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Sample records for hfo2 trapping layer

  1. High performance organic nonvolatile memory transistors based on HfO2 and poly(α-methylstyrene) electret hybrid charge-trapping layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W. C.; He, H. X.; Jing, X. S.; Wu, S. J.; Zhang, Z.; Gao, J. W.; Gao, X. S.; Zhou, G. F.; Lu, X. B.; Liu, J.-M.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we fabricated a high performance flash-type organic nonvolatile memory transistor, which adopted polymer-electret poly(α-methylstyrene) (PαMS) and HfO2 films as hybrid charge trapping layer (CTL). Compared with a single HfO2 or PαMS CTL structure, the hybrid HfO2/PαMS CTL structure can provide enhanced charge trapping efficiency to increase the device operation speed and reduce the leakage current to boost the device reliability. The fabricated nonvolatile organic memory transistors with the hybrid CTL shows excellent electrical properties, including low operation voltage (8 V), high speed (memories.

  2. Effects of biased irradiation on charge trapping in HfO2 dielectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yifei; Zhao, Ce Zhou; Lu, Qifeng; Zhao, Chun; Qi, Yanfei; Lam, Sang; Mitrovic, Ivona Z.; Taylor, Stephen; Chalker, Paul R.

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports the low-dose-rate radiation response of Al-HfO2/SiO2-Si MOS devices, in which the gate dielectric was formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with 5-nm equivalent oxide thickness. The degradation of the devices was characterized by a pulse capacitance-voltage (CV) and on-site radiation response technique under continuous gamma (γ) ray exposure at a relatively low dose rate of 0.116 rad (HfO2)/s. Compared with conventional CV measurements, the proposed measurements extract significant variations of flat-band voltage shift of the hafnium based MOS devices. The large flat-band voltage shift is mainly attributed to the radiation-induced oxide trapped charges, which are not readily compensated by bias-induced charges produced over the measurement timescales (for timescales less than 5 ms). A negative flat-band voltage shift up to -1.02 V was observed under a positive biased irradiation with the total dose up to 40 krad (HfO2) and with the electric field of 0.5 MV/cm. This is attributed to net positive charge generation in the HfO2 oxide layer. The generated charges are transported towards the HfO2/SiO2 interface, and then form effective trapped holes in the HfO2. Similarly, a positive flat-band voltage shift up to 1.1 V was observed from irradiation under negative bias with an electric field of -0.5 MV/cm. The positive shift is mainly due to the accumulation of trapped electrons. Analyses of the experimental results suggest that both hole and electron trapping can dominate the radiation response performance of the HfO2-based MOS devices depending upon the applied bias. It was also found there was no distinct border traps with irradiation in all cases.

  3. Distribution of electron traps in SiO2/HfO2 nMOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao-Hui, Hou; Xue-Feng, Zheng; Ao-Chen, Wang; Ying-Zhe, Wang; Hao-Yu, Wen; Zhi-Jing, Liu; Xiao-Wei, Li; Yin-He, Wu

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the principle of discharge-based pulsed I-V technique is introduced. By using it, the energy and spatial distributions of electron traps within the 4-nm HfO2 layer have been extracted. Two peaks are observed, which are located at ΔE ˜ -1.0 eV and -1.43 eV, respectively. It is found that the former one is close to the SiO2/HfO2 interface and the latter one is close to the gate electrode. It is also observed that the maximum discharge time has little effect on the energy distribution. Finally, the impact of electrical stress on the HfO2 layer is also studied. During stress, no new electron traps and interface states are generated. Meanwhile, the electrical stress also has no impact on the energy and spatial distribution of as-grown traps. The results provide valuable information for theoretical modeling establishment, material assessment, and reliability improvement for advanced semiconductor devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61334002, 61106106, and 61474091), the New Experiment Development Funds for Xidian University, China (Grant No. SY1434), and the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry, China (Grant No. JY0600132501).

  4. Single layer of Ge quantum dots in HfO2 for floating gate memory capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepadatu, A M; Palade, C; Slav, A; Maraloiu, A V; Lazanu, S; Stoica, T; Logofatu, C; Teodorescu, V S; Ciurea, M L

    2017-04-28

    High performance trilayer memory capacitors with a floating gate of a single layer of Ge quantum dots (QDs) in HfO2 were fabricated using magnetron sputtering followed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The layer sequence of the capacitors is gate HfO 2/floating gate of single layer of Ge QDs in HfO 2/tunnel HfO 2/p-Si wafers. Both Ge and HfO2 are nanostructured by RTA at moderate temperatures of 600-700 °C. By nanostructuring at 600 °C, the formation of a single layer of well separated Ge QDs with diameters of 2-3 nm at a density of 4-5 × 10(15) m(-2) is achieved in the floating gate (intermediate layer). The Ge QDs inside the intermediate layer are arranged in a single layer and are separated from each other by HfO2 nanocrystals (NCs) about 8 nm in diameter with a tetragonal/orthorhombic structure. The Ge QDs in the single layer are located at the crossing of the HfO2 NCs boundaries. In the intermediate layer, besides Ge QDs, a part of the Ge atoms is segregated by RTA at the HfO2 NCs boundaries, while another part of the Ge atoms is present inside the HfO2 lattice stabilizing the tetragonal/orthorhombic structure. The fabricated capacitors show a memory window of 3.8 ± 0.5 V and a capacitance-time characteristic with 14% capacitance decay in the first 3000-4000 s followed by a very slow capacitance decrease extrapolated to 50% after 10 years. This high performance is mainly due to the floating gate of a single layer of well separated Ge QDs in HfO2, distanced from the Si substrate by the tunnel oxide layer with a precise thickness.

  5. Interaction of La2O3 capping layers with HfO2 gate dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copel, M.; Guha, S.; Bojarczuk, N.; Cartier, E.; Narayanan, V.; Paruchuri, V.

    2009-11-01

    We report the effect of La2O3 capping layers on HfO2/SiO2/Si dielectrics, proposed for use in threshold voltage tuning of field effect transistors. Depth profiling with medium energy ion scattering shows that an initial surface layer of La2O3 diffuses through the HfO2 at elevated temperatures, ultimately converting some of the thin interfacial SiO2 into a silicate. Core-level photoemission measurements indicate that the additional band-bending induced by the La2O3 only appears after diffusion, and the added charge resides between the HfO2 and the substrate.

  6. Structural and electrical properties of metal ferroelectric insulator semiconductor structure of Al/SrBi2Ta2O9/HfO2/Si using HfO2 as buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A.; Dhar, A.; Bhattacharya, D.; Ray, S. K.

    2008-05-01

    Ferroelectric SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) thin films have been deposited by the radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique on bare p-Si as well as on HfO2 insulating buffer p-Si. XRD patterns revealed the formation of a well-crystallized SBT perovskite thin film on the HfO2 buffer layer. The electrical properties of the metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) structure were characterized by varying thicknesses of the HfO2 layer. The MFIS structure exhibits a maximum clockwise C-V memory window of 1.60 V when the thickness of the HfO2 layer was 12 nm with a lower leakage current density of 6.20 × 10-7 A cm-2 at a positive applied voltage of 7 V. However, the memory window reaches a maximum value of 0.7 V at a bias voltage of ±5 and then decreases due to charge injection in the case of the insulating buffer layer thickness of 3 nm. The density of oxide trapped charges at/near the buffer layer-ferroelectric interface is studied by the voltage stress method. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) and leakage current density (J-V) characteristics of the Al/SBT/HfO2/Si(1 0 0) capacitor indicate that the introduction of the HfO2 buffer layer prevents interfacial diffusion between the SBT thin film and the Si substrate effectively and improves the interface quality. Furthermore, the Al/SBT/HfO2/Si structures exhibit excellent retention characteristics, the high and low capacitance values clearly distinguishable for over 1 h and 30 min. This shows that the proposed Al/SrBi2Ta2O9/HfO2/Si structure is ideally suitable for high performance ferroelectric memories.

  7. The effects of layering in ferroelectric Si-doped HfO2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomenzo, Patrick D.; Takmeel, Qanit; Zhou, Chuanzhen; Liu, Yang; Fancher, Chris M.; Jones, Jacob L.; Moghaddam, Saeed; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2014-08-01

    Atomic layer deposited Si-doped HfO2 thin films approximately 10 nm thick are deposited with various Si-dopant concentrations and distributions. The ferroelectric behavior of the HfO2 thin films are shown to be dependent on both the Si mol. % and the distribution of Si-dopants. Metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor capacitors are shown to exhibit a tunable remanent polarization through the adjustment of the Si-dopant distribution at a constant Si concentration. Inhomogeneous layering of Si-dopants within the thin films effectively lowers the remanent polarization. A pinched hysteresis loop is observed for higher Si-dopant concentrations and found to be dependent on the Si layering distribution.

  8. Epitaxial SrO interfacial layers for HfO2-Si gate stack scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, C.; Frank, M. M.; Bruley, J.; Narayanan, V.; Fompeyrine, J.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the structural and electrical properties of scaled 2 nm HfO2/SrO gate stacks. Thin SrO layers are deposited by molecular beam epitaxy onto (001) p-Si substrates as alternative passivating interfacial layers (ILs) to SiO2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy show that, despite some HfO2-SrO intermixing, the SrO IL acts as a barrier against HfxSiy and SiO2 formation during high-κ deposition. Electrical measurements on metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with TiN metal gates integrated in a low-temperature process flow reveal an equivalent oxide thickness of 5 Å with competitive leakage current and hysteresis and a negative flat band voltage shift, suitable for n-channel transistors.

  9. Silicon surface passivation using thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gope, Jhuma; Vandana; Batra, Neha; Panigrahi, Jagannath; Singh, Rajbir; Maurya, K. K.; Srivastava, Ritu; Singh, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is a potential material for equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) scaling in microelectronics; however, its surface passivation properties particularly on silicon are not well explored. This paper reports investigation on passivation properties of thermally deposited thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition system (ALD) on silicon surface. As-deposited pristine film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with <100 cm/s surface recombination velocity (SRV) vis-à-vis thicker films. Further improvement in passivation quality is achieved with annealing at 400 °C for 10 min where the SRV reduces to ∼20 cm/s. Conductance measurements show that the interface defect density (Dit) increases with film thickness whereas its value decreases after annealing. XRR data corroborate with the observations made by FTIR and SRV data.

  10. Electrical characteristics of multilayered HfO2-Al2O3 charge trapping stacks deposited by ALD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassov, D.; Paskaleva, A.; Guziewicz, E.; Luka, G.; AKrajewski, T.; Kopalko, K.; Wierzbicka, A.; Blagoev, B.

    2016-10-01

    Electrical and charge trapping properties of atomic layer deposited HfO2-Al2O3 multilayer stacks with two different Al2O3 sublayer thicknesses were investigated regarding their implementation in charge trapping non-volatile memories. The effect of post deposition annealing in oxygen at 600°C is also studied. The decreasing Al2O3 thickness increases the stack's dielectric constant and the density of the initial positive oxide charge. The initial oxide charge increases after annealing to ∼6×1012 cm-2 and changes its sign to negative for the stacks with thicker Al2O3. The annealing enhances the dielectric constant of the stacks and reduces their thickness preserving the amorphous status. Nevertheless the annealing is not beneficial for the stacks with thicker Al2O3 as it considerably increases leakage currents. Conduction mechanisms in stacks were considered in terms of hopping conduction at low electric fields, and Fowler- Nordheim tunnelling, Schottky emission and Poole-Frenkel effect at higher ones. Maximum memory windows of about 12 and 16V were obtained for the as-grown structures with higher and lower Al2O3 content, respectively. In latter case additional improvement (the memory window increase up to 23V) is achieved by the annealing.

  11. Influence of different oxidants on the band alignment of HfO2 films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Ji-Bin; Liu Hong-Xia; Gao Bo; Ma Fei; Zhuo Qing-Qing; Hao Yue

    2012-01-01

    Based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),influences of different oxidants on band alignment of HfO2 films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are investigated in this paper.The measured valence band offset (VBO) value for H2O-based HfO2 increases from 3.17 eV to 3.32 eV after annealing,whereas the VBO value for O3-based HfO2 decreases from 3.57 eV to 3.46 eV.The research results indicate that the silicate layer changes in different ways for H2O-based and O3-based HfO2 films after the annealing process,which plays a key role in generating the internal electric field formed by the dipoles.The variations of the dipoles at the interface between the HfO2 and SiO2 after annealing may lead the VBO values of H2O-based and O3-based HfO2 to vary in different ways,which fits with the variation of fiat band (VFB) voltage.

  12. Electrical Characterization of Metal-Insulator-Metal Capacitors with Atomic-Layer-Deposited HfO2 Dielectrics for Radio Frequency Integrated Circuit Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yu-Jian; HUANG Yue; DING Shi-Jin; ZHANG Wei; LIU Ran

    2007-01-01

    Metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors with atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 dielectric and TaN electrodes are investigated for rf integrated circuit applications. For 12nm HfO2, the fabricated capacitor exhibits a high capacitance density of 15.5fF/μm2 at 100kHz, a small leakage current density of 6.4 × 10-9 A/cm2 at 1.8 V and 125℃, a breakdown electric field of 2.6 MV/cm as well as voltage coefficients of capacitance (VCCs) of 2110ppm/V2 and -824 ppm/V at 100kHz. Further, it is deduced that the conduction mechanism in the high field range is dominated by the Poole-Frenkel emission, and the conduction mechanism in the low field range is possibly related to trap-assisted tunnelling. Finally, comparison of various HfO2 MIM capacitors is present,suggesting that the present MIM capacitor is a promising candidate for future rf integrated circuit application.

  13. Bipolar Resistive Switching Characteristics of HfO2/TiO2/HfO2 Trilayer-Structure RRAM Devices on Pt and TiN-Coated Substrates Fabricated by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Kong, Ji-Zhou; Cao, Zheng-Yi; Li, Ai-Dong; Wang, Lai-Guo; Zhu, Lin; Li, Xin; Cao, Yan-Qiang; Wu, Di

    2017-06-01

    The HfO2/TiO2/HfO2 trilayer-structure resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices have been fabricated on Pt- and TiN-coated Si substrates with Pt top electrodes by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The effect of the bottom electrodes of Pt and TiN on the resistive switching properties of trilayer-structure units has been investigated. Both Pt/HfO2/TiO2/HfO2/Pt and Pt/HfO2/TiO2/HfO2/TiN exhibit typical bipolar resistive switching behavior. The dominant conduction mechanisms in low and high resistance states (LRS and HRS) of both memory cells are Ohmic behavior and space-charge-limited current, respectively. It is found that the bottom electrodes of Pt and TiN have great influence on the electroforming polarity preference, ratio of high and low resistance, and dispersion of the operating voltages of trilayer-structure memory cells. Compared to using symmetric Pt top/bottom electrodes, the RRAM cells using asymmetric Pt top/TiN bottom electrodes show smaller negative forming voltage of -3.7 V, relatively narrow distribution of the set/reset voltages and lower ratio of high and low resistances of 102. The electrode-dependent electroforming polarity can be interpreted by considering electrodes' chemical activity with oxygen, the related reactions at anode, and the nonuniform distribution of oxygen vacancy concentration in trilayer-structure of HfO2/TiO2/HfO2 on Pt- and TiN-coated Si. Moreover, for Pt/HfO2/TiO2/HfO2/TiN devices, the TiN electrode as oxygen reservoir plays an important role in reducing forming voltage and improving uniformity of resistive switching parameters.

  14. Atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 and HfO2 on InAlAs: A comparative study of interfacial and electrical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Fan; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Lv, Hong-Liang; Zhang, Yi-Men

    2016-10-01

    Al2O3 and HfO2 thin films are separately deposited on n-type InAlAs epitaxial layers by using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The interfacial properties are revealed by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS). It is demonstrated that the Al2O3 layer can reduce interfacial oxidation and trap charge formation. The gate leakage current densities are 1.37 × 10-6 A/cm2 and 3.22 × 10-6 A/cm2 at +1 V for the Al2O3/InAlAs and HfO2/InAlAs MOS capacitors respectively. Compared with the HfO2/InAlAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor, the Al2O3/InAlAs MOS capacitor exhibits good electrical properties in reducing gate leakage current, narrowing down the hysteresis loop, shrinking stretch-out of the C-V characteristics, and significantly reducing the oxide trapped charge (Q ot) value and the interface state density (D it). Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2010CB327505), the Advanced Research Foundation of China (Grant No. 914xxx803-051xxx111), the National Defense Advance Research Project, China (Grant No. 513xxxxx306), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51302215), the Scientific Research Program Funded by Shaanxi Provincial Education Department, China (Grant No. 14JK1656), and the Science and Technology Project of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2016KRM029).

  15. Enhancement of Endurance in HfO2-Based CBRAM Device by Introduction of a TaN Diffusion Blocking Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Chand, Umesh

    2017-08-05

    We propose a new method to improve resistive switching properties in HfO2 based CBRAM crossbar structure device by introducing a TaN thin diffusion blocking layer between the Cu top electrode and HfO2 switching layer. The Cu/TaN/HfO2/TiN device structure exhibits high resistance ratio of OFF/ON states without any degradation in switching during endurance test. The improvement in the endurance properties of the Cu/TaN/HfO2/TiN CBRAM device is thus attributed to the relatively low amount of Cu migration into HfO2 switching layer.

  16. Enhanced PEC performance of nanoporous Si photoelectrodes by covering HfO2 and TiO2 passivation layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhuo; Ren, Feng; Wu, Hengyi; Wu, Liang; Wang, Xuening; Wang, Jingli; Wan, Da; Zhang, Guozhen; Jiang, Changzhong

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructured Si as the high efficiency photoelectrode material is hard to keep stable in aqueous for water splitting. Capping a passivation layer on the surface of Si is an effective way of protecting from oxidation. However, it is still not clear in the different mechanisms and effects between insulating oxide materials and oxide semiconductor materials as passivation layers. Here, we compare the passivation effects, the photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties, and the corresponding mechanisms between the HfO2/nanoporous-Si and the TiO2/nanoporous-Si by I–V curves, Motte-schottky (MS) curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Although the saturated photocurrent densities of the TiO2/nanoporous Si are lower than that of the HfO2/nanoporous Si, the former is more stable than the later. PMID:28252106

  17. Enhanced PEC performance of nanoporous Si photoelectrodes by covering HfO2 and TiO2 passivation layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhuo; Ren, Feng; Wu, Hengyi; Wu, Liang; Wang, Xuening; Wang, Jingli; Wan, Da; Zhang, Guozhen; Jiang, Changzhong

    2017-03-01

    Nanostructured Si as the high efficiency photoelectrode material is hard to keep stable in aqueous for water splitting. Capping a passivation layer on the surface of Si is an effective way of protecting from oxidation. However, it is still not clear in the different mechanisms and effects between insulating oxide materials and oxide semiconductor materials as passivation layers. Here, we compare the passivation effects, the photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties, and the corresponding mechanisms between the HfO2/nanoporous-Si and the TiO2/nanoporous-Si by I-V curves, Motte-schottky (MS) curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Although the saturated photocurrent densities of the TiO2/nanoporous Si are lower than that of the HfO2/nanoporous Si, the former is more stable than the later.

  18. Growth and properties of hafnicone and HfO(2)/hafnicone nanolaminate and alloy films using molecular layer deposition techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung H; Anderson, Virginia R; George, Steven M

    2014-10-08

    Molecular layer deposition (MLD) of the hafnium alkoxide polymer known as "hafnicone" was grown using sequential exposures of tetrakis(dimethylamido) hafnium (TDMAH) and ethylene glycol (EG) as the reactants. In situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) experiments demonstrated self-limiting reactions and linear growth versus the number of TDMAH/EG reaction cycles. Ex situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) analysis confirmed linear growth and measured the density of the hafnicone films. The hafnicone growth rates were temperature-dependent and decreased from 1.2 Å per cycle at 105 °C to 0.4 Å per cycle at 205 °C. The measured density was ∼3.0 g/cm(3) for the hafnicone films at all temperatures. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed very uniform and conformal hafnicone films. The XRR studies also showed that the hafnicone films were very stable with time. Nanoindentation measurements determined that the elastic modulus and hardness of the hafnicone films were 47 ± 2 and 2.6 ± 0.2 GPa, respectively. HfO2/hafnicone nanolaminate films also were fabricated using HfO2 atomic layer deposition (ALD) and hafnicone MLD at 145 °C. The in situ QCM measurements revealed that HfO2 ALD nucleation on the hafnicone MLD surface required at least 18 TDMAH/H2O cycles. Hafnicone alloys were also fabricated by combining HfO2 ALD and hafnicone MLD at 145 °C. The composition of the hafnicone alloy was varied by adjusting the relative number of TDMAH/H2O ALD cycles and TDMAH/EG MLD cycles in the reaction sequence. The electron density changed continuously from 8.2 × 10(23) e(-)/cm(3) for pure hafnicone MLD films to 2.4 × 10(24) e(-)/cm(3) for pure HfO2 ALD films. These hafnicone films and the HfO2/hafnicone nanolaminates and alloys may be useful for flexible thin-film devices.

  19. Electron trapping properties at HfO2/SiO2 interface, studied by Kelvin probe force microscopy and theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Man-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Electron trapping properties at the HfO2/SiO2 interface have been measured through Kelvin Probe force microscopy, between room temperature and 90 °C. The electron diffusion in HfO2 shows a multiple-step process. After injection, electrons diffuse quickly toward the HfO2/SiO2 interface and then diffuse laterally near the interface in two sub-steps: The first is a fast diffusion through shallow trap centers and the second is a slow diffusion through deep trap centers. Evolution of contact potential difference profile in the fast lateral diffusion sub-step was simulated by solving a diffusion equation with a term describing the charge loss. In this way, the diffusion coefficient and the average life time at different temperatures were extracted. A value of 0.57 eV was calculated for the activation energy of the shallow trap centers in HfO2. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61176080).

  20. SnO2 anode surface passivation by atomic layer deposited HfO2 improves li-ion battery performance

    KAUST Repository

    Yesibolati, Nulati

    2014-03-14

    For the first time, it is demonstrated that nanoscale HfO2 surface passivation layers formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) significantly improve the performance of Li ion batteries with SnO2-based anodes. Specifically, the measured battery capacity at a current density of 150 mAg -1 after 100 cycles is 548 and 853 mAhg-1 for the uncoated and HfO2-coated anodes, respectively. Material analysis reveals that the HfO2 layers are amorphous in nature and conformably coat the SnO2-based anodes. In addition, the analysis reveals that ALD HfO2 not only protects the SnO2-based anodes from irreversible reactions with the electrolyte and buffers its volume change, but also chemically interacts with the SnO2 anodes to increase battery capacity, despite the fact that HfO2 is itself electrochemically inactive. The amorphous nature of HfO2 is an important factor in explaining its behavior, as it still allows sufficient Li diffusion for an efficient anode lithiation/delithiation process to occur, leading to higher battery capacity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Enhanced non-volatile memory characteristics with quattro-layer graphene nanoplatelets vs . 2.85-nm Si nanoparticles with asymmetric Al2O3/HfO2 tunnel oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Turgut, Berk Berkan; Okyay, Ali K.; Nayfeh, Munir; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a non-volatile metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) memory with Quattro-layer graphene nanoplatelets as charge storage layer with asymmetric Al2O3/HfO2 tunnel oxide and we compare it to the same memory structure with 2.85-nm Si nanoparticles charge trapping layer. The results show that graphene nanoplatelets with Al2O3/HfO2 tunnel oxide allow for larger memory windows at the same operating voltages, enhanced retention, and endurance characteristics. The measurements are further confirmed by plotting the energy band diagram of the structures, calculating the quantum tunneling probabilities, and analyzing the charge transport mechanism. Also, the required program time of the memory with ultra-thin asymmetric Al2O3/HfO2 tunnel oxide with graphene nanoplatelets storage layer is calculated under Fowler-Nordheim tunneling regime and found to be 4.1 ns making it the fastest fully programmed MOS memory due to the observed pure electrons storage in the graphene nanoplatelets. With Si nanoparticles, however, the program time is larger due to the mixed charge storage. The results confirm that band-engineering of both tunnel oxide and charge trapping layer is required to enhance the current non-volatile memory characteristics.

  2. Capacitance-voltage and retention characteristics of Pt/SrBi2Ta2O9/HfO2/Si structures with various buffer layer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M. H.; Sun, Z. H.; Zhou, Y. C.; Sugiyama, Y.; Ishiwara, H.

    2009-05-01

    The metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) structure diodes with SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) as ferroelectric thin film and HfO2 as insulating buffer layer were fabricated. The electrical properties of MFIS structure were investigated for different HfO2 buffer layer thickness. The experimental results show that the memory window extended significantly as the HfO2 layer thickness increased from 6 to 10 nm. It is also observed that the leakage current was reduced to about 10-10 A at applied voltage of 4 V, and the high and low capacitances remained distinguishable for over 8 h even if we extrapolate the measured data to 10 years.

  3. The initial atomic layer deposition of HfO2/Si(001) as followed in situ by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, Massimo; Karavaev, Konstantin; Schmeisser, Dieter

    2008-09-01

    We have grown HfO2 on Si(001) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using HfCl4 and H2O as precursors. The early stages of the ALD were investigated with high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We observed the changes occurring in the Si2p, O1s, Hf4f, Hf4d, and Cl2p core level lines after each ALD cycle up to the complete formation of two layers of HfO2. From the analysis of those variations, we deduced the growth properties of HfO2. The first layer consists of a sparse and Cl-contaminated oxide because of the incomplete oxidation, and the second layer is denser than the first one and with an almost stoichiometric O /Hf ratio. At the completion of the second layer, the x-ray absorption spectra revealed the change of the Hf-oxide chemical state due to the transition from the thin Hf-oxide to the bulklike HfO2.

  4. Memory Effect of Metal-Oxide-Silicon Capacitors with Self-Assembly Double-Layer Au Nanocrystals Embedded in Atomic-Layer-Deposited HfO_2 Dielectric

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yue; GOU Hong-Yan; SUN Qing-Qing; DING Shi-Jin; ZHANG Wei; ZHANG Shi-Li

    2009-01-01

    We report the chemical self-assembly growth of Au nanocrystals on atomic-layer-deposited HfO_2 films aminosilanized by (3-Aminopropyl)-trimethoxysilane aforehand for memory applications.The resulting Au nanocrystals show a density of about 4×10~(11) cm~(-2) and a diameter range of 5-8nm.The metal-oxide-silicon capacitor with double-layer Au nanocrystals embedded in HfO2 dielectric exhibits a large C - V hysteresis window of 11.9 V for ±11 V gate voltage sweeps at 1 MHz, a fiat-band voltage shift of 1.5 V after the electrical stress under 7 V for I ms, a leakage current density of 2.9 ×10~(-8) A/cm~(-2) at 9 V and room temperature.Compared to single-layer Au nanocrystals, the double-layer Au nanocrystals increase the hysteresis window significantly, and the underlying mechanism is thus discussed.

  5. Thirty-Day-Long Data Retention in Ferroelectric-Gate Field-Effect Transistors with HfO2 Buffer Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Aizawa, Koji; Park, Byung-Eun; Ishiwara, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    Metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) diodes and p-channel MFIS field-effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated and their electrical properties were characterized. These MFIS structures were formed using HfO2 as an insulating buffer layer, and SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) and (Bi,La)4Ti3O12 (BLT) as ferroelectric films. HfO2 buffer layers of about 8 nm physical thickness were deposited by ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) electron-beam evaporation, then ferroelectric films of about 400 nm thickness were deposited by sol-gel spin coating. The fabricated p-channel MFIS-FETs with the SBT/HfO2 gate structure exhibited a drain current on/off ratio larger than 103 even after 30 days had elapsed. It was also found that the degradation of ferroelectricity was not pronounced even after applying 2.2× 1011 bipolar pulses.

  6. Comparison of HfAlO, HfO2/Al2O3, and HfO2 on n-type GaAs using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Lv, Hongliang; Zhang, Yuming; Zhang, Yimen; Liu, Chen

    2016-11-01

    Different high-permittivity (high-k) gate dielectric structures of HfO2, HfAlO, and HfO2/Al2O3 deposited on HF-etched n-GaAs using ALD have been investigated. It has been demonstrated that the stacked structure of HfO2/Al2O3 has the lowest interface state density of 8.12 × 1012eV-1 cm-2 due to the "self-cleaning" reaction process, but the sample of HfAlO shows much better frequency dispersion and much higher dielectric permittivity extracted from the C-V curves. The investigation reveals that the electrical properties of gate dielectrics are improved by introducing alumina into HfO2.

  7. Effects of annealing on electrical performance of multilayer MoS2 transistors with atomic layer deposited HfO2 gate dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming; Xu, Jingping; Liu, Lu; Lai, Pui-To; Tang, Wing-Man

    2016-09-01

    Atomic layer deposited HfO2 annealed in different ambients (N2, O2, and NH3) is used to replace SiO2 as a gate dielectric for fabricating back-gated multilayer MoS2 transistors. Excellent electrical properties such as a mobility of 15.1 cm2/(V·s), an on/off ratio exceeding 107, and a hysteresis of 0.133 V are achieved for samples annealed in NH3 at 400 °C for 10 min. This is caused by the NH3 annealing passivation effects that reduce defective states in the HfO2 dielectric and the interface. The capacitance equivalent thickness is only 7.85 nm, which is quite small for a back-gated MoS2 transistor and is conducive to the scaling down of the device.

  8. Effects of the oxygen precursor on the electrical and structural properties of HfO2 films grown by atomic layer deposition on Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, S.; Wiemer, C.; Tallarida, G.; Scarel, G.; Ferrari, S.; Seguini, G.; Fanciulli, M.

    2005-09-01

    We report on the growth by atomic layer deposition of HfO2 films on HF-last treated Ge(001) substrates using HfCl4 as a Hf source and either O3 or H2O as oxygen sources. The choice of the oxygen precursor strongly influences the structural, chemical, and electrical properties of the HfO2 films: Those grown using H2O exhibit local epitaxial growth, a large amount of contaminants such as chlorine and carbon, and a large frequency dispersion of the capacitance-voltage (C -V) characteristics. Films grown using O3 are good insulators and exhibit well-shaped C -V curves with a minimum frequency dispersion of the accumulation capacitance. Moreover, they are smoother, less crystallized, and with a lower contaminant content than those grown using H2O. However, the use of O3 leads to the formation of a 2nm thick layer, possibly GeOx, at the HfO2/Ge interface.

  9. Examination of flatband and threshold voltage tuning of HfO2/TiN field effect transistors by dielectric cap layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, S.; Paruchuri, V. K.; Copel, M.; Narayanan, V.; Wang, Y. Y.; Batson, P. E.; Bojarczuk, N. A.; Linder, B.; Doris, B.

    2007-02-01

    The authors have examined the role of sub nanometer La2O3 and LaN cap layers interposed in Si /HfO2/TiN high-k gate dielectric stacks in tuning the flatband and threshold voltages of capacitors and transistors. High performance, band edge n metal oxide field effect transistors with channel lengths down to 60nm may be fabricated without significant compromise in mobility, electrical thickness, and threshold voltage. They have carried out a microstructural evaluation of these stacks and correlated these results with the electrical behavior of the devices.

  10. Simulation study of HEMT structures with HfO2 cap layer for mitigating inverse piezoelectric effect related device failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepthi Nagulapally

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Inverse Piezoelectric Effect (IPE is thought to contribute to possible device failure of GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs. Here we focus on a simulation study to probe the possible mitigation of the IPE by reducing the internal electric fields and related elastic energy through the use of high-k materials. Inclusion of a HfO2 “cap layer” above the AlGaN barrier particularly with a partial mesa structure is shown to have potential advantages. Simulations reveal even greater reductions in the internal electric fields by using “field plates” in concert with high-k oxides.

  11. Interfacial Layer Growth Condition Dependent Carrier Transport Mechanisms in HfO2/SiO2 Gate Stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Misra, D.

    2012-06-04

    The temperature and field dependent leakage current in HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} gate stack for in situ steam grown and chemical interfacial layers (ILs) are studied in the temperature range of 20 C to 105 C. Poole-Frenkel mechanism in high field whereas Ohmic conduction in low field region are dominant for both devices. Leakage current decreases whereas both trap energy level ({phi}{sub t}) and activation energy (E{sub a}) increase for chemically grown IL devices. The trap level energy, ({phi}{sub t}) -0.2 eV, indicates that doubly charged oxygen vacancies (V{sup 2-}) are the active electron traps which contribute to the leakage current in these gate stacks.

  12. Trapped charge densities in Al2O3-based silicon surface passivation layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Paul M.; Simon, Daniel K.; Mikolajick, Thomas; Dirnstorfer, Ingo

    2016-06-01

    In Al2O3-based passivation layers, the formation of fixed charges and trap sites can be strongly influenced by small modifications in the stack layout. Fixed and trapped charge densities are characterized with capacitance voltage profiling and trap spectroscopy by charge injection and sensing, respectively. Al2O3 layers are grown by atomic layer deposition with very thin (˜1 nm) SiO2 or HfO2 interlayers or interface layers. In SiO2/Al2O3 and HfO2/Al2O3 stacks, both fixed charges and trap sites are reduced by at least a factor of 5 compared with the value measured in pure Al2O3. In Al2O3/SiO2/Al2O3 or Al2O3/HfO2/Al2O3 stacks, very high total charge densities of up to 9 × 1012 cm-2 are achieved. These charge densities are described as functions of electrical stress voltage, time, and the Al2O3 layer thickness between silicon and the HfO2 or the SiO2 interlayer. Despite the strong variation of trap sites, all stacks reach very good effective carrier lifetimes of up to 8 and 20 ms on p- and n-type silicon substrates, respectively. Controlling the trap sites in Al2O3 layers opens the possibility to engineer the field-effect passivation in the solar cells.

  13. Material insights of HfO2-based integrated 1-transistor-1-resistor resistive random access memory devices processed by batch atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Gang; Kim, Hee-Dong; Roelofs, Robin; Perez, Eduardo; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Zaumseil, Peter; Costina, Ioan; Wenger, Christian

    2016-06-01

    With the continuous scaling of resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices, in-depth understanding of the physical mechanism and the material issues, particularly by directly studying integrated cells, become more and more important to further improve the device performances. In this work, HfO2-based integrated 1-transistor-1-resistor (1T1R) RRAM devices were processed in a standard 0.25 μm complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process line, using a batch atomic layer deposition (ALD) tool, which is particularly designed for mass production. We demonstrate a systematic study on TiN/Ti/HfO2/TiN/Si RRAM devices to correlate key material factors (nano-crystallites and carbon impurities) with the filament type resistive switching (RS) behaviours. The augmentation of the nano-crystallites density in the film increases the forming voltage of devices and its variation. Carbon residues in HfO2 films turn out to be an even more significant factor strongly impacting the RS behaviour. A relatively higher deposition temperature of 300 °C dramatically reduces the residual carbon concentration, thus leading to enhanced RS performances of devices, including lower power consumption, better endurance and higher reliability. Such thorough understanding on physical mechanism of RS and the correlation between material and device performances will facilitate the realization of high density and reliable embedded RRAM devices with low power consumption.

  14. Material insights of HfO2-based integrated 1-transistor-1-resistor resistive random access memory devices processed by batch atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Gang; Kim, Hee-Dong; Roelofs, Robin; Perez, Eduardo; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Zaumseil, Peter; Costina, Ioan; Wenger, Christian

    2016-06-17

    With the continuous scaling of resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices, in-depth understanding of the physical mechanism and the material issues, particularly by directly studying integrated cells, become more and more important to further improve the device performances. In this work, HfO2-based integrated 1-transistor-1-resistor (1T1R) RRAM devices were processed in a standard 0.25 μm complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process line, using a batch atomic layer deposition (ALD) tool, which is particularly designed for mass production. We demonstrate a systematic study on TiN/Ti/HfO2/TiN/Si RRAM devices to correlate key material factors (nano-crystallites and carbon impurities) with the filament type resistive switching (RS) behaviours. The augmentation of the nano-crystallites density in the film increases the forming voltage of devices and its variation. Carbon residues in HfO2 films turn out to be an even more significant factor strongly impacting the RS behaviour. A relatively higher deposition temperature of 300 °C dramatically reduces the residual carbon concentration, thus leading to enhanced RS performances of devices, including lower power consumption, better endurance and higher reliability. Such thorough understanding on physical mechanism of RS and the correlation between material and device performances will facilitate the realization of high density and reliable embedded RRAM devices with low power consumption.

  15. Material insights of HfO2-based integrated 1-transistor-1-resistor resistive random access memory devices processed by batch atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Gang; Kim, Hee-Dong; Roelofs, Robin; Perez, Eduardo; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Zaumseil, Peter; Costina, Ioan; Wenger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    With the continuous scaling of resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices, in-depth understanding of the physical mechanism and the material issues, particularly by directly studying integrated cells, become more and more important to further improve the device performances. In this work, HfO2-based integrated 1-transistor-1-resistor (1T1R) RRAM devices were processed in a standard 0.25 μm complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process line, using a batch atomic layer deposition (ALD) tool, which is particularly designed for mass production. We demonstrate a systematic study on TiN/Ti/HfO2/TiN/Si RRAM devices to correlate key material factors (nano-crystallites and carbon impurities) with the filament type resistive switching (RS) behaviours. The augmentation of the nano-crystallites density in the film increases the forming voltage of devices and its variation. Carbon residues in HfO2 films turn out to be an even more significant factor strongly impacting the RS behaviour. A relatively higher deposition temperature of 300 °C dramatically reduces the residual carbon concentration, thus leading to enhanced RS performances of devices, including lower power consumption, better endurance and higher reliability. Such thorough understanding on physical mechanism of RS and the correlation between material and device performances will facilitate the realization of high density and reliable embedded RRAM devices with low power consumption. PMID:27312225

  16. Interfacial Layer Growth Condition Dependent Electrical Conduction in HfO2/SiO2 Heterostructured Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Misra, D.

    2012-01-01

    The electrical conduction mechanism contributing to the leakage current at different field regions has been studied in this work. The current-voltage (I-V) measurement of TiN/HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/P-Si nMOS capacitor has been taken for two different interfacial layer (SiO{sub 2}) growth conditions such as in situ steam grown (ISSG) and chemical processes. It is observed that Poole-Frenkel mechanism is the dominant conduction mechanism in high field region whereas Ohmic conduction is dominant in the low field region. Also it is seen that the gate leakage current is reduced for the devices having chemically grown interfacial layer compared to that of ISSG devices. Both trap energy level ({phi}{sub t}) and activation energy (E{sub a}) increase in the chemically grown interfacial layer devices for the Poole-Frenkel and Ohmic conduction mechanisms respectively in comparison to ISSG devices. Trap energy level ({phi}{sub t}) of {approx} 0.2 eV, obtained from Poole-Frenkel mechanism indicates that the doubly ionized oxygen vacancies (V{sup 2-}) are the active defects and are contributing to the leakage current in these devices.

  17. Characterization of Pt/Bi3.15Nd0.85Ti3O12/HfO2/Si structure using a hafnium oxide as buffer layer for ferroelectric-gate field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dan; Luo, Yafeng; Han, Xueguang; Ren, Tianling; Liu, Litian

    2009-12-01

    We have investigated the structural and electrical properties of metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) capacitors with Bi3.15Nd0.85Ti3O12 (BNdT) thin film deposited on Si and hafnium oxide (HfO2)/Si substrates. Microstructural analysis reveals the formation of well-crystallized BNdT perovskite film and good interface between BNdT film and HfO2 buffer layer. Pt/BNdT/HfO2/Si structure exhibits a memory window of 1.12 V at an operation voltage of 3.5 V. The width of memory window for the MFIS structure varies with increasing thickness of HfO2 layer, and 4-nm-thickness is optimum. The results from the fatigue test indicate a slight degradation of the memory window after 1010 switching cycles. These properties are encouraging for the development of ferroelectric memory transistors.

  18. Epitaxial growth and characterization of Gd2O3-doped HfO2 film on Ge (001) substrates with zero interface layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张心强; 屠海令; 魏峰; 熊玉华; 杨萌萌; 赵洪滨; 杜军; 王文武

    2013-01-01

    The GHO (Gd2O3-doped HfO2) films were epitaxially grown on Ge (001) substrates adopting cube-on-cube mode with zero interface layer using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observation revealed a sharp interface of GHO/Ge and orientation relationship corre-sponding to (001)GHO//(001)Ge and [011] GHO//[011]Ge. The band offset for GHO/Ge stack was evaluated to be 3.92 eV for va-lence band and 1.38 eV for conduction band by X-ray photoelectron spectrum. Small equivalent oxide thickness (0.49 nm) and inter-face state density (7×1011 cm-2) were achieved from Au/Ti/GHO/Ge/Al capacitors.

  19. Carbon-coated ZnO mat passivation by atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mi-Hee

    2017-11-01

    ZnO has had little consideration as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries compared with other transition-metal oxides due to its inherent poor electrical conductivity and large volume expansion upon cycling and pulverization of ZnO-based electrodes. A logical design and facile synthesis of ZnO with well-controlled particle sizes and a specific morphology is essential to improving the performance of ZnO in lithium-ion batteries. In this paper, a simple approach is reported that uses a cation surfactant and a chelating agent to synthesize three-dimensional hierarchical nanostructured carbon-coated ZnO mats, in which the ZnO mats are composed of stacked individual ZnO nanowires and form well-defined nanoporous structures with high surface areas. In order to improve the performance of lithium-ion batteries, HfO2 is deposited on the carbon-coated ZnO mat electrode via atomic layer deposition. Lithium-ion battery devices based on the carbon-coated ZnO mat passivation by atomic layer deposited HfO2 exhibit an excellent initial discharge and charge capacities of 2684.01 and 963.21mAhg(-1), respectively, at a current density of 100mAg(-1) in the voltage range of 0.01-3V. They also exhibit cycle stability after 125 cycles with a capacity of 740mAhg(-1) and a remarkable rate capability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative study of atomic-layer-deposited HfO2/Al2O3, Hf0.8Al0.2Ox and Hf0.5Al0.5Ox on N-GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinjiang; Lv, Hongliang; Zhang, Yuming; Zhang, Yimen; Qin, Zaiyang

    2016-11-01

    Interfacial properties of n-GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOSCAPs) with the gate dielectrics of HfO2/Al2O3, Hf0.8Al0.2Ox and Hf0.5Al0.5Ox are investigated. The results reveal that Hf0.5Al0.5Ox has larger permittivity and lower interface trap density than that of HfO2/Al2O3. In order to explain the result from the physical perspective, the XPS tests of all three samples are performed. It is found that the main reason to form interface trap of three samples treated with 500 °C post-deposition annealing, is attributed to the interfacial component of Ga2O3 and The Hf0.5Al0.5Ox dielectric is beneficial to reducing the formation of Ga2O3.

  1. Enhanced resistive switching characteristics in Pt/BaTiO3/ITO structures through insertion of HfO2:Al2O3 (HAO) dielectric thin layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J. P. B.; Faita, F. L.; Kamakshi, K.; Sekhar, K. C.; Moreira, J. Agostinho; Almeida, A.; Pereira, M.; Pasa, A. A.; Gomes, M. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    An enhanced resistive switching (RS) effect is observed in Pt/BaTiO3(BTO)/ITO ferroelectric structures when a thin HfO2:Al2O3 (HAO) dielectric layer is inserted between Pt and BTO. The P-E hysteresis loops reveal the ferroelectric nature of both Pt/BTO/ITO and Pt/HAO/BTO/ITO structures. The relation between the RS and the polarization reversal is investigated at various temperatures in the Pt/HAO/BTO/ITO structure. It is found that the polarization reversal induces a barrier variation in the Pt/HAO/BTO interface and causes enhanced RS, which is suppressed at Curie temperature (Tc = 140 °C). Furthermore, the Pt/HAO/BTO/ITO structures show promising endurance characteristics, with a RS ratio >103 after 109 switching cycles, that make them potential candidates for resistive switching memory devices. By combining ferroelectric and dielectric layers this work provides an efficient way for developing highly efficient ferroelectric-based RS memory devices.

  2. Atomic layer deposition for fabrication of HfO2/Al2O3 thin films with high laser-induced damage thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yaowei; Pan, Feng; Zhang, Qinghua; Ma, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on the laser damage resistance of thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is rare. In this work, the ALD process for thin film generation was investigated using different process parameters such as various precursor types and pulse duration. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) was measured as a key property for thin films used as laser system components. Reasons for film damaged were also investigated. The LIDTs for thin films deposited by improved process parameters reached a higher level than previously measured. Specifically, the LIDT of the Al2O3 thin film reached 40 J/cm(2). The LIDT of the HfO2/Al2O3 anti-reflector film reached 18 J/cm(2), the highest value reported for ALD single and anti-reflect films. In addition, it was shown that the LIDT could be improved by further altering the process parameters. All results show that ALD is an effective film deposition technique for fabrication of thin film components for high-power laser systems.

  3. The charge trapping effect of metal-ferroelectric (PbZr0.53Ti0.47O3)-insulator (HfO2)-silicon capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Pi-chun; Hu, Yu-ping; Chiu, Fu-chien; Lee, Joseph Ya-min

    2005-08-01

    Metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) capacitors with a Pb(Zr0.53,Ti0.47)O3 ferroelectric layer and a hafnium oxide insulator layer have been fabricated and characterized. The size of the capacitance-voltage memory windows was investigated. The memory window first increases to a saturated value of 0.7V with the sweep voltage and then decreases due to charge injection. The oxide trapped charges in the ferroelectric/insulator layers are studied by a voltage stress method. The flatband voltage (VFB) is measured before and after the voltage stress. The ΔVFB is 0.59V at a negative stress voltage pulse of -5V for 30s. The ΔVFB under positive voltage stress was much less and was 0.06V at a stress voltage of +5V for 5min. The energy-band diagram of the MFIS structure at inversion and accumulation modes are plotted and the VFB shift can be explained by the trapping or detrapping of charges. The current-density versus stress time (J-t ) characteristics were also measured. The result is consistent with the charge trapping model.

  4. High-reflectivity HfO2/SiO2 ultraviolet mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchio, Philippe; Gatto, Alexandre; Alvisi, Marco; Albrand, Gérard; Kaiser, Norbert; Amra, Claude

    2002-06-01

    High-reflectivity dense multilayer coatings were produced for the ultraviolet spectral region. Thin-film single layers and UV mirrors were deposited by ion plating and plasma ion-assisted deposition high-energetic technologies. Optical characterizations of HfO2 and SiO2 single layers are made. The optical constants obtained for these two materials are presented. HfO2 and SiO2 mirrors with a reflectance of approximately 99% near 250 nm are reported.

  5. Formation of Al2O3-HfO2 Eutectic EBC Film on Silicon Carbide Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyosuke Seya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure, the preparation method, and the formation mechanism of the eutectic EBC layer on the silicon carbide substrate are summarized. Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic EBC film is prepared by optical zone melting method on the silicon carbide substrate. At high temperature, a small amount of silicon carbide decomposed into silicon and carbon. The components of Al2O3 and HfO2 in molten phase also react with the free carbon. The Al2O3 phase reacts with free carbon and vapor species of AlO phase is formed. The composition of the molten phase becomes HfO2 rich from the eutectic composition. HfO2 phase also reacts with the free carbon and HfC phase is formed on the silicon carbide substrate; then a high density intermediate layer is formed. The adhesion between the intermediate layer and the substrate is excellent by an anchor effect. When the solidification process finished before all of HfO2 phase is reduced to HfC phase, HfC-HfO2 functionally graded layer is formed on the silicon carbide substrate and the Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure grows from the top of the intermediate layer.

  6. High-performance self-aligned inversion-channel In0.53Ga0.47As metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors by in-situ atomic-layer-deposited HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. D.; Chang, W. H.; Chu, R. L.; Chang, Y. C.; Chang, Y. H.; Lee, M. Y.; Hong, P. F.; Chen, Min-Cheng; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    2013-12-01

    Self-aligned inversion-channel In0.53Ga0.47As metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs) have been fabricated using the gate dielectrics of in-situ directly atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) HfO2 followed by ALD-Al2O3. There were no surface pretreatments and no interfacial passivation/barrier layers prior to the ALD. TiN/Al2O3 (4 nm)/HfO2 (1 nm)/In0.53Ga0.47As/InP MOS capacitors exhibited well-behaved capacitance-voltage characteristics with true inversion behavior, low leakage current densities of ˜10-8 A/cm2 at ±1 MV/cm, and thermodynamic stability at high temperatures. Al2O3 (3 nm)/HfO2 (1 nm)/In0.53Ga0.47As MOSFETs of 1 μm gate length, with 700 °C-800 °C rapid thermal annealing in source/drain activation, have exhibited high extrinsic drain current (ID) of 1.5 mA/μm, transconductance (Gm) of 0.84 mS/μm, ION/IOFF of ˜104, low sub-threshold swing of 103 mV/decade, and field-effect electron mobility of 1100 cm2/V . s. The devices have also achieved very high intrinsic ID and Gm of 2 mA/μm and 1.2 mS/μm, respectively.

  7. Mixed Al and Si doping in ferroelectric HfO2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomenzo, Patrick D.; Takmeel, Qanit; Zhou, Chuanzhen; Chung, Ching-Chang; Moghaddam, Saeed; Jones, Jacob L.; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2015-12-01

    Ferroelectric HfO2 thin films 10 nm thick are simultaneously doped with Al and Si. The arrangement of the Al and Si dopant layers within the HfO2 greatly influences the resulting ferroelectric properties of the polycrystalline thin films. Optimizing the order of the Si and Al dopant layers led to a remanent polarization of ˜20 μC/cm2 and a coercive field strength of ˜1.2 MV/cm. Post-metallization anneal temperatures from 700 °C to 900 °C were used to crystallize the Al and Si doped HfO2 thin films. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction detected differences in peak broadening between the mixed Al and Si doped HfO2 thin films, indicating that strain may influence the formation of the ferroelectric phase with variations in the dopant layering. Endurance characteristics show that the mixed Al and Si doped HfO2 thin films exhibit a remanent polarization greater than 15 μC/cm2 up to 108 cycles.

  8. Ferroelectric HfO2 for Emerging Ferroelectric Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florent, Karine

    The spontaneous polarization in ferroelectrics (FE) makes them particularly attractive for non-volatile memory and logic applications. Non-volatile FRAM memories using perovskite structure materials, such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) and Strontium Bismuth Tantalate (SBT) have been studied for many years. However, because of their scaling limit and incompatibility with CMOS beyond 130 nm node, floating gate Flash memory technology has been preferred for manufacturing. The recent discovery of ferroelectricity in doped HfO2 in 2011 has opened the door for new ferroelectric based devices compatible with CMOS technology, such as Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistor (FeFET) and Ferroelectric Tunnel Junctions (FTJ). This work began with developing ferroelectric hysteresis characterization capabilities at RIT. Initially reactively sputtered aluminum doped HfO 2 films were investigated. It was observed that the composition control using co-sputtering was not achievable within the existing capabilities. During the course of this study, collaboration was established with the NaMLab group in Germany to investigate Si doped HfO2 deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Metal Ferroelectric Metal (MFM) devices were fabricated using TiN as the top and bottom electrode with Si:HfO2 thickness ranging from 6.4 nm to 22.9 nm. The devices were electrically tested for P-E, C-V and I-V characteristics. Structural characterizations included TEM, EELS, XRR, XRD and XPS/Auger spectroscopy. Higher remanant polarization (Pr) was observed for films of 9.3 nm and 13.1 nm thickness. Thicker film (22.9 nm) showed smaller Pr. Devices with 6.4 nm thick films exhibit tunneling behavior showing a memristor like I-V characteristics. The tunnel current and ferroelectricity showed decrease with cycling indicating a possible change in either the structure or the domain configurations. Theoretical simulations using the improved FE model were carried out to model the ferroelectric behavior of

  9. Post-Cleaning Effect on a HfO2 Gate Stack Using a NF3/NH3 Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Seon; Oh, Hoon-Jung; Lee, Joo-Hee; Lee, In-Geun; Shin, Woo-Gon; Kim, Kyu-Dong; Park, Jin-Gu; Ko, Dae-Hong

    2016-05-01

    The effects of dry cleaning of a HfO2 gate stack using NF3 only and a NF3/NH3 gas mixture plasma were investigated. The plasma dry cleaning process was carried out after HfO2 deposition using an indirect down-flow capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) system. An analysis of the chemical composition of the HfO2 gate stacks by XPS indicated that fluorine was incorporated into the HfO2 films during the plasma dry cleaning. Significant changes in the HfO2 chemical composition were observed as a result of the NF3 dry cleaning, while they were not observed in this case of NF3/NH3 dry cleaning. TEM results showed that the interfacial layer (IL) between the HfO2 and Si thickness was increased by the plasma dry cleaning. However, in the case of NF3/NH3 dry cleaning using 150 W, the IL thickness was suppressed significantly compared to the sample that had not been dry cleaned. Its electrical properties were also improved, including the low gate leakage currents, and reduced EOT. Finally, the finding show that the IL thickness of the HfO2 gate stack can be controlled by using the novel NF3/NH3 dry cleaning process technique without any the significant changes in chemical composition and metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor characteristics.

  10. Epitaxial Thin Films of Y doped HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Claudy; Khan, Asif; Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is one of a few metal oxides that is thermodynamically stable on silicon and silicon oxide. There has been renewed interest in HfO2 due to the recent discovery of ferroelectricity and antiferroelectricity in doped HfO2. Typical ferroelectrics - such as strontium bismuth tantalate (SBT) and lead zirconium titanate (PZT) - contain elements that easily react with silicon and silicon oxide at elevated temperatures; therefore, such ferroelectrics are not suited for device applications. Meanwhile, ferroelectric HfO2 offers promise regarding integration with silicon. The stable phase of HfO2 at room temperature is monoclinic, but HfO2 can be stabilized in the tetragonal, orthorhombic or even cubic phase by suitable doping. We stabilized Y-doped HfO2 thin films using pulsed laser deposition. The strain state can be controlled using various perovskite substrates and controlled growth conditions. We report on Y-doped HfO2 domain structures from piezo-response force microscopy (PFM) and structural parameters via X-ray reciprocal space maps (RSM). We hope this work spurs further interest in strain-tuned ferroelectricity in doped HfO2.

  11. Crystal structure and band gap determination of HfO2 thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheynet, M.C.; Pokrant, S.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Rouvière, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Valence electron energy loss spectroscopy (VEELS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) are performed on three different HfO2 thin films grown on Si (001) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or atomic layer deposition (ALD). For each sample the band gap (Eg) is determined by

  12. Determination of complex dielectric functions at HfO(2)/Si interface by using STEM-VEELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jucheol; Yang, Mino

    2009-04-01

    The complex dielectric functions and refractive index of atomic layer deposited HfO(2) were determined by the line scan method of the valence electron energy loss spectrum (VEELS) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The complex dielectric functions and dielectric constant of monoclinic HfO(2) were calculated by the density functional theory (DFT) method. The resulting two dielectric functions were relatively well matched. On the other hand, the refractive index of HfO(2) was measured as 2.18 by VEELS analysis and 2.1 by DFT calculation. The electronic structure of HfO(2) was revealed by the comparison of the inter-band transition strength, obtained by STEM-VEELS, with the density of states (DOS) calculated by DFT calculation.

  13. Optical properties of a HfO2/Si stack with a trace amount of nitrogen incorporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ye; Jiang Tingting; Sun Qingqing; Wang Pengfei; Ding Shijin; Zhang Wei

    2012-01-01

    HfO2 films were deposited by atomic layer deposition through alternating pulsing of Hf[N(C2H5)(CH3)]4 and H2O2.A trace amount of nitrogen was incorporated into the HfO2 through ammonia annealing.The composition,the interface stability of the HfO2/Si stack and the optical properties of the annealed films were analyzed to investigate the property evolution of HfO2 during thermal treatment.With a nitrogen concentration increase from 1.41 to 7.45%,the bandgap of the films decreased from 5.82 to 4.94 eV.

  14. Accumulation effect of SiO2 protective layer on multi-shot laser-induced damage in high-reflectivity HfO2 /SiO2 coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wang; Hongbo He; Yuan'an Zhao; Yongguang Shan; Chaoyang Wei

    2011-01-01

    The accumulation effects in high-reflectivity (HR) HfO2/SiO2 coatings under laser irradiation are investigated. The HR HfO2/SiO2 coatings are prepared by electron beam evaporation at 1064 nm. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) are measured at 1064 nm and at a pulse duration of 12 ns, in 1-on-l and S-on-1 modes. Multi-shot LIDT is lower than single-shot LIDT. The laser-induced and native defects play an important role in the multi-shot mode. A correlative theory model based on critical conduction band electron density is constructed to elucidate the experimental phenomena.%The accumulation effects in high-reflectivity (HR) HfO2/SiO2 coatings under laser irradiation are investigated.The HR HfO2/SiO2 coatings are prepared by electron beam evaporation at 1 064 nm.The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) are measured at 1 064 nm and at a pulse duration of 12 ns,in 1-on-1 and S-on-1 modes.Multi-shot LIDT is lower than single-shot LIDT.The laser-induced and native defects play an important role in the multi-shot mode.A correlative theory model based on critical conduction band electron density is constructed to elucidate the experimental phenomena.In recent years,many laboratories have investigated multi-shot laser-induced damage in optical materials,such as fused silica[1] and KTP crystals[2].The multishot laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) is often lower than single-shot LIDT because of the accumulation effects in most optical materials[1,3-5].As a result,investigations on multi-shot laser-induced damage in optical coatings are of high practical importance for high-power laser applications[5,6].The mechanism for single-shot laser damage includes avalanche ionization (AI)[7],multiphoton ionization (MPI) [8],impurity breakdown[9],etc.

  15. Synthesis of Freestanding HfO2 Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    Tang J, Fabbri J, Robinson RD, Zhu Y, Herman IP, Steigerwald ML, Brus LE: Solid-solution nanoparticles:use of a nonhydrolytic sol-gel synthesis to...colloidal HfO2 nanorods. Adv Mater 2007, 19:2608-2612. Page 21 5. Qiu X, Howe JY, Cardoso MB, Polat O, Heller W: Size control of highly ordered HfO2

  16. Downscaling ferroelectric field effect transistors by using ferroelectric Si-doped HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dominik; Yurchuk, Ekaterina; Müller, Stefan; Müller, Johannes; Paul, Jan; Sundquist, Jonas; Slesazeck, Stefan; Schlösser, Till; van Bentum, Ralf; Trentzsch, Martin; Schröder, Uwe; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Throughout the 22 nm technology node HfO2 is established as a reliable gate dielectric in contemporary complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The working principle of ferroelectric field effect transistors FeFET has also been demonstrated for some time for dielectric materials like Pb[ZrxTi1-x]O3 and SrBi2Ta2O9. However, integrating these into contemporary downscaled CMOS technology nodes is not trivial due to the necessity of an extremely thick gate stack. Recent developments have shown HfO2 to have ferroelectric properties, given the proper doping. Moreover, these doped HfO2 thin films only require layer thicknesses similar to the ones already in use in CMOS technology. This work will show how the incorporation of Si induces ferroelectricity in HfO2 based capacitor structures and finally demonstrate non-volatile storage in nFeFETs down to a gate length of 100 nm. A memory window of 0.41 V can be retained after 20,000 switching cycles. Retention can be extrapolated to 10 years.

  17. Impact and Origin of Interface States in MOS Capacitor with Monolayer MoS2 and HfO2 High-k Dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Pengkun; Feng, Xuewei; Ng, Rui Jie; Wang, Shijie; Chi, Dongzhi; Li, Cequn; He, Zhubing; Liu, Xinke; Ang, Kah-Wee

    2017-01-01

    Two-dimensional layered semiconductors such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) at the quantum limit are promising material for nanoelectronics and optoelectronics applications. Understanding the interface properties between the atomically thin MoS2 channel and gate dielectric is fundamentally important for enhancing the carrier transport properties. Here, we investigate the frequency dispersion mechanism in a metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) with a monolayer MoS2 and an ultra-thin HfO2 high-k gate dielectric. We show that the existence of sulfur vacancies at the MoS2-HfO2 interface is responsible for the generation of interface states with a density (Dit) reaching ~7.03 × 1011 cm−2 eV−1. This is evidenced by a deficit S:Mo ratio of ~1.96 using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, which deviates from its ideal stoichiometric value. First-principles calculations within the density-functional theory framework further confirms the presence of trap states due to sulfur deficiency, which exist within the MoS2 bandgap. This corroborates to a voltage-dependent frequency dispersion of ~11.5% at weak accumulation which decreases monotonically to ~9.0% at strong accumulation as the Fermi level moves away from the mid-gap trap states. Further reduction in Dit could be achieved by thermally diffusing S atoms to the MoS2-HfO2 interface to annihilate the vacancies. This work provides an insight into the interface properties for enabling the development of MoS2 devices with carrier transport enhancement. PMID:28084434

  18. Impact and Origin of Interface States in MOS Capacitor with Monolayer MoS2 and HfO2 High-k Dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Pengkun; Feng, Xuewei; Ng, Rui Jie; Wang, Shijie; Chi, Dongzhi; Li, Cequn; He, Zhubing; Liu, Xinke; Ang, Kah-Wee

    2017-01-01

    Two-dimensional layered semiconductors such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) at the quantum limit are promising material for nanoelectronics and optoelectronics applications. Understanding the interface properties between the atomically thin MoS2 channel and gate dielectric is fundamentally important for enhancing the carrier transport properties. Here, we investigate the frequency dispersion mechanism in a metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) with a monolayer MoS2 and an ultra-thin HfO2 high-k gate dielectric. We show that the existence of sulfur vacancies at the MoS2-HfO2 interface is responsible for the generation of interface states with a density (Dit) reaching ~7.03 × 1011 cm-2 eV-1. This is evidenced by a deficit S:Mo ratio of ~1.96 using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, which deviates from its ideal stoichiometric value. First-principles calculations within the density-functional theory framework further confirms the presence of trap states due to sulfur deficiency, which exist within the MoS2 bandgap. This corroborates to a voltage-dependent frequency dispersion of ~11.5% at weak accumulation which decreases monotonically to ~9.0% at strong accumulation as the Fermi level moves away from the mid-gap trap states. Further reduction in Dit could be achieved by thermally diffusing S atoms to the MoS2-HfO2 interface to annihilate the vacancies. This work provides an insight into the interface properties for enabling the development of MoS2 devices with carrier transport enhancement.

  19. Potential imaging of Si /HfO2/polycrystalline silicon gate stacks: Evidence for an oxide dipole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludeke, R.; Narayanan, V.; Gusev, E. P.; Cartier, E.; Chey, S. J.

    2005-03-01

    Surface potential profiles of the junction area of a cleaved n-Si(100)/HfO2/p +-polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) gate stack reveal a dipole potential in the oxide, hole trapping at the HfO2/poly-Si interface, with the Fermi level ˜0.4eV below the Si conduction bandedge and enhanced and inhomogeneous hole depletion in the p +-poly-Si. The dipole accounts for band bending reduction in the n-Si and is consistent with flatband voltage shifts reported for similar gate stacks.

  20. Crystal structure of Si-doped HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lili; Nelson, Matthew; Aldridge, Henry; Iamsasri, Thanakorn; Fancher, Chris M.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Nishida, Toshikazu; Moghaddam, Saeed; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-01-01

    Si-doped HfO2 was prepared by solid state synthesis of the starting oxides. Using Rietveld refinement of high resolution X-ray diffraction patterns, a substitutional limit of Si in HfO2 was determined as less than 9 at. %. A second phase was identified as Cristobalite (SiO2) rather than HfSiO4, the latter of which would be expected from existing SiO2-HfO2 phase diagrams. Crystallographic refinement with increased Si-dopant concentration in monoclinic HfO2 shows that c/b increases, while β decreases. The spontaneous strain, which characterizes the ferroelastic distortion of the unit cell, was calculated and shown to decrease with increasing Si substitution.

  1. Mechanistic Insight into the Stability of HfO2-Coated MoS2 Nanosheet Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2015-06-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that surface passivation of 2D nanosheets of MoS2 by an ultrathin and uniform layer of HfO2 can significantly improve the cyclic performance of sodium ion batteries. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, bare MoS2 and HfO2 coated MoS2 electrodes deliver the specific capacity of 435 and 636 mAh g-1, respectively, at current density of 100 mA g-1. These results imply that batteries using HfO2 coated MoS2 anodes retain 91% of the initial capacity; in contrast, bare MoS2 anodes retain only 63%. Also, HfO2 coated MoS2 anodes show one of the highest reported capacity values for MoS2. Cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results suggest that HfO2 does not take part in electrochemical reaction. The mechanism of capacity retention with HfO2 coating is explained by ex situ transmission electron microscope imaging and electrical impedance spectroscopy. It is illustrated that HfO2 acts as a passivation layer at the anode/electrolyte interface and prevents structural degradation during charge/discharge process. Moreover, the amorphous nature of HfO2 allows facile diffusion of Na ions. These results clearly show the potential of HfO2 coated MoS2 anodes, which performance is significantly higher than previous reports where bulk MoS2 or composites of MoS2 with carbonaceous materials are used. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Design and Fabrication of Interdigital Nanocapacitors Coated with HfO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel González

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article nickel interdigital capacitors were fabricated on top of silicon substrates. The capacitance of the interdigital capacitor was optimized by coating the electrodes with a 60 nm layer of HfO2. An analytical solution of the capacitance was compared to electromagnetic simulations using COMSOL and with experimental measurements. Results show that modeling interdigital capacitors using Finite Element Method software such as COMSOL is effective in the design and electrical characterization of these transducers.

  3. Design and Fabrication of Interdigital Nanocapacitors Coated with HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gabriel; Kolosovas-Machuca, Eleazar Samuel; López-Luna, Edgar; Hernández-Arriaga, Heber; González, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    In this article nickel interdigital capacitors were fabricated on top of silicon substrates. The capacitance of the interdigital capacitor was optimized by coating the electrodes with a 60 nm layer of HfO2. An analytical solution of the capacitance was compared to electromagnetic simulations using COMSOL and with experimental measurements. Results show that modeling interdigital capacitors using Finite Element Method software such as COMSOL is effective in the design and electrical characterization of these transducers. PMID:25602271

  4. Correlation of nanochemistry and electrical properties in HfO2 films grown by metalorganic molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Tae-Hyoung; Ham, Moon-Ho; Myoung, Jae-Min

    2005-03-01

    We present the annealing effects on nanochemistry and electrical properties in HfO2 dielectrics grown by metalorganic molecular-beam epitaxy. After the postannealing treatment of HfO2 films in the temperature range of 600-800°C, the thicknesses and chemical states of the films were examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. By comparing the line shapes of core-level spectra for the samples with different annealing temperatures, the concentrations of SiO and Hf-silicate with high dielectric constant are found to be highest for HfO2 film annealed at 700°C. This result supports that the accumulation capacitance of the sample annealed at 700°C is not deteriorated in spite of a steep increase in interfacial layer thickness compared with that of the sample annealed at 600°C.

  5. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of Co/Pt bilayers on ALD HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Bart F.; Wu, Jackson; Swerts, Johan; Couet, Sebastien; Linten, Dimitri; Radu, Iuliana P.; Temst, Kristiaan; Rampelberg, Geert; Detavernier, Christophe; Groeseneken, Guido; Martens, Koen

    2016-10-01

    Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy (PMA) is a key requirement for state of the art Magnetic Random Access Memories (MRAM). Currently, PMA has been widely reported in standard Magnetic Tunnel Junction material stacks using MgO as a dielectric. In this contribution, we present the first report of PMA at the interface with a high-κ dielectric grown by Atomic Layer Deposition, HfO2. The PMA appears after annealing a HfO2/Co/Pt/Ru stack in N2 with the Keff of 0.25 mJ/m2 as determined by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry. X-Ray Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy show that the appearance of PMA coincides with interdiffusion and the epitaxial ordering of the Co/Pt bilayer. High-κ dielectrics are especially interesting for Voltage Control of Magnetic Anisotropy applications and are of potential interest for low-power MRAM and spintronics technologies.

  6. Contamination process and laser-induced damage of HfO2/SiO2 coatings in vacuum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Ma; Feng Pan; Songlin Chen; Zhen Wang; Jianping Hu; Qinghua Zhang; Jianda Shao

    2009-01-01

    The performances of HfO2/SiO2 single- and multi-layer coatings in vacuum influenced by contamination are studied. The surface morphology, the transmittance spectrum, and the laser-induced damage threshold are investigated. The results show that the contamination in vacuum mainly comes from the vacuum system and the contamination process is different for the HfO2 and SiO2 films. The laser-induced damage experiments at 1064 nm in vacuum show that the damage resistance of the coatings will decrease largely due to the organic contamination.

  7. Hetero-epitaxial growth of the cubic single crystalline HfO 2 film as high k materials by pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinqiang; Tu, Hailing; Wang, Xiaona; Xiong, Yuhua; Yang, Mengmeng; Wang, Lei; Du, Jun

    2010-10-01

    We report a hetero-epitaxial growth of cubic single crystalline HfO 2 film on Si substrates as high k materials by pulse laser ablation (PLA) at 820 °C. To eliminate the interfacial defects, the HfO 2 film has then been annealed at 900 °C for 5 min in N 2. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) results indicate orientation of the HfO 2 film on Si substrates corresponding to (∥( and [∥[. An interface layer has been revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Through capacitance-voltage ( C- V) and current-voltage ( I- V), it has been obtained that the leakage current of the HfO 2 gate insulator with dielectric constant of 26 is 5×10 -6 A/cm 2 at -1 V.

  8. HfO 2 -based ferroelectric modulator of terahertz waves with graphene metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ran; Wu, Zheng-Ran; Han, Zu-Yin; Jung, Hyung-Suk

    2016-10-01

    Tunable modulations of terahertz waves in a graphene/ferroelectric-layer/silicon hybrid structure are demonstrated at low bias voltages. The modulation is due to the creation/elimination of an extra barrier in Si layer in response to the polarization in the ferroelectric Si:HfO2 layer. Considering the good compatibility of HfO2 with the Si-based semiconductor process, the highly tunable characteristics of the graphene metamaterial device under ferroelectric effect open up new avenues for graphene-based high performance integrated active photonic devices compatible with the silicon technology. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374182).

  9. Evidence of GeO volatilization and its effect on the characteristics of HfO2 grown on a Ge substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Ji-Bin; Liu Hong-Xia; Fei Cheng-Xi; Ma Fei; Fan Xiao-Jiao; Hao Yue

    2013-01-01

    HfO2 films are deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tetrakis ethylmethylamino hafnium (TEMAH) as the hafnium precursor,while O3 or H2O is used as the oxygen precursor.After annealing at 500 ℃ in nitrogen,the thickness of Ge oxide's interfacial layer decreases,and the presence of GeO is observed at the H2O-based HfO2 interface due to GeO volatilization,while it is not observed for the O3-based HfO2.The difference is attributed to the residue hydroxyl groups or H2O molecules in H2O-based HfO2 hydrolyzing GeO2 and forming GeO,whereas GeO is only formed by the typical reaction mechanism between GeO2 and the Ge substrate for O3-based HfO2 after annealing.The volatilization of GeO deteriorates the characteristics of the high-κ films after annealing,which has effects on the variation of valence band offset and the C-V characteristics of HfO2/Ge after annealing.The results are confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrical measurements.

  10. Enhanced resistive switching performance for bilayer HfO2/TiO2 resistive random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Cong; Deng, Tengfei; Zhang, Junchi; Shen, Liangping; He, Pin; Wei, Wei; Wang, Hao

    2016-10-01

    We prepared bilayer HfO2/TiO2 resistive random accessory memory (RRAM) using magnetron sputtering on an ITO/PEN flexible substrate. The switching voltages (V SET and V RESET) were smaller for the Pt/HfO2/TiO2/ITO device than for a Pt/HfO2/ITO memory device. The insertion of a TiO2 layer in the switching layer was inferred to act as an oxygen reservoir to reduce the switching voltages. In addition, greatly improved uniformity was achieved, which showed the coefficient of the variations of V SET and V RESET to be 9.90% and 6.35% for the bilayer structure RRAM. We deduced that occurrence of conductive filament connection/rupture at the interface of the HfO2 and TiO2, in combination with the HfO2 acting as a virtual cathode, led to the improved uniformity. A multilevel storage capability can be obtained by varying the stop voltage in the RESET process for bilayer HfO2/TiO2 RRAM. By analyzing the current conduction mechanism, we demonstrated that the multilevel high resistance state (HRS) was attributable to the increased barrier height when the stop voltage was increased.

  11. Synthesis of freestanding HfO2 nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle Kayla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two new methods for synthesizing nanostructured HfO2 have been developed. The first method entails exposing HfTe2 powders to air. This simple process resulted in the formation of nanometer scale crystallites of HfO2. The second method involved a two-step heating process by which macroscopic, freestanding nanosheets of HfO2 were formed as a byproduct during the synthesis of HfTe2. These highly two-dimensional sheets had side lengths measuring up to several millimeters and were stable enough to be manipulated with tweezers and other instruments. The thickness of the sheets ranged from a few to a few hundred nanometers. The thinnest sheets appeared transparent when viewed in a scanning electron microscope. It was found that the presence of Mn enhanced the formation of HfO2 by exposure to ambient conditions and was necessary for the formation of the large scale nanosheets. These results present new routes to create freestanding nanostructured hafnium dioxide. PACS: 81.07.-b, 61.46.Hk, 68.37.Hk.

  12. Improved Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Fabricated from a Coumarin NKX-2700 Dye-Sensitized TiO2/MgO Core-Shell Photoanode with an HfO2 Blocking Layer and a Quasi-Solid-State Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswari, D.; Venkatachalam, P.

    2015-03-01

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) were fabricated from a coumarin NKX-2700 dye-sensitized core-shell photoanode and a quasi-solid-state electrolyte, sandwiched together, with a cobalt sulfide-coated counter electrode. The core-shell photoanode consisted of a composite mixture of 90% TiO2 nanoparticles and 10% TiO2 nanowires (TNPW) as core layer and MgO nanoparticles (MNP) as shell layer. Hafnium oxide (HfO2) was applied to the core-shell photoanode film as a blocking layer. TiO2 nanoparticles, TiO2 nanowires, and TNPW/MNP were characterized by x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. It was apparent from the UV-visible spectrum of the sensitizing dye coumarin NKX-2700 that its absorption was maximum at 525 nm. Power conversion efficiency (PCE) was greater for DSSC-1, fabricated with a core-shell TNPW/MNP/HfO2 photoanode, than for the other DSSC; its photovoltaic properties were: short circuit photocurrent J sc = 19 mA/cm2, open circuit voltage ( V oc) = 720 mV, fill factor ( FF) = 66%, and PCE ( η) = 9.02%. The charge-transport and charge-recombination behavior of the DSSC were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; the results showed that the composite core-shell film resulted in the lowest charge-transfer resistance ( R CE) and the longest electron lifetime ( τ eff). Hence, the improved performance of DSSC-1 could be ascribed to the core-shell photoanode with blocking layer, which increased electron transport and suppressed recombination of charge carriers at the photoanode/dye/electrolyte interface.

  13. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of gate stacks with HfO2 dielectrics and TiN electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Agustin, Melody P.; Fonseca, Leo R. C.; Hooker, Jacob C.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    High-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in scanning transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate HfO2 gate dielectrics grown by atomic layer deposition on Si substrates, and their interfaces with TiN electrodes and silicon, as a function of annealing temperature. Annealing at high temperatures (900 °C) caused significant roughening of both bottom (substrate) and top (electrode) interface. At the bottom interface, HAADF images s...

  14. Interfacial reaction and electrical properties of HfO2 film gate dielectric prepared by pulsed laser deposition in nitrogen: role of rapid thermal annealing and gate electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Hao; Ye, Cong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Hanbin; Jiang, Yong

    2011-10-01

    The high-k dielectric HfO(2) thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition in nitrogen atmosphere. Rapid thermal annealing effect on film surface roughness, structure and electrical properties of HfO(2) film was investigated. The mechanism of interfacial reaction and the annealing atmosphere effect on the interfacial layer thickness were discussed. The sample annealed in nitrogen shows an amorphous dominated structure and the lowest leakage current density. Capacitors with high-k HfO(2) film as gate dielectric were fabricated, using Pt, Au, and Ti as the top gate electrode whereas Pt constitutes the bottom side electrode. At the gate injection case, the Pt- and Au-gated metal oxide semiconductor devices present a lower leakage current than that of the Ti-gated device, as well as similar leakage current conduction mechanism and interfacial properties at the metal/HfO(2) interface, because of their close work function and chemical properties.

  15. Orientation control and domain structure analysis of {100}-oriented epitaxial ferroelectric orthorhombic HfO2-based thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Kiliha; Shimizu, Takao; Sakata, Osami; Shiraishi, Takahisa; Nakamura, Shogo; Kiguchi, Takanori; Akama, Akihiro; Konno, Toyohiko J.; Uchida, Hiroshi; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Orientation control of {100}-oriented epitaxial orthorhombic 0.07YO1.5-0.93HfO2 films grown by pulsed laser deposition was investigated. To achieve in-plane lattice matching, indium tin oxide (ITO) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were selected as underlying layers. We obtained (100)- and (001)/(010)-oriented films on ITO and YSZ, respectively. Ferroelastic domain formation was confirmed for both films by X-ray diffraction using the superlattice diffraction that appeared only for the orthorhombic symmetry. The formation of ferroelastic domains is believed to be induced by the tetragonal-orthorhombic phase transition upon cooling the films after deposition. The present results demonstrate that the orientation of HfO2-based ferroelectric films can be controlled in the same manner as that of ferroelectric films composed of conventional perovskite-type material such as Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 and BiFeO3.

  16. Ferroelectricity-modulated resistive switching in Pt/Si:HfO2/HfO2-x /Pt memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Jiang; Xianghao, Du; Zuyin, Han

    2016-08-01

    It is investigated for the effect of a ferroelectric Si:HfO2 thin film on the resistive switching in a stacked Pt/Si:HfO2/highly-oxygen-deficient HfO2-x /Pt structure. Improved resistance performance was observed. It was concluded that the observed resistive switching behavior was related to the modulation of the width and height of a depletion barrier in the HfO2-x layer, which was caused by the Si:HfO2 ferroelectric polarization field effect. Reliable switching reproducibility and long data retention were observed in these memory cells, suggesting their great potential in non-volatile memories applications with full compatibility and simplicity. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11374182), the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province (No. ZR2012FQ012), and the Jinan Independent Innovation Projects of Universities (No. 201303019).

  17. Effect of growth rate on crystallization of HfO2 thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanunjaya, M.; Manikanthababu, N.; Pathak, A. P.; Rao, S. V. S. Nageswara

    2016-05-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is the potentially useful dielectric material in both; electronics to replace the conventional SiO2 as gate dielectric and in Optics as anti-reflection coating material. In this present work we have synthesized polycrystalline HfO2 thin films by RF magnetron sputtering deposition technique with varying target to substrate distance. The deposited films were characterized by X-ray Diffraction, Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and transmission and Reflection (T&R) measurements to study the growth behavior, microstructure and optical properties. XRD measurement shows that the samples having mixed phase of monoclinic, cubic and tetragonal crystal structure. RBS measurements suggest the formation of Inter Layer (IL) in between Substrate and film

  18. Strong photoluminescence of the porous silicon with HfO2-filled microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ran; Wu, Zhengran; Du, Xianghao; Han, Zuyin; Sun, Weideng

    2015-06-01

    Greatly enhanced blue emission was observed at room temperature in the single-crystal silicon with HfO2 filled into its microcavities. The broad blue band light was emitted from both the HfO2 dielectric and the porous Si. The ferroelectricity of HfO2 enhances the blue emission from Si by its filling into the microcaivities. At the same time, HfO2 contributes to the light emission for the transitions of the defect levels for oxygen vacancy. The observation of greatly enhanced blue light emission of the porous Si filled with HfO2 dielectric is remarkable as both HfO2 and Si are highly compatible with Si-based electronic industry.

  19. Study of Direct-Contact HfO2/Si Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Miyata

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Controlling monolayer Si oxide at the HfO2/Si interface is a challenging issue in scaling the equivalent oxide thickness of HfO2/Si gate stack structures. A concept that the author proposes to control the Si oxide interface by using ultra-high vacuum electron-beam HfO2 deposition is described in this review paper, which enables the so-called direct-contact HfO2/Si structures to be prepared. The electrical characteristics of the HfO2/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors are reviewed, which suggest a sufficiently low interface state density for the operation of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs but reveal the formation of an unexpected strong interface dipole. Kelvin probe measurements of the HfO2/Si structures provide obvious evidence for the formation of dipoles at the HfO2/Si interfaces. The author proposes that one-monolayer Si-O bonds at the HfO2/Si interface naturally lead to a large potential difference, mainly due to the large dielectric constant of the HfO2. Dipole scattering is demonstrated to not be a major concern in the channel mobility of MOSFETs.

  20. HfO2/SiO2 multilayer based reflective and transmissive optics from the IR to the UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue; Hart, Gary A.; Oudard, Jean Francois; Wamboldt, Leonard; Roy, Brian P.

    2016-05-01

    HfO2/SiO2 multilayer based reflective optics enable threat detection in the short-wave/middle-wave infrared and high power laser targeting capability in the near infrared. On the other hand, HfO2/SiO2 multilayer based transmissive optics empower early missile warning by taking advantage of the extremely low noise light detection in the deep-ultraviolet region where solar irradiation is strongly absorbed by the ozone layer of the earth's atmosphere. The former requires high laser damage resistance, whereas the latter needs a solar-blind property, i.e., high transmission of the radiation below 290 nm and strong suppression of the solar background from 300 nm above. The technical challenges in both cases are revealed. The spectral limits associated with the HfO2 and SiO2 films are discussed and design concepts are schematically illustrated. Spectral performances are realized for potential A and D and commercial applications.

  1. Research of data retention for charge trapping memory by first-principles%电荷俘获存储器数据保持特性第一性原理研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋先伟; 鲁世斌; 代广珍; 汪家余; 金波; 陈军宁

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of charge trapping memory storage feature is studied by doping the substitutional impurity Al and introducing oxygen vacancy within HfO2. HfO2 is widely used in trapping layer of charge trapping memory, for it belongs to high dielectric constant materials with the abilities to shrink the device size and improve the device performance. Materials studio and Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package are used to investigate the influence of doping Al on the formation of the oxygen vacancy in HfO2 as a trapping layer. At the same time, the interaction energy of two defects at different distances is calculated. Results show that doping the substitutional impurity Al reduces the formation energy of oxygen vacancies in HfO2, and the reduced formation energy of the three-fold-coordinated O vacancy is larger than that of the four-fold-coordinated O vacancy. After having studied three different defect distances between the substitutional impurity Al and the three-fold-coordinated O vacancy, the results indicate that the system acquires the largest charge trapping energy, the most of quantum states, the smallest population number, and the longest Al—O bond length when the distance between the defects is 2.107 Å. Studying the bond length changes of the three systems after writing a hole, we obtain a result that the change of Al—O bond length is the smallest when the distance between defects is 2.107 Å. In conclusion, the data retention in the trapping layer of monoclinic HfO2 can be improved by doping the substitutional impurity Al. This work will provide a theoretical guidance for the performance improvement in the data retention of charge trapping memory.

  2. In-situ growth of HfO2 on clean 2H-MoS2 surface: Growth mode, interface reactions and energy band alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang Pang; Ong, Bin Leong; Ong, Sheau Wei; Ong, Weijie; Tan, Hui Ru; Chai, Jian Wei; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Shi Jie; Pan, Ji Sheng; Harrison, Leslie John; Kang, Hway Chuan; Tok, Eng Soon

    2017-10-01

    Room temperature growth of HfO2 thin film on clean 2H-MoS2 via plasma-sputtering of Hf-metal target in an argon/oxygen environment was studied in-situ using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The deposited film was observed to grow akin to a layer-by-layer growth mode. At the onset of growth, a mixture of sulfate- and sulfite-like species (SOx2- where x = 3, 4), and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3), are formed at the HfO2/MoS2 interface. An initial decrease in binding energies for both Mo 3d and S 2p core-levels of the MoS2 substrate by 0.4 eV was also observed. Their binding energies, however, did not change further with increasing HfO2 thickness. There was no observable change in the Hf4f core-level binding energy throughout the deposition process. With increasing HfO2 deposition, MoO3 becomes buried at the interface while SOx2- was observed to be present in the film. The shift of 0.4 eV for both Mo 3d and S 2p core-levels of the MoS2 substrate can be attributed to a charge transfer from the substrate to the MoO3/SOx2--like interface layer. Consequently, the Type I heterojunction valence band offset (conduction band offset) becomes 1.7 eV (2.9 eV) instead of 1.3 eV (3.3 eV) expected from considering the bulk HfO2 and MoS2 valence band offset (conduction band offset). The formation of these states and its influence on band offsets will need to be considered in their device applications.

  3. Photocurrent generation in carbon nanotube/cubic-phase HfO2 nanoparticle hybrid nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protima Rauwel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid material consisting of nonfunctionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and cubic-phase HfO2 nanoparticles (NPs with an average diameter of 2.6 nm has been synthesized. Free standing HfO2 NPs present unusual optical properties and a strong photoluminescence emission in the visible region, originating from surface defects. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that these NPs decorate the MWCNTs on topological defect sites. The electronic structure of the C K-edge in the nanocomposites was probed by electron energy loss spectroscopy, highlighting the key role of the MWCNT growth defects in anchoring HfO2 NPs. A combined optical emission and absorption spectroscopy approach illustrated that, in contrast to HfO2 NPs, the metallic MWCNTs do not emit light but instead expose their discrete electronic structure in the absorption spectra. The hybrid material manifests characteristic absorption features with a gradual merger of the MWCNT π-plasmon resonance band with the intrinsic defect band and fundamental edge of HfO2. The photoluminescence of the nanocomposites indicates features attributed to combined effects of charge desaturation of HfO2 surface states and charge transfer to the MWCNTs with an overall reduction of radiative recombination. Finally, photocurrent generation under UV–vis illumination suggests that a HfO2 NP/MWCNT hybrid system can be used as a flexible nanodevice for light harvesting applications.

  4. Structural degradation of thin HfO2 film on Ge during the postdeposition annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Noriyuki; Yasuda, Tetsuji; Abe, Yasuhiro

    2010-05-01

    Securing the thermal robustness of thin hafnium oxide (HfO2) film on the semiconductor surface is an important technical issue in the fabrication of the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor devices, as the HfO2-based high-k gate stacks usually undergo high-temperature processes. In this study, the structural development of thin HfO2 film on a Ge surface during postdeposition annealing in an ultrahigh vacuum was examined to explore the origin for the initial degradation of thin HfO2 film. Void nucleation and subsequent two-dimensional void growth take place at 780-840 °C, while the chemical composition of the remaining Hf oxide is virtually stable. Both the void nucleation and growth processes show similar larger activation energy of about 10 eV. Based on the observed manner of void growth and the estimated activation energies, the authors propose that mass transport on the HfO2 surface is responsible for void nucleation in the HfO2 films on Ge. The authors also compare the present results with the previous studies on HfO2/Si structures, and suggest that similar surface process leads to the local Hf silicidation.

  5. Hafnium carbamates and ureates: new class of precursors for low-temperature growth of HfO2 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Milanov, Andrian P; Barreca, Davide; Gasparotto, Alberto; Becker, Hans-Werner; Winter, Manuela; Fischer, Roland A; Devi, Anjana

    2009-04-21

    Novel volatile compounds of hafnium, namely tetrakis-N,O-dialkylcarbamato hafnium(iv) [Hf((i)PrNC(O)O(i)Pr)(4)] () and tetrakis-N,N,N'-trialkylureato hafnium(iv) [Hf((i)PrNC(O)N-(Me)Et)(4)] (), have been synthesized through the simple insertion reaction of isopropyl isocyanate into hafnium isopropoxide and hafnium ethylmethylamide, respectively; based on the promising thermal properties, compound has been evaluated as a precursor for metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of HfO(2) thin films, which resulted in the growth of stoichiometric and crystalline layers with a uniform morphology at temperature as low as 250 degrees C.

  6. Laminated CeO2/HfO2 High-K Gate Dielectrics Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition in Reducing Ambient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karakaya, K.; Barcones, B.; Zinine, A.; Rittersma, Z.M.; Graat, P.; Berkum, van J.G.M.; Verheijen, M.A.; Rijnders, G.; Blank, D.H.A.

    2006-01-01

    CeO2 and HfO2 dielectric layers were deposited in an Ar+(5%)H2 gas mixture by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) on Si (100). A CeO2-Ce2O3 transformation is achieved by deposition in reducing ambient. It is also shown that in-situ post deposition anneal efficiently oxidizes Ce2O3 layers to CeO2. The prop

  7. Investigation of plasma hydrogenation and trapping mechanism for layer transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Chu, Paul K.; Höchbauer, T.; Lee, J.-K.; Nastasi, M.; Buca, D.; Mantl, S.; Loo, R.; Caymax, M.; Alford, T.; Mayer, J. W.; Theodore, N. David; Cai, M.; Schmidt, B.; Lau, S. S.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen ion implantation is conventionally used to initiate the transfer of Si thin layers onto Si wafers coated with thermal oxide. In this work, we studied the feasibility of using plasma hydrogenation to replace high dose H implantation for layer transfer. Boron ion implantation was used to introduce H-trapping centers into Si wafers to illustrate the idea. Instead of the widely recognized interactions between boron and hydrogen atoms, this study showed that lattice damage, i.e., dangling bonds, traps H atoms and can lead to surface blistering during hydrogenation or upon postannealing at higher temperature. The B implantation and subsequent processes control the uniformity of H trapping and the trap depths. While the trap centers were introduced by B implantation in this study, there are many other means to do the same without implantation. Our results suggest an innovative way to achieve high quality transfer of Si layers without H implantation at high energies and high doses.

  8. Traps in Zirconium Alloys Oxide Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmar Frank

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxide films long-time grown on tubes of three types of zirconium alloys in water and in steam were investigated, by analysing I-V characteristic measured at constant voltages with various temperatures. Using theoretical concepts of Rose [3] and Gould [5], ZryNbSn(Fe proved to have an exponential distribution of trapping centers below the conduction band edge, wheras Zr1Nb and IMP Zry-4 proved to have single energy trap levels.

  9. Ferroelectric phase stabilization of HfO2 by nitrogen doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lun; Nishimura, Tomonori; Shibayama, Shigehisa; Yajima, Takeaki; Migita, Shinji; Toriumi, Akira

    2016-09-01

    We report that nitrogen (N) doping can drive the ferroelectricity of HfO2. It was found that N doping can cause the transition from a monoclinic phase to a highly symmetric phase. The role of N doping is discussed from the viewpoints of charge balance and bond-constraining effects. The former is responsible for the structural transformation from a paraelectric phase to a ferroelectric phase by forming an oxygen vacancy. In addition, Hf-N and N-O bonds with covalent characteristics have strong effects on HfO2 structural and electrical properties, and thus contribute to a marked HfO2 para-/ferroelectric transition.

  10. Effects of Modified Precursor Solution on Microstructure of (Y,Yb)MnO3/HfO2/Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2007-10-01

    Ferroelectric/insulator/silicon structures were prepared using (Y,Yb)MnO3 films as ferroelectrics and HfO2 thin films as insulators through alkoxy-derived precursor solutions. The HfO2 solution was chemically modified in order to decrease the number of heating cycles required. The HfO2 films prepared using a partially hydrolyzed alkoxide solution had a uniform structure. From the results of measurements of the roughness level and refractive index of the HfO2 films, the partial hydrolysis of the HfO2 solution was found to be effective for the formation of a uniform microstructure in a thin insulator film. (Y,Yb)MnO3/HfO2/Si structures were constructed using the resultant HfO2 thin films prepared using the modified solutions.

  11. Study of structure and antireflective properties of LaF3/HfO2/SiO2 and LaF3/HfO2/MgF2 trilayers for UV applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszalek, K.; Jaglarz, J.; Sahraoui, B.; Winkowski, P.; Kanak, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study antireflective properties of the tree-layer systems LaF3/HfO2/SiO2 and LaF3/HfO2/MgF2 deposited on heated optical glass substrates. The films were evaporated by the use two deposition techniques. In first method oxide films were prepared by means of e-gun evaporation in vacuum of 5 × 10-5 mbar in the presence of oxygen. The second was used for the deposition of fluoride films. They were obtained by means of thermal source evaporation. Simulation of reflectance was performed for 1M2H1L (Quarter Wavelength Optical Thickness) film stack on an optical quartz glass with the refractive index n = 1.46. The layer thickness was optimized to achieve the lowest light scattering from glass surface covered with dioxide and fluoride films. The values of the interface roughness were determined through atomic force microscopy measurements. The essence of performed calculation was to find minimum reflectance of light in wide ultraviolet region. The spectral dispersion of the refractive index needed for calculations was determined from ellipsometric measurements using the spectroscopic ellipsometer M2000. Additionally, the total reflectance measurements in integrating sphere coupled with Perkin Elmer 900 spectrophotometer were performed. These investigations allowed to determine the influence of such film features like surface and interface roughness on light scattering.

  12. Interface engineered HfO2-based 3D vertical ReRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudec, Boris; Wang, I.-Ting; Lai, Wei-Li; Chang, Che-Chia; Jančovič, Peter; Fröhlich, Karol; Mičušík, Matej; Omastová, Mária; Hou, Tuo-Hung

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a double-layer 3D vertical resistive random access memory (ReRAM) stack implementing a Pt/HfO2/TiN memory cell. The HfO2 switching layer is grown by atomic layer deposition on the sidewall of a SiO2/TiN/SiO2/TiN/SiO2 multilayer pillar. A steep vertical profile was achieved using CMOS-compatible TiN dry etching. We employ in situ TiN bottom interface engineering by ozone, which results in (a) significant forming voltage reduction which allows for forming-free operation in AC pulsed mode, and (b) non-linearity tuning of low resistance state by current compliance during Set operation. The vertical ReRAM shows excellent read and write disturb immunity between vertically stacked cells, retention over 104 s and excellent switching stability at 400 K. Endurance of 107 write cycles was achieved using 100 ns wide AC pulses while fast switching speed using pulses of only 10 ns width is also demonstrated. The active switching region was evaluated to be located closer to the bottom interface which allows for the observed high endurance.

  13. Ferroelectric-field-effect-enhanced resistance performance of TiN/Si:HfO2/oxygen-deficient HfO2/TiN resistive switching memory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ran; Wu, Zhengran; Du, Xianghao; Han, Zuyin; Sun, Weideng

    2015-07-01

    Greatly improved resistance performance, including high resistance ratio between the high resistance state and the low resistance state, long-time retention, and reliable endurance, was observed in TiN/Si:HfO2/oxygen-deficient HfO2/TiN memory cells. The enhanced resistance ratio is ascribed to the creation/elimination of an extra barrier in oxygen-deficient HfO2 layer in response to the polarization reversal in the ferroelectric Si:HfO2 layer. Along with the enhanced resistance ratio, the long retention and good endurance make the proposed device a promising candidate for non-volatile resistive memories.

  14. Zinc-oxide charge trapping memory cell with ultra-thin chromium-oxide trapping layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazek El-Atab

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A functional zinc-oxide based SONOS memory cell with ultra-thin chromium oxide trapping layer was fabricated. A 5 nm CrO2 layer is deposited between Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD steps. A threshold voltage (Vt shift of 2.6V was achieved with a 10V programming voltage. Also for a 2V Vt shift, the memory with CrO2 layer has a low programming voltage of 7.2V. Moreover, the deep trapping levels in CrO2 layer allows for additional scaling of the tunnel oxide due to an increase in the retention time. In addition, the structure was simulated using Physics Based TCAD. The results of the simulation fit very well with the experimental results providing an understanding of the charge trapping and tunneling physics.

  15. Zinc-oxide charge trapping memory cell with ultra-thin chromium-oxide trapping layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Rizk, Ayman; Nayfeh, Ammar [Institute Center for Microsystems – iMicro, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Masdar Institute of Science and Technology Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Okyay, Ali K. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center and Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-11-15

    A functional zinc-oxide based SONOS memory cell with ultra-thin chromium oxide trapping layer was fabricated. A 5 nm CrO{sub 2} layer is deposited between Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) steps. A threshold voltage (V{sub t}) shift of 2.6V was achieved with a 10V programming voltage. Also for a 2V V{sub t} shift, the memory with CrO{sub 2} layer has a low programming voltage of 7.2V. Moreover, the deep trapping levels in CrO{sub 2} layer allows for additional scaling of the tunnel oxide due to an increase in the retention time. In addition, the structure was simulated using Physics Based TCAD. The results of the simulation fit very well with the experimental results providing an understanding of the charge trapping and tunneling physics.

  16. Zinc-oxide charge trapping memory cell with ultra-thin chromium-oxide trapping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Rizk, Ayman; Okyay, Ali K.; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2013-11-01

    A functional zinc-oxide based SONOS memory cell with ultra-thin chromium oxide trapping layer was fabricated. A 5 nm CrO2 layer is deposited between Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) steps. A threshold voltage (Vt) shift of 2.6V was achieved with a 10V programming voltage. Also for a 2V Vt shift, the memory with CrO2 layer has a low programming voltage of 7.2V. Moreover, the deep trapping levels in CrO2 layer allows for additional scaling of the tunnel oxide due to an increase in the retention time. In addition, the structure was simulated using Physics Based TCAD. The results of the simulation fit very well with the experimental results providing an understanding of the charge trapping and tunneling physics.

  17. On the etching characteristics and mechanisms of HfO2 thin films in CF4/O2/Ar and CHF3/O2/Ar plasma for nano-devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Nomin; Efremov, Alexander; Yeom, Geun Young; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2014-12-01

    The study of etching characteristics and mechanisms for HfO2 and Si in CF4/O2/Ar and CHF3/O2/Ar inductively-coupled plasmas was carried out. The etching rates of HfO2 thin films as well as the HfO2/Si etching selectivities were measured as functions of Ar content in a feed gas (0-50% Ar) at fixed fluorocarbon gas content (50%), gas pressure (6 mTorr), input power (700 W), bias power (200 W), and total gas flow rate (40 sccm). Plasma parameters as well as the differences in plasma chemistries for CF4- and CHF3-based plasmas were analyzed using Langmuir probe diagnostics and 0-dimensional plasma modeling. It was found that, in both gas systems, the non-monotonic (with a maximum at about 15-20% Ar) HfO2 etching rate does not correlate with monotonic changes of F atom flux and ion energy flux. It was proposed that, under the given set of experimental conditions, the HfO2 etching process is affected by the factors determining the formation and decomposition kinetics of the fluorocarbon polymer layer. These factor are the fluxes of CF(x) (x = 1, 2) radicals, O atoms and H atoms.

  18. HfO2 Gate Dielectrics for Future Generation of CMOS Device Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Y.Yu; J.F.Kang; Ren Chi; M.F.Li; D.L.Kwong

    2004-01-01

    The material and electrical properties of HfO2 high-k gate dielectric are reported.In the first part,the band alignment of HfO2 and (HfO2)x(Al2O3)1-x to (100)Si substrate and their thermal stability are studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and TEM.The energy gap of (HfO2)x(Al2O3)1-x,the valence band offset,and the conduction band offset between (HfO2)x(Al2O3)1-x and the Si substrate as functions of x are obtained based on the XPS results.Our XPS results also demonstrate that both the thermal stability and the resistance to oxygen diffusion of HfO2 are improved by adding Al to form Hf aluminates.In the second part,a thermally stable and high quality HfN/HfO2 gate stack is reported.Negligible changes in equivalent oxide thickness (EOT),gate leakage,and work function (close to Si mid-gap) of HfN/HfO2 gate stack are demonstrated even after 1000℃ post-metal annealing(PMA),which is attributed to the superior oxygen diffusion barrier of HfN as well as the thermal stability of the HfN/HfO2 interface.Therefore,even without surface nitridation prior to HfO2 deposition,the EOT of HfN/HfO2 gate stack has been successfully scaled down to less than 1nm after 1000℃ PMA with excellent leakage and long-term reliability.The last part demonstrates a novel replacement gate process employing a HfN dummy gate and sub-1nm EOT HfO2 gate dielectric.The excellent thermal stability of the HfN/HfO2 gate stack enables its use in high temperature CMOS processes.The replacement of HfN with other metal gate materials with work functions adequate for n- and p-MOS is facilitated by a high etch selectivity of HfN with respect to HfO2,without any degradation to the EOT,gate leakage,or TDDB characteristics of HfO2.

  19. Effects of water vapor in high vacuum chamber on the properties of HfO2 films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Ling; Hongbo He; Jianda Shao

    2007-01-01

    The influence of water vapor content in high vacuum chamber during the coating process on physical properties of HfO2 films was investigated. Coatings were deposited on BK7 substrates by electron beam evaporation and photoelectric maximum control method. An in situ residual gas analyzer (RGA) was used to monitor the residual gas composition in the vacuum chamber. The optical properties, microstructure,absorption and laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the samples were characterized by Lambda 900 spectrophotometer, X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface thermal lensing (STL) technique and 1064-nm Qswitched pulsed laser at a pulse duration of 12 ns respectively. It was found that a cold trap is an effective equipment to suppress water vapor in the vacuum chamber during the pumping process, and the coatings deposited in the vacuum atmosphere with relatively low water vapor composition show higher refractive index and smaller grain size. Meanwhile, the higher LIDT value is corresponding to lower absorbance.

  20. The effect of ultraviolet irradiation on the ultra-thin HfO2 based CO gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaduman, Irmak; Barin, Ã.-zlem; Yıldız, Dilber Esra; Acar, Selim

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an effort has been made to fabricate ultrathin HfO2/Al2O3 sample by atomic layer deposition method for the fast detection of CO gas at room temperature. The effect of the operating temperature and the UV light on the gas sensing characteristics has been studied. We investigated the optimum operating temperature for the sample by sensing 25 ppm CO and CO2 gases from room temperature to 150 °C for 10 °C steps. The maximum response was obtained at 150 °C for both gases in the measurement temperature range. Also, the photoresponse measurements clearly show the effect of UV light on the sample. At room temperature, sensor showed superior response (14%) for 5 ppm CO gas. The response time of sensor is 6 s to 5 ppm CO gas concentration. The ultrathin HfO2 based sample shows acceptable gas sensitivity for 5 ppm CO gas at room temperature under UV light irradiation.

  1. Nanoscale morphological and electrical homogeneity of HfO2 and ZrO2 thin films studied by conducting atomic-force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremmer, S.; Wurmbauer, H.; Teichert, C.; Tallarida, G.; Spiga, S.; Wiemer, C.; Fanciulli, M.

    2005-04-01

    The morphological and electrical evolution of HfO2 and ZrO2 thin films is investigated on the nanoscale using conducting atomic-force microscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. Films of different thicknesses have been grown by atomic layer deposition. With increasing film thickness the film structure changes from amorphous to polycrystalline. By conducting atomic-force microscopy using local current-voltage curve statistics and two-dimensional current imaging it is found that the formation of crystallites has different effects on the electrical properties of the two dielectrics. In the case of HfO2, the crystalline fraction causes weak spots in the oxide, whereas for the ZrO2 films the crystallites exhibit lower leakage currents compared to the amorphous matrix and leakage is mainly determined by thickness fluctuations.

  2. Elastic and vibrational properties of monoclinic HfO2 from first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui; Zhou, Bo; Li, Qian; Jiang, ZhenYi; Wang, WenBo; Ma, WenYan; Zhang, XiaoDong

    2012-03-01

    The elastic and vibrational properties of crystalline monoclinic HfO2 have been investigated using density functional perturbation theory. Using the Voigt and Reuss theory, we estimate the bulk, shear and Young's modulus for polycrystalline HfO2, which agree very well with the available experimental and theoretical data. Additionally, we present a systematic analysis of the elastic properties of HfO2 polymorphs and find the trends in the elastic parameters for the HfO2 structures are consistent with those for the ZrO2 structures. The choice of exchange-correlation functional has an important effect on the results of elastic and vibrational properties. The utilization of Hartwigzen-Goedecker-Hutter type functional is a great improvement on calculation of the zone-centre phonon frequencies, and shows the root-mean-square absolute deviation of 7 cm-1 with experiments. A rigorous assignment of all the Raman modes is achieved by combining symmetry analysis with the first-principles calculations, which helps us to identify the main peak and some other features of Raman spectra. Furthermore, the Raman spectrum of HfO2 powder has been simulated for the first time, providing a theoretical benchmark for the interpretation of the unresolved problems in experimental studies.

  3. Fabrication and characteristics of high-K HfO2 gate dielectrics on n-germanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han De-Dong; Kang Jin-Feng; Liu Xiao-Yan; Sun Lei; Luo Hao; Han Ru-Qi

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports that the high-K HfO2 gate dielectrics are fabricated on n-germanium substrates by sputtering Hf on Ge and following by a furnace annealing. The impacts of sputtering ambient, annealing ambient and annealing temperature on the electrical properties of high-K HfO2 gate dielectrics on germanium substrates are investigated.Experimental results indicate that high-K HfO2 gate dielectrics on germanium substrates with good electrical characteristics are obtained, the electrical properties of high-K HfO2 gate dielectrics is strongly correlated with sputtering ambient, annealing ambient and annealing temperature.

  4. Effect of standing-wave field distribution on femosecond laser-induced damage of HfO2/SiO2 mirror coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shunli Chen; Yuan'an Zhao; Hongbo He; Manda Shao

    2011-01-01

    Single-pulse and multi-pulse damage behaviors of "standard" (with A/4 stack structure) and "modified" (with reduced standing-wave field) HfO2/SiO2 mirror coatings are investigated using a commercial 50-fs, 800-nm Tksapphire laser system. Precise morphologies of damaged sites display strikingly different features when the samples are subjected to various number of incident pulses, which are explained reasonably by the standing-wave field distribution within the coatings. Meanwhile, the single-pulse laser-induced damage threshold of the "standard" mirror is improved by about 14% while suppressing the normalized electric field intensity at the outmost interface of the HfO2 and SiO2 layers by 37%. To discuss the damage mechanism, a theoretical model based on photoionization, avalanche ionization, and decays of electrons is adopted to simulate the evolution curves of the conduction-band electron density during pulse duration.%@@ Single-pulse and multi-pulse damage behaviors of "standard"(with λ/4 stack structure) and "modified"(with reduced standing-wave field) HfO2/SiO2 mirror coatings are investigated using a commercial 50-fs,800-nm Thsapphire laser system.以Precise morphologies of damaged sites display strikingly different features when the samples are subjected to various number of incident pulses, which are explained reasonably by the standing-wave field distribution within the coatings .

  5. On the structural origins of ferroelectricity in HfO2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Xiahan; Grimley, Everett D.; Schenk, Tony; Schroeder, Uwe; LeBeau, James M.

    2015-04-01

    Here, we present a structural study on the origin of ferroelectricity in Gd doped HfO2 thin films. We apply aberration corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy to directly determine the underlying lattice type using projected atom positions and measured lattice parameters. Furthermore, we apply nanoscale electron diffraction methods to visualize the crystal symmetry elements. Combined, the experimental results provide unambiguous evidence for the existence of a non-centrosymmetric orthorhombic phase that can support spontaneous polarization, resolving the origin of ferroelectricity in HfO2 thin films.

  6. Influences of Annealing on Residual Stress and Structure of HfO2 Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Yan-Ming; SHAO Shu-Ying; DENG Zhen-Xia; HE Hong-Bo; SHAO Jian-Da; FAN Zheng-Xiu

    2007-01-01

    HfO2 films are deposited on BK7 glass substrates by electron beam evaporation. The influences of annealing between 100℃ and 400℃ on residual stresses and structures of HfO2 films are studied. It is found that little differences of spectra, residual stresses and structures are obtained after annealing at lower temperatures. After annealing at higher temperatures, the spectra shift to short wavelength, the residual stress increases with the increasing annealing temperature. At the same time, the crystallite size increases and interplanar distance decreases. The variations of optical spectra and residual stress correspond to the evolutions of structures induced by annealing.

  7. A tunneling current density model for ultra thin HfO2 high-k dielectric material based MOS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Niladri Pratap; Maity, Reshmi; Thapa, R. K.; Baishya, Srimanta

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an analytical model for evaluation of tunneling current density of ultra thin MOS devices is presented. The impacts of the promising high-k dielectric material, HfO2 on the current density model have been carried out. In this work, improvement in the results is brought in by taking into account the barrier height lowering due to the image force effect. The considered voltage range is from 0 to ψ1/e i.e., 0 neglecting the image force effect for a MOS device consisting asymmetric barrier. Later, image force effect of ultra thin oxide layer has been introduced for practical potential barrier by superimposing the potential barrier on the trapezoidal barrier. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results obtained by the 2-D numerical device simulator ATLAS and published experimental results. Excellent agreements among the three are observed.

  8. Effects of NH3 annealing on interface and electrical properties of Gd-doped HfO2/Si stack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Mengmeng; TU Hailing; DU Jun; WEI Feng; XIONG Yuhua; ZHAO Hongbin

    2013-01-01

    Effects of NH3 rapid thermal annealing (RTA) on the interface and electrical properties of Gd-doped HfO2 (GDH)/Si stack were investigated.The process of NH3 annealing could significantly affect the crystallization,stoichiometric properties of GDH film and the interface characteristic of GDH/Si system.NH3 annealing also led to the decrease of interface layer thickness.The leakage current density of Pt/GDH/p-Si MOS capacitor without RTA was 2× 10-3 A/cm2.After NH3 annealing,the leakage current density was about one order of magnitude lower (3.9×10-4 A/cm2).The effective permittivity extracted from the C-V curves was ~14.1 and ~13.1 for samples without and with RTA,respectively.

  9. Trap levels in layered semiconductor Ga 2SeS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinli, A.; Gasanly, N. M.; Aytekin, S.

    2004-12-01

    Trap levels in nominally undoped Ga 2SeS layered crystals have been characterized by thermally stimulated current (TSC) measurements. During the measurements, current was allowed to flow along the c-axis of the crystals in the temperature range of 10-300 K. Two distinct TSC peaks were observed in the spectra, deconvolution of which yielded three peaks. The results are analyzed by curve fitting, peak shape and initial rise methods. They all seem to be in good agreement with each other. The activation energies of three trapping centers in Ga 2SeS are found to be 72, 100 and 150 meV. The capture cross section of these traps are 6.7×10 -23, 1.8×10 -23 and 2.8×10 -22 cm 2 with concentrations of 1.3×10 12, 5.4×10 12 and 4.2×10 12 cm -3, respectively.

  10. Ferroelectricity of nondoped thin HfO2 films in TiN/HfO2/TiN stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tomonori; Xu, Lun; Shibayama, Shigehisa; Yajima, Takeaki; Migita, Shinji; Toriumi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    We report on the impact of TiN interfaces on the ferroelectricity of nondoped HfO2. Ferroelectric properties of nondoped HfO2 in TiN/HfO2/TiN stacks are shown in capacitance-voltage and polarization-voltage characteristics. The Curie temperature is also estimated to be around 500 °C. The ferroelectricity of nondoped HfO2 clearly appears by thinning HfO2 film down to ˜35 nm. We directly revealed in thermal treatments that the ferroelectric HfO2 film on TiN was maintained by covering the top surface of HfO2 with TiN, while it was followed by a phase transition to the paraelectric phase in the case of the open surface of HfO2. Thus, it is concluded that the ferroelectricity in nondoped HfO2 in this study was mainly driven by both of top and bottom TiN interfaces.

  11. Enhancement of the blue photoluminescence intensity for the porous silicon with HfO2 filling into microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ran; Du, Xianghao; Sun, Weideng; Han, Zuyin; Wu, Zhengran

    2015-10-01

    With HfO2 filled into the microcavities of the porous single-crystal silicon, the blue photoluminescence was greatly enhanced at room temperature. On one hand, HfO2 contributes to the light emission with the transitions of the defect levels for oxygen vacancy. On the other hand, the special filling-into-microcavities structure of HfO2 leads to the presence of ferroelectricity, which greatly enhances the blue emission from porous silicon. Since both HfO2 and Si are highly compatible with Si-based electronic industry, combined the low-cost and convenient process, the HfO2-filled porous Si shows a promising application prospect.

  12. Ferroelectricity in Si-doped HfO2 revealed: a binary lead-free ferroelectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dominik; Müller, Johannes; Schenk, Tony; Arruda, Thomas M; Kumar, Amit; Strelcov, Evgheni; Yurchuk, Ekaterina; Müller, Stefan; Pohl, Darius; Schröder, Uwe; Kalinin, Sergei V; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2014-12-23

    Static domain structures and polarization dynamics of silicon doped HfO2 are explored. The evolution of ferroelectricity as a function of Si-doping level driving the transition from paraelectricity via ferroelectricity to antiferroelectricity is investigated. Ferroelectric and antiferroelectric properties can be observed locally on the pristine, poled and electroded surfaces, providing conclusive evidence to intrinsic ferroic behavior.

  13. Growth of epitaxial orthorhombic YO1.5-substituted HfO2 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takao; Katayama, Kiliha; Kiguchi, Takanori; Akama, Akihiro; Konno, Toyohiko J.; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    YO1.5-substituted HfO2 thin films with various substitution amounts were grown on (100) YSZ substrates by the pulsed laser deposition method directly from the vapor phase. The epitaxial growth of film with different YO1.5 amounts was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction method. Wide-area reciprocal lattice mapping measurements were performed to clarify the crystal symmetry of films. The formed phases changed from low-symmetry monoclinic baddeleyite to high-symmetry tetragonal/cubic fluorite phases through an orthorhombic phase as the YO1.5 amount increased from 0 to 0.15. The additional annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy indicates that the orthorhombic phase has polar structure. This means that the direct growth by vapor is of polar orthorhombic HfO2-based film. Moreover, high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the film with a YO1.5 amount of 0.07 with orthorhombic structure at room temperature only exhibited a structural phase transition to tetragonal phase above 450 °C. This temperature is much higher than the reported maximum temperature of 200 °C to obtain ferroelectricity as well as the expected temperature for real device application. The growth of epitaxial orthorhombic HfO2-based film helps clarify the nature of ferroelectricity in HfO2-based films (186 words/200 words).

  14. Optical properties of nanocrystalline HfO2 synthesized by an auto-igniting combustion synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Padma Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of nanocrystalline HfO2 synthesized using a single-step auto-igniting combustion technique is reported. Nanocrystalline hafnium oxide having particle size of the order 10–15 nm were obtained in the present method. The nanopowder was characterized using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopic studies. All these studies confirm that the phase formation is complete in the combustion synthesis and monoclinic phase [P21/c(14] of HfO2 is obtained without the presence of any impurities or additional phases. The powder morphology of the as-prepared sample was studied using transmission electron microscopy and the results were in good agreement with that of the X-ray diffraction studies. The optical constants such as refractive index, extinction coefficient, optical conductivity and the band gap were estimated from UV–vis spectroscopic techniques. The band gap of nanocrystalline HfO2 was found to be 5.1 eV and the sample shows a broad PL emission at 628 nm. It is concluded that the transitions between intermediate energy levels in the band gap are responsible for the interesting photoluminescent properties of nanocrystalline HfO2.

  15. Thermal Conductivity and Water Vapor Stability of Ceramic HfO2-Based Coating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 are candidate thermal/environmental barrier coating materials for gas turbine ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor liner applications because of their relatively low thermal conductivity and high temperature capability. In this paper, thermal conductivity and high temperature phase stability of plasma-sprayed coatings and/or hot-pressed HfO2-5mol%Y2O3, HfO2-15mol%Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 were evaluated at temperatures up to 1700 C using a steady-state laser heat-flux technique. Sintering behavior of the plasma-sprayed coatings was determined by monitoring the thermal conductivity increases during a 20-hour test period at various temperatures. Durability and failure mechanisms of the HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 coatings on mullite/SiC Hexoloy or CMC substrates were investigated at 1650 C under thermal gradient cyclic conditions. Coating design and testing issues for the 1650 C thermal/environmental barrier coating applications will also be discussed.

  16. III-Nitride grating grown on freestanding HfO2 gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Tong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report here the epitaxial growth of III-nitride material on freestanding HfO2 gratings by molecular beam epitaxy. Freestanding HfO2 gratings are fabricated by combining film evaporation, electron beam lithography, and fast atom beam etching of an HfO2 film by a front-side silicon process. The 60-μm long HfO2 grating beam can sustain the stress change during the epitaxial growth of a III-nitride material. Grating structures locally change the growth condition and vary indium composition in the InGaN/GaN quantum wells and thus, the photoluminescence spectra of epitaxial III-nitride grating are tuned. Guided mode resonances are experimentally demonstrated in fabricated III-nitride gratings, opening the possibility to achieve the interaction between the excited light and the grating structure through guided mode resonance. PACS: 78.55.Cr; 81.65.Cf; 81.15.Hi.

  17. The conduction bands of MgO, MgS and HfO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, P.K. de; Groot, R.A. de

    1998-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations for MgO, MgS and HfO2 are reported. It is shown that the conduction bands of MgO and MgS have predominantly anion character, contrary to the common picture of the conduction band being derived from cation states. In transition metal oxides, unoccupied anion states a

  18. Retention loss in the ferroelectric (SrBi2Ta2O9)-insulator (HfO2)-silicon structure studied by piezoresponse force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. H.; Zhong, X. L.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, J. B.; Lu, C. J.; Ye, W. N.; Zhou, Y. C.

    2012-04-01

    Metal-ferroelectric-insulator-silicon (MFIS) structures with SrBi2Ta2O9 as ferroelectric thin film and HfO2 as insulating buffer layer were fabricated by pulsed-laser deposition. The interfaces and memory window of the MFIS structure were investigated. Piezoresponse force microscopy was used to observe the change of domain images in order to investigate the retention characteristics, which demonstrated that the MFIS structure experiences retention loss via a random-walk-type process, identified by a stretched exponential-decay model. The corresponding mechanism was discussed based on the time-dependent depolarization field.

  19. The impact of ultrathin Al2O3 films on the electrical response of p-Ge/Al2O3/HfO2/Au MOS structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botzakaki, M. A.; Skoulatakis, G.; Kennou, S.; Ladas, S.; Tsamis, C.; Georga, S. N.; Krontiras, C. A.

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that the most critical issue in Ge CMOS technology is the successful growth of high-k gate dielectrics on Ge substrates. The high interface quality of Ge/high-k dielectric is connected with advanced electrical responses of Ge based MOS devices. Following this trend, atomic layer deposition deposited ultrathin Al2O3 and HfO2 films were grown on p-Ge. Al2O3 acts as a passivation layer between p-Ge and high-k HfO2 films. An extensive set of p-Ge/Al2O3/HfO2 structures were fabricated with Al2O3 thickness ranging from 0.5 nm to 1.5 nm and HfO2 thickness varying from 2.0 nm to 3.0 nm. All structures were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and AFM. XPS analysis revealed the stoichiometric growth of both films in the absence of Ge sub-oxides between p-Ge and Al2O3 films. AFM analysis revealed the growth of smooth and cohesive films, which exhibited minimal roughness (~0.2 nm) comparable to that of clean bare p-Ge surfaces. The electrical response of all structures was analyzed by C-V, G-V, C-f, G-f and J-V characteristics, from 80 K to 300 K. It is found that the incorporation of ultrathin Al2O3 passivation layers between p-Ge and HfO2 films leads to superior electrical responses of the structures. All structures exhibit well defined C-V curves with parasitic effects, gradually diminishing and becoming absent below 170 K. D it values were calculated at each temperature, using both Hill-Coleman and Conductance methods. Structures of p-Ge/0.5 nm Al2O3/2.0 nm HfO2/Au, with an equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) equal to 1.3 nm, exhibit D it values as low as ~7.4  ×  1010 eV-1 cm-2. To our knowledge, these values are among the lowest reported. J-V measurements reveal leakage currents in the order of 10-1 A cm-2, which are comparable to previously published results for structures with the same EOT. A complete mapping of the energy distribution of D its into the energy bandgap of p-Ge, from the valence band

  20. Formation and disruption of conductive filaments in a HfO2/TiN structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brivio, S.; Tallarida, G.; Cianci, E.; Spiga, S.

    2014-09-01

    The process of the formation and disruption of nanometric conductive filaments in a HfO2/TiN structure is investigated by conductive atomic force microscopy. The preforming state evidences nonhomogeneous conduction at high fields through conductive paths, which are associated with pre-existing defects and develop into conductive filaments with a forming procedure. The disruption of the same filaments is demonstrated as well, according to a bipolar operation. In addition, the conductive tip of the microscopy is exploited to perform electrical operations on single conductive spots, which evidences that neighboring conductive filaments are not electrically independent. We propose a picture that describes the evolution of the shape of the conductive filaments in the processes of their formation and disruption, which involves the development of conductive branches from a common root; this root resides in the pre-existing defects that lay at the HfO2/TiN interface.

  1. Stable tetragonal phase and magnetic properties of Fe-doped HfO2 nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. N. Sales

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect in structural and magnetic properties of iron doping with concentration of 20% in hafnium dioxide (HfO2 nanoparticles is investigated. HfO2 is a wide band gap oxide with great potential to be used as high-permittivity gate dielectrics, which can be improved by doping. Nanoparticle samples were prepared by sol-gel chemical method and had their structure, morphology, and magnetic properties, respectively, investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM with electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD, and magnetization measurements. TEM and SEM results show size distribution of particles in the range from 30 nm to 40 nm with small dispersion. Magnetization measurements show the blocking temperature at around 90 K with a strong paramagnetic contribution. XRD results show a major tetragonal phase (94%.

  2. Annealing effects on residual stress of HfO2/SiO2 multilayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanming Shen; Zhaoxia Han; Jianda Shao; Shuying Shao; Hongbo He

    2008-01-01

    HfO2/SiO2 multilayer films were deposited on BK7 glass substrates by electron beam evaporation method.The effects of annealing at the temperature between 200 and 400℃ on residual stresses have been studied.It is found that the residual stress of as-deposited HfO2/SiO2 multilayers is compressive.It becomes tensile after annealing at 200℃,and then the value of tensile stress increases as annealing temperature increases.And cracks appear in the film because tensile stress is too large when the sample is annealed at 400℃.At the same time,the crystallite size increases and interplanar distance decreases with the increase of annealing temperature.The variation of residual stresses is corresponding with the evolution of structures.

  3. The demonstration of significant ferroelectricity in epitaxial Y-doped HfO2 film

    OpenAIRE

    Takao Shimizu; Kiliha Katayama; Takanori Kiguchi; Akihiro Akama; Konno, Toyohiko J.; Osami Sakata; Hiroshi Funakubo

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectricity and Curie temperature are demonstrated for epitaxial Y-doped HfO2 film grown on (110) yttrium oxide-stabilized zirconium oxide (YSZ) single crystal using Sn-doped In2O3 (ITO) as bottom electrodes. The XRD measurements for epitaxial film enabled us to investigate its detailed crystal structure including orientations of the film. The ferroelectricity was confirmed by electric displacement filed – electric filed hysteresis measurement, which revealed saturated polarization of 16...

  4. Ferroelectricity and antiferroelectricity of doped thin HfO2-based films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Hyuk; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Han Joon; Kim, Yu Jin; Moon, Taehwan; Kim, Keum Do; Müller, Johannes; Kersch, Alfred; Schroeder, Uwe; Mikolajick, Thomas; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2015-03-18

    The recent progress in ferroelectricity and antiferroelectricity in HfO2-based thin films is reported. Most ferroelectric thin film research focuses on perovskite structure materials, such as Pb(Zr,Ti)O3, BaTiO3, and SrBi2Ta2O9, which are considered to be feasible candidate materials for non-volatile semiconductor memory devices. However, these conventional ferroelectrics suffer from various problems including poor Si-compatibility, environmental issues related to Pb, large physical thickness, low resistance to hydrogen, and small bandgap. In 2011, ferroelectricity in Si-doped HfO2 thin films was first reported. Various dopants, such as Si, Zr, Al, Y, Gd, Sr, and La can induce ferro-electricity or antiferroelectricity in thin HfO2 films. They have large remanent polarization of up to 45 μC cm(-2), and their coercive field (≈1-2 MV cm(-1)) is larger than conventional ferroelectric films by approximately one order of magnitude. Furthermore, they can be extremely thin (5 eV). These differences are believed to overcome the barriers of conventional ferroelectrics in memory applications, including ferroelectric field-effect-transistors and three-dimensional capacitors. Moreover, the coupling of electric and thermal properties of the antiferroelectric thin films is expected to be useful for various applications, including energy harvesting/storage, solid-state-cooling, and infrared sensors.

  5. Effects of packing materials on the sensitivity of RadFET with HfO2 gate dielectric for electron and photon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, A.; Yilmaz, E.; Kaya, S.; Aktag, A.

    2015-10-01

    The radiation sensing field effect transistor (RadFET) with SiO2 gate oxide has been commonly used as a device component or dosimetry system in the radiation applications such as space research, radiotherapy, and high-energy physics experiments. However, alternative gate oxides and more suitable packaging materials are still demanded for these dosimeters. HfO2 is one of the most attractive gate oxide materials that are currently under investigation by many researchers. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of the average deposited energy in RadFET dosimetry systems with different package lid materials for point electron and photon sources were performed with the aim of evaluating the effects of package lids on the sensitivity of the RadFET by using HfO2 as a gate dielectric material. The RadFET geometry was defined in a PENGEOM package and electron-photon transport was simulated by a PENELOPE code. The relatively higher average deposited energies in the sensitive region (HfO2 layer) for electron energies of 250 keV-20 MeV were obtained from the RadFET with the Al2O3 package lid despite of some deviations from the general tendency. For the photon energies of 20-100 keV, the average amount of energy deposited in RadFET with Al2O3 package was higher compared with the other capped devices. The average deposited energy in the sensitive region was quite close to each other at 200 keV for both capped and uncapped devices. The difference in the average deposited energy of the RadFET with different package lid materials was not high for photon energies of 200-1200 keV. The increase in the average deposited energy in the HfO2 layer of the RadFET with Ta package lid was higher compared with the other device configurations above 3 MeV.

  6. The Hydrothermal Autoclave Synthesis of the Nanopowders of the Refractory ZrO2 and HfO2 Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Karpovich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The nanopowders of the transition metal ZrO2 and HfO2 oxides were obtained by the hydrothermal autoclave synthesis. The nanoparticles possess a rounded shape and a size range of 40 to 80 nm (ZrO2, of 10 to 40 nm (HfO2. X-ray diffraction analysis and electron microscopy show that the structure of the nanoparticles is monoclinic.

  7. Study on absorbance and laser damage threshold of HfO2 films prepared by ion-assisted reaction deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawei Zhang(张大伟); Shuhai Fan(范树海); Weidong Gao(高卫东); Hongbo He(贺洪波); Yingjian Wang(王英剑); Jianda Shao(邵建达); Zhengxiu Fan(范正修); Haojie Sun(孙浩杰)

    2004-01-01

    Using a new kind of EH1000 ion source, hafnium dioxide (HfO2) films are deposited with different deposition techniques and different conditions. The absorbance and the laser damage threshold of these films have been measured and studied. By comparing these characteristics, one can conclude that under right conditions, such as high partial pressure of oxygen and right kind of ion source, the ion-assisted reaction deposition can prepare HfO2 films with higher laser induced damage threshold.

  8. A combined ab initio and Franck-Condon factor simulation study on the photodetachment spectrum of HfO2-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Daniel K W; Lee, Edmond P F; Chau, Foo-Tim; Dyke, John M

    2008-12-28

    Restricted-spin coupled-cluster single-double plus perturbative triple excitation {RCCSD(T)} potential energy functions (PEFs) of the X[combining tilde]1A1 state of HfO2 and the X[combining tilde]2A1 state of HfO2- were computed, employing the quasi-relativistic effective core potential, ECP60MWB, and an associated contracted [13s6p6d4f3g2h] basis set designed for Hf, and the augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence quadruple-zeta (aug-cc-pVQZ) basis set for O. Based on the differences between the computed r0 and re geometrical parameters obtained from the PEF, and available experimentally derived r0 geometrical parameters of the X[combining tilde]1A1 state of HfO2, the experimental re geometrical parameters of the X[combining tilde]1A1 state of HfO2 were estimated as:-re(HfO)=1.7751 A and thetae(OHfO)=107.37 degrees. In addition, Franck-Condon factors for the HfO2 (X[combining tilde]1A1)+eVDEs) to these neutral states from the X[combining tilde]2A1 state of HfO2-.

  9. Optimum Ferroelectric Film Thickness in Metal-Ferroelectric-Insulator-Semiconductor Structures Composed of Pt, (Bi,La)4Ti3O12, HfO2, and Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Aizawa, Koji; Ishiwara, Hiroshi

    2006-06-01

    The optimum ferroelectric film thickness in metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) structures is investigated, in which 80- to 560-nm-thick (Bi,La)4Ti3O12 (BLT) films are deposited on HfO2 buffer layers using a sol-gel spin-coating method. It is found from electrical characteristics of MFIS diodes as well as MIS diodes that the HfO2 layers act as excellent barriers for suppressing both leakage current and atom interdiffusion when they are annealed in a rapid-thermal-annealing furnace at 900 °C for 1 min in O2 flow. In MFIS diodes, the memory window width in capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics is found to increase from 0.2 to 1.6 V, as ferroelectric film thickness increases from 80 to 560 nm. On the basis of these results, the relationships among memory window width, ferroelectric film thickness, and the optimum applied voltage are discussed. Finally, it is shown from the capacitance change measured over 24 h that data retention characteristics are excellent in samples with BLT films thicker than 240 nm.

  10. Growth of (111)-oriented epitaxial and textured ferroelectric Y-doped HfO2 films for downscaled devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Kiliha; Shimizu, Takao; Sakata, Osami; Shiraishi, Takahisa; Nakamura, Syogo; Kiguchi, Takanori; Akama, Akihiro; Konno, Toyohiko J.; Uchida, Hiroshi; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the growth of (111)-oriented epitaxial and textured YO1.5-HfO2 (0.07:0.93 ratio) films using the pulsed laser deposition method is presented. Epitaxial films were prepared on ITO//(111)yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates (ITO: Sn-doped In2O3; YSZ: yttria-stabilized zirconia), while textured films were prepared on (111)Pt/TiOx/SiO2//Si substrates with and without an ITO buffer layer via the grain on grain coherent growth. Inserting an ITO layer increased the volume fraction of the ferroelectric orthorhombic phase. Both the epitaxial and uniaxially textured films exhibited similar ferroelectricity with a remanent polarization of around 10 μC/cm2 and a coercive field of 1.9 to 2.0 MV/cm. These results present us with a way of obtaining stable and uniform ferroelectric properties for each grain and device cells consisting of a small number of grains. This opens the door for ultimately miniaturized ferroelectric devices, such as ferroelectric field effect transistors with small gate length and resistive random access memory using ferroelectric tunnel junctions.

  11. Integration of lead-free ferroelectric on HfO2/Si (100) for high performance non-volatile memory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Souvik; Maurya, Deepam; Clavel, Michael; Zhou, Yuan; Halder, Nripendra N.; Hudait, Mantu K.; Banerji, Pallab; Priya, Shashank

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a novel lead-free ferroelectric thin film (1-x)BaTiO3-xBa(Cu1/3Nb2/3)O3 (x = 0.025) (BT-BCN) integrated on to HfO2 buffered Si for non-volatile memory (NVM) applications. Piezoelectric force microscopy (PFM), x-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were employed to establish the ferroelectricity in BT-BCN thin films. PFM study reveals that the domains reversal occurs with 180° phase change by applying external voltage, demonstrating its effectiveness for NVM device applications. X-ray photoelectron microscopy was used to investigate the band alignments between atomic layer deposited HfO2 and pulsed laser deposited BT-BCN films. Programming and erasing operations were explained on the basis of band-alignments. The structure offers large memory window, low leakage current, and high and low capacitance values that were easily distinguishable even after ~106 s, indicating strong charge storage potential. This study explains a new approach towards the realization of ferroelectric based memory devices integrated on Si platform and also opens up a new possibility to embed the system within current complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor processing technology.

  12. Wide band antireflective coatings Al2O3 / HfO2 / MgF2 for UV region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkowski, P.; Marszałek, Konstanty W.

    2013-07-01

    Deposition technology of the three layers antireflective coatings consists of hafnium compound are presented in this paper. Oxide films were deposited by means of e-gun evaporation in vacuum of 5x10-5 mbar in presence of oxygen and fluoride films by thermal evaporation. Substrate temperature was 250°C. Coatings were deposited onto optical lenses made from quartz glass (Corning HPFS). Thickness and deposition rate were controlled by thickness measuring system Inficon XTC/2. Simulations leading to optimization of thickness and experimental results of optical measurements carried during and after deposition process were presented. Physical thickness measurements were made during deposition process and were equal to 43 nm/74 nm/51 nm for Al2O3 / HfO2 / MgF2 respectively. Optimization was carried out for ultraviolet region from 230nm to the beginning of visible region 400 nm. In this region the average reflectance of the antireflective coating was less than 0.5% in the whole range of application.

  13. Influence of thin alien layers on hydrogen reflection and trapping by PFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, A. V.; Kurnaev, V. A.; Levchuk, D. V.; Trifonov, N. N.

    2003-03-01

    Investigations of the influence of carbon and hydrocarbon layers on the trapping and reflection of hydrogen isotopes by tungsten were carried out with BCA based computer code SCATTER. It is shown that for small layer thickness the trapping efficiency depends on the hydrocarbon film composition. At layer thickness of a few nanometers energy dependence of the trapping efficiency has a non-monotonous character with a minimum at primary energies about 100-1000 eV and continuous increment with energy at higher energies. The possible reason of this effect is briefly discussed. Comparison between the trapping efficiencies of different hydrogen isotopes in a C-W target is also presented.

  14. Influence of thin alien layers on hydrogen reflection and trapping by PFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubeva, A.V.; Kurnaev, V.A. E-mail: kurnaev@plasma.mephi.ru; Levchuk, D.V.; Trifonov, N.N

    2003-03-01

    Investigations of the influence of carbon and hydrocarbon layers on the trapping and reflection of hydrogen isotopes by tungsten were carried out with BCA based computer code SCATTER. It is shown that for small layer thickness the trapping efficiency depends on the hydrocarbon film composition. At layer thickness of a few nanometers energy dependence of the trapping efficiency has a non-monotonous character with a minimum at primary energies about 100-1000 eV and continuous increment with energy at higher energies. The possible reason of this effect is briefly discussed. Comparison between the trapping efficiencies of different hydrogen isotopes in a C-W target is also presented.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of HfO2 thin films on indium zinc oxide: Band offsets measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, D.; Craciun, V.

    2017-04-01

    One of the most used dielectric films for amorphous indium zinc oxide (IZO) based thin films transistor is HfO2. The estimation of the valence band discontinuity (ΔEV) of HfO2/IZO heterostructure grown using the pulsed laser deposition technique, with In/(In + Zn) = 0.79, was obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The binding energies of Hf 4d5, Zn 2p3 and In 3d5 core levels and valence band maxima were measured for thick pure films and for a very thin HfO2 film deposited on a thick IZO film. A value of ΔEV = 1.75 ± 0.05 eV was estimated for the heterostructure. Taking into account the measured HfO2 and IZO optical bandgap values of 5.50 eV and 3.10 eV, respectively, a conduction band offset ΔEC = 0.65 ± 0.05 eV in HfO2/IZO heterostructure was then obtained.

  16. Ferroelectric HfO2-based materials for next-generation ferroelectric memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhen; Chen, Jingsheng; Wang, John

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric random access memory (FeRAM) based on conventional ferroelectric perovskites, such as Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and SrBi2Ta2O9, has encountered bottlenecks on memory density and cost, because those conventional perovskites suffer from various issues mainly including poor complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatibility and limited scalability. Next-generation cost-efficient, high-density FeRAM shall therefore rely on a material revolution. Since the discovery of ferroelectricity in Si:HfO2 thin films in 2011, HfO2-based materials have aroused widespread interest in the field of FeRAM, because they are CMOS-compatible and can exhibit robust ferroelectricity even when the film thickness is scaled down to below 10 nm. A review on this new class of ferroelectric materials is therefore of great interest. In this paper, the most appealing topics about ferroelectric HfO2-based materials including origins of ferroelectricity, advantageous material properties, and current and potential applications in FeRAM, are briefly reviewed.

  17. The demonstration of significant ferroelectricity in epitaxial Y-doped HfO2 film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takao; Katayama, Kiliha; Kiguchi, Takanori; Akama, Akihiro; Konno, Toyohiko J.; Sakata, Osami; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Ferroelectricity and Curie temperature are demonstrated for epitaxial Y-doped HfO2 film grown on (110) yttrium oxide-stabilized zirconium oxide (YSZ) single crystal using Sn-doped In2O3 (ITO) as bottom electrodes. The XRD measurements for epitaxial film enabled us to investigate its detailed crystal structure including orientations of the film. The ferroelectricity was confirmed by electric displacement filed – electric filed hysteresis measurement, which revealed saturated polarization of 16 μC/cm2. Estimated spontaneous polarization based on the obtained saturation polarization and the crystal structure analysis was 45 μC/cm2. This value is the first experimental estimations of the spontaneous polarization and is in good agreement with the theoretical value from first principle calculation. Curie temperature was also estimated to be about 450 °C. This study strongly suggests that the HfO2-based materials are promising for various ferroelectric applications because of their comparable ferroelectric properties including polarization and Curie temperature to conventional ferroelectric materials together with the reported excellent scalability in thickness and compatibility with practical manufacturing processes.

  18. Morphology and Photoluminescence of HfO2Obtained by Microwave-Hydrothermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavalcante LS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this letter, we report on the obtention of hafnium oxide (HfO2 nanostructures by the microwave-hydrothermal method. These nanostructures were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field-emission gum scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDXS, ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL measurements. XRD patterns confirmed that this material crystallizes in a monoclinic structure. FEG-SEM and TEM micrographs indicated that the rice-like morphologies were formed due to an increase in the effective collisions between the nanoparticles during the MH processing. The EDXS spectrum was used to verify the chemical compositional of this oxide. UV–vis spectrum revealed that this material have an indirect optical band gap. When excited with 488 nm wavelength at room temperature, the HfO2nanostructures exhibited only one broad PL band with a maximum at around 548 nm (green emission.

  19. Theoretical prediction of ion conductivity in solid state HfO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wei; Chen Wen-Zhou; Sun Jiu-Yu; Jiang Zhen-Yi

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical prediction of ion conductivity for solid state HfO2 is carried out in analogy to ZrO2 based on the density functional calculation.Geometric and electronic structures of pure bulks exhibit similarity for the two materials.Negative formation enthalpy and negative vacancy formation energy are found for YSH (yttria-stabilized hafnia) and YSZ (yttriastabilized zirconia),suggesting the stability of both materials.Low activation energies (below 0.7 eV) of diffusion are found in both materials,and YSH's is a little higher than that of YSZ.In addition,for both HfO2 and ZrO2,the supercells with native oxygen vacancies are also studied.The so-called defect states are observed in the supercells with neutral and +1 charge native vacancy but not in the +2 charge one.It can give an explanation to the relatively lower activation energies of yttria-doped oxides and +2 charge vacancy supercells.A brief discussion is presented to explain the different YSH ion conductivities in the experiment and obtained by us,and we attribute this to the different ion vibrations at different temperatures.

  20. HfO2 and SiO2 as barriers in magnetic tunneling junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Gokaran; Archer, Thomas; Sanvito, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    SiO2 and HfO2 are both high-k, wide-gap semiconductors, currently used in the microelectronic industry as gate barriers. Here we investigate whether the same materials can be employed to make magnetic tunnel junctions, which in principle can be amenable for integration in conventional Si technology. By using a combination of density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green's functions method for quantum transport we have studied the transport properties of Co [0001 ] /SiO2[001 ] /Co [0001 ] and Fe [001 ] /HfO2[001 ] /Fe [001 ] junctions. In both cases we found a quite large magnetoresistance, which is explained through the analysis of the real band structure of the magnets and the complex one of the insulator. We find that there is no symmetry spin filtering for the Co-based junction since the high transmission Δ2' band crosses the Fermi level, EF, for both spin directions. However, the fact that Co is a strong ferromagnet makes the orbital contribution to the two Δ2' spin subbands different, yielding magnetoresistance. In contrast for the Fe-based junction symmetry filtering is active for an energy window spanning between the Fermi level and 1 eV below EF, with Δ1 symmetry contributing to the transmission.

  1. The effect of Gd doping on the atomic and electronic structure of HfO2 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketsman, Ihor; Sokolov, Andrei; Belashchenko, Kirill; Dowben, Peter; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Tang, Jinke; Wang, Zhenjun

    2008-03-01

    HfO2 is a promising oxide for many applications, including high-k gate dielectric for CMOS devices. In addition, Gd-doped HfO2 could lead to a dilute magnetic semiconductor and provide an efficient neutron detection medium due to huge neutron absorption cross section of Gd. Gd-doped HfO2 films deposited on both p-type and n-type silicon by PLD retain monoclinic phase at small doping levels, but can be stabilized in fluorite phase by increased doping [1]. At small doping levels, photoemission measurements indicate n-type character of the films as a result of overcompensation with oxygen vacancies. Depending on a doping level, the films form heterojunctions with good rectifying properties on n- or p-type silicon. Preliminary results show the potential ability of the formed diode structures to detect neutrons. [1] Ya.B.Losovyj, I.Ketsman et al.,APL, 91, 132908, (2007)

  2. Electrical properties and reliability of HfO2 gate-dielectric MOS capacitors with trichloroethylene surface pretreatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jing-Ping; Chen Wei-Bing; Lai Pui-To; Li Yan-Ping; Chan Chu-Lok

    2007-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) pretreatment of Si surface prior to HfO2 deposition is employed to fabricate HfO2 gatedielectric MOS capacitors. Influence of this processing procedure on interlayer growth, HfO2/Si interface properties,gate-oxide leakage and device reliability is investigated. Among the surface pretreatments in NH3, NO, N2O and TCE ambients, the TCE pretreatment gives the least interlayer growth, the lowest interface-state density, the smallest gate leakage and the highest reliability. All these improvements should be ascribed to the passivation effects of Cl2 and Hclon the structural defects in the interlayer and at the interface, and also their gettering effects on the ion contamination in the gate dielectric.

  3. Study on absorbance and laser damage threshold of HfO2 films prepared by ion-assisted reaction deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张大伟; 范树海; 高卫东; 贺洪波; 王英剑; 邵建达; 范正修; 孙浩杰

    2004-01-01

    Using a new kind of EH1000 ion source, hafnium dioxide (HfO2) films are deposited with different depo sition techniques and different conditions. The absorbance and the laser damage threshold of these films have been measured and studied. By comparing these characteristics, one can conclude that under right conditions, such as high partial pressure of oxygen and right kind of ion source, the ion-assisted reaction deposition can prepare HfO2 films with higher laser induced damage threshold.

  4. Evolution of interface chemistry and dielectric properties of HfO2/Ge gate stack modulated by Gd incorporation and thermal annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang He

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In current work, effects of rapid thermal annealing (RTA on the interface chemistry and electrical properties of Gd-doped HfO2 (HGO/Ge stack have been investigated systematically. It has been demonstrated that the presence of GeOx interfacial layer between HfGdO and Ge is unavoidable and appropriate annealing can improve metal-oxide-semiconductor device characteristics such as interface state density, accumulation capacitance, frequency dispersion, and leakage current. The involved leakage current conduction mechanisms for metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS capacitors based on sputtered HGO/Ge gate stacks with optimal annealed temperature also have been discussed in detail. As a result, the Al/HGO barrier height and the band offset of HGO/Ge gate stack have been determined precisely.

  5. Comprehensive studies of IR to UV light intensification by nodular defects in HfO2/SiO2 multilayer mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalakys, Linas; Batavičiūtė, Gintarė; Pupka, Egidijus; Melninkaitis, Andrius

    2014-10-01

    Nodular defects tend to limit laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of multilayer dielectric coatings frequently used for laser applications. Cross-sections of localized damage morphologies correlate well with light intensifi- cation patterns caused by defect geometries. In vast majority of studies electric field enhancement in nodular defects was investigated for infrared spectral region. In this work theoretical analysis has been extended for IR - UV range. Light intensification in HfO2/SiO2 multilayer mirror coating was studied numerically. The analysis of obtained results indicates that phenomena is very sensitive to almost every investigated parameter. It was also found that field enhancement effect can be reached within distinct material layers (either of low or high refractive index). The discussion and insights complementing existing knowledge on nodular defects were made.

  6. Robust Low Voltage Program-Erasable Cobalt-Nanocrystal Memory Capacitors with Multistacked Al2O3/HfO2/Al2O3 Tunnel Barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Zhong-Wei; GOU Hong-Yan; HUANG Yue; SUN Qing-Qing; DING Shi-Jin; ZHANG Wei; ZHANG Shi-Li

    2009-01-01

    An atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3/HfO2/Al2O3 (A/H/A) tunnel barrier is investigated for Co nanocrystal memory capacitors. Compared to a single Al2O3 tunnel barrier, the A/H/A barrier can significantly increase the hysteresis window, i.e., an increase by 9 V for ±12 V sweep range. This is attributed to a marked decrease in the energy barriers of charge injections for the A/H/A tunnel barrier. Further, the Co-nanocrystal memory capacitor with the A/H/A tunnel barrier exhibits a memory window as large as 4.1 V for 100 /us program/erase at a low voltage of ±7 V, which is due to fast charge injection rates, i.e., about 2.4 × 1016 cm-2s-1 for electrons and 1.9×1016 cm-2s-1 for holes.

  7. Structural and dielectric properties of amorphous ZrO2 and HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceresoli, Davide; Vanderbilt, David

    2006-09-01

    Zirconia (ZrO2) and hafnia (HfO2) are leading candidates for replacing SiO2 as the gate insulator in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology. Amorphous versions of these materials ( a-ZrO2 and a-HfO2 ) can be grown as metastable phases on top of a silicon buffer; while they tend to recrystallize during subsequent annealing steps, they would otherwise be of considerable interest because of the promise they hold for improved uniformity and electrical passivity. In this work, we report our theoretical studies of a-ZrO2 and a-HfO2 by first-principles density-functional methods. We construct realistic amorphous models using the “activation-relaxation” technique of Barkema and Mousseau. The structural, vibrational, and dielectric properties of the resulting models are analyzed in detail. The overall average dielectric constant is computed and found to be comparable to that of the monoclinic phase.

  8. First principle simulations on the effects of oxygen vacancy in HfO2-based RRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehua Dai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HfO2-based resistive random access memory (RRAM takes advantage of oxygen vacancy (V o defects in its principle of operation. Since the change in resistivity of the material is controlled by the level of oxygen deficiency in the material, it is significantly important to study the performance of oxygen vacancies in formation of conductive filament. Excluding effects of the applied voltage, the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP is used to investigate the orientation and concentration mechanism of the oxygen vacancies based on the first principle. The optimal value of crystal orientation [010] is identified by means of the calculated isosurface plots of partial charge density, formation energy, highest isosurface value, migration barrier, and energy band of oxygen vacancy in ten established orientation systems. It will effectively influence the SET voltage, forming voltage, and the ON/OFF ratio of the device. Based on the results of orientation dependence, different concentration models are established along crystal orientation [010]. The performance of proposed concentration models is evaluated and analyzed in this paper. The film is weakly conductive for the samples deposited in a mixture with less than 4.167at.% of V o contents, and the resistive switching (RS phenomenon cannot be observed in this case. The RS behavior improves with an increase in the V o contents from 4.167at.% to 6.25at.%; nonetheless, it is found difficult to switch to a stable state. However, a higher V o concentration shows a more favorable uniformity and stability for HfO2-based RRAM.

  9. Temperature Effects on a-IGZO Thin Film Transistors Using HfO2 Gate Dielectric Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsien Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the temperature effect on amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO thin film transistors (TFTs using hafnium oxide (HfO2 gate dielectric material. HfO2 is an attractive candidate as a high-κ dielectric material for gate oxide because it has great potential to exhibit superior electrical properties with a high drive current. In the process of integrating the gate dielectric and IGZO thin film, postannealing treatment is an essential process for completing the chemical reaction of the IGZO thin film and enhancing the gate oxide quality to adjust the electrical characteristics of the TFTs. However, the hafnium atom diffused the IGZO thin film, causing interface roughness because of the stability of the HfO2 dielectric thin film during high-temperature annealing. In this study, the annealing temperature was optimized at 200°C for a HfO2 gate dielectric TFT exhibiting high mobility, a high ION/IOFF ratio, low IOFF current, and excellent subthreshold swing (SS.

  10. Coexistence of different charge states in Ta-doped monoclinic HfO2: Theoretical and experimental approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, M.A.; Alonso, R.E.; Errico, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    A combination of experiments and ab initio quantum-mechanical calculations has been applied to examine hyperfine interactions in Ta-doped hafnium dioxide. Although the properties of monoclinic HfO2 have been the subject of several earlier studies, some aspects remain open. In particular, time dif...

  11. Electrical Characteristics of the Uniaxial-Strained nMOSFET with a Fluorinated HfO2/SiON Gate Stack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Yu Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The channel fluorine implantation (CFI process was integrated with the Si3N4 contact etch stop layer (SiN CESL uniaxial-strained n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (nMOSFET with the hafnium oxide/silicon oxynitride (HfO2/SiON gate stack. The SiN CESL process clearly improves basic electrical performance, due to induced uniaxial tensile strain within the channel. However, further integrating of the CFI process with the SiN CESL-strained nMOSFET exhibits nearly identical transconductance, subthreshold swing, drain current, gate leakage and breakdown voltage, which indicates that the strain effect is not affected by the fluorine incorporation. Moreover, hydrogen will diffuse toward the interface during the SiN deposition, then passivate dangling bonds to form weak Si-H bonds, which is detrimental for channel hot electron stress (CHES. Before hydrogen diffusion, fluorine can be used to terminate oxygen vacancies and dangling bonds, which can create stronger Hf-F and Si-F bonds to resist consequent stress. Accordingly, the reliability of constant voltage stress (CVS and CHES for the SiN CESL uniaxial-strained nMOSFET can be further improved by the fluorinated HfO2/SiON using the CFI process. Nevertheless, the nMOSFET with either the SiN CESL or CFI process exhibits less charge detrapping, which means that a greater part of stress-induced charges would remain in the gate stack after nitrogen (SiN CESL or fluorine (CFI incorporation.

  12. Towards lightweight and flexible high performance nanocrystalline silicon solar cells through light trapping and transport layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Zachary R.

    This thesis investigates ways to enhance the efficiency of thin film solar cells through the application of both novel nano-element array light trapping architectures and nickel oxide hole transport/electron blocking layers. Experimental results independently demonstrate a 22% enhancement in short circuit current density (JSC) resulting from a nano-element array light trapping architecture and a ˜23% enhancement in fill factor (FF) and ˜16% enhancement in open circuit voltage (VOC) resulting from a nickel oxide transport layer. In each case, the overall efficiency of the device employing the light trapping or transport layer was superior to that of the corresponding control device. Since the efficiency of a solar cell scales with the product of JSC, FF, and VOC, it follows that the results of this thesis suggest high performance thin film solar cells can be realized in the event light trapping architectures and transport layers can be simultaneously optimized. The realizations of these performance enhancements stem from extensive process optimization for numerous light trapping and transport layer fabrication approaches. These approaches were guided by numerical modeling techniques which will also be discussed. Key developments in this thesis include (1) the fabrication of nano-element topographies conducive to light trapping using various fabrication approaches, (2) the deposition of defect free nc-Si:H onto structured topographies by switching from SiH4 to SiF 4 PECVD gas chemistry, and (3) the development of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) growth conditions for NiO. Keywords: light trapping, nano-element array, hole transport layer, electron blocking layer, nickel oxide, nanocrystalline silicon, aluminum doped zinc oxide, atomic layer deposition, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, electron beam lithography, ANSYS HFSS.

  13. Thermomechanical analysis of nodule damage in HfO2/SiO2 multilayer coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongguang Shan; Hongbo He; C haoyang Wei; Ying Wang; Yuan'an Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Samples with nodular defects grown from gold nanoparticles are prepared, and laser-induced damage tests are conducted on them. Nodular defects, which are in critical state of damage, are cross-sectioned by focusing on the ion beam and by imaging using a field emission scanning electron microscope. The cross-sectional profile shows that cracks are generated and propagated along the nodular boundaries and the HfO2/SiO2 interface, or are even melted. The thermomechanical process induced by the heated seed region is analyzed based on the calculations of temperature increase and thermal stress. The numerical results give the critical temperature of the seed region and the thermal stress for crack generation, irradiated with threshold fluence. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental ones.%Samples with nodular defects grown from gold nanoparticles are prepared,and laser induced damage tests are conducted on them.Nodular defects,which are in critical state of damage,are cross-sectioned by focusing on the ion beam and by imaging using a field emission scanning electron microscope.The crosssectional profile shows that cracks are generated and propagated along the nodular boundaries and the HfO2/SiO2 interface,or are even melted.The thermomechanical process induced by the heated seed region is analyzed based on the calculations of temperature increase and thermal stress.The numerical results give the critical temperature of the seed region and the thermal stress for crack generation,irradiated with threshold fluence.The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental ones.Nodular defect,a typical defect in multilayer coatings,largely limits the improvement of the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) in the nanosecond regime and thus has been widely investigated.Electric field enhancement in the nodule,induced by the microlens effect of the dome structure of nodular defects,is an important factor in reducing the LIDT[1-5].Recently,Liu et al.

  14. Gas-phase reaction studies of dipositive hafnium and hafnium oxide ions: generation of the peroxide HfO2(2+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Célia; Michelini, Maria del Carmen; Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K; Oliveira, Maria Conceição

    2012-12-27

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was used to characterize the gas-phase reactivity of Hf dipositive ions, Hf(2+)and HfO(2+), toward several oxidants: thermodynamically facile O-atom donor N(2)O, ineffective donor CO, and intermediate donors O(2), CO(2), NO, and CH(2)O. The Hf(2+) ion exhibited electron transfer with N(2)O, O(2), NO, and CH(2)O, reflecting the high ionization energy of Hf(+). The HfO(2+) ion was produced by O-atom transfer to Hf(2+) from N(2)O, O(2), and CO(2), and the HfO(2)(2+) ion by O-atom transfer to HfO(2+) from N(2)O; these reactions were fairly efficient. Density functional theory revealed the structure of HfO(2)(2+) as a peroxide. The HfO(2)(2+) ion reacted by electron transfer with N(2)O, CO(2), and CO to give HfO(2)(+). Estimates were made for the second ionization energies of Hf (14.5 ± 0.5 eV), HfO (14.3 ± 0.5 eV), and HfO(2) (16.2 ± 0.5 eV), and also for the bond dissociation energies, D[Hf(2+)-O] = 686 ± 69 kJ mol(-1) and D[OHf(2+)-O] = 186 ± 98 kJ mol(-1). The computed bond dissociation energies, 751 and 270 kJ mol(-1), respectively, are within these experimental ranges. Additionally, it was found that HfO(2)(2+) oxidized CO to CO(2) and is thus a catalyst in the oxidation of CO by N(2)O and that Hf(2+) activates methane to produce a carbene, HfCH(2)(2+).

  15. Accurate prediction of band gaps and optical properties of HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondračka, Pavel; Holec, David; Nečas, David; Zajíčková, Lenka

    2016-10-01

    We report on optical properties of various polymorphs of hafnia predicted within the framework of density functional theory. The full potential linearised augmented plane wave method was employed together with the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential (TB-mBJ) for exchange and local density approximation for correlation. Unit cells of monoclinic, cubic and tetragonal crystalline, and a simulated annealing-based model of amorphous hafnia were fully relaxed with respect to internal positions and lattice parameters. Electronic structures and band gaps for monoclinic, cubic, tetragonal and amorphous hafnia were calculated using three different TB-mBJ parametrisations and the results were critically compared with the available experimental and theoretical reports. Conceptual differences between a straightforward comparison of experimental measurements to a calculated band gap on the one hand and to a whole electronic structure (density of electronic states) on the other hand, were pointed out, suggesting the latter should be used whenever possible. Finally, dielectric functions were calculated at two levels, using the random phase approximation without local field effects and with a more accurate Bethe-Salpether equation (BSE) to account for excitonic effects. We conclude that a satisfactory agreement with experimental data for HfO2 was obtained only in the latter case.

  16. Growth and luminescence properties of Eu-doped HfO2/α-Al2O3 eutectic scintillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kei Kamada; Kosuke Hishinuma; Shunsuke Kurosawa; Akihiro Yamaji; Yasuhiro Shoji; Jan Pejchal; Yuji Ohashi; Yuui Yokota; Akira Yoshikawa

    2016-01-01

    HfO2/α-Al2O3 eutectics were grown by the micro-pulling down (μ-PD) method at the composition of 63.2 mol.%α-Al2O3, 35.512 mol.%HfO2, 0.92 mol.%Eu2O3 and 0.368 mol.%Y2O3. Rod phases with around 3–4μm diameter were observed on the transverse cross-section. The phase-separated scintillator fibers (PSSFs) structure with fibers of around 3–4μm diameter and 10–20μm length was observed. The electron back scattering patterns indicated crystal orientation of [101] for monoclinic HfO2 rod phase and [0001] forα-Al2O3 matrix in the transverse cross-section. Eu3+4f-4f emission was observed at 550–750 nm.

  17. A small shoulder of optical absorption in polycrystalline HfO2 by LDA+U approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Liyuan; Li, Jinping; Meng, Songhe; Lu, Hantao; Tohyama, Takami

    2016-10-01

    The dielectric function of the wide-gap optical material HfO2 is investigated by the local density approximation (LDA)+U approach. We focus on the origin of the shoulder-like structure near the edge of the band gap in the imaginary part of the dielectric function, which has been observed on the thin films of monoclinic HfO2. A comparison study on the three polymorphs of hafnia shows that regardless of the underlying crystal structure, the existence of the shoulder is mainly controlled by the value of the shortest length of Hf-O bonds. The proposition is further supported by the numerical simulations of isostatic pressing. A possible implication in high-pressure measurements is suggested accordingly.

  18. Intrinsic electron traps in atomic-layer deposited HfO{sub 2} insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerbu, F.; Madia, O.; Afanas' ev, V. V.; Houssa, M.; Stesmans, A. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Andreev, D. V. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Bauman Moscow State Technical University—Kaluga Branch, 248000 Kaluga, Moscow obl. (Russian Federation); Fadida, S.; Eizenberg, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Breuil, L. [imec, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lisoni, J. G. [imec, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Kittl, J. A. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Advanced Logic Lab, Samsung Semiconductor, Inc., Austin, 78754 Texas (United States); Strand, J.; Shluger, A. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-30

    Analysis of photodepopulation of electron traps in HfO{sub 2} films grown by atomic layer deposition is shown to provide the trap energy distribution across the entire oxide bandgap. The presence is revealed of two kinds of deep electron traps energetically distributed at around E{sub t} ≈ 2.0 eV and E{sub t} ≈ 3.0 eV below the oxide conduction band. Comparison of the trapped electron energy distributions in HfO{sub 2} layers prepared using different precursors or subjected to thermal treatment suggests that these centers are intrinsic in origin. However, the common assumption that these would implicate O vacancies cannot explain the charging behavior of HfO{sub 2}, suggesting that alternative defect models should be considered.

  19. Fabrication and characteristics of ZnO MOS capacitors with high-K HfO2 gate dielectrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    ZnO thin films are first deposited on n-type silicon by radio frequency (rf) magnetron sputtering at room temperature.And high-K HfO2 gate dielectrics thin films are deposited on ZnO films to form metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) capacitors.The temperature to fabricate ZnO MOS capacitors is 400°C,and the low temperature process is applicable for thin film transistors,flat-panel display (FPD),flexible display,etc.The electronic availability of ZnO thin films,which serve as a semiconductor material for MOS capacitors with HfO2 gate dielectric is investigated.High frequency (1 MHz) capacitance-voltage (C-V) and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of ZnO-based MOS capacitors are measured.The thermal stability and electronic stability of the ZnO capacitors are investigated,respectively.Experimental results indicate that good electrical characteristics can be obtained on ZnO substrates with high-K HfO2 gate dielectrics.Besides,the ZnO capacitors can exhibit high thermal and electronic stabilities.

  20. SHI induced effects on the electrical and optical properties of HfO2 thin films deposited by RF sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikanthababu, N.; Dhanunjaya, M.; Nageswara Rao, S. V. S.; Pathak, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    The continuous downscaling of Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) devices has reached a limit with SiO2 as a gate dielectric material. Introducing high-k dielectric materials as a replacement for the conservative SiO2 is the only alternative to reduce the leakage current. HfO2 is a reliable and an impending material for the wide usage as a gate dielectric in semiconductor industry. HfO2 thin films were synthesized by RF sputtering technique. Here, we present a study of Swift Heavy Ion (SHI) irradiation with100 MeV Ag ions for studying the optical properties as well as 80 MeV Ni ions for studying the electrical properties of HfO2/Si thin films. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), profilometer and I-V (leakage current) measurements have been employed to study the SHI induced effects on both the structural, electrical and optical properties.

  1. Mixing and trapping of dissolved CO2 in deep geologic formations with shale layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agartan, Elif; Cihan, Abdullah; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2017-07-01

    For dissolution trapping, the spatial variability of the geologic properties of naturally complex storage formations can significantly impact flow patterns and storage mechanisms of dissolved CO2. The significance of diffusive mixing that occurs in low permeability layers embedded between relatively higher permeability materials was highlighted by Agartan et al. (2015) using a highly controlled laboratory experimental study on trapping of dissolved CO2 in multilayered systems. In this paper, we present a numerical modeling study on the impacts of low permeability layers on flow and storage of dissolved CO2 in realistic field-scale settings. The simulator of variable-density flow used in this study was first verified using the experimental data in Agartan et al. (2015) to capture the observed processes. The simulator was then applied to a synthetic, field-scale multilayered system, with 19 sensitivity cases having variable permeability and thickness of the shale layers as well as the source strength and geometry of the source zone of dissolved CO2. Simulation results showed that the presence of continuous shale layers in the storage system disrupts the convective mixing by enhancing lateral spreading of dissolved CO2 in sandstone layers and retarding the vertical mixing of dissolved CO2. The effectiveness of trapping of dissolved CO2 depends on the physical properties of the shale layers and configurations of the source zone. The comparison to homogeneous cases with effective vertical permeability shows that it is important to capture these continuous thin shale layers in a storage formation and include them in the models to enhance dissolution trapping.

  2. The Post—deposition Anneal Effects on the Electrical Properties of HfO2 Gate Dielectric Deposited by Ion Beam Sputtering at Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANGJinfeng; LIUXiaoyan; TIANDayu; WANGWei; LIANGuijun; XIONGGuangcheng; HANRuqi

    2003-01-01

    HfO2 high K gate dielectric films were fab-ricated on p-Si(100) substrates by ion beam sputtering at room temperature followed by a post-deposition anneal-ing (PDA). The PDA effects on the electrical properties of HfO2 gate dielectric films were studied. High quality HfO2 gate dielectric with small equivalent oxide thickness (EOT = 2.3nm), small hystereis (△VFB<50mV), and lowleakage current (< 1× 10-4A/cm2@lV) was fabricated.The studies of PDA effects on the electrical properties in-dicate that the PDA process in nitrogen ambient will be necessary for the HfO2 gate dielectric films deposited by ion beam sputtering the sintered target at room temper-ature in order to obtain small equivalent oxide thickness and low leakage currents, whereas a PDA in oxygen ambi-ent will be not required. The results also means that there is less oxygen vacancy defect produced in the HfO2 gate dielectric films during the deposition at room temperature.

  3. Photo-, cathodo- and thermoluminescent properties of dysprosium-doped HfO2 films deposited by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manríquez, R Reynoso; Góngora, J A I Díaz; Guzmán-Mendoza, J; Montalvo, T Rivera; Olguín, J C Guzmán; Ramírez, P V Cerón; García-Hipólito, M; Falcony, C

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the photoluminescent (PL), cathodoluminescent (CL) and thermoluminescent (TL) properties of hafnium oxide films doped with trivalent dysprosium ions are reported. The films were deposited on glass substrates at temperatures ranging from 300 to 600°C, using chlorides as precursor reagents. The surface morphology of films showed a veins shaped microstructure at low deposition temperatures, while at higher temperatures the formation of spherical particles was observed on the surface. X-ray diffraction showed the presence of HfO2 monoclinic phase in the films deposited at temperatures greater than 400°C. The PL and CL spectra of the doped films showed the highest emission band centered at 575nm corresponding to the transitions (4)F9/2→(6)H13/2, which is a characteristic transition of Dy(3+) ion. The greatest emission intensities were observed in samples doped with 1 atomic percent (at%) of DyCl3 in the precursor solution. Regarding the TL behavior, the glow curve of HfO2:Dy(+3) films exhibited spectrum with one broad band centered at about 150°C. The highest intensity TL response was observed on the films deposited at 500°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication.

  5. Memory window widening of Pt/SrBi2Ta2O9/HfO2/Si ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistors by nitriding Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Mitsue; Ohhashi, Kentaro; Sakai, Shigeki

    2009-10-01

    The optimum temperature of rapid thermal nitridation (RTN) of Si substrates was investigated for minimizing an equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) of an interfacial layer (IL) which was grown between HfO2 and Si of Pt/SrBi2Ta2O9(SBT)/HfO2/Si ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistors (FeFETs) during a post-annealing process. The RTN was performed in NH3 gas at various temperatures ranging from 800 °C to 1190 °C. As the RTN temperature was raised from 800 °C to 1080 °C, memory windows of drain current-gate voltage curves became wider. Large memory windows were obtained at the range from 1020 °C to 1130 °C. The maximum was 1.36 V obtained at 1080 °C. It was 10% larger than the typical values of Pt/SBT/HfO2/Si FeFETs without the RTN. At higher RTN temperatures than 1080 °C, the memory windows tended to decrease. At 800 °C and 1190 °C, all layer boundaries among SBT-HfO2-IL-Si seemed unclear in scanning transmission electron microscopic views probably due to material diffusions. The optimum RTN temperature for minimizing the EOT of the IL and maximizing the memory window of the Pt/SBT/HfO2/SiNx/Si FeFET was 1080 °C. The FeFET using the Si processed by the RTN at 1080 °C also showed good retentions without significant degradations over two days.

  6. Studies of Ink Trapping III Direct Detection of Small Air Bubbles in Ink Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuo Naito

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Ink trappings were studied by using polyethylene terephthalate (PET film with black inks for offset proofing and synthetic paper. By observing printed matter from reverse side through the PET film, we detected many air bubbles in the ink layer and between the ink layer and the PET film. They are classified roughly to two groups, small number of large ones (φ = 2 - 5 μm and many small ones (φ = 0.5 - 1.0 μm. The former ones were fixed air bubbles during the trapping. The latter ones decreased according to increase the amount of ink trapped (y. Because number of the air bubbles (Nair bubble increased with increasing the ink distribution time, they seemed to be yielded by suspension of air into the ink layer during ink distribution. By observing printed surface, we also detected many ink peaks (immediately after the trapping and pinholes (at 24 h. The numbers of the ink peaks and pinholes (Nink peak and Npinhole, respectively decreased also with increasing the y value and increased with increasing the ink distribution time. We studied effects of nip width on these values (distribution time = 2 min.; nip width = 2, 3 and 4 mm. The Nair bubble value decreased with increasing nip width contrary to increase the Nink peak and Npinhole values. The effects can be represented by differences in the values of 2 and 4 mm nip widths. At y = 2 gm-2, the difference in the Nair bubble value is about one third (synthetic paper ink or a half (offset proofing ink of the difference in the Nink peak values.

  7. Imaging spectroscopy with Ta/Al DROIDs: Performance for different Al trapping layer thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hijmering, R.A. [Science Payload and Advanced Concept Office, European Space Agency, ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands)]. E-mail: rhijmeri@rssd.esa.int; Verhoeve, P. [Science Payload and Advanced Concept Office, European Space Agency, ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Martin, D.D.E. [Science Payload and Advanced Concept Office, European Space Agency, ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Peacock, A. [Science Payload and Advanced Concept Office, European Space Agency, ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Kozorezov, A.G. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-15

    To overcome the limited field of view, which can be achieved with single superconducting tunneling junction (STJ) arrays, distributed read-out imaging devices (DROIDs) are being developed. DROIDs consist of a superconducting absorber strip with proximized STJs on either end. The ratio of the two signals from the STJs provides information on the absorption position, and the sum signal is a measure for the energy of the absorbed photon. In our devices, the absorber is an epitaxial Ta strip that extends underneath the Ta/Al read-out STJs. Thus, the bottom electrode of the STJs is an integral part of the absorber. Due to the proximity effect, the STJs have a lower energy gap than the absorber, causing trapping of quasiparticles (QPs) in the STJs. The trapping will change with thicker Al layers because the energy gap of the devices will decrease. A series of 50x200 {mu}m{sup 2} and 20x200 {mu}m{sup 2} absorbers (including 50x50 {mu}m{sup 2} STJs) and different Al trapping layer thicknesses, ranging from 65 to 130 nm, have been tested. The devices have been illuminated with 6 keV {sup 55}Fe photons. The position resolution is found to improve with increasing Al thickness. It is found that the current model needs to be adapted for DROIDs to account for different injection of QPs into the STJ and extra losses to the absorber.

  8. Imaging spectroscopy with Ta/Al DROIDs: Performance for different Al trapping layer thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijmering, R. A.; Verhoeve, P.; Martin, D. D. E.; Peacock, A.; Kozorezov, A. G.

    2006-04-01

    To overcome the limited field of view, which can be achieved with single superconducting tunneling junction (STJ) arrays, distributed read-out imaging devices (DROIDs) are being developed. DROIDs consist of a superconducting absorber strip with proximized STJs on either end. The ratio of the two signals from the STJs provides information on the absorption position, and the sum signal is a measure for the energy of the absorbed photon. In our devices, the absorber is an epitaxial Ta strip that extends underneath the Ta/Al read-out STJs. Thus, the bottom electrode of the STJs is an integral part of the absorber. Due to the proximity effect, the STJs have a lower energy gap than the absorber, causing trapping of quasiparticles (QPs) in the STJs. The trapping will change with thicker Al layers because the energy gap of the devices will decrease. A series of 50×200 μm 2 and 20×200 μm 2 absorbers (including 50×50 μm 2 STJs) and different Al trapping layer thicknesses, ranging from 65 to 130 nm, have been tested. The devices have been illuminated with 6 keV 55Fe photons. The position resolution is found to improve with increasing Al thickness. It is found that the current model needs to be adapted for DROIDs to account for different injection of QPs into the STJ and extra losses to the absorber.

  9. A comparison between HfO2/Al2O3 nano-laminates and ternary HfxAlyO compound as the dielectric material in InGaAs based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, Igor; Pokroy, Boaz; Eizenberg, Moshe; Ritter, Dan

    2016-09-01

    We compare the electrical properties of HfO2/Al2O3 nano-laminates with those of the ternary HfxAlyO compound in metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. The dielectrics were deposited by atomic layer deposition on InGaAs. Water, ozone, and oxygen plasma were tested as oxygen precursors, and best results were obtained using water. The total dielectric thickness was kept constant in our experiments. It was found that the effective dielectric constant increased and the leakage current decreased with the number of periods. Best results were obtained for the ternary compound. The effect of the sublayer thicknesses on the electrical properties of the interface was carefully investigated, as well as the role of post-metallization annealing. Possible explanations for the observed trends are provided. We conclude that the ternary HfxAlyO compound is more favorable than the nano-laminates approach for InGaAs based MOS transistor applications.

  10. HfO2/porous anodic alumina composite films for multifunctional data storage media materials under electric field control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Li-Qian; Pan, Di-Ya; Li, Jun-Qing; Liu, Li-Hu; Sun, Hui-Yuan

    2017-03-01

    New materials for achieving direct electric field control of ferromagnetism and resistance behavior are highly desirable in the development of multifunctional data storage devices. In this paper, HfO2 nanoporous films have been fabricated on porous anodic alumina (PAA) substrates by DC-reactive magnetron sputtering. Electrically induced resistive switching (RS) and modulated room temperature ferromagnetism are simultaneously found in a Ag/HfO2/PAA/Al (Ag/HP/Al) heterostructure. The switching mechanism between low resistance state and high resistance state is generally attributed to the formation/rupture of conductive filaments which may consist of oxygen vacancies. The combination of the electric field control of magnetization change and RS makes HP films possible for the multifunctional data storage media materials.

  11. Plasmonic Light Trapping in an Ultrathin Photovoltaic Layer with Film-Coupled Metamaterial Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    A film-coupled metamaterial structure is numerically investigated for enhancing the light absorption in an ultrathin photovoltaic layer of crystalline gallium arsenide (GaAs). The top subwavelength concave grating and the bottom metallic film could not only effectively trap light with the help of wave interference and magnetic resonance effects excited above the bandgap, but also practically serve as electrical contacts for photon-generated charge collection. The energy absorbed by the active layer is greatly enhanced in the film-coupled metamaterial structure, resulting in significant enhancement on the short-circuit current density by three times over a free-standing GaAs layer at the same thickness. The results would facilitate the development of next-generation ultrathin solar cells with lower cost and higher efficiency.

  12. Thermally stimulated current observation of trapping centers in undoped GaSe layered single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasanly, N.M.; Salihoglu, Oe. [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Physics; Aydinli, A. [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Physics; Bilkent Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Physics

    2001-07-01

    Undoped p-GaSe layered single crystals were grown using Bridgman technique. Thermally stimulated current measurements in the temperature range of 10-300 K were performed at a heating rate of 0.18 K/s. The analysis of the data revealed three trap levels at 0.02, 0.10 and 0.26 eV. The calculation for these traps yielded 8.8 x 10{sup -27}, 1.9 x 10{sup -25}, and 3.2 x 10{sup -21} cm{sup 2} for capture cross sections and 3.2 x 10{sup 14}, 1.1 x 10{sup 16}, and 1.2 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} for the concentrations, respectively. (orig.)

  13. Transparent Flash Memory using Single Ta2O5 Layer for both Charge Trapping and Tunneling Dielectrics

    KAUST Repository

    Hota, Mrinal Kanti

    2017-06-08

    We report reproducible multibit transparent flash memory in which a single solution-derived Ta2O5 layer is used simultaneously as charge trapping and tunneling layer. This is different from conventional flash cells, where two different dielectric layers are typically used. Under optimized programming/erasing operations, the memory device shows excellent programmable memory characteristics with a maximum memory window of ~10 V. Moreover, the flash memory device shows a stable 2-bit memory performance, good reliability, including data retention for more than 104 sec and endurance performance for more than 100 cycles. The use of a common charge trapping and tunneling layer can simplify advanced flash memory fabrication.

  14. TaN interface properties and electric field cycling effects on ferroelectric Si-doped HfO2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomenzo, Patrick D.; Takmeel, Qanit; Zhou, Chuanzhen; Fancher, Chris M.; Lambers, Eric; Rudawski, Nicholas G.; Jones, Jacob L.; Moghaddam, Saeed; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2015-04-01

    Ferroelectric HfO2-based thin films, which can exhibit ferroelectric properties down to sub-10 nm thicknesses, are a promising candidate for emerging high density memory technologies. As the ferroelectric thickness continues to shrink, the electrode-ferroelectric interface properties play an increasingly important role. We investigate the TaN interface properties on 10 nm thick Si-doped HfO2 thin films fabricated in a TaN metal-ferroelectric-metal stack which exhibit highly asymmetric ferroelectric characteristics. To understand the asymmetric behavior of the ferroelectric characteristics of the Si-doped HfO2 thin films, the chemical interface properties of sputtered TaN bottom and top electrodes are probed with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ta-O bonds at the bottom electrode interface and a significant presence of Hf-N bonds at both electrode interfaces are identified. It is shown that the chemical heterogeneity of the bottom and top electrode interfaces gives rise to an internal electric field, which causes the as-grown ferroelectric domains to preferentially polarize to screen positively charged oxygen vacancies aggregated at the oxidized bottom electrode interface. Electric field cycling is shown to reduce the internal electric field with a concomitant increase in remanent polarization and decrease in relative permittivity. Through an analysis of pulsed transient switching currents, back-switching is observed in Si-doped HfO2 thin films with pinched hysteresis loops and is shown to be influenced by the internal electric field.

  15. Fabrication of HfO2 patterns by laser interference nanolithography and selective dry etching for III-V CMOS application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molina-Aldareguia Jon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nanostructuring of ultrathin HfO2 films deposited on GaAs (001 substrates by high-resolution Lloyd's mirror laser interference nanolithography is described. Pattern transfer to the HfO2 film was carried out by reactive ion beam etching using CF4 and O2 plasmas. A combination of atomic force microscopy, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy microanalysis was used to characterise the various etching steps of the process and the resulting HfO2/GaAs pattern morphology, structure, and chemical composition. We show that the patterning process can be applied to fabricate uniform arrays of HfO2 mesa stripes with tapered sidewalls and linewidths of 100 nm. The exposed GaAs trenches were found to be residue-free and atomically smooth with a root-mean-square line roughness of 0.18 nm after plasma etching. PACS: Dielectric oxides 77.84.Bw, Nanoscale pattern formation 81.16.Rf, Plasma etching 52.77.Bn, Fabrication of III-V semiconductors 81.05.Ea

  16. Optimization of non-periodic plasmonic light-trapping layers for thin-film solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Ragip A; Liu, John S Q; Barnard, Edward S; Askarov, Daulet; Garnett, Erik C; Fan, Shanhui; Brongersma, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    Non-periodic arrangements of nanoscale light scatterers allow for the realization of extremely effective broadband light-trapping layers for solar cells. However, their optimization is challenging given the massive number of degrees of freedom. Brute-force, full-field electromagnetic simulations are computationally too time intensive to identify high-performance solutions in a vast design space. Here we illustrate how a semi-analytical model can be used to quickly identify promising non-periodic spatial arrangements of nanoscale scatterers. This model only requires basic knowledge of the scattering behaviour of a chosen nanostructure and the waveguiding properties of the semiconductor layer in a cell. Due to its simplicity, it provides new intuition into the ideal amount of disorder in high-performance light-trapping layers. Using simulations and experiments, we demonstrate that arrays of nanometallic stripes featuring a limited amount of disorder, for example, following a quasi-periodic or Fibonacci sequence, can substantially enhance solar absorption over perfectly periodic and random arrays.

  17. Optimization of non-periodic plasmonic light-trapping layers for thin-film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Ragip A.; Liu, John S. Q.; Barnard, Edward S.; Askarov, Daulet; Garnett, Erik C.; Fan, Shanhui; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2013-07-01

    Non-periodic arrangements of nanoscale light scatterers allow for the realization of extremely effective broadband light-trapping layers for solar cells. However, their optimization is challenging given the massive number of degrees of freedom. Brute-force, full-field electromagnetic simulations are computationally too time intensive to identify high-performance solutions in a vast design space. Here we illustrate how a semi-analytical model can be used to quickly identify promising non-periodic spatial arrangements of nanoscale scatterers. This model only requires basic knowledge of the scattering behaviour of a chosen nanostructure and the waveguiding properties of the semiconductor layer in a cell. Due to its simplicity, it provides new intuition into the ideal amount of disorder in high-performance light-trapping layers. Using simulations and experiments, we demonstrate that arrays of nanometallic stripes featuring a limited amount of disorder, for example, following a quasi-periodic or Fibonacci sequence, can substantially enhance solar absorption over perfectly periodic and random arrays.

  18. O-vacancies in (i) nano-crystalline HfO2 and (i) non-crystalline SiO2 and Si3N4 studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucovsky, Gerald; Miotti, Leonardo; Bastos, Karen Paz

    2012-06-01

    Performance and reliability in semiconductor devices are limited by electronically active defects, primarily O-atom and N-atom vacancies. Synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy results, interpreted in the context of two-electron multiplet theories, have been used to analyze conduction band edge, and O-vacancy defect states in nano-crystalline transition metal oxides, e.g., HfO2, and the noncrystalline dielectrics, SiO2, Si3N4 and Si-oxynitride alloys. Two-electron multiplet theory been used to develop a high-spin state equivalent d2 model for O-vacancy allowed transitions and negative ion states as detected by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the O K pre-edge regime. Comparisons between theory and experiment have used Tanabe-Sugano energy level diagrams for determining the symmetries and relative energies of intra-d-state transitions for an equivalent d2 ground state occupancy. Trap-assisted-tunneling, Poole-Frenkel hopping transport, and the negative bias temperature instability have been explained in terms of injection and/or trapping into O-atom and N-atom vacancy sites, and applied to gate dielectric, and metal-insulator-metal structures.

  19. Properties of Ultra-Thin Hafnium Oxide and Interfacial Layer Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taeho Lee; Young-Bae Kim; Kyung-Il Hong; Duck-Kyun Choi; Jinho Ahn

    2004-01-01

    Ultra-thin hafnium-oxide gate dielectric films deposited by atomic layer deposition technique using HfCl4 and H2O precursor on a hydrogen-terminated Si substrate were investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the interface layer is Hf-silicate rather than phase separated Hf-silicide and silicon oxide structure. The Hf-silicate interfacial layer partially changes into SiOx after high temperature annealing, resulting in a complex HfO2-silicate-SiOx dielectric structure. Electrical measurements confirms that HfO2 on Si is stable up to 700 ℃ for 30 s under N2 ambient.

  20. Current Thermal Emission from Photonic Nanostructures Composed of TA, W, GE, and HFO2 Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    and Manufacturing Directorate. Substrates chosen for this study consisted of p-type silicon (Si) wafers having Prime grade, 1-10 Ω resistivity, and...100) orientation. These Si wafers were obtained by AFRL from University Wafer . All of the designs will begin with a DCMS deposition technique that...Sputtering (DCMS) technique. The micrograph was taken at 20,000x magnification with 2 kV at 45° from surface normal. The surface W layer displays bumps

  1. Electrical Characterisation of Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistors based on Ferroelectric HfO2 Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Yurchuk, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric field effect transistor (FeFET) memories based on a new type of ferroelectric material (silicon doped hafnium oxide) were studied within the scope of the present work. Utilisation of silicon doped hafnium oxide (Si:HfO2) thin films instead of conventional perovskite ferroelectrics as a functional layer in FeFETs provides compatibility to the CMOS process as well as improved device scalability. The influence of different process parameters on the properties of Si:HfO2 thin films ...

  2. Crystallization behaviors of ultrathin Al-doped HfO2 amorphous films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xue-Li; Yang, Hong; Xiang, Jin-Juan; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Wen-Wu; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Yin, Hua-Xiang; Zhu, Hui-Long; Zhao, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA016501) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61574168 and 61504163).

  3. Field effect transistor with HfO2/Parylene-C bilayer hybrid gate insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Kito, Ai; Inoue, Isao

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the electric field control of the carrier density and the mobility at the surface of SrTiO3, a well known transition-metal oxide, in a field effect transistor (FET) geometry. We have used a Parylene-C (8 nm)/HfO2 (20 nm) double-layer gate insulator (GI), which can be a potential candidate for a solid state GI for the future Mott FETs. So far, only examples of the Mott FET used liquid electrolyte or ferroelectric oxides for the GI. However, possible electrochemical reaction at the interface causes damage to the surface of the Mott insulator. Thus, an alternative GI has been highly desired. We observed that even an ultra thin Parylene-C layer is effective for keeping the channel surface clean and free from oxygen vacancies. The 8 nm Parylene-C film has a relatively low resistance and consequentially its capacitance does not dominate the total capacitance of the Parylene-C/HfO2 GI. The breakdown gate voltage at 300 K is usually more than 10 V (~ 3.4 MV/cm). At gate voltage of 3 V the carrier density measured by the Hall effect is about 3 ×1013 cm-2, competent to cause the Mott transition. Moreover, the field effect mobility reaches in the range of 10 cm2/Vs indicating the Parylene-C passivated surface is actually very clean.

  4. Enhanced memory effect with embedded graphene nanoplatelets in ZnO charge trapping layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Institute Center for Microsystems–iMicro, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Cimen, Furkan [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Alkis, Sabri [UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Okyay, Ali K. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2014-07-21

    A charge trapping memory with graphene nanoplatelets embedded in atomic layer deposited ZnO (GNIZ) is demonstrated. The memory shows a large threshold voltage V{sub t} shift (4 V) at low operating voltage (6/−6 V), good retention (>10 yr), and good endurance characteristic (>10{sup 4} cycles). This memory performance is compared to control devices with graphene nanoplatelets (or ZnO) and a thicker tunnel oxide. These structures showed a reduced V{sub t} shift and retention characteristic. The GNIZ structure allows for scaling down the tunnel oxide thickness along with improving the memory window and retention of data. The larger V{sub t} shift indicates that the ZnO adds available trap states and enhances the emission and retention of charges. The charge emission mechanism in the memory structures with graphene nanoplatelets at an electric field E ≥ 5.57 MV/cm is found to be based on Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. The fabrication of this memory device is compatible with current semiconductor processing, therefore, has great potential in low-cost nano-memory applications.

  5. Trapped charge densities in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based silicon surface passivation layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Paul M., E-mail: Paul.Jordan@namlab.com; Simon, Daniel K.; Dirnstorfer, Ingo [NaMLab gGmbH, Nöthnitzer Str. 64, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Mikolajick, Thomas [NaMLab gGmbH, Nöthnitzer Str. 64, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Chair of Nanoelectronic Materials, TU Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-06-07

    In Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based passivation layers, the formation of fixed charges and trap sites can be strongly influenced by small modifications in the stack layout. Fixed and trapped charge densities are characterized with capacitance voltage profiling and trap spectroscopy by charge injection and sensing, respectively. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers are grown by atomic layer deposition with very thin (∼1 nm) SiO{sub 2} or HfO{sub 2} interlayers or interface layers. In SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} stacks, both fixed charges and trap sites are reduced by at least a factor of 5 compared with the value measured in pure Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} stacks, very high total charge densities of up to 9 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} are achieved. These charge densities are described as functions of electrical stress voltage, time, and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer thickness between silicon and the HfO{sub 2} or the SiO{sub 2} interlayer. Despite the strong variation of trap sites, all stacks reach very good effective carrier lifetimes of up to 8 and 20 ms on p- and n-type silicon substrates, respectively. Controlling the trap sites in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers opens the possibility to engineer the field-effect passivation in the solar cells.

  6. Surface Passivation of MoO3 Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition Towards High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2015-06-03

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in Lithium (Li) ion batteries at high rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g, on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li–ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex–situ HRTEM, X–ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and X–ray diffraction was carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  7. Surface Passivation of MoO₃ Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition toward High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, B; Shahid, Muhammad; Nagaraju, D H; Anjum, D H; Hedhili, Mohamed N; Alshareef, H N

    2015-06-24

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in lithium (Li) ion batteries at high-rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than that of bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g; on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li-ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction were carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  8. Identification of the ferroelectric switching process and dopant-dependent switching properties in orthorhombic HfO2: A first principles insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clima, S.; Wouters, D. J.; Adelmann, C.; Schenk, T.; Schroeder, U.; Jurczak, M.; Pourtois, G.

    2014-03-01

    The origin of the ferroelectric polarization switching in orthorhombic HfO2 has been investigated by first principles calculations. The phenomenon can be regarded as being the coordinated displacement of four O ions in the orthorhombic unit cell, which can lead to a saturated polarization as high as 53 μC/cm2. We show the correlation between the computed polarization reversal barrier and the experimental coercive fields.

  9. MOHOS-type memory performance using HfO{sub 2} nanoparticles as charge trapping layer and low temperature annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, Joel, E-mail: jmolina@inaoep.mx [National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics. Electronics Department, Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Ortega, Rafael; Calleja, Wilfrido; Rosales, Pedro; Zuniga, Carlos; Torres, Alfonso [National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics. Electronics Department, Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico)

    2012-09-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HfO{sub 2} nanoparticles used as charge trapping layer in MOHOS memory devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing HfO{sub 2} nanoparticles concentration enhances charge injection and trapping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of memory performance with low temperature annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Charge injection is done without using any hot-carrier injection mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using injected charge density is better for comparison of scaled memory devices. - Abstract: In this work, HfO{sub 2} nanoparticles (np-HfO{sub 2}) are embedded within a spin-on glass (SOG)-based oxide matrix and used as a charge trapping layer in metal-oxide-high-k-oxide-silicon (MOHOS)-type memory applications. This charge trapping layer is obtained by a simple sol-gel spin coating method after using different concentrations of np-HfO{sub 2} and low temperature annealing (down to 425 Degree-Sign C) in order to obtain charge-retention characteristics with a lower thermal budget. The memory's charge trapping characteristics are quantized by measuring both the flat-band voltage shift of MOHOS capacitors (writing/erasing operations) and their programming retention times after charge injection while correlating all these data to np-HfO{sub 2} concentration and annealing temperature. Since a large memory window has been obtained for our MOHOS memory, the relatively easy injection/annihilation (writing/erasing) of charge injected through the substrate opens the possibility to use this material as an effective charge trapping layer. It is shown that by using lower annealing temperatures for the charge trapping layer, higher densities of injected charge are obtained along with enhanced retention times. In conclusion, by using np-HfO{sub 2} as charge trapping layer in memory devices, moderate programming and retention characteristics have been obtained by this simple and yet low-cost spin-coating method.

  10. Formation of (111) orientation-controlled ferroelectric orthorhombic HfO2 thin films from solid phase via annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Takanori; Katayama, Kiliha; Shimizu, Takao; Uchida, Hiroshi; Kiguchi, Takanori; Akama, Akihiro; Konno, Toyohiko J.; Sakata, Osami; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    0.07YO1.5-0.93HfO2 (YHO7) films were prepared on various substrates by pulse laser deposition at room temperature and subsequent heat treatment to enable a solid phase reaction. (111)-oriented 10 wt. % Sn-doped In2O3(ITO)//(111) yttria-stabilized zirconia, (111)Pt/TiOx/SiO2/(001)Si substrates, and (111)ITO/(111)Pt/TiOx/SiO2/(001)Si substrates were employed for film growth. In this study, X-ray diffraction measurements including θ-2θ measurements, reciprocal space mappings, and pole figure measurements were used to study the films. The film on (111)ITO//(111)yttria-stabilized zirconia was an (111)-orientated epitaxial film with ferroelectric orthorhombic phase; the film on (111)ITO/(111)Pt/TiOx/SiO2/(001)Si was an (111)-oriented uniaxial textured film with ferroelectric orthorhombic phase; and no preferred orientation was observed for the film on the (111)Pt/TiOx/SiO2/(001)Si substrate, which does not contain ITO. Polarization-hysteresis measurements confirmed that the films on ITO covered substrates had saturated ferroelectric hysteresis loops. A remanent polarization (Pr) of 9.6 and 10.8 μC/cm2 and coercive fields (Ec) of 1.9 and 2.0 MV/cm were obtained for the (111)-oriented epitaxial and uniaxial textured YHO7 films, respectively. These results demonstrate that the (111)-oriented ITO bottom electrodes play a key role in controlling the orientation and ferroelectricity of the phase formation of the solid films deposited at room temperature.

  11. Monomeric malonate precursors for the MOCVD of HfO2 and ZrO2 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Milanov, Andrian; Parala, Harish; Winter, Manuela; Fischer, Roland A; Devi, Anjana

    2009-01-28

    New Hf and Zr malonate complexes have been synthesized by the reaction of metal amides with different malonate ligands (L = dimethyl malonate (Hdmml), diethyl malonate (Hdeml), di-tert-butyl malonate (Hdbml) and bis(trimethylsilyl) malonate (Hbsml)). Homoleptic eight-coordinated monomeric compounds of the type ML4 were obtained for Hf with all the malonate ligands employed. In contrast, for Zr only Hdmml and Hdeml yielded the eight-coordinated monomeric compounds of the type ML4, while using the bulky Hdbml and Hbsml ligands resulted into mixed alkoxo-malonato six-coordinated compounds of the type [ML2(OR)2]. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of all the compounds are presented and discussed, and they are found to be monomeric. The complexes are solids and in solution, they retain their monomeric nature as evidenced by NMR measurements. Compared to the classical beta-diketonate complexes, [M(acac)4] and [M(thd)4] (M = Hf, Zr; acac: acetylacetonate; thd: tetramethylheptadione), the new malonate compounds are more volatile, decompose at lower temperatures and have lower melting points. In particular, the homoleptic diethyl malonate complexes of Hf and Zr melt at temperatures as low as 62 degrees C. In addition, the compounds are very stable in air and can be sublimed quantitatively. The promising thermal properties makes these compounds interesting for metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This was demonstrated by depositing HfO2 and ZrO2 thin films successfully with two representative Hf and Zr complexes.

  12. Solid-state dewetting of ultra-thin Au films on SiO2 and HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguini, G.; Llamoja Curi, J.; Spiga, S.; Tallarida, G.; Wiemer, C.; Perego, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ultra-thin Au films with thickness (h) ranging from 0.5 to 6.0 nm were deposited at room temperature (RT) by means of e-beam evaporation on SiO2 and HfO2. Due to the natural solid-state dewetting (SSD) of the as-deposited films, Au nanoparticles (NPs) were formed on the substrates. By properly adjusting the h value, the size and the density of the Au NPs can be finely tuned. For h = 0.5 nm, spherical-like Au NPs with diameter below 5 nm and density in the order of 1012 Au NPs cm-2 were obtained without any additional thermal treatment independently from the substrate. The dependence of the Au NPs characteristics on the substrate starts to be effective for h ≥ 1.0 nm where the Au NPs diameter is in the 5-10 nm range and the density is around 1011 Au NPs cm-2. The effect of a subsequent high temperature (400-800 °C) annealing in N2 atmosphere on the Au NPs was investigated as well. For h ≤ 1.0 nm, the Au NPs characteristics evidenced an excellent thermal stability. Whereas the thermal treatment affects the cristallinity of the Au NPs. For the thicker films (2.0 ≤ h ≤ 6.0 nm), the thermal treatment becomes effective to induce the SSD. The proposed methodology can be exploited for the synthesis of Au NPs with diameter below 10 nm on different substrates at RT.

  13. Optical properties of the Al2O3/SiO2 and Al2O3/HfO2/SiO2 antireflective coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszałek, Konstanty; Winkowski, Paweł; Jaglarz, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of bilayer and trilayer Al2O3/SiO2 and Al2O3/HfO2/SiO2 antireflective coatings are presented in this paper. The oxide films were deposited on a heated quartz glass by e-gun evaporation in a vacuum of 5 × 10-3 [Pa] in the presence of oxygen. Depositions were performed at three different temperatures of the substrates: 100 °C, 200 °C and 300 °C. The coatings were deposited onto optical quartz glass (Corning HPFS). The thickness and deposition rate were controlled with Inficon XTC/2 thickness measuring system. Deposition rate was equal to 0.6 nm/s for Al2O3, 0.6 nm - 0.8 nm/s for HfO2 and 0.6 nm/s for SiO2. Simulations leading to optimization of the thin film thickness and the experimental results of optical measurements, which were carried out during and after the deposition process, have been presented. The optical thickness values, obtained from the measurements performed during the deposition process were as follows: 78 nm/78 nm for Al2O3/SiO2 and 78 nm/156 nm/78 nm for Al2O3/HfO2/SiO2. The results were then checked by ellipsometric technique. Reflectance of the films depended on the substrate temperature during the deposition process. Starting from 240 nm to the beginning of visible region, the average reflectance of the trilayer system was below 1 % and for the bilayer, minima of the reflectance were equal to 1.6 %, 1.15 % and 0.8 % for deposition temperatures of 100 °C, 200 °C and 300 °C, respectively.

  14. Effect of reduction of trap charge carrier density in organic field effect transistors by surface treatment of dielectric layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagar, Janardan; Yadav, Vandana; Kumar Singh, Rajiv; Suman, C. K.; Srivastava, Ritu, E-mail: ritu@mail.nplindia.org [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, CSIR-Network of Institute for Solar Energy (NISE), Dr. K.S.Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Tyagi, Priyanka [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, CSIR-Network of Institute for Solar Energy (NISE), Dr. K.S.Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Center for Applied Research in Electronics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2013-12-14

    In this work, we have studied the effect of surface treatment of SiO{sub 2} dielectric layer on the reduction of the trap charge carrier density at dielectric/semiconducting interface by fabricating a metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS) device using α, ω-dihexylcarbonylquaterthiophene as semiconducting layer. SiO{sub 2} dielectric layer has been treated with 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) to modify the chemical group acting as charge traps. Capacitance-voltage measurements have been performed on MIS devices fabricated on SiO{sub 2} and HMDS treated SiO{sub 2}. These data have been used for the calculation of trap charge carrier density and Debye length at the dielectric-semiconductor interface. The calculated trap charge carrier density has been found to reduce from (2.925 ± 0.049) × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to (2.025 ± 0.061) × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} for the MIS device with HMDS treated SiO{sub 2} dielectric in comparison to that of untreated SiO{sub 2}. Next, the effect of reduction in trap charge carrier density has been studied on the performance of organic field effect transistors. The improvement in the device parameters like mobility, on/off ratio, and gate leakage current has been obtained with the effect of the surface treatment. The charge carrier mobility has been improved by a factor of 2 through this treatment. Further, the influence of the treatment was observed by atomic force microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques.

  15. Integration of lead-free ferroelectric on HfO2/Si (100) for high performance non-volatile memory applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kundu, Souvik; Maurya, Deepam; Clavel, Michael; Zhou, Yuan; Nripendra N. Halder; Hudait, Mantu K.; Banerji, Pallab; Priya, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel lead-free ferroelectric thin film (1-x)BaTiO3-xBa(Cu1/3Nb2/3)O3 (x = 0.025) (BT-BCN) integrated on to HfO2 buffered Si for non-volatile memory (NVM) applications. Piezoelectric force microscopy (PFM), x-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were employed to establish the ferroelectricity in BT-BCN thin films. PFM study reveals that the domains reversal occurs with 180° phase change by applying external voltage, demonstrating its effectivene...

  16. Damage on HfO2/SiO2 high-reflecting coatings under single and multiple Nd:YAG laser pulse irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weidong Gao; Tao Wang; Yuanan Zhao; Jianda Shao

    2005-01-01

    The single- and multi-shot damage behaviors of HfO2/SiO2 high-reflecting (HR) coatings under Nd:YAG laser exposure were investigated. Fundamental aspects of multi-shot laser damage, such as the instability due to pulse-to-pulse accumulation of absorption defect and structural defect effect, and the mechanism of laser induced defect generation, are considered. It was found in multi-shot damage, the main factors influencing laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) are accumulation of irreversible changes of structural defects and thermal stress that induced by thermal density fluctuations.

  17. Damage evaluation in graphene underlying atomic layer deposition dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaohui; Reckinger, Nicolas; Poncelet, Olivier; Louette, Pierre; Ureña, Ferran; Idrissi, Hosni; Turner, Stuart; Cabosart, Damien; Colomer, Jean-François; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benoit; Francis, Laurent A

    2015-08-27

    Based on micro-Raman spectroscopy (μRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we study the structural damage incurred in monolayer (1L) and few-layer (FL) graphene subjected to atomic-layer deposition of HfO2 and Al2O3 upon different oxygen plasma power levels. We evaluate the damage level and the influence of the HfO2 thickness on graphene. The results indicate that in the case of Al2O3/graphene, whether 1L or FL graphene is strongly damaged under our process conditions. For the case of HfO2/graphene, μRS analysis clearly shows that FL graphene is less disordered than 1L graphene. In addition, the damage levels in FL graphene decrease with the number of layers. Moreover, the FL graphene damage is inversely proportional to the thickness of HfO2 film. Particularly, the bottom layer of twisted bilayer (t-2L) has the salient features of 1L graphene. Therefore, FL graphene allows for controlling/limiting the degree of defect during the PE-ALD HfO2 of dielectrics and could be a good starting material for building field effect transistors, sensors, touch screens and solar cells. Besides, the formation of Hf-C bonds may favor growing high-quality and uniform-coverage dielectric. HfO2 could be a suitable high-K gate dielectric with a scaling capability down to sub-5-nm for graphene-based transistors.

  18. Performance improvement of charge-trap memory by using a stacked Zr{sub 0.46}Si{sub 0.54}O{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} charge-trapping layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhenjie; Hu, Dan; Zhang, Xiwei; Zhao, Yage [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455000 (China); Li, Rong [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455000 (China)

    2016-11-15

    The postdeposition annealing (PDA)-treated charge-trap flash memory capacitor with stacked Zr{sub 0.46}Si{sub 0.54}O{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} charge-trapping layer flanked by a SiO{sub 2} tunneling oxide and an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} blocking oxide was fabricated and investigated. It is observed that the memory capacitor exhibits prominent memory characteristics with large memory windows 12.8 V in a ±10 V gate sweeping voltage range, faster program/erase speed, and good data-retention characteristics even at 125 C compared to a single charge-trapping layer (Zr{sub 0.46}Si{sub 0.54}O{sub 2}, Zr{sub 0.79}Si{sub 0.21}O{sub 2}, and Zr{sub 0.46}Al{sub 1.08}O{sub 2.54}). The quantum wells and introduced interfacial traps of the stacked trapping layer regulate the storage and loss behavior of charges, and jointly contribute to the improved memory characteristics. Hence, the memory capacitor with a stacked trapping layer is a promising candidate in future nonvolatile charge-trap memory device design and application. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Atomic-layer-deposition-assisted ZnO nanoparticles for oxide charge-trap memory thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Gi Ho; Yun, Da Jeong; Lee, Won Ho; Yoon, Sung Min

    2017-02-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) with monolayer structures were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) to use for a charge-trap layer (CTL) for nonvolatile memory thin-film transistors (MTFTs). The optimum ALD temperature of the NP formation was demonstrated to be 160 °C. The size and areal density of the ZnO NPs was estimated to be approximately 33 nm and 4.8 × 109 cm-2, respectively, when the number of ALD cycles was controlled to be 20. The fabricated MTFTs using a ZnO-NP CTL exhibited typical memory window properties, which are generated by charge-trap/de-trap processes, in their transfer characteristics and the width of the memory window (MW) increased from 0.6 to 18.0 V when the number of ALD cycles increased from 5 to 30. The program characteristics of the MTFT were markedly enhanced by the post-annealing process performed at 180 °C in an oxygen ambient due to the improvements in the interface and bulk qualities of the ZnO NPs. The program/erase (P/E) speed was estimated to be 10 ms at P/E voltages of -14 and 17 V. The memory margin showed no degradation with the lapse in retention time for 2 × 104 s and after the repetitive P/E operations of 7 × 103 cycles.

  20. ZnO/NiO diode-based charge-trapping layer for flash memory featuring low-voltage operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chergn-En; Chen, Chin-Yu; Chu, Ka-Lip; Shen, Yung-Shao; Lin, Chia-Chun; Wu, Yung-Hsien

    2015-04-01

    A stacked oxide semiconductor of n-type ZnO/p-type NiO with diode behavior was proposed as the novel charge-trapping layer to enable low-voltage flash memory for green electronics. The memory performance outperforms that of other devices with high κ and a nanocrystal-based charge-trapping layer in terms of a large hysteresis memory window of 2.02 V with ±3 V program/erase voltage, a high operation speed of 1.88 V threshold voltage shift by erasing at -4 V for 1 ms, negligible memory window degradation up to 10(5) operation cycles, and 16.2% charge loss after 10 years of operation at 85 °C. The promising electrical characteristics can be explained by the negative conduction band offset with respect to Si of ZnO that is beneficial to electron injection and storage, the large number of trapping sites of NiO that act as other good storage media, and most importantly the built-in electric field between n-type ZnO and p-type NiO that provides a favorable electric field for program and erase operation. The process of diode-based flash memory is fully compatible with incumbent VLSI technology, and utilization of the built-in electric field ushers in a new avenue of accomplishing green flash memory.

  1. Dual gratings for enhanced light trapping in thin-film solar cells by a layer-transfer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Christian S; Kowalczewski, Piotr; Martins, Emiliano R; Patrini, Maddalena; Scullion, Mark G; Liscidini, Marco; Lewis, Liam; Reardon, Christopher; Andreani, Lucio C; Krauss, Thomas F

    2013-05-01

    Thin film solar cells benefit significantly from the enhanced light trapping offered by photonic nanostructures. The thin film is typically patterned on one side only due to technological constraints. The ability to independently pattern both sides of the thin film increases the degrees of freedom available to the designer, as different functions can be combined, such as the reduction of surface reflection and the excitation of quasiguided modes for enhanced light absorption. Here, we demonstrate a technique based on simple layer transfer that allows us to independently pattern both sides of the thin film leading to enhanced light trapping. We used a 400 nm thin film of amorphous hydrogenated silicon and two simple 2D gratings for this proof-of-principle demonstration. Since the technique imposes no restrictions on the design parameters, any type of structure can be made.

  2. Effect of concurrent joule heat and charge trapping on RESET for NbAlO fabricated by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Ye, Li; Sun, Qing Qing; Wang, Peng Fei; Jiang, An Quan; Ding, Shi Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2013-02-19

    The RESET process of NbAlO-based resistive switching memory devices fabricated by atomic layer deposition is investigated at low temperatures from 80 to 200 K. We observed that the conduction mechanism of high resistance state changed from hopping conduction to Frenkel-Poole conduction with elevated temperature. It is found that the conductive filament rupture in RRAM RESET process can be attributed not only to the Joule heat generated by internal current flow through a filament but also to the charge trap/detrapping effect. The RESET current decreases upon heating. Meanwhile, the energy consumption also decreases exponentially. This phenomenon indicates the temperature-related charge trap/detrapping process which contributes to the RESET besides direct Joule heat.

  3. High reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory with a poly(4-vinyl phenol) charge trapping layer based on a pn-heterojunction active layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Lanyi; Ying, Jun; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Letian; Wang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate a high reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor (OFET) based nonvolatile memory (NVM) with a polymer poly(4-vinyl phenol) (PVP) as the charge trapping layer. In the unipolar OFETs, the inreversible shifts of the turn-on voltage (Von) and severe degradation of the memory window (ΔVon) at programming (P) and erasing (E) voltages, respectively, block their application in NVMs. The obstacle is overcome by using a pn-heterojunction as the active layer in the OFET memory, which supplied a holes and electrons accumulating channel at the supplied P and E voltages, respectively. Both holes and electrons transferring from the channels to PVP layer and overwriting the trapped charges with an opposite polarity result in the reliable bidirectional shifts of Von at P and E voltages, respectively. The heterojunction OFET exhibits excellent nonvolatile memory characteristics, with a large ΔVon of 8.5 V, desired reading (R) voltage at 0 V, reliable P/R/E/R dynamic endurance over 100 cycles and a long retention time over 10 years.

  4. Slow invasion of a fluid from multiple inlet sources in a thin porous layer: influence of trapping and wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, L; Prat, M

    2013-04-01

    We study numerically the process of quasistatic invasion of a fluid in thin porous layers from multiple inlet injection sources focusing on the effect of trapping or mixed wettability, that is, when hydrophobic and hydrophilic pores coexist in the system. Two flow scenarios are considered. In the first one, referred to as the sequential scenario, the injection bonds at the inlet are activated one after the other. In the second one, referred to as the kinetic scenario, the injection bonds at the inlet are activated simultaneously. In contrast with the case of purely hydrophobic systems with no trapping, studied in a previous work, it is shown that the invasion pattern and the breakthrough point statistics at the end of the displacement depend on the flow scenario when trapping or mixed wettability effects are taken into account. The transport properties of the defending phase are also studied and it is shown that a one-to-one relationship between the overall diffusive conductance and the mean saturation cannot be expected in a thin system. In contrast with thick systems, the diffusive conductance also depends on the thickness when the system is thin. After consideration of various generic aspects characterizing thin porous systems, the main results are briefly discussed in relation with the water management problem in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  5. Ferroelectric Properties of Pt/Pb5Ge3O11/Pt and Pt/Pb5Ge3O11/HfO2/Si Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Shuichiro; Aizawa, Koji; Ishiwara, Hiroshi

    2005-09-01

    The ferroelectric properties of metal-ferroelectric-metal (MFM) capacitors with a Pt/Pb5Ge3O11(PGO)/Pt structure and metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) diodes with a Pt/PGO/HfO2/Si structure were investigated. C-axis-oriented PGO thin films were formed on both Pt/SiO2/Si and HfO2 (6 nm)/Si structures by a sol-gel method. Typical values of remanent polarization (2Pr), coercive field (2Ec), and dielectric constant in the MFM capacitors were 5.7 μC/cm2, 63 kV/cm, and 50, respectively, and the remanent polarization gradually increased with the switching pulses for up to 1 × 1010 cycles. It was also found that the memory window in the MFIS diodes with a 340-nm-thick PGO film was as large as 1.3 V.

  6. Influence of Ti substitution on the electrical properties of metal-ferroelectric (BiFeO3)-insulator (HfO2)-silicon structures for nonvolatile memory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi-Chun Juan, Trevor; Liu, Yu-Wei

    2011-05-01

    Metal-ferroelectric (Ti-substituted BiFeO3)-insulator (HfO2)-semiconductor structures have been fabricated via the cosputtering technique. Ti4+ substitution at the Fe site was investigated through x-ray photoelectron spectra and x-ray diffraction patterns at postannealing temperatures of 500 to 700 °C. The capacitance-voltage memory windows as functions of the insulator film thickness and the dc power for Ti were measured and compared. A memory window of 3.1 V was obtained at a sweep voltage of 8 V under O2-rich conditions. The leakage current and the charge injection effect, especially gate injection, can be greatly improved by Ti substitution. The effects of the postannealing temperature and the substitution amount on the leakage current can be well explained by the defect reaction model.

  7. 0.532-μm laser conditioning of HfO2/SiO2 third harmonic separator fabricated by electron-beam evaporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawei Li; Yuan'an Zhao; Jianda Shao; Zhengxiu Fan; Hongbo He

    2008-01-01

    The 0.532-μm laser conditioning of HfO2/SiO2 third harmonic separator fabricated by electron-beam evaporation (EBE) was studied.The laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the separator determined by 1-on-1 test is 9.1 J/cm2 and it is 15.2 J/cm2 after laser conditioning determined by raster scanning.Two kinds of damage morphologies,taper pits and flat bottom pits,are found on the sample surface and they show different damage behaviors.The damage onset of taper pits does not change obviously and the laser conditioning effect is contributed to the flat bottom pits,which limits the application of laser conditioning.

  8. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements on radio frequency magnetron sputtered HfO2 thin films deposited with different oxygen partial pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidul Haque, S; Nayak, C; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Jha, S N; Sahoo, N K

    2016-03-20

    Two sets of HfO2 thin film have been deposited by the radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique at various oxygen partial pressures, one set without any substrate bias and another set with a 50 W pulsed dc substrate bias. The films have been characterized by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at the Hf L3 edge, and the structural information obtained from analysis of the EXAFS data has been used to explain the macroscopic behavior of the refractive index obtained from spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. It has been observed that the variation of refractive index with oxygen partial pressure depends on the Hf-Hf bond length for the set of films deposited without substrate bias, while for the other set of films deposited with pulsed dc substrate bias, it depends on the oxygen coordination of the nearest neighbor shell surrounding Hf sites.

  9. Study of the picosecond laser damage in HfO2/SiO2-based thin-film coatings in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, A. A.; Papernov, S.; Oliver, J. B.; Rigatti, A.; Taylor, B.; Charles, B.; Smith, C.

    2016-12-01

    The laser damage thresholds of various HfO2/SiO2-based thin film coatings, including multilayer dielectric (MLD) gratings and high reflectors of different designs, prepared by E-beam and Plasma Ion Assisted Deposition (PIAD) methods, were investigated in vacuum, dry nitrogen, and after air-vacuum cycling. Single and multiple-pulse damage thresholds and their pulse-length scaling in the range of 0.6 to 100 ps were measured using a vacuum damage test station operated at 1053nm. The E-beam deposited high reflectors showed higher damage thresholds with square-root pulse-length scaling, as compared to PIAD coatings, which typically show slower power scaling. The former coatings appeared to be not affected by air/vacuum cycling, contrary to PIAD mirrors and MLD gratings. The relation between 1-on-1 and N-on-1 damage thresholds was found dependent on coating design and deposition methods.

  10. Investigating the Temperature Effects on ZnO, TiO2, WO3 and HfO2 Based Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Dongale

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report the effect of filament radius and filament resistivity on the ZnO, TiO2, WO3 and HfO2 based Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM devices. We resort to the thermal reaction model of RRAM for the present analysis. The results substantiate decrease in saturated temperature with increase in the radius and resistivity of filament for the investigated RRAM devices. Moreover, a sudden change in the saturated temperature at a lower value of filament radius and resistivity is observed as against the steady change at the medium and higher value of the filament radius and resistivity. Results confirm the dependence of saturated temperature on the filament size and resistivity in RRAM.

  11. Multi-type particle layer improved light trapping for photovoltaic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Christin

    2016-01-01

    This work discusses regular particle arrays as nanostructured front layers for possible application in photovoltaic devices yielding strongly increased forward scattering. I used a rigorous plane-wave method to investigate multi-type particle layers combining different radii and configurations. T...

  12. Atomic layer deposition of nanolaminate oxide films on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, M.; Weisheit, M.; Kolanek, K.; Michling, M.; Engelmann, H. J.; Schmeisser, D.

    2011-11-01

    Among the methods for depositing thin films, atomic layer deposition is unique for its capability of growing conformal thin films of compounds with a control of composition and thickness at the atomic level. The conformal growth of thin films can be of particular interest for covering nanostructures since it assures the homogeneous growth of the ALD film in all directions, independent of the position of the sample with respect to the incoming precursor flow. Here we describe the technique for growing the HfO2/Al2O3 bilayer on Si substrate and our in situ approach for its investigation by means of synchrotron radiation photoemission. In particular, we study the interface interactions between the two oxides for various thickness compositions ranging from 0.4 to 2.7 nm. We find that the ALD of HfO2 on Si induces the increase of the interfacial SiO2 layer, and a change in the band bending of Si. On the contrary, the ALD of Al2O3 on HfO2 shows negligible interaction between layers as the binding energies of Hf4f, Si2p, and O1s core level peaks and the valence band maximum of HfO2 do not change and the interfacial SiO2 does not increase.

  13. The stability of the stratospheric ozone layer during the end-Permian eruption of the Siberian Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerling, David J; Harfoot, Michael; Lomax, Barry; Pyle, John A

    2007-07-15

    The discovery of mutated palynomorphs in end-Permian rocks led to the hypothesis that the eruption of the Siberian Traps through older organic-rich sediments synthesized and released massive quantities of organohalogens, which caused widespread O3 depletion and allowed increased terrestrial incidence of harmful ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280-315nm; Visscher et al. 2004 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 101, 12952-12956). Here, we use an extended version of the Cambridge two-dimensional chemistry-transport model to evaluate quantitatively this possibility along with two other potential causes of O3 loss at this time: (i) direct effects of HCl release by the Siberian Traps and (ii) the indirect release of organohalogens from dispersed organic matter. According to our simulations, CH3Cl released from the heating of coals alone caused comparatively minor O3 depletion (5-20% maximum) because this mechanism fails to deliver sufficiently large amounts of Cl into the stratosphere. The unusual explosive nature of the Siberian Traps, combined with the direct release of large quantities of HCl, depleted the model O3 layer in the high northern latitudes by 33-55%, given a main eruptive phase of less than or equal to 200kyr. Nevertheless, O3 depletion was most extensive when HCl release from the Siberian Traps was combined with massive CH3Cl release synthesized from a large reservoir of dispersed organic matter in Siberian rocks. This suite of model experiments produced column O3 depletion of 70-85% and 55-80% in the high northern and southern latitudes, respectively, given eruption durations of 100-200kyr. On longer eruption time scales of 400-600kyr, corresponding O3 depletion was 30-40% and 20-30%, respectively. Calculated year-round increases in total near-surface biologically effective (BE) UV-B radiation following these reductions in O3 layer range from 30-60 (kJm(-2)d(-1))BE up to 50-100 (kJm(-2)d(-1))BE. These ranges of daily UV-B doses appear sufficient to exert mutagenic

  14. Reduction of interface traps between poly-Si and SiO2 layers through the dielectric recovery effect during delayed pulse bias stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Uk; Pak, Sangwoo; Lee, Daemyoung; Kim, Yihun; Yang, Haechang; Hong, Sanghoo; Lee, Seungjun; Kim, Eun Kyu

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the interface trap behavior between tunneling oxide and poly-Si channel layer post erase/write cycling with a delayed pulse by using deep level transient spectroscopy. For comparison of the defect states depending on the stress pulses, a Schottky and a metal-oxide semiconductor device were fabricated. A defect state at about E c -0.51 eV in the Schottky device was measured before the annealing process. Three-hole trap states with activation energies of E v +0.28 eV, E v +0.53 eV, and E v +0.76 eV appeared after the post-annealing process. The electron trap was about E c -0.15 eV after erase/write 3000 cycling was applied at ±10 V for 100 ms at 25 °C and 85 °C. These defect states may have an effect on the charge loss behavior of the electrons localized in the charge trap layer at the retention mode of three-dimensional non-volatile memory devices. Dramatically, after the endurance stress was applied with a delayed pulse of 300 cycling at 85 °C for 50.4 h, no interface traps of the deep level transient spectroscopy spectra appeared. Dielectric recovery can decrease the density of the interface trap and improve the retention properties. This may have been caused by the passivation effect on the dangling bond of the interface traps.

  15. Ion/Ioff ratio enhancement and scalability of gate-all-around nanowire negative-capacitance FET with ferroelectric HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kyungmin; Saraya, Takuya; Kobayashi, Masaharu; Hiramoto, Toshiro

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated the energy efficiency and scalability of ferroelectric HfO2 (FE:HfO2)-based negative-capacitance field-effect-transistor (NCFET) with gate-all-around (GAA) nanowire (NW) channel structure. Analytic simulation is conducted to characterize NW-NCFET by varying NW diameter and/or thickness of gate insulator as device structural parameters. Due to the negative-capacitance effect and GAA NW channel structure, NW-NCFET is found to have 5× higher Ion/Ioff ratio than classical NW-MOSFET and 2× higher than double-gate (DG) NCFET, which results in wider design window for high Ion/Ioff ratio. To analyze these obtained results from the viewpoint of the device scalability, we have considered constraints regarding very limited device structural spaces to fit by the gate insulator and NW channel for aggresively scaled gate length (Lg) and/or very tight NW pitch. NW-NCFET still has design point with very thinned gate insulator and/or narrowed NW. Therefore, FE:HfO2-based NW-NCFET is applicable to the aggressively scaled technology node of sub-10 nm Lg and to the very tight NW integration of sub-30 nm NW pitch for beyond 7 nm technology. From 2011 to 2014, he engaged in developing high-speed optical transceiver module as an alternative military service in Republic of Korea. His research interest includes the development of steep slope MOSFETs for high energy-efficient operation and ferroelectric HfO2-based semiconductor devices, and fabrication of nanostructured devices. He joined the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY, in 2010, where he worked on advanced CMOS technologies such as FinFET, nanowire FET, SiGe channel and III-V channel. He was also engaged in launching 14 nm SOI FinFET and RMG technology development. Since 2014, he has been an Associate Professor in Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, where he has been working on ultralow power transistor and memory technology. Dr. Kobayashi is a member of IEEE and the Japan Society of Applied Physics. Dr. Hiramoto is a fellow of Japan Society of Applied Physics and a member of IEEE and IEICE. He served as the General Chair of Silicon Nanoelectronics Workshop in 2003 and the Program Chair in 1997, 1999, and 2001. He was on Committee of IEDM from 2003 to 2009. He was the Program Chair of Symposium on VLSI Technology in 2013 and was the General Chair in 2015. He is the Program Chair of International Conference on Solid-State Devices and Materials (SSDM) in 2016.

  16. Evidence of molecular hydrogen trapped in two-dimensional layered titanium carbide-based MXene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osti, Naresh C.; Naguib, Michael; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Gogotsi, Yury; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Mamontov, Eugene

    2017-07-01

    Two-dimensional transition metal carbides and nitrides (MXenes) are one of the largest and fastest growing families of materials. The presence of molecular hydrogen at ambient conditions in a MXene (T i3C2Tx , where Tx represents a surface terminating species, including O, OH, and F) material is revealed here by inelastic and elastic neutron scatterings. The inelastic neutron-scattering spectrum measured at 5 K shows a peak at 14.6 meV, presenting a clear indication of the presence of parahydrogen in the MXene synthesized using 48 % hydrofluoric acid and annealed at 110 ∘C in vacuum prior to the measurement. An increase in the measurement temperature gradually reduces the peak intensity and increases the peak width due to the mobility of the molecular hydrogen in confinement. The presence of molecular hydrogen is confirmed further from the observed elastic intensity drop in a fixed energy-window scan of elastic intensity measurements in the temperature range of 10-35 K. Using milder etching conditions, ion intercalation, or an increase in the annealing temperature all result in the absence of the trapped hydrogen molecules in MXene. The results of this paper can guide the development of MXene materials with desired properties and improve our understanding of the behavior of MXenes in applications ranging from supercapacitors to hydrogen evolution reaction catalysis and hydrogen storage.

  17. Accurate characterization and understanding of interface trap density trends between atomic layer deposited dielectrics and AlGaN/GaN with bonding constraint theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanan, Narayanan; Lee, Bongmook; Misra, Veena, E-mail: vmisra@ncsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, 2410 Campus Shore Drive, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Many dielectrics have been proposed for the gate stack or passivation of AlGaN/GaN based metal oxide semiconductor heterojunction field effect transistors, to reduce gate leakage and current collapse, both for power and RF applications. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is preferred for dielectric deposition as it provides uniform, conformal, and high quality films with precise monolayer control of film thickness. Identification of the optimum ALD dielectric for the gate stack or passivation requires a critical investigation of traps created at the dielectric/AlGaN interface. In this work, a pulsed-IV traps characterization method has been used for accurate characterization of interface traps with a variety of ALD dielectrics. High-k dielectrics (HfO{sub 2}, HfAlO, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) are found to host a high density of interface traps with AlGaN. In contrast, ALD SiO{sub 2} shows the lowest interface trap density (<2 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}) after annealing above 600 °C in N{sub 2} for 60 s. The trend in observed trap densities is subsequently explained with bonding constraint theory, which predicts a high density of interface traps due to a higher coordination state and bond strain in high-k dielectrics.

  18. Controllable Threshold Voltage in Organic Complementary Logic Circuits with an Electron-Trapping Polymer and Photoactive Gate Dielectric Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Toan Thanh; Sakai, Heisuke; Nguyen, Hai Thanh; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Murata, Hideyuki

    2016-07-20

    We present controllable and reliable complementary organic transistor circuits on a PET substrate using a photoactive dielectric layer of 6-[4'-(N,N-diphenylamino)phenyl]-3-ethoxycarbonylcoumarin (DPA-CM) doped into poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and an electron-trapping layer of poly(perfluoroalkenyl vinyl ether) (Cytop). Cu was used for a source/drain electrode in both the p-channel and n-channel transistors. The threshold voltage of the transistors and the inverting voltage of the circuits were reversibly controlled over a wide range under a program voltage of less than 10 V and under UV light irradiation. At a program voltage of -2 V, the inverting voltage of the circuits was tuned to be at nearly half of the supply voltage of the circuit. Consequently, an excellent balance between the high and low noise margins (NM) was produced (64% of NMH and 68% of NML), resulting in maximum noise immunity. Furthermore, the programmed circuits showed high stability, such as a retention time of over 10(5) s for the inverter switching voltage. Our findings bring about a flexible, simple way to obtain robust, high-performance organic circuits using a controllable complementary transistor inverter.

  19. Mechanochemical synthesis and electrical conductivity of nanocrystalline delta-Bi2O3 stabilized by HfO2 and ZrO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJILJANA KARANOVIĆ

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A powder mixture of a-Bi2O3 and HfO2, in the molar ratio 2:3, was mechanochemically treated in a planetary ball mill under air, using zirconium oxide vials and balls as the milling medium. After 50 h of milling, the mechanochemical reaction led to the formation of a nanocrystalline a-Bi2O3 phase (fluorite-type solid solution Bi0.87Hf0.59Zr0.63O3.61, with a crystallite size of 20 nm. The mechanochemical reaction started at a very beginning of milling accompanied by an accumulation of ZrO2 arising from the milling tools. The samples prepared after various milling times were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and DSC analysis. The electrical properties of the as-milled and pressed Bi0.87Hf0.59Zr0.63O3.61powder were studied using impedance spectroscopy in the temperature range from 100 to 700 °C under air. The electrical conductivity was determined to be 9.43×10-6 and 0.080 S cm-1 for the temperatures of 300 and 700 °C, respectively.

  20. Effects of Gardening on the Heterogeneity of Ice Layers in Lunar Cold Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, D.; Retherford, K. D.; Lucey, P. G.; Patterson, G. W.

    2016-12-01

    In very cold places, where thermal diffusion does not occur, impact gardening is the primary driver of the depth and lateral distribution of water ice. Using a model of impact gardening, I simulate the evolution of regolith over time in extremely cold lunar permanently shadowed regions. The simulations provide information about the redistribution of ice due to impacts on a large range of size scales. I apply the model to provide the evolution of a putative ice layer over time. The model output is interpreted in terms of how the heterogeneous distribution would appear to various remote sensing techniques including LRO instruments Mini-RF, LEND, LAMP, and LOLA. Factoring in those instruments fields of view and sensitivities, the same ice deposit may appear very different to these different types of measurements. I report on the scenarios (age, initial thickness, number of layers) that are consistent with the existing set of observations from LRO. In contrast, the planet Mercury has pervasive ice deposits. Much more of the surface has temperatures where thermal effects are important, which may be the differentiating factor. Alternatively, Mercury may have access to a greater source of water ice or a more recent episodic event. The model output can also be used to facilitate mission planning for a landed mission in lunar polar regions that aims to acquire samples of volatiles in situ. The implications for the model for site selection, mobility range, and subsurface access are presented.

  1. On device design for steep-slope negative-capacitance field-effect-transistor operating at sub-0.2V supply voltage with ferroelectric HfO2 thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaharu Kobayashi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Internet-of-Things (IoT technologies require a new energy-efficient transistor which operates at ultralow voltage and ultralow power for sensor node devices employing energy-harvesting techniques as power supply. In this paper, a practical device design guideline for low voltage operation of steep-slope negative-capacitance field-effect-transistors (NCFETs operating at sub-0.2V supply voltage is investigated regarding operation speed, material requirement and energy efficiency in the case of ferroelectric HfO2 gate insulator, which is the material fully compatible to Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS process technologies. A physics-based numerical simulator was built to design NCFETs with the use of experimental HfO2 material parameters by modeling the ferroelectric gate insulator and FET channel simultaneously. The simulator revealed that NCFETs with ferroelectric HfO2 gate insulator enable hysteresis-free operation by setting appropriate operation point with a few nm thick gate insulator. It also revealed that, if the finite response time of spontaneous polarization of the ferroelectric gate insulator is 10-100psec, 1-10MHz operation speed can be achieved with negligible hysteresis. Finally, by optimizing material parameters and tuning negative capacitance, 2.5 times higher energy efficiency can be achieved by NCFET than by conventional MOSFETs. Thus, NCFET is expected to be a new CMOS technology platform for ultralow power IoT.

  2. Thermal Conductivity and Stability of HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 Evaluated for 1650 Deg C Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coating Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 are candidate thermal and environmental barrier coating (T/EBC) materials for gas turbine ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor applications because of their relatively low thermal conductivity and high temperature capability. In this paper, thermal conductivity and high temperature stability of hot-pressed and plasma sprayed specimens with representative partially-stabilized and fully-cubic HfO2-Y2O3 compositions and La2Zr2O7 were evaluated at temperatures up to 1700 C using a steady-state laser heat-flux technique. Sintering behavior of the plasmasprayed coatings was determined by monitoring the thermal conductivity increases during a 20-hour test period at various temperatures. Durability and failure mechanisms of the HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 coatings on mullite/SiC hexoloy or SiC/SiC CMC substrates were investigated at 1650 C under thermal gradient cyclic conditions. Coating design and testing issues for the 1650 C thermal/environmental barrier coating applications are also discussed.

  3. On device design for steep-slope negative-capacitance field-effect-transistor operating at sub-0.2V supply voltage with ferroelectric HfO2 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masaharu; Hiramoto, Toshiro

    2016-02-01

    Internet-of-Things (IoT) technologies require a new energy-efficient transistor which operates at ultralow voltage and ultralow power for sensor node devices employing energy-harvesting techniques as power supply. In this paper, a practical device design guideline for low voltage operation of steep-slope negative-capacitance field-effect-transistors (NCFETs) operating at sub-0.2V supply voltage is investigated regarding operation speed, material requirement and energy efficiency in the case of ferroelectric HfO2 gate insulator, which is the material fully compatible to Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) process technologies. A physics-based numerical simulator was built to design NCFETs with the use of experimental HfO2 material parameters by modeling the ferroelectric gate insulator and FET channel simultaneously. The simulator revealed that NCFETs with ferroelectric HfO2 gate insulator enable hysteresis-free operation by setting appropriate operation point with a few nm thick gate insulator. It also revealed that, if the finite response time of spontaneous polarization of the ferroelectric gate insulator is 10-100psec, 1-10MHz operation speed can be achieved with negligible hysteresis. Finally, by optimizing material parameters and tuning negative capacitance, 2.5 times higher energy efficiency can be achieved by NCFET than by conventional MOSFETs. Thus, NCFET is expected to be a new CMOS technology platform for ultralow power IoT.

  4. Production of HfO2 thin films using different methods: chemical bath deposition, SILAR and sol-gel process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariper, İ. A.

    2014-08-01

    Hafnium oxide thin films (HOTFs) were successfully deposited onto amorphous glasses using chemical bath deposition, successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR), and sol-gel methods. The same reactive precursors were used for all of the methods, and all of the films were annealed at 300°C in an oven (ambient conditions). After this step, the optical and structural properties of the films produced by using the three different methods were compared. The structures of the films were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The optical properties are investigated using the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopic technique. The film thickness was measured via atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the tapping mode. The surface properties and elemental ratios of the films were investigated and measured by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The lowest transmittance and the highest reflectance values were observed for the films produced using the SILAR method. In addition, the most intense characteristic XRD peak was observed in the diffraction pattern of the film produced using the SILAR method, and the greatest thickness and average grain size were calculated for the film produced using the SILAR method. The films produced using SILAR method contained fewer cracks than those produced using the other methods. In conclusion, the SILAR method was observed to be the best method for the production of HOTFs.

  5. Trap states in enhancement-mode double heterostructures AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with different GaN channel layer thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yunlong; Wang, Chong, E-mail: chongw@xidian.edu.cn; Li, Xiangdong; Zhao, Shenglei; Mi, Minhan; Pei, Jiuqing; Zhang, Jincheng; Hao, Yue, E-mail: yhao@xidian.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Wide Band Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Li, Peixian, E-mail: pxli@mail.xidian.edu.cn [School of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Ma, Xiaohua [Key Laboratory of Wide Band Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); School of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2015-08-10

    This is the report on trap states in enhancement-mode AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN double heterostructures high electron mobility transistors by fluorine plasma treatment with different GaN channel layer thicknesses. Compared with the thick GaN channel layer sample, the thin one has smaller 2DEG concentration, lower electron mobility, lower saturation current, and lower peak transconductance, but it has a higher threshold voltage of 1.2 V. Deep level transient spectroscopy measurements are used to obtain the accurate capture cross section of trap states. By frequency dependent capacitance and conductance measurements, the trap state density of (1.98–2.56) × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} is located at E{sub T} in a range of (0.37–0.44) eV in the thin sample, while the trap state density of (2.3–2.92) × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} is located at E{sub T} in a range of (0.33–0.38) eV in the thick one. It indicates that the trap states in the thin sample are deeper than those in the thick one.

  6. Ab initio study of the elastic properties of single and polycrystal TiO(2), ZrO(2) and HfO(2) in the cotunnite structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, M A; Miño, J C; Pérez, V J; Casali, R A; Ponce, C A

    2009-01-07

    In this work, we study theoretically the elastic properties of the orthorhombic (Pnma) high-pressure phase of IV-B group oxides: titania, zirconia and hafnia. By means of the self-consistent SIESTA code, pseudopotentials, density functional theory in the LDA and GGA approximations, the total energies, hydrostatic pressures and stress tensor components are calculated. From the stress-strain relationships, in the linear regime, the elastic constants C(ij) are determined. Derived elastic constants, such as bulk, Young's and shear modulus, Poisson coefficient and brittle/ductile behavior are estimated with the polycrystalline approach, using Voigt-Reuss-Hill theories. We have found that C(11), C(22) and C(33) elastic constants of hafnia and zirconia show increased strength with respect to the experimental values of the normal phase, P 2(1)/c. A similar situation applies to titania if these constants are compared with its normal phase, rutile. However, shear elastic constants C(44), C(55) and C(66) are similar to the values found in the normal phase. This fact increases the compound anisotropy as well as its ductile behavior. The dependence of unit-cell volumes under hydrostatic pressures is also analyzed. P-V data, fitted to third-order Birch-Murnaghan equations of state, provide the bulk modulus B(0) and its pressure derivatives B'(0). In this case, LDA estimations show good agreement with respect to recent measured bulk moduli of ZrO(2) and HfO(2). Thermo-acoustic properties, e.g. the propagation speed of transverse, longitudinal elastic waves together with associated Debye temperatures, are also estimated.

  7. Polarity reversion of the operation mode of HfO2-based resistive random access memory devices by inserting Hf metal layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ching-Shiang; Chang, Wen-Yuan; Lin, Ming-Ho; Chen, Wei-Su; Chen, Frederick; Tsai, Ming-Jinn

    2013-03-01

    The reversion of polarity within bipolar resistive switching operation occurs in Pt/HfO2/TiN and Pt/Hf/HfO2/TiN resistive random access memory devices. This reversion of voltage polarity is the result of interface generation which induces a conduction mechanism transformation from Poole-Frenkel emission to space charge limited current mechanism. To prove the reversion of polarity, this study uses curve fitting of I-V relations to verify the conduction mechanism theoretically and physical analysis to verify the oxygen ion distribution practically. The proposed Pt/Hf/HfO2/TiN devices exhibit good resistive switching characteristics, such as good uniformity, low voltage operation, robust endurance (10(3) dc sweep), and long retention (3 x 10(4) s at 85 degrees C).

  8. Enhanced memory effect via quantum confinement in 16 nm InN nanoparticles embedded in ZnO charge trapping layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar [Institute Center for Microsystems-iMicro, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Cimen, Furkan [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Alkis, Sabri; Ortaç, Bülend [UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Alevli, Mustafa [Department of Physics, Marmara University, 34722 Istanbul (Turkey); Dietz, Nikolaus [Department of Physics, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States); Okyay, Ali K. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-06-23

    In this work, the fabrication of charge trapping memory cells with laser-synthesized indium-nitride nanoparticles (InN-NPs) embedded in ZnO charge trapping layer is demonstrated. Atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers are used as tunnel and blocking oxides. The gate contacts are sputtered using a shadow mask which eliminates the need for any lithography steps. High frequency C-V{sub gate} measurements show that a memory effect is observed, due to the charging of the InN-NPs. With a low operating voltage of 4 V, the memory shows a noticeable threshold voltage (V{sub t}) shift of 2 V, which indicates that InN-NPs act as charge trapping centers. Without InN-NPs, the observed memory hysteresis is negligible. At higher programming voltages of 10 V, a memory window of 5 V is achieved and the V{sub t} shift direction indicates that electrons tunnel from channel to charge storage layer.

  9. Effect of NO annealing on charge traps in oxide insulator and transition layer for 4H-SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yifan; Lv, Hongliang; Niu, Yingxi; Li, Ling; Song, Qingwen; Tang, Xiaoyan; Li, Chengzhan; Zhao, Yanli; Xiao, Li; Wang, Liangyong; Tang, Guangming; Zhang, Yimen; Zhang, Yuming

    2016-09-01

    The effect of nitric oxide (NO) annealing on charge traps in the oxide insulator and transition layer in n-type 4H-SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices has been investigated using the time-dependent bias stress (TDBS), capacitance-voltage (C-V), and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). It is revealed that two main categories of charge traps, near interface oxide traps (Nniot) and oxide traps (Not), have different responses to the TDBS and C-V characteristics in NO-annealed and Ar-annealed samples. The Nniot are mainly responsible for the hysteresis occurring in the bidirectional C-V characteristics, which are very close to the semiconductor interface and can readily exchange charges with the inner semiconductor. However, Not is mainly responsible for the TDBS induced C-V shifts. Electrons tunneling into the Not are hardly released quickly when suffering TDBS, resulting in the problem of the threshold voltage stability. Compared with the Ar-annealed sample, Nniot can be significantly suppressed by the NO annealing, but there is little improvement of Not. SIMS results demonstrate that the Nniot are distributed within the transition layer, which correlated with the existence of the excess silicon. During the NO annealing process, the excess Si atoms incorporate into nitrogen in the transition layer, allowing better relaxation of the interface strain and effectively reducing the width of the transition layer and the density of Nniot. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61404098 and 61274079), the Doctoral Fund of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20130203120017), the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB759600), the National Grid Science & Technology Project, China (Grant No. SGRI-WD-71-14-018), and the Key Specific Project in the National Science & Technology Program, China (Grant Nos. 2013ZX02305002-002 and 2015CB759600).

  10. Defects and Charge Trapping Mechanisms of Double Active Layer In-Zn-O and Al-Sn-Zn-In-O Thin-Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Youngin; Kim, Taeho; Yang, Jong-Heon; Choi, Ji-Hun; Hwang, Chi-Sun; Cho, Sung Haeng; Jeon, Sanghun

    2017-03-02

    Active matrix organic light-emitting diodes (AMOLED) are considered as a core component of next-generation display technology, which can be used for wearable and flexible devices. Reliable thin-film transistors (TFTs) with high mobility are required to drive AMOLEDs. Recently, amorphous oxide TFTs, owing to their high mobility, have been considered as excellent substitutes for driving AMOLEDs. However, the device instabilities of high-mobility oxide TFTs have remained a key issue to be used in production. In this letter, we present the charge trapping and device instability mechanisms of high-mobility oxide TFTs with double active layers, using In-Zn-O (IZO) and Al-doped Sn-Zn-In-O (ATZIO) with various interfacial IZO thicknesses (0-6nm). To this end, we employed microsecond fast I-V, single-pulse I-V, transient current, and discharging current analysis. These AC device characterization methodologies enable the extraction of various trap parameters and defect densities as well as the understanding of dynamic charge transport in double active-layer TFTs. The results show that the number of defect sites decreases with an increase in the interfacial IZO thickness. From these results, we conclude that the interfacial IZO layer plays a crucial role in minimizing the charge trapping in ATZIO TFTs.

  11. The methane record of Daansgard-Oeschger event 17 in Vostok 4G-2 ice core: effects of layered bubble trapping and smoothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourteau, Kévin; Faïn, Xavier; Martinerie, Patricia; Landais, Amaëlle; Ekaykin, Alexey A.; Lipenkov, Vladimir Ya.; Chappellaz, Jérôme

    2017-04-01

    This work aims to characterise and quantify the modification and loss of past atmospheric information recorded in ice cores due to gas trapping mechanisms. For this purpose a very high resolution methane record of the DO event 17 in Vostok 4G-2 ice core has been measured by continuous flow analysis and laser spectroscopy. This is the first time that the gas of a very low accumulation core, about 1.3cm.yr-1 ice equivalent, is measured using a continuous method. The measurements reveal numerous anomalous layers a couple of centimetres thick. These anomalous layers differ in methane mixing ratio from adjacent layers by about plus or minus 50ppbv. Their amplitude and uneven distribution along the ice core can be reproduced by a simple layered bubble trapping model. After removing the layering anomalies, the DO 17 recorded in the Vostok core is clearly smoother than in the WAIS Divide record, a much higher accumulation rate site. This is consistent with previous observations and general understanding, since high accumulation firns sink and densify faster and the trapping phase of gases is less spread over time. However the smoothing of the DO event in the Vostok ice core turns out to be less important and to contain higher frequencies than expected. Finally we developed a method to infer the gas age distribution enclosed in ice cores by comparison with a high frequency atmospheric scenario, such as the WAIS Divide record. This approach allows to constrain gas age distributions in climatic conditions which have no modern analogue.

  12. Highly reliable top-gated thin-film transistor memory with semiconducting, tunneling, charge-trapping, and blocking layers all of flexible polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Hwang, Sun Kak; Kim, Kang Lib; Lee, Ju Han; Cho, Suk Man; Park, Cheolmin

    2015-05-27

    The core components of a floating-gate organic thin-film transistor nonvolatile memory (OTFT-NVM) include the semiconducting channel layer, tunneling layer, floating-gate layer, and blocking layer, besides three terminal electrodes. In this study, we demonstrated OTFT-NVMs with all four constituent layers made of polymers based on consecutive spin-coating. Ambipolar charges injected and trapped in a polymer electret charge-controlling layer upon gate program and erase field successfully allowed for reliable bistable channel current levels at zero gate voltage. We have observed that the memory performance, in particular the reliability of a device, significantly depends upon the thickness of both blocking and tunneling layers, and with an optimized layer thickness and materials selection, our device exhibits a memory window of 15.4 V, on/off current ratio of 2 × 10(4), read and write endurance cycles over 100, and time-dependent data retention of 10(8) s, even when fabricated on a mechanically flexible plastic substrate.

  13. High-performance printed carbon nanotube thin-film transistors array fabricated by a nonlithography technique using hafnium oxide passivation layer and mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2012-12-01

    The large-scale application of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) for printed electronics requires scalable, repeateable, as well as noncontaminating assembly techniques. Previously explored nanotube deposition methods include serial methods such as inkjet printing and parallel methods such as spin-coating with photolithography. The serial methods are usually slow, whereas the photolithography-related parallel methods result in contamination of the nanotubes. In this paper, we report a reliable clean parallel method for fabrication of arrays of carbon nanotube-based field effect transistors (CNTFETs) involving shadow mask patterning of a passivating layer of Hafnium oxide (HfO(2)) over the nanotube (CNT) active channel regions and plasma etching of the unprotected nanotubes. Pure (99%) semiconducting SWCNTs are first sprayed over the entire surface of a wafer substrate followed by a two-step shadow masking procedure to first deposit metal electrodes and then a HfO(2) isolation/passivation layer over the device channel region. The exposed SWCNT network outside the HfO(2) protected area is removed with oxygen plasma etching. The HfO(2) thus serves as both the device isolation mask during the plasma etching and as a protective passivating layer in subsequent use. The fabricated devices on SiO(2)/Si substrate exhibit good device performance metrics, with on/off ratio ranging from 1 × 10(1) to 3 × 10(5) and mobilities of 4 to 23 cm(2)/(V s). The HfO(2)/Si devices show excellent performance with on/off ratios of 1 × 10(2) to 2 × 10(4) and mobilities of 8 to 56 cm(2)/(V s). The optimum devices (on HfO(2)/Si) have an on/off ratio of 1 × 10(4) and mobility as high as 46 cm(2)/(V s). This HfO(2)-based patterning method enables large scale fabrication of CNTFETs with no resist residue or other contamination on the device channel. Further, shadow masking circumvents the need for expensive and area-limited lithography patterning process. The device

  14. Dual phase TiO(x)N(y)/TiN charge trapping layer for low-voltage and high-speed flash memory application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Yoo, Won Jong

    2009-12-01

    Flash memory using a dual phase TiO(x)N(y)/TiN charge trapping layer has been fabricated and its electrical properties were investigated. The TiO(x)N(y)/TiN layer was formed by partial oxidation of a pre-deposited TiN layer, and the formation of TiO(x)N(y)/SiO(x)N(y) was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. The enlarged conduction (deltaphi(c) = 3.6 eV) and valence (deltaphi(v) = 2.5 eV) band offsets of the TiO(x)N(y)/TiN to SiO2 enabled low-voltage (+/- 6 V) and fast programming/erasing (P: 2.7 x 10(4) V/s and E: -5.1 x 10(4) V/s) operations, while the transition layer suppressed the trapped charge leakage, giving rise to good 10-year data retention with less than 35% V(th) decay.

  15. Polymer composite electrolytes having core-shell silica fillers with anion-trapping boron moiety in the shell layer for all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jimin; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kim, Hee Joong; Lee, Jin Hong; Lee, Jong-Chan

    2015-04-15

    Core-shell silica particles with ion-conducting poly(ethylene glycol) and anion-trapping boron moiety in the shell layer were prepared to be used as fillers for polymer composite electrolytes based on organic/inorganic hybrid branched copolymer as polymer matrix for all-solid-state lithium-ion battery applications. The core-shell silica particles were found to improve mechanical strength and thermal stability of the polymer matrix and poly(ethylene glycol) and boron moiety in the shell layer increase compatibility between filler and polymer matrix. Furthermore, boron moiety in the shell layer increases both ionic conductivity and lithium transference number of the polymer matrix because lithium salt can be more easily dissociated by the anion-trapping boron. Interfacial compatibility with lithium metal anode is also improved because well-dispersed silica particles serve as protective layer against interfacial side reactions. As a result, all-solid-state battery performance was found to be enhanced when the copolymer having core-shell silica particles with the boron moiety was used as solid polymer electrolyte.

  16. Protective coatings of hafnium dioxide by atomic layer deposition for microelectromechanical systems applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdova, Maria; Wiemer, Claudia; Lamperti, Alessio; Tallarida, Grazia; Cianci, Elena; Lamagna, Luca; Losa, Stefano; Rossini, Silvia; Somaschini, Roberto; Gioveni, Salvatore; Fanciulli, Marco; Franssila, Sami

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the investigation of HfO2 deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from either HfD-CO4 or TEMAHf and ozone for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications, in particular, for environmental protection of aluminum micromirrors. This work shows that HfO2 films successfully protect aluminum in moist environment and at the same time retain good reflectance properties of underlying material. In our experimental work, the chemical composition, crystal structure, electronic density and roughness of HfO2 films remained the same after one week of humidity treatment (relative humidity of 85%, 85 °C). The reflectance properties underwent only minor changes. The observed shift in reflectance was only from 80-90% to 76-85% in 400-800 nm spectral range when coated with ALD HfO2 films grown with Hf(NMeEt)4 and no shift (remained in the range of 68-83%) for films grown from (CpMe)2Hf(OMe)Me.

  17. Study on transconductance non-linearity of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs considering acceptor-like traps in barrier layer under the gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiangfeng; Chen, Nanting; Jiang, Zhiguang; Bai, Zhiyuan; Liu, Yong; Liu, Yang; Yu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    DC and pulsed transfer characteristics of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) have been systematically investigated. A significant difference of transconductance linearity between DC and gate-pulsed measurements is clearly observed. The acceptor-like traps in the barrier layer under the gate is the main cause of non-linear behavior of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs transconductance. A physical model has been constructed to explain the phenomenon. In the modeling, an acceptor-like trap concentration of 1.2 × 1019 cm-3 with an energy level of 0.5 eV below the conduction band minimum shows the best fit to measurement results.

  18. Data Retention and Readout Degradation Properties of Pt/Sr0.7Sm0.07Bi2.2Ta2O9/HfO2/Si Structure Ferroelectric-Gate Field Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Hirokazu; Tokumitsu, Eisuke

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the data retention and readout degradation properties of ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistors (FeFETs) with Pt/Sr0.7Sm0.07Bi2.2Ta2O9/HfO2/Si structures. We first point out that to read out the stored data correctly, unselected FeFETs should be turned off during the readout process and that this process causes a significant reduction of ON readout current. We next characterize the data retention properties of Pt/Sr0.7Sm0.07Bi2.2Ta2O9/HfO2/Si structure n-channel FeFET by taking the readout process into account. It is shown that the retention property measured by applying positive readout pulses after holding at VG=0 V for 30 s, is similar to that measured by the conventional method in which drain current is continuously measured at a positive hold voltage.

  19. Synthesis of ZrO2-HfO2-Y2O3-Sc2O3 Nano-Particles by Sol-Gel Technique in Aqueous Solution of Alcohol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Agglomeration-free nanosized ZrO2-HfO2-Y2O3-Sc2O3 composite powders were successfully synthesized by Sol-Gel technique in heated aqueous solution of alcohol, using analytically pure ZrOCl2·8H2O, HfOCl2·8H2O, Y(NO3)3·6H2O, and Sc2O3 as raw materials. The effect of synthesis condition on the size and dispersity of the composite powders was investigated by means of XRD, TEM, and TG-DSC techniques. The results showed that well-dispersed predecessor of ZrO2-HfO2-Y2O3-Sc2O3 composite nanopowders could be obtained. The optional condition: PEG6000 as dispersant was 1%, alcohol/H2O ratio was 5/1, metallic ion concentration in whole solution was 0.5 mol·L-1 and the pH value of the solution was 12. After calcined at 620 ℃, the powder obtained was in uniform cubic structure, and its average particle size was about 13 nm, which was good for producing nanocrystalline solid electrolyte.

  20. Structural and electrical characteristics of ALD-HfO2/n-Si gate stack with SiON interfacial layer for advanced CMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Rajput, Renu; Prasher, Rakesh; Vaid, Rakesh

    2016-09-01

    We report the fabrication of an ultra-thin silicon oxynitride (SiON) as an interfacial layer (IL) for n-Si/ALD-HfO2 gate stack with reduced leakage current. The XRD, AFM, FTIR, FESEM and EDAX characterizations have been performed for structural and morphological studies. Electrical parameters such as dielectric constant (K), interface trap density (Dit), leakage current density (J), effective oxide charge (Qeff), barrier height (Φbo), ideality factor (ƞ), breakdown-voltage (Vbr) and series resistance (Rs) were extracted through C-V, G-V and I-V measurements. The determined values of K, Dit, J, Qeff, Φbo, ƞ, Vbr and Rs are 14.4, 0.5 × 10 11 eV-1 cm-2, 2.2 × 10-9 A/cm2, 0.3 × 1013 cm-2, 0.42, 2.1, -0.33 and 14.5 MΩ respectively. SiON growth prior to HfO2 deposition has curtailed the problem of high leakage current density and interfacial traps due to sufficient amount of N2 incorporated at the interface.

  1. Charge and excitation dynamics in semiconducting polymer layers doped with emitters and charge carrier traps; Ladungstraeger- und Anregungsdynamik in halbleitenden Polymerschichten mit eingemischten Emittern und Ladungstraegerfallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaiser, F.

    2006-06-15

    Light-emitting diodes generate light from the recombination of injected charge carriers. This can be obtained in inorganic materials. Here, it is necessary to produce highly ordered crystalline structures that determine the properties of the device. Another possibility is the utilization of organic molecules and polymers. Based on the versatile organic chemistry, it is possible to tune the properties of the semiconducting polymers already during synthesis. In addition, semiconducting polymers are mechanically flexible. Thus, it is possible to construct flexible, large-area light sources and displays. The first light-emitting diode using a polymer emitter was presented in 1990. Since then, this field of research has grown rapidly up to the point where first products are commercially available. It has become clear that the properties of polymer light-emitting diodes such as color and efficiency can be improved by incorporating multiple components inside the active layer. At the same time, this gives rise to new interactions between these components. While components are often added either to improve the charge transport or to change the emission, it has to made sure that other processes are not influenced in a negative manner. This work investigates some of these interactions and describes them with simple physical models. First, blue light-emitting diodes based on polyfluorene are analyzed. This polymer is an efficient emitter, but it is susceptible to the formation of chemical defects that can not be suppressed completely. These defects form electron traps, but their effect can be compensated by the addition of hole traps. The underlying process, namely the changed charge carrier balance, is explained. In the following, blend systems with dendronized emitters that form electron traps are investigated. The different influence of the insulating shell on the charge and energy transfer between polymer host and the emissive core of the dendrimers is examined. In the

  2. Effect of thermal annealing on nonvolatile memory structures containing a high-k La{sub 2}O{sub 3} charge-trapping layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Park, J. W.; Kim, C. O.; Chung, H. Y.; Choi, S. H.; Lim, D. [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    We investigated the effect of thermal annealing on the memory properties of metal-oxide-high-k-oxide-silicon (MOHOS)-type structures using high-k La{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a charge-trapping layer. When a MOHOS memory capacitor underwent rapid thermal annealing (RTA), the memory window reached a maximum at an intermediate RTA temperature and then decreased with increasing annealing temperature. The oxide stack also broke down more easily with increasing RTA temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed that high-temperature annealing led to the diffusion of La and the formation of crystalline lanthanum silicate, resulting in a smaller breakdown field and an increased leakage current. Our experimental result indicates that the MOHOS memory can be optimized near an RTA temperature of {approx} 600 .deg. C. On the other hand, laser spike annealing (LSA), with its high peak temperature and fast heating/cooling led to a good memory property by suppressing silicate formation while creating high-density charge trapping defects in the La{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. Our results show that LSA can be an alternative choice for MOHOS memory devices when a high-temperature annealing process is needed for device applications.

  3. The effect of the thickness of tunneling layer on the memory properties of (Cu2O)0.5(Al2O3)0.5 high-k composite charge-trapping memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinqiu; Lu, Jianxin; Yin, Jiang; Xu, Bo; Xia, Yidong; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-06-01

    The charge-trapping memory devices namely Pt/Al2O3/(Al2O3)0.5(Cu2O)0.5/SiO2/p-Si with 2, 3 and 4 nm SiO2 tunneling layers were fabricated by using RF magnetron sputtering and atomic layer deposition techniques. At an applied voltage of ±11 V, the memory windows in the C-V curves of the memory devices with 2, 3 and 4 nm SiO2 tunneling layers were about 4.18, 9.91 and 11.33 V, respectively. The anomaly in memory properties among the three memory devices was ascribed to the different back tunneling probabilities of trapped electrons in the charge-trapping dielectric (Al2O3)0.5(Cu2O)0.5 due to the different thicknesses of SiO2 tunneling layer.

  4. Development and Performance Evaluations of HfO2-Si and Rare Earth-Si Based Environmental Barrier Bond Coat Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft propulsion systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, improve component durability, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced EBC systems for SiCSiC CMC turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant material development challenges for the high temperature CMC components is to develop prime-reliant, high strength and high temperature capable environmental barrier coating bond coat systems, since the current silicon bond coat cannot meet the advanced EBC-CMC temperature and stability requirements. In this paper, advanced NASA HfO2-Si based EBC bond coat systems for SiCSiC CMC combustor and turbine airfoil applications are investigated. The coating design approach and stability requirements are specifically emphasized, with the development and implementation focusing on Plasma Sprayed (PS) and Electron Beam-Physic Vapor Deposited (EB-PVD) coating systems and the composition optimizations. High temperature properties of the HfO2-Si based bond coat systems, including the strength, fracture toughness, creep resistance, and oxidation resistance were evaluated in the temperature range of 1200 to 1500 C. Thermal gradient heat flux low cycle fatigue and furnace cyclic oxidation durability tests were also performed at temperatures up to 1500 C. The coating strength improvements, degradation and failure modes of the environmental barrier coating bond coat systems on SiCSiC CMCs tested in simulated stress-environment interactions are briefly discussed and supported by modeling. The performance enhancements of the HfO2-Si bond coat systems with rare earth element dopants and rare earth-silicon based bond coats are also highlighted. The advanced bond coat systems, when integrated with advanced EBC top coats, showed promise to achieve 1500 C temperature capability, helping enable next generation turbine engines with significantly improved engine component temperature capability and long-term durability.

  5. The investigation of structure, chemical composition, hydrogen isotope trapping and release processes in deposition layers on surfaces exposed to DIII-D divertor plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzhinskij, O.I.; Opimach, I.V.; Barsuk, V.A. [TRINITI, Troitsk (Russian Federation); Arkhipov, I.I. [Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry; West, W.P.; Wong, C.P.C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Whyte, D. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Wampler, W.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The exposure of ATG graphite sample to DIII-D divertor plasma was provided by the DiMES (Divertor Material Evaluation System) mechanism. The graphite sample arranged to receive the parallel heat flux on a small region of the surface was exposed to 600ms of outer strike point plasma. The sample was constructed to collect the eroded material directed downward into a trapping zone onto s Si disk collector. The average heat flux onto the graphite sample during the exposure was about 200W/cm{sup 2}, and the parallel heat flux was about 10 KW/cm{sup 2}. After the exposure the graphite sample and Si collector disk were analyzed using SEM, NRA, RBS, Auger spectroscopy. IR and Raman spectroscopy. The thermal desorption was studied also. The deposited coating on graphite sample is amorphous carbon layer. Just upstream of the high heat flux zone the redeposition layer has a globular structure. The deposition layer on Si disk is composed also from carbon but has a diamond-like structure. The areal density of C and D in the deposited layer on Si disk varied in poloidal and toroidal directions. The maximum D/C areal density ratio is about 0.23, maximum carbon density is about 3.8 {times} 10{sup 18}cm{sup {minus}2}, maximum D area density is about 3 {times} 10{sup 17}cm{sup 2}. The thermal desorption spectrum had a peak at 1,250K.

  6. The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, T.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.

    2012-09-01

    The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP) aims to provide a common platform for rapidly deploying Astronomy Archives to the web. TRAP is currently under development for both the VAO Data Discovery Portal and the MAST Multi-Mission Portal (Figure 1). TRAP consists of 2 major software packages: the TRAP Client and the TRAP Server. The TRAP framework allows developers to deploy the Server, connect to data resources, then focus on building custom tools for the Client. TRAP is built upon proven industry technologies including the Ext/JS JavaScript Component Library, Mono.NET Web Services, and JSON message based APIs. The multi-layered architecture of TRAP decouples each layer: Client, Service and Data Access, enabling each to evolve independently over time. Although currently deployed to provide astronomy science data access, the TRAP architecture is flexible enough to thrive in any distributed data environment.

  7. First Principles Calculation of Elastic Constants of Monoclinic HfO2 Thin Film%单斜相HfO2薄膜弹性常数的第一性原理计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔺玲; 邵淑英; 李静平

    2013-01-01

    用电子束蒸发沉积在K9玻璃基底上镀制HfO2薄膜,沉积温度为200℃,蒸发速率为0.03 nm/s.由X射线衍射谱可知薄膜出现明显结晶,且为单斜相和正交相混合结构,其中单斜相占明显优势.用Jade5软件分析得到单斜相HfO2的晶格常数a,b,c以及晶格矢量a和c之间的夹角β.基于得到的晶格常数建立了单斜相HfO2薄膜的晶体结构模型.同时建立固态单斜相HfO2的晶体结构模型进行对比.通过密度泛函理论(DFT)框架下的平面超软赝势法,采用两种不同的交换关联函数:局域密度近似(LDA)中的CA-PZ和广义梯度近似(GGA)中的质子平衡方程(PBE),计算了薄膜态和固态单斜晶相HfO2的弹性刚度系数矩阵Gij和弹性柔度系数矩阵Sij,Reuss模型、Voigt模型和Hill理论下的体积模量和剪切模量,材料平均杨氏模量和泊松比.此外还计算得到薄膜态和固态单斜晶相HfO2在不同方向上的杨氏模量.%HfO2 films are deposited by electron beam evaporation at a deposition rate of 0.03 nm/s and deposition temperature of 200 ℃ on K9 glass substrates. The films are observed to show a mixed structure of monoclinic and orthorhombic phase through X-ray diffraction and monoclinic phase is of obvious advantages. The structure parameters a, b, c and angel β of monoclinic HfO2 films are obtained using Jade5 software, based on which the crystal structure model is built. While solid crystal monoclinic HfO2 model is built to compare with the thin film one. Elastic stiffness constants of monoclinic HfO2 thin film and solid crystal are investigated using the plane waves ultrasoft pseudopotential technique based on the density functional theory (DFT) under two different exchange correlation functions of local density approximation (LDA) CA-PZ and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) PBE. Reuss, Voigt and Hill theories are used to estimate the bulk, shear and average Young's moduli and Possion ratio for polycrystalline HfO2 thin film and solid crystal. In addition, the Young's moduli in different orientations are also calculated.

  8. Theoretical views on activation of methane catalyzed by Hf2+ and oxidation of CO (x(1)Σ(+)) by N2O (x(1)Σ(+)) Catalyzed by HfO2+ and TaO2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Jingyan; Tie, Lu; Wang, Ben; Guo, Zhiguang

    2013-09-12

    The mechanisms of activation of CH4 catalyzed by (1/3)Hf(2+) and oxidation of CO by N2O catalyzed by (1/3)HfO(2+) or (2/4)TaO(2+) have been investigated using the B3LYP level of theory. For the activation of methane, the TSR (two-state reactivity) mechanism has been certified through the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) calculation and the Landau-Zener-type model. In the vicinity of the minimum energy crossing point (MECP), SOC equals 900.23 cm(-1) and the probability of intersystem crossing is approximately 0.62. Spin inversion makes the activation barrier decline from 1.63 to 0.57 eV. NBO analysis demonstrates that empty 6s and 5d orbitals of the Hf atom play the major role for the activation of C-H bonds. Finally, CH4 dehydrogenates to produce Hf-CH2(2+). For oxidation of CO by N2O catalyzed by HfO(2+) or TaO(2+), the covalent bonds between transition metal atoms and the oxygen atom restrict the freedom of valence electrons. Therefore, they are all SSR (single-state reactivity). The oxygen atom is directly extracted during the course of oxygen transfer, and its microscopic essence has been discussed. The detailed kinetic information of two catalytic cycles has been calculated by referencing the "energetic span (δE)" model. Finally, TOF(HfO(2+))/TOF(TaO(2+)) = 2.7 at 298.15 K, which has a good consistency with the experimental result.

  9. CeO2掺杂对HfO2栅介质电学特性的影响%Influence of CeO2-Doping on Electrical Properties of HfO2 Gate Dielectrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨萌萌; 屠海令; 张心强; 熊玉华; 王小娜; 杜军

    2012-01-01

    采用磁控共溅射的方法在p-Si(100)衬底上沉积了掺杂和不掺杂CeO2的HfO2薄膜.通过X射线光电子能谱(XPS)研究了薄膜中元素的化学计量比及结合能,制备MOS结构并对漏电流及电容等电学性能进行表征.结果表明,掺入CeO2后,整个体系的氧空位生成能增大,氧空位数目减少,漏电流较纯HfO2下降了一个数量级,满足作为高k材料的要求.%CeO2-doped HfO2(CDH) thin films were deposited on p-Si substrates by RF magnetron co-sputtering. The film thickness was measured by surface profiler. The binding energy of elements was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ( XPS). MOS structures were made to characterize the leakage current and capacitance. XPS analysis of Hf 4f and 01s confirmed that the Hf-0 binding energy increased after doping CeO2. This resulted in the increase of the oxygen vacancy formation energy and the reduction of the concentration of oxygen vacancy. The leakage current density of CDH film was about one order of magnitude lower than that of HfO2 film. CDH film can meet the requirements of high-fc application.

  10. Combined effects of trapped energetic ions and resistive layer damping on the stability of the resistive wall mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yuling; Liu, Yue, E-mail: Yueqiang.Liu@ccfe.ac.uk, E-mail: liuyue@dlut.edu.cn; Liu, Chao; Xia, Guoliang [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Yueqiang, E-mail: Yueqiang.Liu@ccfe.ac.uk, E-mail: liuyue@dlut.edu.cn [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Earth and Space Science, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Wang, Aike; Hao, Guangzhou [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Li [College of Science, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Cui, Shaoyan [School of Mathematics and Statistics Science, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China)

    2016-01-15

    A dispersion relation is derived for the stability of the resistive wall mode (RWM), which includes both the resistive layer damping physics and the toroidal precession drift resonance damping from energetic ions in tokamak plasmas. The dispersion relation is numerically solved for a model plasma, for the purpose of systematic investigation of the RWM stability in multi-dimensional plasma parameter space including the plasma resistivity, the radial location of the resistive wall, as well as the toroidal flow velocity. It is found that the toroidal favorable average curvature in the resistive layer contributes a significant stabilization of the RWM. This stabilization is further enhanced by adding the drift kinetic contribution from energetic ions. Furthermore, two traditionally assumed inner layer models are considered and compared in the dispersion relation, resulting in different predictions for the stability of the RWM.

  11. Near-field microwave microscopy of high-κ oxides grown on graphene with an organic seeding layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselev, Alexander; Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; Marks, Tobin J.; Lauhon, Lincoln J.; Hersam, Mark C.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2013-12-01

    Near-field scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) is used for non-destructive nanoscale characterization of Al2O3 and HfO2 films grown on epitaxial graphene on SiC by atomic layer deposition using a self-assembled perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride seeding layer. SMM allows imaging of buried inhomogeneities in the dielectric layer with a spatial resolution close to 100 nm. The results indicate that, while topographic features on the substrate surface cannot be eliminated as possible sites of defect nucleation, the use of a vertically heterogeneous Al2O3/HfO2 stack suppresses formation of large outgrowth defects in the oxide film, ultimately improving lateral uniformity of the dielectric film.

  12. Interface Trap Density Reduction for Al2O3/GaN (0001) Interfaces by Oxidizing Surface Preparation prior to Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhernokletov, Dmitry M; Negara, Muhammad A; Long, Rathnait D; Aloni, Shaul; Nordlund, Dennis; McIntyre, Paul C

    2015-06-17

    We correlate interfacial defect state densities with the chemical composition of the Al2O3/GaN interface in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures using synchrotron photoelectron emission spectroscopy (PES), cathodoluminescence and high-temperature capacitance-voltage measurements. The influence of the wet chemical pretreatments involving (1) HCl+HF etching or (2) NH4OH(aq) exposure prior to atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3 were investigated on n-type GaN (0001) substrates. Prior to ALD, PES analysis of the NH4OH(aq) treated surface shows a greater Ga2O3 component compared to either HCl+HF treated or as-received surfaces. The lowest surface concentration of oxygen species is detected on the acid etched surface, whereas the NH4OH treated sample reveals the lowest carbon surface concentration. Both surface pretreatments improve electrical characteristics of MOS capacitors compared to untreated samples by reducing the Al2O3/GaN interface state density. The lowest interfacial trap density at energies in the upper band gap is detected for samples pretreated with NH4OH. These results are consistent with cathodoluminescence data indicating that the NH4OH treated samples show the strongest band edge emission compared to as-received and acid etched samples. PES results indicate that the combination of reduced carbon contamination while maintaining a Ga2O3 interfacial layer by NH4OH(aq) exposure prior to ALD results in fewer interface traps after Al2O3 deposition on the GaN substrate.

  13. Optimization of Fluorine Plasma Treatment for Interface Improvement on HfO2/In0.53Ga0.47As MOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ting Chen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports significant improvements in the electrical performance of In0.53Ga0.47As metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET by a post-gate CF4/O2 plasma treatment. The optimum condition of CF4/O2 plasma treatment has been systematically studied and found to be 30 W for 3–5 min. Approximately 5× reduction in interface trap density from 2.8 × 1012 to 4.9 × 1011 cm−2eV−1 has been demonstrated with fluorine (F incorporation. Subthreshold swing has been improved from 127 to 109 mV/dec. Effective channel mobility has been enhanced from 826 to 1,144 cm2/Vs.

  14. Broad-Band Photocurrent Enhancement in MoS2 Layers Directly Grown on Light-Trapping Si Nanocone Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yunae; Cho, Byungjin; Kim, Yonghun; Lee, Jihye; Kim, Eunah; Nguyen, Trang Thi Thu; Lee, Ju Hyun; Yoon, Seokhyun; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2017-02-22

    There has been growing research interest in realizing optoelectronic devices based on the two-dimensional atomically thin semiconductor MoS2 owing to its distinct physical properties that set it apart from conventional semiconductors. However, there is little optical absorption in these extremely thin MoS2 layers, which presents an obstacle toward applying them for use in high-efficiency light-absorbing devices. We synthesized trilayers of MoS2 directly on SiO2/Si nanocone (NC) arrays using chemical vapor deposition and investigated their photodetection characteristics. The photoresponsivity of the MoS2/NC structure was much higher than that of the flat counterpart across the whole visible wavelength range (for example, it was almost an order of magnitude higher at λ = 532 nm). Strongly concentrated light near the surface that originated from a Fabry-Perot interference in the SiO2 thin layers and a Mie-like resonance caused by the Si NCs boosted the optical absorption in MoS2. Our work demonstrates that MoS2/NC structures could provide a useful means to realize high-performance optoelectronic devices.

  15. Utilization of Mg2Al-layered double hydroxide as an effective sequestrator to trap Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution impacted by water quality parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Linghu, Wensheng; Hu, Jun; Jiang, Gongyi; Sheng, Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Recently, Mg2Al-layered double hydroxide (Mg2Al-LDH) has been extensively studied as promising candidates to trap metal ions due to their high complexation and adsorption capacity. Herein, Mg2Al-LDH was utilized as an effectiveness sequestrator to trap Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution by an adsorption process using batch technique under ambient conditions. The results showed that Cu(II) adsorption on Mg2Al-LDH increases with pH increasing and maintains a high level at pH>7.0. The adsorption of Cu(II) was obviously affected by ionic strength at low pH, which was not dependent on ionic strength at high pH. The presence of HA or FA promotes the adsorption of Cu(II) on Mg2Al-LDH at low pH values, while reduces the adsorption of Cu(II) at high pH values. The adsorption isotherms of Cu(II) on Mg2Al-LDH at three different temperatures were simulated by the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevitch (D-R) models very well. The thermodynamic parameters were determined from the temperature-dependent adsorption, and the results showed that Cu(II) adsorption on Mg2Al-LDH was exothermic and the process was favored at high temperature. The results suggest that Mg2Al-LDH is suitable as a sorbent material for the recovery and attenuation of Cu(II)-polluted wastewater.

  16. Cold trap dehydration in the Tropical Tropopause Layer characterised by SOWER chilled-mirror hygrometer network data in the Tropical Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hasebe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A network of balloon-borne radiosonde observations employing chilled-mirror hygrometers for water and electrochemical concentration cells for ozone has been operated since the late 1990s in the Tropical Pacific to capture the evolution of dehydration of air parcels advected quasi-horizontally in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL. The analysis of this dataset is made on isentropes taking advantage of the conservative properties of tracers moving adiabatically. The existence of ice particles is diagnosed by lidars simultaneously operated with sonde flights. Characteristics of the TTL dehydration are presented on the basis of individual soundings and statistical features. Supersaturations close to 80% in relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice have been observed in subvisible cirrus clouds located near the cold point tropopause at extremely low temperatures around 180 K. Although further observational evidence is needed to confirm the credibility of such high values of RHice, the evolution of TTL dehydration is evident from the data in isentropic scatter plots between the sonde-observed mixing ratio (OMR and the minimum saturation mixing ratio (SMRmin along the back trajectories associated with the observed air mass. Supersaturation exceeding the critical value of homogeneous ice nucleation (OMR > 1.6 × SMRmin is frequently observed on the 360 and 365 K surfaces indicating that cold trap dehydration is in progress in the TTL. The near correspondence between the two (OMR ~ SMRmin at 380 K on the other hand implies that this surface is not sufficiently cold for the advected air parcels to be dehydrated. Above 380 K, cold trap dehydration would scarcely function while some moistening occurs before the air parcels reach the lowermost stratosphere at around 400 K where OMR is generally smaller than SMRmin.

  17. Environmental Stability and Oxidation Behavior of HfO2-Si and YbGd(O) Based Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Farmer, Serene; McCue, Terry R.; Harder, Bryan; Hurst, Janet B.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft propulsion systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, improve component durability, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced EBC systems for SiCSiC CMC turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant material development challenges for the high temperature CMC components is to develop prime-reliant, environmental durable environmental barrier coating systems. In this paper, the durability and performance of advanced Electron Beam-Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD) NASA HfO2-Si and YbGdSi(O) EBC bond coat top coat systems for SiCSiC CMC have been summarized. The high temperature thermomechanical creep, fatigue and oxidation resistance have been investigated in the laboratory simulated high-heat-flux environmental test conditions. The advanced NASA EBC systems showed promise to achieve 1500C temperature capability, helping enable next generation turbine engines with significantly improved engine component temperature capability and durability.

  18. Investigation of Symphytum cordatum alkaloids by liquid-liquid partitioning, thin-layer chromatography and liquid chromatography-ion-trap mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mroczek, Tomasz [Department of Pharmacognosy with Medicinal Plants Laboratory, Medical University, 1 Chodzki St., 20-093 Lublin (Poland)]. E-mail: tmroczek@pharmacognosy.org; Ndjoko-Ioset, Karine [Laboratoire de Pharmacognosie et Phytochimie, Ecole de Pharmacie Geneve-Lausanne, Universite de Geneve, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 30, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Glowniak, Kazimierz [Department of Pharmacognosy with Medicinal Plants Laboratory, Medical University, 1 Chodzki St., 20-093 Lublin (Poland); Mietkiewicz-Capala, Agnieszka [Department of Pharmacognosy with Medicinal Plants Laboratory, Medical University, 1 Chodzki St., 20-093 Lublin (Poland); Hostettmann, Kurt [Laboratoire de Pharmacognosie et Phytochimie, Ecole de Pharmacie Geneve-Lausanne, Universite de Geneve, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 30, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2006-05-04

    From the alkalised crude extract of Symphytum cordatum (L.) W.K. roots, pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) were extracted as free tertiary bases and polar N-oxides in a merely one-step liquid-liquid partitioning (LLP) in separation funnel and subsequently pre-fractionated by preparative multiple-development (MD) thin-layer chromatography (TLC) on silica gel plates. In this way three alkaloid fractions of different polarities and retention on silica gel plates were obtained as: the most polar N-oxides of the highest retention, the tertiary bases of medium retention, and diesterified N-oxides of the lowest retention. The former fraction was reduced into free bases by sodium hydrosulfite and purified by LLP on Extrelut-NT3 cartridge. It was further analysed together with the two other fractions by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-ion-trap mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) interface on XTerra C{sub 18} column using a gradient elution. Based on MS {sup n} spectra, 18 various alkaloids have been tentatively determined for the first time in this plant as the following types of structure: echimidine-N-oxide (three diasteroisomers), 7-sarracinyl-9-viridiflorylretronecine (two diasteroisomers), echimidine (two diasteroisomers), lycopsamine (two diasteroisomers), dihydroechinatine-N-oxide, dihydroheliospathuline-N-oxide, lycopsamine-N-oxide (three diasteroisomers), 7-acetyllycopsamine-N-oxide, symphytine-N-oxide (two diasteroisomers) and 2'',3''-epoxyechiumine-N-oxide.

  19. Production of HfO2 thin films using different methods:chemical bath deposition, SILAR and sol-gel process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    İ.A.Kariper

    2014-01-01

    Hafnium oxide thin films (HOTFs) were successfully deposited onto amorphous glasses using chemical bath deposition, succes-sive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR), and sol-gel methods. The same reactive precursors were used for all of the methods, and all of the films were annealed at 300°C in an oven (ambient conditions). After this step, the optical and structural properties of the films pro-duced by using the three different methods were compared. The structures of the films were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The opti-cal properties are investigated using the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopic technique. The film thickness was measured via atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the tapping mode. The surface properties and elemental ratios of the films were investigated and measured by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The lowest transmittance and the highest reflectance values were observed for the films produced using the SILAR method. In addition, the most intense characteristic XRD peak was observed in the diffraction pattern of the film produced using the SILAR method, and the greatest thickness and average grain size were calculated for the film produced using the SILAR method. The films produced using SILAR method contained fewer cracks than those produced using the other methods. In conclusion, the SILAR method was observed to be the best method for the production of HOTFs.

  20. Growth of laser-induced damage during repetitive illumination of HfO2-SiO2 multilayer mirror and polarizer coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genin, F.Y.; Stolz, C.J.; Kozlowski, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    As peak fluence of high power lasers is increased, it becomes necessary to tolerate damage on mirrors, polarizers. To study how different types of damage morphologies initiate and grow during repetitive illumination, hafnia-silica multilayer mirror and polarizer coatings were laser damage tested. The coatings were prepared by e-beam evaporation and irradiated with a 3-ns pulse at 1064 nm. The damage morphology was recorded after each shot to determine the types of damage that cause massive unstable failure and lower the optic`s functional damage threshold. Results were summarized on damage stability maps plotting the average damage size vs number of shots for fluences ranging from 10 to 40 J/cm{sup 2}. The maps indicate that the commonly observed damage morphologies (pits, flat bottom pits, scalds, outer layer delamination) have distinct growth behaviors and influence the value of the functional damage threshold differently. While pits are stable up to fluences as high as 40 J/cm{sup 2}, flat bottom pits can grow during repetitive illumination above a critical fluence of about 35 J/cm{sup 2}. Scalds are formed in the first shot and never grow at fluences below 40 J/cm{sup 2}. Finally, delaminates are highly unstable and have the potential for damaging the coating catastrophically above 15 J/cm{sup 2}. Results show that delaminate damage should be prevented; this knowledge has allowed coatings development efforts to focus on eliminating the origin of such damage morphology.

  1. Carriers recombination processes in charge trapping memory cell by simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Yun-Cheng; Liu Xiao-Yan; Du Gang; Kang Jin-Feng; Han Ru-Qi

    2008-01-01

    We have evaluated the effects of recombination processes in a charge storage layer, either between trapped electrons and trapped holes or between trapped carriers and free carriers, on charge trapping memory cell's performances by numerical simulation. Recombination is an indispensable mechanism in charge trapping memory. It helps charge convert process between negative and positive charges in the charge storage layer during charge trapping memory programming/erasing operation. It can affect the speed of programming and erasing operations.

  2. Structural, electrical, band alignment and charge trapping analysis of nitrogen-annealed Pt/HfO2/p-Si (100) MIS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Mondal, Sandip; Rao, K. S. R. Koteswara

    2016-12-01

    Low leakage current density and high relative permittivity (dielectric constant) are the key factor in order to replace the SiO2 from Si-based technology toward its further downscaling. HfO2 thin films received significant attention due to its excellent optoelectronic properties. In this work, ultra-thin (17 nm) HfO2 films on Si substrate are fabricated by RF sputtering. As deposited films are amorphous in nature and in order to get the reasonable high dielectric constant, the films are annealed (700 °C, 30 min) in nitrogen environment. A high refractive index (2.08) and small grain size ( 10) nm were extracted from ellipsometry and XRD, respectively. The AFM study revealed a small RMS surface roughness 9 Å. For electrical characterization, films are integrated in metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors structure. The oxide capacitance ( C ox), flat band capacitance ( C FB), flat band voltage ( V FB), and oxide-trapped charges ( Q ot) calculated from high-frequency (1 MHz) C- V curve are 490, 241 pF, 1.21 V and 1.8 × 1012 cm-2, respectively. The dielectric constant calculated from accumulation capacitance is 17. The films show a low leakage current density 6.8 × 10-9 A/cm2 at +1 V, and this is due to the reduction in oxygen vacancies concentration as we performed annealing in N2 environment. The band gap of the films is estimated from O 1 s loss spectra and found 5.7 eV. The electron affinity ( χ) and HfO2/Si barrier height (conduction band offset) extracted from UPS spectra are 1.88 and 2.17 eV, respectively. A trap state with 0.99 eV activation energy below the conduction band edge is found and assigned to the fourfold coordinated oxygen vacancy in m-HfO2.

  3. Characteristics and optimization of 4H-SiC MESFET with a novel p-type spacer layer incorporated with a field-plate structure based on improved trap models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Kun; Chai Changchun; Yang Yintang; Jia Hujun; Zhang Xianjun; Chen Bin

    2011-01-01

    A novel structure of 4H-SiC MESFETs is proposed that focuses on surface trap suppression.Characteristics of the device have been investigated based on physical models for material properties and improved trap models.By comparing with the performance of the well-utilized buried-gate incorporated with a field-plate (BG-FP) structure,it is shown that the proposed structure improves device properties in comprehensive aspects.A p-type spacer layer introduced in the channel layer suppresses the surface trap effect and reduces the gate-drain capacitance (Cgd) under a large drain voltage.A p-type spacer layer incorporated with a field-plate improves the electric field distribution on the gate edge while the spacer layer induces less Cgd than a conventional FP.For microwave applications,4H-SiC MESFET for the proposed structure has a larger gate-lag ratio in the saturation region due to better surface trap isolation from the conductive channel.For high power applications,the proposed structure is able to endure higher operating voltage as well.The maximum saturation current density of 460 mA/mm is yielded.Also,the gate-lag ratio under a drain voltage of 20 V is close to 90%.In addition,5% and 17.8% improvements in fT and fmax are obtained compared with a BG-FP MESFET in AC simulation,respectively.Parameters and dimensions of the proposed structure are optimized to make the best of the device for microwave applications and to provide a reference for device design.

  4. Characteristics and optimization of 4H-SiC MESFET with a novel p-type spacer layer incorporated with a field-plate structure based on improved trap models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Kun; Chai Changchun; Yang Yintang; Jia Hujun; Zhang Xianjun; Chen Bin, E-mail: sk88205853@sina.com [Key Laboratory of Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices of the Ministry of Education, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2011-07-15

    A novel structure of 4H-SiC MESFETs is proposed that focuses on surface trap suppression. Characteristics of the device have been investigated based on physical models for material properties and improved trap models. By comparing with the performance of the well-utilized buried-gate incorporated with a field-plate (BG-FP) structure, it is shown that the proposed structure improves device properties in comprehensive aspects. A p-type spacer layer introduced in the channel layer suppresses the surface trap effect and reduces the gate-drain capacitance (C{sub gd}) under a large drain voltage. A p-type spacer layer incorporated with a field-plate improves the electric field distribution on the gate edge while the spacer layer induces less C{sub gd} than a conventional FP. For microwave applications, 4H-SiC MESFET for the proposed structure has a larger gate-lag ratio in the saturation region due to better surface trap isolation from the conductive channel. For high power applications, the proposed structure is able to endure higher operating voltage as well. The maximum saturation current density of 460 mA/mm is yielded. Also, the gate-lag ratio under a drain voltage of 20 V is close to 90%. In addition, 5% and 17.8% improvements in f{sub T} and f{sub max} are obtained compared with a BG-FP MESFET in AC simulation, respectively. Parameters and dimensions of the proposed structure are optimized to make the best of the device for microwave applications and to provide a reference for device design. (semiconductor devices)

  5. Si掺杂HfO2薄膜的铁电和反铁电性质%Ferro electric and antiferro electric prop erties of Si-dop ed HfO2 thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周大雨; 徐进; Johannes Müller; Uwe Schröder

    2014-01-01

    通过改变Si掺杂量制备出了具有显著铁电和反铁电特征的HfO2纳米薄膜,对其电滞回线、电容-电压和漏电流-电压特性以及物相温度稳定性进行了对比研究。反铁电薄膜的介电系数大于铁电薄膜,在电场加载和减载过程中发生的可逆反铁电-铁电相变导致了双电滞回线的出现,在室温至185◦C的测试温度范围内未出现反铁电→顺电相变。在电流-电压特性测量时观察到的负微分电阻效应归因于极化弛豫等慢响应机理的贡献。%Ferroelectric and antiferroelectric HfO2 nano-films were prepared by changing silicon doping concentration, and their basic properties were compared in terms of polarization hysteresis, capacitance-voltage and leakage-voltage behavior, as well as the effect of temperature on phase stability. Antiferroelectric thin film exhibits a higher dielectric constant than the ferroelectric film, and is characterized by the double polarization hysteresis loops due to reversible antiferroelectric-ferroelectric phase transition induced during loading and unloading processes of electric field. No antiferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition is observed at measuring temperatures up to 185 ◦C. The negative differential resistivity effect observed in leakage measurements is attributed to the contributions from slow response mechanisms like polarization relaxation.

  6. Improving Performance via Blocking Layers in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on Nanowire Photoanodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luping; Xu, Cheng; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Shikai; Ziegler, Kirk J

    2015-06-17

    Electron recombination in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) results in significant electron loss and performance degradation. However, the reduction of electron recombination via blocking layers in nanowire-based DSSCs has rarely been investigated. In this study, HfO2 or TiO2 blocking layers are deposited on nanowire surfaces via atomic layer deposition (ALD) to reduce electron recombination in nanowire-based DSSCs. The control cell consisting of ITO nanowires coated with a porous shell of TiO2 by TiCl4 treatment yields an efficiency of 2.82%. The efficiency increases dramatically to 5.38% upon the insertion of a 1.3 nm TiO2 compact layer between the nanowire surface and porous TiO2 shell. This efficiency enhancement implies that porous sol-gel coatings on nanowires (e.g., via TiCl4 treatment) result in significant electron recombination in nanowire-based DSSCs, while compact coatings formed by ALD are more advantageous because of their ability to act as a blocking layer. By comparing nanowire-based DSSCs with their nanoparticle-based counterparts, we find that the nanowire-based DSSCs suffer more severe electron recombination from ITO due to the much higher surface area exposed to the electrolyte. While the insertion of a high band gap compact layer of HfO2 between the interface of the conductive nanowire and TiO2 shell improves performance, a comparison of the cell performance between TiO2 and HfO2 compact layers indicates that charge collection is suppressed by the difference in energy states. Consequently, the use of high band gap materials at the interface of conductive nanowires and TiO2 is not recommended.

  7. Comparative band alignment of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics on gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jialing; Eller, Brianna S.; Zhu, Chiyu; England, Chris; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2012-09-01

    Al2O3 films, HfO2 films, and HfO2/Al2O3 stacked structures were deposited on n-type, Ga-face, GaN wafers using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). The wafers were first treated with a wet-chemical clean to remove organics and an in-situ combined H2/N2 plasma at 650 °C to remove residual carbon contamination, resulting in a clean, oxygen-terminated surface. This cleaning process produced slightly upward band bending of 0.1 eV. Additional 650 °C annealing after plasma cleaning increased the upward band bending by 0.2 eV. After the initial clean, high-k oxide films were deposited using oxygen PEALD at 140 °C. The valence band and conduction band offsets (VBOs and CBOs) of the Al2O3/GaN and HfO2/GaN structures were deduced from in-situ x-ray and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS and UPS). The valence band offsets were determined to be 1.8 and 1.4 eV, while the deduced conduction band offsets were 1.3 and 1.0 eV, respectively. These values are compared with the theoretical calculations based on the electron affinity model and charge neutrality level model. Moreover, subsequent annealing had little effect on these offsets; however, the GaN band bending did change depending on the annealing and processing. An Al2O3 layer was investigated as an interfacial passivation layer (IPL), which, as results suggest, may lead to improved stability, performance, and reliability of HfO2/IPL/GaN structures. The VBOs were ˜0.1 and 1.3 eV, while the deduced CBOs were 0.6 and 1.1 eV for HfO2 with respect to Al2O3 and GaN, respectively.

  8. 不同基底上HfO2/SiO2多层膜的力学性能%Mechanical Properties of HfO2/SiO2 Thin Films on Different Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王河; 贺洪波; 张伟丽

    2013-01-01

    The HfO2/SiO2 films are deposited on K9 glass and Y3Al5O12 (YAG) crystal substrates by electron beam technology respectively.Nano-scratch tests are taken to investigate the mechanical properties of films respectively.The results show that the modulus of the films deposited on K9 and YAG are 34.8 GPa and 38.5 GPa respectively and the substrates have few effect on the elasticity modulus of the films.The adhesive force of the film is 7 mN on K9 substrate and 5 mN on YAG,and they present different failure modes.This can be attributed to the weak adhesion and large divergence of modulus between film and YAG crystal.The chemical binding state and elasticity modulus between the film and the substrate are taken to explain the different mechanical behaviors of the films on YAG and K9 substrates.%用电子束蒸发技术在K9玻璃及YAG晶体上沉积了HfO2/SiO2多层膜,采用纳米划痕仪对薄膜的力学性能进行了研究.实验结果表明:沉积在YAG和K9的多层膜弹性模量分别为34.8 GPa和38.5 GPa,基底对薄膜的弹性模量影响较小;YAG和K9上薄膜的粘附失效临界附着力分别为5 mN和7 mN,薄膜与YAG基底的结合状态较K9基底的差,并且呈现不同破坏模式.从薄膜之间及膜基界面处的界面结合状态和弹性模量两方面分析解释了YAG基底和K9基底上薄膜的不同力学行为.

  9. Analysis of carrier transport and carrier trapping in organic diodes with polyimide-6,13-Bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene double-layer by charge modulation spectroscopy and optical second harmonic generation measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Eunju, E-mail: elim@dankook.ac.kr, E-mail: taguchi.d.aa@m.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: iwamoto@pe.titech.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Institute of Nanosensor and Biotechnology, Dankook University, Jukjeon-dong, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Taguchi, Dai, E-mail: elim@dankook.ac.kr, E-mail: taguchi.d.aa@m.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: iwamoto@pe.titech.ac.jp; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa, E-mail: elim@dankook.ac.kr, E-mail: taguchi.d.aa@m.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: iwamoto@pe.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2014-08-18

    We studied the carrier transport and carrier trapping in indium tin oxide/polyimide (PI)/6,13-Bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene)/Au diodes by using charge modulation spectroscopy (CMS) and time-resolved electric field induced optical second harmonic generation (TR-EFISHG) measurements. TR-EFISHG directly probes the spatial carrier behaviors in the diodes, and CMS is useful in explaining the carrier motion with respect to energy. The results clearly indicate that the injected carriers move across TIPS-pentacene thorough the molecular energy states of TIPS-pentacene and accumulate at the PI/TIPS-pentacene interface. However, some carriers are trapped in the PI layers. These findings take into account the capacitance-voltage and current-voltage characteristics of the diodes.

  10. H fO 2铁电相与四方相转变关系的第一性原理研究%First principle study of the transformation relationship between HfO2 ferroelectric and tetragonal phases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶飞; 肖海珠; 周大雨

    2014-01-01

    The Pca21 orthogonal phase with ferroelectric property and P42/nmc tetragonal phase of HfO2 have been studied using the augmented plane wave within density functional theory in this work.It has been found out that in the case of the crystal structures,both the ferroelectric phase and the tetragonal phase can be regar-ded as fluorite-related structure,and the deformation of the unit cells during transformation from the tetragonal phase to the ferroelectric phase was less than 3.75%;in the case of the electronic structures,the hybridization of Hf 5d and O 2p,2s was enhanced by the transformation from the tetragonal phase to the ferroelectric phase, and the electron states shift to lower energy,which lead to a lower lattice energy of the ferroelectric phase. These results have confirmed that the Pca21 orthogonal phase with ferroelectric property was a stable phase, and provided further insight into the transformation relationship between the ferroelectric phase and the tetra-gonal phase.%基于密度泛函理论的缀加平面波方法计算了 HfO2的正交相 Pca21和四方相 P42/nmc,其中正交相具有铁电性质。计算结果表明,在晶体结构方面, HfO2正交相和四方相都具有类萤石结构特征,并且从四方相P42/nmc到正交相Pca21的转变过程中单胞变形<3.75%;在电子结构方面,通过四方相到正交相的结构转变,Hf的5d和O 的2p、2s的杂化效应增强,同时这些电子态向低能移动,使正交相的相对能量低于四方相。这些研究结果证实了 HfO2具有铁电性质的 Pca21正交相是一种稳定的相结构,并解释了从P42/nmc四方相到Pca21正交相的转变关系。

  11. Trapped antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, E.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kemp, S. L.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif el Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ˜1 T (˜0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be `born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released—the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  12. Oxide-based materials by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewski, Marek; Pietruszka, Rafał; Kaszewski, Jarosław; Witkowski, Bartłomiej S.; Gierałtowska, Sylwia; Wachnicki, Łukasz; Godlewski, Michał M.; Slonska, Anna; Gajewski, Zdzisław

    2017-02-01

    Thin films of wide band-gap oxides grown by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) are suitable for a range of applications. Some of these applications will be presented. First of all, ALD-grown high-k HfO2 is used as a gate oxide in the electronic devices. Moreover, ALD-grown oxides can be used in memory devices, in transparent transistors, or as elements of solar cells. Regarding photovoltaics (PV), ALD-grown thin films of Al2O3 are already used as anti-reflection layers. In addition, thin films of ZnO are tested as replacement of ITO in PV devices. New applications in organic photovoltaics, electronics and optoelectronics are also demonstrated Considering new applications, the same layers, as used in electronics, can also find applications in biology, medicine and in a food industry. This is because layers of high-k oxides show antibacterial activity, as discussed in this work.

  13. A thermodynamic model for the solubility of HfO2(am) in the aqueous K +– HCO3-– CO32-–O-–H2O system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Kitamura, Akira; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2017-01-01

    Solubility of HfO2(am) was determined as a function of KHCO3 concentrations ranging from 0.001 mol·kg-1 to 0.1 mol·kg-1. The solubility of HfO2(am) increased dramatically with the increase in KHCO3 concentrations, indicating that Hf(IV) makes strong complexes with carbonate. Thermodynamic equilibrium constants for the formation of Hf-carbonate complexes were determined using both the Pitzer and SIT models. The dramatic increase in Hf concentrations with the increase in KHCO3 concentrations can best be described by the formation of Hf(OH-)2(CO3)22- and Hf(CO3)56-. The log10 K0 values for the reactions [Hf4++2CO32-+2OH-⇌Hf(OH)2(CO3)22-] and [Hf4++5CO32-⇌Hf(CO3)56-], based on the SIT model, were determined to be 44.53±0.46 and 41.53±0.46, respectively, and based on the Pitzer model they were 44.56±0.48 and 40.20±0.48, respectively.

  14. Remarkable charge-trapping performance based in Zr0.5Hf0.5O2 with nanocrystal Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 blocking layer for nonvolatile memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. B.; Jia, X. L.; Yang, T.; Zhao, J. H.; Li, Y. C.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Zhang, Y. Y.

    2016-10-01

    Two kinds of charge trapping memory device with Au/Zr0.5Hf0.5O2(ZHO)/SiO2/p-Si and Au/Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3(BST)/Zr0.5Hf0.5O2/SiO2/p-Si structure were fabricated and investigated. The double BST/ZHO films exhibit a larger memory window of 7.36 V under ±14 V sweeping voltages in its C-V curve and the device has good charge retention properties with only small charge loss of ∼ 5% after more than 104 s. The good characteristics are attributed to the inter-diffusion between BST and ZHO where more deep defect sites were created after RTA treatment, which provides high potential barriers for the trapped charges to tunnel back to the silicon substrate. Furthermore, the nanocrystal in the BST layer increases the tunneling barrier of tunneling current into the gate and effectively restrains the leakage of storage charge from blocking layer, which improves the charge retention characteristic.

  15. (Invited) Atomic Layer Deposition for Novel Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tétreault, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Herein we present the latest fabrication and characterization techniques for atomic layer deposition of Al 2O 3, ZnO, SnO 2, Nb 2O 5, HfO 2, Ga 2O 3 and TiO 2 for research on dye-sensitized solar cell. In particular, we review the fabrication of state-of-the-art 3D host-passivation-guest photoanodes and ZnO nanowires as well as characterize the deposited thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray diffraction, Hall effect, J-V curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. ©The Electrochemical Society.

  16. ANTIREFLECTION MULTILAYER COATINGS WITH THIN METAL LAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    L. A. Gubanova

    2016-01-01

    The design of anti-reflective coatings for metal surfaces of Al, Ti, N,i Cr is proposed. The coatings have the form of alternating layers of dielectric/metal/dielectric with the number of cells up to15. The method of calculation of such coatings is proposed. We have calculated the coatings of the type [HfO2/Cr/HfO2]15, [ZrO2/Ti/Al2O3]15, [ZrO2/Cr/ZrO2]15. It is shown that the proposed interference coatings provide reduction of the residual reflectance of the metal several times (from 3.5 to 6...

  17. ANTIREFLECTION MULTILAYER COATINGS WITH THIN METAL LAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Gubanova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The design of anti-reflective coatings for metal surfaces of Al, Ti, N,i Cr is proposed. The coatings have the form of alternating layers of dielectric/metal/dielectric with the number of cells up to15. The method of calculation of such coatings is proposed. We have calculated the coatings of the type [HfO2/Cr/HfO2]15, [ZrO2/Ti/Al2O3]15, [ZrO2/Cr/ZrO2]15. It is shown that the proposed interference coatings provide reduction of the residual reflectance of the metal several times (from 3.5 to 6.0 in a wide spectral range (300-1000 nm. The proposed coatings can be recommended as anti-reflective coatings for energy saving solar systems and batteries, and photovoltaic cells.

  18. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, E; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kemp, S L; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ∼1 T (∼0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be ‘born’ inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been ...

  19. Detection of Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Hydomako, Richard Allan

    The ALPHA experiment is an international effort to produce, trap, and perform precision spectroscopic measurements on antihydrogen (the bound state of a positron and an antiproton). Based at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility at CERN, the ALPHA experiment has recently magnetically confined antihydrogen atoms for the first time. A crucial element in the observation of trapped antihydrogen is ALPHA’s silicon vertexing detector. This detector contains sixty silicon modules arranged in three concentric layers, and is able to determine the three-dimensional location of the annihilation of an antihydrogen atom by reconstructing the trajectories of the produced annihilation products. This dissertation focuses mainly on the methods used to reconstruct the annihilation location. Specifically, the software algorithms used to identify and extrapolate charged particle tracks are presented along with the routines used to estimate the annihilation location from the convergence of the identified tracks. It is shown...

  20. Atomic Layer Deposition of SnO2 on MXene for Li-Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2017-02-24

    In this report, we show that oxide battery anodes can be grown on two-dimensional titanium carbide sheets (MXenes) by atomic layer deposition. Using this approach, we have fabricated a composite SnO2/MXene anode for Li-ion battery applications. The SnO2/MXene anode exploits the high Li-ion capacity offered by SnO2, while maintaining the structural and mechanical integrity by the conductive MXene platform. The atomic layer deposition (ALD) conditions used to deposit SnO2 on MXene terminated with oxygen, fluorine, and hydroxyl-groups were found to be critical for preventing MXene degradation during ALD. We demonstrate that SnO2/MXene electrodes exhibit excellent electrochemical performance as Li-ion battery anodes, where conductive MXene sheets act to buffer the volume changes associated with lithiation and delithiation of SnO2. The cyclic performance of the anodes is further improved by depositing a very thin passivation layer of HfO2, in the same ALD reactor, on the SnO2/MXene anode. This is shown by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy to also improve the structural integrity of SnO2 anode during cycling. The HfO2 coated SnO2/MXene electrodes demonstrate a stable specific capacity of 843 mAh/g when used as Li-ion battery anodes.

  1. VACUUM TRAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  2. Formation of He-Rich Layers Observed by Neutron Reflectometry in the He-Ion-Irradiated Cr/W Multilayers: Effects of Cr/W Interfaces on the He-Trapping Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feida; Tang, Xiaobin; Huang, Hai; Li, Xinxi; Wang, Yan; Huang, Chaoqiang; Liu, Jian; Li, Huan; Chen, Da

    2016-09-21

    Cr/W multilayer nanocomposites were presented in the paper as potential candidate materials for the plasma facing components in fusion reactors. We used neutron reflectometry to measure the depth profile of helium in the multienergy He ions irradiated [Cr/W (50 nm)]3 multilayers. Results showed that He-rich layers with low neutron scattering potential energy form at the Cr/W interfaces, which is in great agreement with previous modeling results of other multilayers. This phenomenon provided a strong evidence for the He trapping effects of Cr/W interfaces and implied the possibility of using the Cr/W multilayer nanocomposites as great He-tolerant plasma facing materials.

  3. First results on determination of chlorophill A and its derivatives in the system of trapped sedimentary material-fluffy layer-bottom sediment of the Caspian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchishina, M. D.; Lisitzin, A. P.; Lein, A. Yu.; Lukashin, V. N.; Novigatsky, A. N.; Klyuvitkin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The first data were obtained on the vertical chlorin flux in the water column and its accumulation in the upper layer of sediments of the Caspian Sea. Seasonal variability of the chlorine concentration in sedimentary matter was evaluated. The tendency of decrease in the phytoplankton-synthesized (allochtonous) organic matter content was revealed over approximately the past 60 years.

  4. Buffer layer investigations on MFIS capacitors consisting of ferroelectric poly[vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, K.; Seime, B.; Paloumpa, I.; Müller, K.; Schmeißer, D.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we present capacitance-voltage (CV) measurements on metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) capacitors with poly[vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene] (P[VDF/TrFE] as ferroelectric layer and SiO2, Al2O3 and HfO2 as buffering insulator layer. In order to discuss our data in a quantitative manner we perform fits to the data based on a model proposed by Miller and McWorther. The improvement of the polarization values and subsequently its effect on the hysteresis of the CV curve by the successive shrinking of the buffer layer thickness and the following choice of a high-k buffer material is demonstrated. Our data underline that a saturated polarization of P[VDF/TrFE] cannot be controlled with a SiO2 buffer layer and the insertion of a high-k buffer layer is essential for further improvements of the characteristics of MFIS stacks.

  5. Trapped phonons

    CERN Document Server

    Mannarelli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the effect of restricted geometries on the contribution of Nambu-Goldstone bosons (phonons) to the shear viscosity, $\\eta$, of a superfluid. For illustrative purpose we examine a simplified system consisting of a circular boundary of radius $R$, confining a two-dimensional rarefied gas of phonons. Considering the Maxwell-type conditions, we show that phonons that are not in equilibrium with the boundary and that are not specularly reflected exert a shear stress on the boundary. In this case it is possible to define an effective (ballistic) shear viscosity coefficient $\\eta \\propto \\rho_{\\rm ph} \\chi R$, where $\\rho_{\\rm ph}$ is the density of phonons and $\\chi$ is a parameter which characterizes the type of scattering at the boundary. For an optically trapped superfluid our results corroborate the findings of Refs. \\cite{Mannarelli:2012su, Mannarelli:2012eg}, which imply that at very low temperature the shear viscosity correlates with the size of the optical trap and decreases with decreasing tempe...

  6. Active layer-incorporated, spectrally tuned Au/SiO2 core/shell nanorod-based light trapping for organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Vladan; Yang, Yang Michael; You, Jingbi; Dou, Letian; Liu, Yongsheng; Cheung, Puilam; Chang, Jane P; Yang, Yang

    2013-05-28

    We demonstrate that incorporation of octadecyltrimethoxysilane (OTMS)-functionalized, spectrally tuned, gold/silica (Au/SiO2) core/shell nanospheres and nanorods into the active layer of an organic photovoltaic (OPV) device led to an increase in photoconversion efficiency (PCE). A silica shell layer was added onto Au core nanospheres and nanorods in order to provide an electrically insulating surface that does not interfere with carrier generation and transport inside the active layer. Functionalization of the Au/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles with the OTMS organic ligand was then necessary to transfer the Au/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles from an ethanol solution into an OPV polymer-compatible solvent, such as dichlorobenzene. The OTMS-functionalized Au/SiO2 core/shell nanorods and nanospheres were then incorporated into the active layers of two OPV polymer systems: a poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCB60M) OPV device and a poly[2,6-4,8-di(5-ethylhexylthienyl)benzo[1,2-b;3,4-b]dithiophene-alt-5-dibutyloctyl-3,6-bis(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4-dione] (PBDTT-DPP:PC60BM) OPV device. For the P3HT:PC60BM polymer with a band edge of ~700 nm, the addition of the core/shell nanorods with an aspect ratio (AR) of ~2.5 (extinction peak ~670 nm) resulted in a 7.1% improvement in PCE, while for the PBDTT-DPP:PC60BM polymer with a band edge of ~860 nm, the addition of core/shell nanorods with an AR of ~4 (extinction peak ~830 nm) resulted in a 14.4% improvement in PCE. The addition of Au/SiO2 core/shell nanospheres to the P3HT:PC60BM polymer resulted in a 2.7% improvement in PCE, while their addition to a PBDTT-DPP:PC60BM polymer resulted in a 9.1% improvement. The PCE and Jsc enhancements were consistent with external quantum efficiency (EQE) measurements, and the EQE enhancements spectrally matched the extinction spectra of Au/SiO2 nanospheres and nanorods in both OPV polymer systems.

  7. Annual Trapping Proposal 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Trapping Plan for the 1984-1985 trapping season at Clarence Cannon NWR outlines rules and regulations for the trapping of beaver and muskrat on the...

  8. Trapping of hydrogen in hafnium-based high kappa dielectric thin films for advanced CMOS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukirde, Vaishali

    In recent years, advanced high kappa gate dielectrics are under serious consideration to replace SiO2 and SiON in semiconductor industry. Hafnium-based dielectrics such as hafnium oxides, oxynitrides and Hf-based silicates/nitrided silicates are emerging as some of the most promising alternatives to SiO2/SiON gate dielectrics in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices. Extensive efforts have been taken to understand the effects of hydrogen impurities in semiconductors and its behavior such as incorporation, diffusion, trapping and release with the aim of controlling and using it to optimize the performance of electronic device structures. In this dissertation, a systematic study of hydrogen trapping and the role of carbon impurities in various alternate gate dielectric candidates, HfO2/Si, HfxSi1-xO2/Si, HfON/Si and HfON(C)/Si is presented. It has been shown that processing of high kappa dielectrics may lead to some crystallization issues. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) for measuring oxygen deficiencies, elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) for quantifying hydrogen and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) for quantifying carbon, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for measuring degree of crystallinity and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize these thin dielectric materials. ERDA data are used to characterize the evolution of hydrogen during annealing in hydrogen ambient in combination with preprocessing in oxygen and nitrogen.

  9. Intrinsic and extrinsic pinning in NdFeAs(O,F): vortex trapping and lock-in by the layered structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantini, C.; Iida, K.; Hänisch, J.; Kurth, F.; Jaroszynski, J.; Sumiya, N.; Chihara, M.; Hatano, T.; Ikuta, H.; Schmidt, S.; Seidel, P.; Holzapfel, B.; Larbalestier, D. C.

    2016-10-01

    Fe-based superconductors (FBS) present a large variety of compounds whose properties are affected to different extents by their crystal structures. Amongst them, the REFeAs(O,F) (RE1111, RE being a rare-earth element) is the family with the highest critical temperature Tc but also with a large anisotropy and Josephson vortices as demonstrated in the flux-flow regime in Sm1111 (Tc ∼ 55 K). Here we focus on the pinning properties of the lower-Tc Nd1111 in the flux-creep regime. We demonstrate that for H//c critical current density Jc at high temperatures is dominated by point-defect pinning centres, whereas at low temperatures surface pinning by planar defects parallel to the c-axis and vortex shearing prevail. When the field approaches the ab-planes, two different regimes are observed at low temperatures as a consequence of the transition between 3D Abrikosov and 2D Josephson vortices: one is determined by the formation of a vortex-staircase structure and one by lock-in of vortices parallel to the layers. This is the first study on FBS showing this behaviour in the full temperature, field, and angular range and demonstrating that, despite the lower Tc and anisotropy of Nd1111 with respect to Sm1111, this compound is substantially affected by intrinsic pinning generating a strong ab-peak in Jc.

  10. Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    trap quantum computer . This architecture has two separate layers of scalability: the first is to increase the number of ion qubits in a single trap...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 02-06-2016 1-Aug-2010 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer The views...P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Ion trap quantum computation , scalable modular architectures REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  11. Gate-Defined Quantum Devices Realized in InGaAs/InP by Incorporating a High-κ Layer as Gate Dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Larsson, Marcus; Xu, H. Q.

    2011-12-01

    Single and double quantum dot devices are realized in InGaAs/InP heterostructures by top gating technology with incorporated High-κ HfO2 gate dielectric layers. At 300 mK, Coulomb blockade effects are observed in as-fabricated devices, and the charge states can be measured by the integrated quantum point contacts. The developed technology should stimulate the research on quantum devices made from materials to which the gating technology is often difficult to apply due to low Schottky barrier height.

  12. Analysis of the electroluminescence features of silicon metal-insulator-semiconductor structures as a tool for diagnostics of the injection properties of a dielectric layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illarionov, Yu. Yu.; Vexler, M. I.; Isakov, D.; Fedorov, V. V.; Sing, Yew Kwang

    2013-10-01

    A technique for diagnostics of the injection properties of thin dielectric layers based on analysis of the data on silicon electroluminescence in a metal-insulator-semiconductor structure is proposed. The possibility of applying this technique to control the electron injection energy (in particular, when the barrier parameters are poorly known) is demonstrated by the example of samples with CaF2 and HfO2/SiO2. The results obtained are important for application of the insulators under study in microelectronic devices.

  13. Shrew trap efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gambalemoke, Mbalitini; Mukinzi, Itoka; Amundala, Drazo

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of four trap types (pitfall, Sherman LFA, Victor snap and Museum Special snap traps) to capture shrews. This experiment was conducted in five inter-riverine forest blocks in the region of Kisangani. The total trapping effort was 6,300, 9,240, 5,280 and 5,460 trap-ni...

  14. Thermal effects on the Raman phonon of few-layer phosphorene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Peng Ling

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional phosphorene is a promising channel material for next generation transistor applications due to its superior carrier transport property. Here, we report the influence of thermal effects on the Raman phonon of few-layer phosphorene formed on hafnium-dioxide (HfO2 high-k dielectric. When annealed at elevated temperatures (up to 200 °C, the phosphorene film was found to exhibit a blue shift in both the out-of-plane (A1g and in-plane (B2g and A2g phonon modes as a result of compressive strain effect. This is attributed to the out-diffusion of hafnium (Hf atoms from the underlying HfO2 dielectric, which compresses the phosphorene in both the zigzag and armchair directions. With a further increase in thermal energy beyond 250 °C, strain relaxation within phosphorene eventually took place. When this happens, the phosphorene was unable to retain its intrinsic crystallinity prior to annealing, as evident from the broadening of full-width at half maximum of the Raman phonon. These results provide an important insight into the impact of thermal effects on the structural integrity of phosphorene when integrated with high-k gate dielectric.

  15. Integration of atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics on GaSb via hydrogen plasma exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B. Ruppalt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter we report the efficacy of a hydrogen plasma pretreatment for integrating atomic layer deposited (ALD high-k dielectric stacks with device-quality p-type GaSb(001 epitaxial layers. Molecular beam eptiaxy-grown GaSb surfaces were subjected to a 30 minute H2/Ar plasma treatment and subsequently removed to air. High-k HfO2 and Al2O3/HfO2 bilayer insulating films were then deposited via ALD and samples were processed into standard metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS capacitors. The quality of the semiconductor/dielectric interface was probed by current-voltage and variable-frequency admittance measurements. Measurement results indicate that the H2-plamsa pretreatment leads to a low density of interface states nearly independent of the deposited dielectric material, suggesting that pre-deposition H2-plasma exposure, coupled with ALD of high-k dielectrics, may provide an effective means for achieving high-quality GaSb MOS structures for advanced Sb-based digital and analog electronics.

  16. Characterization, engineering, and reliability of nano-scale high-k dielectrics and semiconductors interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kang-Ill

    The continued scaling of silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices has lead to a need to replace the SiO2 gate insulator with high-k dielectric oxides, such as ZrO2 and HfO 2-based materials, to maintain a smaller leakage current without losing electrostatic gate control of the channel region. The main objectives of this dissertation are to understand the physical and electronic structure of the high-k/semiconductor interfaces, and based on that understanding, to develop new techniques that can modify or passivate the high-k /semiconductor interfaces for improved performance and reliability. First, we investigated chemical bonding structures and valence band alignments at the high-k (HfO2) and semiconductor (Si, Ge) interfaces using Synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy. We found that highly non-stoichiometric GeOx exists at the HfO2/Ge interface, while stoichiometric SiOx was analyzed at the HfO 2/Si interface. From the valence band spectra the valence band offsets between HfO2 and Si or Ge were determined. Second, we demonstrated that the Zr-silicate interfacial layer (IL) can be formed between ZrO2 and a Si substrate by controlling the solid state reaction between Zr and an underlying SiO2/Si substrate. Incorporation of the metal-silicate layer improved the electrical properties, and reduced the stack equivalent oxide thickness. We also determined changes in chemical bonding at the HfO2/Si interface and associated electrical properties after the SiO2 IL is gettered by a Ti metal overlayer. We found that the removal of a part of SiO2 IL by oxygen-gettering Ti electrodes may be a promising approach for engineering ultrathin EOT without provoking a significant increase in interface trap density. Finally, for the first time, we developed a new technique to incorporate fluorine in high-k stack (HfO2/SiO2), and discovered that the negative bias temperature instability problems, such as positive charge trapping, interface trap generation, and C

  17. Gibbs free energy assisted passivation layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Tansel, T.; Hostut, M.; Ergun, Y.; Aydinli, A.

    2016-05-01

    Reduction of surface leakage is a major challenge in most photodetectors that requires the elimination of surface oxides on etched mesas during passivation. Engineering the passivation requires close attention to chemical reactions that take place at the interface during the process. In particular, removal of surface oxides may be controlled via Gibbs reactivity. We have compared electrical performance of type-II superlattice photodetectors, designed for MWIR operation, passivated by different passivation techniques. We have used ALD deposited Al2O3, HfO2, TiO2, ZnO, PECVD deposited SiO2, Si3N4 and sulphur containing octadecanethiol (ODT) selfassembled monolayers (SAM) passivation layers on InAs/GaSb p-i-n superlattice photodetectors with cutoff wavelength at 5.1 μm. In this work, we have compared the result of different passivation techniques which are done under same conditions, same epitaxial structure and same fabrication processes. We have found that ALD deposited passivation is directly related to the Gibbs free energy of the passivation material. Gibbs free energies of the passivation layer can directly be compared with native surface oxides to check the effectiveness of the passivation layer before the experimental study.

  18. Controlling trapping potentials and stray electric fields in a microfabricated ion trap through design and compensation

    CERN Document Server

    Doret, S Charles; Wright, Kenneth; Volin, Curtis; Killian, Tyler; Ozakin, Arkadas; Denison, Douglas; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C -S; Slusher, Richart E; Harter, Alexa W

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum information processing with trapped ions have demonstrated the need for new ion trap architectures capable of holding and manipulating chains of many (>10) ions. Here we present the design and detailed characterization of a new linear trap, microfabricated with scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) techniques, that is well-suited to this challenge. Forty-four individually controlled DC electrodes provide the many degrees of freedom required to construct anharmonic potential wells, shuttle ions, merge and split ion chains, precisely tune secular mode frequencies, and adjust the orientation of trap axes. Microfabricated capacitors on DC electrodes suppress radio-frequency pickup and excess micromotion, while a top-level ground layer simplifies modeling of electric fields and protects trap structures underneath. A localized aperture in the substrate provides access to the trapping region from an oven below, permitting deterministic loading of particular isotopic/eleme...

  19. Lift enhancement by trapped vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of lift enhancement by trapped vortex are provided. Efforts are continuously being made to find simple ways to convert wings of aircraft from an efficient cruise configuration to one that develops the high lift needed during landing and takeoff. The high-lift configurations studied here consist of conventional airfoils with a trapped vortex over the upper surface. The vortex is trapped by one or two vertical fences that serve as barriers to the oncoming stream and as reflection planes for the vortex and the sink that form a separation bubble on top of the airfoil. Since the full three-dimensional unsteady flow problem over the wing of an aircraft is so complicated that it is hard to get an understanding of the principles that govern the vortex trapping process, the analysis is restricted here to the flow field illustrated in the first slide. It is assumed that the flow field between the two end plates approximates a streamwise strip of the flow over a wing. The flow between the endplates and about the airfoil consists of a spanwise vortex located between the suction orifices in the endplates. The spanwise fence or spoiler located near the nose of the airfoil serves to form a separated flow region and a shear layer. The vorticity in the shear layer is concentrated into the vortex by withdrawal of fluid at the suction orifices. As the strength of the vortex increases with time, it eventually dominates the flow in the separated region so that a shear or vertical layer is no longer shed from the tip of the fence. At that point, the vortex strength is fixed and its location is such that all of the velocity contributions at its center sum to zero thereby making it an equilibrium point for the vortex. The results of a theoretical analysis of such an idealized flow field are described.

  20. Small Mammal Trapping 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Small mammal traps were placed in the Baring division and in the Edmunds division of Moosehom National Wildlife Refuge. There were a total of 98 traps set for up to...

  1. St. Croix trap study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains detailed information about the catch from 600 trap stations around St. Croix. Data fields include species caught, size data, trap location...

  2. Characterization of 1064nm laser-induced damage on antireflection coatings grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhichao; Wei, Yaowei; Chen, Songlin; Luo, Jin; Ma, Ping

    2011-12-01

    Damage tests were carried out to measure the laser resistance of Al2O3/TiO2 and Al2O3/HfO2 antireflection coatings at 1064nm grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The S-on-1 and R-on-1 damage results are given. It's interesting to find that ALD coatings damage performance seems closed to those grown by conventional e-beam evaporation process. For Al2O3/TiO2 coatings, the grown temperature will impact the damage resistance of thin films. Crystallization of TiO2 layer at higher temperature could play an importance role as absorption defects that reduced the LIDT of coatings. In addition, it is found that using inorganic compound instead of organic compound as precursors for ALD process can effective prevent residual carbon in films and will increase the LIDT of coatings.

  3. Global Liquidity Trap

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara, Ippei; NAKAJIMA Tomoyuki; Sudo, Nao; Teranishi, Yuki

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a two-country New Open Economy Macroeconomics model, and analyze the optimal monetary policy when countries cooperate in the face of a "global liquidity trap" -- i.e., a situation where the two countries are simultaneously caught in liquidity traps. The notable features of the optimal policy in the face of a global liquidity trap are history dependence and international dependence. The optimality of history dependent policy is confirmed as in local liquidity trap. A ...

  4. Ion trap simulation tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

    2009-02-01

    Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

  5. FInvestigation of enhancement mode HfO2 insulated N-polarity GaN/InN/GaN/In0.9Al0.1N heterostructure MISHEMT for high-frequency applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanbabu, A.; Mohankumar, N.; Godwin Raj, D.; Sarkar, Partha

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we examined normally-OFF N-polar InN-channel Metal insulated semiconductor high-electron mobility transistors (MISHEMTs) device with a relaxed In0.9Al0.1N buffer layer. In addition, the enhancement-mode operation of the N-polar structure was investigated. The effect of scaling in N-polar MISHEMT, such as the dielectric and the channel thickness, alter the electrical behavior of the device. We have achieved a maximum drain current of 1.17 A/mm, threshold voltage (VT) =0.728 V, transconductance (gm) of 2.9 S mm-1, high ION/IOFF current ratio of 3.23×103, lowest ON-state resistance (RON) of 0.41 Ω mm and an intrinsic delay time (τ) of 1.456 Fs along with high-frequency performance with ft/ fmaxof 90 GHz/109 GHz and 180 GHz/260 GHz for TCH =0.5 nm at Vds =0.5 V and 1.0 V. The numerically simulated results of highly confined GaN/InN/GaN/In0.9Al0.1N heterostructure MISHEMT exhibits outstanding potential as one of the possibility to replace presently used N-polar MISHEMTs for delivering high power density and frequency at RF/power amplifier applications.

  6. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shannon X; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Dauler, Eric; Berggren, Karl; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  7. Trap style influences wild pig behavior and trapping success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the efforts of many natural resource professionals, wild pig (Sus scrofa) populations are expanding in many areas of the world. Although many creative techniques for controlling pig populations are being explored, trapping has been and still is themost commonly usedmethod of population control formany public and private land managers. We conducted an observational study to examine the efficiency of 2 frequently used trap styles: a small, portable box-style trap and a larger, semi-permanent, corral-style trap.We used game cameras to examine patterns of trap entry by wild pigs around each style of trap, and we conducted a trapping session to compare trapping success between trap styles. Adult female and juvenile wild pigs entered both styles of trap more readily than did adult males, and adult males seemed particularly averse to entering box traps. Less than 10% of adult male visits to box traps resulted in entries, easily the least percentage of any class at any style of trap. Adult females entered corral traps approximately 2.2 times more often per visit than box traps and re-entered corral traps >2 times more frequently. Juveniles entered and reentered both box and corral traps at similar rates. Overall (all-class) entry-per-visit rates at corral traps (0.71) were nearly double that of box traps (0.37). Subsequent trapping data supported these preliminary entry data; the capture rate for corral traps was >4 times that of box traps. Our data suggest that corral traps are temporally and economically superior to box traps with respect to efficiency; that is, corral traps effectively trap more pigs per trap night at a lower cost per pig than do box traps. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  8. In situ transmission infrared spectroscopy of high-kappa oxide atomic layer deposition onto silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Tsung

    Ultra-thin aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) layers have been grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tri-methyl-aluminum (TMA) and tetrakis-ethyl-methyl-amino-hafnium (TEMAH) respectively with heavy water (D2O) as the oxidizing agent. Several different silicon surfaces were used as substrates such as hydrogen terminated silicon (H/Si), SC2 (or RCA 2) cleaned native silicon oxide (SiO 2/Si), and silicon (oxy)nitride. In-situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been adopted for the study of the growth mechanisms during ALD of these films. The vibrational spectra of gas phase TEMAH and its reaction byproducts with oxidants have also been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) normal mode calculations show a good agreement with the experimental data when it is combined with linear wave-number scaling method and Fermi resonance mechanism. Ether (-C-O-C-) and tertiary alkylamine (N(R1R 2R3)) compounds are the two most dominant products of TEMAH reacting with oxygen gas and water. When ozone is used as the oxidant, gas phase CH2O, CH3NO2, CH3-N=C=O and other compounds containing -(C=O)- and --C-O-C- (or --O-C-) segments are observed. With substrate temperatures less than 400°C and 300°C for TMA and TEMAH respectively, Al oxide and Hf oxide ALD can be appropriately performed on silicon surfaces. Thin silicon (oxy)nitride thermally grown in ammonia on silicon substrate can significantly reduce silicon oxide interlayer formation during ALD and post-deposition annealing. The crystallization temperature of amorphous ALD grown HfO2 on nitridized silicon is 600°C, which is 100°C higher than on the other silicon surfaces. When HfO2 is grown on H/Si(111) at 100°C deposition temperature, minimum 5--10 ALD cycles are required for the full surface coverage. The steric effect can be seen by the evolution of the H-Si stretching mode at 2083 cm-1. The observed red shift of H-Si stretching to ˜ 2060 cm-1 can be caused by Si

  9. Effects of trimethylaluminium and tetrakis(ethylmethylamino) hafnium in the early stages of the atomic-layer-deposition of aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide on hydroxylated GaN nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Plata, Paola A; Coan, Mary R; Seminario, Jorge M

    2013-10-01

    We calculate the interactions of two atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactants, trimethylaluminium (TMA) and tetrakis(ethylmethylamino) hafnium (TEMAH) with the hydroxylated Ga-face of GaN clusters when aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide, respectively, are being deposited. The GaN clusters are suitable as testbeds for the actual Ga-face on practical GaN nanocrystals of importance not only in electronics but for several other applications in nanotechnology. We find that TMA spontaneously interacts with hydroxylated GaN; however it does not follow the atomic layer deposition reaction path unless there is an excess in potential energy introduced in the clusters at the beginning of the optimization, for instance, using larger bond lengths of various bonds in the initial structures. TEMAH also does not interact with hydroxylated GaN, unless there is an excess in potential energy. The formation of a Ga-N(CH3)(CH2CH3) bond during the ALD of HfO2 using TEMAH as the reactant without breaking the Hf-N bond could be the key part of the mechanism behind the formation of an interface layer at the HfO2/GaN interface.

  10. Microfabricated ion trap array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  11. Neutral atom traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  12. Towards trapped antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, L. V.; Andresen, G.; Bertsche, W.; Boston, A.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hayano, R. S.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R. D.; Povilus, A.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Alpha Collaboration

    2008-02-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the last few years in the nascent field of antihydrogen physics. The next big step forward is expected to be the trapping of the formed antihydrogen atoms using a magnetic multipole trap. ALPHA is a new international project that started to take data in 2006 at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. The primary goal of ALPHA is stable trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms to facilitate measurements of its properties. We discuss the status of the ALPHA project and the prospects for antihydrogen trapping.

  13. Towards trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, L V; Bertsche, W; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the last few years in the nascent field of antihydrogen physics. The next big step forward is expected to be the trapping of the formed antihydrogen atoms using a magnetic multipole trap. ALPHA is a new international project that started to take data in 2006 at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator facility. The primary goal of ALPHA is stable trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms to facilitate measurements of its properties. We discuss the status of the ALPHA project and the prospects for antihydrogen trapping.

  14. Pyroelectric and dielectric properties of ferroelectric films with interposed dielectric buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinal, Y.; Kesim, M. T.; Misirlioglu, I. B.; Trolier-McKinstry, S.; Mantese, J. V.; Alpay, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    The dielectric and pyroelectric properties of c-domain ferroelectric films with linear dielectric buffer layers were investigated theoretically. Computations were carried out for multilayers consisting of PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3 with Al2O3, SiO2, Si3N4, HfO2, and TiO2 buffers on metalized Si. It is shown that the dielectric and pyroelectric properties of such multilayers can be increased by the presence of the buffer compared to ferroelectric monolayers. Calculations for PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3 films with 1% Al2O3 interposed between electrodes on Si show that the dielectric and pyroelectric coefficients are 310 and 0.070 μC cm-2 °C-1, respectively. Both values are higher than the intrinsic response of PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3 monolayer on Si.

  15. Search for trapped antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wilding, D.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Alpha Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experiment to search for trapped antihydrogen atoms with the ALPHA antihydrogen trap at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. Sensitive diagnostics of the temperatures, sizes, and densities of the trapped antiproton and positron plasmas have been developed, which in turn permitted development of techniques to precisely and reproducibly control the initial experimental parameters. The use of a position-sensitive annihilation vertex detector, together with the capability of controllably quenching the superconducting magnetic minimum trap, enabled us to carry out a high-sensitivity and low-background search for trapped synthesised antihydrogen atoms. We aim to identify the annihilations of antihydrogen atoms held for at least 130 ms in the trap before being released over ∼30 ms. After a three-week experimental run in 2009 involving mixing of 10 7 antiprotons with 1.3×10 positrons to produce 6×10 antihydrogen atoms, we have identified six antiproton annihilation events that are consistent with the release of trapped antihydrogen. The cosmic ray background, estimated to contribute 0.14 counts, is incompatible with this observation at a significance of 5.6 sigma. Extensive simulations predict that an alternative source of annihilations, the escape of mirror-trapped antiprotons, is highly unlikely, though this possibility has not yet been ruled out experimentally.

  16. Atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo study of atomic layer deposition derived from density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Mahdi; Elliott, Simon D

    2014-01-30

    To describe the atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactions of HfO2 from Hf(N(CH3)2)4 and H2O, a three-dimensional on-lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo model is developed. In this model, all atomistic reaction pathways in density functional theory (DFT) are implemented as reaction events on the lattice. This contains all steps, from the early stage of adsorption of each ALD precursor, kinetics of the surface protons, interaction between the remaining precursors (steric effect), influence of remaining fragments on adsorption sites (blocking), densification of each ALD precursor, migration of each ALD precursors, and cooperation between the remaining precursors to adsorb H2O (cooperative effect). The essential chemistry of the ALD reactions depends on the local environment at the surface. The coordination number and a neighbor list are used to implement the dependencies. The validity and necessity of the proposed reaction pathways are statistically established at the mesoscale. The formation of one monolayer of precursor fragments is shown at the end of the metal pulse. Adsorption and dissociation of the H2O precursor onto that layer is described, leading to the delivery of oxygen and protons to the surface during the H2O pulse. Through these processes, the remaining precursor fragments desorb from the surface, leaving the surface with bulk-like and OH-terminated HfO2, ready for the next cycle. The migration of the low coordinated remaining precursor fragments is also proposed. This process introduces a slow reordering motion (crawling) at the mesoscale, leading to the smooth and conformal thin film that is characteristic of ALD.

  17. Trapping radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Heinz-Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  18. Formation of High-quality Advanced High-k Oxide Layers at Low Temperature by Excimer UV Lamp-assisted Photo-CVD and Sol-gel Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU J. J.

    2004-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated that high quality and high dielectric constant layers can be fabricated by low temperature photo-induced or -assisted processing. Ta2O5 and ZrO2 have been deposited at t<400 ℃by means of a UV photo-CVD technique and HfO2 by photo-assisted sol-gel processing with the aid of excimer lamps. The UV annealing of as-grown layers was found to significantly improve their electrical properties.Low leakage current densities on the order of 10-8 A/cm2 at 1 MV/cm for deposited ultrathin Ta2O5 films and ca. 10-6 A/cm2 for the photo-CVD ZrO2 layers and photo-irradiated sol-gel HfO2 layers have been readily achieved. The improvement in the leakage properties of these layers is attributed to the UV-generated active oxygen species O(1D) which strongly oxidize any suboxides to form more stoichiometric oxides on removing certain defects, oxygen vacancies and impurities present in the as-prepared layers. The photo-CVD Ta2O5films deposited across 10. 16-cm Si wafers exhibit a high thickness uniformity with a variation of less than ±2.0% being obtained for ultrathin ca. 10 nm thick films. The lamp technology can in principle be extended to larger area wafers, providing a promising low temperature route to the fabrication of a range of high quality thin films for future ULSI technology.

  19. 1985-86 Trapping Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Trapping Plan for the 1985-1986 trapping season at Clarence Cannon NWR outlines rules and regulations for the trapping of beaver and muskrat on the...

  20. Nematode-Trapping Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique and intriguing group of carnivorous microorganisms that can trap and digest nematodes by means of specialized trapping structures. They can develop diverse trapping devices, such as adhesive hyphae, adhesive knobs, adhesive networks, constricting rings, and nonconstricting rings. Nematode-trapping fungi have been found in all regions of the world, from the tropics to Antarctica, from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems. They play an important ecological role in regulating nematode dynamics in soil. Molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that the majority of nematode-trapping fungi belong to a monophyletic group in the order Orbiliales (Ascomycota). Nematode-trapping fungi serve as an excellent model system for understanding fungal evolution and interaction between fungi and nematodes. With the development of molecular techniques and genome sequencing, their evolutionary origins and divergence, and the mechanisms underlying fungus-nematode interactions have been well studied. In recent decades, an increasing concern about the environmental hazards of using chemical nematicides has led to the application of these biological control agents as a rapidly developing component of crop protection.

  1. Scalable arrays of RF Paul traps in degenerate Si

    CERN Document Server

    Britton, J; Beall, J; Blakestad, R B; Wesenberg, J H; Wineland, D J

    2009-01-01

    We report techniques for the fabrication of multi-zone linear RF Paul traps that exploit the machinability and electrical conductivity of degenerate silicon. The approach was tested by trapping and laser cooling 24Mg+ ions in two trap geometries: a single-zone two-layer trap and a multi-zone surface-electrode trap. From the measured ion motional heating rate we determine an electric field spectral density at the ion's position of approximately 1E-10 (V/m)^2/Hz at a frequency of 1.125 MHz when the ion lies 40 micron above the trap surface. One application of these devices is controlled manipulation of atomic ion qubits, the basis of one form of quantum information processing.

  2. Scalable arrays of rf Paul traps in degenerate Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, J.; Leibfried, D.; Beall, J. A.; Blakestad, R. B.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Wineland, D. J.

    2009-10-01

    We report techniques for the fabrication of multizone linear radio frequency Paul traps that exploit the machinability and electrical conductivity of degenerate silicon. The approach was tested by trapping and laser cooling M24g+ ions in the two following trap geometries: a single-zone two-layer trap and a multizone surface-electrode trap. From the measured ion motional heating rate we determine an electric field spectral density at the ion's position of approximately 1×10-10 (V/m)2ṡHz-1 at ωz/2π=1.125 MHz when the ion lies 40 μm above the trap surface. One application of these devices is controlled manipulation of atomic ion qubits, the basis of one form of quantum information processing.

  3. Geometric light trapping with a V-trap for efficient organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Soo Jin

    2013-03-14

    The efficiency of today’s most efficient organic solar cells is primarily limited by the ability of the active layer to absorb all the sunlight. While internal quantum efficiencies exceeding 90% are common, the external quantum efficiency rarely exceeds 70%. Light trapping techniques that increase the ability of a given active layer to absorb light are common in inorganic solar cells but have only been applied to organic solar cells with limited success. Here, we analyze the light trapping mechanism for a cell with a V-shape substrate configuration and demonstrate significantly improved photon absorption in an 5.3%-efficient PCDTBT:PC70BM bulk heterojunction polymer solar cell. The measured short circuit current density improves by 29%, in agreement with model predictions, and the power conversion efficiency increases to 7.2%, a 35% improvement over the performance in the absence of a light trap.

  4. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu

    2017-09-01

    A nano - scale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon - atom interactions . A neutral - atom platf orm based on this microfabrication technology will be pre - aligned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano - waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  5. Search For Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Bray, Crystal C; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayano, Ryugo S; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Jørgensen, Lars V; Kurchaninov, Lenoid; Lambo, Ricardo; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Nasr, Sarah Seif El; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wilding, Dean; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experiment to search for trapped antihydrogen atoms with the ALPHA antihydrogen trap at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. Sensitive diagnostics of the temperatures, sizes, and densities of the trapped antiproton and positron plasmas have been developed, which in turn permitted development of techniques to precisely and reproducibly control the initial experimental parameters. The use of a position-sensitive annihilation vertex detector, together with the capability of controllably quenching the superconducting magnetic minimum trap, enabled us to carry out a high-sensitivity and low-background search for trapped synthesised antihydrogen atoms. We aim to identify the annihilations of antihydrogen atoms held for at least 130 ms in the trap before being released over ~30 ms. After a three-week experimental run in 2009 involving mixing of 10^7 antiprotons with 1.3 10^9 positrons to produce 6 10^5 antihydrogen atoms, we have identified six antiproton annihilation events that are consist...

  6. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  7. Role of Ge and Si substrates in higher-k tetragonal phase formation and interfacial properties in cyclical atomic layer deposition-anneal Hf1-xZrxO2/Al2O3 thin film stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Sonal; Tapily, Kandabara; Consiglio, Steven; Clark, Robert D.; Wajda, Cory S.; Leusink, Gert J.; Woll, Arthur R.; Diebold, Alain C.

    2016-09-01

    Using a five-step atomic layer deposition (ALD)-anneal (DADA) process, with 20 ALD cycles of metalorganic precursors followed by 40 s of rapid thermal annealing at 1073 K, we have developed highly crystalline Hf1-xZrxO2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) thin films (DADA ALD process. We surmise that the interfacial metal germanate layer also function as a diffusion barrier limiting excessive Ge uptake into the dielectric film. An ALD Al2O3 passivation layer of thickness ≥1.5 nm is required to minimize Ge diffusion for developing highly conformal and textured HfO2 based higher-k dielectrics on Ge substrates using the DADA ALD process.

  8. Penning trap at IGISOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szerypo, J. E-mail: jerzy.szerypo@phys.jyu.fi; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V.S.; Nieminen, A.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Aeystoe, J

    2002-04-22

    The IGISOL facility at the Department of Physics of the University of Jyvaeskylae (JYFL) is delivering radioactive beams of short-lived exotic nuclei, in particular the neutron-rich isotopes from the fission reaction. These nuclei are studied with the nuclear spectroscopy methods. In order to substantially increase the quality and sensitivity of such studies, the beam should undergo beam handling: cooling, bunching and isobaric purification. The first two processes are performed with the use of an RFQ cooler/buncher. The isobaric purification will be made by a Penning trap placed after the RF-cooler element. This contribution describes the current status of the Penning trap project and its future prospects. The latter comprise the precise nuclear mass measurements, nuclear spectroscopy in the Penning trap interior as well as the laser spectroscopy on the extracted beams.

  9. Ion sponge: a 3-dimentional array of quadrupole ion traps for trapping and mass-selectively processing ions in gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Li, Linfan; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Ouyang, Zheng

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the concept of ion sponge has been explored for developing 3D arrays of large numbers of ion traps but with simple configurations. An ion sponge device with 484 trapping units in a volume of 10 × 10 × 3.2 cm has been constructed by simply stacking 9 meshes together. A single rf was used for trapping ions and mass-selective ion processing. The ion sponge provides a large trapping capacity and is highly transparent for transfer of ions, neutrals, and photons for gas phase ion processing. Multiple layers of quadrupole ion traps, with 121 trapping units in each layer, can operate as a single device for MS or MS/MS analysis, or as a series of mass-selective trapping devices with interlayer ion transfers facilitated by AC and DC voltages. Automatic sorting of ions to different trapping layers based on their mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios was achieved with traps of different sizes. Tandem-in-space MS/MS has also been demonstrated with precursor ions and fragment ions trapped in separate locations.

  10. Trapping molecules on chips

    CERN Document Server

    Santambrogio, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, it was demonstrated that neutral molecules can be loaded on a microchip directly from a supersonic beam. The molecules are confined in microscopic traps that can be moved smoothly over the surface of the chip. Once the molecules are trapped, they can be decelerated to a standstill, for instance, or pumped into selected quantum states by laser light or microwaves. Molecules are detected on the chip by time-resolved spatial imaging, which allows for the study of the distribution in the phase space of the molecular ensemble.

  11. Flow regimes in a trapped vortex cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasagna, D.; Iuso, G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents results of an experimental investigation on the flow in a trapped vortex cell, embedded into a flat plate, and interacting with a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. The objective of the work is to describe the flow features and elucidate some of the governing physical mechanisms, in the light of recent investigations on flow separation control using vortex cells. Hot-wire velocity measurements of the shear layer bounding the cell and of the boundary layers upstream and downstream are reported, together with spectral and correlation analyses of wall-pressure fluctuation measurements. Smoke flow visualisations provide qualitative insight into some relevant features of the internal flow, namely a large-scale flow unsteadiness and possible mechanisms driving the rotation of the vortex core. Results are presented for two very different regimes: a low-Reynolds-number case where the incoming boundary layer is laminar and its momentum thickness is small compared to the cell opening, and a moderately high-Reynolds-number case, where the incoming boundary layer is turbulent and the ratio between the momentum thickness and the opening length is significantly larger than in the first case. Implications of the present findings to flow control applications of trapped vortex cells are also discussed.

  12. Atomic Layer Deposition of High-k Dielectrics Using Supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, Rajesh

    2005-03-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of high-κdielectric was performed in supercritical CO2 (SCCO2), using a two-step reaction sequence. In step one, tetraethoxy silane (TEOS) precursor was injected in SCCO2 at 80-100 C and 50 MPa pressure to obtain a chemisorbed surface monolayer, which was then oxidized into SiO2 using peroxide entrained in SCCO2. ALD process was controlled by estimating precursor solubility and its mass transport with respect to the density of SCCO2, and correlating these parameters with precursor injection volume. In the ALD process, 7 pulses of precursor were used anticipating deposition of one atomic layer in each of the pulses. The thickness of the SiO2 atomic layers deposited using SCCO2 was measured by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE), and the C-V measurements were also performed. The result obtained using VASE indicates that there were 7 monolayers of SiO2 with total thickness of 35 å, and the dielectric constant of the deposited layers was 4.0±0.1. Our initial findings clearly demonstrate that SCCO2 is capable of atomic layer deposition of high quality dielectric films at very low process temperatures preventing interface reaction. More research is in progress to achieve ALD of HfO2 and TiO2 in SCCO2.

  13. On mode trapping in pulsating DA white dwarf stars

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuto, O G; Althaus, L G; Serenelli, A M

    2002-01-01

    The present work is designed to explore the effects of the time-dependent element diffusion on the mode trapping properties of DA white dwarf models with various thickness of the hydrogen envelope. Our predictions are compared with the standard assumption of diffusive equilibrium in the trace element approximation. We find that element diffusion markedly weakens the presence of mode trapping originated in the outer layers of the models, even for the case of thin hydrogen envelopes.

  14. Redesigning octopus traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduarda Gomes

    2014-06-01

    In order to minimise the identified problems in the actual traps, the present work proposes a new design with the aim of reducing the volume and weight during transport, and also during onshore storage. Alternative materials to avoid corrosion and formation of encrustations were also proposed.

  15. Characterizing optical dipole trap via fluorescence of trapped cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; GENG Tao; YAN Shubin; LI Gang; ZHANG Jing; WANG Junmin; PENG Kunchi; ZHANG Tiancai

    2006-01-01

    Optical dipole trap (ODT) is becoming an important tool of manipulating neutral atoms. In this paper ODT is realized with a far-off resonant laser beam strongly focused in the magneto-optical trap (MOT) of cesium atoms. The light shift is measured by simply monitoring the fluorescence of the atoms in the magneto-optical trap and the optical dipole trap simultaneously. The advantages of our experimental scheme are discussed, and the effect of the beam waist and power on the potential of dipole trap as well as heating rate is analyzed.

  16. Traps for neutral radioactive atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sprouse, G D; Grossman, J S; Orozco, L A; Pearson, M R

    2002-01-01

    We describe several methods for efficiently injecting a small number of radioactive atoms into a laser trap. The characteristics of laser traps that make them desirable for physics experiments are discussed and several different experimental directions are described. We describe recent experiments with the alkali element Fr and point to future directions of the neutral atom trapping program.

  17. Trapping ions with lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Cormick, Cecilia; Morigi, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    This work theoretically addresses the trapping an ionized atom with a single valence electron by means of lasers, analyzing qualitatively and quantitatively the consequences of the net charge of the particle. In our model, the coupling between the ion and the electromagnetic field includes the charge monopole and the internal dipole, within a multipolar expansion of the interaction Hamiltonian. Specifically, we perform a Power-Zienau-Woolley transformation, taking into account the motion of the center of mass. The net charge produces a correction in the atomic dipole which is of order $m_e/M$ with $m_e$ the electron mass and $M$ the total mass of the ion. With respect to neutral atoms, there is also an extra coupling to the laser field which can be approximated by that of the monopole located at the position of the center of mass. These additional effects, however, are shown to be very small compared to the dominant dipolar trapping term.

  18. Coherence in Microchip Traps

    CERN Document Server

    Treutlein, P; Steinmetz, T; Hänsch, T W; Reichel, J; Treutlein, Philipp; Hommelhoff, Peter; Steinmetz, Tilo; H\\"ansch, Theodor W.; Reichel, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    We report the coherent manipulation of internal states of neutral atoms in a magnetic microchip trap. Coherence lifetimes exceeding 1 s are observed with atoms at distances of $4-130 \\mu$m from the microchip surface. The coherence lifetime in the microtrap is independent of atom-surface distance and agrees well with the results of similar measurements in macroscopic magnetic traps. Due to the absence of surface-induced decoherence, a miniaturized atomic clock with a relative stability in the $10^{-13}$ range can be realized. For applications in quantum information processing, we propose to use microwave near-fields in the proximity of chip wires to create potentials that depend on the internal state of the atoms.

  19. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    an inspiring speech at the MIT Physics of Computation 1st Conference in 1981, Feynman proposed the development of a computer that would obey the...on ion trap based 36 quantum computing for physics and computer science students would include lecture notes, slides, lesson plans, a syllabus...reading lists, videos, demonstrations, and laboratories. 37 LIST OF REFERENCES [1] R. P. Feynman , “Simulating physics with computers,” Int. J

  20. Water-Trapped Worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Menou, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Although tidally-locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO2 as dayside ocean basins dry-up. Water-tr...

  1. MIS and MFIS Devices: DyScO3 as a gate-oxide and buffer-layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo, R.; Karan, N. K.; Saavedra-Arias, J.; Pradhan, D. K.; Thomas, R.; Katiyar, R. S.

    2008-03-01

    Metal-Ferroelectric-Insulator-Semiconductor (MFIS) structure is of importance in nonvolatile memories, as insulating buffer layer that prevents interdiffusion between the ferroelectric (FE) and the Si substrate. However, insulating layer has some disadvantages viz. generation of depolarization field in FE film and increase of operation voltage. To overcome this, it is important to find a FE with low ɛr (compared to normal FE) and an insulating buffer layer with high ɛr (compared to ɛr = 3.9 of SiO2). High-k materials viz. LaAlO3, SiN, HfO2, HfAlO etc. have been studied as buffer layers in the MFIS structures and as gate-oxide in metal-insulator-silicon (MIS). Recently, a novel gate dielectric material, DyScO3 was considered and studies indicate that crystallization temperature significantly increased and the film on Si remained amorphous even at 1000 C annealing. Considering the requirements on crystallization temperature, ɛr, electrical stability for high-k buffer layers, DyScO3 seems to be very promising for future MFIS device applications. Therefore, the evaluations of MOCVD grown DyScO3 as gate-oxide for MIS and the buffer layers for Bi3.25La0.75Ti3O12 based MFIS structures are presented.

  2. Light trapping architecture for photovoltaic and photodector applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lunt, Richard R.; Slootsky, Michael

    2016-08-09

    There is disclosed photovoltaic device structures which trap admitted light and recycle it through the contained photosensitive materials to maximize photoabsorption. For example, there is disclosed a photosensitive optoelectronic device comprising: a first reflective layer comprising a thermoplastic resin; a second reflective layer substantially parallel to the first reflective layer; a first transparent electrode layer on at least one of the first and second reflective layer; and a photosensitive region adjacent to the first electrode, wherein the first transparent electrode layer is substantially parallel to the first reflective layer and adjacent to the photosensitive region, and wherein the device has an exterior face transverse to the planes of the reflective layers where the exterior face has an aperture for admission of incident radiation to the interior of the device.

  3. Trapped-space-charge-limited currents in organics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paasch, Gernot [IFW Dresden (Germany); Blom, Paul; Mandoc, Magda; Boer, Bert de [University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2007-07-01

    The Mott-Gurney law for space charge limited current (SCLC) has been modified early to account for the presence of exponentially distributed traps. This expression has been widely used to analyse transport in organic light emitting diodes. However, the theory fails to describe the rather weak temperature dependence observed for electron transport, for instance in PPV derivatives. There we have shown that the trap-limited SCLC law is essentially modified if the density of transport states is of Gaussian type. Here, we discuss the origin of this modification and present a detailed analysis of the modified law. In addition, we derive further modifications for different combinations of densities of states of both the transport states and the trap distribution. As a result, rather different dependencies of the current on voltage, layer thickness and temperature are possible. Consequently, one has to exercise care in order to obtain reliable trap parameters from SCLC.

  4. Atomic Coherent Trapping and Properties of Trapped Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guo-Jian; XIA Li-Xin; XIE Min

    2006-01-01

    Based on the theory of velocity-selective coherent population trapping, we investigate an atom-laser system where a pair of counterpropagating laser fields interact with a three-level atom. The influence of the parametric condition on the properties of the system such as velocity at which the atom is selected to be trapped, time needed for finishing the coherent trapping process, and possible electromagnetically induced transparency of an altrocold atomic medium,etc., is studied.

  5. Cryogenic resonator design for trapped ion experiments in Paul traps

    CERN Document Server

    Brandl, Matthias F; Monz, Thomas; Blatt, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Trapping ions in Paul traps requires high radio-frequency voltages, which are generated using resonators. When operating traps in a cryogenic environment, an in-vacuum resonator showing low loss is crucial to limit the thermal load to the cryostat. In this study, we present a guide for the design and production of compact, shielded cryogenic resonators. We produced and characterized three different types of resonators and furthermore demonstrate efficient impedance matching of these resonators at cryogenic temperatures.

  6. Nonresonance adiabatic photon trap

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, S S; Burdakov, A V; Ushkova, M Yu

    2016-01-01

    Concept of high efficiency photon storage based on adiabatic confinement between concave mirrors is presented and experimentally investigated. The approach is insensitive to typical for Fabri-Perot cells requirements on quality of accumulated radiation, tolerance of resonator elements and their stability. Experiments have been carried out with the trap, which consists from opposed concave cylindrical mirrors and conjugated with them spherical mirrors. In result, high efficiency for accumulation of radiation with large angular spread and spectrum width has been confirmed. As radiation source a commercial fiber laser has been used.

  7. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  8. Engineering the mechanical properties of ultrabarrier films grown by atomic layer deposition for the encapsulation of printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, A.; Singh, A.; Wang, C. Y.; Dindar, A.; Fuentes-Hernandez, C.; Kim, H.; Cullen, D.; Kippelen, B.; Graham, S.

    2015-08-01

    Direct deposition of barrier films by atomic layer deposition (ALD) onto printed electronics presents a promising method for packaging devices. Films made by ALD have been shown to possess desired ultrabarrier properties, but face challenges when directly grown onto surfaces with varying composition and topography. Challenges include differing nucleation and growth rates across the surface, stress concentrations from topography and coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch, elastic constant mismatch, and particle contamination that may impact the performance of the ALD barrier. In such cases, a polymer smoothing layer may be needed to coat the surface prior to ALD barrier film deposition. We present the impact of architecture on the performance of aluminum oxide (Al2O3)/hafnium oxide (HfO2) ALD nanolaminate barrier films deposited on fluorinated polymer layer using an optical calcium (Ca) test under damp heat. It is found that with increasing polymer thickness, the barrier films with residual tensile stress are prone to cracking resulting in rapid failure of the Ca sensor at 50 °C/85% relative humidity. Inserting a SiNx layer with residual compressive stress between the polymer and ALD layers is found to prevent cracking over a range of polymer thicknesses with more than 95% of the Ca sensor remaining after 500 h of testing. These results suggest that controlling mechanical properties and film architecture play an important role in the performance of direct deposited ALD barriers.

  9. Light trapping in thin film organic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Tang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A major issue in organic solar cells is the poor mobility and recombination of the photogenerated charge carriers. The active layer has to be kept thin to facilitate charge transport and minimize recombination losses. However, optical losses due to inefficient light absorption in the thin active layers can be considerable in organic solar cells. Therefore, light trapping schemes are critically important for efficient organic solar cells. Traditional light trapping schemes for thick solar cells need to be modified for organic thin film solar cells in which coherent optics and wave effects play a significant role. In this review, we discuss the light trapping schemes for organic thin film solar cells, which includes geometric engineering of the structure of the solar cell at the micro and nanoscale, plasmonic structures, and more.

  10. A pentacene monolayer trapped between graphene and a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qicheng; Peng, Boyu; Chan, Paddy Kwok Leung; Luo, Zhengtang

    2015-08-01

    A self-assembled pentacene monolayer can be fabricated between the solid-solid interface of few-layered graphene (FLG) and the mica substrate, through a diffusion-spreading method. By utilizing a transfer method that allows us to sandwich pentacene between graphene and mica, followed by controlled annealing, we enabled the diffused pentacene to be trapped in the interfaces and led to the formation of a stable monolayer. We found that the formation of a monolayer is kinetically favored by using a 2D Ising lattice gas model for pentacene trapped between the graphene-substrate interfaces. This kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results indicate that, due to the graphene substrate enclosure, the spreading of the first layer proceeds faster than the second layer, as the kinetics favors the filling of voids by molecules from the second layer. This graphene assisted monolayer assembly method provides a new avenue for the fabrication of two-dimensional monolayer structures.A self-assembled pentacene monolayer can be fabricated between the solid-solid interface of few-layered graphene (FLG) and the mica substrate, through a diffusion-spreading method. By utilizing a transfer method that allows us to sandwich pentacene between graphene and mica, followed by controlled annealing, we enabled the diffused pentacene to be trapped in the interfaces and led to the formation of a stable monolayer. We found that the formation of a monolayer is kinetically favored by using a 2D Ising lattice gas model for pentacene trapped between the graphene-substrate interfaces. This kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results indicate that, due to the graphene substrate enclosure, the spreading of the first layer proceeds faster than the second layer, as the kinetics favors the filling of voids by molecules from the second layer. This graphene assisted monolayer assembly method provides a new avenue for the fabrication of two-dimensional monolayer structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  11. Nanofriction in cold ion traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassi, A; Vanossi, A; Tosatti, E

    2011-01-01

    Sliding friction between crystal lattices and the physics of cold ion traps are so far non-overlapping fields. Two sliding lattices may either stick and show static friction or slip with dynamic friction; cold ions are known to form static chains, helices or clusters, depending on the trapping conditions. Here we show, based on simulations, that much could be learnt about friction by sliding, through, for example, an electric field, the trapped ion chains over a corrugated potential. Unlike infinite chains, in which the theoretically predicted Aubry transition to free sliding may take place, trapped chains are always pinned. Yet, a properly defined static friction still vanishes Aubry-like at a symmetric-asymmetric structural transition, found for decreasing corrugation in both straight and zig-zag trapped chains. Dynamic friction is also accessible in ringdown oscillations of the ion trap. Long theorized static and dynamic one-dimensional friction phenomena could thus become accessible in future cold ion tribology.

  12. Electron traps in semiconducting polymers: exponential versus Gaussian trap distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H.T.; Mandoc, M.M.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The low electron currents in poly(dialkoxy-p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) derivatives and their steep voltage dependence are generally explained by trap-limited conduction in the presence of an exponential trap distribution. Here we demonstrate that the electron transport of several PPV derivatives can

  13. Electron traps in semiconducting polymers : Exponential versus Gaussian trap distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H. T.; Mandoc, M. M.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2011-01-01

    The low electron currents in poly(dialkoxy-p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) derivatives and their steep voltage dependence are generally explained by trap-limited conduction in the presence of an exponential trap distribution. Here we demonstrate that the electron transport of several PPV derivatives can

  14. Quantifying the effectiveness of SiO2/Au light trapping nanoshells for thin film poly-Si solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In order to enhance light absorption of thin film poly-crystalline silicon(TF poly-Si)solar cells over a broad spectral range, and quantify the effectiveness of nanoshell light trapping structure over the full solar spectrum in theory,the effective photon trapping flux(EPTF)and effective photon trapping efficiency(EPTE)were firstly proposed by considering both the external quantum efficiency of TF poly-Si solar cell and scattering properties of light trapping structures.The EPTF,EPTE and scattering spectrum exhibit different behaviors depending on the geometric size and density of nanoshells that form the light trapping layer.With an optimum size and density of SiO2/Au nanoshell light trapping layer,the EPTE could reach up to 40%due to the enhancement of light trapping over a broad spectral range,especially from 500 to 800 nm.

  15. The Honey Trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michael

    Michael F. Wagner: The Honey Trap –The democratization of leisure through automobilism The automobile has achieved a central position in modern everyday life as an essential artefact to mobility. This raises the question how automobiles have been mediated for mass consumption? The central thesis...... in the article is that the culture of Danish automobilism was constructed around and appropriated through leisure activities conducted primarily by the automobile consumer’s organisation Touring Club de Danemark (FDM). The general purpose for the consumer organisation has been to create a cultural identity...... and a material reality of democratic participation linking ‘Car and Leisure’, a term that has been a central motto for the organization during many decades. The keyword in this activity was ‘Free’ celebrating the manner in which the privately owned automobile secured a maximum of freedom to the owner. The paper...

  16. Light Trapping for Silicon Solar Cells: Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui

    Crystalline silicon solar cells have been the mainstream technology for photovoltaic energy conversion since their invention in 1954. Since silicon is an indirect band gap material, its absorption coefficient is low for much of the solar spectrum, and the highest conversion efficiencies are achieved only in cells that are thicker than about 0.1 mm. Light trapping by total internal reflection is important to increase the optical absorption in silicon layers, and becomes increasingly important as the layers are thinned. Light trapping is typically characterized by the enhancement of the absorptance of a solar cell beyond the value for a single pass of the incident beam through an absorbing semiconductor layer. Using an equipartition argument, in 1982 Yablonovitch calculated an enhancement of 4n2 , where n is the refractive index. We have extracted effective light-trapping enhancements from published external quantum efficiency spectra in several dozen silicon solar cells. These results show that this "thermodynamic" enhancement has never been achieved experimentally. The reasons for incomplete light trapping could be poor anti-reflection coating, inefficient light scattering, and parasitic absorption. We report the light-trapping properties of nanocrystalline silicon nip solar cells deposited onto two types of Ag/ZnO backreflectors at United Solar Ovonic, LLC. We prepared the first type by first making silver nanparticles onto a stainless steel substrate, and then overcoating the nanoparticles with a second silver layer. The second type was prepared at United Solar using a continuous silver film. Both types were then overcoated with a ZnO film. The root mean square roughness varied from 27 to 61 nm, and diffuse reflectance at 1000 nm wavelength varied from 0.4 to 0.8. The finished cells have a thin, indium-tin oxide layer on the top that acts as an antireflection coating. For both backreflector types, the short-circuit photocurrent densities J SC for solar

  17. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  18. The ALPHA antihydrogen trapping apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Carpenter, P. T.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Escallier, J.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hurt, J. L.; Hydomako, R.; Isaac, C. A.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kerrigan, S. J.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Marone, A.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Parker, B.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seddon, D.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The ALPHA collaboration, based at CERN, has recently succeeded in confining cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic minimum neutral atom trap and has performed the first study of a resonant transition of the anti-atoms. The ALPHA apparatus will be described herein, with emphasis on the structural aspects, diagnostic methods and techniques that have enabled antihydrogen trapping and experimentation to be achieved.

  19. Cryogenic silicon surface ion trap

    CERN Document Server

    Niedermayr, Michael; Kumph, Muir; Partel, Stefan; Edlinger, Johannes; Brownnutt, Michael; Blatt, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Trapped ions are pre-eminent candidates for building quantum information processors and quantum simulators. They have been used to demonstrate quantum gates and algorithms, quantum error correction, and basic quantum simulations. However, to realise the full potential of such systems and make scalable trapped-ion quantum computing a reality, there exist a number of practical problems which must be solved. These include tackling the observed high ion-heating rates and creating scalable trap structures which can be simply and reliably produced. Here, we report on cryogenically operated silicon ion traps which can be rapidly and easily fabricated using standard semiconductor technologies. Single $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions have been trapped and used to characterize the trap operation. Long ion lifetimes were observed with the traps exhibiting heating rates as low as $\\dot{\\bar{n}}=$ 0.33 phonons/s at an ion-electrode distance of 230 $\\mu$m. These results open many new avenues to arrays of micro-fabricated ion traps.

  20. Accretion discs trapped near corotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Angelo, C.R.; Spruit, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    We show that discs accreting on to the magnetosphere of a rotating star can end up in a trapped state, in which the inner edge of the disc stays near the corotation radius, even at low and varying accretion rates. The accretion in these trapped states can be steady or cyclic; we explore these states

  1. The ALPHA antihydrogen trapping apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Andresen, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M.D. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC Canada, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Bowe, P.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Capra, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Carpenter, P.T. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Cesar, C.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Escallier, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Fajans, J. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Friesen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C.; Gill, D.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); and others

    2014-01-21

    The ALPHA collaboration, based at CERN, has recently succeeded in confining cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic minimum neutral atom trap and has performed the first study of a resonant transition of the anti-atoms. The ALPHA apparatus will be described herein, with emphasis on the structural aspects, diagnostic methods and techniques that have enabled antihydrogen trapping and experimentation to be achieved.

  2. Photonic crystals for light trapping in solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjessing, Jo

    2012-07-25

    Solar energy is an abundant and non-polluting source of energy. Nevertheless, the installation of solar cells for energy production is still dependent on subsidies in most parts of the world. One way of reducing the costs of solar cells is to decrease their thickness. This will reduce material consumption and, at the same time, unlock the possibility of using cheaper lower quality solar cell material. However, a thinner solar cell will have a higher optical loss due to insufficient absorption of long wavelength light. Therefore, light-trapping must be improved in order to make thin solar cells economically viable. In this thesis I investigate the potential for light-trapping in thin silicon solar cells by the use of various photonic crystal back-side structures. The first structure I study consists of a periodic array of cylinders in a configuration with a layer of silicon oxide separating the periodic structure from the rear metal reflector. This configuration reduces unwanted parasitic absorption in the reflector and the thickness of the oxide layer provides a new degree of freedom for improving light trapping from the structure. I use a large-period and a small-period approximation to analyze the cylinder structure and to identify criteria that contributes to successful light-trapping. I explore the light-trapping potential of various periodic structures including dimples, inverted pyramids, and cones. The structures are compared in an optical model using a 20 m thick Si slab. I find that the light trapping potential differs between the structures, that the unit cell dimensions for the given structure is more important for light trapping than the type of structure, and that the optimum lattice period does not differ significantly between the different structures. The light-trapping effect of the structures is investigated as a function on incidence angle. The structures provide good light trapping also under angles of incidence up to 60 degrees. The behavior

  3. Photonic crystals for light trapping in solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjessing, Jo

    2012-07-25

    Solar energy is an abundant and non-polluting source of energy. Nevertheless, the installation of solar cells for energy production is still dependent on subsidies in most parts of the world. One way of reducing the costs of solar cells is to decrease their thickness. This will reduce material consumption and, at the same time, unlock the possibility of using cheaper lower quality solar cell material. However, a thinner solar cell will have a higher optical loss due to insufficient absorption of long wavelength light. Therefore, light-trapping must be improved in order to make thin solar cells economically viable. In this thesis I investigate the potential for light-trapping in thin silicon solar cells by the use of various photonic crystal back-side structures. The first structure I study consists of a periodic array of cylinders in a configuration with a layer of silicon oxide separating the periodic structure from the rear metal reflector. This configuration reduces unwanted parasitic absorption in the reflector and the thickness of the oxide layer provides a new degree of freedom for improving light trapping from the structure. I use a large-period and a small-period approximation to analyze the cylinder structure and to identify criteria that contributes to successful light-trapping. I explore the light-trapping potential of various periodic structures including dimples, inverted pyramids, and cones. The structures are compared in an optical model using a 20 m thick Si slab. I find that the light trapping potential differs between the structures, that the unit cell dimensions for the given structure is more important for light trapping than the type of structure, and that the optimum lattice period does not differ significantly between the different structures. The light-trapping effect of the structures is investigated as a function on incidence angle. The structures provide good light trapping also under angles of incidence up to 60 degrees. The behavior

  4. Nonvolatile multilevel data storage memory device from controlled ambipolar charge trapping mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Roy, V. A. L.

    2013-07-01

    The capability of storing multi-bit information is one of the most important challenges in memory technologies. An ambipolar polymer which intrinsically has the ability to transport electrons and holes as a semiconducting layer provides an opportunity for the charge trapping layer to trap both electrons and holes efficiently. Here, we achieved large memory window and distinct multilevel data storage by utilizing the phenomena of ambipolar charge trapping mechanism. As fabricated flexible memory devices display five well-defined data levels with good endurance and retention properties showing potential application in printed electronics.

  5. Reduced graphene oxide based flexible organic charge trap memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Adila; Song, Ji-Min; Jung Lee, Mi; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2012-12-01

    A nonvolatile organic transistor memory device was developed using layer-by-layer assembly of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and solution-processed, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) as the charge trapping layer on flexible substrates. Reduction of graphene oxide and successful adsorption of the rGO on APTES-covered substrates were confirmed. The organic memory devices based on rGO exhibited reliable programmable memory operations, confirmed by program/erase operations, data retention, and endurance properties. These methods can potentially play a significant role in the fabrication of next-generation flexible nonvolatile memory devices based on graphene materials.

  6. The trapped human experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, R; Agapiou, A; Bocos-Bintintan, V; Brown, L J; Burns, C; Creaser, C S; Devenport, N A; Gao-Lau, B; Guallar-Hoyas, C; Hildebrand, L; Malkar, A; Martin, H J; Moll, V H; Patel, P; Ratiu, A; Reynolds, J C; Sielemann, S; Slodzynski, R; Statheropoulos, M; Turner, M A; Vautz, W; Wright, V E; Thomas, C L P

    2011-12-01

    This experiment observed the evolution of metabolite plumes from a human trapped in a simulation of a collapsed building. Ten participants took it in turns over five days to lie in a simulation of a collapsed building and eight of them completed the 6 h protocol while their breath, sweat and skin metabolites were passed through a simulation of a collapsed glass-clad reinforced-concrete building. Safety, welfare and environmental parameters were monitored continuously, and active adsorbent sampling for thermal desorption GC-MS, on-line and embedded CO, CO(2) and O(2) monitoring, aspirating ion mobility spectrometry with integrated semiconductor gas sensors, direct injection GC-ion mobility spectrometry, active sampling thermal desorption GC-differential mobility spectrometry and a prototype remote early detection system for survivor location were used to monitor the evolution of the metabolite plumes that were generated. Oxygen levels within the void simulator were allowed to fall no lower than 19.1% (v). Concurrent levels of carbon dioxide built up to an average level of 1.6% (v) in the breathing zone of the participants. Temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide levels and the physiological measurements were consistent with a reproducible methodology that enabled the metabolite plumes to be sampled and characterized from the different parts of the experiment. Welfare and safety data were satisfactory with pulse rates, blood pressures and oxygenation, all within levels consistent with healthy adults. Up to 12 in-test welfare assessments per participant and a six-week follow-up Stanford Acute Stress Response Questionnaire indicated that the researchers and participants did not experience any adverse effects from their involvement in the study. Preliminary observations confirmed that CO(2), NH(3) and acetone were effective markers for trapped humans, although interactions with water absorbed in building debris needed further study. An unexpected observation from the NH(3

  7. 1986-87 Annual Trapping Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Trapping Plan for the 1986-87 trapping season at Clarence Cannon NWR outlines rules and regulations for the trapping of beaver, muskrat, raccoon,...

  8. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R. D.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-01

    The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

  9. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilov, Momčilo

    2016-01-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without "touching" them. Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: They can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop--absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid--we are free to ...

  10. Trapping tsetse flies on water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laveissière C.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Riverine tsetse flies such as Glossina palpalis gambiensis and G. tachinoides are the vectors of human and animal trypanosomoses in West Africa. Despite intimate links between tsetse and water, to our knowledge there has never been any attempt to design trapping devices that would catch tsetse on water. In mangrove (Guinea one challenging issue is the tide, because height above the ground for a trap is a key factor affecting tsetse catches. The trap was mounted on the remains of an old wooden dugout, and attached with rope to nearby branches, thereby allowing it to rise and fall with the tide. Catches showed a very high density of 93.9 flies/”water-trap”/day, which was significantly higher (p < 0.05 than all the catches from other habitats where the classical trap had been used. In savannah, on the Comoe river of South Burkina Faso, the biconical trap was mounted on a small wooden raft anchored to a stone, and catches were compared with the classical biconical trap put on the shores. G. p. gambiensis and G. tachinoides densities were not significantly different from those from the classical biconical one. The adaptations described here have allowed to efficiently catch tsetse on the water, which to our knowledge is reported here for the first time. This represents a great progress and opens new opportunities to undertake studies on the vectors of trypanosomoses in mangrove areas of Guinea, which are currently the areas showing the highest prevalences of sleeping sickness in West Africa. It also has huge potential for tsetse control using insecticide impregnated traps in savannah areas where traps become less efficient in rainy season. The Guinean National control programme has already expressed its willingness to use such modified traps in its control campaigns in Guinea, as has the national PATTEC programme in Burkina Faso during rainy season.

  11. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  12. Pattern formation with trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Tony E

    2010-01-01

    We propose an experiment to study collective behavior in a nonlinear medium of trapped ions. Using laser cooling and heating and an anharmonic trap potential, one can turn an ion into a nonlinear van der Pol-Duffing oscillator. A chain of ions interacting electrostatically has stable plane waves for all parameters. The system also behaves like an excitable medium, since a sufficiently large perturbation generates a travelling pulse. Small chains exhibit multistability and limit cycles. We account for noise from spontaneous emission in the amplitude equation and find that the patterns are observable for realistic experimental parameters. The tunability of ion traps makes them an exciting setting to study nonequilibrium statistical physics.

  13. A New Atom Trap The Annular Shell Atom Trap (ASAT)

    CERN Document Server

    Pilloff, H S; Pilloff, Herschel S.; Horbatsch, Marko

    2002-01-01

    In the course of exploring some aspects of atom guiding in a hollow, optical fiber, a small negative potential energy well was found just in front of the repulsive or guiding barrier. This results from the optical dipole and the van der Waals potentials. The ground state for atoms bound in this negative potential well was determined by numerically solving the Schrodinger eq. and it was found that this negative well could serve as an atom trap. This trap is referred to as the Annular Shell Atom Trap or ASAT because of the geometry of the trapped atoms which are located in the locus of points defining a very thin annular shell just in front of the guiding barrier. A unique feature of the ASAT is the compression of the atoms from the entire volume to the volume of the annular shell resulting in a very high density of atoms in this trap. This trap may have applications to very low temperatures using evaporative cooling and possibly the formation of BEC. Finally, a scheme is discussed for taking advantage of the d...

  14. Modification of SnO2 Anodes by Atomic Layer Deposition for High Performance Lithium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Yesibolati, Nulati

    2013-05-01

    Tin dioxide (SnO2) is considered one of the most promising anode materials for Lithium ion batteries (LIBs), due to its large theoretical capacity and natural abundance. However, its low electronic/ionic conductivities, large volume change during lithiation/delithiation and agglomeration prevent it from further commercial applications. In this thesis, we investigate modified SnO2 as a high energy density anode material for LIBs. Specifically two approaches are presented to improve battery performances. Firstly, SnO2 electrochemical performances were improved by surface modification using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Ultrathin Al2O3 or HfO2 were coated on SnO2 electrodes. It was found that electrochemical performances had been enhanced after ALD deposition. In a second approach, we implemented a layer-by-layer (LBL) assembled graphene/carbon-coated hollow SnO2 spheres as anode material for LIBs. Our results indicated that the LBL assembled electrodes had high reversible lithium storage capacities even at high current densities. These superior electrochemical performances are attributed to the enhanced electronic conductivity and effective lithium diffusion, because of the interconnected graphene/carbon networks among nanoparticles of the hollow SnO2 spheres.

  15. Innovation: the classic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    these traps.

  16. Trapping Triatominae in Silvatic Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noireau François

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale trials of a trapping system designed to collect silvatic Triatominae are reported. Live-baited adhesive traps were tested in various ecosystems and different triatomine habitats (arboreal and terrestrial. The trials were always successful, with a rate of positive habitats generally over 20% and reaching 48.4% for palm trees of the Amazon basin. Eleven species of Triatominae belonging to the three genera of public health importance (Triatoma, Rhodnius and Panstrongylus were captured. This trapping system provides an effective way to detect the presence of triatomines in terrestrial and arboreal silvatic habitats and represents a promising tool for ecological studies. Various lines of research are contemplated to improve the performance of this trapping system.

  17. Magneto optical trapping of Barium

    CERN Document Server

    De, S; Jungmann, K; Willmann, L

    2008-01-01

    First laser cooling and trapping of the heavy alkaline earth element barium has been achieved based on the strong 6s$^2$ $^1$S$_0$ - 6s6p $^1$P$_1$ transition for the main cooling. Due to the large branching into metastable D-states several additional laser driven transitions are required to provide a closed cooling cycle. A total efficiency of $0.4(1) \\cdot 10^{-2}$ for slowing a thermal atomic beam and capturing atoms into a magneto optical trap was obtained. Trapping lifetimes of more than 1.5 s were observed. This lifetime is shortened at high laser intensities by photo ionization losses. The developed techniques will allow to extend significantly the number of elements that can be optically cooled and trapped.

  18. Seismic fault zone trapped noise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hillers, G; Campillo, M; Ben‐Zion, Y; Roux, P

    2014-01-01

    Systematic velocity contrasts across and within fault zones can lead to head and trapped waves that provide direct information on structural units that are important for many aspects of earthquake and fault mechanics...

  19. Direct scattering, trapping, and desorption in atom-surface collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoqing; Manson, J R

    2008-08-08

    Maxwell is credited as the first to invoke the assumption that an impinging gas beam scatters from a surface with a direct contribution exhibiting little change in state and a trapping-desorption fraction that desorbs in equilibrium [J. C. Maxwell, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London 170, 231 (1879)]. Here a classical mechanical scattering theory is developed to describe direct scattering, trapping, and subsequent desorption of the incident beam. This theory allows a rigorous test of the Maxwell assumption and determines the conditions under which it is valid. The theory also gives quantitative explanations of important new experimental measurements [K. D. Gibson, N. Isa, and S. J. Sibener, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 13 083 (2003)] for direct and trapping-desorption scattering of Ar atoms by a self-assembled layer of 1-decanethiol on Au(111).

  20. Trapping Surface Electrons on Graphene Layers and Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Niesner, D.; Fauster, Th.; Dadap, J. I.; Zaki, N.; Knox, K. R.; Yeh, P. -C.; Bhandari, R.; Osgood, R. M.; Petrović, M; Kralj, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report the use of time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission to map the bound, unoccupied electronic structure of the weakly coupled graphene/Ir(111) system. The energy, dispersion, and lifetime of the lowest three image-potential states are measured. In addition, the weak interaction between Ir and graphene permits observation of resonant transitions from an unquenched Shockley-type surface state of the Ir substrate to graphene/Ir image-potential states. The image-potential-state l...

  1. Optical two-beam trap in a polymer microfluidic chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espina Palanco, Marta; Catak, Darmin; Marie, Rodolphe; Matteucci, Marco; Bilenberg, Brian; Kristensen, Anders; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2016-09-01

    An optical two-beam trap, composed from two counter propagating laser beams, is an interesting setup due to the ability of the system to trap, hold, and stretch soft biological objects like vesicles or single cells. Because of this functionality, the system was also named "the optical stretcher" by Jochen Guck, Josep Käs and co-workers some 15 years ago. In a favorable setup, the two opposing laser beams meet with equal intensities in the middle of a fluidic channel in which cells may flow past, be trapped, stretched, and allowed to move on, giving the promise of a high throughput device. Yet, single beam optical traps, aka optical tweezers, by far outnumber the existing optical stretchers in research labs throughout the world. The ability to easily construct an optical stretcher setup in a low-cost material would possibly imply more frequent use of the optical stretching technique. Here, we will outline the design, the production procedures, and results obtained in a fiber-based experimental setup built within an injection molded microfluidic polymer chip. The microfluidic chip is constructed with a three layer technology in which we ensure both horizontal and vertical focusing of the cells we wish to trap, thereby preventing too many cells to flow below the line of focus of the two counter propagating laser beams that are positioned perpendicular to the direction of flow of the cells. Results will be compared to that from other designs from previous work in the group.

  2. Microinstrument gradient-force optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S D; Baskin, R J; Howitt, D G

    1999-10-01

    A micromachined fiber-optic trap is presented. The trap consists of four single-mode, 1064-nm optical intersection. The beam fibers mounted in a micromachined silicon and glass housing. Micromachining provides the necessary precision to align the four optical fibers so that the outputs have a common intersection forms a strong three-dimensional gradient-force trap with trapping forces comparable with that of optical tweezers. Characterization of the multibeam fiber trap is illustrated for capture of polystyrene microspheres, computer simulations of the trap stiffness, and experimental determination of the trapping forces.

  3. Subthreshold slope as a measure of interfacial trap density in pentacene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Yongwoo; Park, Byoungnam, E-mail: metalpbn@hongik.ac.kr

    2016-01-29

    Electrical properties in organic field effect transistors (FETs) are dominated by charge transport in the accumulation layer, few molecular layers close to the gate dielectric. Through comparison of the subthreshold slope between monolayer (ML) and thick pentacene FETs, formation of the second layer islands on top of the complete first layer is found to be crucial in determining the charge transport in ML pentacene FETs. It is demonstrated that a pentacene ML field effect transistor (FET) is an excellent probe that can detect electronic states of organic semiconductors interfacing with the gate dielectric at nanometer scale. Far higher sub-threshold slope in ML FETs, as a measure of interfacial charge trap density, than that in thick pentacene FETs is translated that the path of the induced carriers in ML FETs is limited into the molecular layer interfacing with the gate dielectric with a high density of charge traps, while carriers in thicker films have alternative pathways through more electrically conductive layer above the first layer with much less trap density. - Highlights: • Sub-threshold slope is demonstrated to be a measure of interface traps. • For application to sensors, effective charge transport layer should be chosen. • Monolayer transistors can be used as a platform for probing localized states.

  4. Effect of light trapping in an amorphous silicon solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iftiquar, S.M., E-mail: iftiquar@skku.edu [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Juyeon; Park, Hyeongsik [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaehyun; Shin, Chonghoon [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinjoo [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Junhee [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Bong, Sungjae [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunbo [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Junsin, E-mail: yi@yurim.skku.ac.kr [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    Light trapping in amorphous silicon based solar cell has been investigated theoretically. The substrate for these cells can be textured, including pyramidally textured c-Si wafer, to improve capture of incident light. A thin silver layer, deposited on the substrate of an n–i–p cell, ultimately goes at the back of the cell structure and can act a back reflector to improve light trapping. The two physical solar cells we investigated had open circuit voltages (V{sub oc}) of 0.87, 0.90 V, short circuit current densities (J{sub sc}) of 14.2, 15.36 mA/cm{sup 2} respectively. The first cell was investigated for the effect on its performance while having and not having light trapping scheme (LT), when thickness of the active layer (d{sub i}) was changed in the range of 100 nm to 800 nm. In both the approaches, for having or not having LT, the short circuit current density increases with d{sub i} while the V{sub oc} and fill factor, decreases steadily. However, maximum cell efficiency can be obtained when d{sub i} = 400 nm, and hence it was considered optimized thickness of the active layer, that was used for further investigation. With the introduction of light trapping to the second cell, it shows a further enhancement in J{sub sc} and red response of the external quantum efficiency to 16.6 mA/cm{sup 2} and by 11.1% respectively. Considering multiple passages of light inside the cell, we obtained an improvement in cell efficiency from 9.7% to 10.6%. - Highlights: • A theoretical analysis of light trapping in p–i–n and n–i–p type solar cells • J{sub sc} increases and V{sub oc} decreases with the increase in i-layer thickness. • Observed optimized thickness of i-layer as 400 nm • J{sub sc} improved from 15.4 mA/cm{sup 2} to 16.6 mA/cm{sup 2} due to the light trapping. • Efficiency (η) improved from 9.7% to 10.6% due to better red response of the EQE.

  5. Live trapping of hawks and owls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R.E.; Cope, J.B.; Robbins, C.S.

    1945-01-01

    1. Hawks of six species (80 individuals) and owls of five species (37 individuals) were trapped for banding from November 1, 1943, to. May 26,1944. 2. In general, pole traps proved better than hand-operated traps or automatic traps using live bait. 3. Verbail pole traps proved very efficient, and were much more humane than padded steel traps because they rarely injured a captured bird. 4: Unbaited Verbail traps took a variety of raptors, in rough proportion to their local abundance, although slightly more of beneficial species were caught than of harmful types. 5. Hawks and owls were retrapped more readily in Verbail traps than in other types tried. 6. The number of song birds caught in Verbail traps was negligible. 7. Crows and vultures were not taken in Verbail traps, but possibly could be caught with bait.

  6. A magnetic particle micro-trap for large trapping surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.

    2012-01-08

    Manipulation of micron-size magnetic particles of the superparamagnetic type contributes significantly in many applications like controlling the antibody/antigen binding process in immunoassays. Specifically, more target biomolecules can be attached/tagged and analyzed since the three dimensional structure of the magnetic particles increases the surface to volume ratio. Additionally, such biomolecular-tagged magnetic particles can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic behavior. Therefore, magnetic particle- based immunoassays are extensively applied in micro-flow cytometry. The design of a square-loop micro-trap as a magnetic particle manipulator as well as numerical and experimental analysis is presented. Experimental results showed that the micro-trap could successfully trap and concentrate magnetic particles from a large to a small area with a high spatial range.

  7. Atomic layer deposition of perovskite oxides and their epitaxial integration with Si, Ge, and other semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Martin D.; Ngo, Thong Q.; Hu, Shen; Posadas, Agham; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2015-12-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a proven technique for the conformal deposition of oxide thin films with nanoscale thickness control. Most successful industrial applications have been with binary oxides, such as Al2O3 and HfO2. However, there has been much effort to deposit ternary oxides, such as perovskites (ABO3), with desirable properties for advanced thin film applications. Distinct challenges are presented by the deposition of multi-component oxides using ALD. This review is intended to highlight the research of the many groups that have deposited perovskite oxides by ALD methods. Several commonalities between the studies are discussed. Special emphasis is put on precursor selection, deposition temperatures, and specific property performance (high-k, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, etc.). Finally, the monolithic integration of perovskite oxides with semiconductors by ALD is reviewed. High-quality epitaxial growth of oxide thin films has traditionally been limited to physical vapor deposition techniques (e.g., molecular beam epitaxy). However, recent studies have demonstrated that epitaxial oxide thin films may be deposited on semiconductor substrates using ALD. This presents an exciting opportunity to integrate functional perovskite oxides for advanced semiconductor applications in a process that is economical and scalable.

  8. Two-dimensional layered MoS₂ biosensors enable highly sensitive detection of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joonhyung; Dak, Piyush; Lee, Yeonsung; Park, Heekyeong; Choi, Woong; Alam, Muhammad A; Kim, Sunkook

    2014-01-01

    We present a MoS2 biosensor to electrically detect prostate specific antigen (PSA) in a highly sensitive and label-free manner. Unlike previous MoS2-FET-based biosensors, the device configuration of our biosensors does not require a dielectric layer such as HfO2 due to the hydrophobicity of MoS2. Such an oxide-free operation improves sensitivity and simplifies sensor design. For a quantitative and selective detection of PSA antigen, anti-PSA antibody was immobilized on the sensor surface. Then, introduction of PSA antigen, into the anti-PSA immobilized sensor surface resulted in a lable-free immunoassary format. Measured off-state current of the device showed a significant decrease as the applied PSA concentration was increased. The minimum detectable concentration of PSA is 1 pg/mL, which is several orders of magnitude below the clinical cut-off level of ~4 ng/mL. In addition, we also provide a systematic theoretical analysis of the sensor platform - including the charge state of protein at the specific pH level, and self-consistent channel transport. Taken together, the experimental demonstration and the theoretical framework provide a comprehensive description of the performance potential of dielectric-free MoS2-based biosensor technology.

  9. Two-dimensional Layered MoS2 Biosensors Enable Highly Sensitive Detection of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joonhyung; Dak, Piyush; Lee, Yeonsung; Park, Heekyeong; Choi, Woong; Alam, Muhammad A.; Kim, Sunkook

    2014-12-01

    We present a MoS2 biosensor to electrically detect prostate specific antigen (PSA) in a highly sensitive and label-free manner. Unlike previous MoS2-FET-based biosensors, the device configuration of our biosensors does not require a dielectric layer such as HfO2 due to the hydrophobicity of MoS2. Such an oxide-free operation improves sensitivity and simplifies sensor design. For a quantitative and selective detection of PSA antigen, anti-PSA antibody was immobilized on the sensor surface. Then, introduction of PSA antigen, into the anti-PSA immobilized sensor surface resulted in a lable-free immunoassary format. Measured off-state current of the device showed a significant decrease as the applied PSA concentration was increased. The minimum detectable concentration of PSA is 1 pg/mL, which is several orders of magnitude below the clinical cut-off level of ~4 ng/mL. In addition, we also provide a systematic theoretical analysis of the sensor platform - including the charge state of protein at the specific pH level, and self-consistent channel transport. Taken together, the experimental demonstration and the theoretical framework provide a comprehensive description of the performance potential of dielectric-free MoS2-based biosensor technology.

  10. Modeling nanostructure-enhanced light trapping in organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Jost

    A promising approach for improving the power conversion efficiencies of organic solar cells (OSCs) is by incorporating nanostructures in their thin film architecture to improve the light absorption in the device’s active polymer layers. Here, we present a modelling framework for the prediction....... Diffraction by fractal metallic supergratings. Optics Express, 15(24), 15628–15636 (2007) [3] Goszczak, A. J. et al. Nanoscale Aluminum dimples for light trapping in organic thin films (submitted)...

  11. Trap induction and trapping in eight nematode-trapping fungi (Orbiliaceae) as affected by juvenile stage of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongyan; Aminuzzaman, F M; Xu, Lingling; Lai, Yiling; Li, Feng; Liu, Xingzhong

    2010-06-01

    This study measured trap induction and trapping on agar disks as affected by juvenile stages (J1, J2, J3, and J4) of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and by species of nematode-trapping fungi. Eight species of nematode-trapping fungi belonging to the family Orbiliaceae and producing four kinds of traps were studied: adhesive network-forming Arthrobotrys oligospora, A. vermicola, and A. eudermata, constricting ring-forming Drechslerella brochopaga, and Dr. stenobrocha, adhesive column-forming Dactylellina cionopaga, and adhesive knob-forming Da. ellipsospora, and Da. drechsleri. The number of traps induced generally increased with increasing juvenile stages of C. elegans. The ability to capture the juveniles tended to be similar among isolates that produced the same kind of trap but differed among species that produced different kinds of traps. Trapping by Dr. stenobrocha and Da. cionopaga was correlated with trap number and with juvenile stage. A. oligospora and A. vermicola respectively captured more than 92 and 88% of the J1, J3, and J4 but captured a lower percentage of J2. The knob-producing isolates captured more younger than elder juveniles. Partial correlation analyses demonstrated that the trap induction of the most fungal species positively correlated with the juvenile size and motility, which was juvenile stage dependent. Overall, trap induction and trapping correlated with C. elegans juvenile stage (size and motility) in six species of trapping fungi.

  12. Structure and morphology of Ru films grown by atomic layer deposition from 1-ethyl-1’-methyl-ruthenocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukli, Kaupo; Aarik, Jaan; Aidla, Aleks; Uustare, Teet; Jõgi, Indrek; Lu, Jun; Tallarida, Massimo; Kemell, Marianna; Kiisler, Alma-Asta; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2010-06-01

    Ru thin films were grown on TiO 2, Al 2O 3, HfO 2, and ZrO 2 films as well as on HF-etched silicon and SiO 2-covered silicon by atomic layer deposition from 1-ethyl-1'-methyl-ruthenocene, (CH 3C 5H 4)(C 2H 5C 5H 4)Ru, and oxygen. The growth of Ru was obtained and characterized at temperatures ranging from 250 to 325 °C. On epitaxial rutile, highly oriented growth of Ru with hexagonal structure was achieved, while on other substrates the films possessed nonoriented hexagonal structure. Ruthenium oxide was not detected in the films. The lowest resistivity value obtained for 5.0-6.6 nm thick films was 26 μΩ cm. The conductivity of the films depended somewhat on the deposition cycle time parameters and, expectedly, more strongly on the amount of deposition cycles. Increase in the deposition temperature of underlying metal oxide films increased the conductivity of Ru layers.

  13. Kinetic model of the bichromatic dark trap for atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, I. V.

    2017-08-01

    A kinetic model of atom confinement in a bichromatic dark trap (BDT) is developed with the goal of describing its dissipative properties. The operating principle of the deep BDT is based on using the combination of multiple bichromatic cosine-Gaussian optical beams (CGBs) for creating high-potential barriers, which is described in our previous work (Krasnov 2016 Laser Phys. 26 105501). In the indicated work, particle motion in the BDT is described in terms of classical trajectories. In the present study, particle motion is analyzed by means of the Wigner function (phase-space distribution function (DF)), which allows one to properly take into account the quantum fluctuations of optical forces. Besides, we consider an improved scheme of the BDT, where CGBs create, apart from plane potential barriers, a narrow cooling layer. We find an asymptotic solution of the Fokker-Planck equation for the DF and show that the DF of particles deeply trapped in a BDT with a cooling layer is the Tsallis distribution with the effective temperature, which can be considerably lower than in a BDT without a cooling layer. Moreover, it can be adjusted by slightly changing the CGBs’ radii. We also study the effect of particle escape from the trap due to the scattering of resonant photons and show that the particle lifetime in a BDT can exceed several tens of hours when it is limited by photon scattering.

  14. The phenomenology of trapped inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Lauren; Sorbo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Trapped inflation is a mechanism in which particle production from the moving inflaton is the main source of friction in the inflaton equation of motion. The produced fields source inflaton perturbations, which dominate over the vacuum ones. We employ the set of equations for the inflaton zero mode and its perturbations which was developed in the original work on trapped inflation, and which we extend to second order in the perturbations. We build on this study by updating the experimental constraints, and by replacing the existing approximate solutions with more accurate ones. We obtain a different numerical value for the amplitude of the scalar power spectrum, and a parametrically different result for the bispectrum. This has implications for the allowed region of parameter space in models of trapped inflation, and for some of the phenomenological results obtained in this region. The main results in the allowed region are the following: monomial inflaton potentials, such as $V \\propto \\varphi,\\, \\varphi^2$ ...

  15. Promoter trapping in Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-hong; LU Jian-ping; WANG Jiao-yu; MIN Hang; LIN Fu-cheng

    2006-01-01

    Application of promoter trapping based on transformation in Magnaporthe grisea is reported in this paper. Two promoter-trapping vectors, designated as pCBGFP and pEGFPHPH, were constructed and transformed into protoplasts of M.grisea. A library of 1077 transformants resistant to hygromycin B was generated. Of which, 448 transformants were found to express eGFP gene in different structures ofM. grisea. Three transformants grew slowly, 5 transformants decreased in conidiafion and 7 transformants reduced in pathogenicity greatly among these 448 transformants. Eleven transformants were checked by genomic southern blot randomly, and 9 of which were single-copy insertions. The promoter trapping technique has been applied successfully in M. grisea and can be used as a tool for functional genomic analysis.

  16. Accretion discs trapped near corotation

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, C.R.; Spruit, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    We show that discs accreting on to the magnetosphere of a rotating star can end up in a trapped state, in which the inner edge of the disc stays near the corotation radius, even at low and varying accretion rates. The accretion in these trapped states can be steady or cyclic; we explore these states over a wide range of parameter space. We find two distinct regions of instability: one related to the buildup and release of mass in the disc outside corotation, and the other to mass storage with...

  17. Dysprosium magneto-optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Youn, Seo Ho; Ray, Ushnish; Lev, Benjamin L

    2010-01-01

    Magneto-optical traps (MOTs) of highly magnetic lanthanides open the door to explorations of novel phases of strongly correlated matter such as lattice supersolids and quantum liquid crystals. We recently reported the first MOTs of the five high abundance isotopes of the most magnetic atom, dysprosium. Described here are details of the experimental technique employed for repumper-free Dy MOTs containing up to half a billion atoms. Extensive characterization of the MOTs' properties---population, temperature, loading, metastable decay dynamics, trap dynamics---is provided.

  18. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Momčilo; Bechhoefer, John

    2017-03-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without `touching' them (e.g. by putting them in a small box or attaching them to a tether). Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: they can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop-absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid-we are free to specify and then manipulate in time an arbitrary potential U(x,t). Here, we review recent applications of feedback traps to studies on the fundamental connections between information and thermodynamics, a topic where feedback plays an even more fundamental role. We discuss how recursive maximum-likelihood techniques allow continuous calibration, to compensate for drifts in experiments that last for days. We consider ways to estimate work and heat, using them to measure fluctuating energies to a precision of ±0.03 kT over these long experiments. Finally, we compare work and heat measurements of the costs of information erasure, the Landauer limit of kT ln 2 per bit of information erased. We argue that, when you want to know the average heat transferred to a bath in a long protocol, you should measure instead the average work and then infer the heat using the first law of thermodynamics. This

  19. Rotation sensing with trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, W C

    2016-01-01

    We present a protocol for using trapped ions to measure rotations via matter-wave Sagnac interferometry. The trap allows the interferometer to enclose a large area in a compact apparatus through repeated round-trips in a Sagnac geometry. We show how a uniform magnetic field can be used to close the interferometer over a large dynamic range in rotation speed and measurement bandwidth without losing contrast. Since this technique does not require the ions to be confined in the Lamb-Dicke regime, thermal states with many phonons should be sufficient for operation.

  20. Ion irradiation of graphene on Ir(111): From trapping to blistering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, Charlotte; Åhlgren, E. Harriet; Valerius, Philipp; Schröder, Ulrike A.; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J.; Arman, Mohammad A.; Kotakoski, Jani; Knudsen, Jan; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Michely, Thomas

    Graphene grown epitaxially on Ir(111) is irradiated with low energy noble gas ions and the processes induced by atomic collision and subsequent annealing are analyzed using scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron diffraction and thermal desorption spectroscopy. Upon room temperature ion irradiation graphene amorphizes and recovers its crystalline structure during annealing. The energetic noble gas projectiles are trapped with surprisingly high efficiency under the graphene cover up to extremely high temperatures beyond 1300K. The energy, angle, and ion species dependence of trapping are quantified. At elevated temperatures the trapped gas forms well developed and highly pressurized blisters under the graphene cover. We use molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio calculations to elucidate the trapping mechanism and its thermal robustness. Similar trapping and blistering are observed after ion irradiation of a single layer of hexagonal boron nitride on Ir(111) and we speculate on the generality of the observed phenomena.

  1. The Rajahmundry Traps, Andhra Pradesh: Evaluation of their petrogenesis relative to the Deccan Traps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajoy K Baksi

    2001-12-01

    Geochemical and geochronological data for rocks from the Rajahmundry Traps, are evaluated for possible correlation with the main Deccan province. Lava flows are found on both banks of the Godavari River and contain an intertrappean sedimentary layer. Based on 40Ar/39Ar age data, rocks on the east bank are post K-T boundary, show normal magnetic polarity, and belong to chron 29N. Their chemistry is identical to lavas in the Mahabaleshwar Formation in the Western Ghats, ∼1000 km away. It was suggested earlier that the genetic link between these geographically widely separated rocks resulted from lava owing down freshly incised river canyons at ∼64 Ma. For the west bank rocks, recent paleomagnetic work indicates lava flows below and above the intertrappean (sedimentary) layer show reversed and normal magnetic polarity, respectively. The chemical composition of the west bank ow above the intertrappean layer is identical to rocks on the east bank. The west bank lava lying below the sedimentary layer, shows chemistry similar to Ambenali Formation lava ows in the western Deccan. 40Ar/39Ar dating and complete chemical characterization of this ow is required to elucidate its petrogenesis with respect to the main Deccan Province.

  2. Light Trapping: Light Manipulation in Organic Photovoltaics (Adv. Sci. 7/2016)

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Qing‐Dong; Li, Yan‐Qing; Tang, Jian‐Xin

    2016-01-01

    Light manipulation is becoming a general strategy for further enhancing the performance of organic photovoltaic cells. In article 1600123, various light trapping schemes are reviewed from the viewpoint of plasmonic and photonic resonances, addressing the external antireflection coatings, substrate geometry‐induced trapping, the role of electrode design in optical enhancement, as well as optically modifying charge extraction and photoactive layers by Jian‐Xin Tang and co‐workers.

  3. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Michael A.; Blain, Matthew G.; Tigges, Chris P.; Linker, Kevin L.

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  4. Mass Trapping for Anastrepha suspensa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT In field tests conducted in south Florida to test grape juice as an alternative inexpensive bait for Anastrepha suspensa Loew, high numbers of Zaprionus indianus Gupta were captured in traps baited with aqueous grape juice. These experiments included comparisons of grape juice with standard...

  5. Evading the joint decision trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbæk, Jørgen; Jensen, Mads Christian Dagnis

    2016-01-01

    is applied, including the concept of the joint-decision trap. The paper finds that the outcome was made possible by compensating the member states that were worst affected by the policy changes. A coalition of net contributors, centered on Germany and the United Kingdom, was influential regarding the overall...

  6. Quantum Games in ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buluta, Iulia Maria [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: noa@lyman.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Fujiwara, Shingo [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: fujiwara@lyman.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Hasegawa, Shuichi [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: hasegawa@q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-10-09

    We propose a general, scalable framework for implementing two-choices-multiplayer Quantum Games in ion traps. In particular, we discuss two famous examples: the Quantum Prisoners' Dilemma and the Quantum Minority Game. An analysis of decoherence due to intensity fluctuations in the applied laser fields is also provided.

  7. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Taheri, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trappe...

  8. Optical trapping of coated microspheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bormuth, V.; Jannasch, A.; Ander, M.; van Kats, C.M.; van Blaaderen, A.; Howard, J.; Schäffer, E.

    2008-01-01

    In an optical trap, micron-sized dielectric particles are held by a tightly focused laser beam. The optical force on the particle is composed of an attractive gradient force and a destabilizing scattering force. We hypothesized that using anti-reflection-coated microspheres would reduce scattering a

  9. Optical trapping of coated microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormuth, Volker; Jannasch, Anita; Ander, Marcel; van Kats, Carlos M; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik

    2008-09-01

    In an optical trap, micron-sized dielectric particles are held by a tightly focused laser beam. The optical force on the particle is composed of an attractive gradient force and a destabilizing scattering force. We hypothesized that using anti-reflection-coated microspheres would reduce scattering and lead to stronger trapping. We found that homogeneous silica and polystyrene microspheres had a sharp maximum trap stiffness at a diameter of around 800 nm--the trapping laser wavelength in water--and that a silica coating on a polystyrene microsphere was a substantial improvement for larger diameters. In addition, we noticed that homogeneous spheres of a correct size demonstrated anti-reflective properties. Our results quantitatively agreed with Mie scattering calculations and serve as a proof of principle. We used a DNA stretching experiment to confirm the large linear range in detection and force of the coated microspheres and performed a high-force motor protein assay. These measurements show that the surfaces of the coated microspheres are compatible with biophysical assays.

  10. Funnel traps capture a higher proportion of juvenile Great Tits Parus major than automatic traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senar, J.C.; Domenech, J.; Conroy, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    We compared capture rates of Great Tits at funnel traps, where several birds can be captured at once so that some decoy effect may appear, to those obtained at automatic traps, where only one bird can be trapped at a time, at trapping stations in northeastern Spain. Juvenile birds were mainly captured at funnel traps (79% of juvenile captures), whereas adult plumaged birds were captured at both types of traps (51% of captures were at the funnel traps) (test between ages, PTits had lower body condition as measured by ptilochronology (P<0.01). These birds are more easily trapped in funnel traps, which may be acting as decoy traps, and thus are vulnerable to the same kinds of biases (eg age or body condition) that have been previously documented for decoy traps.

  11. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  12. Interactions of hydrogen with amorphous hafnium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Moloud; Afanas'ev, Valeri V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2017-02-01

    We used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the interaction of hydrogen with amorphous hafnia (a -HfO2 ) using a hybrid exchange-correlation functional. Injection of atomic hydrogen, its diffusion towards electrodes, and ionization can be seen as key processes underlying charge instability of high-permittivity amorphous hafnia layers in many applications. Hydrogen in many wide band gap crystalline oxides exhibits negative-U behavior (+1 and -1 charged states are thermodynamically more stable than the neutral state) . Our results show that in a -HfO2 hydrogen is also negative-U, with charged states being the most thermodynamically stable at all Fermi level positions. However, metastable atomic hydrogen can share an electron with intrinsic electron trapping precursor sites [Phys. Rev. B 94, 020103 (2016)., 10.1103/PhysRevB.94.020103] forming a [etr -+O -H ] center, which is lower in energy on average by about 0.2 eV. These electron trapping sites can affect both the dynamics and thermodynamics of the interaction of hydrogen with a -HfO2 and the electrical behavior of amorphous hafnia films in CMOS devices.

  13. Scaling ion traps for quantum computing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a chipscale, multi-zone, surface electrode ion trap is reported. The modular design and fabrication techniques used are anticipated to advance scalability of ion trap quantum computing architectures...

  14. A Portable Root-door Hog Trap

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Since the early 1960's, over 4,500 wild hogs have been relocated through Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission trapping operations. The trap now used by the...

  15. Trapping Plan: Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Clarence Cannon NWR trapping plan outlines trapping areas, species, regulations, equipment, and seasons. This plan will allow harvest of a renewable natural...

  16. Trapping Plan: Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Necedah NWR trapping plan outlines trapping areas, species, regulations, equipment, and seasons. This plan will allow harvest of a renewable natural resource...

  17. Oxford ion-trap quantum computing project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, D M; Donald, C J S; Home, J P; McDonnell, M J; Ramos, A; Stacey, D N; Stacey, J-P; Steane, A M; Webster, S C

    2003-07-15

    We describe recent progress in the development of an ion-trap quantum information processor. We discuss the choice of ion species and describe recent experiments on read-out for a ground-state qubit and photoionization trap loading.

  18. Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Trapping Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Benton Lake NWR trapping plan outlines trapping areas, species, regulations, equipment, and seasons. This plan will allow harvest of a renewable natural resource...

  19. Trap split with Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kazemi, Seyedeh Hamideh; Mahmoud, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The optical trapping techniques have been extensively used in physics, biophysics, micro-chemistry, and micro-mechanics to allow trapping and manipulation of materials ranging from particles, cells, biological substances, and polymers to DNA and RNA molecules. In this Letter, we present a convenient and effective way to generate a novel phenomenon of trapping, named trap split, in a conventional four-level double-$\\Lambda$ atomic system driven by four femtosecond Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses. We find that trap split can be always achieved when atoms are trapped by such laser pulses, as compared to Gaussian ones. This work would greatly facilitate the trapping and manipulating the particles and generation of trap split. It may also suggest the possibility of extension into new research fields, such as micro-machining and biophysics.

  20. Optical and Magnetic Trapping of Potassium 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensher, Jason; Cornell, Eric; Cataliotti, Francesco; Fort, Chiara; Marin, Francesco; Prevedelli, Marco; Inguscio, Massimo; Ricci, Leonardo; Tino, Guglielmo

    1998-05-01

    We present measurments of optical trapping and cooling and magnetic trapping of ^39K in a double-MOT apparatus. (Optics Lett. 21, 290(1996)) We have measured light-assisted collisional loss rates from our second MOT over a range of trap light intensities. At an intensity of 10 mW/cm^2 we find a loss rate parameter β of 2 x 10-11 cc/s. β increases with trap light intensity and is consistent with the values measured by Williamson and Walker (JOSA B 12, 1393 (1995)). We also present studies of the temperature of atoms in a MOT of ^39K. Under certain conditions of repump light intensity and trap light detuning we measure temperatures nearly as low as the Doppler Limit. Finally, we report on prelimiary results of magnetic trapping in which we have trapped several 10^7 atoms in a quadrupole magnetic trap.

  1. A microfluidic chip for direct and rapid trapping of white blood cells from whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingdong; Chen, Di; Yuan, Tao; Xie, Yao; Chen, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Blood analysis plays a major role in medical and science applications and white blood cells (WBCs) are an important target of analysis. We proposed an integrated microfluidic chip for direct and rapid trapping WBCs from whole blood. The microfluidic chip consists of two basic functional units: a winding channel to mix and arrays of two-layer trapping structures to trap WBCs. Red blood cells (RBCs) were eliminated through moving the winding channel and then WBCs were trapped by the arrays of trapping structures. We fabricated the PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) chip using soft lithography and determined the critical flow velocities of tartrazine and brilliant blue water mixing and whole blood and red blood cell lysis buffer mixing in the winding channel. They are 0.25 μl/min and 0.05 μl/min, respectively. The critical flow velocity of the whole blood and red blood cell lysis buffer is lower due to larger volume of the RBCs and higher kinematic viscosity of the whole blood. The time taken for complete lysis of whole blood was about 85 s under the flow velocity 0.05 μl/min. The RBCs were lysed completely by mixing and the WBCs were trapped by the trapping structures. The chip trapped about 2.0 × 10(3) from 3.3 × 10(3) WBCs.

  2. Effects of Gate Stack Structural and Process Defectivity on High-k Dielectric Dependence of NBTI Reliability in 32 nm Technology Node PMOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hussin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a simulation study on negative bias temperature instability (NBTI induced hole trapping in E′ center defects, which leads to depassivation of interface trap precursor in different geometrical structures of high-k PMOSFET gate stacks using the two-stage NBTI model. The resulting degradation is characterized based on the time evolution of the interface and hole trap densities, as well as the resulting threshold voltage shift. By varying the physical thicknesses of the interface silicon dioxide (SiO2 and hafnium oxide (HfO2 layers, we investigate how the variation in thickness affects hole trapping/detrapping at different stress temperatures. The results suggest that the degradations are highly dependent on the physical gate stack parameters for a given stress voltage and temperature. The degradation is more pronounced by 5% when the thicknesses of HfO2 are increased but is reduced by 11% when the SiO2 interface layer thickness is increased during lower stress voltage. However, at higher stress voltage, greater degradation is observed for a thicker SiO2 interface layer. In addition, the existence of different stress temperatures at which the degradation behavior differs implies that the hole trapping/detrapping event is thermally activated.

  3. Dynamic array of dark optical traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daria, V.R.; Rodrigo, P.J.; Glückstad, J.

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic array of dark optical traps is generated for simultaneous trapping and arbitrary manipulation of multiple low-index microstructures. The dynamic intensity patterns forming the dark optical trap arrays are generated using a nearly loss-less phase-to-intensity conversion of a phase-encode...... optical traps for simultaneous manipulation of hollow "air-filled" glass microspheres suspended in an aqueous medium. (C) 2004 American Institute of Physics....

  4. The Aarhus Ion Micro-Trap Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Nielsen, Otto; Poulsen, Gregers

    and installed in an ultra high vacuum chamber, which includes an ablation oven for all-optical loading of the trap [2]. The next steps on the project are to demonstrate the operation of the micro-trap and the cooling of ions using fiber delivered light. [1] D. Grant, Development of Micro-Scale Ion traps, Master...

  5. The Nanocluster Trap endstation at BESSY II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Lau

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Nanocluster Trap endstation at BESSY II combines a cryogenic linear radio-frequency ion trap with an applied magnetic field for x-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of cold and size-selected trapped ions. Applications include atomic, molecular, and cluster ions as well as ionic complexes.

  6. Superdense Coding via Hot Trapped Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Tao; FENG Mang; GAO Ke-Lin

    2004-01-01

    Superdense coding plays an important role in quantum information and can be performed with trapped ions. By confining the ions in a linear trap or a trap-cavity setup, we propose schemes to implement a reliable superdense coding by means of bichromatic radiation method. Experimental feasibility and reliability for achieving our schemes is discussed in detail.

  7. Microchip-Based Trapped-Atom Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Vuletic, Vladan; Schleier-Smith, Monika H

    2011-01-01

    This is a chapter of a recently published book entitled Atom Chips, edited by Jakob Reichel and Vladan Vuletic. The contents of this chapter include: Basic Principles; Atomic-Fountain versus Trapped-Atom Clocks; Optical-Transition Clocks versus Microwave Clocks; Clocks with Magnetically Trapped Atoms--Fundamental Limits and Experimental Demonstrations; Readout in Trapped-Atom Clocks; and Spin Squeezing.

  8. Photo-reactive charge trapping memory based on lanthanide complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jiaqing; Lo, Wai-Sum; Zhou, Li; Sun, Qi-Jun; Chan, Chi-Fai; Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Yan, Yan; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Ka-Leung; Roy, V A L

    2015-10-09

    Traditional utilization of photo-induced excitons is popularly but restricted in the fields of photovoltaic devices as well as photodetectors, and efforts on broadening its function have always been attempted. However, rare reports are available on organic field effect transistor (OFET) memory employing photo-induced charges. Here, we demonstrate an OFET memory containing a novel organic lanthanide complex Eu(tta)3ppta (Eu(tta)3 = Europium(III) thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, ppta = 2-phenyl-4,6-bis(pyrazol-1-yl)-1,3,5-triazine), in which the photo-induced charges can be successfully trapped and detrapped. The luminescent complex emits intense red emission upon ultraviolet (UV) light excitation and serves as a trapping element of holes injected from the pentacene semiconductor layer. Memory window can be significantly enlarged by light-assisted programming and erasing procedures, during which the photo-induced excitons in the semiconductor layer are separated by voltage bias. The enhancement of memory window is attributed to the increasing number of photo-induced excitons by the UV light. The charges are stored in this luminescent complex for at least 10(4) s after withdrawing voltage bias. The present study on photo-assisted novel memory may motivate the research on a new type of light tunable charge trapping photo-reactive memory devices.

  9. Scalar Trapping and Saxion Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Moroi, Takeo; Nakayama, Kazunori; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    We study in detail the dynamics of a scalar field in thermal bath with symmetry breaking potential. In particular, we focus on the process of trapping of a scalar field at an enhanced symmetry point through the thermal/non-thermal particle production, taking into account the interactions of produced particles with the standard model particles. As an explicit example, we revisit the saxion dynamics with an initial amplitude much larger than the Peccei-Quinn scale and show that the saxion trapping phenomenon happens for the most cases and it often leads to thermal inflation. We also study the saxion dynamics after thermal inflation, and it is shown that thermal dissipation effect on the saxion can relax the axion overproduction problem from the saxion decay.

  10. Fundamental physics in particle traps

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This volume provides detailed insight into the field of precision spectroscopy and fundamental physics with particles confined in traps. It comprises experiments with electrons and positrons, protons and antiprotons, antimatter and highly charged ions, together with corresponding theoretical background. Such investigations represent stringent tests of quantum electrodynamics and the Standard model, antiparticle and antimatter research, test of fundamental symmetries, constants, and their possible variations with time and space. They are key to various aspects within metrology such as mass measurements and time standards, as well as promising to further developments in quantum information processing. The reader obtains a valuable source of information suited for beginners and experts with an interest in fundamental studies using particle traps.

  11. Tachyon Physics with Trapped Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Tony E; Cheng, Xiao-Hang; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    It has been predicted that particles with imaginary mass, called tachyons, would be able to travel faster than the speed of light. So far, there has not been any experimental evidence for tachyons in either natural or engineered systems. Here, we propose how to experimentally simulate Dirac tachyons with trapped ions. Quantum measurement on a Dirac particle simulated by a trapped ion causes it to have an imaginary mass so that it may travel faster than the effective speed of light. We show that a Dirac tachyon must have spinor-motion entanglement in order to be superluminal. We also show that it exhibits significantly more Klein tunneling than a normal Dirac particle. We provide numerical simulations with realistic ion systems and show that our scheme is feasible with current technology.

  12. TRAP SYNDROME: A RARE ENTITY

    OpenAIRE

    Varsha; Kanan; Chanda,, Abhra; Qazi,, S.

    2014-01-01

    TRAP (Twin Reversed Arterial Perfusion) sequence is a rare complication of monozygotic twin pregnancy. It is due to defect in early pregnancy where there is defective arterial anastomosis in placenta. This results in a fetus with an absent heart (acardiac twin). This acardiac twin has a poorly developed upper body and head also. The pump twin (with a normal heart) is also at a risk of heart failure and problems related to preterm birth1.

  13. TRAP SYNDROME: A RARE ENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available TRAP (Twin Reversed Arterial Perfusion sequence is a rare complication of monozygotic twin pregnancy. It is due to defect in early pregnancy where there is defective arterial anastomosis in placenta. This results in a fetus with an absent heart (acardiac twin. This acardiac twin has a poorly developed upper body and head also. The pump twin (with a normal heart is also at a risk of heart failure and problems related to preterm birth1.

  14. Trapper readies trap for lizard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    State-licensed animal trapper James Dean sets the open door of an animal trap on KSC. He hopes to catch a large monitor lizard spotted recently near S.R. 3, a route into the Center, by several area residents. The lizard is not a native of the area, and possibly a released pet. Dean is working with the cooperation of KSC and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  15. Antiparticle plasmas for antihydrogen trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, M.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Butler, E.; Carpenter, P. T.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hurt, J. L.; Hydomako, R.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2012-05-01

    Over the last decades it has become routine to form beams of positrons and antiprotons and to use them to produce trapped samples of both species for a variety of purposes. Positrons can be captured efficiently, for instance using a buffer-gas system, and in such quantities to form dense, single component plasmas useful for antihydrogen formation. The latter is possible using developments of techniques for dynamically capturing and then cooling antiprotons ejected from the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN. The antiprotons can then be manipulated by cloud compression and evaporative cooling to form tailored plasmas. We will review recent advances that have allowed antihydrogen atoms to be confined for the first time in a shallow magnetic minimum neutral atom trap superimposed upon the region in which the antiparticles are held and mixed. A new mixing technique has been developed to help achieve this using autoresonant excitation of the centreofmass longitudinal motion of an antiproton cloud. This allows efficient antihydrogen formation without imparting excess energy to the antiprotons and helps enhance the probability of trapping the anti-atom.

  16. Hybrid ion, atom and light trap

    CERN Document Server

    Jyothi, S; Ram, N Bhargava; Rangwala, S A

    2013-01-01

    We present an unique experimental arrangement which permits the simultaneous trapping and cooling of ions and neutral atoms, within a Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity. The versatility of this hybrid trap experiment enables a variety of studies with trapped mixtures. The motivations behind the production of such a hybrid trap system are explained, followed by details of how the experiment is put together. Several experiments that have been performed with this system are presented and some opportunities with this system are discussed. However the primary emphasis is focussed on the aspects that pertain to the trapped ions, in this hybrid system.

  17. Collisional blockade in microscopic optical dipole traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, N; Reymond, G; Grangier, P

    2002-07-08

    We analyze the operating regimes of a very small optical dipole trap, loaded from a magneto-optical trap, as a function of the atom loading rate, i.e., the number of atoms per second entering the dipole trap. We show that, when the dipole trap volume is small enough, a "collisional blockade" mechanism locks the average number of trapped atoms on the value 0.5 over a large range of loading rates. We also discuss the "weak loading" and "strong loading" regimes outside the blockade range, and we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these three regimes.

  18. In-trap conversion electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissman, L. E-mail: weissman@nscl.msu.edu; Ames, F.; Aeysto, J.; Forstner, O.; Reisinger, K.; Rinta-Antila, S

    2002-10-21

    The Penning trap REXTRAP at ISOLDE was used to test the feasibility of in-trap conversion electron spectroscopy. The results of simulations, experiments with solid conversion electron sources as well as first on-line tests with trapped radioactive ions are presented. In addition to obtaining high-resolution spectroscopic data, the detection of conversion electrons was found to be a useful tool for the diagnostics of the trap operation. The tests proved the feasibility of in-trap spectroscopy but also revealed some potential problems to be addressed in the future.

  19. In-trap conversion electron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Weissman, L; Äystö, J; Forstner, O; Reisinger, K; Rinta-Antila, S

    2002-01-01

    The Penning trap REXTRAP at ISOLDE was used to test the feasibility of in-trap conversion electron spectroscopy. The results of simulations, experiments with solid conversion electron sources as well as first on-line and tests with trapped radioactive ions are presented. In addition to obtaining high-resolution spectroscopic data, the detection of conversion electrons was found to be a useful tool for the diagnostics of the trap operation. The tests proved the feasibility of in-trap spectroscopy but also revealed some potential problems to be addressed in the future.

  20. Effect of trapped charge accumulation on the retention of charge trapping memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Rui; Liu Xiaoyan; Du Gang; Kang Jinfeng; Han Ruqi, E-mail: xyliu@ime.pku.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China)

    2010-12-15

    The accumulation process of trapped charges in a TANOS cell during P/E cycling is investigated via numerical simulation. The recombination process between trapped charges is an important issue on the retention of charge trapping memory. Our results show that accumulated trapped holes during P/E cycling can have an influence on retention, and the recombination mechanism between trapped charges should be taken into account when evaluating the retention capability of TANOS. (semiconductor devices)

  1. Efficacy of commercial traps and food odor attractants for mass trapping of Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Rodrigo; Velázquez, Olinda E; Ortega, Rafael; Acosta, Emilio

    2014-02-01

    One of the most important factors for the success of a mass trapping strategy to control a fruit fly involves the selection of an effective trap-lure combination. Because different species of fruit flies respond differently to the physical characteristics of a trap and to bait volatiles, the evaluation of commercial traps and lures that have proved useful against other tephtrids is necessary to determine their efficacy for mass trapping of Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae). Under caged conditions, a commercial hemispherical trap with lateral holes (Maxitrap Plus) proved more attractive to A. ludens (both sexes) than five other commercial traps that were all baited with hydrolyzed protein. Among these traps, bottom invaginated traps and traps with invaginated lateral holes constructed with transparent cylinders had the best physical retention properties. When evaluated under field conditions, the lure was critical for the efficacy of the trap, and one of the traps that performed poorly in attraction and retention cage tests (MS2) resulted as one of the most effective traps when baited with CeraTrap lure. Considering the use of different trap models under field conditions, CeraTrap liquid bait was more effective in A. ludens capture than Biolure dry synthetic bait, but both lures were not replaced during the entire course of the experiment. The percentage of captured females was also slightly higher using CeraTrap lure (67.2%) than using Biolure baits (54.5-58.8%). In field tests, 75-81% of females were mated and no significant differences were observed among trap-lure combinations. Trap selectivity against nontarget adult lacewings also differed among trap-lure combinations.

  2. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Effect of trapped charge accumulation on the retention of charge trapping memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Jin; Xiaoyan, Liu; Gang, Du; Jinfeng, Kang; Ruqi, Han

    2010-12-01

    The accumulation process of trapped charges in a TANOS cell during P/E cycling is investigated via numerical simulation. The recombination process between trapped charges is an important issue on the retention of charge trapping memory. Our results show that accumulated trapped holes during P/E cycling can have an influence on retention, and the recombination mechanism between trapped charges should be taken into account when evaluating the retention capability of TANOS.

  3. Metallorganic chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition approaches for the growth of hafnium-based thin films from dialkylamide precursors for advanced CMOS gate stack applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Steven P.

    To continue the rapid progress of the semiconductor industry as described by Moore's Law, the feasibility of new material systems for front end of the line (FEOL) process technologies needs to be investigated, since the currently employed polysilicon/SiO2-based transistor system is reaching its fundamental scaling limits. Revolutionary breakthroughs in complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology were recently announced by Intel Corporation and International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), with both organizations revealing significant progress in the implementation of hafnium-based high-k dielectrics along with metal gates. This announcement was heralded by Gordon Moore as "...the biggest change in transistor technology since the introduction of polysilicon gate MOS transistors in the late 1960s." Accordingly, the study described herein focuses on the growth of Hf-based dielectrics and Hf-based metal gates using chemical vapor-based deposition methods, specifically metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). A family of Hf source complexes that has received much attention recently due to their desirable properties for implementation in wafer scale manufacturing is the Hf dialkylamide precursors. These precursors are room temperature liquids and possess sufficient volatility and desirable decomposition characteristics for both MOCVD and ALD processing. Another benefit of using these sources is the existence of chemically compatible Si dialkylamide sources as co-precursors for use in Hf silicate growth. The first part of this study investigates properties of MOCVD-deposited HfO2 and HfSixOy using dimethylamido Hf and Si precursor sources using a customized MOCVD reactor. The second part of this study involves a study of wet and dry surface pre-treatments for ALD growth of HfO2 using tetrakis(ethylmethylamido)hafnium in a wafer scale manufacturing environment. The third part of this study is an investigation of

  4. Algae commensal community in Genlisea traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Wołowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The community of algae occurring in Genlisea traps and on the external traps surface in laboratory conditions were studied. A total of 29 taxa were found inside the traps, with abundant diatoms, green algae (Chlamydophyceae and four morphotypes of chrysophytes stomatocysts. One morphotype is described as new for science. There are two ways of algae getting into Genlisea traps. The majority of those recorded inside the traps, are mobile; swimming freely by flagella or moving exuding mucilage like diatoms being ablate to colonize the traps themselves. Another possibility is transport of algae by invertebrates such as mites and crustaceans. In any case algae in the Genlisea traps come from the surrounding environment. Two dominant groups of algae (Chladymonas div. and diatoms in the trap environment, show ability to hydrolyze phosphomonoseters. We suggest that algae in carnivorous plant traps can compete with plant (host for organic phosphate (phosphomonoseters. From the spectrum and ecological requirements of algal species found in the traps, environment inside the traps seems to be acidic. However, further studies are needed to test the relations between algae and carnivorous plants both in laboratory conditions and in the natural environment. All the reported taxa are described briefly and documented with 74 LM and SEM micrographs.

  5. Multipole Traps as Tools in Environmental Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Mihalcea, Bogdan M; Giurgiu, Liviu C; Groza, Andreea; Surmeian, Agavni; Ganciu, Mihai; Filinov, Vladimir; Lapitsky, Dmitry; Deputatova, Lidiya; Vasilyak, Leonid; Pecherkin, Vladimir; Vladimirov, Vladimir; Syrovatka, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Trapping of microparticles, nanoparticles and aerosols is an issue of major interest for physics and chemistry. We present a setup intended for microparticle trapping in multipole linear Paul trap geometries, operating under Standard Ambient Temperature and Pressure (SATP) conditions. A 16-electrode linear trap geometry has been designed and tested, with an aim to confine a larger number of particles with respect to quadrupole traps and thus enhance the signal to noise ratio, as well as to study microparticle dynamical stability in electrodynamic fields. Experimental tests and numerical simulations suggest that multipole traps are very suited for high precision mass spectrometry measurements in case of different microparticle species or to identify the presence of certain aerosols and polluting agents in the atmosphere. Particle traps represent versatile tools for environment monitoring or for the study of many-body Coulomb systems and dusty plasmas.

  6. The Aarhus Ion Micro-Trap Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Nielsen, Otto; Poulsen, Gregers

    As part of our involvement in the EU MICROTRAP project, we have designed, manufactured and assembled a micro-scale ion trap with integrated optical fibers. These prealigned fibers will allow delivering cooling laser light to single ions. Therefore, such a trap will not require any direct optical...... access for laser cooling. All the parts for the trap have been made in our institute [1]. The electrodes and the spacers were laser cut in the collaboration with the group of P.  Balling. In our group we have developed a technique to manufacture lensed optical fibers. The trap is now assembled...... and installed in an ultra high vacuum chamber, which includes an ablation oven for all-optical loading of the trap [2]. The next steps on the project are to demonstrate the operation of the micro-trap and the cooling of ions using fiber delivered light. [1] D. Grant, Development of Micro-Scale Ion traps, Master...

  7. Gate Stack Engineering and Thermal Treatment on Electrical and Interfacial Properties of Ti/Pt/HfO2/InAs pMOS Capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yen Chien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of gate stack engineering and thermal treatment on electrical and interfacial properties of Ti/Pt/HfO2/InAs metal insulator semiconductor (MIS capacitors were systematically evaluated in terms of transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, current-voltage, and capacitance-voltage characterizations. A 10 nm thick Pt metal effectively suppresses the formation of interfacial oxide, TiO2, between the Ti gate and HfO2 gate dielectric layer, enhancing the gate modulation on the surface potential of InAs. An in situ HfO2 deposition onto the n-InAs channel with an interfacial layer (IL of one-monolayer InP followed by a 300°C post-metal-anneal produces a high-quality HfO2/InAs interface and thus unravels the annoying Fermi-level pinning, which is evidenced by the distinct capacitance dips in the high-/low-frequency C-V characteristics. The interface trap states could be further suppressed by replacing the InP IL by an As-rich InAs, which is substantiated by a gate leakage reduction and a steep voltage-dependent depletion capacitance.

  8. Venus flytrap biomechanics: forces in the Dionaea muscipula trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Harris, Shawn L; Vilfranc, Chrystelle L; Murphy, Veronica A; Wooten, Joseph D; Paulicin, Henoc; Volkova, Maia I; Markin, Vladislav S

    2013-01-01

    Biomechanics of morphing structures in the Venus flytrap has attracted the attention of scientists during the last 140 years. The trap closes in a tenth of a second if a prey touches a trigger hair twice. The driving force of the closing process is most likely due to the elastic curvature energy stored and locked in the leaves, which is caused by a pressure differential between the upper and lower layers of the leaf. The trap strikes, holds and compresses the prey. We have developed new methods for measuring all these forces involved in the hunting cycle. We made precise calibration of the piezoelectric sensor and performed direct measurements of the average impact force of the trap closing using a high speed video camera for the determination of time constants. The new equation for the average impact force was derived. The impact average force between rims of two lobes in the Venus flytrap was found equal to 149 mN and the corresponding pressure between the rims was about 41 kPa. Direct measurements of the constriction force in the trap of Dionaea muscipula was performed during gelatin digestion. This force increases in the process of digestion from zero to 450 mN with maximal constriction pressure created by the lobes reaching to 9 kPa. The insects and different small prey have little chance to escape after the snap of the trap. The prey would need to overpower the "escaping" force which is very strong and can reach up to 4N. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling and Optimizing RF Multipole Ion Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanghaenel, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Radio frequency (rf) ion traps are very well suited for spectroscopy experiments thanks to the long time storage of the species of interest in a well defined volume. The electrical potential of the ion trap is determined by the geometry of its electrodes and the applied voltages. In order to understand the behavior of trapped ions in realistic multipole traps it is necessary to characterize these trapping potentials. Commercial programs like SIMION or COMSOL, employing the finite difference and/or finite element method, are often used to model the electrical fields of the trap in order to design traps for various purposes, e.g. introducing light from a laser into the trap volume. For a controlled trapping of ions, e.g. for low temperature trapping, the time dependent electrical fields need to be known to high accuracy especially at the minimum of the effective (mechanical) potential. The commercial programs are not optimized for these applications and suffer from a number of limitations. Therefore, in our approach the boundary element method (BEM) has been employed in home-built programs to generate numerical solutions of real trap geometries, e.g. from CAD drawings. In addition the resulting fields are described by appropriate multipole expansions. As a consequence, the quality of a trap can be characterized by a small set of multipole parameters which are used to optimize the trap design. In this presentation a few example calculations will be discussed. In particular the accuracy of the method and the benefits of describing the trapping potentials via multipole expansions will be illustrated. As one important application heating effects of cold ions arising from non-ideal multipole fields can now be understood as a consequence of imperfect field configurations.

  10. Recombination in Perovskite Solar Cells: Significance of Grain Boundaries, Interface Traps, and Defect Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Trap-assisted recombination, despite being lower as compared with traditional inorganic solar cells, is still the dominant recombination mechanism in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) and limits their efficiency. We investigate the attributes of the primary trap-assisted recombination channels (grain boundaries and interfaces) and their correlation to defect ions in PSCs. We achieve this by using a validated device model to fit the simulations to the experimental data of efficient vacuum-deposited p–i–n and n–i–p CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells, including the light intensity dependence of the open-circuit voltage and fill factor. We find that, despite the presence of traps at interfaces and grain boundaries (GBs), their neutral (when filled with photogenerated charges) disposition along with the long-lived nature of holes leads to the high performance of PSCs. The sign of the traps (when filled) is of little importance in efficient solar cells with compact morphologies (fused GBs, low trap density). On the other hand, solar cells with noncompact morphologies (open GBs, high trap density) are sensitive to the sign of the traps and hence to the cell preparation methods. Even in the presence of traps at GBs, trap-assisted recombination at interfaces (between the transport layers and the perovskite) is the dominant loss mechanism. We find a direct correlation between the density of traps, the density of mobile ionic defects, and the degree of hysteresis observed in the current–voltage (J–V) characteristics. The presence of defect states or mobile ions not only limits the device performance but also plays a role in the J–V hysteresis. PMID:28540366

  11. Comparative Study of SiO2, Al2O3, and BeO Ultrathin Interfacial Barrier Layers in Si Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Yum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we have demonstrated that beryllium oxide (BeO film grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD on Si and III-V MOS devices has excellent electrical and physical characteristics. In this paper, we compare the electrical characteristics of inserting an ultrathin interfacial barrier layer such as SiO2, Al2O3, or BeO between the HfO2 gate dielectric and Si substrate in metal oxide semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs and n-channel inversion type metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs. Si MOSCAPs and MOSFETs with a BeO/HfO2 gate stack exhibited high performance and reliability characteristics, including a 34% improvement in drive current, slightly better reduction in subthreshold swing, 42% increase in effective electron mobility at an electric field of 1 MV/cm, slightly low equivalent oxide thickness, less stress-induced flat-band voltage shift, less stress induced leakage current, and less interface charge.

  12. Status and Outlook of CHIP-TRAP: the Central Michigan University High Precision Penning Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Redshaw, Matthew; Hawks, Paul; Gamage, Nadeesha D; Hunt, Curtis; Kandegedara, Rathnayake M E B; Ratnayake, Ishara S; Sharp, Lance

    2015-01-01

    At Central Michigan University we are developing a high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometer (CHIP-TRAP)that will focus on measurements with long-lived radioactive isotopes. CHIP-TRAP will consist of a pair of hyperbolic precision-measurement Penning traps, and a cylindrical capture/?filter trap in a 12 T magnetic field. Ions will be produced by external ion sources, including a laser ablation source, and transported to the capture trap at low energies enabling ions of a given m=q ratio to be selected via their time-of-flight. In the capture trap, contaminant ions will be removed with a mass-selective rf dipole excitation and the ion of interest will be transported to the measurement traps. A phase-sensitive image charge detection technique will be used for simultaneous cyclotron frequency measurements on single ions in the two precision traps, resulting in a reduction in statistical uncertainty due to magnetic field fluctuations.

  13. Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Kurchaninov, L; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly-identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antipr...

  14. Natural evolution inspired design of light trapping structure in thin film organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Yu, Shuangcheng; Chen, Wei; Sun, Cheng

    2013-09-01

    Light trapping has been developed to effectively enhance the efficiency of the thin film solar cell by extending the pathlength for light interacting with the active materials. Searching for optimal light trapping design requires a delicate balance among all the competing physical processes, including light refraction, reflection, and absorption. The existing design methods mainly depend on engineers' intuition to predefine the topology of the light-trapping structure. However, these methods are not capable of handling the topological variation in reaching the optimal design. In this work, a systematic approach based on Genetic Algorithm is introduced to design the scattering pattern for effective light trapping. Inspired by natural evolution, this method can gradually improve the performance of light trapping structure through iterative procedures, producing the most favorable structure with minimized reflection and substantial enhancement in light absorption. Both slot waveguide based solar cell and a more realistic organic solar with a scattering layer consisting of nano-scale patterned front layer is optimized to maximize absorption by strongly coupling incident sun light into the localized photonic modes supported by the multilayer system. Rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) is implemented to evaluate the absorbance. The optimized slot waveguide cell achieves a broadband absorption efficiency of 48.1% and more than 3-fold increase over the Yablonovitch limit and the optimized realistic organic cell exhibits nearly 50% average absorbance over the solar spectrum with short circuit current density five times larger than the control case using planar ITO layer.

  15. Microfluidic droplet trapping array as nanoliter reactors for gas-liquid chemical reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingquan; Zeng, Shaojiang; Qin, Jianhua; Lin, Bingcheng

    2009-09-01

    This article presents a simple method for trapping arrays of droplets relying on the designed microstructures of the microfluidic device, and this has been successfully used for parallel gas-liquid chemical reaction. In this approach, the trapping structure is composed of main channel, lateral channel and trapping region. Under a negative pressure, array droplets can be generated and trapped in the microstructure simultaneously, without the use of surfactant and the precise control of the flow velocity. By using a multi-layer microdevice containing the microstructures, single (pH gradient) and multiple gas-liquid reactions (metal ion-NH3 complex reaction) can be performed in array droplets through the transmembrane diffusion of the gas. The droplets with quantitative concentration gradient can be formed by only replacing the specific membrane. The established method is simple, robust and easy to operate, demonstrating the potential of this device for droplet-based high-throughput screening.

  16. Numerical simulation of fundamental trapped sausage modes

    CERN Document Server

    Cécere, M; Reula, O

    2011-01-01

    Context: We integrate the 2D MHD ideal equations of a straight slab to simulate observational results associated with fundamental sausage trapped modes. Aims: Starting from a non-equilibrium state with a dense chromospheric layer, we analyse the evolution of the internal plasma dynamics of magnetic loops, subject to line-tying boundary conditions, and with the coronal parameters described in Asai et al. (2001) and Melnikov et al. (2002) to investigate the onset and damping of sausage modes. Methods: To integrate the equations we used a high resolution shock-capturing (HRSC) method specially designed to deal appropriately with flow discontinuities. Results: Due to non-linearities and inhomogeneities, pure modes are difficult to sustain and always occur coupled among them so as to satisfy, e.g., the line-tying constraint. We found that, in one case, the resonant coupling of the sausage fundamental mode with a slow one results in a non-dissipative damping of the former. Conclusions: In scenarios of thick and den...

  17. Bose condensation in (random traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Zagrebnov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a non-interacting (perfect Bose-gas in random external potentials (traps. It is shown that a generalized Bose-Einstein condensation in the random eigenstates manifests if and only if the same occurs in the one-particle kinetic-energy eigenstates, which corresponds to the generalized condensation of the free Bose-gas. Moreover, we prove that the amounts of both condensate densities are equal. This statement is relevant for justification of the Bogoliubov approximation} in the theory of disordered boson systems.

  18. An introduction to the trapping of clusters with ion traps and electrostatic storage devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredy, R; Bernard, J; Chen, L; Montagne, G; Li, B; Martin, S [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS, UMR 5579, LASIM (France)

    2009-08-14

    This paper presents an introduction to the application of ion traps and storage devices for cluster physics. Some experiments involving cluster ions in trapping devices such as Penning traps, Paul traps, quadrupole or multipole linear traps are briefly discussed. Electrostatic ion storage rings and traps which allow for the storage of fast ion beams without mass limitation are presented as well. We also report on the recently developed mini-ring, a compact electrostatic ion storage ring for cluster, molecular and biomolecular ion studies. (review)

  19. Nonmixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Pierre; Giovangigli, Vincent; Matuszewski, Lionel

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the impact of nonideal diffusion on the structure of supercritical cryogenic binary mixing layers. This situation is typical of liquid fuel injection in high-pressure rocket engines. Nonideal diffusion has a dramatic impact in the neighborhood of chemical thermodynamic stability limits where the components become quasi-immiscible and ultimately form a nonmixing layer. Numerical simulations are performed for mixing layers of H2 and N2 at a pressure of 100 atm and temperature around 120-150 K near chemical thermodynamic stability limits.

  20. Post passivation light trapping back contacts for silicon heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, M; Bittkau, K; Lentz, F; Richter, A; Ding, K; Carius, R; Rau, U; Paetzold, U W

    2016-11-10

    Light trapping in crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells is an essential building block for high efficiency solar cells targeting low material consumption and low costs. In this study, we present the successful implementation of highly efficient light-trapping back contacts, subsequent to the passivation of Si heterojunction solar cells. The back contacts are realized by texturing an amorphous silicon layer with a refractive index close to the one of crystalline silicon at the back side of the silicon wafer. As a result, decoupling of optically active and electrically active layers is introduced. In the long run, the presented concept has the potential to improve light trapping in monolithic Si multijunction solar cells as well as solar cell configurations where texturing of the Si absorber surfaces usually results in a deterioration of the electrical properties. As part of this study, different light-trapping textures were applied to prototype silicon heterojunction solar cells. The best path length enhancement factors, at high passivation quality, were obtained with light-trapping textures based on randomly distributed craters. Comparing a planar reference solar cell with an absorber thickness of 280 μm and additional anti-reflection coating, the short-circuit current density (JSC) improves for a similar solar cell with light-trapping back contact. Due to the light trapping back contact, the JSC is enhanced around 1.8 mA cm(-2) to 38.5 mA cm(-2) due to light trapping in the wavelength range between 1000 nm and 1150 nm.

  1. Photovoltaic cell with light trapping for enhanced efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Igal; Fofang, Nche Tumasang; Luk, Ting S.

    2015-11-19

    The efficiency of a photovoltaic cell is enhanced by light trapping using Mie-scattering nanostructures. In one embodiment, an array of nanocylinders is formed on the front surface of a silicon film to enhance forward scattering into the film, and an array of nanocylinders is formed on the back surface to enhance backscattering so that more light is absorbed within the silicon film. In an alternate embodiment, a mirror layer is formed on the back surface of the silicon film to reflect light within the film back toward the front-surface nanocylinder array.

  2. The charge storage characteristics of ZrO2 nanocrystallite-based charge trap nonvolatile memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Zhen-Jie; Li Rong; Yin Jiang

    2013-01-01

    ZrO2 nanocrystallite-based charge trap flash memory capacitors incorporating a (ZrO2)0.6(SiO2)0.4 pseudobinary high-k oxide film as the charge trapping layer were prepared and investigated.The precipitation reaction in the charge trapping layer,forming ZrO2 nanocrystallites during rapid thermal annealing,was investigated by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction.It was observed that a ZrO2 nanocrystallite-based memory capacitor after post-annealing at 850 ℃ for 60 s exhibits a maximum memory window of about 6.8 V,good endurance and a low charge loss of ~25% over a period of 10 years (determined by extrapolating the charge loss curve measured experimentally),even at 85 ℃.Such 850 ℃-annealed memory capacitors appear to be candidates for future nonvolatile flash memory device applications.

  3. Sensor-based atomic layer deposition for rapid process learning and enhanced manufacturability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wei

    In the search for sensor based atomic layer deposition (ALD) process to accelerate process learning and enhance manufacturability, we have explored new reactor designs and applied in-situ process sensing to W and HfO 2 ALD processes. A novel wafer scale ALD reactor, which features fast gas switching, good process sensing compatibility and significant similarity to the real manufacturing environment, is constructed. The reactor has a unique movable reactor cap design that allows two possible operation modes: (1) steady-state flow with alternating gas species; or (2) fill-and-pump-out cycling of each gas, accelerating the pump-out by lifting the cap to employ the large chamber volume as ballast. Downstream quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) sampling is applied for in-situ process sensing of tungsten ALD process. The QMS reveals essential surface reaction dynamics through real-time signals associated with byproduct generation as well as precursor introduction and depletion for each ALD half cycle, which are then used for process learning and optimization. More subtle interactions such as imperfect surface saturation and reactant dose interaction are also directly observed by QMS, indicating that ALD process is more complicated than the suggested layer-by-layer growth. By integrating in real-time the byproduct QMS signals over each exposure and plotting it against process cycle number, the deposition kinetics on the wafer is directly measured. For continuous ALD runs, the total integrated byproduct QMS signal in each ALD run is also linear to ALD film thickness, and therefore can be used for ALD film thickness metrology. The in-situ process sensing is also applied to HfO2 ALD process that is carried out in a furnace type ALD reactor. Precursor dose end-point control is applied to precisely control the precursor dose in each half cycle. Multiple process sensors, including quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and QMS are used to provide real time process information. The

  4. Polaronic trapping in magnetic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raebiger, Hannes

    2012-02-01

    GaN doped with iron is an interesting candidate material for magnetic semiconductors, as p-d coupling between the localized Fe-d and extended N-p hole states is expected to facilitate long-range ferromagnetic alignment of the Fe spins [1]. This picture of extended states in GaN:Fe, however, falls apart due to a polaronic localization of the hole carriers nearby the Fe impurities. To elucidate the carrier localization in GaN:Fe and related iron doped III-V semiconductors, I present a systematic study using self-interaction corrected density-functional calculations [2]. These calculations predict three distinct scenarios. (i) Some systems do sustain extended host-like hole states, (ii) some exhibit polaronic trapping, (iii) and some exhibit carrier trapping at Fe-d orbitals. These behaviors are described in detail to give an insight as to how to distinguish them experimentally. I thank T. Fujita, C. Echeverria-Arrondo, and A. Ayuela for their collaboration.[4pt] [1] T. Dietl et al, Science, 287, 1019 (2000).[0pt] [2] S. Lany and A. Zunger, Phys. Rev. B, 80, 085202 (2009).

  5. Case Study: Trap Crop with Pheromone Traps for Suppressing Euschistus servus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae in Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Tillman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The brown stink bug, Euschistus servus (Say, can disperse from source habitats, including corn, Zea mays L., and peanut, Arachis hypogaea L., into cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. Therefore, a 2-year on-farm experiment was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench spp. bicolor trap crop, with or without Euschistus spp. pheromone traps, to suppress dispersal of this pest to cotton. In 2004, density of E. servus was lower in cotton fields with sorghum trap crops (with or without pheromone traps compared to control cotton fields. Similarly, in 2006, density of E. servus was lower in cotton fields with sorghum trap crops and pheromone traps compared to control cotton fields. Thus, the combination of the sorghum trap crop and pheromone traps effectively suppressed dispersal of E. servus into cotton. Inclusion of pheromone traps with trap crops potentially offers additional benefits, including: (1 reducing the density of E. servus adults in a trap crop, especially females, to possibly decrease the local population over time and reduce the overwintering population, (2 reducing dispersal of E. servus adults from the trap crop into cotton, and (3 potentially attracting more dispersing E. servus adults into a trap crop during a period of time when preferred food is not prevalent in the landscape.

  6. Orientation of Culex mosquitoes to carbon dioxide-baited traps: flight manoeuvres and trapping efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperband, M F; Cardé, R T

    2006-03-01

    Females of Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Culex tarsalis Coquillet (Diptera: Culicidae) in the host-seeking stage were released and video recorded in three dimensions in a large field wind tunnel as they flew to four kinds of CO2-baited mosquito traps. The trapping efficiency (number of mosquitoes approaching compared to the number caught) was determined for each trap type. The Encephalitis Virus Surveillance (EVS), Mosquito Magnet Freedom (MMF) and Mosquito Magnet Liberty (MML) traps captured only 13-16% of approaching Cx. quinquefasciatus females, whereas the Mosquito Magnet-X (MMX) trap captured 58%. Similar results were obtained for Cx. tarsalis. Orientation behaviour and flight parameters of mosquitoes approaching the four traps were compared. Mosquitoes spent the most time orienting to the EVS trap. Flight speed decreased as mosquitoes entered the vicinity of each trap and a large portion of their time was spent within 30 cm downwind of the traps. Flights became highly tortuous downwind of the poorly performing traps and just upwind of the MMX trap. Differences between traps and possible explanations for the superior performance of the MMX trap are considered.

  7. The MSL-110 small sediment trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashin, V. N.; Klyuvitkin, A. A.; Lisitzin, A. P.; Novigatsky, A. N.

    2011-08-01

    A simple construction of the MSL-110 sediment trap developed at the Laboratory of Physical-Geological Research of the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, is presented. The trap is easily assembled from standard parts available at stores. The trap is easy to use, reliable, and inexpensive. It is applied for determination of sedimentary matter fluxes and their components in water columns of seas, lakes, and other water reservoirs.

  8. Magneto-optical trap for polar molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhl, Benjamin K; Sawyer, Brian C; Wang, Dajun; Ye, Jun

    2008-12-12

    We propose a method for laser cooling and trapping a substantial class of polar molecules and, in particular, titanium (II) oxide (TiO). This method uses pulsed electric fields to nonadiabatically remix the ground-state magnetic sublevels of the molecule, allowing one to build a magneto-optical trap based on a quasicycling J' = J'' -1 transition. Monte Carlo simulations of this electrostatically remixed magneto-optical trap demonstrate the feasibility of cooling TiO to a temperature of 10 micrpK and trapping it with a radiation-pumping-limited lifetime on the order of 80 ms.

  9. Exploration of Subtle Trap in Jiyang Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiPilong; ZhangShanwen; XiaoHuanqin; WangYongshi; QiuGuiqiang

    2004-01-01

    This article analyses the procedure of exploration of the Tertiary subtle trap in Jiyang depression and divides the Tertiary subtle trap into 3 types (lithologic reservoir, stratigraphic reservoir and fractured reservoir) and 8 groups, then summarizes the common feature and founding discipline of the subtle trap and finds 4 accumulating modes including steep slope mode, depression mode, center anticline mode and gentle slope mode. Its main exploration methods are explicated from the viewpoint of reservoir geological modeling, description of recognizing traps and comprehensive evaluation of reservoir and so on.

  10. Ion trapping for quantum information processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Jin-yin; WANG Yu-zhu; LIU Liang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we have reviewed the recent pro-gresses on the ion trapping for quantum information process-ing and quantum computation. We have first discussed the basic principle of quantum information theory and then fo-cused on ion trapping for quantum information processing.Many variations, especially the techniques of ion chips, have been investigated since the original ion trap quantum compu-tation scheme was proposed. Full two-dimensional control of multiple ions on an ion chip is promising for the realization of scalable ion trap quantum computation and the implemen-tation of quantum networks.

  11. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Atomic Strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, D.S.; Reschovsky, B. J.; Pisenti, N. C.; Campbell, G. K.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the 3P1 to 3S1 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, int...

  12. Laser spectroscopy of trapped Th^3+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Adam; Campbell, Corey; Churchill, Layne; Depalatis, Michael; Naylor, David; Kuzmich, Alex; Chapman, Michael

    2008-05-01

    We are applying the techniques of laser cooling and ion trapping to investigate the low lying nuclear isomeric state in ^229Th. We will confine Th^3+ atoms in an RF trap [1] and sympathetically cool them with barium ions. The ions are produced by laser ablation from a thorium metal target by the third harmonic of a Q-switched YAG laser. Using mass-spectroscopic techniques we separate out the Th^3+ ions from the plume of ablation products. We once trapped we will observe fluorescence from the trapped ions using transitions at 984 nm and 690 nm. [1] Peik E. and Tamm Chr., Europhysics Letters, 61 (2) (2003)

  13. Some aspects of impurity trapping of muons

    CERN Document Server

    Karlsson, E

    1981-01-01

    Several aspects of muon trapping in metals have been studied during the last two years, but the situation is still far from clear. The precise nature of the traps as well as the mechanisms leading to trapping seem to require more detailed investigations than those carried out so far. This review contains therefore a certain number of ideas which should be regarded as working hypotheses rather than established facts or descriptions of positive muon behaviour. The author considers muons in FCC metals (Al:Mn and Cu), and impurity trapping in BCC metals (V, Nb, Ta, Fe). (21 refs).

  14. High Optical Access Trap 2.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-26

    The High Optical Access (HOA) trap was designed in collaboration with the Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer (MUSIQC) team, funded along with Sandia National Laboratories through IARPA's Multi Qubit Coherent Operations (MQCO) program. The design of version 1 of the HOA trap was completed in September 2012 and initial devices were completed and packaged in February 2013. The second version of the High Optical Access Trap (HOA-2) was completed in September 2014 and is available at IARPA's disposal.

  15. Active Stabilization of Ion Trap Radiofrequency Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, K G; Neyenhuis, B; Mizrahi, J; Monroe, C

    2016-01-01

    We actively stabilize the harmonic oscillation frequency of a laser-cooled atomic ion confined in a rf Paul trap by sampling and rectifying the high voltage rf applied to the trap electrodes. We are able to stabilize the 1 MHz atomic oscillation frequency to better than 10 Hz, or 10 ppm. This represents a suppression of ambient noise on the rf circuit by 34 dB. This technique could impact the sensitivity of ion trap mass spectrometry and the fidelity of quantum operations in ion trap quantum information applications.

  16. Surface band bending and band alignment of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited dielectrics on Ga- and N-face gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jialing; Eller, Brianna S.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of surface pretreatment, dielectric growth, and post deposition annealing on interface electronic structure and polarization charge compensation of Ga- and N-face bulk GaN were investigated. The cleaning process consisted of an ex-situ wet chemical NH4OH treatment and an in-situ elevated temperature NH3 plasma process to remove carbon contamination, reduce oxygen coverage, and potentially passivate N-vacancy related defects. After the cleaning process, carbon contamination decreased below the x-ray photoemission spectroscopy detection limit, and the oxygen coverage stabilized at ˜1 monolayer on both Ga- and N-face GaN. In addition, Ga- and N-face GaN had an upward band bending of 0.8 ± 0.1 eV and 0.6 ± 0.1 eV, respectively, which suggested the net charge of the surface states and polarization bound charge was similar on Ga- and N-face GaN. Furthermore, three dielectrics (HfO2, Al2O3, and SiO2) were prepared by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition on Ga- or N-face GaN and annealed in N2 ambient to investigate the effect of the polarization charge on the interface electronic structure and band offsets. The respective valence band offsets of HfO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 with respect to Ga- and N-face GaN were 1.4 ± 0.1, 2.0 ± 0.1, and 3.2 ± 0.1 eV, regardless of dielectric thickness. The corresponding conduction band offsets were 1.0 ± 0.1, 1.3 ± 0.1, and 2.3 ± 0.1 eV, respectively. Experimental band offset results were consistent with theoretical calculations based on the charge neutrality level model. The trend of band offsets for dielectric/GaN interfaces was related to the band gap and/or the electronic part of the dielectric constant. The effect of polarization charge on band offset was apparently screened by the dielectric-GaN interface states.

  17. Low Threshold Voltage and High Mobility N-Channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor Using Hf-Si/HfO2 Gate Stack Fabricated by Gate-Last Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Takashi; Hirano, Tomoyuki; Tai, Kaori; Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Yoshida, Shinichi; Iwamoto, Hayato; Kadomura, Shingo; Watanabe, Heiji

    2010-01-01

    Systematic characterization of Hf-Si/HfO2 gate stacks revealed two mobility degradation modes. One is carrier scattering by fixed charges and/or trapped charges induced by the crystallization in the thick HfO2 case (inversion oxide thickness, Tinv> 1.6 nm). The other is the Hf penetration into the interfacial layer with the Si substrate in the thin HfO2 case (Tinv< 1.6 nm) for the Hf-rich electrode. It was demonstrated that careful optimization of the HfO2 thickness and the Hf-Si composition can suppress both modes. As a result, a high electron mobility equivalent to that of n+polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)/SiO2 (248 cm2 V-1 s-1 at Eeff=1 MV/cm) was obtained at Tinv of 1.47 nm. Moreover, the effective work function of the optimized Hf-Si/HfO2 gate stack is located within 50 mV from the Si band edge (Ec). An extremely high Ion of 1165 µA/µm (at Ioff = 81 nA/µm) at Vdd=1.0 V was demonstrated for a 45 nm gate n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (n-MOSFET) without strain enhanced technology.

  18. Depth profiling of oxide-trapped charges in 6H-SiC MOS structures by slant etching method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Kazunari; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Kazunori [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Coll. of Science and Technology; Yoshikawa, Masahito; Ohshima, Takeshi; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Nashiyama, Isamu

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to evaluate the depth profile of trapped charges in an oxide layer on SiC. Using this method, 6H-SiC MOS structures with different oxide thickness were fabricated on the same substrate under the same oxidation condition, and the depth profile of oxide-trapped charges before and after {sup 60}Co-gamma ray irradiation were obtained. It is found, from the depth profiling, that the trapping mechanism of electrons and holes in the oxide strongly depends on the bias polarity during irradiation, and these charges are trapped near 6H-SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface. We believe that this method is very useful for estimation of the oxide-trapped charges in 6H-SiC MOS structures. (author)

  19. A Single Laser Cooled Trapped 40Ca+ Ion in a Miniature Paul Trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU Hua-Lin; GUAN Hua; HUANG Xue-Ren; LI Jiao-Mei; GAO Ke-Lin

    2005-01-01

    @@ We have observed the phenomenon of phase transition of a few trapped ions in a miniature Paul trap. Judging from the quantum jump signals, a single laser-cooled trapped Ca+ ion has been realized. The ion temperature is estimated to be 22mK. The result shows that the amplitude of ion micromotion is strongly dependent on the rf voltage.

  20. A toroidal trap for the cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms using a rf-dressed quadrupole trap

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, A; Ram, S P; Tiwari, S K; Rawat, H S

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the trapping of cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms in a toroidal geometry using a rf-dressed quadrupole magnetic trap formed by superposing a strong radio frequency (rf) field on a quadrupole trap. This rf-dressed quadrupole trap has minimum of the potential away from the quadrupole trap centre on a circular path which facilitates the trapping in the toroidal geometry. In the experiments, the laser cooled atoms were first trapped in the quadrupole trap, then cooled evaporatively using a weak rf-field, and finally trapped in the rf-dressed quadrupole trap. The radius of the toroid could be varied by varying the frequency of the dressing rf-field. It has also been demonstrated that a single rf source and an antenna can be used for the rf-evaporative cooling as well as for rf-dressing of atoms. The atoms trapped in the toroidal trap may have applications in realization of an atom gyroscope as well as in studying the quantum gases in low dimensions.

  1. Nonlinear ion trap stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, Bogdan M; Visan, Gina G, E-mail: bmihal@infim.r [Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics (INFLPR), Atomistilor Str. Nr. 409, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest, Jud. Ilfov (Romania)

    2010-09-01

    This paper investigates the dynamics of an ion confined in a nonlinear Paul trap. The equation of motion for the ion is shown to be consistent with the equation describing a damped, forced Duffing oscillator. All perturbing factors are taken into consideration in the approach. Moreover, the ion is considered to undergo interaction with an external electromagnetic field. The method is based on numerical integration of the equation of motion, as the system under investigation is highly nonlinear. Phase portraits and Poincare sections show that chaos is present in the associated dynamics. The system of interest exhibits fractal properties and strange attractors. The bifurcation diagrams emphasize qualitative changes of the dynamics and the onset of chaos.

  2. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed. PMID:28373994

  3. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1-100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  4. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Rada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  5. Experimental study of gradual/abrupt dynamics of HfO2-based memristive devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brivio, S.; Covi, E.; Serb, A.; Prodromakis, T.; Fanciulli, M.; Spiga, S.

    2016-09-01

    The resistance switching dynamics of TiN/HfO2/Pt devices is analyzed in this paper. When biased with a voltage ramp of appropriate polarity, the devices experience SET transitions from high to low resistance states in an abrupt manner, which allows identifying a threshold voltage. However, we find that the stimulation with trains of identical pulses at voltages near the threshold results in a gradual SET transition, whereby the resistive state visits a continuum of intermediate levels as it approaches some low resistance state limit. On the contrary, RESET transitions from low to high resistance states proceed in a gradual way under voltage ramp stimulation, while gradual resistance changes driven by trains of identical spikes cover only a limited resistance window. The results are discussed in terms of the relations among the thermo-electrochemical effects of Joule heating, ion mobility, and resistance change, which provide positive and negative closed loop processes in SET and RESET, respectively. Furthermore, the effect of the competition between opposite tendencies of filament dissolution and formation at opposite metal/HfO2 interfaces is discussed as an additional ingredient affecting the switching dynamics.

  6. Impact of lanthanum on the modification of HfO2 films structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. P. Smirnova; L.V. Yakovkina; V.O. Borisov

    2015-01-01

    LaxHf1–xOy thin films with various concentrations of La, homogeneous and nonhomogeneous distributions of elements throughout the films thickness was purposefully grown by CVD. The composition of the films and their chemical structures were characterized throughout the films thickness by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDXA). A full picture of the film crystallinity was provided by the combination of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) synchrotron radiation (SR) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR TEM). It was shown that La acted as “molar volume modulator” and stabilized the nonequilibrium atT≤1300 °C cubic phases. The samples with La content in range of 7 at.%

  7. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  8. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-05-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  9. Variable geometry two mode levitation trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babič, D.; Čadež, A.

    1999-11-01

    Construction and operation of the electrodynamic levitation trap which can be operated in a passive and an active mode is described. This combination together with variable electrode geometry simplifies the trap's design and simultaneously gives more flexibility with respect to different kinds of measurements. Sample measurements of mechanocaloric effect caused by nonuniform heating of a single levitated particle are presented and discussed.

  10. Collective excitations of harmonically trapped ideal gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Schaeybroeck, B.; Lazarides, A.

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically study the collective excitations of an ideal gas confined in an isotropic harmonic trap. We give an exact solution to the Boltzmann-Vlasov equation; as expected for a single-component system, the associated mode frequencies are integer multiples of the trapping frequency. We show

  11. Lobster trap detection at the Saba Bank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van I.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    According to previous studies and anecdotal evidence there are a lot of lost lobster traps at the Saba Bank. One study estimated the loss to be between 210 and 795 lobster traps per year. The Saba Bank is an approximately 2,200 km2 submerged area and spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) is one of the mai

  12. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  13. Depolarization of UCN stored in material traps

    CERN Document Server

    Serebrov, A; Lasakov, M; Rudnev, Y; Krasnoschekova, I A; Geltenbort, P; Butterworth, J; Bowles, T; Morris, C; Seestrom, S; Smith, D; Young, A R

    2000-01-01

    Depolarization of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) stored in material traps was first observed. The probability of UCN spin flip per reflection depends on the trap material and varies from 7x10 sup - sup 6 (beryllium) to 10 sup - sup 4 (glass).

  14. An Experimental Analysis of Social Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechner, Kevin C.

    1977-01-01

    Social traps, such as the overgrazing of pasturelands, overpopulation, and the extinction of species, are situations where individuals in a group respond for their own advantage in a manner damaging to the group. Alaboratory analog was devised to simulate conditions that produce social traps. The intent was to cause an immediate positive…

  15. An Experimental Analysis of Social Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechner, Kevin C.

    1977-01-01

    Social traps, such as the overgrazing of pasturelands, overpopulation, and the extinction of species, are situations where individuals in a group respond for their own advantage in a manner damaging to the group. Alaboratory analog was devised to simulate conditions that produce social traps. The intent was to cause an immediate positive…

  16. Optical trapping with Super-Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McLaren, M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We outline the possibility of optical trapping and tweezing with Super-Gaussian beam profiles. We show that the trapping strength can be tuned continuously by adjusting the order of a Super-Gaussian beam, approaching that of a perfect Gaussian...

  17. Trap split with Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamideh Kazemi, Seyedeh; Ghanbari, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mohammad

    2017-08-01

    We present a convenient and effective way to generate a novel phenomenon of trapping, named ‘trap split’, in a conventional four-level double-Λ atomic system, driven by four femtosecond Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses. We find that trap split can always be achieved when atoms are trapped by such laser pulses, as compared to Gaussian ones. This feature is enabled by the interaction of the atomic system and the Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses with zero intensity in the center. A further advantage of using Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses is the insensitivity to fluctuation in the intensity of the lasers in such a way that the separation between the traps remains constant. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the suggested scheme with Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses can form optical traps with spatial sizes that are not limited by the wavelength of the laser, and can, in principle, become smaller than the wavelength of light. This work would greatly facilitate the trapping and manipulating of particles and the generation of trap split. It may also suggest the possibility of extension into new research fields, such as micro-machining and biophysics.

  18. Optimization of RF multipole ion trap geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanghänel, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2017-02-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) traps are ideal places to store cold ions for spectroscopic experiments. Specific multipole configurations are suited best for different applications but have to be modified to allow e.g. for a proper overlap of a laser beam waist with the ion cloud. Therefore the corresponding trapping fields should be shaped accordingly. To achieve this goal highly accurate electrical potentials of rf multipole traps and the resulting effective trapping potentials are calculated using the boundary element method (BEM). These calculations are used to evaluate imperfections and to optimize the field geometry. For that purpose the complex fields are reduced to a small set of multipole expansion coefficients. Desirable values for these coefficients are met by systematic changes of real trap dimensions from CAD designs. The effect of misalignment of a linear quadrupole, the optimization of an optically open Paul trap, the influence of steering electrodes (end electrode and ring electrode) on a 22-pole ion trap and the effect of the micro motion on the lowest reachable temperatures in such a trap are discussed.

  19. Biased trapping issue on weighted hierarchical networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meifeng Dai; Jie Liu; Feng Zhu

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we present trapping issues of weight-dependent walks on weighted hierarchical networks which are based on the classic scale-free hierarchical networks. Assuming that edge’s weight is used as local information by a random walker, we introduce a biased walk. The biased walk is that a walker, at each step, chooses one of its neighbours with a probability proportional to the weight of the edge. We focus on a particular case with the immobile trap positioned at the hub node which has the largest degree in the weighted hierarchical networks. Using a method based on generating functions, we determine explicitly the mean first-passage time (MFPT) for the trapping issue. Let parameter (0 < < 1) be the weight factor. We show that the efficiency of the trapping process depends on the parameter a; the smaller the value of a, the more efficient is the trapping process.

  20. A dynamical model for the Utricularia trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Coraline; Argentina, Médéric; Bouret, Yann; Marmottant, Philippe; Vincent, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    We propose a model that captures the dynamics of a carnivorous plant, Utricularia inflata. This plant possesses tiny traps for capturing small aquatic animals. Glands pump water out of the trap, yielding a negative pressure difference between the plant and its surroundings. The trap door is set into a meta-stable state and opens quickly as an extra pressure is generated by the displacement of a potential prey. As the door opens, the pressure difference sucks the animal into the trap. We write an ODE model that captures all the physics at play. We show that the dynamics of the plant is quite similar to neuronal dynamics and we analyse the effect of a white noise on the dynamics of the trap. PMID:22859569