological and plant parameters. A computing procedure is described in detail together with a fully developed numerical example. The procedure is based on monthly usability. It is reliable and it allows designers to take into account the influence of the main plant parameters within rather wide ranges.

  12. Microprocessor control of photovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millner, A. R.; Kaufman, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The present low power CMOS microprocessor controller for photovoltaic power systems possesses three programs, which are respectively intended for (1) conventional battery-charging systems with state-of-charge estimation and sequential shedding of subarrays and loads, (2) maximum power-controlled battery-charging systems, and (3) variable speed dc motor drives. Attention is presently given to the development of this terrestrial equipment for spacecraft use.

  13. Towards photovoltaic powered artificial retina

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of current and future concepts in the field of retinal prostheses, and is focused on the power supply based on solar energy conversion; we introduce the possibility of using PV minimodules as power supply for a new concept of retinal prostheses: Photovoltaic Powered Artificial Retina (PVAR). Main characteristics of these PV modules are presented showing its potential for this application. Peer Reviewed

  14. Decentalized solar photovoltaic energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupka, M. C.

    1980-09-01

    Environmental data for decentralized solar photovoltaic systems have been generated in support of the Technology Assessment of Solar Energy Systems program (TASE). Emphasis has been placed upon the selection and use of a model residential photovoltaic system to develop and quantify the necessary data. The model consists of a reference home located in Phoenix, AZ, utilizing a unique solar cell array-roof shingle combination. Silicon solar cells, rated at 13.5% efficiency at 28/sup 0/C and 100 mW/cm/sup 2/ (AMI) insolation are used to generate approx. 10 kW (peak). An all-electric home is considered with lead-acid battery storage, dc-ac inversion and utility backup. The reference home is compared to others in regions of different insolation. Major material requirements, scaled to quad levels of end-use energy include significant quantities of silicon, copper, lead, antimony, sulfuric acid and plastics. Operating residuals generated are negligible with the exception of those from the storage battery due to a short (10-year) lifetime. A brief general discussion of other environmental, health, and safety and resource availability impacts is presented. It is suggested that solar cell materials production and fabrication may have the major environmental impact when comparing all facets of photovoltaic system usage. Fabrication of the various types of solar cell systems involves the need, handling, and transportation of many toxic and hazardous chemicals with attendant health and safety impacts. Increases in production of such materials as lead, antimony, sulfuric acid, copper, plastics, cadmium and gallium will be required should large scale usage of photovoltaic systems be implemented.

  15. International Photovoltaic Program Plan. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

    1979-12-01

    This second volume of a two-part report on the International Photovoltaic Program Plan contains appendices summarizing the results of analyses conducted in preparation of the plan. These analyses include compilations of relevant statutes and existing Federal programs; strategies designed to expand the use of photovoltaics abroad; information on the domestic photovoltaic plan and its impact on the proposed international plan; perspectives on foreign competition; industry views on the international photovoltaic market and ideas about how US government actions could affect this market; international financing issues; and information on issues affecting foreign policy and developing countries.

  16. International photovoltaic program. Volume 2: Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

    1979-01-01

    The results of analyses conducted in preparation of an international photovoltaic marketing plan are summarized. Included are compilations of relevant statutes and existing Federal programs; strategies designed to expand the use of photovoltaics abroad; information on the domestic photovoltaic plan and its impact on the proposed international plan; perspectives on foreign competition; industry views on the international photovoltaic market and ideas about the how US government actions could affect this market;international financing issues; and information on issues affecting foreign policy and developing countries.

  17. Solar photovoltaic reflective trough collection structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin J.; Sweatt, William C.; Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2015-11-19

    A photovoltaic (PV) solar concentration structure having at least two troughs encapsulated in a rectangular parallelepiped optical plastic structure, with the troughs filled with an optical plastic material, the troughs each having a reflective internal surface and approximately parabolic geometry, and the troughs each including photovoltaic cells situated so that light impinging on the optical plastic material will be concentrated onto the photovoltaic cells. Multiple structures can be connected to provide a solar photovoltaic collection system that provides portable, efficient, low-cost electrical power.

  18. Review of photovoltaic research in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, R D

    1985-08-01

    This paper describes US research efforts to develop new generations of photovoltaic technologies having the potential for lower cost and better performance than the older generations of crystalline silicon technologies. The newer generations consist primarily of single and multijunction thin film devices destined for either flat plate or concentrator photovoltaic systems. The principal sponsors for the research are the US Department of Energy, US photovoltaic companies, the Electric Power Research Institute, and those US government agencies interested in the use of photovoltaics in space. The paper concludes with a description of future research activities in the areas of amorphous silicon, polycrystalline thin films, high efficiency concepts, and fundamental research.

  19. Space power technology 21: Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Joseph

    1989-04-01

    The Space Power needs for the 21st Century and the program in photovoltaics needed to achieve it are discussed. Workshops were conducted in eight different power disciplines involving industry and other government agencies. The Photovoltaics Workshop was conducted at Aerospace Corporation in June 1987. The major findings and recommended program from this workshop are discussed. The major finding is that a survivable solar power capability is needed in photovoltaics for critical Department of Defense missions including Air Force and Strategic Defense Initiative. The tasks needed to realize this capability are described in technical, not financial, terms. The second finding is the need for lightweight, moderately survivable planar solar arrays. High efficiency thin III-V solar cells can meet some of these requirements. Higher efficiency, longer life solar cells are needed for application to both future planar and concentrator arrays with usable life up to 10 years. Increasing threats are also anticipated and means for avoiding prolonged exposure, retraction, maneuvering and autonomous operation are discussed.

  20. Concentrated photovoltaics, a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Piergiorgio; Centro, Sandro; Golfetto, Stelvio; Saccà, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    Concentrated Photovoltaics (CPV), once a niche technology, has now reached the maturity and reliability for large scale power generation. Especially in regions where temperatures are very high, the use of high efficiency triple junction solar cells with concentrating optics allows stable energy yield. Thus CPV can be seen as complementary and not in concurrence with silicon photovoltaics. The state of the art, the advantages and limitations of this technology will be shown. Among the main advantages of CPV is the possibility of a much higher energy supply, when compared to silicon photovoltaics, both comparing CPV and silicon with same area or the same installed power. The use of recycled and recyclable materials allows a more environmentally friendly production. The possibility to couple CPV with desalination facilities, energy storage will be analysed. As an example a case study of a CPV installation in Northern Italy is discussed. Here the use of mature technologies, derived from automotive and lighting sectors resulted in a simple and efficient module.

  1. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    This report describes subcontracted research by the Chronar Corporation, prepared by Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS) for Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Development project. Amorphous silicon is chosen as the PV technology that Chronar Corporation and APS believe offers the greatest potential for manufacturing improvements, which, in turn, will result in significant cost reductions and performance improvements in photovoltaic products. The APS Eureka'' facility was chosen as the manufacturing system that can offer the possibility of achieving these production enhancements. The relationship of the Eureka'' facility to Chronar's batch'' plants is discussed. Five key areas are also identified that could meet the objectives of manufacturing potential that could lead to improved performance, reduced manufacturing costs, and significantly increased production. The projected long-term potential benefits of these areas are discussed, as well as problems that may impede the achievement of the hoped-for developments. A significant number of the problems discussed are of a generic nature and could be of general interest to the industry. The final section of this document addresses the cost and time estimates for achieving the solutions to the problems discussed earlier. Emphasis is placed on the number, type, and cost of the human resources required for the project.

  2. Space power technology 21: Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    The Space Power needs for the 21st Century and the program in photovoltaics needed to achieve it are discussed. Workshops were conducted in eight different power disciplines involving industry and other government agencies. The Photovoltaics Workshop was conducted at Aerospace Corporation in June 1987. The major findings and recommended program from this workshop are discussed. The major finding is that a survivable solar power capability is needed in photovoltaics for critical Department of Defense missions including Air Force and Strategic Defense Initiative. The tasks needed to realize this capability are described in technical, not financial, terms. The second finding is the need for lightweight, moderately survivable planar solar arrays. High efficiency thin III-V solar cells can meet some of these requirements. Higher efficiency, longer life solar cells are needed for application to both future planar and concentrator arrays with usable life up to 10 years. Increasing threats are also anticipated and means for avoiding prolonged exposure, retraction, maneuvering and autonomous operation are discussed.

  3. Concentrated photovoltaics, a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonini Piergiorgio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentrated Photovoltaics (CPV, once a niche technology, has now reached the maturity and reliability for large scale power generation. Especially in regions where temperatures are very high, the use of high efficiency triple junction solar cells with concentrating optics allows stable energy yield. Thus CPV can be seen as complementary and not in concurrence with silicon photovoltaics. The state of the art, the advantages and limitations of this technology will be shown. Among the main advantages of CPV is the possibility of a much higher energy supply, when compared to silicon photovoltaics, both comparing CPV and silicon with same area or the same installed power. The use of recycled and recyclable materials allows a more environmentally friendly production. The possibility to couple CPV with desalination facilities, energy storage will be analysed. As an example a case study of a CPV installation in Northern Italy is discussed. Here the use of mature technologies, derived from automotive and lighting sectors resulted in a simple and efficient module.

  4. Nanochemistry and nanomaterials for photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanying; Seo, Jangwon; Yang, Chunhui; Prasad, Paras N

    2013-11-01

    Nanochemistry and nanomaterials provide numerous opportunities for a new generation of photovoltaics with high solar energy conversion efficiencies at low fabrication cost. Quantum-confined nanomaterials and polymer-inorganic nanocomposites can be tailored to harvest sun light over a broad range of the spectrum, while plasmonic structures offer effective ways to reduce the thickness of light-absorbing layers. Multiple exciton generation, singlet exciton fission, photon down-conversion, and photon up-conversion realized in nanostructures, create significant interest for harvesting underutilized ultraviolet and currently unutilized infrared photons. Nanochemical interface engineering of nanoparticle surfaces and junction-interfaces enable enhanced charge separation and collection. In this review, we survey these recent advances employed to introduce new concepts for improving the solar energy conversion efficiency, and reduce the device fabrication cost in photovoltaic technologies. The review concludes with a summary of contributions already made by nanochemistry. It then describes the challenges and opportunities in photovoltaics where the chemical community can play a vital role.

  5. Utility photovoltaic group: Status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serfass, Jeffrey A.; Hester, Stephen L.; Wills, Bethany N.

    1996-01-01

    The Utility PhotoVoltaic Group (UPVG) was formed in October of 1992 with a mission to accelerate the use of cost-effective small-scale and emerging grid-connected applications of photovoltaics for the benefit of electric utilities and their customers. The UPVG is now implementing a program to install up to 50 megawatts of photovoltaics in small-scale and grid-connected applications. This program, called TEAM-UP, is a partnership of the U.S. electric utility industry and the U.S. Department of Energy to help develop utility PV markets. TEAM-UP is a utility-directed program to significantly increase utility PV experience by promoting installations of utility PV systems. Two primary program areas are proposed for TEAM-UP: (1) Small-Scale Applications (SSA)—an initiative to aggregate utility purchases of small-scale, grid-independent applications; and (2) Grid-Connected Applications (GCA)—an initiative to identify and competitively award cost-sharing contracts for grid-connected PV systems with high market growth potential, or collective purchase programs involving multiple buyers. This paper describes these programs and outlines the schedule, the procurement status, and the results of the TEAM-UP process.

  6. EXTREMAL CONTROL FOR PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve DAPHIN TANGUY

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a methodology for extremal control of photovoltaic panels has been designed through the use of an embedded polynomial controller using robust approaches and algorithms. Also, a framework for testing solar trackers in a hard ware in the loop (HIL configuration has been established. Efficient gradient based optimization methods were put in place in order to determine the parameters of the employed photovoltaic panel, as well as for computing the Maximum Power Point (MPP. Further a numerical RST controller has been computed in order to allow the panel to follow the movement of the sun to obtain a maximum energetic efficiency. A robustness analysis and correction procedure has been done on the RST polynomial algorithm. The hardware in the loop configuration allows for the development of a test and development platform which can be used for bringing improvements to the current design and also test different control approaches. For this, a microcontroller based solution was chosen. The achieved performances of the closed loop photovoltaic panel (PP system are validated in simulation using the MATLAB / SIMULINK environment and the WinPim & WinReg dedicated software. As it will be seen further in this paper, the extremal control of this design resides in a sequential set of computations used for obtaining the new Maximum Power Point at each change in the system.

  7. Molecular Photovoltaics in Nanoscale Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V. Pakoulev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the intrinsic charge transport in organic photovoltaic (PVC devices and field-effect transistors (SAM-OFETs fabricated by vapor phase molecular self-assembly (VP-SAM method. The dynamics of charge transport are determined and used to clarify a transport mechanism. The 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic diphenylimide (NTCDI SAM devices provide a useful tool to study the fundamentals of polaronic transport at organic surfaces and to discuss the performance of organic photovoltaic devices in nanoscale. Time-resolved photovoltaic studies allow us to separate the charge annihilation kinetics in the conductive NTCDI channel from the overall charge kinetic in a SAM-OFET device. It has been demonstrated that tuning of the type of conductivity in NTCDI SAM-OFET devices is possible by changing Si substrate doping. Our study of the polaron charge transfer in organic materials proposes that a cation-radical exchange (redox mechanism is the major transport mechanism in the studied SAM-PVC devices. The role and contribution of the transport through delocalized states of redox active surface molecular aggregates of NTCDI are exposed and investigated. This example of technological development is used to highlight the significance of future technological development of nanotechnologies and to appreciate a structure-property paradigm in organic nanostructures.

  8. High performance x-ray imaging detectors on foil using solutionprocessed organic photodiodes with extremely low dark leakage current (Presentation Recording)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, A.; Moet, D.; Steen, J.L. van der; Breemen, A.J.J.M. van; Shanmugam, S.; Gilot, J.; Andriessen, H.A.J.M.; Matthias, S.; Ruetten, W.; Douglas, A.; Raaijmakers, R.; Malinowski, P.E.; Myny, K.; Gelinck, G.H.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate high performance X-ray imaging detectors on foil suitable for medical grade X-ray imaging applications. The detectors are based on solution-processed organic photodiodes forming bulk-heterojunctions from photovoltaic donor and acceptor blend. The organic photodiodes are deposited usin

  9. Design and fabrication of a rectenna system to be coupled to photovoltaic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossavat, Mazda

    Inkjet-printed metamaterials and nanotechnology enabled flexible antennas fabricated on glass or polyester substrates help in further absorption of transmitted radiation through photovoltaic solar cells. Using metamaterials processed by inkjet printing and diffusing it, for a rectenna system coupled with photovoltaic solar cells, as rectifying antenna, an antenna in system in tandem is created. Metamaterials are artificial materials engineered to have properties that may not be found in nature (negative refractive index). When used in an antenna, they increase gain. For efficient solar cell use, nanophotonics on the incident surface or metamaterials under it as a rectenna, can enhance voltage gain in cloudy or rainy condition, which in turn increases the overall efficiency and reduces the amount of material required, thereby cutting costs. Photovoltaic is a field of technology and research related to practical application of photovoltaic cells in producing electricity from light. Cells are described as photovoltaic cells when the light source is not necessarily sunlight but can be lamplight, artificial light, or any other source used for detecting light or other electromagnetic radiation at different light intensity and producing voltage. These can be, for example, infrared detectors, or detectors for measurement of light intensity. Conventional solar cell films are typically manufactured using expensive and slow manufacturing methods, which rely on high-temperature fabrication and finicky `vacuum deposition' processes for depositing solar materials onto substrates (III-V elements). The resultant products are simply too thick to allow for transparency. An important consideration in the development of a commercially viable solar powered cell is the glass substrate. The learning process and skills involved in developing the antenna below a solar cell is a great experience in theory and practice. My main effort will be to design and check performance of different

  10. Development of NIR detectors and science driven requirements forSNAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.G.; Bebek, C.; Bernstein, G.; Bonissent, A.; Carithers,B.; Cole, D.; Figer, D.; Gerdes, D.; Gladney, L.; Lorenzon, W.; Kim, A.; Kushner, G.; Kuznetsova, N.; Linder, E.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Mostek,N.; Mufson, S.; Schubnell, M.; Seshadri, S.; Shukla, H.; Smith, R.; Stebbins, A.; Stoughton, C.; Tarle, G.

    2006-05-23

    Precision near infrared (NIR) measurements are essential for the next generation of ground and space based instruments. The SuperNova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will measure thousands of type Ia supernovae upto a redshift of 1.7. The highest redshift supernovae provide the most leverage for determining cosmological parameters, in particular the dark energy equation of state and its possible time evolution. Accurate NIR observations are needed to utilize the full potential of the highest redshift supernovae. Technological improvements in NIR detector fabrication have lead to high quantum efficiency, low noise detectors using a HgCdTe diode with a band-gap that is tuned to cutoff at 1:7 1m. The effects of detector quantum efficiency, read noise, and dark current on lightcurve signal to noise, lightcurve parameter errors, and distance modulus ?ts are simulated in the SNAP sim framework. Results show that improving quantum efficiency leads to the largest gains in photometric accuracy for type Ia supernovae. High quantum efficiency in the NIR reduces statistical errors and helps control systematic uncertainties at the levels necessary to achieve the primary SNAP science goals.

  11. Improved IR detectors to swap heavy systems for SWaP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manissadjian, Alain; Rubaldo, Laurent; Rebeil, Yann; Kerlain, Alexandre; Brellier, Delphine; Mollard, Laurent

    2012-06-01

    Cooled IR technologies are challenged for answering new system needs like the compactness and the reduction of cryopower which is a key feature for the SWaP (Size, Weight and Power) requirements. Over the last years, SOFRADIR has improved its HgCdTe technology, with effect on dark current reduction, opening the way for High Operating Temperature (HOT) systems that can get rid of the 80K temperature constraint, and therefore releases the Stirling cooler engine power consumption. Performances of the 640×512 15μm pitch LW detector working above 100K will be presented. A compact 640×512 15μm pitch MW detector presenting high EO performance above 130K with cut-off wavelength above 5.0μm has been developed. Its different performances with respect to the market requirements for SWaP will be discussed. High performance compact systems will make no compromise on detector resolution. The pixel pitch reduction is the answer for resolution enhancement with size reduction. We will therefore also discuss the ongoing developments and market needs for SWaP systems.

  12. MTF Issues in Small-Pixel-Pitch Planar Quantum IR Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravrand, O.; Baier, N.; Ferron, A.; Rochette, F.; Berthoz, J.; Rubaldo, L.; Cluzel, R.

    2014-08-01

    The current trend in quantum infrared (IR) detector development is the design of very small-pixel-pitch large arrays. From the previous 30 μm pitch, the standard pixel pitch today is 15 μm and is expected to decrease to 12 μm in the next few years. Furthermore, focal-plane arrays (FPAs) with pixel pitch as small as 10 μm have been demonstrated. Such ultrasmall-pixel pitches are very small compared with the typical length ruling the electrical characteristics of the absorbing materials, namely the minority-carrier diffusion length. As an example, for low-doped n-type HgCdTe or InSb material, this diffusion length is on the order of 30 μm to 50 μm, i.e., three to five times the targeted pixel pitches. This has strong consequences for the modulation transfer function (MTF) of planar structures, where the lateral extension of the photodiode is limited by diffusion. For such aspect ratios, the self-confinement of neighboring diodes may not be efficient enough to maintain an optimal MTF. Therefore, this issue has to be addressed to take full advantage of the pixel pitch reduction in terms of image resolution. The aim of this work is to investigate the evolution of the MTF of HgCdTe and InSb FPAs when decreasing the pixel pitch below 15 μm. Both experimental measurements and finite-element simulations are used to discuss this issue. Different scenarios are compared, namely deep mesa etch between pixels, internal drift, surface recombination, and thin absorbing layers.

  13. Reactive ion etching (RIE) induced p- to n-type conversion in extrinsically doped p-type HgCdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musca, C.A.; Smith, E.P.G.; Siliquini, J.F.; Dell, J.M.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. [Univ. of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Piotrowski, J. [Vigo System Ltd., Warsaw (Poland)

    1998-12-31

    Mercury annealing of reactive ion etching (RIE) induced p- to n-type conversion in extrinsically doped p-type epitaxial layers of HgCdTe (x = 0.31) has been used to reconvert n-type conversion sustained during RIE processing. For the RIE processing conditions used (400 mT, CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, 90 W) p- to n-type conversion was observed using laser beam induced current (LBIC) measurements. After a sealed tube mercury anneal at 200 C for 17 hours, LBIC measurements clearly indicated no n-type converted region remained. Subsequent Hall measurements confirmed that the material consisted of a p-type layer, with electrical properties equivalent to that of the initial as-grown wafer (N{sub A}-N{sub D} = 2 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3}, {mu} = 350 cm{sup 2}.V{sup {minus}1}.s{sup {minus}1}).

  14. Photovoltaic Energy Program overview, fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Photovoltaic Energy Program fosters the widespread acceptance of photovoltaic (PV) technology and accelerates commercial use of US PV products. The Program is founded on a collaborative strategy involving industry, the research and development community, potential users, utilities, and state and federal agencies. There are three main Program elements: Systems Engineering and Applications, Technology Development, and Research and Development.

  15. Charging a Capacitor with a Photovoltaic Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco; Navarro, Luis Barba

    2017-01-01

    Charging a capacitor with a photovoltaic module is an experiment which reveals a lot about the modules characteristics. It is customary to represent these characteristics with an equivalent circuit whose elements represent its physical parameters. The behavior of a photovoltaic module is very similar to that of a single cell but the electric…

  16. Cost and Performance Model for Photovoltaic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, C. S.; Smith, J. H.; Davisson, M. C.; Reiter, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    Lifetime cost and performance (LCP) model assists in assessment of design options for photovoltaic systems. LCP is simulation of performance, cost, and revenue streams associated with photovoltaic power systems connected to electric-utility grid. LCP provides user with substantial flexibility in specifying technical and economic environment of application.

  17. Photovoltaics: A Solar Technology for Powering Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Christopher

    1983-01-01

    Photovoltaics, the technology that converts sunlight directly into electricity, may soon be a reliable power source for the world's poor. The one major challenge is cost reduction. Many topics are discussed, including solar powering the Third World, designing the solar building, investing in the sun, and the future of photovoltaics. (NW)

  18. Electrical aspects of photovoltaic-system simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, G. W.; Raghuraman, P.

    1982-06-01

    A TRNSYS simulation was developed to simulate the performance of utility interactive residential photovoltaic energy systems. The PV system is divided into major functional components, which are individually described with computer models. The results of simulation and actual measured data are compared. The electrical influences on the design of such photovoltaic energy systems are given particular attention.

  19. Building integrated photovoltaic; Photovaltaique integre aux batiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-01-01

    Durable, modular and flexible in use, as demonstrated by the different case studies in this publication, photovoltaic can replace diverse building elements, from glass facades to weather proof roofs. This leaflet towards architects describes aesthetic, technical, economic and environmental interest of building integrated photovoltaic. (author)

  20. A challenging future for improved photovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Douglas M.

    The expansion of space requirements creates opportunities and priorities for power production, thus driving the development of innovative technologies. Key requirements for improving photovoltaics are outlined including cell efficiency, specific power, packaging, reliability, and affordability issues. The competition faced by photovoltaic cells is discussed with specific reference to solar dynamics and nuclear radioisotope thermal generator systems.

  1. Low band gap polymers for organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Eva; Krebs, Frederik C

    2007-01-01

    Low band gap polymer materials and their application in organic photovoltaics (OPV) are reviewed. We detail the synthetic approaches to low band gap polymer materials starting from the early methodologies employing quinoid homopolymer structures to the current state of the art that relies...... in photovoltaic applications and give a tabular overview of rarely applied materials....

  2. Solar spectrum conversion for photovoltaics using nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van; Meijerink, A.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility to tune chemical and physical properties in nanosized materials has a strong impact on a variety of technologies, including photovoltaics. One of the prominent research areas of nanomaterials for photovoltaics involves spectral conversion. Conventional single-junction semiconductor s

  3. Recent facts about photovoltaics in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Harry (comp.)

    2015-10-16

    Germany is leaving the age of fossil fuel behind. In building a sustainable energy future, photovoltaics is going to have an important role. The following summary consists of the most recent facts, figures and findings and shall assist in forming an overall assessment of the photovoltaic expansion in Germany.

  4. A Wearable All-Solid Photovoltaic Textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nannan; Chen, Jun; Huang, Yi; Guo, Wanwan; Yang, Jin; Du, Jun; Fan, Xing; Tao, Changyuan

    2016-01-13

    A solution is developed to power portable electronics in a wearable manner by fabricating an all-solid photovoltaic textile. In a similar way to plants absorbing solar energy for photosynthesis, humans can wear the as-fabricated photovoltaic textile to harness solar energy for powering small electronic devices.

  5. Optimized microsystems-enabled photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Nielson, Gregory N.; Young, Ralph W.; Resnick, Paul J.; Okandan, Murat; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2015-09-22

    Technologies pertaining to designing microsystems-enabled photovoltaic (MEPV) cells are described herein. A first restriction for a first parameter of an MEPV cell is received. Subsequently, a selection of a second parameter of the MEPV cell is received. Values for a plurality of parameters of the MEPV cell are computed such that the MEPV cell is optimized with respect to the second parameter, wherein the values for the plurality of parameters are computed based at least in part upon the restriction for the first parameter.

  6. Advanced photovoltaic-trough development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, R.; Yasuda, K.; Merson, B.

    1982-04-01

    The scope of the work on photvoltaic troughs includes analytical studies, hardware development, and component testing. Various aspects of the system have been optimized and improvements have been realized, particularly in the receiver and reflecting surface designs. An empirical system performance model has been developed that closely agrees with measured system performance. This in-depth study of single-axis reflecting linear focus photovoltaic concentrators will be very beneficial in the development of improved models for similar systems as well as other phtovoltaic concentrator designs.

  7. Advances in photovoltaics pt.3

    CERN Document Server

    Willeke, Gerhard P

    2014-01-01

    This volume is the third of a set of seven on the topic of photovoltaics. Solar cell-related technologies covered here include: ribbon silicon; heterojunction crystalline silicon; wafer equivalent crystalline silicon; and other advanced silicon solar cell structures and processes. Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. Originally widely known as the ""Willardson and Beer"" Series, it has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. The series publishes timely, highly relevant v

  8. Photovoltaics - Where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    The directions that will be followed for solar cell development, production and marketing are projected on the basis of experiences gained during the JPL's Flat-Plate Solar Array project. It is thought that a billion dollar market for Si ribbons can be established by 1990. Thin film technology will yield a product at $2 U.S./W at the end of the 1980s. R&D is growing more focused on central station photovoltaic generators, although the residential market may be the more suitable goal. The intermediate markets, e.g., schools, hospitals and shopping centers may be developed before the central stations.

  9. Method of making photovoltaic cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Zhou, Xiaowang; Zubia, David

    2017-06-20

    A photovoltaic solar cell comprises a nano-patterned substrate layer. A plurality of nano-windows are etched into an intermediate substrate layer to form the nano-patterned substrate layer. The nano-patterned substrate layer is positioned between an n-type semiconductor layer composed of an n-type semiconductor material and a p-type semiconductor layer composed of a p-type semiconductor material. Semiconductor material accumulates in the plurality of nano-windows, causing a plurality of heterojunctions to form between the n-type semiconductor layer and the p-type semiconductor layer.

  10. Photovoltaics system design and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Häberlin, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    With the explosive growth in PV (photovoltaic) installations globally, the sector continues to benefit from important improvements in manufacturing technology and the increasing efficiency of solar cells. this timely handbook brings together all the latest design, layout and construction methods for entire PV plants in a single volume. Coverage includes procedures for the design of both stand-alone and grid-connected systems as well as practical guidance on typical operational scenarios and problems encountered for optimum PV plant performance. Key features:

    • Photovoltaic driven vapor compression cycles

      Science.gov (United States)

      Anand, D. K.

      Since the vast majority of heat pumps, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment employs the vapor compression cycle (VCC), the use of renewable energy represents a significant opportunity. As discussed in this report, it is clear that the use of photovoltaics (PV) to drive the VCC has more potential than any other active solar cooling approach. This potential exists due to improvements in not only the PV cells but VCC machinery and control algorithms. It is estimated that the combined improvements will result in reducing the PV cell requirements by as much as one half.

    • Solution for Improve the Efficiency of Solar Photovoltaic Installation

      OpenAIRE

      Petru Chioncel; Cristian Paul Chioncel; Nicoleta Gillich

      2013-01-01

      This paper present a solution for improving efficiency of solar photovoltaic installation, realized with fixed solar photovoltaic modules, placed in solar parks or individual installations. The proposed solution to increase the radiation on the solar photovoltaic panels is to use some thin plates covered with a reflective blanket, mounted in front of the solar photovoltaic modules, with the possibility of their adjustment.

    • High-Efficiency Selective Electron Tunnelling in a Heterostructure Photovoltaic Diode.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Jia, Chuancheng; Ma, Wei; Gu, Chunhui; Chen, Hongliang; Yu, Haomiao; Li, Xinxi; Zhang, Fan; Gu, Lin; Xia, Andong; Hou, Xiaoyuan; Meng, Sheng; Guo, Xuefeng

      2016-06-08

      A heterostructure photovoltaic diode featuring an all-solid-state TiO2/graphene/dye ternary interface with high-efficiency photogenerated charge separation/transport is described here. Light absorption is accomplished by dye molecules deposited on the outside surface of graphene as photoreceptors to produce photoexcited electron-hole pairs. Unlike conventional photovoltaic conversion, in this heterostructure both photoexcited electrons and holes tunnel along the same direction into graphene, but only electrons display efficient ballistic transport toward the TiO2 transport layer, thus leading to effective photon-to-electricity conversion. On the basis of this ipsilateral selective electron tunnelling (ISET) mechanism, a model monolayer photovoltaic device (PVD) possessing a TiO2/graphene/acridine orange ternary interface showed ∼86.8% interfacial separation/collection efficiency, which guaranteed an ultrahigh absorbed photon-to-current efficiency (APCE, ∼80%). Such an ISET-based PVD may become a fundamental device architecture for photovoltaic solar cells, photoelectric detectors, and other novel optoelectronic applications with obvious advantages, such as high efficiency, easy fabrication, scalability, and universal availability of cost-effective materials.

    • Field Guide for Testing Existing Photovoltaic Systems for Ground Faults and Installing Equipment to Mitigate Fire Hazards: November 2012 - October 2013

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Brooks, W.

      2015-02-01

      Ground faults and arc faults are the two most common reasons for fires in photovoltaic (PV) arrays and methods exist that can mitigate the hazards. This report provides field procedures for testing PV arrays for ground faults, and for implementing high resolution ground fault and arc fault detectors in existing and new PV system designs.

    • The MINOS Detectors

      CERN Document Server

      Grashorn, A H E W

      2005-01-01

      The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment's primary goal is the precision measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters in the atmospheric neutrino sector. This long-baseline experiment uses Fermilab's NuMI beam, measured with a Near Detector at Fermilab, and again 735 km later using a Far Detector in the Soudan Mine Underground Lab in northern Minnesota. The detectors are magnetized iron/scintillator calorimeters. The Far Detector has been operational for cosmic ray and atmospheric neutrino data from July of 2003, the Near Detector from September 2004, and the NuMI beam started in early 2005. This poster presents details of the two detectors.

    • GADRAS Detector Response Function.

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

      2014-11-01

      The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

    • The TALE Tower Detector

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bergman, D. R.

      The TA Low Energy Extension will include a Tower FluorescenceDetector. Extensive air showers at the lowest usful energies for fluorescence detectors will in general be close to the detector. This requires viewing all elevation angles to be able to reconstruct showers. The TALE Tower Detector, operating in conjunction with other TALE detectors will view elevation angles up to above 70 degrees, with an azimuthal coverage of about 90 degrees. Results from a prototype mirror operated in conjunction with the HiRes detector will also be presented.

    • Mathematical Model for Photovoltaic Cells

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Wafaa ABD EL-BASIT

      2013-11-01

      Full Text Available The study of photovoltaic systems in an efficient manner requires a precise knowledge of the (I-V and (P-V characteristic curves of photovoltaic modules. So, the aim of the present paper is to estimate such characteristics based on different operating conditions. In this concern, a simple one diode mathematical model was implemented using MATLAB script. The output characteristics of PV cell depend on the environmental conditions. For any solar cell, the model parameters are function of the irradiance and the temperature values of the site where the panel is placed. In this paper, the numerical values of the equivalent circuit parameters are generated by the program. As well, the dependence of the cells electrical parameters are analyzed under the influence of different irradiance and temperature levels. The variation of slopes of the (I–V curves of a cell at short-circuit and open-circuit conditions with intensity of illumination in small span of intensity and different temperature levels have been applied to determine the cell parameters, shunt resistance, series resistance. The results show that the efficiency of solar cells has an inverse relationship with temperature, irradiance levels are affected by the change of the photo-generation current and the series resistance in the single diode model.

    • Real options analysis for photovoltaic project under climate uncertainty

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kim, Kyeongseok; Kim, Sejong; Kim, Hyoungkwan

      2016-08-01

      The decision on photovoltaic project depends on the level of climate environments. Changes in temperature and insolation affect photovoltaic output. It is important for investors to consider future climate conditions for determining investments on photovoltaic projects. We propose a real options-based framework to assess economic feasibility of photovoltaic project under climate change. The framework supports investors to evaluate climate change impact on photovoltaic projects under future climate uncertainty.

    • Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

      1989-07-01

      We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  1. Added values of photovoltaic power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-15

    The structure, ownership and operation of electricity systems around the world are changing in response to industry restructuring, the availability of new technologies and increasing environmental awareness. At the same time, many countries have yet to provide basic energy services for their populations, particularly in areas not served by the electricity grid. Large-scale, central power generation and distribution which characterized the electricity industry for much of the 20{sup th} century is being challenged by new technologies, which are cleaner, faster to deploy and better matched to local requirements. Higher values are being placed on ancillary services, such as power system reliability and voltage stability, so that a simple comparison of energy cost is no longer appropriate as a measure of competitiveness. Solar photovoltaic electricity is unique amongst the new energy sources for the wide range of energy and non-energy benefits which can be provided, while the use of photovoltaic power systems as an integral part of a building provides the greatest opportunity for exploiting non-energy benefits and for adding value to the photovoltaic power system. This report documents the potential added values or non-energy benefits photovoltaic power systems can provide, the current state of market development and the key barriers faced by renewable energy technologies generally and photovoltaic power systems in particular. Means by which non-energy benefits may be used to overcome barriers to the use of photovoltaic power systems are then discussed, with specific attention to the use of building integrated photovoltaics. (author)

  2. Micro Photo Detector Fabricated of Ferroelectric–Metal Heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZOMORRODIAN, A.; WU, N. J.; SONG, Y.; STAHL, S.; IGNATIEV, A.; TREXLER, E. Brady; GARCIA, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    The anomalous photovoltaic effect (APE) in ferroelectric thin films has been utilized for the development of an optical micro-detector active in the visible range (from 350 to 800 nm). La-doped Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PLZT) ferroelectric films epitaxially grown on Pt(001)/Mg(001) substrate were fabricated into micro-detector arrays and characterized as to their optical response. The Au/PLZT/Pt/MgO device was self-polarized in the as-deposited form with the polarization vector perpendicular to film surface. The heterostructure photovoltage response ranged from 100 to 200 mV, and the photocurrent was ~30 nA/cm2 for devices of ~250 μm diameter under illumination of 100 mW/cm2 at wavelengths from 400 to 580 nm. Such micro-detectors can be used for optical sensors in MEMS devices as well as for electrical stimulators of biological cells. PMID:21472042

  3. Thermal kinetic inductance detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecil, Thomas; Gades, Lisa; Miceli, Antonio; Quaranta, Orlando

    2016-12-20

    A microcalorimeter for radiation detection that uses superconducting kinetic inductance resonators as the thermometers. The detector is frequency-multiplexed which enables detector systems with a large number of pixels.

  4. Forward tracking detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Klaus Mönig

    2007-11-01

    Forward tracking is an essential part of a detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The requirements for forward tracking are explained and the proposed solutions in the detector concepts are shown.

  5. Low-amplitude Screening-photovoltaic Spatial Solitons in Biased Photovoltaic Photorefractive Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Chunfeng; LI Yan; YUAN Baohong; SUN Xiudong

    2000-01-01

    The low-amplitude spatial solitons in biased photovoltaic photorefractive crystals are investigated theoretically. The analytical solutions for both the bright and the dark low-amplitude screening-photovoltaic spatial solitons in photorefractive crystals are obtained. The expressions for the width of these solitons are given. The explicit expressions for the spatial deflection and angular deviation of the bright low-amplitude screening-photovoltaic spatial soliton are also presented by taking into account the effect of diffusion.

  6. Advanced silicon materials for photovoltaic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pizzini, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Today, the silicon feedstock for photovoltaic cells comes from processes which were originally developed for the microelectronic industry. It covers almost 90% of the photovoltaic market, with mass production volume at least one order of magnitude larger than those devoted to microelectronics. However, it is hard to imagine that this kind of feedstock (extremely pure but heavily penalized by its high energy cost) could remain the only source of silicon for a photovoltaic market which is in continuous expansion, and which has a cumulative growth rate in excess of 30% in the last few years. Ev

  7. Photovoltaics: Contract lists, fiscal year 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    US DOE's Photovoltaics Program has helped photovoltaic technologies evolve from materials and concepts in laboratories to competitive products rolling off automated assembly lines. The program is working to expand industrial capacity while continuing basic and applied technology R and D. This document is a tabulation of photovoltaics R and D that were begun, continued, or completed during this period. National laboratories or industrial, academic, and nonprofit research institutions perform the R and D activities. The document is organized first by directing organization, then by project title and individual task. Each listing provides the name of contractor, period of performance, funding, objectives, accomplishments, and FY 1993 milestones. An index of contractors is included.

  8. Combined photovoltaic and thermal hybrid collector systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, E.C. Jr.; Russell, M.C.

    1978-01-01

    Solar energy collectors that produce both electric and thermal energy are an attractive alternative to individual thermal and photovoltaic collectors for certain applications and climates. Economic results from a system analysis indicate that hybrid collector systems are attractive in small buildings that have substantial heating loads. Passively cooled photovoltaic panels are best suited for structures located in regions where year-round air conditioning and small, low-grade, thermal energy demands predominate. Hybrid collectors are to be tested according to ASHRAE standards and a full-system experiment incorporating a photovoltaic array installed at the Solar Energy Research Facility of the University of Texas will be conducted by Lincoln Laboratory.

  9. Future contingencies and photovoltaic system worth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G. J.; Thomas, M. G.; Bonk, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The value of dispersed photovoltaic systems connected to the utility grid has been calculated using the General Electric Optimized Generation Planning program. The 1986 to 2001 time period was used for this study. Photovoltaic systems were dynamically integrated, up to 5% total capacity, into 9 NERC based regions under a range of future fuel and economic contingencies. Value was determined by the change in revenue requirements due to the photovoltaic additions. Displacement of high cost fuel was paramount to value, while capacity displacement was highly variable and dependent upon regional fuel mix.

  10. The OSMOND detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, J.E. [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Dalgliesh, R. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Duxbury, D.M., E-mail: dom.duxbury@stfc.ac.uk [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Helsby, W.I. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Holt, S.A.; Kinane, C.J. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Marsh, A.S. [Diamond Light Source LTD, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Diamond House, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Spill, E.J.; Stephenson, R. [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-11

    The development and testing of the Off Specular MicrOstrip Neutron Detector (OSMOND) is described. Based on a microstrip gas chamber the aim of the project was to produce a high counting rate detector capable of replacing the existing rate limited scintillator detectors currently in use on the CRISP reflectometer for off specular reflectometry experiments. The detector system is described together with results of neutron beam tests carried out at the ISIS spallation neutron source.

  11. The CAPRICE RICH detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Codino, A.; Grimani, C. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `Tor Vergata` Rome (Italy); Cafagna, F. [Bari Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Bari (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.; Brancaccio, F.; Bocciolini, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Barbiellini, G.; Boezio, M. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    A compact RICH detector has been developed and used for particle identification in a balloon borne spectrometer to measure the flux of antimatter in the cosmic radiation. This is the first RICH detector ever used in space experiments that is capable of detecting unit charged particles, such as antiprotons. The RICH and all other detectors performed well during the 27 hours long flight.

  12. Bright-Dark Vector Screening-Photovoltaic Spatial Solitons in Biased Photorefractive-Photovoltaic Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢克清; 钱士雄; 窦春升; 吴振森

    2002-01-01

    We show that the vector beam evolution equations in properly oriented biased photorefractive-photovoltaic crystals can exhibit bright-dark vector solitons, which result from both the bulk photovoltaic effect and the spatially non-uniform screening of the external bias field. By adjusting the polarization of the incident beam to obtain the appropriate ratio of two orthogonal components, these vector solitons can be established. When the bulk photovoltaic effect is negligible, these vector solitons are bright-dark vector screening solitons. When the external field is absent, these vector solitons predict bright-dark vector photovoltaic solitons.

  13. A photovoltaic industry overview - The results of a survey on photovoltaic technology industrialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferber, R. R.; Costogue, E. N.; Thornhill, J. W.; Shimada, K.

    1981-01-01

    The National Photovoltaics Program of the United States Department of Energy has the objective of bringing photovoltaic power systems to a point where they can supply a significant portion of the United States energy requirements by the year 2000. This is planned to be accomplished through substantial research and technology development activities aimed at achieving major cost reductions and market penetration. This paper presents information derived from a limited survey performed to obtain photovoltaic industry attitudes concerning industrialization, and to determine current industry plans to meet the DOE program goals. Silicon material production, a key photovoltaic manufacturing industry, is highlighted with regards to implementation of technology improvement and silicon material supply outlook.

  14. Characterization of H2RG IR detectors for the Euclid NISP instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secroun, Aurélia; Serra, Benoit; Clémens, Jean Claude; Legras, Romain; Lagier, Philippe; Niclas, Mathieu; Caillat, Laurence; Gillard, William; Tilquin, André; Ealet, Anne; Barbier, Rémi; Ferriol, Sylvain; Kubik, Bogna; Smadja, Gérard; Prieto, Eric; Maciaszek, Thierry; Norup Sorensen, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Euclid, a major ESA mission for the study of dark energy, will offer a large survey of tens of millions of galaxies thanks to its Near-Infrared Spectro-Photometer. For it to be successful, the 16 Teledyne's 2.3 μm cutoff 2048x2048 pixels IR HgCdTe detectors of the focal plane must show very high performances over more than 95% of pixels, in terms of median dark current, total noise, budget error on non-linearity after correction, residual dark due to latency effects and quantum efficiency. This will be verified through a thorough characterization of their performances, leading to the production of the pixel map calibration database for the Euclid mission. Characterization is challenging in many ways: each detector will have to be fully and accurately characterized in less than three weeks, with rather tight requirements: dark current at the 10-3 e-/s level with 10% accuracy, relative Pixel Response map better than 1%, obtained with an illumination flatness better than 1%, measurements alternating dark and high level illumination taking care of latency impacts. Due to statistics needs, very long runs (24h without interrupts) of scripted measurements would be executed. Systematics of the test bench should be at the end the limiting factor of the parameter measurement accuracy. Test plan, facilities with functionalities developed for those specific purposes and associated performances will be described.

  15. Photovoltaic module parameters acquisition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibira, Gabriel; Koščová, Marcela

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents basic procedures for photovoltaic (PV) module parameters acquisition using MATLAB and Simulink modelling. In first step, MATLAB and Simulink theoretical model are set to calculate I-V and P-V characteristics for PV module based on equivalent electrical circuit. Then, limited I-V data string is obtained from examined PV module using standard measurement equipment at standard irradiation and temperature conditions and stated into MATLAB data matrix as a reference model. Next, the theoretical model is optimized to keep-up with the reference model and to learn its basic parameters relations, over sparse data matrix. Finally, PV module parameters are deliverable for acquisition at different realistic irradiation, temperature conditions as well as series resistance. Besides of output power characteristics and efficiency calculation for PV module or system, proposed model validates computing statistical deviation compared to reference model.

  16. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izu, M. (Energy Conversion Devices, Inc., Troy, MI (United States))

    1992-03-01

    This report examines manufacturing multiple-band-gap, multiple- junction solar cells and photovoltaic modules. Amorphous silicon alloy material is deposited (using microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition) on a stainless-steel substrate using a roll-to-roll process that is continuous and automated. Rapid thermal equilibration of the metal substrate allows rapid throughput of large-area devices in smaller production machines. Potential improvements in the design, deposition, and module fabrication process are described. Problems are also discussed that could impede using these potential improvements. Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) proposes cost and time estimates for investigating and solving these problems. Manufacturing modules for less than $1.00 per peak watt and stable module efficiencies of greater than 10% are near-term goals proposed by ECD. 18 refs.

  17. Pursuing Photovoltaic Cost-Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Koutroulis, Eftichios; Sangwongwanich, Ariya

    2017-01-01

    Countries with considerable PhotoVoltaic (PV) installations are facing a challenge of overloading their power grid during peak-power production hours if the power infrastructure remains the same. To address this, regulations have been imposed on PV systems, where more active power control should...... be flexibly performed. As an advanced control strategy, the Absolute Active Power Control (AAPC) can effectively solve the overloading issues by limiting the maximum possible PV power to a certain level (i.e., the power limitation), and also benefit the inverter reliability due to the reduction in the thermal...... loading of the power devices. However, its feasibility is challenged by the associated energy losses. An increase of the inverter lifetime and a reduction of the energy yield can alter the cost of energy, demanding an optimization of the power limitation. Therefore, aiming at minimizing the Levelized Cost...

  18. A Space Testbed for Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.

    1998-01-01

    The Ohio Aerospace Institute and the NASA Lewis Research Center are designing and building a solar-cell calibration facility, the Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed (PET) to fly on the International Space Station to test advanced solar cell types in the space environment. A wide variety of advanced solar cell types have become available in the last decade. Some of these solar cells offer more than twice the power per unit area of the silicon cells used for the space station power system. They also offer the possibilities of lower cost, lighter weight, and longer lifetime. The purpose of the PET facility is to reduce the cost of validating new technologies and bringing them to spaceflight readiness. The facility will be used for three primary functions: calibration, measurement, and qualification. It is scheduled to be launched in June of 2002.

  19. Organic photovoltaics concepts and realization

    CERN Document Server

    Dyakonov, Vladimir; Parisi, Jürgen; Sariciftci, Niyazi

    2003-01-01

    Achieving efficient solar energy conversion at both large scale and low cost is among the most important technological challenges for the near future. The present volume describes and explains the fundamentals of organic/plastic solar cells in a manner accessible to both researchers and students. It provides a comprehensive analysis of the operational principles underlying several types of solar cells that have absorber layers based on polymer materials and small molecules. It addresses competing approaches, such as polymer solar cells and dye-sensitized cells, while considering the thermodynamic principles within the context of these schemes. Organic Photovoltaics also analyzes in detail the charge-transfer processes in the bulk-heterojunction devices corresponding to the relevant mechanism of carrier generation. Emphasized throughout is the concept of interpenetrating polymer-fullerene networks, due to their high potential for improving power efficiency.

  20. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, M.J. (Utility Power Group, Chatsworth, CA (United States))

    1991-11-01

    This report documents Utility Power Group's (UPG) contract under Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Specifically, the report contains the results of a manufacturing technology cost analysis based on an existing PV module production facility. It also projects the cost analysis of a future production facility based on a larger module area, a larger production rate, and the elimination of several technical obstacles. With a coordinated 18-month engineering effort, the technical obstacles could be overcome. Therefore, if solutions to the financial obstacles concerning production expansion were found, UPG would be able to manufacture PV modules at a cost of under $1.25 per watt by 1994.

  1. Apparatuses to support photovoltaic modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciasulli, John; Jones, Jason

    2017-08-22

    Methods and apparatuses to support photovoltaic ("PV") modules are described. A saddle bracket has a mounting surface to support one or more PV modules over a tube, a gusset coupled to the mounting surface, and a mounting feature coupled to the gusset to couple to the tube. A grounding washer has a first portion to couple to a support; and a second portion coupled to the first portion to provide a ground path to a PV module. A PV system has a saddle bracket; a PV module over the saddle bracket; and a grounding washer coupled to the saddle bracket and the PV module. Saddle brackets can be coupled to a torque tube at predetermined locations. PV modules can be coupled to the saddle brackets.

  2. Photovoltaic module and module arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Lenox, Carl J. S.; Culligan, Matthew; Danning, Matt

    2012-07-17

    A photovoltaic (PV) module including a PV device and a frame. The PV device has a PV laminate defining a perimeter and a major plane. The frame is assembled to and encases the laminate perimeter, and includes leading, trailing, and side frame members, and an arm that forms a support face opposite the laminate. The support face is adapted for placement against a horizontal installation surface, to support and orient the laminate in a non-parallel or tilted arrangement. Upon final assembly, the laminate and the frame combine to define a unitary structure. The frame can orient the laminate at an angle in the range of 3.degree.-7.degree. from horizontal, and can be entirely formed of a polymeric material. Optionally, the arm incorporates integral feature(s) that facilitate interconnection with corresponding features of a second, identically formed PV module.

  3. Central station market development strategies for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Federal market development strategies designed to accelerate the market penetration of central station applications of photovoltaic energy system are analyzed. Since no specific goals were set for the commercialization of central station applications, strategic principles are explored which, when coupled with specific objectives for central stations, can produce a market development implementation plan. The study includes (1) background information on the National Photovoltaic Program, photovoltaic technology, and central stations; (2) a brief market assessment; (3) a discussion of the viewpoints of the electric utility industry with respect to solar energy; (4) a discussion of commercialization issues; and (5) strategy principles. It is recommended that a set of specific goals and objectives be defined for the photovoltaic central station program, and that these goals and objectives evolve into an implementation plan that identifies the appropriate federal role.

  4. Combat climat change with competetive photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeyron, P.J.; Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van; Zietek, G.

    2009-01-01

    Photovoltaics (PV) offer a promising solution for CO2 emission reductions and climate change combat. However, before its wide spread on the market, PV needs to find new approaches to make solar cells competitive with respect to conventional electricity sources.

  5. NASA-OAST photovoltaic energy conversion program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, J. P.; Loria, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA program in photovoltaic energy conversion research is discussed. Solar cells, solar arrays, gallium arsenides, space station and spacecraft power supplies, and state of the art devices are discussed.

  6. FSM Model of a Simple Photovoltaic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Latkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a simulation model of a simple photovoltaic system intended as a tool for testing the use of finite state machines for simulations representing a long-term operation of renewable energy sources. The mathematical model of the photovoltaic system is described first. Then it is used to build a finite state machine model that calculates a power output of the photovoltaic system for changing values of a solar irradiance and a temperature. Data measured on a real photovoltaic installation are used to verify model’s accuracy through its comparison with a previously created and verified Matlab model. The finite state machine model presented in this paper was created using Ptolemy II software.

  7. Basic research challenges in crystalline silicon photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, J.H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1995-08-01

    Silicon is abundant, non-toxic and has an ideal band gap for photovoltaic energy conversion. Experimental world record cells of 24 % conversion efficiency with around 300 {mu}m thickness are only 4 % (absolute) efficiency points below the theoretical Auger recombination-limit of around 28 %. Compared with other photovoltaic materials, crystalline silicon has only very few disadvantages. The handicap of weak light absorbance may be mastered by clever optical designs. Single crystalline cells of only 48 {mu}m thickness showed 17.3 % efficiency even without backside reflectors. A technology of solar cells from polycrystalline Si films on foreign substrates arises at the horizon. However, the disadvantageous, strong activity of grain boundaries in Si could be an insurmountable hurdle for a cost-effective, terrestrial photovoltaics based on polycrystalline Si on foreign substrates. This talk discusses some basic research challenges related to a Si based photovoltaics.

  8. Equalized near maximum likelihood detector

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents new detector that is used to mitigate intersymbol interference introduced by bandlimited channels. This detector is named equalized near maximum likelihood detector which combines nonlinear equalizer and near maximum likelihood detector. Simulation results show that the performance of equalized near maximum likelihood detector is better than the performance of nonlinear equalizer but worse than near maximum likelihood detector.

  9. Development of a solar photovoltaic backpack sprayer

    OpenAIRE

    Robson Shigueaki Sasak; Mauri Martins Teixeira; Delly Oliveira Filho; Carlos JúnioCesconetti; Anderson Candido Silva; Daniel Mariano Leite

    2014-01-01

    Backpack solar photovoltaic sprayers have appeared in the market with the aim of improving spraying quality and reducing physical effort for the operator. Queries related to the duration and how to charge batteries are very common and in general they become a barrier for using this equipment in the field. With the objective to better such sprayers, this work has aimed to develop and evaluate a solar photovoltaic backpack sprayer. An electric backpack sprayer MTS brand, model Spritz 18, ...

  10. New architectures and designs for organic photovoltaics

    OpenAIRE

    Alley, Nigel John

    2012-01-01

    The field of organic photovoltaics has seen many significant findings over the last two decades. It is now a very active area of research generating thousands of publications, resulting in advancements in a multi-disciplinary setting. The research described in the body of this thesis aims to investigate the use of new materials and architectures in the fabrication of organic photovoltaics. An approach to incorporate carbon nanotube-Buckminster fullerene hybrid materials into the blended activ...

  11. University Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajeet Rohatgi; Vijay Yelundur; Abasifreke Ebong; Dong Seop Kim

    2008-08-18

    The overall goal of the program is to advance the current state of crystalline silicon solar cell technology to make photovoltaics more competitive with conventional energy sources. This program emphasizes fundamental and applied research that results in low-cost, high-efficiency cells on commercial silicon substrates with strong involvement of the PV industry, and support a very strong photovoltaics education program in the US based on classroom education and hands-on training in the laboratory.

  12. Evaluation and directions of the photovoltaic technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmerski, L.L.; Emery, K.A.; DeBlasio, R. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States))

    1994-08-01

    The status of, directions and expectations for photovoltaic technologies are discussed and updated, with emphasis on the performances of cells and modules used in various research and commercial solar cell approaches. Current and projected research and development directions are indicated. Special aspects of the current evolution of photovoltaics from the research laboratory to the commercial arena are discussed, including new programs directed to make this energy resource a viable electricity choice for users worldwide. (Author)

  13. Special issue photovoltaic; Numero special photovoltaique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-05-01

    In this letter of the INES (french National Institute of the Solar Energy), a special interest is given to photovoltaic realizations in Europe. Many information are provided on different topics: the China future fifth world producer of cells in 2005, batteries and hydrogen to storage the solar energy and a technical sheet on a photovoltaic autonomous site installation for electric power production. (A.L.B.)

  14. Residential photovoltaic system simulation: Thermal aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, G. W.; Raghuraman, P.

    1982-04-01

    A TRNSYS simulation was developed to simulate the performance of utility interactive residential photovoltaic energy systems. The PV system is divided into its major functional components, which are individually described with computer models. These models are described in detail. The results of simulation and actual measured data obtained a MIT Lincoln Laboratory's Northeast Residential Station are compared. The thermal influences on the design of such photovoltaic energy systems are given particular attention.

  15. Autonomous photovoltaic systems: a sizing criterion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayr, U.; Cirillo, E.; Lazzarin, R. (Bari Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Tecnica e Impianti Termotecnici)

    The proposed method for the sizing of photovoltaic plants is based on the evaluation of the LLP parameter (Load Loss Probability), defined as the average monthly load fraction not supplied by the plant itself. In this study, the LLP parameter is determined by simulating the operation of a photovoltaic system under the typical climatic conditions of Italy. This allows the determination, for each system, of the values of the collecting surfaces and of the storage capacity.

  16. Photovoltaic solar energy; Energia solar fotovoltaica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraidenraich, Naum; Tiba, Chigueru; Vilela, Olga de Castro; Barbosa, Elielza Moura de Souza [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco(UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear (DEN). Grupo de Pesquisas em Fontes Alternativas de Energia

    2003-07-01

    This chapter gives an overview on energy generation from thermal solar energy, analysing the international markets of the photovoltaic modules, the changes which are being produced in the application character, the environmental phenomena resulting from the modules production, briefly describes the physical phenomena explaining the photovoltaic effect, analyses the process of module price formation and performs the energy costs resultant for the user and subsides politics being practiced in various countries.

  17. Topologies for large scale photovoltaic power plants

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrera Tobar, Ana; Bullich Massagué, Eduard; Aragüés Peñalba, Mònica; Gomis Bellmunt, Oriol

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. The concern of increasing renewable energy penetration into the grid together with the reduction of prices of photovoltaic solar panels during the last decade have enabled the development of large scale solar power plants connected to the medium and high voltage grid. Photovoltaic generation components, the internal layout and the ac collection grid are being investigated for ensuring the best design, operation and control of these power plants. This ...

  18. Photovoltaic concentrator assembly with optically active cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesniak, Adam P

    2014-01-21

    A photovoltaic concentrator assembly that includes a housing that defines an internal volume and includes a rim, wherein the rim defines an opening into the internal volume, a photovoltaic cell positioned in the internal volume, and an optical element that includes an optically active body and a flange extending outward from the body, wherein the flange is sealingly engaged with the rim of the housing to enclose the internal volume.

  19. High-energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  20. Photovoltaics program plan, FY 1991--FY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This program plan describes the goals and philosophy of DOE National Photovoltaics Program and its major research and development activities for fiscal years (FY) 1991 through 1995. The plan represents a consensus among researchers and manufacturers, as well as current and potential users of photovoltaics (PV). It defines the activites that we believe are necessary to continue the rapid progress toward acceptance of photovoltaics as a serious candidate for cost-competitive electric power generation by the utility, transportation, buildings, and industrial sectors. A succesful National Photovoltaics Program will help achieve many of our national priorities. The mission of the National Photovoltaics Program is to help US industry to develop photovoltaic technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States, making PV a significant part of our national energy mix. To fully achieve this, we must continue to work toward the long-term goals established in our previous program plan: reducing the price of delivered electricity to 5 to 6 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh), increasing lifetimes to 30 years, and increasing module efficiencies to 15% for flat-plate and 25% for concentrator technologies. If progress continues at its current pace, we expect that the PV industry will have installed at least 1000 megawatts (MW) of capacity in the United States and 500 MW internationally by the year 2000.

  1. NREL Photovoltaic Program FY 1996 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1997-08-01

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontract research and development (R&D) activities under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaics (PV) Program from October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996 (fiscal year [FY] 1996). The NREL PV Program is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE Photovoltaics Program Plan, FY 1991 - FY 1995. The mission of the DOE National Photovoltaics Program is to: "Work in partnership with U.S. industry to develop and deploy photovoltaic technology for generating economically competitive electric power, making photovoltaics an important contributor to the nation's and the world's energy use and environmental improvement. The two primary goals of the national program are to (1) maintain the U.S. PV industry's world leadership in research and technology development and (2) help the U.S. industry remain a major, profitable force in the world market. The NREL PV Program provides leadership and support to the national program toward achieving its mission and goals.

  2. Orthogonal Thin Film Photovoltaics on Vertical Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnood, Arman; Zhou, H; Suzuki, Y; Sliz, R; Fabritius, T; Nathan, Arokia; Amaratunga, G A J

    2015-12-01

    Decoupling paths of carrier collection and illumination within photovoltaic devices is one promising approach for improving their efficiency by simultaneously increasing light absorption and carrier collection efficiency. Orthogonal photovoltaic devices are core-shell type structures consisting of thin film photovoltaic stack on vertical nanopillar scaffolds. These types of devices allow charge collection to take place in the radial direction, perpendicular to the path of light in the vertical direction. This approach addresses the inherently high recombination rate of disordered thin films, by allowing semiconductor films with minimal thicknesses to be used in photovoltaic devices, without performance degradation associated with incomplete light absorption. This work considers effects which influence the performance of orthogonal photovoltaic devices. Illumination non-uniformity as light travels across the depth of the pillars, electric field enhancement due to the nanoscale size and shape of the pillars, and series resistance due to the additional surface structure created through the use of pillars are considered. All of these effects influence the operation of orthogonal solar cells and should be considered in the design of vertically nanostructured orthogonal photovoltaics.

  3. A Failure Mode in Dense Infrared Detector Arrays Resulting in Increased Dark Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkie, Benjamin; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate a failure mode that arises in dense infrared focal plane detector arrays as a consequence of the interactions of neighboring pixels through the minority carrier profiles in the common absorber layer. We consider the situation in which one pixel in a hexagonal array becomes de-biased relative to its neighbors and show that the dark current in the six neighboring pixels increases exponentially as a function of the difference between the nominal and anomalous biases. Moreover, we show that the current increase in the six nearest-neighbor pixels is in total larger than that by which the current in the affected pixel decreases, causing a net increase in the dark current. The physical origins of this effect are explained as being due to increased lateral diffusion currents that arise as a consequence of breaking the symmetry of the minority carrier profiles. We then perform a parametric study to quantify the magnitude of this effect for a number of detector geometric parameters, operating temperatures, and spectral bands. Particularly, numerical simulations are carried out for short-, mid-, and long-wavelength HgCdTe infrared detectors operating between 77 K and 210 K. We show that this effect is most prevalent in architectures for which the lateral diffusion current is the largest component of the total dark current—high operating temperature devices with narrow epitaxial absorber thicknesses and pitches small compared to the diffusion length of minority carriers. These results could prove significant particularly for short- and mid-wave infrared detectors, which are typically designed to fit these conditions.

  4. The DØ detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abachi, S.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alvarez, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, W.; Antipov, Yu.; Aronson, S. H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R. E.; Baden, A.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Bantly, J.; Barasch, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Behnke, T.; Bezzubov, V.; Bhat, P. C.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Bozko, N.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoy, V.; Butler, J. M.; Callot, O.; Chakraborty, D.; Chekulaev, S.; Chen, J.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Daniels, B.; De, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisenko, K.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.; Dharmaratna, W.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Durston-Johnson, S.; Eartly, D.; Eberhard, P. H.; Edmunds, D.; Efimov, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eroshin, O.; Evdokimov, V.; Fahey, S.; Fanourakis, G.; Fatyga, M.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finley, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Franzini, P.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Gao, C. S.; Geld, T. L.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glebov, V.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Good, M. L.; Goozen, F.; Gordon, H.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Guryn, W.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hodel, K.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hubbard, J. R.; Huehn, T.; Huson, R.; Igarashi, S.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jiang, J.; Johns, K.; Johnson, C. R.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kanekal, S.; Kernan, A.; Kerth, L.; Kirunin, A.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klochkov, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V.; Kochetkov, V.; Kohli, J. M.; Kononenko, W.; Kotcher, J.; Kotov, I.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A.; Kozlovsky, E.; Krafczyk, G.; Krempetz, K.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Kroon, P.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lanou, R. E.; Laurens, P.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Li, J.; Li, R.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G. R.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.-C.; Lloyd-Owen, D.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lokos, S.; Lueking, L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Malamud, E.; Mangeot, Ph.; Manning, I.; Mansoulié, B.; Manzella, V.; Mao, H.-S.; Marcin, M.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, H. J.; Martin, M. I.; Martin, P. S.; Marx, M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A.; McCarthy, R.; McKinley, J.; Mendoza, D.; Meng, X.-C.; Merritt, K. W.; Milder, A.; Mincer, A.; Mondal, N. K.; Montag, M.; Mooney, P.; Mudan, M.; Mulholland, G. T.; Murphy, C.; Murphy, C. T.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Neal, H. A.; Nemethy, P.; Nešić, D.; Ng, K. K.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, C. H.; Partridge, R.; Paterno, M.; Peryshkin, A.; Peters, M.; Pi, B.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Yu.; Pizzuto, D.; Pluquet, A.; Podstavkov, V.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Que, Y.-K.; Quintas, P. Z.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rao, M. V. S.; Rasmussen, L.; Read, A. L.; Regan, T.; Repond, S.; Riadovikov, V.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Sculli, J.; Selove, W.; Shea, M.; Shkurenkov, A.; Shupe, M.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, D.; Smith, R. P.; Snow, G. R.; Snyder, S.; Sosebee, M.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stampke, S.; Stephens, R.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stocker, F.; Stoyanova, D.; Stredde, H.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Suhanov, A.; Taketani, A.; Tartaglia, M.; Taylor, J. D.; Teiger, J.; Theodosiou, G.; Thompson, J.; Tisserant, S.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Van Berg, R.; Vaz, M.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Volkov, A.; Vorobiev, A.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, D.-C.; Wang, L.-Z.; Weerts, H.; Wenzel, W. A.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wolf, Z.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xie, P.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.-J.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Zeller, R.; Zhang, S.; Zhou, Y. H.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Y.-S.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zylberstejn, A.; DØ Collaboration

    1994-01-01

    The DØ detector is a large general purpose detector for the study of short-distance phenomena in high energy antiproton-proton collisions, now in operation at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The detector focusses upon the detection of electrons, muons, jets and missing transverse momentum. We describe the design and performance of the major elements of the detector, including the tracking chambers, transition radiation detector, liquid argon calorimetry and muon detection. The associated electronics, triggering systems and data acquisition systems are presented. The global mechanical, high voltage, and experiment monitoring and control systems which support the detector are described. We also discuss the design and implementation of software and software support systems that are specific to DØ.

  5. Single Photon Counting Detectors for Low Light Level Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Kimberly

    2015-10-01

    This dissertation presents the current state-of-the-art of semiconductor-based photon counting detector technologies. HgCdTe linear-mode avalanche photodiodes (LM-APDs), silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs), and electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) are compared via their present and future performance in various astronomy applications. LM-APDs are studied in theory, based on work done at the University of Hawaii. EMCCDs are studied in theory and experimentally, with a device at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab. The emphasis of the research is on GM-APD imaging arrays, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory and tested at the RIT Center for Detectors. The GM-APD research includes a theoretical analysis of SNR and various performance metrics, including dark count rate, afterpulsing, photon detection efficiency, and intrapixel sensitivity. The effects of radiation damage on the GM-APD were also characterized by introducing a cumulative dose of 50 krad(Si) via 60 MeV protons. Extensive development of Monte Carlo simulations and practical observation simulations was completed, including simulated astronomical imaging and adaptive optics wavefront sensing. Based on theoretical models and experimental testing, both the current state-of-the-art performance and projected future performance of each detector are compared for various applications. LM-APD performance is currently not competitive with other photon counting technologies, and are left out of the application-based comparisons. In the current state-of-the-art, EMCCDs in photon counting mode out-perform GM-APDs for long exposure scenarios, though GM-APDs are better for short exposure scenarios (fast readout) due to clock-induced-charge (CIC) in EMCCDs. In the long term, small improvements in GM-APD dark current will make them superior in both long and short exposure scenarios for extremely low flux. The efficiency of GM-APDs will likely always be less than EMCCDs, however, which is particularly disadvantageous for

  6. Noble Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Elena; Bolozdynya, Alexander I; Doke, Tadayoshi

    2006-01-01

    This book discusses the physical properties of noble fluids, operational principles of detectors based on these media, and the best technical solutions to the design of these detectors. Essential attention is given to detector technology: purification methods and monitoring of purity, information readout methods, electronics, detection of hard ultra-violet light emission, selection of materials, cryogenics etc.The book is mostly addressed to physicists and graduate students involved in the preparation of fundamental next generation experiments, nuclear engineers developing instrumentation

  7. ATLAS inner detector performance

    CERN Document Server

    Gadomski, S

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector consists of three subsystems using different tracking detector technologies: silicon pixels, silicon strips and straw tubes. The combination gives ATLAS a robust, hermetic and efficient tracking system, able to reconstruct tracks at the highest foreseen LHC luminosities. The inner detector provides vertex and momentum measurements, electron identification and some $K/\\pi$ separation. Since last year the beam pipe of ATLAS was changed, causing a redesign of the first tracking layer and a deterioration of the impact parameter resolutions.

  8. LHCb Detector Performance

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2075808; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are described, using data taken from 2010 to 2012. It is shown that the design criteria of the experiment have been met. The excellent performance of the detector has allowed the LHCb collaboration to publish a wide range of physics results, demonstrating LHCb's unique role, both as a heavy flavour experiment and as a general purpose detector in the forward region.

  9. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS/LHC. The ALFA system is composed by two stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from each side of the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronic for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  10. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus). The ALFA system is composed by four stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  11. Photovoltaic venture analysis. Final report. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, D.; Posner, D.; Schiffel, D.; Doane, J.; Bishop, C.

    1978-07-01

    This appendix contains a brief summary of a detailed description of alternative future energy scenarios which provide an overall backdrop for the photovoltaic venture analysis. Also included is a summary of a photovoltaic market/demand workshop, a summary of a photovoltaic supply workshop which used cross-impact analysis, and a report on photovoltaic array and system prices in 1982 and 1986. The results of a sectorial demand analysis for photovoltaic power systems used in the residential sector (single family homes), the service, commercial, and institutional sector (schools), and in the central power sector are presented. An analysis of photovoltaics in the electric utility market is given, and a report on the industrialization of photovoltaic systems is included. A DOE information memorandum regarding ''A Strategy for a Multi-Year Procurement Initiative on Photovoltaics (ACTS No. ET-002)'' is also included. (WHK)

  12. Photovoltaic venture analysis. Final report. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, D.; Posner, D.; Schiffel, D.; Doane, J.; Bishop, C.

    1978-07-01

    This appendix contains a brief summary of a detailed description of alternative future energy scenarios which provide an overall backdrop for the photovoltaic venture analysis. Also included is a summary of a photovoltaic market/demand workshop, a summary of a photovoltaic supply workshop which used cross-impact analysis, and a report on photovoltaic array and system prices in 1982 and 1986. The results of a sectorial demand analysis for photovoltaic power systems used in the residential sector (single family homes), the service, commercial, and institutional sector (schools), and in the central power sector are presented. An analysis of photovoltaics in the electric utility market is given, and a report on the industrialization of photovoltaic systems is included. A DOE information memorandum regarding ''A Strategy for a Multi-Year Procurement Initiative on Photovoltaics (ACTS No. ET-002)'' is also included. (WHK)

  13. Photovoltaic Prospection in South Tamaulipas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleme Vila, S.; Rivas, D.; Ortega Izaguirre, R.

    2015-12-01

    Commercial monocrystalline silicon (c-Si), polycrystalline silicon (p-Si) and amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic (PV) panels are tested on real conditions in order to identify which of the aforementioned PV panels present the best performance in the city of Altamira, Tamaulipas (northeastern Mexico) and to evaluate the impact of the city's climatic conditions over the electrical characteristics and power generation of the aforementioned PV panels. In situ direct solar irradiance and current-voltage characteristics (I-V) of each PV panel were taken from Monday to Friday at 11:00, 13:00 and 15:00 hours (GMT-6) with 3 repeats from 08/04/2014 to 07/31/2015. Also, daylong in situ direct solar irradiance, panel temperature, and I-V characteristics were taken from 8:00 to 20:30 hours with a 30-minute interval in synchrony with National Polytechnic Institute-owned CICATA-I meteorological station in order to cross-reference the experimental data with the station's air temperature, specific humidity and global solar irradiance data. Up to June 2015, c-Si panel presented the best performance on real conditions with mean max power loss of 49% compared to the reference max power value followed by the p-Si with 54% mean max power loss and the a-Si panel with a 73% mean max power loss. The number of cloudy days, electrical resistance due to panel materials nature and meteorological impact are further discussed.

  14. Photovoltaic concentrator module improvements study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, S.L.; Kerschen, K.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Hutchison, G. (Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Nowlan, M.J. (Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    This report presents results of a project to design and fabricate an improved photovoltaic concentrator module. Using previous work as a baseline, this study conducted analyses and testing to select major module components and design features. The lens parquet and concentrator solar cell were selected from the highest performing, available components. A single 185X point-focus module was fabricated by the project team and tested at Sandia. Major module characteristics include a 6 by 4 compression-molded acrylic lens parquet (0.737 m{sup 2} area), twenty-four 0.2 ohms-cm, FZ, p-Si solar cells (1.56 cm{sup 2} area) soldered to ceramic substrates and copper heat spreaders, and an aluminized steel housing with corrugated bottom. This project marked the first attempt to use prismatic covers on solar cells in a high-concentration, point-focus application. Cells with 15 percent metallization were obtained, but problems with the fabrication and placement of prismatic covers on these cells lead to the decision not to use covers in the prototype module. Cell assembly fabrication, module fabrication, and module optical design activities are presented here. Test results are also presented for bare cells, cell assemblies, and module. At operating conditions of 981 watts/m{sup 2} DNI and an estimated cell temperature of 65{degrees}C, the module demonstrated an efficiency of 13.9 percent prior to stressed environmental exposure. 12 refs., 56 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Biomonitoring for the photovoltaics industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernholc, N.M.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1995-07-01

    Biomonitoring often is used as a method for estimating the dose to an individual. Therefore, a parameter of measurement, or biomarkers must be identified. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of biomonitoring protocols for metals used in the photovoltaics industry. Special attention is given to areas that often are skimmed over, to gain insights into some of the problems that may arise when these tasks are carried out. Biological monitoring can be used to determine current human exposures to chemicals, as well as to detect past exposures, and the effects that these exposures may have on human health. It is used in conjunction with environmental monitoring to describe more completely worker`s exposures to, and absorption of, chemicals in the workplace. Biological specimens (e.g., blood, hair or urine) are analyzed for chemical agents, metabolites, or for some specific effect on the person (Lowry 1994). Biomonitoring can assess a workers exposure to industrial chemicals by all routes including skin absorption and ingestion. Although the methodology still is in its infancy, in cases where the procedures have been developed, it can be an invaluable component of an ongoing program of industrial hygiene monitoring. Like any technology, there are limitations to its effectiveness because of a lack of knowledge, contamination of specimens, and the introduction of errors.

  16. Photovoltaic measurements and performance branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, S. E.; Dippo, P.

    1990-05-01

    The Photovoltaic (PV) Measurements and Performance Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) provides comprehensive PV materials, device and component characterization, measurement, fabrication, and modeling research and support for the international PV research community in the context of the U.S. Department of Energy's PV m goals. The progress of the Branch is summarized. The seven technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups; Surface and Interface Analysis, Materials Characterization, Device Development, Electro-Optical Characterization, Cell Performance, Advanced Module Testing and Performance, and Surface and Interface Modification and Stability. The main research projects completed in FY 1989 are highlighted including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of the more than 80 branch-originated journal and conference publications which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 130 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

  17. Designer Nanocrystal Materials for Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Cherie

    Advances in synthetic methods allow a wide range of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) to be tailored in size and shape and to be used as building blocks in the design of NC solids. However, the long, insulating ligands commonly employed in the synthesis of colloidal NCs inhibit strong interparticle coupling and charge transport once NCs are assembled into the solids state as NC arrays. We will describe the range of short, compact ligand chemistries we employ to exchange the long, insulating ligands used in synthesis and to increase interparticle coupling. These ligand exchange processes can have a dramatic influence on NC surface chemistry as well as NC organization in the solids, showing examples of short-range order. Synergistically, we use 1) thermal evaporation and diffusion and 2) wet-chemical methods to introduce extrinsic impurities and non-stoichiometry to passivate surface traps and dope NC solids. NC coupling and doping provide control over the density of states and the carrier type, concentration, mobility, and lifetime, which we characterize by a range of electronic and spectroscopic techniques. We will describe the importance of engineering device interfaces to design NC materials for solar photovoltaics.

  18. Printed interconnects for photovoltaic modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, J. D.; Pach, G.; Horowitz, K. A. W.; Stockert, T. R.; Woodhouse, M.; van Hest, M. F. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Film-based photovoltaic modules employ monolithic interconnects to minimize resistance loss and enhance module voltage via series connection. Conventional interconnect construction occurs sequentially, with a scribing step following deposition of the bottom electrode, a second scribe after deposition of absorber and intermediate layers, and a third following deposition of the top electrode. This method produces interconnect widths of about 300 um, and the area comprised by interconnects within a module (generally about 3%) does not contribute to power generation. The present work reports on an increasingly popular strategy capable of reducing the interconnect width to less than 100 um: printing interconnects. Cost modeling projects a savings of about $0.02/watt for CdTe module production through the use of printed interconnects, with savings coming from both reduced capital expense and increased module power output. Printed interconnect demonstrations with copper-indium-gallium-diselenide and cadmium-telluride solar cells show successful voltage addition and miniaturization down to 250 um. Material selection guidelines and considerations for commercialization are discussed.

  19. Interdigitated photovoltaic power conversion device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, James Scott; Wanlass, Mark Woodbury; Gessert, Timothy Arthur

    1999-01-01

    A photovoltaic power conversion device has a top surface adapted to receive impinging radiation. The device includes at least two adjacent, serially connected cells. Each cell includes a semi-insulating substrate and a lateral conductivity layer of a first doped electrical conductivity disposed on the substrate. A base layer is disposed on the lateral conductivity layer and has the same electrical charge conductivity thereof. An emitter layer of a second doped electrical conductivity of opposite electrical charge is disposed on the base layer and forms a p-n junction therebetween. A plurality of spaced channels are formed in the emitter and base layers to expose the lateral conductivity layer at the bottoms thereof. A front contact grid is positioned on the top surface of the emitter layer of each cell. A first current collector is positioned along one outside edge of at least one first cell. A back contact grid is positioned in the channels at the top surface of the device for engagement with the lateral conductivity layer. A second current collector is positioned along at least one outside edge of at least one oppositely disposed second cell. Finally, an interdigitation mechanism is provided for serially connecting the front contact grid of one cell to the back contact grid of an adjacent cell at the top surface of the device.

  20. Energy losses in photovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Wagdy R.; Nour, M. Abdulsadek

    1994-10-01

    The maximum power generated by photovoltaic (PV) arrays is not fully used. During summer, the main cause for the energy loss is the system design that necessitates an oversizing of the PV array to supply the load during the winter season when the solar energy is limited. Other reasons that cause energy loss are: the mismatch between the array and the load or battery, the loss in the batteries, and the loss due to the PV array disconnect. The array disconnect loss takes place during summer season when the battery is fully charged. To avoid the disconnect loss, a novel battery voltage regulator (BVR) is used. This supplies the load directly from the array when the battery is fully charged. Energy losses have been analyzed and divided into fundamental (unavoidable) and non-fundamental losses. Both conventional (using a conventional BVR) and new (using a novel BVR) PV systems are studied. A load that consumes constant power for 24 h a day through the year is considered. The climatic condition of Cairo city is taken as the test case.