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Sample records for hfo2 trapping layer

  1. MOHOS-type memory performance using HfO2 nanoparticles as charge trapping layer and low temperature annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, Joel; Ortega, Rafael; Calleja, Wilfrido; Rosales, Pedro; Zuniga, Carlos; Torres, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► HfO 2 nanoparticles used as charge trapping layer in MOHOS memory devices. ► Increasing HfO 2 nanoparticles concentration enhances charge injection and trapping. ► Enhancement of memory performance with low temperature annealing. ► Charge injection is done without using any hot-carrier injection mechanism. ► Using injected charge density is better for comparison of scaled memory devices. - Abstract: In this work, HfO 2 nanoparticles (np-HfO 2 ) are embedded within a spin-on glass (SOG)-based oxide matrix and used as a charge trapping layer in metal–oxide–high-k–oxide–silicon (MOHOS)-type memory applications. This charge trapping layer is obtained by a simple sol–gel spin coating method after using different concentrations of np-HfO 2 and low temperature annealing (down to 425 °C) in order to obtain charge–retention characteristics with a lower thermal budget. The memory's charge trapping characteristics are quantized by measuring both the flat-band voltage shift of MOHOS capacitors (writing/erasing operations) and their programming retention times after charge injection while correlating all these data to np-HfO 2 concentration and annealing temperature. Since a large memory window has been obtained for our MOHOS memory, the relatively easy injection/annihilation (writing/erasing) of charge injected through the substrate opens the possibility to use this material as an effective charge trapping layer. It is shown that by using lower annealing temperatures for the charge trapping layer, higher densities of injected charge are obtained along with enhanced retention times. In conclusion, by using np-HfO 2 as charge trapping layer in memory devices, moderate programming and retention characteristics have been obtained by this simple and yet low-cost spin-coating method.

  2. Improved speed and data retention characteristics in flash memory using a stacked HfO2/Ta2O5 charge-trapping layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Zhiwei; Huo, Zongliang; Zhang, Manhong; Zhu, Chenxin; Liu, Jing; Liu, Ming

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the simultaneous improvements in erase speed and data retention characteristics in flash memory using a stacked HfO 2 /Ta 2 O 5 charge-trapping layer. In comparison to a memory capacitor with a single HfO 2 trapping layer, the erase speed of a memory capacitor with a stacked HfO 2 /Ta 2 O 5 charge-trapping layer is 100 times faster and its memory window is enlarged from 2.7 to 4.8 V for the same ±16 V sweeping voltage range. With the same initial window of ΔV FB = 4 V, the device with a stacked HfO 2 /Ta 2 O 5 charge-trapping layer has a 3.5 V extrapolated 10-year retention window, while the control device with a single HfO 2 trapping layer has only 2.5 V for the extrapolated 10-year window. The present results demonstrate that the device with the stacked HfO 2 /Ta 2 O 5 charge-trapping layer has a strong potential for future high-performance nonvolatile memory application

  3. Analysis of Conduction and Charging Mechanisms in Atomic Layer Deposited Multilayered HfO2/Al2O3 Stacks for Use in Charge Trapping Flash Memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Novkovski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Method for characterization of electrical and trapping properties of multilayered high permittivity stacks for use in charge trapping flash memories is proposed. Application of the method to the case of multilayered HfO2/Al2O3 stacks is presented. By applying our previously developed comprehensive model for MOS structures containing high-κ dielectrics on the J-V characteristics measured in the voltage range without marked degradation and charge trapping (from −3 V to +3 V, several parameters of the structure connected to the interfacial layer and the conduction mechanisms have been extracted. We found that the above analysis gives precise information on the main characteristics and the quality of the injection layer. C-V characteristics of stressed (with write and erase pulses structures recorded in a limited range of voltages between −1 V and +1 V (where neither significant charge trapping nor visible degradation of the structures is expected to occur were used in order to provide measures of the effect of stresses with no influence of the measurement process. Both trapped charge and the distribution of interface states have been determined using modified Terman method for fresh structures and for structures stressed with write and erase cycles. The proposed method allows determination of charge trapping and interface state with high resolution, promising a precise characterization of multilayered high permittivity stacks for use in charge trapping flash memories.

  4. Deep electron traps in HfO_2-based metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomone, L. Sambuco; Lipovetzky, J.; Carbonetto, S.H.; García Inza, M.A.; Redin, E.G.; Campabadal, F.

    2016-01-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO_2) is currently considered to be a good candidate to take part as a component in charge-trapping nonvolatile memories. In this work, the electric field and time dependences of the electron trapping/detrapping processes are studied through a constant capacitance voltage transient technique on metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with atomic layer deposited HfO_2 as insulating layer. A tunneling-based model is proposed to reproduce the experimental results, obtaining fair agreement between experiments and simulations. From the fitting procedure, a band of defects is identified, located in the first 1.7 nm from the Si/HfO_2 interface at an energy level E_t = 1.59 eV below the HfO_2 conduction band edge with density N_t = 1.36 × 10"1"9 cm"−"3. A simplified analytical version of the model is proposed in order to ease the fitting procedure for the low applied voltage case considered in this work. - Highlights: • We characterized deep electron trapping/detrapping in HfO_2 structures. • We modeled the experimental results through a tunneling-based model. • We obtained an electron trap energy level of 1.59 eV below conduction band edge. • We obtained a spatial trap distribution extending 1.7 nm within the insulator. • A simplified tunneling front model is able to reproduce the experimental results.

  5. Effect of oxide charge trapping on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of HfO2/SiO2/Si structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yasuhiro; Miyata, Noriyuki; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Kitamura, Koji; Igarashi, Satoru; Nohira, Hiroshi; Ikenaga, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    We examined the effects of interfacial SiO 2 layers and a surface metal layer on the photoelectron spectra of HfO 2 /SiO 2 /Si structures by hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation as well as conventional X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Hf 4f and Hf 3d photoelectron peaks broadened and shifted toward a higher binding energy with increasing thickness of the interfacial SiO 2 layer, even though photoelectrons may have been emitted from the HfO 2 layer with the same chemical composition. Thinning the interfacial Si oxide layer to approximately one monolayer and depositing a metal layer on the HfO 2 surface suppressed these phenomena. The O 1s photoelectron spectra revealed marked differences between the metal- and nonmetal-deposited HfO 2 /SiO 2 /Si structures; HfO 2 and SiO 2 components in the O 1s photoelectron spectra for the metal-deposited structures were observed at reasonably separated binding energies, but those for the nonmetal-deposited structures were not separated clearly. From this behavior concerning the effects of interfacial SiO 2 and surface metal layers, we concluded that the Hf 4f, Hf 3d, and O 1s spectra measured from the HfO 2 /SiO 2 /Si structures did not reflect actual chemical bonding states. We consider that potential variations in the HfO 2 film owing to charge trapping strongly affect the measured photoelectron spectra. On the basis of angle-resolved XPS measurements, we propose that positive charges are trapped at the HfO 2 surface and negative charges are trapped inside the HfO 2 layer. (author)

  6. Atomic layer deposition of HfO2 on graphene through controlled ion beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Seok; Oh, Il-Kwon; Jung, Hanearl; Kim, Hyungjun; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kyong Nam

    2016-01-01

    The polymer residue generated during the graphene transfer process to the substrate tends to cause problems (e.g., a decrease in electron mobility, unwanted doping, and non-uniform deposition of the dielectric material). In this study, by using a controllable low-energy Ar + ion beam, we cleaned the polymer residue without damaging the graphene network. HfO 2 grown by atomic layer deposition on graphene cleaned using an Ar + ion beam showed a dense uniform structure, whereas that grown on the transferred graphene (before Ar + ion cleaning) showed a non-uniform structure. A graphene–HfO 2 –metal capacitor fabricated by growing 20-nm thick HfO 2 on graphene exhibited a very low leakage current (<10 −11 A/cm 2 ) for Ar + ion-cleaned graphene, whereas a similar capacitor grown using the transferred graphene showed high leakage current.

  7. Silicon surface passivation using thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gope, Jhuma; Vandana; Batra, Neha; Panigrahi, Jagannath; Singh, Rajbir; Maurya, K.K.; Srivastava, Ritu; Singh, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • HfO 2 films using thermal ALD are studied for silicon surface passivation. • As-deposited thin film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with surface recombination velocity (SRV) <100 cm/s. • Annealing improves passivation quality with SRV ∼20 cm/s for ∼8 nm film. - Abstract: Hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) is a potential material for equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) scaling in microelectronics; however, its surface passivation properties particularly on silicon are not well explored. This paper reports investigation on passivation properties of thermally deposited thin HfO 2 films by atomic layer deposition system (ALD) on silicon surface. As-deposited pristine film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with <100 cm/s surface recombination velocity (SRV) vis-à-vis thicker films. Further improvement in passivation quality is achieved with annealing at 400 °C for 10 min where the SRV reduces to ∼20 cm/s. Conductance measurements show that the interface defect density (D it ) increases with film thickness whereas its value decreases after annealing. XRR data corroborate with the observations made by FTIR and SRV data.

  8. Defect states and charge trapping characteristics of HfO2 films for high performance nonvolatile memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Shao, Y. Y.; Lu, X. B.; Zeng, M.; Zhang, Z.; Gao, X. S.; Zhang, X. J.; Liu, J.-M.; Dai, J. Y.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present significant charge trapping memory effects of the metal-hafnium oxide-SiO 2 -Si (MHOS) structure. The devices based on 800 °C annealed HfO 2 film exhibit a large memory window of ∼5.1 V under ±10 V sweeping voltages and excellent charge retention properties with only small charge loss of ∼2.6% after more than 10 4  s retention. The outstanding memory characteristics are attributed to the high density of deep defect states in HfO 2 films. We investigated the defect states in the HfO 2 films by photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation measurements and found that the defect states distributed in deep energy levels ranging from 1.1 eV to 2.9 eV below the conduction band. Our work provides further insights for the charge trapping mechanisms of the HfO 2 based MHOS devices.

  9. Leakage current conduction mechanisms and electrical properties of atomic-layer-deposited HfO2/Ga2O3 MOS capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongpeng; Jia, Renxu; Lei, Yuan; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yimen; Zhang, Yuming

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, current conduction mechanisms in HfO2/β-Ga2O3 metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors under positive and negative biases are investigated using the current-voltage (I-V) measurements conducted at temperatures from 298 K to 378 K. The Schottky emission is dominant under positively biased electric fields of 0.37-2.19 MV cm-1, and the extracted Schottky barrier height ranged from 0.88 eV to 0.91 eV at various temperatures. The Poole-Frenkel emission dominates under negatively biased fields of 1.92-4.83 MV cm-1, and the trap energy levels are from 0.71 eV to 0.77 eV at various temperatures. The conduction band offset (ΔE c) of HfO2/β-Ga2O3 is extracted to be 1.31  ±  0.05 eV via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, while a large negative sheet charge density of 1.04  ×  1013 cm-2 is induced at the oxide layer and/or HfO2/β-Ga2O3 interface. A low C-V hysteresis of 0.76 V, low interface state density (D it) close to 1  ×  1012 eV-1 cm-2, and low leakage current density of 2.38  ×  10-5 A cm-2 at a gate voltage of 7 V has been obtained, suggesting the great electrical properties of HfO2/β-Ga2O3 MOSCAP. According to the above analysis, ALD-HfO2 is an attractive candidate for high voltage β-Ga2O3 power devices.

  10. Surface Passivation of Silicon Using HfO2 Thin Films Deposited by Remote Plasma Atomic Layer Deposition System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Hsu, Chia-Hsun; Lien, Shui-Yang; Chen, Song-Yan; Huang, Wei; Yang, Chih-Hsiang; Kung, Chung-Yuan; Zhu, Wen-Zhang; Xiong, Fei-Bing; Meng, Xian-Guo

    2017-12-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) thin films have attracted much attention owing to their usefulness in equivalent oxide thickness scaling in microelectronics, which arises from their high dielectric constant and thermodynamic stability with silicon. However, the surface passivation properties of such films, particularly on crystalline silicon (c-Si), have rarely been reported upon. In this study, the HfO 2 thin films were deposited on c-Si substrates with and without oxygen plasma pretreatments, using a remote plasma atomic layer deposition system. Post-annealing was performed using a rapid thermal processing system at different temperatures in N 2 ambient for 10 min. The effects of oxygen plasma pretreatment and post-annealing on the properties of the HfO 2 thin films were investigated. They indicate that the in situ remote plasma pretreatment of Si substrate can result in the formation of better SiO 2 , resulting in a better chemical passivation. The deposited HfO 2 thin films with oxygen plasma pretreatment and post-annealing at 500 °C for 10 min were effective in improving the lifetime of c-Si (original lifetime of 1 μs) to up to 67 μs.

  11. Enhanced PEC performance of nanoporous Si photoelectrodes by covering HfO2 and TiO2 passivation layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhuo; Ren, Feng; Wu, Hengyi; Wu, Liang; Wang, Xuening; Wang, Jingli; Wan, Da; Zhang, Guozhen; Jiang, Changzhong

    2017-03-02

    Nanostructured Si as the high efficiency photoelectrode material is hard to keep stable in aqueous for water splitting. Capping a passivation layer on the surface of Si is an effective way of protecting from oxidation. However, it is still not clear in the different mechanisms and effects between insulating oxide materials and oxide semiconductor materials as passivation layers. Here, we compare the passivation effects, the photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties, and the corresponding mechanisms between the HfO 2 /nanoporous-Si and the TiO 2 /nanoporous-Si by I-V curves, Motte-schottky (MS) curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Although the saturated photocurrent densities of the TiO 2 /nanoporous Si are lower than that of the HfO 2 /nanoporous Si, the former is more stable than the later.

  12. Enhanced PEC performance of nanoporous Si photoelectrodes by covering HfO2 and TiO2 passivation layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhuo; Ren, Feng; Wu, Hengyi; Wu, Liang; Wang, Xuening; Wang, Jingli; Wan, Da; Zhang, Guozhen; Jiang, Changzhong

    2017-03-01

    Nanostructured Si as the high efficiency photoelectrode material is hard to keep stable in aqueous for water splitting. Capping a passivation layer on the surface of Si is an effective way of protecting from oxidation. However, it is still not clear in the different mechanisms and effects between insulating oxide materials and oxide semiconductor materials as passivation layers. Here, we compare the passivation effects, the photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties, and the corresponding mechanisms between the HfO2/nanoporous-Si and the TiO2/nanoporous-Si by I-V curves, Motte-schottky (MS) curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Although the saturated photocurrent densities of the TiO2/nanoporous Si are lower than that of the HfO2/nanoporous Si, the former is more stable than the later.

  13. Enhancement of Endurance in HfO2-Based CBRAM Device by Introduction of a TaN Diffusion Blocking Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Chand, Umesh

    2017-08-05

    We propose a new method to improve resistive switching properties in HfO2 based CBRAM crossbar structure device by introducing a TaN thin diffusion blocking layer between the Cu top electrode and HfO2 switching layer. The Cu/TaN/HfO2/TiN device structure exhibits high resistance ratio of OFF/ON states without any degradation in switching during endurance test. The improvement in the endurance properties of the Cu/TaN/HfO2/TiN CBRAM device is thus attributed to the relatively low amount of Cu migration into HfO2 switching layer.

  14. Effects of nitrogen incorporation in HfO(2) grown on InP by atomic layer deposition: an evolution in structural, chemical, and electrical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yu-Seon; Kim, Dae-Kyoung; Kang, Hang-Kyu; Jeong, Kwang-Sik; Cho, Mann-Ho; Ko, Dae-Hong; Kim, Hyoungsub; Seo, Jung-Hye; Kim, Dong-Chan

    2014-03-26

    We investigated the effects of postnitridation on the structural characteristics and interfacial reactions of HfO2 thin films grown on InP by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a function of film thickness. By postdeposition annealing under NH3 vapor (PDN) at 600 °C, an InN layer formed at the HfO2/InP interface, and ionized NHx was incorporated in the HfO2 film. We demonstrate that structural changes resulting from nitridation of HfO2/InP depend on the film thickness (i.e., a single-crystal interfacial layer of h-InN formed at thin (2 nm) HfO2/InP interfaces, whereas an amorphous InN layer formed at thick (>6 nm) HfO2/InP interfaces). Consequently, the tetragonal structure of HfO2 transformed into a mixture structure of tetragonal and monoclinic because the interfacial InN layer relieved interfacial strain between HfO2 and InP. During postdeposition annealing (PDA) in HfO2/InP at 600 °C, large numbers of oxidation states were generated as a result of interfacial reactions between interdiffused oxygen impurities and out-diffused InP substrate elements. However, in the case of the PDN of HfO2/InP structures at 600 °C, nitrogen incorporation in the HfO2 film effectively blocked the out-diffusion of atomic In and P, thus suppressing the formation of oxidation states. Accordingly, the number of interfacial defect states (Dit) within the band gap of InP was significantly reduced, which was also supported by DFT calculations. Interfacial InN in HfO2/InP increased the electron-barrier height to ∼0.6 eV, which led to low-leakage-current density in the gate voltage region over 2 V.

  15. SnO2 anode surface passivation by atomic layer deposited HfO2 improves li-ion battery performance

    KAUST Repository

    Yesibolati, Nulati

    2014-03-14

    For the first time, it is demonstrated that nanoscale HfO2 surface passivation layers formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) significantly improve the performance of Li ion batteries with SnO2-based anodes. Specifically, the measured battery capacity at a current density of 150 mAg -1 after 100 cycles is 548 and 853 mAhg-1 for the uncoated and HfO2-coated anodes, respectively. Material analysis reveals that the HfO2 layers are amorphous in nature and conformably coat the SnO2-based anodes. In addition, the analysis reveals that ALD HfO2 not only protects the SnO2-based anodes from irreversible reactions with the electrolyte and buffers its volume change, but also chemically interacts with the SnO2 anodes to increase battery capacity, despite the fact that HfO2 is itself electrochemically inactive. The amorphous nature of HfO2 is an important factor in explaining its behavior, as it still allows sufficient Li diffusion for an efficient anode lithiation/delithiation process to occur, leading to higher battery capacity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. SnO2 anode surface passivation by atomic layer deposited HfO2 improves li-ion battery performance

    KAUST Repository

    Yesibolati, Nulati; Shahid, Muhammad; Chen, Wei; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Reuter, Mark C.; Ross, Frances M.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, it is demonstrated that nanoscale HfO2 surface passivation layers formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) significantly improve the performance of Li ion batteries with SnO2-based anodes. Specifically, the measured battery

  17. Low-temperature fabrication of an HfO2 passivation layer for amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin film transistors using a solution process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seonghwan; Park, Sung Pyo; Kim, Yeong-Gyu; Kang, Byung Ha; Na, Jae Won; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2017-11-24

    We report low-temperature solution processing of hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) passivation layers for amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). At 150 °C, the hafnium chloride (HfCl 4 ) precursor readily hydrolyzed in deionized (DI) water and transformed into an HfO 2 film. The fabricated HfO 2 passivation layer prevented any interaction between the back surface of an a-IGZO TFT and ambient gas. Moreover, diffused Hf 4+ in the back-channel layer of the a-IGZO TFT reduced the oxygen vacancy, which is the origin of the electrical instability in a-IGZO TFTs. Consequently, the a-IGZO TFT with the HfO 2 passivation layer exhibited improved stability, showing a decrease in the threshold voltage shift from 4.83 to 1.68 V under a positive bias stress test conducted over 10,000 s.

  18. Memory Effect of Metal-Oxide-Silicon Capacitors with Self-Assembly Double-Layer Au Nanocrystals Embedded in Atomic-Layer-Deposited HfO2 Dielectric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Huang; Hong-Yan, Gou; Qing-Qing, Sun; Shi-Jin, Ding; Wei, Zhang; Shi-Li, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    We report the chemical self-assembly growth of Au nanocrystals on atomic-layer-deposited HfO 2 films aminosilanized by (3-Aminopropyl)-trimethoxysilane aforehand for memory applications. The resulting Au nanocrystals show a density of about 4 × 10 11 cm −2 and a diameter range of 5–8nm. The metal-oxide-silicon capacitor with double-layer Au nanocrystals embedded in HfO 2 dielectric exhibits a large C – V hysteresis window of 11.9V for ±11 V gate voltage sweeps at 1 MHz, a flat-band voltage shift of 1.5 V after the electrical stress under 7 V for 1 ms, a leakage current density of 2.9 × 10 −8 A/cm −2 at 9 V and room temperature. Compared to single-layer Au nanocrystals, the double-layer Au nanocrystals increase the hysteresis window significantly, and the underlying mechanism is thus discussed

  19. Effect of interfacial SiO2- y layer and defect in HfO2- x film on flat-band voltage of HfO2- x /SiO2- y stacks for backside-illuminated CMOS image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Heedo; Lee, Jimin; Jeong, Juyoung; Kim, Taeho; Sohn, Hyunchul

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the effect of oxygen gas fraction during deposition of a hafnium oxide (HfO2- x ) film and the influence of the quality of the SiO2- y interlayer on the nature of flat-band voltage ( V fb) in TiN/HfO/SiO2- y /p-Si structures were investigated. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy analysis showed that the non-lattice oxygen peak, indicating an existing oxygen vacancy, increased as the oxygen gas fraction decreased during sputtering. From C- V and J- E analyses, the V fb behavior was significantly affected by the characteristics of the SiO2- y interlayer and the non-lattice oxygen fraction in the HfO2- x films. The HfO2- x /native SiO2- y stack presented a V fb of - 1.01 V for HfO2- x films with an oxygen gas fraction of 5% during sputtering. Additionally, the V fb of the HfO2- x /native SiO2- y stack could be controlled from - 1.01 to - 0.56 V by changing the deposition conditions of the HfO2- x film with the native SiO2- y interlayer. The findings of this study can be useful to fabricate charge-accumulating layers for backside-illuminated image sensor devices.

  20. Ultrathin ZnS and ZnO Interfacial Passivation Layers for Atomic-Layer-Deposited HfO2 Films on InP Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Joo, So Yeong; Jin, Hyun Soo; Kim, Woo-Byoung; Park, Tae Joo

    2016-08-17

    Ultrathin ZnS and ZnO films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were employed as interfacial passivation layers (IPLs) for HfO2 films on InP substrates. The interfacial layer growth during the ALD of the HfO2 film was effectively suppressed by the IPLs, resulting in the decrease of electrical thickness, hysteresis, and interface state density. Compared with the ZnO IPL, the ZnS IPL was more effective in reducing the interface state density near the valence band edge. The leakage current density through the film was considerably lowered by the IPLs because the film crystallization was suppressed. Especially for the film with the ZnS IPL, the leakage current density in the low-voltage region was significantly lower than that observed for the film with the ZnO IPL, because the direct tunneling current was suppressed by the higher conduction band offset of ZnS with the InP substrate.

  1. Low temperature formation of higher-k cubic phase HfO2 by atomic layer deposition on GeOx/Ge structures fabricated by in-situ thermal oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.; Huang, P.-C.; Taoka, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Takenaka, M.; Takagi, S.

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated a low temperature formation (300 °C) of higher-k HfO 2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on an in-situ thermal oxidation GeO x interfacial layer. It is found that the cubic phase is dominant in the HfO 2 film with an epitaxial-like growth behavior. The maximum permittivity of 42 is obtained for an ALD HfO 2 film on a 1-nm-thick GeO x form by the in-situ thermal oxidation. It is suggested from physical analyses that the crystallization of cubic phase HfO 2 can be induced by the formation of six-fold crystalline GeO x structures in the underlying GeO x interfacial layer

  2. Simulation study of HEMT structures with HfO2 cap layer for mitigating inverse piezoelectric effect related device failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepthi Nagulapally

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Inverse Piezoelectric Effect (IPE is thought to contribute to possible device failure of GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs. Here we focus on a simulation study to probe the possible mitigation of the IPE by reducing the internal electric fields and related elastic energy through the use of high-k materials. Inclusion of a HfO2 “cap layer” above the AlGaN barrier particularly with a partial mesa structure is shown to have potential advantages. Simulations reveal even greater reductions in the internal electric fields by using “field plates” in concert with high-k oxides.

  3. Low-Frequency Noise in Layered ReS2 Field Effect Transistors on HfO2 and Its Application for pH Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wugang; Wei, Wei; Tong, Yu; Chim, Wai Kin; Zhu, Chunxiang

    2018-02-28

    Layered rhenium disulfide (ReS 2 ) field effect transistors (FETs), with thickness ranging from few to dozens of layers, are demonstrated on 20 nm thick HfO 2 /Si substrates. A small threshold voltage of -0.25 V, high on/off current ratio of up to ∼10 7 , small subthreshold swing of 116 mV/dec, and electron carrier mobility of 6.02 cm 2 /V·s are obtained for the two-layer ReS 2 FETs. Low-frequency noise characteristics in ReS 2 FETs are analyzed for the first time, and it is found that the carrier number fluctuation mechanism well describes the flicker (1/f) noise of ReS 2 FETs with different thicknesses. pH sensing using a two-layer ReS 2 FET with HfO 2 as a sensing oxide is then demonstrated with a voltage sensitivity of 54.8 mV/pH and a current sensitivity of 126. The noise characteristics of the ReS 2 FET-based pH sensors are also examined, and a corresponding detection limit of 0.0132 pH is obtained. Our studies suggest the high potential of ReS 2 for future low-power nanoelectronics and biosensor applications.

  4. Performance improvement of charge trap flash memory by using a composition-modulated high-k trapping layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhen-Jie; Li Rong; Yin Jiang

    2013-01-01

    A composition-modulated (HfO 2 ) x (Al 2 O3) 1−x charge trapping layer is proposed for charge trap flash memory by controlling the Al atom content to form a peak and valley shaped band gap. It is found that the memory device using the composition-modulated (HfO 2 ) x (Al 2 O 3 ) 1−x as the charge trapping layer exhibits a larger memory window of 11.5 V, improves data retention even at high temperature, and enhances the program/erase speed. Improvements of the memory characteristics are attributed to the special band-gap structure resulting from the composition-modulated trapping layer. Therefore, the composition-modulated charge trapping layer may be useful in future nonvolatile flash memory device application. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  5. Material insights of HfO2-based integrated 1-transistor-1-resistor resistive random access memory devices processed by batch atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Gang; Kim, Hee-Dong; Roelofs, Robin; Perez, Eduardo; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Zaumseil, Peter; Costina, Ioan; Wenger, Christian

    2016-06-17

    With the continuous scaling of resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices, in-depth understanding of the physical mechanism and the material issues, particularly by directly studying integrated cells, become more and more important to further improve the device performances. In this work, HfO2-based integrated 1-transistor-1-resistor (1T1R) RRAM devices were processed in a standard 0.25 μm complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process line, using a batch atomic layer deposition (ALD) tool, which is particularly designed for mass production. We demonstrate a systematic study on TiN/Ti/HfO2/TiN/Si RRAM devices to correlate key material factors (nano-crystallites and carbon impurities) with the filament type resistive switching (RS) behaviours. The augmentation of the nano-crystallites density in the film increases the forming voltage of devices and its variation. Carbon residues in HfO2 films turn out to be an even more significant factor strongly impacting the RS behaviour. A relatively higher deposition temperature of 300 °C dramatically reduces the residual carbon concentration, thus leading to enhanced RS performances of devices, including lower power consumption, better endurance and higher reliability. Such thorough understanding on physical mechanism of RS and the correlation between material and device performances will facilitate the realization of high density and reliable embedded RRAM devices with low power consumption.

  6. Carbon-coated ZnO mat passivation by atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mi-Hee

    2017-11-01

    ZnO has had little consideration as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries compared with other transition-metal oxides due to its inherent poor electrical conductivity and large volume expansion upon cycling and pulverization of ZnO-based electrodes. A logical design and facile synthesis of ZnO with well-controlled particle sizes and a specific morphology is essential to improving the performance of ZnO in lithium-ion batteries. In this paper, a simple approach is reported that uses a cation surfactant and a chelating agent to synthesize three-dimensional hierarchical nanostructured carbon-coated ZnO mats, in which the ZnO mats are composed of stacked individual ZnO nanowires and form well-defined nanoporous structures with high surface areas. In order to improve the performance of lithium-ion batteries, HfO 2 is deposited on the carbon-coated ZnO mat electrode via atomic layer deposition. Lithium-ion battery devices based on the carbon-coated ZnO mat passivation by atomic layer deposited HfO 2 exhibit an excellent initial discharge and charge capacities of 2684.01 and 963.21mAhg -1 , respectively, at a current density of 100mAg -1 in the voltage range of 0.01-3V. They also exhibit cycle stability after 125 cycles with a capacity of 740mAhg -1 and a remarkable rate capability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Improvement in negative bias illumination stress stability of In-Ga-Zn-O thin film transistors using HfO2 gate insulators by controlling atomic-layer-deposition conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, So-Yeong; Kim, Yeo-Myeong; Yoon, Da-Jeong; Yoon, Sung-Min

    2017-12-01

    The effects of atomic layer deposition (ALD) conditions for the HfO2 gate insulators (GI) on the device characteristics of the InGaZnO (IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) were investigated when the ALD temperature and Hf precursor purge time were varied to 200, 225, and 250 °C, and 15 and 30 s, respectively. The HfO2 thin films showed low leakage current density of 10-8 A cm-2, high dielectric constant of over 20, and smooth surface roughness at all ALD conditions. The IGZO TFTs using the HfO2 GIs showed good device characteristics such as a saturation mobility as high as 11 cm2 V-1 s-1, a subthreshold swing as low as 0.10 V/dec, and all the devices could be operated at a gate voltage as low as  ±3 V. While there were no marked differences in transfer characteristics and PBS stabilities among the fabricated devices, the NBIS instabilities could be improved by increasing the ALD temperature for the formation of HfO2 GIs by reducing the oxygen vacancies within the IGZO channel.

  8. Effects of layer sequence and postdeposition annealing temperature on performance of La2O3 and HfO2 multilayer composite oxides on In0.53Ga0.47As for MOS capacitor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Hao; Lin, Yueh-Chin; Chuang, Ting-Wei; Chen, Yu-Chen; Hou, Tzu-Ching; Yao, Jing-Neng; Chang, Po-Chun; Iwai, Hiroshi; Kakushima, Kuniyuki; Chang, Edward Yi

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we report on high-k composite oxides that are formed by depositing multiple layers of HfO2 and La2O3 on In0.53Ga0.47As for MOS device application. Both multilayer HfO2 (0.8 nm)/La2O3 (0.8 nm)/In0.53Ga0.47As and La2O3 (0.8 nm)/HfO2 (0.8 nm)/In0.53Ga0.47As MOS structures were investigated. The effects of oxide thickness and postdeposition annealing (PDA) temperature on the interface properties of the composite oxide MOS capacitors were studied. It was found that a low CET of 1.41 nm at 1 kHz was achieved using three-layer composite oxides. On the other hand, a small frequency dispersion of 2.8% and an excellent Dit of 7.0 × 1011 cm-2·eV-1 can be achieved using multiple layers of La2O3 (0.8 nm) and HfO2 (0.8 nm) on the In0.53Ga0.47As MOS capacitor with optimum thermal treatment and layer thickness.

  9. Interfacial, Electrical, and Band Alignment Characteristics of HfO2/Ge Stacks with In Situ-Formed SiO2 Interlayer by Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan-Qiang; Wu, Bing; Wu, Di; Li, Ai-Dong

    2017-05-01

    In situ-formed SiO2 was introduced into HfO2 gate dielectrics on Ge substrate as interlayer by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). The interfacial, electrical, and band alignment characteristics of the HfO2/SiO2 high-k gate dielectric stacks on Ge have been well investigated. It has been demonstrated that Si-O-Ge interlayer is formed on Ge surface during the in situ PEALD SiO2 deposition process. This interlayer shows fantastic thermal stability during annealing without obvious Hf-silicates formation. In addition, it can also suppress the GeO2 degradation. The electrical measurements show that capacitance equivalent thickness of 1.53 nm and a leakage current density of 2.1 × 10-3 A/cm2 at gate bias of Vfb + 1 V was obtained for the annealed sample. The conduction (valence) band offsets at the HfO2/SiO2/Ge interface with and without PDA are found to be 2.24 (2.69) and 2.48 (2.45) eV, respectively. These results indicate that in situ PEALD SiO2 may be a promising interfacial control layer for the realization of high-quality Ge-based transistor devices. Moreover, it can be demonstrated that PEALD is a much more powerful technology for ultrathin interfacial control layer deposition than MOCVD.

  10. Al2O3 Passivation Effect in HfO2·Al2O3 Laminate Structures Grown on InP Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hang-Kyu; Kang, Yu-Seon; Kim, Dae-Kyoung; Baik, Min; Song, Jin-Dong; An, Youngseo; Kim, Hyoungsub; Cho, Mann-Ho

    2017-05-24

    The passivation effect of an Al 2 O 3 layer on the electrical properties was investigated in HfO 2 -Al 2 O 3 laminate structures grown on indium phosphide (InP) substrate by atomic-layer deposition. The chemical state obtained using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that interfacial reactions were dependent on the presence of the Al 2 O 3 passivation layer and its sequence in the HfO 2 -Al 2 O 3 laminate structures. Because of the interfacial reaction, the Al 2 O 3 /HfO 2 /Al 2 O 3 structure showed the best electrical characteristics. The top Al 2 O 3 layer suppressed the interdiffusion of oxidizing species into the HfO 2 films, whereas the bottom Al 2 O 3 layer blocked the outdiffusion of In and P atoms. As a result, the formation of In-O bonds was more effectively suppressed in the Al 2 O 3 /HfO 2 /Al 2 O 3 /InP structure than that in the HfO 2 -on-InP system. Moreover, conductance data revealed that the Al 2 O 3 layer on InP reduces the midgap traps to 2.6 × 10 12 eV -1 cm -2 (compared to that of HfO 2 /InP, that is, 5.4 × 10 12 eV -1 cm -2 ). The suppression of gap states caused by the outdiffusion of In atoms significantly controls the degradation of capacitors caused by leakage current through the stacked oxide layers.

  11. Ge interactions on HfO2 surfaces and kinetically driven patterning of Ge nanocrystals on HfO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, Scott K.; Joshi, Sachin V.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2006-01-01

    Germanium interactions are studied on HfO 2 surfaces, which are prepared through physical vapor deposition (PVD) and by atomic layer deposition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature-programed desorption are used to follow the reactions of germanium on HfO 2 . Germanium chemical vapor deposition at 870 K on HfO 2 produces a GeO x adhesion layer, followed by growth of semiconducting Ge 0 . PVD of 0.7 ML Ge (accomplished by thermally cracking GeH 4 over a hot filament) also produces an initial GeO x layer, which is stable up to 800 K. PVD above 2.0 ML deposits semiconducting Ge 0 . Temperature programed desorption experiments of ∼1.0 ML Ge from HfO 2 at 400-1100 K show GeH 4 desorption below 600 K and GeO desorption above 850 K. These results are compared to Ge on SiO 2 where GeO desorption is seen at 550 K. Exploiting the different reactivity of Ge on HfO 2 and SiO 2 allows a kinetically driven patterning scheme for high-density Ge nanoparticle growth on HfO 2 surfaces that is demonstrated

  12. Solid phase crystallisation of HfO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modreanu, M.; Sancho-Parramon, J.; O'Connell, D.; Justice, J.; Durand, O.; Servet, B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the solid phase crystallisation of carbon-free HfO 2 thin films deposited by plasma ion assisted deposition (PIAD). After deposition, the HfO 2 films were annealed in N 2 ambient for 3 h at 350, 550 and 750 deg. C. Several characterisation techniques including X-ray reflectometry (XRR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used for the physical characterisation of as-deposited and annealed HfO 2 . XRD has revealed that the as-deposited HfO 2 film is in an amorphous-like state with only traces of crystalline phase and that the annealed films are in a highly crystalline state. These results are in good agreement with the SE results showing an increase of refractive index by increasing the annealing temperature. XRR results show a significant density gradient over the as-deposited film thickness, which is characteristic of the PIAD method. The AFM measurements show that the HfO 2 layers have a smooth surface even after annealing at 750 deg. C. The present study demonstrates that the solid phase crystallisation of HfO 2 PIAD thin films starts at a temperature as low as 550 deg. C

  13. Photo-induced tunneling currents in MOS structures with various HfO2/SiO2 stacking dielectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Sheng Pang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the current conduction mechanisms of structures with tandem high-k dielectric in illumination are discussed. Samples of Al/SiO2/Si (S, Al/HfO2/SiO2/Si (H, and Al/3HfO2/SiO2/Si (3H were examined. The significant observation of electron traps of sample H compares to sample S is found under the double bias capacitance-voltage (C-V measurements in illumination. Moreover, the photo absorption sensitivity of sample H is higher than S due to the formation of HfO2 dielectric layer, which leads to larger numbers of carriers crowded through the sweep of VG before the domination of tunneling current. Additionally, the HfO2 dielectric layer would block the electrons passing through oxide from valance band, which would result in less electron-hole (e−-h+ pairs recombination effect. Also, it was found that both of the samples S and H show perimeter dependency of positive bias currents due to strong fringing field effect in dark and illumination; while sample 3H shows area dependency of positive bias currents in strong illumination. The non-uniform tunneling current through thin dielectric and through HfO2 stacking layers are importance to MOS(p tunneling photo diodes.

  14. Suspended HfO2 photonic crystal slab on III-nitride/Si platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yongjin; Feng, Jiao; Cao, Ziping; Zhu, Hongbo

    2014-01-01

    We present here the fabrication of suspended hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) photonic crystal slab on a III-nitride/Si platform. The calculations are performed to model the suspended HfO 2 photonic crystal slab. Aluminum nitride (AlN) film is employed as the sacrificial layer to form air gap. Photonic crystal patterns are defined by electron beam lithography and transferred into HfO 2 film, and suspended HfO 2 photonic crystal slab is achieved on a III-nitride/Si platform through wet-etching of AlN layer in the alkaline solution. The method is promising for the fabrication of suspended HfO 2 nanostructures incorporating into a III-nitride/Si platform, or acting as the template for epitaxial growth of III-nitride materials. (orig.)

  15. Reliability assessment of ultra-thin HfO2 films deposited on silicon wafer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Wei-En; Chang, Chia-Wei; Chang, Yong-Qing; Yao, Chih-Kai; Liao, Jiunn-Der

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Nano-mechanical properties on annealed ultra-thin HfO 2 film are studied. ► By AFM analysis, hardness of the crystallized HfO 2 film significantly increases. ► By nano-indention, the film hardness increases with less contact stiffness. ► Quality assessment on the annealed ultra-thin films can thus be achieved. - Abstract: Ultra-thin hafnium dioxide (HfO 2 ) is used to replace silicon dioxide to meet the required transistor feature size in advanced semiconductor industry. The process integration compatibility and long-term reliability for the transistors depend on the mechanical performance of ultra-thin HfO 2 films. The criteria of reliability including wear resistance, thermal fatigue, and stress-driven failure rely on film adhesion significantly. The adhesion and variations in mechanical properties induced by thermal annealing of the ultra-thin HfO 2 films deposited on silicon wafers (HfO 2 /SiO 2 /Si) are not fully understood. In this work, the mechanical properties of an atomic layer deposited HfO 2 (nominal thickness ≈10 nm) on a silicon wafer were characterized by the diamond-coated tip of an atomic force microscope and compared with those of annealed samples. The results indicate that the annealing process leads to the formation of crystallized HfO 2 phases for the atomic layer deposited HfO 2 . The HfSi x O y complex formed at the interface between HfO 2 and SiO 2 /Si, where the thermal diffusion of Hf, Si, and O atoms occurred. The annealing process increases the surface hardness of crystallized HfO 2 film and therefore the resistance to nano-scratches. In addition, the annealing process significantly decreases the harmonic contact stiffness (or thereafter eliminate the stress at the interface) and increases the nano-hardness, as measured by vertically sensitive nano-indentation. Quality assessments on as-deposited and annealed HfO 2 films can be thereafter used to estimate the mechanical properties and adhesion of ultra-thin HfO 2

  16. Optical properties of a HfO2/Si stack with a trace amount of nitrogen incorporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Li; Tingting, Jiang; Qingqing, Sun; Pengfei, Wang; Shijin, Ding; Wei, Zhang

    2012-03-01

    HfO2 films were deposited by atomic layer deposition through alternating pulsing of Hf[N(C2H5)(CH3)]4 and H2O2. A trace amount of nitrogen was incorporated into the HfO2 through ammonia annealing. The composition, the interface stability of the HfO2/Si stack and the optical properties of the annealed films were analyzed to investigate the property evolution of HfO2 during thermal treatment. With a nitrogen concentration increase from 1.41 to 7.45%, the bandgap of the films decreased from 5.82 to 4.94 eV.

  17. Thermally-driven H interaction with HfO2 films deposited on Ge(100) and Si(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, G. V.; Feijó, T. O.; Baumvol, I. J. R.; Aguzzoli, C.; Krug, C.; Radtke, C.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we investigated the thermally-driven H incorporation in HfO2 films deposited on Si and Ge substrates. Two regimes for deuterium (D) uptake were identified, attributed to D bonded near the HfO2/substrate interface region (at 300 °C) and through the whole HfO2 layer (400-600 °C). Films deposited on Si presented higher D amounts for all investigated temperatures, as well as, a higher resistance for D desorption. Moreover, HfO2 films underwent structural changes during annealings, influencing D incorporation. The semiconductor substrate plays a key role in this process.

  18. Mechanisms and selectivity for etching of HfO2 and Si in BCl3 plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chunyu; Donnelly, Vincent M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors have investigated plasma etching of HfO 2 , a high dielectric constant material, and poly-Si in BCl 3 plasmas. Etching rates were measured as a function of substrate temperature (T s ) at several source powers. Activation energies range from 0.2 to 1.0 kcal/mol for HfO 2 and from 0.8 to 1.8 kcal/mol for Si, with little or no dependence on source power (20-200 W). These low activation energies suggest that product removal is limited by chemical sputtering of the chemisorbed Hf or Si-containing layer, with a higher T s only modestly increasing the chemical sputtering rate. The slightly lower activation energy for HfO 2 results in a small improvement in selectivity over Si at low temperature. The surface layers formed on HfO 2 and Si after etching in BCl 3 plasmas were also investigated by vacuum-transfer x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A thin boron-containing layer was observed on partially etched HfO 2 and on poly-Si after etching through HfO 2 films. For HfO 2 , a single B(1s) feature at 194 eV was ascribed to a heavily oxidized species with bonding similar to B 2 O 3 . B(1s) features were observed for poly-Si surfaces at 187.6 eV (B bound to Si), 189.8 eV, and 193 eV (both ascribed to BO x Cl y ). In the presence of a deliberately added 0.5% air, the B-containing layer on HfO 2 is largely unaffected, while that on Si converts to a thick layer with a single B(1s) peak at 194 eV and an approximate stoichiometry of B 3 O 4 Cl

  19. Chemical reaction at the interface between pentacene and HfO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S.J.; Yi, Y.; Kim, K.H.; Yoo, C.Y.; Moewes, A.; Cho, M.H.; Denlinger, J.D.; Whang, C.N.; Chang, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    The electronic structure and the interface formation at the interface region between pentacene and HfO2 are investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). The measured C 1s XPS spectra of pentacene indicate that chemical bonding occurs at the interface between pentacene and HfO2. The carbon of pentacene reacts with oxygen belonging to HfO2 and band bending occurs at the interface due to a redistribution of charge. The determined interface dipole and band bending between pentacene and HfO2 are 0.04 and 0.1 eV, respectively. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level is observed at 0.68 eV below the Fermi level. This chemical reaction allows us to grow a pentacene film with large grains onto HfO2. We conclude that high performance pentacene thin film transistors can be obtained by inserting an ultrathin HfO2 layer between pentacene and a gate insulator

  20. Suppression of interfacial reaction for HfO2 on silicon by pre-CF4 plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, C.S.; Wu, W.C.; Chao, T.S.; Chen, J.H.; Wang, J.C.; Tay, L.-L.; Rowell, Nelson

    2006-01-01

    In this letter, the effects of pre-CF 4 plasma treatment on Si for sputtered HfO 2 gate dielectrics are investigated. The significant fluorine was incorporated at the HfO 2 /Si substrate interface for a sample with the CF 4 plasma pretreatment. The Hf silicide was suppressed and Hf-F bonding was observed for the CF 4 plasma pretreated sample. Compared with the as-deposited sample, the effective oxide thickness was much reduced for the pre-CF 4 plasma treated sample due to the elimination of the interfacial layer between HfO 2 and Si substrate. These improved characteristics of the HfO 2 gate dielectrics can be explained in terms of the fluorine atoms blocking oxygen diffusion through the HfO 2 film into the Si substrate

  1. Formation of Al2O3-HfO2 Eutectic EBC Film on Silicon Carbide Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyosuke Seya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure, the preparation method, and the formation mechanism of the eutectic EBC layer on the silicon carbide substrate are summarized. Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic EBC film is prepared by optical zone melting method on the silicon carbide substrate. At high temperature, a small amount of silicon carbide decomposed into silicon and carbon. The components of Al2O3 and HfO2 in molten phase also react with the free carbon. The Al2O3 phase reacts with free carbon and vapor species of AlO phase is formed. The composition of the molten phase becomes HfO2 rich from the eutectic composition. HfO2 phase also reacts with the free carbon and HfC phase is formed on the silicon carbide substrate; then a high density intermediate layer is formed. The adhesion between the intermediate layer and the substrate is excellent by an anchor effect. When the solidification process finished before all of HfO2 phase is reduced to HfC phase, HfC-HfO2 functionally graded layer is formed on the silicon carbide substrate and the Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure grows from the top of the intermediate layer.

  2. Energy-band alignment of (HfO2)x(Al2O3)1-x gate dielectrics deposited by atomic layer deposition on β-Ga2O3 (-201)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Zhang, Hongpeng; Jia, Renxu; Guo, Lixin; Zhang, Yimen; Zhang, Yuming

    2018-03-01

    Energy band alignments between series band of Al-rich high-k materials (HfO2)x(Al2O3)1-x and β-Ga2O3 are investigated using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The results exhibit sufficient conduction band offsets (1.42-1.53 eV) in (HfO2)x(Al2O3)1-x/β-Ga2O3. In addition, it is also obtained that the value of Eg, △Ec, and △Ev for (HfO2)x(Al2O3)1-x/β-Ga2O3 change linearly with x, which can be expressed by 6.98-1.27x, 1.65-0.56x, and 0.48-0.70x, respectively. The higher dielectric constant and higher effective breakdown electric field of (HfO2)x(Al2O3)1-x compared with Al2O3, coupled with sufficient barrier height and lower gate leakage makes it a potential dielectric for high voltage β-Ga2O3 power MOSFET, and also provokes interest in further investigation of HfAlO/β-Ga2O3 interface properties.

  3. Thermoluminescence in films of HfO2:Dy+3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceron, P.; Rivera, T.; Guzman, J.; Montes, E.; Pelaez, A.; Rojas, B.; Guzman, D.; Azorin, J.; Paredes, L.

    2014-08-01

    In this work the thermoluminescence (TL) response of films of hafnium oxide polluted with dysprosium (HfO 2 :Dy +3 ) that were irradiated in the near UV (200 nm - 400 nm). The films were deposited by means of the ultrasonics spray pyrolysis technique on a glass substrate, using different deposit temperatures (300 grades C - 600 grades C). The best TL emission corresponded to the prepared film to 450 grades C that was exposed to a spectral irradiation of 80 μJ/(cm 2 -s) with a wave longitude of 240 nm. The TL response in function of the spectral irradiation was lineal in the studied interval (24 to 288 mJ/cm 2 ), several kinetic parameters were also calculated of the shine curve as depth of the trap (E), frequency factor (s) and order to the kinetics (b). The obtained results show that the films of HfO 2 :Dy +3 could be used as radiation monitor in the region of the near UV. (Author)

  4. Conduction Mechanism and Improved Endurance in HfO2-Based RRAM with Nitridation Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang-Yuan; Deng, Ning; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Tseng, Yi-Ting; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Wang, Ming-Hui; Chen, Wen-Chung; Zheng, Hao-Xuan; Wu, Huaqiang; Qian, He; Sze, Simon M.

    2017-10-01

    A nitridation treatment technology with a urea/ammonia complex nitrogen source improved resistive switching property in HfO2-based resistive random access memory (RRAM). The nitridation treatment produced a high performance and reliable device which results in superior endurance (more than 109 cycles) and a self-compliance effect. Thus, the current conduction mechanism changed due to defect passivation by nitrogen atoms in the HfO2 thin film. At a high resistance state (HRS), it transferred to Schottky emission from Poole-Frenkel in HfO2-based RRAM. At low resistance state (LRS), the current conduction mechanism was space charge limited current (SCLC) after the nitridation treatment, which suggests that the nitrogen atoms form Hf-N-Ox vacancy clusters (Vo +) which limit electron movement through the switching layer.

  5. Electrical Characterization of Defects Created by γ-Radiation in HfO2-Based MIS Structures for RRAM Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, H.; González, M. B.; Mallol, M. M.; Castán, H.; Dueñas, S.; Campabadal, F.; Acero, M. C.; Sambuco Salomone, L.; Faigón, A.

    2018-04-01

    The γ-radiation effects on the electrical characteristics of metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors based on HfO2, and on the resistive switching characteristics of the structures have been studied. The HfO2 was grown directly on silicon substrates by atomic layer deposition. Some of the capacitors were submitted to a γ ray irradiation using three different doses (16 kGy, 96 kGy and 386 kGy). We studied the electrical characteristics in the pristine state of the capacitors. The radiation increased the interfacial state densities at the insulator/semiconductor interface, and the slow traps inside the insulator near the interface. However, the leakage current is not increased by the irradiation, and the conduction mechanism is Poole-Frenkel for all the samples. The switching characteristics were also studied, and no significant differences were obtained in the performance of the devices after having been irradiated, indicating that the fabricated capacitors present good radiation hardness for its use as a RS element.

  6. Crystal structure and band gap determination of HfO2 thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheynet, M.C.; Pokrant, S.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Rouvière, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Valence electron energy loss spectroscopy (VEELS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) are performed on three different HfO2 thin films grown on Si (001) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or atomic layer deposition (ALD). For each sample the band gap (Eg) is determined by

  7. Nanomechanical study of amorphous and polycrystalline ALD HfO2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Tapily; J.E. Jakes; D. Gu; H. Baumgart; A.A. Elmustafa

    2011-01-01

    Thin films of hafnium oxide (HfO2) were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The structural properties of the deposited films were characterised by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We investigated the effect of phase transformations induced by thermal treatments on the mechanical properties of ALD HfO

  8. Mechanical properties of ultra-thin HfO2 films studied by nano scratches tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Wei-En; Chang, Yong-Qing; Chang, Chia-Wei; Yao, Chih-Kai; Liao, Jiunn-Der

    2013-01-01

    10-nm-thick atomic layer deposited HfO 2 films were characterized in terms of wear resistance and indentation hardness to investigate the thermal annealing induced impacts on mechanical properties. The wear resistance of ultra-thin films at low loads was characterized using nano-scratch tests with an atomic force microscope. The depth of the nano-scratches decreases with increasing annealing temperature, indicating that the hardness of the annealed films increases with the annealing temperatures. Surface nanoindentation was also performed to confirm the nanoscratch test results. The hardness variation of the annealed films is due to the generation of HfSi x O y induced by the thermal annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements proved that the hardness of formed HfSi x O y with increasing annealing temperatures. The existence of HfSi x O y broadens the interface, and causes the increase of the interfacial layer thickness. As a result, the surface hardness increases with the increasing HfSi x O y induced by the thermal annealing. - Highlights: ► Mechanical properties of HfO 2 films were assessed by nano-scratch and indentation. ► Scratch depth of HfO 2 films decreased with the increase of annealing temperatures. ► Nano-hardness of HfO 2 films increased with the increase of annealing temperatures

  9. Chemical states and electronic structure of a HfO(-2)/Ge(001) interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kang-ill; McIntyre, Paul C.; Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Shiyu; Lee, Dong-Ick; Pianetta, Piero; SLAC, SSRL; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept.

    2005-01-01

    We report the chemical bonding structure and valence band alignment at the HfO 2 /Ge (001) interface by systematically probing various core level spectra as well as valence band spectra using soft x-rays at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. We investigated the chemical bonding changes as a function of depth through the dielectric stack by taking a series of synchrotron photoemission spectra as we etched through the HfO 2 film using a dilute HF-solution. We found that a very non-stoichiometric GeO x layer exists at the HfO 2 /Ge interface. The valence band spectra near the Fermi level in each different film structure were carefully analyzed, and as a result, the valence band offset between Ge and GeO x was determined to be ΔE v (Ge-GeO x ) = 2.2 ± 0.15 eV, and that between Ge and HfO 2 , ΔE v (Ge-HfO 2 ) = 2.7 ± 0.15 eV

  10. Impact and Origin of Interface States in MOS Capacitor with Monolayer MoS2 and HfO2 High-k Dielectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Pengkun; Feng, Xuewei; Ng, Rui Jie; Wang, Shijie; Chi, Dongzhi; Li, Cequn; He, Zhubing; Liu, Xinke; Ang, Kah-Wee

    2017-01-13

    Two-dimensional layered semiconductors such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) at the quantum limit are promising material for nanoelectronics and optoelectronics applications. Understanding the interface properties between the atomically thin MoS 2 channel and gate dielectric is fundamentally important for enhancing the carrier transport properties. Here, we investigate the frequency dispersion mechanism in a metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) with a monolayer MoS 2 and an ultra-thin HfO 2 high-k gate dielectric. We show that the existence of sulfur vacancies at the MoS 2 -HfO 2 interface is responsible for the generation of interface states with a density (D it ) reaching ~7.03 × 10 11  cm -2  eV -1 . This is evidenced by a deficit S:Mo ratio of ~1.96 using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, which deviates from its ideal stoichiometric value. First-principles calculations within the density-functional theory framework further confirms the presence of trap states due to sulfur deficiency, which exist within the MoS 2 bandgap. This corroborates to a voltage-dependent frequency dispersion of ~11.5% at weak accumulation which decreases monotonically to ~9.0% at strong accumulation as the Fermi level moves away from the mid-gap trap states. Further reduction in D it could be achieved by thermally diffusing S atoms to the MoS 2 -HfO 2 interface to annihilate the vacancies. This work provides an insight into the interface properties for enabling the development of MoS 2 devices with carrier transport enhancement.

  11. Difference in Thermal Degradation Behavior of ZrO2 and HfO2 Anodized Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamijyo, Masahiro; Onozuka, Tomotake; Yoshida, Naoto; Shinkai, Satoko; Sasaki, Katsutaka; Yamane, Misao; Abe, Yoshio

    2004-09-01

    Microcrystalline ZrO2 and HfO2 thin film capacitors were prepared by anodizing sputter-deposited Zr and Hf films. The thermal degradation behavior of both anodized capacitors was clarified by the measurement of their capacitance properties and Auger depth profiles before and after heat treatment in air. As a result, it is confirmed that the heat-resistance property of the HfO2 anodized capacitor is superior to that of the ZrO2 capacitor. In addition, it is revealed that the thermal degradation of the ZrO2 anodized capacitor is caused by the diffusion of Zr atoms from the underlying layer into the ZrO2 anodized layer, while that of the HfO2 anodized capacitor is caused by the diffusion of oxygen atoms from the anodized layer into the underlying Hf layer.

  12. Operation mode switchable charge-trap memory based on few-layer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiang; Yan, Xiao; Liu, Chunsen; Ding, Shijin; Zhang, David Wei; Zhou, Peng

    2018-03-01

    Ultrathin layered two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors like MoS2 and WSe2 have received a lot of attention because of their excellent electrical properties and potential applications in electronic devices. We demonstrate a charge-trap memory with two different tunable operation modes based on a few-layer MoS2 channel and an Al2O3/HfO2/Al2O3 charge storage stack. Our device shows excellent memory properties under the traditional three-terminal operation mode. More importantly, unlike conventional charge-trap devices, this device can also realize the memory performance with just two terminals (drain and source) because of the unique atomic crystal electrical characteristics. Under the two-terminal operation mode, the erase/program current ratio can reach up to 104 with a stable retention property. Our study indicates that the conventional charge-trap memory cell can also realize the memory performance without the gate terminal based on novel two dimensional materials, which is meaningful for low power consumption and high integration density applications.

  13. Design and Fabrication of Interdigital Nanocapacitors Coated with HfO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel González

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article nickel interdigital capacitors were fabricated on top of silicon substrates. The capacitance of the interdigital capacitor was optimized by coating the electrodes with a 60 nm layer of HfO2. An analytical solution of the capacitance was compared to electromagnetic simulations using COMSOL and with experimental measurements. Results show that modeling interdigital capacitors using Finite Element Method software such as COMSOL is effective in the design and electrical characterization of these transducers.

  14. Mechanistic Insight into the Stability of HfO2-Coated MoS2 Nanosheet Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2015-06-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that surface passivation of 2D nanosheets of MoS2 by an ultrathin and uniform layer of HfO2 can significantly improve the cyclic performance of sodium ion batteries. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, bare MoS2 and HfO2 coated MoS2 electrodes deliver the specific capacity of 435 and 636 mAh g-1, respectively, at current density of 100 mA g-1. These results imply that batteries using HfO2 coated MoS2 anodes retain 91% of the initial capacity; in contrast, bare MoS2 anodes retain only 63%. Also, HfO2 coated MoS2 anodes show one of the highest reported capacity values for MoS2. Cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results suggest that HfO2 does not take part in electrochemical reaction. The mechanism of capacity retention with HfO2 coating is explained by ex situ transmission electron microscope imaging and electrical impedance spectroscopy. It is illustrated that HfO2 acts as a passivation layer at the anode/electrolyte interface and prevents structural degradation during charge/discharge process. Moreover, the amorphous nature of HfO2 allows facile diffusion of Na ions. These results clearly show the potential of HfO2 coated MoS2 anodes, which performance is significantly higher than previous reports where bulk MoS2 or composites of MoS2 with carbonaceous materials are used. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Mechanistic Insight into the Stability of HfO2-Coated MoS2 Nanosheet Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2015-01-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that surface passivation of 2D nanosheets of MoS2 by an ultrathin and uniform layer of HfO2 can significantly improve the cyclic performance of sodium ion batteries. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, bare MoS2 and HfO2 coated MoS2 electrodes deliver the specific capacity of 435 and 636 mAh g-1, respectively, at current density of 100 mA g-1. These results imply that batteries using HfO2 coated MoS2 anodes retain 91% of the initial capacity; in contrast, bare MoS2 anodes retain only 63%. Also, HfO2 coated MoS2 anodes show one of the highest reported capacity values for MoS2. Cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results suggest that HfO2 does not take part in electrochemical reaction. The mechanism of capacity retention with HfO2 coating is explained by ex situ transmission electron microscope imaging and electrical impedance spectroscopy. It is illustrated that HfO2 acts as a passivation layer at the anode/electrolyte interface and prevents structural degradation during charge/discharge process. Moreover, the amorphous nature of HfO2 allows facile diffusion of Na ions. These results clearly show the potential of HfO2 coated MoS2 anodes, which performance is significantly higher than previous reports where bulk MoS2 or composites of MoS2 with carbonaceous materials are used. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Electrical characterization of ALD HfO2 high-k dielectrics on ( 2 ¯ 01) β-Ga2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, David I.; Tadjer, Marko J.; Wheeler, Virginia D.; Koehler, Andrew D.; Anderson, Travis J.; Eddy, Charles R.; Christou, Aris

    2018-01-01

    The electrical quality of HfO2 dielectrics grown by thermal atomic layer deposition at 175 °C on n-type ( 2 ¯ 01) β-Ga2O3 has been studied through capacitance- and current-voltage measurements on metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors. These capacitors exhibited excellent electrical characteristics, including dual-sweep capacitance-voltage curves with low hysteresis and stretch-out and a frequency-stable dielectric constant of k˜14 when measured between 10 kHz and 1 MHz. The C-V curves exhibited a uniform and repeatable +1.05 V shift relative to the ideal case when swept from 3.5 to -5 V, yielding positively measured flatband (+2.15 V) and threshold (+1.05 V) voltages that may be useful for normally off n-channel Ga2O3 devices. Using the Terman method, an average interface trap density of 1.3 × 1011 cm-2.eV-1 was obtained between 0.2 and 0.6 eV below the conduction band edge. The forward bias current-voltage characteristic was successfully fitted to the Fowler-Nordheim tunneling model at a field strength of 5 MV/cm, allowing an extraction of a 1.3 eV conduction band offset between HfO2 and Ga2O3, which matches the value previously determined from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. However, a temperature dependence in the leakage current was observed. These results suggest that HfO2 is an appealing dielectric for Ga2O3 device applications.

  17. Analyses of desorbed H2O with temperature programmed desorption technique in sol-gel derived HfO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, H.; Nemoto, D.; Ikeda, M.; Nishide, T.

    2009-01-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) is a promising material for the gate insulator in highly miniaturized silicon (Si) ultra-large-scale-integration (ULSI) devices (32 nm and beyond). In the field chemistry, a sol-gel processing has been used to fabricate HfO 2 thin film with the advantages of low cost, relative simplicity, and easy control of the composition of the layers formed. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) has been used not only for analyzing adsorbed gases on the surfaces of bulk sol-gel-derived HfO 2 of sol-gel-derived HfO 2 thin film fired at 350, 450, 550 and 700 deg C in sol-gel derived HfO 2 films in air is investigated using TPD, and also the material characterization of HfO 2 thin films is evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The dielectric constant of the films was also estimated using the capacitance-voltage (C-V) method. TPD is essentially a method of analyzing desorped gases from samples heated by infra-red light as a function of temperature under vacuum conditions using a detector of quadruple mass spectroscopy (QMS). Sol-gel-derived HfO 2 films were fabricated on 76-mm-diameter Si(100) wafers as follows. Hafnia sol solutions were prepared by dissolving HfCl 4 in NH 4 OH solution, followed by the of HCOOH. (author)

  18. Characterization, integration and reliability of HfO2 and LaLuO3 high-κ/metal gate stacks for CMOS applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichau, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    . A lower limit found was EOT=5 Aa for Al doping inside TiN. The doping of TiN on LaLuO 3 is proven by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) studies to modify the interfacial silicate layer to La-rich silicates or even reduce the layer. The oxide quality in Si/HfO 2 /TiN gate stacks is characterized by charge pumping and carrier mobility measurements on 3d MOSFETs a.k.a. FinFETs. The oxide quality in terms of the number of interface (and oxide) traps on top- and sidewall of FinFETs is compared for three different annealing processes. A high temperature anneal of HfO 2 improves significantly the oxide quality and mobility. The gate oxide integrity (GOI) of gate stacks below 1 nm EOT is determined by time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) measurements on FinFETs with HfO 2 /TiN gate stacks. A successful EOT scaling has always to consider the oxide quality and resulting reliability. Degraded oxide quality leads to mobility degradation and earlier soft-breakdown, i.e. leakage current increase.

  19. HfO2 as gate dielectric on Ge: Interfaces and deposition techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caymax, M.; Van Elshocht, S.; Houssa, M.; Delabie, A.; Conard, T.; Meuris, M.; Heyns, M.M.; Dimoulas, A.; Spiga, S.; Fanciulli, M.; Seo, J.W.; Goncharova, L.V.

    2006-01-01

    To fabricate MOS gate stacks on Ge, one can choose from a multitude of metal oxides as dielectric material which can be deposited by many chemical or physical vapor deposition techniques. As a few typical examples, we will discuss here the results from atomic layer deposition (ALD), metal organic CVD (MOCVD) and molecular beam deposition (MBD) using HfO 2 /Ge as materials model system. It appears that a completely interface layer free HfO 2 /Ge combination can be made in MBD, but this results in very bad capacitors. The same bad result we find if HfGe y (Hf germanides) are formed like in the case of MOCVD on HF-dipped Ge. A GeO x interfacial layer appears to be indispensable (if no other passivating materials are applied), but the composition of this interfacial layer (as determined by XPS, TOFSIMS and MEIS) is determining for the C/V quality. On the other hand, the presence of Ge in the HfO 2 layer is not the most important factor that can be responsible for poor C/V, although it can still induce bumps in C/V curves, especially in the form of germanates (Hf-O-Ge). We find that most of these interfacial GeO x layers are in fact sub-oxides, and that this could be (part of) the explanation for the high interfacial state densities. In conclusion, we find that the Ge surface preparation is determining for the gate stack quality, but it needs to be adapted to the specific deposition technique

  20. Electronic excitation induced defect dynamics in HfO2 based MOS devices investigated by in-situ electrical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikanthababu, N.; Vajandar, S.; Arun, N.; Pathak, A. P.; Asokan, K.; Osipowicz, T.; Basu, T.; Nageswara Rao, S. V. S.

    2018-03-01

    In-situ I-V and C-V characterization studies were carried out to determine the device quality of atomic layer deposited HfO2 (2.7 nm)/SiO2 (0.6 nm)/Si-based metal oxide semiconductor devices during 120 MeV Ag ion irradiation. The influence of various tunneling mechanisms has been investigated by analyzing the I-V characteristics as a function of ion fluence. The nature of the defects created is tentatively identified by the determination of the significant tunneling processes. While the ion induced annealing of defects is observed at lower fluences, ion induced intermixing and radiation damage is found to be significant at higher fluences. The C-V characteristics also reveal significant changes at the interface and oxide trap densities: an increase in the oxide layer thickness occurs through the formation of an HfSiO interlayer. The interlayer is due to the swift heavy ion induced intermixing, which has been confirmed by X-TEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements.

  1. Atomic scale engineering of HfO2-based dielectrics for future DRAM applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudek, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Modern dielectrics in combination with appropriate metal electrodes have a great potential to solve many difficulties associated with continuing miniaturization process in the microelectronic industry. One significant branch of microelectronics incorporates dynamic random access memory (DRAM) market. The DRAM devices scaled for over 35 years starting from 4 kb density to several Gb nowadays. The scaling process led to the dielectric material thickness reduction, resulting in higher leakage current density, and as a consequence higher power consumption. As a possible solution for this problem, alternative dielectric materials with improved electrical and material science parameters were intensively studied by many research groups. The higher dielectric constant allows the use of physically thicker layers with high capacitance but strongly reduced leakage current density. This work focused on deposition and characterization of thin insulating layers. The material engineering process was based on Si cleanroom compatible HfO 2 thin films deposited on TiN metal electrodes. A combined materials science and dielectric characterization study showed that Ba-added HfO 2 (BaHfO 3 ) films and Ti-added BaHfO 3 (BaHf 0.5 Ti 0.5 O 3 ) layers are promising candidates for future generation of state-of-the-art DRAMs. In especial a strong increase of the dielectric permittivity k was achieved for thin films of cubic BaHfO 3 (k∝38) and BaHf 0.5 Ti 0.5 O 3 (k∝90) with respect to monoclinic HfO 2 (k∝19). Meanwhile the CET values scaled down to 1 nm for BaHfO 3 and ∝0.8 nm for BaHf 0.5 Ti 0.5 O 3 with respect to HfO 2 (CET=1.5 nm). The Hf 4+ ions substitution in BaHfO 3 by Ti 4+ ions led to a significant decrease of thermal budget from 900 C for BaHfO 3 to 700 C for BaHf 0.5 Ti 0.5 O 3 . Future studies need to focus on the use of appropriate metal electrodes (high work function) and on film deposition process (homogeneity) for better current leakage control. (orig.)

  2. Nanopore fabricated in pyramidal HfO2 film by dielectric breakdown method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Chen, Qi; Deng, Tao; Liu, Zewen

    2017-10-01

    The dielectric breakdown method provides an innovative solution to fabricate solid-state nanopores on insulating films. A nanopore generation event via this method is considered to be caused by random charged traps (i.e., structural defects) and high electric fields in the membrane. Thus, the position and number of nanopores on planar films prepared by the dielectric breakdown method is hard to control. In this paper, we propose to fabricate nanopores on pyramidal HfO2 films (10-nm and 15-nm-thick) to improve the ability to control the location and number during the fabrication process. Since the electric field intensity gets enhanced at the corners of the pyramid-shaped film, the probability of nanopore occurrence at vertex and edge areas increases. This priority of appearance provides us chance to control the location and number of nanopores by monitoring a sudden irreversible discrete increase in current. The experimental results showed that the probability of nanopore occurrence decreases in an order from the vertex area, the edge area to the side face area. The sizes of nanopores ranging from 30 nm to 10 nm were obtained. Nanopores fabricated on the pyramid-shaped HfO2 film also showed an obvious ion current rectification characteristic, which might improve the nanopore performance as a biomolecule sequencing platform.

  3. Al-, Y-, and La-doping effects favoring intrinsic and field induced ferroelectricity in HfO2: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materlik, Robin; Künneth, Christopher; Falkowski, Max; Mikolajick, Thomas; Kersch, Alfred

    2018-04-01

    III-valent dopants have shown to be most effective in stabilizing the ferroelectric, crystalline phase in atomic layer deposited, polycrystalline HfO2 thin films. On the other hand, such dopants are commonly used for tetragonal and cubic phase stabilization in ceramic HfO2. This difference in the impact has not been elucidated so far. The prospect is a suitable doping to produce ferroelectric HfO2 ceramics with a technological impact. In this paper, we investigate the impact of Al, Y, and La doping, which have experimentally proven to stabilize the ferroelectric Pca21 phase in HfO2, in a comprehensive first-principles study. Density functional theory calculations reveal the structure, formation energy, and total energy of various defects in HfO2. Most relevant are substitutional electronically compensated defects without oxygen vacancy, substitutional mixed compensated defects paired with a vacancy, and ionically compensated defect complexes containing two substitutional dopants paired with a vacancy. The ferroelectric phase is strongly favored with La and Y in the substitutional defect. The mixed compensated defect favors the ferroelectric phase as well, but the strongly favored cubic phase limits the concentration range for ferroelectricity. We conclude that a reduction of oxygen vacancies should significantly enhance this range in Y doped HfO2 thin films. With Al, the substitutional defect hardly favors the ferroelectric phase before the tetragonal phase becomes strongly favored with the increasing concentration. This could explain the observed field induced ferroelectricity in Al-doped HfO2. Further Al defects are investigated, but do not favor the f-phase such that the current explanation remains incomplete for Al doping. According to the simulation, doping alone shows clear trends, but is insufficient to replace the monoclinic phase as the ground state. To explain this fact, some other mechanism is needed.

  4. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of CoFeB\\Ta bilayers on ALD HfO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart F. Vermeulen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA is an essential condition for CoFe thin films used in magnetic random access memories. Until recently, interfacial PMA was mainly known to occur in materials stacks with MgO\\CoFe(B interfaces or using an adjacent crystalline heavy metal film. Here, PMA is reported in a CoFeB\\Ta bilayer deposited on amorphous high-κ dielectric (relative permittivity κ=20 HfO2, grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD. PMA with interfacial anisotropy energy Ki up to 0.49 mJ/m2 appears after annealing the stacks between 200°C and 350°C, as shown with vibrating sample magnetometry. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the decrease of PMA starting from 350°C coincides with the onset of interdiffusion in the materials. High-κ dielectrics are potential enablers for giant voltage control of magnetic anisotropy (VCMA. The absence of VCMA in these experiments is ascribed to a 0.6 nm thick magnetic dead layer between HfO2 and CoFeB. The results show PMA can be easily obtained on ALD high-κ dielectrics.

  5. Photoemission study on electrical dipole at SiO_2/Si and HfO_2/SiO_2 interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Nobuyuki; Ohta, Akio; Ikeda, Mitsuhisa; Makihara, Katsunori; Miyazaki, Seiichi

    2017-01-01

    Electrical dipole at SiO_2/Si and HfO_2/SiO_2 interfaces have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) under monochromatized Al Kα radiation. From the analysis of the cut-off energy for secondary photoelectrons measured at each thinning step of a dielectric layer by wet-chemical etching, an abrupt potential change caused by electrical dipole at SiO_2/Si and HfO_2/SiO_2 interfaces has been clearly detected. Al-gate MOS capacitors with thermally-grown SiO_2 and a HfO_2/SiO_2 dielectric stack were fabricated to evaluate the Al work function from the flat band voltage shift of capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics. Comparing the results of XPS and C-V measurements, we have verified that electrical dipole formed at the interface can be directly measured by photoemission measurements. (author)

  6. Pressure-induced phase transformation of HfO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arashi, H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the pressure dependence of the Raman spectra of HfO 2 that was measured by a micro-Raman technique using a single-crystal specimen in the pressure range from 0 to 10 GPa at room temperature. The symmetry assignment of Raman bands of the monoclinic phase was experimentally accomplished from the polarization measurements for the single crystal. With increased pressure, a phase transformation for the monoclinic phase took place at 4.3 ± 0.3 GPa. Nineteen Raman bands were observed for the high-pressure phase. The spectral structure of the Raman bands for the high-pressure phase was similar with those reported previously for ZrO 2 . The space group for the high pressure phase of HfO 2 was determined as Pbcm, which was the same as that of the high-pressure phase for ZrO 2 on the basis of the number and the spectral structure of the Raman bands

  7. Study of Direct-Contact HfO2/Si Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Miyata

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Controlling monolayer Si oxide at the HfO2/Si interface is a challenging issue in scaling the equivalent oxide thickness of HfO2/Si gate stack structures. A concept that the author proposes to control the Si oxide interface by using ultra-high vacuum electron-beam HfO2 deposition is described in this review paper, which enables the so-called direct-contact HfO2/Si structures to be prepared. The electrical characteristics of the HfO2/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors are reviewed, which suggest a sufficiently low interface state density for the operation of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs but reveal the formation of an unexpected strong interface dipole. Kelvin probe measurements of the HfO2/Si structures provide obvious evidence for the formation of dipoles at the HfO2/Si interfaces. The author proposes that one-monolayer Si-O bonds at the HfO2/Si interface naturally lead to a large potential difference, mainly due to the large dielectric constant of the HfO2. Dipole scattering is demonstrated to not be a major concern in the channel mobility of MOSFETs.

  8. Effects of annealing temperature on the characteristics of ALD-deposited HfO2 in MIM capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, S.-W.; Lee, H.J.; Kim, K.S.; You, M.T.; Roh, Y.; Noguchi, T.; Xianyu, W.; Jung, J.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the annealing effects of HfO 2 films deposited by an atomic layer deposition (ALD) method on the electrical and physical properties in the Si/SiO 2 /Pt/ALD-HfO 2 /Pd metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors. If the annealing temperature for HfO 2 films was restricted below 500 deg. C, an annealing step using a rapid thermal processor (RTP) improves the electrical properties such as the dissipation factor and the dielectric constant. On the other hand, annealing at 700 deg. C degrades the electrical characteristics in general; the dissipation factor increases over the frequency range of 1∼4 MHz, and the leakage current increases up to 2 orders at the low electric field regions. We found that the degradation of electrical properties is due to the grain growth in the HfO 2 film (i.e., poly-crystallization of the film) by the high temperature annealing processing. We suggested that the annealing temperature must be restricted below 500 deg. C to obtain the high quality high-k film for the MIM capacitors

  9. MeV-Si ion irradiation effects on the electrical properties of HfO2 thin films on Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xiangkun; Shao Lin; Chen, Q.Y.; Trombetta, L.; Wang Chunyu; Dharmaiahgari, Bhanu; Wang Xuemei; Chen Hui; Ma, K.B.; Liu Jiarui; Chu, W.-K.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the irradiation effect of 2-MeV Si ions on HfO 2 films deposited on Si substrates. HfO 2 films ∼11 nm thick were deposited onto Si substrates by chemical vapor deposition. The samples were then irradiated by 2-MeV Si ions at a fluence of 1 x 10 14 cm -2 at room temperature, followed by rapid thermal annealing at 1000 deg. C for 10 s. After annealing, a layer of aluminum was deposited on the samples as the gate electrode to form metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor structures. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and electrical measurement of both capacitance and current as a function of voltage were used to characterize the samples before and after annealing. Non-insulating properties of the HfO 2 films deteriorated immediately after the ion irradiation, but rapid thermal annealing effectively repaired the irradiation damages, as reflected in improved capacitance versus voltage characteristics and significant reduction of leakage current in the MOS capacitors

  10. Electrical Performance and Reliability Improvement of Amorphous-Indium-Gallium-Zinc-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors with HfO2 Gate Dielectrics by CF4 Plasma Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ching-Lin; Tseng, Fan-Ping; Tseng, Chiao-Yuan

    2018-01-01

    In this work, amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs) with a HfO2 gate insulator and CF4 plasma treatment was demonstrated for the first time. Through the plasma treatment, both the electrical performance and reliability of the a-IGZO TFT with HfO2 gate dielectric were improved. The carrier mobility significantly increased by 80.8%, from 30.2 cm2/V∙s (without treatment) to 54.6 cm2/V∙s (with CF4 plasma treatment), which is due to the incorporated fluorine not only providing an extra electron to the IGZO, but also passivating the interface trap density. In addition, the reliability of the a-IGZO TFT with HfO2 gate dielectric has also been improved by the CF4 plasma treatment. By applying the CF4 plasma treatment to the a-IGZO TFT, the hysteresis effect of the device has been improved and the device’s immunity against moisture from the ambient atmosphere has been enhanced. It is believed that the CF4 plasma treatment not only significantly improves the electrical performance of a-IGZO TFT with HfO2 gate dielectric, but also enhances the device’s reliability. PMID:29772767

  11. Electrical Performance and Reliability Improvement of Amorphous-Indium-Gallium-Zinc-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors with HfO2 Gate Dielectrics by CF4 Plasma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Fan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs with a HfO2 gate insulator and CF4 plasma treatment was demonstrated for the first time. Through the plasma treatment, both the electrical performance and reliability of the a-IGZO TFT with HfO2 gate dielectric were improved. The carrier mobility significantly increased by 80.8%, from 30.2 cm2/V∙s (without treatment to 54.6 cm2/V∙s (with CF4 plasma treatment, which is due to the incorporated fluorine not only providing an extra electron to the IGZO, but also passivating the interface trap density. In addition, the reliability of the a-IGZO TFT with HfO2 gate dielectric has also been improved by the CF4 plasma treatment. By applying the CF4 plasma treatment to the a-IGZO TFT, the hysteresis effect of the device has been improved and the device’s immunity against moisture from the ambient atmosphere has been enhanced. It is believed that the CF4 plasma treatment not only significantly improves the electrical performance of a-IGZO TFT with HfO2 gate dielectric, but also enhances the device’s reliability.

  12. Study of bulk Hafnium oxide (HfO2) under compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Santanu; Mandal, Guruprasad; Das, Parnika

    2018-04-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is a technologically important material. This material has K-value of 25 and band gap 5.8 eV. A k value of 25-30 is preferred for a gate dielectric [1]. As it shows good insulating and capacitive properties, HfO2 is being considered as a replacement to SiO2 in microelectronic devices as gate dielectrics. On the other hand because of toughening mechanism due to phase transformation induced by stress field observed in these oxides, HFO2 has been a material of investigations in various configurations for a very long time. However the controversies about phase transition of HfO2 under pressure still exists. High quality synchrotron radiation has been used to study the structural phase transition of HfO2 under pressure.

  13. High performance organic field-effect transistors with ultra-thin HfO2 gate insulator deposited directly onto the organic semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, S.; Häusermann, R.; Chiba, D.; Shimamura, K.; Ono, T.; Batlogg, B.

    2014-01-01

    We have produced stable organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with an ultra-thin HfO 2 gate insulator deposited directly on top of rubrene single crystals by atomic layer deposition (ALD). We find that ALD is a gentle deposition process to grow thin films without damaging rubrene single crystals, as results these devices have a negligibly small threshold voltage and are very stable against gate-bias-stress, and the mobility exceeds 1 cm 2 /V s. Moreover, the devices show very little degradation even when kept in air for more than 2 months. These results demonstrate thin HfO 2 layers deposited by ALD to be well suited as high capacitance gate dielectrics in OFETs operating at small gate voltage. In addition, the dielectric layer acts as an effective passivation layer to protect the organic semiconductor

  14. Traps in Zirconium Alloys Oxide Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmar Frank

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxide films long-time grown on tubes of three types of zirconium alloys in water and in steam were investigated, by analysing I-V characteristic measured at constant voltages with various temperatures. Using theoretical concepts of Rose [3] and Gould [5], ZryNbSn(Fe proved to have an exponential distribution of trapping centers below the conduction band edge, wheras Zr1Nb and IMP Zry-4 proved to have single energy trap levels.

  15. Material parameters from frequency dispersion simulation of floating gate memory with Ge nanocrystals in HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palade, C.; Lepadatu, A. M.; Slav, A.; Lazanu, S.; Teodorescu, V. S.; Stoica, T.; Ciurea, M. L.

    2018-01-01

    Trilayer memory capacitors with Ge nanocrystals (NCs) floating gate in HfO2 were obtained by magnetron sputtering deposition on p-type Si substrate followed by rapid thermal annealing at relatively low temperature of 600 °C. The frequency dispersion of capacitance and resistance was measured in accumulation regime of Al/HfO2 gate oxide/Ge NCs in HfO2 floating gate/HfO2 tunnel oxide/SiOx/p-Si/Al memory capacitors. For simulation of the frequency dispersion a complex circuit model was used considering an equivalent parallel RC circuit for each layer of the trilayer structure. A series resistance due to metallic contacts and Si substrate was necessary to be included in the model. A very good fit to the experimental data was obtained and the parameters of each layer in the memory capacitor, i.e. capacitances and resistances were determined and in turn the intrinsic material parameters, i.e. dielectric constants and resistivities of layers were evaluated. The results are very important for the study and optimization of the hysteresis behaviour of floating gate memories based on NCs embedded in oxide.

  16. Interface engineered HfO2-based 3D vertical ReRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudec, Boris; Wang, I-Ting; Lai, Wei-Li; Chang, Che-Chia; Hou, Tuo-Hung; Jančovič, Peter; Fröhlich, Karol; Mičušík, Matej; Omastová, Mária

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a double-layer 3D vertical resistive random access memory (ReRAM) stack implementing a Pt/HfO 2 /TiN memory cell. The HfO 2 switching layer is grown by atomic layer deposition on the sidewall of a SiO 2 /TiN/SiO 2 /TiN/SiO 2 multilayer pillar. A steep vertical profile was achieved using CMOS-compatible TiN dry etching. We employ in situ TiN bottom interface engineering by ozone, which results in (a) significant forming voltage reduction which allows for forming-free operation in AC pulsed mode, and (b) non-linearity tuning of low resistance state by current compliance during Set operation. The vertical ReRAM shows excellent read and write disturb immunity between vertically stacked cells, retention over 10 4 s and excellent switching stability at 400 K. Endurance of 10 7 write cycles was achieved using 100 ns wide AC pulses while fast switching speed using pulses of only 10 ns width is also demonstrated. The active switching region was evaluated to be located closer to the bottom interface which allows for the observed high endurance. (paper)

  17. Study of structure and antireflective properties of LaF3/HfO2/SiO2 and LaF3/HfO2/MgF2 trilayers for UV applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszalek, K.; Jaglarz, J.; Sahraoui, B.; Winkowski, P.; Kanak, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study antireflective properties of the tree-layer systems LaF3/HfO2/SiO2 and LaF3/HfO2/MgF2 deposited on heated optical glass substrates. The films were evaporated by the use two deposition techniques. In first method oxide films were prepared by means of e-gun evaporation in vacuum of 5 × 10-5 mbar in the presence of oxygen. The second was used for the deposition of fluoride films. They were obtained by means of thermal source evaporation. Simulation of reflectance was performed for 1M2H1L (Quarter Wavelength Optical Thickness) film stack on an optical quartz glass with the refractive index n = 1.46. The layer thickness was optimized to achieve the lowest light scattering from glass surface covered with dioxide and fluoride films. The values of the interface roughness were determined through atomic force microscopy measurements. The essence of performed calculation was to find minimum reflectance of light in wide ultraviolet region. The spectral dispersion of the refractive index needed for calculations was determined from ellipsometric measurements using the spectroscopic ellipsometer M2000. Additionally, the total reflectance measurements in integrating sphere coupled with Perkin Elmer 900 spectrophotometer were performed. These investigations allowed to determine the influence of such film features like surface and interface roughness on light scattering.

  18. GaN MOSHEMT employing HfO2 as a gate dielectric with partially etched barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kefeng; Zhu, Lin

    2017-09-01

    In order to suppress the gate leakage current of a GaN high electron mobility transistor (GaN HEMT), a GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high electron mobility transistor (MOSHEMT) is proposed, in which a metal-oxide-semiconductor gate with high-dielectric-constant HfO2 as an insulating dielectric is employed to replace the traditional GaN HEMT Schottky gate. A 0.5 μm gate length GaN MOSHEMT was fabricated based on the proposed structure, the {{{Al}}}0.28{{{Ga}}}0.72{{N}} barrier layer is partially etched to produce a higher transconductance without deteriorating the transport characteristics of the two-dimensional electron gas in the channel, the gate dielectric is HfO2 deposited by atomic layer deposition. Current-voltage characteristics and radio frequency characteristics are obtained after device preparation, the maximum current density of the device is 900 mA mm-1, the source-drain breakdown voltage is 75 V, gate current is significantly suppressed and the forward gate voltage swing range is about ten times higher than traditional GaN HEMTs, the GaN MOSHEMT also demonstrates radio frequency characteristics comparable to traditional GaN HEMTs with the same gate length.

  19. Insights into thermal diffusion of germanium and oxygen atoms in HfO2/GeO2/Ge gate stacks and their suppressed reaction with atomically thin AlOx interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Shingo; Asahara, Ryohei; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji; Sako, Hideki; Kawasaki, Naohiko; Yamada, Ichiko; Miyamoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The thermal diffusion of germanium and oxygen atoms in HfO 2 /GeO 2 /Ge gate stacks was comprehensively evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with an isotopic labeling technique. It was found that 18 O-tracers composing the GeO 2 underlayers diffuse within the HfO 2 overlayers based on Fick's law with the low activation energy of about 0.5 eV. Although out-diffusion of the germanium atoms through HfO 2 also proceeded at the low temperatures of around 200 °C, the diffusing germanium atoms preferentially segregated on the HfO 2 surfaces, and the reaction was further enhanced at high temperatures with the assistance of GeO desorption. A technique to insert atomically thin AlO x interlayers between the HfO 2 and GeO 2 layers was proven to effectively suppress both of these independent germanium and oxygen intermixing reactions in the gate stacks

  20. Structural, morphological, optical and photoluminescence properties of HfO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.Y.; Wang, W.J.; Wang, J.; Miao, C.Y.; Li, S.L.; Zhang, Q.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystalline monoclinic HfO 2 films with an average crystal size of 4.2–14.8 nm were sputter deposited under controlled temperatures and their structural characteristics and optical and photoluminescence properties have been evaluated. Structural investigations indicate that monoclinic HfO 2 films grown at higher temperatures above 400 °C are highly oriented along the (− 111) direction. The lattice expansion increases with diminishing HfO 2 crystalline size below 6.8 nm while maximum lattice expansion occurs with highly oriented monoclinic HfO 2 of crystalline size about 14.8 nm. The analysis of atomic force microscopy shows that the film growth at 600 °C can be attributed to the surface-diffusion-dominated growth. The intensity of the shoulderlike band that initiates at ∼ 5.7 eV and saturates at 5.94 eV shows continued increase with increasing crystalline size, which is intrinsic to nanocrystalline monoclinic HfO 2 films. Optical band gap varies in the range 5.40 ± 0.03–5.60 ± 0.03 eV and is slightly decreased with the increase in crystalline size. The luminescence band at 4.0 eV of HfO 2 films grown at room temperature can be ascribed to the vibronic transition of excited OH · radical while the emission at 3.2–3.3 eV for the films grown at all temperatures was attributed to the radiative recombination at impurity and/or defect centers. - Highlights: • Nanocrystalline monoclinic HfO 2 films were sputter deposited. • Structural, optical and photoluminescence properties were studied. • To analyze the scaling behavior using the power spectral density • Optical and photoluminescence properties strongly depend on film growth temperature

  1. Fabrication of periodic arrays of metallic nanoparticles by block copolymer templates on HfO_2 substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frascaroli, Jacopo; Seguini, Gabriele; Spiga, Sabina; Perego, Michele; Boarino, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Block copolymer-based templates can be exploited for the fabrication of ordered arrays of metal nanoparticles (NPs) with a diameter down to a few nanometers. In order to develop this technique on metal oxide substrates, we studied the self-assembly of polymeric templates directly on the HfO_2 surface. Using a random copolymer neutralization layer, we obtained an effective HfO_2 surface neutralization, while the effects of surface cleaning and annealing temperature were carefully examined. Varying the block copolymer molecular weight, we produced regular nanoporous templates with feature size variable between 10 and 30 nm and a density up to 1.5 × 10"1"1 cm"−"2. With the adoption of a pattern transfer process, we produced ordered arrays of Pt and Pt/Ti NPs with diameters of 12, 21 and 29 nm and a constant size dispersion (σ) of 2.5 nm. For the smallest template adopted, the NP diameter is significantly lower than the original template dimension. In this specific configuration, the granularity of the deposited film probably influences the pattern transfer process and very small NPs of 12 nm were achieved without a significant broadening of the size distribution. (paper)

  2. High-throughput identification of higher-κ dielectrics from an amorphous N2-doped HfO2–TiO2 library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, K.-S.; Lu, W.-C.; Wu, C.-Y.; Feng, H.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Amorphous N 2 -doped HfO 2 –TiO 2 libraries were fabricated using sputtering. • Structure and quality of the dielectric and interfacial layers were investigated. • κ (54), J L < 10 −6 A/cm 2 , and equivalent oxide thickness (1 nm) were identified. - Abstract: High-throughput sputtering was used to fabricate high-quality, amorphous, thin HfO 2 –TiO 2 and N 2 -doped HfO 2 –TiO 2 (HfON–TiON) gate dielectric libraries. Electron probe energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to investigate the structures, compositions, and qualities of the dielectric and interfacial layers of these libraries to determine their electrical properties. A κ value of approximately 54, a leakage current density <10 −6 A/cm 2 , and an equivalent oxide thickness of approximately 1 nm were identified in an HfON–TiON library within a composition range of 68–80 at.% Ti. This library exhibits promise for application in highly advanced metal–oxide–semiconductor (higher-κ) gate stacks

  3. SIMS study of oxygen diffusion in monoclinic HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael P.; De Souza, Roger A.

    2018-01-01

    The diffusion of oxygen in dense ceramics of monoclinic HfO2 was studied by means of (18O/16O) isotope exchange annealing and subsequent determination of isotope depth profiles by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. Anneals were performed in the temperature range of 573 ≤T /K ≤ 973 at an oxygen partial pressure of p O2=200 mbar . All measured isotope profiles exhibited two features: the first feature, closer to the surface, was attributed mainly to slow oxygen diffusion in an impurity silicate phase; the second feature, deeper in the sample, was attributed to oxygen diffusion in bulk monoclinic HfO2 . The activation enthalpy of oxygen tracer diffusion in bulk HfO2 was found to be ΔHD∗≈0.5 eV .

  4. Role of Ti and Pt electrodes on resistance switching variability of HfO2-based Resistive Random Access Memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabout, T.; Buckley, J.; Cagli, C.; Jousseaume, V.; Nodin, J.-F.; Salvo, B. de; Bocquet, M.; Muller, Ch.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the role of platinum or titanium–titanium nitride electrodes on variability of resistive switching characteristics and electrical performances of HfO 2 -based memory elements. Capacitor-like Pt/HfO 2 (10 nm)/Pt and Ti/HfO 2 (10 nm)/TiN structures were fabricated on top of a tungsten pillar bottom electrode and integrated in-between two interconnect metal lines. First, quasi-static measurements were performed to apprehend the role of electrodes on electroforming, set and reset operations and their corresponding switching parameters. Memory elements with Pt as top and bottom electrodes exhibited a non-polar behavior with sharp decrease of current during reset operation while Ti/HfO 2 /TiN capacitors showed a bipolar switching behavior, with a gradual reset. In a second step, statistical distributions of switching parameters (voltage and resistance) were extracted from data obtained on few hundreds of capacitors. Even if the resistance in low resistive state and reset voltage was found to be comparable for both types of electrodes, the progressive reset operation observed on samples with Ti/TiN electrodes led to a lower variability of resistance in high resistive state and concomitantly of set voltage. In addition Ti–TiN electrodes enabled gaining: (i) lower forming and set voltages with significantly narrower capacitor-to-capacitor distributions; (ii) a better data retention capability (10 years at 65 °C instead of 10 years at 50 °C for Pt electrodes); (iii) satisfactory dynamic performances with lower set and reset voltages for ramp speed ranging from 10 −2 to 10 7 V/s. The significant improvement of switching behavior with Ti–TiN electrodes is mainly attributed to the formation of a native interface layer between HfO 2 oxide and Ti top electrode. - Highlights: ► HfO2 based capacitor-like structures were fabricated with Pt and Ti based electrodes. ► Influence of electrode materials on switching parameter variability is assessed.

  5. Preparation and characterization of Ce-doped HfO2 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gálvez-Barboza, S.; González, L.A.; Puente-Urbina, B.A.; Saucedo-Salazar, E.M.; García-Cerda, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ce-doped HfO 2 nanoparticles were prepared by a modified solgel method. • Ce-doped HfO 2 nanoparticles have a semispherical shape with sizes between 6 and 11.5 nm. • The samples doped with 10% in weight of Ce directly crystallized in a cubic structure. • A quick, straightforward and effective route for the preparation of Ce-doped nanoparticles. - Abstract: A modified solgel method to synthesize Ce-doped HfO 2 nanoparticles was carried out using a precursor material prepared with cerium nitrate, hafnium chloride, citric acid and ethylene glycol. The obtained precursor material was calcined at 500 and 700 °C for 2 h in air. The influence of the concentration of Ce and the calcination temperature was studied to observe the structural and morphological changes of the obtained materials. For the characterization, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman scattering (RS) were employed. The XRD patterns shown that the Ce-doped HfO 2 undergoes a structural transformation from monoclinic to cubic phase, which is significantly dependent on the Ce content and calcination temperature. TEM images have also confirmed the existence of semispherical nanoparticles with sizes between 6 and 11.5 nm

  6. Thermal Conductivity and Water Vapor Stability of Ceramic HfO2-Based Coating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 are candidate thermal/environmental barrier coating materials for gas turbine ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor liner applications because of their relatively low thermal conductivity and high temperature capability. In this paper, thermal conductivity and high temperature phase stability of plasma-sprayed coatings and/or hot-pressed HfO2-5mol%Y2O3, HfO2-15mol%Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 were evaluated at temperatures up to 1700 C using a steady-state laser heat-flux technique. Sintering behavior of the plasma-sprayed coatings was determined by monitoring the thermal conductivity increases during a 20-hour test period at various temperatures. Durability and failure mechanisms of the HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 coatings on mullite/SiC Hexoloy or CMC substrates were investigated at 1650 C under thermal gradient cyclic conditions. Coating design and testing issues for the 1650 C thermal/environmental barrier coating applications will also be discussed.

  7. Comparative study on electrical properties of atomic layer deposited high-permittivity materials on silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duenas, S.; Castan, H.; Garcia, H.; Barbolla, J.; Kukli, K.; Ritala, M.; Leskelae, M.

    2005-01-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage and conductance transient measurement techniques have been applied in order to evaluate the electrical quality of thin high-permittivity oxide layers on silicon. The oxides studied included HfO 2 film grown from two different oxygen-free metal precursors and Ta 2 O 5 and Nb 2 O 5 nanolaminates. The interface trap densities correlated to the oxide growth chemistry and semiconductor substrate treatment. No gap state densities induced by structural disorder were measured in the films grown on chemical SiO 2 . Trap densities were also clearly lower in HfO 2 films compared to Ta 2 O 5 -Nb 2 O 5

  8. Improved charge trapping flash device with Al2O3/HfSiO stack as blocking layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Zhi-Wei; Huo Zong-Liang; Zhu Chen-Xin; Xu Zhong-Guang; Liu Jing; Liu Ming

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate an Al 2 O 3 /HfSiO stack as the blocking layer of a metal—oxide—nitride—oxide—silicon-type (MONOS) memory capacitor. Compared with a memory capacitor with a single HfSiO layer as the blocking layer or an Al 2 O 3 /HfO 2 stack as the blocking layer, the sample with the Al 2 O 3 /HfSiO stack as the blocking layer shows high program/erase (P/E) speed and good data retention characteristics. These improved performances can be explained by energy band engineering. The experimental results demonstrate that the memory device with an Al 2 O 3 /HfSiO stack as the blocking layer has great potential for further high-performance nonvolatile memory applications. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  9. Issues concerning the determination of solubility products of sparingly soluble crystalline solids. Solubility of HfO2(cr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Kitamura, Akira; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sasaki, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Taishi

    2016-01-01

    Solubility studies were conducted with HfO 2 (cr) solid as a function HCl and ionic strength ranging from 2.0 to 0.004 mol kg -1 . These studies involved (1) using two different amounts of the solid phase, (2) acid washing the bulk solid phase, (3) preheating the solid phase to 1400 C, and (4) heating amorphous HfO 2 (am) suspensions to 90 C to ascertain whether the HfO 2 (am) converts to HfO 2 (cr) and to determine the solubility from the oversaturation direction. Based on the results of these treatments it is concluded that the HfO 2 (cr) contains a small fraction of less crystalline, but not amorphous, material [HfO 2 (lcr)] and this, rather than the HfO 2 (cr), is the solubility-controlling phase in the range of experimental variables investigated in this study. The solubility data are interpreted using both the Pitzer and SIT models and they provide log 10 K 0 values of -(59.75±0.35) and -(59.48±0.41), respectively, for the solubility product of HfO 2 (lcr)[HfO 2 (lcr) + 2H 2 O ↔ Hf 4+ + 4OH - ]. The log 10 of the solubility product of HfO 2 (cr) is estimated to be < -63. The observation of a small fraction of less crystalline higher solubility material is consistent with the general picture that mineral surfaces are often structurally and/or compositionally imperfect leading to a higher solubility than the bulk crystalline solid. This study stresses the urgent need, during interpretation of solubility data, of taking precautions to make certain that the observed solubility behavior for sparingly-soluble solids is assigned to the proper solid phase.

  10. Stable tetragonal phase and magnetic properties of Fe-doped HfO2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, T. S. N.; Cavalcante, F. H. M.; Bosch-Santos, B.; Pereira, L. F. D.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Freitas, R. S.; Saxena, R. N.; Carbonari, A. W.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the effect in structural and magnetic properties of iron doping with concentration of 20% in hafnium dioxide (HfO2) nanoparticles is investigated. HfO2 is a wide band gap oxide with great potential to be used as high-permittivity gate dielectrics, which can be improved by doping. Nanoparticle samples were prepared by sol-gel chemical method and had their structure, morphology, and magnetic properties, respectively, investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD), and magnetization measurements. TEM and SEM results show size distribution of particles in the range from 30 nm to 40 nm with small dispersion. Magnetization measurements show the blocking temperature at around 90 K with a strong paramagnetic contribution. XRD results show a major tetragonal phase (94%).

  11. Formation and disruption of conductive filaments in a HfO2/TiN structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brivio, S; Tallarida, G; Cianci, E; Spiga, S

    2014-01-01

    The process of the formation and disruption of nanometric conductive filaments in a HfO 2 /TiN structure is investigated by conductive atomic force microscopy. The preforming state evidences nonhomogeneous conduction at high fields through conductive paths, which are associated with pre-existing defects and develop into conductive filaments with a forming procedure. The disruption of the same filaments is demonstrated as well, according to a bipolar operation. In addition, the conductive tip of the microscopy is exploited to perform electrical operations on single conductive spots, which evidences that neighboring conductive filaments are not electrically independent. We propose a picture that describes the evolution of the shape of the conductive filaments in the processes of their formation and disruption, which involves the development of conductive branches from a common root; this root resides in the pre-existing defects that lay at the HfO 2 /TiN interface. (paper)

  12. Stable tetragonal phase and magnetic properties of Fe-doped HfO2 nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. N. Sales

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect in structural and magnetic properties of iron doping with concentration of 20% in hafnium dioxide (HfO2 nanoparticles is investigated. HfO2 is a wide band gap oxide with great potential to be used as high-permittivity gate dielectrics, which can be improved by doping. Nanoparticle samples were prepared by sol-gel chemical method and had their structure, morphology, and magnetic properties, respectively, investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM with electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD, and magnetization measurements. TEM and SEM results show size distribution of particles in the range from 30 nm to 40 nm with small dispersion. Magnetization measurements show the blocking temperature at around 90 K with a strong paramagnetic contribution. XRD results show a major tetragonal phase (94%.

  13. Field-enhanced route to generating anti-Frenkel pairs in HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schie, Marcel; Menzel, Stephan; Robertson, John; Waser, Rainer; De Souza, Roger A.

    2018-03-01

    The generation of anti-Frenkel pairs (oxygen vacancies and oxygen interstitials) in monoclinic and cubic HfO2 under an applied electric field is examined. A thermodynamic model is used to derive an expression for the critical field strength required to generate an anti-Frenkel pair. The critical field strength of EaFcr˜101GVm-1 obtained for HfO2 exceeds substantially the field strengths routinely employed in the forming and switching operations of resistive switching HfO2 devices, suggesting that field-enhanced defect generation is negligible. Atomistic simulations with molecular static (MS) and molecular dynamic (MD) approaches support this finding. The MS calculations indicated a high formation energy of Δ EaF≈8 eV for the infinitely separated anti-Frenkel pair, and only a decrease to Δ EaF≈6 eV for the adjacent anti-Frenkel pair. The MD simulations showed no defect generation in either phase for E <3 GVm-1 , and only sporadic defect generation in the monoclinic phase (at E =3 GVm-1 ) with fast (trec<4 ps ) recombination. At even higher E but below EaFcr both monoclinic and cubic structures became unstable as a result of field-induced deformation of the ionic potential wells. Further MD investigations starting with preexisting anti-Frenkel pairs revealed recombination of all pairs within trec<1 ps , even for the case of neutral vacancies and charged interstitials, for which formally there is no electrostatic attraction between the defects. In conclusion, we find no physically reasonable route to generating point-defects in HfO2 by an applied field.

  14. Thermal expansion studies on HfO2-Gd2O3 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panneerselvam, G.; Antony, M.P.; Nagarajan, K.

    2014-01-01

    A series of solid solutions containing GdO 1.5 in HfO 2 , (Hf 1-y Gd y ) O 2 (y = 0.15, 0.2, 0.3, 0.41 and 0.505) were prepared by solid state method. Structural characterization and computation of lattice parameter was carried out using room temperature X-ray diffraction measurements

  15. Oxygen vacancy effects in HfO2-based resistive switching memory: First principle study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehua Dai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The work investigated the shape and orientation of oxygen vacancy clusters in HfO2-base resistive random access memory (ReRAM by using the first-principle method based on the density functional theory. Firstly, the formation energy of different local Vo clusters was calculated in four established orientation systems. Then, the optimized orientation and charger conductor shape were identified by comparing the isosurface plots of partial charge density, formation energy, and the highest isosurface value of oxygen vacancy. The calculated results revealed that the [010] orientation was the optimal migration path of Vo, and the shape of system D4 was the best charge conductor in HfO2, which effectively influenced the SET voltage, formation voltage and the ON/OFF ratio of the device. Afterwards, the PDOS of Hf near Vo and total density of states of the system D4_010 were obtained, revealing the composition of charge conductor was oxygen vacancy instead of metal Hf. Furthermore, the migration barriers of the Vo hopping between neighboring unit cells were calculated along four different orientations. The motion was proved along [010] orientation. The optimal circulation path for Vo migration in the HfO2 super-cell was obtained.

  16. Characterization of luminescent samarium doped HfO2 coatings synthesized by spray pyrolysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon-Roa, C; Guzman-Mendoza, J; Aguilar-Frutis, M; Garcia-Hipolito, M; Alvarez-Fragoso, O; Falcony, C

    2008-01-01

    Trivalent samarium (Sm 3+ ) doped hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) films were deposited using the spray pyrolysis deposition technique. The films were deposited on Corning glass substrates at temperatures ranging from 300 to 550 deg. C using chlorides as raw materials. Films, mostly amorphous, were obtained when deposition temperatures were below 350 deg. C. However, for temperatures higher than 400 deg. C, the films became polycrystalline, presenting the HfO 2 monoclinic phase. Scanning electron microscopy of the films revealed a rough surface morphology with spherical particles. Also, electron energy dispersive analysis was performed on these films. The photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence characteristics of the HfO 2 : SmCl 3 films, measured at room temperature, exhibited four main bands centred at 570, 610, 652 and 716 nm, which are due to the well-known intra-4f transitions of the Sm 3+ ion. It was found that the overall emission intensity rose as the deposition temperature was increased. Furthermore, a concentration quenching of the luminescence intensity was also observed

  17. High-temperature x-ray diffraction study of HfTiO4-HfO2 solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    High-temperature x-ray diffraction techniques were used to determine the axial thermal expansion curves of HfTiO 4 -HfO 2 solid solutions as a function of composition. Data show increasing anisotropy with increasing HfO 2 content. An orthorhombic-to-monoclinic phase transformation was detected near room temperature for compositions near the high HfO 2 end of the orthorhombic phase field and for compositions within the two-phase region (HfTiO 4 solid solution plus HfO 2 solid solution). An orthorhombic-to-cubic phase transformation is indicated by data from oxygen-deficient materials at greater than 1873 0 K. (U.S.)

  18. Self-diffusion of Er and Hf inpure and HfO2-doped polycrystalline Er2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidecker, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Using a tracer technique, self-diffusion of Er and Hf was measured over the approximate temperature interval of 1600 to 1970 0 C in pure and HfO 2 -doped polycryatalline Er 2 O 3 . Up to about 10 m/o HfO 2 dopant level, the Er self-diffusion coefficients followed a relationship based on cation vacancies. Above 10 m/o HfO 2 , deviation from this relationship occurred, apparently due to clustering of cation vacancies and oxygen interstitials around the dopant hafnia ion. The activation energy for the self-diffusion of Er in pure Er 2 O 3 was 82.2 Kcal/mole and increased with the HfO 2 dopant level present. Self-diffusion of Hf was measured in pure Er 2 O 3 having two impurity levels, and a separation of the grain boundary. The volume diffusion of Hf showed both extrinsic and intrinsic behavior with the transition temperature increasing with the impurity level present in Er 2 O 3 . The activation energy for Hf volume diffusion in the intrinsic region was high, i.e. 235 -+ 9.5 Kcal/mole. The grain boundary diffusion was apparently extrinsic over the entire temperature interval Very low Hf self diffusion rates were found in both pure and HfO 2 doped Er 2 O 3 compositions. Despite a clustering effect, the HfO 2 dopant increased the Hf volume diffusion coefficients

  19. Self-trapped excitonic green emission from layered semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M. Idrish

    2009-01-01

    Crystals of layered semiconductor are grown by Bridgman technique and are studied them under two-photon excitation by a Q-switched 20-ns pulse laser. The photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra of the crystals are measured at various pumping powers and temperatures. The PL spectra appear broad and structureless emissions with their peaks in the green spectral region. The characteristic emissions are from self-trapped excitons of the crystals. An analysis of the spectra measured at various pumping powers shows a quadratic dependence of the PL peak intensity on the power, confirming a biphotonic process of the two-photon pumping. The temperature dependence shows an enhancement of the nonlinear response at low temperatures. The activation energy is estimated and found to be 2.4 meV. The roles of the bound excitons in the observed PL are discussed briefly.

  20. Self-trapped excitonic green emission from layered semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M. Idrish, E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)

    2009-08-15

    Crystals of layered semiconductor are grown by Bridgman technique and are studied them under two-photon excitation by a Q-switched 20-ns pulse laser. The photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra of the crystals are measured at various pumping powers and temperatures. The PL spectra appear broad and structureless emissions with their peaks in the green spectral region. The characteristic emissions are from self-trapped excitons of the crystals. An analysis of the spectra measured at various pumping powers shows a quadratic dependence of the PL peak intensity on the power, confirming a biphotonic process of the two-photon pumping. The temperature dependence shows an enhancement of the nonlinear response at low temperatures. The activation energy is estimated and found to be 2.4 meV. The roles of the bound excitons in the observed PL are discussed briefly.

  1. Interface and oxide traps in high-κ hafnium oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, H.; Zhan, N.; Ng, K.L.; Poon, M.C.; Kok, C.W.

    2004-01-01

    The origins of the interface trap generation and the effects of thermal annealing on the interface and bulk trap distributions are studied in detail. We found that oxidation of the HfO 2 /Si interface, removal of deep trap centers, and crystallization of the as-deposited film will take place during the post-deposition annealing (PDA). These processes will result in the removal of interface traps and deep oxide traps and introduce a large amount of shallow oxide traps at the grain boundaries of the polycrystalline film. Thus, trade-off has to be made in considering the interface trap density and oxide trap density when conducting PDA. In addition, the high interface trap and oxide trap densities of the HfO 2 films suggest that we may have to use the SiO 2 /HfO 2 stack or hafnium silicate structure for better device performance

  2. Surface modelling on heavy atom crystalline compounds: HfO2 and UO2 fluorite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evarestov, Robert; Bandura, Andrei; Blokhin, Eugeny

    2009-01-01

    The study of the bulk and surface properties of cubic (fluorite structure) HfO 2 and UO 2 was performed using the hybrid Hartree-Fock density functional theory linear combination of atomic orbitals simulations via the CRYSTAL06 computer code. The Stuttgart small-core pseudopotentials and corresponding basis sets were used for the core-valence interactions. The influence of relativistic effects on the structure and properties of the systems was studied. It was found that surface properties of Mott-Hubbard dielectric UO 2 differ from those found for other metal oxides with the closed-shell configuration of d-electrons

  3. Wide band antireflective coatings Al2O3 / HfO2 / MgF2 for UV region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkowski, P.; Marszałek, Konstanty W.

    2013-07-01

    Deposition technology of the three layers antireflective coatings consists of hafnium compound are presented in this paper. Oxide films were deposited by means of e-gun evaporation in vacuum of 5x10-5 mbar in presence of oxygen and fluoride films by thermal evaporation. Substrate temperature was 250°C. Coatings were deposited onto optical lenses made from quartz glass (Corning HPFS). Thickness and deposition rate were controlled by thickness measuring system Inficon XTC/2. Simulations leading to optimization of thickness and experimental results of optical measurements carried during and after deposition process were presented. Physical thickness measurements were made during deposition process and were equal to 43 nm/74 nm/51 nm for Al2O3 / HfO2 / MgF2 respectively. Optimization was carried out for ultraviolet region from 230nm to the beginning of visible region 400 nm. In this region the average reflectance of the antireflective coating was less than 0.5% in the whole range of application.

  4. PAC study in the HfO2-SiO2 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chain, C.Y.; Damonte, L.C.; Ferrari, S.; Munoz, E.; Torres, C. Rodriguez; Pasquevich, A.F.

    2010-01-01

    A high-k HfO 2 /SiO 2 gate stack is taking the place of SiO 2 as a gate dielectric in field effect transistors. This fact makes the study of the solid-state reaction between these oxides very important. Nanostructure characterization of a high-energy ball milled and post-annealed equimolar HfO 2 and amorphous SiO 2 powder mixture has been carried out by perturbed angular correlations (PAC) technique. The study was complemented with X-ray diffraction and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The experimental results revealed that the ball milling of equimolar mixtures increases the defects concentration in hafnium oxide. No solid-state reaction occurred even after 8 h of milling. The formation of HfSiO 4 (hafnon) was observed in the milled blends annealed at high temperatures.The PAC results of the milled samples are compared with those obtained for pure m-ZrO 2 subjected to high-energy ball milling and with reported microstructure data for the system ZrO 2 -SiO 2 .

  5. Laser conditioning effect on HfO2/SiO2 film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Yaowei; Zhang Zhe; Liu Hao; Ouyang Sheng; Zheng Yi; Tang Gengyu; Chen Songlin; Ma Ping

    2013-01-01

    Laser conditioning is one of the important methods to improve the laser damage threshold of film optics. Firstly, a large aperture laser was used to irradiate the HfO 2 /SiO 2 reflectors, which were evaporated from hafnia and silica by e-beam. Secondly, a laser calorimeter was used to test the film absorption before and after laser irradiation. Focused ion beam (FIB) was few reported using on laser film, it was used to study the damage morphology and explore the cause of damage. The shooting of the partial ejection on nodule was obtained for the first time, which provided the basis for study the damage process. The results show that film absorption was decreased obviously after the laser irradiation, laser conditioning can raise the laser damage threshold by the 'cleaning mechanism'. For the HfO 2 /SiO 2 reflectors, laser conditioning was effective to eject the nodules on substrate. It resulted from the nodule residue not to affect the subsequent laser. In addition, laser conditioning was not effective to the nodule in the film, which might be from the material spatter in coating process. In this case, other method could be used to get rid of the nodules. (authors)

  6. Theoretical prediction of ion conductivity in solid state HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Wen-Zhou; Sun, Jiu-Yu; Jiang, Zhen-Yi

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical prediction of ion conductivity for solid state HfO2 is carried out in analogy to ZrO2 based on the density functional calculation. Geometric and electronic structures of pure bulks exhibit similarity for the two materials. Negative formation enthalpy and negative vacancy formation energy are found for YSH (yttria-stabilized hafnia) and YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia), suggesting the stability of both materials. Low activation energies (below 0.7 eV) of diffusion are found in both materials, and YSH's is a little higher than that of YSZ. In addition, for both HfO2 and ZrO2, the supercells with native oxygen vacancies are also studied. The so-called defect states are observed in the supercells with neutral and +1 charge native vacancy but not in the +2 charge one. It can give an explanation to the relatively lower activation energies of yttria-doped oxides and +2 charge vacancy supercells. A brief discussion is presented to explain the different YSH ion conductivities in the experiment and obtained by us, and we attribute this to the different ion vibrations at different temperatures.

  7. Resistive switching characteristics of HfO2-based memory devices on flexible plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong; Cho, Kyoungah; Park, Sukhyung; Kim, Sangsig

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we examine the characteristics of HfO2-based resistive switching random access memory (ReRAM) devices on flexible plastics. The Pt/HfO2/Au ReRAM devices exhibit the unipolar resistive switching behaviors caused by the conducting filaments. From the Auger depth profiles of the HfO2 thin film, it is confirmed that the relatively lower oxygen content in the interface of the bottom electrode is responsible for the resistive switching by oxygen vacancies. And the unipolar resistive switching behaviors are analyzed from the C-V characteristics in which negative and positive capacitances are measured in the low-resistance state and the high-resistance state, respectively. The devices have a high on/off ratio of 10(4) and the excellent retention properties even after a continuous bending test of two thousand cycles. The correlation between the device size and the memory characteristics is investigated as well. A relatively smaller-sized device having a higher on/off ratio operates at a higher voltage than a relatively larger-sized device.

  8. HfO2 and SiO2 as barriers in magnetic tunneling junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Gokaran; Archer, Thomas; Sanvito, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    SiO2 and HfO2 are both high-k, wide-gap semiconductors, currently used in the microelectronic industry as gate barriers. Here we investigate whether the same materials can be employed to make magnetic tunnel junctions, which in principle can be amenable for integration in conventional Si technology. By using a combination of density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green's functions method for quantum transport we have studied the transport properties of Co [0001 ] /SiO2[001 ] /Co [0001 ] and Fe [001 ] /HfO2[001 ] /Fe [001 ] junctions. In both cases we found a quite large magnetoresistance, which is explained through the analysis of the real band structure of the magnets and the complex one of the insulator. We find that there is no symmetry spin filtering for the Co-based junction since the high transmission Δ2' band crosses the Fermi level, EF, for both spin directions. However, the fact that Co is a strong ferromagnet makes the orbital contribution to the two Δ2' spin subbands different, yielding magnetoresistance. In contrast for the Fe-based junction symmetry filtering is active for an energy window spanning between the Fermi level and 1 eV below EF, with Δ1 symmetry contributing to the transmission.

  9. Temperature Effects on a-IGZO Thin Film Transistors Using HfO2 Gate Dielectric Material

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yu-Hsien; Chou, Jay-Chi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the temperature effect on amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) using hafnium oxide (HfO2) gate dielectric material. HfO2 is an attractive candidate as a high-κ dielectric material for gate oxide because it has great potential to exhibit superior electrical properties with a high drive current. In the process of integrating the gate dielectric and IGZO thin film, postannealing treatment is an essential process for completing the chem...

  10. Modeling and Implementation of HfO2-based Ferroelectric Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Spencer Allen

    HfO2-based ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) represent a unique opportunity as both a next-generation digital non-volatile memory and as synapse devices in braininspired logic systems, owing to their higher reliability compared to filamentary resistive random-access memory (ReRAM) and higher speed and lower power consumption compared to competing devices, including phase-change memory (PCM) and state-of-the-art FTJ. Ferroelectrics are often easier to deposit and have simpler material structure than films for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). Ferroelectric HfO2 also enables complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatibility, since lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and BaTiO3-based FTJs often are not. No other groups have yet demonstrated a HfO2-based FTJ (to best of the author's knowledge) or applied it to a suitable system. For such devices to be useful, system designers require models based on both theoretical physical analysis and experimental results of fabricated devices in order to confidently design control systems. Both the CMOS circuitry and FTJs must then be designed in layout and fabricated on the same die. This work includes modeling of proposed device structures using a custom python script, which calculates theoretical potential barrier heights as a function of material properties and corresponding current densities (ranging from 8x103 to 3x10-2 A/cm 2 with RHRS/RLRS ranging from 5x105 to 6, depending on ferroelectric thickness). These equations were then combined with polynomial fits of experimental timing data and implemented in a Verilog-A behavioral analog model in Cadence Virtuoso. The author proposes tristate CMOS control systems, and circuits, for implementation of FTJ devices as digital memory and presents simulated performance. Finally, a process flow for fabrication of FTJ devices with CMOS is presented. This work has therefore enabled the fabrication of FTJ devices at RIT and the continued investigation of them as applied to any appropriate systems.

  11. Properties of phases in HfO2-TiO2 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Red'ko, V.P.; Terekhovskij, P.B.; Majster, I.M.; Shevchenko, A.V.; Lopato, L.M.; Dvernyakova, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    A study was made on axial and linear coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of HfO 2 -TiO 2 system samples in concentration range of 25-50 mol% TiO 2 . Samples, containing 35 and 37 mol% TiO 2 , are characterized by the lowest values of linear CTE. Dispersion of the basic substances doesn't affect CTE value. Correlation with axial and linear CTE of samples in ZrO 2 -TiO 2 system was conducted. Presence of anisotropy of change of lattice parameters was supported for samples, containing 37.5 and 40 mol% TiO 2 . Polymorphous transformations for hafnium titanate were not revealed

  12. Study of strained-Si p-channel MOSFETs with HfO2 gate dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Diana; Das, Sanghamitra; Dash, Tara Prasanna

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the transconductance of strained-Si p-MOSFETs with high-K dielectric (HfO2) as gate oxide, has been presented through simulation using the TCAD tool Silvaco-ATLAS. The results have been compared with a SiO2/strained-Si p-MOSFET device. Peak transconductance enhancement factors of 2.97 and 2.73 has been obtained for strained-Si p-MOSFETs in comparison to bulk Si channel p-MOSFETs with SiO2 and high-K dielectric respectively. This behavior is in good agreement with the reported experimental results. The transconductance of the strained-Si device at low temperatures has also been simulated. As expected, the mobility and hence the transconductance increases at lower temperatures due to reduced phonon scattering. However, the enhancements with high-K gate dielectric is less as compared to that with SiO2.

  13. First principle simulations on the effects of oxygen vacancy in HfO2-based RRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehua Dai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HfO2-based resistive random access memory (RRAM takes advantage of oxygen vacancy (V o defects in its principle of operation. Since the change in resistivity of the material is controlled by the level of oxygen deficiency in the material, it is significantly important to study the performance of oxygen vacancies in formation of conductive filament. Excluding effects of the applied voltage, the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP is used to investigate the orientation and concentration mechanism of the oxygen vacancies based on the first principle. The optimal value of crystal orientation [010] is identified by means of the calculated isosurface plots of partial charge density, formation energy, highest isosurface value, migration barrier, and energy band of oxygen vacancy in ten established orientation systems. It will effectively influence the SET voltage, forming voltage, and the ON/OFF ratio of the device. Based on the results of orientation dependence, different concentration models are established along crystal orientation [010]. The performance of proposed concentration models is evaluated and analyzed in this paper. The film is weakly conductive for the samples deposited in a mixture with less than 4.167at.% of V o contents, and the resistive switching (RS phenomenon cannot be observed in this case. The RS behavior improves with an increase in the V o contents from 4.167at.% to 6.25at.%; nonetheless, it is found difficult to switch to a stable state. However, a higher V o concentration shows a more favorable uniformity and stability for HfO2-based RRAM.

  14. Poling effect of a charge-trapping layer in glass waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Yitao; Marckmann, Carl Johan; Jacobsen, Rune Shim

    2004-01-01

    Germanium-doped multi-layer waveguides containing a silicon oxy-nitride layer as a charge trapper are thermally poled in an air environment. Compared to the waveguides without the trapping layer, the induced linear electro-optic coefficient increases more than 20%. A comparable rise in the intern...

  15. Temperature Effects on a-IGZO Thin Film Transistors Using HfO2 Gate Dielectric Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsien Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the temperature effect on amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO thin film transistors (TFTs using hafnium oxide (HfO2 gate dielectric material. HfO2 is an attractive candidate as a high-κ dielectric material for gate oxide because it has great potential to exhibit superior electrical properties with a high drive current. In the process of integrating the gate dielectric and IGZO thin film, postannealing treatment is an essential process for completing the chemical reaction of the IGZO thin film and enhancing the gate oxide quality to adjust the electrical characteristics of the TFTs. However, the hafnium atom diffused the IGZO thin film, causing interface roughness because of the stability of the HfO2 dielectric thin film during high-temperature annealing. In this study, the annealing temperature was optimized at 200°C for a HfO2 gate dielectric TFT exhibiting high mobility, a high ION/IOFF ratio, low IOFF current, and excellent subthreshold swing (SS.

  16. Coexistence of different charge states in Ta-doped monoclinic HfO2: Theoretical and experimental approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, M.A.; Alonso, R.E.; Errico, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    A combination of experiments and ab initio quantum-mechanical calculations has been applied to examine hyperfine interactions in Ta-doped hafnium dioxide. Although the properties of monoclinic HfO2 have been the subject of several earlier studies, some aspects remain open. In particular, time dif...

  17. Customized binary and multi-level HfO2-x-based memristors tuned by oxidation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weifan; Sun, Huajun; Zhou, Yaxiong; Lu, Ke; Xue, Kanhao; Miao, Xiangshui

    2017-08-30

    The memristor is a promising candidate for the next generation non-volatile memory, especially based on HfO 2-x , given its compatibility with advanced CMOS technologies. Although various resistive transitions were reported independently, customized binary and multi-level memristors in unified HfO 2-x material have not been studied. Here we report Pt/HfO 2-x /Ti memristors with double memristive modes, forming-free and low operation voltage, which were tuned by oxidation conditions of HfO 2-x films. As O/Hf ratios of HfO 2-x films increase, the forming voltages, SET voltages, and R off /R on windows increase regularly while their resistive transitions undergo from gradually to sharply in I/V sweep. Two memristors with typical resistive transitions were studied to customize binary and multi-level memristive modes, respectively. For binary mode, high-speed switching with 10 3 pulses (10 ns) and retention test at 85 °C (>10 4 s) were achieved. For multi-level mode, the 12-levels stable resistance states were confirmed by ongoing multi-window switching (ranging from 10 ns to 1 μs and completing 10 cycles of each pulse). Our customized binary and multi-level HfO 2-x -based memristors show high-speed switching, multi-level storage and excellent stability, which can be separately applied to logic computing and neuromorphic computing, further suitable for in-memory computing chip when deposition atmosphere may be fine-tuned.

  18. Effect of Advanced Plasma Source bias voltage on properties of HfO2 films prepared by plasma ion assisted electron evaporation from metal hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Meiping; Yi, Kui; Arhilger, Detlef; Qi, Hongji; Shao, Jianda

    2013-01-01

    HfO 2 films, using metal hafnium as starting material, are deposited by plasma-ion assisted electron evaporation with different Advanced Plasma Source (APS) bias voltages. The refractive index and extinction coefficient are calculated, the chemical state and composition, as well as the stress and aging behavior is investigated. Laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) and damage mechanism are also evaluated and discussed. Optical, structural, mechanical and laser induced damage properties of HfO 2 films are found to be sensitive to APS bias voltage. The film stress can be tuned by varying the APS bias voltage. Damage morphologies indicate the LIDT of the HfO 2 films at 1064 nm and 532 nm are dominated by the nodular-defect density in coatings, while the 355 nm LIDT is dominated by the film absorption. HfO 2 films with higher 1064 nm LIDT than samples evaporated from hafnia are achieved with bias voltage of 100 V. - Highlights: • HfO 2 films are evaporated with different Advanced Plasma Source (APS) bias voltages. • Properties of HfO 2 films are sensitive to APS bias voltage. • With a bias voltage of 100 V, HfO 2 coatings without any stress can be achieved. • Higher 1064 nm laser induced damage threshold is achieved at a bias voltage of 100 V

  19. Relevance of sub-surface chip layers for the lifetime of magnetically trapped atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H. B.; Henkel, C; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    on the thickness of that layer, as long as the layers below have a much smaller conductivity; essentially the same magnetic noise would be obtained with a metallic membrane suspended in vacuum. Based on our theory we give general scaling laws of how to reduce the effect of surface magnetic noise on the trapped...... measurements where the center of a side guide trap is laterally shifted with respect to the current carrying wire using additional bias fields. Comparing the experiment to theory, we find a fair agreement and demonstrate that for a chip whose topmost layer is metallic, the magnetic noise depends essentially...

  20. Thermoluminescence in HfO_2:Eu"3"+ powders irradiated in UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceron R, P. V.; Montes R, E.; Rivera M, T.; Diaz G, J. A. I.; Guzman M, J.

    2016-10-01

    Various inorganic compounds synthesized for photo luminescent applications have also presented a thermoluminescent (Tl) response, for example the metal oxides doped with rare earths. This property extends the use of these materials to the radiation dosimetry. For this reason, in this work the Tl response is presented in HfO_2:Eu"3"+ powders synthesized by the hydrothermal path, exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation of 254 nm. The kinetic parameters of its brightness curve were also calculated using the Chen expressions and the analysis method based on the shape of the curve. For the powders irradiated for 10 min the highest Tl response corresponds to the sample with 5% of the impurity, which is 6.5 times higher than the signal corresponding to the intrinsic sample. Its bright curve shows a main peak with a maximum in 148 degrees Celsius and a second order kinetics. Another test with the same material shows the Tl response against the exposure time, with a maximum in the 3 minutes. These calculations and tests constitute a first approach for the study of these powders as Tl dosimeter for UV radiation. (Author)

  1. Intrinsic electron traps in atomic-layer deposited HfO{sub 2} insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerbu, F.; Madia, O.; Afanas' ev, V. V.; Houssa, M.; Stesmans, A. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Andreev, D. V. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Bauman Moscow State Technical University—Kaluga Branch, 248000 Kaluga, Moscow obl. (Russian Federation); Fadida, S.; Eizenberg, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Breuil, L. [imec, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lisoni, J. G. [imec, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Kittl, J. A. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Advanced Logic Lab, Samsung Semiconductor, Inc., Austin, 78754 Texas (United States); Strand, J.; Shluger, A. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-30

    Analysis of photodepopulation of electron traps in HfO{sub 2} films grown by atomic layer deposition is shown to provide the trap energy distribution across the entire oxide bandgap. The presence is revealed of two kinds of deep electron traps energetically distributed at around E{sub t} ≈ 2.0 eV and E{sub t} ≈ 3.0 eV below the oxide conduction band. Comparison of the trapped electron energy distributions in HfO{sub 2} layers prepared using different precursors or subjected to thermal treatment suggests that these centers are intrinsic in origin. However, the common assumption that these would implicate O vacancies cannot explain the charging behavior of HfO{sub 2}, suggesting that alternative defect models should be considered.

  2. Studies of the hyperfine interaction in semiconducting or isolating oxides on the examples HfO2, Ga2O3, and Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffens, Michael

    2014-01-01

    On the example of the three oxide compounds of the hafnium, gallium, and aluminium among others the method of the perturbed γ-γ angular correlation (PAC) was applied in dependence on the sample temperature. Applied were thereby the PAC probe nuclei 111 Cd and 181 Ga, which were inserted in the samples by ion implantation or proced by neutron activation in the samples. In HfO 2 thereby especially the hyperfine interaction of thin layers with thicknesses from 2.7 to 17 nm and 100 nm were studied. Strongly disagreeing field gradients and a great influence of the sample surface on the measurement are shown. It could be shown that ν qO x should scale with the layer thickness of the oxide and that the temperature-dependent behaviour, which is influenced by the thermal expansion of the lattice, underlies also this scaling. Conditioned by the neighbourhood to the surface at high temperature oxygen can escape from the samples and so degrade the oxide. The studied Ga 2 O 3 layers were produced by oxidation of GaN at 1223 K in air. The structure of the oxide layer was thereby stepwise pursued with the PAC and could be modelled with an exponential time dependence. The oxidation was repeated with several samples at equal absolute oxidation time but different partition in intermediate steps. Altogether the result were shown as reproducable, the occuring differences of the hyperfine interactions are probably given by external quantities fluctuating in the oxidation. The measurement of the Al 2 O 3 sample in the PAC furnace and cryostat represents mainly a reproduction of the preceding experiments of Penner et al. In this materials the attempt held the spotlight to manipulate the temperature-dependent behaviour of the hyperfine interaction by additional doping. Over the experiments of the single materials was set the more precise consideration of dynamic hyperfine interactions on the probe nucleus 111 Cd. In the spin-correlation functions R(t) these were manifested by an

  3. SHI induced effects on the electrical and optical properties of HfO_2 thin films deposited by RF sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manikanthababu, N.; Dhanunjaya, M.; Nageswara Rao, S.V.S.; Pathak, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    The continuous downscaling of Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) devices has reached a limit with SiO_2 as a gate dielectric material. Introducing high-k dielectric materials as a replacement for the conservative SiO_2 is the only alternative to reduce the leakage current. HfO_2 is a reliable and an impending material for the wide usage as a gate dielectric in semiconductor industry. HfO_2 thin films were synthesized by RF sputtering technique. Here, we present a study of Swift Heavy Ion (SHI) irradiation with100 MeV Ag ions for studying the optical properties as well as 80 MeV Ni ions for studying the electrical properties of HfO_2/Si thin films. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), profilometer and I–V (leakage current) measurements have been employed to study the SHI induced effects on both the structural, electrical and optical properties.

  4. Effect of heat treatment on properties of HfO2 film deposited by ion-beam sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huasong; Jiang, Yugang; Wang, Lishuan; Li, Shida; Yang, Xiao; Jiang, Chenghui; Liu, Dandan; Ji, Yiqin; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Deying

    2017-11-01

    The effects of atmosphere heat treatment on optical, stress, and microstructure properties of an HfO2 film deposited by ion-beam sputtering were systematically researched. The relationships among annealing temperature and refractive index, extinction coefficient, physical thickness, forbidden-band width, tape trailer width, Urbach energy, crystal phase structure, and stress were assessed. The results showed that 400 °C is the transformation point, and the microstructure of the HfO2 film changed from an amorphous into mixed-phase structure. Multistage phonons appeared on the HfO2 film, and the trends of the refractive index, extinction coefficient, forbidden-band width change, and Urbach energy shifted from decrease to increase. With the elevation of the annealing temperature, the film thickness increased monotonously, the compressive stress gradually turned to tensile stress, and the transformation temperature point for the stress was between 200 °C and 300 °C. Therefore, the change in the stress is the primary cause for the shifts in thin-film thickness.

  5. Hydration layers trapped between graphene and a hydrophilic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temmen, M; Reichling, M; Bollmann, T R J; Ochedowski, O; Schleberger, M

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is mechanically exfoliated on CaF 2 (111) under ambient conditions. We demonstrate the formation of a several monolayer thick hydration layer on the hydrophilic substrate and its response to annealing at temperatures up to 750 K in an ultra-high vacuum environment. Upon heating, water is released, however, it is impossible to remove the first layer. The initially homogeneous film separates into water-containing and water-free domains by two-dimensional Ostwald ripening. Upon severe heating, thick graphene multilayers undergo rupture, while nanoblisters confining sealed water appear on thinner sheets, capable of the storage and release of material. From modeling the dimensions of the nanoblisters, we estimate the graphene/CaF 2 (111) interfacial adhesion energy to be 0.33±0.13 J m −2 , thereby viable for polymer-assisted transfer printing. (paper)

  6. Electrical characterisation of ferroelectric field effect transistors based on ferroelectric HfO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurchuk, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric field effect transistor (FeFET) memories based on a new type of ferroelectric material (silicon doped hafnium oxide) were studied within the scope of the present work. Utilisation of silicon doped hafnium oxide (Si:HfO 2 ) thin films instead of conventional perovskite ferroelectrics as a functional layer in FeFETs provides compatibility to the CMOS process as well as improved device scalability. The influence of different process parameters on the properties of Si:HfO 2 thin films was analysed in order to gain better insight into the occurrence of ferroelectricity in this system. A subsequent examination of the potential of this material as well as its possible limitations with the respect to the application in non-volatile memories followed. The Si:HfO 2 -based ferroelectric transistors that were fully integrated into the state-of-the-art high-k metal gate CMOS technology were studied in this work for the first time. The memory performance of these devices scaled down to 28 nm gate length was investigated. Special attention was paid to the charge trapping phenomenon shown to significantly affect the device behaviour.

  7. MoO3 trapping layers with CF4 plasma treatment in flash memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Chuyan Haur; Chen, Hsiang; Chen, Su-Zhien; Chen, Chian Yu; Lo, Kuang-Yu; Lin, Chun Han

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • MoO 3 -based flash memories have been fabricated. • CF4 plasma treatment could enhance good memory performance. • Material analyses confirm that plasma treatment eliminated defects. • Fluorine atoms might fix the dangling bonds. - Abstract: In this research, we used MoO 3 with CF 4 plasma treatment as charge trapping layer in metal-oxide-high-k -oxide-Si-type memory. We analyzed material properties and electrical characteristics with multiple analyses. The plasma treatment could increase the trapping density, reduce the leakage current, expand band gap, and passivate the defect to enhance the memory performance. The MoO 3 charge trapping layer memory with suitable CF 4 plasma treatment is promising for future nonvolatile memory applications

  8. Periodic molybdenum disc array for light trapping in amorphous silicon layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiwei; Deng, Changkai [International Center of Quantum and Molecular Structures, Materials Genome Institute, and Department of Physics, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Shanghai, 200444 China (China); Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 99 Haike Road, Shanghai, 201210 China (China); Yang, Kang; Chen, Haiyan, E-mail: chenhy@sari.ac.cn; Li, Dongdong; Chen, Xiaoyuan [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 99 Haike Road, Shanghai, 201210 China (China); Ren, Wei, E-mail: renwei@shu.edu.cn [International Center of Quantum and Molecular Structures, Materials Genome Institute, and Department of Physics, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Shanghai, 200444 China (China)

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate the light trapping effect in amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layer by inserting a layer of periodic molybdenum disc array (MDA) between the a-Si:H layer and the quartz substrate, which forms a three-layer structure of Si/MDA/SiO{sub 2}. The MDA layer was fabricated by a new cost-effective method based on nano-imprint technology. Further light absorption enhancement was realized through altering the topography of MDA by annealing it at 700°C. The mechanism of light absorption enhancement in a-Si:H interfaced with MDA was analyzed, and the electric field distribution and light absorption curve of the different layers in the Si/MDA structure under light illumination of different wavelengths were simulated by employing numerical finite difference time domain (FDTD) solutions.

  9. Slow electron acoustic double layer (SEADL) structures in bi-ion plasma with trapped electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shaukat Ali; Imtiaz, Nadia

    2018-05-01

    The properties of ion acoustic double layer (IADL) structures in bi-ion plasma with electron trapping are investigated by using the quasi-potential analysis. The κ-distributed trapped electrons number density expression is truncated to some finite order of the electrostatic potential. By utilizing the reductive perturbation method, a modified Schamel equation which describes the evolution of the slow electron acoustic double layer (SEADL) with the modified speed due to the presence of bi-ion species is investigated. The Sagdeev-like potential has been derived which accounts for the effect of the electron trapping and superthermality in a bi-ion plasma. It is found that the superthermality index, the trapping efficiency of electrons, and ion to electron temperature ratio are the inhibiting parameters for the amplitude of the slow electron acoustic double layers (SEADLs). However, the enhanced population of the cold ions is found to play a supportive role for the low frequency DLs in bi-ion plasmas. The illustrations have been presented with the help of the bi-ion plasma parameters in the Earth's ionosphere F-region.

  10. Rapid formation of nanocrystalline HfO2 powders from amorphous hafnium hydroxide under ultrasonically assisted hydrothermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskin, Pavel E.; Sharikov, Felix Yu.; Ivanov, Vladimir K.; Churagulov, Bulat R.; Tretyakov, Yury D.

    2007-01-01

    Peculiarities of hafnium hydroxide hydrothermal decomposition were studied by in situ heat flux calorimetry for the first time. It was shown that this process occurs in one exothermal stage (ΔH = -17.95 kJ mol -1 ) at 180-250 deg. C resulting in complete crystallization of amorphous phase with formation of pure monoclinic HfO 2 . It was found that the rate of m-HfO 2 formation can be significantly increased by combining hydrothermal treatment with simultaneous ultrasonic activation

  11. HfO2 - rare earth oxide systems in the region with high content of rare earth oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, A.V.; Lopato, L.M.

    1982-01-01

    Using the methods of annealing and hardenings (10 2 -10 4 deg/s cooling rate) and differential thermal analysis elements of state diagrams of HfO 2 - rare earth oxide (rare earths-La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Y, Er, Yb, Lu, Sc) systems from 1800 deg C up to melting in the range of 60-100 mol% rare earth oxide concentration were constructed. Regularities of HfQ 2 addition effect on high-temperature polymorphic transformations of rare earth oxides were studied. Results of investigation were discussed from viewpoint of crystal chemistry

  12. Characteristics of multilevel storage and switching dynamics in resistive switching cell of Al2O3/HfO2/Al2O3 sandwich structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Yang, Huafeng; Ma, Zhongyuan; Chen, Kunji; Zhang, Xinxin; Huang, Xinfan; Oda, Shunri

    2018-01-01

    We reported an Al2O3/HfO2/Al2O3 sandwich structure resistive switching device with significant improvement of multilevel cell (MLC) operation capability, which exhibited that four stable and distinct resistance states (one low resistance state and three high resistance states) can be achieved by controlling the Reset stop voltages (V Reset-stop) during the Reset operation. The improved MLC operation capability can be attributed to the R HRS/R LRS ratio enhancement resulting from increasing of the series resistance and decreasing of leakage current by inserting two Al2O3 layers. For the high-speed switching applications, we studied the initial switching dynamics by using the measurements of the pulse width and amplitude dependence of Set and Reset switching characteristics. The results showed that under the same pulse amplitude conditions, the initial Set progress is faster than the initial Reset progress, which can be explained by thermal-assisted electric field induced rupture model in the oxygen vacancies conductive filament. Thus, proper combination of varying pulse amplitude and width can help us to optimize the device operation parameters. Moreover, the device demonstrated ultrafast program/erase speed (10 ns) and good pulse switching endurance (105 cycles) characteristics, which are suitable for high-density and fast-speed nonvolatile memory applications.

  13. Ti–Al–O nanocrystal charge trapping memory cells fabricated by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Zheng-Yi; Li, Ai-Dong; Li, Xin; Cao, Yan-Qiang; Wu, Di

    2014-01-01

    Charge trapping memory cells using Ti–Al–O (TAO) film as charge trapping layer and amorphous Al 2 O 3 as the tunneling and blocking layers were fabricated on Si substrates by atomic layer deposition method. As-deposited TAO films were annealed at 700 °C, 800 °C and 900 °C for 3 min in N 2 with a rapid thermal annealing process to form nanocrystals. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the microstructure and band diagram of the heterostructures. The electrical characteristics and charge storage properties of the Al 2 O 3 /TAO/Al 2 O 3 /Si stack structures were also evaluated. Compared to 700 °C and 900 °C samples, the memory cells annealed at 800 °C exhibit better memory performance with larger memory window of 4.8 V at ± 6 V sweeping, higher program/erase speed and excellent endurance. - Highlights: • The charge trapping memory cells were fabricated by atomic layer deposition method. • The anneal temperature plays a key role in forming nanocrystals. • The memory cells annealed at 800 °C exhibit better memory performance. • The band alignment is beneficial to enhance the retention characteristics

  14. Memory characteristics of silicon nitride with silicon nanocrystals as a charge trapping layer of nonvolatile memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sangmoo; Yang, Hyundeok; Chang, Man; Baek, Sungkweon; Hwang, Hyunsang; Jeon, Sanghun; Kim, Juhyung; Kim, Chungwoo

    2005-01-01

    Silicon nitride with silicon nanocrystals formed by low-energy silicon plasma immersion ion implantation has been investigated as a charge trapping layer of a polycrystalline silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon-type nonvolatile memory device. Compared with the control sample without silicon nanocrystals, silicon nitride with silicon nanocrystals provides excellent memory characteristics, such as larger width of capacitance-voltage hysteresis, higher program/erase speed, and lower charge loss rate at elevated temperature. These improved memory characteristics are derived by incorporation of silicon nanocrystals into the charge trapping layer as additional accessible charge traps with a deeper effective trap energy level

  15. High temperature X-ray diffraction studies on HfO2-Gd2O3 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panneerselvam, G.; Antony, M.P.; Ananthasivan, K.; Joseph, M.

    2016-01-01

    High temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) technique is an important experimental tool for measuring thermal expansion of materials of interest. A series of solid solutions containing GdO 1.5 in HfO 2 ,Hf 1-y Gd y )O 2 (y = 0.15, 0.2, 0.3, 0.41 and 0.505) were prepared by solid state method. Structural characterization and computation of lattice parameter was carried out by using room temperature X-ray diffraction measurements. The room temperature lattice parameter estimated for (Hf 1-y Gd y )O 2 (y=0.15, 0.2, 0.3, 0.41 and 0.505) are 0.51714 nm, 0.51929 nm, 0.52359nm, 0.52789nm and 0.53241 nm, respectively. Thermal expansion coefficients and percentage linear thermal expansion of the HfO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 solid solutions containing 20 and 41 mol% GdO 1.5 were determined using HTXRD in the temperature range 298 to 1673K. The mean linear thermal expansion coefficients of the solid solutions containing 20 and 41 mol. %Gd are 11.65 x 10 -6 K -1 and 12.07 x 10 -6 K -1 , respectively. (author)

  16. Thickness measurement of a thin hetero-oxide film with an interfacial oxide layer by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Joong; Lee, Seung Mi; Jang, Jong Shik; Moret, Mona

    2012-02-01

    The general equation Tove = L cos θ ln(Rexp/R0 + 1) for the thickness measurement of thin oxide films by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was applied to a HfO2/SiO2/Si(1 0 0) as a thin hetero-oxide film system with an interfacial oxide layer. The contribution of the thick interfacial SiO2 layer to the thickness of the HfO2 overlayer was counterbalanced by multiplying the ratio between the intensity of Si4+ from a thick SiO2 film and that of Si0 from a Si(1 0 0) substrate to the intensity of Si4+ from the HfO2/SiO2/Si(1 0 0) film. With this approximation, the thickness levels of the HfO2 overlayers showed a small standard deviation of 0.03 nm in a series of HfO2 (2 nm)/SiO2 (2-6 nm)/Si(1 0 0) films. Mutual calibration with XPS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to verify the thickness of HfO2 overlayers in a series of HfO2 (1-4 nm)/SiO2 (3 nm)/Si(1 0 0) films. From the linear relation between the thickness values derived from XPS and TEM, the effective attenuation length of the photoelectrons and the thickness of the HfO2 overlayer could be determined.

  17. Graphene-edge dielectrophoretic tweezers for trapping of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Avijit; Zhang, Yao; Grassi, Roberto; Nadappuram, Binoy Paulose; Edel, Joshua B; Low, Tony; Koester, Steven J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2017-11-30

    The many unique properties of graphene, such as the tunable optical, electrical, and plasmonic response make it ideally suited for applications such as biosensing. As with other surface-based biosensors, however, the performance is limited by the diffusive transport of target molecules to the surface. Here we show that atomically sharp edges of monolayer graphene can generate singular electrical field gradients for trapping biomolecules via dielectrophoresis. Graphene-edge dielectrophoresis pushes the physical limit of gradient-force-based trapping by creating atomically sharp tweezers. We have fabricated locally backgated devices with an 8-nm-thick HfO 2 dielectric layer and chemical-vapor-deposited graphene to generate 10× higher gradient forces as compared to metal electrodes. We further demonstrate near-100% position-controlled particle trapping at voltages as low as 0.45 V with nanodiamonds, nanobeads, and DNA from bulk solution within seconds. This trapping scheme can be seamlessly integrated with sensors utilizing graphene as well as other two-dimensional materials.

  18. Double vacancy on BN layer: A natural trap for Hydrogen Molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arellano, J S

    2015-01-01

    A pair of vacancies, one of boron and other of nitrogen atom at a flat layer becomes a natural trap to capture a hydrogen molecule at the center of the cavity defined by the empty space left by the lack of a nitrogen and a boron atom at the perfect BN layer formed by 16 N atoms and 16 B atoms. The adsorption of the hydrogen molecule is compared with the equivalent graphene layer with a pair of carbon vacancies. The little increase in the BN cell parameter respect to the graphene cell parameter, besides the differences between N, B and C atoms helps to explain the easier adsorption on the defective BN layer

  19. Studies of Ink Trapping III Direct Detection of Small Air Bubbles in Ink Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuo Naito

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Ink trappings were studied by using polyethylene terephthalate (PET film with black inks for offset proofing and synthetic paper. By observing printed matter from reverse side through the PET film, we detected many air bubbles in the ink layer and between the ink layer and the PET film. They are classified roughly to two groups, small number of large ones (φ = 2 - 5 μm and many small ones (φ = 0.5 - 1.0 μm. The former ones were fixed air bubbles during the trapping. The latter ones decreased according to increase the amount of ink trapped (y. Because number of the air bubbles (Nair bubble increased with increasing the ink distribution time, they seemed to be yielded by suspension of air into the ink layer during ink distribution. By observing printed surface, we also detected many ink peaks (immediately after the trapping and pinholes (at 24 h. The numbers of the ink peaks and pinholes (Nink peak and Npinhole, respectively decreased also with increasing the y value and increased with increasing the ink distribution time. We studied effects of nip width on these values (distribution time = 2 min.; nip width = 2, 3 and 4 mm. The Nair bubble value decreased with increasing nip width contrary to increase the Nink peak and Npinhole values. The effects can be represented by differences in the values of 2 and 4 mm nip widths. At y = 2 gm-2, the difference in the Nair bubble value is about one third (synthetic paper ink or a half (offset proofing ink of the difference in the Nink peak values.

  20. Formation of Pentacene wetting layer on the SiO2 surface and charge trap in the wetting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chaeho; Jeon, D.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the early-stage growth of vacuum-evaporated pentacene film on a native SiO 2 surface using atomic force microscopy and in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. Pentacene deposition prompted an immediate change in the ellipsometry spectra, but atomic force microscopy images of the early stage films did not show a pentacene-related morphology other than the decrease in the surface roughness. This suggested that a thin pentacene wetting layer was formed by pentacene molecules lying on the surface before the crystalline islands nucleated. Growth simulation based on the in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry spectra supported this conclusion. Scanning capacitance microscopy measurement indicated the existence of trapped charges in the SiO 2 and pentacene wetting layer

  1. Trap effect of an ultrathin DCJTB layer in organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yuanmin [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Teng Feng [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)]. E-mail: advanced9898@126.com; Xu Zheng [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Hou Yanbing [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Yang Shengyi [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Xu Xurong [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2005-08-15

    An improved performance of organic light-emitting diodes has been obtained by using 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl) -4Hpyran (DCJTB) as an ultrathin emitting layer. When 0.1 nm DCJTB was inserted between the hole-transporting layer and electron-transporting layer, for an unoptimized device indium-tin oxide (ITO)/naphtylphenyliphenyl diamine (NPB)/DCJTB (0.1 nm)/8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum (Alq{sub 3})/Al, the maximum brightness was 1531 cd m{sup -2} at 15 V. Compared with doped devices ITO/NPB/Alq{sub 3}:DCJTB (1%)/Alq{sub 3}/LiF/Al, a higher efficiency has been achieved. Compared with the conventional device ITO/NPB/Alq{sub 3}/Al, the inserted device has a slightly higher current efficiency and lower turn-on voltage. We suggest the ultrathin DCJTB layer acts as trap for carriers, and the accumulated holes at the hole-transport layer/electron-transport layer interface have enhanced the electric field in the electron-transport layer and improved the electron injection at the cathode.

  2. The Development of HfO2-Rare Earth Based Oxide Materials and Barrier Coatings for Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan James

    2014-01-01

    Advanced hafnia-rare earth oxides, rare earth aluminates and silicates have been developed for thermal environmental barrier systems for aerospace propulsion engine and thermal protection applications. The high temperature stability, low thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of these oxide material systems make them attractive and potentially viable for thermal protection systems. This paper will focus on the development of the high performance and high temperature capable ZrO2HfO2-rare earth based alloy and compound oxide materials, processed as protective coating systems using state-or-the-art processing techniques. The emphasis has been in particular placed on assessing their temperature capability, stability and suitability for advanced space vehicle entry thermal protection systems. Fundamental thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of the material systems have been investigated at high temperatures. Laser high-heat-flux testing has also been developed to validate the material systems, and demonstrating durability under space entry high heat flux conditions.

  3. Electrical behaviour of fully solution processed HfO2 (MOS) in presence of different light illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sandip

    2018-04-01

    This experiment demonstrates the electrical behaviors of fully solution processed HfO2(MOS) in presence of different optical illumination. The capacitance voltage measurement was performed at frequency of 100 kHz with a DC gate sweep voltage of ±5V (with additional AC voltage of 100mV) in presence of deep UV (wavelength of 365nm with power of 25W) as well as white light (20W). It is found that there is a large shift in flatband voltage of 120mV due presence of white light during the CV measurement. However there is negligible change in flatband voltage (30mV) has been observed due to illumination of deep UV light.

  4. Comparison of HfCl4, HfI4, TEMA-Hf, and TDMA-Hf as precursors in early growing stages of HfO2 films deposited by ALD: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez-Valadez, M.; Fierro, C.; Farias-Mancilla, J. R.; Vargas-Ortiz, A.; Flores-Acosta, M.; Ramírez-Bon, R.; Enriquez-Carrejo, J. L.; Soubervielle-Montalvo, C.; Mani-Gonzalez, P. G.

    2016-06-01

    The final structure of HfO2 films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) after reaction with OH- ions has been analyzed by DFT (density functional theory). The interaction of the precursors: HfCl4 (hafnium tetrachloride), HfI4 (hafnium tetraiodide), TEMA-Hf (tetrakis-ethylmethylamino hafnium), and TDMA-Hf (tetrakis-dimethylamino hafnium) with HO-H was studied employing the B3LYP (Becke 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr) hybrid functional and the PBE (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof) generalized gradient functional. The structural evolution at the Si(100) surface has been analyzed by LDA (local density approximation). The structural parameters: bond length and bond angle, and the vibrational parameters for the optimized structures are also reported. The presence of hafnium silicate at the interface was detected. The infrared spectra and structural parameters obtained in this work agree with previously reported experimental results.

  5. Transparent Flash Memory using Single Ta2O5 Layer for both Charge Trapping and Tunneling Dielectrics

    KAUST Repository

    Hota, Mrinal Kanti

    2017-06-08

    We report reproducible multibit transparent flash memory in which a single solution-derived Ta2O5 layer is used simultaneously as charge trapping and tunneling layer. This is different from conventional flash cells, where two different dielectric layers are typically used. Under optimized programming/erasing operations, the memory device shows excellent programmable memory characteristics with a maximum memory window of ~10 V. Moreover, the flash memory device shows a stable 2-bit memory performance, good reliability, including data retention for more than 104 sec and endurance performance for more than 100 cycles. The use of a common charge trapping and tunneling layer can simplify advanced flash memory fabrication.

  6. Transparent Flash Memory using Single Ta2O5 Layer for both Charge Trapping and Tunneling Dielectrics

    KAUST Repository

    Hota, Mrinal Kanti; Alshammari, Fwzah H.; Salama, Khaled N.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    We report reproducible multibit transparent flash memory in which a single solution-derived Ta2O5 layer is used simultaneously as charge trapping and tunneling layer. This is different from conventional flash cells, where two different dielectric layers are typically used. Under optimized programming/erasing operations, the memory device shows excellent programmable memory characteristics with a maximum memory window of ~10 V. Moreover, the flash memory device shows a stable 2-bit memory performance, good reliability, including data retention for more than 104 sec and endurance performance for more than 100 cycles. The use of a common charge trapping and tunneling layer can simplify advanced flash memory fabrication.

  7. Simulation of trapping properties of high κ material as the charge storage layer for flash memory application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Yee Ngee; Wang Yingqian; Samanta, Santanu Kumar; Yoo, Won Jong; Samudra, Ganesh; Gao, Dongyue; Chong, Chee Ching

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the trapping properties of high κ material as the charge storage layer in non-volatile flash memory devices using a two-dimensional device simulator, Medici. The high κ material is sandwiched between two silicon oxide layers, resulting in the Silicon-Oxide-High κ-Oxide-Silicon (SOHOS) structure. The trap energy levels of the bulk electron traps in high κ material were determined. The programming and erasing voltage and time using Fowler Nordheim tunneling were estimated by simulation. The effect of deep level traps on erasing was investigated. Also, the effect of bulk traps density, thickness of block oxide and thickness of high κ material on the threshold voltage of the device was simulated

  8. Magnetic trapping of energetic particles on open dayside boundary layer flux tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, S.W.H.; Lewis, Z.V.

    1990-01-01

    Both simple as well as detailed empirical magnetic models of the Earth's dayside magnetosphere suggest that field lines near the magnetopause boundary in the noon quadrant (∼ 09:00 to ∼ 15:00 M.L.T.) possess an unusual property due to the compressive effect of the impinging solar wind flow, namely that the equatorial region represents a local maximum in the magnetic field strength, and not a minimum as elsewhere in the magnetosphere. In this region the field lines can therefore support two distinct particle populations, those which bounce across the equator between mirror points on either side, and those which are trapped about the off-equatorial field strength minima and are confined to one side of the equator. When these field lines become magnetically open due to the occurrence of magnetic reconnection at the equatorial magnetopause, the former particles will rapidly escape into the magnetosheath by field-aligned flow, while the latter population may be sustained within the boundary layer over many bounce periods, as the flux tubes contract and move tailward. Consequently, trapped distributions of energetic particles may commonly occur on open field lines in the dayside boundary layer in the noon quadrant, particularly at high latitudes. The existence of such particles is thus not an infallible indicator of the presence of closed magnetic field lines in this region. At earlier and later local times, however, the boundary layer field lines revert to possessing a minimum in the field strength at the equator. (author)

  9. Oxygen vacancy defect engineering using atomic layer deposited HfAlOx in multi-layered gate stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyian, M. N.; Sengupta, R.; Vurikiti, P.; Misra, D.

    2016-05-01

    This work evaluates the defects in high quality atomic layer deposited (ALD) HfAlOx with extremely low Al (estimated by the high temperature current voltage measurement shows that the charged oxygen vacancies, V+/V2+, are the primary source of defects in these dielectrics. When Al is added in HfO2, the V+ type defects with a defect activation energy of Ea ˜ 0.2 eV modify to V2+ type to Ea ˜ 0.1 eV with reference to the Si conduction band. When devices were stressed in the gate injection mode for 1000 s, more V+ type defects are generated and Ea reverts back to ˜0.2 eV. Since Al has a less number of valence electrons than do Hf, the change in the co-ordination number due to Al incorporation seems to contribute to the defect level modifications. Additionally, the stress induced leakage current behavior observed at 20 °C and at 125 °C demonstrates that the addition of Al in HfO2 contributed to suppressed trap generation process. This further supports the defect engineering model as reduced flat-band voltage shifts were observed at 20 °C and at 125 °C.

  10. The influence of surface preparation on low temperature HfO2 ALD on InGaAs (001) and (110) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, Tyler; Edmonds, Mary; Kummel, Andrew C.; Tang, Kechao; Negara, Muhammad Adi; McIntyre, Paul; Chobpattana, Varistha; Mitchell, William; Sahu, Bhagawan; Galatage, Rohit; Droopad, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Current logic devices rely on 3D architectures, such as the tri-gate field effect transistor (finFET), which utilize the (001) and (110) crystal faces simultaneously thus requiring passivation methods for the (110) face in order to ensure a pristine 3D surface prior to further processing. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and correlated electrical measurement on MOSCAPs were utilized to compare the effects of a previously developed in situ pre-atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface clean on the InGaAs (001) and (110) surfaces. Ex situ wet cleans are very effective on the (001) surface but not the (110) surface. Capacitance voltage indicated the (001) surface with no buffered oxide etch had a higher C max hypothesized to be a result of poor nucleation of HfO 2 on the native oxide. An in situ pre-ALD surface clean employing both atomic H and trimethylaluminum (TMA) pre-pulsing, developed by Chobpattana et al. and Carter et al. for the (001) surface, was demonstrated to be effective on the (110) surface for producing low D it high C ox MOSCAPs. Including TMA in the pre-ALD surface clean resulted in reduction of the magnitude of the interface state capacitance. The XPS studies show the role of atomic H pre-pulsing is to remove both carbon and oxygen while STM shows the role of TMA pre-pulsing is to eliminate H induced etching. Devices fabricated at 120 °C and 300 °C were compared

  11. Influence of O2 flow rate on HfO2 gate dielectrics for back-gated graphene transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapathi, Kolla Lakshmi; Bhat, Navakanta; Mohan, Sangeneni

    2014-01-01

    HfO 2  thin films deposited on Si substrate using electron beam evaporation, are evaluated for back-gated graphene transistors. The amount of O 2  flow rate, during evaporation is optimized for 35 nm thick HfO 2  films, to achieve the best optical, chemical and electrical properties. It has been observed that with increasing oxygen flow rate, thickness of the films increased and refractive index decreased due to increase in porosity resulting from the scattering of the evaporant. The films deposited at low O 2  flow rates (1 and 3 SCCM) show better optical and compositional properties. The effects of post-deposition annealing and post-metallization annealing in forming gas ambience (FGA) on the optical and electrical properties of the films have been analyzed. The film deposited at 3 SCCM O 2  flow rate shows the best properties as measured on MOS capacitors. To evaluate the performance of device properties, back-gated bilayer graphene transistors on HfO 2  films deposited at two O 2  flow rates of 3 and 20 SCCM have been fabricated and characterized. The transistor with HfO 2  film deposited at 3 SCCM O 2  flow rate shows better electrical properties consistent with the observations on MOS capacitor structures. This suggests that an optimum oxygen pressure is necessary to get good quality films for high performance devices. (paper)

  12. The effect of a HfO2 insulator on the improvement of breakdown voltage in field-plated GaN-based HEMT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Wei; Hao Yue; Ma Xiao-Hua; Wang Chong; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Liu Hong-Xia; Bi Zhi-Wei; Xu Sheng-Rui; Yang Lin-An; Yang Ling; Zhang Kai; Zhang Nai-Qian; Pei Yi; Yang Cui

    2011-01-01

    A GaN/Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 N/AlN/GaN high-electron mobility transistor utilizing a field plate (with a 0.3 μm overhang towards the drain and a 0.2 μm overhang towards the source) over a 165-nm sputtered HfO 2 insulator (HfO 2 -FP-HEMT) is fabricated on a sapphire substrate. Compared with the conventional field-plated HEMT, which has the same geometric structure but uses a 60-nm SiN insulator beneath the field plate (SiN-FP-HEMT), the HfO 2 -FP-HEMT exhibits a significant improvement of the breakdown voltage (up to 181 V) as well as a record field-plate efficiency (up to 276 V/μm). This is because the HfO 2 insulator can further improve the modulation of the field plate on the electric field distribution in the device channel, which is proved by the numerical simulation results. Based on the simulation results, a novel approach named the proportional design is proposed to predict the optimal dielectric thickness beneath the field plate. It can simplify the field-plated HEMT design significantly. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  13. The influence of thermal treatment on the phase development in HfO2-Al2O3 and ZrO2-Al2O3 systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanic, G.; Music, S.; Trojko, R.

    2005-01-01

    Amorphous precursors of HfO 2 -AlO 1.5 and ZrO 2 -AlO 1.5 systems covering the whole concentration range were co-precipitated from aqueous solutions of the corresponding salts. The thermal behaviour of the amorphous precursors was examined by differential thermal analysis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), laser Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The crystallization temperature of both systems increased with increase in the AlO 1.5 content, from 530 to 940 deg. C in the HfO 2 -AlO 1.5 system, and from 405 to 915 deg. C in the ZrO 2 -AlO 1.5 system. The results of phase analysis indicate an extended capability for the incorporation of Al 3+ ions in the metastable HfO 2 - and ZrO 2 -type solid solutions obtained after crystallization of amorphous co-gels. Precise determination of lattice parameters, performed using whole-powder-pattern decomposition method, showed that the axial ratio c f /a f in the ZrO 2 - and HfO 2 -type solid solutions with 10 mol% or more of Al 3+ approach 1. The tetragonal symmetry of these samples, as determined by laser Raman spectroscopy, was attributed to the displacement of the oxygen sublattice from the ideal fluorite positions. It was found that the lattice parameters of the ZrO 2 -type solid solutions decreased with increasing Al 3+ content up to ∼10 mol%, whereas above 10 mol%, further increase of the Al 3+ content has very small influence on the unit-cell volume of both HfO 2 - and ZrO 2 -type solid solutions. The reason for such behaviour was discussed. The solubility of Hf 4+ and Zr 4+ ions in the aluminium oxides lattice appeared to be negligible

  14. Investigation of various properties of HfO2-TiO2 thin film composites deposited by multi-magnetron sputtering system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, M.; Poniedziałek, A.; Kaczmarek, D.; Wojcieszak, D.; Domaradzki, J.; Gibson, D.

    2017-11-01

    In this work the properties of hafnium dioxide (HfO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2) and mixed HfO2-TiO2 thin films with various amount of titanium addition, deposited by magnetron sputtering were described. Structural, surface, optical and mechanical properties of deposited coatings were analyzed. Based on X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measuremets it was observed that there was a significant influence of titanium concentration in mixed TiO2-HfO2 thin films on their microstructure. Increase of Ti content in prepared mixed oxides coatings caused, e.g. a decrease of average crystallite size and amorphisation of the coatings. As-deposited hafnia and titania thin films exhibited nanocrystalline structure of monoclinic phase and mixed anatase-rutile phase for HfO2 and TiO2 thin films, respectively. Atomic force microscopy investigations showed that the surface of deposited thin films was densely packed, crack-free and composed of visible grains. Surface roughness and the value of water contact angle decreased with the increase of Ti content in mixed oxides. Results of optical studies showed that all deposited thin films were well transparent in a visible light range. The effect of the change of material composition on the cut-off wavelength, refractive index and packing density was also investigated. Performed measurements of mechanical properties revealed that hardness and Young's elastic modulus of thin films were dependent on material composition. Hardness of thin films increased with an increase of Ti content in thin films, from 4.90 GPa to 13.7 GPa for HfO2 and TiO2, respectively. The results of the scratch resistance showed that thin films with proper material composition can be used as protective coatings in optical devices.

  15. Diffractive intermediate layer enables broadband light trapping for high efficiency ultrathin c-Si tandem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guijun, E-mail: gliad@connect.ust.hk; Ho, Jacob Y. L.; Li, He; Kwok, Hoi-Sing [State Key Laboratory on Advanced Displays and Optoelectronics Technologies, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-06-09

    Light management through the intermediate reflector in the tandem cell configuration is of great practical importance for achieving high stable efficiency and also low cost production. So far, however, the intermediate reflectors employed currently are mainly focused on the light absorption enhancement of the top cell. Here, we present a diffractive intermediate layer that allows for light trapping over a broadband wavelength for the ultrathin c-Si tandem solar cell. Compared with the standard intermediate reflector, this nanoscale architectural intermediate layer results in a 35% and 21% remarkable enhancement of the light absorption in the top (400–800 nm) and bottom (800–1100 nm) cells simultaneously, and ultrathin c-Si tandem cells with impressive conversion efficiency of 13.3% are made on the glass substrate.

  16. Diffractive intermediate layer enables broadband light trapping for high efficiency ultrathin c-Si tandem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guijun; Ho, Jacob Y. L.; Li, He; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2014-01-01

    Light management through the intermediate reflector in the tandem cell configuration is of great practical importance for achieving high stable efficiency and also low cost production. So far, however, the intermediate reflectors employed currently are mainly focused on the light absorption enhancement of the top cell. Here, we present a diffractive intermediate layer that allows for light trapping over a broadband wavelength for the ultrathin c-Si tandem solar cell. Compared with the standard intermediate reflector, this nanoscale architectural intermediate layer results in a 35% and 21% remarkable enhancement of the light absorption in the top (400–800 nm) and bottom (800–1100 nm) cells simultaneously, and ultrathin c-Si tandem cells with impressive conversion efficiency of 13.3% are made on the glass substrate.

  17. Light trapping of crystalline Si solar cells by use of nanocrystalline Si layer plus pyramidal texture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Kentaro; Nonaka, Takaaki; Onitsuka, Yuya; Irishika, Daichi; Kobayashi, Hikaru, E-mail: h.kobayashi@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Ultralow reflectivity Si wafers with light trapping effect can be obtained by forming a nanocrystalline Si layer on pyramidal textured Si surfaces. • Surface passivation using phosphosilicate glass improved minority carrier lifetime of the nanocrystalline Si layer/Si structure. • A high photocurrent density of 40.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, and a high conversion efficiency of 18.5% were achieved. - Abstract: The surface structure chemical transfer (SSCT) method has been applied to fabrication of single crystalline Si solar cells with 170 μm thickness. The SSCT method, which simply involves immersion of Si wafers in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} plus HF solutions and contact of Pt catalyst with Si taking only ∼30 s for 6 in. wafers, can decrease the reflectivity to less than 3% by the formation of a nanocrystalline Si layer. However, the reflectivity of the nanocrystalline Si layer/flat Si surface/rear Ag electrode structure in the wavelength region longer than 1000 nm is high because of insufficient absorption of incident light. The reflectivity in the long wavelength region is greatly decreased by the formation of the nanocrystalline Si layer on pyramidal textured Si surfaces due to an increase in the optical path length. Deposition of phosphosilicate glass (PSG) on the nanocrystalline Si layer for formation of pn-junction does not change the ultralow reflectivity because the surface region of the nanocrystalline Si layer possesses a refractive index of 1.4 which is nearly the same as that of PSG of 1.4–1.5. The PSG layer is found to passivate the nanocrystalline Si layer, which is evident from an increase in the minority carrier lifetime from 12 to 44 μs. Hydrogen treatment at 450 °C further increases the minority carrier lifetime approximately to a doubled value. The solar cells with the layer/pyramidal Si substrate/boron-diffused back surface field/Ag rear electrode> structure show a high conversion efficiency of 18

  18. Atomic layer-deposited Al–HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} bi-layers towards 3D charge trapping non-volatile memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Congedo, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.congedo@mdm.imm.cnr.it; Wiemer, Claudia; Lamperti, Alessio; Cianci, Elena; Molle, Alessandro; Volpe, Flavio G.; Spiga, Sabina, E-mail: sabina.spiga@mdm.imm.cnr

    2013-04-30

    A metal/oxide/high-κ dielectric/oxide/silicon (MOHOS) planar charge trapping memory capacitor including SiO{sub 2} as tunnel oxide, Al–HfO{sub 2} as charge trapping layer, SiO{sub 2} as blocking oxide and TaN metal gate was fabricated and characterized as test vehicle in the view of integration into 3D cells. The thin charge trapping layer and blocking oxide were grown by atomic layer deposition, the technique of choice for the implementation of these stacks into 3D structures. The oxide stack shows a good thermal stability for annealing temperature of 900 °C in N{sub 2}, as required for standard complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor processes. MOHOS capacitors can be efficiently programmed and erased under the applied voltages of ± 20 V to ± 12 V. When compared to a benchmark structure including thin Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} as charge trapping layer, the MOHOS cell shows comparable program characteristics, with the further advantage of the equivalent oxide thickness scalability due to the high dielectric constant (κ) value of 32, and an excellent retention even for strong testing conditions. Our results proved that high-κ based oxide structures grown by atomic layer deposition can be of interest for the integration into three dimensionally stacked charge trapping devices. - Highlights: ► Charge trapping device with Al–HfO{sub 2} storage layer is fabricated and characterized. ► Al–HfO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} blocking oxides are deposited by atomic layer deposition. ► The oxide stack shows a good thermal stability after annealing at 900 °C. ► The device can be efficiently programmed/erased and retention is excellent. ► The oxide stack could be used for 3D-stacked Flash non-volatile memories.

  19. Effect of annealing on structural changes and oxygen diffusion in amorphous HfO2 using classical molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenqing; Kumari, Niru; Gibson, Gary; Jeon, Yoocharn; Henze, Dick; Silverthorn, Sarah; Bash, Cullen; Kumar, Satish

    2018-02-01

    Non-volatile memory is a promising alternative to present memory technologies. Oxygen vacancy diffusion has been widely accepted as one of the reasons for the resistive switching mechanism of transition-metal-oxide based resistive random access memory. In this study, molecular dynamics simulation is applied to investigate the diffusion coefficient and activation energy of oxygen in amorphous hafnia. Two sets of empirical potential, Charge-Optimized Many-Body (COMB) and Morse-BKS (MBKS), were considered to investigate the structural and diffusion properties at different temperatures. COMB predicts the activation energy of 0.53 eV for the temperature range of 1000-2000 K, while MBKS predicts 2.2 eV at high temperature (1600-2000 K) and 0.36 eV at low temperature (1000-1600 K). Structural changes and appearance of nano-crystalline phases with increasing temperature might affect the activation energy of oxygen diffusion predicted by MBKS, which is evident from the change in coordination number distribution and radial distribution function. None of the potentials make predictions that are fully consistent with density functional theory simulations of both the structure and diffusion properties of HfO2. This suggests the necessity of developing a better multi-body potential that considers charge exchange.

  20. A thorough investigation of the progressive reset dynamics in HfO2-based resistive switching structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzi, P.; Rao, R.; Irrera, F.; Suñé, J.; Miranda, E.

    2015-01-01

    According to previous reports, filamentary electron transport in resistive switching HfO 2 -based metal-insulator-metal structures can be modeled using a diode-like conduction mechanism with a series resistance. Taking the appropriate limits, the model allows simulating the high (HRS) and low (LRS) resistance states of the devices in terms of exponential and linear current-voltage relationships, respectively. In this letter, we show that this simple equivalent circuit approach can be extended to represent the progressive reset transition between the LRS and HRS if a generalized logistic growth model for the pre-exponential diode current factor is considered. In this regard, it is demonstrated here that a Verhulst logistic model does not provide accurate results. The reset dynamics is interpreted as the sequential deactivation of multiple conduction channels spanning the dielectric film. Fitting results for the current-voltage characteristics indicate that the voltage sweep rate only affects the deactivation rate of the filaments without altering the main features of the switching dynamics

  1. Enhanced memory effect with embedded graphene nanoplatelets in ZnO charge trapping layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar; Cimen, Furkan; Alkis, Sabri; Okyay, Ali K.

    2014-01-01

    A charge trapping memory with graphene nanoplatelets embedded in atomic layer deposited ZnO (GNIZ) is demonstrated. The memory shows a large threshold voltage V t shift (4 V) at low operating voltage (6/−6 V), good retention (>10 yr), and good endurance characteristic (>10 4 cycles). This memory performance is compared to control devices with graphene nanoplatelets (or ZnO) and a thicker tunnel oxide. These structures showed a reduced V t shift and retention characteristic. The GNIZ structure allows for scaling down the tunnel oxide thickness along with improving the memory window and retention of data. The larger V t shift indicates that the ZnO adds available trap states and enhances the emission and retention of charges. The charge emission mechanism in the memory structures with graphene nanoplatelets at an electric field E ≥ 5.57 MV/cm is found to be based on Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. The fabrication of this memory device is compatible with current semiconductor processing, therefore, has great potential in low-cost nano-memory applications.

  2. Deuterium trapping in ion implanted and co-deposited beryllium oxide layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, A.V.; Gorodetsky, A.E.; Zakharov, A.P.; Wu, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    Deuterium trapping in beryllium oxide films irradiated with 400 eV D ions has been studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). It has been found that for thermally grown BeO films implanted in the range 300 - 900 K the total deuterium retention doesn't depend whereas TDS spectra do markedly on irradiation temperature. For R.T. implantation the deuterium is released in a wide range from 500 to 1100 K. At implantation above 600 K the main portion of retained deuterium is released in a single peak centered at about 1000 K. The similar TDS peak is measured for D/BeO co-deposited layer. In addition we correlate our implantation data on BeO with the relevant data on beryllium metal and carbon. The interrelations between deuterium retention and microstructure are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Probing the thermal decomposition behaviors of ultrathin HfO2 films by an in situ high temperature scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kun; Wang, Lei; An, Jin; Xu, Jianbin

    2011-05-13

    The thermal decomposition of ultrathin HfO(2) films (∼0.6-1.2 nm) on Si by ultrahigh vacuum annealing (25-800 °C) is investigated in situ in real time by scanning tunneling microscopy. Two distinct thickness-dependent decomposition behaviors are observed. When the HfO(2) thickness is ∼ 0.6 nm, no discernible morphological changes are found below ∼ 700 °C. Then an abrupt reaction occurs at 750 °C with crystalline hafnium silicide nanostructures formed instantaneously. However, when the thickness is about 1.2 nm, the decomposition proceeds gradually with the creation and growth of two-dimensional voids at 800 °C. The observed thickness-dependent behavior is closely related to the SiO desorption, which is believed to be the rate-limiting step of the decomposition process.

  4. Optimization of pH sensing using silicon nanowire field effect transistors with HfO2 as the sensing surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, Sufi; D'Emic, Christopher; Afzali, Ali; Fletcher, Benjamin; Zhu, Y; Ning, Tak

    2011-01-01

    Silicon nanowire field effect transistor sensors with SiO 2 /HfO 2 as the gate dielectric sensing surface are fabricated using a top down approach. These sensors are optimized for pH sensing with two key characteristics. First, the pH sensitivity is shown to be independent of buffer concentration. Second, the observed pH sensitivity is enhanced and is equal to the Nernst maximum sensitivity limit of 59 mV/pH with a corresponding subthreshold drain current change of ∼ 650%/pH. These two enhanced pH sensing characteristics are attributed to the use of HfO 2 as the sensing surface and an optimized fabrication process compatible with silicon processing technology.

  5. Optimization of pH sensing using silicon nanowire field effect transistors with HfO2 as the sensing surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Sufi; D'Emic, Christopher; Afzali, Ali; Fletcher, Benjamin; Zhu, Y; Ning, Tak

    2011-10-07

    Silicon nanowire field effect transistor sensors with SiO(2)/HfO(2) as the gate dielectric sensing surface are fabricated using a top down approach. These sensors are optimized for pH sensing with two key characteristics. First, the pH sensitivity is shown to be independent of buffer concentration. Second, the observed pH sensitivity is enhanced and is equal to the Nernst maximum sensitivity limit of 59 mV/pH with a corresponding subthreshold drain current change of ∼ 650%/pH. These two enhanced pH sensing characteristics are attributed to the use of HfO(2) as the sensing surface and an optimized fabrication process compatible with silicon processing technology.

  6. Intermixing between HfO2 and GeO2 films deposited on Ge(001) and Si(001): Role of the substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, G. V.; Krug, C.; Miotti, L.; Bastos, K. P.; Lucovsky, G.; Baumvol, I. J. R.; Radtke, C.

    2011-01-01

    Thermally driven atomic transport in HfO 2 /GeO 2 /substrate structures on Ge(001) and Si(001) was investigated in N 2 ambient as function of annealing temperature and time. As-deposited stacks showed no detectable intermixing and no instabilities were observed on Si. On Ge, loss of O and Ge was detected in all annealed samples, presumably due to evolution of GeO from the GeO 2 /Ge interface. In addition, hafnium germanate is formed at 600 deg. C. Our data indicate that at 500 deg. C and above HfO 2 /GeO 2 stacks are stable only if isolated from the Ge substrate.

  7. Ab initio study of mechanical and thermo-acoustic properties of tough ceramics: applications to HfO2 in its cubic and orthorhombic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponce, C A; Casali, R A; Caravaca, M A

    2008-01-01

    By means of the ab initio all-electron new full-potential linear-muffin-tin orbitals method, calculations were made for elastic constants C 11 , C 12 and C 44 for Si, ZrO 2 and HfO 2 in their cubic phase, and constants C 11 , C 22 , C 33 , C 12 , C 13 , C 23 , C 44 , C 55 and C 66 for HfO 2 in its orthorhombic phase. Using the Voigt and Reuss theory, estimations were made for polycrystals of their bulk, shear and Young moduli, and Poisson coefficients. The speed of elastic wave propagations and Debye temperatures were estimated for polycrystals built from Si and the above mentioned compounds. The semicore 4f 14 electrons should be included in the valence set of Hf atom in this all-electron approach if accurate results for elastic properties under pressures are looked for

  8. Hydrogen and helium trapping in tungsten deposition layers formed by RF plasma sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazunari Katayama; Kazumi Imaoka; Takayuki Okamura; Masabumi Nishikawa

    2006-01-01

    Understanding of tritium behavior in plasma facing materials is an important issue for fusion reactor from viewpoints of fuel control and radiation safety. Tungsten is used as a plasma facing material in the divertor region of ITER. However, investigation of hydrogen isotope behavior in tungsten deposition layer is not sufficient so far. It is also necessary to evaluate an effect of helium on a formation of deposition layer and an accumulation of hydrogen isotopes because helium generated by fusion reaction exists in fusion plasma. In this study, tungsten deposition layers were formed by sputtering method using hydrogen and helium RF plasma. An erosion rate and a deposition rate of tungsten were estimated by weight measurement. Hydrogen and helium retention were investigated by thermal desorption method. Tungsten deposition was performed using a capacitively-coupled RF plasma device equipped with parallel-plate electrodes. A tungsten target was mounted on one electrode which is supplied with RF power at 200 W. Tungsten substrates were mounted on the other electrode which is at ground potential. The plasma discharge was continued for 120 hours where pressure of hydrogen or helium was controlled to be 10 Pa. The amounts of hydrogen and helium released from deposition layers was quantified by a gas chromatograph. The erosion rate of target tungsten under helium plasma was estimated to be 1.8 times larger than that under hydrogen plasma. The deposition rate on tungsten substrate under helium plasma was estimated to be 4.1 times larger than that under hydrogen plasma. Atomic ratio of hydrogen to tungsten in a deposition layer formed by hydrogen plasma was estimated to be 0.17 by heating to 600 o C. From a deposition layer formed by helium plasma, not only helium but also hydrogen was released by heating to 500 o C. Atomic ratios of helium and hydrogen to tungsten were estimated to be 0.080 and 0.075, respectively. The trapped hydrogen is probably impurity hydrogen

  9. Low-temperature fabrication of sputtered high-k HfO2 gate dielectric for flexible a-IGZO thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rihui; Zheng, Zeke; Xiong, Mei; Zhang, Xiaochen; Li, Xiaoqing; Ning, Honglong; Fang, Zhiqiang; Xie, Weiguang; Lu, Xubing; Peng, Junbiao

    2018-03-01

    In this work, low temperature fabrication of a sputtered high-k HfO2 gate dielectric for flexible a-IGZO thin film transistors (TFTs) on polyimide substrates was investigated. The effects of Ar-pressure during the sputtering process and then especially the post-annealing treatments at low temperature (≤200 °C) for HfO2 on reducing the density of defects in the bulk and on the surface were systematically studied. X-ray reflectivity, UV-vis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and micro-wave photoconductivity decay measurements were carried out and indicated that the high quality of optimized HfO2 film and its high dielectric properties contributed to the low concentration of structural defects and shallow localized defects such as oxygen vacancies. As a result, the well-structured HfO2 gate dielectric exhibited a high density of 9.7 g/cm3, a high dielectric constant of 28.5, a wide optical bandgap of 4.75 eV, and relatively low leakage current. The corresponding flexible a-IGZO TFT on polyimide exhibited an optimal device performance with a saturation mobility of 10.3 cm2 V-1 s-1, an Ion/Ioff ratio of 4.3 × 107, a SS value of 0.28 V dec-1, and a threshold voltage (Vth) of 1.1 V, as well as favorable stability under NBS/PBS gate bias and bending stress.

  10. TaN interface properties and electric field cycling effects on ferroelectric Si-doped HfO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomenzo, Patrick D.; Nishida, Toshikazu; Takmeel, Qanit; Zhou, Chuanzhen; Fancher, Chris M.; Jones, Jacob L.; Lambers, Eric; Rudawski, Nicholas G.; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric HfO 2 -based thin films, which can exhibit ferroelectric properties down to sub-10 nm thicknesses, are a promising candidate for emerging high density memory technologies. As the ferroelectric thickness continues to shrink, the electrode-ferroelectric interface properties play an increasingly important role. We investigate the TaN interface properties on 10 nm thick Si-doped HfO 2 thin films fabricated in a TaN metal-ferroelectric-metal stack which exhibit highly asymmetric ferroelectric characteristics. To understand the asymmetric behavior of the ferroelectric characteristics of the Si-doped HfO 2 thin films, the chemical interface properties of sputtered TaN bottom and top electrodes are probed with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ta-O bonds at the bottom electrode interface and a significant presence of Hf-N bonds at both electrode interfaces are identified. It is shown that the chemical heterogeneity of the bottom and top electrode interfaces gives rise to an internal electric field, which causes the as-grown ferroelectric domains to preferentially polarize to screen positively charged oxygen vacancies aggregated at the oxidized bottom electrode interface. Electric field cycling is shown to reduce the internal electric field with a concomitant increase in remanent polarization and decrease in relative permittivity. Through an analysis of pulsed transient switching currents, back-switching is observed in Si-doped HfO 2 thin films with pinched hysteresis loops and is shown to be influenced by the internal electric field

  11. Structure and properties of a model conductive filament/host oxide interface in HfO2-based ReRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, A. C. M.; McKenna, K. P.

    2018-04-01

    Resistive random-access memory (ReRAM) is a promising class of nonvolatile memory capable of storing information via its resistance state. In the case of hafnium oxide-based devices, experimental evidence shows that a conductive oxygen-deficient filament is formed and broken inside of the device by oxygen migration, leading to switching of its resistance state. However, little is known about the nature of this conductive phase, its interface with the host oxide, or the associated interdiffusion of oxygen, presenting a challenge to understanding the switching mechanism and device properties. To address these problems, we present atomic-scale first-principles simulations of a prototypical conductive phase (HfO), the electronic properties of its interface with HfO2, as well as stability with respect to oxygen diffusion across the interface. We show that the conduction-band offset between HfO and HfO2 is 1.3 eV, smaller than typical electrode-HfO2 band offsets, suggesting that positive charging and band bending should occur at the conductive filament-HfO2 interface. We also show that transfer of oxygen across the interface, from HfO2 into HfO, costs around 1.2 eV per atom and leads to a gradual opening of the HfO band gap, and hence disruption of the electrical conductivity. These results provide invaluable insights into understanding the switching mechanism for HfO2-based ReRAM.

  12. Effect of current compliance and voltage sweep rate on the resistive switching of HfO2/ITO/Invar structure as measured by conductive atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, You-Lin; Liao, Chun-Wei; Ling, Jing-Jenn

    2014-01-01

    The electrical characterization of HfO 2 /ITO/Invar resistive switching memory structure was studied using conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a semiconductor parameter analyzer, Agilent 4156C. The metal alloy Invar was used as the metal substrate to ensure good ohmic contact with the substrate holder of the AFM. A conductive Pt/Ir AFM tip was placed in direct contact with the HfO 2 surface, such that it acted as the top electrode. Nanoscale current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the HfO 2 /ITO/Invar structure were measured by applying a ramp voltage through the conductive AFM tip at various current compliances and ramp voltage sweep rates. It was found that the resistance of the low resistance state (RLRS) decreased with increasing current compliance value, but resistance of high resistance state (RHRS) barely changed. However, both the RHRS and RLRS decreased as the voltage sweep rate increased. The reasons for this dependency on current compliance and voltage sweep rate are discussed.

  13. Influence of Optimization of Process Parameters on Threshold Voltage for Development of HfO2/TiSi2 18 nm PMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atan N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing a 18-nm transistor requires a variety of parameters, materials, temperatures, and methods. In this research, HfO2 was used as the gate dielectric ad TiO2 was used as the gate material. The transistor HfO2/TiSi2 18-nm PMOS was invented using SILVACO TCAD. Ion implantation was adopted in the fabrication process for the method’s practicality and ability to be used to suppress short channel effects. The study involved ion implantation methods: compensation implantation, halo implantation energy, halo tilt, and source–drain implantation. Taguchi method is the best optimization process for a threshold voltage of HfO2/TiSi2 18-nm PMOS. In this case, the method adopted was Taguchi orthogonal array L9. The process parameters (ion implantations and noise factors were evaluated by examining the Taguchi’s signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and nominal-the-best for the threshold voltage (VTH. After optimization, the result showed that the VTH value of the 18-nm PMOS device was -0.291339.

  14. Tunneling current in HfO2 and Hf0.5Zr0.5O2-based ferroelectric tunnel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhipeng; Cao, Xi; Wu, Tong; Guo, Jing

    2018-03-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) have been intensively explored for future low power data storage and information processing applications. Among various ferroelectric (FE) materials studied, HfO2 and H0.5Zr0.5O2 (HZO) have the advantage of CMOS process compatibility. The validity of the simple effective mass approximation, for describing the tunneling process in these materials, is examined by computing the complex band structure from ab initio simulations. The results show that the simple effective mass approximation is insufficient to describe the tunneling current in HfO2 and HZO materials, and quantitative accurate descriptions of the complex band structures are indispensable for calculation of the tunneling current. A compact k . p Hamiltonian is parameterized to and validated by ab initio complex band structures, which provides a method for efficiently and accurately computing the tunneling current in HfO2 and HZO. The device characteristics of a metal/FE/metal structure and a metal/FE/semiconductor (M-F-S) structure are investigated by using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism with the parameterized effective Hamiltonian. The result shows that the M-F-S structure offers a larger resistance window due to an extra barrier in the semiconductor region at off-state. A FTJ utilizing M-F-S structure is beneficial for memory design.

  15. MOHOS-type memory performance using HfO{sub 2} nanoparticles as charge trapping layer and low temperature annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, Joel, E-mail: jmolina@inaoep.mx [National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics. Electronics Department, Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Ortega, Rafael; Calleja, Wilfrido; Rosales, Pedro; Zuniga, Carlos; Torres, Alfonso [National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics. Electronics Department, Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico)

    2012-09-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HfO{sub 2} nanoparticles used as charge trapping layer in MOHOS memory devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing HfO{sub 2} nanoparticles concentration enhances charge injection and trapping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of memory performance with low temperature annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Charge injection is done without using any hot-carrier injection mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using injected charge density is better for comparison of scaled memory devices. - Abstract: In this work, HfO{sub 2} nanoparticles (np-HfO{sub 2}) are embedded within a spin-on glass (SOG)-based oxide matrix and used as a charge trapping layer in metal-oxide-high-k-oxide-silicon (MOHOS)-type memory applications. This charge trapping layer is obtained by a simple sol-gel spin coating method after using different concentrations of np-HfO{sub 2} and low temperature annealing (down to 425 Degree-Sign C) in order to obtain charge-retention characteristics with a lower thermal budget. The memory's charge trapping characteristics are quantized by measuring both the flat-band voltage shift of MOHOS capacitors (writing/erasing operations) and their programming retention times after charge injection while correlating all these data to np-HfO{sub 2} concentration and annealing temperature. Since a large memory window has been obtained for our MOHOS memory, the relatively easy injection/annihilation (writing/erasing) of charge injected through the substrate opens the possibility to use this material as an effective charge trapping layer. It is shown that by using lower annealing temperatures for the charge trapping layer, higher densities of injected charge are obtained along with enhanced retention times. In conclusion, by using np-HfO{sub 2} as charge trapping layer in memory devices, moderate programming and retention characteristics have been obtained by this simple and yet low-cost spin-coating method.

  16. Uniform Self-rectifying Resistive Switching Behavior via Preformed Conducting Paths in a Vertical-type Ta2O5/HfO2-x Structure with a Sub-μm(2) Cell Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung Ho; Yoo, Sijung; Song, Seul Ji; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Kwon, Dae Eun; Kwon, Young Jae; Park, Tae Hyung; Kim, Hye Jin; Shao, Xing Long; Kim, Yumin; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2016-07-20

    To replace or succeed the present NAND flash memory, resistive switching random access memory (ReRAM) should be implemented in the vertical-type crossbar array configuration. The ReRAM cell must have a highly reproducible resistive switching (RS) performance and an electroforming-free, self-rectifying, low-power-consumption, multilevel-switching, and easy fabrication process with a deep sub-μm(2) cell area. In this work, a Pt/Ta2O5/HfO2-x/TiN RS memory cell fabricated in the form of a vertical-type structure was presented as a feasible contender to meet the above requirements. While the fundamental RS characteristics of this material based on the electron trapping/detrapping mechanisms have been reported elsewhere, the influence of the cell scaling size to 0.34 μm(2) on the RS performance by adopting the vertical integration scheme was carefully examined in this work. The smaller cell area provided much better switching uniformity while all the other benefits of this specific material system were preserved. Using the overstressing technique, the nature of RS through the localized conducting path was further examined, which elucidated the fundamental difference between the present material system and the general ionic-motion-related bipolar RS mechanism.

  17. Ab initio localized basis set study of structural parameters and elastic properties of HfO2 polymorphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caravaca, M A; Casali, R A

    2005-01-01

    The SIESTA approach based on pseudopotentials and a localized basis set is used to calculate the electronic, elastic and equilibrium properties of P 2 1 /c, Pbca, Pnma, Fm3m, P4 2 nmc and Pa3 phases of HfO 2 . Using separable Troullier-Martins norm-conserving pseudopotentials which include partial core corrections for Hf, we tested important physical properties as a function of the basis set size, grid size and cut-off ratio of the pseudo-atomic orbitals (PAOs). We found that calculations in this oxide with the LDA approach and using a minimal basis set (simple zeta, SZ) improve calculated phase transition pressures with respect to the double-zeta basis set and LDA (DZ-LDA), and show similar accuracy to that determined with the PPPW and GGA approach. Still, the equilibrium volumes and structural properties calculated with SZ-LDA compare better with experiments than the GGA approach. The bandgaps and elastic and structural properties calculated with DZ-LDA are accurate in agreement with previous state of the art ab initio calculations and experimental evidence and cannot be improved with a polarized basis set. These calculated properties show low sensitivity to the PAO localization parameter range between 40 and 100 meV. However, this is not true for the relative energy, which improves upon decrease of the mentioned parameter. We found a non-linear behaviour in the lattice parameters with pressure in the P 2 1 /c phase, showing a discontinuity of the derivative of the a lattice parameter with respect to external pressure, as found in experiments. The common enthalpy values calculated with the minimal basis set give pressure transitions of 3.3 and 10.8?GPa for P2 1 /c → Pbca and Pbca → Pnma, respectively, in accordance with different high pressure experimental values

  18. Surface Passivation of MoO3 Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition Towards High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2015-06-03

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in Lithium (Li) ion batteries at high rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g, on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li–ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex–situ HRTEM, X–ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and X–ray diffraction was carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  19. Surface Passivation of MoO3 Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition Towards High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal; Shahid, Muhammad; Nagaraju, Doddahalli H.; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in Lithium (Li) ion batteries at high rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g, on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li–ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex–situ HRTEM, X–ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and X–ray diffraction was carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  20. Interaction of Multiple Particles with a Solidification Front: From Compacted Particle Layer to Particle Trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Michel, Brice; Georgelin, Marc; Deville, Sylvain; Pocheau, Alain

    2017-06-13

    The interaction of solidification fronts with objects such as particles, droplets, cells, or bubbles is a phenomenon with many natural and technological occurrences. For an object facing the front, it may yield various fates, from trapping to rejection, with large implications regarding the solidification pattern. However, whereas most situations involve multiple particles interacting with each other and the front, attention has focused almost exclusively on the interaction of a single, isolated object with the front. Here we address experimentally the interaction of multiple particles with a solidification front by performing solidification experiments of a monodisperse particle suspension in a Hele-Shaw cell with precise control of growth conditions and real-time visualization. We evidence the growth of a particle layer ahead of the front at a close-packing volume fraction, and we document its steady-state value at various solidification velocities. We then extend single-particle models to the situation of multiple particles by taking into account the additional force induced on an entering particle by viscous friction in the compacted particle layer. By a force balance model this provides an indirect measure of the repelling mean thermomolecular pressure over a particle entering the front. The presence of multiple particles is found to increase it following a reduction of the thickness of the thin liquid film that separates particles and front. We anticipate the findings reported here to provide a relevant basis to understand many complex solidification situations in geophysics, engineering, biology, or food engineering, where multiple objects interact with the front and control the resulting solidification patterns.

  1. Comparison of HfCl4, HfI4, TEMA-Hf, and TDMA-Hf as precursors in early growing stages of HfO2 films deposited by ALD: A DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortez-Valadez, M.; Fierro, C.; Farias-Mancilla, J.R.; Vargas-Ortiz, A.; Flores-Acosta, M.; Ramírez-Bon, R.; Enriquez-Carrejo, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Hafnium oxide growth on Si(100) by atomic layer deposition was simulated. • The interface structure was considered as silicate and silicide. • The interface was studied employing DFT. • TDMA-Hf precursor show better interface stability. - Abstract: The final structure of HfO 2 films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) after reaction with OH − ions has been analyzed by DFT (density functional theory). The interaction of the precursors: HfCl 4 (hafnium tetrachloride), HfI 4 (hafnium tetraiodide), TEMA-Hf (tetrakis-ethylmethylamino hafnium), and TDMA-Hf (tetrakis-dimethylamino hafnium) with HO–H was studied employing the B3LYP (Becke 3-parameter, Lee–Yang–Parr) hybrid functional and the PBE (Perdew–Burke–Ernzerhof) generalized gradient functional. The structural evolution at the Si(100) surface has been analyzed by LDA (local density approximation). The structural parameters: bond length and bond angle, and the vibrational parameters for the optimized structures are also reported. The presence of hafnium silicate at the interface was detected. The infrared spectra and structural parameters obtained in this work agree with previously reported experimental results.

  2. Temperature-Dependent Physical and Memory Characteristics of Atomic-Layer-Deposited RuOx Metal Nanocrystal Capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maikap

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical and memory characteristics of the atomic-layer-deposited RuOx metal nanocrystal capacitors in an n-Si/SiO2/HfO2/RuOx/Al2O3/Pt structure with different postdeposition annealing temperatures from 850–1000°C have been investigated. The RuOx metal nanocrystals with an average diameter of 7 nm and a highdensity of 0.7 × 1012/cm2 are observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy after a postdeposition annealing temperature at 1000°C. The density of RuOx nanocrystal is decreased (slightly by increasing the annealing temperatures, due to agglomeration of multiple nanocrystals. The RuO3 nanocrystals and Hf-silicate layer at the SiO2/HfO2 interface are confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. For post-deposition annealing temperature of 1000°C, the memory capacitors with a small equivalent oxide thickness of ~9 nm possess a large hysteresis memory window of >5 V at a small sweeping gate voltage of ±5 V. A promising memory window under a small sweeping gate voltage of ~3 V is also observed due to charge trapping in the RuOx metal nanocrystals. The program/erase mechanism is modified Fowler-Nordheim (F-N tunneling of the electrons and holes from Si substrate. The electrons and holes are trapped in the RuOx nanocrystals. Excellent program/erase endurance of 106 cycles and a large memory window of 4.3 V with a small charge loss of ~23% at 85°C are observed after 10 years of data retention time, due to the deep-level traps in the RuOx nanocrystals. The memory structure is very promising for future nanoscale nonvolatile memory applications.

  3. Analytical constraints on layered gas trapping and smoothing of atmospheric variability in ice under low-accumulation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Fourteau

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate for the first time the loss and alteration of past atmospheric information from air trapping mechanisms under low-accumulation conditions through continuous CH4 (and CO measurements. Methane concentration changes were measured over the Dansgaard–Oeschger event 17 (DO-17,  ∼  60 000 yr BP in the Antarctic Vostok 4G-2 ice core. Measurements were performed using continuous-flow analysis combined with laser spectroscopy. The results highlight many anomalous layers at the centimeter scale that are unevenly distributed along the ice core. The anomalous methane mixing ratios differ from those in the immediate surrounding layers by up to 50 ppbv. This phenomenon can be theoretically reproduced by a simple layered trapping model, creating very localized gas age scale inversions. We propose a method for cleaning the record of anomalous values that aims at minimizing the bias in the overall signal. Once the layered-trapping-induced anomalies are removed from the record, DO-17 appears to be smoother than its equivalent record from the high-accumulation WAIS Divide ice core. This is expected due to the slower sinking and densification speeds of firn layers at lower accumulation. However, the degree of smoothing appears surprisingly similar between modern and DO-17 conditions at Vostok. This suggests that glacial records of trace gases from low-accumulation sites in the East Antarctic plateau can provide a better time resolution of past atmospheric composition changes than previously expected. We also developed a numerical method to extract the gas age distributions in ice layers after the removal of the anomalous layers based on comparison with a weakly smoothed record. It is particularly adapted for the conditions of the East Antarctic plateau, as it helps to characterize smoothing for a large range of very low-temperature and low-accumulation conditions.

  4. Optical properties of the Al2O3/SiO2 and Al2O3/HfO2/SiO2 antireflective coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszałek, Konstanty; Winkowski, Paweł; Jaglarz, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of bilayer and trilayer Al2O3/SiO2 and Al2O3/HfO2/SiO2 antireflective coatings are presented in this paper. The oxide films were deposited on a heated quartz glass by e-gun evaporation in a vacuum of 5 × 10-3 [Pa] in the presence of oxygen. Depositions were performed at three different temperatures of the substrates: 100 °C, 200 °C and 300 °C. The coatings were deposited onto optical quartz glass (Corning HPFS). The thickness and deposition rate were controlled with Inficon XTC/2 thickness measuring system. Deposition rate was equal to 0.6 nm/s for Al2O3, 0.6 nm - 0.8 nm/s for HfO2 and 0.6 nm/s for SiO2. Simulations leading to optimization of the thin film thickness and the experimental results of optical measurements, which were carried out during and after the deposition process, have been presented. The optical thickness values, obtained from the measurements performed during the deposition process were as follows: 78 nm/78 nm for Al2O3/SiO2 and 78 nm/156 nm/78 nm for Al2O3/HfO2/SiO2. The results were then checked by ellipsometric technique. Reflectance of the films depended on the substrate temperature during the deposition process. Starting from 240 nm to the beginning of visible region, the average reflectance of the trilayer system was below 1 % and for the bilayer, minima of the reflectance were equal to 1.6 %, 1.15 % and 0.8 % for deposition temperatures of 100 °C, 200 °C and 300 °C, respectively.

  5. Performance improvement of charge-trap memory by using a stacked Zr_0_._4_6Si_0_._5_4O_2/Al_2O_3 charge-trapping layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Zhenjie; Hu, Dan; Zhang, Xiwei; Zhao, Yage; Li, Rong

    2016-01-01

    The postdeposition annealing (PDA)-treated charge-trap flash memory capacitor with stacked Zr_0_._4_6Si_0_._5_4O_2/Al_2O_3 charge-trapping layer flanked by a SiO_2 tunneling oxide and an Al_2O_3 blocking oxide was fabricated and investigated. It is observed that the memory capacitor exhibits prominent memory characteristics with large memory windows 12.8 V in a ±10 V gate sweeping voltage range, faster program/erase speed, and good data-retention characteristics even at 125 C compared to a single charge-trapping layer (Zr_0_._4_6Si_0_._5_4O_2, Zr_0_._7_9Si_0_._2_1O_2, and Zr_0_._4_6Al_1_._0_8O_2_._5_4). The quantum wells and introduced interfacial traps of the stacked trapping layer regulate the storage and loss behavior of charges, and jointly contribute to the improved memory characteristics. Hence, the memory capacitor with a stacked trapping layer is a promising candidate in future nonvolatile charge-trap memory device design and application. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Performance improvement of charge-trap memory by using a stacked Zr{sub 0.46}Si{sub 0.54}O{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} charge-trapping layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhenjie; Hu, Dan; Zhang, Xiwei; Zhao, Yage [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455000 (China); Li, Rong [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455000 (China)

    2016-11-15

    The postdeposition annealing (PDA)-treated charge-trap flash memory capacitor with stacked Zr{sub 0.46}Si{sub 0.54}O{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} charge-trapping layer flanked by a SiO{sub 2} tunneling oxide and an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} blocking oxide was fabricated and investigated. It is observed that the memory capacitor exhibits prominent memory characteristics with large memory windows 12.8 V in a ±10 V gate sweeping voltage range, faster program/erase speed, and good data-retention characteristics even at 125 C compared to a single charge-trapping layer (Zr{sub 0.46}Si{sub 0.54}O{sub 2}, Zr{sub 0.79}Si{sub 0.21}O{sub 2}, and Zr{sub 0.46}Al{sub 1.08}O{sub 2.54}). The quantum wells and introduced interfacial traps of the stacked trapping layer regulate the storage and loss behavior of charges, and jointly contribute to the improved memory characteristics. Hence, the memory capacitor with a stacked trapping layer is a promising candidate in future nonvolatile charge-trap memory device design and application. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Atomic layer deposition grown composite dielectric oxides and ZnO for transparent electronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieraltowska, S.; Wachnicki, L.; Witkowski, B.S.; Godlewski, M.; Guziewicz, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report on transparent transistor obtained using laminar structure of two high-k dielectric oxides (hafnium dioxide, HfO 2 and aluminum oxide, Al 2 O 3 ) and zinc oxide (ZnO) layer grown at low temperature (60 °C–100 °C) using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) technology. Our research was focused on the optimization of technological parameters for composite layers Al 2 O 3 /HfO 2 /Al 2 O 3 for thin film transistor structures with ZnO as a channel and a gate layer. We elaborate on the ALD growth of these oxides, finding that the 100 nm thick layers of HfO 2 and Al 2 O 3 exhibit fine surface flatness and required amorphous microstructure. Growth parameters are optimized for the monolayer growth mode and maximum smoothness required for gating.

  8. Radiation induced leakage due to stochastic charge trapping in isolation layers of nanoscale MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrev, G. I.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Pershenkov, V. S.

    2008-03-01

    The sensitivity of sub-100 nm devices to microdose effects, which can be considered as intermediate case between cumulative total dose and single event errors, is investigated. A detailed study of radiation-induced leakage due to stochastic charge trapping in irradiated planar and nonplanar devices is developed. The influence of High-K insulators on nanoscale ICs reliability is discussed. Low critical values of trapped charge demonstrate a high sensitivity to single event effect.

  9. A comparative study of amorphous InGaZnO thin-film transistors with HfOxNy and HfO2 gate dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Xiao; Tong, Xingsheng; Fang, Guojia; Yuan, Longyan; Zhao, Xingzhong

    2010-01-01

    High-κ HfO x N y and HfO 2 films are applied to amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) devices as gate dielectric using radio-frequency reactive sputtering. The electrical characteristics and reliability of a-IGZO metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS) capacitors and thin-film transistors (TFTs) are then investigated. Experimental results indicate that the nitrogen incorporation into HfO 2 can effectively improve the interface quality and enhance the reliability of the devices. Electrical properties with an interface-state density of 5.2 × 10 11 eV −1 cm −2 , capacitance equivalent thickness of 1.65 nm, gate leakage current density of 3.4 × 10 −5 A cm −2 at V fb +1 V, equivalent permittivity of 23.6 and hysteresis voltage of 110 mV are obtained for an Al/HfO x N y /a-IGZO MIS capacitor. Superior performance of HfO x N y /a-IGZO TFTs has also been achieved with a low threshold voltage of 0.33 V, a high saturation mobility of 12.1 cm 2 V −1 s −1 and a large on–off current ratio up to 7 × 10 7 (W/L = 500/20 µm) at 3 V

  10. Atomic-layer deposited IrO2 nanodots for charge-trap flash-memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sangmoo; Cha, Young-Kwan; Seo, Bum-Seok; Park, Sangjin; Park, Ju-Hee; Shin, Sangmin; Seol, Kwang Soo; Park, Jong-Bong; Jung, Young-Soo; Park, Youngsoo; Park, Yoondong; Yoo, In-Kyeong; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2007-01-01

    Charge-trap flash- (CTF) memory structures have been fabricated by employing IrO 2 nanodots (NDs) grown by atomic-layer deposition. A band of isolated IrO 2 NDs of about 3 nm lying almost parallel to Si/SiO 2 interface is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The memory device with IrO 2 NDs shows much larger capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis and memory window compared with the control sample without IrO 2 NDs. After annealing at 800 deg. C for 20 min, the ND device shows almost no change in the width of C-V hysteresis and the ND distribution. These results indicate that the IrO 2 NDs embedded in SiO 2 can be utilized as thermally stable, discrete charge traps, promising for metal oxide-ND-based CTF memory devices

  11. High reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory with a poly(4-vinyl phenol) charge trapping layer based on a pn-heterojunction active layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Lanyi; Ying, Jun; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Letian, E-mail: zlt@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: wwei99@jlu.edu.cn; Wang, Wei, E-mail: zlt@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: wwei99@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2016-04-25

    In this letter, we demonstrate a high reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor (OFET) based nonvolatile memory (NVM) with a polymer poly(4-vinyl phenol) (PVP) as the charge trapping layer. In the unipolar OFETs, the inreversible shifts of the turn-on voltage (V{sub on}) and severe degradation of the memory window (ΔV{sub on}) at programming (P) and erasing (E) voltages, respectively, block their application in NVMs. The obstacle is overcome by using a pn-heterojunction as the active layer in the OFET memory, which supplied a holes and electrons accumulating channel at the supplied P and E voltages, respectively. Both holes and electrons transferring from the channels to PVP layer and overwriting the trapped charges with an opposite polarity result in the reliable bidirectional shifts of V{sub on} at P and E voltages, respectively. The heterojunction OFET exhibits excellent nonvolatile memory characteristics, with a large ΔV{sub on} of 8.5 V, desired reading (R) voltage at 0 V, reliable P/R/E/R dynamic endurance over 100 cycles and a long retention time over 10 years.

  12. High-Performance Nonvolatile Organic Field-Effect Transistor Memory Based on Organic Semiconductor Heterostructures of Pentacene/P13/Pentacene as Both Charge Transport and Trapping Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Guo, Fengning; Ling, Haifeng; Zhang, Peng; Yi, Mingdong; Wang, Laiyuan; Wu, Dequn; Xie, Linghai; Huang, Wei

    2017-08-01

    Nonvolatile organic field-effect transistor (OFET) memory devices based on pentacene/ N , N '-ditridecylperylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (P13)/pentacene trilayer organic heterostructures have been proposed. The discontinuous n-type P13 embedded in p-type pentacene layers can not only provide electrons in the semiconductor layer that facilitates electron trapping process; it also works as charge trapping sites, which is attributed to the quantum well-like pentacene/P13/pentacene organic heterostructures. The synergistic effects of charge trapping in the discontinuous P13 and the charge-trapping property of the poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVP) layer remarkably improve the memory performance. In addition, the trilayer organic heterostructures have also been successfully applied to multilevel and flexible nonvolatile memory devices. The results provide a novel design strategy to achieve high-performance nonvolatile OFET memory devices and allow potential applications for different combinations of various organic semiconductor materials in OFET memory.

  13. Enhanced memory performance by tailoring the microstructural evolution of (ZrO{sub 2}){sub 0.6}(SiO{sub 2}){sub 0.4} charge trapping layer in the nanocrystallites-based charge trap flash memory cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhenjie; Xu, Hanni; Xia, Yidong; Yin, Jiang; Li, Aidong; Liu, Zhiguo [Nanjing University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing (China); Zhu, Xinhua [Nanjing University, Department of Physics and National and Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing (China); Yan, Feng [Nanjing University, School of Electronics Science and Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2012-07-15

    ZrO{sub 2} nanocrystallites based charge trap memory cells by incorporating a (ZrO{sub 2}){sub 0.6}(SiO{sub 2}){sub 0.4} film as a charge trapping layer and amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as tunneling and blocking layer were prepared and investigated. The precipitation reaction in charge trapping layer forming ZrO{sub 2} nanocrystallites during rapid thermal annealing was investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The density and size of ZrO{sub 2} nanocrystallites are the critical factors for controlling the charge storage characteristics. The ZrO{sub 2} nanocrystallites based memory cells after postannealing at 800 C for 60 s exhibit the best electrical characteristics and a low charge loss {proportional_to}5 % after 10{sup 5} write/erase cycles operation. (orig.)

  14. High performance SONOS flash memory with in-situ silicon nanocrystals embedded in silicon nitride charge trapping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae-Gab; Yang, Seung-Dong; Yun, Ho-Jin; Jung, Jun-Kyo; Park, Jung-Hyun; Lim, Chan; Cho, Gyu-seok; Park, Seong-gye; Huh, Chul; Lee, Hi-Deok; Lee, Ga-Won

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, SONOS-type flash memory device with highly improved charge-trapping efficiency is suggested by using silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) embedded in silicon nitride (SiNX) charge trapping layer. The Si-NCs were in-situ grown by PECVD without additional post annealing process. The fabricated device shows high program/erase speed and retention property which is suitable for multi-level cell (MLC) application. Excellent performance and reliability for MLC are demonstrated with large memory window of ∼8.5 V and superior retention characteristics of 7% charge loss for 10 years. High resolution transmission electron microscopy image confirms the Si-NC formation and the size is around 1-2 nm which can be verified again in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) where pure Si bonds increase. Besides, XPS analysis implies that more nitrogen atoms make stable bonds at the regular lattice point. Photoluminescence spectra results also illustrate that Si-NCs formation in SiNx is an effective method to form deep trap states.

  15. First-principles simulations of the leakage current in metal-oxide-semiconductor structures caused by oxygen vacancies in HfO2 high-K gate dielectric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, L.F.; Wang, Z.O.

    2008-01-01

    HfO 2 high-K gate dielectric has been used as a new gate dielectric in metal-oxide-semiconductor structures. First-principles simulations are used to study the effects of oxygen vacancies on the tunneling current through the oxide. A level which is nearly 1.25 eV from the bottom of the conduction band is introduced into the bandgap due to the oxygen vacancies. The tunneling current calculations show that the tunneling currents through the gate oxide with different defect density possess the typical characteristic of stress-induced leakage current. Further analysis shows that the location of oxygen vacancies will have a marked effect on the tunneling current. The largest increase in the tunneling current caused by oxygen vacancies comes about at the middle oxide field when defects are located at the middle of the oxide. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Influence of phosphorous precursors on spectroscopic properties of Er3+-activated SiO2-HfO2-P2O5 planar waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilchenko, I; Carpentiero, A; Chiappini, A; Chiasera, A; Ferrari, M; Vaccari, A; Lukowiak, A; Righini, G C; Vereshagin, V

    2014-01-01

    (70-x)SiO 2 -30HfO 2 -xP 2 O 5 (x= 5, 10 mol %) glass planar waveguides activated by 0.5 mol% Er 3 + ions were prepared by sol-gel route. Several phosphorous precursors have been investigated for the synthesis of a dielectric stable sol useful for the realization of planar waveguides. The waveguides were investigated by different diagnostic techniques. The optical properties such as refractive index, thickness, number of propagating modes and attenuation coefficient were measured at 632.8 and 543.5 nm by prism coupling technique. Transmission measurements were carried out in order to assess the transparency of the deposited films. Photoluminescence measurements and lifetime decay curves of the Er 3 + transition (4 I 13/2 → 4 I 15/2 ) were performed in order to investigate the role of P 2 O 5

  17. Deuterium trapping in the carbon-silicon co-deposition layers prepared by RF sputtering in D2 atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Zhang, Weiyuan; Su, Ranran; Tu, Hanjun; Shi, Liqun; Hu, Jiansheng

    2018-04-01

    Deuterated carbon-silicon layers co-deposited on graphite and silicon substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering in pure D2 plasma were produced to study deuterium trapping and characteristics of the C-Si layers. The C-Si co-deposited layers were examined by ion beam analysis (IBA), Raman spectroscopy (RS), infrared absorption (IR) spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the growth rate of the C-Si co-deposition layer decreased with increasing temperature from 350 K to 800 K, the D concentration and C/Si ratios increased differently on graphite and silicon substrates. TDS shows that D desorption is mainly as D2, HD, HDO, CD4, and C2D4 and release peaks occurred at temperatures of less than 900 K. RS and IR analysis reveal that the structure of the C-Si layers became more disordered with increasing temperatures. Rounded areas of peeling with 1-2 μm diameters were observed on the surface.

  18. Trapping, self-trapping and the polaron family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoneham, A M; Gavartin, J; Shluger, A L; Kimmel, A V; Ramo, D Munoz; Roennow, H M; Aeppli, G; Renner, C

    2007-01-01

    The earliest ideas of the polaron recognized that the coupling of an electron to ionic vibrations would affect its apparent mass and could effectively immobilize the carrier (self-trapping). We discuss how these basic ideas have been generalized to recognize new materials and new phenomena. First, there is an interplay between self-trapping and trapping associated with defects or with fluctuations in an amorphous solid. In high dielectric constant oxides, like HfO 2 , this leads to oxygen vacancies having as many as five charge states. In colossal magnetoresistance manganites, this interplay makes possible the scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) observation of polarons. Second, excitons can self-trap and, by doing so, localize energy in ways that can modify the material properties. Third, new materials introduce new features, with polaron-related ideas emerging for uranium dioxide, gate dielectric oxides, Jahn-Teller systems, semiconducting polymers and biological systems. The phonon modes that initiate self-trapping can be quite different from the longitudinal optic modes usually assumed to dominate. Fourth, there are new phenomena, like possible magnetism in simple oxides, or with the evolution of short-lived polarons, like muons or excitons. The central idea remains that of a particle whose properties are modified by polarizing or deforming its host solid, sometimes profoundly. However, some of the simpler standard assumptions can give a limited, indeed misleading, description of real systems, with qualitative inconsistencies. We discuss representative cases for which theory and experiment can be compared in detail

  19. Multi-type particle layer improved light trapping for photovoltaic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Christin

    2016-01-01

    . The absorbance was enhanced compared to the bare Si wafer and I demonstrated on mixing particles a broadband boost in the absorbance within the homogeneous wafer region, excluding parasitic absorption in the particle layer. I studied the efficiency enhancement for varying geometries. Multi-type layers made of Si...

  20. Deuterium trapping in tungsten deposition layers formed by deuterium plasma sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimov, V.Kh.; Roth, J.; Shu, W.M.; Komarov, D.A.; Isobe, K.; Yamanishi, T.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the influence of the deposition conditions on the surface morphology and deuterium (D) concentration in tungsten (W) deposition layers formed by magnetron sputtering and in the linear plasma generator has been carried out. Thick W layers (≥0.4 μm) deposited onto copper substrates demonstrate areas of pilling and, after post-deposition heating to 1300 K, flaking-off and fracturing. For thin W layers (≤80 nm) deposited onto stainless steel (SS) and W substrates, no areas of flaking-off and fracturing exist both after deposition and after post-deposition heating to 673 K for the SS substrate and to 1300 K for the W substrate. The concentration of deuterium in the W layers was found to decrease with increasing substrate temperature and with increasing tungsten deposition rate. For layers with relatively high concentration of oxygen (0.20-0.60 O/W), a decrease of the D concentration with increasing substrate temperature is more pronounced than that for layers deposited in good vacuum conditions. To describe the evolution of the D/W ratio with the substrate temperature and the tungsten deposition rate, an empirical equation proposed by De Temmerman and Doerner [J. Nucl. Mater. 389 (2009) 479] but with alternative parameters has been used.

  1. Dust acoustic solitary waves and double layers in a dusty plasma with two-temperature trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Labany, S.K.; El-Taibany, W.F.; Mamun, A.A.; Moslem, Waleed M.

    2004-01-01

    The combined effects of trapped ion distribution, two-ion-temperature, dust charge fluctuation, and dust fluid temperature are incorporated in the study of nonlinear dust acoustic waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma. It is found that, owing to the departure from the Boltzmann ion distribution to the trapped ion distribution, the dynamics of small but finite amplitude dust acoustic waves is governed by a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation. The latter admits a stationary dust acoustic solitary wave solution, which has stronger nonlinearity, smaller amplitude, wider width, and higher propagation velocity than that involving adiabatic ions. The effect of two-ion-temperature is found to provide the possibility for the coexistence of rarefactive and compressive dust acoustic solitary structures and double layers. Although the dust fluid temperature increases the amplitude of the small but finite amplitude solitary waves, the dust charge fluctuation does the opposite effect. The present investigation should help us to understand the salient features of the nonlinear dust acoustic waves that have been observed in a recent numerical simulation study

  2. Interface charge trapping induced flatband voltage shift during plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition in through silicon via

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunlong; Suhard, Samuel; Van Huylenbroeck, Stefaan; Meersschaut, Johan; Van Besien, Els; Stucchi, Michele; Croes, Kristof; Beyer, Gerald; Beyne, Eric

    2017-12-01

    A Through Silicon Via (TSV) is a key component for 3D integrated circuit stacking technology, and the diameter of a TSV keeps scaling down to reduce the footprint in silicon. The TSV aspect ratio, defined as the TSV depth/diameter, tends to increase consequently. Starting from the aspect ratio of 10, to improve the TSV sidewall coverage and reduce the process thermal budget, the TSV dielectric liner deposition process has evolved from sub-atmospheric chemical vapour deposition to plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD). However, with this change, a strong negative shift in the flatband voltage is observed in the capacitance-voltage characteristic of the vertical metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) parasitic capacitor formed between the TSV copper metal and the p-Si substrate. And, no shift is present in planar MOS capacitors manufactured with the same PE-ALD oxide. By comparing the integration process of these two MOS capacitor structures, and by using Elastic Recoil Detection to study the elemental composition of our films, it is found that the origin of the negative flatband voltage shift is the positive charge trapping at the Si/SiO2 interface, due to the positive PE-ALD reactants confined to the narrow cavity of high aspect ratio TSVs. This interface charge trapping effect can be effectively mitigated by high temperature annealing. However, this is limited in the real process due to the high thermal budget. Further investigation on liner oxide process optimization is needed.

  3. Ion/Ioff ratio enhancement and scalability of gate-all-around nanowire negative-capacitance FET with ferroelectric HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kyungmin; Saraya, Takuya; Kobayashi, Masaharu; Hiramoto, Toshiro

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated the energy efficiency and scalability of ferroelectric HfO2 (FE:HfO2)-based negative-capacitance field-effect-transistor (NCFET) with gate-all-around (GAA) nanowire (NW) channel structure. Analytic simulation is conducted to characterize NW-NCFET by varying NW diameter and/or thickness of gate insulator as device structural parameters. Due to the negative-capacitance effect and GAA NW channel structure, NW-NCFET is found to have 5× higher Ion/Ioff ratio than classical NW-MOSFET and 2× higher than double-gate (DG) NCFET, which results in wider design window for high Ion/Ioff ratio. To analyze these obtained results from the viewpoint of the device scalability, we have considered constraints regarding very limited device structural spaces to fit by the gate insulator and NW channel for aggresively scaled gate length (Lg) and/or very tight NW pitch. NW-NCFET still has design point with very thinned gate insulator and/or narrowed NW. Therefore, FE:HfO2-based NW-NCFET is applicable to the aggressively scaled technology node of sub-10 nm Lg and to the very tight NW integration of sub-30 nm NW pitch for beyond 7 nm technology. From 2011 to 2014, he engaged in developing high-speed optical transceiver module as an alternative military service in Republic of Korea. His research interest includes the development of steep slope MOSFETs for high energy-efficient operation and ferroelectric HfO2-based semiconductor devices, and fabrication of nanostructured devices. He joined the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY, in 2010, where he worked on advanced CMOS technologies such as FinFET, nanowire FET, SiGe channel and III-V channel. He was also engaged in launching 14 nm SOI FinFET and RMG technology development. Since 2014, he has been an Associate Professor in Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, where he has been working on ultralow power transistor and memory technology. Dr. Kobayashi is a member of IEEE and the Japan Society of Applied Physics. Dr. Hiramoto is a fellow of Japan Society of Applied Physics and a member of IEEE and IEICE. He served as the General Chair of Silicon Nanoelectronics Workshop in 2003 and the Program Chair in 1997, 1999, and 2001. He was on Committee of IEDM from 2003 to 2009. He was the Program Chair of Symposium on VLSI Technology in 2013 and was the General Chair in 2015. He is the Program Chair of International Conference on Solid-State Devices and Materials (SSDM) in 2016.

  4. The trapping of fly-ash particles in the surface layers of Sphagnum-dominated peat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punning, J.-M.; Alliksaar, T.

    1997-01-01

    The movement of fly-ash particles in a sequence of Sphagnum moss was studied in laboratory experiments and field investigations. Fly ash was obtained from the electrostatic precipitators of the Estonian Thermal Power Plant operating on oil shale. The data obtained in the laboratory show that only 0.8% of particles, placed on the surface of a 6-10 cm thick Sphagnum layer, were washed out with water (700-750 mm) during the 241 days of the experiment. The majority of added particles were fixed in the upper part (90% in 1-3 cm) of the moss layer. A SEM study indicates that sorption is slightly species-dependent due to the micromorphological parameters of the Sphagnum species. The storage of particles by Sphagnum mosses allows the use of natural sequences to study the history of atmospheric pollution. The distribution of particles in the upper part of moss layers in Viru Bog (50 km east of Tallinn, North Estonia) shows good agreement with the known air pollution history in Tallinn. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Gravity Wave Dynamics in a Mesospheric Inversion Layer: 1. Reflection, Trapping, and Instability Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughman, Brian; Wang, Ling; Lund, Thomas S.; Collins, Richard L.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract An anelastic numerical model is employed to explore the dynamics of gravity waves (GWs) encountering a mesosphere inversion layer (MIL) having a moderate static stability enhancement and a layer of weaker static stability above. Instabilities occur within the MIL when the GW amplitude approaches that required for GW breaking due to compression of the vertical wavelength accompanying the increasing static stability. Thus, MILs can cause large‐amplitude GWs to yield instabilities and turbulence below the altitude where they would otherwise arise. Smaller‐amplitude GWs encountering a MIL do not lead to instability and turbulence but do exhibit partial reflection and transmission, and the transmission is a smaller fraction of the incident GW when instabilities and turbulence arise within the MIL. Additionally, greater GW transmission occurs for weaker MILs and for GWs having larger vertical wavelengths relative to the MIL depth and for lower GW intrinsic frequencies. These results imply similar dynamics for inversions due to other sources, including the tropopause inversion layer, the high stability capping the polar summer mesopause, and lower frequency GWs or tides having sufficient amplitudes to yield significant variations in stability at large and small vertical scales. MILs also imply much stronger reflections and less coherent GW propagation in environments having significant fine structure in the stability and velocity fields than in environments that are smoothly varying. PMID:29576994

  6. Accurate characterization and understanding of interface trap density trends between atomic layer deposited dielectrics and AlGaN/GaN with bonding constraint theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanan, Narayanan; Lee, Bongmook; Misra, Veena, E-mail: vmisra@ncsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, 2410 Campus Shore Drive, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Many dielectrics have been proposed for the gate stack or passivation of AlGaN/GaN based metal oxide semiconductor heterojunction field effect transistors, to reduce gate leakage and current collapse, both for power and RF applications. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is preferred for dielectric deposition as it provides uniform, conformal, and high quality films with precise monolayer control of film thickness. Identification of the optimum ALD dielectric for the gate stack or passivation requires a critical investigation of traps created at the dielectric/AlGaN interface. In this work, a pulsed-IV traps characterization method has been used for accurate characterization of interface traps with a variety of ALD dielectrics. High-k dielectrics (HfO{sub 2}, HfAlO, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) are found to host a high density of interface traps with AlGaN. In contrast, ALD SiO{sub 2} shows the lowest interface trap density (<2 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}) after annealing above 600 °C in N{sub 2} for 60 s. The trend in observed trap densities is subsequently explained with bonding constraint theory, which predicts a high density of interface traps due to a higher coordination state and bond strain in high-k dielectrics.

  7. Fabrication of Metal Nanoparticle Arrays in the ZrO2(Y, HfO2(Y, and GeOx Films by Magnetron Sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Gorshkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The single sheet arrays of Au nanoparticles (NPs embedded into the ZrO2(Y, HfO2(Y, and GeOx (x≈2 films have been fabricated by the alternating deposition of the nanometer-thick dielectric and metal films using Magnetron Sputtering followed by annealing. The structure and optical properties of the NP arrays have been studied, subject to the fabrication technology parameters. The possibility of fabricating dense single sheet Au NP arrays in the matrices listed above with controlled NP sizes (within 1 to 3 nm and surface density has been demonstrated. A red shift of the plasmonic optical absorption peak in the optical transmission spectra of the nanocomposite films (in the wavelength band of 500 to 650 nm has been observed. The effect was attributed to the excitation of the collective surface plasmon-polaritons in the dense Au NP arrays. The nanocomposite films fabricated in the present study can find various applications in nanoelectronics (e.g., single electronics, nonvolatile memory devices, integrated optics, and plasmonics.

  8. Comparison of precursors for pulsed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of HfO2 high-K dielectric thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teren, Andrew R.; Thomas, Reji; He, Jiaqing; Ehrhart, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Hafnium oxide films were deposited on Si(100) substrates using pulsed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and evaluated for high-K dielectric applications. Three types of precursors were tested: two oxygenated ones, Hf butoxide-dmae and Hf butoxide-mmp, and an oxygen-free one, Hf diethyl-amide. Depositions were carried out in the temperature range of 350-650 deg. C, yielding different microstructures ranging from amorphous to crystalline, monoclinic, films. The films were compared on the basis of growth rate, phase development, density, interface characteristics, and electrical properties. Some specific features of the pulsed injection technique are considered. For low deposition temperatures the growth rate for the amide precursor was significantly higher than for the mixed butoxide precursors. A thickness-dependent amorphous to crystalline phase transition temperature was found for all precursors. There is an increase of the film density along with the deposition temperature from values as low as 5 g/cm 3 at 350 deg. C to values close to the bulk value of 9.7 g/cm 3 at 550 deg. C. Crystallization is observed in the same temperature range for films of typically 10-20 nm thickness. However, annealing studies show that this density increase is not simply related to the crystallization of the films. Similar electrical properties could be observed for all precursors and the dielectric constant of the films reaches values similar to the best values reported for bulk crystalline HfO 2

  9. Low-loss, low-confinement GaAs-AlGaAs DQW laser diode with optical trap layer for high-power operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buda, M.; Vleuten, van der W.C.; Iordache, G.; Acket, G.A.; Roer, van de T.G.; Es, van C.M.; Roy, van B.H.; Smalbrugge, E.

    1999-01-01

    A low-confinement asymmetric GaAs-AlGaAs double-quantum-well molecular-beam-epitaxy grown laser diode structure with optical trap layer is characterized, The value of the internal absorption coefficient is as low as 1.4 cm-1, while keeping the series resistance at values comparable cm with

  10. High‐Performance Nonvolatile Organic Field‐Effect Transistor Memory Based on Organic Semiconductor Heterostructures of Pentacene/P13/Pentacene as Both Charge Transport and Trapping Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Guo, Fengning; Ling, Haifeng; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Laiyuan; Wu, Dequn

    2017-01-01

    Nonvolatile organic field‐effect transistor (OFET) memory devices based on pentacene/N,N′‐ditridecylperylene‐3,4,9,10‐tetracarboxylic diimide (P13)/pentacene trilayer organic heterostructures have been proposed. The discontinuous n‐type P13 embedded in p‐type pentacene layers can not only provide electrons in the semiconductor layer that facilitates electron trapping process; it also works as charge trapping sites, which is attributed to the quantum well‐like pentacene/P13/pentacene organic heterostructures. The synergistic effects of charge trapping in the discontinuous P13 and the charge‐trapping property of the poly(4‐vinylphenol) (PVP) layer remarkably improve the memory performance. In addition, the trilayer organic heterostructures have also been successfully applied to multilevel and flexible nonvolatile memory devices. The results provide a novel design strategy to achieve high‐performance nonvolatile OFET memory devices and allow potential applications for different combinations of various organic semiconductor materials in OFET memory. PMID:28852619

  11. Ab initio study of the elastic properties of single and polycrystal TiO2, ZrO2 and HfO2 in the cotunnite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caravaca, M A; Mino, J C; Perez, V J; Casali, R A; Ponce, C A

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we study theoretically the elastic properties of the orthorhombic (Pnma) high-pressure phase of IV-B group oxides: titania, zirconia and hafnia. By means of the self-consistent SIESTA code, pseudopotentials, density functional theory in the LDA and GGA approximations, the total energies, hydrostatic pressures and stress tensor components are calculated. From the stress-strain relationships, in the linear regime, the elastic constants C ij are determined. Derived elastic constants, such as bulk, Young's and shear modulus, Poisson coefficient and brittle/ductile behavior are estimated with the polycrystalline approach, using Voigt-Reuss-Hill theories. We have found that C 11 , C 22 and C 33 elastic constants of hafnia and zirconia show increased strength with respect to the experimental values of the normal phase, P 2 1 /c. A similar situation applies to titania if these constants are compared with its normal phase, rutile. However, shear elastic constants C 44 , C 55 and C 66 are similar to the values found in the normal phase. This fact increases the compound anisotropy as well as its ductile behavior. The dependence of unit-cell volumes under hydrostatic pressures is also analyzed. P-V data, fitted to third-order Birch-Murnaghan equations of state, provide the bulk modulus B 0 and its pressure derivatives B' 0 . In this case, LDA estimations show good agreement with respect to recent measured bulk moduli of ZrO 2 and HfO 2 . Thermo-acoustic properties, e.g. the propagation speed of transverse, longitudinal elastic waves together with associated Debye temperatures, are also estimated.

  12. Theoretical study of charge trapping levels in silicon nitride using the LDA-1/2 self-energy correction scheme for excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrocinio, Weslley S.; Ribeiro, Mauro; Fonseca, Leonardo R.C.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nitride, with a permittivity mid-way between SiO 2 and common high-k materials such as HfO 2 , is widely used in microelectronics as an insulating layer on top of oxides where it serves as an impurity barrier with the positive side effect of increasing the dielectric constant of the insulator when it is SiO 2 . It is also employed as charge storage in nonvolatile memory devices thanks to its high concentration of charge traps. However, in the case of memories, it is still unclear which defects are responsible for charge trapping and what is the impact of defect concentration on the structural and electronic properties of SiN x . Indeed, for the amorphous phase the band gap was measured in the range 5.1–5.5 eV, with long tails in the density of states penetrating the gap region. It is still not clear which defects are responsible for the tails. On the other hand, the K-center defects have been associated with charge trapping, though its origin is assigned to one Si back bond. To investigate the contribution of defect states to the band edge tails and band gap states, we adopted the β phase of stoichiometric silicon nitride (β-Si 3 N 4 ) as our model material and calculated its electronic properties employing ab initio DFT/LDA simulations with self-energy correction to improve the location of defect states in the SiN x band gap through the correction of the band gap underestimation typical of DFT/LDA. We considered some important defects in SiN x , as the Si anti-site and the N vacancy with H saturation, in two defect concentrations. The location of our calculated defect levels in the band gap correlates well with the available experimental data, offering a structural explanation to the measured band edge tails and charge trapping characteristics.

  13. Impedance Characterization of the Capacitive field-Effect pH-Sensor Based on a thin-Layer Hafnium Oxide Formed by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael LEE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As a sensing element, silicon dioxide (SiO2 has been applied within ion-sensitive field effect transistors (ISFET. However, a requirement of increasing pH-sensitivity and stability has observed an increased number of insulating materials that obtain high-k gate being applied as FETs. The increased high-k gate reduces the required metal oxide layer and, thus, the fabrication of thin hafnium oxide (HfO2 layers by atomic layer deposition (ALD has grown with interest in recent years. This metal oxide presents advantageous characteristics that can be beneficial for the advancements within miniaturization of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS technology. In this article, we describe a process for fabrication of HfO2 based on ALD by applying water (H2O as the oxygen precursor. As a first, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements were performed with varying pH (2-10 to demonstrate the sensitivity of HfO2 as a potential pH sensing material. The Nyquist plot demonstrates a high clear shift of the polarization resistance (Rp between pH 6-10 (R2 = 0.9986, Y = 3,054X + 12,100. At acidic conditions (between pH 2-10, the Rp change was small due to the unmodified oxide gate (R2 = 0.9655, Y = 2,104X + 4,250. These preliminary results demonstrate the HfO2 substrate functioned within basic to neutral conditions and establishes a great potential for applying HfO2 as a dielectric material for future pH measuring FET sensors.

  14. New theory of effective work functions at metal/high-k dielectric interfaces : application to metal/high-k HfO2 and la2O 3 dielectric interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Shiraishi, Kenji; Nakayama, Takashi; Akasaka, Yasushi; Miyazaki, Seiichi; Nakaoka, Takashi; Ohmori, Kenji; Ahmet, Parhat; Torii, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Heiji; Chikyow, Toyohiro; Nara, Yasuo; Iwai, Hiroshi; Yamada, Keisaku

    2006-01-01

    We have constructed a universal theory of the work functions at metal/high-k HfO2 and La2O3 dielectric interfaces by introducing a new concept of generalized charge neutrality levels. Our theory systematically reproduces the experimentally observed work functions of various gate metals on Hf-based high-k dielectrics, including the hitherto unpredictable behaviors of the work functions of p-metals. Our new concept provides effective guiding principles to achieving near-bandedge work functions ...

  15. A comparative study on top-gated and bottom-gated multilayer MoS2 transistors with gate stacked dielectric of Al2O3/HfO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiao; Xu, Jingping; Huang, Hao; Zhu, Ziqang; Wang, Hongjiu; Li, Borui; Liao, Lei; Fang, Guojia

    2018-06-15

    Top-gated and bottom-gated transistors with multilayer MoS 2 channel fully encapsulated by stacked Al 2 O 3 /HfO 2 (9 nm/6 nm) were fabricated and comparatively studied. Excellent electrical properties are demonstrated for the TG transistors with high on-off current ratio of 10 8 , high field-effect mobility of 10 2 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , and low subthreshold swing of 93 mV dec -1 . Also, enhanced reliability has been achieved for the TG transistors with threshold voltage shift of 10 -3 -10 -2 V MV -1 cm -1 after 6 MV cm -1 gate-biased stressing. All improvement for the TG device can be ascribed to the formed device structure and dielectric environment. Degradation of the performance for the BG transistors should be attributed to reduced gate capacitance density and deteriorated interface properties related to vdW gap with a thickness about 0.4 nm. So, the TG transistor with MoS 2 channel fully encapsulated by stacked Al 2 O 3 /HfO 2 is a promising way to fabricate high-performance ML MoS 2 field-effect transistors for practical electron device applications.

  16. Charge and excitation dynamics in semiconducting polymer layers doped with emitters and charge carrier traps; Ladungstraeger- und Anregungsdynamik in halbleitenden Polymerschichten mit eingemischten Emittern und Ladungstraegerfallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaiser, F

    2006-06-15

    Light-emitting diodes generate light from the recombination of injected charge carriers. This can be obtained in inorganic materials. Here, it is necessary to produce highly ordered crystalline structures that determine the properties of the device. Another possibility is the utilization of organic molecules and polymers. Based on the versatile organic chemistry, it is possible to tune the properties of the semiconducting polymers already during synthesis. In addition, semiconducting polymers are mechanically flexible. Thus, it is possible to construct flexible, large-area light sources and displays. The first light-emitting diode using a polymer emitter was presented in 1990. Since then, this field of research has grown rapidly up to the point where first products are commercially available. It has become clear that the properties of polymer light-emitting diodes such as color and efficiency can be improved by incorporating multiple components inside the active layer. At the same time, this gives rise to new interactions between these components. While components are often added either to improve the charge transport or to change the emission, it has to made sure that other processes are not influenced in a negative manner. This work investigates some of these interactions and describes them with simple physical models. First, blue light-emitting diodes based on polyfluorene are analyzed. This polymer is an efficient emitter, but it is susceptible to the formation of chemical defects that can not be suppressed completely. These defects form electron traps, but their effect can be compensated by the addition of hole traps. The underlying process, namely the changed charge carrier balance, is explained. In the following, blend systems with dendronized emitters that form electron traps are investigated. The different influence of the insulating shell on the charge and energy transfer between polymer host and the emissive core of the dendrimers is examined. In the

  17. Development and Performance Evaluations of HfO2-Si and Rare Earth-Si Based Environmental Barrier Bond Coat Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft propulsion systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, improve component durability, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced EBC systems for SiCSiC CMC turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant material development challenges for the high temperature CMC components is to develop prime-reliant, high strength and high temperature capable environmental barrier coating bond coat systems, since the current silicon bond coat cannot meet the advanced EBC-CMC temperature and stability requirements. In this paper, advanced NASA HfO2-Si based EBC bond coat systems for SiCSiC CMC combustor and turbine airfoil applications are investigated. The coating design approach and stability requirements are specifically emphasized, with the development and implementation focusing on Plasma Sprayed (PS) and Electron Beam-Physic Vapor Deposited (EB-PVD) coating systems and the composition optimizations. High temperature properties of the HfO2-Si based bond coat systems, including the strength, fracture toughness, creep resistance, and oxidation resistance were evaluated in the temperature range of 1200 to 1500 C. Thermal gradient heat flux low cycle fatigue and furnace cyclic oxidation durability tests were also performed at temperatures up to 1500 C. The coating strength improvements, degradation and failure modes of the environmental barrier coating bond coat systems on SiCSiC CMCs tested in simulated stress-environment interactions are briefly discussed and supported by modeling. The performance enhancements of the HfO2-Si bond coat systems with rare earth element dopants and rare earth-silicon based bond coats are also highlighted. The advanced bond coat systems, when integrated with advanced EBC top coats, showed promise to achieve 1500 C temperature capability, helping enable next generation turbine engines with significantly improved engine component temperature capability and long-term durability.

  18. The investigation of structure, chemical composition, hydrogen isotope trapping and release processes in deposition layers on surfaces exposed to DIII-D divertor plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzhinskij, O.I.; Opimach, I.V.; Barsuk, V.A.; Arkhipov, I.I.; Whyte, D.; Wampler, W.R.

    1998-05-01

    The exposure of ATG graphite sample to DIII-D divertor plasma was provided by the DiMES (Divertor Material Evaluation System) mechanism. The graphite sample arranged to receive the parallel heat flux on a small region of the surface was exposed to 600ms of outer strike point plasma. The sample was constructed to collect the eroded material directed downward into a trapping zone onto s Si disk collector. The average heat flux onto the graphite sample during the exposure was about 200W/cm 2 , and the parallel heat flux was about 10 KW/cm 2 . After the exposure the graphite sample and Si collector disk were analyzed using SEM, NRA, RBS, Auger spectroscopy. IR and Raman spectroscopy. The thermal desorption was studied also. The deposited coating on graphite sample is amorphous carbon layer. Just upstream of the high heat flux zone the redeposition layer has a globular structure. The deposition layer on Si disk is composed also from carbon but has a diamond-like structure. The areal density of C and D in the deposited layer on Si disk varied in poloidal and toroidal directions. The maximum D/C areal density ratio is about 0.23, maximum carbon density is about 3.8 x 10 18 cm -2 , maximum D area density is about 3 x 10 17 cm 2 . The thermal desorption spectrum had a peak at 1,250K

  19. UV-laser-light-controlled photoluminescence of metal oxide nanoparticles in different gas atmospheres: BaTiO3, SrTiO3 and HfO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Shosuke; Saito, Takashi; Yoshida, Kaori

    2012-01-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) enhancement has been studied at room temperature using various specimen atmospheres (O 2 gas, CO 2 gas, CO 2 -H 2 mixture gas, Ar-H 2 mixture gas and vacuum) under 325 nm laser light irradiation on various metal oxides. Of them, the results obtained for BaTiO 3 nanocrystals, SrTiO 3 ones and HfO 2 powder crystal are given in the present paper. Their PL were considerably increased in intensity by irradiation of 325 nm laser light in CO 2 gas and CO 2 -H 2 mixture gas. The cause of the PL intensity enhancements is discussed in the light of the exciton theory, the defect chemistry and the photocatalytic theory. The results may be applied for the utilization of greenhouse gas (CO 2 ) and the optical sensor for CO 2 gas.

  20. Effects of H2 High-pressure Annealing on HfO2/Al2O3/In0.53Ga0.47As Capacitors: Chemical Composition and Electrical Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sungho; An, Youngseo; Lee, Changmin; Song, Jeongkeun; Nguyen, Manh-Cuong; Byun, Young-Chul; Choi, Rino; McIntyre, Paul C.; Kim, Hyoungsub

    2017-01-01

    We studied the impact of H2 pressure during post-metallization annealing on the chemical composition of a HfO2/Al2O3 gate stack on a HCl wet-cleaned In0.53Ga0.47As substrate by comparing the forming gas annealing (at atmospheric pressure with a H2 partial pressure of 0.04?bar) and H2 high-pressure annealing (H2-HPA at 30?bar) methods. In addition, the effectiveness of H2-HPA on the passivation of the interface states was compared for both p- and n-type In0.53Ga0.47As substrates. The decomposi...

  1. Wet thermal annealing effect on TaN/HfO2/Ge metal—oxide—semiconductor capacitors with and without a GeO2 passivation layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guan-Zhou; Li Cheng; Lu Chang-Bao; Tang Rui-Fan; Tang Meng-Rao; Wu Zheng; Yang Xu; Huang Wei; Lai Hong-Kai; Chen Song-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Wet thermal annealing effects on the properties of TaN/HfO 2 /Ge metal—oxide—semiconductor (MOS) structures with and without a GeO 2 passivation layer are investigated. The physical and the electrical properties are characterized by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, capacitance—voltage (C—V) and current—voltage characteristics. It is demonstrated that wet thermal annealing at relatively higher temperature such as 550 °C can lead to Ge incorporation in HfO 2 and the partial crystallization of HfO 2 , which should be responsible for the serious degradation of the electrical characteristics of the TaN/HfO 2 /Ge MOS capacitors. However, wet thermal annealing at 400 °C can decrease the GeO x interlayer thickness at the HfO 2 /Ge interface, resulting in a significant reduction of the interface states and a smaller effective oxide thickness, along with the introduction of a positive charge in the dielectrics due to the hydrolyzable property of GeO x in the wet ambient. The pre-growth of a thin GeO 2 passivation layer can effectively suppress the interface states and improve the C—V characteristics for the as-prepared HfO 2 gated Ge MOS capacitors, but it also dissembles the benefits of wet thermal annealing to a certain extent

  2. Growth of AlN/Pt heterostructures on amorphous substrates at low temperatures via atomic layer epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nepal, N.; Goswami, R.; Qadri, S.B.; Mahadik, N.A.; Kub, F.J.; Eddy, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent results on atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) growth and characterization of (0 0 0 1)AlN on highly oriented (1 1 1)Pt layers on amorphous HfO 2 /Si(1 0 0) are reported. HfO 2 was deposited by atomic layer deposition on Si(1 0 0) followed by ALE growth of Pt(15 nm) and, subsequently, AlN(60 nm) at 500 °C. Based on the X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements, the Pt and AlN layers are highly oriented along the (1 1 1) and (0 0 0 2) directions, respectively. Demonstrations of AlN/Pt heterostructures open up the possibility of new state-of-the-art microelectromechanical systems devices

  3. High-k shallow traps observed by charge pumping with varying discharging times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Szu-Han; Chen, Ching-En; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Lo, Wen-Hung; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju; Wang, Bin-Wei; Cao, Xi-Xin; Chen, Hua-Mao; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Chen, Tsai-Fu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of falling time and base level time on high-k bulk shallow traps measured by charge pumping technique in n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with HfO 2 /metal gate stacks. N T -V high level characteristic curves with different duty ratios indicate that the electron detrapping time dominates the value of N T for extra contribution of I cp traps. N T is the number of traps, and I cp is charge pumping current. By fitting discharge formula at different temperatures, the results show that extra contribution of I cp traps at high voltage are in fact high-k bulk shallow traps. This is also verified through a comparison of different interlayer thicknesses and different Ti x N 1−x metal gate concentrations. Next, N T -V high level characteristic curves with different falling times (t falling time ) and base level times (t base level ) show that extra contribution of I cp traps decrease with an increase in t falling time . By fitting discharge formula for different t falling time , the results show that electrons trapped in high-k bulk shallow traps first discharge to the channel and then to source and drain during t falling time . This current cannot be measured by the charge pumping technique. Subsequent measurements of N T by charge pumping technique at t base level reveal a remainder of electrons trapped in high-k bulk shallow traps

  4. Improvement in the performance of an InGaZnO thin-film transistor by controlling interface trap densities between the insulator and active layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinh, Thanh Thuy; Nguyen, Van Duy; Ryu, Kyungyul; Jang, Kyungsoo; Lee, Wonbeak; Baek, Seungshin; Raja, Jayapal; Yi, Junsin

    2011-01-01

    An amorphous InGaZnO film fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering in only an Ar-reactive gas shows high conductivity, and a thin-film transistors (TFTs)-based IGZO active layer expresses a poor on/off current ratio with a high off current and high subthreshold swing (SS). This paper presents the post-annealing effects on IGZO thin films to compensate the oxygen deficiencies in films as well as on TFT devices to reduce the densities of the interface trap between the active layer and insulator. The ratio of oxygen vacancies over total of oxygen (O 2 /O tot ) in IGZO estimated by the XPS measurement shows that they significantly diminish from 24.75 to 17.68% when increasing the temperature treatment to 350 °C, which is related to the enhancement in resistivity of IGZO. The TFT characteristics of IGZO treated in air at 350 °C show a high I ON /I OFF ratio of ∼1.1 × 10 7 , a high field-effect mobility of 7.48 cm 2 V −1 s −1 , and a low SS of 0.41 V dec −1 . The objective of this paper is to achieve a successful reduction in the interface trap density, ΔD it , which has been reduced about 3.1 × 10 12 cm −2 eV −1 and 2.0 × 10 12 cm −2 eV −1 for the 350 and 200 °C treatment samples compared with the as-deposited one. The resistivity of the IGZO films can be adjusted to the appropriate value that can be used for TFT applications by controlling the treatment temperature

  5. Ultrathin HfON/SiO2 dual tunneling layer for improving the electrical properties of metal–oxide–nitride–oxide–silicon memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.; Xu, J.P.; Chen, J.X.; Ji, F.; Huang, X.D.; Lai, P.T.

    2012-01-01

    A high-k gate stack structure with ultrathin HfON/SiO 2 as dual tunneling layer (DTL), AlN as charge storage layer (CSL) and HfAlO as blocking layer (BL) is proposed to make a charge-trapping-type metal–oxide–nitride–oxide–silicon non-volatile memory device by employing in-situ sputtering method. The validity of the structure is examined and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The memory window, program/erase, endurance and retention properties are investigated and compared with similar gate stack structure with Si 3 N 4 /SiO 2 as DTL, HfO 2 as CSL and Al 2 O 3 as BL. Results show that a large memory window of 3.55 V at a program/erase (P/E) voltage of + 8 V/− 15 V, high P/E speed, and good endurance and retention characteristic can be achieved using the Au/ HfAlO/AlN/(HfON/SiO 2 )/Si gate stack structure. The main mechanisms lie in the enhanced electron injection through the ultrathin high-k HfON/SiO 2 DTL with suitable band offset, high trapping efficiency of the high-k AlN material, and effective blocking role of the high-k HfAlO BL. - Highlights: ► An Au/HfAlO/AlN/(HfON/SiO 2 )/Si high-k gate stack structure is proposed. ► A band-engineered dual tunneling layer (HfON/SiO 2 ) is proposed and prepared. ► A good trade-off among the memory characteristics is obtained. ► In-situ sputtering method is employed to fabricate the gate stack structure.

  6. Optimization of Fluorine Plasma Treatment for Interface Improvement on HfO2/In0.53Ga0.47As MOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ting Chen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports significant improvements in the electrical performance of In0.53Ga0.47As metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET by a post-gate CF4/O2 plasma treatment. The optimum condition of CF4/O2 plasma treatment has been systematically studied and found to be 30 W for 3–5 min. Approximately 5× reduction in interface trap density from 2.8 × 1012 to 4.9 × 1011 cm−2eV−1 has been demonstrated with fluorine (F incorporation. Subthreshold swing has been improved from 127 to 109 mV/dec. Effective channel mobility has been enhanced from 826 to 1,144 cm2/Vs.

  7. Electrical characteristics and interface properties of ALD-HfO2/AlGaN/GaN MIS-HEMTs fabricated with post-deposition annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Toshiharu; Egawa, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    HfO2/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS)-type high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) on Si substrates were fabricated by atomic layer deposition of HfO2 layers and post-deposition annealing (PDA). The current-voltage characteristics of the MIS-HEMTs with as-deposited HfO2 layers showed a low gate leakage current (I g) despite the relatively low band gap of HfO2, and a dynamic threshold voltage shift (ΔV th) was observed. After PDA above 500 °C, ΔV th was reduced from 2.9 to 0.7 V with an increase in I g from 2.2 × 10-7 to 4.8 × 10-2 mA mm-1. Effects of the PDA on the HfO2 layer and the HfO2/AlGaN interface were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using synchrotron radiation. XPS data showed that oxygen vacancies exist in the as-deposited HfO2 layers and they disappeared with an increase in the PDA temperature. These results indicate that the deep electron traps that cause ΔV th are related to the oxygen vacancies in the HfO2 layers.

  8. Cold trap dehydration in the Tropical Tropopause Layer characterised by SOWER chilled-mirror hygrometer network data in the Tropical Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hasebe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A network of balloon-borne radiosonde observations employing chilled-mirror hygrometers for water and electrochemical concentration cells for ozone has been operated since the late 1990s in the Tropical Pacific to capture the evolution of dehydration of air parcels advected quasi-horizontally in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL. The analysis of this dataset is made on isentropes taking advantage of the conservative properties of tracers moving adiabatically. The existence of ice particles is diagnosed by lidars simultaneously operated with sonde flights. Characteristics of the TTL dehydration are presented on the basis of individual soundings and statistical features. Supersaturations close to 80% in relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice have been observed in subvisible cirrus clouds located near the cold point tropopause at extremely low temperatures around 180 K. Although further observational evidence is needed to confirm the credibility of such high values of RHice, the evolution of TTL dehydration is evident from the data in isentropic scatter plots between the sonde-observed mixing ratio (OMR and the minimum saturation mixing ratio (SMRmin along the back trajectories associated with the observed air mass. Supersaturation exceeding the critical value of homogeneous ice nucleation (OMR > 1.6 × SMRmin is frequently observed on the 360 and 365 K surfaces indicating that cold trap dehydration is in progress in the TTL. The near correspondence between the two (OMR ~ SMRmin at 380 K on the other hand implies that this surface is not sufficiently cold for the advected air parcels to be dehydrated. Above 380 K, cold trap dehydration would scarcely function while some moistening occurs before the air parcels reach the lowermost stratosphere at around 400 K where OMR is generally smaller than SMRmin.

  9. In-situ atomic layer deposition growth of Hf-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karavaev, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    We have grown HfO 2 on Si(001) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using HfCl 4 , TEMAHf, TDMAHf and H 2 O as precursors. The early stages of the ALD were investigated with high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We observed the changes occurring in the Si 2p, O 1s, Hf 4f, Hf 4d, and Cl 2p (for HfCl 4 experiment) core level lines after each ALD cycle up to the complete formation of two layers of HfO 2 . The investigation was carried out in situ giving the possibility to determine the properties of the grown film after every ALD cycle or even after a half cycle. This work focused on the advantages in-situ approach in comparison with ex-situ experiments. The study provides to follow the evolution of the important properties of HfO 2 : contamination level, density and stoichiometry, and influence of the experimental parameters to the interface layer formation during ALD. Our investigation shows that in-situ XPS approach for ALD gives much more information than ex-situ experiments. (orig.)

  10. Development and Property Evaluation of Selected HfO2-Silicon and Rare Earth-Silicon Based Bond Coats and Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft propulsion systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, improve component durability, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced EBC systems for SiC/SiC CMC turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant material development challenges for the high temperature CMC components is to develop prime-reliant, high strength and high temperature capable environmental barrier coating bond coat systems, since the current silicon bond coat cannot meet the advanced EBC-CMC temperature and stability requirements. In this paper, advanced NASA HfO2-Si and rare earth Si based EBC bond coat EBC systems for SiC/SiC CMC combustor and turbine airfoil applications are investigated. High temperature properties of the advanced EBC systems, including the strength, fracture toughness, creep and oxidation resistance have been studied and summarized. The advanced NASA EBC systems showed some promise to achieve 1500C temperature capability, helping enable next generation turbine engines with significantly improved engine component temperature capability and durability.

  11. Effects of H2 High-pressure Annealing on HfO2/Al2O3/In0.53Ga0.47As Capacitors: Chemical Composition and Electrical Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungho; An, Youngseo; Lee, Changmin; Song, Jeongkeun; Nguyen, Manh-Cuong; Byun, Young-Chul; Choi, Rino; McIntyre, Paul C; Kim, Hyoungsub

    2017-08-29

    We studied the impact of H 2 pressure during post-metallization annealing on the chemical composition of a HfO 2 /Al 2 O 3 gate stack on a HCl wet-cleaned In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As substrate by comparing the forming gas annealing (at atmospheric pressure with a H 2 partial pressure of 0.04 bar) and H 2 high-pressure annealing (H 2 -HPA at 30 bar) methods. In addition, the effectiveness of H 2 -HPA on the passivation of the interface states was compared for both p- and n-type In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As substrates. The decomposition of the interface oxide and the subsequent out-diffusion of In and Ga atoms toward the high-k film became more significant with increasing H 2 pressure. Moreover, the increase in the H 2 pressure significantly improved the capacitance‒voltage characteristics, and its effect was more pronounced on the p-type In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As substrate. However, the H 2 -HPA induced an increase in the leakage current, probably because of the out-diffusion and incorporation of In/Ga atoms within the high-k stack.

  12. Environmental Stability and Oxidation Behavior of HfO2-Si and YbGd(O) Based Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Farmer, Serene; McCue, Terry R.; Harder, Bryan; Hurst, Janet B.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft propulsion systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, improve component durability, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced EBC systems for SiCSiC CMC turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant material development challenges for the high temperature CMC components is to develop prime-reliant, environmental durable environmental barrier coating systems. In this paper, the durability and performance of advanced Electron Beam-Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD) NASA HfO2-Si and YbGdSi(O) EBC bond coat top coat systems for SiCSiC CMC have been summarized. The high temperature thermomechanical creep, fatigue and oxidation resistance have been investigated in the laboratory simulated high-heat-flux environmental test conditions. The advanced NASA EBC systems showed promise to achieve 1500C temperature capability, helping enable next generation turbine engines with significantly improved engine component temperature capability and durability.

  13. Investigation of Symphytum cordatum alkaloids by liquid-liquid partitioning, thin-layer chromatography and liquid chromatography-ion-trap mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mroczek, Tomasz; Ndjoko-Ioset, Karine; Glowniak, Kazimierz; Mietkiewicz-Capala, Agnieszka; Hostettmann, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    From the alkalised crude extract of Symphytum cordatum (L.) W.K. roots, pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) were extracted as free tertiary bases and polar N-oxides in a merely one-step liquid-liquid partitioning (LLP) in separation funnel and subsequently pre-fractionated by preparative multiple-development (MD) thin-layer chromatography (TLC) on silica gel plates. In this way three alkaloid fractions of different polarities and retention on silica gel plates were obtained as: the most polar N-oxides of the highest retention, the tertiary bases of medium retention, and diesterified N-oxides of the lowest retention. The former fraction was reduced into free bases by sodium hydrosulfite and purified by LLP on Extrelut-NT3 cartridge. It was further analysed together with the two other fractions by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-ion-trap mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) interface on XTerra C 18 column using a gradient elution. Based on MS n spectra, 18 various alkaloids have been tentatively determined for the first time in this plant as the following types of structure: echimidine-N-oxide (three diasteroisomers), 7-sarracinyl-9-viridiflorylretronecine (two diasteroisomers), echimidine (two diasteroisomers), lycopsamine (two diasteroisomers), dihydroechinatine-N-oxide, dihydroheliospathuline-N-oxide, lycopsamine-N-oxide (three diasteroisomers), 7-acetyllycopsamine-N-oxide, symphytine-N-oxide (two diasteroisomers) and 2'',3''-epoxyechiumine-N-oxide

  14. Investigation of Symphytum cordatum alkaloids by liquid-liquid partitioning, thin-layer chromatography and liquid chromatography-ion-trap mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mroczek, Tomasz [Department of Pharmacognosy with Medicinal Plants Laboratory, Medical University, 1 Chodzki St., 20-093 Lublin (Poland)]. E-mail: tmroczek@pharmacognosy.org; Ndjoko-Ioset, Karine [Laboratoire de Pharmacognosie et Phytochimie, Ecole de Pharmacie Geneve-Lausanne, Universite de Geneve, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 30, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Glowniak, Kazimierz [Department of Pharmacognosy with Medicinal Plants Laboratory, Medical University, 1 Chodzki St., 20-093 Lublin (Poland); Mietkiewicz-Capala, Agnieszka [Department of Pharmacognosy with Medicinal Plants Laboratory, Medical University, 1 Chodzki St., 20-093 Lublin (Poland); Hostettmann, Kurt [Laboratoire de Pharmacognosie et Phytochimie, Ecole de Pharmacie Geneve-Lausanne, Universite de Geneve, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 30, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2006-05-04

    From the alkalised crude extract of Symphytum cordatum (L.) W.K. roots, pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) were extracted as free tertiary bases and polar N-oxides in a merely one-step liquid-liquid partitioning (LLP) in separation funnel and subsequently pre-fractionated by preparative multiple-development (MD) thin-layer chromatography (TLC) on silica gel plates. In this way three alkaloid fractions of different polarities and retention on silica gel plates were obtained as: the most polar N-oxides of the highest retention, the tertiary bases of medium retention, and diesterified N-oxides of the lowest retention. The former fraction was reduced into free bases by sodium hydrosulfite and purified by LLP on Extrelut-NT3 cartridge. It was further analysed together with the two other fractions by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-ion-trap mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) interface on XTerra C{sub 18} column using a gradient elution. Based on MS {sup n} spectra, 18 various alkaloids have been tentatively determined for the first time in this plant as the following types of structure: echimidine-N-oxide (three diasteroisomers), 7-sarracinyl-9-viridiflorylretronecine (two diasteroisomers), echimidine (two diasteroisomers), lycopsamine (two diasteroisomers), dihydroechinatine-N-oxide, dihydroheliospathuline-N-oxide, lycopsamine-N-oxide (three diasteroisomers), 7-acetyllycopsamine-N-oxide, symphytine-N-oxide (two diasteroisomers) and 2'',3''-epoxyechiumine-N-oxide.

  15. Band Offsets and Interfacial Properties of HfAlO Gate Dielectric Grown on InP by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lifeng; Wang, Tao; Zou, Ying; Lu, Hong-Liang

    2017-12-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy have been used to determine interfacial properties of HfO 2 and HfAlO gate dielectrics grown on InP by atomic layer deposition. An undesirable interfacial InP x O y layer is easily formed at the HfO 2 /InP interface, which can severely degrade the electrical performance. However, an abrupt interface can be achieved when the growth of the HfAlO dielectric on InP starts with an ultrathin Al 2 O 3 layer. The valence and conduction band offsets for HfAlO/InP heterojunctions have been determined to be 1.87 ± 0.1 and 2.83 ± 0.1 eV, respectively. These advantages make HfAlO a potential dielectric for InP MOSFETs.

  16. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Michael

    irradiation. Deuterium trapping could be characterized by three regimes: (i) enhanced D retention in a graphitic film formed by the C+ irradiation; (ii) decreased D retention in a modified tungsten-carbon layer; and (iii) D retention in pure tungsten.

  17. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, M.

    2004-01-01

    irradiation Deuterium trapping could be characterized by three regimes: (i) enhanced D retention in a graphitic film formed by the C + irradiation ; (ii) decreased D retention in a modified tungsten-carbon layer; and (iii) D retention in pure tungsten. (author)

  18. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, M

    2004-07-01

    irradiation Deuterium trapping could be characterized by three regimes: (i) enhanced D retention in a graphitic film formed by the C{sup +} irradiation ; (ii) decreased D retention in a modified tungsten-carbon layer; and (iii) D retention in pure tungsten. (author)

  19. Effects of trap density on drain current LFN and its model development for E-mode GaN MOS-HEMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, D. K.; Lenka, T. R.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper the drain current low-frequency noise (LFN) of E-mode GaN MOS-HEMT is investigated for different gate insulators such as SiO2, Al2O3/Ga2O3/GdO3, HfO2/SiO2, La2O3/SiO2 and HfO2 with different trap densities by IFM based TCAD simulation. In order to analyze this an analytical model of drain current low frequency noise is developed. The model is developed by considering 2DEG carrier fluctuations, mobility fluctuations and the effects of 2DEG charge carrier fluctuations on the mobility. In the study of different gate insulators it is observed that carrier fluctuation is the dominant low frequency noise source and the non-uniform exponential distribution is critical to explain LFN behavior, so the analytical model is developed by considering uniform distribution of trap density. The model is validated with available experimental data from literature. The effect of total number of traps and gate length scaling on this low frequency noise due to different gate dielectrics is also investigated.

  20. Effect of ion implantation energy for the synthesis of Ge nanocrystals in SiN films with HfO2/SiO2 stack tunnel dielectrics for memory application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloux Florence

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ge nanocrystals (Ge-NCs embedded in SiN dielectrics with HfO2/SiO2 stack tunnel dielectrics were synthesized by utilizing low-energy (≤5 keV ion implantation method followed by conventional thermal annealing at 800°C, the key variable being Ge+ ion implantation energy. Two different energies (3 and 5 keV have been chosen for the evolution of Ge-NCs, which have been found to possess significant changes in structural and chemical properties of the Ge+-implanted dielectric films, and well reflected in the charge storage properties of the Al/SiN/Ge-NC + SiN/HfO2/SiO2/Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS memory structures. No Ge-NC was detected with a lower implantation energy of 3 keV at a dose of 1.5 × 1016 cm-2, whereas a well-defined 2D-array of nearly spherical and well-separated Ge-NCs within the SiN matrix was observed for the higher-energy-implanted (5 keV sample for the same implanted dose. The MIS memory structures implanted with 5 keV exhibits better charge storage and retention characteristics compared to the low-energy-implanted sample, indicating that the charge storage is predominantly in Ge-NCs in the memory capacitor. A significant memory window of 3.95 V has been observed under the low operating voltage of ± 6 V with good retention properties, indicating the feasibility of these stack structures for low operating voltage, non-volatile memory devices.

  1. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, K. K.; Ram, R. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Eltony, A. M.; Chuang, I. L. [Center for Ultracold Atoms, Research Laboratory of Electronics and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M., E-mail: jsage@ll.mit.edu; Chiaverini, J., E-mail: john.chiaverini@ll.mit.edu [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lexington, Massachusetts 02420 (United States)

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware utilizing a commercial CMOS process opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  2. Analysis of carrier transport and carrier trapping in organic diodes with polyimide-6,13-Bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene double-layer by charge modulation spectroscopy and optical second harmonic generation measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Eunju, E-mail: elim@dankook.ac.kr, E-mail: taguchi.d.aa@m.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: iwamoto@pe.titech.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Institute of Nanosensor and Biotechnology, Dankook University, Jukjeon-dong, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Taguchi, Dai, E-mail: elim@dankook.ac.kr, E-mail: taguchi.d.aa@m.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: iwamoto@pe.titech.ac.jp; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa, E-mail: elim@dankook.ac.kr, E-mail: taguchi.d.aa@m.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: iwamoto@pe.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2014-08-18

    We studied the carrier transport and carrier trapping in indium tin oxide/polyimide (PI)/6,13-Bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene)/Au diodes by using charge modulation spectroscopy (CMS) and time-resolved electric field induced optical second harmonic generation (TR-EFISHG) measurements. TR-EFISHG directly probes the spatial carrier behaviors in the diodes, and CMS is useful in explaining the carrier motion with respect to energy. The results clearly indicate that the injected carriers move across TIPS-pentacene thorough the molecular energy states of TIPS-pentacene and accumulate at the PI/TIPS-pentacene interface. However, some carriers are trapped in the PI layers. These findings take into account the capacitance-voltage and current-voltage characteristics of the diodes.

  3. Trapped antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, E., E-mail: eoin.butler@cern.ch [CERN, Physics Department (Switzerland); Andresen, G. B. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Ashkezari, M. D. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Bertsche, W. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Bowe, P. D. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Cesar, C. L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil); Chapman, S. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Fajans, J. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C. [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Gill, D. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hangst, J. S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, W. N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayden, M. E. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Humphries, A. J. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only {approx}1 T ({approx}0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be 'born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 10{sup 4} times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released-the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  4. Ripple Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    3 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the margin of a lava flow on a cratered plain in the Athabasca Vallis region of Mars. Remarkably, the cratered plain in this scene is essentially free of bright, windblown ripples. Conversely, the lava flow apparently acted as a trap for windblown materials, illustrated by the presence of the light-toned, wave-like texture over much of the flow. That the lava flow surface trapped windblown sand and granules better than the cratered plain indicates that the flow surface has a rougher texture at a scale too small to resolve in this image. Location near: 10.7oN, 204.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Winter

  5. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, E; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kemp, S L; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ∼1 T (∼0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be ‘born’ inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been ...

  6. ANTIREFLECTION MULTILAYER COATINGS WITH THIN METAL LAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Gubanova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The design of anti-reflective coatings for metal surfaces of Al, Ti, N,i Cr is proposed. The coatings have the form of alternating layers of dielectric/metal/dielectric with the number of cells up to15. The method of calculation of such coatings is proposed. We have calculated the coatings of the type [HfO2/Cr/HfO2]15, [ZrO2/Ti/Al2O3]15, [ZrO2/Cr/ZrO2]15. It is shown that the proposed interference coatings provide reduction of the residual reflectance of the metal several times (from 3.5 to 6.0 in a wide spectral range (300-1000 nm. The proposed coatings can be recommended as anti-reflective coatings for energy saving solar systems and batteries, and photovoltaic cells.

  7. Intrinsic charge trapping in amorphous oxide films: status and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Jack; Kaviani, Moloud; Gao, David; El-Sayed, Al-Moatasem; Afanas’ev, Valeri V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2018-06-01

    We review the current understanding of intrinsic electron and hole trapping in insulating amorphous oxide films on semiconductor and metal substrates. The experimental and theoretical evidences are provided for the existence of intrinsic deep electron and hole trap states stemming from the disorder of amorphous metal oxide networks. We start from presenting the results for amorphous (a) HfO2, chosen due to the availability of highest purity amorphous films, which is vital for studying their intrinsic electronic properties. Exhaustive photo-depopulation spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations using density functional theory shed light on the atomic nature of electronic gap states responsible for deep electron trapping observed in a-HfO2. We review theoretical methods used for creating models of amorphous structures and electronic structure calculations of amorphous oxides and outline some of the challenges in modeling defects in amorphous materials. We then discuss theoretical models of electron polarons and bi-polarons in a-HfO2 and demonstrate that these intrinsic states originate from low-coordinated ions and elongated metal-oxygen bonds in the amorphous oxide network. Similarly, holes can be captured at under-coordinated O sites. We then discuss electron and hole trapping in other amorphous oxides, such as a-SiO2, a-Al2O3, a-TiO2. We propose that the presence of low-coordinated ions in amorphous oxides with electron states of significant p and d character near the conduction band minimum can lead to electron trapping and that deep hole trapping should be common to all amorphous oxides. Finally, we demonstrate that bi-electron trapping in a-HfO2 and a-SiO2 weakens Hf(Si)–O bonds and significantly reduces barriers for forming Frenkel defects, neutral O vacancies and O2‑ ions in these materials. These results should be useful for better understanding of electronic properties and structural evolution of thin amorphous films under carrier injection

  8. (Invited) Atomic Layer Deposition for Novel Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tétreault, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Herein we present the latest fabrication and characterization techniques for atomic layer deposition of Al 2O 3, ZnO, SnO 2, Nb 2O 5, HfO 2, Ga 2O 3 and TiO 2 for research on dye-sensitized solar cell. In particular, we review the fabrication of state-of-the-art 3D host-passivation-guest photoanodes and ZnO nanowires as well as characterize the deposited thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray diffraction, Hall effect, J-V curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. ©The Electrochemical Society.

  9. Gyrotactic trapping: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorai, S.

    2016-04-01

    Gyrotactic trapping is a mechanism proposed by Durham et al. ["Disruption of vertical motility by shear triggers formation of thin Phytoplankton layers," Science 323, 1067-1070 (2009)] to explain the formation of thin phytoplankton layer just below the ocean surface. This mechanism is examined numerically using a rational model based on the generalized Taylor dispersion theory. The crucial role of sedimentation speed in the thin layer formation is demonstrated. The effects of variation in different parameters on the thin layer formation are also investigated.

  10. Transparent and Highly Responsive Phototransistors Based on a Solution-Processed, Nanometers-Thick Active Layer, Embedding a High-Mobility Electron-Transporting Polymer and a Hole-Trapping Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caranzi, Lorenzo; Pace, Giuseppina; Sassi, Mauro; Beverina, Luca; Caironi, Mario

    2017-08-30

    Organic materials are suitable for light sensing devices showing unique features such as low cost, large area, and flexibility. Moreover, transparent photodetectors are interesting for smart interfaces, windows, and display-integrated electronics. The ease of depositing ultrathin organic films with simple techniques enables low light absorbing active layers, resulting in the realization of transparent devices. Here, we demonstrate a strategy to obtain high efficiency organic photodetectors and phototransistors based on transparent active layers with a visible transmittance higher than 90%. The photoactive layer is composed of two phases, each a few nanometers thick. First, an acceptor polymer, which is a good electron-transporting material, on top of which a small molecule donor material is deposited, forming noncontinuous domains. The small molecule phase acts as a trap for holes, thus inducing a high photoconductive gain, resulting in a high photoresponsivity. The organic transparent detectors proposed here can reach very high external quantum efficiency and responsivity values, which in the case of the phototransistors can be as high as ∼74000% and 340 A W -1 at 570 nm respectively, despite an absorber total thickness below 10 nm. Moreover, frequency dependent 2D photocurrent mapping allows discrimination between the contribution of a fast but inefficient and highly spatially localized photoinduced injection mechanism at the electrodes, and the onset of a slower and spatially extended photoconductive process, leading to high responsivity.

  11. Investigating degradation behavior of hole-trapping effect under static and dynamic gate-bias stress in a dual gate a-InGaZnO thin film transistor with etch stop layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Po-Yung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Hsieh, Tien-Yu; Tsai, Ming-Yen; Chen, Bo-Wei; Chu, Ann-Kuo; Chou, Cheng-Hsu; Chang, Jung-Fang

    2016-01-01

    The degree of degradation between the amorphous-indium–gallium–zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistor (TFT) using the top-gate only or bottom-gate only is compared. Under negative gate bias illumination stress (NBIS), the threshold voltage (V T ) after bottom-gate NBIS monotonically shifts in the negative direction, whereas top-gate NBIS operation exhibits on-state current increases without V T shift. Such anomalous degradation behavior of NBIS under top-gate operation is due to hole-trapping in the etch stop layer above the central portion of the channel. These phenomena can be ascribed to the screening of the electric field by redundant source/drain electrodes. In addition, the device degradation of dual gate a-IGZO TFT stressed with different top gate pulse waveforms is investigated. It is observed that the degradation is dependent on the frequency of the top gate pulses. The V T shift increases with decreasing frequency, indicating the hole mobility of IGZO is low. - Highlights: • Static and dynamic gate bias stresses are imposed on dual gate InGaZnO TFTs. • Top-gate NBIS operation exhibits on-state current increases without VT shift. • The degradation behavior of top-gate NBIS is due to hole-trapping in the ESL. • The degradation is dependent on the frequency of the top gate pulses. • The V T shift increases with decreasing frequency of the top gate pulses.

  12. Atomic Layer Deposition of SnO2 on MXene for Li-Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2017-02-24

    In this report, we show that oxide battery anodes can be grown on two-dimensional titanium carbide sheets (MXenes) by atomic layer deposition. Using this approach, we have fabricated a composite SnO2/MXene anode for Li-ion battery applications. The SnO2/MXene anode exploits the high Li-ion capacity offered by SnO2, while maintaining the structural and mechanical integrity by the conductive MXene platform. The atomic layer deposition (ALD) conditions used to deposit SnO2 on MXene terminated with oxygen, fluorine, and hydroxyl-groups were found to be critical for preventing MXene degradation during ALD. We demonstrate that SnO2/MXene electrodes exhibit excellent electrochemical performance as Li-ion battery anodes, where conductive MXene sheets act to buffer the volume changes associated with lithiation and delithiation of SnO2. The cyclic performance of the anodes is further improved by depositing a very thin passivation layer of HfO2, in the same ALD reactor, on the SnO2/MXene anode. This is shown by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy to also improve the structural integrity of SnO2 anode during cycling. The HfO2 coated SnO2/MXene electrodes demonstrate a stable specific capacity of 843 mAh/g when used as Li-ion battery anodes.

  13. Buffer layer investigations on MFIS capacitors consisting of ferroelectric poly[vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkel, K; Seime, B; Paloumpa, I; Mueller, K; Schmeisser, D

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present capacitance-voltage (CV) measurements on metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) capacitors with poly[vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene] (P[VDF/TrFE] as ferroelectric layer and SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and HfO 2 as buffering insulator layer. In order to discuss our data in a quantitative manner we perform fits to the data based on a model proposed by Miller and McWorther. The improvement of the polarization values and subsequently its effect on the hysteresis of the CV curve by the successive shrinking of the buffer layer thickness and the following choice of a high-k buffer material is demonstrated. Our data underline that a saturated polarization of P[VDF/TrFE] cannot be controlled with a SiO 2 buffer layer and the insertion of a high-k buffer layer is essential for further improvements of the characteristics of MFIS stacks.

  14. Charge trapping characteristics of Au nanocrystals embedded in remote plasma atomic layer-deposited Al2O3 film as the tunnel and blocking oxides for nonvolatile memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaesang; Kim, Hyungchul; Park, Taeyong; Ko, Youngbin; Ryu, Jaehun; Jeon, Heeyoung; Park, Jingyu; Jeon, Hyeongtag

    2012-01-01

    Remote plasma atomic layer deposited (RPALD) Al 2 O 3 films were investigated to apply as tunnel and blocking layers in the metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor memory utilizing Au nanocrystals (NCs) for nonvolatile memory applications. The interface stability of an Al 2 O 3 film deposited by RPALD was studied to observe the effects of remote plasma on the interface. The interface formed during RPALD process has high oxidation states such as Si +3 and Si +4 , indicating that RPALD process can grow more stable interface which has a small amount of fixed oxide trap charge. The significant memory characteristics were also observed in this memory device through the electrical measurement. The memory device exhibited a relatively large memory window of 5.6 V under a 10/-10 V program/erase voltage and also showed the relatively fast programming/erasing speed and a competitive retention characteristic after 10 4 s. These results indicate that Al 2 O 3 films deposited via RPALD can be applied as the tunnel and blocking oxides for next-generation flash memory devices.

  15. Globalisation Trapped

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Caraça

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The promise of making society progress through the direct applications of science was finally fulfilled in the mid-20th century. Science progressed immensely, propelled by the effects of the two world wars. The first science-based technologies saw the daylight during the 1940s and their transformative power was such that neither the military, nor subsequently the markets, allowed science to return intact to its curiosity-driven nest. Technoscience was born then and (being progressively pulled away from curiosity-driven science was able to grow enormously, erecting a formidable structure of networks of institutions that impacted decisively on the economy. It is a paradox, or maybe a trap, that the fulfillment of science’s solemn promise of ‘transforming nature’ means seeing ourselves and our Western societies entangled in crises after crises with no clear outcome in view. A redistribution of geopolitical power is under way, along with the deployment of information and communication technologies, forcing dominant structures to oscillate, as knowledge about organization and methods, marketing, design, and software begins to challenge the role of technoscience as the main vector of economic growth and wealth accumulation. What ought to be done?

  16. Investigating degradation behavior of hole-trapping effect under static and dynamic gate-bias stress in a dual gate a-InGaZnO thin film transistor with etch stop layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Po-Yung [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, 70 Lien-hai Road, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Chang, E-mail: tcchang3708@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, 70 Lien-hai Road, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Tien-Yu [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, 70 Lien-hai Road, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ming-Yen; Chen, Bo-Wei; Chu, Ann-Kuo [Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, 70 Lien-hai Road, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Chou, Cheng-Hsu; Chang, Jung-Fang [Product Technology Center, Chimei Innolux Corp., Tainan 741, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-31

    The degree of degradation between the amorphous-indium–gallium–zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistor (TFT) using the top-gate only or bottom-gate only is compared. Under negative gate bias illumination stress (NBIS), the threshold voltage (V{sub T}) after bottom-gate NBIS monotonically shifts in the negative direction, whereas top-gate NBIS operation exhibits on-state current increases without V{sub T} shift. Such anomalous degradation behavior of NBIS under top-gate operation is due to hole-trapping in the etch stop layer above the central portion of the channel. These phenomena can be ascribed to the screening of the electric field by redundant source/drain electrodes. In addition, the device degradation of dual gate a-IGZO TFT stressed with different top gate pulse waveforms is investigated. It is observed that the degradation is dependent on the frequency of the top gate pulses. The V{sub T} shift increases with decreasing frequency, indicating the hole mobility of IGZO is low. - Highlights: • Static and dynamic gate bias stresses are imposed on dual gate InGaZnO TFTs. • Top-gate NBIS operation exhibits on-state current increases without VT shift. • The degradation behavior of top-gate NBIS is due to hole-trapping in the ESL. • The degradation is dependent on the frequency of the top gate pulses. • The V{sub T} shift increases with decreasing frequency of the top gate pulses.

  17. Deuterium trapping in carbon fiber composites under high fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetov, A.A.; Begrambekov, L.B.; Kuzmin, A.A.; Shigin, P.A.; Zakharov, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of deuterium trapping in CFC, dance graphite MPG-8 and pyrolytic graphite (PG) under plasma ion- and electron irradiation. Number of specific features of deuterium trapping and retention under plasma ion and electron irradiation is presented and discussed. In particular it is shown that 1) deuterium trapping takes place even when energy of impinging ions approaches zero; 2) deuterium is trapped under irradiation by plasma electrons; 3) under irradiation at equal fluences deuterium trapping is higher, when ion flux is smaller. High energy ion penetrating the surfaces are trapped in the traps created at the expense of their kinetic energy. The process may be named 'kinetic trapping'. Under low energy (smaller than 200 eV) electron and/or ion irradiation the energy of inelastic interaction on the surface provides creation of active centers, which initiate dissociation of deuterium sorbed on the surface, penetration of deuterium atoms into graphite and their trapping in specific low energy traps. The term 'potential trapping' is proposed for this type of trapping. Under high energy irradiation such atoms can fill the traps formed through kinetic mechanism. Origination of moveable deuterium atoms from the layer of surface sorption seems to be time dependent process and it is a reason of increase of trapping along with irradiation time. New features of deuterium trapping and retention in graphite evaluated in this study offer new opportunities for analysis and correct estimation of hydrogen isotope trapping and retention in tokamaks having graphite tiles. (authors)

  18. Effects of oxide traps, interface traps, and ''border traps'' on metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Winokur, P.S.; Reber, R.A. Jr.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Schwank, J.R.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Riewe, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    We have identified several features of the 1/f noise and radiation response of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices that are difficult to explain with standard defect models. To address this issue, and in response to ambiguities in the literature, we have developed a revised nomenclature for defects in MOS devices that clearly distinguishes the language used to describe the physical location of defects from that used to describe their electrical response. In this nomenclature, ''oxide traps'' are simply defects in the SiO 2 layer of the MOS structure, and ''interface traps'' are defects at the Si/SiO 2 interface. Nothing is presumed about how either type of defect communicates with the underlying Si. Electrically, ''fixed states'' are defined as trap levels that do not communicate with the Si on the time scale of the measurements, but ''switching states'' can exchange charge with the Si. Fixed states presumably are oxide traps in most types of measurements, but switching states can either be interface traps or near-interfacial oxide traps that can communicate with the Si, i.e., ''border traps'' [D. M. Fleetwood, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-39, 269 (1992)]. The effective density of border traps depends on the time scale and bias conditions of the measurements. We show the revised nomenclature can provide focus to discussions of the buildup and annealing of radiation-induced charge in non-radiation-hardened MOS transistors, and to changes in the 1/f noise of MOS devices through irradiation and elevated-temperature annealing

  19. Tailoring properties of lossy-mode resonance optical fiber sensors with atomic layer deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiel, Kamil; Koba, Marcin; Masiewicz, Marcin; Śmietana, Mateusz

    2018-06-01

    The paper shows application of atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique as a tool for tailoring sensorial properties of lossy-mode-resonance (LMR)-based optical fiber sensors. Hafnium dioxide (HfO2), zirconium dioxide (ZrO2), and tantalum oxide (TaxOy), as high-refractive-index dielectrics that are particularly convenient for LMR-sensor fabrication, were deposited by low-temperature (100 °C) ALD ensuring safe conditions for thermally vulnerable fibers. Applicability of HfO2 and ZrO2 overlays, deposited with ALD-related atomic level thickness accuracy for fabrication of LMR-sensors with controlled sensorial properties was presented. Additionally, for the first time according to our best knowledge, the double-layer overlay composed of two different materials - silicon nitride (SixNy) and TaxOy - is presented for the LMR fiber sensors. The thin films of such overlay were deposited by two different techniques - PECVD (the SixNy) and ALD (the TaxOy). Such approach ensures fast overlay fabrication and at the same time facility for resonant wavelength tuning, yielding devices with satisfactory sensorial properties.

  20. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  1. Hf layer thickness dependence of resistive switching characteristics of Ti/Hf/HfO2/Au resistive random access memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Ryo; Azuma, Atsushi; Yoshida, Hayato; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Ito, Takeshi; Shingubara, Shoso

    2018-06-01

    Resistive random access memory (ReRAM) devices with a HfO2 dielectric layer have been studied extensively owing to the good reproducibility of their SET/RESET switching properties. Furthermore, it was reported that a thin Hf layer next to a HfO2 layer stabilized switching properties because of the oxygen scavenging effect. In this work, we studied the Hf thickness dependence of the resistance switching characteristics of a Ti/Hf/HfO2/Au ReRAM device. It is found that the optimum Hf thickness is approximately 10 nm to obtain good reproducibility of SET/RESET voltages with a small RESET current. However, when the Hf thickness was very small (∼2 nm), the device failed after the first RESET process owing to the very large RESET current. In the case of a very thick Hf layer (∼20 nm), RESET did not occur owing to the formation of a leaky dielectric layer. We observed the occurrence of multiple resistance states in the RESET process of the device with a Hf thickness of 10 nm by increasing the RESET voltage stepwise.

  2. Thermal effects on the Raman phonon of few-layer phosphorene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Zhi-Peng; Ang, Kah-Wee

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional phosphorene is a promising channel material for next generation transistor applications due to its superior carrier transport property. Here, we report the influence of thermal effects on the Raman phonon of few-layer phosphorene formed on hafnium-dioxide (HfO 2 ) high-k dielectric. When annealed at elevated temperatures (up to 200 °C), the phosphorene film was found to exhibit a blue shift in both the out-of-plane (A 1 g ) and in-plane (B 2g and A 2 g ) phonon modes as a result of compressive strain effect. This is attributed to the out-diffusion of hafnium (Hf) atoms from the underlying HfO 2 dielectric, which compresses the phosphorene in both the zigzag and armchair directions. With a further increase in thermal energy beyond 250 °C, strain relaxation within phosphorene eventually took place. When this happens, the phosphorene was unable to retain its intrinsic crystallinity prior to annealing, as evident from the broadening of full-width at half maximum of the Raman phonon. These results provide an important insight into the impact of thermal effects on the structural integrity of phosphorene when integrated with high-k gate dielectric

  3. Shrew trap efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gambalemoke, Mbalitini; Mukinzi, Itoka; Amundala, Drazo

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of four trap types (pitfall, Sherman LFA, Victor snap and Museum Special snap traps) to capture shrews. This experiment was conducted in five inter-riverine forest blocks in the region of Kisangani. The total trapping effort was 6,300, 9,240, 5,280 and 5,460 trap......, our results indicate that pitfall traps are the most efficient for capturing shrews: not only do they have a higher efficiency (yield), but the taxonomic diversity of shrews is also higher when pitfall traps are used....

  4. Lift enhancement by trapped vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of lift enhancement by trapped vortex are provided. Efforts are continuously being made to find simple ways to convert wings of aircraft from an efficient cruise configuration to one that develops the high lift needed during landing and takeoff. The high-lift configurations studied here consist of conventional airfoils with a trapped vortex over the upper surface. The vortex is trapped by one or two vertical fences that serve as barriers to the oncoming stream and as reflection planes for the vortex and the sink that form a separation bubble on top of the airfoil. Since the full three-dimensional unsteady flow problem over the wing of an aircraft is so complicated that it is hard to get an understanding of the principles that govern the vortex trapping process, the analysis is restricted here to the flow field illustrated in the first slide. It is assumed that the flow field between the two end plates approximates a streamwise strip of the flow over a wing. The flow between the endplates and about the airfoil consists of a spanwise vortex located between the suction orifices in the endplates. The spanwise fence or spoiler located near the nose of the airfoil serves to form a separated flow region and a shear layer. The vorticity in the shear layer is concentrated into the vortex by withdrawal of fluid at the suction orifices. As the strength of the vortex increases with time, it eventually dominates the flow in the separated region so that a shear or vertical layer is no longer shed from the tip of the fence. At that point, the vortex strength is fixed and its location is such that all of the velocity contributions at its center sum to zero thereby making it an equilibrium point for the vortex. The results of a theoretical analysis of such an idealized flow field are described.

  5. Integration of atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics on GaSb via hydrogen plasma exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B. Ruppalt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter we report the efficacy of a hydrogen plasma pretreatment for integrating atomic layer deposited (ALD high-k dielectric stacks with device-quality p-type GaSb(001 epitaxial layers. Molecular beam eptiaxy-grown GaSb surfaces were subjected to a 30 minute H2/Ar plasma treatment and subsequently removed to air. High-k HfO2 and Al2O3/HfO2 bilayer insulating films were then deposited via ALD and samples were processed into standard metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS capacitors. The quality of the semiconductor/dielectric interface was probed by current-voltage and variable-frequency admittance measurements. Measurement results indicate that the H2-plamsa pretreatment leads to a low density of interface states nearly independent of the deposited dielectric material, suggesting that pre-deposition H2-plasma exposure, coupled with ALD of high-k dielectrics, may provide an effective means for achieving high-quality GaSb MOS structures for advanced Sb-based digital and analog electronics.

  6. Trap-induced photoconductivity in singlet fission pentacene diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Xianfeng, E-mail: qiaoxianfeng@hotmail.com; Zhao, Chen; Chen, Bingbing; Luan, Lin [WuHan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wu Han 430074 (China)

    2014-07-21

    This paper reports a trap-induced photoconductivity in ITO/pentacene/Al diodes by using current-voltage and magneto-conductance measurements. The comparison of photoconductivity between pentacene diodes with and without trap clearly shows that the traps play a critical role in generating photoconductivity. It shows that no observable photoconductivity is detected for trap-free pentacene diodes, while significant photoconductivity is observed in diodes with trap. This is because the initial photogenerated singlet excitons in pentacene can rapidly split into triplet excitons with higher binding energy prior to dissociating into free charge carriers. The generated triplet excitons react with trapped charges to release charge-carriers from traps, leading to a trap-induced photoconductivity in the single-layer pentacene diodes. Our studies elucidated the formation mechanisms of photoconductivity in pentacene diodes with extremely fast singlet fission rate.

  7. St. Croix trap study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains detailed information about the catch from 600 trap stations around St. Croix. Data fields include species caught, size data, trap location...

  8. Angular trap for macroparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksyonov, D.S.

    2013-01-01

    Properties of angular macroparticle traps were investigated in this work. These properties are required to design vacuum arc plasma filters. The correlation between trap geometry parameters and its ability to absorb macroparticles were found. Calculations allow one to predict the behaviour of filtering abilities of separators which contain such traps in their design. Recommendations regarding the use of angular traps in filters of different builds are given.

  9. Light-erasable embedded charge-trapping memory based on MoS2 for system-on-panel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Long-Fei; Zhu, Hao; Xu, Jing; Liu, Hao; Nie, Xin-Ran; Chen, Lin; Sun, Qing-Qing; Xia, Yang; Wei Zhang, David

    2017-11-01

    The continuous scaling and challenges in device integrations in modern portable electronic products have aroused many scientific interests, and a great deal of effort has been made in seeking solutions towards a more microminiaturized package assembled with smaller and more powerful components. In this study, an embedded light-erasable charge-trapping memory with a high-k dielectric stack (Al2O3/HfO2/Al2O3) and an atomically thin MoS2 channel has been fabricated and fully characterized. The memory exhibits a sufficient memory window, fast programming and erasing (P/E) speed, and high On/Off current ratio up to 107. Less than 25% memory window degradation is observed after projected 10-year retention, and the device functions perfectly after 8000 P/E operation cycles. Furthermore, the programmed device can be fully erased by incident light without electrical assistance. Such excellent memory performance originates from the intrinsic properties of two-dimensional (2D) MoS2 and the engineered back-gate dielectric stack. Our integration of 2D semiconductors in the infrastructure of light-erasable charge-trapping memory is very promising for future system-on-panel applications like storage of metadata and flexible imaging arrays.

  10. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    variations of ion traps, including (1) the cylindrically symmetric 3D ring trap; (2) the linear trap with a combination of cavity QED; (#) the symmetric...concepts of quantum information. The major demonstration has been the test of a Bell inequality as demonstrated by Rowe et al. [50] and a decoherence...famous physics experiment [62]. Wolfgang Paul demonstrated a similar apparatus during his Nobel Prize speech [63]. This device is hyperbolic- parabolic

  11. Towards trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, L V; Bertsche, W; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the last few years in the nascent field of antihydrogen physics. The next big step forward is expected to be the trapping of the formed antihydrogen atoms using a magnetic multipole trap. ALPHA is a new international project that started to take data in 2006 at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator facility. The primary goal of ALPHA is stable trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms to facilitate measurements of its properties. We discuss the status of the ALPHA project and the prospects for antihydrogen trapping.

  12. Controlling trapping potentials and stray electric fields in a microfabricated ion trap through design and compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles Doret, S; Amini, Jason M; Wright, Kenneth; Volin, Curtis; Killian, Tyler; Ozakin, Arkadas; Denison, Douglas; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C-S; Slusher, Richart E; Harter, Alexa W

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum information processing with trapped ions have demonstrated the need for new ion trap architectures capable of holding and manipulating chains of many (>10) ions. Here we present the design and detailed characterization of a new linear trap, microfabricated with scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) techniques, that is well-suited to this challenge. Forty-four individually controlled dc electrodes provide the many degrees of freedom required to construct anharmonic potential wells, shuttle ions, merge and split ion chains, precisely tune secular mode frequencies, and adjust the orientation of trap axes. Microfabricated capacitors on dc electrodes suppress radio-frequency pickup and excess micromotion, while a top-level ground layer simplifies modeling of electric fields and protects trap structures underneath. A localized aperture in the substrate provides access to the trapping region from an oven below, permitting deterministic loading of particular isotopic/elemental sequences via species-selective photoionization. The shapes of the aperture and radio-frequency electrodes are optimized to minimize perturbation of the trapping pseudopotential. Laboratory experiments verify simulated potentials and characterize trapping lifetimes, stray electric fields, and ion heating rates, while measurement and cancellation of spatially-varying stray electric fields permits the formation of nearly-equally spaced ion chains. (paper)

  13. Versatile electrostatic trap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhoven, J.; Bethlem, H.L.; Schnell, M.; Meijer, G.

    2006-01-01

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of ND315 molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to

  14. Liquid metal cold trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundal, R.

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal is described. A hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly

  15. Trapping radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Heinz-Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  16. Trapping radioactive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning

  17. Control of thermal deformation in dielectric mirrors using mechanical design and atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Nicholas T; Kim, Sangho S; Talghader, Joseph J

    2009-07-01

    A mechanical design technique for optical coatings that simultaneously controls thermal deformation and optical reflectivity is reported. The method requires measurement of the refractive index and thermal stress of single films prior to the design. Atomic layer deposition was used for deposition because of the high repeatability of the film constants. An Al2O3/HfO2 distributed Bragg reflector was deposited with a predicted peak reflectivity of 87.9% at 542.4 nm and predicted edge deformation of -360 nm/K on a 10 cm silicon substrate. The measured peak reflectivity was 85.7% at 541.7 nm with an edge deformation of -346 nm/K.

  18. Trapped particles at a magnetic discontinuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    At a tangential discontinuity between two constant magnetic fields a layer of trapped particles can exist, this work examines the conditions under which the current carried by such particles tends to maintain the discontinuity. Three cases are examined. If the discontinuity separates aligned vacuum fields, the only requirement is that they be antiparallel. With arbitrary relative orientations, the field must have equal intensities on both sides. Finally, with a guiding center plasma on both sides, the condition reduces to a relation which is also derivable from hydromagnetic theory. Arguments are presented for the occurrence of such trapped modes in the magnetopause and for the non-existence of specular particle reflection.

  19. Nematode-Trapping Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique and intriguing group of carnivorous microorganisms that can trap and digest nematodes by means of specialized trapping structures. They can develop diverse trapping devices, such as adhesive hyphae, adhesive knobs, adhesive networks, constricting rings, and nonconstricting rings. Nematode-trapping fungi have been found in all regions of the world, from the tropics to Antarctica, from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems. They play an important ecological role in regulating nematode dynamics in soil. Molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that the majority of nematode-trapping fungi belong to a monophyletic group in the order Orbiliales (Ascomycota). Nematode-trapping fungi serve as an excellent model system for understanding fungal evolution and interaction between fungi and nematodes. With the development of molecular techniques and genome sequencing, their evolutionary origins and divergence, and the mechanisms underlying fungus-nematode interactions have been well studied. In recent decades, an increasing concern about the environmental hazards of using chemical nematicides has led to the application of these biological control agents as a rapidly developing component of crop protection.

  20. Atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo study of atomic layer deposition derived from density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Mahdi; Elliott, Simon D

    2014-01-30

    To describe the atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactions of HfO2 from Hf(N(CH3)2)4 and H2O, a three-dimensional on-lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo model is developed. In this model, all atomistic reaction pathways in density functional theory (DFT) are implemented as reaction events on the lattice. This contains all steps, from the early stage of adsorption of each ALD precursor, kinetics of the surface protons, interaction between the remaining precursors (steric effect), influence of remaining fragments on adsorption sites (blocking), densification of each ALD precursor, migration of each ALD precursors, and cooperation between the remaining precursors to adsorb H2O (cooperative effect). The essential chemistry of the ALD reactions depends on the local environment at the surface. The coordination number and a neighbor list are used to implement the dependencies. The validity and necessity of the proposed reaction pathways are statistically established at the mesoscale. The formation of one monolayer of precursor fragments is shown at the end of the metal pulse. Adsorption and dissociation of the H2O precursor onto that layer is described, leading to the delivery of oxygen and protons to the surface during the H2O pulse. Through these processes, the remaining precursor fragments desorb from the surface, leaving the surface with bulk-like and OH-terminated HfO2, ready for the next cycle. The migration of the low coordinated remaining precursor fragments is also proposed. This process introduces a slow reordering motion (crawling) at the mesoscale, leading to the smooth and conformal thin film that is characteristic of ALD. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurtele, Jonathan [UC Berkeley and LBNL

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  2. EBIT trapping program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, S.R.; Beck, B.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Church, D.; DeWitt, D.; Knapp, D.K.; Marrs, R.E.; Schneider, D.; Schweikhard, L.

    1993-01-01

    The LLNL electron beam ion trap provides the world's only source of stationary highly charged ions up to bare U. This unique capability makes many new atomic and nuclear physics experiments possible. (orig.)

  3. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  4. Geometric light trapping with a V-trap for efficient organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Soo Jin

    2013-03-14

    The efficiency of today’s most efficient organic solar cells is primarily limited by the ability of the active layer to absorb all the sunlight. While internal quantum efficiencies exceeding 90% are common, the external quantum efficiency rarely exceeds 70%. Light trapping techniques that increase the ability of a given active layer to absorb light are common in inorganic solar cells but have only been applied to organic solar cells with limited success. Here, we analyze the light trapping mechanism for a cell with a V-shape substrate configuration and demonstrate significantly improved photon absorption in an 5.3%-efficient PCDTBT:PC70BM bulk heterojunction polymer solar cell. The measured short circuit current density improves by 29%, in agreement with model predictions, and the power conversion efficiency increases to 7.2%, a 35% improvement over the performance in the absence of a light trap.

  5. Search For Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm B.; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D.; Bray, Crystal C.; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L.; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C.; Gill, David R.; Hangst, Jeffrey S.; Hardy, Walter N.; Hayano, Ryugo S.; Hayden, Michael E.; Humphries, Andrew J.; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Jorgensen, Lars V.; Kurchaninov, Lenoid; Lambo, Ricardo; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Nasr, Sarah Seif El; Silveira, Daniel M.; So, Chukman; Storey, James W.; Thompson, Robert I.; van der Werf, Dirk P.; Wilding, Dean; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experiment to search for trapped antihydrogen atoms with the ALPHA antihydrogen trap at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. Sensitive diagnostics of the temperatures, sizes, and densities of the trapped antiproton and positron plasmas have been developed, which in turn permitted development of techniques to precisely and reproducibly control the initial experimental parameters. The use of a position-sensitive annihilation vertex detector, together with the capability of controllably quenching the superconducting magnetic minimum trap, enabled us to carry out a high-sensitivity and low-background search for trapped synthesised antihydrogen atoms. We aim to identify the annihilations of antihydrogen atoms held for at least 130 ms in the trap before being released over ~30 ms. After a three-week experimental run in 2009 involving mixing of 10^7 antiprotons with 1.3 10^9 positrons to produce 6 10^5 antihydrogen atoms, we have identified six antiproton annihilation events that are consist...

  6. Interfacial charge trapping in the polymer solar cells and its elimination by solvent annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Chauhan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The PCDTBT:PCBM solar cells were fabricated adopting a tandem layer approach to investigate the critical issues of charge trapping, radiation absorption, and efficiency in polymer solar cells. This layered structure was found to be a source of charge trapping which was identified and confirmed by impedance spectroscopy. The low efficiency in multilayered structures was related to trapping of photo-generated carriers and low carrier mobility, and thus an increased recombination. Solvent annealing of the structures in tetrahydrofuran vapors was found beneficial in homogenizing the active layer, dissolving additional interfaces, and elimination of charge traps which improved the carrier mobilities and eventually the device efficiencies.

  7. High temperature study on the thermal properties of few-layer Mo0.5W0.5S2 and effects of capping layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Gu

    Full Text Available We investigated the thermal properties of few-layer Mo0.5W0.5S2 using a series of samples with different kinds of capping layers. Temperature-dependent Raman measurements were conducted in the range of 300–500 K, with power-dependent measurements also carried out. It indicated, for the few-layer Mo0.5W0.5S2, the temperature coefficients of the WS2-like E12g mode, MoS2-like E12g mode and A1g mode were −0.0155 cm−1/K, −0.0146 cm−1/K, and −0.0130 cm−1/K, respectively. And the thermal conductivity was estimated to be 44.8 W/mK. Moreover, the Mo0.5W0.5S2 samples coated with capping layers (ZrO2, HfO2 both showed a better thermal stability and a larger thermal conductivity than the one without. The results revealed that the capping layer should be an important factor in the thermal property. Keywords: Mo0.5W0.5S2, TMDs, Thermal properties, High temperature, Capping layers, Raman

  8. Microfabricated Microwave-Integrated Surface Ion Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelle, Melissa C.; Blain, Matthew G.; Haltli, Raymond A.; Hollowell, Andrew E.; Nordquist, Christopher D.; Maunz, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Quantum information processing holds the key to solving computational problems that are intractable with classical computers. Trapped ions are a physical realization of a quantum information system in which qubits are encoded in hyperfine energy states. Coupling the qubit states to ion motion, as needed for two-qubit gates, is typically accomplished using Raman laser beams. Alternatively, this coupling can be achieved with strong microwave gradient fields. While microwave radiation is easier to control than a laser, it is challenging to precisely engineer the radiated microwave field. Taking advantage of Sandia's microfabrication techniques, we created a surface ion trap with integrated microwave electrodes with sub-wavelength dimensions. This multi-layered device permits co-location of the microwave antennae and the ion trap electrodes to create localized microwave gradient fields and necessary trapping fields. Here, we characterize the trap design and present simulated microwave performance with progress towards experimental results. This research was funded, in part, by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  9. On-chip particle trapping and manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Kaelyn Danielle

    The ability to control and manipulate the world around us is human nature. Humans and our ancestors have used tools for millions of years. Only in recent years have we been able to control objects at such small levels. In order to understand the world around us it is frequently necessary to interact with the biological world. Optical trapping and manipulation offer a non-invasive way to move, sort and interact with particles and cells to see how they react to the world around them. Optical tweezers are ideal in their abilities but they require large, non-portable, and expensive setups limiting how and where we can use them. A cheap portable platform is required in order to have optical manipulation reach its full potential. On-chip technology offers a great solution to this challenge. We focused on the Liquid-Core Anti-Resonant Reflecting Optical Waveguide (liquid-core ARROW) for our work. The ARROW is an ideal platform, which has anti-resonant layers which allow light to be guided in liquids, allowing for particles to easily be manipulated. It is manufactured using standard silicon manufacturing techniques making it easy to produce. The planner design makes it easy to integrate with other technologies. Initially I worked to improve the ARROW chip by reducing the intersection losses and by reducing the fluorescence and background on the ARROW chip. The ARROW chip has already been used to trap and push particles along its channel but here I introduce several new methods of particle trapping and manipulation on the ARROW chip. Traditional two beam traps use two counter propagating beams. A trapping scheme that uses two orthogonal beams which counter to first instinct allow for trapping at their intersection is introduced. This scheme is thoroughly predicted and analyzed using realistic conditions. Simulations of this method were done using a program which looks at both the fluidics and optical sources to model complex situations. These simulations were also used to

  10. Physics with Trapped Antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Michael

    2017-04-01

    For more than a decade antihydrogen atoms have been formed by mixing antiprotons and positrons held in arrangements of charged particle (Penning) traps. More recently, magnetic minimum neutral atom traps have been superimposed upon the anti-atom production region, promoting the trapping of a small quantity of the antihydrogen yield. We will review these advances, and describe some of the first physics experiments performed on anrtihydrogen including the observation of the two-photon 1S-2S transition, invesigation of the charge neutrailty of the anti-atom and studies of the ground state hyperfine splitting. We will discuss the physics motivations for undertaking these experiments and describe some near-future initiatives.

  11. Sawteeth stabilization by energetic trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samain, A.; Edery, D.; Garbet, X.; Roubin, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The analysis of a possible stabilization of sawteeth by a population of energetic ions is performed by using the Lagrangian of the electromagnetic perturbation. It is shown that the trapped component of such a population has a small influence compared to that of the passing component. The stabilization threshold is calculated assuming a non linear regime in the q=1 resonant layer. The energetic population must create a stable tearing structure if the average curvature effect on thermal particles in the layer is small. However, this effect decreases the actual threshold

  12. Ion trap device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  13. Asymmetric ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  14. Flow regimes in a trapped vortex cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasagna, D.; Iuso, G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents results of an experimental investigation on the flow in a trapped vortex cell, embedded into a flat plate, and interacting with a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. The objective of the work is to describe the flow features and elucidate some of the governing physical mechanisms, in the light of recent investigations on flow separation control using vortex cells. Hot-wire velocity measurements of the shear layer bounding the cell and of the boundary layers upstream and downstream are reported, together with spectral and correlation analyses of wall-pressure fluctuation measurements. Smoke flow visualisations provide qualitative insight into some relevant features of the internal flow, namely a large-scale flow unsteadiness and possible mechanisms driving the rotation of the vortex core. Results are presented for two very different regimes: a low-Reynolds-number case where the incoming boundary layer is laminar and its momentum thickness is small compared to the cell opening, and a moderately high-Reynolds-number case, where the incoming boundary layer is turbulent and the ratio between the momentum thickness and the opening length is significantly larger than in the first case. Implications of the present findings to flow control applications of trapped vortex cells are also discussed.

  15. Surface layers in the 4A group metals with implanted silicon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovneristyj, Yu.K.; Vavilova, V.V.; Krasnopevtsev, V.V.; Galkin, L.N.; Kudyshev, A.N.; Klechkovskaya, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made on the change of structure and phase composition of fine near the surface layers of 4A group metals (Hf, Zr, Ti) during ion Si implantation and successive thermal annealing at elevated temperatures. Implantation of Si + ions with 30 or 16 keV energy in Ti, Zr and Hf at room temperature results to amorphization of metal surface layer. The surface hafnium and titanium layer with implanted Si atoms due to interaction with residual atmosphere of oxygen turns during annealing at 870 K to amorphous solid solution of HfO 2m or TiO 2 with Si, preventing further metal oxidation; layers of amorphous alloy are characterized by thermal stability up to 1270 K. Oxidation of the surface amorphous layer in residual oxygen atmosphere and its crystallization in ZrO 2 take place in result of Zr annealing with implanted Si ions at temperature not exceeding 870 K. Similar phenomena are observed in the case of hafnium with implanted oxygen ions or small dose of silicon ions. Thermal stability of amorphous layers produced during ion implantation of Si in Ti, Zr and Hf corresponds to scale resistance of monolithic alloys in Ti-Si, Zr-Si and Hf-Si systems

  16. Fundamental Limit of Nanophotonic Light-trapping in Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Zongfu; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2010-01-01

    Establishing the fundamental limit of nanophotonic light-trapping schemes is of paramount importance and is becoming increasingly urgent for current solar cell research. The standard theory of light trapping demonstrated that absorption enhancement in a medium cannot exceed a factor of 4n^2/ sin^2(\\theta), where n is the refractive index of the active layer, and \\theta is the angle of the emission cone in the medium surrounding the cell. This theory, however, is not applicable in the nanophot...

  17. Cost effective flat plate photovoltaic modules using light trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, C. N.; Gordon, B. A.; Knasel, T. M.; Malinowski, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Work in optical trapping in 'thick films' is described to form a design guide for photovoltaic engineers. A thick optical film can trap light by diffusive reflection and total internal reflection. Light can be propagated reasonably long distances compared with layer thicknesses by this technique. This makes it possible to conduct light from inter-cell and intra-cell areas now not used in photovoltaic modules onto active cell areas.

  18. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menou, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO 2 as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe

  19. Redesigning octopus traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduarda Gomes

    2014-06-01

    In order to minimise the identified problems in the actual traps, the present work proposes a new design with the aim of reducing the volume and weight during transport, and also during onshore storage. Alternative materials to avoid corrosion and formation of encrustations were also proposed.

  20. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  1. Light effect in photoionization of traps in GaN MESFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Arabshahi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Trapping of hot electron behavior by trap centers located in buffer layer of a wurtzite phase GaN MESFET has been simulated using an ensemble Monte Carlo simulation. The results of the simulation show that the trap centers are responsible for current collapse in GaN MESFET at low temperatures. These electrical traps degrade the performance of the device at low temperature. On the opposite, a light-induced increase in the trap-limited drain current, results from the photoionization of trapped carriers and their return to the channel under the influence of the built in electric field associated with the trapped charge distribution. The simulated device geometries and doping are matched to the nominal parameters described for the experimental structures as closely as possible, and the predicted drain current and other electrical characteristics for the simulated device including trapping center effects show close agreement with the available experimental data.

  2. [Trapping techniques for Solenopsis invicta].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao-song; Zhang, Qiang; Zhuang, Yiong-lin; Li, Gui-wen; Ji, Lin-peng; Wang, Jian-guo; Dai, Hua-guo

    2007-06-01

    A field study was made to investigate the trapping effects of different attractants, traps, and wind directions on Solenopsis invicta. The results showed that among the test attractants, TB1 (50 g fishmeal, 40 g peptone, 10 ml 10% sucrose water solution and 20 ml soybean oil) had the best effect, followed by TB2 (ham), TB6 (100 g cornmeal and 20 ml soybean oil) and TB4 (10 ml 10% sucrose water solution, 100 g sugarcane powder and 20 ml soybean oil), with a mean capture efficiency being 77.6, 58.7, 29 and 7.7 individuals per trap, respectively. No S. invicta was trapped with TB3 (10 ml 10% sucrose water solution, 100 g cornmeal and 20 ml soybean oil) and TB5 (honey). Tube trap was superior to dish trap, with a trapping efficiency of 75.2 and 35 individuals per trap, respectively. The attractants had better effects in leeward than in windward.

  3. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Taheri, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trapped...... in air using a 1064 nm laser. The positions visited by the trapped gold nano-particle were quantified using a quadrant photo diode placed in the back focal plane. The time traces were analyzed and the trapping stiffness characterizing gold aerosol trapping determined and compared to aerosol trapping...... of nanometer sized silica and polystyrene particles. Based on our analysis, we concluded that gold nano-particles trap more strongly in air than similarly sized polystyrene and silica particles. We found that, in a certain power range, the trapping strength of polystyrene particles is linearly decreasing...

  4. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.

  5. Wide-angle light-trapping electrode for photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelyanovich, Mikhail M; Simovski, Constantin R

    2017-10-01

    In this Letter, we experimentally show that a submicron layer of a transparent conducting oxide that may serve a top electrode of a photovoltaic cell based on amorphous silicon when properly patterned by notches becomes an efficient light-trapping structure. This is so for amorphous silicon thin-film solar cells with properly chosen thicknesses of the active layers (p-i-n structure with optimal thicknesses of intrinsic and doped layers). The nanopatterned layer of transparent conducting oxide reduces both the light reflectance from the photovoltaic cell and transmittance through the photovoltaic layers for normal incidence and for all incidence angles. We explain the physical mechanism of our light-trapping effect, prove that this mechanism is realized in our structure, and show that the nanopatterning is achievable in a rather easy and affordable way that makes our method of solar cell enhancement attractive for industrial adaptations.

  6. Escaping the tolerance trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammoudeh, S.; Madan, V.

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the implications of the weakening of OPEC's responsiveness in adjusting its production levels, this paper explicitly incorporates rigidity in the quantity adjustment mechanism, thereby extending previous research which assumed smooth quantity adjustments. The rigidity is manifested in a tolerance range for the discrepancy between the declared target price and that of the market. This environment gives rise to a 'tolerance trap' which impedes the convergence process and inevitably brings the market to a standstill before its reaches the targeted price and revenue objectives. OPEC's reaction to the standstill has important implications for the achievement of the target-based equilibrium and for the potential collapse of the market price. This paper examines OPEC's policy options in the tolerance trap and reveals that the optional policy in order to break this impasse and move closer to the equilibrium point is gradually to reduce output and not to flood the market. (Author)

  7. Trapped Ion Qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm

    2017-04-01

    Qubits can be encoded in clock states of trapped ions. These states are well isolated from the environment resulting in long coherence times [1] while enabling efficient high-fidelity qubit interactions mediated by the Coulomb coupled motion of the ions in the trap. Quantum states can be prepared with high fidelity and measured efficiently using fluorescence detection. State preparation and detection with 99.93% fidelity have been realized in multiple systems [1,2]. Single qubit gates have been demonstrated below rigorous fault-tolerance thresholds [1,3]. Two qubit gates have been realized with more than 99.9% fidelity [4,5]. Quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on systems of 5 to 15 qubits [6–8].

  8. Sediment Trapping in Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchard, Hans; Schuttelaars, Henk M.; Ralston, David K.

    2018-01-01

    Estuarine turbidity maxima (ETMs) are generated by a large suite of hydrodynamic and sediment dynamic processes, leading to longitudinal convergence of cross-sectionally integrated and tidally averaged transport of cohesive and noncohesive suspended particulate matter (SPM). The relative importance of these processes for SPM trapping varies substantially among estuaries depending on topography, fluvial and tidal forcing, and SPM composition. The high-frequency dynamics of ETMs are constrained by interactions with the low-frequency dynamics of the bottom pool of easily erodible sediments. Here, we use a transport decomposition to present processes that lead to convergent SPM transport, and review trapping mechanisms that lead to ETMs at the landward limit of the salt intrusion, in the freshwater zone, at topographic transitions, and by lateral processes within the cross section. We use model simulations of example estuaries to demonstrate the complex concurrence of ETM formation mechanisms. We also discuss how changes in SPM trapping mechanisms, often caused by direct human interference, can lead to the generation of hyperturbid estuaries.

  9. Light trapping architecture for photovoltaic and photodector applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lunt, Richard R.; Slootsky, Michael

    2016-08-09

    There is disclosed photovoltaic device structures which trap admitted light and recycle it through the contained photosensitive materials to maximize photoabsorption. For example, there is disclosed a photosensitive optoelectronic device comprising: a first reflective layer comprising a thermoplastic resin; a second reflective layer substantially parallel to the first reflective layer; a first transparent electrode layer on at least one of the first and second reflective layer; and a photosensitive region adjacent to the first electrode, wherein the first transparent electrode layer is substantially parallel to the first reflective layer and adjacent to the photosensitive region, and wherein the device has an exterior face transverse to the planes of the reflective layers where the exterior face has an aperture for admission of incident radiation to the interior of the device.

  10. Stable Trapping of Multielectron Helium Bubbles in a Paul Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, E. M.; Vadakkumbatt, V.; Pal, A.; Ghosh, A.

    2017-06-01

    In a recent experiment, we have used a linear Paul trap to store and study multielectron bubbles (MEBs) in liquid helium. MEBs have a charge-to-mass ratio (between 10^{-4} and 10^{-2} C/kg) which is several orders of magnitude smaller than ions (between 10^6 and 10^8 C/kg) studied in traditional ion traps. In addition, MEBs experience significant drag force while moving through the liquid. As a result, the experimental parameters for stable trapping of MEBs, such as magnitude and frequency of the applied electric fields, are very different from those used in typical ion trap experiments. The purpose of this paper is to model the motion of MEBs inside a linear Paul trap in liquid helium, determine the range of working parameters of the trap, and compare the results with experiments.

  11. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  12. Atom trap trace analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-01-01

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual 85 Kr and 81 Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10 -11 and 10 -13 , respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications

  13. Magnetic traps with a sperical separatrix: Tornado traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregood, B.P.; Lehnert, B.

    1979-11-01

    A review is given on the features of magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix, with special emphesis on Tornado spiral coil configurations. The confinement and heating of static plasmas in Tornado traps is treated, including the topology of the magnetic field structure, the magneto-mechanical properties of the magnetic coil system, as well as the particle orbits and plasma behaviour in these traps. In additio, the mode of rotating plasma operation by crossed electric and magnetic fields is being described. The results of experiments on static and rotating plasmas are summarized, and conclusions are drawn about future possibilities of Tornado traps for the creation and containment of hot plasmas. (author)

  14. Magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix: Tornado traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregood, B.P.; Lehnert, B.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given on the features of magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix, with special emphasis on Tornado spiral coil configurations. The confinement and heating of static plasms in Tornado traps is treated, including the topology of the magnetic field structure, the magneto-mechanical properties of the magnetic coil system, as well as the particle orbits and plasma behaviour in these traps. In addition, the mode of rotating plasma operation by crossed electric and magnetic fields is described. The results of experiments on static and rotating plasmas are summarized, and conclusions are drawn about future possibilities of Tornado traps in the creation and containment of hot plasmas. (orig.)

  15. Characteristics of trapped electrons and electron traps in single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzinski, E.E.; Potter, W.R.; Potienko, G.; Box, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    Two additional carbohydrates are reported whose crystal structures trap electrons intermolecularly in single crystals x irradiated at low temperature, namely sucrose and rhamnose. Five carbohydrate and polyhydroxy compounds are now known which exhibit this phenomenon. The following characteristics of the phenomenon were investigated: (1) the hyperfine couplings of the electron with protons of the polarized hydroxy groups forming the trap; (2) the distances between these protons and the trapped electron; (3) the spin density of the electron at the protons and (4) the relative stabilities of the electron trapped in various crystal structures

  16. A pentacene monolayer trapped between graphene and a substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qicheng; Peng, Boyu; Chan, Paddy Kwok Leung; Luo, Zhengtang

    2015-09-21

    A self-assembled pentacene monolayer can be fabricated between the solid-solid interface of few-layered graphene (FLG) and the mica substrate, through a diffusion-spreading method. By utilizing a transfer method that allows us to sandwich pentacene between graphene and mica, followed by controlled annealing, we enabled the diffused pentacene to be trapped in the interfaces and led to the formation of a stable monolayer. We found that the formation of a monolayer is kinetically favored by using a 2D Ising lattice gas model for pentacene trapped between the graphene-substrate interfaces. This kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results indicate that, due to the graphene substrate enclosure, the spreading of the first layer proceeds faster than the second layer, as the kinetics favors the filling of voids by molecules from the second layer. This graphene assisted monolayer assembly method provides a new avenue for the fabrication of two-dimensional monolayer structures.

  17. ATRAP - Progress Towards Trapped Antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grzonka, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zhang, Z.; Comeau, D.; Hessels, E.A.; Storry, C.H.; Gabrielse, G.; Larochelle, P.; Lesage, D.; Levitt, B.; Speck, A.; Haensch, T.W.; Pittner, H.; Walz, J.

    2005-01-01

    The ATRAP experiment at the CERN antiproton decelerator AD aims for a test of the CPT invariance by a high precision comparison of the 1s-2s transition in the hydrogen and the antihydrogen atom.Antihydrogen production is routinely operated at ATRAP and detailed studies have been performed in order to optimize the production efficiency of useful antihydrogen.For high precision measurements of atomic transitions cold antihydrogen in the ground state is required which must be trapped due to the low number of available antihydrogen atoms compared to the cold hydrogen beam used for hydrogen spectroscopy. To ensure a reasonable antihydrogen trapping efficiency a magnetic trap has to be superposed the nested Penning trap. First trapping tests of charged particles within a combined magnetic/Penning trap have started at ATRAP

  18. ATRAP Progress Towards Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Grzonka, D; Gabrielse, G; Goldenbaum, F; Hänsch, T W; Hessels, E A; Larochelle, P; Le Sage, D; Levitt, B; Oelert, W; Pittner, H; Sefzick, T; Speck, A; Storry, C H; Walz, J; Zhang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The ATRAP experiment at the CERN antiproton decelerator AD aims for a test of the CPT invariance by a high precision comparison of the 1s‐2s transition in the hydrogen and the antihydrogen atom. Antihydrogen production is routinely operated at ATRAP and detailed studies have been performed in order to optimize the production efficiency of useful antihydrogen. For high precision measurements of atomic transitions cold antihydrogen in the ground state is required which must be trapped due to the low number of available antihydrogen atoms compared to the cold hydrogen beam used for hydrogen spectroscopy. To ensure a reasonable antihydrogen trapping efficiency a magnetic trap has to be superposed the nested Penning trap. First trapping tests of charged particles within a combined magnetic/Penning trap have started at ATRAP.

  19. Calibration of optically trapped nanotools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carberry, D M; Simpson, S H; Grieve, J A; Hanna, S; Miles, M J [H H Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Wang, Y; Schaefer, H; Steinhart, M [Institute for Chemistry, University of Osnabrueck, Osnabrueck (Germany); Bowman, R; Gibson, G M; Padgett, M J, E-mail: m.j.miles@bristol.ac.uk [SUPA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Science Road, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-30

    Holographically trapped nanotools can be used in a novel form of force microscopy. By measuring the displacement of the tool in the optical traps, the contact force experienced by the probe can be inferred. In the following paper we experimentally demonstrate the calibration of such a device and show that its behaviour is independent of small changes in the relative position of the optical traps. Furthermore, we explore more general aspects of the thermal motion of the tool.

  20. Optical traps with geometric aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roichman, Yael; Waldron, Alex; Gardel, Emily; Grier, David G.

    2006-01-01

    We assess the influence of geometric aberrations on the in-plane performance of optical traps by studying the dynamics of trapped colloidal spheres in deliberately distorted holographic optical tweezers. The lateral stiffness of the traps turns out to be insensitive to moderate amounts of coma, astigmatism, and spherical aberration. Moreover holographic aberration correction enables us to compensate inherent shortcomings in the optical train, thereby adaptively improving its performance. We also demonstrate the effects of geometric aberrations on the intensity profiles of optical vortices, whose readily measured deformations suggest a method for rapidly estimating and correcting geometric aberrations in holographic trapping systems

  1. Integrated Visible Photonics for Trapped-Ion Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-10

    etch to provide a smooth oxide facet, and clearance for fiber positioning for edge input coupling. Integrated Visible Photonics for Trapped-Ion...capability to optically address individual ions at several wavelengths. We demonstrate a dual-layered silicon nitride photonic platform for integration...coherence times, strong coulomb interactions, and optical addressability, hold great promise for implementation of practical quantum information

  2. A live-trap and trapping technique for fossorial mammals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mammals. G.C. Hickman. An effective live-trap was designed for Cryptomys hottentotus .... that there is an animal in the burrow system, and to lessen the likelihood of the .... the further testing and modification of existing trap types. Not only is it ...

  3. Electron traps in semiconducting polymers : Exponential versus Gaussian trap distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H. T.; Mandoc, M. M.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2011-01-01

    The low electron currents in poly(dialkoxy-p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) derivatives and their steep voltage dependence are generally explained by trap-limited conduction in the presence of an exponential trap distribution. Here we demonstrate that the electron transport of several PPV derivatives can

  4. Electron traps in semiconducting polymers: exponential versus Gaussian trap distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H.T.; Mandoc, M.M.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The low electron currents in poly(dialkoxy-p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) derivatives and their steep voltage dependence are generally explained by trap-limited conduction in the presence of an exponential trap distribution. Here we demonstrate that the electron transport of several PPV derivatives can

  5. Engineering the mechanical properties of ultrabarrier films grown by atomic layer deposition for the encapsulation of printed electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulusu, A.; Singh, A.; Kim, H.; Wang, C. Y.; Dindar, A.; Fuentes-Hernandez, C.; Kippelen, B.; Cullen, D.; Graham, S.

    2015-01-01

    Direct deposition of barrier films by atomic layer deposition (ALD) onto printed electronics presents a promising method for packaging devices. Films made by ALD have been shown to possess desired ultrabarrier properties, but face challenges when directly grown onto surfaces with varying composition and topography. Challenges include differing nucleation and growth rates across the surface, stress concentrations from topography and coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch, elastic constant mismatch, and particle contamination that may impact the performance of the ALD barrier. In such cases, a polymer smoothing layer may be needed to coat the surface prior to ALD barrier film deposition. We present the impact of architecture on the performance of aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 )/hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) ALD nanolaminate barrier films deposited on fluorinated polymer layer using an optical calcium (Ca) test under damp heat. It is found that with increasing polymer thickness, the barrier films with residual tensile stress are prone to cracking resulting in rapid failure of the Ca sensor at 50 °C/85% relative humidity. Inserting a SiN x layer with residual compressive stress between the polymer and ALD layers is found to prevent cracking over a range of polymer thicknesses with more than 95% of the Ca sensor remaining after 500 h of testing. These results suggest that controlling mechanical properties and film architecture play an important role in the performance of direct deposited ALD barriers

  6. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  7. Detection of trapped antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hydomako, Richard [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2013-02-01

    A landmark thesis describing the first ever trapping of antihydrogen atoms in CERN's ALPHA apparatus. Opens the way to crucial tests of fundamental theories. Nominated as an outstanding contribution by the University of Calgary. In 2010, the ALPHA collaboration achieved a first for mankind: the stable, long-term storage of atomic antimatter, a project carried out a the Antiproton Decelerator facility at CERN. A crucial element of this observation was a dedicated silicon vertexing detector used to identify and analyze antihydrogen annihilations. This thesis reports the methods used to reconstruct the annihilation location. Specifically, the methods used to identify and extrapolate charged particle tracks and estimate the originating annihilation location are outlined. Finally, the experimental results demonstrating the first-ever magnetic confinement of antihydrogen atoms are presented. These results rely heavily on the silicon detector, and as such, the role of the annihilation vertex reconstruction is emphasized.

  8. Flux trapping in superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, C.; Bolore, M.; Bonin, B.; Charrier, J.P.; Daillant, B.; Gratadour, J.; Koechlin, F.; Safa, H.

    1992-01-01

    The flux trapped in various field cooled Nb and Pb samples has been measured. For ambient fields smaller than 3 Gauss, 100% of the flux is trapped. The consequences of this result on the behavior of superconducting RF cavities are discussed. (author) 12 refs.; 2 figs

  9. Injection into electron plasma traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorgadze, Vladimir; Pasquini, Thomas A.; Fajans, Joel; Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2003-01-01

    Computational studies and experimental measurements of plasma injection into a Malmberg-Penning trap reveal that the number of trapped particles can be an order of magnitude higher than predicted by a simple estimates based on a ballistic trapping model. Enhanced trapping is associated with a rich nonlinear dynamics generated by the space-charge forces of the evolving trapped electron density. A particle-in-cell simulation is used to identify the physical mechanisms that lead to the increase in trapped electrons. The simulations initially show strong two-stream interactions between the electrons emitted from the cathode and those reflected off the end plug of the trap. This is followed by virtual cathode oscillations near the injection region. As electrons are trapped, the initially hollow longitudinal phase-space is filled, and the transverse radial density profile evolves so that the plasma potential matches that of the cathode. Simple theoretical arguments are given that describe the different dynamical regimes. Good agreement is found between simulation and theory

  10. The ALPHA antihydrogen trapping apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Andresen, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M.D. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC Canada, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Bowe, P.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Capra, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Carpenter, P.T. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Cesar, C.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Escallier, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Fajans, J. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Friesen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C.; Gill, D.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); and others

    2014-01-21

    The ALPHA collaboration, based at CERN, has recently succeeded in confining cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic minimum neutral atom trap and has performed the first study of a resonant transition of the anti-atoms. The ALPHA apparatus will be described herein, with emphasis on the structural aspects, diagnostic methods and techniques that have enabled antihydrogen trapping and experimentation to be achieved.

  11. Electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Cooling and trapping of neutral atoms is a new branch of applied physics that has potential for application in many areas. The authors present an introduction to laser cooling and magnetic trapping. Some basic ideas and fundamental limitations are discussed, and the first successful experiments are reviewed. Trapping a neutral object depends on the interaction between an inhomogeneous electromagnetic field and a multiple moment that results in the exchange of kinetic for potential energy. In neutral atom traps, the potential energy must be stored as internal atomic energy, resulting in two immediate and extremely important consequences. First, the atomic energy levels will necessarily shift as the atoms move in the trap, and, second, practical traps for ground state neutral atoms atr necessarily very shallow compared to thermal energy. This small depth also dictates stringent vacuum requirements because a trapped atom cannot survive a single collision with a thermal energy background gas molecule. Neutral trapping, therefore, depends on substantial cooling of a thermal atomic sample and is inextricably connected with the cooling process

  12. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  13. Trapped surfaces in spherical stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizon, P.; Malec, E.; O'Murchadha, N.

    1988-01-01

    We give necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of trapped surfaces in spherically symmetric spacetimes. These conditions show that the formation of trapped surfaces depends on both the degree of concentration and the average flow of the matter. The result can be considered as a partial validation of the cosmic-censorship hypothesis

  14. Spin resonance with trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, Ch; Balzer, Ch; Hannemann, T; Mintert, F; Neuhauser, W; Reiss, D; Toschek, P E [Institut fuer Laser-Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 9, 20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    2003-03-14

    A modified ion trap is described where experiments (in particular related to quantum information processing) that usually require optical radiation can be carried out using microwave or radio frequency electromagnetic fields. Instead of applying the usual methods for coherent manipulation of trapped ions, a string of ions in such a modified trap can be treated like a molecule in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments taking advantage of spin-spin coupling. The collection of trapped ions can be viewed as an N-qubit molecule with adjustable spin-spin coupling constants. Given N identically prepared quantum mechanical two-level systems (qubits), the optimal strategy to estimate their quantum state requires collective measurements. Using the ground state hyperfine levels of electrodynamically trapped {sup 171}Yb{sup +}, we have implemented an adaptive algorithm for state estimation involving sequential measurements on arbitrary qubit states.

  15. Spin resonance with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Ch; Balzer, Ch; Hannemann, T; Mintert, F; Neuhauser, W; Reiss, D; Toschek, P E

    2003-01-01

    A modified ion trap is described where experiments (in particular related to quantum information processing) that usually require optical radiation can be carried out using microwave or radio frequency electromagnetic fields. Instead of applying the usual methods for coherent manipulation of trapped ions, a string of ions in such a modified trap can be treated like a molecule in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments taking advantage of spin-spin coupling. The collection of trapped ions can be viewed as an N-qubit molecule with adjustable spin-spin coupling constants. Given N identically prepared quantum mechanical two-level systems (qubits), the optimal strategy to estimate their quantum state requires collective measurements. Using the ground state hyperfine levels of electrodynamically trapped 171 Yb + , we have implemented an adaptive algorithm for state estimation involving sequential measurements on arbitrary qubit states

  16. Modeling of radiation-induced charge trapping in MOS devices under ionizing irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petukhov, M. A., E-mail: m.a.petukhov@gmail.com; Ryazanov, A. I. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The numerical model of the radiation-induced charge trapping process in the oxide layer of a MOS device under ionizing irradiation is developed; the model includes carrier transport, hole capture by traps in different states, recombination of free electrons and trapped holes, kinetics of hydrogen ions which can be accumulated in the material during transistor manufacture, and accumulation and charging of interface states. Modeling of n-channel MOSFET behavior under 1 MeV photon irradiation is performed. The obtained dose dependences of the threshold voltage shift and its contributions from trapped holes and interface states are in good agreement with experimental data.

  17. Photonic crystals for light trapping in solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjessing, Jo

    2012-07-25

    Solar energy is an abundant and non-polluting source of energy. Nevertheless, the installation of solar cells for energy production is still dependent on subsidies in most parts of the world. One way of reducing the costs of solar cells is to decrease their thickness. This will reduce material consumption and, at the same time, unlock the possibility of using cheaper lower quality solar cell material. However, a thinner solar cell will have a higher optical loss due to insufficient absorption of long wavelength light. Therefore, light-trapping must be improved in order to make thin solar cells economically viable. In this thesis I investigate the potential for light-trapping in thin silicon solar cells by the use of various photonic crystal back-side structures. The first structure I study consists of a periodic array of cylinders in a configuration with a layer of silicon oxide separating the periodic structure from the rear metal reflector. This configuration reduces unwanted parasitic absorption in the reflector and the thickness of the oxide layer provides a new degree of freedom for improving light trapping from the structure. I use a large-period and a small-period approximation to analyze the cylinder structure and to identify criteria that contributes to successful light-trapping. I explore the light-trapping potential of various periodic structures including dimples, inverted pyramids, and cones. The structures are compared in an optical model using a 20 m thick Si slab. I find that the light trapping potential differs between the structures, that the unit cell dimensions for the given structure is more important for light trapping than the type of structure, and that the optimum lattice period does not differ significantly between the different structures. The light-trapping effect of the structures is investigated as a function on incidence angle. The structures provide good light trapping also under angles of incidence up to 60 degrees. The behavior

  18. Photonic crystals for light trapping in solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjessing, Jo

    2012-01-01

    Solar energy is an abundant and non-polluting source of energy. Nevertheless, the installation of solar cells for energy production is still dependent on subsidies in most parts of the world. One way of reducing the costs of solar cells is to decrease their thickness. This will reduce material consumption and, at the same time, unlock the possibility of using cheaper lower quality solar cell material. However, a thinner solar cell will have a higher optical loss due to insufficient absorption of long wavelength light. Therefore, light-trapping must be improved in order to make thin solar cells economically viable. In this thesis I investigate the potential for light-trapping in thin silicon solar cells by the use of various photonic crystal back-side structures. The first structure I study consists of a periodic array of cylinders in a configuration with a layer of silicon oxide separating the periodic structure from the rear metal reflector. This configuration reduces unwanted parasitic absorption in the reflector and the thickness of the oxide layer provides a new degree of freedom for improving light trapping from the structure. I use a large-period and a small-period approximation to analyze the cylinder structure and to identify criteria that contributes to successful light-trapping. I explore the light-trapping potential of various periodic structures including dimples, inverted pyramids, and cones. The structures are compared in an optical model using a 20 m thick Si slab. I find that the light trapping potential differs between the structures, that the unit cell dimensions for the given structure is more important for light trapping than the type of structure, and that the optimum lattice period does not differ significantly between the different structures. The light-trapping effect of the structures is investigated as a function on incidence angle. The structures provide good light trapping also under angles of incidence up to 60 degrees. The behavior

  19. Charge trapping at organic/self-assembly molecule interfaces studied by electrical switching behaviour in a crosspoint structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yun; Pan Lijia; Pu Lin; Shi Yi; Liu Chuan; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2012-01-01

    Charge trapping at organic/self-assembly molecule (SAM) interfaces is studied by the electrical switching behaviour in a crosspoint structure, where interfacial charge trapping tunes the potential barrier of the SAM layer. The sample with rubrene exhibits the write-once read-many-times memory effect, which is due to the interfacial charges trapped at deep states. On the other hand, the sample with 2-amino-4,5-dicyanoimidazole presents recyclable conduction transition, which results from the trapped charges distributed at shallow states. Moreover, the percentage of the charges trapped at shallow states can be estimated from electrical transition levels. (paper)

  20. Charge trapping at organic/self-assembly molecule interfaces studied by electrical switching behaviour in a crosspoint structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Liu, Chuan; Pan, Lijia; Pu, Lin; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Shi, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Charge trapping at organic/self-assembly molecule (SAM) interfaces is studied by the electrical switching behaviour in a crosspoint structure, where interfacial charge trapping tunes the potential barrier of the SAM layer. The sample with rubrene exhibits the write-once read-many-times memory effect, which is due to the interfacial charges trapped at deep states. On the other hand, the sample with 2-amino-4,5-dicyanoimidazole presents recyclable conduction transition, which results from the trapped charges distributed at shallow states. Moreover, the percentage of the charges trapped at shallow states can be estimated from electrical transition levels.

  1. Origin and behavior of main electron traps in Si-implanted GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Z.Q.; Yamamoto, H.; Look, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    The electron traps in Si-implanted active layers (n ∼ 10 17 cm -3 ) have been studied by capacitance and conductance DLTS techniques in conjunction with different anneal conditions, which include rapid thermal anneals at different temperatures and furnace anneals with Si 3 N 4 cap or capless in an AsH 3 atmosphere. As compared to the electron traps in as-grown bulk n-GaAs (n ∼ 4 x 10 16 cm -3 ), nearly the same electron traps, i.e. EL2, EL3, EL4, EL5, EL6, and EL9 can be observed in the Si-implanted layers. Through a comparison with the annealing behavior of the main electron traps in bulk n-GaAs, the processing associated origins of some of the traps (EL2, EL3, EL4, EL5 and EL9) observed in Si-implanted GaAs layers have been determined. For some Si-implanted capped with Si 3 N 4 and furnace annealed, traps EL3 and EL4 dominate the trap EL2. In such layers it is found that emission due to EL3 is reduced while emission from EL12 is augmented by increasing the filling pulse width from 10 μs to 5 x 10 3 μs. In this paper phenomenon is explained in terms of a defect reaction enhanced by electron capture, showing a metastability or bistability

  2. Trapping tsetse flies on water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laveissière C.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Riverine tsetse flies such as Glossina palpalis gambiensis and G. tachinoides are the vectors of human and animal trypanosomoses in West Africa. Despite intimate links between tsetse and water, to our knowledge there has never been any attempt to design trapping devices that would catch tsetse on water. In mangrove (Guinea one challenging issue is the tide, because height above the ground for a trap is a key factor affecting tsetse catches. The trap was mounted on the remains of an old wooden dugout, and attached with rope to nearby branches, thereby allowing it to rise and fall with the tide. Catches showed a very high density of 93.9 flies/”water-trap”/day, which was significantly higher (p < 0.05 than all the catches from other habitats where the classical trap had been used. In savannah, on the Comoe river of South Burkina Faso, the biconical trap was mounted on a small wooden raft anchored to a stone, and catches were compared with the classical biconical trap put on the shores. G. p. gambiensis and G. tachinoides densities were not significantly different from those from the classical biconical one. The adaptations described here have allowed to efficiently catch tsetse on the water, which to our knowledge is reported here for the first time. This represents a great progress and opens new opportunities to undertake studies on the vectors of trypanosomoses in mangrove areas of Guinea, which are currently the areas showing the highest prevalences of sleeping sickness in West Africa. It also has huge potential for tsetse control using insecticide impregnated traps in savannah areas where traps become less efficient in rainy season. The Guinean National control programme has already expressed its willingness to use such modified traps in its control campaigns in Guinea, as has the national PATTEC programme in Burkina Faso during rainy season.

  3. Status of THe-Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streubel, Sebastian; Eronen, Tommi; Hoecker, Martin; Ketter, Jochen; Blaum, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Van Dyck, Robert S. Jr. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    THe-Trap (short for Tritium-{sup 3}He Trap) is a Penning-trap setup dedicated to measure the {sup 3}H to {sup 3}He mass-ratio with a relative uncertainty of better than 10{sup -11}. The ratio is of relevance for the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN), which aims to measure the electron anti-neutrino mass, by measuring the shape of the β-decay energy spectrum close to its endpoint. An independent measurement of the {sup 3}H to {sup 3}He mass-ratio pins down this endpoint, and thus will help to determine the systematics of KATRIN. The trap setup consists of two Penning-traps: One trap for precision measurements, the other trap for ion storage. Ideally, the trap content will be periodically switched, which reduces the time between the measurements of the two ions' motional frequencies. In 2012, a mass ratio measurement of {sup 12}C{sup 4+} to {sup 14}N{sup 5+} was performed to characterize systematic effects of the traps. This measurement yielded a accuracy of 10{sup -9}. Further investigations revealed that a major reason for the modest accuracy is the large axial amplitude of ∼100 μm, compared to a ideal case of 3 μm at 4 K. In addition, relative magnetic fluctuations at a 3 x 10{sup -10} level on a 10 h timescale need to be significantly improved. In this contribution, the aforementioned findings and further systematic studies will be presented.

  4. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  5. Urban fall traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia de Almeida Valsecchi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the repercussion of falls in the elderly peoplewho live in the city of São Paulo and address - though synthetically- some questions regarding the city and its relation to aging and thequality of life of the elderly. Methods: This is a qualitative study. As fordata collection, “in-depth individual interviews” were applied. Selectionof subjects was guided by a procedure named as “network”. Results:Ten interviews were performed, nine with elderly individuals who werevictims of falls and one with a public authority representative. Dataresulting from interviews confirmed that significant changes occurin live of the elderly, who are victims of what has been called “urbantraps”, and that, by extrapolating mobility and dependence contexts,invade feelings, emotions and desires. The inappropriate environmentprovided by the city of São Paulo is confirmed by absence of adequateurban planning and lack of commitment of public authorities. It alsorevealed that the particular way of being old and living an elderlylife, in addition to right to citizenship, is reflected by major or lesserdifficulties imposed to the elderly to fight for their rights and have theirpublic space respected. Conclusion: The city of São Paulo is not anideal locus for an older person to live in. To the traps that are found inpublic places one can add those that are found in private places andthat contribute to the hard experience of falls among the elderly, anexperience that is sometimes fatal. In Brazil, the attention is basicallyfocused on the consequences of falls and not on prevention, by meansof urban planning that should meet the needs of the most vulnerablegroups - the physically disabled and the elderly.

  6. Innovation: the classic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    these traps.

  7. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  8. Charged particle traps II applications

    CERN Document Server

    Werth, Günther; Major, Fouad G

    2009-01-01

    This, the second volume of Charged Particle Traps, is devoted to applications, complementing the first volume’s comprehensive treatment of the theory and practice of charged particle traps, their many variants and refinements. In recent years, applications of far reaching importance have emerged ranging from the ultra-precise mass determinations of elementary particles and their antiparticles and short-lived isotopes, to high-resolution Zeeman spectroscopy on multiply-charged ions, to microwave and optical spectroscopy, some involving "forbidden" transitions from metastable states of such high resolution that optical frequency standards are realized by locking lasers to them. Further the potential application of trapped ions to quantum computing is explored, based on the extraordinary quantum state coherence made possible by the particle isolation. Consideration is given to the Paul and Penning traps as potential quantum information processors.

  9. Holes in magneto electrostatic traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.

    1996-01-01

    We observe that in magneto electrostatic confinement (MEC) devices the magnetic surfaces are not always equipotentials. The lack of symmetry in the equipotential surfaces can result in holes in MEC plasma traps. (author)

  10. Trapping Triatominae in Silvatic Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noireau François

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale trials of a trapping system designed to collect silvatic Triatominae are reported. Live-baited adhesive traps were tested in various ecosystems and different triatomine habitats (arboreal and terrestrial. The trials were always successful, with a rate of positive habitats generally over 20% and reaching 48.4% for palm trees of the Amazon basin. Eleven species of Triatominae belonging to the three genera of public health importance (Triatoma, Rhodnius and Panstrongylus were captured. This trapping system provides an effective way to detect the presence of triatomines in terrestrial and arboreal silvatic habitats and represents a promising tool for ecological studies. Various lines of research are contemplated to improve the performance of this trapping system.

  11. Rapid localized crystallization of lysozyme by laser trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuyama, Ken-Ichi; Chang, Kai-Di; Tu, Jing-Ru; Masuhara, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Teruki

    2018-02-28

    Confining protein crystallization to a millimetre size was achieved within 0.5 h after stopping 1 h intense trapping laser irradiation, which shows excellent performance in spatial and temporal controllability compared to spontaneous nucleation. A continuous-wave near-infrared laser beam is tightly focused into a glass/solution interfacial layer of a supersaturated buffer solution of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL). The crystallization is not observed during laser trapping, but initiated by stopping the laser irradiation. The generated crystals are localized densely in a circular area with a diameter of a few millimetres around the focal spot and show specific directions of the optical axes of the HEWL crystals. To interpret this unique crystallization, we propose a mechanism that nucleation and the subsequent growth take place in a highly concentrated domain consisting of HEWL liquid-like clusters after turning off laser trapping.

  12. Proximity effect in normal-superconductor hybrids for quasiparticle traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Amin [Peter Grunberg Institute (PGI-2), Forschungszentrum Julich, D-52425 Julich (Germany); JARA-Institute for Quantum Information, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Coherent transport of charges in the form of Cooper pairs is the main feature of Josephson junctions which plays a central role in superconducting qubits. However, the presence of quasiparticles in superconducting devices may lead to incoherent charge transfer and limit the coherence time of superconducting qubits. A way around this so-called ''quasiparticle poisoning'' might be using a normal-metal island to trap quasiparticles; this has motivated us to revisit the proximity effect in normal-superconductor hybrids. Using the semiclassical Usadel equations, we study the density of states (DoS) both within and away from the trap. We find that in the superconducting layer the DoS quickly approaches the BCS form; this indicates that normal-metal traps should be effective at localizing quasiparticles.

  13. Fundamental limit of nanophotonic light trapping in solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zongfu; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2010-10-12

    Establishing the fundamental limit of nanophotonic light-trapping schemes is of paramount importance and is becoming increasingly urgent for current solar cell research. The standard theory of light trapping demonstrated that absorption enhancement in a medium cannot exceed a factor of 4n(2)/sin(2)θ, where n is the refractive index of the active layer, and θ is the angle of the emission cone in the medium surrounding the cell. This theory, however, is not applicable in the nanophotonic regime. Here we develop a statistical temporal coupled-mode theory of light trapping based on a rigorous electromagnetic approach. Our theory reveals that the conventional limit can be substantially surpassed when optical modes exhibit deep-subwavelength-scale field confinement, opening new avenues for highly efficient next-generation solar cells.

  14. Science, conservation, and camera traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas; O'Connel, Allan F.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    Biologists commonly perceive camera traps as a new tool that enables them to enter the hitherto secret world of wild animals. Camera traps are being used in a wide range of studies dealing with animal ecology, behavior, and conservation. Our intention in this volume is not to simply present the various uses of camera traps, but to focus on their use in the conduct of science and conservation. In this chapter, we provide an overview of these two broad classes of endeavor and sketch the manner in which camera traps are likely to be able to contribute to them. Our main point here is that neither photographs of individual animals, nor detection history data, nor parameter estimates generated from detection histories are the ultimate objective of a camera trap study directed at either science or management. Instead, the ultimate objectives are best viewed as either gaining an understanding of how ecological systems work (science) or trying to make wise decisions that move systems from less desirable to more desirable states (conservation, management). Therefore, we briefly describe here basic approaches to science and management, emphasizing the role of field data and associated analyses in these processes. We provide examples of ways in which camera trap data can inform science and management.

  15. Status of THe-trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketter, Jochen; Eronen, Tommi; Hoecker, Martin; Streubel, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Van Dyck, Robert S. Jr. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Originally developed at the University of Washington and relocated to the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in 2008, the Penning-trap spectrometer THe-Trap is specially tailored for a {sup 3}H/{sup 3}He mass-ratio measurement, from which the Q-value of the beta-decay of {sup 3}H to {sup 3}He can be derived. Improving the current best value by at least an order of magnitude will provide an important independent test parameter for the determination of the electron-antineutrino's mass by the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment (KATRIN). However, Penning-trap mass spectrometry has to be pushed to its limits in a dedicated experiment for a sufficiently accurate mass-ratio measurement with a relative uncertainty of 10{sup -11}. Unlike the closed-envelope, single-trap predecessor, the new spectrometer features an external ion source, owing to the radioactive nature of tritium, and two traps in order to speed up the measurement cycle. While the double-trap technique holds great promise, it also calls for more intricate procedures, such as ion transfer. Details about the recent progress of the experiment are given.

  16. Modification of SnO2 Anodes by Atomic Layer Deposition for High Performance Lithium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Yesibolati, Nulati

    2013-05-01

    Tin dioxide (SnO2) is considered one of the most promising anode materials for Lithium ion batteries (LIBs), due to its large theoretical capacity and natural abundance. However, its low electronic/ionic conductivities, large volume change during lithiation/delithiation and agglomeration prevent it from further commercial applications. In this thesis, we investigate modified SnO2 as a high energy density anode material for LIBs. Specifically two approaches are presented to improve battery performances. Firstly, SnO2 electrochemical performances were improved by surface modification using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Ultrathin Al2O3 or HfO2 were coated on SnO2 electrodes. It was found that electrochemical performances had been enhanced after ALD deposition. In a second approach, we implemented a layer-by-layer (LBL) assembled graphene/carbon-coated hollow SnO2 spheres as anode material for LIBs. Our results indicated that the LBL assembled electrodes had high reversible lithium storage capacities even at high current densities. These superior electrochemical performances are attributed to the enhanced electronic conductivity and effective lithium diffusion, because of the interconnected graphene/carbon networks among nanoparticles of the hollow SnO2 spheres.

  17. An optical trap for relativistic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ping; Saleh, Ned; Chen Shouyuan; Sheng Zhengming; Umstadter, Donald

    2003-01-01

    The first optical trap capable of confining relativistic electrons, with kinetic energy ≤350 keV was created by the interference of spatially and temporally overlapping terawatt power, 400 fs duration laser pulses (≤2.4x10 18 W/cm 2 ) in plasma. Analysis and computer simulation predicted that the plasma density was greatly modulated, reaching a peak density up to 10 times the background density (n e /n 0 ∼10) at the interference minima. Associated with this charge displacement, a direct-current electrostatic field of strength of ∼2x10 11 eV/m was excited. These predictions were confirmed experimentally by Thomson and Raman scattering diagnostics. Also confirmed were predictions that the electron density grating acted as a multi-layer mirror to transfer energy between the crossed laser beams, resulting in the power of the weaker laser beam being nearly 50% increased. Furthermore, it was predicted that the optical trap acted to heat electrons, increasing their temperature by two orders of magnitude. The experimental results showed that the number of high energy electrons accelerated along the direction of one of the laser beams was enhanced by a factor of 3 and electron temperature was increased ∼100 keV as compared with single-beam illumination

  18. Effect of light trapping in an amorphous silicon solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iftiquar, S.M.; Jung, Juyeon; Park, Hyeongsik; Cho, Jaehyun; Shin, Chonghoon; Park, Jinjoo; Jung, Junhee; Bong, Sungjae; Kim, Sunbo; Yi, Junsin

    2015-01-01

    Light trapping in amorphous silicon based solar cell has been investigated theoretically. The substrate for these cells can be textured, including pyramidally textured c-Si wafer, to improve capture of incident light. A thin silver layer, deposited on the substrate of an n–i–p cell, ultimately goes at the back of the cell structure and can act a back reflector to improve light trapping. The two physical solar cells we investigated had open circuit voltages (V oc ) of 0.87, 0.90 V, short circuit current densities (J sc ) of 14.2, 15.36 mA/cm 2 respectively. The first cell was investigated for the effect on its performance while having and not having light trapping scheme (LT), when thickness of the active layer (d i ) was changed in the range of 100 nm to 800 nm. In both the approaches, for having or not having LT, the short circuit current density increases with d i while the V oc and fill factor, decreases steadily. However, maximum cell efficiency can be obtained when d i = 400 nm, and hence it was considered optimized thickness of the active layer, that was used for further investigation. With the introduction of light trapping to the second cell, it shows a further enhancement in J sc and red response of the external quantum efficiency to 16.6 mA/cm 2 and by 11.1% respectively. Considering multiple passages of light inside the cell, we obtained an improvement in cell efficiency from 9.7% to 10.6%. - Highlights: • A theoretical analysis of light trapping in p–i–n and n–i–p type solar cells • J sc increases and V oc decreases with the increase in i-layer thickness. • Observed optimized thickness of i-layer as 400 nm • J sc improved from 15.4 mA/cm 2 to 16.6 mA/cm 2 due to the light trapping. • Efficiency (η) improved from 9.7% to 10.6% due to better red response of the EQE

  19. Subthreshold slope as a measure of interfacial trap density in pentacene films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Yongwoo; Park, Byoungnam

    2016-01-01

    Electrical properties in organic field effect transistors (FETs) are dominated by charge transport in the accumulation layer, few molecular layers close to the gate dielectric. Through comparison of the subthreshold slope between monolayer (ML) and thick pentacene FETs, formation of the second layer islands on top of the complete first layer is found to be crucial in determining the charge transport in ML pentacene FETs. It is demonstrated that a pentacene ML field effect transistor (FET) is an excellent probe that can detect electronic states of organic semiconductors interfacing with the gate dielectric at nanometer scale. Far higher sub-threshold slope in ML FETs, as a measure of interfacial charge trap density, than that in thick pentacene FETs is translated that the path of the induced carriers in ML FETs is limited into the molecular layer interfacing with the gate dielectric with a high density of charge traps, while carriers in thicker films have alternative pathways through more electrically conductive layer above the first layer with much less trap density. - Highlights: • Sub-threshold slope is demonstrated to be a measure of interface traps. • For application to sensors, effective charge transport layer should be chosen. • Monolayer transistors can be used as a platform for probing localized states.

  20. Subthreshold slope as a measure of interfacial trap density in pentacene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Yongwoo; Park, Byoungnam, E-mail: metalpbn@hongik.ac.kr

    2016-01-29

    Electrical properties in organic field effect transistors (FETs) are dominated by charge transport in the accumulation layer, few molecular layers close to the gate dielectric. Through comparison of the subthreshold slope between monolayer (ML) and thick pentacene FETs, formation of the second layer islands on top of the complete first layer is found to be crucial in determining the charge transport in ML pentacene FETs. It is demonstrated that a pentacene ML field effect transistor (FET) is an excellent probe that can detect electronic states of organic semiconductors interfacing with the gate dielectric at nanometer scale. Far higher sub-threshold slope in ML FETs, as a measure of interfacial charge trap density, than that in thick pentacene FETs is translated that the path of the induced carriers in ML FETs is limited into the molecular layer interfacing with the gate dielectric with a high density of charge traps, while carriers in thicker films have alternative pathways through more electrically conductive layer above the first layer with much less trap density. - Highlights: • Sub-threshold slope is demonstrated to be a measure of interface traps. • For application to sensors, effective charge transport layer should be chosen. • Monolayer transistors can be used as a platform for probing localized states.

  1. Light Trapping with Silicon Light Funnel Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Prajapati

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Silicon light funnels are three-dimensional subwavelength structures in the shape of inverted cones with respect to the incoming illumination. Light funnel (LF arrays can serve as efficient absorbing layers on account of their light trapping capabilities, which are associated with the presence of high-density complex Mie modes. Specifically, light funnel arrays exhibit broadband absorption enhancement of the solar spectrum. In the current study, we numerically explore the optical coupling between surface light funnel arrays and the underlying substrates. We show that the absorption in the LF array-substrate complex is higher than the absorption in LF arrays of the same height (~10% increase. This, we suggest, implies that a LF array serves as an efficient surface element that imparts additional momentum components to the impinging illumination, and hence optically excites the substrate by near-field light concentration, excitation of traveling guided modes in the substrate, and mode hybridization.

  2. Faradaic AC Electrokinetic Flow and Particle Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Yuxing; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2004-11-01

    Faradaic reaction at higher voltages can produce co-ion polarization at AC electrodes instead of counter-ion polarization due to capacitive charging from the bulk. The Faradaic co-ion polarization also does not screen the external field and hence can produce large net electro-kinetic flows at frequencies lower than the inverse RC time of the double layer. Due to the opposite polarization of capacitve and Faradaic charging, we can reverse the direction of AC flows on electrodes by changing the voltage and frequency. Particles and bacteria are trapped and then dispersed at stagnation lines, at locations predicted by our theory, by using these two flows sequentially. This technique offers a good way to concentrate and detect bacteria.

  3. A magnetic particle micro-trap for large trapping surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.

    2012-01-08

    Manipulation of micron-size magnetic particles of the superparamagnetic type contributes significantly in many applications like controlling the antibody/antigen binding process in immunoassays. Specifically, more target biomolecules can be attached/tagged and analyzed since the three dimensional structure of the magnetic particles increases the surface to volume ratio. Additionally, such biomolecular-tagged magnetic particles can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic behavior. Therefore, magnetic particle- based immunoassays are extensively applied in micro-flow cytometry. The design of a square-loop micro-trap as a magnetic particle manipulator as well as numerical and experimental analysis is presented. Experimental results showed that the micro-trap could successfully trap and concentrate magnetic particles from a large to a small area with a high spatial range.

  4. A magnetic particle micro-trap for large trapping surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Liang, Cai; Giouroudi, Ioanna; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2012-01-01

    Manipulation of micron-size magnetic particles of the superparamagnetic type contributes significantly in many applications like controlling the antibody/antigen binding process in immunoassays. Specifically, more target biomolecules can be attached/tagged and analyzed since the three dimensional structure of the magnetic particles increases the surface to volume ratio. Additionally, such biomolecular-tagged magnetic particles can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic behavior. Therefore, magnetic particle- based immunoassays are extensively applied in micro-flow cytometry. The design of a square-loop micro-trap as a magnetic particle manipulator as well as numerical and experimental analysis is presented. Experimental results showed that the micro-trap could successfully trap and concentrate magnetic particles from a large to a small area with a high spatial range.

  5. Particle trapping in stimulated scattering processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karttunen, S.J.; Heikkinen, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Particle trapping effects on stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering are investigated. A time and space dependent model assumes a Maxwellian plasma which is taken to be homogeneous in the interaction region. Ion trapping has a rather weak effect on stimulated Brillouin scattering and large reflectivities are obtained even in strong trapping regime. Stimulated Raman scattering is considerably reduced by electron trapping. Typically 15-20 times larger laser intensities are required to obtain same reflectivity levels than without trapping. (author)

  6. Calcium Atom Trap for Atom Trap Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kwang Hoon; Park, Hyun Min; Han, Jae Min; Kim, Taek Soo; Cha, Yong Ho; Lim, Gwon; Jeong, Do Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Trace isotope analysis has been an important role in science, archaeological dating, geology, biology and nuclear industry. Artificially produced fission products such as Sr-90, Cs-135 and Kr-85 can be released to the environment when nuclear accident occurs and the reprocessing factory operates. Thus, the analysis of them has been of interest in nuclear industry. But it is difficult to detect them due to low natural abundance less then 10-10. The ultra-trace radio isotopes have been analyzed by the radio-chemical method, accelerator mass spectrometer, and laser based method. The radiochemical method has been used in the nuclear industry. But this method has disadvantages of long measurement time for long lived radioisotopes and toxic chemical process for the purification. The accelerator mass spectrometer has high isotope selectivity, but the system is huge and it has the isobar effects. The laser based method, such as RIMS (Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry) is a basically isobar-effect free method. Recently, ATTA (Atom Trap Trace Analysis), one of the laser based method, has been successfully demonstrated sufficient isotope selectivity with small system size. It has been applied for the detection of Kr-81 and Kr-85. However, it is not suitable for real sample detection, because it requires steady atomic beam generation during detection and is not allowed simultaneous detection of other isotopes. Therefore, we proposed the coupled method of Atom Trap and Mass Spectrometer. It consists of three parts, neutral atom trap, ionization and mass spectrometer. In this paper, we present the demonstration of the magneto-optical trap of neutral calcium. We discuss the isotope selective characteristics of the MOT (Magneto Optical Trap) of calcium by the fluorescence measurement. In addition, the frequency stabilization of the trap beam will be presented

  7. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear β decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left up to other presenters

  8. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, J A

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear beta decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left...

  9. Trapped atoms along nanophotonic resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Brian; Kim, May; Chang, Tzu-Han; Hung, Chen-Lung

    2017-04-01

    Many-body systems subject to long-range interactions have remained a very challenging topic experimentally. Ultracold atoms trapped in extreme proximity to the surface of nanophotonic structures provides a dynamic system combining the strong atom-atom interactions mediated by guided mode photons with the exquisite control implemented with trapped atom systems. The hybrid system promises pair-wise tunability of long-range interactions between atomic pseudo spins, allowing studies of quantum magnetism extending far beyond nearest neighbor interactions. In this talk, we will discuss our current status developing high quality nanophotonic ring resonators, engineered on CMOS compatible optical chips with integrated nanostructures that, in combination with a side illuminating beam, can realize stable atom traps approximately 100nm above the surface. We will report on our progress towards loading arrays of cold atoms near the surface of these structures and studying atom-atom interaction mediated by photons with high cooperativity.

  10. Kinetic model of the bichromatic dark trap for atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, I. V.

    2017-08-01

    A kinetic model of atom confinement in a bichromatic dark trap (BDT) is developed with the goal of describing its dissipative properties. The operating principle of the deep BDT is based on using the combination of multiple bichromatic cosine-Gaussian optical beams (CGBs) for creating high-potential barriers, which is described in our previous work (Krasnov 2016 Laser Phys. 26 105501). In the indicated work, particle motion in the BDT is described in terms of classical trajectories. In the present study, particle motion is analyzed by means of the Wigner function (phase-space distribution function (DF)), which allows one to properly take into account the quantum fluctuations of optical forces. Besides, we consider an improved scheme of the BDT, where CGBs create, apart from plane potential barriers, a narrow cooling layer. We find an asymptotic solution of the Fokker-Planck equation for the DF and show that the DF of particles deeply trapped in a BDT with a cooling layer is the Tsallis distribution with the effective temperature, which can be considerably lower than in a BDT without a cooling layer. Moreover, it can be adjusted by slightly changing the CGBs’ radii. We also study the effect of particle escape from the trap due to the scattering of resonant photons and show that the particle lifetime in a BDT can exceed several tens of hours when it is limited by photon scattering.

  11. Quantized motion of trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, J.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with a theoretical and numerical study of the preparation and coherent manipulation of quantum states in the external and internal degrees of freedom of trapped ions. In its first part, this thesis proposes and investigates schemes for generating several nonclassical states for the quantized vibrational motion of a trapped ion. Based on dark state preparation specific laser excitation configurations are presented which, given appropriately chosen initial states, realize the desired motional states in the steady-state, indicated by the cessation of the fluorescence emitted by the ion. The focus is on the SU(1,1) intelligent states in both their single- and two-mode realization, corresponding to one- and two-dimensional motion of the ion. The presented schemes are also studied numerically using a Monte-Carlo state-vector method. The second part of the thesis describes how two vibrational degrees of freedom of a single trapped ion can be coupled through the action of suitably chosen laser excitation. Concentrating on a two-dimensional ion trap with dissimilar vibrational frequencies a variety of quantized two-mode couplings are derived. The focus is on a linear coupling that takes excitations from one mode to another. It is demonstrated how this can result in a state rotation, in which it is possible to coherently transfer the motional state of the ion between orthogonal directions without prior knowledge of that motional state. The third part of this thesis presents a new efficient method for generating maximally entangled internal states of a collection of trapped ions. The method is deterministic and independent of the number of ions in the trap. As the essential element of the scheme a mechanism for the realization of a controlled NOT operation that can operate on multiple ions is proposed. The potential application of the scheme for high-precision frequency standards is explored. (author)

  12. Open trap with ambipolar mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimov, G.I.; Zakajdakov, V.V.; Kishinevskij, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    Results of numerical calculations on the behaviour of a thermonuclear plasma, allowing for α-particles in a trap with longitudinal confinement of the main ions by ambipolar electric fields are presented. This trap is formed by connecting two small-volume ''mirrortrons'' to an ordinary open trap. Into the extreme mirrortrons, approximately 1-MeV ions are introduced continuously by ionization of atomic beams on the plasma, and approximately 10-keV ions are similarly introduced into the main central region of the trap. By a suitable choice of injection currents, the plasma density established in the extreme mirrortrons is higher than in the central region. As a result of the quasi-neutrality condition, a longitudinal ambipolar field forming a potential well not only for electrons but also for the central ions is formed in the plasma. When the depth of the well for the central ions is much greater than their temperature, their life-time considerably exceeds the time of confinement by the magnetic mirrors. As a result, the plasma density is constant over the entire length of the central mirrortron, including the regions near the mirrors, and an ambipolar field is formed only in the extreme mirrortrons. The distribution of central ions and ambipolar potential in the extreme mirrortrons is uniquely determined by the density distribution of fast extreme ions. It is shown in the present study that an amplification coefficient Q as high as desired can, in principle, be reached in the trap under consideration, allowing for α-particles. However, this requires high magnetic fields in the mirrors and a sufficient length of the central mirrotron. It is shown that for moderate values of Q=3-8, it is desirable not to confine the central fast α-particles. To achieve a coefficient of Q=5, it is necessary to create fields of 250 kG in the mirrors, and the length of the trap must not be greater than 100 m. (author)

  13. Ion trap architectures and new directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siverns, James D.; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2017-12-01

    Trapped ion technology has seen advances in performance, robustness and versatility over the last decade. With increasing numbers of trapped ion groups worldwide, a myriad of trap architectures are currently in use. Applications of trapped ions include: quantum simulation, computing and networking, time standards and fundamental studies in quantum dynamics. Design of such traps is driven by these various research aims, but some universally desirable properties have lead to the development of ion trap foundries. Additionally, the excellent control achievable with trapped ions and the ability to do photonic readout has allowed progress on quantum networking using entanglement between remotely situated ion-based nodes. Here, we present a selection of trap architectures currently in use by the community and present their most salient characteristics, identifying features particularly suited for quantum networking. We also discuss our own in-house research efforts aimed at long-distance trapped ion networking.

  14. Artificial covering on trap nests improves the colonization of trap-nesting wasps

    OpenAIRE

    Taki, Hisatomo; Kevan, Peter G.; Viana, Blandina Felipe; Silva, Fabiana O.; Buck, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Acesso restrito: Texto completo. p. 225-229 To evaluate the role that a trap-nest cover might have on sampling methodologies, the abundance of each species of trap-nesting Hymenoptera and the parasitism rate in a Canadian forest were compared between artificially covered and uncovered traps. Of trap tubes exposed at eight forest sites in six trap-nest boxes, 531 trap tubes were occupied and 1216 individuals of 12 wasp species of four predatory families, Vespidae (Eumeninae), Crabronidae...

  15. Atomic layer deposition of perovskite oxides and their epitaxial integration with Si, Ge, and other semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, Martin D.; Ngo, Thong Q.; Hu, Shen; Ekerdt, John G.; Posadas, Agham; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a proven technique for the conformal deposition of oxide thin films with nanoscale thickness control. Most successful industrial applications have been with binary oxides, such as Al 2 O 3 and HfO 2 . However, there has been much effort to deposit ternary oxides, such as perovskites (ABO 3 ), with desirable properties for advanced thin film applications. Distinct challenges are presented by the deposition of multi-component oxides using ALD. This review is intended to highlight the research of the many groups that have deposited perovskite oxides by ALD methods. Several commonalities between the studies are discussed. Special emphasis is put on precursor selection, deposition temperatures, and specific property performance (high-k, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, etc.). Finally, the monolithic integration of perovskite oxides with semiconductors by ALD is reviewed. High-quality epitaxial growth of oxide thin films has traditionally been limited to physical vapor deposition techniques (e.g., molecular beam epitaxy). However, recent studies have demonstrated that epitaxial oxide thin films may be deposited on semiconductor substrates using ALD. This presents an exciting opportunity to integrate functional perovskite oxides for advanced semiconductor applications in a process that is economical and scalable

  16. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Michael A [Albuquerque, NM; Blain, Matthew G [Albuquerque, NM; Tigges, Chris P [Albuquerque, NM; Linker, Kevin L [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  17. Asymmetric Penning trap coherent states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras-Astorga, Alonso; Fernandez, David J.

    2010-01-01

    By using a matrix technique, which allows to identify directly the ladder operators, the coherent states of the asymmetric Penning trap are derived as eigenstates of the appropriate annihilation operators. They are compared with those obtained through the displacement operator method.

  18. Indeterminacy, sunspots, and development traps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slobodyan, Sergey

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, 1-2 (2005), s. 159-185 ISSN 0165-1889 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : indeterminacy * development trap * stochastic stability Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.691, year: 2005 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jedc.2003.04.011

  19. Efficiency of subaquatic light traps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ditrich, Tomáš; Čihák, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 3 (2017), s. 171-184 ISSN 0165-0424 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-29857S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Heteroptera * Diptera * light trap Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 0.524, year: 2016

  20. The rise of trapped populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April T Humble

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available As border security increases and borders become less permeable, cross-border migration is becoming increasingly difficult, selective and dangerous. Growing numbers of people are becoming trapped in their own countries or in transit countries, or being forced to roam border areas, unable to access legal protection or basic social necessities.

  1. Magnetic trapping of Rydberg atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niestadt, D.; Naber, J.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.; Spreeuw, R.J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic trapping is a well-established technique for ground state atoms. We seek to extend this concept to Rydberg atoms. Rydberg atoms are important for current visions of quantum simulators that will be used in the near future to simulate and analyse quantum problems. Current efforts in Amsterdam

  2. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeffner, H.; Roos, C.F.; Blatt, R.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computers hold the promise of solving certain computational tasks much more efficiently than classical computers. We review recent experimental advances towards a quantum computer with trapped ions. In particular, various implementations of qubits, quantum gates and some key experiments are discussed. Furthermore, we review some implementations of quantum algorithms such as a deterministic teleportation of quantum information and an error correction scheme

  3. Biexciton emission from single isoelectronic traps formed by nitrogen-nitrogen pairs in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamiya, Kengo; Fukushima, Toshiyuki; Yagi, Shuhei; Hijikata, Yasuto; Yaguchi, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku , Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Yoshita, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hidefumi [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Onabe, Kentaro [Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Katayama, Ryuji [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-12-04

    We have studied photoluminescence (PL) from individual isoelectronic traps formed by nitrogen-nitrogen (NN) pairs in GaAs. Sharp emission lines due to exciton and biexciton were observed from individual isoelectronic traps in nitrogen atomic-layer doped (ALD) GaAs. The binding energy of biexciton bound to individual isoelectronic traps was approximately 8 meV. Both the exciton and biexciton luminescence lines show completely random polarization and no fine-structure splitting. These results are desirable to the application to the quantum cryptography used in the field of quantum information technology.

  4. Electron trapping in neutron-irradiated very thin films of Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P.C.; Bardhan, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    Oxide layers of thicknesses less than 100 A have been prepared by thermal-oxidation of a base metal electrode film of aluminium. These films were then neutron-irradiated from a laboratory Ra-Be source to a fluence of approximately 10 11 neutrons cm -2 and the sandwich structure, Al-Al 2 O 3 -Au, was completed by depositing a thin metal film of gold over the irradiated oxide layer. D.C. steady and transient flow through the sandwich structures have been studied. Results obtained in the experiments with irradiated sandwiches have been compared with unirradiated ones to show that traps are introduced because of the damage caused by the incident neutrons. Transient voltage measurement across the junction gives a trap density of approximately 10 18 cm -3 . A capture cross-section of the order 10 -28 cm 2 is estimated for the traps. It is found that the (identified) traps are uniformly distributed within an energy of 0.099 eV below the conduction band edge of aluminium oxide. The physical nature of the traps is discussed by comparing the capture cross-sections of the physically known trapping centres. The possibility of vacancies or F-centres acting as traps (for the identified ones) has been suggested. (author)

  5. Paths to light trapping in thin film GaAs solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianling; Fang, Hanlin; Su, Rongbin; Li, Kezheng; Song, Jindong; Krauss, Thomas F; Li, Juntao; Martins, Emiliano R

    2018-03-19

    It is now well established that light trapping is an essential element of thin film solar cell design. Numerous light trapping geometries have already been applied to thin film cells, especially to silicon-based devices. Less attention has been paid to light trapping in GaAs thin film cells, mainly because light trapping is considered less attractive due to the material's direct bandgap and the fact that GaAs suffers from strong surface recombination, which particularly affects etched nanostructures. Here, we study light trapping structures that are implemented in a high-bandgap material on the back of the GaAs active layer, thereby not perturbing the integrity of the GaAs active layer. We study photonic crystal and quasi-random nanostructures both by simulation and by experiment and find that the photonic crystal structures are superior because they exhibit fewer but stronger resonances that are better matched to the narrow wavelength range where GaAs benefits from light trapping. In fact, we show that a 1500 nm thick cell with photonic crystals achieves the same short circuit current as an unpatterned 4000 nm thick cell. These findings are significant because they afford a sizeable reduction in active layer thickness, and therefore a reduction in expensive epitaxial growth time and cost, yet without compromising performance.

  6. Atomic layer deposition of calcium oxide and calcium hafnium oxide films using calcium cyclopentadienyl precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukli, Kaupo; Ritala, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo; Haenninen, Timo; Leskelae, Markku

    2006-01-01

    Calcium oxide and calcium hafnium oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition on borosilicate glass and silicon substrates in the temperature range of 205-300 o C. The calcium oxide films were grown from novel calcium cyclopentadienyl precursor and water. Calcium oxide films possessed refractive index 1.75-1.80. Calcium oxide films grown without Al 2 O 3 capping layer occurred hygroscopic and converted to Ca(OH) 2 after exposure to air. As-deposited CaO films were (200)-oriented. CaO covered with Al 2 O 3 capping layers contained relatively low amounts of hydrogen and re-oriented into (111) direction upon annealing at 900 o C. In order to examine the application of CaO in high-permittivity dielectric layers, mixtures of Ca and Hf oxides were grown by alternate CaO and HfO 2 growth cycles at 230 and 300 o C. HfCl 4 was used as a hafnium precursor. When grown at 230 o C, the films were amorphous with equal amounts of Ca and Hf constituents (15 at.%). These films crystallized upon annealing at 750 o C, showing X-ray diffraction peaks characteristic of hafnium-rich phases such as Ca 2 Hf 7 O 16 or Ca 6 Hf 19 O 44 . At 300 o C, the relative Ca content remained below 8 at.%. The crystallized phase well matched with rhombohedral Ca 2 Hf 7 O 16 . The dielectric films grown on Si(100) substrates possessed effective permittivity values in the range of 12.8-14.2

  7. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one or...

  8. Scaling ion traps for quantum computing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a chipscale, multi-zone, surface electrode ion trap is reported. The modular design and fabrication techniques used are anticipated to advance scalability of ion trap quantum computing architectures...

  9. Servo control of an optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Kurt D; Cole, Daniel G; Clark, Robert L

    2007-08-01

    A versatile optical trap has been constructed to control the position of trapped objects and ultimately to apply specified forces using feedback control. While the design, development, and use of optical traps has been extensive and feedback control has played a critical role in pushing the state of the art, few comprehensive examinations of feedback control of optical traps have been undertaken. Furthermore, as the requirements are pushed to ever smaller distances and forces, the performance of optical traps reaches limits. It is well understood that feedback control can result in both positive and negative effects in controlled systems. We give an analysis of the trapping limits as well as introducing an optical trap with a feedback control scheme that dramatically improves an optical trap's sensitivity at low frequencies.

  10. Step tunneling enhanced asymmetry in metal-insulator-insulator-metal (MIIM) diodes for rectenna applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimardani, N.; Conley, J. F.

    2013-09-01

    We combine nanolaminate bilayer insulator tunnel barriers (Al2O3/HfO2, HfO2/Al2O3, Al2O3/ZrO2) deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD) with asymmetric work function metal electrodes to produce MIIM diodes with enhanced I-V asymmetry and non-linearity. We show that the improvements in MIIM devices are due to step tunneling rather than resonant tunneling. We also investigate conduction processes as a function of temperature in MIM devices with Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 high electron affinity insulators. For both Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 insulators, the dominant conduction process is established as Schottky emission at small biases and Frenkel-Poole emission at large biases. The energy depth of the traps that dominate Frenkel-Poole emission in each material are estimated.

  11. Ultralow-Power Electronic Trapping of Nanoparticles with Sub-10 nm Gold Nanogap Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Avijit; Chen, Xiaoshu; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2016-10-12

    We demonstrate nanogap electrodes for rapid, parallel, and ultralow-power trapping of nanoparticles. Our device pushes the limit of dielectrophoresis by shrinking the separation between gold electrodes to sub-10 nm, thereby creating strong trapping forces at biases as low as the 100 mV ranges. Using high-throughput atomic layer lithography, we manufacture sub-10 nm gaps between 0.8 mm long gold electrodes and pattern them into individually addressable parallel electronic traps. Unlike pointlike junctions made by electron-beam lithography or larger micron-gap electrodes that are used for conventional dielectrophoresis, our sub-10 nm gold nanogap electrodes provide strong trapping forces over a mm-scale trapping zone. Importantly, our technology solves the key challenges associated with traditional dielectrophoresis experiments, such as high voltages that cause heat generation, bubble formation, and unwanted electrochemical reactions. The strongly enhanced fields around the nanogap induce particle-transport speed exceeding 10 μm/s and enable the trapping of 30 nm polystyrene nanoparticles using an ultralow bias of 200 mV. We also demonstrate rapid electronic trapping of quantum dots and nanodiamond particles on arrays of parallel traps. Our sub-10 nm gold nanogap electrodes can be combined with plasmonic sensors or nanophotonic circuitry, and their low-power electronic operation can potentially enable high-density integration on a chip as well as portable biosensing.

  12. A microfluidic chip for direct and rapid trapping of white blood cells from whole blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingdong; Chen, Di; Yuan, Tao; Xie, Yao; Chen, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Blood analysis plays a major role in medical and science applications and white blood cells (WBCs) are an important target of analysis. We proposed an integrated microfluidic chip for direct and rapid trapping WBCs from whole blood. The microfluidic chip consists of two basic functional units: a winding channel to mix and arrays of two-layer trapping structures to trap WBCs. Red blood cells (RBCs) were eliminated through moving the winding channel and then WBCs were trapped by the arrays of trapping structures. We fabricated the PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) chip using soft lithography and determined the critical flow velocities of tartrazine and brilliant blue water mixing and whole blood and red blood cell lysis buffer mixing in the winding channel. They are 0.25 μl/min and 0.05 μl/min, respectively. The critical flow velocity of the whole blood and red blood cell lysis buffer is lower due to larger volume of the RBCs and higher kinematic viscosity of the whole blood. The time taken for complete lysis of whole blood was about 85 s under the flow velocity 0.05 μl/min. The RBCs were lysed completely by mixing and the WBCs were trapped by the trapping structures. The chip trapped about 2.0 × 103 from 3.3 × 103 WBCs. PMID:24404026

  13. Two-baffle trap for macroparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksyonov, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, properties of two-baffle macroparticle traps were investigated. These properties are needed for designing and optimization of vacuum arc plasma filters. The dependencies between trap geometry parameters and its ability to absorb macroparticles were found. Calculations made allow one to predict the behaviour of filtering abilities of separators containing such traps in their design. Recommendations regarding the use of two-baffle traps in filters of different builds are given

  14. Cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Morigi, Giovanna; Pinkse, Pepijn Willemszoon Harry; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency of cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules is theoretically investigated for the case in which the infrared transition between two rovibrational states is used as a cycling transition. The molecules are assumed to be trapped either by a radiofrequency or optical trapping

  15. An Open Standard for Camera Trap Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forrester, Tavis; O'Brien, Tim; Fegraus, Eric; Jansen, P.A.; Palmer, Jonathan; Kays, Roland; Ahumada, Jorge; Stern, Beth; McShea, William

    2016-01-01

    Camera traps that capture photos of animals are a valuable tool for monitoring biodiversity. The use of camera traps is rapidly increasing and there is an urgent need for standardization to facilitate data management, reporting and data sharing. Here we offer the Camera Trap Metadata Standard as an

  16. Influence of trap location on the efficiency of trapping in dendrimers and regular hyperbranched polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Zhongzhi

    2013-03-07

    The trapping process in polymer systems constitutes a fundamental mechanism for various other dynamical processes taking place in these systems. In this paper, we study the trapping problem in two representative polymer networks, Cayley trees and Vicsek fractals, which separately model dendrimers and regular hyperbranched polymers. Our goal is to explore the impact of trap location on the efficiency of trapping in these two important polymer systems, with the efficiency being measured by the average trapping time (ATT) that is the average of source-to-trap mean first-passage time over every staring point in the whole networks. For Cayley trees, we derive an exact analytic formula for the ATT to an arbitrary trap node, based on which we further obtain the explicit expression of ATT for the case that the trap is uniformly distributed. For Vicsek fractals, we provide the closed-form solution for ATT to a peripheral node farthest from the central node, as well as the numerical solutions for the case when the trap is placed on other nodes. Moreover, we derive the exact formula for the ATT corresponding to the trapping problem when the trap has a uniform distribution over all nodes. Our results show that the influence of trap location on the trapping efficiency is completely different for the two polymer networks. In Cayley trees, the leading scaling of ATT increases with the shortest distance between the trap and the central node, implying that trap's position has an essential impact on the trapping efficiency; while in Vicsek fractals, the effect of location of the trap is negligible, since the dominant behavior of ATT is identical, respective of the location where the trap is placed. We also present that for all cases of trapping problems being studied, the trapping process is more efficient in Cayley trees than in Vicsek fractals. We demonstrate that all differences related to trapping in the two polymer systems are rooted in their underlying topological structures.

  17. Photo-reactive charge trapping memory based on lanthanide complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jiaqing; Lo, Wai-Sum; Zhou, Li; Sun, Qi-Jun; Chan, Chi-Fai; Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Yan, Yan; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Ka-Leung; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-10-01

    Traditional utilization of photo-induced excitons is popularly but restricted in the fields of photovoltaic devices as well as photodetectors, and efforts on broadening its function have always been attempted. However, rare reports are available on organic field effect transistor (OFET) memory employing photo-induced charges. Here, we demonstrate an OFET memory containing a novel organic lanthanide complex Eu(tta)3ppta (Eu(tta)3 = Europium(III) thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, ppta = 2-phenyl-4,6-bis(pyrazol-1-yl)-1,3,5-triazine), in which the photo-induced charges can be successfully trapped and detrapped. The luminescent complex emits intense red emission upon ultraviolet (UV) light excitation and serves as a trapping element of holes injected from the pentacene semiconductor layer. Memory window can be significantly enlarged by light-assisted programming and erasing procedures, during which the photo-induced excitons in the semiconductor layer are separated by voltage bias. The enhancement of memory window is attributed to the increasing number of photo-induced excitons by the UV light. The charges are stored in this luminescent complex for at least 104 s after withdrawing voltage bias. The present study on photo-assisted novel memory may motivate the research on a new type of light tunable charge trapping photo-reactive memory devices.

  18. Fundamental physics in particle traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quint, Wolfgang; Vogel, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The individual topics are covered by leading experts in the respective fields of research. Provides readers with present theory and experiments in this field. A useful reference for researchers. This volume provides detailed insight into the field of precision spectroscopy and fundamental physics with particles confined in traps. It comprises experiments with electrons and positrons, protons and antiprotons, antimatter and highly charged ions, together with corresponding theoretical background. Such investigations represent stringent tests of quantum electrodynamics and the Standard model, antiparticle and antimatter research, test of fundamental symmetries, constants, and their possible variations with time and space. They are key to various aspects within metrology such as mass measurements and time standards, as well as promising to further developments in quantum information processing. The reader obtains a valuable source of information suited for beginners and experts with an interest in fundamental studies using particle traps.

  19. Trapping and spectroscopy of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, Claudio Lenz

    1997-01-01

    I review the results and techniques used by the MIT H↑ group to achieve a fractional resolution of 2 parts in 10 12 in the 1S-2S transition in hydrogen [Cesar, D. Fried, T. Killian, A. Polcyn, J. Sandberg, I.A. Yu, T. Greytak, D. Kleppner and J. Doyle, Two-photon spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 255.] With some improvements, this system should deliver 100 times higher resolution with an improved signal count rate getting us closer to an old advertised goal of a precision of 1 part in 10 18 . While these developments are very important for the proposed test of the CPT theorem through the comparison with anti-hydrogen, some of the techniques used with hydrogen are not applicable to anti-hydrogen and I discuss some difficulties and alternatives for the trapping and spectroscopy of anti-hydrogen

  20. Centrifugal trapping in the magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    Full Text Available Particles leaving the neutral sheet in the distant magnetotail at times display adiabatic trajectory sequences characterized by an inflection toward the equator and subsequent mirroring in its vicinity. We demonstrate that this low-latitude mirroring results primarily from a centrifugal deceleration due to the fast direction-changing E×B drift. This effect which we refer to as "centrifugal trapping" appears both in guiding centre and full particle treatments. It thus does not directly relate to nonadiabatic motion. However, pitch angle scattering due to nonadiabatic neutral sheet interaction does play a role in reducing the parallel speed of the particles. We show that centrifugal trapping is an important mechanism for the confinement of the slowest (typically below the equatorial E×B drift speed plasma sheet populations to the midplane vicinity.

  1. Centrifugal trapping in the magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Particles leaving the neutral sheet in the distant magnetotail at times display adiabatic trajectory sequences characterized by an inflection toward the equator and subsequent mirroring in its vicinity. We demonstrate that this low-latitude mirroring results primarily from a centrifugal deceleration due to the fast direction-changing E×B drift. This effect which we refer to as "centrifugal trapping" appears both in guiding centre and full particle treatments. It thus does not directly relate to nonadiabatic motion. However, pitch angle scattering due to nonadiabatic neutral sheet interaction does play a role in reducing the parallel speed of the particles. We show that centrifugal trapping is an important mechanism for the confinement of the slowest (typically below the equatorial E×B drift speed plasma sheet populations to the midplane vicinity.

  2. Vapor trap for liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T

    1968-05-22

    In a pipe system which transfers liquid metal, inert gas (cover gas) is packed above the surface of the liquid metal to prevent oxidization of the liquid. If the metal vapor is contained in such cover gas, the circulating system of the cover gas is blocked due to condensation of liquid metal inside the system. The present invention relates to an improvement in vapor trap to remove the metal vapor from the cover gas. The trap consists of a cylindrical outer body, an inlet nozzle which is deeply inserted inside the outer body and has a number of holes to inject the cove gas into the body, metal mesh or steel wool which covers the exterior of the nozzle and on which the condensation of the metal gas takes place, and a heater wire hich is wound around the nozzle to prevent condensation of the metal vapor at the inner peripheral side of the mesh.

  3. Optical trapping for analytical biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Praveen C; Dholakia, Kishan

    2012-02-01

    We describe the exciting advances of using optical trapping in the field of analytical biotechnology. This technique has opened up opportunities to manipulate biological particles at the single cell or even at subcellular levels which has allowed an insight into the physical and chemical mechanisms of many biological processes. The ability of this technique to manipulate microparticles and measure pico-Newton forces has found several applications such as understanding the dynamics of biological macromolecules, cell-cell interactions and the micro-rheology of both cells and fluids. Furthermore we may probe and analyse the biological world when combining trapping with analytical techniques such as Raman spectroscopy and imaging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Charge trapping/de-trapping in nitrided SiO2 dielectrics and its influence on device reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambour, Kenneth; Hjalmarson, Harold; Nguyen, Duc; Kouhestani, Camron; Devine, Roderick

    2012-02-01

    Field effect devices with insulator gate dielectrics are excellent test vehicles to probe the physics of defects and charge trapping in the insulator/ semiconductor structure. p-channel field effect device reliability under negative bias stressing has been identified to originate from at least two terms: a) charged defect generation at the Si substrate/SiOxNy interface and b) charge trapping at neutral defect pre-cursors in the ``bulk'' of the SiOxNy beyond the interface. Measurements of transistor characteristics enable extraction of the two terms. We report the results of such measurements and demonstrate that short time effects are associated primarily with electric field assisted tunneling of holes from the inversion layer to neutral traps. This is confirmed by bias stressing measurements at different frequencies in the range 1 Hz to 2 MHz. First principles modeling of the tunneling/trapping phenomena is presented. K.Kambour worked under contract FA9453-08-C-0245 with the Air Force Research Laboratory/RVSE. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Antihydrogen Formation, Dynamics and Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, Eoin; Charlton, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Antihydrogen, the simplest pure-antimatter atomic system, holds the promise of direct tests of matter-antimatter equivalence and CPT invariance, two of the outstanding unanswered questions in modern physics. Antihydrogen is now routinely produced in charged-particle traps through the combination of plasmas of antiprotons and positrons, but the atoms escape and are destroyed in a minuscule fraction of a second. The focus of this work is the production of a sample of cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic atom trap. This poses an extreme challenge, because the state-of-the-art atom traps are only approximately 0.5 K deep for ground-state antihydrogen atoms, much shallower than the energies of particles stored in the plasmas. This thesis will outline the main parts of the ALPHA experiment, with an overview of the important physical processes at work. Antihydrogen production techniques will be described, and an analysis of the spatial annihilation distribution to give indications of the temperature and binding ene...

  6. Abnormal Multiple Charge Memory States in Exfoliated Few-Layer WSe2 Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mikai; Wang, Yifan; Shepherd, Nathan; Huard, Chad; Zhou, Jiantao; Guo, L J; Lu, Wei; Liang, Xiaogan

    2017-01-24

    To construct reliable nanoelectronic devices based on emerging 2D layered semiconductors, we need to understand the charge-trapping processes in such devices. Additionally, the identified charge-trapping schemes in such layered materials could be further exploited to make multibit (or highly desirable analog-tunable) memory devices. Here, we present a study on the abnormal charge-trapping or memory characteristics of few-layer WSe 2 transistors. This work shows that multiple charge-trapping states with large extrema spacing, long retention time, and analog tunability can be excited in the transistors made from mechanically exfoliated few-layer WSe 2 flakes, whereas they cannot be generated in widely studied few-layer MoS 2 transistors. Such charge-trapping characteristics of WSe 2 transistors are attributed to the exfoliation-induced interlayer deformation on the cleaved surfaces of few-layer WSe 2 flakes, which can spontaneously form ambipolar charge-trapping sites. Our additional results from surface characterization, charge-retention characterization at different temperatures, and density functional theory computation strongly support this explanation. Furthermore, our research also demonstrates that the charge-trapping states excited in multiple transistors can be calibrated into consistent multibit data storage levels. This work advances the understanding of the charge memory mechanisms in layered semiconductors, and the observed charge-trapping states could be further studied for enabling ultralow-cost multibit analog memory devices.

  7. Nonadiabatic transitions in electrostatically trapped ammonia molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirste, Moritz; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard; Sartakov, Boris G.

    2009-01-01

    Nonadiabatic transitions are known to be major loss channels for atoms in magnetic traps but have thus far not been experimentally reported upon for trapped molecules. We have observed and quantified losses due to nonadiabatic transitions for three isotopologues of ammonia in electrostatic traps by comparing the trapping times in traps with a zero and a nonzero electric field at the center. Nonadiabatic transitions are seen to dominate the overall loss rate even for the present samples that are at relatively high temperatures of 30 mK. It is anticipated that losses due to nonadiabatic transitions in electric fields are omnipresent in ongoing experiments on cold molecules.

  8. Sognenavne, Albertslund Kommune (3 artikler). trap.dk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kællerød, Lars-Jakob Harding

    2019-01-01

    Artikler til Trap Danmarks netpublikation trap.dk Sognenavnene Herstedvester, Herstedøster og Opstandelseskirkens Sogn......Artikler til Trap Danmarks netpublikation trap.dk Sognenavnene Herstedvester, Herstedøster og Opstandelseskirkens Sogn...

  9. Effect of Dielectric Interface on the Performance of MoS2 Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuefei; Xiong, Xiong; Li, Tiaoyang; Li, Sichao; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Wu, Yanqing

    2017-12-27

    Because of their wide bandgap and ultrathin body properties, two-dimensional materials are currently being pursued for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic applications. Although there have been increasing numbers of studies on improving the performance of MoS 2 field-effect transistors (FETs) using various methods, the dielectric interface, which plays a decisive role in determining the mobility, interface traps, and thermal transport of MoS 2 FETs, has not been well explored and understood. In this article, we present a comprehensive experimental study on the effect of high-k dielectrics on the performance of few-layer MoS 2 FETs from 300 to 4.3 K. Results show that Al 2 O 3 /HfO 2 could boost the mobility and drain current. Meanwhile, MoS 2 transistors with Al 2 O 3 /HfO 2 demonstrate a 2× reduction in oxide trap density compared to that of the devices with the conventional SiO 2 substrate. Also, we observe a negative differential resistance effect on the device with 1 μm-channel length when using conventional SiO 2 as the gate dielectric due to self-heating, and this is effectively eliminated by using the Al 2 O 3 /HfO 2 gate dielectric. This dielectric engineering provides a highly viable route to realizing high-performance transition metal dichalcogenide-based FETs.

  10. Advanced ion trap structures with integrated tools for qubit manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterk, J. D.; Benito, F.; Clark, C. R.; Haltli, R.; Highstrete, C.; Nordquist, C. D.; Scott, S.; Stevens, J. E.; Tabakov, B. P.; Tigges, C. P.; Moehring, D. L.; Stick, D.; Blain, M. G.

    2012-06-01

    We survey the ion trap fabrication technologies available at Sandia National Laboratories. These include four metal layers, precision backside etching, and low profile wirebonds. We demonstrate loading of ions in a variety of ion traps that utilize these technologies. Additionally, we present progress towards integration of on-board filtering with trench capacitors, photon collection via an optical cavity, and integrated microwave electrodes for localized hyperfine qubit control and magnetic field gradient quantum gates. [4pt] This work was supported by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Nanophotonic light-trapping theory for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zongfu; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui [Stanford University, Ginzton Lab, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Conventional light-trapping theory, based on a ray-optics approach, was developed for standard thick photovoltaic cells. The classical theory established an upper limit for possible absorption enhancement in this context and provided a design strategy for reaching this limit. This theory has become the foundation for light management in bulk silicon PV cells, and has had enormous influence on the optical design of solar cells in general. This theory, however, is not applicable in the nanophotonic regime. Here we develop a statistical temporal coupled-mode theory of light trapping based on a rigorous electromagnetic approach. Our theory reveals that the standard limit can be substantially surpassed when optical modes in the active layer are confined to deep-subwavelength scale, opening new avenues for highly efficient next-generation solar cells. (orig.)

  12. Effects of Gate Stack Structural and Process Defectivity on High-k Dielectric Dependence of NBTI Reliability in 32 nm Technology Node PMOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hussin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a simulation study on negative bias temperature instability (NBTI induced hole trapping in E′ center defects, which leads to depassivation of interface trap precursor in different geometrical structures of high-k PMOSFET gate stacks using the two-stage NBTI model. The resulting degradation is characterized based on the time evolution of the interface and hole trap densities, as well as the resulting threshold voltage shift. By varying the physical thicknesses of the interface silicon dioxide (SiO2 and hafnium oxide (HfO2 layers, we investigate how the variation in thickness affects hole trapping/detrapping at different stress temperatures. The results suggest that the degradations are highly dependent on the physical gate stack parameters for a given stress voltage and temperature. The degradation is more pronounced by 5% when the thicknesses of HfO2 are increased but is reduced by 11% when the SiO2 interface layer thickness is increased during lower stress voltage. However, at higher stress voltage, greater degradation is observed for a thicker SiO2 interface layer. In addition, the existence of different stress temperatures at which the degradation behavior differs implies that the hole trapping/detrapping event is thermally activated.

  13. Algae commensal community in Genlisea traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Wołowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The community of algae occurring in Genlisea traps and on the external traps surface in laboratory conditions were studied. A total of 29 taxa were found inside the traps, with abundant diatoms, green algae (Chlamydophyceae and four morphotypes of chrysophytes stomatocysts. One morphotype is described as new for science. There are two ways of algae getting into Genlisea traps. The majority of those recorded inside the traps, are mobile; swimming freely by flagella or moving exuding mucilage like diatoms being ablate to colonize the traps themselves. Another possibility is transport of algae by invertebrates such as mites and crustaceans. In any case algae in the Genlisea traps come from the surrounding environment. Two dominant groups of algae (Chladymonas div. and diatoms in the trap environment, show ability to hydrolyze phosphomonoseters. We suggest that algae in carnivorous plant traps can compete with plant (host for organic phosphate (phosphomonoseters. From the spectrum and ecological requirements of algal species found in the traps, environment inside the traps seems to be acidic. However, further studies are needed to test the relations between algae and carnivorous plants both in laboratory conditions and in the natural environment. All the reported taxa are described briefly and documented with 74 LM and SEM micrographs.

  14. Trapping Dust to Form Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    Growing a planet from a dust grain is hard work! A new study explores how vortices in protoplanetary disks can assist this process.When Dust Growth FailsTop: ALMA image of the protoplanetary disk of V1247 Orionis, with different emission components labeled. Bottom: Synthetic image constructed from the best-fit model. [Kraus et al. 2017]Gradual accretion onto a seed particle seems like a reasonable way to grow a planet from a grain of dust; after all, planetary embryos orbit within dusty protoplanetary disks, which provides them with plenty of fuel to accrete so they can grow. Theres a challenge to this picture, though: the radial drift problem.The radial drift problem acknowledges that, as growing dust grains orbit within the disk, the drag force on them continues to grow as well. For large enough dust grains perhaps around 1 millimeter the drag force will cause the grains orbits to decay, and the particles drift into the star before they are able to grow into planetesimals and planets.A Close-Up Look with ALMASo how do we overcome the radial drift problem in order to form planets? A commonly proposed mechanism is dust trapping, in which long-lived vortices in the disk trap the dust particles, preventing them from falling inwards. This allows the particles to persist for millions of years long enough to grow beyond the radial drift barrier.Observationally, these dust-trapping vortices should have signatures: we would expect to see, at millimeter wavelengths, specific bright, asymmetric structures where the trapping occurs in protoplanetary disks. Such disk structures have been difficult to spot with past instrumentation, but the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has made some new observations of the disk V1247 Orionis that might be just what were looking for.Schematic of the authors model for the disk of V1247 Orionis. [Kraus et al. 2017]Trapped in a Vortex?ALMAs observations of V1247 Orionis are reported by a team of scientists led by Stefan

  15. Trapped

    OpenAIRE

    Storvik, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    This study explores how the Muslim Sunni Women in the city of Tripoli- Lebanon perceive the the inequity in the rights of women in terms of those of men within the Personal Status codes practiced today in the Sunni Muslim Sharīʻa Courts in the country. Lebanese women and men in general are subject to an imbalanced patronage as a result of the patriarchal conditions dominating the Lebanese society and its various communities. This project further explores the factors that have led to the failu...

  16. Status and outlook of CHIP-TRAP: The Central Michigan University high precision Penning trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redshaw, M.; Bryce, R. A.; Hawks, P.; Gamage, N. D.; Hunt, C.; Kandegedara, R. M. E. B.; Ratnayake, I. S.; Sharp, L.

    2016-06-01

    At Central Michigan University we are developing a high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometer (CHIP-TRAP) that will focus on measurements with long-lived radioactive isotopes. CHIP-TRAP will consist of a pair of hyperbolic precision-measurement Penning traps, and a cylindrical capture/filter trap in a 12 T magnetic field. Ions will be produced by external ion sources, including a laser ablation source, and transported to the capture trap at low energies enabling ions of a given m / q ratio to be selected via their time-of-flight. In the capture trap, contaminant ions will be removed with a mass-selective rf dipole excitation and the ion of interest will be transported to the measurement traps. A phase-sensitive image charge detection technique will be used for simultaneous cyclotron frequency measurements on single ions in the two precision traps, resulting in a reduction in statistical uncertainty due to magnetic field fluctuations.

  17. Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Kurchaninov, L; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly-identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antipr...

  18. Portable Pbars, traps that travel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, S.D.; Hynes, M.V.; Picklesimer, A.

    1987-10-01

    The advent of antiproton research utilizing relatively small scale storage devices for very large numbers of these particles opens the possibility of transporting these devices to a research site removed from the accelerator center that produced the antiprotons. Such a portable source of antiprotons could open many new areas of research and make antiprotons available to a new research community. At present antiprotons are available at energies down to 1 MeV. From a portable source these particles can be made available at energies ranging from several tens of kilovolts down to a few millielectron volts. These low energies are in the domain of interest to the atomic and condensed matter physicist. In addition such a source can be used as an injector for an accelerator which could increase the energy domain even further. Moreover, the availability of such a source at a university will open research with antiprotons to a broader range of students than possible at a centralized research facility. This report focuses on the use of ion traps, in particular cylindrical traps, for the antiproton storage device. These devices store the charged antiprotons in a combination of electric and magnet fields. At high enough density and low enough temperature the charged cloud will be susceptible to plasma instabilities. Present day ion trap work is just starting to explore this domain. Our assessment of feasibility is based on what could be done with present day technology and what future technology could achieve. We conclude our report with a radiation safety study that shows that about 10 11 antiprotons can be transported safely, however the federal guidelines for this transport must be reviewed in detail. More antiprotons than this will require special transportation arrangements. 28 refs., 8 figs

  19. Trapping molecules in two and three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkse, PW.H.; Junglen, T.; Rieger, T.; Rangwala, S.A.; Windpassinger, P.; Rempe, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Cold molecules offer a new testing ground for quantum-physical effects in nature. For example, producing slow beams of large molecules could push experiments studying the boundary between quantum interference and classical particles up towards ever heavier particles. Moreover, cold molecules, in particular YbF, seem an attractive way to narrow down the constraints on the value of the electron dipole moment and finally, quantum information processing using chains of cold polar molecules or vibrational states in molecules have been proposed. All these proposals rely on advanced production and trapping techniques, most of which are still under development. Therefore, novel production and trapping techniques for cold molecules could offer new possibilities not found in previous methods. Electric traps hold promise for deep trap potentials for neutral molecules. Recently we have demonstrated two-dimensional trapping of polar molecules in a four-wire guide using electrostatic and electrodynamic trapping techniques. Filled from a thermal effusive source, such a guide will deliver a beam of slow molecules, which is an ideal source for interferometry experiments with large molecules, for instance. Here we report about the extension of this work to three-dimensional trapping. Polar molecules with a positive Stark shift can be trapped in the minimum of an electrostatic field. We have successfully tested a large volume electrostatic trap for ND3 molecules. A special feature of this trap is that it can be loaded continuously from an electrostatic guide, at a temperature of a few hundred mK. (author)

  20. Introduced species as evolutionary traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaepfer, Martin A.; Sherman, P.W.; Blossey, B.; Runge, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Invasive species can alter environments in such a way that normal behavioural decision-making rules of native species are no longer adaptive. The evolutionary trap concept provides a useful framework for predicting and managing the impact of harmful invasive species. We discuss how native species can respond to changes in their selective regime via evolution or learning. We also propose novel management strategies to promote the long-term co-existence of native and introduced species in cases where the eradication of the latter is either economically or biologically unrealistic.

  1. Telomerase Repeated Amplification Protocol (TRAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W

    2015-11-20

    Telomeres are found at the end of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, and proteins that bind to telomeres protect DNA from being recognized as double-strand breaks thus preventing end-to-end fusions (Griffith et al. , 1999). However, due to the end replication problem and other factors such as oxidative damage, the limited life span of cultured cells (Hayflick limit) results in progressive shortening of these protective structures (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The ribonucleoprotein enzyme complex telomerase-consisting of a protein catalytic component hTERT and a functional RNA component hTR or hTERC - counteracts telomere shortening by adding telomeric repeats to the end of chromosomes in ~90% of primary human tumors and in some transiently proliferating stem-like cells (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). This results in continuous proliferation of cells which is a hallmark of cancer. Therefore, telomere biology has a central role in aging, cancer progression/metastasis as well as targeted cancer therapies. There are commonly used methods in telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) (Mender and Shay, 2015b), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this detailed protocol we describe Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP). The TRAP assay is a popular method to determine telomerase activity in mammalian cells and tissue samples (Kim et al. , 1994). The TRAP assay includes three steps: extension, amplification, and detection of telomerase products. In the extension step, telomeric repeats are added to the telomerase substrate (which is actually a non telomeric oligonucleotide, TS) by telomerase. In the amplification step, the extension products are amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers (TS upstream primer and ACX downstream primer) and in the detection step, the presence or absence of telomerase is

  2. Bose condensation in (random traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Zagrebnov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a non-interacting (perfect Bose-gas in random external potentials (traps. It is shown that a generalized Bose-Einstein condensation in the random eigenstates manifests if and only if the same occurs in the one-particle kinetic-energy eigenstates, which corresponds to the generalized condensation of the free Bose-gas. Moreover, we prove that the amounts of both condensate densities are equal. This statement is relevant for justification of the Bogoliubov approximation} in the theory of disordered boson systems.

  3. Recent progress in the understanding of H transport and trapping in W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, K; Bauer, J; Schwarz-Selinger, T; Toussaint, U v; Manhard, A; Jacob, W; Markelj, S

    2017-01-01

    The retention of hydrogen isotopes (HIs) (H, D and T) in the first, plasma exposed wall is one of the key concerns for the operation of future long pulse fusion devices. It affects the particle-, momentum- and energy balance in the scrape off layer as well as the retention of HIs and their permeation into the coolant. The currently accepted picture that is used for interpreting current laboratory and tokamak experiments is that of diffusion hindered by trapping at lattice defects. This paper summarises recent results that show that this current picture of how HIs are transported and retained in W needs to be extended: the modification of the surface (e.g. blistering) can lead to the formation of fast loss channels for near surface HIs. Trapping at single occupancy traps with fixed de-trapping energy fails to explain isotope exchange experiments, instead a trapping model with multi occupancy traps and fill level dependent de-trapping energies is required. The presence of interstitial impurities like N or C may affect the transport of solute HI. The presence of HIs during damage creation by e.g. neutrons stabilises defects and reduces defect annealing at elevated temperatures. (paper)

  4. The surface emissions trap: a new approach in indoor air purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowicz, Pawel; Larsson, Lennart

    2012-11-01

    A new device for stopping or reducing potentially irritating or harmful emissions from surfaces indoors is described. The device is a surface emissions trap prototype and consists of an adsorbent sheet with a semipermeable barrier surrounded by two thin nonwoven layers. The trap may be applied directly at the source of the emissions e.g. at moisture-affected floors and walls, surfaces contaminated by chemical spills etc. This results in an immediate stop or reduction of the emitting pollutants. The trap has a very low water vapor resistance thus allowing drying of wet surfaces. In laboratory experiments typically 98% reduction of air concentrations of volatile organic compounds and a virtually total reduction of mold particle-associated mycotoxins was observed. The surface emissions trap may represent a convenient and efficient way of restoring indoor environments polluted by microbial and other moisture-associated emissions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Time-dependence hole and electron trapping effects in SIMOX buried oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesch, H.E. Jr.; Taylor, T.L.; Hite, L.R.; Bailey, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    Back-channel threshold shift associated with the buried oxide layers of separation by implanted oxygen (SIMOX) and zone-melted recrystallization (ZMR) field-effect transistors (FETs) was measured following pulsed irradiation as a function of temperature and back-gate bias using a fast time-resolved I-V measurement technique. The SIMOX FETs showed large initial negative voltage shifts at 0.2 ms after irradiation followed by temperature- and bias-dependent additional negative shifts to 800s. Analysis and modeling of the results indicate efficient deep trapping of radiation-generated holes in the bulk of the oxide, substantial initial trapping of radiation-generated electrons in the oxide, and rapid removal of the trapped electrons by a thermal detrapping process. The ZMR FETs showed evidence of substantial trapping of holes alone in the oxide bulk

  6. Metallorganic chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition approaches for the growth of hafnium-based thin films from dialkylamide precursors for advanced CMOS gate stack applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Steven P.

    To continue the rapid progress of the semiconductor industry as described by Moore's Law, the feasibility of new material systems for front end of the line (FEOL) process technologies needs to be investigated, since the currently employed polysilicon/SiO2-based transistor system is reaching its fundamental scaling limits. Revolutionary breakthroughs in complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology were recently announced by Intel Corporation and International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), with both organizations revealing significant progress in the implementation of hafnium-based high-k dielectrics along with metal gates. This announcement was heralded by Gordon Moore as "...the biggest change in transistor technology since the introduction of polysilicon gate MOS transistors in the late 1960s." Accordingly, the study described herein focuses on the growth of Hf-based dielectrics and Hf-based metal gates using chemical vapor-based deposition methods, specifically metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). A family of Hf source complexes that has received much attention recently due to their desirable properties for implementation in wafer scale manufacturing is the Hf dialkylamide precursors. These precursors are room temperature liquids and possess sufficient volatility and desirable decomposition characteristics for both MOCVD and ALD processing. Another benefit of using these sources is the existence of chemically compatible Si dialkylamide sources as co-precursors for use in Hf silicate growth. The first part of this study investigates properties of MOCVD-deposited HfO2 and HfSixOy using dimethylamido Hf and Si precursor sources using a customized MOCVD reactor. The second part of this study involves a study of wet and dry surface pre-treatments for ALD growth of HfO2 using tetrakis(ethylmethylamido)hafnium in a wafer scale manufacturing environment. The third part of this study is an investigation of

  7. Fuel conditioning facility electrorefiner cadmium vapor trap operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaden, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    Processing sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel at the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West involves an electrometallurgical process employing a molten LiCl-KCl salt covering a pool of molten cadmium. Previous research has shown that the cadmium dissolves in the salt as a gas, diffuses through the salt layer and vaporizes at the salt surface. This cadmium vapor condenses on cool surfaces, causing equipment operation and handling problems. Using a cadmium vapor trap to condense the cadmium vapors and reflux them back to the electrorefiner has mitigated equipment problems and improved electrorefiner operations

  8. Progress at THe-trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoecker, Martin; Eronen, Tommi; Ketter, Jochen; Schuh, Marc; Streubel, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Van Dyck, Robert S. Jr. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1560 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    THe-Trap is a Penning-trap mass spectrometry experiment that is currently being set up to measure the atomic mass ratio of tritium and helium-3 with a relative uncertainty of 10{sup -11}. In 2013, the experiment's first high-precision mass ratio measurement was performed on the ions {sup 12}C{sup 4+} and {sup 16}O{sup 5+}. The carbon-12/oxygen-16 mass ratio is one of the most precisely determined mass ratios and serves as a benchmark for the experiment. This measurement reached a statistical uncertainty of 6.3 . 10{sup -11} and was limited by systematic frequency shifts due to too high motional amplitudes. In the following service cycle, the experiment was modified to address the shortcomings that were discovered in the 2013 ratio measurements. This talk summarizes the results of the 2013 measurements and introduces the upgrades to the experiment, including a new amplifier, a modified ion source, and an improved vacuum system.

  9. Dynamic array of dark optical traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daria, V.R.; Rodrigo, P.J.; Glückstad, J.

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic array of dark optical traps is generated for simultaneous trapping and arbitrary manipulation of multiple low-index microstructures. The dynamic intensity patterns forming the dark optical trap arrays are generated using a nearly loss-less phase-to-intensity conversion of a phase......-encoded coherent light source. Two-dimensional input phase distributions corresponding to the trapping patterns are encoded using a computer-programmable spatial light modulator, enabling each trap to be shaped and moved arbitrarily within the plane of observation. We demonstrate the generation of multiple dark...... optical traps for simultaneous manipulation of hollow "air-filled" glass microspheres suspended in an aqueous medium. (C) 2004 American Institute of Physics....

  10. The charge storage characteristics of ZrO2 nanocrystallite-based charge trap nonvolatile memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhen-Jie; Li Rong; Yin Jiang

    2013-01-01

    ZrO 2 nanocrystallite-based charge trap flash memory capacitors incorporating a (ZrO 2 ) 0.6 (SiO 2 ) 0.4 pseudobinary high-k oxide film as the charge trapping layer were prepared and investigated. The precipitation reaction in the charge trapping layer, forming ZrO 2 nanocrystallites during rapid thermal annealing, was investigated by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was observed that a ZrO 2 nanocrystallite-based memory capacitor after post-annealing at 850 °C for 60 s exhibits a maximum memory window of about 6.8 V, good endurance and a low charge loss of ∼25% over a period of 10 years (determined by extrapolating the charge loss curve measured experimentally), even at 85 °C. Such 850 °C-annealed memory capacitors appear to be candidates for future nonvolatile flash memory device applications

  11. Spatial identification of traps in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures by the combination of lateral and vertical electrical stress measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Anqi; Yang, Xuelin; Cheng, Jianpeng; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Weikun; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Qin, Zhixin; Wang, Maojun; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present a methodology and the corresponding experimental results to identify the exact location of the traps that induce hot electron trapping in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures grown on Si substrates. The methodology is based on a combination of lateral and vertical electrical stress measurements employing three ohmic terminals on the test sample structure with different GaN buffer designs. By monitoring the evolution of the lateral current during lateral as well as vertical stress application, we investigate the trapping/detrapping behaviors of the hot electrons and identify that the traps correlated with current degradation are in fact located in the GaN buffer layers. The trap activation energies (0.38–0.39 eV and 0.57–0.59 eV) extracted from either lateral or vertical stress measurements are in good agreement with each other, also confirming the identification. By further comparing the trapping behaviors in two samples with different growth conditions of an unintentionally doped GaN layer, we conclude that the traps are most likely in the unintentionally doped GaN layer but of different origins. It is suggested that the 0.38–0.39 eV trap is related to residual carbon incorporation while the 0.57–0.59 eV trap is correlated with native defects or complexes

  12. Case Study: Trap Crop with Pheromone Traps for Suppressing Euschistus servus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae in Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Tillman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The brown stink bug, Euschistus servus (Say, can disperse from source habitats, including corn, Zea mays L., and peanut, Arachis hypogaea L., into cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. Therefore, a 2-year on-farm experiment was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench spp. bicolor trap crop, with or without Euschistus spp. pheromone traps, to suppress dispersal of this pest to cotton. In 2004, density of E. servus was lower in cotton fields with sorghum trap crops (with or without pheromone traps compared to control cotton fields. Similarly, in 2006, density of E. servus was lower in cotton fields with sorghum trap crops and pheromone traps compared to control cotton fields. Thus, the combination of the sorghum trap crop and pheromone traps effectively suppressed dispersal of E. servus into cotton. Inclusion of pheromone traps with trap crops potentially offers additional benefits, including: (1 reducing the density of E. servus adults in a trap crop, especially females, to possibly decrease the local population over time and reduce the overwintering population, (2 reducing dispersal of E. servus adults from the trap crop into cotton, and (3 potentially attracting more dispersing E. servus adults into a trap crop during a period of time when preferred food is not prevalent in the landscape.

  13. Diffusion to finite-size traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, P.M.

    1986-01-01

    The survival probability of a random-walking particle is derived for hopping in a random distribution of traps of arbitrary radius and concentration. The single-center approximation is shown to be valid for times of physical interest even when the fraction of volume occupied by traps approaches unity. The theory is based on computation of the number of different potential trap regions sampled in a random walk and is confirmed by simulations on a simple-cubic lattice

  14. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references

  15. Active stabilization of ion trap radiofrequency potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K. G.; Wong-Campos, J. D.; Restelli, A.; Landsman, K. A.; Neyenhuis, B.; Mizrahi, J.; Monroe, C. [Joint Quantum Institute and University of Maryland Department of Physics, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We actively stabilize the harmonic oscillation frequency of a laser-cooled atomic ion confined in a radiofrequency (rf) Paul trap by sampling and rectifying the high voltage rf applied to the trap electrodes. We are able to stabilize the 1 MHz atomic oscillation frequency to be better than 10 Hz or 10 ppm. This represents a suppression of ambient noise on the rf circuit by 34 dB. This technique could impact the sensitivity of ion trap mass spectrometry and the fidelity of quantum operations in ion trap quantum information applications.

  16. How to detect trap cluster systems?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandowski, Arkadiusz

    2008-01-01

    Spatially correlated traps and recombination centres (trap-recombination centre pairs and larger clusters) are responsible for many anomalous phenomena that are difficult to explain in the framework of both classical models, i.e. model of localized transitions (LT) and the simple trap model (STM), even with a number of discrete energy levels. However, these 'anomalous' effects may provide a good platform for identifying trap cluster systems. This paper considers selected cluster-type effects, mainly relating to an anomalous dependence of TL on absorbed dose in the system of isolated clusters (ICs). Some consequences for interacting cluster (IAC) systems, involving both localized and delocalized transitions occurring simultaneously, are also discussed

  17. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references.

  18. Optical Trapping of Ion Coulomb Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Julian; Lambrecht, Alexander; Weckesser, Pascal; Debatin, Markus; Karpa, Leon; Schaetz, Tobias

    2018-04-01

    The electronic and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions can be controlled and coherently coupled on the level of individual quanta. Assembling complex quantum systems ion by ion while keeping this unique level of control remains a challenging task. For many applications, linear chains of ions in conventional traps are ideally suited to address this problem. However, driven motion due to the magnetic or radio-frequency electric trapping fields sometimes limits the performance in one dimension and severely affects the extension to higher-dimensional systems. Here, we report on the trapping of multiple barium ions in a single-beam optical dipole trap without radio-frequency or additional magnetic fields. We study the persistence of order in ensembles of up to six ions within the optical trap, measure their temperature, and conclude that the ions form a linear chain, commonly called a one-dimensional Coulomb crystal. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we access the collective motion and perform spectrometry of the normal modes in the optical trap. Our system provides a platform that is free of driven motion and combines advantages of optical trapping, such as state-dependent confinement and nanoscale potentials, with the desirable properties of crystals of trapped ions, such as long-range interactions featuring collective motion. Starting with small numbers of ions, it has been proposed that these properties would allow the experimental study of many-body physics and the onset of structural quantum phase transitions between one- and two-dimensional crystals.

  19. High Optical Access Trap 2.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-26

    The High Optical Access (HOA) trap was designed in collaboration with the Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer (MUSIQC) team, funded along with Sandia National Laboratories through IARPA's Multi Qubit Coherent Operations (MQCO) program. The design of version 1 of the HOA trap was completed in September 2012 and initial devices were completed and packaged in February 2013. The second version of the High Optical Access Trap (HOA-2) was completed in September 2014 and is available at IARPA's disposal.

  20. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, S.

    1995-01-01

    The basic ideas of laser cooling and atom trapping will be discussed. These techniques have applications in spectroscopy, metrology, nuclear physics, biophysics, geophysics, and polymer science. (author)

  1. High-resolution magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic study of Ethiopian traps-related products in Oligocene sediments from the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchard, Yannick; Rochette, Pierre; Aubry, Marie Pierre; Michard, Annie

    2003-02-01

    Volcanic traps correspond typically to aerial emissions of more than 10 6 km 3 of magma over 1 Myr periods. The potential global impact of such emissions makes the precise correlation of traps with the global magnetobiochronologic timescale an important task. Our study is focused on the Ethiopian traps which correspond to the birth of the Afar hotspot at the triple junction between the Red Sea, Aden Gulf and East-African rift. The Ethiopian traps have a significant acidic component (about 10% of the traps by volume) which enables more efficient stratospheric aerosol diffusion than for the main basaltic eruptions. Furthermore, a magnetostratigraphy is well established for the traps: traps activity began in Chron C11r.2r and ended in Chron C11r.1r or C10r, with well clustered 40Ar/ 39Ar ages at 30±0.5 Ma. Four tephra layers, marked by prominent magnetic susceptibility peaks, occur in Oligocene sections of sites from Ocean Drilling Program Leg 115, drilled in the southern Indian Ocean near Madingley Rise, 2600 km away from the Ethiopian traps. In order to demonstrate that these tephra layers are related to the Ethiopian traps, a high-resolution study of sites 709 and 711 was undertaken, involving magnetostratigraphy and nannofossil stratigraphy, together with isotopic and geochemical characterization of the tephra. Geochemical analyses and isotope ratios of the glass shards indicate the same acid continental source for these tephras which is compatible with the Ethiopian signature. Moreover, Hole 711A provides a reliable magnetostratigraphy for the Oligocene (Chrons 13-9). The tephra layers occur in the interval spanning Chrons C11n.2n-C11n.1n which agrees with the positions of acidic layers in the traps. Calcareous nannofossil stratigraphy confirms the magnetostratigraphic interpretation, with the NP23/24 zonal boundary occurring within the interval containing the tephra layers. Hole 709B supports the results from Hole 711A. Thus, the Ethiopian traps can be

  2. Laser-cooling and electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.D.; Migdall, A.L.; Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Until recently it has been impossible to confine and trap neutral atoms using electromagnetic fields. While many proposals for such traps exist, the small potential energy depth of the traps and the high kinetic energy of available atoms prevented trapping. We review various schemes for atom trapping, the advances in laser cooling of atomic beams which have now made trapping possible, and the successful magnetic trapping of cold sodium atoms

  3. Numerical double layer solutions with ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, D.; Soerensen, J.

    1982-08-01

    Maxwell's equation div D = ro in one dimension is solved numerically, taking ionization into account. Time independent anode sheath and double layer solutions are obtained. By varying voltage, neutral gas pressure, temperature of the trapped ions on the cathode side and density and temperature of the trapped electrones on the anode side, diagrams are constructed that show permissible combinations of these parameters. Results from a recent experiment form a subset. Distribution functions, the Langmuir condition, some scaling laws and a possible application to the lower ionosphere are discussed. (Authors)

  4. Depth profiling of oxide-trapped charges in 6H-SiC MOS structures by slant etching method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Kazunari; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Kazunori [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Coll. of Science and Technology; Yoshikawa, Masahito; Ohshima, Takeshi; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Nashiyama, Isamu

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to evaluate the depth profile of trapped charges in an oxide layer on SiC. Using this method, 6H-SiC MOS structures with different oxide thickness were fabricated on the same substrate under the same oxidation condition, and the depth profile of oxide-trapped charges before and after {sup 60}Co-gamma ray irradiation were obtained. It is found, from the depth profiling, that the trapping mechanism of electrons and holes in the oxide strongly depends on the bias polarity during irradiation, and these charges are trapped near 6H-SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface. We believe that this method is very useful for estimation of the oxide-trapped charges in 6H-SiC MOS structures. (author)

  5. Secretion Trap Tagging of Secreted and Membrane-Spanning Proteins Using Arabidopsis Gene Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Groover; Joseph R. Fontana; Juana M. Arroyo; Cristina Yordan; W. Richard McCombie; Robert A. Martienssen

    2003-01-01

    Secreted and membrane-spanning proteins play fundamental roles in plant development but pose challenges for genetic identification and characterization. We describe a "secretion trap" screen for gene trap insertions in genes encoding proteins routed through the secretory pathway. The gene trap transposon encodes a ß-glucuronidase reporter enzyme...

  6. Thickness-modulated anisotropic ferromagnetism in Fe-doped epitaxial HfO2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenlong; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Ruyi; Ma, Rong; Wang, Hong

    2017-10-01

    Epitaxial tetragonal Fe-doped Hf0.95Fe0.05O2 (FHO) thin films with various thicknesses were deposited on (001)-oriented NdCaAlO4 (NCAO) substrates by using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) system. The crystal structure and epitaxial nature of the FHO thin films were confirmed by typical x-ray diffraction (XRD) θ-2θ scan and reciprocal space mapping (RSM). The results indicate that two sets of lattice sites exist with two different crystal orientations [(001) and (100)] in the thicker FHO thin films. Further, the intensity of the (100) direction increases with the increase in thicknesses, which should have a significant effect on the anisotropic magnetization of the FHO thin films. Meanwhile, all the FHO thin films possess a tetragonal phase structure. An anisotropy behavior in magnetization has been observed in the FHO thin films. The anisotropic magnetization of the FHO thin films is slowly weakened as the thickness increases. Meanwhile, the saturation magnetization (Ms) of both in-plane and out-of-plane decreases with the increase in the thickness. The change in the anisotropic magnetization and Ms is attributed to the crystal lattice and the variation in the valence of Fe ions. These results indicate that the thickness-modulated anisotropic ferromagnetism of the tetragonal FHO epitaxial thin films is of potential use for the integration of metal-oxide semiconductors with spintronics.

  7. Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometric characterization of HfO2 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M.; Kumari, N.; Karar, V.; Sharma, A. L.

    2018-02-01

    Hafnium Oxide film was deposited on BK7 glass substrate using reactive oxygenated E-Beam deposition technique. The film was deposited using in-situ quartz crystal thickness monitoring to control the film thickness and rate of evaporation. The thin film was grown with a rate of deposition of 0.3 nm/s. The coated substrate was optically characterized using spectrophotometer to determine its transmission spectra. The optical constants as well as film thickness of the hafnia film were extracted by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry with Cauchy fitting at incidence angles of 65˚, 70˚ and 75˚.

  8. Preparation of hafnium metal by calciothermic reduction of HfO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, I.G.; Vijay, P.L.; Sehra, J.C.; Sundaram, C.V.

    1975-01-01

    Hafnium metal powder has been produced by the calciothermic reduction of hafnium oxide. The influence of various experimental parameters - such as amount of calcium in excess of stoichiometric requirement, temperature, and time of reduction - on the yield and purity of the metal has been studied. The metal powder obtained by reduction at 960 0 C (two hours) with a calcium excess of 70% analysed 600 ppm of oxygen and 147 ppm of nitrogen. A reduction efficiency of 96% has been achieved under these conditions. The refining of the powder by electron beam melting, fused salt electrolysis, and iodide process has been studied. The oxygen content in the metal could be brought down from 6900 to 148 ppm by electron beam melt-refining. (author)

  9. Sensor-based atomic layer deposition for rapid process learning and enhanced manufacturability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wei

    In the search for sensor based atomic layer deposition (ALD) process to accelerate process learning and enhance manufacturability, we have explored new reactor designs and applied in-situ process sensing to W and HfO 2 ALD processes. A novel wafer scale ALD reactor, which features fast gas switching, good process sensing compatibility and significant similarity to the real manufacturing environment, is constructed. The reactor has a unique movable reactor cap design that allows two possible operation modes: (1) steady-state flow with alternating gas species; or (2) fill-and-pump-out cycling of each gas, accelerating the pump-out by lifting the cap to employ the large chamber volume as ballast. Downstream quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) sampling is applied for in-situ process sensing of tungsten ALD process. The QMS reveals essential surface reaction dynamics through real-time signals associated with byproduct generation as well as precursor introduction and depletion for each ALD half cycle, which are then used for process learning and optimization. More subtle interactions such as imperfect surface saturation and reactant dose interaction are also directly observed by QMS, indicating that ALD process is more complicated than the suggested layer-by-layer growth. By integrating in real-time the byproduct QMS signals over each exposure and plotting it against process cycle number, the deposition kinetics on the wafer is directly measured. For continuous ALD runs, the total integrated byproduct QMS signal in each ALD run is also linear to ALD film thickness, and therefore can be used for ALD film thickness metrology. The in-situ process sensing is also applied to HfO2 ALD process that is carried out in a furnace type ALD reactor. Precursor dose end-point control is applied to precisely control the precursor dose in each half cycle. Multiple process sensors, including quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and QMS are used to provide real time process information. The

  10. Organic nonvolatile memory devices with charge trapping multilayer graphene film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Yongsung; Choe, Minhyeok; Cho, Byungjin; Song, Sunghoon; Yoon, Jongwon; Ko, Heung Cho; Lee, Takhee

    2012-01-01

    We fabricated an array-type organic nonvolatile memory device with multilayer graphene (MLG) film embedded in polyimide (PI) layers. The memory devices showed a high ON/OFF ratio (over 10 6 ) and a long retention time (over 10 4 s). The switching of the Al/PI/MLG/PI/Al memory devices was due to the presence of the MLG film inserted into the PI layers. The double-log current–voltage characteristics could be explained by the space-charge-limited current conduction based on a charge-trap model. A conductive atomic force microscopy found that the conduction paths in the low-resistance ON state were distributed in a highly localized area, which was associated with a carbon-rich filamentary switching mechanism. (paper)

  11. Slopes To Prevent Trapping of Bubbles in Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Harold E.; Lee, Michael C.; Smith, J. Anthony; Willis, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    The idea of designing a microfluidic channel to slope upward along the direction of flow of the liquid in the channel has been conceived to help prevent trapping of gas bubbles in the channel. In the original application that gave rise to this idea, the microfluidic channels are parts of micro-capillary electrophoresis (microCE) devices undergoing development for use on Mars in detecting compounds indicative of life. It is necessary to prevent trapping of gas bubbles in these devices because uninterrupted liquid pathways are essential for sustaining the electrical conduction and flows that are essential for CE. The idea is also applicable to microfluidic devices that may be developed for similar terrestrial microCE biotechnological applications or other terrestrial applications in which trapping of bubbles in microfluidic channels cannot be tolerated. A typical microCE device in the original application includes, among other things, multiple layers of borosilicate float glass wafers. Microfluidic channels are formed in the wafers, typically by use of wet chemical etching. The figure presents a simplified cross section of part of such a device in which the CE channel is formed in the lowermost wafer (denoted the channel wafer) and, according to the present innovation, slopes upward into a via hole in another wafer (denoted the manifold wafer) lying immediately above the channel wafer. Another feature of the present innovation is that the via hole in the manifold wafer is made to taper to a wider opening at the top to further reduce the tendency to trap bubbles. At the time of reporting the information for this article, an effort to identify an optimum technique for forming the slope and the taper was in progress. Of the techniques considered thus far, the one considered to be most promising is precision milling by use of femtosecond laser pulses. Other similar techniques that may work equally well are precision milling using a focused ion beam, or a small diamond

  12. Inelastic collision rates of trapped metastable hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landhuis, D; Matos, L; Moss, SC; Steinberger, JK; Vant, K; Willmann, L; Greytak, TJ; Kleppner, D

    We report the first detailed decay studies of trapped metastable (2S) hydrogen. By two-photon excitation of ultracold H samples, we have produced clouds of at least 5x10(7) magnetically trapped 2S atoms at densities greater than 4x10(10) cm(-3) and temperatures below 100 muK. At these densities and

  13. Insects in IBL-4 pine weevil traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    I. Skrzecz

    2003-01-01

    Pipe traps (IBL-4) are used in Polish coniferous plantations to monitor and control the pine weevil (Hylobius abietis L.). This study was conducted in a one-year old pine plantation established on a reforested clear-cut area in order to evaluate the impact of these traps on non-target insects. Evaluation of the catches indicated that species of

  14. Modes of oscillation in radiofrequency Paul traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landa, H.; Reznik, B.; Drewsen, M.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the time-dependent dynamics of ion crystals in radiofrequency traps. The problem of stable trapping of general threedimensional crystals is considered and the validity of the pseudopotential approximation is discussed. We analytically derive the micromotion amplitude of the ions...

  15. Spin polarized atom traps and fundamental symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.

    1994-10-01

    Plans are described to couple a neutral atom trap to an upgraded version of TRIUMF's TISOL on-line mass separator. The unique properties of trapped and cooled atoms promise improvements of some symmetry tests of the Standard Model of the electroweak and strong interactions. (author). 33 refs., 3 figs

  16. Astroturf seed traps for studying hydrochory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, M; Geertsema, J; Chang, ER; Veeneklaas, RM; Carey, PD; Bakker, JP

    1. Astroturf mats can effectively trap diaspores dispersed by tidal water. 2. Within four tidal inundations, up to 745 propagules per m(2) and between three and eight different species per astroturf mat were trapped. Overall, 15 different species were collected on the astroturf mats, 10 of which

  17. An Experimental Analysis of Social Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechner, Kevin C.

    1977-01-01

    Social traps, such as the overgrazing of pasturelands, overpopulation, and the extinction of species, are situations where individuals in a group respond for their own advantage in a manner damaging to the group. Alaboratory analog was devised to simulate conditions that produce social traps. The intent was to cause an immediate positive…

  18. Effect of trapping on transport coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barvik, I.; Herman, P.

    1990-10-01

    Influence of a trap (sink) on an exciton transfer in molecular aggregates is investigated. Memory functions entering the generalized master equations are calculated. The presence of the sink changes their analytical form. We used the sink in trimer as example to show that for large trapping rate parameters the rest of the system is decoupled from the sink. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs

  19. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  20. Collective excitations of harmonically trapped ideal gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Schaeybroeck, B.; Lazarides, A.

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically study the collective excitations of an ideal gas confined in an isotropic harmonic trap. We give an exact solution to the Boltzmann-Vlasov equation; as expected for a single-component system, the associated mode frequencies are integer multiples of the trapping frequency. We show

  1. Lobster trap detection at the Saba Bank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van I.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    According to previous studies and anecdotal evidence there are a lot of lost lobster traps at the Saba Bank. One study estimated the loss to be between 210 and 795 lobster traps per year. The Saba Bank is an approximately 2,200 km2 submerged area and spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) is one of the

  2. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  3. Review of statistical analysis of trapped gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmittroth, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    A review was conducted of trapped gas estimates in Hanford waste tanks. Tank waste levels were found to correlate with barometric pressure changes giving the possibility to infer amounts of trapped gas. Previous models of the tank waste level were extended to include other phenomena such as evaporation in a more complete description of tank level changes

  4. Influence of trap construction on mosquito capture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebesta, Oldřich; Peško, Juraj; Gelbič, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2012), s. 209-215 ISSN 1934-7391 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : CDC miniature light traps * baited lard-can traps * mosquitoes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  5. Effect of trap position on the efficiency of trapping in treelike scale-free networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhongzhi; Lin Yuan; Ma Youjun

    2011-01-01

    The conventional wisdom is that the role and impact of nodes on dynamical processes in scale-free networks are not homogenous, because of the presence of highly connected nodes at the tail of their power-law degree distribution. In this paper, we explore the influence of different nodes as traps on the trapping efficiency of the trapping problem taking place on scale-free networks. To this end, we study in detail the trapping problem in two families of deterministically growing scale-free networks with treelike structure: one family is non-fractal, the other is fractal. In the first part of this work, we attack a special case of random walks on the two network families with a perfect trap located at a hub, i.e. node with the highest degree. The second study addresses the case with trap distributed uniformly over all nodes in the networks. For these two cases, we compute analytically the mean trapping time (MTT), a quantitative indicator characterizing the trapping efficiency of the trapping process. We show that in the non-fractal scale-free networks the MTT for both cases follows different scalings with the network order (number of network nodes), implying that trap's position has a significant effect on the trapping efficiency. In contrast, it is presented that for both cases in the fractal scale-free networks, the two leading scalings exhibit the same dependence on the network order, suggesting that the location of trap has no essential impact on the trapping efficiency. We also show that for both cases of the trapping problem, the trapping efficiency is more efficient in the non-fractal scale-free networks than in their fractal counterparts.

  6. Nanoscale Trapping and Squeeze-Out of Confined Alkane Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosvami, N N; O'Shea, S J

    2015-12-01

    We present combined force curve and conduction atomic force microscopy (AFM) data for the linear alkanes CnH2n+2 (n = 10, 12, 14, 16) confined between a gold-coated AFM tip and a graphite surface. Solvation layering is observed in the force curves for all liquids, and conduction AFM is used to study in detail the removal of the confined (mono)layer closest to the graphite surface. The squeeze-out behavior of the monolayer can be very different depending upon the temperature. Below the monolayer melting transition temperatures the molecules are in an ordered state on the graphite surface, and fast and complete removal of the confined molecules is observed. However, above the melting transition temperature the molecules are in a disordered state, and even at large applied pressure a few liquid molecules are trapped within the tip-sample contact zone. These findings are similar to a previous study for branched alkanes [ Gosvami Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 100, 076101 ], but the observation for the linear alkane homologue series demonstrates clearly the dependence of the squeeze-out and trapping on the state of the confined material.

  7. Nano-islands Based Charge Trapping Memory: A Scalability Study

    KAUST Repository

    Elatab, Nazek; Saadat, Irfan; Saraswat, Krishna; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2017-01-01

    Zinc-oxide (ZnO) and zirconia (ZrO2) metal oxides have been studied extensively in the past few decades with several potential applications including memory devices. In this work, a scalability study, based on the ITRS roadmap, is conducted on memory devices with ZnO and ZrO2 nano-islands charge trapping layer. Both nano-islands are deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD), however, the different sizes, distribution and properties of the materials result in different memory performance. The results show that at the 32-nm node charge trapping memory with 127 ZrO2 nano-islands can provide a 9.4 V memory window. However, with ZnO only 31 nano-islands can provide a window of 2.5 V. The results indicate that ZrO2 nano-islands are more promising than ZnO in scaled down devices due to their higher density, higher-k, and absence of quantum confinement effects.

  8. Nano-islands Based Charge Trapping Memory: A Scalability Study

    KAUST Repository

    Elatab, Nazek

    2017-10-19

    Zinc-oxide (ZnO) and zirconia (ZrO2) metal oxides have been studied extensively in the past few decades with several potential applications including memory devices. In this work, a scalability study, based on the ITRS roadmap, is conducted on memory devices with ZnO and ZrO2 nano-islands charge trapping layer. Both nano-islands are deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD), however, the different sizes, distribution and properties of the materials result in different memory performance. The results show that at the 32-nm node charge trapping memory with 127 ZrO2 nano-islands can provide a 9.4 V memory window. However, with ZnO only 31 nano-islands can provide a window of 2.5 V. The results indicate that ZrO2 nano-islands are more promising than ZnO in scaled down devices due to their higher density, higher-k, and absence of quantum confinement effects.

  9. Modified semiclassical approximation for trapped Bose gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukalov, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    A generalization of the semiclassical approximation is suggested allowing for an essential extension of its region of applicability. In particular, it becomes possible to describe Bose-Einstein condensation of a trapped gas in low-dimensional traps and in traps of low confining dimensions, for which the standard semiclassical approximation is not applicable. The result of the modified approach is shown to coincide with purely quantum-mechanical calculations for harmonic traps, including the one-dimensional harmonic trap. The advantage of the semiclassical approximation is in its simplicity and generality. Power-law potentials of arbitrary powers are considered. The effective thermodynamic limit is defined for any confining dimension. The behavior of the specific heat, isothermal compressibility, and density fluctuations is analyzed, with an emphasis on low confining dimensions, where the usual semiclassical method fails. The peculiarities of the thermodynamic characteristics in the effective thermodynamic limit are discussed

  10. Magnetic trapping of cold bromine atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennick, C J; Lam, J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-17

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the millikelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br2 molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are lost only by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential.

  11. Cold trap disposed within a tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reliability and the durability of cold traps by simplifying the structure and recycling liquid metals without using electromagnetic pumps. Constitution: The reactor container is partitioned by an intermediate container enhousing primary recycling pumps and cold traps. The inlet and the exit for the liquid metal of each cold trap are opened to the outside and the inside of the intermediate container respectively. In such a structure, the pressure difference between the inside and the outside of the intermediate container is exerted on the cold traps due to the exhaust pressure of the recycling pumps in which the liquid metal flowing into the cold traps is purified through filters, cooled and then discharged from the exit to the cold plenum. In this way, liquid metal can be recycled without using an electromagnetic pump whose reliability has not yet been established. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. The Aarhus Ion Micro-Trap Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Nielsen, Otto; Poulsen, Gregers

    As part of our involvement in the EU MICROTRAP project, we have designed, manufactured and assembled a micro-scale ion trap with integrated optical fibers. These prealigned fibers will allow delivering cooling laser light to single ions. Therefore, such a trap will not require any direct optical...... and installed in an ultra high vacuum chamber, which includes an ablation oven for all-optical loading of the trap [2]. The next steps on the project are to demonstrate the operation of the micro-trap and the cooling of ions using fiber delivered light. [1] D. Grant, Development of Micro-Scale Ion traps, Master...... Thesis (2008). [2] R.J. Hendricks, D.M. Grant, P.F. Herskind, A. Dantan and M. Drewsen, An all-optical ion-loading technique for scalable microtrap architectures, Applied Physics B, 88, 507 (2007)....

  13. The hidden traps in decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, J S; Keeney, R L; Raiffa, H

    1998-01-01

    Bad decisions can often be traced back to the way the decisions were made--the alternatives were not clearly defined, the right information was not collected, the costs and benefits were not accurately weighted. But sometimes the fault lies not in the decision-making process but rather in the mind of the decision maker. The way the human brain works can sabotage the choices we make. John Hammond, Ralph Keeney, and Howard Raiffa examine eight psychological traps that are particularly likely to affect the way we make business decisions: The anchoring trap leads us to give disproportionate weight to the first information we receive. The statusquo trap biases us toward maintaining the current situation--even when better alternatives exist. The sunk-cost trap inclines us to perpetuate the mistakes of the past. The confirming-evidence trap leads us to seek out information supporting an existing predilection and to discount opposing information. The framing trap occurs when we misstate a problem, undermining the entire decision-making process. The overconfidence trap makes us overestimate the accuracy of our forecasts. The prudence trap leads us to be overcautious when we make estimates about uncertain events. And the recallability trap leads us to give undue weight to recent, dramatic events. The best way to avoid all the traps is awareness--forewarned is forearmed. But executives can also take other simple steps to protect themselves and their organizations from the various kinds of mental lapses. The authors show how to take action to ensure that important business decisions are sound and reliable.

  14. Effect of trapped electrons on the transient current density and luminance of organic light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiun-Haw; Chen, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Bo-Yen; Shih, Yen-Chen; Lin, King-Fu; Wang, Leeyih; Chiu, Tien-Lung; Lin, Chi-Feng

    2018-04-01

    Transient current density and luminance from an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) driven by voltage pulses were investigated. Waveforms with different repetition rate, duty cycle, off-period, and on-period were used to study the injection and transport characteristics of electron and holes in an OLED under pulse operation. It was found that trapped electrons inside the emitting layer (EML) and the electron transporting layer (ETL) material, tris(8-hydroxyquinolate)aluminum (Alq3) helped for attracting the holes into the EML/ETL and reducing the driving voltage, which was further confirmed from the analysis of capacitance-voltage and displacement current measurement. The relaxation time and trapped filling time of the trapped electrons in Alq3 layer were ~200 µs and ~600 µs with 6 V pulse operation, respectively.

  15. Characterisation of retention properties of charge-trapping memory cells at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurchuk, E; Bollmann, J; Mikolajick, T

    2009-01-01

    The density of states of deep level centers in silicon oxynitride layer of SONOS memory cells are calculated from temperature dependent retention measurement. The dominating charge loss mechanisms are direct trap-to-band tunneling (TB) and thermally stimulated emission (TE). Retention measurements at low temperatures (80 - 300K) will be dominated by TE from more 'shallow' traps with energies below 1eV and by TB. Taking into account both independent and rival processes the density of states could be calculated self consisting. The results are in excellent agreement with elsewhere published data.

  16. Characterisation of retention properties of charge-trapping memory cells at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchuk, E.; Bollmann, J.; Mikolajick, T.

    2009-09-01

    The density of states of deep level centers in silicon oxynitride layer of SONOS memory cells are calculated from temperature dependent retention measurement. The dominating charge loss mechanisms are direct trap-to-band tunneling (TB) and thermally stimulated emission (TE). Retention measurements at low temperatures (80 - 300K) will be dominated by TE from more "shallow" traps with energies below 1eV and by TB. Taking into account both independent and rival processes the density of states could be calculated self consisting. The results are in excellent agreement with elsewhere published data.

  17. Layered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  18. Nonlinear spectroscopy of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlawin, Frank; Gessner, Manuel; Mukamel, Shaul; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy employs a series of laser pulses to interrogate dynamics in large interacting many-body systems, and it has become a highly successful method for experiments in chemical physics. Current quantum optical experiments approach system sizes and levels of complexity that require the development of efficient techniques to assess spectral and dynamical features with scalable experimental overhead. However, established methods from optical spectroscopy of macroscopic ensembles cannot be applied straightforwardly to few-atom systems. Based on the ideas proposed in M. Gessner et al., (arXiv:1312.3365), we develop a diagrammatic approach to construct nonlinear measurement protocols for controlled quantum systems, and we discuss experimental implementations with trapped ion technology in detail. These methods, in combination with distinct features of ultracold-matter systems, allow us to monitor and analyze excitation dynamics in both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. They are independent of system size, and they can therefore reliably probe systems in which, e.g., quantum state tomography becomes prohibitively expensive. We propose signals that can probe steady-state currents, detect the influence of anharmonicities on phonon transport, and identify signatures of chaotic dynamics near a quantum phase transition in an Ising-type spin chain.

  19. Laser trapping of radioactive francium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprouse, G.D.; Orozco, L.A.; Simsarian, J.E.; Shi, W.; Zhao, W.Z.

    1997-01-01

    The difficult problem of quickly slowing and cooling nuclear reaction products so that they can be injected into a laser trap has been solved by several groups and there are now strong efforts to work with the trapped atoms. The atoms are confined in the trap to a small spatial volume of the order of 1 mm 3 , but more importantly, they are also confined in velocity, which makes them an ideal sample for spectroscopic measurements with other lasers. We have recently trapped radioactive francium and have embarked on a program to further study the francium atom as a prelude to a test of the Standard Model analogous to previous work with Cs. Our sample of 3 min 210 Fr now contains over 20 000 atoms, and is readily visible with an ordinary TV camera. We work on-line with the accelerator, and continuously load the trap to replace losses due to decay and collisions with background gas. We have maintained a sample of Fr atoms in the trap for over 10 hours, with occasional adjustment of the trapping laser frequency to account for drifts. The proposed test of the Standard Model will require accurate calculation of its atomic properties. We are currently testing these calculations by measuring other predicted quantities. (orig.)

  20. An Open Standard for Camera Trap Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavis Forrester

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Camera traps that capture photos of animals are a valuable tool for monitoring biodiversity. The use of camera traps is rapidly increasing and there is an urgent need for standardization to facilitate data management, reporting and data sharing. Here we offer the Camera Trap Metadata Standard as an open data standard for storing and sharing camera trap data, developed by experts from a variety of organizations. The standard captures information necessary to share data between projects and offers a foundation for collecting the more detailed data needed for advanced analysis. The data standard captures information about study design, the type of camera used, and the location and species names for all detections in a standardized way. This information is critical for accurately assessing results from individual camera trapping projects and for combining data from multiple studies for meta-analysis. This data standard is an important step in aligning camera trapping surveys with best practices in data-intensive science. Ecology is moving rapidly into the realm of big data, and central data repositories are becoming a critical tool and are emerging for camera trap data. This data standard will help researchers standardize data terms, align past data to new repositories, and provide a framework for utilizing data across repositories and research projects to advance animal ecology and conservation.

  1. Single-molecule dynamics in nanofabricated traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam

    2009-03-01

    The Anti-Brownian Electrokinetic trap (ABEL trap) provides a means to immobilize a single fluorescent molecule in solution, without surface attachment chemistry. The ABEL trap works by tracking the Brownian motion of a single molecule, and applying feedback electric fields to induce an electrokinetic motion that approximately cancels the Brownian motion. We present a new design for the ABEL trap that allows smaller molecules to be trapped and more information to be extracted from the dynamics of a single molecule than was previously possible. In particular, we present strategies for extracting dynamically fluctuating mobilities and diffusion coefficients, as a means to probe dynamic changes in molecular charge and shape. If one trapped molecule is good, many trapped molecules are better. An array of single molecules in solution, each immobilized without surface attachment chemistry, provides an ideal test-bed for single-molecule analyses of intramolecular dynamics and intermolecular interactions. We present a technology for creating such an array, using a fused silica plate with nanofabricated dimples and a removable cover for sealing single molecules within the dimples. With this device one can watch the shape fluctuations of single molecules of DNA or study cooperative interactions in weakly associating protein complexes.

  2. Residual CO2 trapping in Indiana limestone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Maghraby, Rehab M; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-02

    We performed core flooding experiments on Indiana limestone using the porous plate method to measure the amount of trapped CO(2) at a temperature of 50 °C and two pressures: 4.2 and 9 MPa. Brine was mixed with CO(2) for equilibration, then the mixture was circulated through a sacrificial core. Porosity and permeability tests conducted before and after 884 h of continuous core flooding confirmed negligible dissolution. A trapping curve for supercritical (sc)CO(2) in Indiana showing the relationship between the initial and residual CO(2) saturations was measured and compared with that of gaseous CO(2). The results were also compared with scCO(2) trapping in Berea sandstone at the same conditions. A scCO(2) residual trapping end point of 23.7% was observed, indicating slightly less trapping of scCO(2) in Indiana carbonates than in Berea sandstone. There is less trapping for gaseous CO(2) (end point of 18.8%). The system appears to be more water-wet under scCO(2) conditions, which is different from the trend observed in Berea; we hypothesize that this is due to the greater concentration of Ca(2+) in brine at higher pressure. Our work indicates that capillary trapping could contribute to the immobilization of CO(2) in carbonate aquifers.

  3. Optical Trapping of Ion Coulomb Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Schmidt

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The electronic and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions can be controlled and coherently coupled on the level of individual quanta. Assembling complex quantum systems ion by ion while keeping this unique level of control remains a challenging task. For many applications, linear chains of ions in conventional traps are ideally suited to address this problem. However, driven motion due to the magnetic or radio-frequency electric trapping fields sometimes limits the performance in one dimension and severely affects the extension to higher-dimensional systems. Here, we report on the trapping of multiple barium ions in a single-beam optical dipole trap without radio-frequency or additional magnetic fields. We study the persistence of order in ensembles of up to six ions within the optical trap, measure their temperature, and conclude that the ions form a linear chain, commonly called a one-dimensional Coulomb crystal. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we access the collective motion and perform spectrometry of the normal modes in the optical trap. Our system provides a platform that is free of driven motion and combines advantages of optical trapping, such as state-dependent confinement and nanoscale potentials, with the desirable properties of crystals of trapped ions, such as long-range interactions featuring collective motion. Starting with small numbers of ions, it has been proposed that these properties would allow the experimental study of many-body physics and the onset of structural quantum phase transitions between one- and two-dimensional crystals.

  4. Laser trapping of 21Na atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian.

    1994-09-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive 21 Na (t l/2 = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped 21 Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of 21 Na → 21 Ne + Β + + v e , which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, 21 Na atoms were produced by bombarding 24 Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The 21 Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined

  5. Biases in Drosophila melanogaster protein trap screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Ilka

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to localise or follow endogenous proteins in real time in vivo is of tremendous utility for cell biology or systems biology studies. Protein trap screens utilise the random genomic insertion of a transposon-borne artificial reporter exon (e.g. encoding the green fluorescent protein, GFP into an intron of an endogenous gene to generate a fluorescent fusion protein. Despite recent efforts aimed at achieving comprehensive coverage of the genes encoded in the Drosophila genome, the repertoire of genes that yield protein traps is still small. Results We analysed the collection of available protein trap lines in Drosophila melanogaster and identified potential biases that are likely to restrict genome coverage in protein trap screens. The protein trap screens investigated here primarily used P-element vectors and thus exhibit some of the same positional biases associated with this transposon that are evident from the comprehensive Drosophila Gene Disruption Project. We further found that protein trap target genes usually exhibit broad and persistent expression during embryonic development, which is likely to facilitate better detection. In addition, we investigated the likely influence of the GFP exon on host protein structure and found that protein trap insertions have a significant bias for exon-exon boundaries that encode disordered protein regions. 38.8% of GFP insertions land in disordered protein regions compared with only 23.4% in the case of non-trapping P-element insertions landing in coding sequence introns (p -4. Interestingly, even in cases where protein domains are predicted, protein trap insertions frequently occur in regions encoding surface exposed areas that are likely to be functionally neutral. Considering the various biases observed, we predict that less than one third of intron-containing genes are likely to be amenable to trapping by the existing methods. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that the

  6. An atom trap relying on optical pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouyer, P.; Lemonde, P.; Ben Dahan, M.; Michaud, A.; Salomon, C.; Dalibard, J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated a new radiation pressure trap which relies on optical pumping and does not require any magnetic field. It employs six circularly polarized divergent beams and works on the red of a J g →J e = J g + 1 atomic transition with J g ≥1/2. We have demonstrated this trap with cesium atoms from a vapour cell using the 852 nm J g = 4→J e = 5 resonance transition. The trap contained up to 3.10 7 atoms in a cloud of 1/√e radius of 330 μm. (orig.)

  7. Effect of layer thickness on the thermal release from Be-D co-deposited layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.

    2014-08-01

    The results of previous work (Baldwin et al 2013 J. Nucl. Mater. 438 S967-70 and Baldwin et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 073005) are extended to explore the influence of layer thickness on the thermal D2 release from co-deposited Be-(0.05)D layers produced at ˜323 K. Bake desorption of layers of thickness 0.2-0.7 µm are explored with a view to examine the influence of layer thickness on the efficacy of the proposed ITER bake procedure, to be carried out at the fixed temperatures of 513 K on the first wall and 623 K in the divertor. The results of experiment and modelling with the TMAP-7 hydrogen transport code, show that thicker Be-D co-deposited layers are relatively more difficult to desorb (time-wise) than thinner layers with the same concentrations of intrinsic traps and retained hydrogen isotope fraction.

  8. Medfly female attractant trapping studies in Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeronimo, F.; Rendon, P.; Villatoro, C.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were conducted from 1994 - 1998 to test the attractiveness of combinations of food-based chemicals for C. capitata (medfly) in Guatemala. Most studies were done in coffee. The 1995 studies, using the FA-2 attractants (ammonium acetate and putrescine) showed that this combination was attractive for females and had potential for use in conjunction with a SIT program. The 1996 studies at three elevations demonstrated that, in general, these attractants, when used in either the Open Bottom Dry Trap (OBDT), Closed Bottom Dry Trap (CBDT), or International Pheromone's McPhail Trap (IPMT) performed better than the Jumbo McPhail trap (JMT) baited with NuLure and borax (NU+B) for capture of feral females. At the high elevation (1400 m), the IPMT with FA-2 and OBDT with FA-2 were best; at the middle elevation (1100 m), the ORDT, IPMT, and CBDT with FA-2 were best; and at low elevations (659 m), the IPMT with FA-2, JMT with NU+B and ORDT with FA-2 were equal in performance. At the middle elevation, using sterile flies, the OBDT with FA-2 worked best. When experiments were carried out in pear, the traps using the FA-2 attractants captured more female flies than the JMT, NU+B, but not significantly more. During the 1997 trials, a third component, trimethylamine was added to the two component lure (FA-3). This attractant was tested in a number of locally produced traps using 2 I soft drink bottles with different color bottoms. The dry versions of the traps contained a yellow sticky insert. All study sites were at low elevation 600 - 650 m, in coffee, testing both sterile and feral flies. With the feral flies during the first phase of the study at finca San Carlos, there were no significant differences between treatments, at finca San Luis, the clear local trap with sticky insert and the green local trap with sticky insert were best, and at finca Valapraiso, the green local trap with yellow sticky insert and yellow local trap with sticky insert captured more flies

  9. Chemical vapor deposited monolayer MoS2 top-gate MOSFET with atomic-layer-deposited ZrO2 as gate dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaoqiao; Jiang, Huaxing; Lau, Kei May; Li, Qiang

    2018-04-01

    For the first time, ZrO2 dielectric deposition on pristine monolayer MoS2 by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is demonstrated and ZrO2/MoS2 top-gate MOSFETs have been fabricated. ALD ZrO2 overcoat, like other high-k oxides such as HfO2 and Al2O3, was shown to enhance the MoS2 channel mobility. As a result, an on/off current ratio of over 107, a subthreshold slope of 276 mV dec-1, and a field-effect electron mobility of 12.1 cm2 V-1 s-1 have been achieved. The maximum drain current of the MOSFET with a top-gate length of 4 μm and a source/drain spacing of 9 μm is measured to be 1.4 μA μm-1 at V DS = 5 V. The gate leakage current is below 10-2 A cm-2 under a gate bias of 10 V. A high dielectric breakdown field of 4.9 MV cm-1 is obtained. Gate hysteresis and frequency-dependent capacitance-voltage measurements were also performed to characterize the ZrO2/MoS2 interface quality, which yielded an interface state density of ˜3 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1.

  10. Separation of effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge on mobility in irradiated power MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zupac, D.; Galloway, K.F.; Khosropour, P.; Anderson, S.R.; Schrimpf, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    An effective approach to separating the effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge on mobility degradation in irradiated MOSFETs is demonstrated. It is based on analyzing mobility data sets which have different functional relationships between the radiation-induced-oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge. Separation of effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge is possible only if these two trapped charge components are not linearly dependent. A significant contribution of oxide-trapped charge to mobility degradation is demonstrated and quantified

  11. Radionuclide trap for liquid metal cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.; Brehm, W.F.

    1978-10-01

    At liquid metal cooled reactor operating temperatures, radioactive corrosion product transport and deposition in the primary system will be sufficiently high to limit access time for maintenance of system components. A radionuclide trap has been developed to aid in controlling radioactivity transport. This is a device which is located above the reactor core and which acts as a getter, physically immobilizing radioactive corrosion products, particularly 54 Mn. Nickel is the getter material used. It is most effective at temperatures above 450 0 C and effectiveness increases with increasing temperature. Prototype traps have been tested in sodium loops for 40,000 hours at reactor primary temperatures and sodium velocities. Several possible in-reactor trap sites were considered but a location within the top of each driver assembly was chosen as the most convenient and effective. In this position the trap is changed each time fuel is changed

  12. Comments on 'Generation of Deccan Trap magmas'

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R.Narasimhan(krishtel emaging)1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Comments on 'Generation of Deccan Trap magmas' by Gautam Sen ... Department of Geology & Geophysics, School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology (SOEST), University of .... Mahoney J J, Sheth H C, Chandrasekharan D and Peng Z.

  13. AEgIS antihydrogen production trap

    CERN Multimedia

    Caraban Gonzalez, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    During technical stop 2017 the AEgIS experiment was open for upgrades and maintenance. We had the opportunity to take some 360 images from inside and see where antiprotons are ¨trapped¨ and anti-Hydrogen produced.

  14. Vapour trap development and operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansing, W.; Kirchner, G.; Menck, J.

    1977-01-01

    Sodium aerosols have the unpleasant characteristic that they deposit at places with low temperature level. This effect can be utilized when sodium aerosols are to be trapped at places which are determined beforehand. Thus vapour traps were developed which can filter sodium vapour from the cover gas. By this means the necessity was eliminated to heat all gas lines and gas systems with trace heaters just as all sodium lines are heated. It was of special interest for the INTERATOM to develop vapour traps which must not be changed or cleaned after a certain limited operating period. The vapour traps were supposed to enable maintenance free operation, i.e. they were to operate 'self cleaning'

  15. ATRAP on the way to trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Grzonka, D; Gabrielse, G; Goldenbaum, F; Hänsch, T W; Hessels, E A; Larochelle, P; Le Sage, D; Levitt, B; Oelert, W; Pittner, H; Sefzick, T; Speck, A; Storry, C H; Walz, J; Zhang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The ATRAP experiment at the CERN antiproton decelerator AD aims for a test of the CPT invariance by a high precision comparison of the 1s‐2s transition in the hydrogen and the antihydrogen atom. Antihydrogen production is routinely operated at ATRAP and detailed studies have been performed in order to optimize the production efficiency of useful antihydrogen. The shape parameters of the antiproton and positron clouds, the n‐state distribution of the produced Rydberg antihydrogen atoms and the antihydrogen velocity have been studied. Furthermore an alternative method of laser controlled antihydrogen production was successfully applied. For high precision measurements of atomic transitions cold antihydrogen in the ground state is required which must be trapped due to the low number of available antihydrogen atoms compared to the cold hydrogen beam used for hydrogen spectroscopy. To ensure a reasonable antihydrogen trapping efficiency a magnetic trap has to be superposed the nested Penning trap. First trappi...

  16. Defect trapping of deuterium implanted in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Y.; Kakeno, M.; Yamada, K.; Hioki, T.; Kawamoto, J.

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of deuterium implanted in Al was studied by the D( 3 He,p) 4 He and the D(d,p)T nuclear reactions. Changes of the depth profiles of the deuterium after heat treatments indicated that the implanted deuterium was trapped by the defect produced during the deuterium implantation and the release probability of the trapped deuterium increased as the specimen temperature was raised. Assuming a thermal equilibrium locally in the region of high defect concentration, the trapping energy of deuterium in Al was determined to be 0.12eV. Since the release probability for the single crystal was considerably larger than that for the polycrystal specimens, the deuterium was considered to be strongly trapped in the grain boundaries. Distributions of displaced Al atoms and the recovery of the lattice damage by annealing were measured by the channelling technique. (author)

  17. Curious behavior of optically trapped neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieman, C.; Walker, T.; Sesko, D.; Monroe, C.

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the behavior of clouds of neutral atoms contained in a spontaneous force optical trap. Because of the low temperatures of the atoms ( 5 atoms. These include the expansion of the cloud as the number is increased and dramatic changes in the distribution of the atoms at higher numbers. We can explain much of the collective behavior using a simple model that includes a 1/r 2 force between the atoms arising from the multiple scattering of photons. Finally, we discuss the optical trapping of atoms directly from a low pressure vapor in a small glass cell. We have used these optically trapped atoms to load a magnetostatic trap in the same cell. This provided a high density sample of atoms with a temperature of less than 2 μK

  18. Whistler wave trapping in a density crest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugai, H.; Niki, H.; Inutake, M.; Takeda, S.

    1979-11-01

    The linear trapping process of whistler waves in a field-aligned density crest is investigated theoretically and experimentally below ω = ωsub(c)/2 (half gyrofrequency). The conditions of the crest trapping are derived in terms of the frequency ω/ωsub(c), the incident wave-normal angle theta sub(i), and the density ratio n sub(i)/n sub(o), where n sub(i) and n sub(o) denote the density at the incident point and that at the ridge, respectively. The oscillation length of the trapped ray path is calculated for a parabolic density profile. The experiment on antenna-excited whistler wave has been performed in a large magnetized plasma with the density crest. The phase and amplitude profile of the whistler wave is measured along and across the crest. The measurement has verified characteristic behaviors of the crest trapping. (author)

  19. Methods in mooring deep sea sediment traps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkatesan, R.; Fernando, V.; Rajaraman, V.S.; Janakiraman, G.

    The experience gained during the process of deployment and retrieval of nearly 39 sets of deep sea sediment trap moorings on various ships like FS Sonne, ORV Sagarkanya and DSV Nand Rachit are outlined. The various problems encountered...

  20. Sodium hydride precipitation in sodium cold traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPheeters, C.C.; Raue, D.J.

    1980-06-01

    A series of experiments have been performed to test a calculational model for precipitation of NaH in sodium cold traps. The calculational model, called ACTMODEL, is a computer simulation that uses the system geometry and operating conditions as input to calculate a mass-transfer coefficient and the distribution of NaH in a cold trap. The ACTMODEL was tested using an analytical cold trap (ACT) that is simple and essentially one-dimensional. The ACT flow and temperature profile can be controlled at any desired condition. The ACT was analyzed destructively after each test to measure the actual NaH distribution. Excellent agreement was obtained between the ACTMODEL simulations and the experiments. Mass-transfer coefficients ranging upward from 6 x 10 -5 m/s were measured in both packless and packed traps. As much as a fourfold increase in precipitation surface area was observed with increasing amount of NaH deposited. 11 figures, 2 tables