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Sample records for hgcdte mct detector

  1. DRIFT EFFECTS IN HGCDTE DETECTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. PAVAN KUMAR

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of temporal drift in spectral responsivity of HgCdTe photodetectors is investigated and found to have an origin different from what has been reported in literature. Traditionally, the literature attributes the cause of drift due to the deposition of thin film of ice water on the active area of the cold detector. The source of drift as proposed in this paper is more critical owing to the difficulties in acquisition of infrared temperature measurements. A model explaining the drift phenomenon in HgCdTe detectors is described by considering the deep trapping of charge carriers and generation of radiation induced deep trap centers which are meta-stable in nature. A theoretical model is fitted to the experimental data. A comparison of the model with the experimental data shows that the radiation induced deep trap centers and charge trapping effects are mainly responsible for the drift phenomenon observed in HgCdTe detectors.

  2. Can graphene make better HgCdTe infrared detectors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Yanli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We develop a simple and low-cost technique based on chemical vapor deposition from which large-size graphene films with 5-10 graphene layers can be produced reliably and the graphene films can be transferred easily onto HgCdTe (MCT thin wafers at room temperature. The proposed technique does not cause any thermal and mechanical damages to the MCT wafers. It is found that the averaged light transmittance of the graphene film on MCT thin wafer is about 80% in the mid-infrared bandwidth at room temperature and 77 K. Moreover, we find that the electrical conductance of the graphene film on the MCT substrate is about 25 times larger than that of the MCT substrate at room temperature and 77 K. These experimental findings suggest that, from a physics point of view, graphene can be utilized as transparent electrodes as a replacement for metal electrodes while producing better and cheaper MCT infrared detectors.

  3. HgCdTe barrier infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytko, M.; Rogalski, A.

    2016-05-01

    In the last decade, new strategies to achieve high-operating temperature (HOT) detectors have been proposed, including barrier structures such as nBn devices, unipolar barrier photodiodes, and multistage (cascade) infrared detectors. The ability to tune the positions of the conduction and valence band edges independently in a broken-gap type-II superlattices is especially helpful in the design of unipolar barriers. This idea has been also implemented in HgCdTe ternary material system. However, the implementation of this detector structure in HgCdTe material system is not straightforward due to the existence of a valence band discontinuity (barrier) at the absorber-barrier interface. In this paper we present status of HgCdTe barrier detectors with emphasis on technological progress in fabrication of MOCVD-grown HgCdTe barrier detectors achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology. Their performance is comparable with state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. From the perspective of device fabrication their important technological advantage results from less stringent surface passivation requirements and tolerance to threading dislocations.

  4. High-performance MCT and QWIP IR detectors at Sofradir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibel, Yann; Rubaldo, Laurent; Manissadjian, Alain; Billon-Lanfrey, David; Rothman, Johan; de Borniol, Eric; Destéfanis, Gérard; Costard, E.

    2012-11-01

    Cooled IR technologies are challenged for answering new system needs like compactness and reduction of cryo-power which is key feature for the SWaP (Size, Weight and Power) requirements. This paper describes the status of MCT IR technology in France at Leti and Sofradir. A focus will be made on hot detector technology for SWAP applications. Sofradir has improved its HgCdTe technology to open the way for High Operating Temperature systems that release the Stirling cooler engine power consumption. Solutions for high performance detectors such as dual bands, much smaller pixel pitch or megapixels will also be discussed. In the meantime, the development of avalanche photodiodes or TV format with digital interface is key to bringing customers cutting-edge functionalities. Since 1997, Sofradir has been working with Thales and Research Technologies (TRT) to develop and produce Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors (QWIP) as a complementary offer with MCT, to provide large LW staring arrays. A dualband MW-LW QWIP detector (25μm pitch 384×288 IDDCA) is currently under development. We will present in this paper its latest results.

  5. MBE HgCdTe heterostructure detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Joel N.; Wu, Owen K.

    1990-01-01

    HgCdTe has been the mainstay for medium (3 to 5 micron) and long (10 to 14 micron) wavelength infrared detectors in recent years. Conventional growth and processing techniques are continuing to improve the material. However, the additional ability to tailor composition and placement of doped layers on the tens of angstroms scale using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) provides the opportunity for new device physics and concepts to be utilized. MBE-based device structures to be discussed here can be grouped into two categories: tailored conventional structures and quantum structures. The tailored conventional structures are improvements on familiar devices, but make use of the ability to create layers of varying composition, and thus band gap, at will. The heterostructure junction can be positioned independently of doping p-n junctions. This allows the small band gap region in which the absorption occurs to be separated from a larger band gap region in which the electric field is large and where unwanted tunneling can occur. Data from hybrid MBE/liquid phase epitaxy (LPE)/bulk structures are given. Quantum structures include the HgTe-CdTe superlattice, in which the band gap and transport can be controlled by alternating thin layers (tens of angstroms thick) of HgTe and CdTe. The superlattice has been shown to exhibit behavior which is non-alloy like, including very high hole mobilities, two-dimensional structure in the absorption coefficient, resonant tunneling, and anisotropic transport.

  6. HgCdTe Detectors for Space and Science Imaging: General Issues and Latest Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravrand, O.; Rothman, J.; Cervera, C.; Baier, N.; Lobre, C.; Zanatta, J. P.; Boulade, O.; Moreau, V.; Fieque, B.

    2016-09-01

    HgCdTe (MCT) is a very versatile material system for infrared (IR) detection, suitable for high performance detection in a wide range of applications and spectral ranges. Indeed, the ability to tailor the cutoff frequency as close as possible to the needs makes it a perfect candidate for high performance detection. Moreover, the high quality material available today, grown either by molecular beam epitaxy or liquid phase epitaxy, allows for very low dark currents at low temperatures, suitable for low flux detection applications such as science imaging. MCT has also demonstrated robustness to the aggressive environment of space and faces, therefore, a large demand for space applications. A satellite may stare at the earth, in which case detection usually involves a lot of photons, called a high flux scenario. Alternatively, a satellite may stare at outer space for science purposes, in which case the detected photon number is very low, leading to low flux scenarios. This latter case induces very strong constraints onto the detector: low dark current, low noise, (very) large focal plane arrays. The classical structure used to fulfill those requirements are usually p/ n MCT photodiodes. This type of structure has been deeply investigated in our laboratory for different spectral bands, in collaboration with the CEA Astrophysics lab. However, another alternative may also be investigated with low excess noise: MCT n/ p avalanche photodiodes (APD). This paper reviews the latest achievements obtained on this matter at DEFIR (LETI and Sofradir common laboratory) from the short wave infrared (SWIR) band detection for classical astronomical needs, to long wave infrared (LWIR) band for exoplanet transit spectroscopy, up to very long wave infrared (VLWIR) bands. The different available diode architectures ( n/ p VHg or p/ n, or even APDs) are reviewed, including different available ROIC architectures for low flux detection.

  7. HgCdTe detector technology at Kunming Institute of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Junhong; Zeng, Gehong

    1996-09-01

    HgCdTe detector and thermal image system laboratories at Kunming Institute of Physics have been carrying the research and development of HgCdTe detectors and thermal imaging systems for a wide range applications for over 20 years. During this period, significant progress has been made in many areas such as HgCdTe material, detector, miniature dewar and cooler to meet the requirements of civil and military operations. This paper describes these activities and present status of HgCdTe technology at Kunming Institute of Physics, and some of the problems we faced and how they were solved.

  8. Progress in MOCVD growth of HgCdTe epilayers for HOT infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebłowski, A.; Gawron, W.; Martyniuk, P.; Stepień, D.; Kolwas, K.; Piotrowski, J.; Madejczyk, P.; Kopytko, M.; Piotrowski, A.; Rogalski, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present progress in MOCVD growth of (100) HgCdTe epilayers achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology and Vigo System S.A. It is shown that MOCVD technology is an excellent tool in fabrication of different HgCdTe detector structures with a wide range of composition, donor/acceptor doping and without post grown annealing. Particular progress has been achieved in the growth of (100) HgCdTe epilayers for long wavelength infrared photoconductors operated in HOT conditions. The (100) HgCdTe photoconductor optimized for 13-μm attain detectivity equal to 6.5x109 Jones and therefore outperform its (111) counterpart. The paper also presents technological progress in fabrication of MOCVD-grown (111) HgCdTe barrier detectors. The barrier device performance is comparable with state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. The detectivity of HgCdTe detectors is close to the value marked HgCdTe photodiodes. Dark current densities are close to the values given by "Rule 07".

  9. Evaluation of HgCdTe on GaAs Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy for High-Operating-Temperature Infrared Detector Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenisch, J.; Schirmacher, W.; Wollrab, R.; Eich, D.; Hanna, S.; Breiter, R.; Lutz, H.; Figgemeier, H.

    2015-09-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of HgCdTe (MCT) on alternative substrates enables production of both cheaper and more versatile (third-generation) infrared (IR) detectors. After rapid progress in the development of MBE-grown MCT on GaAs in recent years, the question of whether the considerable benefits of this material system are also applicable to high-operating-temperature (HOT) applications demands attention. In this paper, we present a mid-wavelength-IR 640 × 512 pixel, 15- μm-pitch focal-plane array with operability of 99.71% at operating temperature of 120 K and low dark current density. In the second part of the paper, MBE growth of short-wavelength IR material with Cd fraction of up to 0.8 is investigated as the basis for future evaluation of the material for low-light-level imaging HOT applications.

  10. HgCdTe Infrared Avalanche Photodiode Single Photon Detector Arrays for the LIST and Other Decadal Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop a HgCdTe avalanche photodiode (APD)  SWIR/IR linear mode photon counting (LMPC) array detector system in support of the LIST lidar. Provide a new type...

  11. Proton irradiation results for long-wave HgCdTe infrared detector arrays for NEOCam

    CERN Document Server

    Dorn, M; McMurtry, C; Hartman, S; Mainzer, A; McKelvey, M; McMurray, R; Chevara, D; Rosser, J

    2016-01-01

    HgCdTe detector arrays with a cutoff wavelength of ~10 ${\\mu}$m intended for the NEOCam space mission were subjected to proton beam irradiation at the University of California Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory. Three arrays were tested - one with 800 $\\mu$m substrate intact, one with 30 $\\mu$m substrate, and one completely substrate-removed. The CdZnTe substrate, on which the HgCdTe detector is grown, has been shown to produce luminescence in shorter wave HgCdTe arrays that causes elevated signal in non-hit pixels when subjected to proton irradiation. This testing was conducted to ascertain whether or not full substrate removal is necessary. At the dark level of the dewar, we detect no luminescence in non-hit pixels during proton testing for both the substrate-removed detector array and the array with 30 ${\\mu}$m substrate. The detector array with full 800 ${\\mu}$m substrate exhibited substantial photocurrent for a flux of 103 protons/cm$^2$-s at a beam energy of 18.1 MeV (~ 750 e$^-$/s) and 34.4 MeV ($\\sim$ 6...

  12. Theoretical Study of Midwave Infrared HgCdTe nBn Detectors Operating at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Nima Dehdashti; Jolley, Gregory; Umana-Membreno, Gilberto A.; Antoszewski, Jarek; Faraone, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    We report a theoretical study of mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) unipolar n-type/barrier/ n-type (nBn) detectors for midwave infrared (MWIR) applications at elevated temperatures. The results obtained indicate that the composition, doping, and thickness of the barrier layer in MWIR HgCdTe nBn detectors can be optimized to yield performance levels comparable with those of ideal HgCdTe p- n photodiodes. It is also shown that introduction of an additional barrier at the back contact layer of the detector structure (nBnn+) leads to substantial suppression of the Auger generation-recombination (GR) mechanism; this results in an order-of-magnitude reduction in the dark current level compared with conventional nBn or p- n junction-based detectors, thus enabling background-limited detector operation above 200 K.

  13. Single-Photon-Sensitive HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to develop single-photon-sensitive short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) and mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) avalanche photodiode (APD) receivers based on linear-mode HgCdTe APDs, for application by NASA in light detection and ranging (lidar) sensors. Linear-mode photon-counting APDs are desired for lidar because they have a shorter pixel dead time than Geiger APDs, and can detect sequential pulse returns from multiple objects that are closely spaced in range. Linear-mode APDs can also measure photon number, which Geiger APDs cannot, adding an extra dimension to lidar scene data for multi-photon returns. High-gain APDs with low multiplication noise are required for efficient linear-mode detection of single photons because of APD gain statistics -- a low-excess-noise APD will generate detectible current pulses from single photon input at a much higher rate of occurrence than will a noisy APD operated at the same average gain. MWIR and LWIR electron-avalanche HgCdTe APDs have been shown to operate in linear mode at high average avalanche gain (M > 1000) without excess multiplication noise (F = 1), and are therefore very good candidates for linear-mode photon counting. However, detectors fashioned from these narrow-bandgap alloys require aggressive cooling to control thermal dark current. Wider-bandgap SWIR HgCdTe APDs were investigated in this program as a strategy to reduce detector cooling requirements.

  14. Thermal cycling reliability of indirect hybrid HgCdTe infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; He, Kai; Wang, Jian-xin; Zhang, Qin-yao

    2013-09-01

    Thermal cycling reliability is one of the most important issues whether the HgCdTe infrared focal plane array detectors can be applied to both military and civil fields. In this paper, a 3D finite element model for indirect hybrid HgCdTe infrared detectors is established. The thermal stress distribution and thermally induced warpage of the detector assembly as a function of the distance between the detector chip and Si-ROIC, the thickness and the materials properties of electrical lead board in cryogenic temperature are analyzed. The results show that all these parameters have influences on the thermal stress distribution and warpage of the detector assembly, especially the coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE) of electrical lead board. The thermal stress and warpage in the assembly can be avoided or minimized by choosing the appropriate electrical lead board. Additionally, the warpage of some indirect hybrid detectors assembly samples is measured in experiment. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation results, which verifies that the results are calculated by finite element method are reasonable.

  15. HgCdTe and silicon detectors and FPAs for remote sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Arvind I.; Stapelbroek, Maryn G.; Robinson, James E.

    2004-02-01

    Photon detectors and focal plane arrays (FPAs) are fabricated from HgCdTe and silicon in many varieties. With appropriate choices for bandgap in HgCdTe, detector architecture, dopants, and operating temperature, HgCdTe and silicon can cover the spectral range from ultraviolet to the very-long-wavelength infrared (VLWIR), exhibit high internal gain to allow photon counting over this broad spectral range, and can be made in large array formats for imaging. DRS makes HgCdTe and silicon detectors and FPAs with unique architectures for a variety of applications. Detector characteristics of High Density Vertically Integrated Photodiode (HDVIP) HdCdTe detectors as well as Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) are presented in this paper. MWIR[λc(78 K) = 5 μm] HDVIP detectors RoA performance was measured to within a factor or two or three of theoretical. In addition, 256 x 256 detector arrays were fabricated. Initial measurements had seven out of ten FPAs having operabilities greater than 99.45% with the best 256 x 256 array having only two inoperable pixels. LWIR [λc(78K)~10 μm] 640 X 480 arrays and a variety of single color linear arrays have also been fabricated. In addition, two-color arrays have been fabricated. DRS has explored HgCdTe avalanche photo diodes (APDs) in the λc = 2.2 μm to 5 μm range. The λc = 5 μm APDs have greater than 200 DC gain values at 8 Volts bias. Large-format to 10242 Arsenic-doped (Si:As, λc ~ 28 μm), Blocked-Impurity-Band (BIB) detectors have been developed for a variety of pixel formats and have been optimized for low, moderate, and high infrared backgrounds. Antimony-doped silicon (Si:Sb) BIB arrays having response to wavelengths > 40 μm have also been demonstrated. Avalanche processes in Si:As at low temperatures (~ 8 K) have led to two unique solid-state photon-counting detectors adapted to infrared and visible wavelengths. The infrared device is the solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM). A related device optimized for the visible spectral

  16. Numerical Device Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization of Extended-SWIR HgCdTe Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, J.; DeWames, R. E.; DeCuir, E. A.; Bellotti, E.; Dhar, N.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.

    2016-09-01

    Imaging in the extended short-wavelength infrared (eSWIR) spectral band (1.7-3.0 μm) for astronomy applications is an area of significant interest. However, these applications require infrared detectors with extremely low dark current (less than 0.01 electrons per pixel per second for certain applications). In these detectors, sources of dark current that may limit the overall system performance are fundamental and/or defect-related mechanisms. Non-optimized growth/device processing may present material point defects within the HgCdTe bandgap leading to Shockley-Read-Hall dominated dark current. While realizing contributions to the dark current from only fundamental mechanisms should be the goal for attaining optimal device performance, it may not be readily feasible with current technology and/or resources. In this regard, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory performed physics-based, two- and three-dimensional numerical modeling of HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detectors designed for operation in the eSWIR spectral band. The underlying impetus for this capability and study originates with a desire to reach fundamental performance limits via intelligent device design.

  17. (55)Fe X-ray Response of HgCdTe NIR Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ori; Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2008-01-01

    Conversion gain is a fundamental parameter in detector characteristics that is used to measure many identifying detector properties, including read noise, dark current, and quantum efficiency (QE). Charge coupling effects, such as inter-pixel capacitance, attenuate photon shot noise and result in an overestimation of of conversion gain when implementing the photon transfer technique. The (55)Fe X-ray technique is a direct and simple method by which to measure the conversion gain by comparing the observed instrumental counts (ADU) to the known charge (e-) liberated by a single X-ray photon. Here we present the calibrated pair production energy for 1.7 micron HgCdTe infrared detectors.

  18. Ultra-Low Dark Current HgCdTe Detector in SWIR for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, C.; Boulade, O.; Gravrand, O.; Lobre, C.; Guellec, F.; Sanson, E.; Ballet, P.; Santailler, J. L.; Moreau, V.; Zanatta, J. P.; Fieque, B.; Castelein, P.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents recent developments at Commissariat à l'Energie atomique, Laboratoire d'Electronique et de Technologie de l'Information infrared laboratory on processing and characterization of p-on-n HgCdTe (MCT) planar infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) in short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectral band for the astrophysics applications. These FPAs have been grown using both liquid phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy on a lattice-matched CdZnTe substrate. This technology exhibits lower dark current and lower series resistance in comparison with n-on-p vacancy-doped architecture and is well adapted for low flux detection or high operating temperature. This architecture has been evaluated for space applications in long-wave infrared and very-long-wave infrared spectral bands with cut-off wavelengths from 10 μm up to 17 μm at 78 K and is now evaluated for the SWIR range. The metallurgical nature of the absorbing layer is also examined and both molecular beam epitaxy and liquid phase epitaxy have been investigated. Electro-optical characterizations have been performed on individual photodiodes from test arrays, whereas dark current investigation has been performed with a fully functional readout integrated circuit dedicated to low flux operations.

  19. Status of HgCdTe Barrier Infrared Detectors Grown by MOCVD in Military University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytko, M.; Jóźwikowski, K.; Martyniuk, P.; Gawron, W.; Madejczyk, P.; Kowalewski, A.; Markowska, O.; Rogalski, A.; Rutkowski, J.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present the status of HgCdTe barrier detectors with an emphasis on technological progress in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology. It is shown that MOCVD technology is an excellent tool for HgCdTe barrier architecture growth with a wide range of composition, donor /acceptor doping, and without post-grown annealing. The device concept of a specific barrier bandgap architecture integrated with Auger-suppression is as a good solution for high-operating temperature infrared detectors. Analyzed devices show a high performance comparable with the state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. Dark current densities are close to the values given by "Rule 07" and detectivities of non-immersed detectors are close to the value marked for HgCdTe photodiodes. Experimental data of long-wavelength infrared detector structures were confirmed by numerical simulations obtained by a commercially available software APSYS platform. A detailed analysis applied to explain dark current plots was made, taking into account Shockley-Read-Hall, Auger, and tunneling currents.

  20. HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode Detectors for Airborne and Spaceborne Lidar at Infrared Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James B.; Beck, Jeffrey D.; Mitra, Pradip; Reiff, Kirk; Yang, Guangning

    2017-01-01

    We report results from characterizing the HgCdTe avalanche photodiode (APD) sensorchip assemblies (SCA) developed for lidar at infrared wavelength using the high density vertically integrated photodiodes (HDVIP) technique. These devices demonstrated high quantum efficiency, typically greater than 90 between 0.8 micrometers and the cut-off wavelength, greater than 600 APD gain, near unity excess noise factor, 6-10 MHz electrical bandwidth and less than 0.5 fW/Hz(exp.1/2) noise equivalent power (NEP). The detectors provide linear analog output with a dynamic range of 2-3 orders of magnitude at a fixed APD gain without averaging, and over 5 orders of magnitude by adjusting the APD and preamplifier gain settings. They have been successfully used in airborne CO2 and CH4 integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar as a precursor for space lidar applications.

  1. Development of megapixel HgCdTe detector arrays with 15 micron cutoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, William J.; McMurtry, Craig W.; Dorn, Meghan; Pipher, Judith; Cabrera, Mario S.

    2016-10-01

    I. HistoryHgCdTe is a versatile II-VI semiconductor with a direct-bandgap tunable via the Hg:Cd ratio. Hg:Cd ratio = 53:47 (2.5 micron cutoff) was used on the NICMOS instrument on HST and the 2MASS. Increasing Hg:Cd ratio to 70:30 leads to a 5.4 micron cutoff, utilized in NEOWISE and many JWST instruments. Bailey, Wu et al. (1998) motivated extending this technology to 10 microns and beyond. Bacon, McMurtry et al. (2003, 2004) indicated significant progress toward this longwave (LW) goal.Warm-Spitzer has pioneered passive cooling to below 30 K in space, enabling the JWST mission.II. CurrentNASA's proposed NEOcam mission selected HgCdTe with a 10.6 micron cutoff because it promises natural Zodiacal background limited sensitivity with modest cooling (40 K). Teledyne Imaging Systems (TIS) is producing megapixel arrays with excellent performance (McMurtry, Lee, Dorn et al. (2013)) for this mission.III. FutureModest cooling requirements (circa 30 K) coupled with megapixel arrays and LW sensitivity in the thermal IR make HgCdTe attractive for many infrared instruments. For instance, the spectral signature of a terrestrial planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a nearby star will be the deep and wide absorption by CO_2 centered at 15 microns (Seager and Deming, 2010). LW instruments can enhance Solar System missions, such as exploration of the Enceladus geysers (Spencer, Buratti et al. 2006). Passive cooling will be adequate for these missions. Modern ground-based observatories will benefit from infrared capability out to the N band (7.5-13.6 microns). The required detector temperatures (30-40 K) are easily achievable using commercially available mechanical cryo-coolers (refrigerators).IV. Progress to dateTIS is developing megapixel HgCdTe arrays sensitive out to 15 microns under the direction of the University of Rochester. As a first step, we have produced arrays with a 13 micron cutoff. The initial measurements indicate very promising performance. We will present the

  2. Proton irradiation results for long-wave HgCdTe infrared detector arrays for Near-Earth Object Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Meghan L.; Pipher, Judith L.; McMurtry, Craig; Hartman, Spencer; Mainzer, Amy; McKelvey, Mark; McMurray, Robert; Chevara, David; Rosser, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    HgCdTe detector arrays with a cutoff wavelength of ˜10 μm intended for the Near-Earth Object Camera (NEOCam) space mission were subjected to proton-beam irradiation at the University of California Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory. Three arrays were tested-one with 800-μm substrate intact, one with 30-μm substrate, and one completely substrate-removed. The CdZnTe substrate, on which the HgCdTe detector is grown, has been shown to produce luminescence in shorter wave HgCdTe arrays that causes an elevated signal in nonhit pixels when subjected to proton irradiation. This testing was conducted to ascertain whether or not full substrate removal is necessary. At the dark level of the dewar, we detect no luminescence in nonhit pixels during proton testing for both the substrate-removed detector array and the array with 30-μm substrate. The detector array with full 800-μm substrate exhibited substantial photocurrent for a flux of 103 protons/cm2 s at a beam energy of 18.1 MeV (˜750 e-/s) and 34.4 MeV (˜65 e-/s). For the integrated space-like ambient proton flux level measured by the Spitzer Space Telescope, the luminescence would be well below the NEOCam dark current requirement of <200 e-/s, but the pattern of luminescence could be problematic, possibly complicating calibration.

  3. Performances of a HGCDTE APD Based Detector with Electric Cooling for 2-μm DIAL/IPDA Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, A.; Rothman, J.; Gibert, F.; Lasfargues, G.; Zanatta, J.-P.; Edouart, D.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we report on design and testing of an HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detector assembly for lidar applications in the Short Wavelength Infrared Region (SWIR : 1,5 - 2 μm). This detector consists in a set of diodes set in parallel -making a 200 μm large sensitive area- and connected to a custom high gain TransImpedance Amplifier (TIA). A commercial four stages Peltier cooler is used to reach an operating temperature of 185K. Crucial performances for lidar use are investigated : linearity, dynamic range, spatial homogeneity, noise and resistance to intense illumination.

  4. State of the art of AIM LWIR and VLWIR MCT 2D focal plane detector arrays for higher operating temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figgemeier, H.; Hanna, S.; Eich, D.; Mahlein, K.-M.; Fick, W.; Schirmacher, W.; Thöt, R.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper AIM presents its latest results on both n-on-p and p-on-n low dark current planar MCT photodiode technology LWIR and VLWIR two-dimensional focal plane detector arrays with a cut-off wavelength >11μm at 80K and a 640x512 pixel format at a 20μm pitch. Thermal dark currents significantly reduced as compared to `Tennant's Rule 07' at a yet good detection efficiency >60% as well as results from NETD and photo response performance characterization are presented. The demonstrated detector performance paces the way for a new generation of higher operating temperature LWIR MCT FPAs with a <30mK NETD up to a 110K detector operating temperature and with good operability.

  5. Passivation Effect of Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 Film on HgCdTe Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Sun, Chang-Hong; Chen, Yi-Yu; Zhang, Tian-Ning; Chen, Xin; Lin, Chun; Ding, Ring-Jun; He, Li

    2016-09-01

    The passivation effect of atomic layer deposition of (ALD) Al2O3 film on a HgCdTe infrared detector was investigated in this work. The passivation effect of Al2O3 film was evaluated by measuring the minority carrier lifetime, capacitance versus voltage ( C- V) characteristics of metal-insulator-semiconductor devices, and resistance versus voltage ( R- V) characteristics of variable-area photodiodes. The minority carrier lifetime, C- V characteristics, and R- V characteristics of HgCdTe devices passivated by ALD Al2O3 film was comparable to those of HgCdTe devices passivated by e-beam evaporation of ZnS/CdTe film. However, the baking stability of devices passivated by Al2O3 film is inferior to that of devices passivated by ZnS/CdTe film. In future work, by optimizing the ALD Al2O3 film growing process and annealing conditions, it may be feasible to achieve both excellent electrical properties and good baking stability.

  6. Progress of MCT Detector Technology at AIM Towards Smaller Pitch and Lower Dark Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, D.; Schirmacher, W.; Hanna, S.; Mahlein, K. M.; Fries, P.; Figgemeier, H.

    2017-09-01

    We present our latest results on cooled p-on- n planar mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) photodiode technology. Along with a reduction in dark current for raising the operating temperature ( T op), AIM INFRAROT-MODULE GmbH (AIM) has devoted its development efforts to shrinking the pixel size. Both are essential requirements to meet the market demands for reduced size, weight and power and high-operating temperature applications. Detectors based on the p-on- n technology developed at AIM now span the spectrum from the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) to the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) with cut-off wavelengths from 5 μm to about 13.5 μm at 80 K. The development of the p-on- n technology for VLWIR as well as for MWIR is mainly implemented in a planar photodetector design with a 20- μm pixel pitch. For the VLWIR, dark currents significantly reduced as compared to `Tennant's Rule 07' are demonstrated for operating temperatures between 30 K and 100 K. This allows for the same dark current performance at a 20 K higher operating temperature than with previous AIM technology. For MWIR detectors with a 20- μm pitch, noise equivalent temperature differences of less than 30 mK are obtained up to 170 K. This technology has been transferred to our small pixel pitch high resolution (XGA) MWIR detector with 1024 × 768 pixels at a 10- μm pitch. Excellent performance at an operating temperature of 160 K is demonstrated.

  7. Monolithic dual-band HgCdTe infrared detector structure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Parish, G

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available A monolithic HgCdTe photoconductive device structure is presented that is suitable for dual-band optically registered infrared photodetection in the two atmospheric transmission windows of 3-5 mu m and 8-12 mu m, which correspond to the mid...

  8. Recent progress for HGCDTE quantum detection in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravrand, O.; Destefanis, G.

    2013-07-01

    Due to its tuneable narrow band gap, HgCdTe (MCT) is a material of choice for high complexity IR focal plane arrays (FPAs). Being a strategic defence technology, MCT detector developments is totally mastered at every stage of fabrication at LETI and Sofradir, from the lattice matched CZT substrate growth, the active layer MCT growth, to PV technology, silicon ROIC design and flip chip hybridization. Within the last few years, MCT devices have considerably evolved in terms of device complexity, performances, and field of action. n/p standard technology has been developed in all spectral ranges, from VLWIR (20 μm) down SWIR (1.7 μm). MCT photodiode sensibility goes even lower, down to visible and even UV with a constant quantum efficiency. Moreover, MCT material provides us with high and noiseless avalanche gains inside the photodiode itself, which we are now fully able to use for the optimization of FPA performances. Besides, p/n diode structure is a new emerging process which improves detector performances by several orders of magnitude in terms of dark current, by comparison with the n/p historical structure. This technology has been successfully demonstrated from VLWIR (15 μm cut off) down to the SWIR range (2 μm cut off) where ultra low dark currents are recorded at low temperatures (0.4 e/s). In the same time, first dual band FPAs are delivered, which are expected to be the 3rd generation of IR detectors. At last, considerable efforts are made in order to increase the operational temperature, going from 100 K to 150 K for MWIR FPAs at constant performances, optimizing all technological steps, especially growth issues. Going at even higher operating temperatures (HOTs) is also under active study.

  9. Development of non-hybridised HgCdTe detectors for the next generation of astronomical instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Gavin B.; Dennis, Peter N.; Lees, David J.; Hall, David J.; Cairns, John W.; Gordon, Neil T.; Hails, Janet E.; Giess, Jean

    2008-07-01

    The superb image quality that is predicted, and even demanded, for the next generation of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT) presents a potential crisis in terms of the sheer number of detectors that may be required. Developments in infrared technology have progressed dramatically in recent years, but a substantial reduction in the cost per pixel of these IR arrays will be necessary to permit full exploitation of the capabilities of these telescopes. Here we present an outline and progress report of an initiative to develop a new generation of astronomical grade Cadmium Mercury Telluride (HgCdTe) array detectors using a novel technique which enables direct growth of the sensor diodes onto the Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC). This technique removes the need to hybridise the detector material to a separate Silicon readout circuit and provides a route to very large monolithic arrays. We present preliminary growth and design simulation results for devices based on this technique, and discuss the prospects for deployment of this technology in the era of extremely large telescopes.

  10. Development activities on NIR large format MCT detectors for astrophysics and space science at CEA and SOFRADIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulade, Olivier; Moreau, Vincent; Mulet, Patrick; Gravrand, Olivier; Cervera, Cyril; Zanatta, Jean-Paul; Castelein, Pierre; Guellec, Fabrice; Fièque, Bruno; Chorier, Philippe; Roumegoux, Julien

    2016-07-01

    CEA and SOFRADIR have been manufacturing and characterizing near infrared detectors in the frame of ESA's near infrared large format sensor array roadmap to develop a 2Kx2K large format low flux low noise device for space applications such as astrophysics. These detectors use HgCdTe as the absorbing material and p/n diode technology. The technological developments (photovoltaic technology, readout circuit, ...) are shared between CEA/LETI and SOFRADIR, both in Grenoble, while most of the performances are evaluated at CEA/IRFU in Saclay where a dedicated test facility has been developed, in particular to measure very low dark currents. The paper will present the current status of these developments at the end of ESA's NIRLFSA phase 2. The performances of the latest batch of devices meet or are very close to all the requirements (quantum efficiency, dark current, cross talk, readout noise, ...) even though a glow induced by the ROIC prevents the accurate measurement of the dark current. The current devices are fairly small, 640x512 15μm pixels, and the next phase of activity will target the development of a full size 2Kx2K detector. From the design and development, to the manufacturing and finally the testing, that type of detector requests a high level of mastering. An appropriate manufacturing and process chain compatible with such a size is needed at industrial level and results obtained with CEA technology coupled with Sofradir industrial experience and work on large dimension detector allow French actors to be confident to address this type of future missions.

  11. Low dark current MCT-based focal plane detector arrays for the LWIR and VLWIR developed at AIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassmann, Kai Uwe; Eich, Detlef; Fick, Wolfgang; Figgemeier, Heinrich; Hanna, Stefan; Thöt, Richard

    2015-10-01

    For nearly 40 years AIM develops, manufactures and delivers photo-voltaic and photo-conductive infrared sensors and associated cryogenic coolers which are mainly used for military applications like pilotage, weapon sights, UAVs or vehicle platforms. In 2005 AIM started to provide the competences also for space applications like IR detector units for the SLSTR instrument on board of the Sentinel 3 satellite, the hyperspectral SWIR Imager for EnMAP or pushbroom detectors for high resolution Earth observation satellites. Meanwhile AIM delivered more than 25 Flight Models for several customers. The first European pulse-tube cooler ever operating on-board of a satellite is made by AIM. AIM homes the required infrared core capabilities such as design and manufacturing of focal plane assemblies, detector housing technologies, development and manufacturing of cryocoolers and also data processing for thermal IR cameras under one roof which enables high flexibility to react to customer needs and assures economical solutions. Cryogenically cooled Hg(1-x)CdxTe (MCT) quantum detectors are unequalled for applications requiring high imaging as well as high radiometric performance in the infrared spectral range. Compared with other technologies, they provide several advantages, such as the highest quantum efficiency, lower power dissipation compared to photoconductive devices and fast response times, hence outperforming micro-bolometer arrays. However, achieving an excellent MCT detector performance at long (LWIR) and very long (VLWIR) infrared wavelengths is challenging due to the exponential increase in the thermally generated photodiode dark current with increasing cut-off wavelength and / or operating temperature. Dark current is a critical design driver, especially for LWIR / VLWIR multi-spectral imagers with moderate signal levels or hyper-spectral Fourier spectrometers operating deep into the VLWIR spectral region. Consequently, low dark current (LDC) technologies are the

  12. Visible to SWIR response of HgCdTe HDVIP detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, A. I.; Robinson, E. W.; Stapelbroek, M. G.; Wong, W.; Skokan, M.; Shih, H.-D.

    2009-05-01

    Detectors that have broadband response from the visible (~ 400 nm) to near infrared (~ 2.5 μm) have remote sensing hyperspectral applications on a single chip. 2.2 and 2.5 μm cutoff detectors permit operation in the 200 K range. The DRS HDVIP detector technology is a front side illuminated detector technology. Consequently, there is no substrate to absorb the visible photons as in backside-illuminated detectors and these 2.2 and 2.5-μm-cutoff detectors should be well suited to respond to visible light. However, HDVIP detectors are passivated using CdTe that absorbs the visible light photons. CdTe with a direct bandgap ~ 1.6 eV strongly absorbs photons of wavelength shorter than about 800 nm. Detectors in 320 x 6 arrays with varying thickness of CdTe passivation layers were fabricated to investigate the visible response of the 2.5-μm-cutoff detectors. The SWIR HDVIP detectors have well known high quantum efficiency (QE) in the near infrared region. Focus here was in acquiring array level data in the visible region of the spectrum. 320 x 6 FPA QE and NEI data was acquired using a 642 nm narrow band filter with 50 % points at 612 nm and 698 nm. The array QE average is ~ 70 % for the array with CdTe passivation thickness = 44.5 nm. The NEI is ~ 5 x 1010 ph/cm2/s at a flux Φ = 5.36 x 1013 ph/cm2/s. QE for an array with CdTe passivation thickness = 44.5 nm is ~ 10 % higher than an array with CdTe passivation thickness = 79.3 nm. In addition, a model that takes into account the complex optical properties of every layer in the HDVIP photodiode architecture was developed to predict the QE of the detectors in the near infrared and visible wavelength regions as a function of CdTe thickness. Measured QE as a function of wavelength is not a good match to the model QE probably due to limitations in the measured QE and knowledge of optical constants that are input into the model.

  13. Research of thermal stress between long linear MCT arrays and lead board using FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Wu, Yonghong; Liu, Dafu

    2010-10-01

    For the long wavelength infrared detection, HgCdTe (MCT) photoconductive devices are selected as the core of next-generation meteorological because of its mature fabrication technique and stable performance. During the assembly process, an innovative multilayer ceramic board providing mechanical support is designed as the electrical interconnection between MCT chips and external circuits for cryogenic application. Furthermore, due to its brittleness, long linear MCT device is normally glued to sapphire substrates on the multilayer ceramic board with cryogenic glue. Thus, it can be seen clearly that the assembly structure is a multilayer configuration which comprises various kinds of materials, including ceramic broad, sapphire, MCT and glues. As a result, the difference in Thermal Expansion Coefficient (TEC) between the layers could create the potential to introduce thermal stress at working environmental temperature (approximately 70K), which could result in device performance degradation, even die crack. This article analyzes the thermal stress between long linear MCT devices and a multilayer ceramic board by using Finite Element Method (FEM). According to analysis results, two factors are revealed as the most significant causes for introducing thermal stress: one is the sapphire substrate thickness; the other is the parameters of various materials, for instance Yong's modulus and TEC. Since the structure of MCT detector is determined by system requirements and is under the limitation of manufacture technology, this article reveals two effective approaches to reduce the unavoidable thermal stress: first, choosing the appropriate thickness of ceramic board which is made by Al2O3; second, adding another metal cushion Invar. With the above considerations, the distribution of thermal stress is simulated using FEM under different parameter conditions. Based on the results of simulations, an optimal design of package structure which could improve the reliability of

  14. The Numerical-Experimental Enhanced Analysis of HOT MCT Barrier Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwikowski, K.; Piotrowski, J.; Jóźwikowska, A.; Kopytko, M.; Martyniuk, P.; Gawron, W.; Madejczyk, P.; Kowalewski, A.; Markowska, O.; Martyniuk, A.; Rogalski, A.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of numerical simulations and experimental data of band gap-engineered higher operating temperature mercury cadmium telluride barrier photodiodes working in a middle wavelength infrared radiation and a long wavelength infrared radiation range of an infrared radiation spectrum. Detailed numerical calculations of the detector performance were made with our own computer software taking into account Shockley Hall Read, Auger, band-to-band and trap-assisted tunneling and dislocation-related currents. We have also simulated a fluctuation phenomena by using our Langevin-like numerical method to analyze shot, diffusion, generation-recombination and 1/f noise.

  15. A 4K x 4K HgCdTe astronomical camera enabled by the JWST NIR detector development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Donald N. B.; Luppino, Gerard; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Garnett, James D.; Loose, Markus; Zandian, Majid

    2004-09-01

    The ambitious science goals of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) have driven spectacular advances in λco ~ 5um detector technology over the past five years. This paper reviews both the UH/RSC team"s Phase A development and evaluation of 2Kx2K arrays exceeding the detector requirements for JWST"s near infrared instruments and also the hardware integration of these into a 4Kx4K (16Mpxl) close packed mosaic focal plane array housed in an Ultra Low Background test facility. Both individual first generation 2Kx2K SCA"s and 4Kx4K mosaic focal planes have been extensively characterized in the laboratory and, since September 2003, a NIR camera utilizing the 4Kx4K mosaic focal plane has been in use for nearly 100 nights at the UH 2.2 m telescope on Mauna Kea. Typical test results for the first generation 2Kx2K arrays and their integration into 4Kx4K mosaic focal planes are reported. Demonstration of the design concepts and both array and mosaic focal plane performance in actual hardware, as described here, has provided the foundation for design iterations leading to later generations of 2Kx2K arrays and 4Kx4K mosaic focal planes. Four major technology developments leading to first generation hardware demonstrations of both 2Kx2K SCA"s and a 4Kx4K mosaic FPA are reviewed. These are: 1) improvement in test equipment and procedures to characterize the detectors against JWST requirements and goals, primarily at 37K but with the capability to test from 30K to 100K; 2) optimization of λc ~ 5 um MBE HgCdTe material on a CZT substrate for low dark current (goal of 0.003 e-/sec at 37K) with high quantum efficiency, low cross-talk and greatly reduced image persistence; 3) development of the 2Kx2K HAWAII-2RG multiplexer designed specifically to take full advantage of these detector characteristics for a wide range of astronomical applications (and fully compatible with an ASIC controller developed under the JWST Instrument Technology Development initiative) and 4) development of

  16. HgCdTe technology in Germany: the past, the present, and the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanski, W.; Ziegler, J.

    2009-05-01

    The first HgCdTe (MCT) activities at AEG-Telefunken in Germany were started in 1976. As part of the closing of AEG, the Heilbronn based IR-technology division was established as a spin-off company in 1995, under the brand name of AIM Infrarot-Module GmbH. A rapidly growing team of scientists focused on the detector-dewar-cooler technology and the development of linear photoconductive MCT arrays by applying the solid-state-recrystallization (SSR) technique for MCT growth, depositing and thinning MCT on sapphire substrates and oxide passivation. In 1979, after successful development of an own MCT-technology base, AEG-Telefunken entered into a license agreement with Texas Instruments for US Common Module (CM) technology in order to speed up the entry into full scale production with a transfer of MCT-material, dewar and cooler processes. CMs are still manufactured in small numbers. At the same time, a proprietary pc-MCT technology, independent of the CM production line, was developed and continuously matured and is today successfully applied in various custom designs like detectors for smart ammunition, for commercial and space applications. In 1982 started the development of 2nd Gen. photovoltaic MCT detectors, based on liquid-phase-epitaxy (LPE) in tilting and dipping technique and on planar array technology with Hg-Diffusion and ion implantation for pn-junction formation and CdTe/ZnS passivation. Linear MCT arrays in the 8-10,5 μm wavelength range with state of the art electro-optical performance have rapidly been demonstrated. Within the frame of the European anti-tank program TRIGAT, a two-way know-how-transfer between AEGTelefunken and SOFRADIR was established for linear LW MCT array processing, flip-chip-technology and dewar technology. Today, AIM's 2nd Gen. portfolio is based on MCT-LPE in dipping technique on CdZnTe substrates, characterized by a very low defect and dislocation density for 0,9 μm to 15μm wavelength application. Array processing is performed

  17. Determination of charge-carrier diffusion length in the photosensing layer of HgCdTe n-on-p photovoltaic infrared focal plane array detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnyakov, A. V.; Stuchinsky, V. A., E-mail: stuchin@isp.nsc.ru; Brunev, D. V.; Zverev, A. V.; Dvoretsky, S. A. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Russian Academy of Science, Siberian Division, 13, Acad. Lavrent' ev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-03

    In the present paper, we propose a method for evaluating the bulk diffusion length of minority charge carriers in the photosensing layer of photovoltaic focal plane array (FPA) photodetectors. The method is based on scanning a strip-shaped illumination spot with one of the detector diodes at a low level of photocurrents j{sub ph} being registered; such scanning provides data for subsequent analysis of measured spot-scan profiles within a simple diffusion model. The asymptotic behavior of the effective (at j{sub ph} ≠ 0) charge-carrier diffusion length l{sub d} {sub eff} as a function of j{sub ph} for j{sub ph} → 0 inferred from our experimental data proved to be consistent with the behavior of l{sub d} {sub eff} vs j{sub ph} as predicted by the model, while the obtained values of the bulk diffusion length of minority carriers (electrons) in the p-HgCdTe film of investigated HgCdTe n-on-p FPA photodetectors were found to be in a good agreement with the previously reported carrier diffusion-length values for HgCdTe.

  18. Characterization of HgCdTe and HgCdSe Materials for Third Generation Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    etched HgCdTe photodiode .................................. 13 1.6 (a) Hybrid IR FPA, (b) cross section of structure, (c) indium bumps on Si...to areas of approximately 30 cm2. At this size, the wafers used for growth are unable to accommodate more than two 1024 × 1024 FPAs.3 For more...clear advantages over the other substrates because of its low cost, large wafer size, and a thermal-expansion coefficient that perfectly matches

  19. Dry etched SiO2 Mask for HgCdTe Etching Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Ye, Z. H.; Sun, C. H.; Deng, L. G.; Zhang, S.; Xing, W.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; He, L.

    2016-09-01

    A highly anisotropic etching process with low etch-induced damage is indispensable for advanced HgCdTe (MCT) infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) detectors. The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) enhanced reactive ion etching technique has been widely adopted in manufacturing HgCdTe IRFPA devices. An accurately patterned mask with sharp edges is decisive to accomplish pattern duplication. It has been reported by our group that the SiO2 mask functions well in etching HgCdTe with high selectivity. However, the wet process in defining the SiO2 mask is limited by ambiguous edges and nonuniform patterns. In this report, we patterned SiO2 with a mature ICP etching technique, prior to which a thin ZnS film was deposited by thermal evaporation. The SiO2 film etching can be terminated at the auto-stopping point of the ZnS layer thanks to the high selectivity of SiO2/ZnS in SF6 based etchant. Consequently, MCT etching was directly performed without any other treatment. This mask showed acceptable profile due to the maturity of the SiO2 etching process. The well-defined SiO2 pattern and the etched smooth surfaces were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. This new mask process could transfer the patterns exactly with very small etch-bias. A cavity with aspect-ratio (AR) of 1.2 and root mean square roughness of 1.77 nm was achieved first, slightly higher AR of 1.67 was also get with better mask profile. This masking process ensures good uniformity and surely benefits the delineation of shrinking pixels with its high resolution.

  20. The Effect of Metal-Semiconductor Contact on the Transient Photovoltaic Characteristic of HgCdTe PV Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyang Cui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The transient photovoltaic (PV characteristic of HgCdTe PV array is studied using an ultrafast laser. The photoresponse shows an apparent negative valley first, then it evolves into a positive peak. By employing a combined theoretical model of pn junction and Schottky potential, this photo-response polarity changing curves can be interpreted well. An obvious decreasing of ratio of negative valley to positive peak can be realized by limiting the illumination area of the array electrode. This shows that the photoelectric effect of Schottky barrier at metal-semiconductor (M/S interface is suppressed, which will verify the correctness of the model. The characteristic parameters of transient photo-response induced from p-n junction and Schottky potential are extracted by fitting the response curve utilizing this model. It shows that the negative PV response induced by the Schottky barrier decreases the positive photovoltage generated by the pn junction.

  1. The effect of metal-semiconductor contact on the transient photovoltaic characteristic of HgCdTe PV detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haoyang; Xu, Yongpeng; Yang, Junjie; Tang, Naiyun; Tang, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    The transient photovoltaic (PV) characteristic of HgCdTe PV array is studied using an ultrafast laser. The photoresponse shows an apparent negative valley first, then it evolves into a positive peak. By employing a combined theoretical model of pn junction and Schottky potential, this photo-response polarity changing curves can be interpreted well. An obvious decreasing of ratio of negative valley to positive peak can be realized by limiting the illumination area of the array electrode. This shows that the photoelectric effect of Schottky barrier at metal-semiconductor (M/S) interface is suppressed, which will verify the correctness of the model. The characteristic parameters of transient photo-response induced from p-n junction and Schottky potential are extracted by fitting the response curve utilizing this model. It shows that the negative PV response induced by the Schottky barrier decreases the positive photovoltage generated by the pn junction.

  2. Experimental Determination of Effective Minority Carrier Lifetime in HgCdTe Photovoltaic Detectors Using Optical and Electrical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyang Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experiment measurements of minority carrier lifetime using three different methods including modified open-circuit voltage decay (PIOCVD method, small parallel resistance (SPR method, and pulse recovery technique (PRT on pn junction photodiode of the HgCdTe photodetector array. The measurements are done at the temperature of operation near 77 K. A saturation constant background light and a small resistance paralleled with the photodiode are used to minimize the influence of the effect of junction capacitance and resistance on the minority carrier lifetime extraction in the PIOCVD and SPR measurements, respectively. The minority carrier lifetime obtained using the two methods is distributed from 18 to 407 ns and from 0.7 to 110 ns for the different Cd compositions. The minority carrier lifetime extracted from the traditional PRT measurement is found in the range of 4 to 20 ns for x=0.231–0.4186. From the results, it can be concluded that the minority carrier lifetime becomes longer with the increase of Cd composition and the pixels dimensional area.

  3. Analysis of the auger recombination rate in P+N-n-N-N HgCdTe detectors for HOT applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, J.; Tennant, W. E.; Bellotti, E.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.

    2016-05-01

    Infrared (IR) photon detectors must be cryogenically cooled to provide the highest possible performance, usually to temperatures at or below ~ 150K. Such low operating temperatures (Top) impose very stringent requirements on cryogenic coolers. As such, there is a constant push in the industry to engineer new detector architectures that operate at higher temperatures, so called higher operating temperature (HOT) detectors. The ultimate goal for HOT detectors is room temperature operation. While this is not currently possibly for photon detectors, significant increases in Top are nonetheless beneficial in terms of reduced size, weight, power and cost (SWAP-C). The most common HgCdTe IR detector architecture is the P+n heterostructure photodiode (where a capital letter indicates a wide band gap relative to the active layer or "AL"). A variant of this architecture, the P+N-n-N-N heterostructure photodiode, should have a near identical photo-response to the P+n heterostructure, but with significantly lower dark diffusion current. The P+N-n-N-N heterostructure utilizes a very low doped AL, surrounded on both sides by wide-gap layers. The low doping in the AL, allows the AL to be fully depleted, which drastically reduces the Auger recombination rate in that layer. Minimizing the Auger recombination rate reduces the intrinsic dark diffusion current, thereby increasing Top. Note when we use the term "recombination rate" for photodiodes, we are actually referring to the net generation and recombination of minority carriers (and corresponding dark currents) by the Auger process. For these benefits to be realized, these devices must be intrinsically limited and well passivated. The focus of this proceeding is on studying the fundamental physics of the intrinsic dark currents in ideal P+N-n-N-N heterostructures, namely Auger recombination. Due to the complexity of these devices, specifically the presence of multiple heterojunctions, numerical device modeling techniques must be

  4. Visible response of λc=2.5´m HgCdTe HDVIP detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelbroek, Maryn G.; Guptill, Matthew; D'Souza, Arvind I.; Bryan, Elizabeth R.; Beck, J. D.; Kinch, M. A.; Robinson, James E.

    2004-08-01

    Cu-doped HDVIP detectors with different cut-off wavelengths are routinely manufactured. The DRS HDVIP detector technology is a front-side-illuminated detector technology. There is no substrate to absorb the visible photons as in backside-illuminated detectors and these detectors should be well suited to respond to visible light. However, HDVIP detectors are passivated using CdTe that absorbs the visible light photons. CdTe strongly absorbs photons of wavelength shorter than about 800 nm. Detectors with varying thickness of CdTe passivation layers were fabricated to investigate the visible response of the 2.5-μm-cutoff detectors. A model was developed to predict the quantum efficiency of the detectors in the near infrared and visible wavelength regions as a function of CdTe thickness. Individual photodiodes (λc = 2.5 μm) in test bars were examined. Measurements of the quantum efficiency as a function of wavelength region will be presented and compared to the model predictions.

  5. Active Pixel HgCdTe Detectors With Built-in Dark Current Reduction for Near-Room Temperature Operation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High sensitivity HgCdTe infrared arrays operating at 77K can now be tailored in a wide range of wavelengths from 1 to 14 microns. However, due to the cooling...

  6. Active Pixel HgCdTe Detectors With Built-in Dark Current Reduction for Near-Room Temperature Operation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High sensitivity HgCdTe infrared arrays operating at 77K can now be tailored in a wide range of wavelengths from 1 to14 um. However, the cooling requirements make...

  7. Measurements of Low Frequency Noise of Infrared Photo-Detectors with Transimpedance Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciura Łukasz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the method and results of low-frequency noise measurements of modern mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors. A type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice based detector with nBn barrier architecture is compared with a high operating temperature (HOT heterojunction HgCdTe detector. All experiments were made in the range 1 Hz - 10 kHz at various temperatures by using a transimpedance detection system, which is examined in detail. The power spectral density of the nBn’s dark current noise includes Lorentzians with different time constants while the HgCdTe photodiode has more uniform 1/f - shaped spectra. For small bias, the low-frequency noise power spectra of both devices were found to scale linearly with bias voltage squared and were connected with the fluctuations of the leakage resistance. Leakage resistance noise defines the lower noise limit of a photodetector. Other dark current components give raise to the increase of low-frequency noise above this limit. For the same voltage biasing devices, the absolute noise power densities at 1 Hz in nBn are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than in a MCT HgCdTe detector. In spite of this, low-frequency performance of the HgCdTe detector at ~ 230K is still better than that of InAs/GaSb superlattice nBn detector.

  8. Measuring extended red sensitivity in a 1.7μm-cutoff HgCdTe detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Monson, Andrew J.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad; Halverson, Samuel P.; Ramsey, Larry

    2016-08-01

    Infrared detectors with cutoff wavelengths of 1.7 μm have much lower sensitivity to thermal background contamination than those with longer cutoff wavelengths. This low sensitivity offers the attractive possibility of reducing the need for fully cryogenic systems for YJH-band work, offering the potential for "warm-pupil" instrumentation that nonetheless reduces detected thermal background to the level of dark current. However, residual sensitivity beyond the cutoff wavelength is not well characterized, and may preclude the implementation of such warm-pupil instruments. We describe an experiment to evaluate the long-wavelength sensitivity tail of a 1.7 µm-cutoff HAWAII-2RG array using a thermal blocking filter. Our results suggest the possibility of measurable red sensitivity beyond 2 μm. Ongoing improvements will confirm and refine this measurement. The thermal blocking filter offers the prospect of warm-pupil NIR instrument operation, which is particularly valuable for cost-effective and efficient testing systems: it has facilitated NIR detector characterization and will enable crucial laboratory tests of laser frequency comb calibration systems and other NIR calibration sources.

  9. Operation and performance of new NIR detectors from SELEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, D.; Bezawada, N.; Hipwood, L. G.; Shorrocks, N.; Milne, H.

    2012-07-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has funded SELEX Galileo, Southampton, UK to develop large format near infrared (NIR) detectors for its future space and ground based programmes. The UKATC has worked in collaboration with SELEX Galileo to test and characterise the new detectors produced during phase-1 of the development. In order to demonstrate the detector material performance, the HgCdTe (MCT) detector diodes (grown on GaAs substrate through MOVPE process in small 320×256, 24μm pixel format) are hybridised to the existing SELEX Galileo SWALLOW CMOS readout chip. The substrate removed and MCT thinned detector arrays were then tested and evaluated at the UKATC following screening tests at SELEX. This paper briefly describes the test setup, the operational aspects of the readout multiplexer and presents the performance parameters of the detector arrays including: conversion gain, detector dark current, read noise, linearity, quantum efficiency and persistence for various detector temperatures between 80K and 140K.

  10. Changes in the electro-physical properties of MCT epitaxial films affected by a plasma volume discharge induced by an avalanche beam in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryev, D. V.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Lozovoy, K. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the influence of the plasma volume discharge of nanosecond duration formed in a non-uniform electric field at atmospheric pressure on samples of epitaxial films HgCdTe (MCT) films are discussed. The experimental data show that the action of pulses of nanosecond volume discharge in air at atmospheric pressure leads to changes in the electrophysical properties of MCT epitaxial films due to formation of a near-surface high- conductivity layer of the n-type conduction. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies for the controlled change of the properties of MCT.

  11. Recent progress in MBE grown HgCdTe materials and devices at UWA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, R.; Lei, W.; Antoszewski, J.; Madni, I.; Umana-Menbreno, G.; Faraone, L.

    2016-05-01

    HgCdTe has dominated the high performance end of the IR detector market for decades. At present, the fabrication costs of HgCdTe based advanced infrared devices is relatively high, due to the low yield associated with lattice matched CdZnTe substrates and a complicated cooling system. One approach to ease this problem is to use a cost effective alternative substrate, such as Si or GaAs. Recently, GaSb has emerged as a new alternative with better lattice matching. In addition, implementation of MBE-grown unipolar n-type/barrier/n-type detector structures in the HgCdTe material system has been recently proposed and studied intensively to enhance the detector operating temperature. The unipolar nBn photodetector structure can be used to substantially reduce dark current and noise without impeding photocurrent flow. In this paper, recent progress in MBE growth of HgCdTe infrared material at the University of Western Australia (UWA) is reported, including MBE growth of HgCdTe on GaSb alternative substrates and growth of HgCdTe nBn structures.

  12. 中波HgCdTe光导探测器组件的故障树和失效研究%Study on HgCdTe Detector Assemble Fault Tree and Failure Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王韡; 许金通; 周青; 张立瑶; 李向阳

    2012-01-01

    Discussed are the reliability problems of HgCdTe(MCT) infrared photoconductive detectors working at near room temperature,including package failure,chip bonding failure and performance attenuation.Based on collecting the failure data of the detectors,fault tree analysis(FTA) was built by analyzing the failure mechanism of physics and chemistry,manufacturing process and parameters of the detectors.Minimal cut sets of FTA were obtained from qualitative analysis and the failure probability of top event was calculated.The failure modes in detectors,structures and process were analyzed.%讨论了近室温工作的HgCdTe中波光导探测器组件的可靠性问题,包括组件封装失效、引线键合失效和探测器的性能衰减等。通过收集探测器组件的失效信息,对其失效物理化学机制、制造工艺和探测器参数进行了分析,建立了组件的故障树(FTA),为探测器组件的失效分析提供了理论依据。由FTA定性分析得出探测器组件FTA的最小割集;计算了顶事件的失效几率。通过计算底事件概率重要度,得出组件封装失效是探测器组件失效的主要故障途径;同时实验发现,失效组件探测器的少子寿命值有较大的衰减,这可能起源于失效探测器的表面钝化层退化。

  13. Engineering steps for optimizing high temperature LWIR HgCdTe photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madejczyk, Pawel; Gawron, Waldemar; Martyniuk, Piotr; Keblowski, Artur; Pusz, Wioletta; Pawluczyk, Jaroslaw; Kopytko, Malgorzata; Rutkowski, Jaroslaw; Rogalski, Antoni; Piotrowski, Jozef

    2017-03-01

    The authors report on energy gap engineering solutions to improve the high-temperature performance of long-wave infrared (LWIR) HgCdTe photodiodes. Metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) technology with a wide range of composition and donor/acceptor doping and without ex-situ post grown annealing seems to be an excellent tool for HgCdTe heterostructure epitaxial growth. The heterojunction HgCdTe photovoltaic device based on epitaxial graded gap structures integrated with Auger-suppression is a magnificent solution for high operating temperature (HOT) infrared detectors. The thickness, composition and doping of HgCdTe heterostructure were optimized with respect to photoelectrical parameters like dark current, the responsivity and the response time. In this paper we focus on graded interface abruptness in the progressive optimization.

  14. MBE Growth and Transfer of HgCdTe Epitaxial Films from InSb Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lyon, T. J.; Rajavel, R. D.; Nosho, B. Z.; Terterian, S.; Beliciu, M. L.; Patterson, P. R.; Chang, D. T.; Boag-O'Brien, M. F.; Holden, B. T.; Jacobs, R. N.; Benson, J. D.

    2010-07-01

    An investigation of the heteroepitaxial growth of HgCdTe films onto InSb(211)B substrates is reported. High-quality HgCdTe(211)B single-crystal films have been successfully deposited onto InSb(211)B substrates and have been characterized with x-ray diffraction rocking curve analysis, etch pit density analysis, and surface void defect mapping. X-ray rocking curve (422) reflection full-width at half-maximum of 60 arcsec has been obtained for 7- μm-thick x = 0.22 HgCdTe epitaxial films, and etch pit densities of 3 × 106 cm-2 to 3 × 107 cm-2 have been observed. A significant reduction in HgCdTe void defect densities to 100 cm-2 to 200 cm-2 has been observed on InSb, including a complete absence of large “void cluster” defects that are often observed for growth on CdZnTe. Wafer bow induced by the growth of HgCdTe on InSb is less than 1 μm for 2-inch-diameter substrates. Significant diffusion of In into HgCdTe is observed for HgCdTe/InSb wafers that are subjected to Hg anneals at 250°C to 300°C. A preliminary investigation of the transfer of HgCdTe films from InSb onto Si substrates has also been undertaken, using an adhesive wafer bonding approach evaluated with scanning acoustic microscopy. The infrared transmission characteristics of the bonding adhesive have been investigated with respect to postgrowth annealing procedures to establish the compatibility of the bonding approach with HgCdTe device processing and detector operation.

  15. State-of-the-art MCT photodiodes for cutting-edge sensor applications by AIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figgemeier, H.; Hanna, S.; Eich, D.; Fries, P.; Mahlein, K.-M.; Wenisch, J.; Schirmacher, W.; Beetz, J.; Breiter, R.

    2017-02-01

    For about 30 years, AIM has been ranking among the leading global suppliers for high-performance MCT infrared detectors, with its portfolio spanning the photosensitivity cut-off range from the SWIR to the VLWIR and from 1st generation to 3rd generation FPA devices. To meet the market demands for SWaP-C- and IR-detectors with additional functionalities such as multicolor detection, AIM employs both LPE and MBE technology. From AIḾs line of highest-performance single color detectors fabricated by LPE, we will present our latest excellent results of 5.3 μm cut-off MWIR MCT detectors with 1024x768 pixels and a 10 μm pixel pitch. AIM's powerful low dark current LWIR and VLWIR p-on-n device technology on LPE-grown MCT has now been extended to the MWIR spectral range. A comparison of results from n-on-p and p-on-n MWIR MCT planar photodiode arrays is presented. Operating temperatures of 160 K and higher, in conjunction with low defect density and excellent thermal sensitivity (NETD) are attained. The results achieved for LPE MWIR are compared to MBE MWIR data. For both the cost-efficient production of MWIR single color MCT detectors, as well as 3rd generation multicolor MCT detectors, AIM makes use of MBE growth of MCT on large-area GaAs substrates. The now-available AIM MWIR single color MBE MCT detectors grown on GaAs are qualified, delivered, and have reached a maturity fully meeting customers' requirements. Representing AIM's multicolor detector development, latest test results on a 640x512 pixels with a 20 μm pitch design will be presented. The MWIR/MWIR diodes demonstrate high QE, very low color cross talk, and excellent NETD in conjunction with low defect densities.

  16. Small pixel pitch MCT IR-modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, H.; Breiter, R.; Eich, D.; Figgemeier, H.; Fries, P.; Rutzinger, S.; Wendler, J.

    2016-05-01

    It is only some years ago, since VGA format detectors in 15μm pitch, manufactured with AIM's MCT n-on-p LPE standard technology, have been introduced to replace TV/4 format detector arrays as a system upgrade. In recent years a rapid increase in the demand for higher resolution, while preserving high thermal resolution, compactness and low power budget is observed. To satisfy these needs AIM has realized first prototypes of MWIR XGA format (1024x768) detector arrays in 10μm pitch. They fit in the same compact dewar as 640x512, 15μm pitch detector arrays. Therefore, they are best suited for system upgrade purposes to benefit from higher spatial resolution and keep cost on system level low. By combining pitch size reduction with recent development progress in the fields of miniature cryocoolers, short dewars and high operating temperatures the way ahead to ultra-compact high performance MWIR-modules is prepared. For cost reduction MBE grown MCT on commercially available GaAs substrates is introduced at AIM. Recently, 640x512, 15μm pitch FPAs, grown with MBE have successfully passed long-term high temperature storage tests as a crucial step towards serial production readiness level for use in future products. Pitch size reduction is not limited to arrays sensitive in the MWIR, but is of great interest for high performance LWIR or 3rd Gen solutions. Some applications such as rotorcraft pilotage require superior spatial resolution in a compact design to master severe weather conditions or degraded visual environment such as brown-out. For these applications AIM is developing both LWIR as well as dual band detector arrays in HD-format (1280x720) with 12μm pitch. This paper will present latest results in the development of detector arrays with small pitch sizes of 10μm and 12μm at AIM, together with their usage to realize compact cooled IR-modules.

  17. Expression and role of GLUT-1, MCT-1, and MCT-4 in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogi, Ai; Koga, Kaori; Aoki, Mikiko; Hamasaki, Makoto; Uesugi, Noriko; Iwasaki, Akinori; Shirakusa, Takayuki; Tamura, Kazuo; Nabeshima, Kazuki

    2013-01-01

    Malignant cells supply their energy needs through increased glucose consumption, producing large quantities of lactic acid via glycolysis. Glucose transporters (GLUTs) and monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are therefore commonly up-regulated in human malignancies to mediate glucose influx and lactic acid efflux, respectively. However, their roles in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) have not been fully elucidated. Here, we evaluated GLUT-1, MCT-1, and MCT-4 expression in human MPM and reactive mesothelial hyperplasia (RMH) and elucidated their biological role in vitro. GLUT-1, MCT-1, and MCT-4 expression was determined in human MPM (n = 35) and RMH (n = 20) specimens by immunohistochemistry and in frozen tissue, and MPM cell lines, by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. GLUT-1, MCT-1, and MCT-4 functions in MPM were evaluated by transfection with small interfering RNA. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed higher levels of GLUT-1, MCT-1, and MCT-4 in MPM than in RMH. Additionally, GLUT-1, MCT-1, and MCT-4 mRNA levels were higher in MPM than in non-neoplastic mesothelial cell lines. The siRNA-mediated knockdown of GLUT-1 or MCT-1 significantly suppressed tumor cell proliferation, and MCT-1 silencing inhibited invasion and induced apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that combined application of GLUT-1, MCT-1, and MCT-4 immunohistochemistry might be useful in differentiating MPM from RMH and suggest that MCT-1plays an important biological role.

  18. Nondestructive Characterization of Residual Threading Dislocation Density in HgCdTe Layers Grown on CdZnTe by Liquid-Phase Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourreau, Y.; Pantzas, K.; Patriarche, G.; Destefanis, V.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT)-based infrared (IR) focal-plane arrays is closely related to the crystalline perfection of the HgCdTe thin film. In this work, Te-rich, (111)B-oriented HgCdTe epilayers grown by liquid-phase epitaxy on CdZnTe substrates have been studied. Surface atomic steps are shown on as-grown MCT materials using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and white-light interferometry (WLI), suggesting step-flow growth. Locally, quasiperfect surface spirals are also evidenced. A demonstration is given that these spirals are related to the emergence of almost pure screw threading dislocations. A nondestructive and quantitative technique to measure the threading dislocation density is proposed. The technique consists of counting the surface spirals on the as-grown MCT surface from images obtained by either AFM or WLI measurements. The benefits and drawbacks of both destructive—chemical etching of HgCdTe dislocations—and nondestructive surface imaging techniques are compared. The nature of defects is also discussed. Finally, state-of-the-art threading dislocation densities in the low 104 cm-2 range are evidenced by both etch pit density (EPD) and surface imaging measurements.

  19. Real-Time Monitoring and Control of HgCdTe MBE Using an Integrated Multi-Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    layer composition, and effusion cell flux during MBE growth of HgCdTe epilayers for advanced IR detectors. Substrate temperature is measured and...HgCdTe MBE growth of high performance IR detector structures over a wide range of compositions, layer thickness and substrate temperature.

  20. Growth, properties and applications of HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, J. L.

    1983-12-01

    This paper provides primarily a review of the methods used to grow HgCdTe with a summary of some of its basic properties and applications. Methods of crystal growth fall generally into three classes: growth from the melt, from solution and from the vapor phase. All three methods have been and are being used to grow HgCdTe. The high vapor pressure of HgCdTe at the melting point, combined with a large segregation coefficient, have effectively limited the use of Czochralski or zone melting techniques, but two melt growth techniques have survived: (1) a variation of Bridgman growth called quench-anneal wherein a dendritic crystal is formed by quenching the melt and is homogenized by solid state recrystallization below the melting point, (2) a variation of freezing from a large volume called slush-growth wherein a melt is held in a temperature gradient for several weeks while a crystal grows. Growth from solution has taken the form of liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) on CdTe with the LPE systems including growth from Hg-rich, HgTe-rich and Te-rich solutions and using tipping, vertical dipping, vertical sliding and horizontal sliding. Vapor phase growth is very promising but is not yet in production. Techniques include growth by isothermal close spaced epitaxy in which HgTe is transported isothermally by chemical potential onto CdTe, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) in which elements are evaporated in a high vacuum, and metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in which some of the metal atoms are carried to the substrate bound to organic radicals before being freed by pyrolysis. In all these methods, control of Hg pressure is a major concern. The fundamental properties discussed briefly are those of prime interest to detector manufacturers: energy gap ( Eg), intrinsic carrier concentration ( ni), and electrical activity of dopants. A reasonable fit to the Eg data from ˜ 20 papers is given by Eg = -0.302+1.93x+5.35×10 -4T(1-2x)-0.810x 2+0.832x 3. This gap, combined with k

  1. Tissue-specific alterations in thyroid hormone homeostasis in combined Mct10 and Mct8 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Müller (Julia); S. Mayerl (Steffen); T.J. Visser (Theo); V.M. Darras (Veerle); A. Boelen (Anita); L. Frappart (Lucien); L. Mariotta (Luca); F. Verrey; H. Heuer (Heike)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe monocarboxylate transporter Mct10 (Slc16a10; T-type amino acid transporter) facilitates the cellular transport of thyroid hormone (TH) and shows an overlapping expression with the wellestablished TH transporter Mct8. Because Mct8 deficiency is associated with distinct tissue-specific

  2. Monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4 regulate migration and invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Su Chii; Nøhr-Nielsen, Asbjørn; Zeeberg, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Novel treatments for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are severely needed. The aim of this work was to explore the roles of H-lactate monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1 and MCT4) in PDAC cell migration and invasiveness. METHODS: Monocarboxylate transporter expression...... and MCT4 (messenger RNA, protein) were robustly expressed in all PDAC lines, localizing to the plasma membrane. Lactate influx capacity was highest in AsPC-1 cells and lowest in HPDE cells and was inhibited by the MCT inhibitor α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (4-CIN), MCT1/MCT2 inhibitor AR-C155858......, or knockdown of MCT1 or MCT4. PDAC cell migration was largely unaffected by MCT1/MCT2 inhibition or MCT1 knockdown but was reduced by 4-CIN and by MCT4 knockdown (BxPC-3). Invasion measured in Boyden chamber (BxPC-3, Panc-1) and spheroid outgrowth (BxPC-3) assays was attenuated by 4-CIN and AR-C155858...

  3. Dislocation reduction in HgCdTe grown on CdTe/Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.

    2016-05-01

    Bulk-grown CdZnTe (Zn = 3%) substrates are the natural choice for HgCdTe epitaxy since it is lattice matched to long wave LW-HgCdTe alloy. However, lack of large area CdZnTe substrates, high production costs, and more importantly, the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between CdZnTe and silicon Read out Integrated Circuits (ROIC) are some of the inherent drawbacks of CdZnTe substrates. Consequently, Hg1-xCdxTe detectors fabricated on silicon substrates are an attractive alternative. Recent developments in the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) buffer layer growth technology on Si substrates has revolutionized the HgCdTe research and offered a new dimension to HgCdTe-based IR technology. Si substrates provide advantages in terms of relatively large area (3 to 6-inch diameter is easily obtained) compared to CZT substrate materials, durability during processing, and reliability to thermal cycling. Innovations in Si-based composite substrates made it possible to fabricate very large-format IR arrays that offer higher resolution, low-cost arrays and more dies per wafer. Between Si substrates and HgCdTe has large lattice mismatch of 19%. This leads to dislocation densities of low-107 cm-2 for optimal growth of HgCdTe on silicon-based substrates as compared to the mid-104 cm-2 dislocation density of HgCdTe grown on CdZnTe. This paper present dislocation reduction by two orders of magnitude using thermal cycle anneal under Hg environment on HgCdTe grown on Si substrates and as well as defect reduction in Cd(Se)Te buffer layers grown on Si Substrates.

  4. HOT MWIR HgCdTe performance on CZT and alternative substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Joseph G.; DeWames, Roger; Perconti, Philip; Billman, Curtis; Maloney, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Mid wave infrared (MWIR) imaging in the 3-5 um spectral band has traditionally been performed by InSb sensors. InSb technology is presently limited to a near 80K operating temperature and the hunt has been on for a higher operating temperature (HOT) technology that does as well at 150K as InSb at 80K, but with reduced power requirements. Amongst these alternative technologies are photovoltaic sensors consisting of heterostructures of HgCdTe (MCT). In previous work we assessed the device performance of several alternative MWIR HOT technologies (MCT on Si, MCT on GaAs) as a function of operating temperature. In this work we compare the NEDT histograms for these alternative technologies with InSb to better understand how their performance can be improved at higher temperatures. We also present analysis formalism for quantitatively assessing the number of FPA pixels which reside in the central versus the shoulder portions of the histogram.Begin the Introduction two lines below the Keywords. The manuscript should not have headers, footers, or page numbers. It should be in a onecolumn format. References are often noted in the text1 and cited at the end of the paper.

  5. Marked Seizure Reduction after MCT Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Azzam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 43-year-old man with history of nonsurgical partial epilepsy who previously failed multiple trials of antiepileptic drugs. Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT were added to his regular diet in the form of pure oil. Subsequently, his seizure frequency was markedly reduced from multiple daily seizures to one seizure every four days. His seizures recurred after transient discontinuation of MCT over a period of ten days. His seizure improvement was achieved at a dose of four tablespoons of MCT twice daily with no reported side effects. He developed significant diarrhea and flatulence at higher doses. We conclude that MCT oil supplementation to regular diet may provide better seizure control in some patients. MCT oil supplementation may be a more tolerable alternative to the standard ketogenic diet.

  6. MCT SWIR modules for passive and active imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiter, R.; Benecke, M.; Eich, D.; Figgemeier, H.; Weber, A.; Wendler, J.; Sieck, A.

    2016-05-01

    Based on AIM's state-of-the-art MCT IR technology, detector modules for the SWIR spectral range have been developed, fabricated and characterized. While LPE grown MCT FPAs with extended 2.5μm cut-off have been fabricated and integrated also MBE grown MCT on GaAs is considered for future production. Two imaging applications have been in focus operating either in passive mode by making use of e.g. the night glow, or in active mode by laser illumination for gated viewing. Dedicated readout integrated circuits (ROIC), realized in 0.18μm Si-CMOS technology providing the required functionality for passive imaging and gated imaging, have been designed and implemented. For both designs a 640x512 15μm pitch format was chosen. The FPAs are integrated in compact dewar cooler configurations using AIM's split linear coolers. A command and control electronics (CCE) provides supply voltages, biasing, clocks, control and video digitization for easy system interfacing. For imaging under low-light conditions a low-noise 640x512 15μm pitch ROIC with CTIA input stages and correlated double sampling was designed. The ROIC provides rolling shutter and snapshot integration. To reduce size, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C) a 640x512 format detector in a 10μm pitch is under development. The module makes use of the extended SWIR spectral cut-off up to 2.5μm. To be used for active gated-viewing operation SWIR MCT avalanche photodiodes have been implemented and characterized on FPA level in a 640x512 15μm pitch format. The specific ROIC provides also the necessary functions for range gate control and triggering by the laser illumination. First lab and field tests of a gated viewing demonstrator have been carried out. The paper will present the development status and performance results of AIM's MCT based SWIR Modules for imaging applications.

  7. Compact dewar and electronics for large-format infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manissadjian, A.; Magli, S.; Mallet, E.; Cassaigne, P.

    2011-06-01

    Infrared systems cameras trend is to require higher performance (thanks to higher resolution) and in parallel higher compactness for easier integration in systems. The latest developments at SOFRADIR / France on HgCdTe (Mercury Cadmium Telluride / MCT) cooled IR staring detectors do show constant improvements regarding detector performances and compactness, by reducing the pixel pitch and optimizing their encapsulation. Among the latest introduced detectors, the 15μm pixel pitch JUPITER HD-TV format (1280×1024) has to deal with challenging specifications regarding dewar compactness, low power consumption and reliability. Initially introduced four years ago in a large dewar with a more than 2kg split Stirling cooler compressor, it is now available in a new versatile compact dewar that is vacuum-maintenance-free over typical 18 years mission profiles, and that can be integrated with the different available Stirling coolers: K548 microcooler for light solution (less than 0.7 kg), K549 or LSF9548 for split cooler and/or higher reliability solution. The IDDCAs are also required with simplified electrical interface enabling to shorten the system development time and to standardize the electronic boards definition with smaller volumes. Sofradir is therefore introducing MEGALINK, the new compact Command & Control Electronics compatible with most of the Sofradir IDDCAs. MEGALINK provides all necessary input biases and clocks to the FPAs, and digitizes and multiplexes the video outputs to provide a 14 bit output signal through a cameralink interface, in a surface smaller than a business card.

  8. Application of advanced sensors to the liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) growth of MCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Glenn H.; Colombo, Luigi; Anderson, Jeff M.

    1994-07-01

    Liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of (Hg,Cd)Te (MCT) is the technique of choice for the preparation of the materials used for high performance focal plane arrays. Its successful development requires the development of advanced sensors and process controls. We detail here progress on the application of four sensor technologies to the LPE process for growth of MCT layers from Te rich melts on CdZnTe substrates. These include: (1) electron beam microprobe/wavelength dispersive x-ray analysis (WDX) for the rapid measurement of film composition immediately after growth; (2) an RTD based precision temperature control system that controls the melt temperature to better than +/- 0.005 degree(s)C and the Hg reservoir temperature to better than +/- 0.020 degree(s)C; (3) UV/visible optical absorption spectroscopy for the determination of the Hg partial pressure over the melt; and (4) CCD imaging for the detection of the liquid temperature of the LPE growth solution. The impact of each of the sensors on process yield is discussed. The application of the CCD camera to Hg rich high pressure LPE growth is also briefly mentioned.

  9. Candidate 10 micron HgCdTe arrays for the NEOCam space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtry, Craig W.; Dorn, Meghan; Cabrera, Mario S.; Pipher, Judith L.; Forrest, William J.; Mainzer, Amy K.; Wong, Andre

    2016-08-01

    The Near Earth Object Camera (NEOCam, Mainzer et al. 2015) is one of five NASA Discovery Class mission experiments selected for Phase A: down-select to one or two experiments will take place late in 2016. NEOCam will survey the sky in search of asteroids and comets, particularly those close to the Earth's orbit. The NEOCam infrared telescope will have two infrared (IR) channels; one covering 4 to 5 microns, and one covering 6-10 microns. Both IR cameras will use multiple 2Kx2K pixel format HAWAII-2RG arrays with different cutoff wavelength HgCdTe detectors from Teledyne Imaging Sensors. Past development work by the University of Rochester with Teledyne Imaging Sensors and JPL (McMurtry et al. 2013, Dorn et al. 2016) focused upon bringing the 10 micron HgCdTe detector technology up to NASA TRL 6+. This work extends that development program to push the format from 1Kx1K to the larger 2Kx2K pixel array. We present results on the first 2Kx2K candidate 10 micron cutoff HgCdTe arrays, where we measured the dark current, read noise, and total noise.

  10. Ultra-low power HOT MCT grown by MOVPE for handheld applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillans, Luke; Baker, Ian; McEwen, R. Kennedy

    2014-06-01

    In 2012 Selex ES demonstrated High Operating Temperature (HOT) MCT detectors with 5μm cut-off wavelength and f/4 aperture operating at temperatures above 200K. These detectors are grown by Metal Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE) which enables fine control over the photo-diode structure. Since 2012 Selex has created two further generations of MOVPE HOT MCT, progressively improving operability and yield. This paper presents performance data for Selex's third generation of HOT MCT technology and describes the improvements to the diode design and materials processing that have enabled these advances. A parallel program has developed miniature Dewars with lower heatload and reduced manufacturing costs. When integrated with the latest generation of miniature linear cryo-engines the required cooler power is reduced to the region of 1W at temperatures of 200K. This paper will present example imagery from a detector operating with <1 Watt cooler input power. The combination of third generation HOT MCT, high efficiency Dewars and miniature linear coolers will allow a drastic reduction in SWAP-C for long range hand-held thermal imagers.

  11. Influence of pulsed nanosecond volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure air on the electrical characteristics of MCT epitaxial films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryev, Denis V.; Voitsekhovskii, Alexandr V.; Lozovoy, Kirill A.; Nesmelov, Sergey N.; Dzyadukh, Stanislav M.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Shulepov, Michail A.; Dvoretskii, Sergei A.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was investigating the effect of volume nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure on the electro-physical properties of the HgCdTe (MCT) epitaxial films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Hall measurements of electro-physical parameters of MCT samples after irradiation have shown that there is a layer of epitaxial films exhibiting n-type conductivity that is formed in the near-surface area. After more than 600 pulses of influence parameters and thickness of the resulting n-layer is such that the measured field dependence of Hall coefficient corresponds to the material of n-type conductivity. Also it is shown that the impact of the discharge leads to significant changes in electro-physical characteristics of MIS structures. This fact is demonstrated by increase in density of positive fixed charge, change in the hysteresis type of the capacitance-voltage characteristic, an increase in density of surface states. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies of the controlled change in the properties of MCT.

  12. Threading and misfit-dislocation motion in molecular-beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe epilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, M.; Lee, D.; Zandian, M.; Phillips, J.; Arias, J.

    2003-07-01

    Lattice mismatch between the substrate and the absorber layer in single-color HgCdTe infrared (IR) detectors and between band 1 and band 2 in two-color detectors results in the formation of crosshatch lines on the surface and an array of misfit dislocations at the epi-interfaces. Threading dislocations originating in the substrate can also bend into the interface plane and result in misfit dislocations because of the lattice mismatch. The existence of dislocations threading through the junction region of HgCdTe IR-photovoltaic detectors can greatly affect device performance. High-quality CdZnTe substrates and controlled molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of HgCdTe can result in very low threading-dislocation densities as measured by the etch-pit density (EPD ˜ 104cm-2). However, dislocation gettering to regions of high stress (such as etched holes, voids, and implanted-junction regions) at elevated-processing temperatures can result in a high density of dislocations in the junction region that can greatly reduce detector performance. We have performed experiments to determine if the dislocations that getter to these regions of high stress are misfit dislocations at the substrate/absorber interface that have a threading component extending to the upper surface of the epilayer, or if the dislocations originate at the cap/absorber interface as misfit dislocations. The preceding mechanisms for dislocation motion are discussed in detail, and the possible diode-performance consequences are explored.

  13. ROIC for HgCdTe e-APD FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zhang, Junling; Wang, Pan; Zhou, Jie; Gao, Lei; Ding, Ruijun

    2013-08-01

    Ultra-low light imaging and passive/active dual mode imaging require very low noise optical receivers to achieve detection of fast and weak optical signal. HgCdTe electrons initiated avalanche photodiodes (e-APDs) in linear multiplication mode is the detector of choice thanks to its high quantum efficiency, high gain at low bias, high bandwidth and low noise factor. In my work, a passive/active dual mode readout integrated circuit (ROIC) of e-APD focal plane array (FPA) is designed. Unit cell circuit architecture of ROIC includes a capacitance feedback transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) as preamplifier of ROIC, a high voltage protection module, a comparator, a Sample-Hold circuit module, and output driver stage. There is a protection module in every unit cell circuit which can avoid ROIC to be damaged from avalanche breakdown of some diodes of detector. Conventional 5V CMOS process is applied to implement the high voltage protection with the small area rather than Laterally Diffused Metal Oxide Semiconductor (LDMOS) in high voltage BCD process in the limited 100um×100um pitch area. In CTIA module, three integration capacitances are included in the CTIA module, two of them are switchable to provide different well capacity and noise. Constraints such as pixel area, stability and power lead us design toward a simple one-stage cascade operational transconductance amplifier (OTA) as pre-amplifier. High voltage protection module can protect ROIC to be damaged because of breakdown of some avalanche diodes.

  14. Acute exercise increases brain region-specific expression of MCT1, MCT2, MCT4, GLUT1, and COX IV proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takimoto, Masaki; Hamada, Taku

    2014-05-01

    The brain is capable of oxidizing lactate and ketone bodies through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). We examined the protein expression of MCT1, MCT2, MCT4, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), and cytochrome-c oxidase subunit IV (COX IV) in the rat brain within 24 h after a single exercise session. Brain samples were obtained from sedentary controls and treadmill-exercised rats (20 m/min, 8% grade). Acute exercise resulted in an increase in lactate in the cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, but not the brainstem, and an increase in β-hydroxybutyrate in the cortex alone. After a 2-h exercise session MCT1 increased in the cortex and hippocampus 5 h postexercise, and the effect lasted in the cortex for 24 h postexercise. MCT2 increased in the cortex and hypothalamus 5-24 h postexercise, whereas MCT2 increased in the hippocampus immediately after exercise, and remained elevated for 10 h postexercise. Regional upregulation of MCT2 after exercise was associated with increases in brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tyrosine-related kinase B proteins, but not insulin-like growth factor 1. MCT4 increased 5-10 h postexercise only in the hypothalamus, and was associated with increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression. However, none of the MCT isoforms in the brainstem was affected by exercise. Whereas GLUT 1 in the cortex increased only at 18 h postexercise, COX IV in the hippocampus increased 10 h after exercise and remained elevated for 24 h postexercise. These results suggest that acute prolonged exercise induces the brain region-specific upregulation of MCT1, MCT2, MCT4, GLUT1, and COX IV proteins.

  15. DUAL-BAND INFRARED DETECTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    As the infrared technology continues to advance, there is a growing demand for multispectral detectors for advanced IR systems with better target discrimination and identification. Both HgCdTe detectors and quantum well GaAs/AlGaAs photodetectors offer wavelength flexibility from medium wavelength to very long wavelength and multicolor capability in these regions. The main challenges facing all multicolor devices are more complicated device structtures, thicker and multilayer material growth, and more difficult device fabrication, especially when the array size gets larger and pixel size gets smaller. In the paper recent progress in development of two-color HgCdTe photodiodes and quantum well infrared photodetectors is presented.More attention is devoted to HgCdTe detectors. The two-color detector arrays are based upon an n-P-N (the capital letters mean the materials with larger bandgap energy) HgCdTe triple layer heterojunction design. Vertically stacking the two p-n junctions permits incorporation of both detectros into a single pixel. Both sequential mode and simultaneous mode detectors are fabricated. The mode of detection is determined by the fabrication process of the multilayer materials.Also the performances of stacked multicolor QWIPs detectors are presented. For multicolor arrays, QWIP's narrow band spectrum is an advantage, resulting in low spectral crosstalk. The major challenge for QWIP is developing broadband or multicolor optical coupling structures that permit efficient absorption of all required spectral bands.

  16. An investigation for the HgCdTe cleaning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tian-Yi; Wang, Nili; Zhao, Shuiping; Liu, Shi-Jia; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2014-11-01

    A new cleaning process for HgCdTe was designed - which used the improved SC-1,SC-2 and Br2- C2H5OH solutions as the main cleaning fluid and applied mega sound waves in the cleaning process. By analyzing the test results carried out on the HgCdTe surface, it was found that the material of HgCdTe for the application of new cleaning process was better than the one for the application of conventional cleaning process in the minority carrier lifetime, residual organic contamination, responsivity and specific detectivity.

  17. Progress on MCT SWIR modules for passive and active imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiter, R.; Benecke, M.; Eich, D.; Figgemeier, H.; Weber, A.; Wendler, J.; Sieck, A.

    2017-02-01

    For SWIR imaging applications, based on AIM's state-of-the-art MCT IR technology specific detector designs for either low light level imaging or laser illuminated active imaging are under development. For imaging under low-light conditions a low-noise 640x512 15μm pitch ROIC with CTIA input stages and correlated double sampling was designed. The ROIC provides rolling shutter and snapshot integration. To reduce size, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C) a 640x512 format detector in a 10μm pitch is been realized. While LPE grown MCT FPAs with extended 2.5μm cut-off have been fabricated and integrated also MBE grown MCT on GaAs is considered for future production. The module makes use of the extended SWIR (eSWIR) spectral cut-off up to 2.5μm to allow combination of emissive and reflective imaging by already detecting thermal radiation in the eSWIR band. A demonstrator imager was built to allow field testing of this concept. A resulting product will be a small, compact clip-on weapon sight. For active imaging a detector module was designed providing gating capability. SWIR MCT avalanche photodiodes have been implemented and characterized on FPA level in a 640x512 15μm pitch format. The specific ROIC provides also the necessary functions for range gate control and triggering by the laser illumination. The FPAs are integrated in a compact dewar cooler configuration using AIM's split linear cooler. A command and control electronics (CCE) provides supply voltages, biasing, clocks, control and video digitization for easy system interfacing. First lab and field tests of a gated viewing demonstrator have been carried out and the module has been further improved.

  18. Developments in MOVPE HgCdTe arrays for passive and active infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ian; Maxey, Chris; Hipwood, Les; Weller, Harald; Thorne, Peter

    2012-09-01

    SELEX Galileo Infrared Ltd has developed a range of 3rd Generation infrared detectors based on HgCdTe grown by Metal Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE) on low cost GaAs substrates. There have been four key development aims: reducing the cost especially for large arrays, extending the wavelength range, improving the operating temperature for lower power, size and weight cameras and increasing the functionality. Despite a 14% lattice mismatch between GaAs and HgCdTe MOVPE arrays show few symptoms of misfit dislocations even in longwave detectors. The key factors in the growth and device technology are described in this paper to explain at a scientific level the radiometric quality of MOVPE arrays. A feature of the past few years has been the increasingly sophisticated products that are emerging thanks to custom designed silicon readout devices. Three devices are described as examples: a multifunctional device that can operate as an active or passive imager with built-in range finder, a 3-side buttable megapixel array and an ultra-low noise device designed for scientific applications.

  19. Receiver Performance of CO2 and CH4 Lidar with Low Noise HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X.; Abshire, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is currently developing CO2 lidars at 1.57 μm wavelength for the Active Sensing of CO2 Emission over Days, Nights, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. One of the major technical challenges is the photodetectors that have to operate in short wave infrared (SWIR) wavelength region and sensitive to received laser pulses of only a few photons. We have been using InGaAs photocathode photomultiplier tubes (PMT) in our airborne simulator of the CO2 lidar that can detect single photon with up to 10% quantum efficiency at photodetector for our CO2 lidars. The new HgCdTe APDs have typically a >50% quantum efficiency, including the effect of fill-factor, from 0.9 to 4.5 μm wavelength. DRS RSTA will integrate a low noise read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) with the HgCdTe APD array into a low noise analog SWIR detector with near single photon sensitivity. The new HgCdTe APD SWIR detector assembly is expected to improve the receiver sensitivity of our CO2 lidar by at least a factor of two and provide a sufficient wide signal dynamic range. The new SWIR detector systems can also be used in the CH4 lidars at 1.65 μm wavelength currently being developed at GSFC. The near infrared PMTs have diminishing quantum efficiency as the wavelength exceeds 1.6 μm. InGaAs APDs have a high quantum efficiency but too high an excess noise factor to achieve near quantum limited performance. The new HgCdTe APDs is expected to give a much superior performance than the PMTs and the InGaAs APDs. In this paper, we will give a brief description of the new HgCdTe APD assembly and present a receiver performance analysis of our CO2 lidar and a CH4 lidar with the new detector system in comparison to the near infrared PMTs and InGaAs APDs.

  20. State-of-the-art MCT IR-modules with enhanced long term and cycle stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiter, R.; Wendler, J.; Lutz, H.; Rutzinger, S.; Schallenberg, T.; Ziegler, J.; Rühlich, I.

    2012-06-01

    Current trends on the enhancement of MCT FPA IR-modules are reduction of size, weight and power (SWaP), increase of resolution with large detector arrays, provision of staring LWIR or dual-band capability. This is achieved by reduction of pixel size, higher operating temperatures (HOT) or complex pixel structures together with the optimization of dewars, adapted cooling engines and proximity electronics. To meet these demands AIM is working on MCT single-band MWIR or LWIR modules with formats 640x512 or 1280x1024 in 15μm pitch and a dual-band MWIR/LWIR module 640x512 in 20μm pitch. As a first step high operating temperatures for MWIR 120K and LWIR 80K were demonstrated, development for MWIR >= 150K and LWIR >= 90K is ongoing. The modules are realized as integrated detector cooler assemblies (IDCA) with proximity electronics. The 640x512/15μm pitch modules are already available in application specific configurations e.g. having integral rotary or split linear cooling engines. Besides implementation of the above mentioned capabilities also improvement in long term and cycle stability of IRmodules has been achieved which is important to fully benefit from increased mission times and longer maintenance periods by HOT. Especially staring MCT LWIR modules so far required sophisticated non-uniformity correction (NUC) processing to provide acceptable long term image quality while former scanning systems usually used implemented temperature references for NUC update. For a thermal imager setup with the LWIR 640x512/15μm module two-point correction with factory calibrated gain coefficients together with a new offset calibration after every cool down cycle is used. The paper will present the results of AIM's current staring single-band MCT IR-modules in MWIR or LWIR configuration especially regarding to their long term and cycle stability.

  1. Further developments of 8μm pitch MCT pixels at Finmeccanica (formerly Selex ES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeckells, David; McEwen, R. Kennedy; Bains, Sudesh; Herbert, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Finmeccanica (formerly Selex ES) introduced high performance mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) infrared detectors on an 8μm pitch in 2015 with their SuperHawk device which builds on standard production processes already used for the manufacture of 24μm, 20μm, 16μm and 12μm pitch devices. The flexibility of the proprietary Finmeccanica designed diode structure, used in conjunction with the mature production Metal Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE) MCT growth process at Finmeccanica, enables fine control of diode electrical and optical structure including free choice of cut-off wavelength. The mesa pixel design inherently provides major system performance benefits by reducing blurring mechanisms, including optical scattering, inter-pixel cross-talk and carrier diffusion, to negligible levels. The SuperHawk detector has demonstrated unrivalled MTF and NETD performance, even when operating at temperatures in excess of 120K. The SuperHawk Integrated Detector Cooler Assembly (IDCA) benefits from recent dewar developments at Finmeccanica, which have improved thermal efficiencies while maintaining mechanical integrity over a wide range of applications, enabling use of smaller cryo-coolers to reduce system SWAP-C. Performance and qualification results are presented together with example imagery. SuperHawk provides an easy high resolution upgrade for systems currently based on standard definition 16μm and 15μm infrared detector formats. The paper also addresses further work to increase the operating temperature of the established 8μm process, exploiting High Operating Temperature (HOT) MCT at Finmeccanica, as well as options for LWIR variants of the SuperHawk device.

  2. COMPARISON OF CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES IN P-ON-N HgCdTe LWIR PHOTODIODES TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper standard techniques for characterization of HgCdTe liquid phase epitaxial layers (LPE) were presented. The performance of long wavelength p-on-n HgCdTe photodiodes fabricated by arsenic diffusion was described. The correlation between LPE HgCdTe material parameters and properties of the infrared photodiodes was demonstrated.

  3. MCT: A UK Retrospective—Reminiscences of a Crystal Grower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capper, Peter

    2017-05-01

    The essentials of bulk Bridgman growth of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) are outlined, together with some background to its use in the UK. It is still being used in a few niche applications, e.g., long-wavelength photoconductive (PC) detectors for space programs, and as material for infrared (IR) optical components. The latter requires very short-wavelength and/or larger-diameter material, and the challenges and successes in these areas are outlined. Use of a new source of high-purity silica, together with continual improvements in element purification, from our in-house tellurium zone refining and mercury distillation, reduced the carrier concentration consistently to sub-1014 cm-3, which helped to further improve PC device performance. An offer is made to supply bulk wafers to the wider community for research and development (R&D) purposes. The benefits of IR-related books, published over the past 30 years, to the community are described and a challenge laid down to continue this process of information dissemination into the future, in either hard-copy form or online versions.

  4. Anticoccidial efficacy of medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Nitanai, Atushi; Kurosawa, Takashi; Oikawa, Shin

    2004-12-01

    Anticoccidial efficacy of dietary fat was evaluated in calves with coccidial infection (Eimeria spp., including E. bovis and E. zuernii). Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT)--natural edible fats composed of caprylic (C8), capric (C10), and lauric (C12) acids -- were given orally with milk to 5 calves and with 10% glucose solution to 3 older, weaned calves by using the reticular groove reflex. After 3 to 11 days of MCT feeding, all Eimeria spp. oocysts had disappeared from the feces of all calves. MCT had no adverse effects on appetite or on fecal pH, ammonia, lactic acid, or volatile fatty acid levels. MCT feeding for coccidial control in calves has minimal side-effects and has benefits in terms of residue-free food production.

  5. Physical and clinical performance of the mCT time-of-flight PET/CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakoby, B. W.; Bercier, Y.; Conti, M.; Casey, M. E.; Bendriem, B.; Townsend, D. W.

    2011-04-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) measurement capability promises to improve PET image quality. We characterized the physical and clinical PET performance of the first Biograph mCT TOF PET/CT scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc.) in comparison with its predecessor, the Biograph TruePoint TrueV. In particular, we defined the improvements with TOF. The physical performance was evaluated according to the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007 standard with additional measurements to specifically address the TOF capability. Patient data were analyzed to obtain the clinical performance of the scanner. As expected for the same size crystal detectors, a similar spatial resolution was measured on the mCT as on the TruePoint TrueV. The mCT demonstrated modestly higher sensitivity (increase by 19.7 ± 2.8%) and peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) (increase by 15.5 ± 5.7%) with similar scatter fractions. The energy, time and spatial resolutions for a varying single count rate of up to 55 Mcps resulted in 11.5 ± 0.2% (FWHM), 527.5 ± 4.9 ps (FWHM) and 4.1 ± 0.0 mm (FWHM), respectively. With the addition of TOF, the mCT also produced substantially higher image contrast recovery and signal-to-noise ratios in a clinically-relevant phantom geometry. The benefits of TOF were clearly demonstrated in representative patient images.

  6. Development of an infrared detector: Quantum well infrared photodetector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wei; LI Ling; ZHENG HongLou; XU WenLan; XIONG DaYuan

    2009-01-01

    The progress in the quantum well infrared photo-detector (QWIP) based on quantum confinement in semiconductor in recent 10 years has been reviewed. The differences between QWlP and the HgCdTe (HCT) infrared detector as well as their compensation are analyzed. The outlook for near-future trends in QWIP technologies is also presented.

  7. Development of an infrared detector: Quantum well infrared photodetector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The progress in the quantum well infrared photo-detector (QWIP) based on quantum confinement in semiconductor in recent 10 years has been reviewed. The differences between QWIP and the HgCdTe (HCT) infrared detector as well as their compensation are analyzed. The outlook for near-future trends in QWIP technologies is also presented.

  8. Impulse coupling between laser and HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji; Li, Xiangyang; Hu, Xierong; Fang, Jiaxiong; Xu, Guosen; Shen, Jie

    1994-10-01

    The interaction between Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) and single pulse of Nd:YAG laser with 1.06 micrometers wavelength and 10 ns pulse duration was studied. The impulse delivered to MCT sample was measured by using ballistic pendulum method. The experiment shows that the momentum transfer results from material being ejected from MCT surface under the impinging of intense pulse laser. The impulse coupling coefficient of MCT gets to its maximum 14.3 dyne(DOT)s/J when incident laser power density is about 7.6 X 10(superscript 8) W/cm(superscript 2). By using 1D model of gas-dynamics, the impulse coupling coefficients have been calculated. The calculated results agree well with measured ones in the region of incident power density larger than 1.5 X 10(superscript 9) W/cm(superscript 2).

  9. CD147 subunit of lactate/H+ symporters MCT1 and hypoxia-inducible MCT4 is critical for energetics and growth of glycolytic tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, Renaud; Chiche, Johanna; Marchiq, Ibtissam; Naiken, Tanesha; Ilc, Karine; Murray, Clare M.; Critchlow, Susan E.; Roux, Danièle; Simon, Marie-Pierre; Pouysségur, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Malignant tumors exhibit increased dependence on glycolysis, resulting in abundant export of lactic acid, a hypothesized key step in tumorigenesis. Lactic acid is mainly transported by two H+/lactate symporters, MCT1/MCT4, that require the ancillary protein CD147/Basigin for their functionality. First, we showed that blocking MCT1/2 in Ras-transformed fibroblasts with AR-C155858 suppressed lactate export, glycolysis, and tumor growth, whereas ectopic expression of MCT4 in these cells conferred resistance to MCT1/2 inhibition and reestablished tumorigenicty. A mutant-derivative, deficient in respiration (res−) and exclusively relying on glycolysis for energy, displayed low tumorigenicity. These res− cells could develop resistance to MCT1/2 inhibition and became highly tumorigenic by reactivating their endogenous mct4 gene, highlighting that MCT4, the hypoxia-inducible and tumor-associated lactate/H+ symporter, drives tumorigenicity. Second, in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (LS174T), we showed that combined silencing of MCT1/MCT4 via inducible shRNA, or silencing of CD147/Basigin alone, significantly reduced glycolytic flux and tumor growth. However, both silencing approaches, which reduced tumor growth, displayed a low level of CD147/Basigin, a multifunctional protumoral protein. To gain insight into CD147/Basigin function, we designed experiments, via zinc finger nuclease-mediated mct4 and basigin knockouts, to uncouple MCTs from Basigin expression. Inhibition of MCT1 in MCT4-null, Basiginhigh cells suppressed tumor growth. Conversely, in Basigin-null cells, in which MCT activity had been maintained, tumorigenicity was not affected. Collectively, these findings highlight that the major protumoral action of CD147/Basigin is to control the energetics of glycolytic tumors via MCT1/MCT4 activity and that blocking lactic acid export provides an efficient anticancer strategy. PMID:21930917

  10. Megapixel mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays for infrared imaging out to 12 microns Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the fabrication of large format, long wave infrared (LWIR) mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) detector arrays where the cutoff wavelength is...

  11. High-Operating Temperature HgCdTe: A Vision for the Near Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Carmody, M.; Piquette, E.; Dreiske, P.; Chen, A.; Yulius, A.; Edwall, D.; Bhargava, S.; Zandian, M.; Tennant, W. E.

    2016-09-01

    We review recent advances in the HgCdTe material quality and detector performance achieved at Teledyne using molecular beam epitaxy growth and the double-layer planar hetero-junction (DLPH) detector architecture. By using an un-doped, fully depleted absorber, Teledyne's DLPH architecture can be extended for use in high operating temperatures and other applications. We assess the potential achievable performance for long wavelength infrared (LWIR) hetero-junction p-lightly-doped n or p-intrinsic- n (p-i-n) detectors based on recently reported results for 10.7 μm cutoff 1 K × 1 K focal plane arrays (FPAs) tested at temperatures down to 30 K. Variable temperature dark current measurements show that any Shockley-Read-Hall currents in the depletion region of these devices have lifetimes that are reproducibly greater than 100 ms. Under the assumption of comparable lifetimes at higher temperatures, it is predicted that fully-depleted background radiation-limited performance can be expected for 10- μm cutoff detectors from room temperature to well below liquid nitrogen temperatures, with room-temperature dark current nearly 400 times lower than predicted by Rule 07. The hetero-junction p-i-n diode is shown to have numerous other significant potential advantages including minimal or no passivation requirements for pBn-like processing, low 1/ f noise, compatibility with small pixel pitch while maintaining high modulation transfer function, low crosstalk and good quantum efficiency. By appropriate design of the FPA dewar shielding, analysis shows that dark current can theoretically be further reduced below the thermal equilibrium radiative limit. Modeling shows that background radiation-limited LWIR HgCdTe operating with f/1 optics has the potential to operate within √2 of background-limited performance at 215 K. By reducing the background radiation by 2/3 using novel shielding methods, operation with a single-stage thermo-electric-cooler may be possible. If the

  12. Multi-color IRFPAs made from HgCdTe grown by MOVPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. L.; Hipwood, L. G.; Price, J.; Shaw, C. J.; Abbott, P.; Maxey, C. D.; Lau, H. W.; Catchpole, R. A.; Ordish, M.; Knowles, P.; Gordon, N. T.

    2007-04-01

    The drive towards improved target recognition has led to an increasing interest in detection in more than one infrared band. This paper describes the design, fabrication and performance of two-colour and three-colour infrared detectors made from HgCdTe grown by Metal Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). The detectors are staring, focal plane arrays consisting of HgCdTe mesa-diode arrays bump bonded to silicon read-out integrated circuits (ROICs). Each mesa diode has one connection to the ROIC and the colours are selected by varying the applied bias. Results will be presented for both two-colour and three-colour devices. In a two-colour n-p-n design the cut-off wavelengths are defined by the compositions of the two n-type absorbers and the doping and composition of the p-type layer are chosen to prevent transistor action. The bias polarity is used to switch the output between colours. This design has been used to make MW/LW detectors with a MW band covering 3 to 5 μm and a LW band covering 5 to 10 μm. In a three-colour n-p-n design the cut-off wavelengths are defined by the compositions of the two n-type absorbers and the p-type absorber, which has an intermediate cut-off wavelength. The absorbers are separated from each other by electronic barriers consisting of wide band-gap material. At low applied bias these barriers prevent photo-electrons generated in the p-type absorber from escaping and the device then gives an output from one of the n-type absorbers. At high applied bias the electronic barrier is pulled down and the device gives an output from both the p-type absorber and one of the n-type absorbers. Thus by varying the polarity and magnitude of the bias it is possible to obtain three-colours from a two-terminal device. This design has been used to make a SW/MW/MW detector with cut-off wavelengths of approximately 3, 4 and 6 μm.

  13. 640 X 480 Pace HgCdTe FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Lester J.; Bailey, Robert B.; Cabelli, Scott A.; Cooper, Donald E.; McComas, Gail D.; Vural, Kadri; Tennant, William E.

    1992-12-01

    A hybrid HgCdTe 640 X 480 infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) that meets the sensitivity, resolution, and field-of-view requirements of high-performance medium wavelength infrared (MWIR) imaging systems has been developed. The key technology making this large, high sensitivity device producible is the epitaxial growth of HgCdTe on a CdTe-buffered, sapphire substrate (referred to as PACE, for Producible Alternative to CdTe for Epitaxy; PACE-I refers to sapphire). The device offers TV resolution with excellent sensitivity at temperatures below 120 K. Mean NE(Delta) T as low as 13 mK has been achieved at operating temperatures nonuniformity compensation.

  14. Uniformity of Electrical Parameters on MCT Epitaxy Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE Lin-ru; MENG Qing-lan; LI Nan

    2004-01-01

    For Hall measurement under different magnetic fields at LN2 temperature,Hg1-xCdxTe (MCT) film (radius 1cm) grown on CdTe substrate by LPE is photoengraved into many small Van Der Pauw squares,then their Hall coefficients and mobilities are measured and analyzed,respectively.Two films were Hall-tested during the temperature range from LHe 4.2K to about 200K.An actual impression on the uniformity of electrical parameters for MCT film can obtained by means of the methods presented in this paper.

  15. MCT1 and MCT4 Expression During Myocardial Ischemic-Reperfusion Injury in the Isolated Rat Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Myocardium ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury can be caused by imbalances in cellular metabolism. Lactate, transported by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs, has been implicated as a mechanism in this process. The present study was designed to investigate the expression and functional role of MCTs in rat hearts during ischemia and reperfusion. Methods: Langendorff-perfused rat hearts were subjected to 20 minutes stabilization, 30 minutes of global ischemia and 60 minutes reperfusion. Hearts were collected serially for detecting expression changes in MCT1, MCT4 during myocardial I/R injury and lactate concentration was measured. Post-ischemic left ventricular function and infract size were determined at end-point, followed by the pretreatment of D-lactate, a competitive inhibitor of MCTs. Results: MCT4 was significantly increased following global ischemia and MCT1 expression was increased during the early stages of reperfusion in isolated rat hearts, while the expression of the ancillary protein CD147 was increased during I/R injury. We determined increases in AMPK phosphorylation status, which was significantly elevated following ischemia and early reperfusion. Blocking monocarboxylate transport by competitive inhibition with D-lactate caused decreased left ventricular performance and increased infarct size. Conclusion: Increased MCT4 expression facilitates lactate extrusion during the ischemic period, while increased MCT1 may facilitate lactate transport into and out of cells simultaneously during early reperfusion, with increases in AMPK phosphorylation status during the myocardial I/R period. Lactate transport by MCTs has a profound protective effect during myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury.

  16. Improved CO [lidar detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, P.L.; Busch, G.E.; Thompson, D.C.; Remelius, D.K.; Wells, F.D.

    1999-07-18

    A high sensitivity, CO{sub 2} lidar detector, based on recent advances in ultra-low noise, readout integrated circuits (ROIC), is being developed. This detector will combine a high speed, low noise focal plane array (FPA) with a dispersive grating spectrometer. The spectrometer will filter the large background flux, thereby reducing the limiting background photon shot noise. In order to achieve the desired low noise levels, the HgCdTe FPA will be cooled to {approximately}50K. High speed, short pulse operation of the lidar system should enable the detector to operate with the order of a few noise electrons in the combined detector/ ROIC output. Current receiver design concepts will be presented, along with their expected noise performance.

  17. Novel Pathogenic Mechanism Suggested by Ex Vivo Analysis of MCT8 (SLC16A2) Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, W. Edward; Jansen, Jurgen; Friesema, Edith C. H.; Kester, Monique H. A.; Mancilla, Edna; Lundgren, Johan; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Lunsing, Roelineke J.; Brouwar, Oebele F.; Visser, Theo J.

    2009-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8; approved symbol SLC16A2) facilitates cellular uptake and efflux of 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3). Mutations in MCT8 arc associated with severe psychomotor retardation, high serum T3 and low 3,3',5'-triiodothyronine (rT3) levels. Here we report three novel MCT8 mut

  18. 人肝癌组织中MCT1,MCT2基因mRNA表达的半定量研究%Semi-quantitative analysis of MCT1 and MCT2 genes mRNA expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李靖; 韩本立

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the mRNA expression of MCT1 and MCT2 genes in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and paracarcinoma liver tissue (PCLT). Methods The semi-quantitative analysis of MCT1 and MCT2 genes mRNA expression in human HCC and PCLT was conducted by RT-PCR method and electrophoresis band opacity density (OD) comparison analysis method in 25 patients with HCC. Results The mRNA expression of MCT1 was significantly higher than MCT2 in HCC and PCLT, in HCC the mRNA expression of MCT1 and MCT2 genes were significant higher than that in PCLT. Conclusions The high expression of mRNA of MCT1 and MCT2 genes in HCC indicates that these genes may take a significant role on lactate and other monocarboxylate transmembrane transportation and on pH regulation in tumor cells.%目的探讨单羧酸转运蛋白-1(MCT1)、单羧酸转运蛋白-2(MCT2) mRNA在人肝癌及癌旁肝组织中的表达及意义。方法应用RT-PCR及电泳条带光密度比较法对25例肝癌病人的肝癌及癌旁肝组织中MCT1,MCT2 mRNA的表达进行半定量分析。结果肝癌及癌旁肝组织的MCT1 mRNA的表达显著高于MCT2。肝癌组织中MCT1,MCT2 mRNA的表达显著高于癌旁肝组织。结论 MCT1,MCT2在肝癌细胞内乳酸等单羧酸的跨膜转运及细胞内pH的调节上可能起重要作用。

  19. Detectors and cooling technology for direct spectroscopic biosignature characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, Bernard J; Moseley, S H; Sadleir, John E; Stevenson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Direct spectroscopic biosignature characterization (hereafter "biosignature characterization") will be a major focus for future space observatories equipped with coronagraphs or starshades. Our aim in this article is to provide an introduction to potential detector and cooling technologies for biosignature characterization. We begin by reviewing the needs. These include nearly noiseless photon detection at flux levels as low as $<0.001~\\textrm{photons}~s^{-1}~\\textrm{pixel}^{-1}$ in the visible and near-IR. We then discuss potential areas for further testing and/or development to meet these needs using non-cryogenic detectors (EMCCD, HgCdTe array, HgCdTe APD array), and cryogenic single photon detectors (MKID arrays and TES microcalorimeter arrays). Non-cryogenic detectors are compatible with the passive cooling that is strongly preferred by coronagraphic missions, but would add non-negligible noise. Cryogenic detectors would require active cooling, but in return deliver nearly quantum limited performance....

  20. Integration of a 'proton antenna' facilitates transport activity of the monocarboxylate transporter MCT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Sina Ibne; Pouyssegur, Jacques; Deitmer, Joachim W; Becker, Holger M

    2017-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) mediate the proton-coupled transport of high-energy metabolites like lactate and pyruvate and are expressed in nearly every mammalian tissue. We have shown previously that transport activity of MCT4 is enhanced by carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), which has been suggested to function as a 'proton antenna' for the transporter. In the present study, we tested whether creation of an endogenous proton antenna by introduction of a cluster of histidine residues into the C-terminal tail of MCT4 (MCT4-6xHis) could facilitate MCT4 transport activity when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results show that integration of six histidines into the C-terminal tail does indeed increase transport activity of MCT4 to the same extent as did coexpression of MCT4-WT with CAII. Transport activity of MCT4-6xHis could be further enhanced by coexpression with extracellular CAIV, but not with intracellular CAII. Injection of an antibody against the histidine cluster into MCT4-expressing oocytes decreased transport activity of MCT4-6xHis, while leaving activity of MCT4-WT unaltered. Taken together, these findings suggest that transport activity of the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter MCT4 can be facilitated by integration of an endogenous proton antenna into the transporter's C-terminal tail.

  1. Doping and Diffusion in HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-28

    In’i, -InT. Te - 1.8 ( - 3 .5 )h ( + 2.9 - 6/) TeT1’- Tej . 4 Hg rich HgCdTe Hg - 1.8 + 1.2 + 1.4 - 2p H - ’g, - H g j.. ’TI - tetrahedral position...A. Anderson, Appl. Phys. Lett. 53, 11.81 (1988). B. D. Patterson, Rev. Mod. Phys. 60, 69 (1988). 60 V. A. Singh , C. Weigel, J. W. Corbett, and L. M

  2. Crystal Growth of Solid Solution HgCdTe Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1997-01-01

    The growth of homogenous crystals of HgCdTe alloys is complicated by the large separation between their liquidus and solidus temperatures. Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te is representative of several alloys which have electrical and optical properties that can be compositionally tuned for a number of applications. Limitations imposed by gravity during growth and results from growth under reduced conditions are described. The importance of residual accelerations was demonstrated by dramatic differences in compositional distribution observed for different attitudes of the space shuttle that resulted in different steady acceleration components.

  3. Role of MCT1 and CAII in skeletal muscle pH homeostasis, energetics, and function: in vivo insights from MCT1 haploinsufficient mice

    KAUST Repository

    Chatel, Benjamin

    2017-03-03

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a partial suppression of monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)-1 on skeletal muscle pH, energetics, and function (MCT1(+/-) mice). Twenty-four MCT1(+/-) and 13 wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to a rest-exercise-recovery protocol, allowing assessment of muscle energetics (by magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and function. The study included analysis of enzyme activities and content of protein involved in pH regulation. Skeletal muscle of MCT1(+/-) mice had lower MCT1 (-61%; P < 0.05) and carbonic anhydrase (CA)-II (-54%; P < 0.05) contents. Although intramuscular pH was higher in MCT1(+/-) mice at rest (P < 0.001), the mice showed higher acidosis during the first minute of exercise (P < 0.01). Then, the pH time course was similar among groups until exercise completion. MCT1(+/-) mice had higher specific peak (P < 0.05) and maximum tetanic (P < 0.01) forces and lower fatigability (P < 0.001) when compared to WT mice. We conclude that both MCT1 and CAII are involved in the homeostatic control of pH in skeletal muscle, both at rest and at the onset of exercise. The improved muscle function and resistance to fatigue in MCT1(+/-) mice remain unexplained.-Chatel, B., Bendahan, D., Hourdé, C., Pellerin, L., Lengacher, S., Magistretti, P., Fur, Y. L., Vilmen, C., Bernard, M., Messonnier, L. A. Role of MCT1 and CAII in skeletal muscle pH homeostasis, energetics, and function: in vivo insights from MCT1 haploinsufficient mice.

  4. MCT8 mutation analysis and identification of the first female with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome due to loss of MCT8 expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frints, S.G.; Lenzner, S.; Bauters, M.; Jensen, L.R.; Esch, H. van; Portes, V. des; Moog, U.; Macville, M.V.; Roozendaal, K. van; Schrander-Stumpel, C.T.; Tzschach, A.; Marynen, P.; Fryns, J.P.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Bokhoven, H. van; Chelly, J.; Beldjord, C.; Turner, G.; Gecz, J.; Moraine, C.; Raynaud, M.; Ropers, H.H.; Froyen, G.; Kuss, A.W.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the thyroid monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene (MCT8/SLC16A2) have been reported to result in X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) in patients with clinical features of the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS). We performed MCT8 mutation analysis including 13 XLMR families with LOD scores

  5. Characteristics of HgCdTe epilayer grown by LPE using horizontal slider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J K Radhakrishnan; S Sitharaman; S C Gupta

    2002-11-01

    The characteristics of HgCdTe epilayers grown in a modified horizontal slider system, are reported here. The surface morphology of the grown layers, their IR transmission characteristics, depth and lateral compositional uniformity, structural and electrical characteristics are discussed.

  6. Low-Roughness Plasma Etching of HgCdTe Masked with Patterned Silicon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Z. H.; Hu, W. D.; Yin, W. T.; Huang, J.; Lin, C.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; Chen, X. S.; Lu, W.; He, L.

    2011-08-01

    A novel mask technique utilizing patterned silicon dioxide films has been exploited to perform mesa etching for device delineation and electrical isolation of HgCdTe third-generation infrared focal-plane arrays (IRFPAs). High-density silicon dioxide films were deposited at temperature of 80°C, and a procedure for patterning and etching of HgCdTe was developed by standard photolithography and wet chemical etching. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the surfaces of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etched samples were quite clean and smooth. Root-mean-square (RMS) roughness characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was less than 1.5 nm. The etching selectivity between a silicon dioxide film and HgCdTe in the samples masked with patterned silicon dioxide films was greater than 30:1. These results show that the new masking technique is readily available and promising for HgCdTe mesa etching.

  7. Ultra-low Noise, High Bandwidth, 1550nm HgCdTe APD Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Voxtel Inc. proposes to optimize the design of a large area, 1.55?m sensitive HgCdTe avalanche photodiode (APD) that achieves high gain with nearly no excess noise....

  8. HgZnTe-based detectors for LWIR NASA applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Elizabeth A.; Kalisher, Murray H.

    1990-01-01

    The initial goal was to grow and characterize HgZnTe and determine if it indeed had the advantageous properties that were predicted. Researchers grew both bulk and liquid phase epitaxial HgZnTe. It was determined that HgZnTe had the following properties: (1) microhardness at least 50 percent greater than HgCdTe of equivalent bandgap; (2) Hg annealing rates of at least 2 to 4 times longer than HgCdTe; and (3) higher Hg vacancy formation energies. This early work did not focus on one specific composition (x-value) of HgZnTe since NASA was interested in HgZnTe's potential for a variety of applications. Since the beginning of 1989, researchers have been concentrating, however, on the liquid phase growth of very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) HgZnTe (cutoff approx. equals 17 microns at 65K) to address the requirements of the Earth Observing System (EOS). Since there are no device models to predict the advantages in reliability one can gain with increased microhardness, surface stability, etc., one must fabricate HgZnTe detectors and assess their relative bake stability (accelerated life test behavior) compared with HgCdTe devices fabricated in the same manner. Researchers chose to fabricate HIT detectors as a development vehicle for this program because high performance in the VLWIR has been demonstrated with HgCdTe HIT detectors and the HgCdTe HIT process should be applicable to HgZnTe. HIT detectors have a significant advantage for satellite applications since these devices dissipate much less power than conventional photoconductors to achieve the same responsivity.

  9. Butyric acid increases transepithelial transport of ferulic acid through upregulation of the monocarboxylate transporters SLC16A1 (MCT1) and SLC16A3 (MCT4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Kerstin; Kerimi, Asimina; Poquet, Laure; Williamson, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Ferulic acid is released by microbial hydrolysis in the colon, where butyric acid, a major by-product of fermentation, constitutes the main energy source for colonic enterocytes. We investigated how varying concentrations of this short chain fatty acid may influence the absorption of the phenolic acid. Chronic treatment of Caco-2 cells with butyric acid resulted in increased mRNA and protein abundance of the monocarboxylate transporters SLC16A1 (MCT1) and SLC16A3 (MCT4), previously proposed to facilitate ferulic acid absorption in addition to passive diffusion. Short term incubation with butyric acid only led to upregulation of MCT4 while both conditions increased transepithelial transport of ferulic acid in the apical to basolateral, but not basolateral to apical, direction. Chronic treatment also elevated intracellular concentrations of ferulic acid, which in turn gave rise to increased concentrations of ferulic acid metabolites. Immunofluorescence staining of cells revealed uniform distribution of MCT1 protein in the cell membrane, whereas MCT4 was only detected in the lateral plasma membrane sections of Caco-2 cells. We therefore propose that MCT1 may be acting as an uptake transporter and MCT4 as an efflux system across the basolateral membrane for ferulic acid, and that this process is stimulated by butyric acid.

  10. Pharmacological treatment and BBB-targeted genetic therapy for MCT8-dependent hypomyelination in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Zada

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypomyelination is a key symptom of Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS, a psychomotor retardation associated with mutations in the thyroid-hormone (TH transporter MCT8 (monocarboxylate transporter 8. AHDS is characterized by severe intellectual deficiency, neuromuscular impairment and brain hypothyroidism. In order to understand the mechanism for TH-dependent hypomyelination, we developed an mct8 mutant (mct8−/− zebrafish model. The quantification of genetic markers for oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs and mature oligodendrocytes revealed reduced differentiation of OPCs into oligodendrocytes in mct8−/− larvae and adults. Live imaging of single glial cells showed that the number of oligodendrocytes and the length of their extensions are reduced, and the number of peripheral Schwann cells is increased, in mct8−/− larvae compared with wild type. Pharmacological analysis showed that TH analogs and clemastine partially rescued the hypomyelination in the CNS of mct8−/− larvae. Intriguingly, triiodothyronine (T3 treatment rescued hypomyelination in mct8−/− embryos before the maturation of the blood–brain barrier (BBB, but did not affect hypomyelination in older larvae. Thus, we expressed Mct8-tagRFP in the endothelial cells of the vascular system and showed that even relatively weak mosaic expression completely rescued hypomyelination in mct8−/− larvae. These results suggest potential pharmacological treatments and BBB-targeted gene therapy that can enhance myelination in AHDS and possibly in other TH-dependent brain disorders.

  11. Minority carrier lifetimes in different doped LWIR HgCdTe grown by LPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, GuangYin; Wei, YanFeng; Sun, QuanZhi; Yang, JianRong

    2012-10-01

    The carrier lifetimes of different types of p-type doped HgCdTe(x~0.23) long wavelength infrared (LWIR) epilayers were measured which were Hg-vacancy, Au and arsenic doped ones prepared by Te-rich Liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE). By comparing the lifetimes of Hg-vacancy and extrinsic doped HgCdTe, we focus on three primary mechanisms limiting the lifetimes in these different p-type HgCdTe samples: radiative recombination, Auger recombination and Schokley-Read- Hall (SRH) Recombination. The recombination mechanism in p-type HgCdTe is the SRH recombination at low temperatures and Auger and radiative recombination at high temperature. It is found that the lifetime of As-doped and Au-doped HgCdTe is far longer than that of Hg-vacancy-doped sample which is caused by the deep energy level of the Hg-vacancy acceptor that is considered as a recombination center in HgCdTe. Also we found lifetime in those p-type doped HgCdTe LWIR epilayers is limited by SRH by comparing the experimental lifetimes with the calculated data. Impurity doping was found to have a main effect on minority carrier lifetime.

  12. Transporters MCT8 and OATP1C1 maintain murine brain thyroid hormone homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerl, Steffen; Müller, Julia; Bauer, Reinhard; Richert, Sarah; Kassmann, Celia M.; Darras, Veerle M.; Buder, Katrin; Boelen, Anita; Visser, Theo J.; Heuer, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS), a severe form of psychomotor retardation with abnormal thyroid hormone (TH) parameters, is linked to mutations in the TH-specific monocarboxylate transporter MCT8. In mice, deletion of Mct8 (Mct8 KO) faithfully replicates AHDS-associated endocrine abnormalities; however, unlike patients, these animals do not exhibit neurological impairments. While transport of the active form of TH (T3) across the blood-brain barrier is strongly diminished in Mct8 KO animals, prohormone (T4) can still enter the brain, possibly due to the presence of T4-selective organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP1C1). Here, we characterized mice deficient for both TH transporters, MCT8 and OATP1C1 (Mct8/Oatp1c1 DKO). Mct8/Oatp1c1 DKO mice exhibited alterations in peripheral TH homeostasis that were similar to those in Mct8 KO mice; however, uptake of both T3 and T4 into the brains of Mct8/Oatp1c1 DKO mice was strongly reduced. Evidence of TH deprivation in the CNS of Mct8/Oatp1c1 DKO mice included highly decreased brain TH content as well as altered deiodinase activities and TH target gene expression. Consistent with delayed cerebellar development and reduced myelination, Mct8/Oatp1c1 DKO mice displayed pronounced locomotor abnormalities. Intriguingly, differentiation of GABAergic interneurons in the cerebral cortex was highly compromised. Our findings underscore the importance of TH transporters for proper brain development and provide a basis to study the pathogenic mechanisms underlying AHDS. PMID:24691440

  13. Cerebral cortex hyperthyroidism of newborn mct8-deficient mice transiently suppressed by lat2 inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Núñez

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone entry into cells is facilitated by transmembrane transporters. Mutations of the specific thyroid hormone transporter, MCT8 (Monocarboxylate Transporter 8, SLC16A2 cause an X-linked syndrome of profound neurological impairment and altered thyroid function known as the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. MCT8 deficiency presumably results in failure of thyroid hormone to reach the neural target cells in adequate amounts to sustain normal brain development. However during the perinatal period the absence of Mct8 in mice induces a state of cerebral cortex hyperthyroidism, indicating increased brain access and/or retention of thyroid hormone. The contribution of other transporters to thyroid hormone metabolism and action, especially in the context of MCT8 deficiency is not clear. We have analyzed the role of the heterodimeric aminoacid transporter Lat2 (Slc7a8, in the presence or absence of Mct8, on thyroid hormone concentrations and on expression of thyroid hormone-dependent cerebral cortex genes. To this end we generated Lat2-/-, and Mct8-/yLat2-/- mice, to compare with wild type and Mct8-/y mice during postnatal development. As described previously the single Mct8 KO neonates had a transient increase of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine concentration and expression of thyroid hormone target genes in the cerebral cortex. Strikingly the absence of Lat2 in the double Mct8Lat2 KO prevented the effect of Mct8 inactivation in newborns. The Lat2 effect was not observed from postnatal day 5 onwards. On postnatal day 21 the Mct8 KO displayed the typical pattern of thyroid hormone concentrations in plasma, decreased cortex 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine concentration and Hr expression, and concomitant Lat2 inactivation produced little to no modifications. As Lat2 is expressed in neurons and in the choroid plexus, the results support a role for Lat2 in the supply of thyroid hormone to the cerebral cortex during early postnatal development.

  14. The effect of extracellular alkalinization on lactate metabolism of breast cancer stem cells: Overview of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1 and MCT4 gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neolaka, G. M. G.; Yustisia, I.; Sadikin, M.; Wanandi, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    Changes in the metabolic status of cancer cells are presumed to be correlated with the adjustment of these cells to extracellular changes. Cell glycolysis increases the production of intracellular lactate catalyzed by the lactate dehydrogenases, both LDH-A and LDH-B. An increase in intracellular lactate can affect extracellular pH balance through monocarboxylate transporters, particularly MCT1 and MCT4. This study aimed to analyze the effects of extracellular alkalinization on the lactate metabolism of human breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). In this study, human primary BCSCs (CD24-/CD44+ cells) were treated with 100 mM sodium bicarbonate for 0.5, 24, and 48 h in DMEM F12/HEPES. After incubation, extracellular pH was measured and cells were harvested to extract the total RNA and protein. The expression of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1, and MCT4 mRNA genes were analyzed using qRT-PCR method. Our study shows that administration of sodium bicarbonate in the BCSC culture medium could increase extracellular pH. To balance the increase of extracellular pH, BCSCs regulated the expression of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1, and MCT4 genes. As the extracellular pH increases, the expression of LDH-A that converts pyruvate to lactate increased along with the increase of MCT 4 and MCT 1 expression, which act as lactate transporters. As the incubation time increases, the pH decreases, leading to the suppression of LDH-A and increase of LDH-B expression that converts lactate into pyruvate. Therefore, we suggest that the extracellular alkalinization by sodium bicarbonate in BCSCs affected the genes that regulate lactate metabolism.

  15. MCT8 mutation analysis and identification of the first female with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome due to loss of MCT8 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frints, Suzanna Gerarda Maria; Lenzner, Steffen; Bauters, Mareike; Jensen, Lars Riff; Van Esch, Hilde; des Portes, Vincent; Moog, Ute; Macville, Merryn Victor Erik; van Roozendaal, Kees; Schrander-Stumpel, Constance Theresia Rimbertha Maria; Tzschach, Andreas; Marynen, Peter; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Hamel, Ben; van Bokhoven, Hans; Chelly, Jamel; Beldjord, Chérif; Turner, Gillian; Gecz, Jozef; Moraine, Claude; Raynaud, Martine; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Froyen, Guy; Kuss, Andreas Walter

    2008-09-01

    Mutations in the thyroid monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene (MCT8/SLC16A2) have been reported to result in X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) in patients with clinical features of the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS). We performed MCT8 mutation analysis including 13 XLMR families with LOD scores >2.0, 401 male MR sibships and 47 sporadic male patients with AHDS-like clinical features. One nonsense mutation (c.629insA) and two missense changes (c.1A>T and c.1673G>A) were identified. Consistent with previous reports on MCT8 missense changes, the patient with c.1673G>A showed elevated serum T3 level. The c.1A>T change in another patient affects a putative translation start codon, but the same change was present in his healthy brother. In addition normal serum T3 levels were present, suggesting that the c.1A>T (NM_006517) variation is not responsible for the MR phenotype but indicates that MCT8 translation likely starts with a methionine at position p.75. Moreover, we characterized a de novo translocation t(X;9)(q13.2;p24) in a female patient with full blown AHDS clinical features including elevated serum T3 levels. The MCT8 gene was disrupted at the X-breakpoint. A complete loss of MCT8 expression was observed in a fibroblast cell-line derived from this patient because of unfavorable nonrandom X-inactivation. Taken together, these data indicate that MCT8 mutations are not common in non-AHDS MR patients yet they support that elevated serum T3 levels can be indicative for AHDS and that AHDS clinical features can be present in female MCT8 mutation carriers whenever there is unfavorable nonrandom X-inactivation.

  16. Prognostic Indications of Elevated MCT4 and CD147 across Cancer Types: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory D. Bovenzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Metabolism in the tumor microenvironment can play a critical role in tumorigenesis and tumor aggression. Metabolic coupling may occur between tumor compartments; this phenomenon can be prognostically significant and may be conserved across tumor types. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs play an integral role in cellular metabolism via lactate transport and have been implicated in metabolic synergy in tumors. The transporters MCT1 and MCT4 are regulated via expression of their chaperone, CD147. Methods. We conducted a meta-analysis of existing publications on the relationship between MCT1, MCT4, and CD147 expression and overall survival and disease-free survival in cancer, using hazard ratios derived via multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results. Increased MCT4 expressions in the tumor microenvironment, cancer cells, or stromal cells were all associated with decreased overall survival and decreased disease-free survival (p<0.001 for all analyses. Increased CD147 expression in cancer cells was associated with decreased overall survival and disease-free survival (p<0.0001 for both analyses. Few studies were available on MCT1 expression; MCT1 expression was not clearly associated with overall or disease-free survival. Conclusion. MCT4 and CD147 expression correlate with worse prognosis across many cancer types. These results warrant further investigation of these associations.

  17. Knockdown of monocarboxylate transporter 8 (mct8) disturbs brain development and locomotion in zebrafish.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieze, E. de; Wiel, S.M. van de; Zethof, J; Flik, G.; Klaren, P.H.; Arjona, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS) is an inherited disorder of brain development characterized by severe psychomotor retardation. This X-linked disease is caused by mutations in the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), an important thyroid hormone transporter in brain neurons. MCT8-knockout mice

  18. The role of Arg445 and Asp498 in the human thyroid hormone transporter MCT8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Groeneweg (Stefan); E.C.H. Friesema (Edith); S. Kersseboom (Simone); W. Klootwijk (Willem); W.E. Visser (Wil Edward); R.P. Peeters (Robin); T.J. Visser (Theo)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMonocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) facilitates cellular influx and efflux of the thyroid hormones (THs) T4 and T3. Mutations in MCT8 lead to severe psychomotor retardation. Here, we studied the importance of 2 highly conserved residues (Arg445 in transmembrane domain 8 and Asp498 in tr

  19. Mutations in MCT8 in patients with Allan-Herndon-Dudley-Syndrome affecting its cellular distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kersseboom (Simone); G.J. Kremers (Gert-Jan); E.C.H. Friesema (Edith); W. Edward Visser (W.); W. Klootwijk (Willem); R.P. Peeters (Robin); T.J. Visser (Theo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMonocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is a thyroid hormone (TH)-specific transporter. Mutations in the MCT8 gene are associated with Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome (AHDS), consisting of severe psychomotor retardation and disturbed TH parameters. To study the functional consequences of diff

  20. Mutations in Thyroid Hormone Transporter MCT8: genotype, function and phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Jansen (Jurgen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe studies presented in this thesis demonstrate that MCT8 is a transmembrane protein that facilitates both in- and efflux of thyroid hormone. MCT8 function is crucial for normal neurological development, as loss-of-function mutations are associated with severe psychomotor retardation. I

  1. MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex and modulates messenger RNA translational profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Shi, B; Nandi, S;

    2006-01-01

    MCT-1 is an oncogene that was initially identified in a human T cell lymphoma and has been shown to induce cell proliferation as well as activate survival-related pathways. MCT-1 contains the PUA domain, a recently described RNA-binding domain that is found in several tRNA and rRNA modification e...

  2. MCT2 expression and lactate influx in anorexigenic and orexigenic neurons of the arcuate nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Cortes-Campos

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic neurons of the arcuate nucleus control food intake, releasing orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides in response to changes in glucose concentration. Several studies have suggested that the glucosensing mechanism is governed by a metabolic interaction between neurons and glial cells via lactate flux through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs. Hypothalamic glial cells (tanycytes release lactate through MCT1 and MCT4; however, similar analyses in neuroendocrine neurons have yet to be undertaken. Using primary rat hypothalamic cell cultures and fluorimetric assays, lactate incorporation was detected. Furthermore, the expression and function of MCT2 was demonstrated in the hypothalamic neuronal cell line, GT1-7, using kinetic and inhibition assays. Moreover, MCT2 expression and localization in the Sprague Dawley rat hypothalamus was analyzed using RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and Western blot analyses. Confocal immunohistochemistry analyses revealed MCT2 localization in neuronal but not glial cells. Moreover, MCT2 was localized to ∼90% of orexigenic and ~60% of anorexigenic neurons as determined by immunolocalization analysis of AgRP and POMC with MCT2-positives neurons. Thus, MCT2 distribution coupled with lactate uptake by hypothalamic neurons suggests that hypothalamic neurons control food intake using lactate to reflect changes in glucose levels.

  3. Mice deficient in MCT8 reveal a mechanism regulating thyroid hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cosmo, Caterina; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Philp, Nancy J; Weiss, Roy E; Refetoff, Samuel

    2010-09-01

    The mechanism of thyroid hormone (TH) secretion from the thyroid gland into blood is unknown. Humans and mice deficient in monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) have low serum thyroxine (T4) levels that cannot be fully explained by increased deiodination. Here, we have shown that Mct8 is localized at the basolateral membrane of thyrocytes and that the serum TH concentration is reduced in Mct8-KO mice early after being taken off a treatment that almost completely depleted the thyroid gland of TH. Thyroid glands in Mct8-KO mice contained more non-thyroglobulin-associated T4 and triiodothyronine than did those in wild-type mice, independent of deiodination. In addition, depletion of thyroidal TH content was slower during iodine deficiency. After administration of 125I, the rate of both its secretion from the thyroid gland and its appearance in the serum as trichloroacetic acid-precipitable radioactivity was greatly reduced in Mct8-KO mice. Similarly, the secretion of T4 induced by injection of thyrotropin was reduced in Mct8-KO in which endogenous TSH and T4 were suppressed by administration of triiodothyronine. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that Mct8 is involved in the secretion of TH from the thyroid gland and contributes, in part, to the low serum T4 level observed in MCT8-deficient patients.

  4. The involvement of MCT-1 oncoprotein in inducing mitotic catastrophe and nuclear abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hung-Ju; Chu, Kang-Lin; Wu, Meng-Hsun; Wu, Pei-Hsuan; Chang, Wei-Wen; Chu, Jan-Show; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching; Takeuchi, Hideki; Ouchi, Toru; Hsu, Hsin-Ling

    2012-03-01

    Centrosome amplification and chromosome abnormality are frequently identified in neoplasia and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying these defects remain unclear. We here identify that MCT-1 is a centrosomal oncoprotein involved in mitosis. Knockdown of MCT-1 protein results in intercellular bridging, chromosome mis-congregation, cytokinesis delay, and mitotic death. Introduction of MCT-1 oncogene into the p53 deficient cells (MCT-1-p53), the mitotic checkpoint kinases and proteins are deregulated synergistically. These biochemical alterations are accompanied with increased frequencies of cytokinesis failure, multi-nucleation, and centrosome amplification in subsequent cell cycle. As a result, the incidences of polyploidy and aneuploidy are progressively induced by prolonged cell cultivation or further promoted by sustained spindle damage on MCT-1-p53 background. These data show that the oncoprotein perturbs centrosome structure and mitotic progression, which provide the molecular aspect of chromsomal abnormality in vitro and the information for understanding the stepwise progression of tumors under oncogenic stress.

  5. InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice infrared detectors: three decades of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.; Kopytko, M.; Martyniuk, P.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, there has been considerable progress towards III-V antimonide-based low dimensional solids development and device design innovations. From a physics point of view, the type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice is an extremely attractive proposition. Their development results from two primary motivations: the perceived challenges of reproducibly fabricating high-operability HgCdTe FPAs at reasonable cost and theoretical predictions of lower Auger recombination for type-II superlattice (T2SL) detectors compared to HgCdTe. Lower Auger recombination should be translated into a fundamental advantage for T2SL over HgCdTe in terms of lower dark current and/or higher operating temperature, provided other parameters such as Shockley-Read-Hall lifetime are equal. Based on these promising results it is obvious now that the InAs/GaSb superlattice technology is competing with HgCdTe third generation detector technology with the potential advantage of standard III-V technology to be more competitive in costs and as a consequence series production pricing. Comments to the statement whether the superlattice IR photodetectors can outperform the "bulk" narrow gap HgCdTe detectors is one of the most important questions for the future of IR photodetectors presented by Rogalski at the April 2006 SPIE meeting in Orlando, Florida, are more credible today and are presented in this paper. It concerns the trade-offs between two most competing IR material technologies: InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices and HgCdTe ternary alloy system.

  6. Monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4 and CD147 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Helena

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs are transmembrane proteins involved in the transport of monocarboxylates across the plasma membrane, which appear to play an important role in solid tumours, however the role of MCTs in prostate cancer is largely unknown. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the clinico-pathological value of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs expression, namely MCT1, MCT2 and MCT4, together with CD147 and gp70 as MCT1/4 and MCT2 chaperones, respectively, in prostate carcinoma. Methods Prostate tissues were obtained from 171 patients, who performed radical prostatectomy and 14 patients who performed cystoprostatectomy. Samples and clinico-pathological data were retrieved and organized into tissue microarray (TMAs blocks. Protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in neoplastic (n = 171, adjacent non-neoplastic tissues (n = 135, PIN lesions (n = 40 and normal prostatic tissue (n = 14. Protein expression was correlated with patients' clinicopathologic characteristics. Results In the present study, a significant increase of MCT2 and MCT4 expression in the cytoplasm of tumour cells and a significant decrease in both MCT1 and CD147 expression in prostate tumour cells was observed when compared to normal tissue. All MCT isoforms and CD147 were expressed in PIN lesions. Importantly, for MCT2 and MCT4 the expression levels in PIN lesions were between normal and tumour tissue, which might indicate a role for these MCTs in the malignant transformation. Associations were found between MCT1, MCT4 and CD147 expressions and poor prognosis markers; importantly MCT4 and CD147 overexpression correlated with higher PSA levels, Gleason score and pT stage, as well as with perineural invasion and biochemical recurrence. Conclusions Our data provides novel evidence for the involvement of MCTs in prostate cancer. According to our results, we consider that MCT2 should be further explored as tumour marker and

  7. Portable sequential multicolor thermal imager based on a MCT 384 x 288 focal plane array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiter, Rainer; Cabanski, Wolfgang A.; Mauk, Karl-Heinz; Rode, Werner; Ziegler, Johann

    2001-10-01

    AIM has developed a sequential multicolor thermal imager to provide customers with a test system to realize real-time spectral selective thermal imaging. In contrast to existing PC based laboratory units, the system is miniaturized with integrated signal processing like non-uniformity correction and post processing functions such as image subtraction of different colors to allow field tests in military applications like detection of missile plumes or camouflaged targets as well as commercial applications like detection of chemical agents, pollution control, etc. The detection module used is a 384 X 288 mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) focal plane array (FPA) available in the mid wave (MWIR) or long wave spectral band LWIR). A compact command and control electronics (CCE) provides clock and voltage supply for the detector as well as 14 bit deep digital conversion of the analog detector output. A continuous rotating wheel with four facets for filters provides spectral selectivity. The customer can choose between various types of filter characteristics, e.g. a 4.2 micrometer bandpass filter for CO2 detection in the MWIR band. The rotating wheel can be synchronized to an external source giving the rotation speed, typical 25 l/s. A position sensor generates the four frame start signals for synchronous operation of the detector -- 100 Hz framerate for the four frames per rotation. The rotating wheel is exchangeable for different configurations and also plates for a microscanner operation to improve geometrical resolution are available instead of a multicolor operation. AIM's programmable MVIP image processing unit is used for signal processing like non- uniformity correction and controlling the detector parameters. The MVIP allows to output the four subsequent images as four quarters of the video screen to prior to any observation task set the integration time for each color individually for comparable performance in each spectral color and after that also to determine

  8. Mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) passivation by advanced thin conformal Al2O3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Richard; Pattison, James; Chen, Andrew; Nayfeh, Osama

    2012-06-01

    HgCdTe passivation process must be performed at low temperature in order to reduce Hg depletion. Low temperature plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) is an emerging deposition technology for thin highly conformal films to meet the demand. Room temperature PE-ALD Al2O3 film's passivation on HgCdTe has been studied. Conformal film was investigated through SEM images of the Al2O3 film deposited onto high aspect ratio features dry etched into HgCdTe. Minority carrier lifetime was measured and compared by photoconductive decay transients of HgCdTe before and after deposition. Room temperature ALD Al2O3 film increased the minority carrier lifetime of HgCdTe.

  9. Ion Beam Nanostructuring of HgCdTe Ternary Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Aleksey B.; Savkina, Rada K.; Udovytska, Ruslana S.; Gudymenko, Oleksandr I.; Kladko, Vasyl P.; Korchovyi, Andrii A.

    2017-05-01

    Systematic study of mercury cadmium telluride thin films subjected to the ion beam bombardment was carried out. The evolution of surface morphology of (111) Hg1 - x Cd x Te ( x 0.223) epilayers due to 100 keV B+ and Ag+ ion irradiation was studied by AFM and SEM methods. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction methods were used for the investigation of the chemical compound and structural properties of the surface and subsurface region. It was found that in the range of nanoscale, arrays of holes and mounds on Hg0.777Cd0.223Te (111) surface as well as the polycrystalline Hg1 - x Cd x Te cubic phase with alternative compound ( x 0.20) have been fabricated using 100 keV ion beam irradiation of the basic material. Charge transport investigation with non-stationary impedance spectroscopy method has shown that boron-implanted structures are characterized by capacity-type impedance whereas for silver-implanted structures, an inductive-type impedance (or "negative capacitance") is observed. A hybrid system, which integrates the nanostructured ternary compound (HgCdTe) with metal-oxide (Ag2O) inclusions, was fabricated by Ag+ ion bombardment. The sensitivity of such metal-oxide-semiconductor hybrid structure for sub-THz radiation was detected with NEP 4.5 × 10-8 W/Hz1/2at ν ≈ 140 GHz and 296 K without amplification.

  10. Simulation of Small-Pitch HgCdTe Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, Marco; Goano, Michele; Bertazzi, Francesco; Ghione, Giovanni; Schirmacher, Wilhelm; Hanna, Stefan; Figgemeier, Heinrich

    2017-09-01

    Recent studies indicate as an important technological step the development of infrared HgCdTe-based focal plane arrays (FPAs) with sub-wavelength pixel pitch, with the advantage of smaller volume, lower weight, and potentially lower cost. In order to assess the limits of pixel pitch scaling, we present combined three-dimensional optical and electrical simulations of long-wavelength infrared HgCdTe FPAs, with 3 μm, 5 μm, and 10 μm pitch. Numerical simulations predict significant cavity effects, brought by the array periodicity. The optical and electrical contributions to spectral inter-pixel crosstalk are investigated as functions of pixel pitch, by illuminating the FPAs with Gaussian beams focused on the central pixel. Despite the FPAs being planar with 100% pixel duty cycle, our calculations suggest that the total crosstalk with nearest-neighbor pixels could be kept acceptably small also with pixels only 3 μ m wide and a diffraction-limited optical system.

  11. Quantitative comparison of PET performance—Siemens Biograph mCT and mMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlberg, Anna M.; Sæther, Oddbjørn [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Olav Kyrres gt 17, 7006 Trondheim (Norway); Eikenes, Live [Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Postbox 8905, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Goa, Pål Erik [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Olav Kyrres gt 17, 7006 Trondheim (Norway); Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-02-25

    Integrated clinical whole-body PET/MR systems were introduced in 2010. In order to bring this technology into clinical usage, it is of great importance to compare the performance with the well-established PET/CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate PET performance, with focus on image quality, on Siemens Biograph mMR (PET/MR) and Siemens Biograph mCT (PET/CT). A direct quantitative comparison of the performance characteristics between the mMR and mCT system was performed according to National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007 protocol. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate and image quality were evaluated. The evaluation was supplemented with additional standardized uptake value (SUV) measurements. The spatial resolution was similar for the two systems. Average sensitivity was higher for the mMR (13.3 kcps/MBq) compared to the mCT system (10.0 kcps/MBq). Peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) was slightly higher for the mMR (196 kcps @ 24.4 kBq/mL) compared to the mCT (186 kcps @ 30.1 kBq/mL). Scatter fractions in the clinical activity concentration range yielded lower values for the mCT (34.9 %) compared to those for the mMR (37.0 %). Best image quality of the systems resulted in approximately the same mean hot sphere contrast and a difference of 19 percentage points (pp) in mean cold contrast, in favour of the mCT. In general, point spread function (PSF) increased hot contrast and time of flight (TOF) increased both hot and cold contrast. Highest hot contrast for the smallest sphere (10 mm) was achieved with the combination of TOF and PSF on the mCT. Lung residual error was higher for the mMR (22 %) than that for the mCT (17 %), with no effect of PSF. With TOF, lung residual error was reduced to 8 % (mCT). SUV was accurate for both systems, but PSF caused overestimations for the 13-, 17- and 22-mm spheres. Both systems proved good performance characteristics, and the PET image quality of the mMR was close to that of the mCT

  12. MCT8 expression in human fetal cerebral cortex is reduced in severe intrauterine growth restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Shiao Y Chan; Hancox, Laura A; Martín-Santos, Azucena; Loubière, Laurence S; Walter, Merlin N.M.; González, Ana-Maria; Cox, Phillip M; Logan, Ann; Christopher J. McCabe; Franklyn, Jayne A; Kilby, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    The importance of the thyroid hormone (TH) transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), to human neurodevelopment is highlighted by findings of severe global neurological impairment in subjects with MCT8 (SLC16A2) mutations. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), usually due to uteroplacental failure, is associated with milder neurodevelopmental deficits, which have been partly attributed to dysregulated TH action in utero secondary to reduced circulating fetal TH concentrations and de...

  13. MCT8 expression in human fetal cerebral cortex is reduced in severe intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Shiao Y; Hancox, Laura A; Martín-Santos, Azucena; Loubière, Laurence S; Walter, Merlin N M; González, Ana-Maria; Cox, Phillip M; Logan, Ann; McCabe, Christopher J; Franklyn, Jayne A; Kilby, Mark D

    2014-02-01

    The importance of the thyroid hormone (TH) transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), to human neurodevelopment is highlighted by findings of severe global neurological impairment in subjects with MCT8 (SLC16A2) mutations. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), usually due to uteroplacental failure, is associated with milder neurodevelopmental deficits, which have been partly attributed to dysregulated TH action in utero secondary to reduced circulating fetal TH concentrations and decreased cerebral thyroid hormone receptor expression. We postulate that altered MCT8 expression is implicated in this pathophysiology; therefore, in this study, we sought to quantify changes in cortical MCT8 expression with IUGR. First, MCT8 immunohistochemistry was performed on occipital and parietal cerebral cortex sections obtained from appropriately grown for gestational age (AGA) human fetuses between 19 weeks of gestation and term. Secondly, MCT8 immunostaining in the occipital cortex of stillborn IUGR human fetuses at 24-28 weeks of gestation was objectively compared with that in the occipital cortex of gestationally matched AGA fetuses. Fetuses demonstrated widespread MCT8 expression in neurons within the cortical plate and subplate, in the ventricular and subventricular zones, in the epithelium of the choroid plexus and ependyma, and in microvessel wall. When complicated by IUGR, fetuses showed a significant fivefold reduction in the percentage area of cortical plate immunostained for MCT8 compared with AGA fetuses (PMCT8 expression was negatively correlated with the severity of IUGR indicated by the brain:liver weight ratios (r(2)=0.28; PMCT8 expression in the IUGR fetal brain could further compromise TH-dependent brain development.

  14. Effects of intermittent training on anaerobic performance and MCT transporters in athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégoire Millet

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of intermittent hypoxic training (IHT on skeletal muscle monocarboxylate lactate transporter (MCT expression and anaerobic performance in trained athletes. Cyclists were assigned to two interventions, either normoxic (N; n = 8; 150 mmHg PIO2 or hypoxic (H; n = 10; ∼3000 m, 100 mmHg PIO2 over a three week training (5×1 h-1h30 x week(-1 period. Prior to and after training, an incremental exercise test to exhaustion (EXT was performed in normoxia together with a 2 min time trial (TT. Biopsy samples from the vastus lateralis were analyzed for MCT1 and MCT4 using immuno-blotting techniques. The peak power output (PPO increased (p<0.05 after training (7.2% and 6.6% for N and H, respectively, but VO2max showed no significant change. The average power output in the TT improved significantly (7.3% and 6.4% for N and H, respectively. No differences were found in MCT1 and MCT4 protein content, before and after the training in either the N or H group. These results indicate there are no additional benefits of IHT when compared to similar normoxic training. Hence, the addition of the hypoxic stimulus on anaerobic performance or MCT expression after a three-week training period is ineffective.

  15. Metacognitive Therapy (MCT+ in patients with psychosis not receiving antipsychotic medication: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Balzan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychotherapies for psychosis typically aim to develop an awareness of the implausible content of a delusion or target the underlying cognitive biases (i.e., problematic thinking styles, such as hasty decisions and illusory control that foster and maintain delusional beliefs. A recently designed individual-based treatment entitled metacognitive therapy (MCT+ combines these two approaches. Emerging evidence suggests individualised MCT+, when used concurrently with antipsychotic medication, may be an effective psychological treatment for reducing delusional symptoms. However, it remains to be tested whether MCT+ can be effective in patients with active delusions who are not currently receiving psychotropic drugs. Method: We present two cases (one patient with schizophrenia and the other with delusional disorder experiencing active delusions who underwent four-weeks of intensive MCT+, without concurrent antipsychotic medication (minimum 6-months unmedicated. Baseline and 6-week follow-up data are presented on a variety of measures assessing delusion symptom severity (i.e., PANSS, PSYRATS, SAPS, clinical insight, and cognitive bias propensity. Results: After 4-weeks of MCT+, both patients showed substantial reduction in delusional symptoms, reported improved clinical insight, and were less prone to making illusory correlations. Conclusions: The presented case studies provide preliminary evidence for the feasibility of MCT+ in treating patients not taking, or resistant to, antipsychotic medication.

  16. Real Time Monitor and Control of MBE Growth of HgCdTe by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    The primary goal of this contract develop a real-time monitoring capability for HgCdTe composition during MBE growth . This goal was realized by...methodology for acquiring and analyzing insitu SE data in the MBE growth environment. These improvements and developments are part of an extensive

  17. Thermal Cycle Annealing and its Application to Arsenic-Ion Implanted HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-26

    doping profile, as shown in Figure 3. The TCA treatment on the unimplanted epilayers showed an exponential defect reduction proportional to the...Chamonal, P. Castelein, J. Zanatta, M. Tchagaspanian, A. Papon, J. Barnes, F. Henry, S. Gout , G. Bourgeois, C. Pautet and P. Fougeres, "HgCdTe FPAs

  18. Arsenic complexes optical signatures in As-doped HgCdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemain, F.; Robin, I. C.; Brochen, S.; Ballet, P.; Gravrand, O.; Feuillet, G. [CEA-LETI Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2013-04-08

    In this paper, the optical signatures of arsenic complexes in As-doped HgCdTe samples grown by molecular beam epitaxy are clearly identified using comparison between photoluminescence spectra, Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure, and Hall measurements. The ionization energies of the different complexes are measured both by photoluminescence and Hall measurements.

  19. Influence of photoresist feature geometry on ECR plasma-etched HgCdTe trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, J. David; Stoltz, Andrew J., Jr.; Kaleczyc, Andrew W.; Martinka, Mike; Almeida, Leo A.; Boyd, Phillip R.; Dinan, John H.

    2002-12-01

    Factors that affect width and aspect ratio in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) etched HgCdTe trenches are investigated. The ECR etch bias and anisotropy are determined by photoresist feature erosion rate. The physical characteristics of the trenches are attributed to ECR plasma etch chemistry.

  20. Temperature-driven massless Kane fermions in HgCdTe crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teppe, F.; Marcinkiewicz, M.; Krishtopenko, S. S.; Ruffenach, S.; Consejo, C.; Kadykov, A. M.; Desrat, W.; But, D.; Knap, W.; Ludwig, J.; Moon, S.; Smirnov, D.; Orlita, M.; Jiang, Z.; Morozov, S. V.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretskii, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    It has recently been shown that electronic states in bulk gapless HgCdTe offer another realization of pseudo-relativistic three-dimensional particles in condensed matter systems. These single valley relativistic states, massless Kane fermions, cannot be described by any other relativistic particles. Furthermore, the HgCdTe band structure can be continuously tailored by modifying cadmium content or temperature. At critical concentration or temperature, the bandgap collapses as the system undergoes a semimetal-to-semiconductor topological phase transition between the inverted and normal alignments. Here, using far-infrared magneto-spectroscopy we explore the continuous evolution of band structure of bulk HgCdTe as temperature is tuned across the topological phase transition. We demonstrate that the rest mass of Kane fermions changes sign at critical temperature, whereas their velocity remains constant. The velocity universal value of (1.07+/-0.05) × 106 m s-1 remains valid in a broad range of temperatures and Cd concentrations, indicating a striking universality of the pseudo-relativistic description of the Kane fermions in HgCdTe.

  1. Evolution of MBE HgCdTe defect structure studied with ion milling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pociask-Bialy, Malgorzata

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, is shown how ion milling can assist in assessing the defect structure of MCT by revealing the residual doping, and establishing the minimum level of donor concentration Nmd, which is needed for obtaining n-regions with a reproducible n value. For this purpose, a study of the electrical properties of ion-milled LWIR n-type MCT films, un-doped and doped with indium with the concentration NIn = 5 × 1014-1017 cm-3 is proposed.

  2. Optimized MCT IR-modules for high-performance imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiter, R.; Eich, D.; Figgemeier, H.; Lutz, H.; Wendler, J.; Rühlich, I.; Rutzinger, S.; Schallenberg, T.

    2014-06-01

    In today's typical military operations situational awareness is a key element for mission success. In contrast to what is known from conventional warfare with typical targets such as tanks, asymmetric scenarios now dominate military operations. These scenarios require improved identification capabilities, for example the assessment of threat levels posed by personnel targets. Also, it is vital to identify and reliably distinguish between combatants, non-combatants and friendly forces. To satisfy these requirements, high-definition (HD) large format systems are well suited due to their high spatial and thermal resolution combined with high contrast. Typical applications are sights for long-range surveillance, targeting and reconnaissance platforms as well as rotorcraft pilotage sight systems. In 2012 AIM presented first prototypes of large format detectors with 1280 × 1024 elements in a 15μm pitch for both spectral bands MWIR and LWIR. The modular design allows integration of different cooler types, like AIM's split linear coolers SX095 or SX040 or rotary integral types depending whatever fits best to the application. Large format FPAs have been fabricated using liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown MCT. To offer high resolution in a more compact configuration AIM started the development of a 1024 × 768 10μm pitch IRmodule. Keeping electro/optical performance is achieved by a higher specific charge handling capacity of the readout integrated circuit (ROIC) in a 0.18μm Si CMOS technology. The FPA size fits to a dewar cooler configuration used for 640 × 512 15μm pitch modules.

  3. Evaluation of MCT1, MCT4 and CD147 Genes in Peripheral Blood Cells of Breast Cancer Patients and Their Potential Use as Diagnostic and Prognostic Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Maria Cláudia de B; Perez, Matheus M; Azzalis, Ligia A; Sousa, Luiz Vinícius de A; Adami, Fernando; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Alves, Beatriz da C A

    2017-03-23

    Patients with breast cancer-the deadliest cancer among women-are at constant risk of developing metastasis. Oxidative stress and hypoxia are common feature of tumor cells that can proliferate even in a resultant metabolic acidosis. Despite the low extracellular pH, intracellular pH of tumor cells remains relatively normal, or even more alkaline due to the action of a membrane protein family known as monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). The objective of this study was to verify the diagnostic and prognostic value of MCT1, MCT4 and CD147 in tumor and peripheral blood samples of patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapic treatment. Differential expression of MCT1, MCT4 and CD147 obtained by qPCR was determined by 2(-ΔΔCq) method between biological samples (tumor and serial samples of peripheral) of patients (n = 125) and healthy women (n = 25). tumor samples with higher histological grades have shown higher expression of these markers; this higher expression was also observed in blood samples obtained at diagnosis of patients when compared to healthy women and in patients with positive progression of the disease (metastasis development). markers studied here could be a promising strategy in routine laboratory evaluations as breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis.

  4. Metabolic markers in relation to hypoxia; staining patterns and colocalization of pimonidazole, HIF-1α, CAIX, LDH-5, GLUT-1, MCT1 and MCT4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussink Johan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cellular response of malignant tumors to hypoxia is diverse. Several important endogenous metabolic markers are upregulated under hypoxic conditions. We examined the staining patterns and co-expression of HIF-1α, CAIX, LDH-5, GLUT-1, MCT1 and MCT4 with the exogenous hypoxic cell marker pimonidazole and the association of marker expression with clinicopathological characteristics. Methods 20 biopsies of advanced head and neck carcinomas were immunohistochemically stained and analyzed. All patients were given the hypoxia marker pimonidazole intravenously 2 h prior to biopsy taking. The tumor area positive for each marker, the colocalization of the different markers and the distribution of the markers in relation to the blood vessels were assessed by semiautomatic quantitative analysis. Results MCT1 staining was present in hypoxic (pimonidazole stained as well as non-hypoxic areas in almost equal amounts. MCT1 expression showed a significant overall correlation (r = 0.75, p Conclusions Colocalization and staining patterns of metabolic and hypoxia-related proteins provides valuable additional information over single protein analyses and can improve the understanding of their functions and environmental influences.

  5. Infrared detectors for Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, K.; Davis, R. P.; Knowles, P.; Shorrocks, N.

    2016-05-01

    IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer), developed by CNES and launched since 2006 on the Metop satellites, is established as a major source of data for atmospheric science and weather prediction. The next generation - IASI NG - is a French national contribution to the Eumetsat Polar System Second Generation on board of the Metop second generation satellites and is under development by Airbus Defence and Space for CNES. The mission aim is to achieve twice the performance of the original IASI instrument in terms of sensitivity and spectral resolution. In turn, this places very demanding requirements on the infrared detectors for the new instrument. Selex ES in Southampton has been selected for the development of the infrared detector set for the IASI-NG instruments. The wide spectral range, 3.6 to 15.5 microns, is covered in four bands, each served by a dedicated detector design, with a common 4 x 4 array format of 1.3 mm square macropixels. Three of the bands up to 8.7 microns employ photovoltaic MCT (mercury cadmium telluride) technology and the very long wave band employs photoconductive MCT, in common with the approach taken between Airbus and Selex ES for the SEVIRI instrument on Second Generation Meteosat. For the photovoltaic detectors, the MCT crystal growth of heterojunction photodiodes is by the MOVPE technique (metal organic vapour phase epitaxy). Novel approaches have been taken to hardening the photovoltaic macropixels against localised crystal defects, and integrating transimpedance amplifiers for each macropixel into a full-custom silicon read out chip, which incorporates radiation hard design.

  6. CD147 and MCT1-potential partners in bladder cancer aggressiveness and cisplatin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Julieta; Santos, Lúcio L; Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Morais, António; Amaro, Teresina; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Baltazar, Fátima

    2015-11-01

    The relapsing and progressive nature of bladder tumors, and the heterogeneity in the response to cisplatin-containing regimens, are the major concerns in the care of urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC) patients. The metabolic adaptations that alter the tumor microenvironment and thus contribute to chemoresistance have been poorly explored in UBC setting. We found significant associations between the immunoexpressions of the microenvironment-related molecules CD147, monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) 1 and 4, CD44 and CAIX in tumor tissue sections from 114 UBC patients. The presence of MCT1 and/or MCT4 expressions was significantly associated with unfavorable clinicopathological parameters. The incidence of CD147 positive staining significantly increased with advancing stage, grade and type of lesion, and occurrence of lymphovascular invasion. Similar associations were observed when considering the concurrent expression of CD147 and MCT1. This expression profile lowered significantly the 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates. Moreover, when selecting patients who received platinum-based chemotherapy, the prognosis was significantly worse for those with MCT1 and CD147 positive tumors. CD147 specific silencing by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in UBC cells was accompanied by a decrease in MCT1 and MCT4 expressions and, importantly, an increase in chemosensitivity to cisplatin. Our results provide novel insights for the involvement of CD147 and MCTs in bladder cancer progression and resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. We consider that the possible cooperative role of CD147 and MCT1 in determining cisplatin resistance should be further explored as a potential theranostics biomarker.

  7. Investigation of Substrate Effects on Interface Strain and Defect Generation in MBE-Grown HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, R.; Lei, W.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L.

    2016-09-01

    Si, Ge, and GaAs have been extensively investigated as alternative substrates for molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of HgCdTe and, at present, are widely used for HgCdTe-based infrared focal-plane arrays. However, the problem of high dislocation density in HgCdTe layers grown on these lattice-mismatched substrates has yet to be resolved. In this work, we investigated another alternative substrate, GaSb, which has a significantly smaller lattice mismatch with HgCdTe in comparison with Si, Ge, and GaAs, and is readily available as large-area, epiready wafers at much lower cost in comparison with lattice-matched CdZnTe substrates. The resultant stress due to lattice and thermal mismatch between the HgCdTe epilayer and various substrates has been calculated in this work using the elasticity matrix, and the corresponding stress distribution simulated using ANSYS. The simulated structures were matched by experimental samples involving MBE growth of HgCdTe on GaAs, GaSb, and CdZnTe substrates, and were characterized via reflection high-energy electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction analysis, followed by etch pit density (EPD) analysis. In comparison with other alternative substrates, GaSb is shown to have lower interface stress and lower EPD, rendering it an interesting and promising alternative substrate material for HgCdTe epitaxy.

  8. The genetic variation in Monocarboxylic acid transporter 2 (MCT2) has functional and clinical relevance with male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinu Lee; Dong Ryul Lee; Suman Lee

    2014-01-01

    Monocarboxylic acid transporter 2(MCT2) transports pyruvate and lactate outside and inside of sperms, mainly as energy sources and plays roles in the regulation of spermatogenesis. We investigated the association among genetic variations in theMCT2 gene, male infertility andMCT2 expression levels in sperm. The functional and genetic signiifcance of the intron 2(+28201A>G, rs10506398) and 3’ untranslated region(UTR) single nucleotide polymorphism(SNP)(+2626G>A, rs10506399) of MCT2 variants were investigated. Two MCT2 polymorphisms were associated with male infertility(n=471,PA) had a strong association with the oligoasthenoteratozoospermia(OAT) group. The+2626GG type had an almost 2.4‑fold higher sperm count than that of the+2626AA type(+2626GG; 66×106vs+2626AA; 27×106, P<0.0001). The MCT2‑3’ UTR SNP may be important for expression, as it is located at the MCT23’ UTR. The average MCT2 protein amount in sperm of the+2626GG type was about two times higher than that of the+2626AA type. The results suggest that genetic variation in MCT2 has functional and clinical relevance with male infertility.

  9. The genetic variation in Monocarboxylic acid transporter 2 (MCT2 has functional and clinical relevance with male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinu Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Monocarboxylic acid transporter 2 (MCT2 transports pyruvate and lactate outside and inside of sperms, mainly as energy sources and plays roles in the regulation of spermatogenesis. We investigated the association among genetic variations in the MCT2 gene, male infertility and MCT2 expression levels in sperm. The functional and genetic significance of the intron 2 (+28201A > G, rs10506398 and 3' untranslated region (UTR single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP (+2626G > A, rs10506399 of MCT2 variants were investigated. Two MCT2 polymorphisms were associated with male infertility (n = 471, P A had a strong association with the oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT group. The +2626GG type had an almost 2.4-fold higher sperm count than that of the +2626AA type (+2626GG; 66 × 10 6 vs +2626AA; 27 × 10 6 , P < 0.0001. The MCT2-3' UTR SNP may be important for expression, as it is located at the MCT2 3' UTR. The average MCT2 protein amount in sperm of the +2626GG type was about two times higher than that of the +2626AA type. The results suggest that genetic variation in MCT2 has functional and clinical relevance with male infertility.

  10. Inhibition of hypothalamic MCT1 expression increases food intake and alters orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptide expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Cortés-Campos, Christian; Barahona, María José; Carril, Claudio; Ordenes, Patricio; Salgado, Magdiel; Oyarce, Karina; García-Robles, María de los Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic glucosensing, which involves the detection of glucose concentration changes by brain cells and subsequent release of orexigenic or anorexigenic neuropeptides, is a crucial process that regulates feeding behavior. Arcuate nucleus (AN) neurons are classically thought to be responsible for hypothalamic glucosensing through a direct sensing mechanism; however, recent data has shown a metabolic interaction between tanycytes and AN neurons through lactate that may also be contributing to this process. Monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) is the main isoform expressed by tanycytes, which could facilitate lactate release to hypothalamic AN neurons. We hypothesize that MCT1 inhibition could alter the metabolic coupling between tanycytes and AN neurons, altering feeding behavior. To test this, we inhibited MCT1 expression using adenovirus-mediated transfection of a shRNA into the third ventricle, transducing ependymal wall cells and tanycytes. Neuropeptide expression and feeding behavior were measured in MCT1-inhibited animals after intracerebroventricular glucose administration following a fasting period. Results showed a loss in glucose regulation of orexigenic neuropeptides and an abnormal expression of anorexigenic neuropeptides in response to fasting. This was accompanied by an increase in food intake and in body weight gain. Taken together, these results indicate that MCT1 expression in tanycytes plays a role in feeding behavior regulation. PMID:27677351

  11. Advanced Microstructural Characterization for Development of Improved HgCdTe Detectors and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-21

    2701-1 J. Chai, O. C. Noriega , A. Dedigama, J. J. Kim, A. A. Savage, K. Doyle, C. Smith, N. Chau, J. Pena, J. H. Dinan, D. J. Smith, T. H. Myers...Chai, O.C. Noriega , J.H. Dinan, J.J. Kim, D.J. Smith, and T.H. Myers, presented at 2012 U.S. Workshop on Physics and Chemistry of II-VI Materials...were also examined for comparison purposes. 6 J. Chai, O.C. Noriega , A. Dedigama, J.J. Kim, A.A. Savage, K. Doyle, C. Smith, N. Chau, J.H. Dinan

  12. Characterization of HgCdTe and Related Materials and Substrates for Third Generation Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Markunas. J. D. Benson, and D. J. Smith, J. Electron. Mater. (2012). submitted. 5 J. Chai, O. C. Noriega , J. H. Dinan, and T. H. Myers, J. Electron...127 110 REFERENCES 1 J. Chai, O. C. Noriega , J. H. Dinan, and T. H. Myers, J. Electron. Mater. 41...3001(2012) 2 J. Chai, O.C. Noriega , J. H. Dinan, J. J. Kim, D. J. Smith, and T. H. Myers, J. Electron. Mater. (2012), submitted. 3 Y.-H. Zhang

  13. Si Based Large Area Substrates for HgCdTe Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    journals (N/A for none) M. C. Debnath, T. D. Mishima , M. B. Santos, K. Hossain, and O. W. Holland, Growth of InSb epilayers and quantum wells on Ge(001...publications (other than abstracts): M. C. Debnath, T. D. Mishima , M. B. Santos, K. Hossain, and O. W. Holland, InSb-based epilayers and quantum wells on

  14. Single Photon Sensitive HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode Detector (APD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A linear mode HgCdT electron-initiated avalanche photodiode (EAPD) capable of 1570nm photon detection efficiency (PDE) at >10 MHz will be developed. The Phase I...

  15. Single Photon Sensitive HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode Detector (APD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging Phase I SBIR successes, in Phase II, a single photon sensitive LIDAR receiver will be fabricated and delivered to NASA. In Phase I, high-gain,...

  16. Expression of lactate/H⁺ symporters MCT1 and MCT4 and their chaperone CD147 predicts tumor progression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma: immunohistochemical and The Cancer Genome Atlas data analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younghye; Choi, Jung-Woo; Lee, Ju-Han; Kim, Young-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) have inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau protein, leading to the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α). HIF-1α induces aerobic glycolysis, the Warburg effect, whereas HIF-2α functions as an oncoprotein. Lactate transport through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and the chaperone CD147 is essential for high glycolytic cancer cell survival. To elucidate the clinical significance of MCT1, MCT4, and CD147 expression, we investigated their expressions by immunohistochemistry in ccRCC specimens and validated the results by an open-access The Cancer Genome Atlas data analysis. Overexpression of MCT1, MCT4, and CD147 was observed in 49.4% (89/180), 39.4% (71/180), and 79.4% (143/180) of ccRCC patients, respectively. High MCT1 expression was associated with older age (P = .017), larger tumor size (P = .015), and advanced TNM stage (P = .012). However, MCT4 overexpression was not related to any variables. CD147 overexpression correlated with high grade (P = .005), tumor necrosis (P = .016), and larger tumor size (P = .038). In univariate analysis, high expression of MCT1 (P CD147 (P = .02) was linked to short progression-free survival. In multivariate analysis, high MCT1 expression was associated with worse progression-free survival (P = .001). In conclusion, high expression of MCT1 and CD147 is associated with poor prognostic factors. Overexpression of MCT1, MCT4, and CD147 predicts tumor progression. Reversing the Warburg effect by targeting the lactate transporters may be a useful strategy to prevent ccRCC progression.

  17. Latest developments of 10μm pitch HgCdTe diode array from the legacy to the extrinsic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péré-Laperne, Nicolas; Berthoz, Jocelyn; Taalat, Rachid; Rubaldo, Laurent; Kerlain, Alexandre; Carrère, Emmanuel; Dargent, Loïc.

    2016-05-01

    Sofradir recently presented Daphnis, its latest 10 μm pitch product family. Both Daphnis XGA and HD720 are 10μm pitch mid-wave infrared focal plane array. Development of small pixel pitch is opening the way to very compact products with a high spatial resolution. This new product is taking part in the HOT technology competition allowing reductions in size, weight and power of the overall package. This paper presents the recent developments achieved at Sofradir to make the 10μm pitch HgCdTe focal plane array based on the legacy technology. Electrical and electro-optical characterizations are presented to define the appropriate design of 10μm pitch diode array. The technological tradeoffs are explained to lower the dark current, to keep high quantum efficiency with a high operability above 110K, F/4. Also, Sofradir recently achieved outstanding Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) demonstration at this pixel pitch, which clearly demonstrates the benefit to users of adopting 10μm pixel pitch focal plane array based detectors. Furthermore, the HgCdTe technology has demonstrated an increase of the operating temperature, plus 40K, moving from the legacy to the P-on-n one at a 15μm pitch in mid-wave band. The first realizations using the extrinsic P-on-n technology and the characterizations of diodes with a 10μm pitch neighborhood will be presented in both mid-wave and long-wave bands.

  18. Deficiency in monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) in mice delays regeneration of peripheral nerves following sciatic nerve crush

    KAUST Repository

    Morrison, Brett M.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration following injury occurs spontaneously, but many of the processes require metabolic energy. The mechanism of energy supply to axons has not previously been determined. In the central nervous system, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), expressed in oligodendroglia, is critical for supplying lactate or other energy metabolites to axons. In the current study, MCT1 is shown to localize within the peripheral nervous system to perineurial cells, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and Schwann cells by MCT1 immunofluorescence in wild-type mice and tdTomato fluorescence in MCT1 BAC reporter mice. To investigate whether MCT1 is necessary for peripheral nerve regeneration, sciatic nerves of MCT1 heterozygous mice are crushed and peripheral nerve regeneration was quantified electrophysiologically and anatomically. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) recovery is delayed from a median of 21. days in wild-type mice to greater than 38. days in MCT1 heterozygote mice. In fact, half of the MCT1 heterozygote mice have no recovery of CMAP at 42. days, while all of the wild-type mice recovered. In addition, muscle fibers remain 40% more atrophic and neuromuscular junctions 40% more denervated at 42. days post-crush in the MCT1 heterozygote mice than wild-type mice. The delay in nerve regeneration is not only in motor axons, as the number of regenerated axons in the sural sensory nerve of MCT1 heterozygote mice at 4. weeks and tibial mixed sensory and motor nerve at 3. weeks is also significantly reduced compared to wild-type mice. This delay in regeneration may be partly due to failed Schwann cell function, as there is reduced early phagocytosis of myelin debris and remyelination of axon segments. These data for the first time demonstrate that MCT1 is critical for regeneration of both sensory and motor axons in mice following sciatic nerve crush.

  19. Investigation of possibility of VLWIR lasing in HgCdTe based heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, S. V.; Rumyantsev, V. V.; Kadykov, A. M.; Dubinov, A. A.; Antonov, A. V.; Kudryavtsev, K. E.; Kuritsin, D. I.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretskii, S. A.; Teppe, F.; Gavrilenko, V. I.

    2015-10-01

    The optical properties of a number of Hg1-xCdxTe bulk epilayers (x = 0.152 - 0.23) and heterostructures with quantum wells (QW) based on narrow gap HgCdTe are examined aiming to reveal the prospects of such structures for laser development in long wave infrared and very long wave infrared ranges. Experimental evidence of long wavelength superluminescence, i.e. amplification of spontaneous emission, at 8.4 μm in narrow gap HgCdTe bulk epitaxial film at 100 K is reported. Employing heterostructures with QW is demonstrated to be promissory for furthering the radiation wavelength to 10 - 30 μm range.

  20. Linear Mode HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiodes for Photon Counting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, William, III; Beck, Jeffrey; Scritchfield, Richard; Skokan, Mark; Mitra, Pradip; Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James; Carpenter, Darren; Lane, Barry

    2015-01-01

    An overview of recent improvements in the understanding and maturity of linear mode photon counting with HgCdTe electron-initiated avalanche photodiodes is presented. The first HgCdTe LMPC 2x8 format array fabricated in 2011 with 64 micron pitch was a remarkable success in terms of demonstrating a high single photon signal to noise ratio of 13.7 with an excess noise factor of 1.3-1.4, a 7 ns minimum time between events, and a broad spectral response extending from 0.4 micron to 4.2 micron. The main limitations were a greater than 10x higher false event rate than expected of greater than 1 MHz, a 5-7x lower than expected APD gain, and a photon detection efficiency of only 50% when greater than 60% was expected. This paper discusses the reasons behind these limitations and the implementation of their mitigations with new results.

  1. Benefits of monitoring patients with mobile cardiac telemetry (MCT) compared with the Event or Holter monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Jean-Patrick; Mohan, Shunmugam

    2013-01-01

    This research is meant to establish if a patient monitored with mobile cardiac telemetry (MCT) sees different outcomes regarding diagnostic yield of arrhythmia, therapeutic management through the use of antiarrhythmic drugs, and cardiovascular costs incurred in the hospital setting when compared with more traditional monitoring devices, such as the Holter or the Event monitor. We conducted a retrospective analysis spanning 57 months of claims data from January 2007 to September 2011 pertaining to 200,000+ patients, of whom 14,000 used MCT only, 54,000 an Event monitor only, and 163,000 a Holter monitor only. Those claims came from the Truven database, an employer database that counts 2.8 million cardiovascular patients from an insured population of about 10 million members. We employed a pair-wise pre/post test-control methodology, and ensured that control patients were similar to test patients along the following dimensions: age, geographic location, type of cardiovascular diagnosis both in the inpatient and outpatient settings, and the cardiovascular drug class the patient uses. First, the diagnostic yield of patients monitored with MCT is 61%, that is significantly higher than that of patients that use the Event monitor (23%) or the Holter monitor (24%). Second, patients naive to antiarrhythmic drugs initiate drug therapy after monitoring at the following rates: 61% for patients that use MCT compared with 39% for patients that use the Event and 43% for patients that use the Holter. Third, there are very significant inpatient cardiovascular savings (in the tens of thousands of dollars) for patients that undergo ablation, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and valve septa. Savings are more modest but nonetheless significant when it comes to the heart/pericardium procedure. Given the superior outcome of MCT regarding both patient care and hospital savings, hospitals only stand to gain by enforcing protocols that favor the MCT system over the Event or the Holter

  2. Development of Musical Creativity of Higher Class Pupils Using Musical Computer Technologies (MCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Rimkutė-Jankuvienė

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – to find out possibilities of development of musical creativity by using MCT in the music education of senior pupils.Design/methodology/approach – literature review, qualitative survey methodology (interview with music teachers.Findings – implementation of MCT, like any other innovation (as well as ICT in different spheres of education, including pre-school education, bring forth a certain positive effect. The results of the interview showed that in the praxis of music education, MCT is used for different development purposes (to make a lesson original, help pupils memorize music, expand their imagination not only by listening, but also by watching and evaluating performance of music, listen to music recordings, understand music and evaluate its quality, etc.. But for the development of musical creativity, MCT has been used very poorly.Research limitation/implications – musical creativity’s concept has not been uniquely defined so far. The aim of scientific literature review is to show that musical creativity is not meant to be separated from general creativity. Moreover, this is compounded by the search of the possibilities to the development of musical creativity. Analysis of scientific literature shows that the use of MCT can make an influence on musical creativity. However, empirical researches on this subject are still missing.Practical implications – the results of the interviews about using MCT in music lessons in order to develop musical creativity could be significant in formulating strategies of the development of musical creativity, preparing methodological instruments as well as in teacher training programs.Originality/value – the object of the survey in the chosen theme has never been explored in Lithuania, while the comparison of the obtained data with foreign scientists’ discoveries could contribute to a musical creativity’s definition.Research type: literature review, interview review.

  3. Update on Linear Mode Photon Counting with the HgCdTe Linear Mode Avalanche Photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jeffrey D.; Kinch, Mike; Sun, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of the gain-voltage characteristic of the mid-wavelength infrared cutoff HgCdTe linear mode avalanche photodiode (e-APD) is discussed both experimentally and theoretically as a function of the width of the multiplication region. Data are shown that demonstrate a strong dependence of the gain at a given bias voltage on the width of the n- gain region. Geometrical and fundamental theoretical models are examined to explain this behavior. The geometrical model takes into account the gain-dependent optical fill factor of the cylindrical APD. The theoretical model is based on the ballistic ionization model being developed for the HgCdTe APD. It is concluded that the fundamental theoretical explanation is the dominant effect. A model is developed that combines both the geometrical and fundamental effects. The model also takes into account the effect of the varying multiplication width in the low bias region of the gain-voltage curve. It is concluded that the lower than expected gain seen in the first 2 × 8 HgCdTe linear mode photon counting APD arrays, and higher excess noise factor, was very likely due to the larger than typical multiplication region length in the photon counting APD pixel design. The implications of these effects on device photon counting performance are discussed.

  4. Update on Linear Mode Photon Counting with the HgCdTe Linear Mode Avalanche Photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jeffrey D.; Kinch, Mike; Sun, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of the gain-voltage characteristic of the mid-wavelength infrared cutoff HgCdTe linear mode avalanche photodiode (e-APD) is discussed both experimentally and theoretically as a function of the width of the multiplication region. Data are shown that demonstrate a strong dependence of the gain at a given bias voltage on the width of the n- gain region. Geometrical and fundamental theoretical models are examined to explain this behavior. The geometrical model takes into account the gain-dependent optical fill factor of the cylindrical APD. The theoretical model is based on the ballistic ionization model being developed for the HgCdTe APD. It is concluded that the fundamental theoretical explanation is the dominant effect. A model is developed that combines both the geometrical and fundamental effects. The model also takes into account the effect of the varying multiplication width in the low bias region of the gain-voltage curve. It is concluded that the lower than expected gain seen in the first 2 × 8 HgCdTe linear mode photon counting APD arrays, and higher excess noise factor, was very likely due to the larger than typical multiplication region length in the photon counting APD pixel design. The implications of these effects on device photon counting performance are discussed.

  5. Recent progress in the doping of MBE HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivananthan, Sivalingam; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Faurie, Jean-Pierre

    1995-09-01

    We present a review of the recent progress in the doping of HgCdTe grown by molecular beam epitaxy. A detailed analysis of the unintentional/intrinsic, n-type, and p-type doping is presented. Our results show that CdZnTe substrates should be carefully screened to reduce the out-diffusion of impurities from the substrate. N-type HgCdTe layers exhibit excellent Hall characteristics down to indium levels of 2 X 10(superscript 15) cm(superscript -3). Electron mobilities in the range of (2 - 3) X 10(superscript 5) cm(superscript 2)/vs at 23 K were obtained. Measured lifetime data fits very well with the intrinsic band-to-band recombination. However, below 2 X 10(superscript 15) cm(superscript -3) doping levels, minority carrier lifetime is limited by Schockley-Reed recombination. We have implemented planar doping with arsenic as p-type dopant during MBE growth. Our results clearly indicate that arsenic incorporates as an acceptor dopant during the growth of MBE HgCdTe.

  6. Tetrac can replace thyroid hormone during brain development in mouse mutants deficient in the thyroid hormone transporter Mct8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Horn (Sigrun); S. Kersseboom (Simone); S. Mayerl (Steffen); J. Müller (Julia); C. Groba (Claudia); M. Trajkovic-Arsic (Marija); T. Ackermann (Tobias); T.J. Visser (Theo); H. Heuer (Heike)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) plays a critical role in mediating the uptake of thyroid hormones (THs) into the brain. In patients, inactivating mutations in the MCT8 gene are associated with a severe form of psychomotor retardation and abnormal serum TH levels. Here, we evalua

  7. Beneficial effects of propylthiouracil plus L-thyroxine treatment in a patient with a mutation in MCT8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L. Wémeau; M. Pigeyre; E. Proust-Lemoine; M. D'Herbomez; F. Gottrand; J.A. Jansen (John); T.J. Visser (Theo); M. Ladsous

    2008-01-01

    textabstractContext: Mutations of the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) gene determine a distinct X-linked phenotype of severe psychomotor retardation and consistently elevated T3levels. Lack of MCT8 transport of T3in neurons could explain the neurological phenotype. Objective: Our objective was

  8. Further insights into the allan-herndon-dudley syndrome: Clinical and functional characterization of a novel MCT8 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armour, C.M. (Christine M.); S. Kersseboom (Simone); Yoon, G. (Grace); T.J. Visser (Theo)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Mutations in the thyroid hormone (TH) transporter MCT8 have been identified as the cause for Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome (AHDS), characterized by severe psychomotor retardation and altered TH serum levels. Here we report a novel MCT8 mutation identified in 4 generations of

  9. Evolution of MBE HgCdTe defect structure studied with ion milling method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pociask-Bialy Malgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, is shown how ion milling can assist in assessing the defect structure of MCT by revealing the residual doping, and establishing the minimum level of donor concentration Nmd, which is needed for obtaining n-regions with a reproducible n value. For this purpose, a study of the electrical properties of ion-milled LWIR n-type MCT films, un-doped and doped with indium with the concentration NIn = 5 × 1014–1017 cm−3 is proposed.

  10. Modeling of high-precision wavefront sensing with new generation of CMT avalanche photodiode infrared detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gousset, Silvère; Petit, Cyril; Michau, Vincent; Fusco, Thierry; Robert, Clelia

    2015-12-01

    Near-infrared wavefront sensing allows for the enhancement of sky coverage with adaptive optics. The recently developed HgCdTe avalanche photodiode arrays are promising due to their very low detector noise, but still present an imperfect cosmetic that may directly impact real-time wavefront measurements for adaptive optics and thus degrade performance in astronomical applications. We propose here a model of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront measurement in the presence of residual fixed pattern noise and defective pixels. To adjust our models, a fine characterization of such an HgCdTe array, the RAPID sensor, is proposed. The impact of the cosmetic defects on the Shack-Hartmann measurement is assessed through numerical simulations. This study provides both a new insight on the applicability of cadmium mercury telluride (CMT) avalanche photodiodes detectors for astronomical applications and criteria to specify the cosmetic qualities of future arrays.

  11. A 1.5k x 1.5k class photon counting HgCdTe linear avalanche photo-diode array for low background space astronomy in the 1-5micron infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Donald

    Under a current award, NASA NNX 13AC13G "EXTENDING THE ASTRONOMICAL APPLICATION OF PHOTON COUNTING HgCdTe LINEAR AVALANCHE PHOTODIODE ARRAYS TO LOW BACKGROUND SPACE OBSERVATIONS" UH has used Selex SAPHIRA 320 x 256 MOVPE L-APD HgCdTe arrays developed for Adaptive Optics (AO) wavefront (WF) sensing to investigate the potential of this technology for low background space astronomy applications. After suppressing readout integrated circuit (ROIC) glow, we have placed upper limits on gain normalized dark current of 0.01 e-/sec at up to 8 volts avalanche bias, corresponding to avalanche gain of 5, and have operated with avalanche gains of up to several hundred at higher bias. We have also demonstrated detection of individual photon events. The proposed investigation would scale the format to 1536 x 1536 at 12um (the largest achievable in a standard reticule without requiring stitching) while incorporating reference pixels required at these low dark current levels. The primary objective is to develop, produce and characterize a 1.5k x 1.5k at 12um pitch MOVPE HgCdTe L-APD array, with nearly 30 times the pixel count of the 320 x 256 SAPHIRA, optimized for low background space astronomy. This will involve: 1) Selex design of a 1.5k x 1.5k at 12um pitch ROIC optimized for low background operation, silicon wafer fabrication at the German XFab foundry in 0.35 um 3V3 process and dicing/test at Selex, 2) provision by GL Scientific of a 3-side close-buttable carrier building from the heritage of the HAWAII xRG family, 3) Selex development and fabrication of 1.5k x 1.5k at 12 um pitch MOVPE HgCdTe L-APD detector arrays optimized for low background applications, 4) hybridization, packaging into a sensor chip assembly (SCA) with initial characterization by Selex and, 5) comprehensive characterization of low background performance, both in the laboratory and at ground based telescopes, by UH. The ultimate goal is to produce and eventually market a large format array, the L

  12. MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex and modulates messenger RNA translational profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Shi, B; Nandi, S

    2006-01-01

    enzymes. Here, we established that MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex through its PUA domain and recruits the density-regulated protein (DENR/DRP), containing the SUI1 translation initiation domain. Through the use of microarray analysis on polysome-associated mRNAs, we showed that up...

  13. Genotype-phenotype relationship in patients with mutations in thyroid hormone transporter MCT8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Jansen (John); E.C.H. Friesema (Edith); M.H.A. Kester (Monique); C.E. Schwartz; T.J. Visser (Theo)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractLoss-of-function mutations in thyroid hormone transporter monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) lead to severe X-linked psychomotor retardation and elevated serum T3levels. Most patients, for example those with mutations V235M, S448X, insI189, or delF230, cannot stand, walk, or speak. Pat

  14. Numerical modeling of HgCdTe solidification: effects of phase diagram double-diffusion convection and microgravity level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1997-07-01

    A numerical model of HgCdTe solidification was implemented using finite the element code FIDAP. Model verification was done using both experimental data and numerical test problems. The model was used to eluate possible effects of double- diffusion convection in molten material, and microgravity level on concentration distribution in the solidified HgCdTe. Particular attention was paid to incorporation of HgCdTe phase diagram. It was found, that below a critical microgravity amplitude, the maximum convective velocity in the melt appears virtually independent on the microgravity vector orientation. Good agreement between predicted interface shape and an interface obtained experimentally by quenching was achieved. The results of numerical modeling are presented in the form of video film.

  15. Role of hypoxia-induced anorexia and right ventricular hypertrophy on lactate transport and MCT expression in rat muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Py, Guillaume; Eydoux, Nicolas; Lambert, Karen; Chapot, Rachel; Koulmann, Natahlie; Sanchez, Hervé; Bahi, Lahoucine; Peinnequin, André; Mercier, Jacques; Bigard, André-Xavier

    2005-05-01

    To dissect the independent effects of altitude-induced hypoxemia and anorexia on the capacity for cardiac lactate metabolism, we examined the effects of 21 days of chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) and its associated decrease in food intake and right ventricle (RV) hypertrophy on the monocarboxylate transporter 1 and 4 (MCT) expression, the rate of lactate uptake into sarcolemmal vesicles, and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoforms in rat muscles. In comparison with control rats (C), 1 mmol/L lactate transport measured on skeletal muscle sarcolemmal vesicles increased by 33% and 58% in hypoxic (CHH, barometric pressure = 495 hPa) and rats pair-fed an equivalent quantity of food to that consumed by hypoxic animals, respectively. The increased lactate transport was higher in PF than in CHH animals ( P < .05). No associated change in the expression of MCT1 protein was observed in skeletal muscles, whereas MCT1 mRNA decreased in CHH rats, in comparison with C animals (42%, P < .05), partly related to caloric restriction (30%, P < .05). MCT4 mRNA and protein increased during acclimatization to hypoxia only in slow-oxidative muscles (68%, 72%, P < .05, respectively). The MCT4 protein content did not change in the plantaris muscle despite a decrease in transcript levels, related to hypoxia and caloric restriction. In both the left and right ventricles, the MCT1 protein content was unaffected by ambient hypoxia or restricted food consumption. These results suggest that MCT1 and MCT4 gene expression in fast-glycolytic muscles is mainly regulated by posttranscriptional mechanisms. Moreover, the results emphasize the role played by caloric restriction on the control of gene expression in response to chronic hypoxia and suggest that hypoxia-induced right ventricle hypertrophy failed to alter MCT proteins.

  16. Progress in cooled IR detectors and new developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribolet, Philippe; Vuillermet, Michel

    2008-03-01

    Cooled IR detectors are produced at mass production level at Sofradir for years based on its mature and proven HgCdTe technology. However, following the market needs, a lot of progress have been made and allow Sofradir to offer new product designs mainly dealing with the simplification of the detector use as well as reliability improvements. In addition to the conventional technologies used at mass production level, the Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) approach has been under investigation for several years to prepare both the very large array fabrication and the new (3rd) generation developments. CEA-Leti, in cooperation with Sofradir, obtained very good results on 4-inches wafer size which confirms the mastering of this growth process. Very high qualities FPAs (1280×1024), with pitches as small as 15μm, were demonstrated as well as bicolor and dual band FPAs which use more complex multi hetero-junctions architectures. A very new development at CEA-Leti concerns avalanche photodiodes (APD) made with HgCdTe which presents a unique feature among all the over semiconductors: extremely high avalanche gains can be obtained on n on p photodiodes without absolutely any noise excess. These results open new interesting fields of investigation for low flux applications and fast detectors. The cooled IR detector field is progressing very rapidly and new developments will offer a lot of system simplification and enhancements.

  17. Microbolometer spectrometer: applications and technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijtens, J.A.P.; Court, A.J.; Hoegee, J.

    2004-01-01

    Current Thermal Infra Red (7.14μm) multispectral imager instruments use cryogenically cooled Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT or HgCdTe) detectors. Now due to the increased performance of uncooled microbolometer arrays, the next generation of instruments can be designed without cryogenic cooling. TNO

  18. Effect of Medium-chain Triglyceride (MCT on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility, Blood Characteristics in Weanling Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Hong

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and twenty weanling pigs in experiment 1 (Exp. 1 (6.91±0.99 kg; 21 d of age and Exp. 2 (10.20±1.09 kg; 28 d of age were used in two 42-d and 35-d experiments to evaluate the effect of medium-chain-triglyceride (MCT on growth performance, apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD of nutrients and blood profile. In both of Exp. 1 and Exp. 2, the same dietary treatments were utilized as follows : i negative control (NC, ii positive control (PC, NC+antibiotics (40 mg/kg Tiamulin, 110 mg/kg Tylosin, and 10 mg/kg Enramycin, iii MCT3, NC+0.32% (phase 1, 2 and 3 MCT, and iv MCT5, NC+0.55% (phase 1, 0.32% (phase 2 and 3 MCT. In Exp. 1, the pigs fed MCT5 diets had higher (p<0.05 ADG compared to NC treatment during the first 2 wk. From d 15 to 28, the ATTD of energy was improved (p<0.05 by MCT3 compared to the PC treatment. No effect has been observed on the blood profiles [red blood cell (RBC, white blood cell (WBC, immunoglobulin-G (IgG, lymphocyte concentration] measured in this study. In Exp. 2, the ADG were increased (p<0.05 by the MCT5 treatment than the PC treatment from d 0 to 14. Pigs fed PC treatment diet had lower ADFI (p<0.05 and better FCR (p<0.05 than NC treatment, whereas no differences were shown between MCT treatments and NC or PC treatment from d 15 to 35 and overall phase. The ATTD of DM and nitrogen were improved (p<0.05 by the effect of MCT5 related to the NC and PC treatment at the end of 2nd and 5th wk. The pigs fed MCT3 had higher (p<0.05 energy digestibility than PC treatment. No effects were seen in the blood profiles we measured (WBC, RBC, lymphocyte and immunoglobulin-G. In conclusion, the addition of MCT in the weanling pigs diet can improve the ADG and digestibility during the earlier period (first 2 wks, but had little effect on the blood characteristics.

  19. Comparative Study of Photokinetics of Reduction of Toluidine Blue and Red Mct Dyes with Allylurea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *M. Qadri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The reaction between Toluidine blue (TB and Red MCT dyes (reactive red monochlorotriazine dyes – MCT with allylurea (AU has been studied in an unbuffered, acidic and basic medium. Wavelength of 625 nm is set for TB and AU and 535 nm for Red MCT and AU mechanism spectrophotometrically. The kinetics were monitored by variations of the concentrations of the dyes, the reductant (AU, acid (HCl and base (NaOH consecutively under the influence of various ions of textile industrial waste. The reaction mechanism was third order kinetics with Red MCT-AU system. Whereas second order kinetics in the case of TB-AU system. The oxidation reaction of AU with TB, the cations showed suppressed effect. The trend with cations exhibited Na+>K+>Ca2+>Mg2+ behavior whereas in the presence of anions the dye decoloration was more prominent, the trend followed HCO3->CO32->Cl- behavior. The oxidation reaction of AU with red MCT, enhanced in the presence of cations. The trend with cationic effect was shown as Na+>K+> Mg2+ Ca2+, whereas the influence of anions was not appreciable. the trend with anions was HCO3-~ CO32->NO3- >Cl-. Dyes were investigated at different temperatures, and activation parameters were evaluated for a Red MCT-AU reaction and TB-AU. The values obtained for energy of activation (Ea= 32.341 kJ.mol-1 and 1.214 kJ.mol-1, enthalpy change (∆H=29.905 kJ.mol-1 and 12.90 kJ.mol-1, entropy change (∆S=-206.96 J.mol-1.K-1 and -224.57 J.mol-1.K-1, and Gibbs energy change (∆G = 90.544 kJ.mol-1 and 80.95 kJ.mol-1 respectively. Mechanisms of interaction of related ions involved in dye bleaching and reduction is proposed.

  20. Inhibition of monocarboxylate transporter-1 (MCT1) by AZD3965 enhances radiosensitivity by reducing lactate transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, Becky M; Chadwick, Amy L; Michopoulos, Filippos; Blount, Kathryn G; Telfer, Brian A; Williams, Kaye J; Smith, Paul D; Critchlow, Susan E; Stratford, Ian J

    2014-12-01

    Inhibition of the monocarboxylate transporter MCT1 by AZD3965 results in an increase in glycolysis in human tumor cell lines and xenografts. This is indicated by changes in the levels of specific glycolytic metabolites and in changes in glycolytic enzyme kinetics. These drug-induced metabolic changes translate into an inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Thus, we combined AZD3965 with fractionated radiation to treat small cell lung cancer (SCLC) xenografts and showed that the combination provided a significantly greater therapeutic effect than the use of either modality alone. These results strongly support the notion of combining MCT1 inhibition with radiotherapy in the treatment of SCLC and other solid tumors. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. A study of DC-DC converters with MCT's for arcjet power supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    Many arcjet DC power supplies use PWM full bridge converters with large arrays of parallel FET's. This report investigates an alternative supply using a variable frequency series resonant converter with small arrays of parallel MCT's (metal oxide semiconductor controlled thyristors). The reasons for this approach are to: increase reliability by reducing the number of switching devices; and decrease the surface mounting area of the switching arrays. The variable frequency series resonant approach is used because the relatively slow switching speed of the MCT precludes the use of PWM. The 10 kW converter operated satisfactorily with an efficiency of over 91 percent. Test results indicate this efficiency could be increased further by additional optimization of the series resonant inductor.

  2. Relaxations and bonding mechanism of arsenic in-situ impurities in MCT: first-principles study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-zhong; ZHONG Xiang-li; WANG Jin-bin; CHEN Xiao-shuang; LU Wei

    2006-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of the arsenic in-situ impurity in Hg1-xCdxTe(MCT) were studied by combining the full-potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) and plane-wave pseudopotential methods base on the density functional theory. Structural relaxations, local charge density, densities of states are computed to investigate the effects of the impurity on the electronic structure. The bonding characteristics between the impurity and the host atoms are discussed by analysis of the valence charge density and the bonding charge density. The amphoteric behavior of arsenic impurity in MCT has been shown. The defect levels introduced by the in-situ arsenic impurities are determined by the single-particle electron energy calculations, which are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  3. JWST Near-Infrared Detector Degradation: Finding the Problem, Fixing the Problem, and Moving Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Stahle, Carl; Hill, Bob; Greenhouse, Matt; Beletic, James; Babu, Sachidananda; Blake, Peter; Cleveland, Keith; Cofie, Emmanuel; Eegholm, Bente; Engelbracht, Chad; Hall, Don; Hoffman, Alan; Jeffers, Basil; Jhabvala, Christine; Kimble, Randy; Kopp, Robert; Lee, Don; Leidecker, Henning; Lindler, Don; McMurray, Bob; Mott, D. Brent; Ohl, Ray; Polis, Don; Pontius, Jim

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST will be an infrared optimized telescope, with an approximately 6.5 m diameter primary mirror, that is located at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Three of JWST's four science instruments use Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG (H2RG) near infrared detector arrays. During 2010, the JWST Project noticed that a few of its 5 micron cutoff H2RG detectors were degrading during room temperature storage, and NASA chartered a "Detector Degradation Failure Review Board" (DD-FRB) to investigate. The DD-FRB determined that the root cause was a design flaw that allowed indium to interdiffuse with the gold contacts and migrate into the HgCdTe detector layer. Fortunately, Teledyne already had an improved design that eliminated this degradation mechanism. During early 2012, the improved H2RG design was qualified for flight and JWST began making additional H2RGs. In this article we present the two public DD-FRB "Executiye Summaries" that: (1) determined the root cause of the detector degradation and (2) defined tests to determine whether the existing detectors are qualified for flight. We supplement these with a brief introduction to H2RG detector arrays, and a discussion of how the JWST Project is using cryogenic storage to retard the degradation rate of the existing flight spare H2RGs.

  4. [MCT8-specific thyroid hormone cell transporter deficiency: a case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Marín, Laura; Martín-Belinchón, Mónica; Gutiérrez-Solana, Luis G; Morte-Molina, Beatriz; Duat-Rodríguez, Anna; Bernal, Juan

    2013-06-16

    Introduccion. El MCT8 es un transportador especifico para las hormonas tiroideas T4 y T3, que permite su entrada en el cerebro y otros organos. La deficiencia de MCT8, o sindrome de Allan-Herndon-Dudley, es un trastorno ligado a X que, generalmente, se presenta como un cuadro neurologico grave de inicio precoz, con un perfil tiroideo caracteristico (aumento de T3 y disminucion de T4 y rT3). Objetivo. Se presenta el primer caso diagnosticado en España con este sindrome y se revisa la bibliografia publicada, las distintas formas de presentacion clinica, los avances geneticos, el diagnostico diferencial y las perspectivas terapeuticas, y se propone un algoritmo diagnostico. Caso clinico. Varon de 5 años con un cuadro clinico compatible con una enfermedad de Pelizaeus-Merzbacher. La secuenciacion del gen PLP1 no mostro alteraciones. Todos los estudios metabolicos y geneticos realizados fueron normales. Finalmente, un estudio completo del perfil tiroideo revelo alteraciones compatibles con una deficiencia del transportador MCT8. La secuenciacion del gen SLC16A2 (MCT8) mostro una mutacion en el exon 3 y el estudio celular confirmo que esta mutacion cambia las propiedades de la proteina. Conclusiones. En los ultimos años se han multiplicado las publicaciones sobre este sindrome, con la identificacion de mas de 50 familias en el mundo. Es importante conocer este sindrome y sospecharlo, porque el diagnostico es facil, economico y accesible (perfil tiroideo), y, aunque no tiene tratamiento especifico, el diagnostico precoz evita pruebas innecesarias y permite ofrecer consejo genetico a las familias afectadas.

  5. Changes of MCT2 expression in cerebral cortex after formalin-induced rat pain model%MCT2在福尔马林致痛模型大鼠大脑皮质中的表达变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋开琴; 康承巧; 孙善全; 黄娟; 徐进; 李文娟; 蒋锦

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察疼痛应激时,大脑第一躯体感觉皮质后肢区(primary somatosensory cortex hindlimb region,S1HL)神经元单羧酸转运蛋2(monocarboxylate transporters 2,MCT2)的表达变化,以探讨MCT2参与疼痛调制的机制。方法应用免疫组织化学(IHC)、Western blot和计算机图像分析法检测福尔马林致痛大鼠模型大脑S1HL内MCT2的表达变化。结果与正常组相比,模型鼠S1HL内MCT2阳性神经元的数量及IOD在1 h时增加,3 d时达高峰,到7 d时有所下降,但仍然高于正常水平(P<0.05)。Western blot结果显示,MCT2蛋白表达变化与MCT2阳性神经元的数量和IOD变化趋势一致。结论在疼痛应激状态下,大脑S1HL神经元MCT2的表达增强,提示MCT2参与了疼痛的产生、传递和调制过程。%Objective To investigate the changeofmonocarboxylate transporters 2( MCT2) expression in cerebral cortex primary somatosensory cortex hindlimb region(S1HL)under the condition of pain stimulation, so as to explore the involvement of MCT2 in the pain adjustment mechanism in a rat pain model. Methods Immunohistochemical staining(IHC), Western blot and Computing- image analysis system were used to detect the changes of MCT2 expression in the cerebral cortex S1HL of the formalin-induced rat pain model. Results Compared with the control group, the number and IOD of MCT2-positive neurons in the cerebral cortex S1HL of formalin-treated rats began to increase at 1h,reaching the highest level on 3d and declined on 7d ,but still higher than those in the control group (P<0.05).The Western blot showed that the alteration tendency of MCT2 expression was consistent with those of the number and IOD of MCT2-positive neurons. Conclusion Our results indicated that MCT2 is up-regulated under the condition of pain stimulation, which might be involved in the formalin-induced pain and behavior regulation.

  6. Analysis of carrier concentration, lifetime, and electron mobility on p-type HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sang Dong; Kwack, Kae Dal

    1998-03-01

    Minority carrier transport characteristics of vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe such as carrier concentration, lifetime, and mobility are investigated. In the calculation of the carrier concentration two acceptor levels—a donor level and a trap level—were taken into account. The acceptor levels have been described by two models—two independent singly ionized levels and a divalent level with two ionization energies. When each model was examined by calculating electron mobility as a function of temperature, the latter was found to be more accurate. Electron mobility as a function of majority carrier concentration was also presented for both n-type and p-type HgCdTe with 0.225 Cd mole fraction. Steady state electron lifetime was computed assuming the acceptor levels and the trap level would act as Schokley-Read-Hall type recombination centers. The calculated results using the divalent acceptor model were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. RF magnetron sputtering deposition of CdTe passivation on HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Jaroslaw; Adamiec, Krzysztof; Rogalski, Antoni

    1998-04-01

    In this study, we report the RF magnetron sputtering growth and characterization of CdTe passivant on bulk n-type HgCdTe. Our investigations include the HgCdTe surface preparation and in-situ pretreatment, deposition-induced surface damage, interface charge, CdTe film stoichiometry, and thermal stability. The metal-insulator-semiconductor test structures are processed and their electrical properties are measured by capacitance-voltage characteristics. The heterostructures are also characterized by reflectance measurement. In order to investigate the passivation properties of CdTe/HgCdTe heterostructures, we have modeled the band diagram of abrupt CdTe/HgCdTe heterojunction. The effect of sputtering growth condition parameters is also reported. The sputtering CdTe layers, exhibit excellent dielectric, insulating and mechano- chemical properties, as well as interface properties. The interfaces are characterized by slight accumulation and a small hysteresis. A carefully controlled growth process and surface pretreatment tailored to the specific material are required in order to obtain near flat band conditions on n- type materials. Additional informations on surface limitations are obtained from analyzing the I-V characteristics of photodiodes with metal gates covering the p-n junction surface location.

  8. Diffusion Mechanism for Arsenic in Intrinsic and Extrinsic Conditions in HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenouilloux, T.; Ferron, A.; Péré-Laperne, N.; Mathiot, D.

    2017-09-01

    Due to its low diffusivity and high activation rate, arsenic has become the dopant of choice in p/n HgCdTe high operating temperature technology. Its diffusion mechanism, however, remains imprecise. In this work, arsenic diffusion was studied in molecular beam epitaxy HgCdTe structures consisting of alternatively As-doped and intrinsic layers grown on a CdZnTe substrate. The diffusion coefficient of As was extracted from secondary ion mass spectroscopy concentration profiles. Annealings were performed for different temperatures, mercury partial pressures ( P Hg), annealing times and cadmium atomic fractions. Fermi-level effect on diffusion was observed, indicating extrinsic conditions for diffusion at high As concentration. Based on the variation of As diffusivity with P Hg and As concentration, we propose that As diffusion occurs on both II and VI sublattices. Our results are consistent with the fact that AsVI diffusion is assisted by the Te interstitial, introducing donor levels in the bandgap, while AsII diffusion is assisted by the cation vacancy.

  9. High-Performance MWIR HgCdTe on Si Substrate Focal Plane Array Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommena, R.; Ketharanathan, S.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Dhar, N. K.; Kodama, R.; Zhao, J.; Buurma, C.; Bergeson, J. D.; Aqariden, F.; Velicu, S.

    2015-09-01

    The development of low noise-equivalent differential temperature (NEDT), high-operability midwave infrared (MWIR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) fabricated from molecular beam epitaxial (MBE)-grown HgCdTe on Si-based substrates is reported. High-quality n-type MWIR HgCdTe layers with a cutoff wavelength of 4.90 μm at 77 K and a carrier concentration of 1-2 × 1015 cm-3 were grown on CdTe/Si substrates by MBE. Highly uniform composition and thickness over 3-inch areas were demonstrated, and low surface defect densities (voids ~5 × 102 cm-2, micro-defects ~5 × 103 cm-2) and etch pit density (~3.5 × 106 cm-2) were measured. This material was used to fabricate 320 × 256, 30 μm pitch FPAs with planar device architecture; arsenic implantation was used to achieve p-type doping. Radiometric and noise characterization was also performed. A low NEDT of 13.8 m K at 85 K for a 1 ms integration time with f/#2 optics was measured. The NEDT operability was 99% at 120 K with a mean dark current noise of 8.14 × 10-13 A/pixel. High-quality thermal images were obtained from the FPA up to a temperature of 150 K.

  10. Molecular beam epitaxy of CdTe and HgCdTe on large-area Si(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporken, R.; Lange, M. D.; Faurie, Jean-Pierre

    1991-09-01

    The current status of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of CdTe and HgCdTe on Si(100) is reviewed. CdTe and HgCdTe grow in the (111)B orientation on Si(100); monocrystalline films with two domains are obtained on most nominal Si(100) substrates, single domain films are grown on misoriented substrates and on nominal Si(100) preheated to 900-950 degree(s)C. Double-crystal x-ray rocking curves (DCRCs) with full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) as low as 110 arcsec are reported for HgCdTe on silicon; these layers are n-type, and electron mobilities higher than 5 X 104 cm2V-2s-1 are measured at 23 K for x equals 0.26. Excellent thickness and composition uniformity is obtained: standard deviation of the CdTe thickness 0.4% of the average thickness on 2-in. and 2.3% on 5-in., standard deviation of the Cd concentration in the HgCdTe layers 0.6% of the average concentration on 3-in. and 2.4% on 5-in. First results regarding growth of CdTe on patterned Si substrates are also reported.

  11. InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice infrared detectors: Future prospect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.; Martyniuk, P.; Kopytko, M.

    2017-09-01

    Investigations of antimonide-based materials began at about the same time as HgCdTe ternary alloys—in the 1950s, and the apparent rapid success of their technology, especially low-dimensional solids, depends on the previous five decades of III-V materials and device research. However, the sophisticated physics associated with the antimonide-based bandgap engineering concept started at the beginning of 1990s gave a new impact and interest in development of infrared detector structures within academic and national laboratories. The development of InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices (T2SLs) results from two primary motivations: the perceived challenges of reproducibly fabricating high-operability HgCdTe focal plane arrays (FPAs) at reasonable cost and the theoretical predictions of lower Auger recombination for type T2SL detectors compared with HgCdTe. Second motivation—lower Auger recombination should be translated into a fundamental advantage for T2SL over HgCdTe in terms of lower dark current and/or higher operating temperature, provided other parameters such as Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) lifetime are equal. InAs/GaSb T2SL photodetectors offer similar performance to HgCdTe at an equivalent cut-off wavelength, but with a sizeable penalty in operating temperature, due to the inherent difference in SRH lifetimes. It is predicted that since the future infrared (IR) systems will be based on the room temperature operation of depletion-current limited arrays with pixel densities that are fully consistent with background- and diffraction-limited performance due to the system optics, the material system with long SRH lifetime will be required. Since T2SLs are very much resisted in attempts to improve its SRH lifetime, currently the only material that meets this requirement is HgCdTe. Due to less ionic chemical bonding, III-V semiconductors are more robust than their II-VI counterparts. As a result, III-V-based FPAs excel in operability, spatial uniformity, temporal stability

  12. Genotype-Phenotype Relationship in Patients with Mutations in Thyroid Hormone Transporter MCT8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jurgen; Friesema, Edith C. H.; Kester, Monique H. A.; Schwartz, Charles E.; Visser, Theo J.

    2008-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in thyroid hormone transporter monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) lead to severe X-linked psychomotor retardation and elevated serum T3 levels. Most patients, for example those with mutations V235M, S448X, insI189, or delF230, cannot stand, walk, or speak. Patients with mutations L434W, L568P, and S194F, however, walk independently and/or develop some dysarthric speech. To study the relationship between mutation and phenotype, we transfected JEG3 and COS1 cells with wild-type or mutant MCT8. Expression and function of the transporter were studied by analyzing T3 and T4 uptake, T3 metabolism (by cotransfected type 3 deiodinase), Western blotting, affinity labeling with N-bromoacetyl-T3, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative RT-PCR. Wild-type MCT8 increased T3 uptake and metabolism about 5-fold compared with empty vector controls. Mutants V235M, S448X, insI189, and delF230 did not significantly increase transport. However, S194F, L568P, and L434W showed about 20, 23, and 37% of wild-type activity. RT-PCR did not show significant differences in mRNA expression between wild-type and mutant MCT8. Immunocytochemistry detected the nonfunctional mutants V235M, insI189, and delF230 mostly in the cytoplasm, whereas mutants with residual function were expressed at the plasma membrane. Mutants S194F and L434W showed high protein expression but low affinity for N-bromoacetyl-T3; L568P was detected in low amounts but showed relatively high affinity. Mutations in MCT8 cause loss of function through reduced protein expression, impaired trafficking to the plasma membrane, or reduced substrate affinity. Mutants L434W, L568P, and S194F showed significant residual transport capacity, which may underlie the more advanced psychomotor development observed in patients with these mutations. PMID:18187543

  13. Investigating the efficacy of an individualized metacognitive therapy program (MCT+) for psychosis: study protocol of a multi-center randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychological interventions are increasingly recommended as adjunctive treatments for psychosis, but their implementation in clinical practice is still insufficient. The individualized metacognitive therapy program (MCT+; www.uke.de/mct_plus) represents a low-threshold psychotherapeutic approach that synthesizes group metacognitive training (MCT) and cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis, and addresses specific cognitive biases that are involved in the onset and maintenance of...

  14. Ostwald Ripening Stability of Curcumin-Loaded MCT Nanoemulsion: Influence of Various Emulsifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Hyung; Ji, Yeun-Sun; Lee, Eui-Seok; Hong, Soon-Taek

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is a flavonoid found in the rhizome of the turmeric plant (Curcuma longa L.) and has recently attracted interest because it has numerous biological functions and therapeutic properties. In the present study, we attempted to incorporate curcumin into medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) nanoemulsions (0.15 wt% curcumin, 10 wt% MCT oil, and 10 wt% emulsifiers) with various emulsifiers [polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate (Tween-20), sorbitan monooleate (SM), and soy lecithin (SL)]. The physicochemical properties of the nanoemulsions including the Ostwald ripening stability were investigated. The initial droplet size was found to be 89.08 nm for the nanoemulsion with 10 wt% Tween-20 (control), and when Tween-20 was partially replaced with SM and SL, the size decreased: 73.43 nm with 4 wt% SM+6 wt% Tween-20 and 67.68 nm with 4 wt% SL+6 wt% Tween-20 (prepared at 15,000 psi). When the nanoemulsions were stored for 28 days at room temperature, the droplet size increased as the storage time increased. The largest increase was observed for the control nanoemulsion, followed by the 4 wt% SL+6 wt% Tween-20 and 4 wt% SM+6 wt% Tween-20 systems. The Turbiscan dispersion stability results strongly supported the relationship between droplet size and storage time. The time-dependent increase in droplet size was attributed to the Ostwald ripening phenomenon. Thus, the Ostwald ripening stability of curcumin-loaded MCT nanoemulsions with Tween-20 was considerably improved by partially replacing the Tween-20 with SM or SL. In addition, curcumin may have acted as an Ostwald ripening inhibitor. PMID:27752506

  15. Exercise-induced changes of MCT1 in cardiac and skeletal muscles of diabetic rats induced by high-fat diet and STZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikooie, Rohollah; Rajabi, Hamid; Gharakhanlu, Reza; Atabi, Fereshteh; Omidfar, Kobra; Aveseh, Malihe; Larijani, Bagher

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that a part of therapeutic effects of endurance training on insulin resistance is mediated by increase in cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondrial lactate transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1). Therefore, we examined the effect of 7 weeks endurance training on the mRNA and protein expression of MCT1 and MCT4 and their chaperon, CD147, on both sarcolemmal and mitochondrial membrane, separately, in healthy and type 2 diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by injection of low dose of streptozotocin and feeding with high-fat diet. Insulin resistance was confirmed by homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance index and accuracy of two membranes separation was confirmed by negative control markers (glucose transporter 1 and cytochrome c oxidase. Real-time PCR and western blotting were used for mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Diabetes dramatically reduced MCT1 and MCT4 mRNA and their expression on sarcolemmal membrane whereas the reduction in MCT1 expression was less in mitochondrial membrane. Training increased the MCT1 mRNA and protein expression in both membranes and decreased insulin resistance as an adaptive consequence. In both tissues increase in CD147 mRNA was only parallel to MCT1 expression. The response of MCT1 on sarcolemmal and mitochondrial membranes was different between cardiac and skeletal muscles which indicate that intracellular lactate kinetic is tissue specific that allows a tissue to coordinate whole organism metabolism.

  16. Immunomodulatory drugs disrupt the cereblon-CD147-MCT1 axis to exert antitumor activity and teratogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Ruth; Heider, Michael; Fernández-Sáiz, Vanesa; van Bebber, Frauke; Garz, Anne-Kathrin; Lemeer, Simone; Rudelius, Martina; Targosz, Bianca-Sabrina; Jacobs, Laura; Knorn, Anna-Maria; Slawska, Jolanta; Platzbecker, Uwe; Germing, Ulrich; Langer, Christian; Knop, Stefan; Einsele, Herrmann; Peschel, Christian; Haass, Christian; Keller, Ulrich; Schmid, Bettina; Götze, Katharina S; Kuster, Bernhard; Bassermann, Florian

    2016-07-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), such as thalidomide and its derivatives lenalidomide and pomalidomide, are key treatment modalities for hematologic malignancies, particularly multiple myeloma (MM) and del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor of the CRL4 ubiquitin ligase complex, is the primary target by which IMiDs mediate anticancer and teratogenic effects. Here we identify a ubiquitin-independent physiological chaperone-like function of CRBN that promotes maturation of the basigin (BSG; also known as CD147) and solute carrier family 16 member 1 (SLC16A1; also known as MCT1) proteins. This process allows for the formation and activation of the CD147-MCT1 transmembrane complex, which promotes various biological functions, including angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion and lactate export. We found that IMiDs outcompete CRBN for binding to CD147 and MCT1, leading to destabilization of the CD147-MCT1 complex. Accordingly, IMiD-sensitive MM cells lose CD147 and MCT1 expression after being exposed to IMiDs, whereas IMiD-resistant cells retain their expression. Furthermore, del(5q) MDS cells have elevated CD147 expression, which is attenuated after IMiD treatment. Finally, we show that BSG (CD147) knockdown phenocopies the teratogenic effects of thalidomide exposure in zebrafish. These findings provide a common mechanistic framework to explain both the teratogenic and pleiotropic antitumor effects of IMiDs.

  17. Medium chain triglyceride (MCT) rich, paclitaxel loaded self nanoemulsifying preconcentrate (PSNP): a safe and efficacious alternative to Taxol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ketan; Patil, Anand; Mehta, Miten; Gota, Vikram; Vavia, Pradeep

    2013-12-01

    The current work was aimed to develop Medium Chain Triglyceride (MCT) rich self nanoemulsifying preconcentrate of paclitaxel (PTX) for parenteral delivery. Very high concentrations of Cremophor EL and ethanol in Taxol have rendered patients to severe side effects. Years of extensive research on development of cost effective and safer vehicle for PTX, have failed to provide a promising replacement for Taxol. MCT was selected as oil owing to its parenteral acceptability, high solubilization capacity and multiple therapeutic benefits in cancer cachexia. PTX precipitation kinetics and reported toxicity profile of Kolliphor HS15 has favored its selection for PTX Self Nanoemulsifying Preconcentrate (PSNP). Presence of 30% free PEG in Kolliphor HS15 (PEG-15-hydroxystearate) restricts its miscibility with MCT, imposing significant challenge in development of MCT rich self nanoemulsifying preconcentrate. Removal of PEG layer from oil-surfactant mixture facilitated the formulation of PSNP with 51% w/w MCT. PSNP exhibited better precipitation kinetic profile, higher PTX loading with negligible hemolysis and histamine release compared to Taxol. PSNP was bioequivalent to Taxol, though V(d) and MRT was significantly higher than Taxol. PSNP showed distinctly better profile in inhibiting tumor growth and maintaining body weight with significantly higher % survival. Thus, PSNP can be a safer vehicle with potential clinical benefits.

  18. Slow recrystallization of tripalmitoylglycerol from MCT oil observed by 2H NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin W; Smith, Paul R; Furó, István; Pettersson, Erik Thyboll; Cain, Fred W; Favre, Loek; Talbot, Geoff

    2007-10-17

    The crystallization and recrystallization of fats have a significant impact on the properties and quality of many food products. While crystallization has been the subject of a number of studies using pure triacylglycerols (TAG), recrystallization in similarly pure systems is rarely studied. In this work, perdeuterated tripalmitoylglycerol ( (2)H-PPP) was dissolved in medium chain triacylglycerol oil (MCT) to yield a saturated solution. The solution was heated to cause partial melting of the solid and dissolution of the molten fraction of (2)H-PPP in MCT and was then cooled to the original temperature to induce recrystallization from the supersaturated solution. (2)H NMR was used to monitor the disappearance of (2)H-PPP from the solution and showed that recrystallization occurred in two steps. The first step was rapid, taking place over a few minutes, and accounted for more than two-thirds of the total recrystallization. The second step was much slower, taking place over a remarkably long timescale of hours to days. It is proposed that dissolution occurs from all parts of the crystals, leaving an etched and pitted surface. The first step of crystallization is the infilling of these pits, while the second step is the continued growth on the smoothed crystal faces.

  19. Electrical and Optical Studies of Defect Structure of HgCdTe Films Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świątek, Z.; Ozga, P.; Izhnin, I. I.; Fitsych, E. I.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Korotaev, A. G.; Mynbaev, K. D.; Varavin, V. S.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Yakushev, M. V.; Bonchyk, A. Yu.; Savytsky, H. V.

    2016-07-01

    Electrical and optical studies of defect structure of HgCdTe films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are performed. It is shown that the peculiarity of these films is the presence of neutral defects formed at the growth stage and inherent to the material grown by MBE. It is assumed that these neutral defects are the Te nanocomplexes. Under ion milling, they are activated by mercury interstitials and form the donor centers with the concentration of 1017 cm-3, which makes it possible to detect such defects by measurements of electrical parameters of the material. Under doping of HgCdTe with arsenic using high temperature cracking, the As2 dimers are present in the arsenic flow and block the neutral Te nanocomplexes to form donor As2Te3 complexes. The results of electrical studies are compared with the results of studies carried out by micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Differential expression of endothelial nutrient transporters (MCT1 and GLUT1) in the developing eyes of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Ayuko; Takahashi-Iwanaga, Hiromi; Watanabe M, Masahiko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko

    2016-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier in the neonatal brain expresses the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)-1 rather than the glucose transporter (GLUT)-1, due to the special energy supply during the suckling period. The hyaloid vascular system, consisting of the vasa hyaloidea propria and tunica vasculosa lentis, is a temporary vasculature present only during the early development of mammalian eyes and later regresses. Although the ocular vasculature manifests such a unique developmental process, no information is available concerning the expression of endothelial nutrient transporters in the developing eye. The present immunohistochemical study using whole mount preparations of murine eyes found that the hyaloid vascular system predominantly expressed GLUT1 in the endothelium, in contrast to the brain endothelium. Characteristically, the endothelium in peripheral regions of the neonatal hyaloid vessels displayed a mosaic pattern of MCT1-immunoreactive cells scattered within the GLUT1-expressing endothelium. The proper retinal vessels first developed by sprouting angiogenesis endowed with filopodia, which were absolutely free from the immunoreactivities of GLUT1 and MCT1. The remodeling retinal capillary networks and veins in the surface layer of the retina mainly expressed MCT1 until the weaning period. Immunostaining of MCT1 in the retina revealed fine radicular processes projecting from the endothelium, differing from the MCT1-immunonegative filopodia. These findings suggest that the expression of nutrient transporters in the ocular blood vessels is differentially regulated at a cellular level and that the neonatal eyes provide an interesting model for research on nutrient transporters in the endothelium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Further Insights into the Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome: Clinical and Functional Characterization of a Novel MCT8 Mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Armour

    Full Text Available Mutations in the thyroid hormone (TH transporter MCT8 have been identified as the cause for Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome (AHDS, characterized by severe psychomotor retardation and altered TH serum levels. Here we report a novel MCT8 mutation identified in 4 generations of one family, and its functional characterization.Proband and family members were screened for 60 genes involved in X-linked cognitive impairment and the MCT8 mutation was confirmed. Functional consequences of MCT8 mutations were studied by analysis of [125I]TH transport in fibroblasts and transiently transfected JEG3 and COS1 cells, and by subcellular localization of the transporter.The proband and a male cousin demonstrated clinical findings characteristic of AHDS. Serum analysis showed high T3, low rT3, and normal T4 and TSH levels in the proband. A MCT8 mutation (c.869C>T; p.S290F was identified in the proband, his cousin, and several female carriers. Functional analysis of the S290F mutant showed decreased TH transport, metabolism and protein expression in the three cell types, whereas the S290A mutation had no effect. Interestingly, both uptake and efflux of T3 and T4 was impaired in fibroblasts of the proband, compared to his healthy brother. However, no effect of the S290F mutation was observed on TH efflux from COS1 and JEG3 cells. Immunocytochemistry showed plasma membrane localization of wild-type MCT8 and the S290A and S290F mutants in JEG3 cells.We describe a novel MCT8 mutation (S290F in 4 generations of a family with Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome. Functional analysis demonstrates loss-of-function of the MCT8 transporter. Furthermore, our results indicate that the function of the S290F mutant is dependent on cell context. Comparison of the S290F and S290A mutants indicates that it is not the loss of Ser but its substitution with Phe, which leads to S290F dysfunction.

  2. Fast sub-electron detectors review for interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-Luc; Bério, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    New disruptive technologies are now emerging for detectors dedicated to interferometry. The detectors needed for this kind of applications need antonymic characteristics: the detector noise must be very low, especially when the signal is dispersed but at the same time must also sample the fast temporal characteristics of the signal. This paper describes the new fast low noise technologies that have been recently developed for interferometry and adaptive optics. The first technology is the Avalanche PhotoDiode (APD) infrared arrays made of HgCdTe. In this paper are presented the two programs that have been developed in that field: the Selex Saphira 320x256 [1] and the 320x255 RAPID detectors developed by Sofradir/CEA LETI in France [2], [3], [4]. Status of these two programs and future developments are presented. Sub-electron noise can now be achieved in the infrared using this technology. The exceptional characteristics of HgCdTe APDs are due to a nearly exclusive impaction ionization of the electrons, and this is why these devices have been called "electrons avalanche photodiodes" or e-APDs. These characteristics have inspired a large effort in developing focal plan arrays using HgCdTe APDs for low photon number applications such as active imaging in gated mode (2D) and/or with direct time of flight detection (3D imaging) and, more recently, passive imaging for infrared wave front correction and fringe tracking in astronomical observations. In addition, a commercial camera solution called C-RED, based on Selex Saphira and commercialized by First Light Imaging [5], is presented here. Some groups are also working with instruments in the visible. In that case, another disruptive technology is showing outstanding performances: the Electron Multiplying CCDs (EMCCD) developed mainly by e2v technologies in UK. The OCAM2 camera, commercialized by First Light Imaging [5], uses the 240x240 EMMCD from e2v and is successfully implemented on the VEGA instrument on the CHARA

  3. Acceptance and Efficacy of Metacognitive Training (MCT) on Positive Symptoms and Delusions in Patients With Schizophrenia: A Meta-analysis Taking Into Account Important Moderators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Carolin; Berna, Fabrice

    2016-07-01

    Metacognitive training (MCT) is a new, widely used intervention for psychosis. The present meta-analysis examines the efficacy of MCT in schizophrenia. Fifteen studies comparing effects of MCT on positive symptoms, delusions or acceptance of MCT with a control group were included in this meta-analysis. These studies comprised a total of 408 patients in the MCT condition and 399 in the control condition. The moderating effects of masking of outcome assessment, randomization, incomplete outcome data, use of an active control intervention, and individual vs group MCT were investigated. Possible effects of sensitivity analyses and publication bias were also examined. The results show a significant overall effect of MCT for positive symptoms (g = -0.34, 95% CI [-0.53, -0.15]), delusions (g = -0.41, 95% CI [-0.74, -0.07]) and acceptance of the intervention (g = -0.84, 95% CI [-1.37, -0.31]). Using only studies being at low risk for bias regarding randomization, masking and incomplete outcome data reduced effect sizes for positive symptoms and delusions (g = -0.28, 95% CI [-0.50, -0.06] and g = -0.18, 95% CI [-0.43, 0.06]), respectively. This meta-analysis demonstrates that MCT exerts a small to moderate effect on delusions and positive symptoms and a large effect on acceptance of the intervention. The effect on delusions is reduced, but remains significant when potential biases are considered.

  4. Maraviroc Clinical Test (MCT) as an alternative tool to decide CCR5-antagonists prescription in naïve HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genebat, Miguel; de Pablo-Bernal, Rebeca S; Pulido, Ildefonso; Jiménez-Mejías, Manuel E; Martínez, Onofre; Pacheco, Yolanda M; Raffi-El-Idrissi Benhia, Mohammed; Abad, María Antonia; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel; Leal, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Our aim was to analyze the virological response to a combined antiretroviral therapy started after Maraviroc Clinical Test (MCT) in naïve HIV-infected patients. Forty-one patients were exposed to MCT, based on an 8-day MVC monotherapy. If undetectability or a viral load reduction >1 log10 HIV-RNA copies/ml was achieved, a MVC-containing cART was prescribed. Forty patients showed a positive MCT; undetectability after 48weeks on cART was achieved in 34/41 (82.9%) patients. The result of MCT was compared with a genotypic tropism method and with Trofile®, showing 10.7% and 18.75% discordance rates, respectively. MCT is a reliable tool to decide CCR5-antagonists prescription, also in the naïve scenario where most patients show a virological response to MVC independently the tropism result reported by genotypic or phenotypic methods.

  5. Comparing and Contrasting Detectors: JWST NIR vs HST WFC3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2015-01-01

    In many ways, WFC3s IR channel is a good indicator for what to expect with JWST. There are some differences, most of which should be beneficial in JWST- JWSTs lower operating temperature will freeze out charge traps that would affect WFC3. Benefits should include lower dark current, lower persistence, and better reciprocity- JWSTs more recent HgCdTe process has lower defect density. The benefits are as described above- JWST uses better indium barriers. The benefits should include fewer RC type pixels. One area where more study might be beneficial is stability. The detector electronics play a significant role in determining how stable a detector system is(v.s. bias drifts and photometry). JWSTs SIDECARs are completely WFC3s Ball electronics- Studies comparing the bias and photometric stability of WFC3 and JWST might be useful to informing data acquisition and calibration strategies for JWST.

  6. The SNAP near infrared detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarle, G.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bercovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, Anne; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.; Harvey, P.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Lampton, M.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; Miguel, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tomasch, A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will measure precisely the cosmological expansion history over both the acceleration and deceleration epochs and thereby constrain the nature of the dark energy that dominates our universe today. The SNAP focal plane contains equal areas of optical CCDs and NIR sensors and an integral field spectrograph. Having over 150 million pixels and a field-of-view of 0.34 square degrees, the SNAP NIR system will be the largest yet constructed. With sensitivity in the range 0.9-1.7 {micro}m, it will detect Type Ia supernovae between z = 1 and 1.7 and will provide follow-up precision photometry for all supernovae. HgCdTe technology, with a cut-off tuned to 1.7 {micro}m, will permit passive cooling at 140 K while maintaining noise below zodiacal levels. By dithering to remove the effects of intrapixel variations and by careful attention to other instrumental effects, we expect to control relative photometric accuracy below a few hundredths of a magnitude. Because SNAP continuously revisits the same fields we will be able to achieve outstanding statistical precision on the photometry of reference stars in these fields, allowing precise monitoring of our detectors. The capabilities of the NIR system for broadening the science reach of SNAP are discussed.

  7. Development and performance of a new version of the OASIS coupler, OASIS3-MCT_3.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Craig

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available OASIS is coupling software developed primarily for use in the climate community. It provides the ability to couple different models with low implementation and performance overhead. OASIS3-MCT is the latest version of OASIS. It includes several improvements compared to OASIS3, including elimination of a separate hub coupler process, parallelization of the coupling communication and run-time grid interpolation, and the ability to easily reuse mapping weight files. OASIS3-MCT_3.0 is the latest release and includes the ability to couple between components running sequentially on the same set of tasks as well as to couple within a single component between different grids or decompositions such as physics, dynamics, and I/O. OASIS3-MCT has been tested with different configurations on up to 32 000 processes, with components running on high-resolution grids with up to 1.5 million grid cells, and with over 10 000 2-D coupling fields. Several new features will be available in OASIS3-MCT_4.0, and some of those are also described.

  8. Transcriptional profiling of fibroblasts from patients with mutations in MCT8 and comparative analysis with the human brain transcriptome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.E. Visser (Wil Edward); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid); Z. Özgür (Zeliha); R. Schot (Rachel); F.W. Verheijen (Frans); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); P.J. van der Spek (Peter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThyroid hormone (TH) is crucial for normal brain development. TH transporters control TH homeostasis in brain as evidenced by the complex endocrine and neurological phenotype of patients with mutations in monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8). We investigated the mechanisms of disease by

  9. Genetic variations in the MCT1 (SLC16A1) gene in the Chinese population of Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lean, Choo Bee; Lee, Edmund Jon Deoon

    2009-01-01

    MCT1(SLC16A1) is the first member of the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) and its family is involved in the transportation of metabolically important monocarboxylates such as lactate, pyruvate, acetate and ketone bodies. This study identifies genetic variations in SLC16A1 in the ethnic Chinese group of the Singaporean population (n=95). The promoter, coding region and exon-intron junctions of the SLC16A1 gene encoding the MCT1 transporter were screened for genetic variation in the study population by DNA sequencing. Seven genetic variations of SLC16A1, including 4 novel ones, were found: 2 in the promoter region, 2 in the coding exons (both nonsynonymous variations), 2 in the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) and 1 in the intron. Of the two mutations detected in the promoter region, the -363-855T>C is a novel mutation. The 1282G>A (Val(428)Ile) is a novel SNP and was found as heterozygotic in 4 subjects. The 1470T>A (Asp(490)Glu) was found to be a common polymorphism in this study. Lastly, IVS3-17A>C in intron 3 and 2258 (755)A>G in 3'UTR are novel mutations found to be common polymorphisms in the local Chinese population. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a comprehensive analysis on the MCT1 gene in any population.

  10. Association Between MCT1 A1470T Polymorphism and Fat-Free Mass in Well-Trained Young Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massidda, Myosotis; Eynon, Nir; Bachis, Valeria; Corrias, Laura; Culigioni, Claudia; Cugia, Paolo; Scorcu, Marco; Calò, Carla M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the MCT1 A1470T polymorphism and fat-free mass in young Italian elite soccer players. Participants were 128 Italian male soccer players. Fat-free mass was estimated for each of the soccer player using age- and gender-specific formulas with plicometry. Genotyping for the MCT1 A1470T polymorphism was performed using polymerase chain reaction. The MCT1 A1470T genotypes were in agreement with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium distribution. The percentage of fat-free mass was significantly higher in soccer players with the TT genotype and in the T-allele-dominant model group (TT + AT) compared with the soccer players with the AA genotype. The MCT1 T allele is associated with the percentage of fat-free mass in young elite male soccer players. Elucidating the genetic basis of body composition in athletes could potentially be used as an additional tool for strength and conditioning professionals in planning and adjusting training. However, these results are preliminary and need to be replicated in more cohorts.

  11. Improved mid infrared detector for high spectral or spatial resolution and synchrotron radiation use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Mbaye; Bordessoule, Michel; Kanouté, Brahim; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Manceron, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    When using bright, small effective size sources, such as synchrotron radiation light beam, for broadband spectroscopy at spectral or spatial high resolution for mid-IR FTIR measurements, a marked detectivity improvement can be achieved by setting up a device matching the detector optical étendue to that of the source. Further improvement can be achieved by reducing the background unmodulated flux and other intrinsic noise sources using a lower temperature cryogen, such as liquid helium. By the combined use of cooled apertures, cold reimaging optics, filters and adapted detector polarization, and preamplification electronics, the sensitivity of a HgCdTe photoconductive IR detector can be improved by a significant factor with respect to standard commercial devices (more than one order of magnitude on average over 6-20 μm region) and the usable spectral range extended to longer wavelengths. The performances of such an optimized detector developed on the AILES Beamline at SOLEIL are presented here.

  12. Design of mct1024×1 short wave infrared thermal camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Xian Zhong; Zhang, Su Ying

    2005-10-01

    A thermal camera consists of 1024-element MCT line wavelength IRFPA with reading electrocircuit made in china. It is presented the composing of this infrared thermal camera and some key question of this thermal camera: 1) nonuniformity correction; 2) Correction of lines and rows. With same axial transmission optics and a 1-D equality angle scanner and 1024X1600 pixels per frame.the scan efficiency of the sensor is over 88% and the half periods of scanner is 5 seconds. we developed a IR instrument. the main technic target is followed: optics calibre: 90 mm, focus: 270.6 mm, identifiaction ratio:170 urad, wave band: 2-2.5um, the half period: 5 second, NEΔρ: 0.8%.

  13. GLUT1, MCT1/4 and CD147 overexpression supports the metabolic reprogramming in papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, L M C A; Silva, R; Cavadas, B; Lima, J; Pereira, L; Soares, P; Sobrinho-Simões, M; Lopes, J M; Máximo, V

    2017-10-01

    Papillary Renal Cell carcinoma (pRCC) is the second most common type of RCC, accounting for about 15% of all RCCs. Surgical excision is the main treatment option. Still, 10 - 15 % of clinically localized tumours will recur and/or develop metastasis early after surgery, and no reliable prognostic biomarkers are available to identify them. It is known that pRCC cells rely on high rates of aerobic glycolysis, characterized by the up-regulation of many proteins and enzymes related with the glycolytic pathway. However, a metabolic signature enabling the identification of advanced pRCC tumours remains to be discovered. The aim of this study was to characterize the metabolic phenotype of pRCCs (subtypes 1-pRCC1 and 2-pRCC2) by evaluating the expression pattern of the glucose transporters (GLUTs) 1 and 4 and the monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) 1 and 4, as well as their chaperon CD147. We analysed the clinico-pathological data and the protein and mRNA expression of GLUT1, GLUT4 and MCT1, MCT4 and CD147 in tumours from Porto and TCGA series (http://cancergenome.nih.gov/), respectively. With the exception of GLUT4, plasma membrane expression of all proteins was frequently observed in pRCCs. GLUT1 and MCT1 membrane overexpression was significantly higher in pRCC2 and significantly associated with higher pN-stage and higher Fuhrman grade. Overexpression of GLUT1, MCT1/4 and CD147, supports the metabolic reprograming in pRCCs. MCT1 expression was associated with pRCC aggressiveness, regardless of the tumour histotype.

  14. High performance infrared fast cooled detectors for missile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibel, Yann; Espuno, Laurent; Taalat, Rachid; Sultan, Ahmad; Cassaigne, Pierre; Matallah, Noura

    2016-05-01

    SOFRADIR was selected in the late 90's for the production of 320×256 MW detectors for major European missile programs. This experience has established our company as a key player in the field of missile programs. SOFRADIR has since developed a vast portfolio of lightweight, compact and high performance JT-based solutions for missiles. ALTAN is a 384x288 Mid Wave infrared detector with 15μm pixel pitch, and is offered in a miniature ultra-fast Joule- Thomson cooled Dewar. Since Sofradir offers both Indium Antimonide (InSb) and Mercury Cadmium Telluride technologies (MCT), we are able to deliver the detectors best suited to customers' needs. In this paper we are discussing different figures of merit for very compact and innovative JT-cooled detectors and are highlighting the challenges for infrared detection technologies.

  15. Mercury Cadmium Telluride Photoconductive Long Wave Infrared Linear Array Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risal Singh

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Mercury cadmium telluride (Hg1-x, CdxTe (MCT photoconductive long wave infrared linear arrays are still in demand due to several advantages. The linear array technology is well established, easier, economical and is quite relevant to thermal imaging even today. The scan thermal imaging systems based on this technology offer wider field of view coverage and capacity for higher resolution in the scan direction relative to staring systems that use expensive and yet to mature focal plane array detector technology. A critical review on photoconductive n-Hg1-x CdxTe linear array detector technology for the long wave infrared range has been presented. The emphasis lies on detector design and processing technology. The critical issues of diffusion and drift effects, Hi-Lo and heterostructure blocking contacts, surface passivation, and other related aspects have been considered from the detector design angle. The device processing technology aspects are of vital importance

  16. A New nBn IR Detection Concept Using HgCdTe Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravrand, O.; Boulard, F.; Ferron, A.; Ballet, Ph.; Hassis, W.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new HgCdTe-based heterostructure to perform quantum infrared detection. The structure is based on the unipolar barrier concept, introduced by White in the 1980s for HgCdTe. The driving concept is the use of a large gap barrier layer to impede the flow of majority carriers (electrons on the conduction band in the case of n-type material) while facilitating the transport of minority (photo) carriers (holes on the valence band). The issue encountered here is the formation of a small potential barrier on the valence band, blocking photocarriers and therefore killing the quantum efficiency. The idea is to optimize the structure with an asymmetric barrier: abrupt on the contact side to efficiently block the majority carriers, and gradual on the absorption layer side to plane down the remaining potential barrier for the collected photocarriers. The concept has been studied by finite element modeling simulation and showed promising results. An optimal design has been identified in the middle wave band and molecular beam epitaxy layers have been grown then processed. First experimental characterization of the electro-optical properties of such structures showed promising features: 60% quantum efficiency and low turn-on voltage have been measured on single pixels.

  17. Two-color HgCdTe infrared staring focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward P.; Pham, Le T.; Venzor, Gregory M.; Norton, Elyse; Newton, Michael; Goetz, Paul; Randall, Valerie; Pierce, Gregory; Patten, Elizabeth A.; Coussa, Raymond A.; Kosai, Ken; Radford, William A.; Edwards, John; Johnson, Scott M.; Baur, Stefan T.; Roth, John A.; Nosho, Brett; Jensen, John E.; Longshore, Randolph E.

    2003-12-01

    Raytheon Vision Systems (RVS) in collaboration with HRL Laboratories is contributing to the maturation and manufacturing readiness of third-generation two-color HgCdTe infrared staring focal plane arrays (FPAs). This paper will highlight data from the routine growth and fabrication of 256x256 30μm unit-cell staring FPAs that provide dual-color detection in the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) spectral regions. FPAs configured for MWIR/MWIR, MWIR/LWIR and LWIR/LWIR detection are used for target identification, signature recognition and clutter rejection in a wide variety of space and ground-based applications. Optimized triple-layer-heterojunction (TLHJ) device designs and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth using in-situ controls has contributed to individual bands in all two-color FPA configurations exhibiting high operability (>99%) and both performance and FPA functionality comparable to state-of-the-art single-color technology. The measured spectral cross talk from out-of-band radiation for either band is also typically less than 10%. An FPA architecture based on a single mesa, single indium bump, and sequential mode operation leverages current single-color processes in production while also providing compatibility with existing second-generation technologies.

  18. Quantitative damage depth profiles in arsenic implanted HgCdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobre, C., E-mail: clement.lobre@cea.fr [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Jalabert, D. [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble 1 UMR-E, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Vickridge, I.; Briand, E.; Benzeggouta, D. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UMR 7588 du CNRS, Universite de Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Mollard, L. [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Jouneau, P.H. [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble 1 UMR-E, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Ballet, P. [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2013-10-15

    Rutherford backscattering experiments under channeling conditions (RBS-c) have been carried out on Hg{sub 0.77}Cd{sub 0.23}Te (MCT) layers implanted with arsenic. Accurate damage profiles have been extracted through a simple formalism for implanted and annealed layers. Quantitative damage profiles are correlated with structural defects observed by bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF-STEM) and chemical composition measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Evolution of damage for increasing ion implantation fluence has been investigated by these three complementary techniques. Evidence is found of irradiation induced annealing during implantation. A fast damage recovery has been observed for post-implantation thermal anneals. In the case of an implanted layer annealed during 1 h, the damage profile, associated with arsenic concentration measurements, indicates the presence of complexes involving arsenic.

  19. Characterization of the Microstructure of HgCdTe with p-Type Doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobre, C.; Jouneau, P.-H.; Mollard, L.; Ballet, P.

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogen, phosphorus, arsenic, and antimony ions were implanted in Hg0.3Cd0.7Te (MCT) layers under the same implantation conditions. An identical annealing process was then applied to these layers to eradicate implantation damage and to activate the impurities. Implantation damage was investigated by direct visualization, by use of bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF-STEM). Secondary-ion mass spectrometry was used to investigate impurity diffusion on annealing. The combination of these two techniques revealed the significant effect of structural implantation damage on the diffusion process. Annealed layers were then investigated by high-resolution STEM imaging and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy in STEM (STEM-EDX). This approach enables direct visualization and, therefore, further description of arsenic and antimony-rich nanocrystals.

  20. Performance and Calibration of H2RG Detectors and SIDECAR ASICs for the RATIR Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ori D.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Rapchun, David A.; Klein, Christopher R.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Bloom, Josh; de Diego, Jos A.; Simn Farah, Alejandro D.; Gehrels, Neil A.; Georgiev, Leonid; Gonzlez-Hernandez, J. Jess; Lee, William H.; Loose, Markus; Lotkin, Gennadiy; Moseley, Samuel H.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Richer, Michael G.; Robinson, Frederick D.; Romn-Zuniga, Carols; Samuel, Mathew V.; Sparr, Leroy M.; Watson, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    The Reionization And Transient Infra,.Red (RATIR) camera has been built for rapid Gamma,.Ray Burst (GRE) followup and will provide simultaneous optical and infrared photometric capabilities. The infrared portion of this camera incorporates two Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG detectors, controlled by Teledyne's SIDECAR ASICs. While other ground-based systems have used the SIDECAR before, this system also utilizes Teledyne's JADE2 interface card and IDE development environment. Together, this setup comprises Teledyne's Development Kit, which is a bundled solution that can be efficiently integrated into future ground-based systems. In this presentation, we characterize the system's read noise, dark current, and conversion gain.

  1. Commentary: JWST near-infrared detector degradation— finding the problem, fixing the problem, and moving forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard J. Rauscher

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST will be an infrared-optimized telescope, with an approximately 6.5 m diameter primary mirror, that is located at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Three of JWST’s four science instruments use Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG (H2RG near infrared detector arrays. During 2010, the JWST Project noticed that a few of its 5 μm cutoff H2RG detectors were degrading during room temperature storage, and NASA chartered a “Detector Degradation Failure Review Board” (DD-FRB to investigate. The DD-FRB determined that the root cause was a design flaw that allowed indium to interdiffuse with the gold contacts and migrate into the HgCdTe detector layer. Fortunately, Teledyne already had an improved design that eliminated this degradation mechanism. During early 2012, the improved H2RG design was qualified for flight and JWST began making additional H2RGs. In this article, we present the two public DD-FRB “Executive Summaries” that: (1 determined the root cause of the detector degradation and (2 defined tests to determine whether the existing detectors are qualified for flight. We supplement these with a brief introduction to H2RG detector arrays, some recent measurements showing that the performance of the improved design meets JWST requirements, and a discussion of how the JWST Project is using cryogenic storage to retard the degradation rate of the existing flight spare H2RGs.

  2. Interface morphology studies of liquid phase epitaxy grown HgCdTe films by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, M.; George, M. A.; Burger, A.; Collins, W. E.; Silberman, E.

    1994-04-01

    In this paper we report an investigation of the morphology of the interfaces of liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) grown HgCdTe thin films on CdTe and CdZnTe substrates by atomic force microscopy (AFM) on freshly cleaved (110) crystallographic planes. An empirical observation which may be linked to lattice mismatch was indicated by an angle between the cleavage steps of the substrate to those of the film. The precipitates with size ranging from 5 nm to 20 nm were found to be most apparent near the interface.

  3. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  4. Infrared limb sounding of Titan with the Cassini Composite InfraRed Spectrometer: effects of the mid-IR detector spatial responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Conor A; Teanby, Nicholas A; Calcutt, Simon B; Aslam, Shahid; Jennings, Donald E; Kunde, Virgil G; Flasar, F Michael; Irwin, Patrick G; Taylor, Fredric W; Glenar, David A; Smith, Michael D

    2009-04-01

    The composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) instrument on board the Cassini Saturn orbiter employs two 1x10 HgCdTe detector arrays for mid-infrared remote sensing of Titan's and Saturn's atmospheres. In this paper we show that the real detector spatial response functions, as measured in ground testing before launch, differ significantly from idealized "boxcar" responses. We further show that neglecting this true spatial response function when modeling CIRS spectra can have a significant effect on interpretation of the data, especially in limb-sounding mode, which is frequently used for Titan science. This result has implications not just for CIRS data analysis but for other similar instrumental applications.

  5. Minority carrier lifetime in iodine-doped molecular beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madni, I.; Umana-Membreno, G. A.; Lei, W.; Gu, R.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2015-11-02

    The minority carrier lifetime in molecular beam epitaxy grown layers of iodine-doped Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Te (x ∼ 0.3) on CdZnTe substrates has been studied. The samples demonstrated extrinsic donor behavior for carrier concentrations in the range from 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} without any post-growth annealing. At a temperature of 77 K, the electron mobility was found to vary from 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/V s to 7 × 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/V s and minority carrier lifetime from 1.6 μs to 790 ns, respectively, as the carrier concentration was increased from 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. The diffusion of iodine is much lower than that of indium and hence a better alternative in heterostructures such as nBn devices. The influence of carrier concentration and temperature on the minority carrier lifetime was studied in order to characterize the carrier recombination mechanisms. Measured lifetimes were also analyzed and compared with the theoretical models of the various recombination processes occurring in these materials, indicating that Auger-1 recombination was predominant at higher doping levels. An increase in deep-level generation-recombination centers was observed with increasing doping level, which suggests that the increase in deep-level trap density is associated with the incorporation of higher concentrations of iodine into the HgCdTe.

  6. Two-color detector: Mercury-cadmium-telluride as a terahertz and infrared detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizov, F.; Zabudsky, V.; Petryakov, V.; Golenkov, A.; Andreyeva, K.; Tsybrii, Z. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine); Dvoretskii, S. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics of SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, issues associated with the development of infrared (IR) and terahertz (THz) radiation detectors based on HgCdTe are discussed. Two-color un-cooled and cooled to 78 K narrow-gap mercury-cadmium-telluride semiconductor thin layers with antennas were considered both as sub-THz (sub-THz) direct detection bolometers and 3–10 μm IR photoconductors. The noise equivalent power (NEP) for one of the detectors studied at ν ≈ 140 GHz reaches NEP{sub 300 K} ≈ 4.5 × 10{sup −10} W/Hz{sup 1/2} and NEP{sub 78 K} ≈ 5 × 10{sup −9} W/Hz{sup 1/2}. The same detector used as an IR photoconductor showed the responsivity at temperatures T = 78 K and 300 K with signal-to-noise ratio S/N ≈ 750 and 50, respectively, under illumination by using IR monochromator and globar as a thermal source.

  7. Infrared detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalski, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This second edition is fully revised and reorganized, with new chapters concerning third generation and quantum dot detectors, THz detectors, cantilever and antenna coupled detectors, and information on radiometry and IR optics materials. Part IV concerning focal plane arrays is significantly expanded. This book, resembling an encyclopedia of IR detectors, is well illustrated and contains many original references … a really comprehensive book.-F. Sizov, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine

  8. Targeting the lactate transporter MCT1 in endothelial cells inhibits lactate-induced HIF-1 activation and tumor angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Sonveaux

    Full Text Available Switching to a glycolytic metabolism is a rapid adaptation of tumor cells to hypoxia. Although this metabolic conversion may primarily represent a rescue pathway to meet the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of proliferating tumor cells, it also creates a gradient of lactate that mirrors the gradient of oxygen in tumors. More than a metabolic waste, the lactate anion is known to participate to cancer aggressiveness, in part through activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 pathway in tumor cells. Whether lactate may also directly favor HIF-1 activation in endothelial cells (ECs thereby offering a new druggable option to block angiogenesis is however an unanswered question. In this study, we therefore focused on the role in ECs of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1 that we previously identified to be the main facilitator of lactate uptake in cancer cells. We found that blockade of lactate influx into ECs led to inhibition of HIF-1-dependent angiogenesis. Our demonstration is based on the unprecedented characterization of lactate-induced HIF-1 activation in normoxic ECs and the consecutive increase in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF expression. Furthermore, using a variety of functional assays including endothelial cell migration and tubulogenesis together with in vivo imaging of tumor angiogenesis through intravital microscopy and immunohistochemistry, we documented that MCT1 blockers could act as bona fide HIF-1 inhibitors leading to anti-angiogenic effects. Together with the previous demonstration of MCT1 being a key regulator of lactate exchange between tumor cells, the current study identifies MCT1 inhibition as a therapeutic modality combining antimetabolic and anti-angiogenic activities.

  9. Type II superlattice technology for LWIR detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Azulai, D.; Benny, Y.; Fraenkel, R.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Klin, O.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nitzani, M.; Shtrichman, I.; Rappaport, N.; Snapi, N.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2016-05-01

    SCD has developed a range of advanced infrared detectors based on III-V semiconductor heterostructures grown on GaSb. The XBn/XBp family of barrier detectors enables diffusion limited dark currents, comparable with MCT Rule-07, and high quantum efficiencies. This work describes some of the technical challenges that were overcome, and the ultimate performance that was finally achieved, for SCD's new 15 μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" type II superlattice (T2SL) XBp array detector. This detector is the first of SCD's line of high performance two dimensional arrays working in the LWIR spectral range, and was designed with a ~9.3 micron cut-off wavelength and a format of 640 x 512 pixels. It contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, engineered using k • p modeling of the energy bands and photo-response. The wafers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are fabricated into Focal Plane Array (FPA) detectors using standard FPA processes, including wet and dry etching, indium bump hybridization, under-fill, and back-side polishing. The FPA has a quantum efficiency of nearly 50%, and operates at 77 K and F/2.7 with background limited performance. The pixel operability of the FPA is above 99% and it exhibits a stable residual non uniformity (RNU) of better than 0.04% of the dynamic range. The FPA uses a new digital read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), and the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector. The Pelican- D LW detector is now in the final stages of qualification and transfer to production, with first prototypes already integrated into new electro-optical systems.

  10. Muscle MCT4 Content Is Correlated with the Lactate Removal Ability during Recovery Following All-Out Supramaximal Exercise in Highly-Trained Rowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Hugo; Bourdin, Muriel; Féasson, Léonard; Dubouchaud, Hervé; Denis, Christian; Freund, Hubert; Messonnier, Laurent A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test if the lactate exchange (γ1) and removal (γ2) abilities during recovery following short all-out supramaximal exercise correlate with the muscle content of MCT1 and MCT4, the two isoforms of the monocarboxylate transporters family involved in lactate and H+ co-transport in skeletal muscle. Eighteen lightweight rowers completed a 3-min all-out exercise on rowing ergometer. Blood lactate samples were collected during the subsequent passive recovery to assess an individual blood lactate curve (IBLC). IBLC were fitted to the bi-exponential time function: La(t) = [La](0) + A1(1 − e-γ1t) + A2(1 − e-γ2t) where [La](0) is the blood lactate concentration at exercise completion and the velocity constants γ1 and γ2 denote the lactate exchange and removal abilities, respectively. An application of the bi-compartmental model of lactate distribution space allowed estimation of the lactate removal rate at exercise completion [LRR(0)]. Biopsy of the right vastus lateralis was taken at rest to measure muscle MCT1 and MCT4 content. Fiber type distribution, activity of key enzymes and capillary density (CD) were also assessed. γ1 was correlated with [La](0) (r = −0.54, P < 0.05) but not with MCT1, MCT4 or CD. γ2 and LRR(0) were correlated with MCT4 (r = 0.63, P < 0.01 and r = 0.73, P < 0.001, respectively) but not with MCT1 or cytochrome c oxidase activity. These findings suggest that the lactate exchange ability is highly dependent on the milieu so that the importance of the muscle MCT1 and MCT4 content in γ1 was hidden in the present study. Our results also suggest that during recovery following all-out supramaximal exercise in well-trained rowers, MCT4 might play a significant role in the distribution and delivery of lactate for its subsequent removal. PMID:27375499

  11. Expression of the hypoxia-inducible monocarboxylate transporter MCT4 is increased in triple negative breast cancer and correlates independently with clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyen, J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre A. Lacassagne, Nice (France); Trastour, C. [Department of Gynecology, Archet II Hospital, 06202 Nice (France); Ettore, F.; Peyrottes, I.; Toussant, N. [Department of Pathology, Centre A. Lacassagne, Nice (France); Gal, J. [Department of Medical Statistics, Centre A. Lacassagne, Nice (France); Ilc, K.; Roux, D. [Institute for Research on Cancer and Aging (IRCAN), University of Nice, Centre A. Lacassagne, 06189 Nice (France); Parks, S.K. [Centre Scientifique de Monaco (CSM) (Monaco); Ferrero, J.M. [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre A. Lacassagne, Nice (France); Pouysségur, J., E-mail: jacques.pouyssegur@unice.fr [Institute for Research on Cancer and Aging (IRCAN), University of Nice, Centre A. Lacassagne, 06189 Nice (France); Centre Scientifique de Monaco (CSM) (Monaco)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Glycolytic markers are highly expressed in triple negative breast cancers. • Lactate/H{sup +} symporter MCT4 demonstrated the strongest deleterious impact on survival. • MCT4 should serve as a new prognostic factor in node-negative breast cancers. - Abstract: Background: {sup 18}Fluor-deoxy-glucose PET-scanning of glycolytic metabolism is being used for staging in many tumors however its impact on prognosis has never been studied in breast cancer. Methods: Glycolytic and hypoxic markers: glucose transporter (GLUT1), carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), monocarboxylate transporter 1 and 4 (MCT1, 4), MCT accessory protein basigin and lactate-dehydrogenase A (LDH-A) were assessed by immunohistochemistry in two cohorts of breast cancer comprising 643 node-negative and 127 triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) respectively. Results: In the 643 node-negative breast tumor cohort with a median follow-up of 124 months, TNBC were the most glycolytic (≈70%), followed by Her-2 (≈50%) and RH-positive cancers (≈30%). Tumoral MCT4 staining (without stromal staining) was a strong independent prognostic factor for metastasis-free survival (HR = 0.47, P = 0.02) and overall-survival (HR = 0.38, P = 0.002). These results were confirmed in the independent cohort of 127 cancer patients. Conclusion: Glycolytic markers are expressed in all breast tumors with highest expression occurring in TNBC. MCT4, the hypoxia-inducible lactate/H{sup +} symporter demonstrated the strongest deleterious impact on survival. We propose that MCT4 serves as a new prognostic factor in node-negative breast cancer and can perhaps act soon as a theranostic factor considering the current pharmacological development of MCT4 inhibitors.

  12. The ^{55}Fe X-ray Energy Response of Mercury Cadmium Telluride Near-Infrared Detector Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Ori D; Wen, Yiting; Foltz, Roger D; Hill, Robert J; Kimble, Randy A; Malumuth, Eliot; Rauscher, Bernard J

    2009-01-01

    A technique involving ^{55}Fe X-rays provides a straightforward method to measure the response of a detector. The detector's response can lead directly to a calculation of the conversion gain (e^- ADU^{-1}), as well as aid detector design and performance studies. We calibrate the ^{55}Fe X-ray energy response and pair production energy of HgCdTe using 8 HST WFC3 1.7 \\micron flight grade detectors. The results show that each K$\\alpha$ X-ray generates 2273 \\pm 137 electrons, which corresponds to a pair-production energy of 2.61 \\pm 0.16 eV. The uncertainties are dominated by our knowledge of the conversion gain. In future studies, we plan to eliminate this uncertainty by directly measuring conversion gain at very low light levels.

  13. Studies on a novel mask technique with high selectivity and aspect-ratio patterns for HgCdTe trenches ICP etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Z. H.; Hu, W. D.; Li, Y.; Huang, J.; Yin, W. T.; Lin, C.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; Chen, X. S.; Lu, W.; He, L.

    2012-06-01

    A novel mask technique, combining high selectivity silicon dioxide patterns over high aspect-ratio photoresist (PR) patterns has been exploited to perform mesa etching for device delineation and electrical isolation of HgCdTe third-generation infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs). High-density silicon dioxide film covering high aspect-ratio PR patterns was deposited at the temperature of 80°C and silicon dioxide film patterns over high aspect-ratio PR patterns of HgCdTe etching samples was developed by standard photolithography and wet chemical etch. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the surfaces of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etched samples are quite clean and smooth. The etching selectivity between the novel mask and HgCdTe of the samples is increased to above 32: 1 while the side-wall impact of etching plasma is suppressed by the high aspect ratio patterns. These results show that the combined patterning of silicon dioxide film and thick PR film is a readily available and promising masking technique for HgCdTe mesa etching.

  14. Gaseous Detectors: Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, H J

    2011-01-01

    Gaseous Detectors in 'Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Subsection '3.1.2 Gaseous Detectors' of Section '3.1 Charged Particle Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.1.2 Gaseous Detectors 3.1.2.1 Introduction 3.1.2.2 Basic Processes 3.1.2.2.1 Gas ionization by charged particles 3.1.2.2.1.1 Primary clusters 3.1.2.2.1.2 Cluster size distribution 3.1.2.2.1.3 Total number of ion pairs 3.1.2.2.1.4 Dependence of energy deposit on particle velocity 3.1.2.2.2 Transport of...

  15. MCT8 is Downregulated by Short Time Iodine Overload in the Thyroid Gland of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, E C L; Dias, G R M; Cardoso, R C; Lima, L P; Fortunato, R S; Visser, T J; Vaisman, M; Ferreira, A C F; Carvalho, D P

    2015-11-01

    Wolff-Chaikoff effect is characterized by the blockade of thyroid hormone synthesis and secretion due to iodine overload. However, the regulation of monocarboxylate transporter 8 during Wolff-Chaikoff effect and its possible role in the rapid reduction of T4 secretion by the thyroid gland remains unclear. Patients with monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene loss-of-function mutations and monocarboxylate transporter 8 knockout mice were shown to have decreased serum T4 levels, indicating that monocarboxylate transporter 8 could be involved in the secretion of thyroid hormones from the thyroid gland. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the regulation of monocarboxylate transporter 8 during the Wolff-Chaikoff effect and the escape from iodine overload, besides the importance of iodine organification for this regulation. Monocarboxylate transporter 8 mRNA and protein levels significantly decreased after 1 day of NaI administration to rats, together with decreased serum T4; while no alteration was observed in LAT2 expression. Moreover, both monocarboxylate transporter 8 expression and serum T4 was restored after 6 days of NaI. The inhibition of thyroperoxidase activity by methimazole prevented the inhibitory effect of NaI on thyroid monocarboxylate transporter 8 expression, suggesting that an active thyroperoxidase is necessary for MCT8 downregulation by iodine overload, similarly to other thyroid markers, such as sodium iodide symporter. Therefore, we conclude that thyroid monocarboxylate transporter 8 expression is downregulated during iodine overload and that the normalization of its expression parallels the escape phenomenon. These data suggest a possible role for monocarboxylate transporter 8 in the changes of thyroid hormones secretion during the Wolff-Chaikoff effect and escape.

  16. Pixel Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wermes, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    Pixel detectors for precise particle tracking in high energy physics have been developed to a level of maturity during the past decade. Three of the LHC detectors will use vertex detectors close to the interaction point based on the hybrid pixel technology which can be considered the state of the art in this field of instrumentation. A development period of almost 10 years has resulted in pixel detector modules which can stand the extreme rate and timing requirements as well as the very harsh...

  17. Forbush decreases on November 6-12, 2004 observed by the Muon Detector Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savian, Jairo Francisco; Schuch, Nelson Jorge [Southern Regional Space Research Center, CRSPE/INPE-MCT, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Silva, Marlos Rockenbach da; Lago, Alisson dal; Echer, Ezequiel; Vieira, Luis Eduardo Antunes; Gonzalez, Walter Demetrio [National Institute for Space Research, INPE-MCT, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Munakata, Kazuoki, E-mail: savian@lacesm.ufsm.br, E-mail: njschuch@lacesm.ufsm.br, E-mail: marlos@dge.inpe.br, E-mail: dallago@dge.inpe.br, E-mail: eecher@dge.inpe.br, E-mail: vieira-le@uol.com.br, E-mail: gonzalez@dge.inpe.br, E-mail: kmuna00@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Physics Department, Shinshu University, Matsumoto, (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    In this paper we study the relationship between interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and the muon count rate decreases detected of the muon detector network on November 6-12, 2004. The muon detector network is composed by the detectors installed at Nagoya (Japan), Hobart (Australia) and the prototype detector installed at the 'Observatorio Espacial do Sul - OES/CRSPE/INPE-MCT', located in Sao Martinho da Serra, RS, Brazil. With the muon count rate observed by the muon detector network, we will be able to observe, in the future, the direction in which a given ICME moves, and with that, we will be able to calculate their angle of incidence on the Earth. Also, with this muon network, we will be able to send alerts of up to 12 hours before the arrival of a shock or an ICME. The space weather forecast method using cosmic rays will be a very important tool because it provides a forecast with good antecedence. (author)

  18. Virus-Like Particle (VLP Plus Microcrystalline Tyrosine (MCT Adjuvants Enhance Vaccine Efficacy Improving T and B Cell Immunogenicity and Protection against Plasmodium berghei/vivax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Cabral-Miranda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is the most effective prophylactic tool against infectious diseases. Despite continued efforts to control malaria, the disease still generally represents a significant unmet medical need. Microcrystalline tyrosine (MCT is a well described depot used in licensed allergy immunotherapy products and in clinical development. However, its proof of concept in prophylactic vaccines has only recently been explored. MCT has never been used in combination with virus-like particles (VLPs, which are considered to be one of the most potent inducers of cellular and humoral immune responses in mice and humans. In the current study we assessed the potential of MCT to serve as an adjuvant in the development of a vaccine against malaria either alone or combined with VLP using Plasmodium vivax thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP as a target antigen. We chemically coupled PvTRAP to VLPs derived from the cucumber mosaic virus fused to a universal T-cell epitope of the tetanus toxin (CMVtt, formulated with MCT and compared the induced immune responses to PvTRAP formulated in PBS or Alum. The protective capacity of the various formulations was assessed using Plasmodium berghei expressing PvTRAP. All vaccine formulations using adjuvants and/or VLP increased humoral immunogenicity for PvTRAP compared to the antigen alone. The most proficient responder was the group of mice immunized with the vaccine formulated with PvTRAP-VLP + MCT. The VLP-based vaccine formulated in MCT also induced the strongest T cell response and conferred best protection against challenge with recombinant Plasmodium berghei. Thus, the combination of VLP with MCT may take advantage of the properties of each component and appears to be an alternative biodegradable depot adjuvant for development of novel prophylactic vaccines.

  19. The adsorption of allergoids and 3-O-desacyl-4'-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL®) to microcrystalline tyrosine (MCT) in formulations for use in allergy immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A J; Heath, M D; Hewings, S J; Skinner, M A

    2015-11-01

    Infectious disease vaccine potency is affected by antigen adjuvant adsorption. WHO and EMA guidelines recommend limits and experimental monitoring of adsorption in vaccines and allergy immunotherapies. Adsorbed allergoids and MPL® in MATA-MPL allergy immunotherapy formulations effectively treat IgE mitigated allergy. Understanding vaccine antigen adjuvant adsorption allows optimisation of potency and should be seen as good practice; however current understanding is seldom applied to allergy immunotherapies. The allergoid and MPL® adsorption to MCT in MATA-MPL allergy immunotherapy formulations was experimental determination using specific allergen IgE allerginicity and MPL® content methods. Binding forces between MPL® and MCT were investigated by competition binding experiments. MATA-MPL samples with different allergoids gave results within 100-104% of the theoretical 50μg/mL MPL® content. Unmodified drug substance samples showed significant desirable IgE antigenicity, 1040-170 QAU/mL. MATA-MPL supernatant samples with different allergoids gave results of ≤2 μg/mL MPL® and ≤0.1-1.4 QAU/mL IgE antigenicity, demonstrating approximately ≥96 & 99% adsorption respectively. Allergoid and MPL® adsorption in different MATA-MPL allergy immunotherapy formulations is consistent and meets guideline recommendations. MCT formulations treated to disrupt electrostatic, hydrophobic and ligand exchange interactions, gave an MPL® content of ≤2 μg/mL in supernatant samples. MCT formulations treated to disrupt aromatic interactions, gave an MPL® content of 73-92 μg/mL in supernatant samples. MPL® adsorption to l-tyrosine in MCT formulations is based on interactions between the 2-deoxy-2-aminoglucose backbone on MPL® and aromatic ring of l-tyrosine in MCT, such as C-H⋯π interaction. MCT could be an alternative adjuvant depot for some infectious disease antigens.

  20. Effects of group metacognitive training (MCT) on mental capacity and functioning in patients with psychosis in a secure forensic psychiatric hospital: a prospective-cohort waiting list controlled study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naughton, Marie

    2012-06-01

    Metacognitive Training (MCT) is a manualised cognitive intervention for psychosis aimed at transferring knowledge of cognitive biases and providing corrective experiences. The aim of MCT is to facilitate symptom reduction and protect against relapse. In a naturalistic audit of clinical effectiveness we examined what effect group MCT has on mental capacity, symptoms of psychosis and global function in patients with a psychotic illness, when compared with a waiting list comparison group.

  1. Metal Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  2. Optical Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbert, Bernd; Goushcha, Alexander

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  3. Butyrate activates the monocarboxylate transporter MCT4 expression in breast cancer cells and enhances the antitumor activity of 3-bromopyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queirós, Odília; Preto, Ana; Pacheco, António; Pinheiro, Céline; Azevedo-Silva, João; Moreira, Roxana; Pedro, Madalena; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Baltazar, Fátima; Casal, Margarida

    2012-02-01

    Most malignant tumors exhibit the Warburg effect, which consists in increased glycolysis rates with production of lactate, even in the presence of oxygen. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), maintain these glycolytic rates, by mediating the influx and/or efflux of lactate and are overexpressed in several cancer cell types. The lactate and pyruvate analogue 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is an inhibitor of the energy metabolism, which has been proposed as a specific antitumor agent. In the present study, we aimed at determining the effect of 3-BP in breast cancer cells and evaluated the putative role of MCTs on this effect. Our results showed that the three breast cancer cell lines used presented different sensitivities to 3-BP: ZR-75-1 ER (+)>MCF-7 ER (+)>SK-BR-3 ER (-). We also demonstrated that 3-BP reduced lactate production, induced cell morphological alterations and increased apoptosis. The effect of 3-BP appears to be cytotoxic rather than cytostatic, as a continued decrease in cell viability was observed after removal of 3-BP. We showed that pre-incubation with butyrate enhanced significantly 3-BP cytotoxicity, especially in the most resistant breast cancer cell line, SK-BR-3. We observed that butyrate treatment induced localization of MCT1 in the plasma membrane as well as overexpression of MCT4 and its chaperone CD147. Our results thus indicate that butyrate pre-treatment potentiates the effect of 3-BP, most probably by increasing the rates of 3-BP transport through MCT1/4. This study supports the potential use of butyrate as adjuvant of 3-BP in the treatment of breast cancer resistant cells, namely ER (-).

  4. Type-II indium arsenide/gallium antimonide superlattices for infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Hooman

    In this work, the unique properties of type-II InAs/GaSb heterojunctions were utilized for the realization of novel infrared photodetectors with higher operating temperature, detectivity and uniformity than the commonly available infrared detectors. This effort was concentrated on two major devices: uncooled infrared detectors in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) range, and cooled devices in the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) range. Uncooled infrared (IR) detectors are required for low-cost, lightweight sensor systems that have many industrial and medical applications. Commercially available uncooled IR sensors use ferroelectric or microbolometer detectors. These sensors are inherently slow and cannot detect rapid signal changes needed for high-speed infrared systems. Some of the applications which require a fast detector (tau LIDARs. Although photon detectors have frequency responses in the megahertz range, their high temperature detectivity is severely degraded due to high Auger recombination rates. Bandgap engineering was used in order to suppress Auger recombination at room temperature in type-II superlattices. Our experimental results demonstrated nearly one order of magnitude lower Auger recombination rate at room temperature in these type-II superlattices compared to typical intrinsic detectors, such as HgCdTe, with similar bandgap. Uncooled detectors based on the engineered superlattices showed a detectivity of 1.3 x 108g cmHz 1/2/W at 11 Et m, which is comparable to microbolometers. However, the measured response time of the detectors was more than five orders of magnitude faster than microbolometers. In parallel, devices for operation in the VLWIR were developed. High-performance infrared detectors with cutoff wavelength above 14 mum are highly needed for many space-based applications. Commonly used detectors are extrinsic silicon and HgCdTe. However, the former has to be cooled below 10K, and the latter do not have good uniformity in the VLWIR

  5. Study of Morphological Defects on Dual-Band HgCdTe on CdZnTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.; Radford, W. A.; Lofgreen, D. D.; Olsson, K. R.; Peterson, J. M.; Johnson, S. M.

    2014-08-01

    HgCdTe dual-band epitaxial layers on lattice-matched CdZnTe substrates often have morphological defects. These defects, unlike normal void and microvoid defects, do not contain a polycrystalline core and, therefore, do not offer a good contrast for observation using optical and electron microscopes. This paper reports a way of identifying these defects by using a Nomarski optical microscopy image overlay on focused ion beam microscopy images for preparation of thin cross-sectional foils of these defects. Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the defect cross-sections to identify the origin and evolution of the morphological defects and their effect on the epitaxial layer. This paper reports cross-sectional analysis of four morphological defects of different shape and size.

  6. Cross-Sectional Study of Macrodefects in MBE Dual-Band HgCdTe on CdZnTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.; Lofgreen, D. D.; Jones, K. A.; Peterson, J. M.; Radford, W. A.; Benson, J. D.; Johnson, S. M.

    2013-11-01

    HgCdTe dual-band mid-wave infrared/long-wave infrared focal-plane arrays on CdZnTe are a key component in advanced electrooptic sensor applications. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been used successfully for growth of dual-band layers on larger CdZnTe substrates. However, the macrodefect density, which is known to reduce the pixel operability and its run-to-run variation, is larger when compared with layers grown on Si substrate. This paper reports the macrodefect density versus size signature of a well-optimized MBE dual-band growth and a cross-sectional study of a macrodefect that represents the most prevalent class using focused ion beam, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results show that the macrodefect originates from a void, which in turn is associated with a pit on the CdZnTe substrate.

  7. Aclaramiento del lactato durante la recuperación activa y pasiva: papel del transportador de lactato MCT1

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Prieto, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    El aclaramiento del lactato plasmático generado en actividades anaeróbicas se favorece con la recuperación activa de moderada intensidad, gracias a los procesos metabólicos implicados en la oxidación de la célula muscular. La eficiencia de este proceso depende de la actividad de los transportadores de monocarboxilatos (MCTs) que facilitan la difusión del lactato a través de la membrana del sarcolema y de la mitocondria de la célula. La isoforma MCT1, expresada fundamentalmente en el músculo e...

  8. Fisopatología de la deficiencia de MCT8: Síndrome de Allan-Herndon-Dudley

    OpenAIRE

    López Espíndola, Daniela Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Bioquímica. Fecha de lectura: 16-10-2015 Mutaciones en el gen SLC16A2 que codifica el transportador específico de hormonas tiroideas (HT) MCT8 (Transportador de monocarboxilatos 8) se asocian con el síndrome de Allan-Herndon-Dudley (SAHD). Este síndrome de retraso mental ligado al cromosoma X se caracteriza por alteraciones neuromotoras y concentraciones alteradas de HT en s...

  9. Technology for advanced focal plane arrays of HgCdTe and AIGaN

    CERN Document Server

    He, Li; Ni, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces the basic framework of advanced focal plane technology based on the third-generation infrared focal plane concept. The essential concept, research advances, and future trends in advanced sensor arrays are comprehensively reviewed. Moreover, the book summarizes recent research advances in HgCdTe/AlGaN detectors for the infrared/ultraviolet waveband, with a particular focus on the numerical method of detector design, material epitaxial growth and processing, as well as Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Transistor readout circuits. The book offers a unique resource for all graduate students and researchers interested in the technologies of focal plane arrays or electro-optical imaging sensors.

  10. Effect of a boron implantation on the electrical properties of epitaxial HgCdTe with different material composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyapunov, D. V.; Pishchagin, A. A.; Grigoryev, D. V.; Korotaev, A. G.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Kokhanenko, A. P.; Iznin, I. I.; Savytskyy, H. V.; Bonchik, A. U.; Dvoretskii, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.

    2016-08-01

    In this work the experimental results of investigations of the dynamics of accumulation and spatial distribution of electrically active radiation defects when irradiating epitaxial films of Hg1-xCdxTe (MCT) with different material composition (x). The films, grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) were irradiated by B ions at room temperature in the radiation dose range 1012 -1015 ions/cm2 and with ion energy 100 keV. The results give the differences in implantation profiles, damage accumulation and electrical properties as a function of the material composition of the films.

  11. A Pilot Proteogenomic Study with Data Integration Identifies MCT1 and GLUT1 as Prognostic Markers in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Stewart

    Full Text Available We performed a pilot proteogenomic study to compare lung adenocarcinoma to lung squamous cell carcinoma using quantitative proteomics (6-plex TMT combined with a customized Affymetrix GeneChip. Using MaxQuant software, we identified 51,001 unique peptides that mapped to 7,241 unique proteins and from these identified 6,373 genes with matching protein expression for further analysis. We found a minor correlation between gene expression and protein expression; both datasets were able to independently recapitulate known differences between the adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma subtypes. We found 565 proteins and 629 genes to be differentially expressed between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, with 113 of these consistently differentially expressed at both the gene and protein levels. We then compared our results to published adenocarcinoma versus squamous cell carcinoma proteomic data that we also processed with MaxQuant. We selected two proteins consistently overexpressed in squamous cell carcinoma in all studies, MCT1 (SLC16A1 and GLUT1 (SLC2A1, for further investigation. We found differential expression of these same proteins at the gene level in our study as well as in other public gene expression datasets. These findings combined with survival analysis of public datasets suggest that MCT1 and GLUT1 may be potential prognostic markers in adenocarcinoma and druggable targets in squamous cell carcinoma. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002622.

  12. Comparison of Effects of Soy Oil, Olive Oil, Mct-Lct Based Nutrition Solutions in Parenterally Fed Intensive Care Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurşen Gürsoy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to compare the changes in biochemical parameters and efficacy of nutrition by using parenteral nutrition solutions with different lipid content in critically ill patients. Material and Method: Fourty-five intensive care patients were randomized into three groups to receive either soy bean based (Group 1 or olive oil based (Group 2 or MCT/LCT based (Group 3 nutrition solutions. The calorie requirement was calculated using Schofield equation day. The levels of albumin, total protein, AST, ALT, LDH, GGT, ALP, glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, LDL, HDL, aPTT, PT, INR, CRP, transferin and prealbumin were measured on days 1, 7 and 14. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between groups according to glucose, liver function tests, triglyceride, cholesterol, LDL, HDL, aPTT, PT, INR levels. CRP and prealbumin were similar within-group and between-group comparisons. In groups II and III, CRP levels decreased while prealbumin levels were increasing. Conclusion: As a conclusion, no difference was found comparing the biochemical parameters and efficacy of nutrition, in ICU patients fed with soy oil, olive oil or MCT/LCT based parenteral nutrition solutions. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 52-8

  13. DUMAND detector

    CERN Multimedia

    This object is one of the 256 other detectors of the DUMAND (Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detection) experiment. The goal of the experiment was the construction of the first deep ocean high energy neutrino detector, to be placed at 4800 m depth in the Pacific Ocean off Keahole Point on the Big Island of Hawaii. A few years ago, a European conference with Cosmic experiments was organized at CERN as they were projects like DUMAND in Hawaii. Along with the conference, a temporary exhibition was organised as well. It was a collaboration of institutions from Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the U.S.A. CERN had borrowed equipment and objects from different institutes around the world, including this detector of the DUMAND experiment. Most of the equipment were sent back to the institutes, however this detector sphere was offered to a CERN member of the personnel.

  14. Increased oxidative metabolism and neurotransmitter cycling in the brain of mice lacking the thyroid hormone transporter SLC16A2 (MCT8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago B Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Mutations of the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8 cause a severe X-linked intellectual deficit and neurological impairment. MCT8 is a specific thyroid hormone (T4 and T3 transporter and the patients also present unusual abnormalities in the serum profile of thyroid hormone concentrations due to altered secretion and metabolism of T4 and T3. Given the role of thyroid hormones in brain development, it is thought that the neurological impairment is due to restricted transport of thyroid hormones to the target neurons. In this work we have investigated cerebral metabolism in mice with Mct8 deficiency. Adult male mice were infused for 30 minutes with (1-(13C glucose and brain extracts prepared and analyzed by (13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Genetic inactivation of Mct8 resulted in increased oxidative metabolism as reflected by increased glutamate C4 enrichment, and of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions as observed by the increases in glutamine C4 and GABA C2 enrichments, respectively. These changes were distinct to those produced by hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Similar increments in glutamate C4 enrichment and GABAergic neurotransmission were observed in the combined inactivation of Mct8 and D2, indicating that the increased neurotransmission and metabolic activity were not due to increased production of cerebral T3 by the D2-encoded type 2 deiodinase. In conclusion, Mct8 deficiency has important metabolic consequences in the brain that could not be correlated with deficiency or excess of thyroid hormone supply to the brain during adulthood.

  15. Fast, High-Precision Readout Circuit for Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, David M.; Hancock, Bruce R.; Key, Richard W.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Wrigley, Chris J.; Seshadri, Suresh; Sander, Stanley P.; Blavier, Jean-Francois L.

    2013-01-01

    The GEO-CAPE mission described in NASA's Earth Science and Applications Decadal Survey requires high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution measurements to monitor and characterize the rapidly changing chemistry of the troposphere over North and South Americas. High-frame-rate focal plane arrays (FPAs) with many pixels are needed to enable such measurements. A high-throughput digital detector readout integrated circuit (ROIC) that meets the GEO-CAPE FPA needs has been developed, fabricated, and tested. The ROIC is based on an innovative charge integrating, fast, high-precision analog-to-digital circuit that is built into each pixel. The 128×128-pixel ROIC digitizes all 16,384 pixels simultaneously at frame rates up to 16 kHz to provide a completely digital output on a single integrated circuit at an unprecedented rate of 262 million pixels per second. The approach eliminates the need for off focal plane electronics, greatly reducing volume, mass, and power compared to conventional FPA implementations. A focal plane based on this ROIC will require less than 2 W of power on a 1×1-cm integrated circuit. The ROIC is fabricated of silicon using CMOS technology. It is designed to be indium bump bonded to a variety of detector materials including silicon PIN diodes, indium antimonide (InSb), indium gallium arsenide (In- GaAs), and mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) detector arrays to provide coverage over a broad spectral range in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet spectral ranges.

  16. Beam diagnostics at DAFNE with fast uncooled IR detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bocci, A; Drago, A; Grilli, A; Marcelli, A; Piccinini, M; Raco, A; Sorchetti, R; Gambicorti, L; De Sio, A; Pace, E; Piotrowski, J

    2008-01-01

    Bunch-by-bunch longitudinal diagnostics is a key issue of modern accelerators. To face up this challenging demand, tests of mid-IR compact uncooled photoconductive HgCdTe detectors have been recently performed at DAFNE. Different devices were used to monitor the emission of e- bunches. The first experiments allowed recording of 2.7 ns long e- bunches with a FWHM of a single pulse of about 600 ps. These results address the possibility to improve diagnostics at DAFNE and to this purpose an exit port on a bending magnet of the positron ring has been set-up. An HV chamber, hosting a gold-coated plane mirror that collects and deflects the radiation through a ZnSe window, is the front-end of this port. After the window, a simple optical layout in air allows focusing IR radiation on different detectors. The instrumentation will allow comparison in the sub-ns time domain between the two rings and to identify and characterize bunch instabilities. Moreover, to improve performances tests of new photovoltaic detectors wi...

  17. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; Merritt, Scott; Beck, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of three novel photon counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride avalanche array made by DRS Inc. 2) a commercial 2880 silicon avalanche photodiode array and 3) a prototype resonant cavity silicon avalanche photodiode array. We will present and compare dark count, photon detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We discuss system wavelength trades and architectures for optimizing overall communication link sensitivity, data rate and cost performance. The HgCdTe APD array has photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50 were routinely demonstrated across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70. High resolution pixel-surface spot scans were performed and the junction diameters of the diodes were measured. The junction diameter was decreased from 31 m to 25 m resulting in a 2x increase in e-APD gain from 470 on the 2010 array to 1100 on the array delivered to NASA GSFC. Mean single photon SNRs of over 12 were demonstrated at excess noise factors of 1.2-1.3.The commercial silicon APD array has a fast output with rise times of 300ps and pulse widths of 600ps. Received and filtered signals from the entire array are multiplexed onto this single fast output. The prototype resonant cavity silicon APD array is being developed for use at 1 micron wavelength.

  18. Transporte y acción de las hormonas tiroideas en cerebro de ratón: interrleación entre MCT8 y LAT2

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez, Bárbara

    2013-01-01

    [ES]: Las hormonas tiroideas (HT) juegan un papel indispensable durante el desarrollo regulando múltiples procesos biológicos. La importancia de transportadores específicos que facilitan la entrada de las HT al interior celular ha quedado demostrada con el descubrimiento de mutaciones en el transportador MCT8. La deficiencia de MCT8 en humanos causa un síndrome endocrino con afectación neurológica ligado al cromosoma X denominado síndrome de Allan-Herndon-Dudley. Las graves altera...

  19. The PRISMA hyperspectral imaging spectrometer: detectors and front-end electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerini, Massimo; Mancini, Mauro; Fossati, Enrico; Battazza, Fabrizio; Formaro, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    Two detectors, SWIR and VNIR, and relevant front-end electronics were developed in the frame of the PRISMA(Precursore Iperspettrale della Missione Applicativa) project, an hyperspectral instrument for the earth observation. The two detectors were of the MCT type and, in particular, the VNIR was realized by Sofradir by using the CZT(Cadmium Zinc Telluride substrate of the PV diodes) substrate removal to obtain the sensitivity in the visible spectral range. The use of the same ROIC permitted to design an unique front-end electronics. Two test campaigns were carried out: by Sofradir, only on the detectors, and by Selex ES, by using the PRISMA flight electronics. This latter tests demonstrated that was possible to obtain the same detector performance, with respect of those ones obtained by a ground setup, with a flight hardware in terms of noise, linearity and thermal stability.

  20. Effects of Gravity on the Double-Diffusive Convection during Directional Solidification of a Non-Dilute Alloy with Application to the HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bune, Andris; Gillies, Donald; Lehoczky, Sandor

    1999-01-01

    General 2-D and 3-D finite element model of non-dilute alloy solidification was used to simulate growth of HgCdTe in terrestrial and microgravity conditions. Parametric research was undertaken to investigate effects of gravity level, gravity vector orientation and growth velocity on the pattern of melt convection, shape of crystal/melt interface and radial thermal gradient. Verification of the model was undertaken by comparison with previously published results. For low growth velocities plane front solidification occurs. The location and the shape of the interface was determined using melting temperatures obtained from the HgCdTe liquidus curve. The low thermal conductivity of the solid HgCdTe causes thermal short circuit through the ampoule walls, resulting in curved isotherms in the vicinity of the interface. Double-diffusive convection in the melt is caused by radial temperature gradients and by material density inversion with temperature. Cooling from below and the rejection at the solid-melt interface of the heavier HgTe-rich solute each tend to reduce convection. Because of these complicating factors dimensional rather then non-dimensional modeling was performed. For gravity levels higher then 10(exp -7) of terrestrial one it was found that the maximum convection velocity is extremely sensitive to gravity vector orientation and can be reduced at least by 50% by choosing proper orientation of the ampoule. The predicted interface shape is in agreement with one obtained experimentally by quenching.

  1. Effects of Gravity on the Double-Diffusive Convection During Directional Solidification of a Non-Dilute Alloy with Application to HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1999-01-01

    A general 2-D and 3-D finite element model of non-dilute alloy solidification was used to simulate growth of HgCdTe in terrestrial and microgravity conditions. Verification of the 3-D model was undertaken by comparison with previously published results on convection in an inclined cylinder. For low growth velocities, plane front solidification occurs. The location and the shape of the interface were determined using melting temperatures obtained from the HgCdTe liquidus curve. The low thermal conductivity of the solid HgCdTe causes a thermal short circuit through the ampoule walls, resulting in curved isotherms in the vicinity of the interface. Double-diffusive convection in the melt is caused by radial temperature gradients and by material density inversion due to the combined effects of composition and temperature. Cooling from below and the rejection at the solid-melt interface of the heavier HgTe-rich solute each tend to reduce convection. Because of these complicating factors, dimensional rather than non-dimensional modeling was performed. the predicted interface shape is in agreement with one obtained experimentally by quenching.

  2. MTF study of planar small pixel pitch quantum IR detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravrand, O.; Baier, N.; Ferron, A.; Rochette, F.; Berthoz, J.; Rubaldo, L.; Cluzel, R.

    2014-06-01

    The actual trend in quantum IR detector development is the design of very small pixel pitch large arrays. From previously 30μm pitch, the standard pixel pitch is today 15μm and is expected to decrease to 12μm in the next few years. Furthermore, focal plane arrays (FPA) with pixel pitch as small as small as 10μm has been demonstrated. Such ultra-small pixel pitches are very small compared to the typical length ruling the electrical characteristics of the absorbing materials, namely the minority carrier diffusion length. As an example for low doped N type HgCdTe or InSb material, this diffusion length is of the order of 30 to 50μm, i.e. 3 to 5 times the targeted pixel pitches. This has strong consequences on the modulation transfer function (MTF) for planar structures, where the lateral extension of the photodiode is limited by diffusion. For such aspect ratios, the self-confinement of neighboring diodes may not be efficient enough to maintain optimal MTF. Therefore, this issue has to be addressed in order to take full benefits of the pixel pitch reduction in terms of image resolution. This paper aims at investigating the MTF evolution of HgCdTe and InSb FPAs decreasing the pixel pitch below 15μm. Both experimental measurements and finite element simulations are used to discuss this issue. Different scenarii will be compared, namely deep mesa etch between pixels, internal drift, surface recombination, thin absorbing layers.

  3. Characterisation activities of new NIR to VLWIR detectors from Selex ES Ltd at the UK ATC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezawada, Naidu; Atkinson, David; Shorrocks, Nick; Hipwood, Les; Weller, Harald; Bryson, Ian; Jackson, Malcolm; Davis, Ray P.; Barnes, Keith; Baker, Ian

    2014-07-01

    The UKATC has undertaken to test and evaluate new infrared detectors being developed at Selex ES Ltd, Southampton in the UK for astronomy and space applications. Current programmes include: the evaluation of large format (1280×1024), near-infrared detectors for astronomy, the characterisation of shortwave infrared detectors (up to 2.5μm) for satellite-based earth observation, long wavelength (8 to 11μm) and very long wavelength (10 to 14.5μm cut-off) devices for cosmos applications. Future programmes include the evaluation of large format, avalanche photodiode arrays for photon-level sensing and high speed applications. Custom test facilities are being setup in order to drive and characterise the detectors at the ATC under conditions representative of the applications. In this paper the test facilities will be described along with the associated challenges to evaluate the performance of these detectors. The paper also includes an overview of the Selex ES detectors, including the ROICs and the MOVPE HgCdTe arrays, and will present the latest results from the characterisation program.

  4. Spatial noise limited NETD performance of a HgCdTe hybrid focal plane array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Vishnu

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a model for theoretically estimating the residual spatial noise in a direct injection readout hybrid focal plane array (FPA) consisting of photovoltaic detectors. The procedure consists of computing the response of the pixels after taking into account the nonlinearity induced by the transfer function in the hybrid configuration and the estimated r.m.s. response nonuniformity from the known input parameters of the detector and readout arrays. A linear two point nonuniformity compensation algorithm is applied to the computed pixel responses to calculate the residual spatial noise. Signal-to-spatial noise ratio is then used to estimate the spatial noise limited NETD performance of MWIR and LWIR Hg 1- x Cd x Te hybrid FPAs.

  5. Calorimeter detectors

    CERN Document Server

    de Barbaro, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Although the instantaneous and integrated luminosity in HL-LHC will be far higher than the LHC detectors were originally designed for, the Barrel calorimeters of the four experiments are expected to continue to perform well  throughout the Phase II program. The conditions for the End-Cap calorimeters are far more challenging and whilst some detectors will require relatively modest changes, others require far more substantial upgrades. We present the results of longevity and performance studies for the calorimeter systems of the four main LHC experiments and outline the upgrade options under consideration. We include a discussion of the R&D required to make the final technology choices for the upgraded detectors.

  6. Pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Passmore, M S

    2001-01-01

    positions on the detector. The loss of secondary electrons follows the profile of the detector and increases with higher energy ions. studies of the spatial resolution predict a value of 5.3 lp/mm. The image noise in photon counting systems is investigated theoretically and experimentally and is shown to be given by Poisson statistics. The rate capability of the LAD1 was measured to be 250 kHz per pixel. Theoretical and experimental studies of the difference in contrast for ideal charge integrating and photon counting imaging systems were carried out. It is shown that the contrast differs and that for the conventional definition (contrast = (background - signal)/background) the photon counting device will, in some cases, always give a better contrast than the integrating system. Simulations in MEDICI are combined with analytical calculations to investigate charge collection efficiencies (CCE) in semiconductor detectors. Different pixel sizes and biasing conditions are considered. The results show charge shari...

  7. Preliminary validation results of an ASIC for the readout and control of near-infrared large array detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pâhlsson, Philip; Meier, Dirk; Otnes Berge, Hans Kristian; Øya, Petter; Steenari, David; Olsen, Alf; Hasanbegovic, Amir; Altan, Mehmet A.; Najafiuchevler, Bahram; Talebi, Jahanzad; Azman, Suleyman; Gheorghe, Codin; Ackermann, Jörg; Mæhlum, Gunnar

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present initial test results of the Near Infrared Readout and Controller ASIC (NIRCA), designed for large area image sensors under contract from the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Norwegian Space Center. The ASIC is designed to read out image sensors based on mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe, or MCT) operating down to 77 K. IDEAS has developed, designed and initiated testing of NIRCA with promising results, showing complete functionality of all ASIC sub-components. The ASIC generates programmable digital signals to clock out the contents of an image array and to amplify, digitize and transfer the resulting pixel charge. The digital signals can be programmed into the ASIC during run-time and allows for windowing and custom readout schemes. The clocked out voltages are amplified by programmable gain amplifiers and digitized by 12-bit, 3-Msps successive approximation register (SAR) analogue-to-digital converters (ADC). Digitized data is encoded using 8-bit to 10-bit encoding and transferred over LVDS to the readout system. The ASIC will give European researchers access to high spectral sensitivity, very low noise and radiation hardened readout electronics for astronomy and Earth observation missions operating at 77 K and room temperature. The versatility of the chip makes the architecture a possible candidate for other research areas, or defense or industrial applications that require analog and digital acquisition, voltage regulation, and digital signal generation.

  8. Linking supply to demand: the neuronal monocarboxylate transporter MCT2 and the alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptor GluR2/3 subunit are associated in a common trafficking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Karin; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Parent, Annabelle; Repond, Cendrine; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Di Luca, Monica; Pellerin, Luc

    2009-05-01

    MCT2 is the major neuronal monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) that allows the supply of alternative energy substrates such as lactate to neurons. Recent evidence obtained by electron microscopy has demonstrated that MCT2, like alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors, is localized in dendritic spines of glutamatergic synapses. Using immunofluorescence, we show in this study that MCT2 colocalizes extensively with GluR2/3 subunits of AMPA receptors in neurons from various mouse brain regions as well as in cultured neurons. It also colocalizes with GluR2/3-interacting proteins, such as C-kinase-interacting protein 1, glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1 and clathrin adaptor protein. Coimmunoprecipitation of MCT2 with GluR2/3 and C-kinase-interacting protein 1 suggests their close interaction within spines. Parallel changes in the localization of both MCT2 and GluR2/3 subunits at and beneath the plasma membrane upon various stimulation paradigms were unraveled using an original immunocytochemical and transfection approach combined with three-dimensional image reconstruction. Cell culture incubation with AMPA or insulin triggered a marked intracellular accumulation of both MCT2 and GluR2/3, whereas both tumor necrosis factor alpha and glycine (with glutamate) increased their cell surface immunolabeling. Similar results were obtained using Western blots performed on membrane or cytoplasm-enriched cell fractions. Finally, an enhanced lactate flux into neurons was demonstrated after MCT2 translocation on the cell surface. These observations provide unequivocal evidence that MCT2 is linked to AMPA receptor GluR2/3 subunits and undergoes a similar translocation process in neurons upon activation. MCT2 emerges as a novel component of the synaptic machinery putatively linking neuroenergetics to synaptic transmission.

  9. Radiation Tolerance Characterization of Dual Band InAs/GaSb Type-II Strain-Layer Superlattice pBp Detectors Using 63 MeV Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    films J. Appl. Phys. 112, 073718 (2012) Additional information on Appl. Phys. Lett. Journal Homepage: http://apl.aip.org/ Journal Information...considered for space applications due to their relative advantage in manu- facturability, compared with conventional mercury -cadmium- telluride (MCT) IR...preliminary 1–2 MeV proton irradiation studies of Sb -based T2SLS photodiodes where the detectors were unbiased and at 300 K during irradiation, which

  10. Differences in metabolism between adeno- and squamous cell non-small cell lung carcinomas: spatial distribution and prognostic value of GLUT1 and MCT4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, T.W.H.; Schuurbiers, O.C.J.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Looijen-Salamon, M.G.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Verhagen, A.F.T.M.; Lok, J.; Heijden, H.F. van der; Rademakers, S.E.; Span, P.N.; Bussink, J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia leads to changes in tumor cell metabolism such as increased glycolysis. In this study, we examined the spatial distribution of the glycolysis and hypoxia related markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4) expression in relation to the vasculatu

  11. Performance overview of the Euclid infrared focal plane detector subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waczynski, A.; Barbier, R.; Cagiano, S.; Chen, J.; Cheung, S.; Cho, H.; Cillis, A.; Clémens, J.-C.; Dawson, O.; Delo, G.; Farris, M.; Feizi, A.; Foltz, R.; Hickey, M.; Holmes, W.; Hwang, T.; Israelsson, U.; Jhabvala, M.; Kahle, D.; Kan, Em.; Kan, Er.; Loose, M.; Lotkin, G.; Miko, L.; Nguyen, L.; Piquette, E.; Powers, T.; Pravdo, S.; Runkle, A.; Seiffert, M.; Strada, P.; Tucker, C.; Turck, K.; Wang, F.; Weber, C.; Williams, J.

    2016-07-01

    In support of the European space agency (ESA) Euclid mission, NASA is responsible for the evaluation of the H2RG mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) detectors and electronics assemblies fabricated by Teledyne imaging systems. The detector evaluation is performed in the detector characterization laboratory (DCL) at the NASA Goddard space flight center (GSFC) in close collaboration with engineers and scientists from the jet propulsion laboratory (JPL) and the Euclid project. The Euclid near infrared spectrometer and imaging photometer (NISP) will perform large area optical and spectroscopic sky surveys in the 0.9-2.02 μm infrared (IR) region. The NISP instrument will contain sixteen detector arrays each coupled to a Teledyne SIDECAR application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The focal plane will operate at 100K and the SIDECAR ASIC will be in close proximity operating at a slightly higher temperature of 137K. This paper will describe the test configuration, performance tests and results of the latest engineering run, also known as pilot run 3 (PR3), consisting of four H2RG detectors operating simultaneously. Performance data will be presented on; noise, spectral quantum efficiency, dark current, persistence, pixel yield, pixel to pixel uniformity, linearity, inter pixel crosstalk, full well and dynamic range, power dissipation, thermal response and unit cell input sensitivity.

  12. XMASS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Hiraide, K; Hirano, S; Kishimoto, Y; Kobayashi, K; Moriyama, S; Nakagawa, K; Nakahata, M; Nishiie, H; Ogawa, H; Oka, N; Sekiya, H; Shinozaki, A; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takachio, O; Ueshima, K; Umemoto, D; Yamashita, M; Yang, B S; Tasaka, S; Liu, J; Martens, K; Hosokawa, K; Miuchi, K; Murata, A; Onishi, Y; Otsuka, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Kim, Y H; Lee, K B; Lee, M K; Lee, J S; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Nishitani, Y; Masuda, K; Takiya, H; Uchida, H; Kim, N Y; Kim, Y D; Kusaba, F; Motoki, D; Nishijima, K; Fujii, K; Murayama, I; Nakamura, S

    2013-01-01

    The XMASS project aims to detect dark matter, pp and $^{7}$Be solar neutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay using ultra pure liquid xenon. The first phase of the XMASS experiment searches for dark matter. In this paper, we describe the XMASS detector in detail, including its configuration, data acquisition equipment and calibration system.

  13. XMASS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hieda, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Hiraide, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hirano, S. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Moriyama, S. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Nakagawa, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Nakahata, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Nishiie, H. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Ogawa, H. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); and others

    2013-07-11

    The XMASS project aims to detect dark matter, pp and {sup 7}Be solar neutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay using ultra pure liquid xenon. The first phase of the XMASS experiment searches for dark matter. In this paper, we describe the XMASS detector in detail, including its configuration, data acquisition equipment and calibration system.

  14. Mct8 and trh co-expression throughout the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus is modified by dehydration-induced anorexia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Salas, Elena; Mengod, Guadalupe; García-Luna, Cinthia; Soberanes-Chávez, Paulina; Matamoros-Trejo, Gilberto; de Gortari, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is a neuropeptide with endocrine and neuromodulatory effects. TRH from the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN) participates in the control of energy homeostasis; as a neuromodulator TRH has anorexigenic effects. Negative energy balance decreases PVN TRH expression and TSH concentration; in contrast, a particular model of anorexia (dehydration) induces in rats a paradoxical increase in TRH expression in hypophysiotropic cells from caudal PVN and high TSH serum levels, despite their apparent hypothalamic hyperthyroidism and low body weight. We compared here the mRNA co-expression pattern of one of the brain thyroid hormones' transporters, the monocarboxylate transporter-8 (MCT8) with that of TRH in PVN subdivisions of dehydration-induced anorexic (DIA) and control rats. Our aim was to identify whether a low MCT8 expression in anorexic rats could contribute to their high TRH mRNA content.We registered daily food intake and body weight of 7-day DIA and control rats and analyzed TRH and MCT8 mRNA co-expression throughout the PVN by double in situ hybridization assays. We found that DIA rats showed increased number of TRHergic cells in caudal PVN, as well as a decreased percentage of TRH-expressing neurons that co-expressed MCT8 mRNA signal. Results suggest that the reduced proportion of double TRH/MCT8 expressing cells may be limiting the entry of hypothalamic triiodothyronine to the greater number of TRH-expressing neurons from caudal PVN and be in part responsible for the high TRH expression in anorexia rats and for the lack of adaptation of their hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis to their low food intake.

  15. Effect of surface fields on the dynamic resistance of planar HgCdTe mid-wavelength infrared photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kai; Zhou, Song-Min; Li, Yang; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yi-Yu; Xie, Xiao-Hui; Lin, Chun; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Jian-Xin; Zhang, Qin-Yao

    2015-05-01

    This work investigates the effect of surface fields on the dynamic resistance of a planar HgCdTe mid-wavelength infrared photodiode from both theoretical and experimental aspects, considering a gated n-on-p diode with the surface potential of its p-region modulated. Theoretical models of the surface leakage current are developed, where the surface tunnelling current in the case of accumulation is expressed by modifying the formulation of bulk tunnelling currents, and the surface channel current for strong inversion is simulated with a transmission line method. Experimental data from the fabricated devices show a flat-band voltage of V F B = - 5.7 V by capacitance-voltage measurement, and then the physical parameters for bulk properties are determined from the resistance-voltage characteristics of the diode working at a flat-band gate voltage. With proper values of the modeling parameters such as surface trap density and channel electron mobility, the theoretical R 0 A product and corresponding dark current calculated from the proposed model as functions of the gate voltage Vg demonstrate good consistency with the measured values. The R 0 A product remarkably degenerates when Vg is far below or above VFB because of the surface tunnelling current or channel current, respectively; and it attains the maximum value of 5.7 × 10 7 Ω . cm 2 around the transition between surface depletion and weak inversion when V g ≈ - 4 V , which might result from reduced generation-recombination current.

  16. TEQUILA: NIR camera/spectrograph based on a Rockwell 1024x1024 HgCdTe FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Elfego; Sohn, Erika; Cruz-Gonzales, Irene; Salas, Luis; Parraga, Antonio; Perez, Manuel; Torres, Roberto; Cobos Duenas, Francisco J.; Gonzalez, Gaston; Langarica, Rosalia; Tejada, Carlos; Sanchez, Beatriz; Iriarte, Arturo; Valdez, J.; Gutierrez, Leonel; Lazo, Francisco; Angeles, Fernando

    1998-08-01

    We describe the configuration and operation modes of the IR camera/spectrograph: TEQUILA based on a 1024 X 1024 HgCdTe FPA. The optical system will allow three possible modes of operation: direct imaging, low and medium resolution spectroscopy and polarimetry. The basic system is being designed to consist of the following: 1) A LN(subscript 2) dewar that allocates the FPA together with the preamplifiers and a 24 filter position cylinder. 2) Control and readout electronics based on DSP modules linked to a workstation through fiber optics. 3) An opto-mechanical assembly cooled to -30 degrees that provides an efficient operation of the instrument in its various modes. 4) A control module for the moving parts of the instrument. The opto-mechanical assembly will have the necessary provision to install a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer and an adaptive optics correction system. The final image acquisition and control of the whole instrument is carried out in a workstation to provide the observer with a friendly environment. The system will operate at the 2.1 m telescope at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional in San Pedro Martir, B.C. (Mexico), and is intended to be a first-light instrument for the new 7.8m Mexican IR-Optical Telescope.

  17. Semiconductor Detectors; Detectores de Semiconductores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina, E.

    2007-07-01

    Particle detectors based on semiconductor materials are among the few devices used for particle detection that are available to the public at large. In fact we are surrounded by them in our daily lives: they are used in photoelectric cells for opening doors, in digital photographic and video camera, and in bar code readers at supermarket cash registers. (Author)

  18. The Future of Infrared; III-Vs or HgCdTe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinch, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    For reasons associated with size, weight, power consumption, and cost, the future of infrared systems for all spectral bands is being driven towards megapixel formats operating under diffraction- and background-limited conditions with ever-smaller pixel pitches and ever-higher operating temperatures. The performance requirements of such systems with regard to both optical and detector limitations are examined for the materials technologies and device architectures that are in vogue today. At elevated operating temperatures, available noise equivalent temperature difference values for diffraction-limited operation are found to be strongly dependent on the available pixel pitch, optimizing at values ˜ λ/4, where λ is the operating wavelength. The possibility for extending the operation of mid- and long-wavelength focal plane arrays to room temperature with diffraction- and background-limited performance is discussed, together with the potential issues that must be addressed in order to achieve this ultimate goal.

  19. 长波碲镉汞材料 As 掺杂激活研究%Research on arsenic-doping activation in LW HgCdTe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张舟; 陈慧卿; 朱西安

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-doped long-wavelength HgCdTe was realized by ion implantation.As doping medium,arsenic shows amphiprotic doping property.When Arsenic only occupies Te-site to be acceptor,P type HgdTe material can be formed.After the arsenic-doped HgCdTe is annealed in the mercury atmosphere,the change of electrical property which is caused by annealing is analyzed.And the effect of mercury pressure,temperature and time on arsenic activa-tion is studied.The activation effect is analyzed by Hall measurement and SIMS.In the end,when the arsenic-doped HgCdTe is annealed in the high temperature and high mercury atmosphere,arsenic activation is achieved.%利用离子注入工艺实现长波碲镉汞材料的 As 掺杂,As 作为掺杂介质表现出两性掺杂行为,而 As 只有占据 Te 位成为受主才能形成 P 型碲镉汞材料。通过对砷掺杂碲镉汞材料在汞气氛中进行退火,分析注入退火引起的样品电学性质的变化,对砷激活退火采用的汞压、温度及时间进行了研究,利用霍尔测试和二次离子质谱仪(SIMS)等手段分析激活效果,研究发现,高温富汞热退火可以实现碲镉汞 As 激活。

  20. Effect of surface fields on the dynamic resistance of planar HgCdTe mid-wavelength infrared photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Kai; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yi-Yu [Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, Song-Min; Xie, Xiao-Hui; Lin, Chun, E-mail: chun-lin@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Jian-Xin; Zhang, Qin-Yao, E-mail: qinyao@mail.sitp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Li, Yang [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-05-28

    This work investigates the effect of surface fields on the dynamic resistance of a planar HgCdTe mid-wavelength infrared photodiode from both theoretical and experimental aspects, considering a gated n-on-p diode with the surface potential of its p-region modulated. Theoretical models of the surface leakage current are developed, where the surface tunnelling current in the case of accumulation is expressed by modifying the formulation of bulk tunnelling currents, and the surface channel current for strong inversion is simulated with a transmission line method. Experimental data from the fabricated devices show a flat-band voltage of V{sub FB}=−5.7 V by capacitance-voltage measurement, and then the physical parameters for bulk properties are determined from the resistance-voltage characteristics of the diode working at a flat-band gate voltage. With proper values of the modeling parameters such as surface trap density and channel electron mobility, the theoretical R{sub 0}A product and corresponding dark current calculated from the proposed model as functions of the gate voltage V{sub g} demonstrate good consistency with the measured values. The R{sub 0}A product remarkably degenerates when V{sub g} is far below or above V{sub FB} because of the surface tunnelling current or channel current, respectively; and it attains the maximum value of 5.7×10{sup 7} Ω · cm{sup 2} around the transition between surface depletion and weak inversion when V{sub g}≈−4 V, which might result from reduced generation-recombination current.

  1. 基于国产MCT8000运动控制卡的开放式结构机器人控制系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭韬; 周学才

    2001-01-01

    Using a homemade motion controller marketed as MCT8000 series, a universal robot controller with open architecture has been developed. This paper presents the hardware and software architecture of this industrialization system. An application example is also indicated at the end of the paper.%应用国产MCT8000运动控制卡开发了一种新型产业化的开放式结构机器人控制系统。本文介绍了该系统软、硬件组成和实现方法,并提供了这种开放式结构机器人控制系统的应用实例。

  2. 基于VLD技术的MCT器件仿真分析%Simulation and Analysis of MCT Device Based on VLD Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮建新; 陈万军; 孙瑞泽; 彭朝飞; 张波

    2014-01-01

    针对在脉冲功率领域有一定应用的栅控晶闸管(MCT)器件,提出了一种基于VLD(横向变掺杂)技术的MCT(VMCT)器件新工艺并通过仿真比较出新工艺的优势。VLD技术是指通过调整掩模版窗口的大小调节杂质掺杂浓度,进而优化MCT中NPN晶体管的电流放大系数a,通过仿真确定了新工艺的杂质注入剂量。仿真结果表明采用新工艺的VMCT器件比采用常规工艺MCT (CMCT)电流能力更强,是CMCT的2倍;和CMCT相比,VMCT器件的耐压和关断电压都保持不变,但是VMCT在工艺流程中比MCT节省一张掩模版。%MOS controlled thyristor (MCT) which is used in pulsed power field is investigated by numerical simulation tool in this paper. A new process based on VLD(variable lateral doping) technology for MCT is proposed and its advantages are also found by simulation. Current amplification factor a of NPN transistor in MCT is optimized by adjust the size of mask and the dose of impurity implantation.The dose of impurity implantation is identified by simulation.The simulation results indicate that the current ability of conventional MOS controlled thyristor (CMCT) is only half of the VLD MOS controlled thyristor (VMCT). The breakdown voltage and turn off voltage of VMCT are the same as CMCT.However, compared with CMCT, a mask is saved in the VMCT process.

  3. 甲状腺激素转运体MCT8的病理生理作用%Pathophysiological role of monocarboxylate transporter 8 on thyroid hormone transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙毅娜; 叶艳; 李永梅; 林来祥

    2016-01-01

    甲状腺激素(THs)进出细胞需要转运体蛋白的介导.单羧酸转运体(MCT)8是介导T3进入神经元的主要转运体蛋白,是迄今为止唯一具有明确的临床意义、在转运THs入脑中起着重要作用的转运体蛋白,其编码基因(SLC16A2)突变导致了艾伦-赫恩登-达得利综合征(AHDS),以严重的神经运动发育迟滞和高T3、低T4的血清学改变为临床特征.Mct8基因敲除的小鼠模型能够完全复制人MCT8基因突变的血清学改变,但神经症状轻微,部分解释了MCT8缺陷患者的临床表现,为THs转运体病理生理作用的研究提供依据.%Transmembrane protein transporters mediate cellular uptake and efflux of thyroid hormones.Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) plays an essential role in the supply of T3 to neurons in the central nervous system.So far, MCT8 is the only one with specific clinical significance and can importantlly transport THs into brain.MCT8 (encoded gene is SLC16A2) mutations lead to Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome (AHDS) with severe neurological impairment and altered concentrations of thyroid hormones.The endocrine component in Mct8-deficiency mice is likely to be similar to the humans'.However, unlike in humans with an MCT8 deficiency, there is almost not neurological impairment in these mice.After all, deep insight for clinical features with MCT8 mutations can be partly explained and the pathophysiological role of thyroid hormone transporters can be partially identified in Mct8-deficiency mice.

  4. Radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2017-06-27

    Alpha particle detecting devices are disclosed that have a chamber that can hold a fluid in a tensioned metastable state. The chamber is tuned with a suitable fluid and tension such that alpha emitting materials such as radon and one or more of its decay products can be detected. The devices can be portable and can be placed in areas, such as rooms in dwellings or laboratories and used to measure radon in these areas, in situ and in real time. The disclosed detectors can detect radon at and below 4 pCi/L in air; also, at and below 4,000 pCi/L or 300 pCi/L in water.

  5. The COSMO-CLM 4.8 regional climate model coupled to regional ocean, land surface and global earth system models using OASIS3-MCT: description and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Andreas; Akhtar, Naveed; Brauch, Jennifer; Breil, Marcus; Davin, Edouard; Ho-Hagemann, Ha T. M.; Maisonnave, Eric; Thürkow, Markus; Weiher, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    We developed a coupled regional climate system model based on the CCLM regional climate model. Within this model system, using OASIS3-MCT as a coupler, CCLM can be coupled to two land surface models (the Community Land Model (CLM) and VEG3D), the NEMO-MED12 regional ocean model for the Mediterranean Sea, two ocean models for the North and Baltic seas (NEMO-NORDIC and TRIMNP+CICE) and the MPI-ESM Earth system model.We first present the different model components and the unified OASIS3-MCT interface which handles all couplings in a consistent way, minimising the model source code modifications and defining the physical and numerical aspects of the couplings. We also address specific coupling issues like the handling of different domains, multiple usage of the MCT library and exchange of 3-D fields.We analyse and compare the computational performance of the different couplings based on real-case simulations over Europe. The usage of the LUCIA tool implemented in OASIS3-MCT enables the quantification of the contributions of the coupled components to the overall coupling cost. These individual contributions are (1) cost of the model(s) coupled, (2) direct cost of coupling including horizontal interpolation and communication between the components, (3) load imbalance, (4) cost of different usage of processors by CCLM in coupled and stand-alone mode and (5) residual cost including i.a. CCLM additional computations.Finally a procedure for finding an optimum processor configuration for each of the couplings was developed considering the time to solution, computing cost and parallel efficiency of the simulation. The optimum configurations are presented for sequential, concurrent and mixed (sequential+concurrent) coupling layouts. The procedure applied can be regarded as independent of the specific coupling layout and coupling details.We found that the direct cost of coupling, i.e. communications and horizontal interpolation, in OASIS3-MCT remains below 7 % of the CCLM stand

  6. CLIC Detector Power Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, A

    2013-01-01

    An estimate for the CLIC detector power requirements is outlined starting from the available data on power consumptions of the four LHC experiments and considering the differences between a typical LHC Detector (CMS) and the CLIC baseline detector concept. In particular the impact of the power pulsing scheme for the CLIC Detector electronics on the overall detector consumption is considered. The document will be updated with the requirements of the sub-detector electronics once they are more defined.

  7. Pixel Vertex Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wermes, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Pixel vertex detectors are THE instrument of choice for the tracking of charged particles close to the interaction point at the LHC. Hybrid pixel detectors, in which sensor and read-out IC are separate entities, constitute the present state of the art in detector technology. Three of the LHC detectors use vertex detectors based on this technology. A development period of almost 10 years has resulted in pixel detector modules which can stand the extreme rate and timing requirements as well as ...

  8. ROIC with on-chip sigma-delta AD converter for HgCdTe e-APD FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zhang, Junling; Wang, Pan; Zhou, Jie; Gao, Lei; Ding, Ruijun

    2013-10-01

    HgCdTe electron injection avalanche photodiodes (e-APDs) work at linear mode. A weak optical current signal is amplified orders of magnitude due to the internal avalanche mechanism and it has been demonstrated to be one of the most promising methods to focal-plane arrays (FPAs) for low-flux like hyper-spectral imaging and high-speed applications such as active imaging. This paper presents the design of a column-shared ADC for cooled e-APDs FPA. Designing a digital FPA requires fulfilling very stringent requirements in terms of power consumption, silicon area and speed. Among the various ADC architectures sigma-delta conversion is a promising solution for high-performance and medium size FPA such as 128×128. The performance of Sigma-delta ADC rather relies on the modulator structure which set over-sampling and noise shaping characteristics than on critical analog circuits. This makes them quite robust and flexible. A multistage noise shaping (MASH) 2-1 single bit architecture sigma-delta conversion with switched-capacitor circuits is designed for column-shared ADC, which is implanted in the GLOBALFOUNDRIES 0.35um CMOS process with 4-poly and 4-metal on the basis of a 100um pixel pitch. It operates under 3.3V supply and the output range of the quantizer is 2V. A quantization noise subtraction circuit in modulator is designed to subtract the quantization noise of first-stage modulator. The quantization noise of the modulator is shaped by a high-pass filter. The silicon area and power consumption are mainly determined by the decimation low pass filter. A cascaded integrator-comb (CIC) filter is designed as the digital decimator filter. CIC filter requires no multipliers and use limited storage thereby leading to more economical hardware implementation. The register word length of the filter in each stage is carefully dimensioned in order to minimize the required hardware. Furthermore, the digital filters operate with a reduced supply voltage to 1.5V. Simulation

  9. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    DT As announced in the previous Bulletin MU DT completed the installation of the vertical chambers of barrel wheels 0, +1 and +2. 242 DT and RPC stations are now installed in the negative barrel wheels. The missing 8 (4 in YB-1 and 4 in YB-2) chambers can be installed only after the lowering of the two wheels into the UX cavern, which is planned for the last quarter of the year. Cabling on the surface of the negative wheels was finished in May after some difficulties with RPC cables. The next step was to begin the final commissioning of the wheels with the final trigger and readout electronics. Priority was giv¬en to YB0 in order to check everything before the chambers were covered by cables and services of the inner detectors. Commissioning is not easy since it requires both activity on the central and positive wheels underground, as well as on the negative wheels still on the surface. The DT community is requested to commission the negative wheels on surface to cope with a possible lack of time a...

  10. Development of Type-II superlattice VLWIR detectors in JAXA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Michito; Murooka, Jumpei; Kumeta, Ayaka; Kimura, Toshiyoshi; Inada, Hiroshi; Iguchi, Yasuhiro; Hiroe, Yuta; Kimata, Masafumi

    2017-02-01

    One of JAXA's future missions, using an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), requires the focal plane array (FPA) that has high sensitivity up to the very long-wavelength infrared (VLWIR) region. Since a Type-II superlattice (T2SL) is the only known infrared material to exhibit performance that is theoretically predicted to be higher than that of HgCdTe additionally the cutoff wavelength can be tailored in the wavelength region of 3-30 μm, we started the research and development of the T2SL detector in 2009. In order to confirm our final goal, which is to realize the FPA with a cutoff wavelength of 15 μm, we first fabricated the 320 × 256 (QVGA format) InAs/GaInSb T2SL FPA with a cutoff wavelength of 15 μm, and the large-format 640 × 512 (VGA format) T2SL FPA is followed because the other missions, using an infrared imager, require the large-format FPA. The noise-equivalent delta temperature measured with F1.4 optics was 0.15 K for QVGA format T2SL FPA at 77 K. It was 0.35 K for VGA format T2SL FPA at 77 K, but there is non-uniformity, and further improvements are necessary to achieve high performance FPAs.

  11. Down-regulation of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) gene expression in the colon of piglets is linked to bacterial protein fermentation and pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villodre Tudela, Carmen; Boudry, Christelle; Stumpff, Friederike; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Vahjen, Wilfried; Zentek, Jürgen; Pieper, Robert

    2015-02-28

    The present study investigated the influence of bacterial metabolites on monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) expression in pigs using in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro approaches. Piglets (n 24) were fed high-protein (26 %) or low-protein (18 %) diets with or without fermentable carbohydrates. Colonic digesta samples were analysed for a broad range of bacterial metabolites. The expression of MCT1, TNF-α, interferon γ (IFN-γ) and IL-8 was determined in colonic tissue. The expression of MCT1 was lower and of TNF-α and IL-8 was higher with high-protein diets (P< 0·05). MCT1 expression was positively correlated with l-lactate, whereas negatively correlated with NH₃ and putrescine (P< 0·05). The expression of IL-8 and TNF-α was negatively correlated with l-lactate and positively correlated with NH₃ and putrescine, whereas the expression of IFN-γ was positively correlated with histamine and 4-ethylphenol (P< 0·05). Subsequently, porcine colonic tissue and Caco-2 cells were incubated with Na-butyrate, NH₄Cl or TNF-α as selected bacterial metabolites or mediators of inflammation. Colonic MCT1 expression was higher after incubation with Na-butyrate (P< 0·05) and lower after incubation with NH₄Cl or TNF-α (P< 0·05). Incubation of Caco-2 cells with increasing concentrations of these metabolites confirmed the up-regulation of MCT1 expression by Na-butyrate (linear, P< 0·05) and down-regulation by TNF-α and NH₄Cl (linear, P< 0·05). The high-protein diet decreased the expression of MCT1 in the colon of pigs, which appears to be linked to NH₃- and TNF-α-mediated signalling.

  12. Development of NIR detectors and science driven requirements forSNAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.G.; Bebek, C.; Bernstein, G.; Bonissent, A.; Carithers,B.; Cole, D.; Figer, D.; Gerdes, D.; Gladney, L.; Lorenzon, W.; Kim, A.; Kushner, G.; Kuznetsova, N.; Linder, E.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Mostek,N.; Mufson, S.; Schubnell, M.; Seshadri, S.; Shukla, H.; Smith, R.; Stebbins, A.; Stoughton, C.; Tarle, G.

    2006-05-23

    Precision near infrared (NIR) measurements are essential for the next generation of ground and space based instruments. The SuperNova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will measure thousands of type Ia supernovae upto a redshift of 1.7. The highest redshift supernovae provide the most leverage for determining cosmological parameters, in particular the dark energy equation of state and its possible time evolution. Accurate NIR observations are needed to utilize the full potential of the highest redshift supernovae. Technological improvements in NIR detector fabrication have lead to high quantum efficiency, low noise detectors using a HgCdTe diode with a band-gap that is tuned to cutoff at 1:7 1m. The effects of detector quantum efficiency, read noise, and dark current on lightcurve signal to noise, lightcurve parameter errors, and distance modulus ?ts are simulated in the SNAP sim framework. Results show that improving quantum efficiency leads to the largest gains in photometric accuracy for type Ia supernovae. High quantum efficiency in the NIR reduces statistical errors and helps control systematic uncertainties at the levels necessary to achieve the primary SNAP science goals.

  13. Improved IR detectors to swap heavy systems for SWaP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manissadjian, Alain; Rubaldo, Laurent; Rebeil, Yann; Kerlain, Alexandre; Brellier, Delphine; Mollard, Laurent

    2012-06-01

    Cooled IR technologies are challenged for answering new system needs like the compactness and the reduction of cryopower which is a key feature for the SWaP (Size, Weight and Power) requirements. Over the last years, SOFRADIR has improved its HgCdTe technology, with effect on dark current reduction, opening the way for High Operating Temperature (HOT) systems that can get rid of the 80K temperature constraint, and therefore releases the Stirling cooler engine power consumption. Performances of the 640×512 15μm pitch LW detector working above 100K will be presented. A compact 640×512 15μm pitch MW detector presenting high EO performance above 130K with cut-off wavelength above 5.0μm has been developed. Its different performances with respect to the market requirements for SWaP will be discussed. High performance compact systems will make no compromise on detector resolution. The pixel pitch reduction is the answer for resolution enhancement with size reduction. We will therefore also discuss the ongoing developments and market needs for SWaP systems.

  14. MTF Issues in Small-Pixel-Pitch Planar Quantum IR Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravrand, O.; Baier, N.; Ferron, A.; Rochette, F.; Berthoz, J.; Rubaldo, L.; Cluzel, R.

    2014-08-01

    The current trend in quantum infrared (IR) detector development is the design of very small-pixel-pitch large arrays. From the previous 30 μm pitch, the standard pixel pitch today is 15 μm and is expected to decrease to 12 μm in the next few years. Furthermore, focal-plane arrays (FPAs) with pixel pitch as small as 10 μm have been demonstrated. Such ultrasmall-pixel pitches are very small compared with the typical length ruling the electrical characteristics of the absorbing materials, namely the minority-carrier diffusion length. As an example, for low-doped n-type HgCdTe or InSb material, this diffusion length is on the order of 30 μm to 50 μm, i.e., three to five times the targeted pixel pitches. This has strong consequences for the modulation transfer function (MTF) of planar structures, where the lateral extension of the photodiode is limited by diffusion. For such aspect ratios, the self-confinement of neighboring diodes may not be efficient enough to maintain an optimal MTF. Therefore, this issue has to be addressed to take full advantage of the pixel pitch reduction in terms of image resolution. The aim of this work is to investigate the evolution of the MTF of HgCdTe and InSb FPAs when decreasing the pixel pitch below 15 μm. Both experimental measurements and finite-element simulations are used to discuss this issue. Different scenarios are compared, namely deep mesa etch between pixels, internal drift, surface recombination, and thin absorbing layers.

  15. Reactive ion etching (RIE) induced p- to n-type conversion in extrinsically doped p-type HgCdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musca, C.A.; Smith, E.P.G.; Siliquini, J.F.; Dell, J.M.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. [Univ. of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Piotrowski, J. [Vigo System Ltd., Warsaw (Poland)

    1998-12-31

    Mercury annealing of reactive ion etching (RIE) induced p- to n-type conversion in extrinsically doped p-type epitaxial layers of HgCdTe (x = 0.31) has been used to reconvert n-type conversion sustained during RIE processing. For the RIE processing conditions used (400 mT, CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, 90 W) p- to n-type conversion was observed using laser beam induced current (LBIC) measurements. After a sealed tube mercury anneal at 200 C for 17 hours, LBIC measurements clearly indicated no n-type converted region remained. Subsequent Hall measurements confirmed that the material consisted of a p-type layer, with electrical properties equivalent to that of the initial as-grown wafer (N{sub A}-N{sub D} = 2 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3}, {mu} = 350 cm{sup 2}.V{sup {minus}1}.s{sup {minus}1}).

  16. 甲状腺激素转运体MCT8在2VO大鼠脑组织中的表达%Expression of monocarboxylate transporter 8 mRNA in the brain tissue of rats with cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔丹; 管玉青; 蒋海山; 汪槿; 席蕾; 王群

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨2VO大鼠脑组织中甲状腺激素转运体MCT8在不同缺血时间点基因水平的变化规律.方法 25只成年雄性SD大鼠随机分为正常对照组、2VO 3 d组、2VO 2周组和2VO 5周组.采用免疫荧光法观察MCT8在正常大鼠侧脑室中的表达;采用双侧颈总动脉永久性结扎术制备脑缺血模型,术后各组大鼠于实验终点采用荧光定量PCR法测定脑组织中甲状腺激素转运体MCT8 mRNA的表达水平.结果 免疫荧光法观察到MCT8在正常大鼠侧脑室的血管内皮细胞膜上表达丰富;中枢甲状腺激素转运体MCT8 mRNA水平在2VO 3 d组及2VO 2周组与正常组相比较差异无统计学意义(P=-0.909,P=0.694);MCT8 mRNA水平在2VO 5周组较正常组及2VO 3 d组明显增高(P=0.029,P=0.023),与2VO 2周组相比较差异无统计学意义(P=0.065).结论 中枢甲状腺激素转运体MCT8基因水平在脑缺血后呈逐渐代偿性增高趋势.%Objective To investigate the mRNA expression of monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8),a thyroid hormone transport protein,in the lateral ventricle of rats with cerebral ischemia.Methods Immunofluorescence staining was used to observe the expression of MCT8 in the lateral ventricle of 5 normal SD rats.Another 20 adult male SD rats were randomized into 4 groups and subject to permanent ligation of both the common carotid arteries (2-vessel occlusion,2VO) for 3 days,2 weeks,or 5 weeks,or no ligation (control).At the end of the experiment,the transcriptional level of MCT8 in the brain tissue of the rats were detected using fluorescent quantitative PCR.Results MCT8 mRNA levels in 3-day and 2-week 2VO groups were comparable with that in the control group (P=0.909;P=0.694),but increased significantly in 5-week 2VO group compared with that in the control and 3-day 2VO groups (P=0.029;P=0.023).No significance was found in MCT8 mRNA between the 2-week and 5-week 2VO groups (P=0.065).Conclusion Prolonged cerebral ischemia causes

  17. Pellitorine, a Potential Anti-Cancer Lead Compound against HL60 and MCT-7 Cell Lines and Microbial Transformation of Piperine from Piper Nigrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendoline Cheng Lian Ee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Pellitorine (1, which was isolated from the roots of Piper nigrum, showed strong cytotoxic activities against HL60 and MCT-7 cell lines. Microbial transformation of piperine (2 gave a new compound 5-[3,4-(methylenedioxyphenyl]-pent-2-ene piperidine (3. Two other alkaloids were also found from Piper nigrum. They are (E-1-[3’,4’-(methylenedioxycinnamoyl]piperidine (4 and 2,4-tetradecadienoic acid isobutyl amide (5. These compounds were isolated using chromatographic methods and their structures were elucidated using MS, IR and NMR techniques.

  18. Pellitorine, a potential anti-cancer lead compound against HL6 and MCT-7 cell lines and microbial transformation of piperine from Piper Nigrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Lim, Chyi Meei; Rahmani, Mawardi; Shaari, Khozirah; Bong, Choon Fah Joseph

    2010-04-05

    Pellitorine (1), which was isolated from the roots of Piper nigrum, showed strong cytotoxic activities against HL60 and MCT-7 cell lines. Microbial transformation of piperine (2) gave a new compound 5-[3,4-(methylenedioxy)phenyl]-pent-2-ene piperidine (3). Two other alkaloids were also found from Piper nigrum. They are (E)-1-[3',4'-(methylenedioxy)cinnamoyl]piperidine (4) and 2,4-tetradecadienoic acid isobutyl amide (5). These compounds were isolated using chromatographic methods and their structures were elucidated using MS, IR and NMR techniques.

  19. The MINOS Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Grashorn, A H E W

    2005-01-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment's primary goal is the precision measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters in the atmospheric neutrino sector. This long-baseline experiment uses Fermilab's NuMI beam, measured with a Near Detector at Fermilab, and again 735 km later using a Far Detector in the Soudan Mine Underground Lab in northern Minnesota. The detectors are magnetized iron/scintillator calorimeters. The Far Detector has been operational for cosmic ray and atmospheric neutrino data from July of 2003, the Near Detector from September 2004, and the NuMI beam started in early 2005. This poster presents details of the two detectors.

  20. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  1. The TALE Tower Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, D. R.

    The TA Low Energy Extension will include a Tower FluorescenceDetector. Extensive air showers at the lowest usful energies for fluorescence detectors will in general be close to the detector. This requires viewing all elevation angles to be able to reconstruct showers. The TALE Tower Detector, operating in conjunction with other TALE detectors will view elevation angles up to above 70 degrees, with an azimuthal coverage of about 90 degrees. Results from a prototype mirror operated in conjunction with the HiRes detector will also be presented.

  2. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  3. Thermal kinetic inductance detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecil, Thomas; Gades, Lisa; Miceli, Antonio; Quaranta, Orlando

    2016-12-20

    A microcalorimeter for radiation detection that uses superconducting kinetic inductance resonators as the thermometers. The detector is frequency-multiplexed which enables detector systems with a large number of pixels.

  4. Forward tracking detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Klaus Mönig

    2007-11-01

    Forward tracking is an essential part of a detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The requirements for forward tracking are explained and the proposed solutions in the detector concepts are shown.

  5. The OSMOND detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, J.E. [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Dalgliesh, R. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Duxbury, D.M., E-mail: dom.duxbury@stfc.ac.uk [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Helsby, W.I. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Holt, S.A.; Kinane, C.J. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Marsh, A.S. [Diamond Light Source LTD, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Diamond House, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Spill, E.J.; Stephenson, R. [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-11

    The development and testing of the Off Specular MicrOstrip Neutron Detector (OSMOND) is described. Based on a microstrip gas chamber the aim of the project was to produce a high counting rate detector capable of replacing the existing rate limited scintillator detectors currently in use on the CRISP reflectometer for off specular reflectometry experiments. The detector system is described together with results of neutron beam tests carried out at the ISIS spallation neutron source.

  6. The CAPRICE RICH detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Codino, A.; Grimani, C. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `Tor Vergata` Rome (Italy); Cafagna, F. [Bari Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Bari (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.; Brancaccio, F.; Bocciolini, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Barbiellini, G.; Boezio, M. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    A compact RICH detector has been developed and used for particle identification in a balloon borne spectrometer to measure the flux of antimatter in the cosmic radiation. This is the first RICH detector ever used in space experiments that is capable of detecting unit charged particles, such as antiprotons. The RICH and all other detectors performed well during the 27 hours long flight.

  7. Characterization of H2RG IR detectors for the Euclid NISP instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secroun, Aurélia; Serra, Benoit; Clémens, Jean Claude; Legras, Romain; Lagier, Philippe; Niclas, Mathieu; Caillat, Laurence; Gillard, William; Tilquin, André; Ealet, Anne; Barbier, Rémi; Ferriol, Sylvain; Kubik, Bogna; Smadja, Gérard; Prieto, Eric; Maciaszek, Thierry; Norup Sorensen, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Euclid, a major ESA mission for the study of dark energy, will offer a large survey of tens of millions of galaxies thanks to its Near-Infrared Spectro-Photometer. For it to be successful, the 16 Teledyne's 2.3 μm cutoff 2048x2048 pixels IR HgCdTe detectors of the focal plane must show very high performances over more than 95% of pixels, in terms of median dark current, total noise, budget error on non-linearity after correction, residual dark due to latency effects and quantum efficiency. This will be verified through a thorough characterization of their performances, leading to the production of the pixel map calibration database for the Euclid mission. Characterization is challenging in many ways: each detector will have to be fully and accurately characterized in less than three weeks, with rather tight requirements: dark current at the 10-3 e-/s level with 10% accuracy, relative Pixel Response map better than 1%, obtained with an illumination flatness better than 1%, measurements alternating dark and high level illumination taking care of latency impacts. Due to statistics needs, very long runs (24h without interrupts) of scripted measurements would be executed. Systematics of the test bench should be at the end the limiting factor of the parameter measurement accuracy. Test plan, facilities with functionalities developed for those specific purposes and associated performances will be described.

  8. NTIS大鼠血清及脑组织甲状腺激素水平及其转运蛋白OATP1C1和MCT8mRNA变化%Changes of thyroid hormone and mRNA of OATP1C1 and MCT8 in serum and brain of rat with nonthyroidal illness syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁大华; 王群

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察非甲状腺疾病综合征(nonthyroidal illness syndrome,NTIS)大鼠血清及脑组织甲状腺激素水平及其转运蛋白有机阴离子转运多肽(organic anion transporting polypeptide 1 C1,OATP1C1)和单羧酸转运蛋白(monocarboxylate transporter 8,MCT8)mRNA的变化.方法 选取成年SPF级SD雄性大鼠23只,分为正常组(n=12)和NTIS组(n=11).NTIS动物采用肝纤维化模型,利用四氯化碳(1:6)用玉米油稀释,0.025 ml腹腔注射,3次/周,共8周.正常组大鼠相同剂量玉米油,腹腔注射,3次/周,共8周.造模成功后2组利用水迷宫法测试学习记忆能力.随后处死,取血及脑组织,放免法测定血清甲状腺激素(T3、T4、rT3、TSH)及脑组织甲状腺激素(T3、T4、rT3);RT-PCR法测定脑组织中OATP1C1及MCT8 mRNA水平.结果 ①NTIS组血清T3、T4水平较正常组明显降低[T3 (0.53±0.18) mmol/Lvs(0.73±0.22) mmol/L,P <0.05;T4 (24.58±7.73) mmol/L vs( 39.97±14.74) mmol/L,P<0.01],rT3、TSH水平2组之间无显著性差异(P>0.05);NTIS组脑组织中T3、T4浓度较正常组稍升高,但差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);②NTIS组OATP1C1和MCT8 mRNA水平较正常组明显升高[ OATP1C1 mRNA(0.054±0.032) vs (0.019±0.016),P<0.01;MCT8 mRNA(0.058±0.048) vs(0.017±0.012),P<0.05];③2组大鼠空间探索和定位航行之间无显著性差异(P>0.05).结论 NTIS大鼠脑内通过OATP1C1和MCT8代偿,保持脑内T3、T4水平相对稳定,从而维持中枢甲状腺功能正常.%Objective To investigate the changes of thyroid hormone level and mRNA expressions of thyroid hormone transporter organic anion transporting polypeptide1C1 (OATP1C1) and monocarboxylate transporter 8 ( MCT8 ) in the sera and brain tissues of rats with nonthyroidal illness syndrome ( NTIS). Methods Twenty-three male SD rats were divided into a control group ( n = 12) and a NTIS group ( n = 11). The rats of the NTIS group and the control group were given intraperitoneal injection of carbon

  9. Equalized near maximum likelihood detector

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents new detector that is used to mitigate intersymbol interference introduced by bandlimited channels. This detector is named equalized near maximum likelihood detector which combines nonlinear equalizer and near maximum likelihood detector. Simulation results show that the performance of equalized near maximum likelihood detector is better than the performance of nonlinear equalizer but worse than near maximum likelihood detector.

  10. High-energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  11. A Failure Mode in Dense Infrared Detector Arrays Resulting in Increased Dark Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkie, Benjamin; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate a failure mode that arises in dense infrared focal plane detector arrays as a consequence of the interactions of neighboring pixels through the minority carrier profiles in the common absorber layer. We consider the situation in which one pixel in a hexagonal array becomes de-biased relative to its neighbors and show that the dark current in the six neighboring pixels increases exponentially as a function of the difference between the nominal and anomalous biases. Moreover, we show that the current increase in the six nearest-neighbor pixels is in total larger than that by which the current in the affected pixel decreases, causing a net increase in the dark current. The physical origins of this effect are explained as being due to increased lateral diffusion currents that arise as a consequence of breaking the symmetry of the minority carrier profiles. We then perform a parametric study to quantify the magnitude of this effect for a number of detector geometric parameters, operating temperatures, and spectral bands. Particularly, numerical simulations are carried out for short-, mid-, and long-wavelength HgCdTe infrared detectors operating between 77 K and 210 K. We show that this effect is most prevalent in architectures for which the lateral diffusion current is the largest component of the total dark current—high operating temperature devices with narrow epitaxial absorber thicknesses and pitches small compared to the diffusion length of minority carriers. These results could prove significant particularly for short- and mid-wave infrared detectors, which are typically designed to fit these conditions.

  12. Micellar emulsions composed of mPEG-PCL/MCT as novel nanocarriers for systemic delivery of genistein: a comparative study with micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang TP

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tianpeng Zhang,* Huan Wang,* Yanghuan Ye, Xingwang Zhang, Baojian Wu Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Polymeric micelles receive considerable attention as drug delivery vehicles, depending on the versatility in drug solubilization and targeting therapy. However, their use invariably suffers with poor stability both in in vitro and in vivo conditions. Here, we aimed to develop a novel nanocarrier (micellar emulsions, MEs for a systemic delivery of genistein (Gen, a poorly soluble anticancer agent. Gen-loaded MEs (Gen-MEs were prepared from methoxy poly(ethylene glycol-block-(ε-caprolactone and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT by solvent-diffusion technique. Nanocarriers were characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and in vitro release. The resulting Gen-MEs were approximately 46 nm in particle size with a narrow distribution. Gen-MEs produced a different in vitro release profile from the counterpart of Gen-ME. The incorporation of MCT significantly enhanced the stability of nanoparticles against dilution with simulated body fluid. Pharmacokinetic study revealed that MEs could notably extend the mean retention time of Gen, 1.57- and 7.38-fold as long as that of micelles and solution formulation, respectively, following intravenous injection. Furthermore, MEs markedly increased the elimination half-life (t1/2β of Gen, which was 2.63-fold larger than that of Gen solution. Interestingly, Gen distribution in the liver and kidney for MEs group was significantly low relative to the micelle group in the first 2 hours, indicating less perfusion in such two tissues, which well accorded with the elongated mean retention time. Our findings suggested that MEs may be promising carriers as an alternative of micelles to systemically deliver poorly soluble drugs. Keywords: genistein, micellar

  13. Androgens enhance the glycolytic metabolism and lactate export in prostate cancer cells by modulating the expression of GLUT1, GLUT3, PFK, LDH and MCT4 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Cátia V; Marques, Ricardo; Alves, Marco G; Oliveira, Pedro F; Cavaco, José E; Maia, Cláudio J; Socorro, Sílvia

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the role of androgens in controlling the glycolytic metabolism and lactate efflux in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. Androgen-responsive LNCaP cells were treated with 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT, 10 nM) for 12-48 h, and their glycolytic metabolism, lactate production and viability were analyzed. Intracellular and extracellular levels of glucose and lactate were determined spectrophotometrically, and the expression of glucose transporters (GLUT1/GLUT3), phosphofructokinase 1, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and monocarboxylate transporter (MCT4) was analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blot. The enzymatic activity of LDH was determined by means of a colorimetric assay. Experiments were reproduced in androgen-non-responsive DU145 and PC3 cells. Androgens stimulated glucose consumption in LNCaP cells by increasing the expression of GLUT3, GLUT1 and PFK, which was underpinned by increased cell viability. Accordingly, lactate production by LNCaP cells was enhanced upon DHT stimulation as evidenced by the increased levels of lactate found in cell culture medium. Although LDH enzymatic activity decreased in LNCaP cells treated with DHT, the expression of MCT4 was significantly increased with androgenic treatment, which sustains the increase on lactate export. Glucose consumption and the expression of GLUTs and PFK remained unchanged in DHT-treated DU145 and PC3 cells. The results obtained establish androgens as modulators of glycolytic metabolism in PCa cells by stimulating glucose consumption, as well as the production and export of lactate, which may represent a crucial issue-driven prostate tumor development. These findings also highlight the importance of PCa therapies targeting AR and metabolism-related proteins.

  14. The DØ detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abachi, S.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alvarez, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, W.; Antipov, Yu.; Aronson, S. H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R. E.; Baden, A.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Bantly, J.; Barasch, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Behnke, T.; Bezzubov, V.; Bhat, P. C.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Bozko, N.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoy, V.; Butler, J. M.; Callot, O.; Chakraborty, D.; Chekulaev, S.; Chen, J.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Daniels, B.; De, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisenko, K.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.; Dharmaratna, W.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Durston-Johnson, S.; Eartly, D.; Eberhard, P. H.; Edmunds, D.; Efimov, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eroshin, O.; Evdokimov, V.; Fahey, S.; Fanourakis, G.; Fatyga, M.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finley, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Franzini, P.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Gao, C. S.; Geld, T. L.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glebov, V.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Good, M. L.; Goozen, F.; Gordon, H.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Guryn, W.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hodel, K.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hubbard, J. R.; Huehn, T.; Huson, R.; Igarashi, S.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jiang, J.; Johns, K.; Johnson, C. R.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kanekal, S.; Kernan, A.; Kerth, L.; Kirunin, A.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klochkov, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V.; Kochetkov, V.; Kohli, J. M.; Kononenko, W.; Kotcher, J.; Kotov, I.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A.; Kozlovsky, E.; Krafczyk, G.; Krempetz, K.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Kroon, P.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lanou, R. E.; Laurens, P.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Li, J.; Li, R.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G. R.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.-C.; Lloyd-Owen, D.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lokos, S.; Lueking, L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Malamud, E.; Mangeot, Ph.; Manning, I.; Mansoulié, B.; Manzella, V.; Mao, H.-S.; Marcin, M.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, H. J.; Martin, M. I.; Martin, P. S.; Marx, M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A.; McCarthy, R.; McKinley, J.; Mendoza, D.; Meng, X.-C.; Merritt, K. W.; Milder, A.; Mincer, A.; Mondal, N. K.; Montag, M.; Mooney, P.; Mudan, M.; Mulholland, G. T.; Murphy, C.; Murphy, C. T.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Neal, H. A.; Nemethy, P.; Nešić, D.; Ng, K. K.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, C. H.; Partridge, R.; Paterno, M.; Peryshkin, A.; Peters, M.; Pi, B.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Yu.; Pizzuto, D.; Pluquet, A.; Podstavkov, V.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Que, Y.-K.; Quintas, P. Z.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rao, M. V. S.; Rasmussen, L.; Read, A. L.; Regan, T.; Repond, S.; Riadovikov, V.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Sculli, J.; Selove, W.; Shea, M.; Shkurenkov, A.; Shupe, M.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, D.; Smith, R. P.; Snow, G. R.; Snyder, S.; Sosebee, M.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stampke, S.; Stephens, R.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stocker, F.; Stoyanova, D.; Stredde, H.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Suhanov, A.; Taketani, A.; Tartaglia, M.; Taylor, J. D.; Teiger, J.; Theodosiou, G.; Thompson, J.; Tisserant, S.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Van Berg, R.; Vaz, M.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Volkov, A.; Vorobiev, A.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, D.-C.; Wang, L.-Z.; Weerts, H.; Wenzel, W. A.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wolf, Z.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xie, P.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.-J.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Zeller, R.; Zhang, S.; Zhou, Y. H.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Y.-S.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zylberstejn, A.; DØ Collaboration

    1994-01-01

    The DØ detector is a large general purpose detector for the study of short-distance phenomena in high energy antiproton-proton collisions, now in operation at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The detector focusses upon the detection of electrons, muons, jets and missing transverse momentum. We describe the design and performance of the major elements of the detector, including the tracking chambers, transition radiation detector, liquid argon calorimetry and muon detection. The associated electronics, triggering systems and data acquisition systems are presented. The global mechanical, high voltage, and experiment monitoring and control systems which support the detector are described. We also discuss the design and implementation of software and software support systems that are specific to DØ.

  15. Quasi-2D analysis of the effect of passivant on the performance of long-wavelength infrared HgCdTe photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, V.; Bhan, R. K.; Ashokan, R.; Kumar, V.

    1996-09-01

    The results of a quasi-two-dimensional model for calculating passivant-induced surface leakage currents due to band-to-band tunnelling in 0268-1242/11/9/010/img1 mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) 0268-1242/11/9/010/img2 photovoltaic (PV) diodes are presented. The object is to assess the effect of a fixed surface state charge density 0268-1242/11/9/010/img3 due to a passivant on the zero-bias resistance - area product 0268-1242/11/9/010/img4 for the technologically important case when surface state charges accumulate the MCT surface. Calculations are carried out to estimate the tolerable value of 0268-1242/11/9/010/img3 beyond which the 0268-1242/11/9/010/img4 of the MCT diode degrades. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such a detailed calculation involving the acceptor concentration profile near the surface has been reported for long-wavelength IR (LWIR) MCT photodiodes. This calculation has been done numerically, and hence the depletion width (pinched near the surface), the electric field and the band-to-band tunnelling are calculated as a function of depth, layer by layer, from the passivant - semiconductor interface. The currents - diffusion, generation - recombination, band-to-band and trap-assisted tunnelling - have been calculated in each layer, and the zero-bias resistance - area product is determined for each mechanism. Hence, the resultant 0268-1242/11/9/010/img4 is calculated. The results are compared with the earlier step model of Bhan and Gopal (Semicond. Sci. Technol. 9 (1994) 289), which assumed a surface layer of constant concentration 0268-1242/11/9/010/img8. The present model indicates that for photodiodes with a cut-off wavelength of 0268-1242/11/9/010/img9 and an acceptor concentration 0268-1242/11/9/010/img10, operating at 77 K, a 0268-1242/11/9/010/img11 would degrade 0268-1242/11/9/010/img4 significantly. This value is insensitive to composition (in the LWIR). For an 0268-1242/11/9/010/img1 diode, the tolerable value of

  16. Single Photon Counting Detectors for Low Light Level Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Kimberly

    2015-10-01

    This dissertation presents the current state-of-the-art of semiconductor-based photon counting detector technologies. HgCdTe linear-mode avalanche photodiodes (LM-APDs), silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs), and electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) are compared via their present and future performance in various astronomy applications. LM-APDs are studied in theory, based on work done at the University of Hawaii. EMCCDs are studied in theory and experimentally, with a device at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab. The emphasis of the research is on GM-APD imaging arrays, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory and tested at the RIT Center for Detectors. The GM-APD research includes a theoretical analysis of SNR and various performance metrics, including dark count rate, afterpulsing, photon detection efficiency, and intrapixel sensitivity. The effects of radiation damage on the GM-APD were also characterized by introducing a cumulative dose of 50 krad(Si) via 60 MeV protons. Extensive development of Monte Carlo simulations and practical observation simulations was completed, including simulated astronomical imaging and adaptive optics wavefront sensing. Based on theoretical models and experimental testing, both the current state-of-the-art performance and projected future performance of each detector are compared for various applications. LM-APD performance is currently not competitive with other photon counting technologies, and are left out of the application-based comparisons. In the current state-of-the-art, EMCCDs in photon counting mode out-perform GM-APDs for long exposure scenarios, though GM-APDs are better for short exposure scenarios (fast readout) due to clock-induced-charge (CIC) in EMCCDs. In the long term, small improvements in GM-APD dark current will make them superior in both long and short exposure scenarios for extremely low flux. The efficiency of GM-APDs will likely always be less than EMCCDs, however, which is particularly disadvantageous for

  17. Noble Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Elena; Bolozdynya, Alexander I; Doke, Tadayoshi

    2006-01-01

    This book discusses the physical properties of noble fluids, operational principles of detectors based on these media, and the best technical solutions to the design of these detectors. Essential attention is given to detector technology: purification methods and monitoring of purity, information readout methods, electronics, detection of hard ultra-violet light emission, selection of materials, cryogenics etc.The book is mostly addressed to physicists and graduate students involved in the preparation of fundamental next generation experiments, nuclear engineers developing instrumentation

  18. ATLAS inner detector performance

    CERN Document Server

    Gadomski, S

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector consists of three subsystems using different tracking detector technologies: silicon pixels, silicon strips and straw tubes. The combination gives ATLAS a robust, hermetic and efficient tracking system, able to reconstruct tracks at the highest foreseen LHC luminosities. The inner detector provides vertex and momentum measurements, electron identification and some $K/\\pi$ separation. Since last year the beam pipe of ATLAS was changed, causing a redesign of the first tracking layer and a deterioration of the impact parameter resolutions.

  19. LHCb Detector Performance

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2075808; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are described, using data taken from 2010 to 2012. It is shown that the design criteria of the experiment have been met. The excellent performance of the detector has allowed the LHCb collaboration to publish a wide range of physics results, demonstrating LHCb's unique role, both as a heavy flavour experiment and as a general purpose detector in the forward region.

  20. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS/LHC. The ALFA system is composed by two stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from each side of the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronic for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  1. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus). The ALFA system is composed by four stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  2. Photocapacitive MIS infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, A.; Lu, S. S.-M.; Moriarty, J. A.; Crouch, R. K.; Miller, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    A new class of room-temperature infrared detectors has been developed through use of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) or metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal (MISIM) slabs. The detectors, which have been fabricated from Si, Ge and GaAs, rely for operation on the electrical capacitance variations induced by modulated incident radiation. The peak detectivity for a 1000-A Si MISIM detector is comparable to that of a conventional Si detector functioning in the photovoltaic mode. Optimization of the photocapacitive-mode detection sensitivity is discussed.

  3. Effects of MCT1 Inhibitor p-CMB on Ach Induced Pancreatic Exocrine Secretions in Rats%MCT1抑制剂p-CMB对乙酰胆碱诱导的大鼠胰液分泌的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金泉

    2008-01-01

    采用在体试验方法研究单羧酸转运蛋白第1亚型(monocarboxylate transporter 1,MCT1)抑制剂(p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate,p-CMB)对乙酰胆碱(acetylcholine,Ach)诱导的大鼠胰液分泌的影响.Sprague-Dwley (SD)雄性大鼠,体重180 g~210 g,分6组,每组5只,试验前禁食24 h,自由饮水.动物麻醉后经外科手术后,每隔10 min收集一次胰液,采用Lowry 法测定胰液蛋白量,Bernfeld法测定胰酶.结果对照组(-p-CMB)和实验组(+p-CMB),在注射1、5 、10 ìg/kg的Ach后对胰液分泌量、胰蛋白分泌量以及胰淀粉酶分泌量都呈现增加作用,注射后1 h内达到峰值,之后逐渐降低.然而,试验组的胰液分泌各项指标比对照组的显著减少(P<0.01).表明MCT1抑制剂p-CMB减弱了Ach增加大鼠胰液分泌的作用.

  4. Comparing FDTD and Ray-Tracing Models in Numerical Simulation of HgCdTe LWIR Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, Marco; Goano, Michele; Bertazzi, Francesco; Ghione, Giovanni; Schirmacher, Wilhelm; Hanna, Stefan; Figgemeier, Heinrich

    2016-09-01

    We present a simulation study of HgCdTe-based long-wavelength infrared detectors, focusing on methodological comparisons between the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and ray-tracing optical models. We performed three-dimensional simulations to determine the absorbed photon density distributions and the corresponding photocurrent and quantum efficiency spectra of isolated n-on- p uniform-composition pixels, systematically comparing the results obtained with FDTD and ray tracing. Since ray tracing is a classical optics approach, unable to describe interference effects, its applicability has been found to be strongly wavelength dependent, especially when reflections from metallic layers are relevant. Interesting cavity effects around the material cutoff wavelength are described, and the cases where ray tracing can be considered a viable approximation are discussed.

  5. ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nayak, T

    2013-01-01

    Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) measures the multiplicity and spatial distribution of photons in the forward region of ALICE on a event-by-event basis. PMD is a pre-shower detector having fine granularity and full azimuthal coverage in the pseudo-rapidity region 2.3 < η < 3.9.

  6. Detector Systems at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider CLIC is designed to deliver e+e- collisions at a center of mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The detector systems at this collider have to provide highly efficient tracking and excellent jet energy resolution and hermeticity for multi-TeV final states with multiple jets and leptons. In addition, the detector systems have to be capable of distinguishing physics events from large beam-induced background at a crossing frequency of 2 GHz. Like for the detector concepts at the ILC, CLIC detectors are based on event reconstruction using particle flow algorithms. The two detector concepts for the ILC, ILD and SID, were adapted for CLIC using calorimeters with dense absorbers limiting leakage through increased compactness, as well as modified forward and vertex detector geometries and precise time stamping to cope with increased background levels. The overall detector concepts for CLIC are presented, with particular emphasis on the main detector and engineering challenges, such as: the ultra-thi...

  7. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  8. CMS Detector Posters

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    CMS Detector posters (produced in 2000): CMS installation CMS collaboration From the Big Bang to Stars LHC Magnetic Field Magnet System Trackering System Tracker Electronics Calorimetry Eletromagnetic Calorimeter Hadronic Calorimeter Muon System Muon Detectors Trigger and data aquisition (DAQ) ECAL posters (produced in 2010, FR & EN): CMS ECAL CMS ECAL-Supermodule cooling and mechatronics CMS ECAL-Supermodule assembly

  9. Pixel detector readout chip

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    Close-up of a pixel detector readout chip. The photograph shows an aera of 1 mm x 2 mm containing 12 separate readout channels. The entire chip contains 1000 readout channels (around 80 000 transistors) covering a sensitive area of 8 mm x 5 mm. The chip has been mounted on a silicon detector to detect high energy particles.

  10. The LDC detector concept

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ties Behnke; LDC Concept Group

    2007-11-01

    In preparation of the experimental program at the international linear collider (ILC), the large detector concept (LDC) is being developed. The main points of the LDC are a large volume gaseous tracking system, combined with high precision vertex detector and an extremely granular calorimeter. The main design force behind the LDC is the particle flow concept.

  11. Introduction to detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Walenta, Albert H

    1995-01-01

    Concepts for momentum measurements,particle identification and energy measurements (calorimeters) as well for imaging applications in medecine, biology and industry (non destructive testing) will be put into relation to the specific detection princip In particular the resolution for position, time, energy and intensity measurement and the efficiency will be discussed. Signal extraction,electronic signal processing and principles of information capture will close the logic circle to the input : the radiation properties.The lecture will provide some sources for data tables and small demonstration computer programs f The basic detector physics as interaction of radiation with matter, information transport via free charges,photons and phonons and the signal formation will be presented in some depth with emphasis on the influence on specific parameters for detector The lecture will cover the most popular detector principles, gas detectors (ion chambers,MPWC's and MSGC's), semiconductor detectors scintillators and ...

  12. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  13. The PERDaix detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachlechner, Andreas; Beischer, Bastian; Greim, Roman [I. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52056 (Germany); Kirn, Thomas, E-mail: kirn@physik.rwth-aachen.de [I. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52056 (Germany); Mai, Carsten; Yearwood, Gregorio Roper; Schael, Stefan; Schug, David; Tholen, Heiner; Wienkenhoever, Jens [I. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52056 (Germany)

    2012-12-11

    The PERDaix (Proton Electron Radiation Detector Aix-la-Chapelle) detector is designed to measure charged particles in cosmic rays. It can distinguish particle species up to 5 GV rigidity. PERDaix was flown on the BEXUS-11 balloon on 23rd November 2010. The detector has the dimensions of 246 Multiplication-Sign 400 Multiplication-Sign 859 mm{sup 3}, a geometrical acceptance of 32 cm{sup 2}sr, a low weight of 40 kg and a low power consumption of 60 W. The spectrometer consists of a time-of-flight system, a scintillating fiber tracking detector, a permanent magnet and a transition radiation detector. Silicon photomultipliers are used as photodetectors in the time-of-flight and the tracker system.

  14. The PERDaix detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner, Andreas; Beischer, Bastian; Greim, Roman; Kirn, Thomas; Mai, Carsten; Yearwood, Gregorio Roper; Schael, Stefan; Schug, David; Tholen, Heiner; Wienkenhöver, Jens

    2012-12-01

    The PERDaix (Proton Electron Radiation Detector Aix-la-Chapelle) detector is designed to measure charged particles in cosmic rays. It can distinguish particle species up to 5 GV rigidity. PERDaix was flown on the BEXUS-11 balloon on 23rd November 2010. The detector has the dimensions of 246×400×859 mm3, a geometrical acceptance of 32 cm2sr, a low weight of 40 kg and a low power consumption of 60 W. The spectrometer consists of a time-of-flight system, a scintillating fiber tracking detector, a permanent magnet and a transition radiation detector. Silicon photomultipliers are used as photodetectors in the time-of-flight and the tracker system.

  15. ATLAS ITk Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, Claudia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) in 2026 will provide new challenge to the ATLAS tracker. The current inner detector will be replaced with a whole silicon tracker which will consist of a five barrel layer Pixel detector surrounded by a four barrel layer Strip detector. The expected high radiation level are requiring the development of upgraded silicon sensors as well as new a front-end chip. The dense tracking environment will require finer granularity detectors. The data rates will require new technologies for high bandwidth data transmission and handling. The current status of the HL-LHC ATLA Pixel detector developments as well as the various layout options will be reviewed.

  16. 一氯三嗪-β-环糊精包合晚香玉香精纳米粒的制备及表征%Preparation and Characterization of Tuberose Fragrance-loaded MCT-β-CD Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张佳; 肖作兵; 胡静; 周如隽; 李百川

    2013-01-01

    Tuberose fragrance loaded monochlorotriazinyl-β-cyclodextrin ( MCT-β-CD ) nanoparticles were prepared by the inclusion complexation method. The effects of the volume ratio of ethanol to water, the mass ratio of tuberose to MCT-β-CD, the reaction time, the stirring rate and the reaction temperature on the size distribution of tuberose fragrance-loaded MCT-β-CD nanoparticles were investigated. The tuberose fragrance-loaded MCT-β-CD were characterized by means of dynamic light scattering ( DLS ) , transmission electron microscope ( TEM ) , infrared spectrometer ( IR ) and thermogravimetric analyzer ( TGA). The results show that the particle size was 216.4 nm, the polydispersity index ( PDI) was 0. 221 and the fragrance loading capacity was 17. 2% when V (CH3CH2OH):F(H2O) = 1:0. 67,m(fragrance) :m( wall materials) = 1:15 ,reaction time was 10 h, rotational speed was 1 300 r/min and reaction temperature was 35 ℃. The release rate of tuberose fragrance-loaded MCT-β-CD nanoparticles was decreased under high temperatures.%以一氯三嗪-β-环糊精(MCT-β-CD)为壁材,晚香玉香精为芯材,通过包合法制备一氯三嗪-β-环糊精晚香玉香精纳米粒.研究了壁材与芯材的质量比、乙醇与水的体积比、反应时间、反应温度、搅拌速度对晚香玉香精纳米粒粒径的影响,并采用动态激光光散射仪(DLS)、透射电镜(TEM)、红外光谱(IR)及热重分析仪(TGA)对其结构及性能进行了表征.结果表明:在V(乙醇):V(水)=1:0.67,m(香精):m(壁材)=1:15,反应时间10h,搅拌速度1 300 r/min,温度为35℃的条件下制备的晚香玉香精一氯三嗪-β-环糊精纳米粒的粒径为216.4 nm,粒径分布系数(PDI)为0.221,香精装载量达17.2%,能减缓高温下香精的释放速率.

  17. The HERMES recoil detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Laboratory of Physics; Aschenauer, E.C. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Belostotski, S. [B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Insitute, Gatchina (Russian Federation)] [and others; Collaboration: HERMES Recoil Detector Group

    2013-02-15

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  18. Detectors for Tomorrow's Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Cryogenically cooled superconducting detectors have become essential tools for a wide range of measurement applications, ranging from quantum limited heterodyne detection in the millimeter range to direct searches for dark matter with superconducting phonon detectors operating at 20 mK. Superconducting detectors have several fundamental and practical advantages which have resulted in their rapid adoption by experimenters. Their excellent performance arises in part from reductions in noise resulting from their low operating temperatures, but unique superconducting properties provide a wide range of mechanisms for detection. For example, the steep dependence of resistance with temperature on the superconductor/normal transition provides a sensitive thermometer for calorimetric and bolometric applications. Parametric changes in the properties of superconducting resonators provides a mechanism for high sensitivity detection of submillimeter photons. From a practical point of view, the use of superconducting detectors has grown rapidly because many of these devices couple well to SQUID amplifiers, which are easily integrated with the detectors. These SQUID-based amplifiers and multiplexers have matured with the detectors; they are convenient to use, and have excellent noise performance. The first generation of fully integrated large scale superconducting detection systems are now being deployed. I will discuss the prospects for a new generation of instruments designed to take full advantage of the revolution in detector technology.

  19. The Belle II Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piilonen, Leo; Belle Collaboration, II

    2017-01-01

    The Belle II detector is now under construction at the KEK laboratory in Japan. This project represents a substantial upgrade of the Belle detector (and the KEKB accelerator). The Belle II experiment will record 50 ab-1 of data, a factor of 50 more than that recorded by Belle. This large data set, combined with the low backgrounds and high trigger efficiencies characteristic of an e+e- experiment, should provide unprecedented sensitivity to new physics signatures in B and D meson decays, and in τ lepton decays. The detector comprises many forefront subsystems. The vertex detector consists of two inner layers of silicon DEPFET pixels and four outer layers of double-sided silicon strips. These layers surround a beryllium beam pipe having a radius of only 10 mm. Outside of the vertex detector is a large-radius, small-cell drift chamber, an ``imaging time-of-propagation'' detector based on Cerenkov radiation for particle identification, and scintillating fibers and resistive plate chambers used to identify muons. The detector will begin commissioning in 2017.

  20. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  1. Detectors - Electronics; Detecteurs - Electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bregeault, J.; Gabriel, J.L.; Hierle, G.; Lebotlan, P.; Leconte, A.; Lelandais, J.; Mosrin, P.; Munsch, P.; Saur, H.; Tillier, J. [Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, Caen Univ., 14 (France)

    1998-04-01

    The reports presents the main results obtained in the fields of radiation detectors and associated electronics. In the domain of X-ray gas detectors for the keV range efforts were undertaken to rise the detector efficiency. Multiple gap parallel plate chambers of different types as well as different types of X {yields} e{sup -} converters were tested to improve the efficiency (values of 2.4% at 60 KeV were reached). In the field of scintillators a study of new crystals has been carried out (among which Lutetium orthosilicate). CdTe diode strips for obtaining X-ray imaging were studied. The complete study of a linear array of 8 CdTe pixels has been performed and certified. The results are encouraging and point to this method as a satisfying solution. Also, a large dimension programmable chamber was used to study the influence of temperature on the inorganic scintillators in an interval from -40 deg. C to +150 deg. C. Temperature effects on other detectors and electronic circuits were also investigated. In the report mentioned is also the work carried out for the realization of the DEMON neutron multidetector. For neutron halo experiments different large area Si detectors associated with solid and gas position detectors were realized. In the frame of a contract with COGEMA a systematic study of Li doped glasses was undertaken aiming at replacing with a neutron probe the {sup 3}He counters presently utilized in pollution monitoring. An industrial prototype has been realised. Other studies were related to integrated analog chains, materials for Cherenkov detectors, scintillation probes for experiments on fundamental processes, gas position sensitive detectors, etc. In the field of associated electronics there are mentioned the works related to the multidetector INDRA, data acquisition, software gamma spectrometry, automatic gas pressure regulation in detectors, etc

  2. A new ROIC with high-voltage protection circuit of HgCdTe e-APD FPA for passive and active imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zhang, Junling; Wang, Pan; Zhou, Jie; Gao, Lei; Ding, Ruijun

    2012-12-01

    HgCdTe electrons initiated avalanche photodiodes (e-APDs) in linear multiplication mode can be used for high speed applications such as active imaging. A readout integrated circuit of e-APD FPA is designed for dual mode passive/active imaging system. Unit cell circuit architecture of ROIC includes a high voltage protection module, a Sample-Hold circuit module, a comparator, output driver stage and a integrator module which includes a amplifier and three capacitors. Generally, APD FPA works at reversed bias such as 5V-15V in active imaging mode, and pixels' dark currents increase exponentially as the reverse-bias voltage is increased. Some cells of ROIC may be short to high voltage because of avalanche breakdown of diodes. If there is no protection circuit, the whole ROIC would be burnt out. Thus a protection circuit module introduced in every ROIC cell circuit is necessary to make sure the rest units of ROIC can still work. Conventional 5V CMOS process is applied to implement the high voltage protection with the small area other than LDMOS in high voltage BCD process in the limited 100μm×100μm pitch area. In integrator module, three integration capacitors are included in the ROIC to provide switchable well capacity. One of them can be shared in two modes in order to save area. Constraints such as pixel area and power lead us design toward a simple one-stage cascade operational transconductance amplifier (OTA) as pre-amplifier which can avoid potential instability caused by inaccuracy of MOSFET Model at 77K.

  3. Characterization of HgCdTe Films Grown on Large-Area CdZnTe Substrates by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkun, F. Erdem; Edwall, Dennis D.; Ellsworth, Jon; Douglas, Sheri; Zandian, Majid; Carmody, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Recent advances in growth of Hg1- x Cd x Te films on large-area (7 cm × 7.5 cm) CdZnTe (CZT) substrates is presented. Growth of Hg1- x Cd x Te with good uniformity on large-area wafers is achieved using a Riber 412 molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) tool designed for growth of Hg1- x Cd x Te compounds. The reactor is equipped with conventional CdTe, Te, and Hg sources for achieving uniform exposure of the wafer during growth. The composition of the Hg1- x Cd x Te compound is controlled in situ by employing a closed-loop spectral ellipsometry technique to achieve a cutoff wavelength ( λ co) of 14 μm at 78 K. We present data on the thickness and composition uniformity of films grown for large-format focal-plane array applications. The composition and thickness nonuniformity are determined to be maps show the spatial distribution of defects generated during the epitaxial growth of the Hg1- x Cd x Te films. Microdefect densities are in the low 103 cm-2 range, and void defects are below 500 cm-2. Dislocation densities less than 5 × 105 cm-2 are routinely achieved for Hg1- x Cd x Te films grown on CZT substrates. HgCdTe 4k × 4k focal-plane arrays with 15 μm pitch for astronomical wide-area infrared imagers have been produced using the recently developed MBE growth process at Teledyne Imaging Sensors.

  4. The HOTWAXS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, J.E.; Derbyshire, G.E. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Diakun, G. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Duxbury, D.M. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: d.m.duxbury@rl.ac.uk; Fairclough, J.P.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Sheffield, Brook Hill, Sheffield S3 7HF (United Kingdom); Harvey, I.; Helsby, W.I. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lipp, J.D.; Marsh, A.S.; Salisbury, J. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Sankar, G. [Royal Institution of GB, 21 Albemarle Street, London W1S 4BS (United Kingdom); Spill, E.J.; Stephenson, R. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Terrill, N.J. [Diamond Light Source LTD, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Diamond House, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-11

    The development and testing of the HOTWAXS position-sensitive X-ray detector for Synchrotron Radiation Sources is described. Funded from a facility development grant, the aim of the project was to produce a high counting rate, parallax-free photon counting detector to be used in the combined studies of X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray diffraction (XAFS/XRD), and also in the technique of small angle and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS). The detector system is described together with results of experiments carried out at the Daresbury Laboratory Synchrotron Radiation Source.

  5. Performance of GLD detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Yoshioka

    2007-12-01

    Most of the important physics processes to be studied in the international linear collider (ILC) experiment have multi-jets in the final state. In order to achieve better jet energy resolution, the so-called particle flow algorithm (PFA) will be employed and there is a general consensus that PFA derives overall ILC detector design. Four detector concepts for the ILC experiment have been proposed so far in the world; the GLD detector that has a large inner calorimeter radius, which is considered to have an advantage for a PFA, is one of them. In this paper, general scheme and performance of the GLD-PFA will be presented.

  6. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  7. The Silicon Cube detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matea, I.; Adimi, N. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan - Universite Bordeaux 1 - UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Blank, B. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan - Universite Bordeaux 1 - UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France)], E-mail: blank@cenbg.in2p3.fr; Canchel, G.; Giovinazzo, J. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan - Universite Bordeaux 1 - UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Borge, M.J.G.; Dominguez-Reyes, R.; Tengblad, O. [Insto. Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Thomas, J.-C. [GANIL, CEA/DSM - CNRS/IN2P3, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

    2009-08-21

    A new experimental device, the Silicon Cube detector, consisting of six double-sided silicon strip detectors placed in a compact geometry was developed at CENBG. Having a very good angular coverage and high granularity, it allows simultaneous measurements of energy and angular distributions of charged particles emitted from unbound nuclear states. In addition, large-volume Germanium detectors can be placed close to the collection point of the radioactive species to be studied. The setup is ideally suited for isotope separation on-line (ISOL)-type experiments to study multi-particle emitters and was tested during an experiment at the low-energy beam line of SPIRAL at GANIL.

  8. ATLAS Inner Detector Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Bocci, A

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is a multi-purpose particle detector that will study high-energy particle collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In order to achieve its physics goals, the ATLAS tracking requires that the positions of the silicon detector elements have to be known to a precision better than 10 μm. Several track-based alignment algorithms have been developed for the Inner Detector. An extensive validation has been performed with simulated events and real data coming from the ATLAS. Results from such validation are reported in this paper.

  9. Directional radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowell, Jonathan L.

    2017-09-12

    Directional radiation detectors and systems, methods, and computer-readable media for using directional radiation detectors to locate a radiation source are provided herein. A directional radiation detector includes a radiation sensor. A radiation attenuator partially surrounds the radiation sensor and defines an aperture through which incident radiation is received by the radiation sensor. The aperture is positioned such that when incident radiation is received directly through the aperture and by the radiation sensor, a source of the incident radiation is located within a solid angle defined by the aperture. The radiation sensor senses at least one of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma particles, or neutrons.

  10. Novel Photo-Detectors and Photo-Detector Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Danilov, M.

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in photo-detectors and photo-detector systems are reviewed. The main emphasis is made on Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPM) - novel and very attractive photo-detectors. Their main features are described. Properties of detectors manufactured by different producers are compared. Different applications are discussed including calorimeters, muon detection, tracking, Cherenkov light detection, and time of flight measurements.

  11. Infrared Detectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The end goal of this project is to develop proof-of-concept infrared detectors which can be integrated in future infrared instruments engaged in remote...

  12. ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Christensen, C

    2013-01-01

    The Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) extends the coverage for multiplicity of charge particles into the forward regions - giving ALICE the widest coverage of the 4 LHC experiments for these measurements.

  13. OPAL detector electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    Half of the electromagnetic calorimeter of the OPAL detector is seen in this photo. This calorimeter consists of 4720 blocks of lead glass. It was used to detect and measure the energy of photons, electrons and positrons by absorbing them.

  14. The LUX Prototype Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Bedikian, S; Bernstein, A; Bolozdynya, A; Bradley, A; Cahn, S; Carr, D; Chapman, J J; Clark, K; Classen, T; Curioni, A; Dahl, C E; Dazeley, S; deViveiros, L; Dragowsky, M; Druszkiewicz, E; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Hall, C; Faham, C; Holbrook, B; Kastens, L; Kazkaz, K; Kwong, J; Lander, R; Leonard, D; Malling, D; Mannino, R; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D; Mock, J; Morii, M; Nikkel, J; Phelps, P; Shutt, T; Skulski, W; Sorensen, P; Spaans, J; Steigler, T; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Thomson, J; Tripathi, M; Walsh, N; Webb, R; White, J; Wolfs, F L H; Woods, M; Zhang, C

    2012-01-01

    The LUX (Large Underground Xenon) detector is a two-phase xenon Time Projection Chamber (TPC) designed to search for WIMP-nucleon dark matter interactions. As with all noble element detectors, continuous purification of the detector medium is essential to produce a large ($>$1ms) electron lifetime; this is necessary for efficient measurement of the electron signal which in turn is essential for achieving robust discrimination of signal from background events. In this paper we describe the development of a novel purification system deployed in a prototype detector. The results from the operation of this prototype indicated heat exchange with an efficiency above 94% up to a flow rate of 42 slpm, allowing for an electron drift length greater than 1 meter to be achieved in approximately two days and sustained for the duration of the testing period.

  15. The CLIC Detector Concept

    CERN Document Server

    Pitters, Florian Michael

    2016-01-01

    CLIC is a concept for a future linear collider that would provide e+e- collisions at up to 3 TeV. The physics aims require a detector system with excellent jet energy and track momentum resolution, highly efficient flavour-tagging and lepton identification capabilities, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles and timing information in the order of nanoseconds to reject beam-induced background. To deal with those requirements, an extensive R&D programme is in place to overcome current technological limits. The CLIC detector concept includes a low-mass all-silicon vertex and tracking detector system and fine-grained calorimeters designed for particle flow analysis techniques, surrounded by a 4 T solenoid magnet. An overview of the requirements and design optimisations for the CLIC detector concept is presented.

  16. Hybrid photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C

    2003-01-01

    Hybrid photon detectors detect light via vacuum photocathodes and accelerate the emitted photoelectrons by an electric field towards inversely polarized silicon anodes, where they are absorbed, thus producing electron-hole pairs. These, in turn, are collected and generate electronic signals on their ohmic contacts. This review first describes the characteristic properties of the main components of hybrid photon detectors: light entrance windows, photocathodes, and silicon anodes. Then, essential relations describing the trajectories of photoelectrons in electric and magnetic fields and their backscattering from the silicon anodes are derived. Depending on their anode configurations, three families of hybrid photon detectors are presented: hybrid photomultiplier tubes with single anodes for photon counting with high sensitivity and for gamma spectroscopy; multi-anode photon detector tubes with anodes subdivided into square or hexagonal pads for position-sensitive photon detection; imaging silicon pixel array t...

  17. GRAVITY detector systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrgan, Leander H.; Finger, Gert; Eisenhauer, Frank; Panduro, Johana

    2016-08-01

    GRAVITY is a second generation instrument for the VLT Interferometer, designed for high-precision narrow-angle astrometry and phase-referenced interferometric imaging in the K-band. It will combine the AO corrected beams of the four VLT telescopes. In total, the GRAVITY instrument uses five eAPD detectors four for the infrared wavefront sensors of each telescope and one for the fringe tracker. In addition two Hawaii2RG arrays are installed, one for the acquisition camera and one for the spectrometer. The SAPHIRA eAPD array is a newly developed near-infrared detector with sub-electron noise performance at frame rates > 1Kfps. For all seven detectors the ESO common controller, NGC, is used. This paper presents an overview and comparison of GRAVITY detector systems and their final performances at the telescope

  18. Pocked surface neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Douglas (Whitmore Lake, MI); Klann, Raymond (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-04-08

    The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

  19. Europe plans megaton detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    A group of French and Italian particle physicists hopes to carry on the long tradition of building large underground detectors by constructing a device deep under the Alps containing a million tonnes of extremely pure water.

  20. The pixelated detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Sutton, C

    1990-01-01

    "Collecting data as patterns of light or subatomic particles is vitally important in all the sciences. The new generation of solid-state detectors called pixel devices could transform experimental research at all levels" (4 pages).

  1. Detector Control System for the ATLAS Forward Proton detector

    CERN Document Server

    Czekierda, Sabina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) is a forward detector using a Roman Pot technique, recently installed in the LHC tunnel. It is aiming at registering protons that were diffractively or electromagnetically scattered in soft and hard processes. Infrastructure of the detector consists of hardware placed both in the tunnel and in the control room USA15 (about 330 meters from the Roman Pots). AFP detector, like the other detectors of the ATLAS experiment, uses the Detector Control System (DCS) to supervise the detector and to ensure its safe and coherent operation, since the incorrect detector performance may influence the physics results. The DCS continuously monitors the detector parameters, subset of which is stored in data bases. Crucial parameters are guarded by alarm system. A detector representation as a hierarchical tree-like structure of well-defined subsystems built with the use of the Finite State Machine (FSM) toolkit allows for overall detector operation and visualization. Every node in the hierarchy is...

  2. The AMANDA Neutrino Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wischnewski, R.; Andres, E.; Askebjer, P.; Barwick, S.; Bay, R.; Bergstroem, L.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Carius, S.; Carlson, M.; Chinowsky, W.; Chirkin, D.; Cowen, D.; Costa, C.; Dalberg, E.; Deyoung, T.; Edsjo, J.; Ekstroem, P.; Goobar, A.; Gray, L.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hardtke, R.; He, Y.; Hill, G.; Hulth, P.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Kandhadai, V.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liss, T.; Liubarsky, I.; Loaiza, P.; LOwder, D.; Marciniewski, P.; Miller, T.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.; Morse, R.; Newcomer, M.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.; Przybylski, G.; Rhode, W.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Rubinstein, H.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, E.; Schwarz, R.; Schwendicke, U.; Smoot, G.; Solarz, M.; Sorin, V.; Spiering, C.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.; Streicher, O.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Walck, C.; Wiebusch, C.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S

    1999-03-01

    The first stage of the AMANDA High Energy Neutrino Detector at the South Pole, the 302 PMT array AMANDA-B with an expected effective area for TeV neutrinos of {approx} 10{sup 4} m{sup 2}, has been taking data since 1997. Progress with calibration, investigation of ice properties, as well as muon and neutrino data analysis are described. The next stage 20-string detector AMANDA-II with {approx}800 PMTs will be completed in spring 2000.

  3. Fiber optic detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  4. Phi factory detector requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arisaka, K.; Atac, M.; Berg, R.; Buchanan, C.; Calvette, M.; Khazin, B.; Kinoshita, K.; Muller, T.; Ohshima, T.; Olsen, S.; Park, J.; Santoni, C.; Shirai, J.; Solodov, E.; Thompson, J.; Triggiani, G.; Ueno, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Detector and Simulation Working Group

    1991-08-01

    We identify the experimental problems and the conditions required for successful phi-factory operation, and show the range of detector parameters which, in conjunction with different machine designs, may meet these conditions. We started by considering, comparing and criticizing the Italian and Novosibirsk designs. With this discussion as a background, we defined the apparent experimental problems and detector constraints. In this article we summarize our understanding. (orig./HSI).

  5. Modelling semiconductor pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieson, K

    2001-01-01

    expected after 200 ps in most cases. The effect of reducing the charge carrier lifetime and examining the charge collection efficiency has been utilised to explore how these detectors would respond in a harsh radiation environment. It is predicted that over critical carrier lifetimes (10 ps to 0.1 ns) an improvement of 40 % over conventional detectors can be expected. This also has positive implications for fabricating detectors, in this geometry, from materials which might otherwise be considered substandard. An analysis of charge transport in CdZnTe pixel detectors has been performed. The analysis starts with simulation studies into the formation of contacts and their influence on the internal electric field of planar detectors. The models include a number of well known defect states and these are balanced to give an agreement with a typical experimental I-V curve. The charge transport study extends to the development of a method for studying the effect of charge sharing in highly pixellated detectors. The ...

  6. Gamma ray detector modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capote, M. Albert (Inventor); Lenos, Howard A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A radiation detector assembly has a semiconductor detector array substrate of CdZnTe or CdTe, having a plurality of detector cell pads on a first surface thereof, the pads having a contact metallization and a solder barrier metallization. An interposer card has planar dimensions no larger than planar dimensions of the semiconductor detector array substrate, a plurality of interconnect pads on a first surface thereof, at least one readout semiconductor chip and at least one connector on a second surface thereof, each having planar dimensions no larger than the planar dimensions of the interposer card. Solder columns extend from contacts on the interposer first surface to the plurality of pads on the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, the solder columns having at least one solder having a melting point or liquidus less than 120 degrees C. An encapsulant is disposed between the interposer circuit card first surface and the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, encapsulating the solder columns, the encapsulant curing at a temperature no greater than 120 degrees C.

  7. ATLAS Inner Detector (Pixel Detector and Silicon Tracker)

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2006-01-01

    To raise awareness of the basic functions of the Pixel Detector and Silicon Tracker in the ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN. This colorful 3D animation is an excerpt from the film "ATLAS-Episode II, The Particles Strike Back." Shot with a bug's eye view of the inside of the detector. The viewer is taken on a tour of the inner workings of the detector, seeing critical pieces of the detector and hearing short explanations of how each works.

  8. 3-D Modeling of Double-Diffusive Convection During Directional Solidification of a Non-Dilute Alloy with Application to the HgCdTe Growth Under Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical calculation for a non-dilute alloy solidification was performed using the FIDAP finite element code. For low growth velocities plane front solidification occurs. The location and the shape of the interface was determined using melting temperatures from the HgCdTe liquidus curve. The low thermal conductivity of the solid HgCdTe causes thermal short circuit through the ampoule walls, resulting in curved isotherms in the vicinity of the interface. Double-diffusive convection in the melt is caused by radial temperature gradients and by material density inversion with temperature. Cooling from below and the rejection at the solid-melt interface of the heavier HgTe-rich solute each tend to reduce convection. Because of these complicating factors dimensional rather then non-dimensional modeling was performed. Estimates of convection contributions for various gravity conditions was performed parametrically. For gravity levels higher then 1 0 -7 of earth's gravity it was found that the maximum convection velocity is extremely sensitive to gravity vector orientation and can be reduced at least by factor of 50% for precise orientation of the ampoule in the microgravity environment. The predicted interface shape is in agreement with one obtained experimentally by quenching. The results of 3-D modeling are compared with previous 2-D finding. A video film featuring melt convection will be presented.

  9. Detectors on the drawing board

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Linear collider detector developers inside and outside CERN are tackling the next generation of detector technology. While their focus has centred on high-energy linear collider detectors, their innovative concepts and designs will be applicable to any future detector.   A simulated event display in one of the new generation detectors. “While the LHC experiments remain the pinnacle of detector technology, you may be surprised to realise that the design and expertise behind them is well over 10 years old,” says Lucie Linssen, CERN’s Linear Collider Detector (LCD) project manager whose group is pushing the envelope of detector design. “The next generation of detectors will have to surpass the achievements of the LHC experiments. It’s not an easy task but, by observing detectors currently in operation and exploiting a decade’s worth of technological advancements, we’ve made meaningful progress.” The LCD team is curr...

  10. The ZEUS microvertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Garfagnini, A

    1999-01-01

    A new vertex detector for the ZEUS experiment at HERA will be installed during the 1999-2000 shutdown, for the high-luminosity runs of HERA. It will allow to reconstruct secondary vertex tracks, coming from the decay of long-lived particles with a lifetime of about 10 sup - sup 1 sup 2 s, and improve the global momentum resolution of the tracking system. The interaction region will be surrounded with single-sided silicon strip detectors, with capacitive charge division: three double layers in the central region (600 detectors), and 4 'wheels' in the forward region (112 silicon planes). Due to the high number of readout channels, 512 readout strips per silicon plane in the barrel region and 480 in the forward part, and the large coverage of the vertex detector (almost 1 m long), the front-end electronics has to be placed on top of the detectors and has to be radiation tolerant since doses up to 2 kGy are expected near the interaction region. The HELIX chip has been chosen as analog chip with a low-noise, charg...

  11. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Esposito, E.; Lisitskyi, M. P.; Nappi, C.; Pagano, S.; Perez de Lara, D.

    2006-03-01

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  12. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristiano, R [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Ejrnaes, M [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, 80126 Naples (Italy); Esposito, E [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Lisitskyi, M P [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Nappi, C [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Pagano, S [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, 84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy); Perez de Lara, D [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  13. Detectors in Extreme Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaj, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Carini, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Carron, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Haller, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hart, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hasi, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Herrmann, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kenney, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Segal, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tomada, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-06

    Free Electron Lasers opened a new window on imaging the motion of atoms and molecules. At SLAC, FEL experiments are performed at LCLS using 120Hz pulses with 1012 - 1013 photons in 10 femtoseconds (billions of times brighter than the most powerful synchrotrons). This extreme detection environment raises unique challenges, from obvious to surprising. Radiation damage is a constant threat due to accidental exposure to insufficiently attenuated beam, focused beam and formation of ice crystals reflecting the beam onto the detector. Often high power optical lasers are also used (e.g., 25TW), increasing the risk of damage or impeding data acquisition through electromagnetic pulses (EMP). The sample can contaminate the detector surface or even produce shrapnel damage. Some experiments require ultra high vacuum (UHV) with strict design, surface contamination and cooling requirements - also for detectors. The setup is often changed between or during experiments with short turnaround times, risking mechanical and ESD damage, requiring work planning, training of operators and sometimes continuous participation of the LCLS Detector Group in the experiments. The detectors used most often at LCLS are CSPAD cameras for hard x-rays and pnCCDs for soft x-rays.

  14. A discrete element model of laser beam induced current (LBIC) due to the lateral photovoltaic effect in open-circuit HgCdTe photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fynn, K.A.; Faraone, L. [Univ. of Western Australia, Nedlands (Australia). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Bajaj, J. [Rockwell International Science Center, Thousand Oaks, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The non-destructive optical characterization technique of Laser-Beam-Induced-Current (LBIC) imaging has proven useful in qualitatively assessing electrically active defects and localized non-uniformities in HgCdTe materials and devices used for infrared photovoltaic arrays. To further the development of a quantitative working model for LBIC, this paper focuses on the application of the technique to photovoltaic structures that are represented by a discrete element equivalent circuit. For this particular case the LBIC signal arises due to the lateral photovoltaic effect in non-uniformly illuminated open-circuit photodiodes. The outcomes of the model predict all of the experimentally observed geometrical features of the LBIC image and signal. Furthermore, the model indicates that the LBIC signal has an extremely weak dependence on the p-n junction reverse saturation current, and shows a linear dependence with laser power. This latter feature may be useful for non-contact measurement of the quantum efficiency of individual photodiodes within a large two-dimensional focal plane array. The decay of the LBIC signal outside the physical boundary of the p-n junction is of the same form as the roll-off in the short circuit photoresponse and, therefore, can be used to extract the diffusion length of minority carriers. Experimental data are obtained from an arsenic implanted p-on-n junction fabricated on MBE grown Hg{sub 1{minus}x}Cd{sub x}Te material with an x-value of 0.3. The p-on-n diode is shown to be uniform and of high quality with an R{sub o}A product of 1 {times} 10{sup 8} {Omega}{center_dot}cm{sup 2} at 77 K. The validity of the simple model developed in this paper, is confirmed by the excellent agreement with experimental results. Consequently, the LBIC technique is shown to be an appropriate diagnostic tool for non-contact quantitative analysis of semiconductor materials and devices.

  15. OPERA: Electronic Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Jollet, C

    2010-01-01

    OPERA is an hybrid detector for the ni-tau appearance search in a direct way, and the Electronic Detectors (ED) have the crucial role of triggerring for the neutrino events and of localizing such an interaction inside the target. Another very important task of the ED is to identify the muon since only a correct matching of such a track with a track in the emulsion connected to the vertex of the event allows to reduce the charm background to the desired level. The ED, fully working since 2006, consist of a target tracker (scintillator strips) and a spectrometer (RPC and drift tubes). The different sub-detectors are de- scribed in the poster, as well as their performance both on Monte Carlo (MC) and real data.

  16. Transition Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Andronic, A

    2012-01-01

    We review the basic features of transition radiation and how they are used for the design of modern Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD). The discussion will include the various realizations of radiators as well as a discussion of the detection media and aspects of detector construction. With regard to particle identification we assess the different methods for efficient discrimination of different particles and outline the methods for the quantification of this property. Since a number of comprehensive reviews already exist, we predominantly focus on the detectors currently operated at the LHC. To a lesser extent we also cover some other TRDs, which are planned or are currently being operated in balloon or space-borne astro-particle physics experiments.

  17. The LHCb Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Schindler, H

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration presented a Letter of Intent (LOI) to the LHCC in March 2011 for a major upgrading of the detector during Long Shutdown 2 (2018) and intends to collect a data sample of 50/fb in the LHC and High-Luminosity-LHC eras. The aim is to operate the experiment at an instantaneous luminosity 2.5 times above the present operational luminosity, which has already been pushed to twice the design value. Reading out the detector at 40MHz allows to increase the trigger efficiencies especially for the hadronic decay modes. The physics case and the strategy for the upgrade have been endorsed by the LHCC. This paper presents briefly the physics motivations for the LHCb upgrade and the proposed changes to the detector and trigger.

  18. JSATS Detector Field Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eric Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Flory, Adam E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lamarche, Brian L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weiland, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) Detector is a software and hardware system that captures JSATS Acoustic Micro Transmitter (AMT) signals. The system uses hydrophones to capture acoustic signals in the water. This analog signal is then amplified and processed by the Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP) board in the computer. This board digitizes and processes the acoustic signal to determine if a possible JSATS tag is present. With this detection, the data will be saved to the computer for further analysis. This document details the features and functionality of the JSATS Detector software. The document covers how to install the software, setup and run the detector software. The document will also go over the raw binary waveform file format and CSV files containing RMS values

  19. JSATS Detector Field Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eric Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Flory, Adam E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lamarche, Brian L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weiland, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) Detector is a software and hardware system that captures JSATS Acoustic Micro Transmitter (AMT) signals. The system uses hydrophones to capture acoustic signals in the water. This analog signal is then amplified and processed by the Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP) board in the computer. This board digitizes and processes the acoustic signal to determine if a possible JSATS tag is present. With this detection, the data will be saved to the computer for further analysis. This document details the features and functionality of the JSATS Detector software. The document covers how to install the software, setup and run the detector software. The document will also go over the raw binary waveform file format and CSV files containing RMS values

  20. Cryogenic Tracking Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Mikuz, M

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN$_2$) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result The first goal of the approved extension of the RD39 program is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particular we shall concentrate on processes and materials that could significantly reduce th...

  1. The AFP Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector is one of the forward detectors of the ATLAS experiment at CERN aiming at measuring momenta and angles of diffractively scattered protons. Silicon Tracking and Time-of-Flight detectors are located inside Roman Pot stations inserted into beam pipe aperture. The AFP detector is composed of two stations on each side of the ATLAS interaction point and is under commissioning. The detector is provided with high and low voltage distribution systems. Each station has vacuum and cooling systems, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. Monitoring of environmental parameters, like temperature and radiation, is also available. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of the detector hardware and ensures the safe and reliable operation of the detector, assuring good data quality. Comparing with DCS systems of other detectors, the AFP DCS main challenge is to cope with the large variety of AFP equipment. This paper describes t...

  2. The MCT-ketogenic diet as a treatment option in refractory childhood epilepsy: A prospective study with 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Danielle A J E; de Kinderen, Reina J A; Vles, Hans S H; de Louw, Anton J; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Majoie, Marian J M

    2015-10-01

    The present study assessed the long-term (i.e., 24months) efficacy of the ketogenic diet (KD) as an add-on therapy in children with refractory epilepsy, with focus on seizure frequency, seizure severity, and tolerability. Most patients were treated with the MCT-diet. At one and two years, 33% and 23%, respectively, of the 48 included patients were still on the KD. After three months, one year, and two years of treatment, 16.7% of the patients were responders. The highest responder rate (i.e., 22.9%) was seen at six and nine months of treatment. Of the fifteen patients with seizure clusters during baseline, 60% were responders after three months when looking at cluster reduction and most of them were not responders for the total seizure frequency. From three months of treatment onwards, most of the patients had a relevant decrease in seizure severity which was mainly related to the most severe seizure type. Gastrointestinal dysfunction was often reported, especially in the first six weeks of treatment. Growth deceleration was present in 30% of the patients, and weight reduction in 15%. Improved arousal was mentioned in 30% of patients. No patients developed ECG abnormalities or kidney stones. Increase in lipid profile was rare. The KD is an effective therapy for children with therapy-resistant epilepsy. Effectiveness is reflected in the reduction of seizure frequency as well as in the reduction of seizure severity. After 6months of treatment, it is obvious which patients are responders and tolerate the treatment well. Most of these patients will continue to benefit from the KD for a longer time. Long-term use of the diet was well tolerated.

  3. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Pachmayer, Y

    2013-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) is the main electron detector in ALICE. In conduction with the TPC and the ITS, it provides the necessary electron identification capability to study: - Production of light and heavy vector mesons as well as the continuum in the di-electron channel, - Semi leptonic decays of hadrons with open charm and open beauty via the single-electron channel using the displaced vertex information provided by the ITS, - Correlated DD and BB pairs via coincidences of electrons in the central barrel and muons in the forward muon arm, - Jets with high Pτ tracks in one single TRD stack.

  4. Edgeless silicon pad detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea Solano, B.; Abreu, M. C.; Avati, V.; Boccali, T.; Boccone, V.; Bozzo, M.; Capra, R.; Casagrande, L.; Chen, W.; Eggert, K.; Heijne, E.; Klauke, S.; Li, Z.; Mäki, T.; Mirabito, L.; Morelli, A.; Niinikoski, T. O.; Oljemark, F.; Palmieri, V. G.; Rato Mendes, P.; Rodrigues, S.; Siegrist, P.; Silvestris, L.; Sousa, P.; Tapprogge, S.; Trocmé, B.

    2006-05-01

    We report measurements in a high-energy pion beam of the sensitivity of the edge region in "edgeless" planar silicon pad diode detectors diced through their contact implants. A large surface current on such an edge prevents the normal reverse biasing of the device, but the current can be sufficiently reduced by the use of a suitable cutting method, followed by edge treatment, and by operating the detector at low temperature. The depth of the dead layer at the diced edge is measured to be (12.5±8 stat..±6 syst.) μm.

  5. Edgeless silicon pad detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perea Solano, B. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)]. E-mail: blanca.perea.solano@cern.ch; Abreu, M.C. [LIP and University of Algarve, 8000 Faro (Portugal); Avati, V. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boccali, T. [INFN Sez. di Pisa and Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Boccone, V. [INFN Sez. di Genova and Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Bozzo, M. [INFN Sez. di Genova and Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Capra, R. [INFN Sez. di Genova and Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Casagrande, L. [INFN Sez. di Roma 2 and Universita di Roma 2, Rome (Italy); Chen, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Eggert, K. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Heijne, E. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Klauke, S. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Li, Z. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Maeki, T. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Mirabito, L. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Morelli, A. [INFN Sez. di Genova and Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Niinikoski, T.O. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Oljemark, F. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Palmieri, V.G. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Rato Mendes, P. [LIP and University of Algarve, 8000 Faro (Portugal); Rodrigues, S. [LIP and University of Algarve, 8000 Faro (Portugal); Siegrist, P. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Silvestris, L. [INFN Sez. Di Bari, Bari (Italy); Sousa, P. [LIP and University of Algarve, 8000 Faro (Portugal); Tapprogge, S. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Trocme, B. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Villeurbanne (France)

    2006-05-01

    We report measurements in a high-energy pion beam of the sensitivity of the edge region in 'edgeless' planar silicon pad diode detectors diced through their contact implants. A large surface current on such an edge prevents the normal reverse biasing of the device, but the current can be sufficiently reduced by the use of a suitable cutting method, followed by edge treatment, and by operating the detector at low temperature. The depth of the dead layer at the diced edge is measured to be (12.5{+-}8{sub stat.}.{+-}6{sub syst.}) {mu}m.

  6. Radiation Detectors and Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, Andrea

    The use of radiation detectors in the analysis of art objects represents a very special application in a true interdisciplinary field. Radiation detectors employed in this field detect, e.g., x-rays, γ-rays, β particles, and protons. Analyzed materials range from stones, metals, over porcelain to paintings. The available nondestructive and noninvasive analytical methods cover a broad range of techniques. Hence, for the sake of brevity, this chapter will concentrate on few techniques: Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Proton Induced γ-ray Emission (PIGE).

  7. The Upgraded D0 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J L; Ahmed, S N; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, J T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Angstadt, R; Anosov, V; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Babukhadia, L; Bacon, Trevor C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baffioni, S; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bardon, O; Barg, W; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bhattacharjee, M; Baturitsky, M A; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Baumbaugh, B; Beauceron, S; Begalli, M; Beaudette, F; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Beutel, D; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Bishoff, A; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Bockenthein, E; Bodyagin, V; Böhnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Bonamy, P; Bonifas, D; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Boswell, C; Bowden, M; Brandt, A; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, D; Butler, J M; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Bystrický, J; Canal, L; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Casey, D; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Chi, E; Chiche, R; Cho, D K; Choate, R; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Chopra, S; Christenson, J H; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Churin, I; Cisko, G; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Clement, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Colling, D J; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; Da Motta, H; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; Davis, W; De, K; de Jong, P; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; de La Taille, C; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Del Signore, K; De Maat, R; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doets, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dvornikov, O; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fagan, J; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Fein, D; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Ferreira, M J; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Fitzpatrick, T; Flattum, E; Fleuret, F; Flores, R; Foglesong, J; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Franklin, C; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Gao, M; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Geurkov, G; Ginther, G; Gobbi, B; Goldmann, K; Golling, T; Gollub, N; Golovtsov, V L; Gómez, B; Gómez, G; Gómez, R; Goodwin, R W; Gornushkin, Y; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graham, D; Graham, G; Grannis, P D; Gray, K; Greder, S; Green, D R; Green, J; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grinstein, S; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gu, W; Guglielmo, J; Sen-Gupta, A; Gurzhev, S N; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haggard, E; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hance, R; Hanagaki, K; Hanlet, P; Hansen, S; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, C; Hays, J; Hazen, E; Hebbeker, T; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hou, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Huang, Y; Hynek, V; Huffman, D; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jacquier, Y; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jayanti, R; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Jiang, Y; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnson, P; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Jöstlein, H; Jouravlev, N I; Juárez, M; Juste, A; Kaan, A P; Kado, M; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Kalmani, S D; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Ke, Z; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A I; Kharzheev, Yu M; Kim, H; Kim, K H; Kim, T J; Kirsch, N; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Komissarov, E V; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kostritskii, A V; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Kotwal, A V; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Kuznetsov, O; Krane, J; Kravchuk, N; Krempetz, K; Krider, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M A; Kubinski, R; Kuchinsky, N; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Kuznetsov, V E; Kwarciany, R; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G L; Larwill, M; Laurens, P; Lavigne, B; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A C; Le Meur, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Leggett, C; Lehner, F; Leitner, R; Leonidopoulos, C; Lévêque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, X; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Lindenmeyer, C; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Litmaath, M; Lizarazo, J; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lü, J; Lubatti, H J; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Luo, C; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Machado, E; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A M; Maity, M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Manakov, V; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Markley, D; Markus, M; Marshall, T; Martens, M; Martin, M; Martin-Chassard, G; Mattingly, S E K; Matulik, M; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; McKenna, M; McMahon, T; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A S; Mendes, A; Mendoza, D; Mendoza, L; Meng, X; Merekov, Y P; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mikhailov, V; Miller, D; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mostafa, M; Moua, S; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagaraj, P; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimhan, V S; Narayanan, A; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neuenschwander, R T; Neustroev, P; Nöding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nozdrin, A; Nunnemann, T; Nurczyk, A; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Olis, D; Oliveira, N; Olivier, B; Olsen, J; Oshima, N; Oshinowo, B O; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Padley, P; Papageorgiou, K; Parashar, N; Park, J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Pérez, E; Peters, O; Petroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M E; Pompos, A; Polosov, P; Pope, B G; Popkov, E; Porokhovoy, S; Prado da Silva, W L; Pritchard, W; Prokhorov, I; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ramberg, E; Ramirez-Gomez, R; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rao, M V S; Rapidis, P A; Rapisarda, S; Raskowski, J; Ratoff, P N; Ray, R E; Reay, N W; Rechenmacher, R; Reddy, L V; Regan, T; Renardy, J F; Reucroft, S; Rha, J; Ridel, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F K; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Roco, M T; Rotolo, C; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rucinski, R; Rud, V I; Rusakovich, N; Russo, P; Sabirov, B; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Satyanarayana, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, A D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schukin, A A; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sen-Gupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shankar, H C; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Sheahan, P; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shishkin, A A; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M; Sidwell, R A; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V I; Skow, D; Skubic, P L; Slattery, P F; Smith, D E; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Song, Y; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sorin, V; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spartana, N; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stefanik, A; Steinberg, J L; Steinbruck, G; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tentindo-Repond, S; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Terentyev, N K; Teterin, V; Thomas, E; Thompson, J; Thooris, B; Titov, M; Toback, D; Tokmenin, V V; Tolian, C; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, D; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Touze, F; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trippe, T G; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Utes, M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van den Berg, P J; Van Gemmeren, P; Van Kooten, R; Van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A H; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Vaz, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vigneault, M; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Vishwanath, P R; Vlimant, J R; Von Törne, E; Vorobyov, A; Vreeswijk, M; Vu-Anh, T; Vysotsky, V S; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wallace, N; Wang, L; Wang, Z M; Warchol, J; Warsinsky, M; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; White, V; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wijnen, T A M; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilcer, N; Willutzki, H; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wlodek, T; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Wu, Z; Xie, Y; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yarema, R J; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Yoffe, F; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zanabria, M; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, B; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zheng, H; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zmuda, T; Zutshi, V; Zviagintsev, S; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2005-01-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  8. The Upgraded D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U.

    2005-07-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  9. Status of the KEDR detector

    CERN Document Server

    Anashin, V V; Baibusinov, B O; Balashov, V; Baldin, E M; Barkov, L M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, M Y; Baru, S E; Bedny, I; Beilin, D M; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bondarev, D V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Cantoni, P; Chilingarov, A G; Dneprovsky, L V; Eidelman, S I; Epifanov, D A; Frabetti, P L; Gaidarev, P B; Groshev, V R; Karpov, S V; Kiselev, V A; Klimenko, S G; Kolachev, G M; Kononov, S A; Kozlov, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Kulikov, V F; Kurdadze, L M; Kuzmin, A S; Kuznecov, S A; Lanni, F; Lelchuk, M Y; Leontiev, L A; Levichev, E B; Malyshev, V M; Manfredi, P F; Maslennikov, A L; Minakov, G D; Nagaslaev, V P; Naumenkov, A I; Nikitin, S A; Nomerotski, A; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Ovechkin, R; Palombo, F; Peleganchuk, S V; Petrosyan, S S; Pivovarov, S V; Poluektov, A O; Pospelov, G E; Protopopov, I Ya; Re, V; Romanov, L V; Root, N I; Ruban, A A; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D; Shubin, M A; Shusharo, A I; Shwartz, B A; Sidorov, V A; Skovpen, Y I; Smakhtin, V P; Snopkov, R G; Sokolov, A V; Soukharev, A M; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Y; Usov, Y V; Vorobyev, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zatcepin, A V; Zhilich, V N

    2002-01-01

    KEDR is a general-purpose detector for experiments at the VEPP-4M e sup + e sup - -collider in the energy range 2E=2.0-12 GeV. All detector subsystems (except the aerogel Cherenkov counters) have been installed into the detector at VEPP-4M. Some preliminary data have been taken in the energy region of the J/PSI meson. The tuning of the detector and the VEPP-4M collider is in progress. Preliminary results on the detector performance are presented. The future experimental program for the KEDR detector is discussed.

  10. Status of the KEDR detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anashin, V.V.; Aulchenko, V.M.; Baibusinov, B.O.; Balashov, V.; Baldin, E.M.; Barkov, L.M.; Barladyan, A.K.; Barnyakov, M.Yu.; Baru, S.E.; Bedny, I.V.; Beilin, D.M.; Blinov, A.E.; Blinov, V.E.; Bondarev, D.V.; Bondar, A.E.; Buzykaev, A.R.; Cantoni, P.; Chilingarov, A.G.; Dneprovsky, L.V.; Eidelman, S.I.; Epifanov, D.A.; Frabetti, P.L.; Gaidarev, P.B.; Groshev, V.R.; Karpov, S.V.; Kiselev, V.A.; Klimenko, S.G.; Kolachev, G.M.; Kononov, S.A.; Kozlov, V.N.; Kravchenko, E.A.; Kulikov, V.F.; Kurdadze, L.M.; Kuzmin, A.S.; Kuznecov, S.A.; Lanni, F.; Lelchuk, M.Yu.; Leontiev, L.A.; Levichev, E.B.; Malyshev, V.M.; Manfredi, P.F.; Maslennikov, A.L.; Minakov, G.D.; Nagaslaev, V.P.; Naumenkov, A.; Nikitin, S.A.; Nomerotsky, A.; Onuchin, A.P.; Oreshkin, S.B.; Ovechkin, R.; Palombo, F.; Peleganchuk, S.V.; Petrosyan, S.S.; Pivovarov, S.V.; Poluektov, A.O.; Pospelov, G.E.; Protopopov, I.Ya.; Re, V.; Romanov, L.V.; Root, N.I.; Ruban, A.A.; Savinov, G.A.; Shamov, A.G.; Shatilov, D.; Shubin, M.A.; Shusharo, A.I.; Shwartz, B.A.; Sidorov, V.A.; Skovpen, Yu.I.; Smakhtin, V.P.; Snopkov, R.G.; Sokolov, A.V.; Soukharev, A.M.; Talyshev, A.A.; Tayursky, V.A.; Telnov, V.I.; Tikhonov, Yu.A. E-mail: tikhonov@cppm.in2p3.fr; Todyshev, K.Yu.; Usov, Yu.V.; Vorobyev, A.I.; Yushkov, A.N.; Zatcepin, A.V.; Zhilich, V.N

    2002-02-01

    KEDR is a general-purpose detector for experiments at the VEPP-4M e{sup +}e{sup -}-collider in the energy range 2E=2.0-12 GeV. All detector subsystems (except the aerogel Cherenkov counters) have been installed into the detector at VEPP-4M. Some preliminary data have been taken in the energy region of the J/{psi} meson. The tuning of the detector and the VEPP-4M collider is in progress. Preliminary results on the detector performance are presented. The future experimental program for the KEDR detector is discussed.

  11. Fast Detector Simulation Using Lelaps, Detector Descriptions in GODL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langeveld, Willy; /SLAC

    2005-07-06

    Lelaps is a fast detector simulation program which reads StdHep generator files and produces SIO or LCIO output files. It swims particles through detectors taking into account magnetic fields, multiple scattering and dE/dx energy loss. It simulates parameterized showers in EM and hadronic calorimeters and supports gamma conversions and decays. In addition to three built-in detector configurations, detector descriptions can also be read from files in the new GODL file format.

  12. Pixel detector insertion

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS

    2015-01-01

    Insertion of the Pixel Tracker, the 66-million-channel device used to pinpoint the vertex of each colliding proton pair, located at the heart of the detector. The geometry of CMS is a cylinder lying on its side (22 meters long and 15 meters high in dia

  13. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  14. B-factory detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Marlow, D R

    2002-01-01

    The designs of the recently commissioned BaBar and Belle B-Factory detectors are described. The discussion is organized around the methods and instruments used to detect the so-called gold-plated-mode B sup 0->J/PSI K sub S decays and related modes.

  15. The BABAR Detector

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    BABAR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e+e- B Factory operating at the upsilon 4S resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagentic showers from electrons and photons are detected in an array of CsI crystals located just inside the solenoidal coil of a superconducting magnet. Muons and neutral hadrons are identified by arrays of resistive plate chambers inserted into gaps in the steel flux return of the magnet. Charged hadrons are identified by dE/dx measurements in the tracking detectors and in a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector surrounding the drift chamber. The trigger, data acquisition and data-monitoring systems, VME- and network-based, are controlled by custom-designed online software. Details of the layout and performance of the detector components and their associated electronics and software are presented.

  16. CALIBRATION OF PHOSWICH DETECTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LEEGTE, HKW; KOLDENHOF, EE; BOONSTRA, AL; WILSCHUT, HW

    1992-01-01

    Two important aspects for the calibration of phoswich detector arrays have been investigated. It is shown that common gate ADCs can be used: The loss in particle identification due to fluctuations in the gate timing in multi-hit events can be corrected for by a simple procedure using the measured ti

  17. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2012-01-01

    The RPC system is operating with a very high uptime, an average chamber efficiency of about 95% and an average cluster size around 1.8. The average number of active channels is 97.7%. Eight chambers are disconnected and forty are working in single-gap mode due to high-voltage problems. The total luminosity lost due to RPCs in 2012 is 88.46 pb–1. One of the main goals of 2012 was to improve the stability of the endcap trigger that is strongly correlated to the performances of the detector, due to the 3-out-3 trigger logic. At beginning of 2011 the instability of the detector efficiency was about 10%. Detailed studies found that this was mainly due to the strong correlation between the performance of the detector and the atmospheric pressure (P). Figure XXY shows the linear correlation between the average cluster size of the endcap chamber versus P. This effect is expected for gaseous detectors and can be reduced by correcting the applied high-voltage working point (HVapp) according to the followi...

  18. Ionic smoke detectors

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Ionic smoke detectors are products incorporating radioactive material. This article summarises the process for their commercialization and marketing, and how the activity is controlled, according to regulations establishing strict design and production requisites to guarantee the absence of radiological risk associated both with their use and their final handling as conventional waste. (Author)

  19. ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Manzari, V

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the innermost two layers of the 6-layer barrel Inner Tracking System (ITS). The SPD plays a key role in the determination of the position of the primary collision and in the reconstruction of the secondary vertices from particle decays.

  20. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dannheim, D

    2015-01-01

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a meas- urement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → W b will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit tim- ing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC ver- tex det...

  1. First ALICE detectors installed!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Detectors to track down penetrating muon particles are the first to be placed in their final position in the ALICE cavern. The Alice muon spectrometer: in the foreground the trigger chamber is positioned in front of the muon wall, with the dipole magnet in the background. After the impressive transport of its dipole magnet, ALICE has begun to fill the spectrometer with detectors. In mid-July, the ALICE muon spectrometer team achieved important milestones with the installation of the trigger and the tracking chambers of the muon spectrometer. They are the first detectors to be installed in their final position in the cavern. All of the eight half planes of the RPCs (resistive plate chambers) have been installed in their final position behind the muon filter. The role of the trigger detector is to select events containing a muon pair coming, for instance, from the decay of J/ or Y resonances. The selection is made on the transverse momentum of the two individual muons. The internal parts of the RPCs, made o...

  2. Superconducting Single Photon Detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorenbos, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is about the development of a detector for single photons, particles of light. New techniques are being developed that require high performance single photon detection, such as quantum cryptography, single molecule detection, optical radar, ballistic imaging, circuit testing and fluoresc

  3. The BABAR Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luth, Vera G

    2001-05-18

    BABAR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} B Factory operating at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagentic showers from electrons and photons are detected in an array of CsI crystals located just inside the solenoidal coil of a superconducting magnet. Muons and neutral hadrons are identified by arrays of resistive plate chambers inserted into gaps in the steel flux return of the magnet. Charged hadrons are identified by dE/dx measurements in the tracking detectors and in a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector surrounding the drift chamber. The trigger, data acquisition and data-monitoring systems, VME- and network-based, are controlled by custom-designed online software. Details of the layout and performance of the detector components and their associated electronics and software are presented.

  4. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Douglas S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Rojeski, Ronald A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  5. Fire Emulator/Detector Evaluator

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description:The fire emulator/detector evaluator (FE/DE) is a computer-controlled flow tunnel used to re-create the environments surrounding detectors in the early...

  6. Fire Emulator/Detector Evaluator

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The fire emulator/detector evaluator (FE/DE) is a computer-controlled flow tunnel used to re-create the environments surrounding detectors in the early...

  7. Position sensitive solid state detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnatterly, S.E.; Husk, D.

    1986-05-15

    Solid state detectors have been used for years as high quantum efficiency detectors for visible light. In this paper the use of PDA and CCD, solid state detectors, in the X-ray region will be discussed. In particular examples of data in the soft X-ray region are presented. Finally the use of phosphor coatings to enhance the sensitivity of solid state detectors is described.

  8. Radiation detectors laboratory; Laboratorio de detectores de radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez J, F.J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The Radiation detectors laboratory was established with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency which gave this the responsibility to provide its services at National and regional level for Latin America and it is located at the ININ. The more expensive and delicate radiation detectors are those made of semiconductor, so it has been put emphasis in the use and repairing of these detectors type. The supplied services by this laboratory are: selection consultant, detectors installation and handling and associated systems. Installation training, preventive and corrective maintenance of detectors and detection systems calibration. (Author)

  9. ATLAS Detector : Performance and Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira Damazio, Denis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Describe the ATLAS detector and summarize most relevant and recent information about the detector performance in 2016 with LHC colliding bunches at sqrt(s)=13 TeV with luminosity above the nominal value. Describe the different upgrade phases previewed for the detector and main activities already ongoing.

  10. Characterizations of GEM detector prototype

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00522505; Rudra, Sharmili; Bhattacharya, P.; Sahoo, Sumanya Sekhar; Biswas, S.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, T.K.; Sahu, P.K.; Sahu, S.

    2016-01-01

    At NISER-IoP detector laboratory an initiative is taken to build and test Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors for ALICE experiment. The optimisation of the gas flow rate and the long-term stability test of the GEM detector are performed. The method and test results are presented.

  11. Characterisations of GEM detector prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, Rajendra Nath [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, West Bengal (India); Nanda, Amit [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Jatni 752050 (India); Rudra, Sharmili [Department of Applied Physics, CU, 92, APC Road, Kolkata 700009, West Bengal (India); Bhattacharya, P.; Sahoo, Sumanya Sekhar [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Jatni 752050 (India); Biswas, S., E-mail: saikat.ino@gmail.com [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Jatni 752050 (India); Mohanty, B. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Jatni 752050 (India); Nayak, T.K. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, West Bengal (India); Sahu, P.K.; Sahu, S. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, P.O.: Sainik School, Bhubaneswar 751005, Odisha (India)

    2016-07-11

    At NISER-IoP detector laboratory an initiative is taken to build and test Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors for ALICE experiment. The optimisation of the gas flow rate and the long-term stability test of the GEM detector are performed. The method and test results are presented.

  12. Workshops on radiation imaging detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sochinskii, N.V.; Sun, G.C.; Kostamo, P.; Silenas, A.; Saynatjoki, A.; Grant, J.; Owens, A.; Kozorezov, A.G.; Noschis, E.; Van Eijk, C.; Nagarkar, V.; Sekiya, H.; Pribat, D.; Campbell, M.; Lundgren, J.; Arques, M.; Gabrielli, A.; Padmore, H.; Maiorino, M.; Volpert, M.; Lebrun, F.; Van der Putten, S.; Pickford, A.; Barnsley, R.; Anton, M.E.G.; Mitschke, M.; Gros d' Aillon, E.; Frojdh, C.; Norlin, B.; Marchal, J.; Quattrocchi, M.; Stohr, U.; Bethke, K.; Bronnimann, C.H.; Pouvesle, J.M.; Hoheisel, M.; Clemens, J.C.; Gallin-Martel, M.L.; Bergamaschi, A.; Redondo-Fernandez, I.; Gal, O.; Kwiatowski, K.; Montesi, M.C.; Smith, K

    2005-07-01

    This document gathers the transparencies that were presented at the international workshop on radiation imaging detectors. 9 sessions were organized: 1) materials for detectors and detector structure, 2) front end electronics, 3) interconnected technologies, 4) space, fusion applications, 5) the physics of detection, 6) industrial applications, 7) synchrotron radiation, 8) X-ray sources, and 9) medical and other applications.

  13. Detector and System Developments for LHC Detector Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelli, Beatrice; Guida, Roberto; Rohne, Ole; Stapnes, Steinar

    2015-05-12

    The future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Physics program and the consequent improvement of the LHC accelerator performance set important challenges to all detector systems. This PhD thesis delineates the studies and strategies adopted to improve two different types of detectors: the replacement of precision trackers with ever increasingly performing silicon detectors, and the improvement of large gaseous detector systems by optimizing their gas mixtures and operation modes. Within the LHC tracker upgrade programs, the ATLAS Insertable B-layer (IBL) is the first major upgrade of a silicon-pixel detector. Indeed the overall ATLAS Pixel Detector performance is expected to degrade with the increase of luminosity and the IBL will recover the performance by adding a fourth innermost layer. The IBL Detector makes use of new pixel and front-end electronics technologies as well as a novel thermal management approach and light support and service structures. These innovations required complex developments and Quality Ass...

  14. The Study on the Properties of CdTe Buffer Layer for MBE HgCdTe Epilayer%分子束外延HgCdTe薄膜的CdTe缓冲层特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋立媛; 唐利斌; 李艳辉; 孔令德; 陈雪梅

    2009-01-01

    CdTe是GaAs衬底上分子束外延(MBE)HgCdTe薄膜时的缓冲层,引入缓冲层的目的是减小失配位错,CdTe缓冲层的生长直接影响到后续HgCdTe薄膜的制备质量,然而目前现有文献鲜有报道CdTe缓冲层的最佳厚度.采用X射线双晶衍射、位错腐蚀坑密度(EPD)、FT-IR和椭圆偏振光谱的方法,从CdTe缓冲层厚度对位错密度的影响入手,分析并确定了理想的CdTe缓冲层厚度.%CdTe is the buffer layer of GaAs substrate for HgCdTe eoilayer grown by MBE,The purpose for introduction of buffer laver is to decrease the mismatched dislocation,the growth of CdTe buffer layer directly affects the quality of foilowing grown HgCdTe thin film.However,up to now only few papers have reported the optimum thickness for CdTe buffer layer.By using of X-ray double ervstal diffraction,EPD,FT-IR as well as soectroscopic ellipsometry the paper has studied the effects of the thickness on EPD for CdTe buffer layer,the optimum thickness of CdTe buffer layer has been obtained.

  15. Future liquid Argon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, A

    2013-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber offers an innovative technology for a new class of massive detectors for rare-event detection. It is a precise tracking device that allows three-dimensional spatial reconstruction with mm-scale precision of the morphology of ionizing tracks with the imaging quality of a "bubble chamber", provides $dE/dx$ information with high sampling rate, and acts as high-resolution calorimeter for contained events. First proposed in 1977 and after a long maturing process, its holds today the potentialities of opening new physics opportunities by providing excellent tracking and calorimetry performance at the relevant multi-kton mass scales, outperforming other techniques. In this paper, we review future liquid argon detectors presently being discussed by the neutrino physics community.

  16. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Although elemental semiconductors such as silicon and germanium are standard for energy dispersive spectroscopy in the laboratory, their use for an increasing range of applications is becoming marginalized by their physical limitations, namely the need for ancillary cooling, their modest stopping powers, and radiation intolerance. Compound semiconductors, on the other hand, encompass such a wide range of physical and electronic properties that they have become viable competitors in a number of applications. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors is a consolidated source of information on all aspects of the use of compound semiconductors for radiation detection and measurement. Serious Competitors to Germanium and Silicon Radiation Detectors Wide-gap compound semiconductors offer the ability to operate in a range of hostile thermal and radiation environments while still maintaining sub-keV spectral resolution at X-ray wavelengths. Narrow-gap materials offer the potential of exceeding the spectral resolutio...

  17. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G.Gomez

    Since September, the muon alignment system shifted from a mode of hardware installation and commissioning to operation and data taking. All three optical subsystems (Barrel, Endcap and Link alignment) have recorded data before, during and after CRAFT, at different magnetic fields and during ramps of the magnet. This first data taking experience has several interesting goals: •    study detector deformations and movements under the influence of the huge magnetic forces; •    study the stability of detector structures and of the alignment system over long periods, •    study geometry reproducibility at equal fields (specially at 0T and 3.8T); •    reconstruct B=0T geometry and compare to nominal/survey geometries; •    reconstruct B=3.8T geometry and provide DT and CSC alignment records for CMSSW. However, the main goal is to recons...

  18. The LUCID detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lasagni Manghi, Federico; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Starting from 2015 LHC is performing a new run, at higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID has been completely renewed, both on detector design and in the electronics, in order to cope with the new running conditions. The new detector electronics is presented, featuring a new read-out board (LUCROD), for signal acquisition and digitization, PMT-charge integration and single-side luminosity measurements, and the revisited LUMAT board for side-A-side-C combination. The contribution covers the new boards design, the firmware and software developments, the implementation of luminosity algorithms, the optical communication between boards and the integration into the ATLAS TDAQ system.

  19. UA1 central detector

    CERN Multimedia

    The UA1 central detector was crucial to understanding the complex topology of proton-antiproton events. It played a most important role in identifying a handful of Ws and Zs among billions of collisions. The detector was a 6-chamber cylindrical assembly 5.8 m long and 2.3 m in diameter, the largest imaging drift chamber of its day. It recorded the tracks of charged particles curving in a 0.7 Tesla magnetic field, measuring their momentum, the sign of their electric charge and their rate of energy loss (dE/dx). Atoms in the argon-ethane gas mixture filling the chambers were ionised by the passage of charged particles. The electrons which were released drifted along an electric field shaped by field wires and were collected on sense wires. The geometrical arrangement of the 17000 field wires and 6125 sense wires allowed a spectacular 3-D interactive display of reconstructed physics events to be produced.

  20. Metrology with Unknown Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altorio, Matteo; Genoni, Marco G; Somma, Fabrizia; Barbieri, Marco

    2016-03-11

    The best possible precision is one of the key figures in metrology, but this is established by the exact response of the detection apparatus, which is often unknown. There exist techniques for detector characterization that have been introduced in the context of quantum technologies but apply as well for ordinary classical coherence; these techniques, though, rely on intense data processing. Here, we show that one can make use of the simpler approach of data fitting patterns in order to obtain an estimate of the Cramér-Rao bound allowed by an unknown detector, and we present applications in polarimetry. Further, we show how this formalism provides a useful calculation tool in an estimation problem involving a continuous-variable quantum state, i.e., a quantum harmonic oscillator.

  1. Aerogel for FARICH detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnyakov, A.Yu. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrentieva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Barnyakov, M.Yu. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrentieva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, Karl Marks 20, Novosibirsk 630073 (Russian Federation); Bobrovnikov, V.S.; Buzykaev, A.R.; Gulevich, V.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrentieva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Danilyuk, A.F. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kononov, S.A.; Kravchenko, E.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrentieva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kuyanov, I.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrentieva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Lopatin, S.A. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Onuchin, A.P.; Ovtin, I.V.; Podgornov, N.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrentieva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, Karl Marks 20, Novosibirsk 630073 (Russian Federation); Porosev, V.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrentieva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Predein, A.Yu.; Protsenko, R.S. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-01

    We present our current experience in preparation of focusing aerogels for the Focusing Aerogel RICH detector. Multilayer focusing aerogel tiles have been produced in Novosibirsk by a collaboration of the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics and Boreskov Institute of Catalysis since 2004. We have obtained 2–3–4-layer blocks with the thickness of 30–45 mm. In 2012, the first samples of focusing blocks with continuous density (refractive index) gradient along thickness were produced. This technology can significantly reduce the contribution from the geometric factor of the radiator thickness to the resolution of the measured Cherenkov angle in the FARICH detector. The special installation was used for automatic control of reagents ratio during the synthesis process. The first samples were tested using the digital radiography method and on the electron beam with the FARICH prototype.

  2. Metrology with Unknown Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Altorio, Matteo; Somma, Fabrizia; Barbieri, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The best possible precision is one of the key figures in metrology, but this is established by the exact response of the detection apparatus, which is often unknown. There exist techniques for detector characterisation, that have been introduced in the context of quantum technologies, but apply as well for ordinary classical coherence; these techniques, though, rely on intense data processing. Here we show that one can make use of the simpler approach of data fitting patterns in order to obtain an estimate of the Cram\\'er-Rao bound allowed by an unknown detector, and present applications in polarimetry. Further, we show how this formalism provide a useful calculation tool in an estimation problem involving a continuous-variable quantum state, i.e. a quantum harmonic oscillator.

  3. Radiation damage in silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lindström, G

    2003-01-01

    Radiation damage effects in silicon detectors under severe hadron and gamma-irradiation are surveyed, focusing on bulk effects. Both macroscopic detector properties (reverse current, depletion voltage and charge collection) as also the underlying microscopic defect generation are covered. Basic results are taken from the work done in the CERN-RD48 (ROSE) collaboration updated by results of recent work. Preliminary studies on the use of dimerized float zone and Czochralski silicon as detector material show possible benefits. An essential progress in the understanding of the radiation-induced detector deterioration had recently been achieved in gamma irradiation, directly correlating defect analysis data with the macroscopic detector performance.

  4. Detectors for the space telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsall, T.

    1978-01-01

    This review of Space Telescope (ST) detectors is divided into two parts. The first part gives short summaries of detector programs carried out during the final planning stage (Phase B) of the ST and discusses such detectors as Photicon, the MAMA detectors, the CODACON, the University of Maryland ICCD, the Goddard Space Flight Center ICCD, and the 70 mm SEC TV sensor. The second part describes the detectors selected for the first ST flight, including the wide field/planetary camera, the faint object and high resolution spectrographs, and the high speed photometer.

  5. Biological detector and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M.; McDowell, Andrew F.

    2015-11-24

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  6. Biological detector and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  7. The AMANDA Neutrino Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wischnewski, R.; Andres, E.; Askebjer, P.; Barwick, S.; Bay, R.; Bergstrom, L.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Carius, S.; Carlson, M.; Chinowsky, W.; Chirkin, D.; Cowen, D.; Costa, C.; Dalberg,E.; Deyoung, T.; Edsjo, J.; Ekstrom, P.; Goobar, A.; Gray, L.; Hallgren,A.; Halzen, F.; Hardtke, R.; He, Y.; Hill, G.; Hulth, P.; Hundertmark,S.; Jacobsen, J.; Kandhadai, V.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Leich, H.; Leuthold,M.; Lindahl, P.; Liss, T.; Liubarsky, I.; Loaiza, P.; Lowder, D.; Marciniewski, P.; Miller, T.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.; Morse, R.; Newcomer, M.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.; de, los, Heros, CP.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.; Przybylski, G.; Rhode, W.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Rubinstein, H.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, E.; Schwarz, R.; Schwendicke, U.; Smoot, G.; Solarz, M.; Sorin, V.; Spiering,C.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.; Streicher, O.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Walck, C.; Wiebusch, C.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S.

    1999-08-23

    The first stage of the AMANDA High Energy Neutrino Detectorat the South Pole, the 302 PMT array AMANDA-B with an expected effectivearea for TeV neutrinos of similar to 10(4) m(2), has been taking datasince 1997. Progress with calibration, investigation of ice properties,as well as muon and neutrino data analysis are described. The next stage20-string detector AMANDA-II with similar to 800 PMTs will be completedin spring 2000.

  8. The ALEPH detector

    CERN Document Server

    1988-01-01

    For detecting the direction and momenta of charged particles with extreme accuracy, the ALEPH detector had at its core a time projection chamber, for years the world's largest. In the foreground from the left, Jacques Lefrancois, Jack Steinberger, Lorenzo Foa and Pierre Lazeyras. ALEPH was an experiment on the LEP accelerator, which studied high-energy collisions between electrons and positrons from 1989 to 2000.

  9. LHCb velo detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Photo 01 : L. to r.: D. Malinon, Summer Student, J. Libby, Fellow, J. Harvey, Head of CERN LHCb group, D. Schlatter, Head of the EP Division in front of the LHCb velo detector test beam (on the right). Photo 02 : L. to r.: J. Harvey, D. Schlatter, W. Riegler (staff), H.J. Hilke, LHCb Technical Coordinator in front of the muon chamber test beam

  10. Development of Portable Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the “Contractor”) and Sense Holdings, Inc. (the “Participant”) was for the development of hand-held detectors with high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of explosives, toxic industrial chemicals and materials, and other materials of interest for security applications. The two parties built a series of demonstration and prototype handheld sensors based upon micoelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with electronic readout.

  11. Biological detector and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2013-02-26

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  12. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); CNR SPIN Salerno, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, n.132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Scherillo, A. [Science and Technology Facility Council, ISIS Facility Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Celentano, G. [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Pietropaolo, A., E-mail: antonino.pietropaolo@enea.it [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics, Via Appia Nuova 31, 00040 Marino, Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  13. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Dallavalle.

    The DT system is ready for the LHC start up. The status of detector hardware, control and safety, of the software for calibration and monitoring and of people has been reviewed at several meetings, starting with the CMS Action Matrix Review and with the Muon Barrel Workshop (October 5 to 7). The disconnected HV channels are at a level of about 0.1%. The loss in detector acceptance because of failures in the Read-Out and Trigger electronics is about 0.5%. The electronics failure rate has been lower this year: next year will tell us whether the rate has stabilised and hopefully will confirm that the number of spares is adequate for ten years operation. Although the detector safety control is very accurate and robust, incidents have happened. In particular the DT system suffered from a significant water leak, originated in the top part of YE+1, that generated HV trips in eighteen chambers going transversely down from the top sector in YB+2 to the bottom sector in YB-2. All chambers recovered and all t...

  14. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2011-01-01

    During data-taking in 2010 the RPC system behaviour was very satisfactory for both the detector and trigger performances. Most of the data analyses are now completed and many results and plots have been approved in order to be published in the muon detector paper. A very detailed analysis of the detector efficiency has been performed using 60 million muon events taken with the dedicated RPC monitor stream. The results have shown that the 96.3% of the system was working properly with an average efficiency of 95.4% at 9.35 kV in the Barrel region and 94.9% at 9.55 kV in the Endcap. Cluster size goes from 1.6 to 2.2 showing a clear and well-known correlation with the strip pitch. Average noise in the Barrel is less than 0.4 Hz/cm2 and about 98% of full system has averaged noise less then 1 Hz/cm2. A linear dependence of the noise versus the luminosity has been preliminary observed and is now under study. Detailed chamber efficiency maps have shown a few percent of chambers with a non-uniform efficiency distribu...

  15. UA1 prototype detector

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Prototype of UA1 central detector inside a plexi tube. The UA1 central detector was crucial to understanding the complex topology of proton-antiproton events. It played a most important role in identifying a handful of Ws and Zs among billions of collisions. The detector was a 6-chamber cylindrical assembly 5.8 m long and 2.3 m in diameter, the largest imaging drift chamber of its day. It recorded the tracks of charged particles curving in a 0.7 Tesla magnetic field, measuring their momentum, the sign of their electric charge and their rate of energy loss (dE/dx). Atoms in the argon-ethane gas mixture filling the chambers were ionised by the passage of charged particles. The electrons which were released drifted along an electric field shaped by field wires and were collected on sense wires. The geometrical arrangement of the 17000 field wires and 6125 sense wires allowed a spectacular 3-D interactive display of reconstructed physics events to be produced.

  16. The STAR PXL detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contin, G.

    2016-12-01

    The PiXeL detector (PXL) of the STAR experiment at RHIC is the first application of the state-of-the-art thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) technology in a collider environment. Designed to extend the STAR measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain, it took data in Au+Au collisions, p+p and p+Au collisions at 0√sNN=20 GeV at RHIC, during the period 2014-2016. The PXL detector is based on 50 μm-thin MAPS sensors with a pitch of 20.7 μm. Each sensor includes an array of nearly 1 million pixels, read out in rolling shutter mode in 185.6 μs. The 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation allows for air cooling and contributes to reduce the global material budget to 0.4% radiation length on the innermost layer. Experience and lessons learned from construction and operations will be presented in this paper. Detector performance and results from 2014 Au+Au data analysis, demonstrating the STAR capabilities of charm reconstruction, will be shown.

  17. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2011-01-01

    RPC detector calibration, HV scan Thanks to the high LHC luminosity and to the corresponding high number of muons created in the first part of the 2011 the RPC community had, for the first time, the possibility to calibrate every single detector element (roll).The RPC steering committee provided the guidelines for both data-taking and data analysis and a dedicated task force worked from March to April on this specific issue. The main goal of the RPC calibration was to study the detector efficiency as a function of high-voltage working points, fit the obtained “plateau curve” with a sigmoid function and determine the “best” high-voltage working point of every single roll. On 18th and 19th March, we had eight runs at different voltages. On 27th March, the full analysis was completed, showing that 60% of the rolls had already a very good fit with an average efficiency greater than 93% in the plateau region. To improve the fit we decided to take three more runs (15th April...

  18. Commissioning the SNO+ detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descamps, Freija; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The SNO+ experiment is the successor to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), in which SNO's heavy water is replaced by approximately 780T of liquid scintillator (LAB). The combination of the 2km underground location, the use of ultra-clean materials and the high light-yield of the liquid scintillator means that a low background level and a low energy threshold can be achieved. This creates a new multipurpose neutrino detector with the potential to address a diverse set of physics goals, including the detection of reactor, solar, geo- and supernova neutrinos. A main physics goal of SNO+ is the search for neutrinoless double beta decay. By loading the liquid scintillator with 0.5% of natural Tellurium, resulting in about 1300kg of 130Te (isotopic abundance is slightly over 34%), a competitive sensitivity to the effective neutrino mass can be reached. This talk will present the status of the SNO+ detector, specifically the results and status of the detector commissioning with water.

  19. Comparison of flash lidar detector options

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManamon, Paul F.; Banks, Paul; Beck, Jeffrey; Fried, Dale G.; Huntington, Andrew S.; Watson, Edward A.

    2017-03-01

    Three lidar receiver technologies using the total laser energy required to perform a set of imaging tasks are compared. The tasks are combinations of two collection types (3-D mapping from near and far), two scene types (foliated and unobscured), and three types of data products (geometry only, geometry plus 3-bit intensity, and geometry plus 6-bit intensity). The receiver technologies are based on Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes (GMAPD), linear mode avalanche photodiodes (LMAPD), and optical time-of-flight lidar, which combine rapid polarization rotation of the image and dual low-bandwidth cameras to generate a 3-D image. We choose scenarios to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of various lidars. We consider HgCdTe and InGaAs variations of LMAPD cameras. The InGaAs GMAPD and the HgCdTe LMAPD cameras required the least energy to 3-D map both scenarios for bare earth, with the GMAPD taking slightly less energy. We comment on the strengths and weaknesses of each receiver technology. Six bits of intensity gray levels requires substantial energy using all camera modalities.

  20. The STAR Vertex Position Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Llope, W J; Nussbaum, T; Hoffmann, G W; Asselta, K; Brandenburg, J D; Butterworth, J; Camarda, T; Christie, W; Crawford, H J; Dong, X; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Geurts, F; Hammond, J; Judd, E; McDonald, D L; Perkins, C; Ruan, L; Scheblein, J; Schambach, J J; Soja, R; Xin, K; Yang, C

    2014-01-01

    The 2x3 channel pseudo Vertex Position Detector (pVPD) in the STAR experiment at RHIC has been upgraded to a 2x19 channel detector in the same acceptance, called the Vertex Position Detector (VPD). This detector is fully integrated into the STAR trigger system and provides the primary input to the minimum-bias trigger in Au+Au collisions. The information from the detector is used both in the STAR Level-0 trigger and offline to measure the location of the primary collision vertex along the beam pipe and the event "start time" needed by other fast-timing detectors in STAR. The offline timing resolution of single detector channels in full-energy Au+Au collisions is ~100 ps, resulting in a start time resolution of a few tens of picoseconds and a resolution on the primary vertex location of ~1 cm.

  1. The DELPHI Detector (DEtector with Lepton Photon and Hadron Identification)

    CERN Multimedia

    Crawley, B; Munich, K; Mckay, R; Matorras, F; Joram, C; Malychev, V; Behrmann, A; Van dam, P; Drees, J K; Stocchi, A; Adam, W; Booth, P; Bilenki, M; Rosenberg, E I; Morton, G; Rames, J; Hahn, S; Cosme, G; Ventura, L; Marco, J; Tortosa martinez, P; Monge silvestri, R; Moreno, S; Phillips, H; Alekseev, G; Boudinov, E; Martinez rivero, C; Gitarskiy, L; Davenport, M; De clercq, C; Firestone, A; Myagkov, A; Belous, K; Haider, S; Hamilton, K M; Lamsa, J; Rahmani, M H; Malek, A; Hughes, G J; Peralta, L; Carroll, L; Fuster verdu, J A; Cossutti, F; Gorn, L; Yi, J I; Bertrand, D; Myatt, G; Richard, F; Shapkin, M; Hahn, F; Ferrer soria, A; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P; Sekulin, R; Timmermans, J; Baillon, P

    2002-01-01

    % DELPHI The DELPHI Detector (Detector with Lepton Photon and Hadron Identification) \\\\ \\\\DELPHI is a general purpose detector for physics at LEP on and above the Z$^0$, offering three-dimensional information on curvature and energy deposition with fine spatial granularity as well as identification of leptons and hadrons over most of the solid angle. A superconducting coil provides a 1.2~T solenoidal field of high uniformity. Tracking relies on the silicon vertex detector, the inner detector, the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), the outer detector and forward drift chambers. Electromagnetic showers are measured in the barrel with high granularity by the High Density Projection Chamber (HPC) and in the endcaps by $ 1 ^0 $~x~$ 1 ^0 $ projective towers composed of lead glass as active material and phototriode read-out. Hadron identification is provided mainly by liquid and gas Ring Imaging Counters (RICH). The instrumented magnet yoke serves for hadron calorimetry and as filter for muons, which are identified in t...

  2. Scintillating fiber detector

    CERN Document Server

    Vozak, Matous

    2016-01-01

    NA61 is one of the physics experiments at CERN dedicated to study hadron states coming from interactions of SPS beams with various targets. To determine the position of a secondary beam, three proportional chambers are placed along the beamline. However, these chambers tend to have slow response. In order to obtain more precise time information, use of another detector is being considered. Fast response and compact size is making scintillation fiber (SciFi) with silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) read out a good candidate. This report is focused on analysing data from SciFi collected in a test beam at the beginning of July 2016.

  3. The ATLAS Detector Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, P.J. [University of Edinburgh, School of Physics and Astronomy, James Clerk Maxwell Building, The Kings Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    We present the simulation software for the ATLAS experiment [G. Aad et al., The ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, JINST 3 (2008), S08003] at the Large Hadron Collider [L. Evans and P. Bryant, LHC Machine, JINST 3 (2008), S08001]. The overall infrastructure and some selected features are discussed. In particular, the detector description, the interface to Geant4, event generator support, magnetic field integration improvements, pile-up and digitisation of overlapping events and fast simulation. Also described are performance studies, large scale production and the validation of the simulated output against recent data.

  4. The WELL Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bellazzini, R; Brez, A; Gariano, G; Latronico, L; Lumb, N; Papanestis, A; Spandre, G; Massai, M M; Raffo, R; Spezziga, M A

    1999-01-01

    We introduce the WELL detector, a new type of position-sensitive gas proportional counter produced using advanced printed circuit board (PCB) technology. The WELL is based on a thin kapton foil, copp erclad on both sides. Charge amplifying micro-wells are etched into the first metal and kapton layers. These end on a micro-strip pattern which is defined on the second metal plane. The array of micr o-strips is used for read-out to obtain 1-D positional information. First results from our systematic assessment of this device are reported.

  5. Flexible composite radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Bennett, Bryan L.; Muenchausen, Ross E.; Wrobleski, Debra A.; Orler, Edward B.

    2006-12-05

    A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum response of photomultipliers (about 400 nanometers) or photodiodes (about 600 nanometers), which maximizes the overall detector efficiency.

  6. Microstructured silicon radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat; Derzon, Mark S.; Draper, Bruce L.

    2017-03-14

    A radiation detector comprises a silicon body in which are defined vertical pores filled with a converter material and situated within silicon depletion regions. One or more charge-collection electrodes are arranged to collect current generated when secondary particles enter the silicon body through walls of the pores. The pores are disposed in low-density clusters, have a majority pore thickness of 5 .mu.m or less, and have a majority aspect ratio, defined as the ratio of pore depth to pore thickness, of at least 10.

  7. PHENIX inner detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, M.; Bennett, M.J.; Bobrek, M.; Boissevain, J.B.; Boose, S.; Bosze, E.; Britton, C.; Chang, J.; Chi, C.Y.; Chiu, M.; Conway, R.; Cunningham, R.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Emery, M.S.; Enokizono, A.; Ericson, N.; Fox, B.; Fung, S.-Y.; Giannotti, P.; Hachiya, T.; Hansen, A.G.; Homma, K.; Jacak, B.V.; Jaffe, D.; Kang, J.H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Kim, S.Y.; Kim, Y.G.; Kohama, T.; Kroon, P.J.; Lenz, W.; Longbotham, N.; Musrock, M.; Nakamura, T.; Ohnishi, H.; Ryu, S.S.; Sakaguchi, A.; Seto, R.; Shiina, T.; Simpson, M.; Simon-Gillo, J.; Sondheim, W.E.; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J.P. E-mail: sullivan@lanl.gov; Hecke, H.W. van; Walker, J.W.; White, S.N.; Willis, P.; Xu, N

    2003-03-01

    The timing, location and particle multiplicity of a PHENIX collision are determined by the Beam-Beam Counters (BBC), the Multiplicity/Vertex Detector (MVD) and the Zero-Degree Calorimeters (ZDC). The BBCs provide both the time of interaction and position of a collision from the flight time of prompt particles. The MVD provides a measure of event particle multiplicity, collision vertex position and fluctuations in charged particle distributions. The ZDCs provide information on the most grazing collisions. A Normalization Trigger Counter (NTC) is used to obtain absolute cross-section measurements for p-p collisions. The BBC, MVD and NTC are described below.

  8. HgCdTe探测器应力的多重晶X射线衍射分析%Multiple crystal X - ray diffraction analysis of stress in HgCdTe photovoltaic detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙涛; 王庆学; 陈文桥; 梁晋穗; 陈兴国; 胡晓宁; 李言谨; 何力

    2004-01-01

    HgCdTe光伏探测器的钝化介质膜应力常常限制其低温性能,利用高分辨率多重晶X射线衍射仪中的三重晶衍射技术和倒易空间作图对钝化介质膜应力进行了表征,发现在较高溅射能量下沉积的钝化膜,由于应力的作用,HgCdTe晶片出现弯曲,并有大量镶嵌结构,而在较低的溅射能量下和热蒸发下沉积的钝化膜,晶面未出现明显弯曲,可获得较低应力的钝化介质层.

  9. Infrared detectors for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, Wolfgang; Gassmann, Kai Uwe; Haas, Luis-Dieter; Haiml, Markus; Hanna, Stefan; Hübner, Dominique; Höhnemann, Holger; Nothaft, Hans-Peter; Thöt, Richard

    2013-12-01

    The motivation and intended benefits for the use of infrared (IR) detectors for space applications are highlighted. The actual status of state-of-the-art IR detectors for space applications is presented based on some of AIM's currently ongoing focal plane detector module developments covering the spectral range from the short-wavelength IR (SWIR) to the long-wavelength IR (LWIR) and very long-wavelength IR (VLWIR), where both imaging and spectroscopy applications will be addressed. In particular, the integrated detector cooler assemblies for a mid-wavelength IR (MWIR) push-broom imaging satellite mission, for the German hyperspectral satellite mission EnMAP and the IR detectors for the Sentinel 3 SLSTR will be elaborated. Additionally, dedicated detector modules for LWIR/VLWIR sounding, providing the possibility to have two different PVs driven by one ROIC, will be addressed.

  10. Scalar top study: Detector optimization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Milsténe; A Sopczak

    2007-11-01

    A vertex detector concept of the linear collider flavour identification (LCFI) collaboration, which studies pixel detectors for heavy quark flavour identification, has been implemented in simulations for -quark tagging in scalar top studies. The production and decay of scalar top quarks (stops) is particularly interesting for the development of the vertex detector as only two -quarks and missing energy (from undetected neutralinos) are produced for light stops. Previous studies investigated the vertex detector design in scenarios with large mass differences between stop and neutralino, corresponding to large visible energy in the detector. In this study we investigate the tagging performance dependence on the vertex detector design in a scenario with small visible energy for the international linear collider (ILC).

  11. Digital detectors for electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Faruqi, A R

    2002-01-01

    Film has traditionally been used for recording images in transmission electron microscopes but there is an essential need for computer-interfaced electronic detectors. Cooled-CCD detectors, developed over the past few years, though not ideal, are increasingly used as the preferred detection system in a number of applications. We describe briefly the design of CCD-based detectors, along with their main properties, which have been used in electron crystallography. A newer detector design with a much bigger sensitive area, incorporating a 2x2 tiled array of CCDs with tapered fibre optics will overcome some of the limitations of existing CCD detectors. We also describe some preliminary results for 8 keV imaging, from (direct detection) silicon hybrid pixel detectors, which offer advantages over CCDs in terms of better spatial resolution, faster readout with minimal noise.

  12. Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ullaland, O

    2011-01-01

    Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors in 'Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Section '3.3 Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.3 Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors 3.3.1 Introduction 3.3.2 Time of Flight Measurements 3.3.2.1 Scintillator hodoscopes 3.3.2.2 Parallel plate ToF detectors 3.3.3 Cherenkov Radiation 3.3.3.1 ...

  13. The FastGas detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, J.E.; Dalgliesh, R.M. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Duxbury, D.M., E-mail: dom.duxbury@stfc.ac.u [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Holt, S.A.; McPhail, D.J. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Marsh, A.S. [Diamond Light Source LTD, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Diamond House, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M.; Spill, E.J.; Stephenson, R. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-21

    The development and testing of the FastGas neutron detector is described. Based on a Gas Microstrip Chamber the aim of the project was to produce a high counting rate detector capable of replacing the existing {sup 3}He tubes for specular reflectometry, currently in use on the ISIS reflectometer instruments. The detector system is described together with results of neutron beam tests carried out at the ISIS spallation neutron source.

  14. The 4th concept detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    John Hauptman

    2007-12-01

    The 4th concept detector consists of four detector subsystems, a small-pixel vertex detector, a high-resolution TPC, a new multiple-readout fiber calorimeter and a new dual-solenoid iron-free muon system. We discuss the design of a comprehensive facility that measures and identifies all partons of the standard model, including hadronic → and → decays, with high precision and high e±ciency. We emphasis here the calorimeter and muon systems.

  15. First detectors at the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    Some of the first detectors at the ISR. A CERN/Rome team was looking at proton scattering at very small angles to the beam direction. A detector known as a "Roman pot" is in the foreground on the left. An Aachen/CERN/Genoa/Harvard/Turin team was looking at wider angles with the detectors seen branching off from the rings on the right.

  16. Decoherence of the Unruh detector

    CERN Document Server

    Demers, G

    1995-01-01

    As it is well known, the Minkowski vacuum appears thermally populated to a quantum mechanical detector on a uniformly accelerating course. We investigate how this thermal radiation may contribute to the classical nature of the detector's trajectory through the criteria of decoherence. An uncertainty-type relation is obtained for the detector involving the fluctuation in temperature, the time of flight and the coupling to the bath.

  17. The CMS detector before closure

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2006-01-01

    The CMS detector before testing using muon cosmic rays that are produced as high-energy particles from space crash into the Earth's atmosphere generating a cascade of energetic particles. After closing CMS, the magnets, calorimeters, trackers and muon chambers were tested on a small section of the detector as part of the magnet test and cosmic challenge. This test checked the alignment and functionality of the detector systems, as well as the magnets.

  18. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    Richard Breedon

    Following the opening of the CMS detector, commissioning of the cathode strip chamber (CSC) system resumed in earnest. Some on-chamber electronics problems could be fixed on the positive endcap when each station became briefly accessible as the steel yokes were peeled off. There was no opportunity to work on the negative endcap chambers during opening; this had to wait instead until the yokes were again separated and the stations accessible during closing. In March, regular detector-operating shifts were resumed every weekday evening during which Local Runs were taken using cosmic rays to monitor and validate repairs and improvements that had taken place during the day. Since April, the CSC system has been collecting cosmic data under shift supervision 24 hours a day on weekdays, and 24/7 operation began in early June. The CSC system arranged shifts for continuous running in the entire first half of 2009. One reward of this effort is that every chamber of the CSC system is alive and recording events. There...

  19. ATLAS Detector Upgrade Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, M.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    After the successful operation at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, the LHC was ramped up and successfully took data at the centre-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015 and 2016. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, which will deliver of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity levelling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb ‑1 expected for LHC running by the end of 2018 to 3000 fb ‑1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of extensions to larger pseudorapidity, particularly in tracking and muon systems. This report summarizes various improvements to the ATLAS detector required to cope with the anticipated evolution of the LHC luminosity during this decade and the next. A brief overview is also given on physics prospects with a pp centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV.

  20. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Hauser

    2011-01-01

    The earliest collision data in 2011 already show that the CSC detector performance is very similar to that seen in 2010. That is discussed in the DPG write-up elsewhere in this Bulletin. This report focuses on a few operational developments, the ME1/1 electronics replacement project, and the preparations at CERN for building the fourth station of CSC chambers ME4/2. During the 2010 LHC run, the CSC detector ran smoothly for the most part and yielded muon triggers and data of excellent quality. Moreover, no major operational problems were found that needed to be fixed during the Extended Technical Stop. Several improvements to software and configuration were however made. One such improvement is the automation of recovery from chamber high-voltage trips. The algorithm, defined by chamber experts, uses the so-called "Expert System" to analyse the trip signals sent from DCS and, based on the frequency and the timing of the signals, respond appropriately. This will make the central DCS shifters...

  1. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Iaselli

    During the last 3 months the RPC group has made impressive improvements in the refinement of the operation tools and understanding of the detector. The full barrel and part of the plus end cap participated systematically to global runs producing millions of trigger on cosmics. The main monitoring tools were robust and efficient in controlling the detector and in diagnosis of problems. After the refinement of the synchronization procedure, detailed studies of the chamber performances, as a function of high voltage and front-end threshold, were pursued. In parallel, new tools for the prompt analysis were developed which have enabled a fast check of the data at the CMS Centre. This effort has been very valuable since it has helped in discovering many minor bugs in the reconstruction software and database which are now being fixed. Unfortunately, a large part of the RE2 station has developed increasing operational current. Some preliminary investigation leads to the conclusion that the serial gas circulation e...

  2. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    Marco Dallavalle

    2013-01-01

    The DT group is undertaking substantial work both for detector maintenance and for detec-tor upgrade. Maintenance interventions on chambers and minicrates require close collaboration between DT, RPC and HO, and are difficult because they depend on the removal of thermal shields and cables on the front and rear of the chambers in order to gain access. The tasks are particularly critical on the central wheel due to the presence of fixed services. Several interventions on the chambers require extraction of the DT+RPC package: a delicate operation due to the very limited space for handling the big chambers, and the most dangerous part of the DT maintenance campaign. The interventions started in July 2013 and will go on until spring 2014. So far out of the 16 chambers with HV problems, 13 have been already repaired, with a global yield of 217 recovered channels. Most of the observed problems were due to displacement of impurities inside the gaseous volume. For the minicrates and FE, repairs occurred on 22 chambe...

  3. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Iaselli.

    Substantial progress has been made on the RPC system resulting in a high standard of operation. Impressive improvements have been made in the online software and DCS PVSS protocols that ensure robustness of the configuration phase and reliability of the detector monitoring tasks. In parallel, an important upgrade of CCU ring connectivity was pursued to avoid noise pick-up and consequent  data transmission errors during operation with magnetic field. While the barrel part is already well synchronized thanks to the long cosmics runs, some refinements are still required on the forward part. The "beam splashes" have been useful to cross check  the existing delay constants, but further efforts will be made as soon as a substantial sample of beam-halo events is available. Progress has been made on early detector performance studies. The RPC DQM tool is being extensively used and minor bugs have been found. More plots have been added and more people have been tr...

  4. PAU camera: detectors characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Ricard; Ballester, Otger; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castilla, Javier; Jiménez, Jorge; Maiorino, Marino; Pío, Cristóbal; Sevilla, Ignacio; de Vicente, Juan

    2012-07-01

    The PAU Camera (PAUCam) [1,2] is a wide field camera that will be mounted at the corrected prime focus of the William Herschel Telescope (Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, Canary Islands, Spain) in the next months. The focal plane of PAUCam is composed by a mosaic of 18 CCD detectors of 2,048 x 4,176 pixels each one with a pixel size of 15 microns, manufactured by Hamamatsu Photonics K. K. This mosaic covers a field of view (FoV) of 60 arcmin (minutes of arc), 40 of them are unvignetted. The behaviour of these 18 devices, plus four spares, and their electronic response should be characterized and optimized for the use in PAUCam. This job is being carried out in the laboratories of the ICE/IFAE and the CIEMAT. The electronic optimization of the CCD detectors is being carried out by means of an OG (Output Gate) scan and maximizing it CTE (Charge Transfer Efficiency) while the read-out noise is minimized. The device characterization itself is obtained with different tests. The photon transfer curve (PTC) that allows to obtain the electronic gain, the linearity vs. light stimulus, the full-well capacity and the cosmetic defects. The read-out noise, the dark current, the stability vs. temperature and the light remanence.

  5. Advanced Radiation Detector Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The University of Michigan

    1998-07-01

    Since our last progress report, the project at The University of Michigan has continued to concentrate on the development of gamma ray spectrometers fabricated from cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). This material is capable of providing energy resolution that is superior to that of scintillation detectors, while avoiding the necessity for cooling associated with germanium systems. In our past reports, we have described one approach (the coplanar grid electrode) that we have used to partially overcome some of the major limitations on charge collection that is found in samples of CZT. This approach largely eliminates the effect of hole motion in the formation of the output signal, and therefore leads to pulses that depend only on the motion of a single carrier (electrons). Since electrons move much more readily through CZT than do holes, much better energy resolution can be achieved under these conditions. In our past reports, we have described a 1 cm cube CZT spectrometer fitted with coplanar grids that achieved an energy resolution of 1.8% from the entire volume of the crystal. This still represents, to our knowledge, the best energy resolution ever demonstrated in a CZT detector of this size.

  6. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Fernandez Bedoya and M. Dallavalle

    2010-01-01

    The DT system operation since the 2010 LHC start up is remarkably smooth.
 All parts of the system have behaved very satisfactorily in the last two months of operation with LHC pp collisions. Disconnected HV channels remain at the level of 0.1%, and the loss in detector acceptance because of failures in the readout and Trigger electronics is about 0.4%. The DT DCS-LHC handshake mechanism, which was strengthened after the short 2009 LHC run, operates without major problems. A problem arose with the opto-receivers of the trigger links connecting the detector to USC; the receivers would unlock from transmission for specific frequencies of the LHC lock, in particular during the LHC ramp. For relocking the TX and RX a “re-synch” command had to be issued. The source of the problem has been isolated and cured in the Opto-RX boards and now the system is stable. The Theta trigger chain also has been commissioned and put in operation. Several interventions on the system have been made, pro...

  7. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2011-01-01

    The RPC muon detector and trigger are working very well, contributing positively to the high quality of CMS data. Most of 2011 has been used to improve the stability of our system and the monitoring tools used online and offline by the shifters and experts. The high-voltage working point is corrected, chamber-by-chamber, for pressure variation since July 2011. Corrections are applied at PVSS level during the stand-by mode (no collision) and are not changed until the next fill. The single detector calibration, HV scan, of February and the P-correction described before were very important steps towards fine-tuning the stability of the RPC performances. A very detailed analysis of the RPC performances is now ongoing and from preliminary results we observe an important improvements of the cluster size stability in time. The maximum oscillation of the cluster size run by run is now about 1%. At the same time we are not observing the same stability in the detection efficiency that shows an oscillation of about ...

  8. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Document Server

    Marco Dallavalle

    2012-01-01

      Although the year 2012 is the third year without access to the chambers and the Front-End electronics, the fraction of good channels is still very high at 99.1% thanks also to the constant care provided by the on-site operation team. The downtime caused to CMS as a consequence of DT failures is to-date <2%. The intervention on the LV power supplies, which required a large number of CAEN modules (137 A3050, 13 A3100, and 3 MAO) to be removed from the detector, reworked and tested during this Year-End Technical Stop, can now, after a few months of stable operation of the LV, be declared to have solved once-and-for-all the persistent problem with the overheating LV Anderson connectors. Another piece of very good news is that measurements of the noise from single-hit rate outside the drift-time box as a function of the LHC luminosity show that the noise rate and distribution are consistent with expectations of the simulations in the Muon TDR, which have guided the detector design and constru...

  9. The TALE Fluorescence Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jui, Charles

    2009-05-01

    The TALE fluorescence detectors are designed to extend the threshold for fluorescence observation by TA down to 3x10^16 eV. It will comprise two main components. The first is a set of 24 telescopes working in stereo, with an existing TA FD station at ˜6 km separation. These will cover between 3-31 degrees in elevation and have azimuthal coverage maximizing the stereo aperture in the 10^18-10^19 eV energy range. The second component consists of 15 telescopes equipped with 4m diameter mirrors and covering the sky between 31 and 73 degrees in elevation. The larger mirror size pushes the physics threshold down to 3x10^16 eV, and provides view of the shower maximum for the lower energy events. The Tower detector will cover one quadrant in azimuth and operate in hybrid mode with the TALE infill array to provide redundant composition measurements from both shower maximum information and muon-to-electron ratio.

  10. VNR CMS Pixel detector replacement

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Joel Butler, spokesperson of the CMS collaboration explains how a team from many different partner institutes installed a new detector in CMS. This detector is the silicon pixel detector and they’ve been working on it for about five years, to replace one of our existing detectors. This detectors measures particles closer to the beam than any of the other components of this huge detector behind me. It gives us the most precise picture of tracks as they come out of the collisions and expand and travel through the detector. This particular device has twice as many pixels, 120 million, as opposed to about 68 million in the old detector and it can take data faster and pump it out to the analysis more quickly. 00’53’’ Images of the descent, insertion and installation of first piece of the Pixel detector on Tue Feb 28. Images of the descent, insertion and installation of second piece of the Pixel and the two cylinders being joined.

  11. Tomography of Spatial Mode Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bobrov, Ivan; Markov, Anton; Straupe, Stanislav; Kulik, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Transformation and detection of photons in higher-order spatial modes usually requires complicated holographic techniques. Detectors based on spatial holograms suffer from non-idealities and should be carefully calibrated. We report a novel method for analyzing the quality of projective measurements in spatial mode basis inspired by quantum detector tomography. It allows us to calibrate the detector response using only gaussian beams. We experimentally investigate the inherent inaccuracy of the existing methods of mode transformation and provide a full statistical reconstruction of the POVM (positive operator valued measure) elements for holographic spatial mode detectors.

  12. Position-sensitive superconductor detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakado, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-12-01

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors and superconducting transition- edge sensors (TESs) are representative superconductor detectors having energy resolutions much higher than those of semiconductor detectors. STJ detectors are thin, thereby making it suitable for detecting low-energy X rays. The signals of STJ detectors are more than 100 times faster than those of TESs. By contrast, TESs are microcalorimeters that measure the radiation energy from the change in the temperature. Therefore, signals are slow and their time constants are typically several hundreds of μs. However, TESs possess excellent energy resolutions. For example, TESs have a resolution of 1.6 eV for 5.9-keV X rays. An array of STJs or TESs can be used as a pixel detector. Superconducting series-junction detectors (SSJDs) comprise multiple STJs and a single-crystal substrate that acts as a radiation absorber. SSJDs are also position sensitive, and their energy resolutions are higher than those of semiconductor detectors. In this paper, we give an overview of position-sensitive superconductor detectors.

  13. PET detector modules based on novel detector technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    1994-05-01

    A successful PET detector module must identify 511 keV photons with: high efficiency (>85%), high spatial resolution (<5 mm fwhm), low cost (<$600 / in{sup 2}), low dead time (<4 {mu}s in{sup 2}), good timing resolution (<5 ns fwhm for conventional PET, <200 ps fwhm for time of flight), and good energy resolution (<100 keV fwhm), where these requirements are listed in decreasing order of importance. The ``high efficiency`` requirement also implies that the detector modules must pack together without inactive gaps. Several novel and emerging radiation detector technologies could improve the performance of PET detectors. Avalanche photodiodes, PIN photodiodes, metal channel dynode photomultiplier tubes, and new scintillators all have the potential to improve PET detectors significantly.

  14. Alterations of MCT 1、2、4 expression in adrenal gland of rat with acute heart failure%单羧酸转运蛋白1、2、4在急性心衰大鼠模型肾上腺的表达变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何书娟; 孙善全; 马容; 王静文; 蒋徐丽; 宋开琴

    2015-01-01

    目的 观察单羧酸转运蛋白(monocarboxylate transporter,MCT)1、2、4在急性心衰大鼠肾上腺的表达变化,以探讨急性心衰肾上腺的能量代谢变化.方法 随机将成年健康SD大鼠(雌雄不限,250±20g)50只,分为3组:正常组(n=10)、假手术组(n=20,2 subgroups,10 in each)和模型组(n=20,2subgroups,10 in each).用1.5%戊巴比妥钠静脉注射制作大鼠急性心衰模型;注毕,运用BL-420F生物机能实验系统记录左室内压峰值(LVSP)和左室内压最大上升速率(+dp/dtmax)的变化曲线;用IHC和Western Blot检测模型鼠,肾上腺MCT1,2,4的表达变化.结果 在急性心衰发生10 min时,肾上腺皮质和髓质MCT1、2、4的表达均有升高,此时假手术组MCT1、2、4也有升高.与正常对照组相比较,两组的MCT1、2、4的表达升高均具有统计学意义(P<0.05);在20 min时,大鼠肾上腺MCT1、2、4的表达较正常组却有所下降,与正常组相比较,仅MCT1的表达下调具有统计学意义(P<0.05),而MCT2、4则无明显差别(P>0.05).假手术20 min组与10 min组相比较,MCT1、2、4的表达无明显差别(P<0.05).结论 在急性心衰和创伤性应激状态下,肾上腺MCT1、2、4的表达,在十分钟内呈代偿性增加,但随着心衰时间的延长,其表达反而降低,机体的能量代谢出现失代偿,提示MCT1、2、4参与创伤性应激及急性心衰的能量代谢过程.

  15. Neutron detector and fabrication method thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandari, Harish B.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Ovechkina, Olena E.

    2016-08-16

    A neutron detector and a method for fabricating a neutron detector. The neutron detector includes a photodetector, and a solid-state scintillator operatively coupled to the photodetector. In one aspect, the method for fabricating a neutron detector includes providing a photodetector, and depositing a solid-state scintillator on the photodetector to form a detector structure.

  16. The Global Muon Detector Network -GMDN and the space situational awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Munakata, Kazuoki; Dal Lago, Alisson; Marcos Denardini, Clezio; Echer, Ezequiel; Demítrio Gonzalez Alarcon, Walter; da Silva, Marlos; Rigozo, Nivaor R.; Petry, Adriano; Kirsch Pinheiro, Damaris; Braga, Carlos Roberto; Vinicius Dias Silveira, Marcos; Ronan Coelho Stekel, Tardelli; Espindola Antunes, Cassio; Ramos Vieira, Lucas; Kemmerich, Níkolas; Kato, Chihiro; Fushishita, Akira; Fujii, Zenjirou; Bieber, John W.; Evenson, Paul; Kuwabara, Takao; Duldig, Marcus L.; Humble, John E.; Chilingarian, Ashot; Sabbah, Ismail; Jansen, Frank

    Space weather forecasting is a very important tool for the space situational awareness to the space objects, the space environment and related threats and risks for manned and non-manned spacecrafts. The global network of ground based multi-directional detectors (GMDN) can be considered as one example of an important emerging Space Situational Awareness program around the world, since its requirements needs global technical, scientific and logistic collab-oration between several countries in different continents. ICMEs accompanied by a strong shock often forms a high-energy galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) depleted region behind the shock known as a Forbush decrease. The ICME arrival also causes a systematic variation in the GCR streaming (i.e. the directional anisotropy of intensity). The magnitude of the streaming is small (about 1 % or less), but its variation is relevant. Some particles from this suppressed density region traveling with about the speed of light leak into the upstream region, much faster than the approaching shock, creating the possibility of being observed at the earth, by a global net-work of ground based multi-directional detectors (GMDN), as precursory loss-cone anisotropy. Loss-cones are typically visible 4-8 hours ahead of shock arrival for shocks associated with ma-jor geomagnetic storms. A multi-directional muon detector for detection of GCR was installed in 2001, through an international cooperation between Brazil, Japan and USA, and has been in operation since then at the Southern Space Observatory -SSO/CRS/INPE -MCT, (29.4° S, 53.8° W, 480m a.s.l), Sao Martinho da Serra, RS, in southern Brazil. The detector's capability and sensitivity were upgraded in 2005. The observations conducted by this detector are used for forecasting the arrival of the geomagnetic storm and their interplanetary coronal mass ejec-tion (ICME) drivers in the near-earth geospace. The detector measures high-energy GCRs by detecting secondary muons produced from the

  17. Particle detector spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution is disclosed. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector. 12 figs.

  18. Radiation detector with spodumene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Amorim, Raquel Aline P.O.; Lima, Hestia Raissa B.R.; Souza, Susana O. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Sasaki, Jose M., E-mail: sasaki@fisica.ufc.b [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this work, {beta}-spodumene potentiality as a radiation detector was evaluated by making use of thermoluminescence (TL) and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) techniques. The pellets were obtained from the {beta}-spodumene powder mixed with Teflon followed by a sintering process of thermal treatments of 300 deg/30 min and 400 deg/1.5 h. The samples were irradiated in standard gamma radiation beams with doses between 5 Gy and 10 kGy. The TL emission curve showed a prominent peak at 160 deg and in the case of TSEE a prominent peak at 145 Celsius approximately. Initial results show that the material is promising for high-dose dosimetry. (author)

  19. Direction sensitive neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlen, Steven; Fisher, Peter; Dujmic, Denis; Wellenstein, Hermann F.; Inglis, Andrew

    2017-01-31

    A neutron detector includes a pressure vessel, an electrically conductive field cage assembly within the pressure vessel and an imaging subsystem. A pressurized gas mixture of CF.sub.4, .sup.3He and .sup.4He at respective partial pressures is used. The field cage establishes a relatively large drift region of low field strength, in which ionization electrons generated by neutron-He interactions are directed toward a substantially smaller amplification region of substantially higher field strength in which the ionization electrons undergo avalanche multiplication resulting in scintillation of the CF.sub.4 along scintillation tracks. The imaging system generates two-dimensional images of the scintillation patterns and employs track-finding to identify tracks and deduce the rate and direction of incident neutrons. One or more photo-multiplier tubes record the time-profile of the scintillation tracks permitting the determination of the third coordinate.

  20. Pixelated gamma detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolinsky, Sergei Ivanovich; Yanoff, Brian David; Guida, Renato; Ivan, Adrian

    2016-12-27

    A pixelated gamma detector includes a scintillator column assembly having scintillator crystals and optical transparent elements alternating along a longitudinal axis, a collimator assembly having longitudinal walls separated by collimator septum, the collimator septum spaced apart to form collimator channels, the scintillator column assembly positioned adjacent to the collimator assembly so that the respective ones of the scintillator crystal are positioned adjacent to respective ones of the collimator channels, the respective ones of the optical transparent element are positioned adjacent to respective ones of the collimator septum, and a first photosensor and a second photosensor, the first and the second photosensor each connected to an opposing end of the scintillator column assembly. A system and a method for inspecting and/or detecting defects in an interior of an object are also disclosed.

  1. Subnanosecond Scintillation Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenk, Michael (Inventor); Hennessy, John (Inventor); Hitlin, David (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A scintillation detector, including a scintillator that emits scintillation; a semiconductor photodetector having a surface area for receiving the scintillation, wherein the surface area has a passivation layer configured to provide a peak quantum efficiency greater than 40% for a first component of the scintillation, and the semiconductor photodetector has built in gain through avalanche multiplication; a coating on the surface area, wherein the coating acts as a bandpass filter that transmits light within a range of wavelengths corresponding to the first component of the scintillation and suppresses transmission of light with wavelengths outside said range of wavelengths; and wherein the surface area, the passivation layer, and the coating are controlled to increase the temporal resolution of the semiconductor photodetector.

  2. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Gomez

    2011-01-01

    A new set of muon alignment constants was approved in August. The relative position between muon chambers is essentially unchanged, indicating good detector stability. The main changes concern the global positioning of the barrel and of the endcap rings to match the new Tracker geometry. Detailed studies of the differences between track-based and optical alignment of DTs have proven to be a valuable tool for constraining Tracker alignment weak modes, and this information is now being used as part of the alignment procedure. In addition to the “split-cosmic” analysis used to investigate the muon momentum resolution at high momentum, a new procedure based on reconstructing the invariant mass of di-muons from boosted Zs is under development. Both procedures show an improvement in the momentum precision of Global Muons with respect to Tracker-only Muons. Recent developments in track-based alignment include a better treatment of the tails of residual distributions and accounting for correla...

  3. Chemical aerosol Raman detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, R. L.; Farrar, L. W.; Di Cecca, S.; Amin, M.; Perkins, B. G.; Clark, M. L.; Jeys, T. H.; Sickenberger, D. W.; D'Amico, F. M.; Emmons, E. D.; Christesen, S. D.; Kreis, R. J.; Kilper, G. K.

    2017-03-01

    A sensitive chemical aerosol Raman detector (CARD) has been developed for the trace detection and identification of chemical particles in the ambient atmosphere. CARD includes an improved aerosol concentrator with a concentration factor of about 40 and a CCD camera for improved detection sensitivity. Aerosolized isovanillin, which is relatively safe, has been used to characterize the performance of the CARD. The limit of detection (SNR = 10) for isovanillin in 15 s has been determined to be 1.6 pg/cm3, which corresponds to 6.3 × 109 molecules/cm3 or 0.26 ppb. While less sensitive, CARD can also detect gases. This paper provides a more detailed description of the CARD hardware and detection algorithm than has previously been published.

  4. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    Z. Szillasi and G. Gomez.

    2013-01-01

    When CMS is opened up, major components of the Link and Barrel Alignment systems will be removed. This operation, besides allowing for maintenance of the detector underneath, is needed for making interventions that will reinforce the alignment measurements and make the operation of the alignment system more reliable. For that purpose and also for their general maintenance and recalibration, the alignment components will be transferred to the Alignment Lab situated in the ISR area. For the track-based alignment, attention is focused on the determination of systematic uncertainties, which have become dominant, since now there is a large statistics of muon tracks. This will allow for an improved Monte Carlo misalignment scenario and updated alignment position errors, crucial for high-momentum muon analysis such as Z′ searches.

  5. Alpine Pixel Detector Layout

    CERN Document Server

    Delebecque, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Geffroy, N; Massol, N; Rambure, T; Todorov, T

    2013-01-01

    A description of an optimized layout of pixel sensors based on a stave that combines both barrel and endcap module orientations. The mechanical stiffness of the structure is provided by carbon fiber shells spaced by carbon foam. The cooling of the modules is provided by two-phase $CO_{2}$ flowing in a thin titanium pipe glued inside the carbon fiber foam. The electrical services of all modules are provided by a single stave flex. This layout eliminates the need for separate barrel and endcap detector structures, and therefore the barrel services material in front of the endcap. The transition from barrel to endcap module orientation is optimized separately for each layer in order to minimize the active pixel area and the traversed material. The sparse module spacing in the endcap part of the stave allows for multiple fixation points, and for a stiff overall structure composed only of staves interconnected by stiff disks.

  6. The SPICE Detector at ISAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garnsworthy A.B.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A new ancillary detector system for the TIGRESS HPGe array called SPectrometer for Internal Conversion Electrons (SPICE is currently under development. SPICE consists of a segmented electron detector, photon shield and a permanent magnetic lens. SPICE will enable in-beam electron spectroscopy and, in coupling to the TIGRESS HPGe array, coincident gamma-electron spectroscopy with stable and radioactive beams.

  7. Micro-channel plate detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Lee, Seon W.; Wang, Hsien -Hau; Pellin, Michael J.; Byrum, Karen; Frisch, Henry J.

    2015-09-22

    A method and system for providing a micro-channel plate detector. An anodized aluminum oxide membrane is provided and includes a plurality of nanopores which have an Al coating and a thin layer of an emissive oxide material responsive to incident radiation, thereby providing a plurality of radiation sensitive channels for the micro-channel plate detector.

  8. Micromegas detector developments for MIMAC

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrer-Ribas, E; Calvet, D; Colas, P; Druillole, F; Giomataris, Y; Iguaz, F J; Mols, J P; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Billard, J; Bosson, G; Bouly, J L; Bourrion, O; Fourel, Ch; Grignon, C; Guillaudin, O; Mayet, F; Richer, J P; Santos, D; Golabek, C; Lebreton, L

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the MIMAC project is to detect non-baryonic Dark Matter with a directional TPC. The recent Micromegas efforts towards building a large size detector will be described, in particular the characterization measurements of a prototype detector of 10 $\\times$ 10 cm$^2$ with a 2 dimensional readout plane. Track reconstruction with alpha particles will be shown.

  9. ALICE Time Of Flight Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Alici, A

    2013-01-01

    Charged particles in the intermediate momentum range are identified in ALICE by the Time Of Flight (TOF) detector. The time measurement with the TOF, in conjunction with the momentum and track length measured by the tracking detector, is used to calculate the particle mass.

  10. R& D for Future Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, J.

    2004-12-13

    Research and development of detector technology are critical to the future particle physics program. The goals of the International Linear Collider, in particular, require advances that are challenging, despite the progress driven in recent years by the needs of the Large Hadron Collider. The ILC detector goals and challenges are described and the program to address them is summarized.

  11. Fast Timing for Collider Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in fast timing particle detectors have opened up new possibilities to design collider detectors that fully reconstruct and separate event vertices and individual particles in the time domain. The applications of these techniques are considered for the physics at HL-LHC.

  12. Space-based detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesana, A.; Weber, W. J.; Killow, C. J.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Robertson, D. I.; Ward, H.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Bryant, J.; Cruise, A. M.; Dixon, G.; Hoyland, D.; Smith, D.; Bogenstahl, J.; McNamara, P. W.; Gerndt, R.; Flatscher, R.; Hechenblaikner, G.; Hewitson, M.; Gerberding, O.; Barke, S.; Brause, N.; Bykov, I.; Danzmann, K.; Enggaard, A.; Gianolio, A.; Vendt Hansen, T.; Heinzel, G.; Hornstrup, A.; Jennrich, O.; Kullmann, J.; Møller-Pedersen, S.; Rasmussen, T.; Reiche, J.; Sodnik, Z.; Suess, M.; Armano, M.; Sumner, T.; Bender, P. L.; Akutsu, T.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    The parallel session C5 on Space-Based Detectors gave a broad overview over the planned space missions related to gravitational wave detection. Overviews of the revolutionary science to be expected from LISA was given by Alberto Sesana and Sasha Buchman. The launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is planned for 2015. This mission and its payload "LISA Technology Package" will demonstrate key technologies for LISA. In this context, reference masses in free fall for LISA, and gravitational physics in general, was described by William Weber, laser interferometry at the pico-metre level and the optical bench of LPF was presented by Christian Killow and the performance of the LPF optical metrology system by Paul McNamara. While LPF will not yet be sensitive to gravitational waves, it may nevertheless be used to explore fundamental physics questions, which was discussed by Michele Armano. Some parts of the LISA technology that are not going to be demonstrated by LPF, but under intensive development at the moment, were presented by Oliver Jennrich and Oliver Gerberding. Looking into the future, Japan is studying the design of a mid-frequency detector called DECIGO, which was discussed by Tomotada Akutsu. Using atom interferometry for gravitational wave detection has also been recently proposed, and it was critically reviewed by Peter Bender. In the nearer future, the launch of GRACE Follow-On (for Earth gravity observation) is scheduled for 2017, and it will include a Laser Ranging Interferometer as technology demonstrator. This will be the first inter-spacecraft laser interferometer and has many aspects in common with the LISA long arm, as discussed by Andrew Sutton.

  13. ENSTAR detector for -mesic studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Chatterjee; B J Roy; V Jha; P Shukla; H Machnder; GEM Collaboration

    2006-05-01

    We have initiated a search for a new type of nuclear matter, the -mesic nucleus, using beams from the multi-GeV hadron facility, COSY at Juelich, Germany. A large acceptance scintillator detector, ENSTAR has been designed and built at BARC, Mumbai and fully assembled and tested at COSY. A test run for calibration and evaluation has been completed. In this contribution we present the design and technical details of the ENSTAR detector and how it will be used to detect protons and pions (the decay products of -mesic bound state). The detector is made of plastic scintillators arranged in three concentric cylindrical layers. The readout of the detectors is by means of optical fibres. The layers are used to generate - spectra for particle identification and total energy information of stopped particles. The granularity of the detector allows for position ( and ) determination making the event reconstruction kinematically complete.

  14. Recent detector developments at SINTEF (industrial presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundby Avset, Berit; Evensen, Lars; Uri Jensen, Geir; Mo, Sjur; Kari Schjølberg-Henriksen; Westgaard, Trond

    1998-02-01

    Results from SINTEF's research on radiation hardness of silicon detectors, thin silicon detectors, silicon drift devices, reach-through avalanche photodiodes, and detectors with thin dead layers are presented.

  15. The 150 ns detector project: Progress with small detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, W. K.; Russell, S. R.; Kleinfelder, Stuart A.; Segal, Julie

    1994-09-01

    This project's long term goal is to develop a pixel area detector capable of 6 MHz frame rates (150 ns/frame). Our milestones toward this goal are: a single pixel, 1 × 256 1D and 8 × 8 2D detectors, 256 × 256 2D detectors and, finally, 1024 × 1024 2D detectors. The design strategy is to supply a complete electronics chain (resetting preamp, selectable gain amplifier, analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and memory) for each pixel. In the final detectors these will all be custom integrated circuits. The front end preamplifiers are being integrated first, since their design and performance are both the most unusual and also critical to the project's success. Similarly, our early work is also concentrating on devising and perfecting detector structures which are thick enough (1 mm) to absorb over 99% of the incident X-rays in the energy range of interest. In this paper we discuss our progress toward the 1 × 256 1D and 8 × 8 2D detectors. We have fabricated sample detectors at Stanford's Center for Integrated Systems and are preparing both to test them individually and to wirebond them to the preamplifier samples to produce our first working small 1D and 2D detectors. We will describe our solutions to the design problems associated with collecting charge in less than 30 ns from 1 mm thick pixels in high resistivity silicon. We have constructed and tested the front end of our preamplifier design using a commercial 1.2 μm CMOS technology and are moving on to produce a few channels of the complete preamplifier, including a switchable gain stage and output stage. We will discuss both the preamplifier design and our initial test results.

  16. Acquisition System and Detector Interface for Power Pulsed Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornat, Rémi; CALICE Colaboration

    A common DAQ system is being developed within the CALICE collaboration. It provides a flexible and scalable architecture based on giga-ethernet and 8b/10b serial links in order to transmit either slow control data, fast signals or read out data. A detector interface (DIF) is used to connect detectors to the DAQ system based on a single firmware shared among the collaboration but targeted on various physical implementations. The DIF allows to build, store and queue packets of data as well as to control the detectors providing USB and serial link connectivity. The overall architecture is foreseen to manage several hundreds of thousands channels.

  17. Acquisition System and Detector Interface for Power Pulsed Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cornat, R

    2012-01-01

    A common DAQ system is being developed within the CALICE collaboration. It provides a flexible and scalable architecture based on giga-ethernet and 8b/10b serial links in order to transmit either slow control data, fast signals or read out data. A detector interface (DIF) is used to connect detectors to the DAQ system based on a single firmware shared among the collaboration but targeted on various physical implementations. The DIF allows to build, store and queue packets of data as well as to control the detectors providing USB and serial link connectivity. The overall architecture is foreseen to manage several hundreds of thousands channels.

  18. Detector instrumentation for nuclear fission studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhil Jhingan

    2015-09-01

    The study of heavy-ion-induced fusion–fission reactions require nuclear instrumentation that include particle detectors such as proportional counters, ionization chambers, silicon detectors, scintillation detectors, etc., and the front-end electronics for these detectors. Using the detectors mentioned above, experimental facilities have been developed for carrying out fusion–fission experiments. This paper reviews the development of detector instrumentation at IUAC.

  19. Plastic neutron detectors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Tiffany M.S; King, Michael J.; Doty, F. Patrick

    2008-12-01

    This work demonstrated the feasibility and limitations of semiconducting {pi}-conjugated organic polymers for fast neutron detection via n-p elastic scattering. Charge collection in conjugated polymers in the family of substituted poly(p-phenylene vinylene)s (PPV) was evaluated using band-edge laser and proton beam ionization. These semiconducting materials can have high H/C ratio, wide bandgap, high resistivity and high dielectric strength, allowing high field operation with low leakage current and capacitance noise. The materials can also be solution cast, allowing possible low-cost radiation detector fabrication and scale-up. However, improvements in charge collection efficiency are necessary in order to achieve single particle detection with a reasonable sensitivity. The work examined processing variables, additives and environmental effects. Proton beam exposure was used to verify particle sensitivity and radiation hardness to a total exposure of approximately 1 MRAD. Conductivity exhibited sensitivity to temperature and humidity. The effects of molecular ordering were investigated in stretched films, and FTIR was used to quantify the order in films using the Hermans orientation function. The photoconductive response approximately doubled for stretch-aligned films with the stretch direction parallel to the electric field direction, when compared to as-cast films. The response was decreased when the stretch direction was orthogonal to the electric field. Stretch-aligned films also exhibited a significant sensitivity to the polarization of the laser excitation, whereas drop-cast films showed none, indicating improved mobility along the backbone, but poor {pi}-overlap in the orthogonal direction. Drop-cast composites of PPV with substituted fullerenes showed approximately a two order of magnitude increase in photoresponse, nearly independent of nanoparticle concentration. Interestingly, stretch-aligned composite films showed a substantial decrease in

  20. The effects of atorvastatin in ameliorating monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats through reduction of inflammation%阿托伐他汀对野百合碱诱导的大鼠肺动脉高压及肺组织炎症的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢西迁; 吴绪伟; 吴尚洁; 李艳丽; 张红艳; 李志东; 魏星; 肖谊

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of atorvastatin on monocrotaline (MCT) -induced pulmonary hypertension in rats and the inflammation in lung. METHODS Twenty-four male SD rats were randomly divided into three groups including control group, MCT group and atorvastatin group (AS group). There were eight rats in each group. The rats in MCT and AS group were given a single subcutaneously injection of MCT (60mg/kg). Atorvastatin (10mg/kg/d) were given orally for 21 days to the rats in AS groups since the day when rats were injected MCT. At 22 days. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) and right ventricular hypertrophy index ( RVHI) were measured. Perivascular inflammation was observed. The index of wall thickness of pulmonary arteriole was measured by a computerized image analyzer. RESULTS The mPAP and RVHI increased significantly in MCT group than that in control group (P< 0.01). This increase in mPAP and RVHI was partially prevented by atorvastatin (P< 0.01). Atorvastatin treatment was associated with a significant reduction of MCT-induced number of inflammatory cells. This increase in WT% and WA% was partially prevented by atorvastatin (P < 0.01). The percentage of inflammatory cells was positively correlated with mPAP and WT% and WA% of pulmonary medial arteries and arteriole (P < 0.01, respectively). CONCLUSION Atorvastatin could prevent MCT-induced inflammatory response, pulmonary vascular remodeling and the development of pulmonary hypertension.%目的 观察阿托伐他汀对野百合碱(monocrotaline,MCT)诱导的大鼠肺动脉压及肺部炎症的影响.方法将24只SD大鼠随机分为正常对照组(对照组),MCT诱导的肺动脉高压组(PH模型组),阿托伐他汀干预组(治疗组),每组8只.PH模型组和治疗组分别一次性腹部皮下注射MCT (60 mg/kg),治疗组自注射MCT之日起以阿托伐他汀(10mg/kg)灌胃,每日1次.3周后达实验终点,测定大鼠平均肺动脉压、计算右心室肥大指数.肺组织切片进行HE