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Sample records for hf-nd isotope array

  1. A chilling perspective on Greenland's early Cenozoic climate from coupled Hf-Nd isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, H. D.; Bizimis, M.; Buckley, W. P., Jr.; Duggan, B.; Bohaty, S. M.; Wilson, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The prevailing view of northern hemisphere glaciation has been of ice sheets forming on Greenland after 2.7 Ma, with iceberg rafting as early as 15 Ma. This view is incompatible with recent results from global climate/ice sheet models that predict northern hemisphere glaciation only after CO2 falls below ~280 ppmv (occurring at 25 Ma) and with recent sediment evidence for Arctic iceberg rafting as early as the middle Eocene. However, the amount of northern hemisphere ice represented by these sediments is ambiguous and global ice budget calculations for the early Cenozoic are controversial. Here we use coupled Hf-Nd isotopes of oxyhydroxides in sediments from the upper Eocene to lower Oligocene section in ODP Site U1411 (Newfoundland Ridge) to determine when the circum-North Atlantic came under the influence of a mechanical weathering regime. Leached oxyhydroxide Hf-Nd isotopes are an indicator of weathering intensity because mechanical weathering by ice sheets mobilizes the zircon-bound Hf reservoir in the crust, which has extreme unradiogenic eHf values. Chemical weathering produces a distinct seawater array on Hf-Nd diagrams, while seawater exposed to the products of mechanical weathering plot on divergent arrays closer to the Terrestrial Array. Hf-Nd isotopes of Site U1411 leachates are grouped in a near vertical trend between the seawater and terrestrial global reference arrays. Within this group there are four distinct arrays that can be delineated by age. Samples that are late Eocene in age fall along an array that is slightly divergent from the seawater array. The aspect of the Hf-Nd isotope data changes permanently after the first step of the EOT, falling along arrays that are systematically offset in the direction of the terrestrial arrays. The steepest array, most proximal to the terrestrial array, is comprised of samples deposited between 33.7 and 32.2 Ma. These results indicate a circum-North Atlantic weathering regime appeared in the earliest Oligocene.

  2. Coupled Hf-Nd-Pb isotope co-variations of HIMU oceanic island basalts from Mangaia, Cook-Austral islands, suggest an Archean source component in the mantle transition zone

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    Nebel, Oliver; Arculus, Richard J.; van Westrenen, Wim; Woodhead, Jon D.; Jenner, Frances E.; Nebel-Jacobsen, Yona J.; Wille, Martin; Eggins, Stephen M.

    2013-07-01

    Although it is widely accepted that oceanic island basalts (OIB) sample geochemically distinct mantle reservoirs including recycled oceanic crust, the composition, age, and locus of these reservoirs remain uncertain. OIB with highly radiogenic Pb isotope signatures are grouped as HIMU (high-μ, with μ = 238U/204Pb), and exhibit unique Hf-Nd isotopic characteristics, defined as ΔɛHf, deviant from a terrestrial igneous rock array that includes all other OIB types. Here we combine new Hf isotope data with previous Nd-Pb isotope measurements to assess the coupled, time-integrated Hf-Nd-Pb isotope evolution of the most extreme HIMU location (Mangaia, French Polynesia). In comparison with global MORB and other OIB types, Mangaia samples define a unique trend in coupled Hf-Nd-Pb isotope co-variations (expressed in 207Pb/206Pb vs. ΔɛHf). In a model employing subducted, dehydrated oceanic crust, mixing between present-day depleted MORB mantle (DMM) and small proportions (˜5%) of a HIMU mantle endmember can re-produce the Hf-Nd-Pb isotope systematics of global HIMU basalts (sensu stricto; i.e., without EM-1/EM-2/FOZO components). An age range of 3.5 to affected by other enriched mantle endmembers (sensu lato). If correct, this requires isolation of parts of the mantle transition zone for >3 Gyr and implies that OIB chemistry can be used to test geodynamic models.

  3. Refinement of the supercontinent cycle with Hf, Nd and Sr isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent C. Condie

    2013-11-01

    External and internal orogens show similar patterns in ɛNd and ɛHf with age suggesting that both juvenile and reworked crustal components are produced in both types of orogens with similar proportions. However, both types of orogens clearly produce more juvenile isotopic signatures in retreating mode than in advancing mode. Many secular changes in ɛHf and ɛNd distributions correlate with the supercontinent cycle. Although supercontinent breakup is correlated with short-lived decreasing ɛHf and ɛNd (≤100 Myr for most supercontinents, there is no isotopic evidence for the breakup of the Paleoproterozoic supercontinent Nuna. Assembly of supercontinents by extroversion is recorded by decreasing ɛNd in granitoids and metasediments and decreasing ɛHf in zircons, attesting to the role of crustal reworking in external orogens in advancing mode. As expected, seawater Sr isotopes increase and seawater Nd isotopes decrease during supercontinent assembly by extroversion. Pangea is the only supercontinent that has a clear isotopic record of introversion assembly, during which median ɛNd and ɛHf rise rapidly for ≤100 Myr. Although expected to increase, radiogenic seawater Sr decreases (and seawater Nd increases during assembly of Pangea, a feature that may be caused by juvenile input into the oceans from new ocean ridges and external orogens in retreating mode. The fact that a probable onset of plate tectonics around 3 Ga is not recorded in isotopic distributions may be due the existence of widespread felsic crust formed prior to the onset of plate tectonics in a stagnant lid tectonic regime, as supported by Nd and Hf model ages.

  4. Effects of Continental Weathering and Sedimentary Sorting on the Hf, Nd, and Pb Isotopic Composition of Sediments and Implications for Dissolved Input to the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Flierdt, T.; Hemming, S. R.; Goldstein, S. L.

    2005-05-01

    The application of radiogenic isotopes of dissolved trace metals (Hf, Pb, Nd) in the ocean to study climate induced weathering changes on the continents is a relatively new and exciting field of research. Most studies on the radiogenic isotope composition of past seawater are based on chemical sediments such as ferromanganese crusts, and suggest a strong linkage in changes in the style of weathering (chemical vs. physical/glacial) on the continents and the isotopic composition of seawater for elements such as Hf and Pb. This is evidenced by records from the northwest Atlantic, which show significant changes in the Hf and Pb isotopic composition of seawater associated with the onset of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG) over the past 3 Myr. On the other hand, the impact of glacial weathering on the Nd isotopic composition of seawater is generally thought to be negligible. In order to better understand the systematics and mechanisms of weathering, erosion, and run-off, as well as their bearing on the isotopic composition of the ocean we choose the following strategy: sediments from the Amerilik and Gothabs Fjords near Nuuk (Greenland) have been analyzed for their bulk rock and grain size specific Hf, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions (sand, silt, mud). Both Fjords are surrounded by early Archean gneisses, among the oldest rocks on Earth, and are filled with glacially floured sediments. Precambrian rocks surround a large fraction of the circum-North Atlantic area that was covered by ice sheets during the NHG, and the source rocks in this region are the most extreme examples. Current knowledge about the impact of weathering processes on isotope systematics implies that the largest changes in the Hf (and Pb) isotopic composition of seawater are expected to arise from glacial weathering of old continental sources. Our data reveal large differences in grain size specific isotope ratios, e.g. between the mud and sand fractions, for sediments with an old provenance

  5. Hf-Nd Isotopes in West Philippine Basin Basalts: Results from International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Site U1438 and Implications for the Early History of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) Subduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Hocking, B.; Bizimis, M.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Ishizuka, O.; Bogus, K.; Arculus, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Drilling at IODP Site U1438, located immediately west of Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR), the site of IBM subduction initiation, penetrated 1460 m of volcaniclastic sedimentary rock and 150 m of underlying basement. Biostratigraphic controls indicate a probable age for the oldest sedimentary rocks at around 55 Ma (51-64 Ma - Arculus et al., Nat Geosci in-press). This is close to the 48-52 Ma time period of IBM subduction initiation, based on studies in the forearc. There, the first products of volcanism are tholeiitic basalts termed FAB (forearc basalt), which are more depleted than average MORB and show subtle indicators of subduction geochemical enrichment (Reagan et al., 2010 - Geochem Geophy Geosy). Shipboard data indicate that Site U1438 basement basalts share many characteristics with FABs, including primitive major elements (high MgO/FeO*) and strongly depleted incompatible element patterns (Ti, Zr, Ti/V and Zr/Y below those of average MORB). Initial results thus indicate that FAB geochemistry may have been produced not only in the forearc, but also in backarc locations (west of the KPR) at the time of subduction initiation. Hf-Nd isotopes for Site 1438 basement basalts show a significant range of compositions from ɛNd of 7.0 to 9.5 and ɛHf of 14.5 to 19.8 (present-day values). The data define a well-correlated and steep array in Hf-Nd isotope space. Relatively radiogenic Hf compared to Nd indicates an Indian Ocean-type MORB source, but the dominant signature, with ɛHf >16.5, is more radiogenic than most Indian MORB. The pattern through time is from more-to-less radiogenic and more variable Hf-Nd isotopes within the basement section. This pattern culminates in basaltic andesite sills, which intrude the lower parts of the sedimentary section. The sills have the least radiogenic compositions measured so far (ɛNd ~6.6, ɛHf ~13.8), and are similar to those of boninites of the IBM forearc and modern IBM arc and reararc rocks. The pattern within the basement

  6. Subduction Contributions in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt: Implications from Lava Chemistry and Hf-Nd-Pb Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y.; Goldstein, S. L.; Langmuir, C. H.; Gómez-Tuena, A.; Lagatta, A.; Straub, S. M.; Martín Del Pozzo, A.

    2007-05-01

    Despite thick continental crust, near primitive lavas erupt throughout the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). In order to distinguish and better constrain subduction contributions and effects of crustal contamination, we analyzed samples representing subducting sediments from DSDP Site 487, and Quaternary lavas from stratovolcanoes and cinder cones, including alkaline "high-Nb" lavas from the Sierra Chichinautzin Volcanic Field (SCVF) showing negligible subduction signature in its trace element chemistry and representing melts of the mantle wedge. Our primary observations and implications are: (1) The high-Nb SCVF `intraplate' lavas define a linear trend along the "Nd-Hf mantle-crust array", defining the composition of the mantle wedge. (2) Popocatepetl and Nevado de Toluca stratovolcanoes show the highest Nd and Hf isotope ratios, higher than the `intraplate' lavas, indicating their sources are more "depleted mantle-like" than the regional mantle wedge. (3) The Popo and Toluca chemical and isotopic trends sharply contrast with Pico de Orizaba, which shows classic indications of crustal contamination (e.g. high 207Pb/204Pb, low Nd-Hf isotope ratios), consistent with contamination by local Precambrian crust. (4) Higher Nd-Hf isotopes in Popo and Toluca lavas also correlate with lower Pb isotope ratios, and lower Lu/Hf and Zr/Hf. Together, these data indicate contributions from subducted Pacific oceanic crust and hydrothermal sediment. (5) Popo and Toluca are also enriched in Th/LREE compared with `intraplate' lavas, reflecting subducted sediment contributions. (6) Nd-Hf isotope ratios of hydrothermal sediment from DSDP Site 487 lie on the "seawater array", with high Hf isotope ratios compared to the "mantle-crust array". Popo and Toluca Nd-Hf isotopes display a shallower slope than the "intraplate lava Nd-Hf array", reflecting contributions from hydrothermal sediment. Popocatepetl and Toluca lavas therefore avoid substantial crustal contamination of mantle wedge

  7. Water mass circulation and weathering inputs in the Labrador Sea based on coupled Hf-Nd isotope compositions and rare earth element distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippova, Alexandra; Frank, Martin; Kienast, Markus; Rickli, Jörg; Hathorne, Ed; Yashayaev, Igor M.; Pahnke, Katharina

    2017-02-01

    The Labrador Sea is one of the key areas for deep water formation driving the Atlantic thermohaline circulation and thus plays an important role in Northern Hemisphere climatic fluctuations. In order to better constrain the overturning processes and the origins of the distinct water masses, combined dissolved Hf-Nd isotopic compositions and rare earth element (REE) distribution patterns were obtained from four water depth profiles along a section across the Labrador Sea. These were complemented by one surface sample off the southern tip of Greenland, three shallow water samples off the coast of Newfoundland, and two deep water samples off Nova Scotia. Although light REEs are markedly enriched in the surface waters off the coast of Newfoundland compared to north Atlantic waters, the REE concentration profiles are essentially invariant throughout the water column across the Labrador Sea. The hafnium concentrations of surface waters exhibit a narrow range between 0.6 and 1 pmol/kg but are not significantly higher than at depth. Neodymium isotope signatures (ɛNd) vary from unradiogenic values between -16.8 and -14.9 at the surface to more radiogenic values near -11.0 at the bottom of the Labrador Sea mainly reflecting the advection of the Denmark Strait Overflow Water and North East Atlantic Deep Water, the signatures of which are influenced by weathering contributions from Icelandic basalts. Unlike Nd, water column radiogenic Hf isotope signatures (ɛHf) are more variable representing diverse weathering inputs from the surrounding landmasses. The least radiogenic seawater ɛHf signatures (up to -11.7) are found in surface waters close to Greenland and near the Canadian margin. This reflects the influence of recirculating Irminger Current Waters, which are affected by highly unradiogenic inputs from Greenland. A three to four ɛHf unit difference is observed between Denmark Strait Overflow Water (ɛHf ∼ -4) and North East Atlantic Deep Water (ɛHf ∼ -0

  8. Hf-Nd isotope and trace element constraints on subduction inputs at island arcs: Limitations of Hf anomalies as sediment input indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Heather K.; Turner, Simon; Macpherson, Colin G.; Gertisser, Ralf; Davidson, Jon P.

    2011-04-01

    New Nd-Hf isotope and trace element data for Javanese volcanoes are combined with recently published data to place constraints on subduction inputs at the Sunda arc in Indonesia and assess the value of Hf anomalies (expressed as Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios) as tracers of such inputs. Hf anomaly does not correlate with Hf isotope ratio in Javanese lavas, however, Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios do correlate with SiO 2. Contrary to previous work, we show that Hf anomaly variation may be controlled by fractionation of clinopyroxene and/or amphibole during magmatic differentiation and does not represent the magnitude or type of subduction input in some arcs. Correlation of Sm/Hf with indices of differentiation for other arcs (e.g., Vanuatu, New Britain, and Mariana) suggests that differentiation control on Sm/Hf ratios in volcanic arc rocks may be a relatively common phenomenon. This study corroborates the use of Nd-Hf isotope co-variations in arc volcanic rocks to ascertain subduction input characteristics. The trajectories of regional volcano groups (East, Central and West Java) in Nd-Hf isotope space reveal heterogeneity in the subducted sediment input along Java, which reflects present-day spatial variations in sediment compositions on the down-going plate in the Java Trench. The high Sm/Hf ratio required in the sediment end-member for some Javanese basalts suggests that partial melting of subducted sediment occurs in the presence of residual zircon, and is inconsistent with residual monazite or allanite.

  9. Hafnium isotope results from mid-ocean ridges and Kerguelen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchett, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    176Hf/177Hf ratios are presented for oceanic volcanic rocks representing both extremes of the range of mantle Hf-Nd-Sr isotopic variation. Hf from critical mid-ocean ridge basalts shows that 176Hf/177Hf does indeed have a greater variability than 143Nd/144Nd and 87Sr/86Sr in the depleted mantle. This extra variation is essentially of a random nature, and can perhaps be understood in terms of known Rb/Sr-Sm/Nd-Lu/Hf fractionation relationships. At the other extreme of mantle isotopic compositions, 176Hf/177Hf ratios for igneous rocks from the Indian Ocean island of Kerguelen show a closely similar variation to published 143Nd/144Nd ratios for the same samples. Comparison of Hf-Nd-Sr isotopic relatonships for Tristan da Cunha, Kerguelen and Samoa reveals divergences in the mantle array for ocean-island magma sources, and perhaps suggests that these irregularities are largely the result of an extra component of 87Sr/86Sr variation.-G.R.

  10. Dopant occupancy and exposure energy in Hf:Nd:LiNbO3 crystal as a function of [Li]/[Nb] ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Li; Liu, Chunrui; Han, Xianbo; Yan, Zhehua; Tan, Chao; Wang, Luping; Xu, Yuheng

    2017-09-01

    A series of Hf: Nd: LiNbO3 crystals with various [Li]/[Nb] ratios ([Li]/[Nb] = 0.94, 1.05, 1.20, 1.38) in the melt were grown by conventional Czochralski technique. The distribution coefficients of Hf4+ and Nd3+ ions were recorded by an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). The effective distribution coefficient of Hf4+ is reduced and that of Nd3+ is increased with the increase of [Li]/[Nb] ratio in the melts. In all cases, the effective distribution coefficients is less than 1. The IR transmission spectroscopy of the Hf: Nd: LiNbO3 crystals were measured, getting the results that Hf: Yb: Ho: LiNbO3 crystals with 1.05 [Li]/[Nb] ratios was the stoichiometric. The optical damage resistance ability of Hf:Nd:LiNbO3 crystals were studied by light-induced scattering exposure energy flux threshold method and it increases with the increasing of [Li]/[Nb] ratios. When the [Li]/[Nb] ratio is 1.38 in the melt (the sample 4#), the exposure energy achieves 687.35 J/cm2, approximately 441 folds than that of the sample 1# ([Li]/[Nb] = 0.94) in magnitude.

  11. Hf isotope evidence for variable slab input and crustal addition in basalts and andesites of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Troll, Valentin R.; Gamble, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    variations likely represent variability in primary magma compositions as a result of different degrees of sediment addition at the slab-wedge interface. Coupled variations in isotopic composition, LILE/HFSE ratios (e.g. Rb/Zr and Ba/La) and SiO2 also clearly indicate that shallower level crustal interactions......Crustal contamination complicates the identification of primary mantle-derived magma compositions in Continental arcs. However,when crustal processes and components arewell characterised, it is possible to extrapolate through continental arc magma compositional arrays towards the Hf and Nd isotope...... compositions of uncontaminated primary magmas. This is because of the similar behaviour of Hf and Nd during fractional crystallisation and mantle melting, and the subsequent limited variation in Hf/Nd in mantle-derived magmas and in many crustal lithologies, resulting in linear contamination trends for Hf...

  12. The statistical decay properties of Gadolinium isotopes using the DANCE array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G.; Baramsai, B.; Chankova, R.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.

    2008-10-01

    The gadolinium isotopes are interesting for reactor applications as well as for medicine and astrophysics. There are seven stable isotopes of gadolinium with varying deformation. Decay γ rays following neutron capture on Gd isotopes are detected by the DANCE array, which is located at flight path 14 at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The high segmentation and close packing of the detector array enable γ-ray multiplicity measurements. The calorimetric property of the DANCE array coupled with the neutron time-of-flight technique enables one to gate on a specific resonance of a specific isotope in the time-of-flight spectrum and obtain the summed energy spectrum for that isotope. The singles γ-ray spectrum for each multiplicity can be separated by their DANCE cluster multiplicity. Various photon strength function models are used for comparison with experimentally measured DANCE data and provide insight for understanding the statistical decay properties of deformed nuclei.

  13. Subduction Controls of Hf and Nd Isotopes in Lavas of the Aleutian Island Arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yogodzinski, Gene; Vervoort, Jeffery; Brown, Shaun Tyler; Gerseny, Megan

    2010-08-29

    The Hf and Nd isotopic compositions of 71 Quaternary lavas collected from locations along the full length of the Aleutian island arc are used to constrain the sources of Aleutian magmas and to provide insight into the geochemical behavior of Nd and Hf and related elements in the Aleutian subduction-magmatic system. Isotopic compositions of Aleutian lavas fall approximately at the center of, and form a trend parallel to, the terrestrial Hf-Nd isotopic array with {var_epsilon}{sub Hf} of +12.0 to +15.5 and {var_epsilon}{sub Nd} of +6.5 to +10.5. Basalts, andesites, and dacites within volcanic centers or in nearby volcanoes generally all have similar isotopic compositions, indicating that there is little measurable effect of crustal or other lithospheric assimilation within the volcanic plumbing systems of Aleutian volcanoes. Hafnium isotopic compositions have a clear pattern of along-arc increase that is continuous from the eastern-most locations near Cold Bay to Piip Seamount in the western-most part of the arc. This pattern is interpreted to reflect a westward decrease in the subducted sediment component present in Aleutian lavas, reflecting progressively lower rates of subduction westward as well as decreasing availability of trench sediment. Binary bulk mixing models (sediment + peridotite) demonstrate that 1-2% of the Hf in Aleutian lavas is derived from subducted sediment, indicating that Hf is mobilized out of the subducted sediment with an efficiency that is similar to that of Sr, Pb and Nd. Low published solubility for Hf and Nd in aqueous subduction fluids lead us to conclude that these elements are mobilized out of the subducted component and transferred to the mantle wedge as bulk sediment or as a silicate melt. Neodymium isotopes also generally increase from east to west, but the pattern is absent in the eastern third of the arc, where the sediment flux is high and increases from east to west, due to the presence of abundant terrigenous sediment in the

  14. Study of the Photon Strength Functions for Gadolinium Isotopes with the DANCE Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chankova, R.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krtička, M.; Bečvář, F.

    2009-03-01

    The gadolinium isotopes are interesting for reactor applications as well as for medicine and astrophysics. The gadolinium isotopes have some of the largest neutron capture cross sections. As a consequence they are used in the control rod in reactor fuel assembly. From the basic science point of view, there are seven stable isotopes of gadolinium with varying degrees of deformation. Therefore they provide a good testing ground for the study of deformation dependent structure such as the scissors mode. Decay gamma rays following neutron capture on Gd isotopes are detected by the DANCE array, which is located at flight path 14 at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The high segmentation and close packing of the detector array enable gamma-ray multiplicity measurements. The calorimetric properties of the DANCE array coupled with the neutron time-of-flight technique enables one to gate on a specific resonance of a specific isotope in the time-of-flight spectrum and obtain the summed energy spectrum for that isotope. The singles gamma-ray spectrum for each multiplicity can be separated by their DANCE cluster multiplicity. Various photon strength function models are used for comparison with experimentally measured DANCE data and provide insight for understanding the statistical decay properties of deformed nuclei.

  15. Systematic Osmium Isotope Binary Mixing Arrays in Arc Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, S.; Alves, S.; Schiano, P.; Capmas, F.; Allegre, C. J.

    2001-12-01

    Isotopic and geochemical studies on subduction-related lavas aim at constraining the nature of their mantle sources and the respective roles of source heterogeneity and petrogenetic processes in their compositions. Many components are potentially involved in producing the geochemical signatures of arc lavas: depleted mantle, subducted oceanic crust and sediments, and the overlying continental or oceanic crust. A further complication in characterizing mantle sources of arc lavas is complex mixing of some component parts via derivative fluids or melts released from the slab. Os isotope ratios are potential tracers of slab contribution in arc lavas because 1) subducted sediments are very radiogenic in Os compared to the upper mantle, and 2) Re behaves as a moderately incompatible element during mantle partial melting, whereas Os is highly compatible. Therefore, MORB have much higher Re/Os ratios than peridotites. Consequently, old oceanic crust is likely to be extremely more radiogenic than the depleted upper mantle so that recycled basaltic components should be identified by their elevated 187Os/188Os ratios. Os isotope ratios and Os and Re concentrations have been measured in 55 lavas coming from 10 different subduction zones. Samples span a large range of major element concentrations (from basalts to dacites) and Mg# (from 0.32 to 0.81). The 10 subduction zones, namely the Lesser Antilles, Java, Papua-New Guinea, the Philippines, Izu-Bonin, Kamchatka, the Aleutians, Mexico, Colombia and Peru-Chile, have a range of basement nature and thickness, as well as a range of age and sediment cover of the subducting plate. Measured 187Os/188Os ratios range from 0.130 to 1.524 and Os concentrations range from 0.048 to 46 ppt. Re concentrations range from 37 to 915 ppt. Os initial isotope ratios are systematically positively and linearly correlated with the inverse of Os concentrations in arc lavas from a given volcano, indicating that the Os isotopic compositions always

  16. Static, Mixed-Array Total Evaporation for Improved Quantitation of Plutonium Minor Isotopes in Small Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, F E; Byerly, Benjamin L; Thomas, Mariam R; Spencer, Khalil J

    2016-06-01

    Actinide isotope measurements are a critical signature capability in the modern nuclear forensics "toolbox", especially when interrogating anthropogenic constituents in real-world scenarios. Unfortunately, established methodologies, such as traditional total evaporation via thermal ionization mass spectrometry, struggle to confidently measure low abundance isotope ratios (<10(-6)) within already limited quantities of sample. Herein, we investigate the application of static, mixed array total evaporation techniques as a straightforward means of improving plutonium minor isotope measurements, which have been resistant to enhancement in recent years because of elevated radiologic concerns. Results are presented for small sample (~20 ng) applications involving a well-known plutonium isotope reference material, CRM-126a, and compared with traditional total evaporation methods. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Petrogenesis of the Neoproterozoic bimodal volcanic rocks along the western margin of the Yangtze Block: New constraints from Hf isotopes and Fe/Mn ratios

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xianhua; QI Changshi; LIU Ying; LIANG Xirong; TU Xianglin; XIE Liewen; YANG Yueheng

    2005-01-01

    High-precision major element and Hf isotope data are reported for the Neoproterozoic Suxiong volcanic rocks along the western margin of the Yangtze Block. These volcanic rocks have variable εHf(T) values and Fe/Mn ratios. The relatively primitive basalts have high Fe/Mn ratios and high Hf-Nd isotopic compositions, indicating that they were generated by partial melting of garnet clinopyroxene in mantle plume at high pressure. Thus, the Suxiong basalts are genetically related to the proposed Neoproterozoic superplume. On the contrary, a few differentiated basalts have low Fe/Mn ratios and low Hf-Nd isotopic compositions. They are likely to experience assimilation-fractional crystallization process. The Suxiong rhyolites have consistent Hf and Nd model ages of 1.3-1.4 Ga. They are likely generated by shallow dehydration melting of pre-existing young arc igneous rocks associated with the basaltic underplating/intrusion in a continental rift.

  18. $\\beta$-delayed neutron spectroscopy of $^{130-132}$ Cd isotopes with the ISOLDE decay station and the VANDLE array

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to use the new ISOLDE decay station and the neutron detector VANDLE to measure the $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission of N=82-84 $^{130-132}$Cd isotopes. The large delayed neutron emission probability observed in a previous ISOLDE measurement is indicative of the Gamow-Teller transitions due to the decay of deep core neutrons. Core Gamow-Teller decay has been experimentally proven in the $^{78}$Ni region for the N>50 nuclei using the VANDLE array. The spectroscopic measurement of delayed neutron emission along the cadmium isotopic chain will allow us to track the evolution of the single particle states and the shell gap.

  19. Static, Mixed-Array Total Evaporation for Improved Quantitation of Plutonium Minor Isotopes in Small Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, F. E.; Byerly, Benjamin L.; Thomas, Mariam R.; Spencer, Khalil J.

    2016-06-01

    Actinide isotope measurements are a critical signature capability in the modern nuclear forensics "toolbox", especially when interrogating anthropogenic constituents in real-world scenarios. Unfortunately, established methodologies, such as traditional total evaporation via thermal ionization mass spectrometry, struggle to confidently measure low abundance isotope ratios (plutonium minor isotope measurements, which have been resistant to enhancement in recent years because of elevated radiologic concerns. Results are presented for small sample (~20 ng) applications involving a well-known plutonium isotope reference material, CRM-126a, and compared with traditional total evaporation methods.

  20. Multiple sulfur isotope composition of oxidized Samoan melts and the implications of a sulfur isotope 'mantle array' in chemical geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, J.; Cartigny, P.; Jackson, M. G.

    2015-05-01

    To better address how subducted protoliths drive the Earth's mantle sulfur isotope heterogeneity, we report new data for sulfur (S) and copper (Cu) abundances, S speciation and multiple S isotopic compositions (32S, 33S, 34S, 36S) in 15 fresh submarine basaltic glasses from the Samoan archipelago, which defines the enriched-mantle-2 (EM2) endmember. Bulk S abundances vary between 835 and 2279 ppm. About 17 ± 11% of sulfur is oxidized (S6+) but displays no consistent trend with bulk S abundance or any other geochemical tracer. The S isotope composition of both dissolved sulfide and sulfate yield homogeneous Δ33S and Δ36S values, within error of Canyon Diablo Troilite (CDT). In contrast, δ34S values are variable, ranging between +0.11 and +2.79‰ (±0.12‰ 1σ) for reduced sulfur, whereas oxidized sulfur values vary between +4.19 and +9.71‰ (±0.80‰, 1σ). Importantly, δ34S of the reduced S pool correlates with the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the glasses, in a manner similar to that previously reported for South-Atlantic MORB, extending the trend to δ34S values up to + 2.79 ± 0.04 ‰, the highest value reported for undegassed oceanic basalts. As for EM-1 basalts from the South Atlantic ridge, the linear δ34S-87Sr/86Sr trend requires the EM-2 endmember to be relatively S-rich, and only sediments can account for these isotopic characteristics. While many authors argue that both the EM-1 and EM-2 mantle components record subduction of various protoliths (e.g. upper or lower continental crust, lithospheric mantle versus intra-metasomatized mantle, or others), it is proposed here that they primarily reflect sediment recycling. Their distinct Pb isotope variation can be accounted for by varying the proportion of S-poor recycled oceanic crust in the source of mantle plumes.

  1. A linear Hf isotope-age array despite different granitoid sources and complex Archean geodynamics: Example from the Pietersburg block (South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Oscar; Zeh, Armin

    2015-11-01

    Combined U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotope data from zircon populations are widely used to constrain Hadean-Archean crustal evolution. Linear Hf isotope-age arrays are interpreted to reflect the protracted, internal reworking of crust derived from the (depleted) mantle during a short-lived magmatic event, and related 176Lu/177Hf ratios are used to constrain the composition of the reworked crustal reservoir. Results of this study, however, indicate that Hf isotope-age arrays can also result from complex geodynamic processes and crust-mantle interactions, as shown by U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotope analyses of zircons from well characterized granitoids of the Pietersburg Block (PB), northern Kaapvaal Craton (South Africa). Apart from scarce remnants of Paleoarchean crust, most granitoids of the PB with ages between 2.94 and 2.05 Ga (n = 32) define a straight Hf isotope-age array with low 176Lu/177Hf of 0.0022, although they show a wide compositional range, were derived from various sources and emplaced successively in different geodynamic settings. The crustal evolution occurred in five stages: (I) predominately mafic crust formation in an intra-oceanic environment (3.4-3.0 Ga); (II) voluminous TTG crust formation in an early accretionary orogen (3.0-2.92 Ga); (III) internal TTG crust reworking and subduction of TTG-derived sediments in an Andean-type setting (2.89-2.75 Ga); (IV) (post-)collisional high-K magmatism from both mantle and crustal sources (2.71-2.67 Ga); and (V) alkaline magmatism in an intra-cratonic environment (2.05-2.03 Ga). The inferred array results from voluminous TTG crust formation during stage II, and involvement of this crust during all subsequent stages by two different processes: (i) internal crust reworking through both partial melting and assimilation at 2.89-2.75 Ga, leading to the formation of biotite granites coeval with minor TTGs, and (ii) subduction of TTG-derived sediments underneath the PB, causing enrichment of the mantle that subsequently became

  2. Shape coexistence measurements in even-even neutron-deficient polonium isotopes by Coulomb excitation, using REX-ISOLDE and the Ge MINIBALL array

    CERN Multimedia

    Butler, P; Bastin, B; Kruecken, R; Voulot, D; Rahkila, P J; Orr, N A; Srebrny, J; Grahn, T; Clement, E; Paul, E S; Gernhaeuser, R A; Dorsival, A; Diriken, J V J; Huyse, M L; Iwanicki, J S

    The neutron-deficient polonium isotopes with two protons outside the closed Z=82 shell represent a set of nuclei with a rich spectrum of nucleus structure phenomena. While the onset of the deformation in the light Po isotopes is well established experimentally, questions remain concerning the sign of deformation and the magnitude of the mixing between different configurations. Furthermore, controversy is present with respect to the transition from the vibrational-like character of the heavier Po isotopes to the shape coexistence mode observed in the lighter Po isotopes. We propose to study this transition in the even-mass neutron-deficient $^{198,200,202}$Po isotopes by using post-accelerated beams from REX-ISOLDE and "safe"-energy Coulomb excitation. $\\gamma$- rays will be detected by the MINIBALL array. The measurements of the Coulomb excitation differential cross section will allow us to deduce both the transition and diagonal matrix elements for these nuclei and, combined with lifetime measurements, the s...

  3. Isotopic decoupling during porous melt flow: A case-study in the Lherz peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, V.; Bodinier, J.-L.; Alard, O.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Griffin, W. L.

    2009-03-01

    Most peridotite massifs and mantle xenoliths show a wide range of isotopic variations, often involving significant decoupling between Hf, Nd and Sr isotopes. These variations are generally ascribed either to mingling of individual components of contrasted isotopic compositions or to time integration of parent-element enrichment by percolating melts/fluids, superimposed onto previous depletion event(s). However, strong isotopic decoupling may also arise during porous flow as a result of daughter-elements fractionation during solid-liquid interaction. Although porous flow is recognized as an important process in mantle rocks, its effects on mantle isotopic variability have been barely investigated so far. The peridotites of the Lherz massif (French Pyrenees) display a frozen melt percolation front separating highly refractory harzburgites from refertilized lherzolites. Isotopic signatures observed at the melt percolation front show a strong decoupling of Hf from Nd and Sr isotopes that cannot be accounted for by simple mixing involving the harzburgite protolith and the percolating melt. Using one dimensional percolation-diffusion and percolation-reaction modeling, we show that these signatures represent transient isotopic compositions generated by porous flow. These signatures are governed by a few critical parameters such as daughter element concentrations in melt and peridotite, element diffusivity, and efficiency of isotopic homogenization rather than by the chromatographic effect of melt transport and the refertilization reaction. Subtle variations in these parameters may generate significant inter-isotopic decoupling and wide isotopic variations in mantle rocks.

  4. High-resolution quadruple sulfur isotope analyses of 3.2 Ga pyrite from the Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa reveal distinct environmental controls on sulfide isotopic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerdink, Desiree L.; Mason, Paul R. D.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Reimer, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Multiple sulfur isotopes in Paleoarchean pyrite record valuable information on atmospheric processes and emerging microbial activity in the early sulfur cycle. Here, we report quadruple sulfur isotope data (32S, 33S, 34S, 36S) analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry from pyrite in a 3.26-3.23 Ga sedimentary barite deposit in the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. Our results demonstrate the presence of distinct pyrite populations and reproducible isotopic arrays in barite-free and barite-rich samples. The most 34S-depleted signatures with weakly positive Δ33S/δ34S were found in disseminated pyrite in barite, whereas positive Δ33S-values with negative Δ33S/δ34S and Δ36S/Δ33S = -0.9 ± 0.2 were exclusively observed in pyrite hosted by chert, dolomite, conglomerate and breccia. We interpret these variations to be related to local redox reactions and mixing in the sulfide phase, rather than representing primary atmospheric variability alone. The strong correlation between lithology and isotopic composition indicates distinct environments of sulfide formation linked to local sulfate concentrations and fluctuating inputs from different sulfur metabolisms. Strongly 34S-depleted sulfide was formed by microbial sulfate reduction at [SO42-] > 200 μM during deposition of barite-rich sediments, whereas isotope effects were suppressed when sulfate levels decreased during deposition of terrigeneous clastic rocks. Positive Δ33S-values indicate an increased input of sulfide derived from elemental sulfur metabolisms when sulfate concentrations fell below 200 μM. Our results support an important role for local sulfate concentrations on the expression of biogenic sulfur isotope signatures in some of the oldest rocks on Earth.

  5. Primary multiple sulfur isotopic compositions of pyrite in 2.7 Ga shales from the Joy Lake sequence (Superior Province) show felsic volcanic array-like signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianghanyang; Zhang, Zhe; Stern, Richard A.; Hannah, Judith L.; Stein, Holly J.; Yang, Gang; Li, Long

    2017-04-01

    Multiple sulfur isotopes provide a powerful tool to study photochemical and biological processes controlling the Archean sulfur cycle and infer related atmospheric and marine environments. However, our understanding of early Earth's environment remains limited by the availability of well-preserved geological samples, as most Archean sedimentary rocks have experienced some degree of metamorphic alteration. To evaluate sulfur isotopic behavior during post-depositional processes and elucidate the sulfur cycle at 2.7 Ga, we use high-resolution in situ analytical techniques (EPMA and SIMS) to determine elemental compositions and multiple sulfur isotopic compositions of large diagenetic pyrite nodules and fine-grained secondary pyrite disseminated in quartz veins (formed during a lower greenschist metamorphic event) in shales from the 2.7 Ga Joy Lake sequence in the southwest Superior Province. Results show that trace metals and sulfur in the secondary pyrite were derived from both metamorphic fluid and pre-existing diagenetic pyrite. Diagenetic pyrite nodules could have been partially dissolved by metamorphic fluid. But the surviving nodules show elemental and isotopic features different from those of the deduced metamorphic fluid endmember, suggesting the nodules were not geochemically altered by metamorphism, and thus preserve primary isotopic signatures acquired during diagenesis. The sulfur isotopic ratios of pyrite nodules show strong variations, with decreasing δ34S values and increasing Δ33S values from cores to rims. This negative Δ33S-δ34S relationship is different from the commonly observed 'Archean reference line' defined by most Archean pyrite data, but similar to the 'felsic volcanic array'. Our observation provides a first possible case from 2.7 Ga, the age of peak crustal growth in the Archean, to support the hypothesis that photochemical pathways could be different under conditions of intense volcanic emission. This study also shows that high

  6. The performance of the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA for γ-ray spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisshaar, D.; Bazin, D.; Bender, P. C.; Campbell, C. M.; Recchia, F.; Bader, V.; Baugher, T.; Belarge, J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Crawford, H. L.; Cromaz, M.; Elman, B.; Fallon, P.; Forney, A.; Gade, A.; Harker, J.; Kobayashi, N.; Langer, C.; Lauritsen, T.; Lee, I. Y.; Lemasson, A.; Longfellow, B.; Lunderberg, E.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Miki, K.; Momiyama, S.; Noji, S.; Radford, D. C.; Scott, M.; Sethi, J.; Stroberg, S. R.; Sullivan, C.; Titus, R.; Wiens, A.; Williams, S.; Wimmer, K.; Zhu, S.

    2017-03-01

    The γ-ray tracking array GRETINA was coupled to the S800 magnetic spectrometer for spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory on the campus of Michigan State University. We describe the technical details of this powerful setup and report on GRETINA's performance achieved with source and in-beam measurements. The γ-ray multiplicity encountered in experiments with fast beams is usually low, allowing for a simplified and efficient treatment of the data in the γ-ray analysis in terms of Doppler reconstruction and spectral quality. The results reported in this work were obtained from GRETINA consisting of 8 detector modules hosting four high-purity germanium crystals each. Currently, GRETINA consists of 10 detector modules.

  7. CAESAR-A high-efficiency CsI(Na) scintillator array for in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy with fast rare-isotope beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisshaar, D., E-mail: weisshaa@nscl.msu.ed [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Gade, A.; Glasmacher, T. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Grinyer, G.F.; Bazin, D.; Adrich, P. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Baugher, T.; Cook, J.M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Diget, C.A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); McDaniel, S.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Siwek, K.P.; Walsh, K.A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2010-12-21

    We report on the construction and commissioning of the high-efficiency CAESium-iodide scintillator ARray CAESAR, a device designed for in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy experiments utilizing fast beams of rare isotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University (MSU). CAESAR consists of 192 CsI(Na) crystals, totaling 290 kg of active scintillator material. For 1 MeV {gamma} rays, a full-energy-peak efficiency of 35% is achieved at an in-beam energy resolution of better than 10% FWHM after event-by-event Doppler reconstruction of the {gamma} rays emitted by nuclei moving with velocities of v/c{approx}0.3-0.4. The spectral quality of the array allows for the identification of {gamma}-ray transitions with intensities of several 10 counts in the full-energy peak and thus opens new avenues for the study of the most exotic nuclei available at the NSCL for in-beam spectroscopy.

  8. Serpentinization Changes Nd, but not Hf Isotopes of Abyssal Peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizimis, M.; Frisby, C. P.; Mallick, S.

    2015-12-01

    Serpentinization of the oceanic lithosphere is a known sink for fluid mobile elements (B, Cl, Li, Sr, etc.), while high field strength elements (HFSE: e.g., Hf, Zr, Ti, Nb) are thought to be unaffected by it. In contrast, the fate of REE during serpentinization is equivocal. Correlations between REE and HFSE concentrations in abyssal peridotites suggest control by magmatic processes (Niu, 2004, J. Pet), while some LREE enrichments in serpentinized peridotites compared to their clinopyroxene (cpx) and Nd, Sr isotope data (Delacour et al., 2008, Chem. Geol.) imply seawater-derived REE addition to the mantle protolith (Paulick et al., 2006, Chem. Geol). To further constrain peridotite-seawater interaction during serpentinization we compare bulk rock and cpx Hf and Nd isotope data in partially (up to ~70%) serpentinized abyssal peridotites (9-16°E South West Indian Ridge). We also present a new method that improves yields in Hf, Nd and Pb separations from depleted (90% of Hf, Zr, Ti are retained in the residue. LA-ICPMS data shows that serpentine after olivine typically has higher LREE/HREE ratios than cpx, pronounced negative Ce anomalies, high U, Sr concentrations and low HFSE, unlike the coexisting cpx. These data are consistent with some seawater-derived LREE addition to peridotite during serpentinization, localized in the serpentine and other secondary phases, while cpx retains the magmatic value. This process will lower the Sm/Nd relative to Lu/Hf ratio in the peridotite and can lead to decoupled radiogenic Hf and unradiogenic Nd isotopes upon recycling and aging. Our data further testifies to the fidelity of Hf isotopes in tracing mantle processes, even in serpentinized rocks.

  9. High-resolution quadruple sulfur isotope analyses of 3.2 Ga pyrite from the Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa reveal distinct environmental controls on sulfide isotopic arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, D.L.; Mason, P.R.D.; Whitehouse, M.J.; Reimer, T.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sulfur isotopes in Paleoarchean pyrite record valuable information on atmospheric processes and emerging microbial activity in the early sulfur cycle. Here, we report quadruple sulfur isotope data (32S, 33S, 34S, 36S) analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry from pyrite in a 3.26–3.23 Ga

  10. Re-Os and Lu-Hf isotopic constraints on the formation and age of mantle pyroxenites from the Bohemian Massif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Bizimis, Michael; Haluzová, Eva; Sláma, Jiří; Svojtka, Martin; Hirajima, Takao; Erban, Vojtěch

    2016-07-01

    We report on the Lu-Hf and Re-Os isotope systematics of a well-characterized suite of spinel and garnet pyroxenites from the Gföhl Unit of the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic, Austria). Lu-Hf mineral isochrons of three pyroxenites yield undistinguishable values in the range of 336-338 Ma. Similarly, the slope of Re-Os regression for most samples yields an age of 327 ± 31 Ma. These values overlap previously reported Sm-Nd ages on pyroxenites, eclogites and associated peridotites from the Gföhl Unit, suggesting contemporaneous evolution of all these HT-HP rocks. The whole-rock Hf isotopic compositions are highly variable with initial εHf values ranging from - 6.4 to + 66. Most samples show a negative correlation between bulk rock Sm/Hf and εHf and, when taking into account other characteristics (e.g., high 87Sr/86Sr), this may be explained by the presence of recycled oceanic sediments in the source of the pyroxenite parental melts. A pyroxenite from Horní Kounice has decoupled Hf-Nd systematics with highly radiogenic initial εHf of + 66 for a given εNd of + 7.8. This decoupling is consistent with the presence of a melt derived from a depleted mantle component with high Lu/Hf. Finally, one sample from Bečváry plots close to the MORB field in Hf-Nd isotope space consistent with its previously proposed origin as metamorphosed oceanic gabbro. Some of the websterites and thin-layered pyroxenites have variable, but high Os concentrations paralleled by low initial γOs. This reflects the interaction of the parental pyroxenitic melts with a depleted peridotite wall rock. In turn, the radiogenic Os isotope compositions observed in most pyroxenite samples is best explained by mixing between unradiogenic Os derived from peridotites and a low-Os sedimentary precursor with highly radiogenic 187Os/188Os. Steep increase of 187Os/188Os at nearly uniform 187Re/188Os found in a few pyroxenites may be connected with the absence of primary sulfides, but the presence of minor

  11. Nano-mole scale side-chain signal assignment by 1H-detected protein solid-state NMR by ultra-fast magic-angle spinning and stereo-array isotope labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songlin Wang

    Full Text Available We present a general approach in 1H-detected 13C solid-state NMR (SSNMR for side-chain signal assignments of 10-50 nmol quantities of proteins using a combination of a high magnetic field, ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS at ~80 kHz, and stereo-array-isotope-labeled (SAIL proteins [Kainosho M. et al., Nature 440, 52-57, 2006]. First, we demonstrate that 1H indirect detection improves the sensitivity and resolution of 13C SSNMR of SAIL proteins for side-chain assignments in the ultra-fast MAS condition. 1H-detected SSNMR was performed for micro-crystalline ubiquitin (~55 nmol or ~0.5mg that was SAIL-labeled at seven isoleucine (Ile residues. Sensitivity was dramatically improved by 1H-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR by factors of 5.4-9.7 and 2.1-5.0, respectively, over 13C-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR and 1D 13C CPMAS, demonstrating that 2D 1H-detected SSNMR offers not only additional resolution but also sensitivity advantage over 1D 13C detection for the first time. High 1H resolution for the SAIL-labeled side-chain residues offered reasonable resolution even in the 2D data. A 1H-detected 3D 13C/13C/1H experiment on SAIL-ubiquitin provided nearly complete 1H and 13C assignments for seven Ile residues only within ~2.5 h. The results demonstrate the feasibility of side-chain signal assignment in this approach for as little as 10 nmol of a protein sample within ~3 days. The approach is likely applicable to a variety of proteins of biological interest without any requirements of highly efficient protein expression systems.

  12. Nano-Mole Scale Side-Chain Signal Assignment by 1H-Detected Protein Solid-State NMR by Ultra-Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Stereo-Array Isotope Labeling

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Songlin

    2015-04-09

    We present a general approach in 1H-detected 13C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) for side-chain signal assignments of 10-50 nmol quantities of proteins using a combination of a high magnetic field, ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ~80 kHz, and stereo-array-isotope-labeled (SAIL) proteins [Kainosho M. et al., Nature 440, 52–57, 2006]. First, we demonstrate that 1H indirect detection improves the sensitivity and resolution of 13C SSNMR of SAIL proteins for side-chain assignments in the ultra-fast MAS condition. 1H-detected SSNMR was performed for micro-crystalline ubiquitin (~55 nmol or ~0.5mg) that was SAIL-labeled at seven isoleucine (Ile) residues. Sensitivity was dramatically improved by 1H-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR by factors of 5.4-9.7 and 2.1-5.0, respectively, over 13C-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR and 1D 13C CPMAS, demonstrating that 2D 1H-detected SSNMR offers not only additional resolution but also sensitivity advantage over 1D 13C detection for the first time. High 1H resolution for the SAIL-labeled side-chain residues offered reasonable resolution even in the 2D data. A 1H-detected 3D 13C/13C/1H experiment on SAIL-ubiquitin provided nearly complete 1H and 13C assignments for seven Ile residues only within ~2.5 h. The results demonstrate the feasibility of side-chain signal assignment in this approach for as little as 10 nmol of a protein sample within ~3 days. The approach is likely applicable to a variety of proteins of biological interest without any requirements of highly efficient protein expression systems.

  13. Palaeoproterozoic continental arc magmatism, and Neoproterozoic metamorphism in the Aravalli-Delhi orogenic belt, NW India: New constraints from in situ zircon U-Pb-Hf isotope systematics, monazite dating and whole-rock geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Parampreet; Zeh, Armin; Chaudhri, Naveen

    2017-04-01

    Presently, the extent, origin and petrogenesis of late Palaeoproterozoic (ca. 1.85 Ga) magmatism in the north-central Aravalli-Delhi orogenic belt, NW India and subsequent metamorphic overprints are poorly constrained. Results of new in situ zircon U-Pb-Hf isotope analyses in combination with whole-rock elemental and isotopic data provide the first hard evidence that granitoid magmatism occurred in a continental magmatic arc setting between 1.86 and 1.81 Ga. The Hf-Nd model ages of 3.0-2.6 Ga and inherited zircon grains of 3.3-2.5 Ga indicate abundant reworking of Archaean crust. Flat HREE patterns with negative Eu anomalies furthermore reveal that the granitoids were generated from garnet-free and plagioclase-rich sources at shallow depths. Significant isotope variation among granitoid samples (εHft = -3.7 to -9.0; εNdt = -4.8 to -7.9) indicate that the reworked Archaean crust was not completely homogenised during the Palaeoproterozoic. This is best reflected by zircon Hf-isotope variation of ca. 9.5 epsilon units within the oldest granitoid sample. Zircon grains from this sample define three discrete Hf-isotope groups at εHf1.86Ga = -8.9, -4.8 and -1.6. These are interpreted to result from mixing of zircon-saturated magmas derived from three distinct sources within the crust prior to solidification. A monazite U-Pb isochron age of 868 ± 4 Ma from one of the granitoid samples furthermore indicates that the Aravalli fold belt was affected by an important post-magmatic overprint, perhaps related to the widespread metasomatic, granulite metamorphic and/or magmatic events during the same time span.

  14. Leatherback Isotopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC is currently working on a project identifying global marine isotopes using leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) as the indicator species. We currently...

  15. Isotopic chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, H.G. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper deals with compounds that are chiral-at least in part, due to isotope substitution-and their use in tracing the steric course of enzyme reaction in vitro and in vivo. There are other applications of isotopically chiral compounds (for example, in analyzing the steric course of nonenzymatic reactions and in probing the conformation of biomolecules) that are important but they will not be discussed in this context.

  16. Isotopic Paleoclimatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, R.

    Paleotemperature scales were calculated by H. C. Urey and others in the 1950s to assess past temperatures, and later work using the stable isotopes of oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon employed standards such as Peedee belemnite (PDB) and Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW). Subsequently, subjects as diverse as ice volume and paleotemperatures, oceanic ice and sediment cores, Pleistocene/Holocene climatic changes, and isotope chronostratigraphy extending back to the Precambrian were investigated.

  17. Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-04-23

    Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies and diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1

  18. The Marine Biogeochemistry of Zinc Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    dust (Niger) Sapropel (Mediterranean) 4* Deep-Sea Sediments * • Lobster Liver Mussel tissue Plankton Zooplankton Zinc ores * * * Sediment trap material...of natural plankton over large changes in nutrient concentrations in the Peru Upwelling Region. This suggests either that the isotope effect for Zn...hydrothermal fluids and minerals, cultured marine phytoplankton, natural plankton , and seawater. By measuring Zn isotopes in a diverse array of

  19. Paleoproxies: Heavy Stable Isotope Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, T. F.; Hippler, D.; Siebert, C.; Kramers, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    Recent advances in isotope ratio mass spectrometry, namely multiple collector ICP-MS and refined TIMS techniques, will significantly enhance the ability to measure heavy stable isotope fractionation, which will lead to the development of a wide array of process-identifying (bio)-geochemical tools. Thus far research in this area is not easily assessable to scientists outside the isotope field. This is due to the fact that analyzing heavy stable isotopes does not provide routine numbers which are per se true (the preciser the truer) but is still a highly experimental field. On the other hand resolving earth science problems requires specialists familiar with the environment being studied. So what is in there for paleoceanographers? In a first order approach, relating isotope variations to physical processes is straightforward. A prominent example are oxygen isotope variations with temperature. The total geological signal is of course far more complicated. At low temperatures, heavy stable isotopes variations have been reported for e.g. Ca, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Mo and Tl. Fractionation mechanisms and physical parameters responsible for the observed variations are not yet resolved for most elements. Significant equilibrium isotope fractionation is expected from redox reactions of transition metals. However a difference in coordination number between two coexisting speciations of an element in the same oxidation state can also cause fractionation. Protonation of dissolved Mo is one case currently discussed. For paleoceanography studies, a principal distinction between transition metals essential for life (V to Zn plus Mo) or not will be helpful. In case of the former group, distinction between biogenic and abiogenic isotope fractionation will remain an important issue. For example, abiotic Fe redox reactions result in isotope fractionations indistinguishable in direction and magnitude from microbial effects. Only a combination of different stable isotope systems bears the

  20. Filter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Ralph H.; Doty, Patrick F.

    2017-08-01

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a tiled filter array that can be used in connection with performance of spatial sampling of optical signals. The filter array comprises filter tiles, wherein a first plurality of filter tiles are formed from a first material, the first material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a first wavelength band pass therethrough. A second plurality of filter tiles is formed from a second material, the second material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a second wavelength band pass therethrough. The first plurality of filter tiles and the second plurality of filter tiles can be interspersed to form the filter array comprising an alternating arrangement of first filter tiles and second filter tiles.

  1. Stable isotope studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  2. Along-arc geochemical and isotopic variations in Javanese volcanic rocks: 'crustal' versus 'source' contamination at the Sunda arc, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, H.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Turner, S.; Macpherson, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    lavas. This information presented will help elucidate the nature of the transition between the continental and oceanic basement to the arc, which is expected to lie between Sumatra and East Java. Whitford, D.J. (1975) Strontium isotopic studies of the volcanic rocks of the Sunda arc, Indonesia, and their petrogenesis. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 39: 12871302. Handley, H.K., Macpherson, C. G., Davidson, J. P., Berlo, K. & Lowry, D. (2007). Constraining Fluid and Sediment Contributions to Subduction-Related Magmatism in Indonesia: Ijen Volcanic Complex. J. Petrol. 48, 1155-1183. Handley, H.K., Davidson, J.P., Macpherson, C.G. & Stimac .J.A. (2008). Untangling differentiation in arc lavas: constraints from unusual minor and trace element variations at Salak Volcano, Indonesia. Chem. Geol. 255, 360-376. Handley, H.K., Macpherson, C.G., Davidson, J.P. (2010). Geochemical and Sr-O isotopic constraints on magmatic differentiation at Gede Volcanic Complex, Java, Indonesia. Contrib. Mineral. Pet. 159, 885-908. Handley, H.K., Turner, S., Macpherson, C.G., Gertisser, R., Davidson, J.P. (2011) Hf-Nd isotope and trace element constraints on subduction inputs at island arcs: limitations of Hf anomalies and Sm/Hf ratios as input indicators. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 304, 212-223.

  3. Global Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Vishnu, Abhinav; Palmer, Bruce J.

    2015-11-01

    Global Arrays (GA) is a distributed-memory programming model that allows for shared-memory-style programming combined with one-sided communication, to create a set of tools that combine high performance with ease-of-use. GA exposes a relatively straightforward programming abstraction, while supporting fully-distributed data structures, locality of reference, and high-performance communication. GA was originally formulated in the early 1990’s to provide a communication layer for the Northwest Chemistry (NWChem) suite of chemistry modeling codes that was being developed concurrently.

  4. Evolution of continental crust and mantle heterogeneity: Evidence from Hf isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan, Patchett P.; Kouvo, O.; Hedge, C.E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1982-01-01

    We present initial 176Hf/177 Hf ratios for many samples of continental crust 3.7-0.3 Gy old. Results are based chiefly on zircons (1% Hf) and whole rocks: zircons are shown to be reliable carriers of essentially the initial Hf itself when properly chosen on the basis of U-Pb studies. Pre-3.0 Gy gneisses were apparently derived from an unfractionated mantle, but both depleted and undepleted mantle are evident as magma sources from 2.9 Gy to present. This mantle was sampled mainly from major crustal growth episodes 2.8, 1.8 and 0.7 Gy ago, all of which show gross heterogeneity of 176Hf/177Hf in magma sources from ??Hf=0 to +14, or about 60% of the variability of the present mantle. The approximate ??Hf=2??Nd relationship in ancient and modern igneous rocks shows that 176Lu/177Hf fractionates in general twice as much as 147Sm/144Nd in mantle melting processes. This allows an estimation of the relative value of the unknown bulk solid/liquid distribution coefficient for Hf. DLu/DHf=??? 2.3 holds for most mantle source regions. For garnet to be an important residual mantle phase, it must hold Hf strongly in order to preserve Hf-Nd isotopic relationships. The ancient Hf initials are consistent with only a small proportion of recycled older cratons in new continental crust, and with quasi-continuous, episodic growth of the continental crust with time. However, recycling of crust less than 150 My old cannot realistically be detected using Hf initials. The mantle shows clearly the general positive ??Hf resulting from a residual geochemical state at least back to 2.9 Gy ago, and seems to have repeatedly possessed a similar degree of heterogeneity, rather than a continuously-developing depletion. This is consistent with a complex dynamic disequilibrium model for the creation, maintenance and destruction of heterogeneity in the mantle. ?? 1981 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Octupole strength in the neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Riley, L A; Agiorgousis, M L; Baugher, T R; Bazin, D; Bowry, M; Cottle, P D; DeVone, F G; Gade, A; Glowacki, M T; Gregory, S D; Haldeman, E B; Kemper, K W; Lunderberg, E; Noji, S; Recchia, F; Sadler, B V; Scott, M; Weisshaar, D; Zegers, R G T

    2016-01-01

    Low-lying excited states of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes $^{48-52}$Ca have been studied via $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy following inverse-kinematics proton scattering on a liquid hydrogen target using the GRETINA $\\gamma$-ray tracking array. The energies and strengths of the octupole states in these isotopes are remarkably constant, indicating that these states are dominated by proton excitations.

  6. METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spevack, J.S.

    1957-04-01

    An isotope concentration process is described which consists of exchanging, at two or more different temperature stages, two isotopes of an element between substances that are physically separate from each other and each of which is capable of containing either of the isotopes, and withdrawing from a point between at least two of the temperatare stages one of the substances containing an increased concentration of the desired isotope.

  7. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a m

  8. Generation of Radixenon Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Morris, Scott J.; Panisko, Mark E.; Pitts, W. K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Reeder, Paul L.; Thomas, Charles W.

    2003-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed an automated system for separating Xe from air and can detect the following radioxenon isotopes, 131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe, and 135Xe. This report details the techniques used to generate the various radioxenon isotopes that are used for the calibration of the detector as well as other isotopes that have the potential to interfere with the fission produced radioxenon isotopes. Fission production is covered first using highly enriched uranium followed by a description and results from an experiment to produce radioxenon isotopes from neutron activation of ambient xenon.

  9. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  10. Coupling in reflector arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1968-01-01

    In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present communic...

  11. Exploring Neutron-Rich Oxygen Isotopes with MoNA

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, N; Bazin, D; Brown, J; DeYoung, P A; Finck, J E; Gade, A; Hinnefeld, J; Howes, R; Lecouey, J -L; Luther, B; Peters, W A; Scheit, H; Schiller, A; Thoennessen, M

    2007-01-01

    The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) was used in conjunction with a large-gap dipole magnet (Sweeper) to measure neutron-unbound states in oxygen isotopes close to the neutron dripline. While no excited states were observed in 24O, a resonance at 45(2) keV above the neutron separation energy was observed in 23O.

  12. Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Szymanski, T.; Thoennessen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-six cobalt isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  13. Discovery of the Arsenic Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, A; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine arsenic isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  14. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  15. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    is incorporated into carbonates. Hence, ancient carbonates can potentially record the Cr isotopic composition (δ53Cr ‰) of seawater in the geological past. Reliable application and interpretation of this proxy requires a detailed knowledge about processes that fractionate Cr on the Earth’s surface...... deposited during the Early Ordovician — a time of known redox instability in ancient oceans – exhibit a significant positive Cr isotope excursion of +0.5‰. This excursion is interpreted as the reductive drawn down of dissolved Cr in seawater in response to the development of a proximal anoxic sink......, and the quantification the Cr isotope composition of major Cr fluxes into and out of ocean. This thesis adds to the current knowledge of the Cr isotope system and is divided into two studies. The focus of the first study was to determine what processes control the Cr isotopic compositionof river water and to quantify...

  16. Isotopes in Greenland Precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Anne-Katrine

    Greenland ice cores offer a unique opportunity to investigate the climate system behaviour. The objective of this PhD project is to investigate isotope modelling of present- day conditions and conduct model-data comparison using Greenland ice cores. Thus this thesis investigates how the integration...... of model and data can be used to improve the understanding of climate changes. This is done through analysis of isotope modelling, observations and ice core measurements. This dissertation comprises three projects: (1) Modelling the isotopic response to changes in Arctic sea surface conditions, (2......) Constructing a new Greenland database of observations and present-day ice core measurements, and (3) Performance test of isotope-enabled CAM5 for Greenland. The recent decades of rapid Arctic sea ice decline are used as a basis for an observational-based model experiment using the isotope-enabled CAM model 3...

  17. (n,{gamma}) Experiments on tin isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Walker, C. L.; Rusev, G. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O' Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Kroll, J. [Charles University of Prague, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Agvaanluvsan, U.; Dashdorj, D.; Erdenehuluun, B.; Tsend-Ayush, T. [MonAme Scientific Research Center, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia)

    2013-04-19

    Neutron capture experiments on highly enriched {sup 117,119}Sn isotopes were performed with the DANCE detector array located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The DANCE detector provides detailed information about the multi-step {gamma}-ray cascade following neutron capture. Analysis of the experimental data provides important information to improve understanding of the neutron capture reaction, including a test of the statistical model, the assignment of spins and parities of neutron resonances, and information concerning the Photon Strength Function (PSF) and Level Density (LD) below the neutron separation energy. Preliminary results for the (n,{gamma}) reaction on {sup 117,119}Sn are presented. Resonance spins of the odd-A tin isotopes were almost completely unknown. Resonance spins and parities have been assigned via analysis of the multi-step {gamma}-ray spectra and directional correlations.

  18. Clocked combustor can array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won-Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Srinivasan, Shiva Kumar

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a clocked combustor can array for coherence reduction in a gas turbine engine. The clocked combustor can array may include a number of combustor cans positioned in a circumferential array. A first set of the combustor cans may have a first orientation and a second set of the combustor cans may have a second orientation.

  19. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  20. Clocked combustor can array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Srinivasan, Shiva Kumar

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a clocked combustor can array for coherence reduction in a gas turbine engine. The clocked combustor can array may include a number of combustor cans positioned in a circumferential array. A first set of the combustor cans may have a first orientation and a second set of the combustor cans may have a second orientation.

  1. Isotopes in Greenland Precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Anne-Katrine

    the Arctic Ocean. A comprehensive database is created based on ice core and weather station data from Greenland within the period 1890-2014. Present day annual and seasonal mean values are computed for 326 locations in Greenland. Parameterization of the spatial distribution of temperature and δ18O are used...... of model and data can be used to improve the understanding of climate changes. This is done through analysis of isotope modelling, observations and ice core measurements. This dissertation comprises three projects: (1) Modelling the isotopic response to changes in Arctic sea surface conditions, (2......) Constructing a new Greenland database of observations and present-day ice core measurements, and (3) Performance test of isotope-enabled CAM5 for Greenland. The recent decades of rapid Arctic sea ice decline are used as a basis for an observational-based model experiment using the isotope-enabled CAM model 3...

  2. Perchlorate isotope forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.M.; Jackson, W.A.; Batista, J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected recently in a variety of soils, waters, plants, and food products at levels that may be detrimental to human health. These discoveries have generated considerable interest in perchlorate source identification. In this study, comprehensive stable isotope analyses ( 37Cl/35Cl and 18O/17O/ 16O) of perchlorate from known synthetic and natural sources reveal systematic differences in isotopic characteristics that are related to the formation mechanisms. In addition, isotopic analyses of perchlorate extracted from groundwater and surface water demonstrate the feasibility of identifying perchlorate sources in contaminated environments on the basis of this technique. Both natural and synthetic sources of perchlorate have been identified in water samples from some perchlorate occurrences in the United States by the isotopic method. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  3. Isotope Production Facility (IPF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced radioactive isotopes for medicine and research since the mid 1970s, when targets were first irradiated using the 800...

  4. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  5. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, E.E.

    2004-11-15

    A review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors is presented. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, can be considered the most important one for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples. Manuel Cardona, the longtime editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications has been and continues to be one of the major contributors to this field of solid state physics and it is a great pleasure to dedicate this review to him.

  6. Isotopes through the looking glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårtensson Pendrill, Ann Marie

    2000-08-01

    Nuclear distributions affect many aspects of atomic spectra. As an example, recent experimental results for the hyperfine anomaly in Fr isotopes are considered. These depend on nuclear charge and magnetization distributions. The variations in charge radii for these isotopes were studied earlier by measuring optical isotope shifts. The hyperfine anomalies for the odd-odd isotopes involve the neutron distributions, of interest for studies of parity nonconserving effects along a chain of isotopes.

  7. Level structures of neutron-rich Xe isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I.; Lister, C.J.; Morss, L.R. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The level structures of neutron-rich Xe isotopes were determined by observing prompt gamma-ray coincidences in {sup 248}Cm fission fragments. A 5-mg {sup 248}Cm, in the form of {sup 248}Cm-KCl pellet, was placed inside Eurogam array which consisted of 45 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and 5 Low-Energy Photon Spectrometers. Transitions in Xe isotopes were identified by the appearance of new peaks in the {gamma}-ray spectra obtained by gating on the gamma peaks of the complementary Mo fragments.

  8. Methods of isotopic geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorokhov, I. M.; Levchenkov, O. A.

    Papers are presented on such topics as the age of the chemical elements; the age of meteorites, the moon, and the earth; isotopic ages of the most ancient terrestrial formations; and the Archean evolution of Enderby Land in the Antarctic as evidenced by isotopic dating. Consideration is also given to a uranium-lead geochronology technique for investigating Precambrian ore deposits, a Pb-Pb technique of zircon dating, and the potentials and limitations of Sm-Nd geochronology.

  9. Oxygen Isotopes in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. N.

    2003-12-01

    Oxygen isotope abundance variations in meteorites are very useful in elucidating chemical and physical processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system (Clayton, 1993). On Earth, the mean abundances of the three stable isotopes are 16O: 99.76%, 17O: 0.039%, and 18O: 0.202%. It is conventional to express variations in abundances of the isotopes in terms of isotopic ratios, relative to an arbitrary standard, called SMOW (for standard mean ocean water), as follows:The isotopic composition of any sample can then be represented by one point on a "three-isotope plot," a graph of δ17O versus δ18O. It will be seen that such plots are invaluable in interpreting meteoritic data. Figure 1 shows schematically the effect of various processes on an initial composition at the center of the diagram. Almost all terrestrial materials lie along a "fractionation" trend; most meteoritic materials lie near a line of "16O addition" (or subtraction). (4K)Figure 1. Schematic representation of various isotopic processes shown on an oxygen three-isotope plot. Almost all terrestrial materials plot along a line of "fractionation"; most primitive meteoritic materials plot near a line of "16O addition." The three isotopes of oxygen are produced by nucleosynthesis in stars, but by different nuclear processes in different stellar environments. The principal isotope, 16O, is a primary isotope (capable of being produced from hydrogen and helium alone), formed in massive stars (>10 solar masses), and ejected by supernova explosions. The two rare isotopes are secondary nuclei (produced in stars from nuclei formed in an earlier generation of stars), with 17O coming primarily from low- and intermediate-mass stars (shielding in the UV photodissociation of CO (van Dishoeck and Black, 1988). This process results from the large differences in abundance between C16O, on the one hand, and C17O and C18O on the other. Photolysis of CO occurs by absorption of stellar UV radiation in the

  10. Electronic Switch Arrays for Managing Microbattery Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad; Alahmad, Mahmoud; Sukumar, Vinesh; Zghoul, Fadi; Buck, Kevin; Hess, Herbert; Li, Harry; Cox, David

    2008-01-01

    Integrated circuits have been invented for managing the charging and discharging of such advanced miniature energy-storage devices as planar arrays of microscopic energy-storage elements [typically, microscopic electrochemical cells (microbatteries) or microcapacitors]. The architecture of these circuits enables implementation of the following energy-management options: dynamic configuration of the elements of an array into a series or parallel combination of banks (subarrarys), each array comprising a series of parallel combination of elements; direct addressing of individual banks for charging/or discharging; and, disconnection of defective elements and corresponding reconfiguration of the rest of the array to utilize the remaining functional elements to obtain the desited voltage and current performance. An integrated circuit according to the invention consists partly of a planar array of field-effect transistors that function as switches for routing electric power among the energy-storage elements, the power source, and the load. To connect the energy-storage elements to the power source for charging, a specific subset of switches is closed; to connect the energy-storage elements to the load for discharging, a different specific set of switches is closed. Also included in the integrated circuit is circuitry for monitoring and controlling charging and discharging. The control and monitoring circuitry, the switching transistors, and interconnecting metal lines are laid out on the integrated-circuit chip in a pattern that registers with the array of energy-storage elements. There is a design option to either (1) fabricate the energy-storage elements in the corresponding locations on, and as an integral part of, this integrated circuit; or (2) following a flip-chip approach, fabricate the array of energy-storage elements on a separate integrated-circuit chip and then align and bond the two chips together.

  11. Array Antenna Limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, B L G; Hussain, N

    2013-01-01

    This letter defines a physical bound based array figure of merit that provides a tool to compare the performance of both single and multi-band array antennas with respect to return-loss, thickness of the array over the ground-plane, and scan-range. The result is based on a sum-rule result of Rozanov-type for linear polarization. For single-band antennas it extends an existing limit for a given fixed scan-angle to include the whole scan-range of the array, as well as the unit-cell structure in the bound. The letter ends with an investigation of the array figure of merit for some wideband and/or wide-scan antennas with linear polarization. We find arrays with a figure of merit >0.6 that empirically defines high-performance antennas with respect to this measure.

  12. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  13. Pacific Array (Transportable Broadband Ocean Floor Array)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Ekstrom, Goran; Evans, Rob; Forsyth, Don; Gaherty, Jim; Kennett, Brian; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Utada, Hisashi

    2016-04-01

    Based on recent developments on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry1, together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (azimuthal, and hopefully radial), with deployments of ~15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for a 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way or concurrently (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure beneath Pacific ocean, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations is essential: if three countries/institutions participate this endeavor together, Pacific Array may be accomplished within five-or-so years.

  14. Dynamically Reconfigurable Microphone Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Static + 2 Wireless Using only a standard computer sound card, a robot is limited to binaural inputs. Even when using wireless microphones, the audio...Abstract—Robotic sound localization has traditionally been restricted to either on-robot microphone arrays or embedded microphones in aware...a microphone array has a significant impact on the mathematics of sound source localization. Arrays, for instance, are commonly designed to

  15. Integrated avalanche photodiode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Eric S.

    2015-07-07

    The present disclosure includes devices for detecting photons, including avalanche photon detectors, arrays of such detectors, and circuits including such arrays. In some aspects, the detectors and arrays include a virtual beveled edge mesa structure surrounded by resistive material damaged by ion implantation and having side wall profiles that taper inwardly towards the top of the mesa structures, or towards the direction from which the ion implantation occurred. Other aspects are directed to masking and multiple implantation and/or annealing steps. Furthermore, methods for fabricating and using such devices, circuits and arrays are disclosed.

  16. Heavy element stable isotope ratios: analytical approaches and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimizu, Masaharu; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Hirata, Takafumi

    2013-03-01

    Continuous developments in inorganic mass spectrometry techniques, including a combination of an inductively coupled plasma ion source and a magnetic sector-based mass spectrometer equipped with a multiple-collector array, have revolutionized the precision of isotope ratio measurements, and applications of inorganic mass spectrometry for biochemistry, geochemistry, and marine chemistry are beginning to appear on the horizon. Series of pioneering studies have revealed that natural stable isotope fractionations of many elements heavier than S (e.g., Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ce, Nd, Mo, Cd, W, Tl, and U) are common on Earth, and it had been widely recognized that most physicochemical reactions or biochemical processes induce mass-dependent isotope fractionation. The variations in isotope ratios of the heavy elements can provide new insights into past and present biochemical and geochemical processes. To achieve this, the analytical community is actively solving problems such as spectral interference, mass discrimination drift, chemical separation and purification, and reduction of the contamination of analytes. This article describes data calibration and standardization protocols to allow interlaboratory comparisons or to maintain traceability of data, and basic principles of isotope fractionation in nature, together with high-selectivity and high-yield chemical separation and purification techniques for stable isotope studies.

  17. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  18. Analysis of VCSEL Array Module Using a Simple Microlens Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hen-Wai; Tsao; Shyh-Lin; Tsao

    2003-01-01

    A simple microlens array is designed between VCSEL array and fiber array for integration of array module. We increase the optical coupling efficiency from -32.057 dBm to -0.9054 dBm by using our designed microlens array.

  19. Analysis of VCSEL Array Module Using a Simple Microlens Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Ming Cheng; Hen-Wai Tsao; Shyh-Lin Tsao

    2003-01-01

    A simple microlens array is designed between VCSEL array and fiber array for integration of array module. We increase the optical coupling efficiency from-32.057 dBm to-0.9054 dBm by using our designed microlens array.

  20. Isotope geochemistry. Biological signatures in clumped isotopes of O₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Laurence Y; Ash, Jeanine L; Young, Edward D

    2015-04-24

    The abundances of molecules containing more than one rare isotope have been applied broadly to determine formation temperatures of natural materials. These applications of "clumped" isotopes rely on the assumption that isotope-exchange equilibrium is reached, or at least approached, during the formation of those materials. In a closed-system terrarium experiment, we demonstrate that biological oxygen (O2) cycling drives the clumped-isotope composition of O2 away from isotopic equilibrium. Our model of the system suggests that unique biological signatures are present in clumped isotopes of O2—and not formation temperatures. Photosynthetic O2 is depleted in (18)O(18)O and (17)O(18)O relative to a stochastic distribution of isotopes, unlike at equilibrium, where heavy-isotope pairs are enriched. Similar signatures may be widespread in nature, offering new tracers of biological and geochemical cycling.

  1. Neutron Capture Reactions on lu Isotopes at Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, O.; Meot, V.; Daugas, J.-M.; Morel, P.; Jandel, M.; Vieira, D. J.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Wouters, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    The DANCE1 (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) array at LANSCE spallation neutron source in Los Alamos has been used to obtain the neutron radiative capture cross sections for 175Lu and 176Lu with neutron energies from thermal up to 100 keV. Both isotopes are of current interest for the nucleosynthesis s-process.2,3 Three targets were used to perform these measurements. One was natural Lu foil of 31 mg/cm2 and the other two were isotope-enriched targets of 175Lu and 176Lu. Firstly, the cross sections were obtained by normalizing yield to a well-known cross section at the thermal neutron energy. Now, we want to obtain absolute cross sections of radiative capture through a precise neutron flux determination, an accurate target mass measurement and an efficiency determination of the DANCE array.

  2. Solar array deployment mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calassa, Mark C.; Kackley, Russell

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a Solar Array Deployment Mechanism (SADM) used to deploy a rigid solar array panel on a commercial spacecraft. The application required a deployment mechanism design that was not only lightweight, but also could be produced and installed at the lowest possible cost. This paper covers design, test, and analysis of a mechanism that meets these requirements.

  3. Array for detecting microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd D.

    2014-07-08

    The present embodiments relate to an array system for detecting and identifying biomolecules and organisms. More specifically, the present embodiments relate to an array system comprising a microarray configured to simultaneously detect a plurality of organisms in a sample at a high confidence level.

  4. Stable isotopes. Applications and production; Les isotopes stables. Applications - production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, S.; Louvet, P.; Soulie, E. [eds.

    1994-12-31

    This conference presents 46 communications concerning stable isotope production, utilization and application, grouped in 6 sessions and posters. The various themes are: biological applications (pharmacology, medical diagnosis, metabolism and protein studies, toxicity and response studies, labelled compounds), analysis procedures (NMR analysis for macromolecules, tracer studies), nuclear applications (utilization of stable isotopes in nuclear reactors), biological, physical and chemical applications (mass transfer, mobility, crystallography, isotopic exchange), stable isotope production (ion chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, cryogenic distillation).

  5. Deformation of C isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Kanada-Enyo, Y

    2004-01-01

    Systematic analysis of the deformations of proton and neutron densities in even-even C isotopes was done based on the method of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics. The $E2$ transition strength was discussed in relation to the deformation. We analyze the $B(E2;2^+_1\\to 0^+_1)$ in $^{16}$C, which has been recently measured to be abnormally small. The results suggest the difference of the deformations between proton and neutron densities in the neutron-rich C isotopes. It was found that stable proton structure in C isotopes plays an important role in the enhancement the neutron skin structure as well as in the systematics of $B(E2)$ in the neutron-rich C.

  6. Photovoltaic array loss mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Charles

    1986-10-01

    Loss mechanisms which come into play when solar cell modules are mounted in arrays are identified. Losses can occur either from a reduction in the array electrical performance or with nonoptimal extraction of power from the array. Electrical performance degradation is caused by electrical mismatch, transmission losses from cell surface soiling and steep angle of reflectance, and electrical losses from field wiring resistance and the voltage drop across blocking diodes. The second type of loss, concerned with the operating points of the array, can involve nonoptimal load impedance and limiting the operating envelope of the array to specific ranges of voltage and current. Each of the loss mechanisms are discussed and average energy losses expected from soiling, steep reflectance angles and circuit losses are calculated.

  7. Microfabricated ion trap array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  8. Neutron capture reactions on Lu isotopes at DANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouters J.M.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments array located at the Los Alamos national laboratory has been used to obtain the neutron capture cross sections for the 175Lu and 176Lu isotopes with neutron energies from thermal up to 100 keV. Both isotopes are of current interest for the nucleosynthesis s-process in astrophysics and for applications as in reactor physics or in nuclear medicine. Three targets were used to perform these measurements. One was natLu foil and the other two were isotope-enriched targets of 175Lu and 176Lu. The cross sections are obtained for now through a precise neutron flux determination and a normalization at the thermal neutron cross section value. A comparison with the recent experimental data and the evaluated data of ENDF/B-VII.0 will be presented. In addition, resonances parameters and spin assignments for some resonances will be featured.

  9. Isotopes in Condensed Matter

    CERN Document Server

    G Plekhanov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a concise introduction to the newly created sub-discipline of solid state physics isotopetronics. The role of isotopes in materials and their properties are describe  in this book. The problem of the enigma of the atomic mass in microphysics is briefly discussed.  The range of the applications of isotopes is wide: from biochemical process in living organisms to modern technical applications in quantum information. Isotopetronics promises to improve nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices. With numerous illustrations this book is useful to researchers, engineers and graduate students.

  10. Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 144 Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions (Web, free access)   The atomic weights are available for elements 1 through 111, and isotopic compositions or abundances are given when appropriate.

  11. Discoveries of isotopes by fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Thoennessen

    2015-09-01

    Of the about 3000 isotopes presently known, about 20% have been discovered in fission. The history of fission as it relates to the discovery of isotopes as well as the various reaction mechanisms leading to isotope discoveries involving fission are presented.

  12. Post-Irradiation Examination of Array Targets - Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icenhour, A.S.

    2004-01-23

    During FY 2001, two arrays, each containing seven neptunium-loaded targets, were irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho to examine the influence of multi-target self-shielding on {sup 236}Pu content and to evaluate fission product release data. One array consisted of seven targets that contained 10 vol% NpO{sub 2} pellets, while the other array consisted of seven targets that contained 20 vol % NpO{sub 2} pellets. The arrays were located in the same irradiation facility but were axially separated to minimize the influence of one array on the other. Each target also contained a dosimeter package, which consisted of a small NpO{sub 2} wire that was inside a vanadium container. After completion of irradiation and shipment back to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, nine of the targets (four from the 10 vol% array and five from the 20 vol% array) were punctured for pressure measurement and measurement of {sup 85}Kr. These nine targets and the associated dosimeters were then chemically processed to measure the residual neptunium, total plutonium production, {sup 238}Pu production, and {sup 236}Pu concentration at discharge. The amount and isotopic composition of fission products were also measured. This report provides the results of the processing and analysis of the nine targets.

  13. From Pangaea to the present: geochronology, thermochronology and isotopic tracking of tectonic processes along the Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spikings, R.; Cochrane, R.; Van der Lelij, R.; Villagomez, D.

    2013-05-01

    Triassic - Tertiary rocks within the Central Cordillera of Colombia and Eastern Cordillera of Ecuador provide a record of the rift-to-drift phase of the western Tethys Wilson Cycle, Jurassic steady-state active margin magmatism, Early Cretaceous attenuation of the margin and the formation of new continental crust, and the accretion of an extensive oceanic plateau and arc sequence at ~75 Ma, which shielded juvenile continental crust from tectonic erosion during the Tertiary. The margin remained active throughout the Tertiary, and exhumed in response to changing oceanic plate kinematics and the collision of heterogeneous oceanic crust. We present geochronological, thermochronological, geochemical and Hf, Nd and O isotopic data that provide a highly-temporally resolved record of the evolution of NW Gondwana from Pangaea to the present. Migmatitic leucosomes and S-type granites were emplaced along the NW South American margin during ~275-225 Ma, and tholeiitic amphibolites intruded during ~240 - 225 Ma. These sequences formed during continental rifting in a back-arc, leading to the formation of ophiolite sequences and oceanic crust by ~216 Ma. The Maya and Oaxaquia terranes of Central America may represent parts of the conjugate margin. The NW South American margin remained passive until ~183 Ma, when subduction gave rise to calc-alkaline, I-type granitoids until ~143 Ma. Earliest Cretaceous roll-back extended and exhumed the margin, causing the arc axis to migrate oceanward while the magmatic rocks became progressively more isotopically juvenile. Arc migration opened Early Cretaceous intra-arc basins that were floored by lavas and filled with arc detritus. The arc axis stabilized at ~130-115 Ma and fringed the continental margin outboard of the Jurassic arc. Compression at 120-110 Ma closed the intra-arc basins, exhumed the buttressing continental margin and obducted variably metamorphosed rocks of the east dipping-subduction channel onto the continental margin during

  14. GEOCHRONOMETRY ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>20040631 Chen Jiangfeng (School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui) ; Xie Zhi Relationships Between Rb-Sr, Ar - Ar Geochronometers and Oxygen Isotopic Equilibrium of Intrusions from Eastern Anhui Province, China (Geological Journal of China Universities, ISSN 1006 - 7493, CN 32 -

  15. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20090432 Zhou Shuqing (School of Energy Resources, China University of Geosciences Beijing 100083, China); Huang Haiping Stable Isotopic Records vs. Important Events in Life Evolution and the Concurrent Environment (Geological Review, ISSN0371-5736, CN11-1952, 54(2), 2008, p.225-231, 3 illus., 1 table, 77 refs.)

  16. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20141014Wang Hairan(State Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics,Department of Geology,Northwest University,Xi’an710069,China);Zhao Hongge Theory and Application of Zircon U-Pb Isotope Dating Technique(Geology and Resources,ISSN1671-1947,CN21-1458/P,22(3),2013,p.229

  17. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20072750 Huang Sijing(State Key Laboratory of Oil/Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation,Chengdu University of Technology,Chengdu 610059,China);Pei Changrong Age Calibration for the Boundary between Lower and Middle Triassic by Strontium Isotope Stratigraphy in Eastern Sichuan Province

  18. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20070454 Bao Zengkuan (Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049, China); Yuan Wanming Apatite (U-Th)/He Dating and Its Application (Acta Petrologica et Mineralogica, ISSN1000-6524, CN11-1966/P, 24(2), 2005, p.126-132, 2 illus., 25 refs.) Key words: isotopic geochronology

  19. Isotopic Implicit Surface Meshing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boissonnat, Jean-Daniel; Cohen-Steiner, David; Vegter, Gert

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of piecewise linear approximation of implicit surfaces. We first give a criterion ensuring that the zero-set of a smooth function and the one of a piecewise linear approximation of it are isotopic. Then, we deduce from this criterion an implicit surface meshing algor

  20. Isotope hydrograph separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, P. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum, Centre of Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Leipzig (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Storm-runoff thus reflects the complex hydraulic behaviour of drainage basins and water-links of such systems. Water of different origin may participate in the events and in this lecture, the application of isotope techniques to separate storm hydrographs into different components will be presented.

  1. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  2. Introduction to adaptive arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Monzingo, Bob; Haupt, Randy

    2011-01-01

    This second edition is an extensive modernization of the bestselling introduction to the subject of adaptive array sensor systems. With the number of applications of adaptive array sensor systems growing each year, this look at the principles and fundamental techniques that are critical to these systems is more important than ever before. Introduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Edition is organized as a tutorial, taking the reader by the hand and leading them through the maze of jargon that often surrounds this highly technical subject. It is easy to read and easy to follow as fundamental concept

  3. Piezoelectric transducer array microspeaker

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of a piezoelectric micro-speaker. The speaker is an array of micro-machined piezoelectric membranes, fabricated on silicon wafer using advanced micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n piezoelectric transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a circular shape structure. The membrane is made out four layers: 300nm of platinum for the bottom electrode, 250nm or lead zirconate titanate (PZT), a top electrode of 300nm and a structural layer of 50

  4. P systems with array objects and array rewriting rules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.G. Subramanian; R. Saravanan; M. Geethalakshmi; P. Helen Chandra; M. Margenstern

    2007-01-01

    Array P systems were introduced by Pǎun Gh. which is linking the two areas of membrane computing and picture grammars. Puzzle grammars were introduced by us for generating connected picture arrays in the two-dimensional plane, motivated by the problem of tiling the plane. On the other hand, incorporating into arrays the developmental type of generation used in the well-known biologically motivated L systems, Siromoney and Siromoney proposed a very general rectangular array generating model, called extended controlled tabled L array system (ECTLAS). In this paper we introduce two variations of the array P system, called BPG array P system and parallel array P system. The former has in the regions array objects and basic puzzle grammar rules (BPG), which are a specific kind of puzzle grammar rules. In the latter, the regions have rectangular array objects and tables of context-free rules. We examine these two types of P systems for their array generative power.

  5. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  6. Water isotopes in desiccating lichens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Matthias; Máguas, Cristina; Lakatos, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of water is routinely used as a tracer to study water exchange processes in vascular plants and ecosystems. To date, no study has focussed on isotope processes in non-vascular, poikilohydric organisms such as lichens and bryophytes. To understand basic isotope exchange processes of non-vascular plants, thallus water isotopic composition was studied in various green-algal lichens exposed to desiccation. The study indicates that lichens equilibrate with the isotopic composition of surrounding water vapour. A model was developed as a proof of concept that accounts for the specific water relations of these poikilohydric organisms. The approach incorporates first their variable thallus water potential and second a compartmentation of the thallus water into two isotopically distinct but connected water pools. Moreover, the results represent first steps towards the development of poikilohydric organisms as a recorder of ambient vapour isotopic composition. PMID:19888598

  7. Tracing recycled volatiles in a heterogeneous mantle with boron isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walowski, Kristina; Kirstein, Linda; de Hoog, Cees-Jan; Elliot, Tim; Savov, Ivan; Devey, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Recycling of oceanic lithosphere drives the chemical evolution of the Earth's mantle supplying both solids and volatiles to the Earth's interior. Yet, how subducted material influences mantle composition remains unclear. A perfect tracer for slab recycling should be only fractionated at the Earth's surface, have a strong influence on mantle compositions but be resistant to perturbations en route back to the surface. Current understanding suggests that boron concentrations linked to B isotope determinations fulfil all these requirements and should be an excellent tracer of heterogeneity in the deep mantle. Here, we present the trace element, volatile and the B isotope composition of basaltic glasses and melt inclusions in olivine from distinct end-member ocean island basalts (OIB) to track the fate of recycled lithosphere and ultimately document how recycling contributes to mantle heterogeneity. The chosen samples represent the different end member OIB compositions and include: EMI (Pitcairn), EMII (MacDonald), HIMU (St. Helena), and FOZO (Cape Verde & Reunion). The data is derived from both submarine and subaerial deposits, with B isotope determination of both basaltic glass and melt inclusions from each locality. Preliminary results suggest OIB have B isotopic compositions that overlap the MORB array (-7.5‰±0.7; Marschall et al., 2015) but extend to both lighter and heavier values. These results suggest that B isotopes will be useful for resolving mantle source heterogeneity at different ocean islands and contribute to our understanding of the volatile budget of the deep mantle.

  8. Improved array illuminators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, A W; Sinzinger, S

    1992-09-10

    The job of an array illuminator is to provide an array of optical gates or smart pixels with photon power or with synchronous clock signals. So far it has been common to take the power from one big laser and distribute it to perhaps a million gates. An obvious alternative is to assign one private small source to each gate. We favor an in-between approach: a few medium-size sources share the job of providing photons. This hybrid approach has several advantages, such as better homogeneity, less coherent noise, and a distributed risk of source failure. We propose several setups and present some experimental results. Our concept calls for an array of incoherent point sources. We simulate such an array experimentally with a single source, which is virtually expanded into a source array by grating diffraction. Ordinarily these virtual sources are mutually coherent, which is undesirable for our aims. We destroy the mutual coherence by moving the grating during the photographic recording of the output array.

  9. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    is incorporated into carbonates. Hence, ancient carbonates can potentially record the Cr isotopic composition (δ53Cr ‰) of seawater in the geological past. Reliable application and interpretation of this proxy requires a detailed knowledge about processes that fractionate Cr on the Earth’s surface...... deposited during the Early Ordovician — a time of known redox instability in ancient oceans – exhibit a significant positive Cr isotope excursion of +0.5‰. This excursion is interpreted as the reductive drawn down of dissolved Cr in seawater in response to the development of a proximal anoxic sink...... of ancient marine sediments can be a useful tool for understanding the cycling of redox sensitive elements on a local scale....

  10. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>20050934 Chen Zhihong (Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Beijing 100037, China); Lu Songnian Age of the Fushui Intermediate-Mafic Intrusive Complex in the Qinling Orogen, New Zircon U - Pb and Whole -Rock Sm and Nd Isotope Chronological Evidence (Geological Bulletin of China, ISSN 1671-2552, CN11-4648/P, 23(4), 2004, p. 322-328, 3 illus. , 3 tables, 10 refs. )

  11. GEOCHRONOMETRY &ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131727 Huang Xiaowen(State Key Laboratory of Ore Deposit Geochemistry,Institute of Geochemistry,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Guiyang 550002,China);Qi Liang Preliminary Study on Sample-Preparation for Re-Os Isotopic Dating of Pyrite(Geochimica,ISSN0379-1726,CN44-1398/P,41(4),2012,p.380-386,3illus.,2tables,25refs)Key words:pyrite,Re-Os dating

  12. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20132601 Cui Yurong(Tianjin Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources,China Geological Survey,Tianjin 300170,China);Zhou Hongying In Situ LA-MC-ICP-MS U-Pb Isotopic Dating of Monazite(Acta Geoscientica Sinica,ISSN0375-5444,CN11-1856/P,33(6),2012,p.865-876,6illus.,4tables,41refs.)Key words:monazite,U-Pb dating

  13. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  14. Nuclear physics and stable isotopes; Physique nucleaire et isotopes stables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutte, D. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee

    1994-12-31

    The aim of this paper is to show that fundamental research in nuclear physics requires utilization of stable isotopes; stable isotopes are essential as target material since a large quantity of nucleus have to be studied in order to appreciate all the complexity of the nuclear structure, but also as a tool, such as beams, for the same purpose. Examples are given with samarium, tin and germanium isotopes. 7 figs.

  15. Evaporating metal nanocrystal arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Joy, James C.; Zhao, Chenwei; Kim, Jin Ho; Fernandes, Gustavo; Xu, J. M.; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2017-03-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with a self-ordered triangular array of nanopores provide the means to fabricate multiple forms of nano materials, such as nanowires and nanoparticles. This study focuses on nanostructures that emerge in thin films of metals thermally evaporated onto the surface of AAO. Previous work showed that films of different evaporated metals assume dramatically different structures, e.g. an ordered triangular array of nearly monodisperse nanoparticles forms for lead (Pb) while a polycrystalline nanohoneycomb structure forms for silver (Ag). Here, we present investigations of the effects of substrate temperature and deposition angle that reveal the processes controlling the nano particle array formation. Our findings indicate that arrays form provided the grain nucleation density exceeds the pore density and the atomic mobility is high enough to promote grain coalescence. They introduce a method for producing films with anisotropic grain array structure. The results provide insight into the influence of substrate nano-morphology on thin film growth energetics and kinetics that can be harnessed for creating films with other novel nano-structures.

  16. Nickel isotopes and methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, A.; Ivarsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Methanogens require Ni for their growth and as a consequence the microbial fractionation of Ni isotopes can be used as a biomarker for activity of methanogenic communities1. Anaerobic laboratory experiments was performed using methanogens to investigate methanogenic growth in a modified nutrient media2 with olivine Fo91 (5g/l) added as an additional mineral nutrient source and as the only H2 provider. One of the investigated methanogens showed an increased growth in the experiments with added olivine. There were also a close relationship between the mobilized Ni and the growth of the methanogen. Ni is an element that previously has been neglected in the study of fossilized microorganisms and their interaction with mineral substrates and, thus, there are no records or published data of Ni in association with microfossils. However, we have detected enrichments of Ni in fossilized microorganisms and ichno-fossils, respectively, from three separate locations. Ni is not present in the host rock in any of the samples. Thus, Ni is present in association with fossilized microorganisms from environments and more extensive analysis is required to understand the magnitude, uptake, preservation and fractionation of Ni in microfossils. In order to analyze Ni isotope fractionation from microbe-mineral interaction, we plan to use a high-resolution Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LMS)3. In situ profile ablation will provide detailed and localized data on fractionation patterns between microfossils and their host rock. Also, this technique will allow us to identify the change in Ni isotopic fractionation in rock samples caused by abiotic and biogenic processes in a faster and easier way and with less risk for contamination compared to the wet chemistry analyses of Ni isotopes. 1. Cameron, V., Vance, D., Archer, C. & House, C. H. A biomarker based on the stable isotopes of nickel. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106, 10944-10948 (2009). 2. Schn

  17. "PRISTINE", a new high volume sampler for ultraclean sampling of trace metals and isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkenberg, Micha J.A.; de Baar, Hein J.W.; Bakker, Karel; Gerringa, Loes J.A.; Keijzer, Edwin; Laan, Martin; Laan, Patrick; Middag, Rob; Ober, Sven; van Ooijen, Jan; Ossebaar, Sharyn; Weerlee, Evaline M. van; Smit, Marck G.

    2015-01-01

    Many trace elements like Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn are essential for marine life, some trace elements are of concern as pollutants, e.g. Pb and Hg, while others, together with a diverse array of isotopes, are used to assess modern-ocean processes and the role of the ocean in past climate change.

  18. “PRISTINE”, a new high volume sampler for ultraclean sampling of trace metals and isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkenberg, M.J.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Bakker, K.; Gerringa, L.J.A.; Keijzer, E.; Laan, M.; Laan, P.; Middag, R.; Ober, S.; van Ooijen, J.; Ossebaar, S.; van Weerlee, E.M.; Smit, M.

    2015-01-01

    Many trace elements like Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn are essential for marine life, some trace elements are of concern as pollutants, e.g. Pb and Hg, while others, together with a diverse array of isotopes, are used to assess modern-ocean processes and the role of the ocean in past climate change. GEO

  19. "PRISTINE", a new high volume sampler for ultraclean sampling of trace metals and isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkenberg, Micha J.A.; de Baar, Hein J.W.; Bakker, Karel; Gerringa, Loes J.A.; Keijzer, Edwin; Laan, Martin; Laan, Patrick; Middag, Rob; Ober, Sven; van Ooijen, Jan; Ossebaar, Sharyn; Weerlee, Evaline M. van; Smit, Marck G.

    2015-01-01

    Many trace elements like Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn are essential for marine life, some trace elements are of concern as pollutants, e.g. Pb and Hg, while others, together with a diverse array of isotopes, are used to assess modern-ocean processes and the role of the ocean in past climate change. GEO

  20. Therapeutic use of radioactive isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2013-01-01

    In December, researchers from ISOLDE-CERN, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) published the results of an in vivo study which successfully proved the effectiveness of four terbium isotopes for diagnosing and treating cancerous tumours.   Four terbium isotopes suitable for clinical purposes. “ISOLDE is the only installation capable of supplying terbium isotopes of such purity and intensity in the case of three out of the four types used in this study,” explains Karl Johnson, a physicist at ISOLDE.  “Producing over a thousand different isotopes, our equipment offers the widest choice of isotopes in the world!” Initially intended for fundamental physics research, ISOLDE has diversified its activities over time to invest in various projects in the materials science, biochemistry and nuclear medicine fields. The proof-of-concept study has confirmed that the four terbium isotopes 149Tb, 152Tb, 155Tb produ...

  1. Wireless Josephson Junction Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Laura

    2015-03-01

    We report low temperature, microwave transmission measurements on a wireless two- dimensional network of Josephson junction arrays composed of superconductor-insulator -superconductor tunnel junctions. Unlike their biased counterparts, by removing all electrical contacts to the arrays and superfluous microwave components and interconnects in the transmission line, we observe new collective behavior in the transmission spectra. In particular we will show emergent behavior that systematically responds to changes in microwave power at fixed temperature. Likewise we will show the dynamic and collective response of the arrays while tuning the temperature at fixed microwave power. We discuss these spectra in terms of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and Shapiro steps. We gratefully acknowledge the support Prof. Steven Anlage at the University of Maryland and Prof. Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota. Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  2. Lithium isotope separation by laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arisawa, T.; Maruyama, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Shiba, K.

    1982-01-01

    A lithium isotope separation was performed using a laser isotope separation method. It was found that the lithium atoms with a natural isotopic abundance enhanced its /sup 6/Li concentration up to over 90% by tuning the laser wavelength to the /sup 2/Psub(1/2) of /sup 6/Li. Too high power, however, leads to a loss of enrichment due to the power broadening effect which was analysed by the equation of motion of density matrices.

  3. Photovoltaic array performance model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochvil, Jay A.; Boyson, William Earl; King, David L.

    2004-08-01

    This document summarizes the equations and applications associated with the photovoltaic array performance model developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, 'translation' of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

  4. The Submillimeter Array

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, P T P; Lo, K Y; Ho, Paul T.P.; Moran, James M.; Lo, Kwok Yung

    2004-01-01

    The Submillimeter Array (SMA), a collaborative project of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA), has begun operation on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. A total of eight 6-m telescopes comprise the array, which will cover the frequency range of 180-900 GHz. All eight telescopes have been deployed and are operational. First scientific results utilizing the three receiver bands at 230, 345, and 690 GHz have been obtained and are presented in the accompanying papers.

  5. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  6. Selecting Sums in Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund

    2008-01-01

    In an array of n numbers each of the \\binomn2+nUnknown control sequence '\\binom' contiguous subarrays define a sum. In this paper we focus on algorithms for selecting and reporting maximal sums from an array of numbers. First, we consider the problem of reporting k subarrays inducing the k larges...... an algorithm with this running time and by proving a matching lower bound. Finally, we combine the ideas and obtain an O(n· max {1,log(k/n)}) time algorithm that selects a subarray storing the k’th largest sum among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u....

  7. Bandwidth Reconfigurable Metamaterial Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanael J. Smith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterial structures provide innovative ways to manipulate electromagnetic wave responses to realize new applications. This paper presents a conformal wideband metamaterial array that achieves as much as 10 : 1 continuous bandwidth. This was done by using interelement coupling to concurrently achieve significant wave slow-down and cancel the inductance stemming from the ground plane. The corresponding equivalent circuit of the resulting array is the same as that of classic metamaterial structures. In this paper, we present a wideband Marchand-type balun with validation measurements demonstrating the metamaterial (MTM array’s bandwidth from 280 MHz to 2800 MHz. Bandwidth reconfiguration of this class of array is then demonstrated achieving a variety of band-pass or band-rejection responses within its original bandwidth. In contrast with previous bandwidth and frequency response reconfigurations, our approach does not change the aperture’s or ground plane’s geometry, nor does it introduce external filtering structures. Instead, the new responses are realized by making simple circuit changes into the balanced feed integrated with the wideband MTM array. A variety of circuit changes can be employed using MEMS switches or variable lumped loads within the feed and 5 example band-pass and band-rejection responses are presented. These demonstrate the potential of the MTM array’s reconfiguration to address a variety of responses.

  8. Visible Genotype Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Imai

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A visible sensor array system for simultaneous multiple SNP genotyping has been developed using a new plastic base with specific surface chemistry. Discrimination of SNP alleles is carried out by an allele-specific extension reaction using immobilized oligonucleotide primers. The 3’-ends of oligonucleotide primers are modified with a locked nucleic acid to enhance their efficiency in allelic discrimination. Biotin-dUTPs included in the reaction mixture are selectively incorporated into extending primer sequences and are utilized as tags for alkaline phosphatase-mediated precipitation of colored chemical substrates onto the surface of the plastic base. The visible precipitates allow immediate inspection of typing results by the naked eye and easy recording by a digital camera equipped on a commercial mobile phone. Up to four individuals can be analyzed on a single sensor array and multiple sensor arrays can be handled in a single operation. All of the reactions can be performed within one hour using conventional laboratory instruments. This visible genotype sensor array is suitable for “focused genomics” that follows “comprehensive genomics”.

  9. Extended Array Evaluation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-31

    irregular structure of the Mohorovicic discontinuity (Moho) underneath the NORSAR array. • Time delay anomalies (deviation from plane wave propagation...appears that most of the amplitude vari- ations may be explained by scattering effects due to the irregular structure of the Mohorovicic discontinuity

  10. Array processors in chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostlund, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    The field of attached scientific processors (''array processors'') is surveyed, and an attempt is made to indicate their present and possible future use in computational chemistry. The current commercial products from Floating Point Systems, Inc., Datawest Corporation, and CSP, Inc. are discussed.

  11. TANGO Array.. 2. Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.

    2004-01-01

    The angular and energy resolutions of the TANGO Array were obtained using extensive Monte Carlo simulations performed with a double purpose: (1) to determine the appropriate parameters for the array fitting to the desired range of sensitivity (the knee energy region), and (2) to construct a reliable shower database required for reference in the analysis of experimental data. The AIRES code, with the SIBYLL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (assuming protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 10 14 to 10 18 eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detectors (water Cherenkov detectors), including the electronics, pickup noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cables. The trigger stage was considered in the simulations in order to estimate the trigger efficiency of the array and to verify the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper delineates the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and describes the simulated data. The results of these simulations suggest that we can expect an error in the energy of the primary cosmic-ray of ˜60% of the estimated value and that the error in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as ˜4°. The present simulations also indicate that unambiguous assignments of the primary energy cannot be obtained because of the uncertainty in the nature of the primary cosmic ray.

  12. TANGO Array. 2. Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauleo, P. E-mail: pablo.bauleo@colostate.edu; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A

    2004-01-11

    The angular and energy resolutions of the TANGO Array were obtained using extensive Monte Carlo simulations performed with a double purpose: (1) to determine the appropriate parameters for the array fitting to the desired range of sensitivity (the knee energy region), and (2) to construct a reliable shower database required for reference in the analysis of experimental data. The AIRES code, with the SIBYLL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (assuming protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 18} eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detectors (water Cherenkov detectors), including the electronics, pickup noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cables. The trigger stage was considered in the simulations in order to estimate the trigger efficiency of the array and to verify the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper delineates the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and describes the simulated data. The results of these simulations suggest that we can expect an error in the energy of the primary cosmic-ray of {approx}60% of the estimated value and that the error in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as {approx}4 deg. . The present simulations also indicate that unambiguous assignments of the primary energy cannot be obtained because of the uncertainty in the nature of the primary cosmic ray.

  13. The Murchison Widefield Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchell, Daniel A.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Ord, Stephen M.; Bernardi, Gianni

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that the excellent Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory site allows the Murchison Widefield Array to employ a simple RFI blanking scheme and still calibrate visibilities and form images in the FM radio band. The techniques described are running autonomously in our calibration and imagin

  14. Microelectronic Stimulator Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-09

    retinal prosthesis test device. Figure 3b shows an enlarged view of a nano-channel glass (NCG) electrode array. Figure 4 shows a conceptual layout (floor...against a visual cortex. 10 This involves invasive brain surgery through the cranium . From a surgical point of view, the intra ocular approach is

  15. TRMM Solar Array Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This final report presents conclusions/recommendations concerning the TRMM Solar Array; deliverable list and schedule summary; waivers and deviations; as-shipped performance data, including flight panel verification matrix, panel output detail, shadow test summary, humidity test summary, reverse bias test panel; and finally, quality assurance summary.

  16. Cold regions isotope applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, T.E.

    1976-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids. (TFD)

  17. Monitoring steel bridge renovation using lead isotopic tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salome, Fred; Gulson, Brian; Chiaradia, Massimo; Davis, Jeffrey; Morris, Howard

    2017-05-01

    Monitoring removal of lead (Pb) paint from steel structures usually involves analysis of environmental samples for total lead and determination of blood Pb levels of employees involved in the Pb paint removal. We used high precision Pb isotopic tracing for a bridge undergoing Pb paint removal to determine if Pb in the environmental and blood samples originated from the bridge paint. The paint system on the bridge consisted of an anti-corrosive red Pb primer top-coated with a Micaceous Iron Oxide (MIO) alkyd. Analysis of the red Pb primer gave uniform isotopic ratios indicative of Pb from the geologically-ancient Broken Hill mines in western New South Wales, Australia. Likewise waste abrasive material, as anticipated, had the same isotopic composition as the paint. The isotopic ratios for other samples lay on 2 separate linear arrays on a(207)Pb/(204)Pb versus (206)Pb/(204)Pb diagram, one largely defined by gasoline and the majority of the ambient air data, and the other by data for one sample each of gasoline and ambient air and underwater sediments. Isotopic ratios in background ambient air samples for the project were characteristic of leaded gasoline. Air sampling during paint removal showed a contribution of paint Pb ranging from about 20 to 40%. Isotopic ratios in the blood of 8 employees prior to the commencement of work showed that 6 of these had been previously exposed to the Broken Hill Pb possibly from earlier bridge paint removal projects. One subject appeared to have increased exposure to Pb probably from the paint renovations.

  18. Carbon and nitrogen isotope systematics in diamond: Different sensitivities to isotopic fractionation or a decoupled origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogberg, K.; Stachel, T.; Stern, R. A.

    2016-11-01

    Using stable isotope data obtained on multiple aliquots of diamonds from worldwide sources, it has been argued that carbon and nitrogen in diamond are decoupled. Here we re-investigate the carbon-nitrogen relationship based on the most comprehensive microbeam data set to date of stable isotopes and nitrogen concentrations in diamonds (n = 94) from a single locality. Our diamond samples, derived from two kimberlites in the Chidliak Field (NE Canada), show large variability in δ13C (- 28.4 ‰ to - 1.1‰, mode at - 5.8‰), δ15N (- 5.8 to + 18.8‰, mode at - 3.0‰) and nitrogen contents ([N]; 3800 to less than 1 at.ppm). In combination, cathodoluminescence imaging and microbeam analyses reveal that the diamonds grew from multiple fluid pulses, with at least one major hiatus documented in some samples that was associated with a resorption event and an abrupt change from low δ13C and [N] to mantle-like δ13C and high [N]. Overall, δ13C appears to be uncorrelated to δ15N and [N] on both the inter- and intra-diamond levels. Co-variations of δ15N-log[N], however, result in at least two parallel, negatively correlated linear arrays, which are also present on the level of the individual diamonds falling on these two trends. These arrays emerge from the two principal data clusters, are characterized by slightly negative and slightly positive δ15N (about - 3 and + 2‰, respectively) and variable but overall high [N]. Using published values for the diamond-fluid nitrogen isotope fractionation factor and nitrogen partition coefficient, these trends are perfectly reproduced by a Rayleigh fractionation model. Overall, three key elements are identified in the formation of the diamond suite studied: (1.) a low δ13C and low [N] component that possibly is directly associated with an eclogitic diamond substrate or introduced during an early stage fluid event. (2.) Repeated influx of a variably nitrogen-rich mantle fluid (mildly negative δ13C and δ15N). (3.) In waning

  19. Isotope Separation and Decay Energy Calculation for LISA Commissioning Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nathaniel; Barker, Alyson; Garrett, Sierra; Rogers, Warren F.; MoNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The commissioning experiment for the Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) was designed to investigate properties of neutron-unstable excited states of the 24O. The array is located at the NSCL, MSU and is used in conjunction with the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and the Sweeper Magnet. Oxygen fragments produced by the 26F secondary beam incident on a Be target are directed through the Sweeper Chamber which includes two tracking CRDC detectors, an ion chamber, and a thin and thick scintillator. Plotting the fragment's trajectory position vs. angle vs. time of flight allows for separation of the individual 22 , 23 , and 24 O isotopes, necessary for the calculation of the decay properties of individual states. Anomalous features in the fragments' emittance distribution, believed to result from little understood issues with the tracking detectors, required that we adopt a slightly different approach than that developed recently by the collaboration. Once the isotopes are successfully separated, decay energies are calculated by applying mass-invariant decay spectroscopy by associating the fragment's precise trajectory (determined by inverse-tracking through the Sweeper Magnet) and energy with those of the emitted neutron. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1101745.

  20. Si Isotopes of Brownleeite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, Scott R.; Ito, M.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Jones, J. H.; Tatsuoka, H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Tatsuoka, H.

    2010-01-01

    Brownleeite is a manganese silicide, ideally stoichiometric MnSi, not previously observed in nature until its discovery within an interplanetary dust particle (IDP) that likely originated from a comet [1]. Three discrete brownleeite grains in the IDP L2055 I3 (4 microns in size, hereafter IDP I3) were identified with maximum dimensions of 100, 250 and 600 nm and fully analyzed using scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) [1]. One of the grains (100 nm in size) was poikilitically enclosed by low-Fe, Mn-enriched (LIME) olivine. LIME olivine is epitaxial to the brownleeite with the brownleeite (200) parallel to the olivine c* [1]. LIME olivine is an enigmatic phase first reported from chondritic porous IDPs and some unequilibrated ordinary chondrites [ 2], that is commonly observed in chondritic-porous IDPs. Recently, LIME olivine has been also found in comet Wild-2 (Stardust) samples [3], indicating that LIME olivine is a common mineral component of comets. LIME olivine has been proposed to form as a high temperature condensate in the protosolar nebula [2]. Brownleeite grains also likely formed as high-temperature condensates either in the early Solar System or in the outflow of an evolved star or supernova explosion [1]. The isotopic composition of the brownleeite grains may strongly constrain their ultimate source. To test this hypothesis, we performed isotopic analyses of the brownleeite and the associated LIME olivine, using the NASA/JSC NanoSIMS 50L ion microprobe.

  1. Calcium isotopes in wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmden, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    The δ 44/40Ca values of bottled wine vary between -0.76% to -1.55% on the seawater scale and correlate weakly with inverse Ca concentration and Mg/Ca ratio, such that the lowest δ 44/40Ca values have the highest Ca concentrations and lowest Mg/Ca ratios. The correlation is notable in the sense that the measured wines include both whites and reds sampled from different wine growing regions of the world, and cover a wide range of quality. Trends among the data yield clues regarding the cause of the observed isotopic fractionation. White wines, and wines generally perceived to be of lower quality, have lower δ 44/40Ca values compared to red wines and wines of generally perceived higher quality. Quality was assessed qualitatively through sensory evaluation, price, and scores assigned by critics. The relationship between δ 44/40Ca and wine quality was most apparent when comparing wines of one varietal from one producer from the same growing region. In the vineyard, wine quality is related to factors such as the tonnage of the crop and the ripeness of the grapes at the time of harvesting, the thickness of the skins for reds, the age of the vines, as well as the place where the grapes were grown (terroir). Quality is also influenced by winemaking practices such as fermentation temperature, duration of skin contact, and barrel ageing. Accordingly, the relationship between δ 44/40Ca and wine quality may originate during grape ripening in the vineyard or during winemaking in the cellar. We tested the grape ripening hypothesis using Merlot grapes sampled from a vineyard in the Okanagan, British Columbia, using sugar content (degrees Brix) as an indicator of ripeness. The grapes were separated into pulp, skin, and pip fractions and were analyzed separately. Thus far, there is no clear evidence for a systematic change in δ 44/40Ca values associated with progressive ripening of grapes in the vineyard. On the day of harvesting, the δ 44/40Ca value of juice squeezed from

  2. Garnet effect on Nd-Hf isotope decoupling: Evidence from the Jinfosi batholith, Northern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Niu, Yaoling; Mo, Xuanxue

    2017-03-01

    The initial Nd and Hf isotope ratios of a 420 Ma post-collisional dioritic-granitic batholith from the Northern Tibetan plateau define a negative trend above and orthogonal to the ԐHf(t)-ԐNd(t) terrestrial array. This uncommon trend offers an insight into the origin of the puzzling Nd-Hf isotope decoupling in the crustal rocks. On this trend, samples depleted in heavy rare earth elements (HREEs, i.e., [Dy/Yb]N ≫ 1) deviate most from the terrestrial array whereas samples with flat HREEs (i.e., [Dy/Yb]N ≥ 1) deviate less or plot within the terrestrial array, pointing to the controlling effect of garnet in the magma source. Ancient garnet-bearing residues after melt extraction will have elevated Lu/Hf ratios and can evolve with time to produce high ԐHf(t) at a low ԐNd(t) value. Mixing of melts derived from such source lithologies (high Lu/Hf) with melts possessing a within-terrestrial array Nd-Hf isotopic composition (low Lu/Hf) best explains the observed trend orthogonal to the terrestrial array. The samples from the Jinfosi batholith with the most decoupled Nd-Hf isotope compositions require a larger degree (> 40%) and ancient (i.e., ≥ 1.8 Gyr) previous melt extraction from their source. It follows that the ancient melts with depleted HREEs complementary to those garnet-bearing residues should have low ԐHf values and plot below the terrestrial array, which is indeed shown by some Archean/Paleoproterozic TTGs.

  3. The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (anasen)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, M.; Blackmon, J. C.; Gardiner, H. E.; Linhardt, L. E.; Macon, K. T.; Mondello, L. L.; Baby, L.; Johnson, E.; Koshchiy, E.; Rogachev, G.; Wiedenhöver, I.; Bardayan, D. W.

    2013-03-01

    Experimental information about most reactions involving short-lived nuclei is limited. New facilities aim to provide wider access to unstable isotopes, but the limited intensities require more efficient and selective techniques and devices. The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged-particle detector array designed primarily for studies of reactions important in the αp- and rp- processes with proton-rich exotic nuclei. The array consists of 40 silicon-strip detectors backed with CsI scintillators. The detectors cover an area of about 1300 cm2 providing essentially complete solid angle coverage for the reactions of interest with good energy and position resolution. ANASEN also includes a position-sensitive annular gas proportional counter that allows it to be used as an active gas target/detector. ANASEN is designed for direct measurement of (α,p) re-actions in inverse kinematics as well as for studies of proton elastic and inelastic scattering, (p, γ) reactions and transfer reactions. The array is being developed by Louisiana State University and Florida State University. Presently it is located at the RESOLUT radioacitve ion beam facility at FSU, where the first experiments are being performed. In the future, the array will be used at the ReA3 facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory.

  4. Neutron inelastic scattering measurements on the stable isotopes of titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olacel, A.; Belloni, F.; Borcea, C.; Boromiza, M.; Dessagne, P.; Henning, G.; Kerveno, M.; Negret, A.; Nyman, M.; Pirovano, E.; Plompen, A. J. M.

    2017-07-01

    The results of a neutron inelastic scattering experiment performed at the Geel Electron Linear Accelerator pulsed white neutron source of the European Commission Joint Research Centre are reported. The neutrons with energies up to 18 MeV interacted with a natTi sample and the γ rays resulting from inelastic scattering reactions on the stable isotopes were detected using the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) spectrometer. We were able to measure the γ -production cross sections for 21 transitions in the five stable Ti isotopes. From these, the level cross sections and the total inelastic cross sections were determined. Our experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations performed using the talys 1.8 code, evaluated nuclear data libraries, and also with previously reported results.

  5. Radar techniques using array antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Wirth, Wulf-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Radar Techniques Using Array Antennas is a thorough introduction to the possibilities of radar technology based on electronic steerable and active array antennas. Topics covered include array signal processing, array calibration, adaptive digital beamforming, adaptive monopulse, superresolution, pulse compression, sequential detection, target detection with long pulse series, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), moving target detection using synthetic aperture radar (SAR), target imaging, energy management and system parameter relations. The discussed methods are confirmed by simulation stud

  6. Timed arrays wideband and time varying antenna arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Haupt, Randy L

    2015-01-01

    Introduces timed arrays and design approaches to meet the new high performance standards The author concentrates on any aspect of an antenna array that must be viewed from a time perspective. The first chapters briefly introduce antenna arrays and explain the difference between phased and timed arrays. Since timed arrays are designed for realistic time-varying signals and scenarios, the book also reviews wideband signals, baseband and passband RF signals, polarization and signal bandwidth. Other topics covered include time domain, mutual coupling, wideband elements, and dispersion. The auth

  7. Investigation of the single Particle Structure of the neutron-rich Sodium Isotopes $^{27-31}\\!$Na

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study the single particle structure of the neutron-rich isotopes $^{27-31}\\!$Na. These isotopes will be investigated via neutron pickup reactions in inverse kinematics on a deuterium and a beryllium target. Scattered beam particles and transfer products are detected in a position sensitive detector located around 0$^\\circ$. De-excitation $\\gamma$-rays emitted after an excited state has been populated will be registered by the MINIBALL Germanium array. The results will shed new light on the structure of the neutron-rich sodium isotopes and especially on the region of strong deformation around the N=20 nucleus $^{31}\\!$Na.

  8. Atacama Compact Array Antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Masao; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Naoi, Takahiro; Yamada, Masumi; Saito, Hiro; Ikenoue, Bungo; Kato, Yoshihiro; Morita, Kou-ichiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Iguchi, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    We report major performance test results of the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) 7-m and 12-m antennas of ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array). The four major performances of the ACA antennas are all-sky pointing (to be not more than 2.0 arcsec), offset pointing (to be < 0.6 arcsec) surface accuracy (< 25(20) micrometer for 12(7)m-antenna), stability of path-length (15 micrometer over 3 min), and high servo capability (6 degrees/s for Azimuth and 3 degrees/s for Elevation). The high performance of the ACA antenna has been extensively evaluated at the Site Erection Facility area at an altitude of about 2900 meters. Test results of pointing performance, surface performance, and fast motion capability are demonstrated.

  9. The Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, Valerie

    2014-03-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a large collaborative effort dedicated to the design and operation of the next-generation ground-based very high-energy gamma-ray observatory. CTA will improve by about one order of magnitude the sensitivity with respect to the current major arrays (VERITAS, H.E.S.S., and MAGIC) in the core energy range of 100 GeV to 10 TeV, and will extend the viability of the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique (IACT) down to tens of GeV and above 100 TeV. In order to achieve such improved performance at both a northern and southern CTA site, four 23m diameter Large Size Telescopes (LST) optimized for low energy gamma rays will be deployed close to the centre of the array. A larger number of Medium Size Telescopes (MST) will be optimized for the core IACT energy range. The southern site will include 25 12m single-mirror MSTs and a US contribution of up to 24 novel dual-mirror design Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) type MSTs with a primary mirror of 9.5m diameter, and will also include an array of Small Size Telescopes (SST) to observe the highest-energy gamma rays from galactic sources. The SSTs can be smaller and more widely separated because more energetic gamma rays produce a larger Cherenkov light pool with many photons. The SSTs achieve a large collection area by covering a wide (10 sq km) footprint on the ground. The CTA project is finishing its preparatory phase, and the pre-production phase will start this year. I will review the status and the expected performance of CTA as well as the main scientific goals for the observatory.

  10. Solar collector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, John Champlin; Martins, Guy Lawrence

    2015-09-06

    A method and apparatus for efficient manufacture, assembly and production of solar energy. In one aspect, the apparatus may include a number of modular solar receiver assemblies that may be separately manufactured, assembled and individually inserted into a solar collector array housing shaped to receive a plurality of solar receivers. The housing may include optical elements for focusing light onto the individual receivers, and a circuit for electrically connecting the solar receivers.

  11. Photovoltaic cell array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, J. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell array consisting of parallel columns of silicon filaments is described. Each fiber is doped to produce an inner region of one polarity type and an outer region of an opposite polarity type to thereby form a continuous radial semi conductor junction. Spaced rows of electrical contacts alternately connect to the inner and outer regions to provide a plurality of electrical outputs which may be combined in parallel or in series.

  12. YBCO Josephson Junction Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-14

    40, 489 (1961). [8] W. H. Press, B. P. Flannery, S. A. Teukolsky and W. T. Vetterling, Numerical recipes: the art of scientific computing (Cambridge...has recently become a commercial product. He has developed processes for depositing state-of-the art YBCO films on buffered sapphire substrates. His...technology can most improve and on what subsystems would benefit most from the pt.. .imance available from these arrays. Aqppoved f or publicO re󈧎OSI AIR

  13. Pulsar Timing Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, the use of an ensemble of radio pulsars to constrain the characteristic strain caused by a stochastic gravitational wave background has advanced the cause of detection of very low frequency gravitational waves significantly. This electromagnetic means of gravitational wave detection, called Pulsar Timing Array(PTA), is reviewed in this article. The principle of operation of PTA, the current operating PTAs and their status is presented along-with a discussion of the main ch...

  14. The TALE Infill Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Douglas

    2009-05-01

    The TALE Infill Array in conjunction with the TALE Tower Detector will provide hybrid coverage of the cosmic ray energy spectrum down to 3x10^16 eV. It will consist of about 100, two square meter scintillators on the surface spaced at 400 m; and 24 buried twelve square meter scintillators. The combination of surface and underground detectors will allow for the determination of the muon content of showers and thus give a handle on cosmic ray composition.

  15. DANCEing with the Stars: Measuring Neutron Capture on Unstable Isotopes with DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, A.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Baker, J. D.; Bayarbadrahk, B.; Becker, J. A.; Bond, E.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Fowler, M.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    Isotopes heavier than iron are known to be produced in stars through neutron capture processes. Two major processes, the slow (s) and rapid (r) processes are each responsible for 50% of the abundances of the heavy isotopes. The neutron capture cross sections of the isotopes on the s process path reveal information about the expected abundances of the elements as well as stellar conditions and dynamics. Until recently, measurements on unstable isotopes, which are most important for determining stellar temperatures and reaction flow, have not been experimentally feasible. The Detector for Advance Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) was designed to perform time-of-flight neutron capture measurements on unstable isotopes for nuclear astrophysics, stockpile stewardship, and reactor development. DANCE is a 4-π BaF2 scintillator array which can perform measurements on sub-milligram samples of isotopes with half-lives as short as a few hundred days. These cross sections are critical for advancing our understanding of the production of the heavy isotopes.

  16. Mir Cooperative Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skor, Mike; Hoffman, Dave J.

    1997-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA), produced jointly by the United States and Russia, was deployed on the Mir Russian space station on May 25, 1996. The MCSA is a photovoltaic electrical power system that can generate up to 6 kW. The power from the MCSA is needed to extend Mir's lifetime and to support experiments conducted there by visiting U.S. astronauts. The MCSA was brought to Mir via the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-74 mission, launched November 12, 1995. This cooperative venture combined the best technology of both countries: the United States provided high-efficiency, lightweight photovoltaic panel modules, whereas Russia provided the array structure and deployment mechanism. Technology developed in the Space Station Freedom Program, and now being used in the International Space Station, was used to develop MCSA's photovoltaic panel. Performance data obtained from MCSA operation on Mir will help engineers better understand the performance of the photovoltaic panel modules in orbit. This information will be used to more accurately predict the performance of the International Space Station solar arrays. Managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center for NASA's International Space Station Program Office in Houston, Texas, the MCSA Project was completed on time and under budget despite a very aggressive schedule.

  17. DSN Array Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikidjian, Raffi; Mackey, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    The DSN Array Simulator (wherein 'DSN' signifies NASA's Deep Space Network) is an updated version of software previously denoted the DSN Receive Array Technology Assessment Simulation. This software (see figure) is used for computational modeling of a proposed DSN facility comprising user-defined arrays of antennas and transmitting and receiving equipment for microwave communication with spacecraft on interplanetary missions. The simulation includes variations in spacecraft tracked and communication demand changes for up to several decades of future operation. Such modeling is performed to estimate facility performance, evaluate requirements that govern facility design, and evaluate proposed improvements in hardware and/or software. The updated version of this software affords enhanced capability for characterizing facility performance against user-defined mission sets. The software includes a Monte Carlo simulation component that enables rapid generation of key mission-set metrics (e.g., numbers of links, data rates, and date volumes), and statistical distributions thereof as functions of time. The updated version also offers expanded capability for mixed-asset network modeling--for example, for running scenarios that involve user-definable mixtures of antennas having different diameters (in contradistinction to a fixed number of antennas having the same fixed diameter). The improved version also affords greater simulation fidelity, sufficient for validation by comparison with actual DSN operations and analytically predictable performance metrics.

  18. Spaceborne Processor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Edward T.; Schatzel, Donald V.; Whitaker, William D.; Sterling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A Spaceborne Processor Array in Multifunctional Structure (SPAMS) can lower the total mass of the electronic and structural overhead of spacecraft, resulting in reduced launch costs, while increasing the science return through dynamic onboard computing. SPAMS integrates the multifunctional structure (MFS) and the Gilgamesh Memory, Intelligence, and Network Device (MIND) multi-core in-memory computer architecture into a single-system super-architecture. This transforms every inch of a spacecraft into a sharable, interconnected, smart computing element to increase computing performance while simultaneously reducing mass. The MIND in-memory architecture provides a foundation for high-performance, low-power, and fault-tolerant computing. The MIND chip has an internal structure that includes memory, processing, and communication functionality. The Gilgamesh is a scalable system comprising multiple MIND chips interconnected to operate as a single, tightly coupled, parallel computer. The array of MIND components shares a global, virtual name space for program variables and tasks that are allocated at run time to the distributed physical memory and processing resources. Individual processor- memory nodes can be activated or powered down at run time to provide active power management and to configure around faults. A SPAMS system is comprised of a distributed Gilgamesh array built into MFS, interfaces into instrument and communication subsystems, a mass storage interface, and a radiation-hardened flight computer.

  19. TANGO ARRAY II: Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.

    The angular and energy resolution of the TANGO Array has been obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. The AIRES code, with the SYBILL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 1014 eV to 1018 eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detector stations (water ˇCerenkov detectors), including the electronics, pick up noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cabling. The trigger stage is taken into account in order to produce estimates of the trigger efficiency of the array and to check the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper describes the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and presents the simulated data. These simulations indicate that the accuracy of the cosmic ray primary energy determination is expected to be ˜ 60 % and the precision in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as ˜ 4 degrees.

  20. Competition from Isotopic Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Fabre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During later MOIS3, in Europe two populations were present, autochthonous Neanderthals and modern humans. Ecological competition between these two populations has often been evoked but never demonstrated. Our aim is to establish whether resource competition occurred. In this paper, in order to examine the possibility of ecological competition between these two populations, 599 isotopic data were subjected to rigorous statistical treatment and analysis through mixing models. The aim of this paper was to compare dietary strategies of Neanderthals and modern humans over time. Our conclusions suggest that Neanderthals and modern humans shared dietary habits in the particular environmental context of MOIS3 characterised in Europe by climatic deterioration. In this environmental context, the resource competition between Neanderthals and modern humans may have accelerated the disappearance of the Neanderthal population.

  1. Isotope Effects in ESR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Herrmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to present the relationship between ESR spectroscopy and isotope effects three levels are considered: (i ESR spectroscopy is described on a general level up to the models for interpretation of the experimental spectra, which go beyond the usually used time and mass independent spin-Hamilton operator, (ii the main characteristics of the generalized isotope effects are worked out, and finally (iii the basic, mainly quantum mechanical effects are used to describe the coupling of electron spins with the degrees of freedom, which are accessible under the selected conditions, of the respective paramagnetic object under investigation. The ESR parameters and the respective models are formalized so far, that they include the time and mass depending influences and reflect the specific isotope effects. Relations will be established between the effects in ESR spectra to spin relaxation, to spin exchange, to the magnetic isotope effect, to the Jahn-Teller effects, as well as to the influence of zero-point vibrations. Examples will be presented which demonstrate the influence of isotopes as well as the kind of accessible information. It will be differentiated with respect to isotope effects in paramagnetic centres itself and in the respective matrices up to the technique of ESR imaging. It is shown that the use of isotope effects is indispensable in ESR spectroscopy.

  2. Mixed Frequency Ultrasound Phased Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    香勇; 霍健; 施克仁; 陈以方

    2004-01-01

    A mixed frequency ultrasonic phased array (MPA) was developed to improve the focus, in which the element excitation frequencies are not all the same as in a normal constant frequency phased array. A theoretical model of the mixed frequency phased array based on the interference principle was used to simulate the array's sound distribution. The pressure intensity in the array focal area was enhanced and the scanning area having effective contrast resolution was enlarged. The system is especially useful for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) with more powerful energy and ultrasound imaging diagnostics with improved signal to noise ratios, improved beam forming and more uniform imaging quality.

  3. Isotope-edited infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Ginka S; Kubelka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Isotope-edited infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying structural and dynamical properties of peptides and proteins with site-specific resolution. Labeling of selected amide carbonyls with (13)C results in detectable sidebands of amide I' vibrations, which provide information about local conformation and/or solvent exposure without structural perturbation to the protein. Incorporation of isotopically labeled amino acids at specific positions is achieved by the chemical synthesis of the studied proteins. We describe the basic procedures for synthesis of (13)C isotopically edited protein samples, experimental IR spectroscopic measurements, and analysis of the site-specific structural changes from the thermal unfolding IR data.

  4. Carbon isotope geochemistry and geobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation values were used to understand the history of the biosphere. For example, plankton analyses confirmed that marine extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous period were indeed severe (see Hsu's article in Sundquist and Broeker, 1984). Variations in the isotopic compositions of carbonates and evaporitic sulfates during the Paleozoic reflect the relative abundances of euxinic (anoxic) marine environments and organic deposits from terrestrial flora. The carbon isotopic composition of Precambrian sediments suggest that the enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase has existed for perhaps 3.5 billion years.

  5. Apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, Leung K; Sessions, Henry T; Xiao, Xin

    2013-06-25

    The apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes is provided using dual columns, each column having an opposite hydrogen isotopic effect such that when a hydrogen isotope mixture feedstock is cycled between the two respective columns, two different hydrogen isotopes are separated from the feedstock.

  6. Compact Transducers and Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Soc. Am., 104, pp.64-71 44 25.Decarpigny, J.N., J.C. Debus, B. Tocquet & D. Boucher. 1985. "In-Air Analysis Of Piezoelectric Tonpilz Transducers In A... Transducers and Arrays Final Report May 2005 Contacts: Dr. Robert E. Newnham The Pennsylvania State University, 251 MRL, University Park, PA 16802 phone...814) 865-1612 fax: (814) 865-2326 email: ....c xx.....i.i.....ht.. .u a.p.u..c.e.du. Dr. Richard J. Meyer, Jr. Systems Engineering ( Transducers ), ARL

  7. Alignments in the nobelium isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Zie; XU Fu-Rong; YUAN Cen-Xi; QI Chong

    2009-01-01

    Total-Routhian-Surface calculations have been performed to investigate the deformation and align-ment properties of the No isotopes. It is found that normal deformed and superdeformed states in these nuclei can coexist at low excitation energies. In neutron-deficient No isotopes, the superdeformed shapes can even become the ground states. Moreover, we plotted the kinematic moments of inertia of the No isotopes, which follow very nicely available experimental data. It is noted that, as the rotational frequency increases, align-ments develop at hω=0.2-0.3 MeV. Our calculations show that the occupation of the vj orbital plays an important role in the alignments of the No isotopes.

  8. Isotope-based quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    G Plekhanov, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The present book provides to the main ideas and techniques of the rapid progressing field of quantum information and quantum computation using isotope - mixed materials. It starts with an introduction to the isotope physics and then describes of the isotope - based quantum information and quantum computation. The ability to manipulate and control electron and/or nucleus spin in semiconductor devices provides a new route to expand the capabilities of inorganic semiconductor-based electronics and to design innovative devices with potential application in quantum computing. One of the major challenges towards these objectives is to develop semiconductor-based systems and architectures in which the spatial distribution of spins and their properties can be controlled. For instance, to eliminate electron spin decoherence resulting from hyperfine interaction due to nuclear spin background, isotopically controlled devices are needed (i.e., nuclear spin-depleted). In other emerging concepts, the control of the spatial...

  9. Isotopic Changes During Digestion: Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuross, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nutrient and hydrological inputs traverse a complicated route of pH, enzymatic and cellular processes in digestion in higher animals. The end products of digestion are the starting products for biosynthesis that are often used to interpret past life-ways. Using an artificial gut system, the isotopic changes (dD, d18O, d13C and d15N) of protein are documented. Three separate protein sources are subjected to the conditions, chemical and enzymatic, found in the stomach and upper small intestine with only a small shift in the oxygen isotopic composition of the proteins observed. Middle to lower small intestine parameters produced both greater isotopic effects and significantly lower molecular weight products. The role of the gastric enterocyte and the likely involvement of the internal milieu of this cell in the isotopic composition of amino acids that are transported to the liver are reported.

  10. Nonlinear phased array imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxford, Anthony J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Potter, Jack N.

    2016-04-01

    A technique is presented for imaging acoustic nonlinearity within a specimen using ultrasonic phased arrays. Acoustic nonlinearity is measured by evaluating the difference in energy of the transmission bandwidth within the diffuse field produced through different focusing modes. The two different modes being classical beam forming, where delays are applied to different element of a phased array to physically focus the energy at a single location (parallel firing) and focusing in post processing, whereby one element at a time is fired and a focused image produced in post processing (sequential firing). Although these two approaches are linearly equivalent the difference in physical displacement within the specimen leads to differences in nonlinear effects. These differences are localized to the areas where the amplitude is different, essentially confining the differences to the focal point. Direct measurement at the focal point are however difficult to make. In order to measure this the diffuse field is used. It is a statistical property of the diffuse field that it represents the total energy in the system. If the energy in the diffuse field for both the sequential and parallel firing case is measured then the difference between these, within the input signal bandwidth, is largely due to differences at the focal spot. This difference therefore gives a localized measurement of where energy is moving out of the transmission bandwidth due to nonlinear effects. This technique is used to image fatigue cracks and other damage types undetectable with conventional linear ultrasonic measurements.

  11. Microplasma generating array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopwood, Jeffrey A.; Wu, Chen; Hoskinson, Alan R.; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2016-10-04

    A microplasma generator includes first and second conductive resonators disposed on a first surface of a dielectric substrate. The first and second conductive resonators are arranged in line with one another with a gap defined between a first end of each resonator. A ground plane is disposed on a second surface of the dielectric substrate and a second end of each of the first and second resonators is coupled to the ground plane. A power input connector is coupled to the first resonator at a first predetermined distance from the second end chosen as a function of the impedance of the first conductive resonator. A microplasma generating array includes a number of resonators in a dielectric material substrate with one end of each resonator coupled to ground. A micro-plasma is generated at the non-grounded end of each resonator. The substrate includes a ground electrode and the microplasmas are generated between the non-grounded end of the resonator and the ground electrode. The coupling of each resonator to ground may be made through controlled switches in order to turn each resonator off or on and therefore control where and when a microplasma will be created in the array.

  12. Electromagnetically Clean Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem, Theodore G.; Kenniston, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    The term 'electromagnetically clean solar array' ('EMCSA') refers to a panel that contains a planar array of solar photovoltaic cells and that, in comparison with a functionally equivalent solar-array panel of a type heretofore used on spacecraft, (1) exhibits less electromagnetic interferences to and from other nearby electrical and electronic equipment and (2) can be manufactured at lower cost. The reduction of electromagnetic interferences is effected through a combination of (1) electrically conductive, electrically grounded shielding and (2) reduction of areas of current loops (in order to reduce magnetic moments). The reduction of cost is effected by designing the array to be fabricated as a more nearly unitary structure, using fewer components and fewer process steps. Although EMCSAs were conceived primarily for use on spacecraft they are also potentially advantageous for terrestrial applications in which there are requirements to limit electromagnetic interference. In a conventional solar panel of the type meant to be supplanted by an EMCSA panel, the wiring is normally located on the back side, separated from the cells, thereby giving rise to current loops having significant areas and, consequently, significant magnetic moments. Current-loop geometries are chosen in an effort to balance opposing magnetic moments to limit far-0field magnetic interactions, but the relatively large distances separating current loops makes full cancellation of magnetic fields problematic. The panel is assembled from bare photovoltaic cells by means of multiple sensitive process steps that contribute significantly to cost, especially if electomagnetic cleanliness is desired. The steps include applying a cover glass and electrical-interconnect-cell (CIC) sub-assemble, connecting the CIC subassemblies into strings of series-connected cells, laying down and adhesively bonding the strings onto a panel structure that has been made in a separate multi-step process, and mounting the

  13. Electrodynamic Arrays Having Nanomaterial Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigwell, Steven (Inventor); Biris, Alexandru S. (Inventor); Calle, Carlos I. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electrodynamic array of conductive nanomaterial electrodes and a method of making such an electrodynamic array. In one embodiment, a liquid solution containing nanomaterials is deposited as an array of conductive electrodes on a substrate, including rigid or flexible substrates such as fabrics, and opaque or transparent substrates. The nanomaterial electrodes may also be grown in situ. The nanomaterials may include carbon nanomaterials, other organic or inorganic nanomaterials or mixtures.

  14. Combinatorial aspects of covering arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Colbourn

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Covering arrays generalize orthogonal arrays by requiring that t -tuples be covered, but not requiring that the appearance of t -tuples be balanced.Their uses in screening experiments has found application in software testing, hardware testing, and a variety of fields in which interactions among factors are to be identified. Here a combinatorial view of covering arrays is adopted, encompassing basic bounds, direct constructions, recursive constructions, algorithmic methods, and applications.

  15. NEUTRON-POOR NICKEL ISOTOPE ANOMALIES IN METEORITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, Robert C. J.; Coath, Christopher D.; Regelous, Marcel; Elliott, Tim [Bristol Isotope Group, School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen' s Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Russell, Sara, E-mail: r.steele@uclmail.net [Meteoritics and Cosmic mineralogy, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-10

    We present new, mass-independent, Ni isotope data for a range of bulk chondritic meteorites. The data are reported as {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, or the parts per ten thousand deviations from a terrestrial reference, the NIST SRM 986 standard, of the {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni internally normalized {sup 60}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni ratios. The chondrites show a range of 0.15, 0.29, and 0.84 in {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61} relative to a typical sample precision of 0.03, 0.05, and 0.08 (2 s.e.), respectively. The carbonaceous chondrites show the largest positive anomalies, enstatite chondrites have approximately terrestrial ratios, though only EH match Earth's composition within uncertainty, and ordinary chondrites show negative anomalies. The meteorite data show a strong positive correlation between {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, an extrapolation of which is within the error of the average of previous measurements of calcium-, aluminium-rich inclusions. Moreover, the slope of this bulk meteorite array is 3.003 {+-} 0.166 which is within the error of that expected for an anomaly solely on {sup 58}Ni. We also determined to high precision ({approx}10 ppm per AMU) the mass-dependent fractionation of two meteorite samples which span the range of {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}. These analyses show that 'absolute' ratios of {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni vary between these two samples whereas those of {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni do not. Thus, Ni isotopic differences seem most likely explained by variability in the neutron-poor {sup 58}Ni, and not correlated anomalies in the neutron-rich isotopes, {sup 62}Ni and {sup 64}Ni. This contrasts with previous inferences from mass-independent measurements of Ni and

  16. Calcium Isotope Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, S.; Richter, S.

    2010-12-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. This presentation discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. Additionally, the availability of Ca isotope reference materials will be discussed.

  17. Testing and Installation of a High Efficiency CsI Scintillator Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscariello, Natalie; Casarotto, Stuart; Frank, Nathan; Smith, Jenna; Thoennessen, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Experiments on neutron-rich nuclei have identified changes to the structure of nuclei far from stability. The Sweeper-MoNA- LISA facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), located at Michigan State University, is used for performing experiments on neutron-rich nuclei. Currently, these experiments are limited to the mass region below neon due to the resolution of the charged fragment detectors, which limit the isotope separation. The resolution of the system will be improved with changes to the setup, primarily due to a new scintillator array. The new array will consist of twenty-five sodium-doped CsI crystals arranged in a 5 × 5 configuration. The array will be used to measure the kinetic energy of charged fragments with energies in the GeV range. The improved resolution will allow experiments of unbound systems above neon. The testing and assembly of the detector array will be presented.

  18. Cascading Constrained 2-D Arrays using Periodic Merging Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Laursen, Torben Vaarby

    2003-01-01

    We consider a method for designing 2-D constrained codes by cascading finite width arrays using predefined finite width periodic merging arrays. This provides a constructive lower bound on the capacity of the 2-D constrained code. Examples include symmetric RLL and density constrained codes....... Numerical results for the capacities are presented....

  19. The Submillimeter Array Polarimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Marrone, Daniel P

    2008-01-01

    We describe the Submillimeter Array (SMA) Polarimeter, a polarization converter and feed multiplexer installed on the SMA. The polarimeter uses narrow-band quarter-wave plates to generate circular polarization sensitivity from the linearly-polarized SMA feeds. The wave plates are mounted in rotation stages under computer control so that the polarization handedness of each antenna is rapidly selectable. Positioning of the wave plates is found to be highly repeatable, better than 0.2 degrees. Although only a single polarization is detected at any time, all four cross correlations of left- and right-circular polarization are efficiently sampled on each baseline through coordinated switching of the antenna polarizations in Walsh function patterns. The initial set of anti-reflection coated quartz and sapphire wave plates allows polarimetry near 345 GHz; these plates have been have been used in observations between 325 and 350 GHz. The frequency-dependent cross-polarization of each antenna, largely due to the varia...

  20. Diagnosable structured logic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Sterling (Inventor); Miles, Lowell (Inventor); Gambles, Jody (Inventor); Maki, Gary K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A diagnosable structured logic array and associated process is provided. A base cell structure is provided comprising a logic unit comprising a plurality of input nodes, a plurality of selection nodes, and an output node, a plurality of switches coupled to the selection nodes, where the switches comprises a plurality of input lines, a selection line and an output line, a memory cell coupled to the output node, and a test address bus and a program control bus coupled to the plurality of input lines and the selection line of the plurality of switches. A state on each of the plurality of input nodes is verifiably loaded and read from the memory cell. A trusted memory block is provided. The associated process is provided for testing and verifying a plurality of truth table inputs of the logic unit.

  1. Array biosensor: recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Joel P.; Rowe-Taitt, Chris A.; Feldstein, Mark J.; Ligler, Frances S.

    1999-05-01

    A fluorescence-based immunosensor has been developed for simultaneous analyses of multiple samples for 1 to 6 different antigens. A patterned array of recognition antibodies immobilized on the surface of a planar waveguide is used to 'capture' analyte present in samples. Bound analyte is then quantified by means of fluorescent detector molecules. Upon excitation of the fluorescent label by a small diode laser, a CCD camera detects the pattern of fluorescent antigen:antibody complexes on the sensor surface. Image analysis software correlates the position of fluorescent signals with the identity of the analyte. A new design for a fluidics distribution system is shown, as well as results from assays for physiologically relevant concentrations of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), F1 antigen from Yersinia pestis, and D- dimer, a marker of sepsis and thrombotic disorders.

  2. Topology in isotopic multispace and origin of mantle chemical heterogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegre, C.J.; Hamelin, B.; Provost, A.; Dupre, B.

    1987-02-01

    In this paper we present a simple technique for multidimensional treatment of isotopic data, which allows a global and rigorous correlation between the various radiogenic tracers. This technique is based on the determination of eigenvectors of the data matrix, allowing a geometric description of the inertia ellipsoid corresponding to the cluster of experimental data points. The relationships between the various sets of samples can be analyzed using the projections on the main elongation planes. When processing the Pb-Sr-Nd data for the oceanic mantle (OIB+MORB) with this technique we find that at least four different end-members are needed to define the 'mantle array' which thus cannot be a plane surface. Samples from island arcs (IAB) show the contribution of a component clearly out of the oceanic domain and very similar to terrigenous sediments. Continental tholeiites (CFB) also show some sort of contamination (but distinct from that of IAB) by the continental crust. They also show a domain overlapping with that of the oceanic islands corresponding to the compositions of the 'Dupal anomaly'. Multispace analysis also permits a rigorous comparison of relationships between the various isotopic tracers. In particular, we demonstrate that a U-Pb fractionation independent from the correlated Sr-Nd, Th-U and Th-Sr ones does exist. Consequently, a three-dimensional analysis performed only with lead isotopes yields by itself the main information that can be inferred from the five Pb-Sr-Nd dimensions. Helium also yields independent information decoupled with respect to the other tracers, adding one fifth end-member (Loihi, Hawaii islands) to the OIB+MORB array.

  3. Triple oxygen isotope systematics of structurally bonded water in gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwartz, Daniel; Surma, Jakub; Voigt, Claudia; Assonov, Sergey; Staubwasser, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The triple oxygen isotopic composition of gypsum mother water (gmw) is recorded in structurally bonded water in gypsum (gsbw). Respective fractionation factors have been determined experimentally for 18O/16O and 17O/16O. By taking previous experiments into account we suggest using 18αgsbw-gmw = 1.0037; 17αgsbw-gmw = 1.00195 and θgsbw-gmw = 0.5285 as fractionation factors in triple oxygen isotope space. Recent gypsum was sampled from a series of 10 ponds located in the Salar de Llamara in the Atacama Desert, Chile. Total dissolved solids (TDS) in these ponds show a gradual increase from 23 g/l to 182 g/l that is accompanied by an increase in pond water 18O/16O. Gsbw falls on a parallel curve to the ambient water from the saline ponds. The offset is mainly due to the equilibrium fractionation between gsbw and gmw. However, gsbw represents a time integrated signal biased towards times of strong evaporation, hence the estimated gmw comprises elevated 18O/16O compositions when compared to pond water samples taken on site. Gypsum precipitation is associated with algae mats in the ponds with lower salinity. No evidence for respective vital effects on the triple oxygen isotopic composition of gypsum hydration water is observed, nor are such effects expected. In principle, the array of δ18Ogsbw vs. 17Oexcess can be used to: (1) provide information on the degree of evaporation during gypsum formation; (2) estimate pristine meteoric water compositions; and (3) estimate local relative humidity which is the controlling parameter of the slope of the array for simple hydrological situations. In our case study, local mining activities may have decreased deep groundwater recharge, causing a recent change of the local hydrology.

  4. Isotopes a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Ellam, Rob

    2016-01-01

    An isotope is a variant form of a chemical element, containing a different number of neutrons in its nucleus. Most elements exist as several isotopes. Many are stable while others are radioactive, and some may only exist fleetingly before decaying into other elements. In this Very Short Introduction, Rob Ellam explains how isotopes have proved enormously important across all the sciences and in archaeology. Radioactive isotopes may be familiar from their use in nuclear weapons, nuclear power, and in medicine, as well as in carbon dating. They have been central to establishing the age of the Earth and the origins of the solar system. Combining previous and new research, Ellam provides an overview of the nature of stable and radioactive isotopes, and considers their wide range of modern applications. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subjec...

  5. Exotic Structure of Carbon Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T; Hagino, K; Suzuki, Toshio; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Hagino, Kouichi

    2002-01-01

    We studied firstly the ground state properties of C-isotopes using a deformed Hartree-Fock (HF)+ BCS model with Skyrme interactions. Shallow deformation minima are found in several neutron$-$rich C-isotopes. It is shown also that the deformation minima appear in both the oblate and the prolate sides in $^{17}$C and $^{19}$C having almost the same binding energies. Secondly, we carried out shell model calculations to study electromagnetic moments and electric dipole transitions of the C-isotopes. We point out the clear configuration dependence of the quadrupole and magnetic moments in the odd C-isotopes, which will be useful to find out the deformations and the spin-parities of the ground states of these nuclei. We studied electric dipole states of C-isotopes focusing on the interplay between low energy Pigmy strength and giant dipole resonances. Reasonable agreement is obtained with available experimental data for the photoreaction cross sections both in the low energy region below $\\hbar \\omega $=14 MeV and ...

  6. Handbook of environmental isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskaran, Mark (ed.) [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. Geology

    2011-07-01

    Applications of radioactive and stable isotopes have revolutionized our understanding of the Earth and near-earth surface processes. The utility of the isotopes are ever-increasing and our sole focus is to bring out the applications of these isotopes as tracers and chronometers to a wider audience so that they can be used as powerful tools to solve environmental problems. New developments in this field remain mostly in peer-reviewed journal articles and hence our goal is to synthesize these findings for easy reference for students, faculty, regulators in governmental and non-governmental agencies, and environmental companies. While this volume maintains its rigor in terms of its depth of knowledge and quantitative information, it contains the breadth needed for wide variety problems and applications in the environmental sciences. This volume presents all of the newer and older applications of isotopes pertaining to the environmental problems in one place that is readily accessible to readers. This book not only has the depth and rigor that is needed for academia, but it has the breadth and case studies to illustrate the utility of the isotopes in a wide variety of environments (atmosphere, oceans, lakes, rivers and streams, terrestrial environments, and sub-surface environments) and serves a large audience, from students and researchers, regulators in federal, state and local governments, and environmental companies. (orig.)

  7. Automated Solar-Array Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffa, A.; Bycer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Large arrays are rapidly assembled from individual solar cells by automated production line developed for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Apparatus positions cells within array, attaches interconnection tabs, applies solder flux, and solders interconnections. Cells are placed in either straight or staggered configurations and may be connected either in series or in parallel. Are attached at rate of one every 5 seconds.

  8. The OncoArray Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amos, Christopher I; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Zhaoming

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common cancers develop through a multistep process often including inherited susceptibility. Collaboration among multiple institutions, and funding from multiple sources, has allowed the development of an inexpensive genotyping microarray, the OncoArray. The array includes a genome-wi...

  9. Tremor as observed by the Array of Arrays in Cascadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A.; Vidale, J. E.; Creager, K. C.

    2010-12-01

    We are capturing the intimate details of tremor activity in Cascadia with 8 small-aperture seismic arrays in northwestern Washington. The Array of Arrays (AoA) focuses on the tremor-active megathrust, including the area we previously imaged with a solo seismic array in 2008 [Ghosh et al., GRL, 2009, 2010]. Each array consists of 10 to 20 three-component sensors recording in continuous mode. Since it became operational in June 2009, the AoA has recorded several minor tremor episodes, and the recent episodic tremor and slip (ETS) event in August 2010. During the ETS event, each array was augmented by 10 additional single-channel, vertical-component sensors. We have already started to analyze seismic data for tremor episodes in July 2009, and March 2010. At each array, we apply a beamforming technique to stack the seismic energy at every 0.2 Hz from 2 to 15 Hz. During active tremor, the arrays show stable slowness, and azimuth over time, and up to 15 Hz energy on vertical channels, and 6 Hz on horizontals, with slowness consistent with the P and S waves respectively (Figure 1). Vidale et al. in this meeting provide a detailed description of a weeklong tremor episode in March 2010. The ETS started early second week of August about 60 km south of our arrays, and in a week or so, migrated along-strike to the north passing directly underneath the arrays. Strong tremor is still active about 50 km north of the arrays as we write this abstract. We will imminently analyze this data, and by the time of AGU, have preliminary results to present. Currently, we are developing an algorithm to focus as many arrays as possible to locate the tremor sources. With fine tremor detection capability and good azimuthal coverage, our AoA will better resolve the various confounding features of tremor spatiotemporal distribution (e.g., tremor patches, bands, streaks, rapid tremor reversals, low frequency earthquakes) that have been recently discovered in Cascadia. The AoA is poised to provide

  10. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher [Modesto, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  11. High-spin research with HERA (High Energy-Resolution Array)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, R.M.

    1987-06-01

    The topic of this report is high spin research with the High Energy Resolution Array (HERA) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. This is a 21 Ge detector system, the first with bismuth germanate (BGO) Compton suppression. The array is described briefly and some of the results obtained during the past year using this detector facility are discussed. Two types of studies are described: observation of superdeformation in the light Nd isotopes, and rotational damping at high spin and excitation energy in the continuum gamma ray spectrum.

  12. Nanocoax Arrays for Sensing Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizal, Binod

    We have adapted a nanocoax array architecture for high sensitivity, all-electronic, chemical and biological sensing. Arrays of nanocoaxes with various dielectric annuli were developed using polymer replicas of Si nanopillars made via soft lithography. These arrays were implemented in the development of two different kinds of chemical detectors. First, arrays of nanocoaxes constructed with different porosity dielectric annuli were employed to make capacitive detectors for gaseous molecules and to investigate the role of dielectric porosity in the sensitivity of the device. Second, arrays of nanocoaxes with partially hollowed annuli were used to fabricate three-dimensional electrochemical biosensors within which we studied the role of nanoscale gap between electrodes on device sensitivity. In addition, we have employed a molecular imprint technique to develop a non-conducting molecularly imprinted polymer thin film of thickness comparable to size of biomolecules as an "artificial antibody" architecture for the detection of biomolecules.

  13. Digital electrostatic acoustic transducer array

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of an array of electrostatic acoustic transducers. The array is micromachined on a silicon wafer using standard micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n electrostatic transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a hexagonal membrane shape structure, which is separated from the substrate by 3µm air gap. The membrane is made out 5µm thick polyimide layer that has a bottom gold electrode on the substrate and a gold top electrode on top of the membrane (250nm). The wafer layout design was diced in nine chips with different array configurations, with variation of the membrane dimensions. The device was tested with 90 V giving and sound output level as high as 35dB, while actuating all the elements at the same time.

  14. Chunking of Large Multidimensional Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotem, Doron; Otoo, Ekow J.; Seshadri, Sridhar

    2007-02-28

    Data intensive scientific computations as well on-lineanalytical processing applications as are done on very large datasetsthat are modeled as k-dimensional arrays. The storage organization ofsuch arrays on disks is done by partitioning the large global array intofixed size hyper-rectangular sub-arrays called chunks or tiles that formthe units of data transfer between disk and memory. Typical queriesinvolve the retrieval of sub-arrays in a manner that accesses all chunksthat overlap the query results. An important metric of the storageefficiency is the expected number of chunks retrieved over all suchqueries. The question that immediately arises is "what shapes of arraychunks give the minimum expected number of chunks over a query workload?"In this paper we develop two probabilistic mathematical models of theproblem and provide exact solutions using steepest descent and geometricprogramming methods. Experimental results, using synthetic workloads onreal life data sets, show that our chunking is much more efficient thanthe existing approximate solutions.

  15. Photonuclear reactions on titanium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyshev, S. S. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Dzhilavyan, L. Z. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, A. A., E-mail: kuznets@depni.sinp.msu.ru; Orlin, V. N.; Stopani, K. A. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    The photodisintegration of titanium isotopes in the giant-dipole-resonance energy region is studied by the photon-activation method. Bremsstrahlung photons whose spectrum has the endpoint energy of 55 MeV is used. The yields and integrated cross sections are determined for photoproton reactions on the titanium isotopes {sup 47,48,49,50}Ti. The respective experimental results are compared with their counterparts calculated on the basis of the TALYS code and a combined photonucleon-reaction model. The TALYS code disregards the isospin structure of the giant dipole resonance and is therefore unable to describe the yield of photoproton reactions on the heavy titanium isotopes {sup 49,50}Ti.

  16. Coulomb Excitation of Neutron Deficient Sn-Isotopes using REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    Di julio, D D; Kownacki, J M; Marechal, F; Andreoiu, C; Siem, S; Perrot, F; Van duppen, P L E; Napiorkowski, P J; Iwanicki, J S

    2002-01-01

    It is proposed to study the evolution of the reduced transition probabilities, B(E2; 0$^{+} \\rightarrow$ 2$^{+}$), for neutron deficient Sn isotopes by Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics using REX-ISOLDE and the MINIBALL detector array. Measurements of the reduced transition matrix element for the transition between the ground state and the first excited 2$^{+}$ state in light even-even Sn isotopes provide a means to study e.g. core polarization effects in the $^{100}$Sn core. Previous attempts to measure this quantity have been carried out using the decay of isomeric states populated in fusion evaporation reactions. We thus propose to utilize the unique opportunity provided by REX-ISOLDE, after the energy upgrade to 3.1 MeV/u, to use the more model-independent approach of Coulomb excitation to measure this quantity in a number of isotopes in this region.

  17. SAQC: SNP Array Quality Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ling-Hui

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays containing hundreds of thousands of SNPs from the human genome have proven useful for studying important human genome questions. Data quality of SNP arrays plays a key role in the accuracy and precision of downstream data analyses. However, good indices for assessing data quality of SNP arrays have not yet been developed. Results We developed new quality indices to measure the quality of SNP arrays and/or DNA samples and investigated their statistical properties. The indices quantify a departure of estimated individual-level allele frequencies (AFs from expected frequencies via standardized distances. The proposed quality indices followed lognormal distributions in several large genomic studies that we empirically evaluated. AF reference data and quality index reference data for different SNP array platforms were established based on samples from various reference populations. Furthermore, a confidence interval method based on the underlying empirical distributions of quality indices was developed to identify poor-quality SNP arrays and/or DNA samples. Analyses of authentic biological data and simulated data show that this new method is sensitive and specific for the detection of poor-quality SNP arrays and/or DNA samples. Conclusions This study introduces new quality indices, establishes references for AFs and quality indices, and develops a detection method for poor-quality SNP arrays and/or DNA samples. We have developed a new computer program that utilizes these methods called SNP Array Quality Control (SAQC. SAQC software is written in R and R-GUI and was developed as a user-friendly tool for the visualization and evaluation of data quality of genome-wide SNP arrays. The program is available online (http://www.stat.sinica.edu.tw/hsinchou/genetics/quality/SAQC.htm.

  18. Array gain for a cylindrical array with baffle scatter effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertilone, Derek C; Killeen, Damien S; Bao, Chaoying

    2007-11-01

    Cylindrical arrays used in sonar for passive underwater surveillance often have sensors surrounding a cylindrical metal baffle. In some operational sonars, the phones in each stave (i.e., each line of phones aligned with the cylinder axis) are hardwired together so that the array is equivalent to a baffled circular array of directional elements, where each element corresponds to a line array of omnidirectional phones steered to broadside. In this paper a model is introduced for computing the array gain of such an array at high frequencies, which incorporates baffle scatter using infinite, rigid cylinder scattering theory, and with ambient noise described by an angular spectral density function. In practice the phones are often offset from the baffle surface, and the acoustic field sampled by the staves is distorted at high frequencies due to interference between the incident and scattered fields. Examples are given to illustrate the resulting array gain degradation, using three noise distributions that are frequently used in sonar performance modeling: three-dimensional isotropic, two-dimensional isotropic, and surface dipole noise.

  19. The terrestrial uranium isotope cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Morten B; Elliott, Tim; Freymuth, Heye; Sims, Kenneth W W; Niu, Yaoling; Kelley, Katherine A

    2015-01-15

    Changing conditions on the Earth's surface can have a remarkable influence on the composition of its overwhelmingly more massive interior. The global distribution of uranium is a notable example. In early Earth history, the continental crust was enriched in uranium. Yet after the initial rise in atmospheric oxygen, about 2.4 billion years ago, the aqueous mobility of oxidized uranium resulted in its significant transport to the oceans and, ultimately, by means of subduction, back to the mantle. Here we explore the isotopic characteristics of this global uranium cycle. We show that the subducted flux of uranium is isotopically distinct, with high (238)U/(235)U ratios, as a result of alteration processes at the bottom of an oxic ocean. We also find that mid-ocean-ridge basalts (MORBs) have (238)U/(235)U ratios higher than does the bulk Earth, confirming the widespread pollution of the upper mantle with this recycled uranium. Although many ocean island basalts (OIBs) are argued to contain a recycled component, their uranium isotopic compositions do not differ from those of the bulk Earth. Because subducted uranium was probably isotopically unfractionated before full oceanic oxidation, about 600 million years ago, this observation reflects the greater antiquity of OIB sources. Elemental and isotope systematics of uranium in OIBs are strikingly consistent with previous OIB lead model ages, indicating that these mantle reservoirs formed between 2.4 and 1.8 billion years ago. In contrast, the uranium isotopic composition of MORB requires the convective stirring of recycled uranium throughout the upper mantle within the past 600 million years.

  20. The Long Wavelength Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. B.

    2006-08-01

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA) will be a new, open, user-oriented astronomical instrument operating in the poorly explored window from 20-80 MHz at arcsecond level resolution and mJy level sensitivity. Key science drivers include (1) acceleration, propagation, and turbulence in the ISM, including the space-distribution and spectrum of Galactic cosmic rays, supernova remnants, and pulsars; (2) the high redshift universe, including the most distant radio galaxies and clusters - tools for understanding the earliest black holes and the cosmological evolution of Dark Matter and Dark Energy; (3) planetary, solar, and space science, including space weather prediction and extra-solar planet searches; and (4) the radio transient universe: including the known (e.g., SNe, GRBs) and the unknown. Because the LWA will explore one of the last and least investigated regions of the spectrum, the potential for new discoveries, including new classes of physical phenomena, is high, and there is a strong synergy with exciting new X-ray and Gamma-ray measurements, e.g. for cosmic ray acceleration, transients, and galaxy clusters. Operated by the University of New Mexico on behalf of the South West Consortium (SWC) the LWA will also provide a unique training ground for the next generation of radio astronomers. Students may also put skills learned on the LWA to work in computer science, electrical engineering, and the communications industry, among others. The development of the LWA will follow a phased build, which benefits from lessons learned at each phase. Four university-based Scientific Testing and Evaluation (ST&E) teams with different areas of concentration (1. High resolution imaging and particle acceleration; 2. Wide field imaging and large scale structures; 3. Ionosphere, and 4. RFI suppression and transient detection) will provide the feedback needed to assure that science objectives are met as the build develops. Currently in its first year of construction funding, the LWA

  1. Non-linear Isotope Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    The isotopic fractionation associated with photodissociation of N2O, OCS and CO2, at different altitudes in Earth’s atmosphere, is investigated theoretically using constructed quantum mechanical models of the dissociation processes (i.e. potential energy surfaces and relevant coupling elements...... or moderate, and overall sulfur fractionation in the stratosphere is very weak which does not exclude OCS from being an acceptable background the Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosol layer. (iii) CO2 photolysis in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere is highly fractionating in both isotopes, enriching...

  2. Construction and testing of the Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) - a model of collaborative undergraduate research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Warren; MoNA Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    The Large-area multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) will detect high-energy neutrons in experiments with fast rare isotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University, allowing for the study of unbound nuclei as well and many unknown higher-lying unbound states in light neutron-rich nuclei (Z LISA is designed to be used in conjunction with the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) (also constructed by undergraduate students), and the two are planned for use in the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at MSU. The construction process and characteristics of the detectors will be presented, as well as results from several measurements made by the undergraduate students before shipping the detectors to NSCL for assembly into the array, including cosmic muon measurements, light attenuation measurements, and 2-dimensional gamma ray angular distribution mapping, among others. Work Supported by the National Science Foundation

  3. The Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Bigongiari, Ciro

    2016-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is planned to be the next generation ground based observatory for very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy. Gamma-rays provide a powerful insight into the non-thermal universe and hopefully a unique probe for new physics. Imaging Cherenkov telescopes have already discovered more than 170 VHE gamma-ray emitters providing plentiful of valuable data and clearly demonstrating the power of this technique. In spite of the impressive results there are indications that the known sources represent only the tip of the iceberg. A major step in sensitivity is needed to increase the number of detected sources, observe short time-scale variability and improve morphological studies of extended sources. An extended energy coverage is advisable to observe far-away extragalactic objects and improve spectral analysis. CTA aims to increase the sensitivity by an order of magnitude compared to current facilities, to extend the accessible gamma-ray energies from a few tens of GeV to a hundred o...

  4. The separation of stable isotopes of carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oziashvili, E. D.; Egiazarov, A. S.

    1989-04-01

    The present state of work on the separation of carbon isotopes by diffusion, fractional distillation, chemical isotopic exchange, and the selective excitation and dissociation of molecules in electrical discharges or in the field of laser radiation has been examined. The characteristics of new laboratory and industrial assemblies for separating carbon isotopes have been described. Promising directions of study aimed at developing effective technological processes for separating carbon isotopes have been noted. The bibliography contains 148 references.

  5. Brief review on the development of isotope hydrology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪集旸; 孙占学

    2001-01-01

    The development of isotope hydrology in China is briefly reviewed. It includes oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of precipitation, application of isotope hydrological methodologies in solving water resources problems, isotope hydrological studies on brines and salt lake waters, as well as isotope hydrological investigations of thermal waters. The review focuses on isotope hydrology in China during the last two decades.

  6. Imaging Properties of Planar Microlens Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The planar microlens arrays is a two-dimensional array of optical component which is fabricated monolithically available. Imaging properties of planar microlens arrays are described, which provide both image multiplexer and erect, unit magnification images.

  7. Dry phase reactor for generating medical isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Thomas Rockwell; Heltemes, Thad Alexander

    2016-05-03

    An apparatus for generating medical isotopes provides for the irradiation of dry-phase, granular uranium compounds which are then dissolved in a solvent for separation of the medical isotope from the irradiated compound. Once the medical isotope is removed, the dissolved compound may be reconstituted in dry granular form for repeated irradiation.

  8. Substitution of stable isotopes in Chlorella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaumenhaft, E.; Katz, J. J.; Uphaus, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Replacement of biologically important isotopes in the alga Chlorella by corresponding heavier stable isotopes produces increasingly greater deviations from the normal cell size and changes the quality and distribution of certain cellular components. The usefulness of isotopically altered organisms increases interest in the study of such permuted organisms.

  9. Isotopic (Pb, Sr, Nd, C, O) evidence for plume-related sampling of an ancient, depleted mantle reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Simonetti, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    The exact mantle source for carbonatite melts remains highly controversial. Despite their predominant occurrence within continental (lithospheric) domains, the radiogenic isotope data from young (oceanic island basalts (OIBs). This feature suggests an intimate petrogenetic relationship with asthenospheric mantle. New Pb, Sr, C, and O isotopic data are reported here for constituent minerals from the Oka carbonatite complex, which is associated with the Cretaceous Monteregian Igneous Province (MIP), northeastern North America. The Pb isotope data define linear arrays in Pb-Pb isotope diagrams, with the corresponding Sr isotope ratios being highly variable (0.70314-0.70343); both these features are consistent with open system behavior involving at least three distinct mantle reservoirs. Compared to the isotope composition of known mantle sources for OIBs and carbonatite occurrences worldwide, the least radiogenic 207Pb/204Pb (14.96 ± 0.07) and 208Pb/204Pb (37.29 ± 0.15) isotopic compositions relative to their corresponding 206Pb/204Pb ratios (18.86 ± 0.08) reported here are distinct, and indicate the involvement of an ancient depleted mantle (ADM) source. The extremely unradiogenic Pb isotope compositions necessitate U/Pb fractionation early in Earth's history (prior to 4.0 Ga ago) and growth via a multi-stage Pb evolution model. The combined stable (C and O) and radiogenic isotopic compositions effectively rule out crustal/lithosphere contamination during the petrogenetic history of the Oka complex. Instead, the isotopic variations reported here most likely result from the mixing of discrete, small volume partial melts derived from a heterogeneous plume source characterized by a mixed HIMU-EM1-ADM signature.

  10. Antenna arrays a computational approach

    CERN Document Server

    Haupt, Randy L

    2010-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of antenna array topics that are becoming increasingly important in wireless applications, particularly in design and computer modeling. Signal processing and numerical modeling algorithms are explored, and MATLAB computer codes are provided for many of the design examples. Pictures of antenna arrays and components provided by industry and government sources are presented with explanations of how they work. Antenna Arrays is a valuable reference for practicing engineers and scientists in wireless communications, radar, and remote sensing, and an excellent textbook for advanced antenna courses.

  11. Fundamentals of ultrasonic phased arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Schmerr, Lester W

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail the physical and mathematical foundations of ultrasonic phased array measurements.?The book uses linear systems theory to develop a comprehensive model of the signals and images that can be formed with phased arrays. Engineers working in the field of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) will find in this approach a wealth of information on how to design, optimize and interpret ultrasonic inspections with phased arrays. The fundamentals and models described in the book will also be of significant interest to other fields, including the medical ultrasound and

  12. Fiber Optic Geophysics Sensor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochowski, Lucjan

    1989-01-01

    The distributed optical sensor arrays are analysed in view of specific needs of 3-D seismic explorations methods. There are compared advantages and disadventages of arrays supported by the sensors which are modulated in intensity and phase. In these systems all-fiber optic structures and their compabilities with digital geophysic formats are discussed. It was shown that the arrays based on TDM systems with the intensity modulated sensors are economically and technically the best matched for geophysic systems supported by a large number of the sensors.

  13. Terahertz superconducting plasmonic hole array

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Han, Jiaguang; Gu, Jianqiang; Xing, Qirong; Zhang, Weili

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate thermally tunable superconductor hole array with active control over their resonant transmission induced by surface plasmon polaritons . The array was lithographically fabricated on high temperature YBCO superconductor and characterized by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy. We observe a clear transition from the virtual excitation of the surface plasmon mode to the real surface plasmon mode. The highly tunable superconducting plasmonic hole arrays may have promising applications in the design of low-loss, large dynamic range amplitude modulation, and surface plasmon based terahertz devices.

  14. Isotope Harvesting Opportunities at FRIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, David

    2017-01-01

    The fragmentation of fast heavy ion beams now at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) and in the future at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) under construction produce an unprecedentedly broad spectrum of radionuclides but only a small fraction are used in the on-line rare-isotope program. Projectile fragmentation facilities provide an electromagnetically purified beam of a single projectile fragment for nuclear physics experiments ranging from low energy astrophysics, through nuclear structure studies, to probing fundamental symmetries. By augmenting the NSCL and FRIB production facilities with complimentary collection and purification of discarded ions, called isotope harvesting with chemical purification, many other nuclides will become available for off-line experiments in parallel with the primary experiment. A growing user community has established a list of key target isotopes and is working with the FRIB design team to allow inclusion of necessary equipment in the future. An overview of the possibilities and the techniques will be presented in this talk. Supported by Office of Science, US DOE and Michigan State University.

  15. Operation of Electromagnetic Isotope Separator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI; Ya-jing

    2015-01-01

    In 2015,we mainly completed the installation of the electromagnetic isotope separator comprehensive technical transformation projects,including the work of installation,debugging,commissioning and acceptance.In June 30,2015,according to the schedule requirements,the project

  16. Research Progress of Isotope Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Department; of; Isotope

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive isotope is one of the origins of nonnuclear power technology.In the 12th Five Year Plan period,CIAE made breakthrough progresses on several important fields such as research and development of preparation of radioactive nuclides,preparation of radioactive source and study of radiopharmaceuticals relied on different financial support,successfully

  17. Bayesian stable isotope mixing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper we review recent advances in Stable Isotope Mixing Models (SIMMs) and place them into an over-arching Bayesian statistical framework which allows for several useful extensions. SIMMs are used to quantify the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixtur...

  18. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better

  19. The Square Kilometer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, James M.

    2006-06-01

    The SKA is an observatory for m/cm wavelengths that will provide quantum leaps in studies of the early universe, the high-energy universe, and astrobiology. Key science areas include:(1) Galaxy Evolution and Large-Scale Structure, including Dark Energy;(2) Probing the Dark Ages through studies of highly redshifted hydrogen and carbon monoxide;(3) Cosmic magnetism;(4) Probing Gravity with Pulsars and Black Holes; and(5) The Cradle of Life, including real-time images of protoplanetary disks, inventory of organic molecules, and the search for signals from extraterrestrial intelligence.From a phase-space point of view, the SKA will expand enormously our ability to discover new and known phenomena, including transient sources with time scales from nano-seconds to years. Particular examples include coherent emissions from extrasolar planets and gamma-ray burst afterglows, detectable at levels 100 times smaller than currently. Specifications needed to meet the science requirements are technically quite challenging: a frequency range of approximately 0.1 to 25 GHz; wide field of view, tens of square degrees (frequency dependent); high dynamic range and image fidelity; flexibility in imaging on scales from sub-mas to degrees; and sampling the time-frequency domain as demanded by transient objects. Meeting these specifications requires collaboration of a world-wide group of engineers and scientists. For this and other reasons, the SKA will be realized internationally. Initially, several concepts have been explored for building inexpensive collecting area that provides broad frequency coverage. The Reference Design now specifies an SKA based on a large number of small-diameter dish antennas with "smart feeds." Complementary to the dishes is a phased aperture array that will provide very wide-field capability. I will discuss the Reference Design, along with a timeline for developing the technology, building the first 10% of the SKA, and finishing the full SKA, along with the

  20. Fracture characterisation using geoelectric null-arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Pierik; Negro, François; Szalai, Sándor; Milnes, Ellen

    2013-06-01

    The term "geoelectric null-array" is used for direct current electrode configurations yielding a potential difference of zero above a homogeneous half-space. This paper presents a comparative study of the behaviour of three null-arrays, midpoint null-array (MAN), Wenner-γ null-array and Schlumberger null-array in response to a fracture, both in profiling and in azimuthal mode. The main objective is to determine which array(s) best localise fractures or best identify their orientation. Forward modelling of the three null-arrays revealed that the Wenner-γ and Schlumberger null-arrays localise vertical fractures the most accurately, whilst the midpoint null-array combined with the Schlumberger null-array allows accurate orientation of a fracture. Numerical analysis then served as a basis to interpret the field results. Field test measurements were carried out above a quarry in Les Breuleux (Switzerland) with the three null-arrays and classical arrays. The results were cross-validated with quarry-wall geological mapping. In real field circumstances, the Wenner-γ null-array proved to be the most efficient and accurate in localising fractures. The orientations of the fractures according to the numerical results were most efficiently determined with the midpoint null-array, whilst the Schlumberger null-array adds accuracy to the results. This study shows that geoelectrical null-arrays are more suitable than classical arrays for the characterisation of fracture geometry.

  1. Calcium isotope analysis by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, Sergei F

    2010-01-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. The present article discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. In Sections 2 and 3, mass spectrometric methods applied to precise stable isotope analysis and to the determination of (41)Ca are described. Section 4 contains a short summary of selected applications, and includes tracer experiments and the potential use

  2. A global Ge isotope budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronas, J. Jotautas; Hammond, Douglas E.; McManus, James; Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Siebert, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    We present measurements of Ge isotope composition and ancillary data for samples of river water, low- and high-temperature hydrothermal fluids, and seawater. The dissolved δ74Ge composition of analyzed rivers ranges from 2.0 to 5.6‰, which is significantly heavier than previously determined values for silicate rocks (δ74Ge = 0.4-0.7‰, Escoube et al., Geostand. Geoanal. Res., 36(2), 2012) from which dissolved Ge is primarily derived. An observed negative correlation between riverine Ge/Si and δ74Ge signatures suggests that the primary δ74Ge fractionation mechanism during rock weathering is the preferential incorporation of light isotopes into secondary weathering products. High temperature (>150 °C) hydrothermal fluids analyzed in this study have δ74Ge of 0.7-1.6‰, most likely fractionated during fluid equilibration with quartz in the reaction zone. Low temperature (25-63 °C) hydrothermal fluids are heavier (δ74Ge between 2.9‰ and 4.1‰) and most likely fractionated during Ge precipitation with hydrothermal clays. Seawater from the open ocean has a δ74Gesw value of 3.2 ± 0.4‰, and is indistinguishable among the different ocean basins at the current level of precision. This value should be regulated over time by the isotopic balance of Ge sources and sinks, and a new compilation of these fluxes is presented, along with their estimated isotopic compositions. Assuming steady-state, non-opal Ge sequestration during sediment authigenesis likely involves isotopic fractionation Δ74Gesolid-solution that is -0.6 ± 1.8‰.

  3. Isotopic composition of Lake Agassiz-Ojibway water just prior to final drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Helie, J.; McKay, J.; Lalonde, A.

    2006-12-01

    Controversies persist with respect to the impact of the final drainage of Lake Agassiz-Ojibway on the thermohaline circulation of the North Atlantic, some 8.4 ka ago. The lack of response of planktic foraminifer isotope records, off Hudson Strait (i.e., at the outlet of the drainage channel) constitutes one of the most puzzling elements in this debate. However, data on the isotopic composition of drainage waters are needed to estimate the response of the 18-O-salinity relationship in NW Atlantic surface waters. In the literature, a large array of isotopic compositions have been suggested, notably for modeling experiment purposes. Scattered information about the isotopic composition of Lake Agassiz water does exist. It includes isotopic measurements of pore waters of lacustrine sediments [1], analyses of oxygen isotopes in cellulose from algal or plant remains [2], and stable isotope compositions of concretions from varves [3]. Whereas, relatively low oxygen isotope values (apx. -25 per mil vs. VSMOW) are inferred for Lake Agassiz waters during cold pulses of the deglaciation, most data suggest much higher values during the final stages of Lake Agassiz-Ojiway, just prior to its drainage. Calcareous concretions from Lake Ojibway varves (not necessarily contemporaneous to the lacustrine stage) yielded oxygen isotope compositions of about -10 per mil (vs. VPDB), suggesting values as high as -14 per mil (vs. VSMOW) for pore waters (assuming a 0-4 degrees C temperature range). Similar high values (as high as -8 per mil vs. VSMOW [1]) were also estimated from pore water analyses of contemporaneous Lake Agassiz sediments. Here, we used a core raised from Eastern Hudson Bay, off Great Whale River, to further document isotopic compositions of the lake waters prior to their drainage into the North Atlantic. The 7.40 m long core has an apx. 1.3 m-thick lacustrine layer at its base, including the drainage sub- layer. It is overlain by Tyrrell Sea clays. Scarce valves of Candona

  4. Modelling stable water isotopes: Status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of stable water isotopes H2 18O and HDO within various parts of the Earth’s hydrological cycle has clearly improved our understanding of the interplay between climatic variations and related isotope fractionation processes. In this article key principles and major research results of stable water isotope modelling studies are described. Emphasis is put on research work using explicit isotope diagnostics within general circulation models as this highly complex model setup bears many resemblances with studies using simpler isotope modelling approaches.

  5. CMOS-Based Biosensor Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Thewes, R; Schienle, M; Hofmann, F; Frey, A; Brederlow, R; Augustyniak, M; Jenkner, M; Eversmann, B; Schindler-Bauer, P; Atzesberger, M; Holzapfl, B; Beer, G; Haneder, T; Hanke, H -C

    2011-01-01

    CMOS-based sensor array chips provide new and attractive features as compared to today's standard tools for medical, diagnostic, and biotechnical applications. Examples for molecule- and cell-based approaches and related circuit design issues are discussed.

  6. Bolometric Arrays for Millimeter Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, E.; Serrano, A.; Torres-Jácome, A.

    2009-11-01

    During last years, semiconductor bolometers using thin films have been developed at INAOE, specifically boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. The characteristics shown by these devices made them attractive to be used in astronomical instrumentation, mainly in two-dimentional arrays. These detector arrays used at the Large Millimeter Telescope will make possible to obtain astronomical images in millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. With this in mind, we are developing a method to produce, with enough reliability, bolometer arrays at INAOE. Until now, silicon nitride diaphragm arrays, useful as radiation absorbers, have succesfully been obtained. Sizes going from one to four millimeter by element in a consistent way; however we have not tested thermometers and metallic contact deposition yet. At the same time, we are working on two possible configurations for the readout electronics; one of them using commercial components while the other will be an integrated circuit specifically designed for this application. Both versions will work below 77K.

  7. Next Generation Microshutter Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop the next generation MicroShutter Array (MSA) as a multi-object field selector for missions anticipated in the next two decades. For many...

  8. The Murchison Widefield Array Correlator

    CERN Document Server

    Ord, S M; Emrich, D; Pallot, D; Wayth, R B; Clark, M A; Tremblay, S E; Arcus, W; Barnes, D; Bell, M; Bernardi, G; Bhat, N D R; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Bunton, J D; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A A; deSouza, L; Ewell-Wice, A; Feng, L; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Herne, D; Hewitt, J N; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, H; Jacobs, D; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kincaid, B B; Koenig, R; Kratzenberg, E; Kudryavtseva, N; Lenc, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A; Pathikulangara, J; Pindor, B; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Remillard, R A; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Salah, J E; Sault, R J; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Stevens, J; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Waterson, M; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wyithe, J S B

    2015-01-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Precursor. The telescope is located at the Murchison Radio--astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia (WA). The MWA consists of 4096 dipoles arranged into 128 dual polarisation aperture arrays forming a connected element interferometer that cross-correlates signals from all 256 inputs. A hybrid approach to the correlation task is employed, with some processing stages being performed by bespoke hardware, based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), and others by Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) housed in general purpose rack mounted servers. The correlation capability required is approximately 8 TFLOPS (Tera FLoating point Operations Per Second). The MWA has commenced operations and the correlator is generating 8.3 TB/day of correlation products, that are subsequently transferred 700 km from the MRO to Perth (WA) in real-time for storage and offline processing. In this paper we outline the correlator design, signal path, and proce...

  9. Integrated Spatial Filter Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA Earth Science Division need for spatial filter arrays for amplitude and wavefront control, Luminit proposes to develop a novel Integrated Spatial...

  10. Large scale biomimetic membrane arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard; Perry, Mark; Vogel, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    To establish planar biomimetic membranes across large scale partition aperture arrays, we created a disposable single-use horizontal chamber design that supports combined optical-electrical measurements. Functional lipid bilayers could easily and efficiently be established across CO2 laser micro......-structured 8 x 8 aperture partition arrays with average aperture diameters of 301 +/- 5 mu m. We addressed the electro-physical properties of the lipid bilayers established across the micro-structured scaffold arrays by controllable reconstitution of biotechnological and physiological relevant membrane...... peptides and proteins. Next, we tested the scalability of the biomimetic membrane design by establishing lipid bilayers in rectangular 24 x 24 and hexagonal 24 x 27 aperture arrays, respectively. The results presented show that the design is suitable for further developments of sensitive biosensor assays...

  11. Thermopile Area Array Readout Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA/JPL thermopile detector linear arrays, wire bonded to Black Forest Engineering (BFE) CMOS readout integrated circuits (ROICs), have been utilized in NASA...

  12. Tent Shaped Phased Array Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    AD-A113 191 HARRIS CORP MELBOURNE FL GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATION SY-ETC Fi 20/11TENT SHAPED PHASED ARRAY TESTS.(U JAN 82 C A CHUANG F19628-79-C-T173...821714f1 45 0 +450 SCAN PLANE ARRAY PATTERNS FIG. B-31 B- 31 AD-AL13 191 HARRS CRP PMELBOURNE FLY GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATION ST--ETC F/6 20/14 TENT SHAPED

  13. Flexible solar-array mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    One of the key elements of the flexible rolled-up solar array system is a mechanism to deploy, retract, and store the flexible solar-cell arrays. The selection of components, the design of the mechanism assembly, and the tests that were performed are discussed. During 6 months in orbit, all mission objectives were satisfied, and inflight performance has shown good correlation with preflight analyses and tests.

  14. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer.

  15. Heavy atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneth, Piotr

    1994-05-01

    The theory of isotope effects, which has proved to be extremely useful in providing geometrical details of transition states in a variety of chemical reactions, has recently found an application in studies of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. These reactions are multistep in nature with few steps being partially rate-limiting, thus interpretation of these isotope effects is more complex. The theoretical framework of heavy-atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions is critically analyzed on the basis of recent results of: carbon kinetic isotope effects on carbonic anhydrase and catalytic antibodies; multiple carbon, deuterium isotope effects on reactions catalyzed by formate decarboxylase; oxygen isotope effects on binding processes in reactions catalyzed by pyruvate kinase; and equilibrium oxygen isotope effect on binding an inhibitor to lactate dehydrogenase. The advantages and disadvantages of reaction complexity in learning details of formal and molecular mechanisms are discussed in the examples of reactions catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, orotidine decarboxylase and glutamine synthetase.

  16. Measuring SNM Isotopic Distributions using FRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-02

    The first group of slides provides background information on the isotopic composition of plutonium. It is shown that 240Pu is the critical isotope in neutron coincidence/multiplicity counting. Next, response function analysis to determine isotopic composition is discussed. The isotopic composition can be determined by measuring the net peak counts from each isotope and then taking the ratio of the counts for each isotope relative to the total counts for the element. Then FRAM (Fixed energy Response function Analysis with Multiple efficiencies) is explained. FRAM can control data acquisition, automatically analyze newly acquired data, analyze previously acquired data, provide information on the quality of the analysis, and facilitate analysis in unusual situations (non-standard energy calibrations, gamma rays from non-SNM isotopes, poor spectra (within limits)).

  17. Hemocompatibility of titania nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barbara S; Yoriya, Sorachon; Grissom, Laura; Grimes, Craig A; Popat, Ketul C

    2010-11-01

    Hemocompatibility is a key consideration for the long-term success of blood contacting biomaterials; hence, there is a critical need to understand the physiological response elicited from blood/nano-biomaterial interactions. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption of key blood serum proteins, in vitro adhesion and activation of platelets, and clotting kinetics of whole blood on titania nanotube arrays. Previous studies have demonstrated improved mesenchymal stem cell functionality, osteoblast phenotypic behavior, localized drug delivery, and the production of endothelial cell ECM on titania nanotube arrays. Furthermore, these titania nanotube arrays have elicited minimal levels of monocyte activation and cytokine secretion, thus exhibiting a very low degree of immunogenicity. Titania nanotube arrays were fabricated using anodization technique and the surface morphology was examined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crystalline phases were identified using glancing angled X-ray diffraction (GAXRD). Nanoindentation and scratch tests were used to characterize the mechanical properties of titania nanotube arrays. The adsorption of key blood proteins (albumin, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin-g) was evaluated using a micro-BCA assay and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adhesion and activation of platelets was investigated using live-cell staining, MTT assay, and SEM. Whole blood clotting kinetics was evaluated by measuring the free hemoglobin concentration, and SEM was used to visualize the clot formation. Our results indicate increased blood serum protein adsorption, platelet adhesion and activation, and whole blood clotting kinetics on titania nanotube arrays.

  18. Array imaging system for lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirner, Raoul; Mueller, Kevin; Malaurie, Pauline; Vogler, Uwe; Noell, Wilfried; Scharf, Toralf; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2016-09-01

    We present an integrated array imaging system based on a stack of microlens arrays. The microlens arrays are manufactured by melting resist and reactive ion etching (RIE) technology on 8'' wafers (fused silica) and mounted by wafer-level packaging (WLP)1. The array imaging system is configured for 1X projection (magnification m = +1) of a mask pattern onto a planar wafer. The optical system is based on two symmetric telescopes, thus anti-symmetric wavefront aberrations like coma, distortion, lateral color are minimal. Spherical aberrations are reduced by using microlenses with aspherical lens profiles. In our system design approach, sub-images of individual imaging channels do not overlap to avoid interference. Image superposition is achieved by moving the array imaging system during the exposure time. A tandem Koehler integrator illumination system (MO Exposure Optics) is used for illumination. The angular spectrum of the illumination light underfills the pupils of the imaging channels to avoid crosstalk. We present and discuss results from simulation, mounting and testing of a first prototype of the investigated array imaging system for lithography.

  19. Magmatic recharge buffers the isotopic compositions against crustal contamination in formation of continental flood basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xun; Chen, Li-Hui; Zeng, Gang

    2017-07-01

    Isotopic compositions of continental flood basalts are essential to understand their genesis and to constrain the character of their mantle sources. Because of potential crustal contamination, it needs to be evaluated if and to which degree these basalts record original isotopic signals of their mantle sources and/or crustal signatures. This study examines the Sr, Nd, Hf, and Pb isotopic compositions of the late Cenozoic Xinchang-Shengzhou (XS) flood basalts, a small-scale continental flood basalt field in eastern China. The basalts show positive correlations between 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd, and negative correlations between 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf, which deviate from compositional arrays of crustal contamination and instead highlight variations in magmatic recharge intensity and mantle source compositions. The lava samples formed by high-volume magmatic recharge recorded signals of recycled sediments in the mantle source, which are characterized by moderate Ba/Th (91.9-106.5), excess 208Pb/204Pb relative to 206Pb/204Pb, and excess 176Hf/177Hf relative to 143Nd/144Nd. Thus, we propose that magmatic recharge buffers the original isotopic compositions of magmas against crustal contamination. Identifying and utilizing the isotope systematics of continental flood basalts generated by high volumes of magmatic recharge are thus crucial to trace their mantle sources.

  20. Sulfur and lead isotopic evidence of relic Archean sediments in the Pitcairn mantle plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavault, Hélène; Chauvel, Catherine; Thomassot, Emilie; Devey, Colin W.; Dazas, Baptiste

    2016-11-01

    The isotopic diversity of oceanic island basalts (OIB) is usually attributed to the influence, in their sources, of ancient material recycled into the mantle, although the nature, age, and quantities of this material remain controversial. The unradiogenic Pb isotope signature of the enriched mantle I (EM I) source of basalts from, for example, Pitcairn or Walvis Ridge has been variously attributed to recycled pelagic sediments, lower continental crust, or recycled subcontinental lithosphere. Our study helps resolve this debate by showing that Pitcairn lavas contain sulfides whose sulfur isotopic compositions are affected by mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF down to Δ33S = -0.8), something which is thought to have occurred on Earth only before 2.45 Ga, constraining the youngest possible age of the EM I source component. With this independent age constraint and a Monte Carlo refinement modeling of lead isotopes, we place the likely Pitcairn source age at 2.5 Ga to 2.6 Ga. The Pb, Sr, Nd, and Hf isotopic mixing arrays show that the Archean EM I material was poor in trace elements, resembling Archean sediment. After subduction, this Archean sediment apparently remained stored in the deep Earth for billions of years before returning to the surface as Pitcairńs characteristic EM I signature. The presence of negative S-MIF in the deep mantle may also help resolve the problem of an apparent deficit of negative Δ33S anomalies so far found in surface reservoirs.

  1. Isotope hydrology of catchment basins: lithogenic and cosmogenic isotopic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimz, G. J., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water. Many solutes in natural waters are derived from the interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system - these are termed `lithogenic` solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both within and outside of the catchment - i.e., in addition to being derived from catchment rock and soil, they are solutes that are also transported into the catchment. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing `cosmogenic` nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing `thermonuclear` nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, principally {sup 238}U (producing `in-situ` lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading `cosmogenic nuclides`, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage here, although always indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute concentrations in catchment waters, and how the isotopic compositions of the solutes can be used in integrative ways to identify these processes, thereby revealing the physical history of the water within a catchment system. The concept of a `system` is important in catchment hydrology. A catchment is the smallest landscape unit that can both participate in all of the aspects of the hydrologic cycle and

  2. Instrumentation for multi-detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Bhowmik

    2001-07-01

    The new generation of detector arrays require complex instrumentation and data acquisition system to ensure increased reliability of operation, high degree of integration, software control and faster data handling capability. The main features of some of the existing multi-detector arrays like MSU 4 array, Gammasphere and Eurogam are summarized. The instrumentation for the proposed INGA array in India is discussed.

  3. Natural fractionation of uranium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordmann, Janine

    2015-01-24

    The topic of this thesis was the investigation of U (n({sup 238}U) / n({sup 235}U)) isotope variations in nature with a focus on samples (1) that represent the continental crust and its weathering products (i.e. granites, shales and river water) (2) that represent products of hydrothermal alteration on mid-ocean ridges (i.e. altered basalts, carbonate veins and hydrothermal water) and (3) from restricted euxinic basins (i.e. from the water column and respective sediments). The overall goal was to explore the environmental conditions and unravel the mechanisms that fractionate the two most abundant U isotopes, n({sup 238}U) and n({sup 235}U), on Earth.

  4. Lasers utilizing CO2 isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechenin, Iu. V.; Domanov, M. S.

    1980-08-01

    The emission spectra and power characteristics of CW (C-12)(O-16)2, (C-13)(O-16)2, (C-12)(O-16)(O-18)2 and (C-12)(O-18) lasers are investigated. Laser output power is found to depend equally on the proportion of carbon and oxygen isotopes in the active medium for all isotopes except the asymmetrical (C-12)(O-16)(O-18), in which maximum output power is four to five times less due to the doubling of emission lines and limited enrichment caused by recombination into (C-12)(O-16)2 and (C-12)(O-18)2 molecules during discharge. The unsaturated gain is observed to increase linearly with enrichment, with that of nonsymmetrical molecules half that of the symmetrical molecules, while the maximum power output is independent of enrichment.

  5. Interstellar Isotopes: Prospects with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley Steven B.

    2010-01-01

    Cold molecular clouds are natural environments for the enrichment of interstellar molecules in the heavy isotopes of H, C, N and O. Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets, that may trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. Models of the fractionation chemistry of H, C, N and O in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred, make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and the capabilities of ALMA for testing these models (e.g. in observing doubly-substituted isotopologues) will be outlined.

  6. Investigating human geographic origins using dual-isotope (87Sr/86Sr, δ18O) assignment approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnemann, Till F.; Shafie, Termeh; Hofman, Corinne L.; Brandes, Ulrik; Davies, Gareth R.

    2017-01-01

    Substantial progress in the application of multiple isotope analyses has greatly improved the ability to identify nonlocal individuals amongst archaeological populations over the past decades. More recently the development of large scale models of spatial isotopic variation (isoscapes) has contributed to improved geographic assignments of human and animal origins. Persistent challenges remain, however, in the accurate identification of individual geographic origins from skeletal isotope data in studies of human (and animal) migration and provenance. In an attempt to develop and test more standardized and quantitative approaches to geographic assignment of individual origins using isotopic data two methods, combining 87Sr/86Sr and δ18O isoscapes, are examined for the Circum-Caribbean region: 1) an Interval approach using a defined range of fixed isotopic variation per location; and 2) a Likelihood assignment approach using univariate and bivariate probability density functions. These two methods are tested with enamel isotope data from a modern sample of known origin from Caracas, Venezuela and further explored with two archaeological samples of unknown origin recovered from Cuba and Trinidad. The results emphasize both the potential and limitation of the different approaches. Validation tests on the known origin sample exclude most areas of the Circum-Caribbean region and correctly highlight Caracas as a possible place of origin with both approaches. The positive validation results clearly demonstrate the overall efficacy of a dual-isotope approach to geoprovenance. The accuracy and precision of geographic assignments may be further improved by better understanding of the relationships between environmental and biological isotope variation; continued development and refinement of relevant isoscapes; and the eventual incorporation of a broader array of isotope proxy data. PMID:28222163

  7. Copper isotope signatures in modern marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Susan H.; Vance, Derek; McManus, James; Severmann, Silke; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2017-09-01

    The development of metal stable isotopes as tools in paleoceanography requires a thorough understanding of their modern marine cycling. To date, no Cu isotope data has been published for modern sediments deposited under low oxygen conditions. We present data encompassing a broad spectrum of hydrographic and redox regimes, including continental margin and euxinic (sulphide-containing) settings. Taken together with previously published data from oxic settings, these data indicate that the modern oceanic sink for Cu has a surprisingly homogeneous isotopic composition of about +0.3‰ (δ65Cu, relative to NIST SRM976). We suggest that this signature reflects one of two specific water-column processes: (1) an equilibrium isotope fractionation between soluble, isotopically heavy, Cu complexed to strong organic ligands and an isotopically light pool sorbed to particles that deliver Cu to the sediment, or (2) an equilibrium isotope fractionation between the same isotopically heavy ligand-bound pool and the particle reactive free Cu2+ species, with the latter being scavenged by particulates and thereby delivered to the sediment. An output flux of about +0.3‰ into sediments is isotopically light relative to the known inputs to the ocean (at around +0.6‰) and the seawater value of +0.6 to +0.9‰, suggesting the presence of an as yet unidentified isotopically light source of Cu to the oceans. We hypothesize that this source may be hydrothermal, or may result from the partial dissolution of continentally derived particles.

  8. Comparative isotope ecology of African great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelze, Vicky M; Fahy, Geraldine; Hohmann, Gottfried; Robbins, Martha M; Leinert, Vera; Lee, Kevin; Eshuis, Henk; Seiler, Nicole; Wessling, Erin G; Head, Josephine; Boesch, Christophe; Kühl, Hjalmar S

    2016-12-01

    The isotope ecology of great apes is a useful reference for palaeodietary reconstructions in fossil hominins. As extant apes live in C3-dominated habitats, variation in isotope signatures is assumed to be low compared to hominoids exploiting C4-plant resources. However, isotopic differences between sites and between and within individuals are poorly understood due to the lack of vegetation baseline data. In this comparative study, we included all species of free-ranging African great apes (Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, Gorilla sp.). First, we explore differences in isotope baselines across different habitats and whether isotopic signatures in apes can be related to feeding niches (faunivory and folivory). Secondly, we illustrate how stable isotopic variations within African ape populations compare to other extant and extinct primates and discuss possible implications for dietary flexibility. Using 701 carbon and nitrogen isotope data points resulting from 148 sectioned hair samples and an additional collection of 189 fruit samples, we compare six different great ape sites. We investigate the relationship between vegetation baselines and climatic variables, and subsequently correct great ape isotope data to a standardized plant baseline from the respective sites. We obtained temporal isotopic profiles of individual animals by sectioning hair along its growth trajectory. Isotopic signatures of great apes differed between sites, mainly as vegetation isotope baselines were correlated with site-specific climatic conditions. We show that controlling for plant isotopic characteristics at a given site is essential for faunal data interpretation. While accounting for plant baseline effects, we found distinct isotopic profiles for each great ape population. Based on evidence from habituated groups and sympatric great ape species, these differences could possibly be related to faunivory and folivory. Dietary flexibility in apes varied, but temporal variation was overall

  9. Retrieval of Mir Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    1999-01-01

    A Russian solar array panel removed in November 1997 from the non-articulating photovoltaic array on the Mir core module was returned to Earth on STS-89 in January 1998. The panel had been exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) for 10 years prior to retrieval. The retrieval provided a unique opportunity to study the effects of the LEO environment on a functional solar array. To take advantage of this opportunity, a team composed of members from RSC-Energia (Russia), the Boeing Company, and the following NASA Centers--Johnson Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Lewis Research Center--was put together to analyze the array. After post-retrieval inspections at the Spacehab Facility at Kennedy in Florida, the array was shipped to Lewis in Cleveland for electrical performance tests, closeup photodocumentation, and removal of selected solar cells and blanket material. With approval from RSC-Energia, five cell pairs and their accompanying blanket and mesh material, and samples of painted handrail materials were selected for removal on the basis of their ability to provide degradation information. Sites were selected that provided different sizes and shapes of micrometeoroid impacts and different levels of surface contamination. These materials were then distributed among the team for round robin testing.

  10. Modeling of phased array transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rais; Kundu, Tribikram; Placko, Dominique

    2005-04-01

    Phased array transducers are multi-element transducers, where different elements are activated with different time delays. The advantage of these transducers is that no mechanical movement of the transducer is needed to scan an object. Focusing and beam steering is obtained simply by adjusting the time delay. In this paper the DPSM (distributed point source method) is used to model the ultrasonic field generated by a phased array transducer and to study the interaction effect when two phased array transducers are placed in a homogeneous fluid. Earlier investigations modeled the acoustic field for conventional transducers where all transducer points are excited simultaneously. In this research, combining the concepts of delayed firing and the DPSM, the phased array transducers are modeled semi-analytically. In addition to the single transducer modeling the ultrasonic fields from two phased array transducers placed face to face in a fluid medium is also modeled to study the interaction effect. The importance of considering the interaction effect in multiple transducer modeling is discussed, pointing out that neighboring transducers not only act as ultrasonic wave generators but also as scatterers.

  11. Wavenumber response of Shanghai Seismic Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Seismic array can be traced back to 1950s when it mainly aimed at detecting and distinguishing the signals of nuclear explosion and seismic signals. The research on seismic array includes seismic array techniques and applications of array in geophysics. Array techniques involve array design and data processing methods (Anne, 1990). Nowadays, the continuous development of seismic array¢s theory could relate to many scientific issues in geophysical field (Tormod, 1989; Mykkeltveit, Bungum, 1984). Seismic array is mainly applied to detect weak events. The response characteristic of array is an important indication of array¢s detection ability. Therefore, when we study an array or construct an array, one of the neces-sary works is to calculate the response characteristics of the array (Harjes, 1990). The aperture and layout of array are two dominating geometrical features. The typical aperture of interna-tional array is generally from several to tens kilometers. For instance, arrays with aperture of dozens kilometers aperture are KSA, WRA, YKA, etc, while arrays with several kilometer aperture are ARC, FIN, GEE, etc. Moreo-ver, in the view of array¢s layout, NOR, GER, etc have circle layout, while WRA, YKA, etc have decussating layout. This paper mainly discusses the relation between deployment of array and wavenumber response. With the example of constructing Shanghai Seismic Array, this paper provides one practical solution to search the proper array deployment. In this paper, the simple delay beam technique is adopted to calculate the response characteris-tics of array. Certainly, the different processing methods have different result, but the result from the simple delay beam processing could be enough to reflect the feature of an array.

  12. Mathematical Simulating Model of Phased-Array Antenna in Multifunction Array Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A mathematical simulating model of phased-array antenna in multifunction array radar has been approached in this paper, including the mathematical simulating model of plane phased-array pattern, the mathematical simulating model of directionality factor, the mathematical simulating model of array factor, the mathematical simulating model of array element factor and the mathematical simulating model of beam steering.

  13. Lifetimes in neutron-rich Nd isotopes measured by Doppler profile method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I.; Lister, C.J.; Morss, L.R. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Lifetimes of the rotational levels in neutron-rich even-even Nd isotopes were deduced from the analysis of the Doppler broadened line shapes. The experiment was performed at Daresbury with the Eurogam array, which at that time consisted of 45 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and 5 Low-Energy Photon Spectrometers. The source was in the form of a 7-mm pellet which was prepared by mixing 5-mg; {sup 248}Cm and 65-mg KCl and pressing it under high pressure. Events for which three or more detectors fired were used to construct a cubic data array whose axes represented the {gamma}-ray energies and the contents of each channel the number of events with that particular combination of {gamma}-ray energies. From this cubic array, one-dimensional spectra were generated by placing gates on peaks on the other two axes. Gamma-ray spectra of even-even Nd isotopes were obtained by gating on the transitions in the complimentary Kr fragments. The gamma peaks de-exciting states with I {>=} 12 h were found to be broader than the instrumental line width due to the Doppler effect. The line shapes of they-ray peaks were fitted separately with a simple model for the feeding of the states and assuming a rotational band with constant intrinsic quadruple moment and these are shown in Fig. I-27. The quadrupole moments thus determined were found to be in good agreement with the quadrupole moments measured previously for lower spin states. Because of the success of this technique for the Nd isotopes, we intend to apply this technique to the new larger data set collected with the Eurogam II array. The results of this study were published.

  14. A novel methodology to investigate isotopic biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B. Y.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2012-04-01

    An enduring goal of trace metal isotopic studies of Earth History is to find isotopic 'fingerprints' of life or of life's individual physiochemical processes. Generally, such signatures are sought by relating an isotopic effect observed in controlled laboratory conditions or a well-characterized environment to a more complex system or the geological record. However, such an approach is ultimately limited because life exerts numerous isotopic fractionations on any one element so it is hard to dissect the resultant net fractionation into its individual components. Further, different organisms, often with the same apparent cellular function, can express different isotopic fractionation factors. We have used a novel method to investigate the isotopic fractionation associated with a single physiological process-enzyme specific isotopic fractionation. We selected Cd isotopes since only one biological use of Cd is known, CdCA (a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase from the coastal diatom T. Weissflogii). Thus, our investigation can also inform the long standing mystery as to why this generally toxic element appears to have a nutrient-like dissolved isotopic and concentration profile in the oceans. We used the pET-15b plasmid to insert the CdCA gene into the E. coli genome. There is no known biochemical function for Cd in E. coli, making it an ideal vector for studying distinct physiological processes within a single organism. The uptake of Cd and associated isotopic fractionation was determined for both normal cells and those expressing CdCA. It was found that whole cells always exhibited a preference for the light isotopes of Cd, regardless of the expression of CdCA; adsorption of Cd to cell surfaces was not seen to cause isotopic fractionation. However, the cleaning procedure employed exerted a strong control on the observed isotopic composition of cells. Using existing protein purification techniques, we measured the Cd isotopic composition of different subcellular fractions of E

  15. Thin, Flexible IMM Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    NASA needs solar arrays that are thin, flexible, and highly efficient; package compactly for launch; and deploy into large, structurally stable high-power generators. Inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) solar cells can enable these arrays, but integration of this thin crystalline cell technology presents certain challenges. The Thin Hybrid Interconnected Solar Array (THINS) technology allows robust and reliable integration of IMM cells into a flexible blanket comprising standardized modules engineered for easy production. The modules support the IMM cell by using multifunctional materials for structural stability, shielding, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) stress relief, and integrated thermal and electrical functions. The design approach includes total encapsulation, which benefits high voltage as well as electrostatic performance.

  16. 10-kilowatt Photovoltaic Concentrator Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, R.L.; Broadbent, S.

    1978-05-01

    Martin Marietta has designed a Photovoltaic Concentrator Array (PCA) for Sandia Laboratories, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico. The PCA is based on the use of an acrylic Fresnel lens to concentrate sunlight on high intensity solar cells. The objective of the development was to obtain economical photovoltaic power generation by replacing relatively high priced solar cells with low cost lenses. Consequently, a major task of the program was to optimize the design for minimum cost per unit power output. Major design aspects considered for optimization were the concentration ratio, size and shape of the Fresnel lens, array size and shape, structure minimization, tracking and control and the practical aspects of operation and maintenance. In addition to design of the complete array, several porototype photovoltaic concentrator module subassemblies were fabricated and delivered to Sandia for evaluation. These prototypes exceed the 9.0% efficiency requirement established for this program.

  17. Optical phased-array ladar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Juan; Sanchez-Rubio, Antonio; Hatch, Robert; Payson, Harold

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate a ladar with 0.5 m class range resolution obtained by integrating a continuous-wave optical phased-array transmitter with a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode receiver array. In contrast with conventional ladar systems, an array of continuous-wave sources is used to effectively pulse illuminate a target by electro-optically steering far-field fringes. From the reference frame of a point in the far field, a steered fringe appears as a pulse. Range information is thus obtained by measuring the arrival time of a pulse return from a target to a receiver pixel. This ladar system offers a number of benefits, including broad spectral coverage, high efficiency, small size, power scalability, and versatility.

  18. Coherent magnetic semiconductor nanodot arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Faxian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In searching appropriate candidates of magnetic semiconductors compatible with mainstream Si technology for future spintronic devices, extensive attention has been focused on Mn-doped Ge magnetic semiconductors. Up to now, lack of reliable methods to obtain high-quality MnGe nanostructures with a desired shape and a good controllability has been a barrier to make these materials practically applicable for spintronic devices. Here, we report, for the first time, an innovative growth approach to produce self-assembled and coherent magnetic MnGe nanodot arrays with an excellent reproducibility. Magnetotransport experiments reveal that the nanodot arrays possess giant magneto-resistance associated with geometrical effects. The discovery of the MnGe nanodot arrays paves the way towards next-generation high-density magnetic memories and spintronic devices with low-power dissipation.

  19. A new method of snowmelt sampling for water stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, D.; Ahmad, M.; Birks, S. J.; Bouchaou, L.; Brencic, M.; Butt, S.; Holko, L.; Jeelani, G.; Martinez, D. E.; Melikadze, G.; Shanley, J.B.; Sokratov, S. A.; Stadnyk, T.; Sugimoto, A.; Vreca, P.

    2014-01-01

    We modified a passive capillary sampler (PCS) to collect snowmelt water for isotopic analysis. Past applications of PCSs have been to sample soil water, but the novel aspect of this study was the placement of the PCSs at the ground-snowpack interface to collect snowmelt. We deployed arrays of PCSs at 11 sites in ten partner countries on five continents representing a range of climate and snow cover worldwide. The PCS reliably collected snowmelt at all sites and caused negligible evaporative fractionation effects in the samples. PCS is low-cost, easy to install, and collects a representative integrated snowmelt sample throughout the melt season or at the melt event scale. Unlike snow cores, the PCS collects the water that would actually infiltrate the soil; thus, its isotopic composition is appropriate to use for tracing snowmelt water through the hydrologic cycle. The purpose of this Briefing is to show the potential advantages of PCSs and recommend guidelines for constructing and installing them based on our preliminary results from two snowmelt seasons.

  20. Modelling of multifrequency IRMPD for laser isotope separation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akshaya K Nayak; Sisir K Sarkar

    2002-12-01

    The process of infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) of molecules is of great fundamental importance and has practical significance, such as isotope separation etc. Unfortunately, a clear insight into the process has been hindered by the bewildering array of important variables affecting MPD. The dissociation probability () i.e. the yield has been found to be a sensitive function of laser fluence along with numerous other parameters like laser frequency, gas pressure etc. We have shown that in single frequency IRMPD, an accurate quantitative characterization of the dissociation probability can be adequately expressed by a `power law’ model with two fitting parameters namely critical fluence, and multiphoton order, . This model was exploited in analysing our MPD results on various systems. However, the small isotope shift encountered in heavy elements and the sticking phenomenon observed in small light molecules restrict respectively the separation factor and the dissociation yield. These problems can effectively be tackled by irradiation with multifrequency laser beams which can be chosen appropriately on the basis of spectroscopic features. Based on our success in single frequency model, multifrequency IRMPD is modelled by a functional form containing the product of power law terms for individual fluences on irradiation frequencies. This model is successfully benchmarked with our experimental results on multifrequency LIS of tritium. Such knowledge can be utilized for appropriate separation process design, evaluation and optimization.

  1. Measurement of picosecond lifetimes in neutron-rich Xe isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, S.; Kröll, Th.; Régis, J.-M.; Saed-Samii, N.; Blanc, A.; Bruce, A. M.; Fraile, L. M.; de France, G.; Hartig, A.-L.; Henrich, C.; Ignatov, A.; Jentschel, M.; Jolie, J.; Korten, W.; Köster, U.; Lalkovski, S.; Lozeva, R.; Mach, H.; Mǎrginean, N.; Mutti, P.; Paziy, V.; Regan, P. H.; Simpson, G. S.; Soldner, T.; Thürauf, M.; Ur, C. A.; Urban, W.; Warr, N.

    2016-09-01

    Background: Lifetimes of nuclear excited states in fission fragments have been studied in the past following isotope separation, thus giving access mainly to the fragments' daughters and only to long-lived isomeric states in the primary fragments. For the first time now, short-lived excited states in the primary fragments, produced in neutron-induced prompt fission of 235U and 241Pu, were studied within the EXILL&FATIMA campaign at the intense neutron-beam facility of the Institute Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. Purpose: We aim to investigate the quadrupole collective properties of neutron-rich even-even 138,140,142Xe isotopes lying between the double shell closure N =82 and Z =50 and a deformed region with octupole collectivity. Method: The γ rays emitted from the excited fragments were detected with a mixed array consisting of 8 HPGe EXOGAM Clover detectors (EXILL) and 16 LaBr3(Ce) fast scintillators (FATIMA). The detector system has the unique ability to select the interesting fragment making use of the high resolution of the HPGe detectors and determine subnanosecond lifetimes using the fast scintillators. For the analysis the generalized centroid difference method was used. Results: We show that quadrupole collectivity increases smoothly with increasing neutron number above the closed N =82 neutron shell. Our measurements are complemented by state-of-the-art theory calculations based on shell-model descriptions. Conclusions: The observed smooth increase in quadrupole collectivity is similar to the evolution seen in the measured masses of the xenon isotopic chain and is well reproduced by theory. This behavior is in contrast to higher Z even-even nuclei where abrupt change in deformation occurs around N =90 .

  2. Pb isotopes during mingling and melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Lesher, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    Pb isotopic data are presented for hybrid rocks formed by mingling between mantle-derived tholeiitic magma of the Eocene Miki Fjord macrodike (East Greenland) and melt derived from the adjacent Precambrian basement. Bulk mixing and AFC processes between end-members readily identified in the field...... fail to model the Pb isotope systematics. Selective contamination during diffusional exchange, which can explain the complex Sr and Nd isotope compositions of the hybrid rocks (Blichert-Toft et al., 1992), cannot fully account for the variability of the Pb isotopic data using the identified crustal end......-members. The crustal anatectic end-member, although similar in Sr and Nd isotope composition, has a markedly different Pb isotopic composition than its source gneiss. The differences are consistent with preferential incorporation of radiogenic Pb from accessory phases such as metamict zircon or loosely-bound Pb from...

  3. Measuring In Vivo Ureagenesis With Stable Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudkoff, Marc; Mew, Nicholas Ah; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Horyn, Oksana; Nissim, Ilana; Nissim, Itzhak; Payan, Irma; Tuchman, Mendel

    2010-01-01

    Stable isotopes have been an invaluable adjunct to biomedical research for more than 70 years. Indeed, the isotopic approach has revolutionized our understanding of metabolism, revealing it to be an intensely dynamic process characterized by an unending cycle of synthesis and degradation. Isotopic studies have taught us that the urea cycle is intrinsic to such dynamism, since it affords a capacious mechanism by which to eliminate waste nitrogen when rates of protein degradation (or dietary protein intake) are especially high. Isotopes have enabled an appreciation of the degree to which ureagenesis is compromised in patients with urea cycle defects. Indeed, isotopic studies of urea cycle flux correlate well with the severity of cognitive impairment in these patients. Finally, the use of isotopes affords an ideal tool with which to gauge the efficacy of therapeutic interventions to augment residual flux through the cycle. PMID:20338795

  4. Isotope Geochemistry for Comparative Planetology of Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandt, K. E.; Atreya, S.; Luspay-Kuti, A.; Mousis, O.; Simon, A.; Hofstadter, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    Isotope geochemistry has played a critical role in understanding processes at work in and the history of solar system bodies. Application of these techniques to exoplanets would be revolutionary and would allow comparative planetology with the formation and evolution of exoplanet systems. The roadmap for comparative planetology of the origins and workings of exoplanets involves isotopic geochemistry efforts in three areas: (1) technology development to expand observations of the isotopic composition of solar system bodies and expand observations to isotopic composition of exoplanet atmospheres; (2) theoretical modeling of how isotopes fractionate and the role they play in evolution of exoplanetary systems, atmospheres, surfaces and interiors; and (3) laboratory studies to constrain isotopic fractionation due to processes at work throughout the solar system.

  5. Stable Oxygen-18 and Deuterium Isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sascha

    The application of stable Oxygen-18 (18O) and Deuterium (2H) isotopes, as a tracer for fluxes between different compartments of the water cycle was subject of the present PhD-thesis. During a three year period, temporal data from a wide range of water cycle constituents was collected from...... the Skjern River catchment, Denmark. The presented applications focused on studying the isotopic 'input signal' to the hydrosphere in the form of precipitation, the isotopic 'output signal' with its related dynamic processes at a coastal saltwater-freshwater interface (groundwater isotopes) and the temporal...... development within a given lowland headwater catchment (stream water isotopes). Based on our investigations on the precipitation isotopic composition a local meteoric water line (LMWL) was constructed and expressed as: δ2H=7.4 δ18O + 5.36‰. Moreover, we showed that under maritime temperature climate influence...

  6. READOUT SYSTEM FOR ARRAYS OF FRISCH-RING CDZNTE DETECTORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CUI, Y.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CAMARDA, G.S.; DE GERONIMO, G.; O' CONNOR, P.; JAMES, R.B.; KARGAR, A.; HARRISON, M.J.; MCGREGOR, D.S.

    2006-10-29

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution for identifying isotopes, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. We will fabricate and test at Brookhaven National Laboratory an integrated module of a 64-element array of 6 x 6 x 12 mm{sup 3} Frisch-ring detectors, coupled with a readout electronics system. It supports 64 readout channels, and includes front-end electronics, signal processing circuit, USB interface and high-voltage power supply. The data-acquisition software is used to process the data stream, which includes amplitude and timing information for each detected event. This paper describes the design and assembly of the detector modules, readout electronics, and a conceptual prototype system. Some test results are also reported.

  7. EHF multifunction phased array antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbach, Klaus

    1986-07-01

    The design of a low cost demonstration EHF multifunction-phased array antenna is described. Both, the radiating elements and the phase-shifter circuits are realized on microstrip substrate material in order to allow photolithographic batch fabrication. Self-encapsulated beam-lead PIN-diodes are employed as the electronic switch elements to avoid expensive hermetic encapsulation of the semiconductors or complete circuits. A space-feed using a horn-radiator to illuminate the array from the front-side is found to be the simplest and most inexpensive feed. The phased array antenna thus operates as a reflect-array, the antenna elements employed in a dual role for the collection of energy from the feed-horn and for the re-radiation of the phase-shifted waves (in transmit-mode). The antenna is divided into modules containing the radiator/phase-shifter plate plus drive- and BITE-circuitry at the back. Both drive- and BITE-components use gate-array integrated circuits especially designed for the purpose. Several bus-systems are used to supply bias and logical data flows to the modules. The beam-steering unit utilizes several signal processors and high-speed discrete adder circuits to combine the pointing, frequency and beam-shape information from the radar system computer with the stored phase-shift codes for the array elements. Since space, weight and power consumption are prime considerations only the most advanced technology is used in the design of both the microwave and the digital/drive circuitry.

  8. Airborne electronically steerable phased array

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of the second stage of a program for the design and development of a phased array capable of simultaneous and separate transmission and reception of radio frequency signals at S-band frequencies. The design goals of this stage were the development of three major areas of interest required for the final prototype model. These areas are the construction and testing of the low-weight, full-scale 128-element array of antenna elements, the development of the RF manifold feed system, and the construction and testing of a working module containing diplexer and transmit and receive circuits.

  9. Versatile Flexible Graphene Multielectrode Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireev, Dmitry; Seyock, Silke; Ernst, Mathis; Maybeck, Vanessa; Wolfrum, Bernhard; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-12-23

    Graphene is a promising material possessing features relevant to bioelectronics applications. Graphene microelectrodes (GMEAs), which are fabricated in a dense array on a flexible polyimide substrate, were investigated in this work for their performance via electrical impedance spectroscopy. Biocompatibility and suitability of the GMEAs for extracellular recordings were tested by measuring electrical activities from acute heart tissue and cardiac muscle cells. The recordings show encouraging signal-to-noise ratios of 65 ± 15 for heart tissue recordings and 20 ± 10 for HL-1 cells. Considering the low noise and excellent robustness of the devices, the sensor arrays are suitable for diverse and biologically relevant applications.

  10. Versatile Flexible Graphene Multielectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Kireev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphene is a promising material possessing features relevant to bioelectronics applications. Graphene microelectrodes (GMEAs, which are fabricated in a dense array on a flexible polyimide substrate, were investigated in this work for their performance via electrical impedance spectroscopy. Biocompatibility and suitability of the GMEAs for extracellular recordings were tested by measuring electrical activities from acute heart tissue and cardiac muscle cells. The recordings show encouraging signal-to-noise ratios of 65 ± 15 for heart tissue recordings and 20 ± 10 for HL-1 cells. Considering the low noise and excellent robustness of the devices, the sensor arrays are suitable for diverse and biologically relevant applications.

  11. Substrate integrated antennas and arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Yu Jian

    2015-01-01

    Substrate Integrated Antennas and Arrays provides a single source for cutting-edge information on substrate integrated circuits (SICs), substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) feeding networks, SIW slot array antennas, SIC traveling-wave antennas, SIW feeding antennas, SIW monopulse antennas, and SIW multibeam antennas. Inspired by the author's extensive research, this comprehensive book:Describes a revolutionary SIC-based antenna technique with the potential to replace existing antenna technologiesExamines theoretical and experimental results connected to electrical and mechanical performanceExp

  12. Highlights from the Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, J. N.

    2016-11-01

    The Telescope Array measures the properties of ultra high energy cosmic ray induced extensive air showers. We do this using a variety of techniques including an array of scintillator detectors to sample the footprint of the air shower when it reaches the Earth's surface and telescopes to measure the fluorescence and Cerenkov light of the air shower. From this we determine the energy spectrum and chemical composition of the primary particles. We also search for sources of cosmic rays and anisotropy. We have found evidence of a possible source of ultra high energy cosmic rays in the northern sky. The experiment and its most recent measurements will be discussed.

  13. Wicking a confined micropillar array

    CERN Document Server

    Texier, Baptiste Darbois; Stoukatch, Serguei; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    This study considers the spreading of a Newtonian and perfectly wetting liquid in a square array of cylindric micropillars confined between two plates. We show experimentally that the dynamics of the contact line follows a Washburn-like law which depends on the characteristics of the micropillar array (height, diameter and pitch). The presence of pillars can either enhanced or slow down the motion of the contact line. A theoretical model based on capillary and viscous forces has been developed in order to rationalize our observations. Finally, the impact of pillars on the volumic flow rate of liquid which is pumped in the microchannel is inspected.

  14. Speckle imaging from an array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riker, Jim F.; Tyler, Glenn A.; Vaughn, Jeff L.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present two analytic theories developed recently to predict the performance of an imaging system composed of a phased array illuminator and a set of receiver subapertures. The receiver need not coincide with the transmitter. The two theories have been documented separately (ref. 1, 2), and the reader can find more details there - the theories present the analytic phased array irradiance on target in the presence of piston errors, and the resulting speckle pattern-induced imaging noise. The principal results presented here are the Signal to Noise Ratios (SNR) for both the radiometric portion of the problem and the speckle imaging portion of the problem.

  15. Phased arrays: inline flow line hub inspection using phased arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, J.G.P.; Chougrani, K.; Rundberg, H.; Oldenziel, G.; Deleye, X.; Martina, Q.

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of the inspection of flow line hubs using the phased array technique was investigated to determine the surface area of the seal area degraded by corrosion. A clean model of the hub was simulated to gain insight into the geometrical echoes and to determine the area covered by the ultr

  16. Design Considerations for Array CGH to OligonucleotideArrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldocchi, R.A.; Glynne, R.J.; Chin, K.; Kowbel, D.; Collins, C.; Mack, D.H.; Gray, J.W.

    2005-03-04

    Background: Representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis has been developed for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms and/or for genome copy number changes. In this process, the intensity of hybridization to oligonucleotides arrays is increased by hybridizing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified representation of reduced genomic complexity. However, hybridization to some oligonucleotides is not sufficiently high to allow precise analysis of that portion of the genome. Methods: In an effort to identify aspects of oligonucleotide hybridization affecting signal intensity, we explored the importance of the PCR product strand to which each oligonucleotide is homologous and the sequence of the array oligonucleotides. We accomplished this by hybridizing multiple PCR-amplified products to oligonucleotide arrays carrying two sense and two antisense 50-mer oligonucleotides for each PCR amplicon. Results: In some cases, hybridization intensity depended more strongly on the PCR amplicon strand (i.e., sense vs. antisense) than on the detection oligonucleotide sequence. In other cases, the oligonucleotide sequence seemed to dominate. Conclusion: Oligonucleotide arrays for analysis of DNA copy number or for single nucleotide polymorphism content should be designed to carry probes to sense and antisense strands of each PCR amplicon to ensure sufficient hybridization and signal intensity.

  17. Normalization of oxygen and hydrogen isotope data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, T.B.

    1988-01-01

    To resolve confusion due to expression of isotopic data from different laboratories on non-corresponding scales, oxygen isotope analyses of all substances can be expressed relative to VSMOW or VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on scales normalized such that the ??18O of SLAP is -55.5% relative to VSMOW. H3+ contribution in hydrogen isotope ratio analysis can be easily determined using two gaseous reference samples that differ greatly in deuterium content. ?? 1988.

  18. Production of radioactive isotopes from stable isotopes, for nuclear medicine; A partir d`isotopes stables, production d`isotopes radioactifs pour la medecine nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdoiseau, M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Office des Rayonnements Ionisants

    1994-12-31

    Around 15 radioactive isotopes only are used for nuclear medicine diagnosis (kinetics or preferential fixation in the body); characteristics of these {gamma} and {beta}-minus emitters are presented: period, energy, production mode (isotopic filiation, fission product separation, cyclotron, reactor); details are given on applications, production mode, properties and consumption of various isotopes: Technetium 99m, Thallium 201, Iodine 123, Indium 111, Gallium 67, Rhenium 186, Erbium 169, Yttrium 90, Iron 59, Chromium 51, Krypton 81m. 1 tab.

  19. Silicon isotopes: from cosmos to benthos

    OpenAIRE

    Chakrabarti, Ramananda

    2015-01-01

    Silicon is the second most abundant element on the Earth and one of the more abundant elements in our Solar System. Variations in the relative abundance of the stable isotopes of Si (Si isotope fractionation) in different natural reservoirs, both terrestrial (surface and deep Earth) as well as extra-terrestrial (e.g. meteorites, lunar samples), are a powerful tracer of present and past processes involving abiotic as well as biotic systems. The versatility of the Si isotope tracer is reflected...

  20. Quantitative microbial ecology through stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungate, Bruce A; Mau, Rebecca L; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J; Liu, Cindy M; McHugh, Theresa A; Marks, Jane C; Morrissey, Ember M; Price, Lance B

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria grow and transform elements at different rates, and as yet, quantifying this variation in the environment is difficult. Determining isotope enrichment with fine taxonomic resolution after exposure to isotope tracers could help, but there are few suitable techniques. We propose a modification to stable isotope probing (SIP) that enables the isotopic composition of DNA from individual bacterial taxa after exposure to isotope tracers to be determined. In our modification, after isopycnic centrifugation, DNA is collected in multiple density fractions, and each fraction is sequenced separately. Taxon-specific density curves are produced for labeled and nonlabeled treatments, from which the shift in density for each individual taxon in response to isotope labeling is calculated. Expressing each taxon's density shift relative to that taxon's density measured without isotope enrichment accounts for the influence of nucleic acid composition on density and isolates the influence of isotope tracer assimilation. The shift in density translates quantitatively to isotopic enrichment. Because this revision to SIP allows quantitative measurements of isotope enrichment, we propose to call it quantitative stable isotope probing (qSIP). We demonstrated qSIP using soil incubations, in which soil bacteria exhibited strong taxonomic variations in (18)O and (13)C composition after exposure to [(18)O]water or [(13)C]glucose. The addition of glucose increased the assimilation of (18)O into DNA from [(18)O]water. However, the increase in (18)O assimilation was greater than expected based on utilization of glucose-derived carbon alone, because the addition of glucose indirectly stimulated bacteria to utilize other substrates for growth. This example illustrates the benefit of a quantitative approach to stable isotope probing.

  1. Scattering lengths of calcium and barium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammalapati, U.; Willmann, L.; Knoop, S. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI), University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); LaserLaB Vrije Universiteit, De Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    We have calculated the s-wave scattering length of all the even isotopes of calcium (Ca) and barium (Ba) in order to investigate the prospect of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). For Ca we have used an accurate molecular potential based on detailed spectroscopic data. Our calculations show that Ca does not provide other isotopes alternative to the recently Bose condensed {sup 40}Ca that suffers strong losses because of a very large scattering length. For Ba we show by using a model potential that the even isotopes cover a broad range of scattering lengths, opening the possibility of BEC for at least one of the isotopes.

  2. The trend of stable isotope separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonekawa, Shigeru [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Kamisaibara, Okayama (Japan). Ningyo Toge Works; Aoki, Eiji; Yato, Yumio

    1994-12-01

    Recently, stable isotopes are used in the field of medical science, nuclear physics, environmental science and agriculture. This report reviews the present status of stable isotope enrichment in ORNL, Urenco, Russia and PNC. Further the utilization method of the stable isotopes in the field of medical science, nuclear power and material science are described, and the application possibility of Laser separation method and Gas Centrifuge method are estimated. There are many overseas actual results of stable isotope separation with Gas Centrifuge method, therefore this method is possible enough in principle. (author).

  3. Copper isotope fractionation by desert shrubs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarrete, Jesica U., E-mail: jnavarrete2@miners.utep.edu [University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Geological Sciences, 500 W. University Ave, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Viveros, Marian; Ellzey, Joanne T. [University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Biological Sciences, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Borrok, David M. [University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Geological Sciences, 500 W. University Ave, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Copper has two naturally occurring stable isotopes of masses 63 and 65 which can undergo mass dependent fractionation during various biotic and abiotic chemical reactions. These interactions and their resulting Cu isotope fractionations can be used to determine the mechanisms involved in the cycling of Cu in natural systems. In this study, Cu isotope changes were investigated at the organismal level in the metal-accumulating desert plant, Prosopis pubescens. Initial results suggest that the lighter Cu isotope was preferentially incorporated into the leaves of the plant, which may suggest that Cu was actively transported via intracellular proteins. The roots and stems show a smaller degree of Cu isotope fractionation and the direction and magnitude of the fractionations was dependent upon the levels of Cu exposure. Based on this and previous work with bacteria and yeast, a trend is emerging that suggests the lighter Cu isotope is preferentially incorporated into biological components, while the heavier Cu isotope tends to become enriched in aqueous solutions. In bacteria, plants and animals, intracellular Cu concentrations are strictly regulated via dozens of enzymes that can bind, transport, and store Cu. Many of these enzymes reduce Cu(II) to Cu(I). These initial results seem to fit into a broader picture of Cu isotope cycling in natural systems where oxidation/reduction reactions are fundamental in controlling the distributions of Cu isotopes.

  4. A High Rigidity Spectrometer for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers, Remco

    2017-01-01

    The High Rigidity Spectrometer (HRS) will be the centerpiece experimental tool of the Facility for Rare-Isotope Beams (FRIB) fast-beam program. The fast-beam program has tremendous discovery potential, enabling experiments with beam intensities of a few ions per second or less through the luminosity afforded by thick targets. The high magnetic rigidity of the HRS (up to 8 Tm) will match the rigidities at which rare-isotope production yields at the FRIB fragment separator are maximum across the entire chart of nuclei and enable experiments with the most neutron-rich nuclei available at FRIB. Gain factors in luminosity of ten or more are achievable compared to running with existing spectrometers, which have a maximum rigidity of 4 Tm, with the highest gains for the most neutron-rich unstable isotopes. To enable a broad spectrum of experiments, the HRS will accommodate different ion-optical modes and provide the flexibility to run in coincidence with a diverse set of other detector systems, such as the Gamma Ray Energy Tracking Array (GRETA) and the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA-LISA). In the presentation, an overview of the scientific opportunities with the HRS and the present layout, based on ion-optical and magnet-feasibility studies, will be given. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office for Nuclear Physics, under Award Number DE-SC0014554.

  5. GRIFFIN's Fast-Timing Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaizola, Bruno; Griffin Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei (GRIFFIN) is the new β-decay spectrometer facility at TRIUMF-ISAC. Consists of an array of 16 large-volume HPGe clover detectors with an unparalleled efficiency of 19% at 1.33 MeV. Its strongest advantage is the versatility of the ancillary detectors that can be coupled to the main array to tag on β particles, neutrons or precisely measure conversion electron spectra. An ancillary array of 8 LaBr3(Ce) detectors for γ-rays and a fast plastic scintillator for β-particles has been optimized for fast-timing experiments with GRIFFIN. The 51 mm x 51 mm cylindrical LaBr3(Ce) crystals are coupled to Hamamatsu R2083 photomultipliers. Timing resolutions as good as FWHM 200 ps and time-walks below +/- 30 ps have been obtained for individual crystals using analog electronics. There is also an ongoing project to develop an active BGO shield for the LaBr3(Ce) crystals. The LaBr3(Ce) array commissioning experiment to measure the 145,146Cs decay to 145,146Ba will test its capabilities over a wide range of lifetimes. Preliminary results on the lifetimes of some of the low-laying states will be presented.

  6. High density arrays of micromirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folta, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Decker, J. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kolman, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lee, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brase, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1999-02-01

    We established and achieved our goal to (1) fabricate and evaluate test structures based on the micromirror design optimized for maskless lithography applications, (2) perform system analysis and code development for the maskless lithography concept, and (3) identify specifications for micromirror arrays (MMAs) for LLNL's adaptive optics (AO) applications and conceptualize new devices.

  7. Gamma-ray array physics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lister, C. J.

    1999-05-25

    In this contribution I am going to discuss the development of large arrays of Compton Suppressed, High Purity Germanium (HpGe) detectors and the physics that has been, that is being, and that will be done with them. These arrays and their science have dominated low-energy nuclear structure research for the last twenty years and will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. John Sharpey Schafer played a visionary role in convincing a skeptical world that the development of these arrays would lead to a path of enlightenment. The extent to which he succeeded can be seen both through the world-wide propagation of ever more sophisticated devices, and through the world-wide propagation of his students. I, personally, would not be working in research if it were not for Johns inspirational leadership. I am eternally grateful to him. Many excellent reviews of array physics have been made in the past which can provide detailed background reading. The review by Paul Nolan, another ex-Sharpey Schafer student, is particularly comprehensive and clear.

  8. The Murchison Widefield Array Correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, S. M.; Crosse, B.; Emrich, D.; Pallot, D.; Wayth, R. B.; Clark, M. A.; Tremblay, S. E.; Arcus, W.; Barnes, D.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Bunton, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; deSouza, L.; Ewell-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Herne, D.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jacobs, D.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kincaid, B. B.; Koenig, R.; Kratzenberg, E.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A.; Pathikulangara, J.; Pindor, B.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Remillard, R. A.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Salah, J. E.; Sault, R. J.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Stevens, J.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Waterson, M.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2015-03-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array is a Square Kilometre Array Precursor. The telescope is located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in Western Australia. The MWA consists of 4 096 dipoles arranged into 128 dual polarisation aperture arrays forming a connected element interferometer that cross-correlates signals from all 256 inputs. A hybrid approach to the correlation task is employed, with some processing stages being performed by bespoke hardware, based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays, and others by Graphics Processing Units housed in general purpose rack mounted servers. The correlation capability required is approximately 8 tera floating point operations per second. The MWA has commenced operations and the correlator is generating 8.3 TB day-1 of correlation products, that are subsequently transferred 700 km from the MRO to Perth (WA) in real-time for storage and offline processing. In this paper, we outline the correlator design, signal path, and processing elements and present the data format for the internal and external interfaces.

  9. BOLOMETRIC ARRAYS FOR MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Castillo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During last years, semiconductor bolometers using thin lms have been developed at INAOE, speci cally boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon lms. The characteristics shown by these devices made them attractive to be used in astronomical instrumentation, mainly in two-dimentional arrays. These detector arrays used at the Large Millimeter Telescope will make possible to obtain astronomical images in millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. With this in mind, we are developing a method to produce, with enough reliability, bolometer arrays at INAOE. Until now, silicon nitride diaphragm arrays, useful as radiation absorbers, have succesfully been obtained. Sizes going from one to four millimeter by element in a consistent way; however we have not tested thermometers and metallic contact deposition yet. At the same time, we are working on two possible con gurations for the readout electronics; one of them using commercial components while the other will be an integrated circuit speci cally designed for this application. Both versions will work below 77K.

  10. Directivity of basic linear arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Henning

    1970-01-01

    For a linear uniform array ofnelements, an expression is derived for the directivity as a function of the spacing and the phase constants. The cases of isotropic elements, collinear short dipoles, and parallel short dipoles are included. The formula obtained is discussed in some detail and contour...

  11. TANGO Array. 1. The instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauleo, P. E-mail: pablo.bauleo@colostate.edu; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.; Reguera, A

    2004-01-11

    TANGO Array is an air shower experiment which has been constructed in Buenos Aires, Argentina. It was commissioned during the year 2000 becoming fully operational in September, 2000. The array consists of four water Cherenkov detectors enclosing a geometrical area of {approx}30,000 m{sup 2} and its design has been optimized for the observation of Extended Air Showers produced by cosmic rays near the 'knee' energy region {approx}4x10{sup 15} eV. Three of the detectors have been constructed using 12,000-l stainless-steel tanks, and the fourth has been mounted in a smaller, 400-l plastic container. The detectors are connected by cables to the data acquisition room, where a very simple system, which takes advantage of the features of a four-channel digital oscilloscope, was set for data collection. This data collection setup allows a fully automatic experiment control which does not require operator intervention. It includes monitoring, data logging, and daily calibration of all detectors. This paper describes the detectors and their associated electronics, and details are given on the data acquisition system, the triggering and calibration procedures, and the operation of the array. Examples of air shower traces, recorded by the array, are presented.

  12. TANGO Array.. 1. The instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.; Reguera, A.

    2004-01-01

    TANGO Array is an air shower experiment which has been constructed in Buenos Aires, Argentina. It was commissioned during the year 2000 becoming fully operational in September, 2000. The array consists of four water Cherenkov detectors enclosing a geometrical area of ˜30,000 m2 and its design has been optimized for the observation of Extended Air Showers produced by cosmic rays near the "knee" energy region ˜4×10 15 eV. Three of the detectors have been constructed using 12,000-l stainless-steel tanks, and the fourth has been mounted in a smaller, 400-l plastic container. The detectors are connected by cables to the data acquisition room, where a very simple system, which takes advantage of the features of a four-channel digital oscilloscope, was set for data collection. This data collection setup allows a fully automatic experiment control which does not require operator intervention. It includes monitoring, data logging, and daily calibration of all detectors. This paper describes the detectors and their associated electronics, and details are given on the data acquisition system, the triggering and calibration procedures, and the operation of the array. Examples of air shower traces, recorded by the array, are presented.

  13. Light weight digital array SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, M.; Maas, N.; Bolt, R.; Anitori, L.

    2010-01-01

    A light weight SAR has been designed, suitable for short range tactical UAVs, consisting of a fully digital receive array, and a very compact active transmit antenna. The weight of the complete RF front is expected to be below 3 kg, with a power consumption below 30 W. This X-band system can provide

  14. Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouk, Thomas E; Redwing, Joan M

    2009-11-10

    This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

  15. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  16. Stable isotope paleoaltimetry and the evolution of landscapes and life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing topography of our planet not only advances our knowledge of the geodynamic processes that shape the Earth's surface; equally important it adds a key element towards understanding long-term continental moisture transport, atmospheric circulation and the distribution of biomes and biodiversity. Stable isotope paleoaltimetry exploits systematic decreases in the oxygen (δ18O) or hydrogen (δD) isotopic composition of precipitation along a mountain front when the interaction of topography and advected moist air masses induces orographic precipitation. These changes in δ18O or δD can be recovered from the geologic record and recent geochemical and modeling advances allow a broad range of proxy materials to be evaluated. Over the last 10 yr stable isotope paleoaltimetry has witnessed rapidly expanding research activities and has produced a broad array of fascinating tectonic and geomorphologic studies many of which have concentrated on determining the elevation history of continental plateau regions. These single-site studies have greatly expanded what used to be very sparse global paleoaltimetric data. The challenge now lies in disentangling the surface uplift component from the impact of climate change on δ18O and δD in precipitation. The robustness of stable isotope paleoaltimetry can be enhanced when high-elevation δ18O or δD data are referenced against low-elevation sites that track climate-modulated sea level δ18O or δD of precipitation through time (' δ- δ approach'). Analysis of central Andean paleosols documents that differences in δ18O of soil carbonate between the Subandean foreland and the Bolivian Altiplano are small between 11 and 7 Ma but rise rapidly to ca. 2.9‰ after 7 Ma, corroborating the magnitude of late Miocene change in δ18O on the Altiplano. Future advances in stable isotope paleoaltimetry will greatly benefit from addressing four key challenges: (1) Identifying topographically-induced changes in atmospheric

  17. Study of stacked microstrip phased arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, M. J.; Smolders, A. B.

    1993-06-01

    Two theoretical methods for studying stacked-patch microstrip phased arrays are compared: (1) the element-by-element approach (finite array approach) of Pozar (1986) and Smolders (1992); and (2) the infinite approach of Pozar and Shaubert (1984) and Liu et al. (1988). Both theories were found to give almost the same results for a 7 x 7 stacked microstrip antenna, except for edge array elements and for large scan angles. Edge array elements could only be analyzed properly by using a finite array approach. Coupling measurements were made on a 7 x 7 array with a single patch layer, and the results agreed well with calculations.

  18. Advanced Rainbow Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, Nick; Shields, Virgil

    2003-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays of the rainbow type, equipped with light-concentrator and spectral-beam-splitter optics, have been investigated in a continuing effort to develop lightweight, high-efficiency solar electric power sources. This investigation has contributed to a revival of the concept of the rainbow photovoltaic array, which originated in the 1950s but proved unrealistic at that time because the selection of solar photovoltaic cells was too limited. Advances in the art of photovoltaic cells since that time have rendered the concept more realistic, thereby prompting the present development effort. A rainbow photovoltaic array comprises side-by-side strings of series-connected photovoltaic cells. The cells in each string have the same bandgap, which differs from the bandgaps of the other strings. Hence, each string operates most efficiently in a unique wavelength band determined by its bandgap. To obtain maximum energy-conversion efficiency and to minimize the size and weight of the array for a given sunlight input aperture, the sunlight incident on the aperture is concentrated, then spectrally dispersed onto the photovoltaic array plane, whereon each string of cells is positioned to intercept the light in its wavelength band of most efficient operation. The number of cells in each string is chosen so that the output potentials of all the strings are the same; this makes it possible to connect the strings together in parallel to maximize the output current of the array. According to the original rainbow photovoltaic concept, the concentrated sunlight was to be split into multiple beams by use of an array of dichroic filters designed so that each beam would contain light in one of the desired wavelength bands. The concept has since been modified to provide for dispersion of the spectrum by use of adjacent prisms. A proposal for an advanced version calls for a unitary concentrator/ spectral-beam-splitter optic in the form of a parabolic curved Fresnel-like prism

  19. CO Isotopes in Planetary Nebulae

    OpenAIRE

    Balser, Dana S.; McMullin, Joseph P.; Wilson, T. L.

    2002-01-01

    Standard stellar evolution theory is inconsistent with the observed isotopic carbon ratio, 12C/13C, in evolved stars. This theory is also inconsistent with the 3He/H abundance ratios observed in Galactic HII regions, when combined with chemical evolution theory. These discrepancies have been attributed to an extra, non-standard mixing which further processes material during the RGB and should lower both the 12C/13C and 3He/H abundance ratios for stars with masses < 2 solar masses. Measurement...

  20. Compilation of Radiogenic Isotope Data in Mexico and their Petrogenetic Implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ignacio S Torres-Alvarado; Surendra P Verma1; Gerardo Carrasco-Nunez

    2000-03-01

    Seven hundred and twenty-five Sr, two hundred and forty-three Nd and one hundred and fifty-one Pb isotopic ratios from seven different Mexican magmatic provinces were compiled in an extensive geochemical database. Data were arranged according to the Mexican geological provinces, indicating for each province total number of analyses, range and mean of values and two times standard deviation (2). Data from seven provinces were included in the database: Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO), Baja California (BC), Pacific Ocean (PacOc), Altiplano (AP), Sierra Madre del Sur (SMS), and Sierra Madre Oriental (SMOr). Isotopic values from upper mantle and lower crustal xenoliths, basement outcrops and sediments from the Cocos Plate were also compiled. In the MVB the isotopic ratios range as follows: 87Sr/86Sr 0.703003-0.70841; 143Nd/144Nd 0.512496-0.513098; 206Pb/204Pb 18.567-19.580; 207Pb/204Pb 15.466-15.647; 208Pb/204Pb 38.065-38.632. The SMO shows a large variation in 87Sr/86Sr ranging from ~ 0.7033 to 0.71387. 143Nd/144Nd ratios are relatively less variable with values from 0.51191 to 0.51286. Pb isotope ratios in the SMO are as follows: 206Pb/204Pb 18.060-18.860; 207Pb/204Pb 15.558- 15.636; 208Pb/204Pb 37.945-38.625. PacOc rocks show the most depleted Sr and Nd isotopic ratios (0.70232-0.70567 for Sr and 0.512631-0.513261 for Nd). Pb isotopes for PacOc show the following range: 206Pb/204Pb 18.049-19.910; 207Pb/204Pb 15.425-15.734; 208Pb/204Pb 37.449-39.404. The isotopic ratios of the AP rocks seem to be within the range of those from the PacOc. Most samples with reported Sr and Nd isotopic data are spread within and around the ``mantle array''. The SMO seems to have been formed by a mixing process between mantle derived magmas and continental crust. The MVB appears to have a larger mantle component, with AFC as the dominant petrogenetic process for the evolved rocks. There is still a need for Pb isotopic data in all Mexican magmatic provinces andof

  1. Exploring the isotopic niche: isotopic variance, physiological incorporation, and the temporal dynamics of foraging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Douglas Yeakel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumer foraging behaviors are dynamic, changing in response to prey availability, seasonality, competition, and even the consumer's physiological state. The isotopic composition of a consumer is a product of these factors as well as the isotopic `landscape' of its prey, i.e. the isotopic mixing space. Stable isotope mixing models are used to back-calculate the most likely proportional contribution of a set of prey to a consumer's diet based on their respective isotopic distributions, however they are disconnected from ecological process. Here we build a mechanistic framework that links the ecological and physiological processes of an individual consumer to the isotopic distribution that describes its diet, and ultimately to the isotopic composition of its own tissues, defined as its `isotopic niche’. By coupling these processes, we systematically investigate under what conditions the isotopic niche of a consumer changes as a function of both the geometric properties of its mixing space and foraging strategies that may be static or dynamic over time. Results of our derivations reveal general insight into the conditions impacting isotopic niche width as a function of consumer specialization on prey, as well as the consumer's ability to transition between diets over time. We show analytically that moderate specialization on isotopically unique prey can serve to maximize a consumer's isotopic niche width, while temporally dynamic diets will tend to result in peak isotopic variance during dietary transitions. We demonstrate the relevance of our theoretical findings by examining a marine system composed of nine invertebrate species commonly consumed by sea otters. In general, our analytical framework highlights the complex interplay of mixing space geometry and consumer dietary behavior in driving expansion and contraction of the isotopic niche. Because this approach is established on ecological mechanism, it is well-suited for enhancing the

  2. Silicon isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Paul S.; Georg, R. Bastian; Williams, Helen M.; Burton, Kevin W.; Halliday, Alex N.

    2011-10-01

    The Si isotopic composition of Earth's mantle is thought to be homogeneous (δ 30Si = -0.29 ± 0.08‰, 2 s.d.) and not greatly affected by partial melting and recycling. Previous analyses of evolved igneous material indicate that such rocks are isotopically heavy relative to the mantle. To understand this variation, it is necessary to investigate the degree of Si isotopic fractionation that takes place during magmatic differentiation. Here we report Si isotopic compositions of lavas from Hekla volcano, Iceland, which has formed in a region devoid of old, geochemically diverse crust. We show that Si isotopic composition varies linearly as a function of silica content, with more differentiated rocks possessing heavier isotopic compositions. Data for samples from the Afar Rift Zone, as well as various igneous USGS standards are collinear with the Hekla trend, providing evidence of a fundamental relationship between magmatic differentiation and Si isotopes. The effect of fractionation has been tested by studying cumulates from the Skaergaard Complex, which show that olivine and pyroxene are isotopically light, and plagioclase heavy, relative to the Si isotopic composition of the Earth's mantle. Therefore, Si isotopes can be utilised to model the competing effects of mafic and felsic mineral fractionation in evolving silicate liquids and cumulates. At an average SiO 2 content of ˜60 wt.%, the predicted δ 30Si value of the continental crust that should result from magmatic fractionation alone is -0.23 ± 0.05‰ (2 s.e.), barely heavier than the mantle. This is, at most, a maximum estimate, as this does not take into account weathered material whose formation drives the products toward lighter δ 30Si values. Mass balance calculations suggest that removal of continental crust of this composition from the upper mantle will not affect the Si isotopic composition of the mantle.

  3. Molybdenum mobility and isotopic fractionation during subduction at the Mariana arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymuth, Heye; Vils, Flurin; Willbold, Matthias; Taylor, Rex N.; Elliott, Tim

    2015-12-01

    The fate of crustal material recycled into the convecting mantle by plate tectonics is important for understanding the chemical and physical evolution of the planet. Marked isotopic variability of Mo at the Earth's surface offers the promise of providing distinctive signatures of such recycled material. However, characterisation of the behaviour of Mo during subduction is needed to assess the potential of Mo isotope ratios as tracers for global geochemical cycles. Here we present Mo isotope data for input and output components of the archetypical Mariana arc: Mariana arc lavas, sediments from ODP Sites 800, 801 and 802 near the Mariana trench and the altered mafic, oceanic crust (AOC), from ODP Site 801, together with samples of the deeper oceanic crust from ODP Site 1256. We also report new high precision Pb isotope data for the Mariana arc lavas and a dataset of Pb isotope ratios from sediments from ODP Sites 800, 801 and 802. The Mariana arc lavas are enriched in Mo compared to elements of similar incompatibility during upper mantle melting, and have distinct, isotopically heavy Mo (high 98Mo/95Mo) relative to the upper mantle, by up to 0.3 parts per thousand. In contrast, the various subducting sediment lithologies dominantly host isotopically light Mo. Coupled Pb and Mo enrichment in the Mariana arc lavas suggests a common source for these elements and we further use Pb isotopes to identify the origin of the isotopically heavy Mo. We infer that an aqueous fluid component with elevated [Mo], [Pb], high 98Mo/95Mo and unradiogenic Pb is derived from the subducting, mafic oceanic crust. Although the top few hundred metres of the subducting, mafic crust have a high 98Mo/95Mo, as a result of seawater alteration, tightly defined Pb isotope arrays of the Mariana arc lavas extrapolate to a fluid component akin to fresh Pacific mid-ocean ridge basalts. This argues against a flux dominantly derived from the highly altered, uppermost mafic crust or indeed from an Indian

  4. Stable isotope utilization methodology; Methodologie de l`emploi des isotopes stables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, E. [Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), 75 - Paris (France)

    1994-12-31

    The various applications of stable isotope utilization are reviewed, as a function of their specific properties: poly-isotopic abundance modification is used for tracer applications; the accurate measurement of the stable isotope abundance may be applied to isotopic dilution for ultra-trace measurement, physical constant determination, fluid volume and concentration measurement; isotopic effects, such as reaction equilibrium differences are used for separation and identification of molecule active centers (pharmacology, paleoclimatology, hydrogeological studies) while reaction rate differences (competitive and non competitive methods) are used for the study of reaction mechanisms, such as enzymatic reactions. Analysis techniques (mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, optical methods) are reviewed. 2 figs., 18 refs.

  5. ISOTOPES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    1 A New Therapeutic Agent for Radiation Synovectomy: Preparation of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA Bai Hongsheng Jin Xiaohai Du Jin Wang Fan Chen Daming Fan Hongqiang Cheng Zhen In order to treat the patient with inflammatory synovial disease, HA particle is labeled with 166Ho by EDTMP under the condition of pH6.0-8.0 and vibration time 15 min, its labeling efficiency is more than 98%, the size of particle is mainly in the range of 2-5 μm. The absorbed capacity is 5 mg Ho per 1g HA. Study on stability of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA in vitro shows that loss of 166Ho is less than 2% for166Ho-EDTMP-HA incubated 72 h in the 0.9% saline and 1% BSA solution at 37 ℃ .Biodistribution in vivo and extra articular leakage are investigated following injection of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA into knee of normal rabbits. The experimental results show that the extra leakage of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA is 0.32% at 48 h post-injection, most of 166Ho radioactivity leaked from the knee joint is excreted in the urine. 99% of 166Ho radioactivity is retained in the knee joint of rabbits. Thereby 166Ho-EDTMP-HA, as a new therapeutical agent of radiation synovectomy, had a value of further clinical study.

  6. The isotopic dipole moment of HDO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assafrao, Denise; Mohallem, Jose R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, CP 702, 30123-970, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2007-03-14

    An adiabatic variational approximation is used to study the monodeuterated water molecule, HDO, accounting for the isotopic effect. The isotopic dipole moment, pointing from D to H, is then calculated for the first time, yielding (1.5 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup -3} Debye, being helpful in the interpretation of experiments. (fast track communication)

  7. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  8. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-28

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ(26)Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ(26)Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  9. Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chastagner, P.

    2001-08-01

    This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

  10. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the pharmacok

  11. Isotopic niches support the resource breadth hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Jonathan A.; Newsome, Seth D.; Sabat, Pablo; Chesser, R. Terry; Dillon, Michael E.; Martinez del Rio, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Because a broad spectrum of resource use allows species to persist in a wide range of habitat types, and thus permits them to occupy large geographical areas, and because broadly distributed species have access to more diverse resource bases, the resource breadth hypothesis posits that the diversity of resources used by organisms should be positively related with the extent of their geographic ranges.We investigated isotopic niche width in a small radiation of South American birds in the genus Cinclodes. We analysed feathers of 12 species of Cinclodes to test the isotopic version of the resource breadth hypothesis and to examine the correlation between isotopic niche breadth and morphology.We found a positive correlation between the widths of hydrogen and oxygen isotopic niches (which estimate breadth of elevational range) and widths of the carbon and nitrogen isotopic niches (which estimates the diversity of resources consumed, and hence of habitats used). We also found a positive correlation between broad isotopic niches and wing morphology.Our study not only supports the resource breadth hypothesis but it also highlights the usefulness of stable isotope analyses as tools in the exploration of ecological niches. It is an example of a macroecological application of stable isotopes. It also illustrates the importance of scientific collections in ecological studies.

  12. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the

  13. Atomic lithium vapor laser isotope separation

    CERN Document Server

    Olivares, I E

    2002-01-01

    An atomic vapor laser isotope separation in lithium was performed using tunable diode lasers. The method permits also the separation of the isotopes between the sup 6 LiD sub 2 and the sup 7 LiD sub 1 lines using a self-made mass separator which includes a magnetic sector and an ion beam designed for lithium. (Author)

  14. Isotope Program Report June FY2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Jr, Benjamin E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Egle, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Isotope Program Monthly Highlights are briefly described. These include data on isotopes shipped, updates on equipment fabrication and testing, a potential new approach for nondestructive measurement of the amount of Cf-252 deposited on a surface, and efforts to recover and purify uranium-234 obtained from old PuBe sources.

  15. Shell Evolution in the Neutron-Rich Cu and Zn Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belarge, Joe; Bazin, Daniel; Gade, Alexandra; Ayyad, Yassid; Bender, Peter; Elder, Robert; Elman, Brandon; Iwasaki, Hiro; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Loelius, Charles; Longfellow, Brenden; Lunderberg, Eric; Morfouace, Pierre; Sullivan, Chris; Weisshaar, Dirk; Whitmore, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Recent shell model calculations predict a gradual reduction of the Z=28 shell gap in Ni isotopes as the ν 1g9 / 2 orbital is filled from 68Ni to 78Ni [Otsuka et al. PRL 95, 232502]. These predictions can be experimentally tested by measuring the spectroscopic strength of a given orbital in an isotopic chain. The neutron-rich Cu isotopes, with one proton outside of a filled π 1f7 / 2 orbital, are some of the best candidates to exhibit the effects of the underlying structure evolution in this region. The high luminosity provided by fast beam, thick target experiments performed at the NSCL, coupled with the high resolution, high efficiency gamma-ray array GRETINA, provide a unique opportunity to study the neutron-rich Cu isotopes. The current experiment aims to measure the strength of 2p-1h excitations in 69-77Cu, populated through one proton knockout from 70-78Zn beams on a Be target, thereby probing the effective single particle energy and spectroscopic strength of the π 1f7 / 2 orbital. Results from the ongoing analysis will be presented.

  16. Large Format Uncooled Focal Plane Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Uncooled focal plane arrays have improved dramatically and array sizes of 320x240 elements in a 50-?m pitch are commercially available at affordable cost. Black...

  17. NRAO Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) comprises ten radio telescopes spanning 5,351 miles. It's the world's largest, sharpest, dedicated telescope array. With an eye...

  18. Low Cost Phased Array Antenna System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JEM Engineering proved the technical feasibility of the FlexScan array?a very low-cost, highly-efficient, wideband phased array antenna?in Phase I, and stands ready...

  19. Calibration of the MoNA and LISA Arrays for the LISA Commissioning Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grovom, A.; Kwiatkowski, J.; Rogers, W. F.; MoNA Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The new LISA (the Large-area multi-Institutional Scintillator Array) neutron detector array, designed to be used in conjunction with MoNA (Modular Neutron Array) at the NSCL was recently commissioned in an experiment designed to investigate excited states of neutron-rich Oxygen isotopes near the neutron drip-line. In order for the trajectories of neutrons arising from decay to be determined with sufficient precision to allow reconstruction of the invariant mass of the decaying system, all 288 scintillator bars must be precisely position-calibrated and time-synchronized to within a few tenths of a nanosecond, and the time origin for neutron time-of-flight determination must coincide precisely with the secondary beam particle/target interaction. The former was accomplished using cosmic muons passing through the array, and the latter using detection of gamma-rays produced at the target in each of the 18 layers of the MoNA-LISA array. Several Root C++ macros were developed in order to produce these calibrations. Results for the LISA commissioning run experiment will be presented. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1101745.

  20. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C.J. [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the full text or extended abstracts of papers number 61- to number 114

  1. Defect Characterization Using Two-Dimensional Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    2D arrays are able to `view' a given defect from a range of angles leading to the possibility of obtaining richer characterization detail than possible with 1D arrays. In this paper a quantitative comparison of 2D arrays with different element layouts is performed. A technique for extracting the scattering matrix of a defect from the raw 2D array data is also presented. The method is tested on experimental data for characterization of various volumetric defects.

  2. Leakage analysis of crossbar memristor arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2014-07-01

    Crossbar memristor arrays provide a promising high density alternative for the current memory and storage technologies. These arrays suffer from parasitic current components that significantly increase the power consumption, and could ruin the readout operation. In this work we study the trade-off between the crossbar array density and the power consumption required for its readout. Our analysis is based on simulating full memristor arrays on a SPICE platform.

  3. Simulations of astronomical imaging phased arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saklatvala, George; Withington, Stafford; Hobson, Michael P

    2008-04-01

    We describe a theoretical procedure for analyzing astronomical phased arrays with overlapping beams and apply the procedure to simulate a simple example. We demonstrate the effect of overlapping beams on the number of degrees of freedom of the array and on the ability of the array to recover a source. We show that the best images are obtained using overlapping beams, contrary to common practice, and show how the dynamic range of a phased array directly affects the image quality.

  4. Manus Water Isotope Investigation Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Jessica L [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Cobb, Kim M [Georgia Institute of Technology; Noone, David [University of Colorado, Boulder

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this field campaign was to investigate climatic controls on the stable isotopic composition of water vapor, precipitation, and seawater in the western tropical Pacific. Simultaneous measurements of the stable isotopic composition of vapor and precipitation from April 28 to May 8, 2013, at the Manus Tropical Western Pacific Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site, provided several key insights into the nature of the climate signal archived in precipitation and vapor isotope ratios. We observed a large shift from lower to higher isotopic values in vapor and precipitation because of the passage of a mesoscale convective system west of the site and a transition from a regional stormy period into a more quiescent period. During the quiescent period, the stable isotopic composition of vapor and precipitation indicated the predominance of oceanic evaporation in determining the isotopic composition of boundary-layer vapor and local precipitation. There was not a consistent relationship between intra-event precipitation amount at the site and the stable isotopic composition of precipitation, thus challenging simplified assumptions about the isotopic “amount effect” in the tropics on the time scale of individual storms. However, some storms did show an amount effect, and deuterium excess values in precipitation had a significant relationship with several meteorological variables, including precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and cloud base height across all measured storms. The direction of these relationships points to condensation controls on precipitation deuterium excess values on intra-event time scales. The relationship between simultaneous measurements of vapor and precipitation isotope ratios during precipitation events indicates the ratio of precipitation-to-vapor isotope ratios can diagnose precipitation originating from a vapor source unique from boundary-layer vapor and rain re-evaporation.

  5. Kronecker Product of Two-dimensional Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Hu

    2006-01-01

    Kronecker sequences constructed from short sequences are good sequences for spread spectrum communication systems. In this paper we study a similar problem for two-dimensional arrays, and we determine the linear complexity of the Kronecker product of two arrays. Our result shows that similar good property on linear complexity holds for Kronecker product of arrays.

  6. Maximum gain of Yagi-Uda arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, J.H.; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans; Nilsson, E.

    1971-01-01

    Numerical optimisation techniques have been used to find the maximum gain of some specific parasitic arrays. The gain of an array of infinitely thin, equispaced dipoles loaded with arbitrary reactances has been optimised. The results show that standard travelling-wave design methods are not optimum....... Yagi–Uda arrays with equal and unequal spacing have also been optimised with experimental verification....

  7. Subwavelength micropillar array terahertz lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Michael; Brandstetter, Martin; Deutsch, Christoph; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried; Unterrainer, Karl

    2014-01-13

    We report on micropillar-based terahertz lasers with active pillars that are much smaller than the emission wavelength. These micropillar array lasers correspond to scaled-down band-edge photonic crystal lasers forming an active photonic metamaterial. In contrast to photonic crystal lasers which use significantly larger pillar structures, lasing emission is not observed close to high-symmetry points in the photonic band diagram, but in the effective medium regime. We measure stimulated emission at 4 THz for micropillar array lasers with pillar diameters of 5 µm. Our results not only demonstrate the integration of active subwavelength optics in a terahertz laser, but are also an important step towards the realization of nanowire-based terahertz lasers.

  8. Antenna Arrays and Automotive Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rabinovich, Victor

    2013-01-01

    This book throws a lifeline to designers wading through mounds of antenna array patents looking for the most suitable systems for their projects. Drastically reducing the research time required to locate solutions to the latest challenges in automotive communications, it sorts and systematizes material on cutting-edge antenna arrays that feature multi-element communication systems with enormous potential for the automotive industry. These new systems promise to make driving safer and more efficient, opening up myriad applications, including vehicle-to-vehicle traffic that prevents collisions, automatic toll collection, vehicle location and fine-tuning for cruise control systems. This book’s exhaustive coverage begins with currently deployed systems, frequency ranges and key parameters. It proceeds to examine system geometry, analog and digital beam steering technology (including "smart" beams formed in noisy environments), maximizing signal-to-noise ratios, miniaturization, and base station technology that ...

  9. Recent Results from Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, M

    2015-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) is an experiment to observe Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). TA's recent results, the energy spectrum and anisotropy based on the 6-year surface array data, and the primary composition obtained from the shower maximum Xmax are reported. The spectrum demonstrates a clear dip and cutoff. The shape of the spectrum is well described by the energy loss of extra-galactic protons interacting with the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Above the cutoff, a medium-scale (20 degrees radius) flux enhancement was observed near the Ursa-Major. A chance probability of creating this hotspot from the isotropic flux is 4.0 sigma. The measured Xmax is consistent with the primary being proton or light nuclei for energies 10^18.2 eV - 10^19.2 eV.

  10. Sandia concentrator array testing experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwin, H. J.; Rogers, C. B.; Beavis, L. C.

    An assortment of PV concentrator modules and arrays have been tested and evaluated at the Sandia outdoor test facility. These test items include actively-cooled parabolic reflector and linear Fresnel lens concentrators, and actively- and passively-cooled point focus collectors. Maximum power efficiencies were measured over a range of sunlight intensities and cell temperatures, then a linear equation relating efficiency to cell temperature and insolation was developed for each module and array by using a multiple linear regression analysis technique on the data. An evaluation of the suitability of Polyvinyl-Butyral (PVB) as a material used to laminate solar cells to glass is presented. Some general observations are made on the accuracy of tracking systems, and the maintenance of these systems.

  11. Invasive tightly coupled processor arrays

    CERN Document Server

    LARI, VAHID

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces new massively parallel computer (MPSoC) architectures called invasive tightly coupled processor arrays. It proposes strategies, architecture designs, and programming interfaces for invasive TCPAs that allow invading and subsequently executing loop programs with strict requirements or guarantees of non-functional execution qualities such as performance, power consumption, and reliability. For the first time, such a configurable processor array architecture consisting of locally interconnected VLIW processing elements can be claimed by programs, either in full or in part, using the principle of invasive computing. Invasive TCPAs provide unprecedented energy efficiency for the parallel execution of nested loop programs by avoiding any global memory access such as GPUs and may even support loops with complex dependencies such as loop-carried dependencies that are not amenable to parallel execution on GPUs. For this purpose, the book proposes different invasion strategies for claiming a desire...

  12. Highlights from the Telescope Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Telescope Array measures the properties of ultra high energy cosmic ray induced extensive air showers. We do this using a variety of techniques including an array of scintillator detectors to sample the footprint of the air shower when it reaches the Earth’s surface and telescopes to measure the fluorescence and Cerenkov light of the air shower. From this we determine the energy spectrum and chemical composition of the primary particles. We also search for sources of cosmic rays and anisotropy. We have found evidence of a possible source of ultra high energy cosmic rays in the northern sky. The experiment and its most recent measurements will be discussed.

  13. High voltage load resistor array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, Monty Ray [Smithfield, VA

    2005-01-18

    A high voltage resistor comprising an array of a plurality of parallel electrically connected resistor elements each containing a resistive solution, attached at each end thereof to an end plate, and about the circumference of each of the end plates, a corona reduction ring. Each of the resistor elements comprises an insulating tube having an electrode inserted into each end thereof and held in position by one or more hose clamps about the outer periphery of the insulating tube. According to a preferred embodiment, the electrode is fabricated from stainless steel and has a mushroom shape at one end, that inserted into the tube, and a flat end for engagement with the end plates that provides connection of the resistor array and with a load.

  14. A Systolic Array RLS Processor

    OpenAIRE

    Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the outline of the systolic array recursive least-squares (RLS) processor prototyped primarily with the aim of broadband mobile communication applications. To execute the RLS algorithm effectively, this processor uses an orthogonal triangularization technique known in matrix algebra as QR decomposition for parallel pipelined processing. The processor board comprises 19 application-specific integrated circuit chips, each with approximately one million gates. Thirty-two bit ...

  15. Micromirror Arrays for Adaptive Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, E.J.

    2000-08-07

    The long-range goal of this project is to develop the optical and mechanical design of a micromirror array for adaptive optics that will meet the following criteria: flat mirror surface ({lambda}/20), high fill factor (> 95%), large stroke (5-10 {micro}m), and pixel size {approx}-200 {micro}m. This will be accomplished by optimizing the mirror surface and actuators independently and then combining them using bonding technologies that are currently being developed.

  16. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Phased Array Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, J. N.; Croxford, A. J.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2014-10-01

    This Letter reports a technique for the imaging of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrasting the energy of the diffuse field produced through the focusing of an ultrasonic array by delayed parallel element transmission with that produced by postprocessing of sequential transmission data, acoustic nonlinearity local to the focal point is measured. Spatially isolated wave distortion is inferred without requiring interrogation of the wave at the inspection point, thereby allowing nonlinear imaging through depth.

  17. Nonlinear ultrasonic phased array imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Potter, J N; Croxford, A.J.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    This Letter reports a technique for the imaging of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrasting the energy of the diffuse field produced through the focusing of an ultrasonic array by delayed parallel element transmission with that produced by postprocessing of sequential transmission data, acoustic nonlinearity local to the focal point is measured. Spatially isolated wave distortion is inferred without requiring interrogation of the wave at the inspection point, thereby allowing nonlinear imaging t...

  18. Array Imaging of Noisy Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    The ultimate limit on ultrasonic defect detectability is the coherent noise due to material backscatter. A model of such noise in ultrasonic array images is developed based on the single scattering assumption. The implications of the model are discussed and supported with some experimental examples. In the case of a copper specimen, it is shown that an improvement in signal to coherent noise ratio of over 30 dB can be obtained by optimization of imaging parameters.

  19. Nonlinear ultrasonic phased array imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, J N; Croxford, A J; Wilcox, P D

    2014-10-03

    This Letter reports a technique for the imaging of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrasting the energy of the diffuse field produced through the focusing of an ultrasonic array by delayed parallel element transmission with that produced by postprocessing of sequential transmission data, acoustic nonlinearity local to the focal point is measured. Spatially isolated wave distortion is inferred without requiring interrogation of the wave at the inspection point, thereby allowing nonlinear imaging through depth.

  20. Array-based photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autrey, S. Thomas; Posakony, Gerald J.; Chen, Yu

    2005-03-22

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. A photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array including a body having at least three recesses or affinity masses connected thereto is used in conjunction with a photoacoustic spectroscopy system. At least one acoustic detector is positioned near the recesses or affinity masses for detection of acoustic waves emitted from species of interest within the recesses or affinity masses.

  1. Automated array assembly. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.F.

    1977-05-01

    The goal of the ERDA/JPL LSSA program of $0.50/W selling price for array modules in 1986 turns out to have been remarkably appropriate. An extensive and detailed analysis of technologies which could be related to array module manufacturing was completed and a minimum manufacturing cost in a highly automated line of $0.30/W was found assuming the silicon is free. The panels are of a double glass construction and are based on round wafers. Screen printed silver has been used as the metallization with a spray-coated AR layer. The least expensive junction formation technology appears to be ion implantation; however, several other technologies also may be used with very little cost penalty as described. Based on the required investment, a profit of $0.05/W appears reasonable. If silicon wafers are available at a price of $20 to 40/M/sup 2/, a selling price for these array modules of $0.50 to 0.66/W is projected. An analysis of the impact of factory size has been made. For a production level of 500 MW/yr, the price above is derived. For comparison, a factory processing 50 MW/yr using the same technology would sell modules for $0.54/W to $0.70/W. An analysis of the impact of wafer size indicates that with traditional metallization and panel designs there is no advantage in increasing wafer size from 3 in. to 5 in., and, in fact, there is some penalty (10% in $/W) due to increasedmetallization costs and reduced system performance. There is a premium placed on high efficiency due to its impact, not only on array module cost, but on system cost. For the near term goals of this program, wafers cut from single-crystal material seem the most likely sheet configuration.

  2. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project are to 1) make a direct detection of gravitational waves, 2) improve the solar system planetary ephemeris and 3) develop a pulsar-based time scale. In this article we describe the project, explain how the data are collected and processed and describe current research. Our current data sets are able to place an upper bound on the gravitational wave background that is the most stringent to date.

  3. A distributed array antenna system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, R.; Kovitz, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station communication system will use microwave frequency radio links to carry digitized information from sender to receiver. The ability of the antenna system to meet stringent requirements on coverage zones, multiple users, and reliability will play an important part in the overall multiple access communication system. This paper will describe the configuration of a multibeam conformal phased array antenna and the individual microwave integrated components incoporated into this antenna system.

  4. Lead Isotopes in Highway Runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, M.; Lau, S.; Green, P. G.; Stenstrom, M. K.

    2011-12-01

    Lead (Pb) isotopes have been used extensively to study the provenance of lead pollution on air, water, and sediments. In this study, we measured Pb isotopes and Pb aqueous concentration in highway runoff in three west Los Angeles sites. Those three sites, part of a long-term study sponsored by the California Department of Transportation, represent small catchment areas, and host heavy traffic. In addition, there were no inputs of sand or salt to the highway because the sites are almost completely impervious and also due to the lack of snow to be controlled. Highway runoff from the three sites was collected for 7 storms during the 2004-2005 Winter. Grab samples were collected every 15 minutes during the first hour, and hourly afterwards. A total of 202 samples were collected and filtered into five size fractions (100μm). Aqueous concentration of Pb range from 0.08μg/L to 46.95μg/L (7.98±10.89μg/L) and it is not correlated with any of the lead isotope ratios. The 208Pb/206Pb ratio ranges from 1.983 to 2.075 (2.024±0.026) and there is no statistical difference for the mean value of the 208Pb/206Pb ratio for the four particulate size fractions (0.45-8μm, 8-20μm, 20-100μm, >100μm). However, the 208Pb/206Pb ratio of nearby soils yield 2.060±0.021 and it is statistically different from the ratios obtained for the highway runoff. This hints that the lead present in highway runoff does not come from local soils. The 207Pb/206Pb ratio ranges from 0.804 to 0.847 (0.827±0.011) and there is no statistical difference for the mean value of the 207Pb/206Pb ratio for the four particulate size fractions (0.45-8μm, 8-20μm, 20-100μm, >100μm). Surprisingly, there is also no statistical difference with the 207Pb/206Pb ratio of nearby soils (0.833±0.009).

  5. Final report of the key comparison CCQM-K98: Pb isotope amount ratios in bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Jochen; Yim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Kyoung-Seok; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi; Malinowskiy, Dmitriy; Ren, Tongxiang; Wang, Jun; Vocke, Robert D., Jr.; Murphy, Karen; Nonose, Naoko; Rienitz, Olaf; Noordmann, Janine; Näykki, Teemu; Sara-Aho, Timo; Ari, Betül; Cankur, Oktay

    2014-01-01

    Isotope amount ratios are proving useful in an ever increasing array of applications that range from studies unravelling transport processes, to pinpointing the provenance of specific samples as well as trace element quantification by using isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). These expanding applications encompass fields as diverse as archaeology, food chemistry, forensic science, geochemistry, medicine and metrology. However, to be effective tools, the isotope ratio data must be reliable and traceable to enable the comparability of measurement results. The importance of traceability and comparability in isotope ratio analysis has already been recognized by the Inorganic Analysis Working Group (IAWG) within the CCQM. While the requirements for isotope ratio accuracy and precision in the case of IDMS are generally quite modest, 'absolute' Pb isotope ratio measurements for geochemical applications as well as forensic provenance studies require Pb isotope ratio measurements of the highest quality. To support present and future CMCs on isotope ratio determinations, a key comparison was urgently needed and therefore initiated at the IAWG meeting in Paris in April 2011. The analytical task within such a comparison was decided to be the measurement of Pb isotope amount ratios in water and bronze. Measuring Pb isotope amount ratios in an aqueous Pb solution tested the ability of analysts to correct for any instrumental effects on the measured ratios, while the measurement of Pb isotope amount ratios in a metal matrix sample provided a real world test of the whole chemical and instrumental procedure. A suitable bronze material with a Pb mass fraction between 10 and 100 mg•kg-1 and a high purity solution of Pb with a mass fraction of approximately 100 mg•kg-1 was available at the pilot laboratory (BAM), both offering a natural-like Pb isotopic composition. The mandatory measurands, the isotope amount ratios n(206Pb)/n(204Pb), n(207Pb)/n(204Pb) and n(208Pb)/n(204Pb

  6. A novel method to design sparse linear arrays for ultrasonic phased array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Chen, Bin; Shi, Ke-Ren

    2006-12-22

    In ultrasonic phased array testing, a sparse array can increase the resolution by enlarging the aperture without adding system complexity. Designing a sparse array involves choosing the best or a better configuration from a large number of candidate arrays. We firstly designed sparse arrays by using a genetic algorithm, but found that the arrays have poor performance and poor consistency. So, a method based on the Minimum Redundancy Linear Array was then adopted. Some elements are determined by the minimum-redundancy array firstly in order to ensure spatial resolution and then a genetic algorithm is used to optimize the remaining elements. Sparse arrays designed by this method have much better performance and consistency compared to the arrays designed only by a genetic algorithm. Both simulation and experiment confirm the effectiveness.

  7. Measured Aperture-Array Noise Temperature of the Mark II Phased Array Feed for ASKAP

    CERN Document Server

    Chippendale, A P; Beresford, R J; Hampson, G A; Shaw, R D; Hayman, D B; Macleod, A; Forsyth, A R; Hay, S G; Leach, M; Cantrall, C; Brothers, M L; Hotan, A W

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the aperture-array noise temperature of the first Mk. II phased array feed that CSIRO has built for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. As an aperture array, the Mk. II phased array feed achieves a beam equivalent noise temperature less than 40 K from 0.78 GHz to 1.7 GHz and less than 50 K from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz for a boresight beam directed at the zenith. We believe these are the lowest reported noise temperatures over these frequency ranges for ambient-temperature phased arrays. The measured noise temperature includes receiver electronics noise, ohmic losses in the array, and stray radiation from sidelobes illuminating the sky and ground away from the desired field of view. This phased array feed was designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array.

  8. Measurement of isotope abundance variations in nature by gravimetric spiking isotope dilution analysis (GS-IDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Gina; Walczyk, Thomas

    2013-04-02

    Subtle variations in the isotopic composition of elements carry unique information about physical and chemical processes in nature and are now exploited widely in diverse areas of research. Reliable measurement of natural isotope abundance variations is among the biggest challenges in inorganic mass spectrometry as they are highly sensitive to methodological bias. For decades, double spiking of the sample with a mix of two stable isotopes has been considered the reference technique for measuring such variations both by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and multicollector-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS). However, this technique can only be applied to elements having at least four stable isotopes. Here we present a novel approach that requires measurement of three isotope signals only and which is more robust than the conventional double spiking technique. This became possible by gravimetric mixing of the sample with an isotopic spike in different proportions and by applying principles of isotope dilution for data analysis (GS-IDA). The potential and principle use of the technique is demonstrated for Mg in human urine using MC-TIMS for isotopic analysis. Mg is an element inaccessible to double spiking methods as it consists of three stable isotopes only and shows great potential for metabolically induced isotope effects waiting to be explored.

  9. The Colorado Lightning Mapping Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Thomas, R. J.; Rodeheffer, D.; Fuchs, B.

    2012-12-01

    A fifteen station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) was installed in northern Colorado in the spring of 2012. While the driving force for the array was to produce 3-dimensional lightning data to support the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Experiment (Barth, this conference), data from the array are being used for several other projects. These include: electrification studies in conjunction with the CSU CHILL radar (Lang et al, this conference); observations of the parent lightning discharges of sprites (Lyons et al, this conference); trying to detect upward discharges triggered by wind turbines, characterizing conditions in which aircraft flying through clouds produce discharges which can be detected by the LMA, and other opportunities, such as observations of lightning in pyrocumulus clouds produced by the High Park Fire west of Fort Collins, CO. All the COLMA stations are solar-powered, and use broadband cellular modems for data communications. This makes the stations completely self-contained and autonomous, allowing a station to be installed anywhere a cellular signal is available. Because most of the stations were installed well away from anthropogenic noise sources, the COLMA is very sensitive. This is evidenced by the numerous plane tracks detected in its the vicinity. The diameter, D, of the COLMA is about 100 km, significantly larger than other LMAs. Because the error in the radial distance r is proportional to (r/D)2, and the error in the altitude z is proportional to (z/D)2, the larger array diameter greatly expands the usable range of the COLMA. The COLMA is able to detect and characterize lighting flashes to a distance of about 350 km from the array center. In addition to a web-based display (lightning.nmt.edu/colma), geo-referenced images are produced and updated at one-minute intervals. These geo-referenced images can be used to overlay the real-time lightning data on Google Earth and other mapping software. These displays were used by the DC3

  10. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    composition of contemporaneous seawater. Marine carbonates are ubiquitous throughout Earth’s rock record rendering them a particularly interesting archive for constraining past changes in ocean chemistry. This thesis includes an investigation of the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopesduring coprecipitation......Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past...... related to the rise of oxygen and the evolution of the biosphere. However, before the Cr isotopesystem can be applied to faithfully delineate paleo-environmental changes, careful assessment of the signal robustness and a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes is necessary...

  11. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    composition of contemporaneous seawater. Marine carbonates are ubiquitous throughout Earth’s rock record rendering them a particularly interesting archive for constraining past changes in ocean chemistry. This thesis includes an investigation of the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopesduring coprecipitation......Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past...... related to the rise of oxygen and the evolution of the biosphere. However, before the Cr isotopesystem can be applied to faithfully delineate paleo-environmental changes, careful assessment of the signal robustness and a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes is necessary...

  12. Acoustic array systems theory, implementation, and application

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mingsian R; Benesty, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Presents a unified framework of far-field and near-field array techniques for noise source identification and sound field visualization, from theory to application. Acoustic Array Systems: Theory, Implementation, and Application provides an overview of microphone array technology with applications in noise source identification and sound field visualization. In the comprehensive treatment of microphone arrays, the topics covered include an introduction to the theory, far-field and near-field array signal processing algorithms, practical implementations, and common applic

  13. Beam combining of quantum cascade laser arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Benjamin G; Kansky, Jan; Goyal, Anish K; Pflügl, Christian; Diehl, Laurent; Belkin, Mikhail A; Sanchez, Antonio; Capasso, Federico A

    2009-08-31

    Wavelength beam combining was used to co-propagate beams from 28 elements in an array of distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers (DFB-QCLs). The beam-quality product of the array, defined as the product of near-field spot size and far-field divergence for the entire array, was improved by a factor of 21 by using wavelength beam combining. To demonstrate the applicability of wavelength beam combined DFB-QCL arrays for remote sensing, we obtained the absorption spectrum of isopropanol at a distance of 6 m from the laser array.

  14. Silver nanorod arrays for photocathode applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilayurganapathy, Subramanian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States); Nandasiri, Manjula I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States); Joly, Alan G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); El-Khoury, Patrick Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Varga, Tamas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coffey, Greg W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schwenzer, Birgit [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pandey, Archana [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kayani, Asghar N. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States); Hess, Wayne P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-10-16

    In this study, we explore the possibility of using plasmonic Ag nanorod arrays featuring enhanced photoemission as high-brightness photocathode material. Silver nanorod arrays are synthesized by the DC electrodeposition method and their dimensionality, uniformity, crystallinity and oxide/impurity content are characterized. These Ag nanorod arrays exhibit greatly enhanced two-photon photoemission under 400 nm femtosecond pulsed laser excitation. Plasmonic field enhancement in the array produces photoemission hot spots that are mapped using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). The relative photoemission enhancement of nanorod array hot spots relative to that of a flat Ag thin film is found to range between 102 and 3 x 103.

  15. Ultrasonic stair case array for NDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, K.; Tittmann, B. R.; Kropf, M.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we present the results on the design of a unique two-dimensional phased array with low channel applications for imaging defects on a metal surface. First, basic transducer calculations will be shown. Followed by the results of important phased array variables, such as focusing, and angle beam sweeping ability, The final design will be given. Next the computer simulation results will be discussed. These results will indicate the performance of the actual array. The second half of the paper will be devoted to a discussion on the phased array testing results with a demonstration phased array.

  16. Shape evolution at high spin states in Kr and Br isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, T. [Department of Pure and Physics, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya, Bilaspur-495009 (India); Palit, R.; Naik, Z.; Jain, H. C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai-400005 (India); Negi, D.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Pancholi, S. C.; Bhowmik, R. K. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi-110067 (India); Yang, Y.-C.; Sun, Y. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Sheikh, J. A. [Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190 006 (India); Raja, M. K. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam-530003 (India); Kumar, S. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India); Choudhury, D. [Department of Physics, IIT Roorkee, Roorkee-247667 (India); Jain, A. K.; Mehrotra, I. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211001 (India)

    2014-08-14

    The high spin states in A = 75, Kr and Br isotopes have been populated via fusion-evaporation reaction at an incident beam energy of 90 MeV. The de-exciting γ-rays were detected utilizing the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA). Lifetime of these excited high spin states were determined by Doppler-shift attenuation method. Experimental results obtained from lifetime measurement are interpreted in the frame work of projected shell-model to get better insight into the evolution of collectivity. Comparison of the calculations of the model with transitional quadrupole moments Q{sub t} of the positive and negative parity bands firmly established their configurations.

  17. Status report of the Jyvaeskylaeion guide isotope separator on-line facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penttilae, H.; Dendooven, P.; Honkanen, A.; Huhta, M.; Jauho, P.P.; Jokinen, A.; Lhersonneau, G.; Oinonen, M.; Parmonen, J.-M.; Peraejaervi, K.; Aeystoe, J. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    1997-04-01

    The ion guide isotope separator facility IGISOL of the University of Jyvaeskylaehas been moved to the new K-130 heavy ion cyclotron laboratory. The totally reconstructed facility is described in detail. The primary beams and targets, helium pumping, separator beam line construction and separator beam diagnostics are discussed. The spectroscopy stations are introduced with illustrative examples from the research program, including beta-delayed proton and neutron spectroscopy, gamma-ray spectroscopy with and without arrays, conversion electron spectroscopy, collinear laser spectroscopy and nuclear level lifetime spectroscopy. (orig.). 15 refs.

  18. Identification of miRNA targets with stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Jeppe; Hedegaard, Mads Marquardt; Gardner, Paul Phillip

    2006-01-01

    miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression. We have used stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to investigate the effect of miRNA-1 on the HeLa cell proteome. Expression of 12 out of 504 investigated proteins was repressed by miRNA-1 transfection....... This repressed set of genes significantly overlaps with miRNA-1 regulated genes that have been identified with DNA array technology and are predicted by computational methods. Moreover, we find that the 3'-untranslated region for the repressed set are enriched in miRNA-1 complementary sites. Our findings...

  19. Compound specific isotope analysis of organophosphorus pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Langping; Yao, Jun; Trebse, Polonca; Zhang, Ning; Richnow, Hans H

    2014-09-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) has been established as a tool to study the environmental fate of a wide range of contaminants. In this study, CSIA was developed to analyse the stable carbon isotope signatures of the widely used organophosphorus pesticides: dichlorvos, omethoate and dimethoate. The linearity of the GC-C-IRMS system was tested for target pesticides and led to an acceptable isotope composition within the uncertainty of the instrument. In order to assess the accuracy of the developed method, the effect of the evaporation procedure on measured carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) values was studied and showed that concentration by evaporation of solvents had no significant isotope effect. The CSIA was then applied to investigate isotope fractionation of the hydrolysis and photolysis of selected pesticides. The carbon isotope fractionation of tested pesticides was quantified by the Rayleigh model, which revealed a bulk enrichment factor (ε) of -0.2±0.1‰ for hydrolysis of dichlorvos, -1.0±0.1‰ and -3.7±1.1‰ for hydrolysis and photolysis of dimethoate respectively. This study is a first step towards the application of CSIA to trace the transport and degradation of organophosphorus pesticides in the environment.

  20. Stable isotopic characterisation of francolite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, J. M.; Benmore, R. A.; Coleman, M. L.; Soldi, C.; Yeh, H.-W.; O'Brien, G. W.

    1986-02-01

    Stable isotopic data are presented for 112 samples of francolite from 18 separate phosphate deposits. Values of δ 13C and δ 34S in most offshore deposits suggest formation within oxic or suboxic environments either by carbonate replacement or direct precipitation of francolite from water of normal marine compositions. The exceptions are concretionary francolite from Namibia, which has an isotopic composition in keeping with its formation within organic-rich sediments, and that from offshore Morocco, which has an isotopic signature of the anoxic/suboxic interface. Onshore deposits from Jordan, Mexico, South Africa and, possibly, the Permian Phosphoria Formation in the western U.S.A., are substantially depleted in 18O: they appear to be too altered for deductions to be made about their environments of formation. In other onshore deposits which are unaltered, or minimally altered, the isotopic composition suggests that some formed within sulphate-reducing sediments (Sedhura, Morocco) whilst francolite from the Georgina Basin of Australia formed at the oxic/anoxic boundary, where oxidation of biogenic H 2S decreases the δ 34S of pore water. In general, pelletal samples show non-oxic isotopic signatures, whilst non-pelletal samples show oxic isotopic signatures, but samples from Namibia, Peru (Ica Plateau) and the Californian and Moroccan margins are exceptions to this rule. Morphology may therefore be a misleading indicator of francolite genesis as no definitive relation exists between phosphorite type and isotopic signature.

  1. The isotope effect: Prediction, discussion, and discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Kragh, Helge

    2011-01-01

    The precise position of a spectral line emitted by an atomic system depends on the mass of the atomic nucleus and is therefore different for isotopes belonging to the same element. The possible presence of an isotope effect followed from Bohr's atomic theory of 1913, but it took several years before it was confirmed experimentally. Its early history involves the childhood not only of the quantum atom, but also of the concept of isotopy. Bohr's prediction of the isotope effect was apparently at odds with early attempts to distinguish between isotopes by means of their optical spectra. However, in 1920 the effect was discovered in HCl molecules, which gave rise to a fruitful development in molecular spectroscopy. The first detection of an atomic isotope effect was no less important, as it was by this means that the heavy hydrogen isotope deuterium was discovered in 1932. The early development of isotope spectroscopy illustrates the complex relationship between theory and experiment, and is also instructive with...

  2. Si isotope homogeneity of the solar nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pringle, Emily A.; Savage, Paul S.; Moynier, Frédéric [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Jackson, Matthew G. [Department of Earth Science, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93109 (United States); Barrat, Jean-Alix, E-mail: eapringle@wustl.edu, E-mail: savage@levee.wustl.edu, E-mail: pringle@ipgp.fr, E-mail: moynier@ipgp.fr, E-mail: jackson@geol.ucsb.edu, E-mail: Jean-Alix.Barrat@univ-brest.fr [Université Européenne de Bretagne, Université de Brest, CNRS UMR 6538 (Domaines Océaniques), I.U.E.M., Place Nicolas Copernic, F-29280 Plouzané Cedex (France)

    2013-12-20

    The presence or absence of variations in the mass-independent abundances of Si isotopes in bulk meteorites provides important clues concerning the evolution of the early solar system. No Si isotopic anomalies have been found within the level of analytical precision of 15 ppm in {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si across a wide range of inner solar system materials, including terrestrial basalts, chondrites, and achondrites. A possible exception is the angrites, which may exhibit small excesses of {sup 29}Si. However, the general absence of anomalies suggests that primitive meteorites and differentiated planetesimals formed in a reservoir that was isotopically homogenous with respect to Si. Furthermore, the lack of resolvable anomalies in the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion measured here suggests that any nucleosynthetic anomalies in Si isotopes were erased through mixing in the solar nebula prior to the formation of refractory solids. The homogeneity exhibited by Si isotopes may have implications for the distribution of Mg isotopes in the solar nebula. Based on supernova nucleosynthetic yield calculations, the expected magnitude of heavy-isotope overabundance is larger for Si than for Mg, suggesting that any potential Mg heterogeneity, if present, exists below the 15 ppm level.

  3. Coupling Between Waveguide-Fed Slot Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Sembiam

    2011-01-01

    Coupling between two waveguide-fed planar slot arrays has been investigated using full-wave analysis. The analysis employs the method-of-moments solution to the pertinent coupled integral equations for the aperture electric field of all slots. In order to compute coupling between two arrays, the input port of the first array is excited with a TE(sub 10) mode wave while the second one is match-terminated. After solving the moment method matrix equations, the aperture fields of all slots are obtained and thereby the TE(sub 10) mode wave received at the input port of the second array is determined. Coupling between two arrays is the ratio of the wave amplitude arriving in the second array port to the incident wave amplitude at the first array port. The coupling mechanism has been studied as a function of spacing between arrays in different directions, e.g. the electric field plane, the magnetic field plane, and the diagonal plane. Computed coupling values are presented for different array geometries. This work is novel since it provides a good understanding of coupling between waveguide-fed slot arrays as a function of spacing and orientation for different aperture distributions and array architectures. This serves as a useful tool for antenna design engineers and system engineers.

  4. New fabrication and applications of carbohydrate arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gangliang; Chen, Xin; Xiao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate arrays are used as high-throughput screening platforms to study the carbohydrate-mediated recognition events for glycobiology. The polysaccharide arrays are easy to fabricate by non-covalently or covalently immobilizing polysaccharides onto array surfaces because polysaccharides have hydrophobic interactions. Oligosaccharides must be derived and covalently or non-covalently immobilized onto array surfaces to fabricate oligosaccharide arrays because they have hydrophilic interactions. At the moment, carbohydrate arrays are mainly used to study the carbohydrate-protein interactions and carbohydrate-binding lectins or antibodies, which are possible to be applied to clinics and diagnoses. This review mainly summed up the new fabrication strategies of carbohydrate arrays and their applications in recent four years.

  5. Dynamics and function of compact nucleosome arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Michael G; Oh, Eugene; Tims, Hannah S; Widom, Jonathan

    2009-09-01

    The packaging of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin sterically occludes polymerases, recombinases and repair enzymes. How chromatin structure changes to allow their actions is unknown. We constructed defined fluorescently labeled trinucleosome arrays, allowing analysis of chromatin conformational dynamics via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The arrays undergo reversible Mg2+-dependent folding similar to that of longer arrays studied previously. We define two intermediate conformational states in the reversible folding of the nucleosome arrays and characterize the microscopic rate constants. Nucleosome arrays are highly dynamic even when compact, undergoing conformational fluctuations on timescales in the second to microsecond range. Compact states of the arrays allow binding to DNA within the central nucleosome via site exposure. Protein binding can also drive decompaction of the arrays. Thus, our results reveal multiple modes by which spontaneous chromatin fiber dynamics allow for the invasion and action of DNA-processing protein complexes.

  6. Delamination Detection Using Guided Wave Phased Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Yu, Lingyu; Leckey, Cara

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for detecting multiple delaminations in composite laminates using non-contact phased arrays. The phased arrays are implemented with a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV). The array imaging algorithm is performed in the frequency domain where both the guided wave dispersion effect and direction dependent wave properties are considered. By using the non-contact SLDV array with a frequency domain imaging algorithm, an intensity image of the composite plate can be generated for delamination detection. For the proof of concept, a laboratory test is performed using a non-contact phased array to detect two delaminations (created through quasi-static impact test) at different locations in a composite plate. Using the non-contact phased array and frequency domain imaging, the two impact-induced delaminations are successfully detected. This study shows that the non-contact phased array method is a potentially effective method for rapid delamination inspection in large composite structures.

  7. International ultraviolet explorer solar array power degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, J. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristic electrical performance of each International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) solar array panel is evaluated as a function of several prevailing variables (namely, solar illumination, array temperature and solar cell radiation damage). Based on degradation in the current-voltage characteristics of the array due to solar cell damage accumulated over time by space charged particle radiations, the available IUE solar array power is determined for life goals up to 10 years. Best and worst case calculations are normalized to actual IUE flight data (available solar array power versus observatory position) to accurately predict the future IUE solar array output. It is shown that the IUE solar array can continue to produce more power than is required at most observatory positions for at least 5 more years.

  8. Beneficial uses and production of isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Isotopes, radioactive and stable, are used worldwide in various applications related to medical diagnosis or care, industry and scientific research. More than fifty countries have isotope production or separation facilities operated for domestic supply, and sometimes for international markets. This publication provides up-to-date information on the current status of, and trends in, isotope uses and production. It also presents key issues, conclusions and recommendations, which will be of interest to policy makers in governmental bodies, scientists and industrial actors in the field.

  9. Hafnium isotope stratigraphy of ferromanganese crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.-C.; Halliday, A.N.; Hein, J.R.; Burton, K.W.; Christensen, J.N.; Gunther, D.

    1999-01-01

    A Cenozoic record of hafnium isotopic compositions of central Pacific deep water has been obtained from two ferromanganese crusts. The crusts are separated by more than 3000 kilometers but display similar secular variations. Significant fluctuations in hafnium isotopic composition occurred in the Eocene and Oligocene, possibly related to direct advection from the Indian and Atlantic oceans. Hafnium isotopic compositions have remained approximately uniform for the past 20 million years, probably reflecting increased isolation of the central Pacific. The mechanisms responsible for the increase in 87Sr/86Sr in seawater through the Cenozoic apparently had no effect on central Pacific deep-water hafnium.

  10. Isotopic Fractionation of Selenium Oxyanions in Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S. K.; Johnson, T. M.

    2004-05-01

    As oxic surface waters pass through aquatic macrophytes and over anoxic sediments in wetlands and lakes, the dissolved Se load often decreases; and, Se isotope ratio measurements can provide information about the mechanisms involved. Previous work on microbially induced isotopic fractionation of Se oxyanions under nearly natural conditions using wetland sediments shows consistent Se isotopic shifts during reduction of Se(VI) and Se(IV) to insoluble Se(0). However, previous isotopic studies of total dissolved selenium in wetlands found little to no isotopic shift as dissolved selenium concentrations decreased. This suggests that plant/algal uptake, followed by deposition and degradation, is the primary route of Se transfer into sediments. However, it is possible that the effective isotopic fractionation between Se in the surface water and Se deposited into sediments is somehow much less than the fractionation induced by the reduction reaction, or that cycling of organically bound Se is involved. In this study, we report Se isotope data for Se(VI), Se(IV) and total dissolved Se, Se(T), in surface waters from three wetland/lake sites: Sweitzer Lake, CO; 33-Mile Reservoir, WY; and, a small pond adjacent to Benton Lake, MT. We isolated Se(IV) via hydride generation, and Se(VI) via ion exchange. Se(T), including any organic components, was also analyzed. Isotope analysis was performed on an Isoprobe MC-ICPMS, using a method modified from that of Rouxel et al. (2002). We used the 82Se + 74Se double spike approach, and spiked samples before species separation. Our results for all three locations indicate similar trends in concentration changes and isotopic shifts between the inflow and outflow waters. Se(T) concentrations decrease by 45-70%, and Se(VI) concentrations decrease by 60-90%, whereas Se(IV) concentrations increase by 60-150%. Concomitant 80Se/76Se shifts are +0.5-0.8‰ for Se(T); -0.1-0.5‰ for Se(VI); and +0.4-6.5‰ for Se(IV). These data provide greater

  11. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrede C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB is a United States Department of Energy user facility currently under construction on the campus of Michigan State University. Based on a 400 kW, 200 MeV/u heavy-ion driver linac, FRIB will deliver high-quality fast, thermalized, and re-accelerated beams of rare isotopes with unprecedented intensities to a variety of experimental areas and equipment. New science opportunities at the frontiers of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental symmetries, and societal applications will be enabled by this future world-leading rare-isotope beam facility.

  12. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, C.

    2015-05-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a United States Department of Energy user facility currently under construction on the campus of Michigan State University. Based on a 400 kW, 200 MeV/u heavy-ion driver linac, FRIB will deliver high-quality fast, thermalized, and re-accelerated beams of rare isotopes with unprecedented intensities to a variety of experimental areas and equipment. New science opportunities at the frontiers of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental symmetries, and societal applications will be enabled by this future world-leading rare-isotope beam facility.

  13. Isotope effects of hafnium in solvent extraction using crown ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Moriyama, Hirotake [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Hirata, Takafumi [Laboratory for Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Nishizawa, Kazushige [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Hafnium isotopes were fractionated in a liquid-liquid extraction system by using seven types of crown ethers, tributyl phosphate, or {omicron}-diethoxybenzene. The largest isotope effect was observed in the isotope pair of {sup 177}Hf-{sup 179}Hf with dibenzo-24-crown-8; the isotope enrichment factor was observed to be 0.0129{+-}0.0032. (author)

  14. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku, Toyama (Japan); Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  15. Environmental geochemistry of calcium isotopes: Applications of a new stable isotope approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhanmin; LIU Congqiang; HAN Guilin; WANG Zhongliang; XUE Zichen; SONG Zhaoliang; YANG Cheng

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes isotope fractionation mechanism, analytical method and applications in environmental geochemistry of calcium isotopes. Calcium isotopic composition can be used to constrain material sources and study geological and environmental processes as the isotopic composition of calcium (δ 44Ca) and fractionation processes depend on geochemical circumstances in nature. Recently, thanks to current advances in analytical technology of calcium isotopes, calcium isotopes are broadly used in biological and geochemical studies, such as the mechanism of plants imbibing nutrients through their roots, calcium transport in the environmental ecosystem, calcium cycle in oceans and paleo-oceans and paleo-climate. The elementary data show that δ44Ca values vary from -2.88‰ to 0.92‰ in natural samples.

  16. Newtonian kinetic isotope effects. Observation, prediction, and origin of heavy-atom dynamic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kelmara K; Hirschi, Jennifer S; Singleton, Daniel A

    2009-06-24

    Intramolecular (13)C kinetic isotope effects were determined for the dimerization of cyclopentadiene. Substantial isotope effects were observed in three positions, despite the C(2) symmetry of the cycloaddition transition state and the absence of dynamical bottlenecks after this transition state. The observed isotope effects were predicted well from trajectory studies by extrapolating the outcomes of trajectories incorporating superheavy isotopes of carbon, ranging from (20)C to (140)C. Trajectory studies suggest that the isotope effects are unrelated to zero-point energy or the geometrical and momentum properties of the transition state. However, steepest-descent paths in mass-weighted coordinates correctly predict the direction of the isotope effects, supporting a novel origin in Newton's second law of motion.

  17. Short course on St-02 applications of isotope dilutions and isotopic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P.

    1998-01-05

    This short course includes information on these topics and subtopics: (I) Nuclear Properties: (A) Historic roots; (B) Nomenclature; (C) Nuclear Stability and abundance; (D) Uses of isotopic techniques; (II) Instrumentation: (A) Sources; (B) Mass resolving elements; (C) Detectors; (III) Making Isotopic Measurements by ICP-MS: (A) Deadtime Correction; (B) Mass Discrimination; (C) Signal /Noise considerations; (IV) Applications and examples: (A) Isotope dilution; (B) Double Spike; (C) Biological Application; (D) Environmental Application; (E) Geological.

  18. Hf isotope evidence for effective impact melt homogenisation at the Sudbury impact crater, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Gavin G.; Petrus, Joseph A.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Daly, J. Stephen; Kamber, Balz S.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the first zircon hafnium-oxygen isotope and trace element study of a transect through one of the largest terrestrial impact melt sheets. The differentiated melt sheet at the 1.85 Ga, originally ca. 200 km in diameter Sudbury impact crater, Ontario, Canada, yields a tight range of uniform zircon Hf isotope compositions (εHf(1850) of ca. -9 to -12). This is consistent with its well-established crustal origin and indicates differentiation from a single melt that was initially efficiently homogenised. We propose that the heterogeneity in other isotopic systems, such as Pb, in early-emplaced impact melt at Sudbury is associated with volatility-related depletion during the impact cratering process. This depletion leaves the isotopic systems of more volatile elements more susceptible to contamination during post-impact assimilation of country rock, whereas the systems of more refractory elements preserve initial homogeneities. Zircon oxygen isotope compositions in the melt sheet are also restricted in range relative to those in the impacted target rocks. However, they display a marked offset approximately one-third up the melt sheet stratigraphy that is interpreted to be a result of post-impact assimilation of 18O-enirched rocks into the base of the cooling impact melt. Given that impact cratering was a more dominant process in the early history of the inner Solar System than it is today, and the possibility that impact melt sheets were sources of ex situ Hadean zircon grains, these findings may have significance for the interpretation of the early zircon Hf record. We speculate that apparent εHf-time arrays observed in the oldest terrestrial and lunar zircon datasets may be related to impact melting homogenising previously more diverse crust. We also show that spatially restricted partial melting of rocks buried beneath the superheated impact melt at Sudbury provided a zircon crystallising environment distinct to the impact melt sheet itself.

  19. Automated array assembly. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiello, R.V.

    1977-12-01

    Three main sections are included which describe a general technology assessment and manufacturing cost analysis; a near-term (1982) factory design; and the results of an experimental production study for the large-scale production of flat-panel silicon solar-cell arrays. The results of an extensive study and detailed analysis of technologies which could be related to array module manufacturing are presented. From this study, several manufacturing sequences emerge as candidates for satisfying the ERDA/JPL cost goal of $0.50/W selling price in 1986. A minimum manufacturing cost was found in a highly automated line of $0.30/W assuming the silicon is free. The panels are of a double-glass construction and are based on round wafers. Screen-printed silver has been used as the metallization with a spray-coated antireflection (AR) layer. The least expensive junction-formation technology appears to be ion implantation;however, several other technologies also may be used with very little cost penalty as described. An interim 1982 factory is described for the large-scale production of silicon solar-cell array modules. The boundary conditions for this design are the use of Czochralski silicon crystals and $25/kg polycrystalline silicon. The objective is a large-scale production facility to meet an intermediate ERDA cost goal of $2.00/W in 1982. A 6-month experimental production study of the elements of low-cost solar-cell manufacturing sequences is described as an outgrowth of the cost and manufacturing studies. This program consisted of three parts: an experimental production line study of the major variables associated with the fabrication of 3-in.-diameter silicon solar cells; a study of thick-film screen-printed silver metallization; and panel design and assembly development. (WHK)

  20. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J.L. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Térmica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Martel, I. [Dpto de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); CERN, ISOLDE, CH 1211 Geneva, 23 (Switzerland); Jiménez, R. [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Galán, J., E-mail: jgalan@diesia.uhu.es [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Salmerón, P. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Térmica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain)

    2016-09-11

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from {sup 12}C up to {sup 84}Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  1. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J. L.; Martel, I.; Jiménez, R.; Galán, J.; Salmerón, P.

    2016-09-01

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from 12C up to 84Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  2. Multicolor photonic crystal laser array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jeremy B; Brener, Igal; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2015-04-28

    A multicolor photonic crystal laser array comprises pixels of monolithically grown gain sections each with a different emission center wavelength. As an example, two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers comprising broad gain-bandwidth III-nitride multiple quantum well axial heterostructures were fabricated using a novel top-down nanowire fabrication method. Single-mode lasing was obtained in the blue-violet spectral region with 60 nm of tuning (or 16% of the nominal center wavelength) that was determined purely by the photonic crystal geometry. This approach can be extended to cover the entire visible spectrum.

  3. Sentinel-3 Solar Array Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combet, Y.; Reutenauer, X.; Mouret, G.; Guerrere, S.; Ergan, A.; Ferrando, E.; Riva, S.; Hodgetts, P.; Levesque, D.; D'Accolti, G.

    2011-10-01

    Sentinel-3 is primarily a mission to support services relating to the marine environment, with capability to serve numerous land-, atmospheric- and cryospheric- based application areas. The mission's main objective is to determine parameters, such as sea-surface topography, sea- and land-surface temperatures, as well as ocean- and land-surface colours with high-end accuracy and reliability. For this mission, Thales Alenia Space has been selected as the spacecraft prime contractor and is also responsible for the solar array. In this frame, TAS leads a European industrial team, comprising Selex Galileo for the photovoltaic assembly and Patria for the panel substrate.

  4. The collinear coaxial array antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, D. J.; Williams, D.

    1981-03-01

    A design of a coaxial vertical antenna proposed in the ARRL antenna handbook is analyzed. A numerical analysis was carried out using the moment method. A variety of antenna configurations in the 160 MHz design frequency are analyzed and current distribution, gain, polar diagrams and impedances are calculated. The analysis is carried out for simple configurations and extended to a case with 16 repeated center sections. The effects of using lossy cable in the construction is also investigated. A defect in the original ARRL design is rectified. An array of an overall length 5.33 wavelengths is shown to have a gain of 10.69 dB.

  5. rasdaman Array Database: current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merticariu, George; Toader, Alexandru

    2015-04-01

    rasdaman (Raster Data Manager) is a Free Open Source Array Database Management System which provides functionality for storing and processing massive amounts of raster data in the form of multidimensional arrays. The user can access, process and delete the data using SQL. The key features of rasdaman are: flexibility (datasets of any dimensionality can be processed with the help of SQL queries), scalability (rasdaman's distributed architecture enables it to seamlessly run on cloud infrastructures while offering an increase in performance with the increase of computation resources), performance (real-time access, processing, mixing and filtering of arrays of any dimensionality) and reliability (legacy communication protocol replaced with a new one based on cutting edge technology - Google Protocol Buffers and ZeroMQ). Among the data with which the system works, we can count 1D time series, 2D remote sensing imagery, 3D image time series, 3D geophysical data, and 4D atmospheric and climate data. Most of these representations cannot be stored only in the form of raw arrays, as the location information of the contents is also important for having a correct geoposition on Earth. This is defined by ISO 19123 as coverage data. rasdaman provides coverage data support through the Petascope service. Extensions were added on top of rasdaman in order to provide support for the Geoscience community. The following OGC standards are currently supported: Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS). The Web Map Service is an extension which provides zoom and pan navigation over images provided by a map server. Starting with version 9.1, rasdaman supports WMS version 1.3. The Web Coverage Service provides capabilities for downloading multi-dimensional coverage data. Support is also provided for several extensions of this service: Subsetting Extension, Scaling Extension, and, starting with version 9.1, Transaction Extension, which

  6. Isotope pattern deconvolution as rising tool for isotope tracer studies in environmental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Zitek, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade stable isotope tracers have emerged as versatile tool in ecological research. Besides 'intrinsic' isotope tracers caused by the natural variation of isotopes, the intentional introduction of 'extrinsic' enriched stable isotope tracers into biological systems has gained significant interest. Hereby the induced change in the natural isotopic composition of an element allows amongst others for studying the fate and fluxes of metals, trace elements and species in organisms or provides an intrinsic marker or tag of particular biological samples. Due to the shoreless potential of this methodology, the number of publications dealing with applications of isotope (double) spikes as tracers to address research questions in 'real world systems' is constantly increasing. However, some isotope systems like the natural Sr isotopic system, although potentially very powerful for this type of application, are still rarely used, mainly because their adequate measurement/determination poses major analytical challenges; as e.g. Sr is available in significant amounts in natural samples. In addition, biological systems underlie complex processes such as metabolism, adsorption/desorption or oxidation/reduction. As a consequence, classic evaluation approaches such as the isotope dilution mass spectrometry equation are often not applicable because of the unknown amount of tracer finally present in the sample. Isotope pattern deconvolution (IPD), based on multiple linear regression, serves as simplified alternative data processing strategy to double spike isotope dilution calculations. The outstanding advantage of this mathematical tool lies in the possibility of deconvolving the isotope pattern in a spiked sample without knowing the quantities of enriched isotope tracer being incorporated into the natural sample matrix as well as the degree of impurities and species-interconversion (e.g. from sample preparation). Here, the potential of IPD for environmental tracer

  7. Stable isotope production with laser techniques; Production d`isotopes stables a l`aide des techniques laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, A. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. des Procedes d`Enrichissement

    1994-12-31

    Laser properties may be used for stable isotope production either by selective photoionization of an atom particular isotope, either by selective photodissociation of a molecule. Principles of both processes are reviewed and examples of calcium 43 isotope separation through photoionization and of carbon and oxygen isotope separation by photodissociation are presented. 4 figs., 1 tab., 11 refs.

  8. Station characteristics of the Singapore Infrasound Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perttu, Anna; Taisne, Benoit; Caudron, Corentin; Garces, Milton; Avila Encillo, Jeffrey; Ildefonso, Sorvigenaleon

    2016-04-01

    Singapore, located in Southeast Asia, presents an ideal location for an additional regional infrasound array, with diverse persistent natural and anthropogenic regional infrasound sources, including ~750 active or potentially active volcanoes within 4,000 kilometers. Previous studies have focused on theoretical and calculated regional signal detection capability improvement with the addition of a Singapore array. The Earth Observatory of Singapore installed a five element infrasound array in northcentral Singapore in late 2014, and this station began consistent real-time data transmission mid-2015. The Singapore array uses MB2005s microbarometers and Nanometrics Taurus digitizers. Automated array processing is carried out with the INFrasonic EneRgy Nth Octave (INFERNO) energy estimation suite, and PMCC (Progressive MultiChannel Correlation). The addition of the Singapore infrasound array to the existing International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound stations in the region has increased regional infrasound detection capability, which is illustrated with the preliminary work on three observed meteor events of various sizes in late 2015. A meteor observed in Bangkok, Thailand in early September, 2015 was picked up by the CTBTO, however, another meteor observed in Bangkok in November was only recorded on the Singapore array. Additionally, another meteor observed over Sumatra was only recorded by one IMS station and the Singapore array. This study uses array processing and Power Spectral Density results for both the Singapore and publicly available regional IMS stations to examine station characteristics and detection capability of the Singapore array in the context of the regional IMS network.

  9. The anomalous quadrupole collectivity in Te isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Chong

    2016-01-01

    We present systematic calculations on the spectroscopy and transition properties of even-even Te isotopes by using the large-scale configuration interaction shell model approach with a realistic interaction. These nuclei are of particular interest since their yrast spectra show a vibrational-like equally-spaced pattern but the few known E2 transitions show anomalous rotational-like behavior, which cannot be reproduced by collective models. Our calculations reproduce well the equally-spaced spectra of those isotopes as well as the constant behavior of the $B(E2)$ values in $^{114}$Te. The calculated $B(E2)$ values for neutron-deficient and heavier Te isotopes show contrasting different behaviors along the yrast line. The $B(E2)$ of light isotopes can exhibit a nearly constant bevavior upto high spins. We show that this is related to the enhanced neutron-proton correlation when approaching $N=50$.

  10. Separation of Isotopes via Dynamical Delocalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farhan Saif

    2008-01-01

    Based on the dynamical de-localization phenomenon we show that different isotopes of a material can be separated.We explain that the suggested scheme can be realized in the laboratory using presently available experimental facilities.

  11. Preparation of Metallic Isotope 26Mg

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuXiaolei; ZhangFuming; GanZaiguo; GuoJunsheng; QinZhi

    2003-01-01

    Some special isotope material is usually used in nuclear experiments. It can be served as ion beam or target. When new superheavy nuclide 265Bh (Z=107) is synthesized, a reaction of 243Am target with 26Mg ion beamis selected to produce new isotope 265Bh. The preparation and production of this rare and extremely expensive isotope 26 Mg used for ion beam substance will be a key problem in synthesizing experiment of 265Bh. Theavailable chemical form of isotope 26Mg in commercial product usually is oxide or other compound, which are not required in our experiment. They need to be transformed to metal form as a proper working substance in ion source.

  12. Nuclear Astrophysics with rare isotopes at FRIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Hendrik

    2011-05-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) currently under construction at Michigan State University will be one of the worlds’ most powerful accelerators to produce rare isotopes. These isotopes live only fractions of seconds, but their properties are imprinted onto the composition of the visible universe and the nature of stellar explosions. FRIB will produce for the first time many of the rare isotopes that are part of the rapid neutron capture process, responsible for the origin of heavy elements; it will measure reaction rates that govern stellar explosions such as supernovae, novae, and X-ray bursts; and it will produce the same exotic nuclei that form the crust of neutron stars. I will discuss how data from FRIB, together with new observational data, promise to address many open questions at the intersection of nuclear physics and astronomy, including the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, the nuclear energy sources of stellar explosions, and the nature of neutron stars.

  13. Quantification of isotopic turnover in agricultural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, A.; Auerswald, K.; Schnyder, H.

    2012-04-01

    The isotopic turnover, which is a proxy for the metabolic rate, is gaining scientific importance. It is quantified for an increasing range of organisms, from microorganisms over plants to animals including agricultural livestock. Additionally, the isotopic turnover is analyzed on different scales, from organs to organisms to ecosystems and even to the biosphere. In particular, the quantification of the isotopic turnover of specific tissues within the same organism, e.g. organs like liver and muscle and products like milk and faeces, has brought new insights to improve understanding of nutrient cycles and fluxes, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of isotopic turnover is important in many areas, including physiology, e.g. milk synthesis, ecology, e.g. soil retention time of water, and medical science, e.g. cancer diagnosis. So far, the isotopic turnover is quantified by applying time, cost and expertise intensive tracer experiments. Usually, this comprises two isotopic equilibration periods. A first equilibration period with a constant isotopic input signal is followed by a second equilibration period with a distinct constant isotopic input signal. This yields a smooth signal change from the first to the second signal in the object under consideration. This approach reveals at least three major problems. (i) The input signals must be controlled isotopically, which is almost impossible in many realistic cases like free ranging animals. (ii) Both equilibration periods may be very long, especially when the turnover rate of the object under consideration is very slow, which aggravates the first problem. (iii) The detection of small or slow pools is improved by large isotopic signal changes, but large isotopic changes also involve a considerable change in the input material; e.g. animal studies are usually carried out as diet-switch experiments, where the diet is switched between C3 and C4 plants, since C3 and C4 plants differ strongly in their isotopic signal. The

  14. The production of stable isotopes in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgel, M.; Iglesias, J.; Casas, J.; Saviron, J. M.; Quintanilla, M.

    1965-07-01

    The activities developed in the field of the production of stable isotopes by means of ion-exchange chromatography and thermal diffusion techniques are reported. The first method was used to study the separation of the nitrogen and boron isotopes, whereby the separation factor was determined by the break through method. Values ranging from 1,028 to 1,022 were obtained for the separation factor of nitrogen by using ammonium hydroxide solutions while the corresponding values as obtained for boron amounted to 1,035-1,027 using boric acid solutions. Using ammonium chloride or acetate and sodium borate, respectively, resulted in the obtention of values for the separation factor approaching unity. The isotopic separation has been carried out according to the method of development by displacement. The separation of the isotopes of the noble gases, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon has been accomplished resorting to the method of thermal diffusion. (Author) 16 refs.

  15. Use of fluorescent screens for isotope radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    Radiographic examination can be performed on items beyond the limitation of conventional isotope radiography without a great loss of resolution. With proper film and screen selection and scatter radiation control, fluorescent screens can be a valuable additional tool for radiography.

  16. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  17. Isotope effects of hydrogen and atom tunnelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Pliss, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    The abnormally high mass-dependent isotope effects in liquid-phase hydrogen (deuterium) atom transfer reactions, which are customarily regarded as quantum effects, are actually the products of two classical effects, namely, kinetic and thermodynamic ones. The former is determined by the rate constants for atom transfer and the latter is caused by nonbonded (or noncovalent) isotope effects in the solvation of protiated and deuterated reacting molecules. This product can mimic the large isotope effects that are usually attributed to tunnelling. In enzymatic reactions, tunnelling is of particular interest; its existence characterizes an enzyme as a rigid molecular machine in which the residence time of reactants on the reaction coordinate exceeds the waiting time for the tunnelling event. The magnitude of isotope effect becomes a characteristic parameter of the internal dynamics of the enzyme catalytic site. The bibliography includes 61 references.

  18. Beam delivery for stable isotope separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Andrew; Strydom, Hendrick J.; Botha, Lourens R.; Ronander, Einar

    2002-10-01

    In the multi-photon dissociation process of Carbon isotope enrichment, IR photons are used to selectively excite a molecule with the given isotopic base element. This enrichment process is very sensitive to the beam's intensity and wavelength. Because the intensity is determined by the propagation of the field, the enrichment factors are also very dependent on the field propagation. In this paper, the influence of the wavelength and intensity of the beam, on the isotope selective dissociation of a CFC compound is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Consideration is also given to some of the factors that influence the delivery of various beams to the reactor chamber, and their subsequent propagation through the reactor. The results show that suitable beam forming can lead to an improved isotope separation process.

  19. On the progress in stable isotope separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prusakov, V.N. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    The principles and process of centrifuge isotope separation are reviewed; the fundamental advantage of the centrifuge over gaseous diffusion arises from the fact that the primary isotope separation effect occurs at thermodynamic equilibrium; thus, gas centrifuge enrichment uses only about 1/20 to 1/30 of the electricity per SWU (separation work unit) consumed by gaseous diffusion. The various substances that can be used in centrifuge isotope separation are listed (fluorides, oxyfluorides, {pi}-complexes, boron hydrides, metal-organic compounds, halides...). The centrifuge method productivity is much greater than with the electromagnetic separation technique; examples of centrifuge stable and radioactive isotope separation are given; the method of the residue reduction is also presented with the example of separating radioactive krypton-85 out of a nuclear reactor krypton blend. 4 figs.

  20. Development of proliferation resistant isotope separation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Doyoung; Ko, Kwanghoon; Kim, Taeksoo; Park, Hyunmin; Lim, Gwon; Cha, Yongho; Han, Jaemin; Baik, Sunghoon; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-02-15

    This project was accomplished with an aim of establishing the industrial facilities for isotope separation in Korea. The experiment for the measurement of neutrino mass that has been an issue in physics, needs very much of enriched calcium-48 isotope. However, calcium-48 isotope can be produced only by the electro-magnetic method and, thus, its price is very expensive. Therefore, we expect that ALSIS can replace the electro-magnetic method for calcium-48 isotope production. In this research stage, the research was advanced systematically with core technologies, such as atomic vapor production, the measurement of vapor characteristics and stable and powerful laser development. These researches will be the basis of the next research stages. In addition, the international research trends and cooperation results are reported in this report.

  1. Stable Oxygen-18 and Deuterium Isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sascha

    development within a given lowland headwater catchment (stream water isotopes). Based on our investigations on the precipitation isotopic composition a local meteoric water line (LMWL) was constructed and expressed as: δ2H=7.4 δ18O + 5.36‰. Moreover, we showed that under maritime temperature climate influence......, humidity is the main driver for the temporal and spatial isotopic development and temperature plays only a secondary role. Based on our investigations at a coastal lagoon aquifer we could improve quantifications of seasonal saltwater-wedge dynamics, based on isotopic tracers combined with salinity. We can...... link the observed seasonal regression/transgression pattern to the inland recharge cycle, which is expressed in hydraulic head configuration and submarine groundwater discharge rates at the fieldsite. Nonetheless, those observed dynamics could not be simulated due to numerical limitations. By the use...

  2. Isotope engineering of carbon nanotube systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, F; Kramberger, Ch; Pfeiffer, R; Kuzmany, H; Zólyomi, V; Kürti, J; Singer, P M; Alloul, H

    2005-07-01

    The synthesis of a unique isotope engineered system, double-wall carbon nanotubes with natural carbon outer and highly 13C enriched inner walls, is reported from isotope enriched fullerenes encapsulated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The material allows the observation of the D line of the highly defect-free inner tubes that can be related to a curvature induced enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling. Ab initio calculations explain the inhomogeneous broadening of inner tube Raman modes due to the distribution of different isotopes. Nuclear magnetic resonance shows a significant contrast of the isotope enriched inner SWCNTs compared to other carbon phases and provides a macroscopic measure of the inner tube mass content. The high curvature of the small diameter inner tubes manifests in an increased distribution of the chemical shift tensor components.

  3. Robust optical carbon dioxide isotope analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Isotopic analysis of carbon dioxide is an important tool for characterization of the exchange and transformation of carbon between the biosphere and the atmosphere....

  4. Iron isotope biogeochemistry of Neoproterozoic marine shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzmann, Marcus; Gibson, Timothy M.; Halverson, Galen P.; Hodgskiss, Malcolm S. W.; Bui, Thi Hao; Carozza, David A.; Sperling, Erik A.; Poirier, André; Cox, Grant M.; Wing, Boswell A.

    2017-07-01

    Iron isotopes have been widely applied to investigate the redox evolution of Earth's surface environments. However, it is still unclear whether iron cycling in the water column or during diagenesis represents the major control on the iron isotope composition of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Interpretation of isotopic data in terms of oceanic redox conditions is only possible if water column processes dominate the isotopic composition, whereas redox interpretations are less straightforward if diagenetic iron cycling controls the isotopic composition. In the latter scenario, iron isotope data is more directly related to microbial processes such as dissimilatory iron reduction. Here we present bulk rock iron isotope data from late Proterozoic marine shales from Svalbard, northwestern Canada, and Siberia, to better understand the controls on iron isotope fractionation in late Proterozoic marine environments. Bulk shales span a δ 56Fe range from -0.45 ‰ to +1.04 ‰ . Although δ 56Fe values show significant variation within individual stratigraphic units, their mean value is closer to that of bulk crust and hydrothermal iron in samples post-dating the ca. 717-660 Ma Sturtian glaciation compared to older samples. After correcting for the highly reactive iron content in our samples based on iron speciation data, more than 90% of the calculated δ 56Fe compositions of highly reactive iron falls in the range from ca. -0.8 ‰ to +3 ‰ . An isotope mass-balance model indicates that diagenetic iron cycling can only change the isotopic composition of highly reactive iron by oxygen levels. Alternatively, increasing oxygen levels would have led to a higher proportion of Fe(II) being oxidized, without decreasing the initial size of the ferrous seawater iron pool. We consider the latter explanation as the most likely. According to this hypothesis, the δ 56Fe record reflects the redox evolution of Earth's surface environments. δ 56Fe values in pre-Sturtian samples

  5. IUPAC Periodic Table of the Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, N.E.; Coplen, T.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Wieser, M.E.; Singleton, G.; Walczyk, T.; Yoneda, S.; Mahaffy, P.G.; Tarbox, L.V.

    2011-01-01

    For almost 150 years, the Periodic Table of the Elements has served as a guide to the world of elements by highlighting similarities and differences in atomic structure and chemical properties. To introduce students, teachers, and society to the existence and importance of isotopes of the chemical elements, an IUPAC Periodic Table of the Isotopes (IPTI) has been prepared and can be found as a supplement to this issue.

  6. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from −0.25 to −0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (−0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid−mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration. PMID:27303032

  7. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Wrede C.

    2015-01-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a United States Department of Energy user facility currently under construction on the campus of Michigan State University. Based on a 400 kW, 200 MeV/u heavy-ion driver linac, FRIB will deliver high-quality fast, thermalized, and re-accelerated beams of rare isotopes with unprecedented intensities to a variety of experimental areas and equipment. New science opportunities at the frontiers of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental sy...

  8. Dye laser chain for laser isotope separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doizi, Denis; Jaraudias, Jean; Pochon, E.; Salvetat, G.

    1993-05-01

    Uranium enrichment by laser isotope separation uses a three step operation which requires four visible wavelengths to boost an individual U235 isotope from a low lying atomic energy level to an autoionizing state. The visible wavelengths are delivered by dye lasers pumped by copper vapor lasers (CVL). In this particular talk, a single dye chain consisting of a master oscillator and amplifier stages will be described and some of its performance given.

  9. Surfaces that become isotopic after Dehn filling

    CERN Document Server

    Bachman, David; Sedgwick, Eric

    2010-01-01

    We show that after generic filling along a torus boundary component of a 3-manifold, no two closed, 2-sided, essential surfaces become isotopic, and no closed, 2-sided, essential surface becomes inessential. That is, the set of essential surfaces (considered up to isotopy) survives unchanged in all suitably generic Dehn fillings. Furthermore, for all but finitely many non-generic fillings, we show that two essential surfaces can only become isotopic in a constrained way.

  10. Hydrogen isotope effect on the Dimits shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2016-10-01

    The hydrogen isotope effect on the Dimits shift in drift wave turbulence (Dimits et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 969) is discussed using the theory of zonal flows, in which the nonlinear damping rate of zonal flows is taken into account. The up-shift of the critical linear growth rate of the drift waves, above which drift wave fluctuations develop, is investigated. The dependence on the mass number of the hydrogen isotope is discussed.

  11. Nickel isotopic composition of the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Louise; Williams, Helen M.; Halliday, Alex N.; Kerr, Andrew C.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a detailed high-precision study of Ni isotope variations in mantle peridotites and their minerals, komatiites as well as chondritic and iron meteorites. Ultramafic rocks display a relatively large range in δ60 Ni (permil deviation in 60 Ni /58 Ni relative to the NIST SRM 986 Ni isotope standard) for this environment, from 0.15 ± 0.07‰ to 0.36 ± 0.08‰, with olivine-rich rocks such as dunite and olivine cumulates showing lighter isotope compositions than komatiite, lherzolite and pyroxenite samples. The data for the mineral separates shed light on the origin of these variations. Olivine and orthopyroxene display light δ60 Ni whereas clinopyroxene and garnet are isotopically heavy. This indicates that peridotite whole-rock δ60 Ni may be controlled by variations in modal mineralogy, with the prediction that mantle melts will display variable δ60 Ni values due to variations in residual mantle and cumulate mineralogy. Based on fertile peridotite xenoliths and Phanerozoic komatiite samples it is concluded that the upper mantle has a relatively homogeneous Ni isotope composition, with the best estimate of δ60Nimantle being 0.23 ± 0.06‰ (2 s.d.). Given that >99% of the Ni in the silicate Earth is located in the mantle, this also defines the Ni isotope composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE). This value is nearly identical to the results obtained for a suite of chondrites and iron meteorites (mean δ60 Ni 0.26 ± 0.12‰ and 0.29 ± 0.10‰, respectively) showing that the BSE is chondritic with respect to its Ni isotope composition, with little to no Ni mass-dependent isotope fractionation resulting from core formation.

  12. Mixed Population Screening for Sulfur Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Bin; ZHAO Lei; ZHAN Zhaoyang; HE Zhijun

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative research of the origin of sulfur isotopes is a difficult problem that has puzzled geochemists all along. In the study of the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River and the Dongpo orefield in Hunan Province,the authors successfully applied the mathematical model of mixed population screening to quantitatively resolving the problem on the origin of sulfur isotopes, which is significant in finding out the source of mineralizing matter and metallogenic mechanisms.

  13. IBFM for Ba isotopes and chaoticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Ivascu, M.; Ur, C.A. (Inst. of Atomic Physics, Bucharest (Romania)); Gizon, A.; Gizon, J. (Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires, 38 - Grenoble (France))

    1992-08-01

    Fluctuation properties have been analysed for the energy levels predicted by IBFM calculations in the Ba isotopes {sup 121}Ba to {sup 131}Ba. The results indicate, in general, a situation which is close to the chaotic limit. For the lighter isotopes studied (121 and 123), a phase transition is obtained in the low-spin, positive parity states, from a situation close to regularity at low excitation energies, towards chaoticity at higher excitations. (orig.).

  14. IBFM for barium isotopes and chaoticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Ivascu, M.; Ur, C.A. (Institute of Atomic Physics, Bucharest (Romania)); Gizon, A.; Gizon, J. (Institute des Sciences Nucleaires, Grenoble (France))

    1992-01-01

    Fluctuation properties have been analysed for the energy levels predicted by IBFM calculations in the Ba isotopes {sup 121}Ba to {sup 131}Ba. The results are indicating, in general, a situation which is close to the chaotic limit. For the lighter isotopes studied (121 and 131), a phase transition is obtained in the low-spin, positive states, from a situation close to regularity at low excitation energies, towards chaoticity at higher excitations. (author).

  15. IBFM for barium isotopes and chaoticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Ivascu, M.; Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; UR, C. A.

    Fluctuation properties have been analysed for the energy levels predicted by IBFM calculations in the Ba isotopes 121Ba to 131Ba. The results are indicating, in general, a situation which is close to the chaotic limit. For the lighter isotopes studied (121 and 131), a phase transition is obtained in the low-spin, positive states, from a situation close to regularity at low excitation energies, towards chaoticity at higher excitations.

  16. Isotope shortage triggers delays for patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Paula

    2009-07-01

    An unplanned shutdown of a nuclear reactor in Canada is disrupting the supply of medical isotopes across North America and forcing some hospitals to cancel or postpone patients' tests. The closure of the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor in Chalk River, Ontario, has also embarrassed Canadian officials, including a senior government minister who was forced to apologize after calling the isotope shortage a "sexy" career challenge.

  17. Isotopic discrimination of zinc in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, D J; Mason, T F D; Zhao, F J; Kirk, G J D; Coles, B J; Horstwood, M S A

    2005-03-01

    * The extent of isotopic discrimination of transition metals in biological processes is poorly understood but potentially has important applications in plant and biogeochemical studies. * Using multicollector inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry, we measured isotopic fractionation of zinc (Zn) during uptake from nutrient solutions by rice (Oryza sativa), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants. * For all three species, the roots showed a similar extent of heavy Zn enrichment relative to the nutrient solution, probably reflecting preferential adsorption on external root surfaces. By contrast, a plant-species specific enrichment of the light Zn isotope occurred in the shoots, indicative of a biological, membrane-transport controlled uptake into plant cells. The extent of the fractionation in the shoots further depended on the Zn speciation in the nutrient solution. * The observed isotopic depletion in heavy Zn from root to shoot (-0.13 to -0.26 per atomic mass unit) is equivalent to roughly a quarter of the total reported terrestrial variability of Zn isotopic compositions (c. 0.84 per atomic mass unit). Plant uptake therefore represents an important source of isotopic variation in biogeochemical cycling of Zn.

  18. Iron isotopic fractionation during continental weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantle, Matthew S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-10-01

    The biological activity on continents and the oxygen content of the atmosphere determine the chemical pathways through which Fe is processed at the Earth's surface. Experiments have shown that the relevant chemical pathways fractionate Fe isotopes. Measurements of soils, streams, and deep-sea clay indicate that the {sup 56}Fe/{sup 54}Fe ratio ({delta}{sup 56}Fe relative to igneous rocks) varies from +1{per_thousand} for weathering residues like soils and clays, to -3{per_thousand} for dissolved Fe in streams. These measurements confirm that weathering processes produce substantial fractionation of Fe isotopes in the modern oxidizing Earth surface environment. The results imply that biologically-mediated processes, which preferentially mobilize light Fe isotopes, are critical to Fe chemistry in weathering environments, and that the {delta}{sup 56}Fe of marine dissolved Fe should be variable and negative. Diagenetic reduction of Fe in marine sediments may also be a significant component of the global Fe isotope cycle. Iron isotopes provide a tracer for the influence of biological activity and oxygen in weathering processes through Earth history. Iron isotopic fractionation during weathering may have been smaller or absent in an oxygen-poor environment such as that of the early Precambrian Earth.

  19. The discovery of isotopes a complete compilation

    CERN Document Server

    Thoennessen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the exciting discovery of every isotope observed on earth to date, which currently numbers some 3000. For each isotope a short essay highlights the authors of the first publication for the isotope, the laboratory and year where and when the isotope was discovered, as well as details about the production and detection methods used. In controversial cases previously claims are also discussed. At the end a comprehensive table lists all isotopes sorted by elements and a complete list of references. Preliminary versions of these paragraphs have been published over the last few years as separate articles in the journal "Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables". The work re-evaluates all assignments judging them with a uniform set of criteria. In addition, the author includes over 100 new isotopes which have been discovered since the articles published. This book is a source of information for researchers as well as enthusiastic laymen alike. From the prepublication review: “The explanations focus ...

  20. Laser Spectroscopy of Neutron Rich Bismuth Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %IS344 :\\\\ \\\\ The aim of the experiment is to measure the optical isotope shifts and hyperfine structures of bismuth isotopes across the N=126 shell closure in order to extract the change in mean square charge radii ($\\delta\\langle r^{2}\\rangle$) and static moments. These include the first isotones of lead to be measured directly above the shell closure and will provide new information on the systematics of the kink ($\\delta\\langle r^{2}\\rangle)$ seen in the lead isotopic chain. After two very successful runs the programme has been extended to include the neutron deficient isotopes below $^{201}$Bi to study the systematics across the $i_{13/2}$ neutron sub-shell closure at N=118.\\\\ \\\\ During the initial 2 runs (9 shifts) the isotope shifts and hyperfine structures of three new isotopes, $ ^{210,212,213}$Bi and the 9$^{-}$ isomer of $^{210}$Bi have been measured. The accuracy of the previous measurements of $^{205,206,208}$Bi have been greatly improved. The samples of $ ^{208,210,210^{m}}$Bi were prepared by c...

  1. The Ooty Wide Field Array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. R. Subrahmanya; P. K. Manoharan; Jayaram N. Chengalur

    2017-03-01

    We describe here an ongoing upgrade to the legacy Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). The ORT is a cylindrical parabolic cylinder 530 m × 30 m in size operating at a frequency of 326.5 (or $z \\sim 3.35$ for the HI 21-cm line). The telescope has been constructed on a North–South hill slope whose gradient is equal to the latitude of the hill, making it effectively equatorially mounted. The feed consists of an array of 1056 dipoles. The key feature of this upgrade is the digitization and cross-correlation of the signals of every set of 4-dipoles. This converts the ORT into a 264 element interferometer with a field-of-view of $ 2^{\\circ} \\times 27.4^{\\circ} \\cos(\\delta)$. This upgraded instrument is called the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA). This paper briefly describes the salient features of the upgrade, as well as its main science drivers. There are three main science drivers viz. (1) observations of the large scale distribution of HI in the post-reionization era, (2) studies of the propagation of plasma irregularities through the inner heliosphere and (3) blind surveys for transient sources. More details on the upgrade, as well as on the expected science uses can be found in other papers in this special issue.

  2. Stretchable Micro-Electrode Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, M; Hamilton, J; Polla, D; Rose, K; Wilson, T; Krulevitch, P

    2002-03-08

    This paper focuses on the design consideration, fabrication processes and preliminary testing of the stretchable micro-electrode array. We are developing an implantable, stretchable micro-electrode array using polymer-based microfabrication techniques. The device will serve as the interface between an electronic imaging system and the human eye, directly stimulating retinal neurons via thin film conducting traces and electroplated electrodes. The metal features are embedded within a thin ({approx}50 micron) substrate fabricated using poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a biocompatible elastomeric material that has very low water permeability. The conformable nature of PDMS is critical for ensuring uniform contact with the curved surface of the retina. To fabricate the device, we developed unique processes for metalizing PDMS to produce robust traces capable of maintaining conductivity when stretched (5%, SD 1.5), and for selectively passivating the conductive elements. An in situ measurement of residual strain in the PDMS during curing reveals a tensile strain of 10%, explaining the stretchable nature of the thin metalized devices.

  3. Optimal array of sand fences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Izael A; Araújo, Ascânio D; Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2017-03-24

    Sand fences are widely applied to prevent soil erosion by wind in areas affected by desertification. Sand fences also provide a way to reduce the emission rate of dust particles, which is triggered mainly by the impacts of wind-blown sand grains onto the soil and affects the Earth's climate. Many different types of fence have been designed and their effects on the sediment transport dynamics studied since many years. However, the search for the optimal array of fences has remained largely an empirical task. In order to achieve maximal soil protection using the minimal amount of fence material, a quantitative understanding of the flow profile over the relief encompassing the area to be protected including all employed fences is required. Here we use Computational Fluid Dynamics to calculate the average turbulent airflow through an array of fences as a function of the porosity, spacing and height of the fences. Specifically, we investigate the factors controlling the fraction of soil area over which the basal average wind shear velocity drops below the threshold for sand transport when the fences are applied. We introduce a cost function, given by the amount of material necessary to construct the fences. We find that, for typical sand-moving wind velocities, the optimal fence height (which minimizes this cost function) is around 50 cm, while using fences of height around 1.25 m leads to maximal cost.

  4. IRAN: interferometric remapped array nulling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristidi, Eric; Vakili, Farrokh; Abe, Lyu; Belu, Adrian; Lopez, Bruno; Lanteri, Henri; Schutz, A.; Menut, Jean-Luc

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes a method of beam-combination in the so-called hypertelescope imaging technique recently introduced by Labeyrie in optical interferometry. The method we propose is an alternative to the Michelson pupil reconfiguration that suffers from the loss of the classical object-image convolution relation. From elementary theory of Fourier optics we demonstrate that this problem can be solved by observing in a combined pupil plane instead of an image plane. The point-source intensity distribution (PSID) of this interferometric "image" tends towards a psuedo Airy disc (similar to that of a giant monolithic telescope) for a sufficiently large number of telescopes. Our method is applicable to snap-shot imaging of extended sources with a field comparable to the Airy pattern of single telescopes operated in a co-phased multi-aperture interferometric array. It thus allows to apply conveniently pupil plane coronagraphy. Our technique called Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling (IRAN) is particularly suitable for high dynamic imaging of extra-solar planetary companions, circumstellar nebulosities or extra-galactic objects where long baseline interferometry would closely probe the central regions of AGNs for instance.

  5. Towards the Long Wavelength Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, N. E.; Erickson, W. C.

    2008-08-01

    Nearly three decades ago, the Very Large Array (VLA) opened the cm-wavelength radio sky to high-dynamic range imaging. By developing and exploiting new techniques to mitigate ionospheric phase fluctuations, the VLA 74 MHz system is providing the first sub-arcminute resolution view of the meter-wavelength radio universe. This technical innovation has inspired an emerging suite of much more powerful low-frequency instruments, including the Long Wavelength Array (LWA). The LWA, with its great collecting area (approaching one square kilometer at 20 MHz) and long baselines (up to 400 km), will surpass, by up to 2--3 orders of magnitude, the imaging power of any previous low-frequency interferometer. LWA science goals include Cosmic Evolution, the Acceleration of Relativistic Particles, Plasma Astrophysics, and Ionospheric & Space Weather Science. Because it will explore one of the last and most poorly investigated regions of the spectrum, the potential for unexpected new discoveries is high. For more on the LWA, see http://lwa.unm.edu. The LWA project is led by the University of New Mexico, and includes the Naval Research Laboratory, Applied Research Laboratories of U. Texas, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Virginia Tech, and U. Iowa, with cooperation from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.

  6. Energy transfer in macromolecular arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, David L.; Jenkins, Robert D.

    2003-11-01

    Macromolecular systems comprised of many light-sensitive centres (the photosynthetic unit, dendrimers, and other highly symmetric multichromophore arrays) are important structures offering challenges to theoreticians and synthetic chemists alike. Here we outline novel photophysical interactions predicted and observed in such arrays. Using the tools of molecular quantum electrodynamics (QED) we present quantum amplitudes for a variety of higher-order resonance energy transfer (RET) schemes associated with well-known nonlinear optical effects such as two- and three-photon absorption. The initial analysis is extended to account for situations where the participant donor species are identical and exist in a highly symmetric environment, leading to the possible formation of excitons. It emerges from the QED theory that such excitons are closely associated with the higher-order RET processes. General results are interpreted by analyzing particular molecular architectures which offer interesting features such as rate enhancement or limitation and exciton pathway quenching. Applications in the areas of photosynthesis, molecular logic gates and low-intensity fluorescence energy transfer are predicted.

  7. One-dimensional Array Grammars and P Systems with Array Insertion and Deletion Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Freund

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider the (one-dimensional array counterpart of contextual as well as insertion and deletion string grammars and consider the operations of array insertion and deletion in array grammars. First we show that the emptiness problem for P systems with (one-dimensional insertion rules is undecidable. Then we show computational completeness of P systems using (one-dimensional array insertion and deletion rules even of norm one only. The main result of the paper exhibits computational completeness of one-dimensional array grammars using array insertion and deletion rules of norm at most two.

  8. Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R; Bajt, S; Graham, G; Lea, A S

    2005-09-02

    We have carried out a comprehensive survey of the isotopic compositions (H, B, C, N, O, S) of a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), including both cluster and individual particles. Isotopic imaging with the NanoSIMS shows the presence of numerous discrete hotspots that are strongly enriched in {sup 15}N, including the largest {sup 15}N enrichments ({approx}1300 {per_thousand}) observed in IDPs to date. A number of the IDPs also contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in {sup 15}N, leading to average bulk N isotopic compositions that are {sup 15}N-enriched in these IDPs. Although C isotopic compositions are normal in most of the IDPs, two {sup 15}N-rich N-hotspots have correlated {sup 13}C anomalies. CN{sup -}/C{sup -} ratios suggest that most of the {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are associated with relatively N-poor carbonaceous matter, although specific carriers have not been determined. H isotopic distributions are similar to those of N: D anomalies are present both as distinct very D-rich hotspots and as larger regions with more modest enrichments. Nevertheless, H and N isotopic anomalies are not directly correlated, consistent with results from previous studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows the presence of abundant presolar silicate grains in the IDPs. The O isotopic compositions of the grains are similar to those found in presolar oxide and silicate grains from primitive meteorites. Most of the silicate grains in the IDPs have isotopic ratios consistent with meteoritic Group 1 oxide grains, indicating origins in oxygen-rich red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars, but several presolar silicates exhibit the {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O enrichments of Group 4 oxide grains, whose origin is less well understood. Based on their N isotopic compositions, the IDPs studied here can be divided into two groups. One group is characterized as being ''isotopically primitive'' and consists of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic

  9. Medical isotope identification with large mobile detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard

    2012-10-01

    The Remote Sensing laboratory (RSL) of National Security Technologies Inc. has built an array of large (5.08 - cm x 10.16 - cm x 40.6 - cm) thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI: Tl) scintillators to locate and screen gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes that are of interests to radiological emergency responders [1]. These vehicle mounted detectors provide the operators with rapid, simple, specific information for radiological threat assessment. Applications include large area inspection, customs inspection, border protection, emergency response, and monitoring of radiological facilities. These RSL mobile units are currently being upgraded to meet the Defense Threat Reduction Agency mission requirements for a next-generation system capable of detecting and identifying nuclear threat materials. One of the challenging problems faced by these gamma-ray detectors is the unambiguous identification of medical isotopes like 131I (364.49 keV [81.7%], 636.99 keV [7.17%]), 99Tcm (140.51 keV [89.1%]) and 67Ga (184.6 keV [19.7%], 300.2 [16.0%], 393.5 [4.5%] that are used in radionuclide therapy and often have overlapping gamma-ray energy regions of interest (ROI). The problem is made worse by short (about 5 seconds) acquisition time of the spectral data necessary for dynamic mobile detectors. This article describes attempts to identify medical isotopes from data collected from this mobile detection system in a short period of time (not exceeding 5 secs) and a large standoff distance (typically ~ 10 meters) The mobile units offer identification capabilities that are based on hardware auto stabilization of the amplifier gain. The 1461 keV gamma-energy line from 40K is tracked. It uses gamma-ray energy windowing along with embedded mobile Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) [2] simultaneously to deconvolve any overlapping gamma-energy ROIs. These high sensitivity detectors are capable of resolving complex masking scenarios and exceed all ANSI N42.34 (2006) requirements

  10. Interferometric Plasmonic Lensing with Nanohole Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-18

    Nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) of nanohole arrays in gold films maps propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) launched from lithographically patterned structures. Strong near field photoemission patterns are observed in the PEEM images, recorded following low angle of incidence irradiation of nanohole arrays with sub-15 fs laser pulses centered at 780 nm. The recorded photoemission patterns are attributed to constructive and destructive interferences between PSPs launched from the individual nanoholes which comprise the array. By exploiting the wave nature of PSPs, we demonstrate how varying the array geometry (hole diameter, pitch, and number of rows/columns) ultimately yields intense localized photoemission. Through a combination of PEEM and finite-difference time-domain simulations, we identify the optimal array geometry for efficient light coupling and interferometric plasmonic lensing. We show a preliminary application of inteferometric plasmonic lensing by enhancing the photoemission from the vertex of a gold triangle using nanohole array.

  11. Flexible Ultrasonic Phased-Array Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施克仁; 阙开良; 郭大勇

    2004-01-01

    In ultrasonic phased-array testing, most probes are rigid with fixed elements. However, when testing a cambered piece, a rigid probe cannot be used directly, but an ultrasonic chock or coupling media must be used, which adds cost and reduces the accuracy. The objective of this research was to improve the tests of cambered pieces. A flexible ultrasonic phased-array probe was developed to do the flexible phased-array testing. The key technologies in the flexible phased-array probe include the probe design and the phased-array control. A new method was developed to design the flexible probe according to the curvature of the piece and the test depth. The method includes the calculation of the element's height (he), the relative rotation angle ((e), the distance between the adjoining elements (de), and the element's effective testing range. A flexible ultrasonic phased-array probe has been developed using this method.

  12. Space and power efficient hybrid counters array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gara, Alan G.; Salapura, Valentina

    2009-05-12

    A hybrid counter array device for counting events. The hybrid counter array includes a first counter portion comprising N counter devices, each counter device for receiving signals representing occurrences of events from an event source and providing a first count value corresponding to a lower order bits of the hybrid counter array. The hybrid counter array includes a second counter portion comprising a memory array device having N addressable memory locations in correspondence with the N counter devices, each addressable memory location for storing a second count value representing higher order bits of the hybrid counter array. A control device monitors each of the N counter devices of the first counter portion and initiates updating a value of a corresponding second count value stored at the corresponding addressable memory location in the second counter portion. Thus, a combination of the first and second count values provide an instantaneous measure of number of events received.

  13. Anisotropic permeability in deterministic lateral displacement arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Vernekar, Rohan; Loutherback, Kevin; Morton, Keith; Inglis, David

    2016-01-01

    We investigate anisotropic permeability of microfluidic deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) arrays. A DLD array can achieve high-resolution bimodal size-based separation of micro-particles, including bioparticles such as cells. Correct operation requires that the fluid flow remains at a fixed angle with respect to the periodic obstacle array. We show via experiments and lattice-Boltzmann simulations that subtle array design features cause anisotropic permeability. The anisotropy, which indicates the array's intrinsic tendency to induce an undesired lateral pressure gradient, can lead to off-axis flows and therefore local changes in the critical separation size. Thus, particle trajectories can become unpredictable and the device useless for the desired separation duty. We show that for circular posts the rotated-square layout, unlike the parallelogram layout, does not suffer from anisotropy and is the preferred geometry. Furthermore, anisotropy becomes severe for arrays with unequal axial and lateral gaps...

  14. Sky reconstruction for the Tianlai cylinder array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiao; Zuo, Shi-Fan; Ansari, Reza; Chen, Xuelei; Li, Yi-Chao; Wu, Feng-Quan; Campagne, Jean-Eric; Magneville, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    We apply our sky map reconstruction method for transit type interferometers to the Tianlai cylinder array. The method is based on spherical harmonic decomposition, and can be applied to a cylindrical array as well as dish arrays and we can compute the instrument response, synthesized beam, transfer function and noise power spectrum. We consider cylinder arrays with feed spacing larger than half a wavelength and, as expected, we find that the arrays with regular spacing have grating lobes which produce spurious images in the reconstructed maps. We show that this problem can be overcome using arrays with a different feed spacing on each cylinder. We present the reconstructed maps, and study the performance in terms of noise power spectrum, transfer function and beams for both regular and irregular feed spacing configurations.

  15. The revised solar array synthesis computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    The Revised Solar Array Synthesis Computer Program is described. It is a general-purpose program which computes solar array output characteristics while accounting for the effects of temperature, incidence angle, charged-particle irradiation, and other degradation effects on various solar array configurations in either circular or elliptical orbits. Array configurations may consist of up to 75 solar cell panels arranged in any series-parallel combination not exceeding three series-connected panels in a parallel string and no more than 25 parallel strings in an array. Up to 100 separate solar array current-voltage characteristics, corresponding to 100 equal-time increments during the sunlight illuminated portion of an orbit or any 100 user-specified combinations of incidence angle and temperature, can be computed and printed out during one complete computer execution. Individual panel incidence angles may be computed and printed out at the user's option.

  16. Space-Time-Isotopic Trends of Snake River Plain Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, M. M.; Hanan, B. B.; Shervais, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Snake River Plain (SRP) volcanic province is an 800 km track of basalt extending from the Owyhee Plateau to its current terminus, the Yellowstone Plateau. It is one of several late-Tertiary magmatic terranes that also include the Cascades magmatic arc, the Columbia River basalts, and the Oregon Plateau basalts; all of which are adjacent to the Basin and Range Province extensional system (Hughes and McCurry, 2002). This province represents the track of the Yellowstone plume and consists of basalt that is compositionally similar to ocean-island basalt. This basalt overlies a series of rhyolitic eruptive centers (overlapping caldera complexes, ignimbrites, and caldera-filling eruptions) that signal the arrival of the plume head (Christiansen, 2001) and herald the onset of plume-related rhyolitic and basaltic volcanism (Pierce et al., 2002). Observed within the SRP are two basalt types: the dominant low-K olivine tholeiites and less common high-K alkaline basalts. We report new Sr-, Nd-, and Pb-isotopic analyses of these two basalt types from all three SRP provinces: eastern, central, and western. Low-K tholeiites are enriched in 143Nd/144Nd and 86Sr/87Sr and forms a quasi-linear array in Pb-isotope space, along with Craters of the Moon and eastern SRP basalts. High-K lavas are found largely in the western plain, and have a uniquely different isotopic signature. They are depleted in 143Nd/144Nd and 86Sr/87Sr, relative to the low-K tholeiites, and plot closer to the BSE component of Zindler and Hart (1986). They also share the same Pb-isotopic space with high-K basalts from Smith Prairie (Boise River Group 2 of Vetter and Shervais, 1992). One low-K tholeiite - Eureka North, plots with these high alkali basalts. Mass balance models have demonstrated an increasing plume component from the Yellowstone caldera in the east to the craton edge in the west. The lavas analyzed in this study conform remarkably to this model. The mass fraction of plume component in western

  17. KIPS kilowatt isotope power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    This Control System topical report covers basic control requirements, selection of control system and a recent review of an electromechanical approach to the flow control valve. Section I covers the basic control requirements for Organic Rankine cycle systems, particular requirements for an isotope fueled space power system, and special requirements imposed by launch, Shuttle deployment and spacecraft requirements. Various control devices which can be used to meet system requirements are discussed. In Section II, various combinations of control functions and devices are presented with comments as to the suitability of each for the intended application. This is essentially a review of the selection process used to pick the present KIPS control system. The formal trade-off matrix, component description, and system selection, as prepared for Design Reviews 2 and 3, is included as Appendix A to the report. Section 3 covers the recently completed design of an electronic-electromechanical flow control valve and compares this approach to the thermal bulb-hydro-mechanical flow control valve baseline. The results of this comparative study indicate that the present configuration is preferable to an electrical valve.

  18. Charged-particle detection efficiencies of close-packed CsI arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfouace, P.; Lynch, W. G.; Tsang, M. B.

    2017-03-01

    Detector efficiency determination is essential to correct the measured yields and extract reliable cross sections of particles emitted in nuclear reactions. We investigate the efficiencies for measuring the full energies of light charged particle in arrays of CsI crystals employed in particle detection arrays such as HiRA, LASSA and MUST2. We perform these simulations with a GEANT4 Monte Carlo transport code implemented in the NPTool framework. Both Coulomb multiple scattering and nuclear reactions within the crystal can significantly reduce the efficiency of detecting the full energy of high energy particles. The calculated efficiencies decrease exponentially as a function of the range of the particle and are quite similar for both the hydrogen (p , d , t) and helium (3He, α) isotopes. The use of a close-packed array introduces significant position dependent efficiency losses at the interior boundaries between crystals that need to be considered in the design of an array and in the efficiency corrections of measured energy spectra.

  19. Halbach arrays in precision motion control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumper, D.L.; Williams, M.E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The Halbach array was developed for use as an optical element in particle accelerators. Following up on a suggestion from Klaus Halbach, the authors have investigated the utility of such arrays as the permanent magnet structure for synchronous machines in cartesian, polar, and cylindrical geometries. Their work has focused on the design of a novel Halbach array linear motor for use in a magnetic suspension stage for photolithography. This paper presents the details of the motor design and its force and power characteristics.

  20. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  1. Big Data Challenges for Large Radio Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Wagstaff, Kiri; Thompson, David; D'Addario, Larry; Navarro, Robert; Mattmann, Chris; Majid, Walid; Lazio, Joseph; Preston, Robert; Rebbapragada, Umaa

    2012-01-01

    Future large radio astronomy arrays, particularly the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will be able to generate data at rates far higher than can be analyzed or stored affordably with current practices. This is, by definition, a "big data" problem, and requires an end-to-end solution if future radio arrays are to reach their full scientific potential. Similar data processing, transport, storage, and management challenges face next-generation facilities in many other fields.

  2. A Study of End-Fed Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Kondylis, Konstantinos; Zimourtopoulos, Petros

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a general analysis of end-fed space arrays with application to self-standing linear arrays of parallel dipoles. A number of test array models were simulated, constructed and their radiation pattern was then measured. The experimental and computational results were found to be in good agreement. The developed software applications are available through the Internet as FLOSS Free Libre Open Source Software.

  3. Monostable array-enhanced stochastic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, J F; Breen, B J; Wills, M E; Bulsara, A R; Ditto, W L

    2001-05-01

    We present a simple nonlinear system that exhibits multiple distinct stochastic resonances. By adjusting the noise and coupling of an array of underdamped, monostable oscillators, we modify the array's natural frequencies so that the spectral response of a typical oscillator in an array of N oscillators exhibits N-1 different stochastic resonances. Such families of resonances may elucidate and facilitate a variety of noise-mediated cooperative phenomena, such as noise-enhanced propagation, in a broad class of similar nonlinear systems.

  4. SWNT-array resonant MOS transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Arun, A.; Campidelli, S; Filoramo, A.; Derycke, V.; Salet, P.; Ionescu, A. M.; Goffman, M. F.

    2010-01-01

    We show that thin horizontal arrays of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) suspended above the channel of silicon MOSFETs can be used as vibrating gate electrodes. This new class of nano-electromechanical system (NEMS) combines the unique mechanical and electronic properties of SWNTs with an integrated siliconbased motion detection. Its electrical response exhibits a clear signature of the mechanical resonance of SWNTs arrays (120-150 MHz) showing that these thin horizontal arrays behave as ...

  5. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  6. Big Data Challenges for Large Radio Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Wagstaff, Kiri; Thompson, David; D'Addario, Larry; Navarro, Robert; Mattmann, Chris; Majid, Walid; Lazio, Joseph; Preston, Robert; Rebbapragada, Umaa

    2012-01-01

    Future large radio astronomy arrays, particularly the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will be able to generate data at rates far higher than can be analyzed or stored affordably with current practices. This is, by definition, a "big data" problem, and requires an end-to-end solution if future radio arrays are to reach their full scientific potential. Similar data processing, transport, storage, and management challenges face next-generation facilities in many other fields.

  7. Optical Epitaxial Growth of Gold Nanoparticle Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ningfeng; Martínez, Luis Javier; Jaquay, Eric; Nakano, Aiichiro; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-09-09

    We use an optical analogue of epitaxial growth to assemble gold nanoparticles into 2D arrays. Particles are attracted to a growth template via optical forces and interact through optical binding. Competition between effects determines the final particle arrangements. We use a Monte Carlo model to design a template that favors growth of hexagonal particle arrays. We experimentally demonstrate growth of a highly stable array of 50 gold particles with 200 nm diameter, spaced by 1.1 μm.

  8. Isotopic evolution of Mauna Loa volcano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, M.D.; Kammer, D.P. (Chemistry Dept., Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (USA))

    1991-04-01

    In an effort to understand the temporal helium isotopic variations in Mauna Loa volcano, we have measured helium, strontium and lead isotopes in a suite of Mauna Loa lavas that span most of the subaerial eruptive history of the volcano. The lavas range in age from historical flows to Ninole basalt which are thought to be several hundred thousand years old. Most of the samples younger than 30 ka in age (Kau Basalt) are radiocarbon-dated flows, while the samples older than 30 ka are stratigraphically controlled (Kahuku and Ninole Basalt). The data reveal a striking change in the geochemistry of the lavas approximately 10 ka before present. The lavas older than 10 ka are characterized by high {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ({approx equal} 16-20 times atmospheric), higher {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ({approx equal} 18.2), and lower {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr({approx equal} 0.70365) ratios than the younger Kau samples (having He, Pb and Sr ratios of approximately 8.5 x atmospheric, 18.1 and 0.70390, respectively). The historical lavas are distinct in having intermediate Sr and Pb isotopic compositions with {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios similar to the other young Kau basalt ({approx equal} 8.5 x atmospheric). The isotopic variations are on a shorter time scale (100 to 10,000 years) than has previously been observed for Hawaiian volcanoes, and demonstrate the importance of geochronology and stratigraphy to geochemical studies. The data show consistency between all three isotope systems, which suggests that the variations are not related to magma chamber degassing processes, and that helium is not decoupled from the other isotopes. However, the complex temporal evolution suggests that three distinct mantle sources are required to explain the isotopic data. Most of the Mauna Loa isotopic variations could be explained by mixing between a plume type source, similar to Loihi, and an asthenospheric source with helium isotopic composition close to MORB and elevated Sr isotopic values. (orig./WL).

  9. Magnesium isotope systematics in Martian meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magna, Tomáš; Hu, Yan; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Mezger, Klaus

    2017-09-01

    Magnesium isotope compositions are reported for a suite of Martian meteorites that span the range of petrological and geochemical types recognized to date for Mars, including crustal breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034. The δ26Mg values (per mil units relative to DSM-3 reference material) range from -0.32 to -0.11‰; basaltic shergottites and nakhlites lie to the heavier end of the Mg isotope range whereas olivine-phyric, olivine-orthopyroxene-phyric and lherzolitic shergottites, and chassignites have slightly lighter Mg isotope compositions, attesting to modest correlation of Mg isotopes and petrology of the samples. Slightly heavier Mg isotope compositions found for surface-related materials (NWA 7034, black glass fraction of the Tissint shergottite fall; δ26Mg > -0.17‰) indicate measurable Mg isotope difference between the Martian mantle and crust but the true extent of Mg isotope fractionation for Martian surface materials remains unconstrained. The range of δ26Mg values from -0.19 to -0.11‰ in nakhlites is most likely due to accumulation of clinopyroxene during petrogenesis rather than garnet fractionation in the source or assimilation of surface material modified at low temperatures. The rather restricted range in Mg isotope compositions between spatially and temporally distinct mantle-derived samples supports the idea of inefficient/absent major tectonic cycles on Mars, which would include plate tectonics and large-scale recycling of isotopically fractionated surface materials back into the Martian mantle. The cumulative δ26Mg value of Martian samples, which are not influenced by late-stage alteration processes and/or crust-mantle interactions, is - 0.271 ± 0.040 ‰ (2SD) and is considered to reflect δ26Mg value of the Bulk Silicate Mars. This value is robust taking into account the range of lithologies involved in this estimate. It also attests to the lack of the Mg isotope variability reported for the inner Solar System bodies at current

  10. Airborne Electronically Steerable Phased Array (AESPA) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The basic concept and design of a flatplate-fed transmission array are described and system performance requirements are summarized. Particular emphasis is given to the design of the aperture, the radiating element, the phase shifter, the flatplate feed, and the mechanical support structure. Fabrication and testing techniques are considered. Of the three major parameters of interest in demonstrating the performance capabilities of the transmissive array, beamwidth was shown to be the least sensitive to system amplitude and phase errors. Beam pointing angle was also shown to be relatively insensitive to errors. Close agreement between measured and calculated values was found for array gain. The greatest difference was found for array sidelone level.

  11. Modeling Array Stations in SIG-VISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, N.; Moore, D.; Russell, S.

    2013-12-01

    We add support for array stations to SIG-VISA, a system for nuclear monitoring using probabilistic inference on seismic signals. Array stations comprise a large portion of the IMS network; they can provide increased sensitivity and more accurate directional information compared to single-component stations. Our existing model assumed that signals were independent at each station, which is false when lots of stations are close together, as in an array. The new model removes that assumption by jointly modeling signals across array elements. This is done by extending our existing Gaussian process (GP) regression models, also known as kriging, from a 3-dimensional single-component space of events to a 6-dimensional space of station-event pairs. For each array and each event attribute (including coda decay, coda height, amplitude transfer and travel time), we model the joint distribution across array elements using a Gaussian process that learns the correlation lengthscale across the array, thereby incorporating information of array stations into the probabilistic inference framework. To evaluate the effectiveness of our model, we perform ';probabilistic beamforming' on new events using our GP model, i.e., we compute the event azimuth having highest posterior probability under the model, conditioned on the signals at array elements. We compare the results from our probabilistic inference model to the beamforming currently performed by IMS station processing.

  12. Microfabricated wire arrays for Z-pinch.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spahn, Olga Blum; Rowen, Adam M.; Cich, Michael Joseph; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Arrington, Christian L.; Nash, Thomas J.; Klem, John Frederick; Romero, Dustin Heinz

    2008-10-01

    Microfabrication methods have been applied to the fabrication of wire arrays suitable for use in Z. Self-curling GaAs/AlGaAs supports were fabricated as an initial route to make small wire arrays (4mm diameter). A strain relief structure that could be integrated with the wire was designed to allow displacements of the anode/cathode connections in Z. Electroplated gold wire arrays with integrated anode/cathode bus connections were found to be sufficiently robust to allow direct handling. Platinum and copper plating processes were also investigated. A process to fabricate wire arrays on any substrate with wire thickness up to 35 microns was developed. Methods to handle and mount these arrays were developed. Fabrication of wire arrays of 20mm diameter was demonstrated, and the path to 40mm array fabrication is clear. With some final investment to show array mounting into Z hardware, the entire process to produce a microfabricated wire array will have been demonstrated.

  13. Cosmic ray effects in microcalorimeter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahle, C.K. E-mail: cak@lheapop.gsfc.nasa.gov; Boyce, K.R.; Brown, G.V.; Cottam, J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Galeazzi, M.; Kelley, R.L.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F.S.; Szymkowiak, A.E.; Tillotson, W.A

    2004-03-11

    We have identified signals resulting from cosmic rays and environmental gamma rays depositing energy in the pixels and in the silicon frame of the Astro-E2/X-Ray Spectrometer microcalorimeter array. Coincidences between pixels and between the array and an anti-coincidence detector determined the nature of the events. Pulse shapes and amplitudes from the cosmic ray events helped refine the thermal model of the array chip. We discuss how future arrays can be optimized either for the greatest background rejection or for the highest source count rates.

  14. ANTENNAS ARRAY ADJUST WITH ADAPTIVE NEURONAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Padrón

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work an array failure correction for Linear Antenna Array (LAA is presented. This is carried out by means ofan Adaptive Artificial Neural Network (AANN that adjusts the amplitude and phase at beamforming. Theappropriated corrections are given, when one, or two, or three elements have a failure in the antenna linear array.The AANN corrects the corresponding parameters in the radiation pattern obtained due to the failure, when weknow the coefficients of the array factor (AF. This yields a reduction of side lobe level and some interferencesdisappear.

  15. Retroreflector Array for Test Environments (RATE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Research Support Instruments, Inc. (RSI) proposes to develop the Retroreflector Array for Test Environments (RATE), an innovative technology that will...

  16. Large Format Uncooled Focal Plane Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Black Forest Engineering has identified innovative modifications in uncooled focal plane array (UFPA) architecture and processing that allows development of large...

  17. Enhanced reflection from inverse tapered nanocone arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Xiang-Tian; Dai, Qing, E-mail: daiq@nanoctr.cn [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China); Butt, Haider, E-mail: h.butt@bham.ac.uk; Deng, Sunan [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Yetisen, Ali K.; Cruz Vasconcellos, Fernando da [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Kangwanwatana, Chuan; Montelongo, Yunuen; Qasim, Malik M.; Wilkinson, Timothy D. [Electrical Engineering Division, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-04

    We computationally and experimentally demonstrate enhanced reflection effects displayed by silicon-based inverted nanocone arrays. A 3D finite element model is used to characterize the optical properties of the nanocone arrays with respect to the change in polarization and incident angles. The nanocone arrays are fabricated by e-beam lithography in hexagonal and triangular geometries with a lattice constant of 300 nm. The fabricated devices show a two-fold increase in reflection compared with bare silicon surface, as well as a strong diffraction within the visible and near-infrared spectra. The nanocone arrays may find a variety of applications from optical devices to energy conservation technologies.

  18. A series array of dc SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welty, R.P. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Martinis, J.M. (Geraghty and Miller, Inc., Reston, VA (United States))

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on a series array of 100 dc SQUIDs using trilayer Nb-AlO{sub x}-Nb junctions. The SQUIDs are modulated with a common flux bias line and produce an output voltage swing of several millivolts across the array. The large output voltage will allow direct connection to room temperature electronics without the transformer coupling and resulting frequency limitations commonly associated with dc SQUID amplifiers. The authors measured a bandwidth of dc to at least 175 MHz for a 100-SQUID array. The series array will be used as the output stage for a multistage integrated SQUID amplifier.

  19. Isotopic yield in cold binary fission of even-even $^{244-258}$Cf isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Santhosh, K P; Krishnan, Sreejith

    2016-01-01

    The cold binary fission of even-even 244-258Cf isotopes has been studied by taking the interacting barrier as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential. The favorable fragment combinations are obtained from the cold valley plot (plot of driving potential vs. mass number of fragments) and by calculating the yield for charge minimized fragments. It is found that highest yield for 244,246,248Cf isotopes are for the fragments with isotope of Pb (Z=82) as one fragment, whereas for 250Cf and 252Cf isotopes the highest yield is for the fragments with isotope of Hg (Z=80) as one fragment. In the case of 254,256,258Cf isotopes the highest yield is for the fragments with Sn (Z=50) as one fragment. Thus, the fragment combinations with maximum yield reveal the role of doubly magic and near doubly magic nuclei in binary fission. It is found that asymmetric splitting is favoured for Cf isotopes with mass number A 252. In the case of Cf isotope with A=252, there is an equal probability for asymmetric and symmetric splitti...

  20. Design and Realization of Array Signal Processor VLSI Architecture for Phased Array System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Govind Rao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A method for implementing an array signal processor for phased array radars. The array signal processor can receive planar array antenna inputs and can process it. It is based on the application of Adaptive Digital beam formers using FPGAs. Adaptive filter algorithm used here is Inverse Q-R Decomposition based Recursive Least Squares (IQRD-RLS [1] algorithm. Array signal processor based on FPGAs is suitable in the areas of Phased Array Radar receiver, where speed, accuracy and numerical stability are of utmost important. Using IQRD-RLS algorithm, optimal weights are calculated in much less time compared to conventional QRD-RLS algorithm. A customized multiple FPGA board comprising three Kintex-7 FPGAs is employed to implement array signal processor. The proposed architecture can form multiple beams from planar array antenna elements

  1. Automated calibration of multistatic arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderer, Bruce

    2017-03-14

    A method is disclosed for calibrating a multistatic array having a plurality of transmitter and receiver pairs spaced from one another along a predetermined path and relative to a plurality of bin locations, and further being spaced at a fixed distance from a stationary calibration implement. A clock reference pulse may be generated, and each of the transmitters and receivers of each said transmitter/receiver pair turned on at a monotonically increasing time delay interval relative to the clock reference pulse. Ones of the transmitters and receivers may be used such that a previously calibrated transmitter or receiver of a given one of the transmitter/receiver pairs is paired with a subsequently un-calibrated one of the transmitters or receivers of an immediately subsequently positioned transmitter/receiver pair, to calibrate the transmitter or receiver of the immediately subsequent transmitter/receiver pair.

  2. AGATA - Advanced Gamma Tracking Array

    CERN Document Server

    Akkoyun, S; Alikhani, B; Ameil, F; de Angelis, G; Arnold, L; Astier, A; Ataç, A; Aubert, Y; Aufranc, C; Austin, A; Aydin, S; Azaiez, F; Badoer, S; Balabanski, D L; Barrientos, D; Baulieu, G; Baumann, R; Bazzacco, D; Beck, F A; Beck, T; Bednarczyk, P; Bellato, M; Bentley, M A; Benzoni, G; Berthier, R; Berti, L; Beunard, R; Bianco, G Lo; Birkenbach, B; Bizzeti, P G; Bizzeti-Sona, A M; Blanc, F Le; Blasco, J M; Blasi, N; Bloor, D; Boiano, C; Borsato, M; Bortolato, D; Boston, A J; Boston, H C; Bourgault, P; Boutachkov, P; Bouty, A; Bracco, A; Brambilla, S; Brawn, I P; Brondi, A; Broussard, S; Bruyneel, B; Bucurescu, D; Burrows, I; Bürger, A; Cabaret, S; Cahan, B; Calore, E; Camera, F; Capsoni, A; Carrió, F; Casati, G; Castoldi, M; Cederwall, B; Cercus, J -L; Chambert, V; Chambit, M El; Chapman, R; Charles, L; Chavas, J; Clément, E; Cocconi, P; Coelli, S; Coleman-Smith, P J; Colombo, A; Colosimo, S; Commeaux, C; Conventi, D; Cooper, R J; Corsi, A; Cortesi, A; Costa, L; Crespi, F C L; Cresswell, J R; Cullen, D M; Curien, D; Czermak, A; Delbourg, D; Depalo, R; Descombes, T; Désesquelles, P; Detistov, P; Diarra, C; Didierjean, F; Dimmock, M R; Doan, Q T; Domingo-Pardo, C; Doncel, M; Dorangeville, F; Dosme, N; Drouen, Y; Duchêne, G; Dulny, B; Eberth, J; Edelbruck, P; Egea, J; Engert, T; Erduran, M N; Ertürk, S; Fanin, C; Fantinel, S; Farnea, E; Faul, T; Filliger, M; Filmer, F; Finck, Ch; de France, G; Gadea, A; Gast, W; Geraci, A; Gerl, J; Gernhäuser, R; Giannatiempo, A; Giaz, A; Gibelin, L; Givechev, A; Goel, N; González, V; Gottardo, A; Grave, X; Grȩbosz, J; Griffiths, R; Grint, A N; Gros, P; Guevara, L; Gulmini, M; Görgen, A; Ha, H T M; Habermann, T; Harkness, L J; Harroch, H; Hauschild, K; He, C; Hernández-Prieto, A; Hervieu, B; Hess, H; Hüyük, T; Ince, E; Isocrate, R; Jaworski, G; Johnson, A; Jolie, J; Jones, P; Jonson, B; Joshi, P; Judson, D S; Jungclaus, A; Kaci, M; Karkour, N; Karolak, M; Kaşkaş, A; Kebbiri, M; Kempley, R S; Khaplanov, A; Klupp, S; Kogimtzis, M; Kojouharov, I; Korichi, A; Korten, W; Kröll, Th; Krücken, R; Kurz, N; Ky, B Y; Labiche, M; Lafay, X; Lavergne, L; Lazarus, I H; Leboutelier, S; Lefebvre, F; Legay, E; Legeard, L; Lelli, F; Lenzi, S M; Leoni, S; Lermitage, A; Lersch, D; Leske, J; Letts, S C; Lhenoret, S; Lieder, R M; Linget, D; Ljungvall, J; Lopez-Martens, A; Lotodé, A; Lunardi, S; Maj, A; van der Marel, J; Mariette, Y; Marginean, N; Marginean, R; Maron, G; Mather, A R; Mȩczyński, W; Mendéz, V; Medina, P; Melon, B; Menegazzo, R; Mengoni, D; Merchan, E; Mihailescu, L; Michelagnoli, C; Mierzejewski, J; Milechina, L; Million, B; Mitev, K; Molini, P; Montanari, D; Moon, S; Morbiducci, F; Moro, R; Morrall, P S; Möller, O; Nannini, A; Napoli, D R; Nelson, L; Nespolo, M; Ngo, V L; Nicoletto, M; Nicolini, R; Noa, Y Le; Nolan, P J; Norman, M; Nyberg, J; Obertelli, A; Olariu, A; Orlandi, R; Oxley, D C; Özben, C; Ozille, M; Oziol, C; Pachoud, E; Palacz, M; Palin, J; Pancin, J; Parisel, C; Pariset, P; Pascovici, G; Peghin, R; Pellegri, L; Perego, A; Perrier, S; Petcu, M; Petkov, P; Petrache, C; Pierre, E; Pietralla, N; Pietri, S; Pignanelli, M; Piqueras, I; Podolyak, Z; Pouhalec, P Le; Pouthas, J; Pugnére, D; Pucknell, V F E; Pullia, A; Quintana, B; Raine, R; Rainovski, G; Ramina, L; Rampazzo, G; La Rana, G; Rebeschini, M; Recchia, F; Redon, N; Reese, M; Reiter, P; Regan, P H; Riboldi, S; Richer, M; Rigato, M; Rigby, S; Ripamonti, G; Robinson, A P; Robin, J; Roccaz, J; Ropert, J -A; Rossé, B; Alvarez, C Rossi; Rosso, D; Rubio, B; Rudolph, D; Saillant, F; Şahin, E; Salomon, F; Salsac, M -D; Salt, J; Salvato, G; Sampson, J; Sanchis, E; Santos, C; Schaffner, H; Schlarb, M; Scraggs, D P; Seddon, D; Şenyiğit, M; Sigward, M -H; Simpson, G; Simpson, J; Slee, M; Smith, J F; Sona, P; Sowicki, B; Spolaore, P; Stahl, C; Stanios, T; Stefanova, E; Stézowski, O; Strachan, J; Suliman, G; Söderström, P -A; Tain, J L; Tanguy, S; Tashenov, S; Theisen, Ch; Thornhill, J; Tomasi, F; Toniolo, N; Touzery, R; Travers, B; Triossi, A; Tripon, M; Tun-Lanoë, K M M; Turcato, M; Unsworth, C; Ur, C A; Valiente-Dobon, J J; Vandone, V; Vardaci, E; Venturelli, R; Veronese, F; Veyssiere, Ch; Viscione, E; Wadsworth, R; Walker, P M; Warr, N; Weber, C; Weisshaar, D; Wells, D; Wieland, O; Wiens, A; Wittwer, G; Wollersheim, H J; Zocca, F; Zamfir, N V; Ziȩbliński, M; Zucchiatti, A

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) is a European project to develop and operate the next generation gamma-ray spectrometer. AGATA is based on the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented high-purity germanium crystals. This technique requires the accurate determination of the energy, time and position of every interaction as a gamma ray deposits its energy within the detector volume. Reconstruction of the full interaction path results in a detector with very high efficiency and excellent spectral response. The realization of gamma-ray tracking and AGATA is a result of many technical advances. These include the development of encapsulated highly-segmented germanium detectors assembled in a triple cluster detector cryostat, an electronics system with fast digital sampling and a data acquisition system to process the data at a high rate. The full characterization of the crystals was measured and compared with detector-response simulations. This enabled pulse-shape analysis algorith...

  3. Cherenkov Telescope Array Data Management

    CERN Document Server

    Lamanna, G; Contreras, J L; Knödlseder, J; Kosack, K; Neyroud, N; Aboudan, A; Arrabito, L; Barbier, C; Bastieri, D; Boisson, C; Brau-Nogué, S; Bregeon, J; Bulgarelli, A; Carosi, A; Costa, A; De Cesare, G; Reyes, R de los; Fioretti, V; Gallozzi, S; Jacquemier, J; Khelifi, B; Kocot, J; Lombardi, S; Lucarelli, F; Lyard, E; Maier, G; Massimino, P; Osborne, J P; Perri, M; Rico, J; Sanchez, D A; Satalecka, K; Siejkowski, H; Stolarczyk, T; Szepieniec, T; Testa, V; Walter, R; Ward, J E; Zoli, A

    2015-01-01

    Very High Energy gamma-ray astronomy with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is evolving towards the model of a public observatory. Handling, processing and archiving the large amount of data generated by the CTA instruments and delivering scientific products are some of the challenges in designing the CTA Data Management. The participation of scientists from within CTA Consortium and from the greater worldwide scientific community necessitates a sophisticated scientific analysis system capable of providing unified and efficient user access to data, software and computing resources. Data Management is designed to respond to three main issues: (i) the treatment and flow of data from remote telescopes; (ii) "big-data" archiving and processing; (iii) and open data access. In this communication the overall technical design of the CTA Data Management, current major developments and prototypes are presented.

  4. THE AUGER ENGINEERING RADIO ARRAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Weidenhaupt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Auger Engineering Radio Array currently measures MHz radio emission from extensive air showers induced by high energy cosmic rays with 24 self-triggered radio detector stations. Its unique site, embedded into the baseline detectors and extensions of the Pierre Auger Observatory, allows to study air showers in great detail and to calibrate the radio emission. In its final stage AERA will expand to an area of approximately 20km2 to explore the feasibility of the radio-detection technique for future cosmic-ray detectors. The concept and hardware design of AERA as well as strategies to enable self-triggered radio detection are presented. Radio emission mechanisms are discussed based on polarization analysis of the first AERA data.

  5. Conformable eddy current array delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summan, Rahul; Pierce, Gareth; Macleod, Charles; Mineo, Carmelo; Riise, Jonathan; Morozov, Maxim; Dobie, Gordon; Bolton, Gary; Raude, Angélique; Dalpé, Colombe; Braumann, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The external surface of stainless steel containers used for the interim storage of nuclear material may be subject to Atmospherically Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking (AISCC). The inspection of such containers poses a significant challenge due to the large quantities involved; therefore, automating the inspection process is of considerable interest. This paper reports upon a proof-of-concept project concerning the automated NDT of a set of test containers containing artificially generated AISCCs. An Eddy current array probe with a conformable padded surface from Eddyfi was used as the NDT sensor and end effector on a KUKA KR5 arc HW robot. A kinematically valid cylindrical raster scan path was designed using the KUKA|PRC path planning software. Custom software was then written to interface measurement acquisition from the Eddyfi hardware with the motion control of the robot. Preliminary results and analysis are presented from scanning two canisters.

  6. Gold film resistor bolometric array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Fuxian [Academia Sinica, Hefei, AH (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics

    1997-03-01

    A new type of bolometric array diagnostic system has been developed for HT-6M tokamak and HT-7 superconductor tokamak plasma physics experimental research. This system is composed of temperature-sensitive detectors of gold film resistor and phase-sensitive rectifiers of the bridge excited by square waves. With this system, a radiation detection limit of 192.0 {mu}W cm{sup -2} at a spatial resolution of 2.0 cm and a temporal resolution of 1.0 mS. The system features a high temperature baking resistance, ultra high vacuum endurance, sufficient insensitivity to radiation damage, sufficient suppression of electromagnetic interference, good long-term stability, high radiation sensitivity and measurement data reliability. Absolute calibration of the detectors is performed simultaneously and in situ by means of a built-in electronic power pulse. (orig.) 9 refs.

  7. Microlens arrays with integrated pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yang

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Microlenses are important optical components that image, detect, and couple light. But most synthetic microlenses have fixed position and shape once they are fabricated, so their possible range of tunability and complexity is rather limited. By comparison, biology provides many varied, new paradigms for the development of adaptive optical networks. Here, we discuss inspirational examples of biological lenses and their synthetic analogs. We focus on the fabrication and characterization of biomimetic microlens arrays with integrated pores, whose appearance and function are similar to highly efficient optical elements formed by brittlestars. The complex design can be created by three-beam interference lithography. The synthetic lens has strong focusing ability for use as an adjustable lithographic mask and a tunable optical device coupled with the microfluidic system. Replacing rigid microlenses with soft hydrogels provides a way of changing the lens geometry and refractive index continuously in response to external stimuli, resulting in intelligent, multifunctional, tunable optics.

  8. Scanning strategies for imaging arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Kovács, A

    2008-01-01

    Large-format (sub)millimeter wavelength imaging arrays are best operated in scanning observing modes rather than traditional position-switched (chopped) modes. The choice of observing mode is critical for isolating source signals from various types of noise interference, especially for ground-based instrumentation operating under a bright atmosphere. Ideal observing strategies can combat 1/f noise, resist instrumental defects, sensitively recover emission on large scales, and provide an even field coverage -- all under feasible requirements of telescope movement. This work aims to guide the design of observing patterns that maximize scientific returns. It also compares some of the popular choices of observing modes for (sub)millimeter imaging, such as random, Lissajous, billiard, spiral, On-The-Fly (OTF), DREAM, chopped and stare patterns. Many of the conclusions are also applicable other imaging applications and imaging in one dimension (e.g. spectroscopic observations).

  9. Gigapixel imaging with microlens arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Antony; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2016-03-01

    A crucial part of the drug discovery process involves imaging the response of thousands of cell cultures to candidate drugs. Quantitative parameters from these "high content screens", such as protein expression and cell morphology, are extracted from fluorescence and brightfield micrographs. Due to the sheer number of cells that need to imaged for adequate statistics, the imaging time itself is a major bottleneck. Automated microscopes image small fields-of-view (FOVs) serially, which are then stitched together to form gigapixel-scale mosaics. We have developed a microscopy architecture that reduces mechanical overhead of traditional large field-of-view by parallelizing the image capture process. Instead of a single objective lens imaging FOVs one by one, we employ a microlens array for continuous photon capture, resulting in a 3-fold throughput increase. In this contribution, we present the design and imaging results of this microscopy architecture in three different contrast modes: multichannel fluorescence, hyperspectral fluorescence and brightfield.

  10. Wind farm array wake losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.W. [Impact Weather, Washougal, WA (United States); McCarthy, E.F. [Wind Economics & Technology, Inc., Martinez, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A wind turbine wake study was conducted in the summer of 1987 at an Altamont Pass wind electric generating facility. The wind speed deficits, turbulence, and power deficits from an array consisting of several rows of wind turbines is discussed. A total of nine different test configurations were evaluated for a downwind spacing ranging from 7 rotor diameters (RD) to 34 RD and a cross wind spacing of 1.3 RD and 2.7 RD. Wake power deficits of 15% were measured at 16 RD and power losses of a few percent were even measurable at 27 RD for the closer cross wind spacing. For several rows of turbines separated by 7-9 RD the wake zones overlapped and formed compound wakes with higher velocity deficits. The wind speed and direction turbulence in the wake was much higher than the ambient turbulence. The results from this study are compared to the findings from other similar field measurements.

  11. Array radars solve communication jams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, H. D.

    1982-04-01

    The possibilities of incorporating mobile radar units as slave stations in communications relay applications during times of disrupted communications is examined. The limitations on uses of search, tracking, and multifunction radars are examined, noting that employment of the mobile system entails some tracking by the master phased-arrays to keep the mobile units in focus. The tracking patterns and dwell times are outlined, and the possibility of 700-1000 dwell times of 1220 microsec duration/sec is mentioned as opening the opportunity for high quality data transmissions. Signal-to-noise ratios are formulated for jamming situations, with offsetting tactical features for the jamming including the directivity and gain of the master antenna, the master station's power aperture product, on-axis to off-axis gain ratio, and antenna positioning ability. A slave station must be equipped with a transponder for communications, which are best achieved with pseudo-random coded waveforms.

  12. Sputtering in supported cluster arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez-Sáez, J.C., E-mail: jc.jimenez@upm.es [Dept. Física Aplicada a la Ingeniería Aeronáutica y Naval, ETSIAE, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pérez-Martín, A.M.C.; Jiménez-Rodríguez, J.J. [Dept. Física Aplicada III, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-06-01

    Bombardment of periodical arrays formed by Co nanoislands deposited on a Cu(0 0 1) substrate with 1-keV argon ions is simulated by using molecular dynamics. Sputtering yield is analyzed distinguishing between particles sputtered across the supported cluster surface and across the flat substrate surface without nanoparticle above. The dependence of this magnitude on the height and the periodical spacing between nanoislands has been investigated. Results show that this dependence for the sputtering across the nanoislands and across the substrate is different. In the case of the total sputtering, the “substrate” effect prevails since the behavior of this magnitude is approximately analogous to the sputtering across the substrate. The more probable causes are analyzed in this article.

  13. Calculation and analysis of correlation curves between Lanzhou Seismic Array sites and assessment of primary array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝春月; 郑重; 周公威

    2003-01-01

    By using the waveform data recorded during the site survey of Lanzhou Seismic Array, the author calculated andanalyzed the correlation of the signal and noise between the site pairs and found that the ideal radii of the twoconcentric rings for Lanzhou Seismic Array were 380 m and 1500 m, respectively. According to the radius limitand other requirements, nine sites were chosen to make a seismic array, and then the detection and location abilityof the array were estimated.

  14. Multipath Array Processing for Co-Prime and Under-Sampled Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    freedom than physical sensors present in the array. However, the cost of the achievable degrees of freedom is a loss of approximately half of the array...of degrees of freedom of the array. A co-prime frequency comb is a novel active sonar waveform that achieves range-Doppler performance similar...localization with moving co-prime arrays,” in Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP), 2015 IEEE International Conference on, 2015. 6 2

  15. Investigation of reduced transition-strengths in neutron-rich chromium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunroth, Thomas; Dewald, Alfred; Fransen, Christoph; Litzinger, Julia [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Koeln (Germany); Iwasaki, Hironori [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, MSU (United States); Lemasson, Antoine [GANIL, Laboratoire Commun DSM/CEA (France); Lenzi, Silvia [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    Neutron-rich nuclei close to N=40 are known for their rapid changes in nuclear structure. While {sup 68}Ni exhibits signatures of a shell closure, experimental data - e.g. excitation energies of the 2{sup +}{sub 1}-state and B(E2;2{sup +}{sub 1} → 0{sup +}{sub 1})-values - along the isotopic chains in even more exotic Fe and Cr-isotopes suggest a sudden rise in collective behaviour for N → 40. Lifetimes of low-lying yrast states in {sup 58,60,62}Cr were measured with the Recoil Distance Doppler-shift (RDDS) technique at NSCL, MSU (USA) to deduce model independent B(E2)-values. After fragmentation of a primary {sup 82}Se beam (E=140 AMeV) on a {sup 9}Be target and subsequent filtering with the A1900 fragment separator, high purity {sup 59,61,63}Mn-beams (E ∝ 95 AMeV) impinged on the {sup 9}Be plunger target, where excited states in the above mentioned Cr-isotopes were then populated in one proton knockout reactions. The S800 spectrograph allowed a clear recoil identification, which then lead to clean γ-spectra as measured by the Segmented Germanium Array (SeGA). Final results of this experiment will be shown and discussed in the context of state-of-the-art shell-model calculations.

  16. Nuclear structure studies of the neutron-rich Rubidium isotopes using Coulomb excitation

    CERN Multimedia

    Reiter, P; Blazhev, A A; Voulot, D; Meot, V H; Simpson, G S; Georgiev, G P; Gaudefroy, L; Roig, O

    We propose to study the properties of odd-mass neutron-rich rubidium isotopes by the Coulomb-excitation technique, using the Miniball array coupled to the REX-ISOLDE facility. The results from similar measurements from the recent years (e.g. for the odd-mass and the odd-odd Cu isotopes, IS435) have shown the strong potential in such measurements for gaining information both for single-particle-like and collective states in exotic nuclei. Since there is practically no experimental information for excited states in the odd-mass Rb isotopes beyond $^{93}$Rb, the present study should be able to provide new data in a region of spherical ($^{93}$Rb and $^{95}$Rb) as well as well-deformed nuclei ($^{97}$Rb and $^{99}$Rb). Of particular interest is the rapid shape change that occurs when going from $^{95}$Rb (${\\varepsilon}_{2}$=0.06) to $^{97}$Rb (${\\varepsilon}_{2}$=0.3). These results should be of significant astrophysical interest as well, due to the close proximity of the r-process path.

  17. Stable isotope analysis of diet confirms niche separation of two sympatric species of Namib Desert lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Ian W; Lease, Hilary M; Hetem, Robyn S; Mitchell, Duncan; Fuller, Andrea; Woodborne, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We used stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen to study the trophic niche of two species of insectivorous lizards, the Husab sand lizard Pedioplanis husabensis and Bradfield's Namib day gecko living sympatrically in the Namib Desert. We measured the δ(13) C and δ(15) N ratios in lizard blood tissues with different turnover times (whole blood, red blood cells and plasma) to investigate lizard diet in different seasons. We also measured the δ(13) C and δ(15) N ratios in available arthropod prey and plant tissues on the site, to identify the avenues of nutrient movement between lizards and their prey. Through the use of stable isotope mixing models, we found that the two lizard species relied on a largely non-overlapping but seasonally variable array of arthropods: P. husabensis primarily fed on termites, beetles and wasps, while R. bradfieldi fed mainly on ants, wasps and hemipterans. Nutrients originating from C3 plants were proportionally higher for R. bradfieldi than for P. husabensis during autumn and late autumn/early winter, although not summer. Contrary to the few available data estimating the trophic transfer of nutrients in ectotherms in mixed C3 and C4 /crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant landscapes, we found that our lizard species primarily acquired nutrients that originated from C4 /CAM plants. This work adds an important dimension to the general lack of studies using stable isotope analyses to estimate lizard niche partitioning and resource use.

  18. An isotopic perspective on growth and differentiation of Proterozoic orogenic crust: From subduction magmatism to cratonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Simon P.; Korhonen, Fawna J.; Kirkland, Christopher L.; Cliff, John B.; Belousova, Elena A.; Sheppard, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The in situ chemical differentiation of continental crust ultimately leads to the long-term stability of the continents. This process, more commonly known as 'cratonization', is driven by deep crustal melting with the transfer of those melts to shallower regions resulting in a strongly chemically stratified crust, with a refractory, dehydrated lower portion overlain by a complementary enriched upper portion. Since the lower to mid portions of continental crust are rarely exposed, investigation of the cratonization process must be through indirect methods. In this study we use in situ Hf and O isotope compositions of both magmatic and inherited zircons from several felsic magmatic suites in the Capricorn Orogen of Western Australia to highlight the differentiation history (i.e. cratonization) of this portion of late Archean to Proterozoic orogenic crust. The Capricorn Orogen shows a distinct tectonomagmatic history that evolves from an active continental margin through to intracratonic reworking, ultimately leading to thermally stable crust that responds similarly to the bounding Archean Pilbara and Yilgarn Cratons. The majority of magmatic zircons from the main magmatic cycles have Hf isotopic compositions that are generally more evolved than CHUR, forming vertical arrays that extend to moderately radiogenic compositions. Complimentary O isotope data, also show a significant variation in composition. However, combined, these data define not only the source components from which the magmas were derived, but also a range of physio-chemical processes that operated during magma transport and emplacement. These data also identify a previously unknown crustal reservoir in the Capricorn Orogen.

  19. Simultaneous use of multiple seismic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipčević, J.; Kennett, B. L. N.; Tkalčić, H.

    2017-01-01

    Seismic arrays provide an important means of enhancing seismic signals and determining the directional properties of the wavefield by beam-forming. When multiple arrays are to be used together, the viewpoint needs to be modified from looking outwards from each array to focusing on a specific target area and so constraining the portions of the waveforms to be analysed. Beam-forming for each array is supplemented by the relative time constraints for propagation from the target to each array to provide tight spatial control. Simultaneous multiple array analysis provides a powerful tool for source characterisation, and for structural analysis of scatterers as virtual sources. The multiple array concept allows us to illuminate a specific point in the Earth from many different directions and thus map detailed patterns of heterogeneity in the Earth. Furthermore, illumination of the structure from multiple directions using data from the same event minimizes source effects to provide clearer images of heterogeneity. The analysis is based on a similar concept to the back-projection technique, where a part of the seismic wavetrain is mapped to a specific point in space by ray-tracing. In contrast to classic back-projection where the incoming energy is mapped onto a horizontal plane with limited vertical resolution, the multi-array method controls depth response by combining relative time constraints between the arrays and conventional beam-forming. We illustrate this approach with application to two earthquakes at moderate depth. The results show that the use of simultaneous multiple arrays can provide improvement both in signal quality and resolution, with the additional benefit of being able to accurately locate the source of the incoming energy and map large areas with only a limited number of such arrays.

  20. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    2015-01-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenviro......Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track...

  1. Matching isotopic distributions from metabolically labeled samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlwain, Sean; Page, David; Huttlin, Edward L; Sussman, Michael R

    2008-07-01

    In recent years stable isotopic labeling has become a standard approach for quantitative proteomic analyses. Among the many available isotopic labeling strategies, metabolic labeling is attractive for the excellent internal control it provides. However, analysis of data from metabolic labeling experiments can be complicated because the spacing between labeled and unlabeled forms of each peptide depends on its sequence, and is thus variable from analyte to analyte. As a result, one generally needs to know the sequence of a peptide to identify its matching isotopic distributions in an automated fashion. In some experimental situations it would be necessary or desirable to match pairs of labeled and unlabeled peaks from peptides of unknown sequence. This article addresses this largely overlooked problem in the analysis of quantitative mass spectrometry data by presenting an algorithm that not only identifies isotopic distributions within a mass spectrum, but also annotates matches between natural abundance light isotopic distributions and their metabolically labeled counterparts. This algorithm is designed in two stages: first we annotate the isotopic peaks using a modified version of the IDM algorithm described last year; then we use a probabilistic classifier that is supplemented by dynamic programming to find the metabolically labeled matched isotopic pairs. Such a method is needed for high-throughput quantitative proteomic metabolomic experiments measured via mass spectrometry. The primary result of this article is that the dynamic programming approach performs well given perfect isotopic distribution annotations. Our algorithm achieves a true positive rate of 99% and a false positive rate of 1% using perfect isotopic distribution annotations. When the isotopic distributions are annotated given 'expert' selected peaks, the same algorithm gets a true positive rate of 77% and a false positive rate of 1%. Finally, when annotating using machine selected peaks, which

  2. Myths of Isotopic Reference Materials Busted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, T.

    2007-12-01

    During the past several years, the determination of the isotopic abundances of elements including H, Li, B, C, N, O, Mg, Si, S, Cl, Ca, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Tl, and Se has substantially increased because of expanded use in hydrology, environmental studies, microbiology, forensic investigations, atmospheric investigations, oceanography, etc. Improvements in instrumentation enable increasingly precise isotope-amount-ratio measurements in these fields, but these improvements in precision commonly do not lead to improvements in accuracy because of the lack or improper use of isotopic reference materials. When properly used, these critically important materials enable any laboratory worldwide to measure the same homogeneous sample and report the same isotopic abundance within analytical uncertainty. For example, for stable isotopic analysis of gaseous hydrogen samples, the agreement among 36 laboratories worldwide before normalization to any hydrogen gas reference material was 11.8 per mill. After normalization to anchors (gaseous H isotopic reference materials) at each end of the delta H-2 scale, the agreement was 0.85 per mill, an improvement of more than an order of magnitude. Consistency of delta C-13 measurements often can be improved by nearly 50 percent by anchoring the delta C-13 scale with two isotopic reference materials differing substantially in C-13 mole fraction, namely NBS 19 calcite and L-SVEC lithium carbonate. Agreement of delta C-13 values of four expert laboratories analyzing USGS40 L- glutamic acid by CF-IRMS methods improved from 0.084 to 0.015 per mill with use of the two scale anchors (NBS 19 and L-SVEC). Solid oxygen isotopic reference materials (IAEA-600 caffeine, IAEA-601 and IAEA-602 benzoic acids, IAEA-NO-3, USGS32, USGS34, and USGS35 nitrates, NBS-127, IAEA-SO-5, and IAEA-SO-6 barium sulfates) are poorly calibrated. Calibrating these solids to the VSMOW-SLAP reference water scale has been very difficult because both the solids and reference

  3. Stable isotopes in Lithuanian bioarcheological material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipityte, Raminta; Jankauskas, Rimantas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of bioarcheological material of ancient human populations allows us to understand the subsistence behavior associated with various adaptations to the environment. Feeding habits are essential to the survival and growth of ancient populations. Stable isotope analysis is accepted tool in paleodiet (Schutkowski et al, 1999) and paleoenvironmental (Zernitskaya et al, 2014) studies. However, stable isotopes can be useful not only in investigating human feeding habits but also in describing social and cultural structure of the past populations (Le Huray and Schutkowski, 2005). Only few stable isotope investigations have been performed before in Lithuanian region suggesting a quite uniform diet between males and females and protein intake from freshwater fish and animal protein. Previously, stable isotope analysis has only been used to study a Stone Age population however, more recently studies have been conducted on Iron Age and Late medieval samples (Jacobs et al, 2009). Anyway, there was a need for more precise examination. Stable isotope analysis were performed on human bone collagen and apatite samples in this study. Data represented various ages (from 5-7th cent. to 18th cent.). Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis on medieval populations indicated that individuals in studied sites in Lithuania were almost exclusively consuming C3 plants, C3 fed terrestrial animals, and some freshwater resources. Current investigation demonstrated social differences between elites and country people and is promising in paleodietary and daily life reconstruction. Acknowledgement I thank prof. dr. G. Grupe, Director of the Anthropological and Palaeoanatomical State Collection in Munich for providing the opportunity to work in her laboratory. The part of this work was funded by DAAD. Antanaitis-Jacobs, Indre, et al. "Diet in early Lithuanian prehistory and the new stable isotope evidence." Archaeologia Baltica 12 (2009): 12-30. Le Huray, Jonathan D., and Holger

  4. Electric Monopole Transition Strengths in Stable Nickel Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evitts, Lee; Garnsworthy, Adam; Kibedi, Tibor; Super-e Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Electric monopole (E 0) transition strengths are a sensitive probe for investigating nuclear structure and shape coexistence. There is a need for E 0 transition strengths in closed shell nuclei in order to develop our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the generation of electric monopole strength. Simultaneous detections of γ rays and internal conversion electrons must be measured in order to determine an E 0 transition strength. A series of measurements in the stable nickel isotopes were performed at the Australian National University. Excited states in 58 , 60 , 62Ni were populated via inelastic proton scattering. The CAESAR array of Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors was used to measure the (E 2 / M 1) mixing ratio of transitions from angular distributions of γ rays. The Super-e spectrometer was used to measure electron-gamma branching ratios in order to extract E 0 transition strengths for a number of Jπ ->Jπ transitions. An overview of the experiments will be presented, along with preliminary results for E 0 transition strengths between Jπ ≠ 0 states in the semi-magic nuclei, 58 , 60 , 62Ni. A comparison with the matrix elements obtained from a new microscopic model for E 0 transitions will be made. This work was supported in part by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  5. Stable isotope enrichment using a plasma centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Bures, Brian; Madden, Robert

    2012-10-01

    A primary goal of the Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program (Isotope Program) within the Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) is to produce isotopes that are in short supply in the U.S. and of which there exists no or insufficient domestic commercial production capability. A vacuum arc plasma centrifuge is a rigid rotor column of metal plasma in which centrifugal forces re-distribute ions radially according to their mass/charge ratio. Early work demonstrated rotation at 2 million rpm and separation of various stable isotopes. The spinning plasma column had a Gaussian flux profile, peaked on the rigid rotor axis. This work adopts a more efficient approach, with the plasma created as a hollow column, wherein the flux is concentrated at larger radii where the centrifugal action is highest. By tailoring the vacuum arc discharge geometry, the rotation rate can also be increased to ˜10 million rpm. Data from Cu, Al and other metal plasmas will be presented and discussed in light of enriched stable isotopes needed for research and medicine.

  6. Accelerator Production of Isotopes for Medical Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, Suzanne

    2014-03-01

    The increase in use of radioisotopes for medical imaging and therapy has led to the development of novel routes of isotope production. For example, the production and purification of longer-lived position emitting radiometals has been explored to allow for nuclear imaging agents based on peptides, antibodies and nanoparticles. These isotopes (64Cu, 89Zr, 86Y) are typically produced via irradiation of solid targets on smaller medical cyclotrons at dedicated facilities. Recently, isotope harvesting from heavy ion accelerator facilities has also been suggested. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be a new national user facility for nuclear science to be completed in 2020. Radioisotopes could be produced by dedicated runs by primary users or may be collected synergistically from the water in cooling-loops for the primary beam dump that cycle the water at flow rates in excess of hundreds of gallons per minute. A liquid water target system for harvesting radioisotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) was designed and constructed as the initial step in proof-of-principle experiments to harvest useful radioisotopes in this manner. This talk will provide an overview of isotope production using both dedicated machines and harvesting from larger accelerators typically used for nuclear physics. Funding from Department of Energy under DESC0007352 and DESC0006862.

  7. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C.J. [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the foreword, technical program, the author index and of the papers (1-60) presented at the conference.

  8. CERN to start producing medical isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    A promising project that was hailed at the ICTR-PHE 2012 medical conference (see Bulletin issues 10-11/2012 and 12-13/2012) has seen the light of day at CERN. The project, known by the name of MEDICIS, will make it possible to produce a large variety of radioactive isotopes for medical research.   This image of a brain, superimposed on a drawing by Leonardo da Vinci, was taken by a PET scanner after injecting a molecule containing a positron-emitting isotope. CERN-MEDICIS will produce new isotopes for imaging which will be able to show up cancerous tissues and destroy them by emitting local radiation as the isotopes decay. In the United States, a new radium-based drug which targets bone metastases is about to go on the market. Radium, which can be brought to bear at the cell level, is a potent weapon in the fight against certain types of cancer, and is opening the way to a new form of medicine. This is the direction that CERN has decided to follow through the CERN-MEDICIS* (Medical Isotopes...

  9. Diagnostics of the BIOMASS feed array prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, Cecilia; Pivnenko, Sergey; Pontoppidan, Kennie Nybo

    2013-01-01

    The 3D reconstruction algorithm is applied to the prototype feed array of the BIOMASS synthetic aperture radar, recently measured at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility in Denmark. Careful analysis of the measured feed array data has shown that the test support structure...

  10. The SKA New Instrumentation: Aperture Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ardenne, A.; Faulkner, A. J.; de Vaate, J. G. bij

    The radio frequency window of the Square Kilometre Array is planned to cover the wavelength regime from cm up to a few meters. For this range to be optimally covered, different antenna concepts are considered enabling many science cases. At the lowest frequency range, up to a few GHz, it is expected that multi-beam techniques will be used, increasing the effective field-of-view to a level that allows very efficient detailed and sensitive exploration of the complete sky. Although sparse narrow band phased arrays are as old as radio astronomy, multi-octave sparse and dense arrays now being considered for the SKA, requiring new low noise design, signal processing and calibration techniques. These new array techniques have already been successfully introduced as phased array feeds upgrading existing reflecting telescopes and for new telescopes to enhance the aperture efficiency as well as greatly increasing their field-of-view (van Ardenne et al., Proc IEEE 97(8):2009) by [1]. Aperture arrays use phased arrays without any additional reflectors; the phased array elements are small enough to see most of the sky intrinsically offering a large field of view.

  11. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brandon; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully operate a photovoltaic (PV) array system in space requires planning and testing to account for the effects of the space environment. It is critical to understand space environment interactions not only on the PV components, but also the array substrate materials, wiring harnesses, connectors, and protection circuitry.

  12. Spherical Horn Array for Wideband Propagation Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Ondrej; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2011-01-01

    A spherical array of horn antennas designed to obtain directional channel information and characteristics is introduced. A dual-polarized quad-ridged horn antenna with open flared boundaries and coaxial feeding for the frequency band 600 MHz–6 GHz is used as the element of the array. Matching...

  13. Defect-free atom arrays on demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Harry; Bernien, Hannes; Keesling, Alex; Anschuetz, Eric; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Endres, Manuel; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Arrays of neutral, trapped atoms have proven to be an extraordinary platform for studying quantum many-body physics and implementing quantum information protocols. Conventional approaches to generate such arrays rely on loading atoms into optical lattices and require elaborate experimental control. An alternative, simpler approach is to load atoms into individual optical tweezers. However, the probabilistic nature of the loading process limits the size of the arrays to small numbers of atoms. Here we present a new method for assembling defect-free arrays of large numbers of atoms. Our technique makes use of an array of tightly focused optical tweezers generated by an acousto-optic deflector. The positions of the traps can be dynamically reconfigured on a sub-millisecond timescale. With single-site resolved fluorescence imaging, we can identify defects in the atom array caused by the probabilistic loading process and rearrange the trap positions in response. This will enable us to generate defect-free atom arrays on demand. We discuss our latest results towards reaching this goal along with schemes to implement long-range interactions between atoms in the array. Now at Caltech.

  14. Array aperture extrapolation using sparse reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Rossum, W.L. van; Huizing, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present some preliminary results on antenna array extrapolation for Direction Of Arrival (DOA) estimation using Sparse Reconstruction (SR). The objective of this study is to establish wether it is possible to achieve with an array of a given physical length the performance (in terms

  15. Polarization tomography of metallic nanohole arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altewischer, E.; Genet, C.; Van Exter, M.P.; Woerdman, J.P.; Alkemade, P.F.A.; Van Zuuk, A.; Van der Drift, E.W.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    We report polarization tomography experiments on metallic nanohole arrays with square and hexagonal symmetry. As a main result we find that a fully polarized input beam is partly depolarized after transmission through a nanohole array. This loss of polarization coherence is found to be anisotropic;

  16. ALMA - the Atacama Large Millimeter Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, W.; Cunningham, C.

    2002-01-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is a major ground based project for millimeter and submillimeter astronomy to be realized during this decade. It comprises an array of 64 telescopes of 12 meter diameter, each equipped with 10 receivers bands covering the atmospheric windows from 30 GHz to 9

  17. Difference packing arrays and systematic authentication codes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a type of combinatorial design (called difference packing array)is proposed and used to give a construction of systematic authentication codes. Taking advantage of this construction, some new series of systematic authentication codes are obtainable in terms of existing difference packing arrays.

  18. Hearing aid comprising an array of microphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, M.M.; Berkhout, A.J.; Merks, I.L.D.M.

    1999-01-01

    Hearing aid for improving the hearing ability of the hard of hearing, comprising an array of microphones, the electrical output signals of which are fed to at least one transmission path belonging to an ear. Means are provided for deriving two array output signals from the output signals of the micr

  19. Miniaturized Retrodirective Arrays for a Nanosatellite Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    128-134, Jan.2006. [13] T. Brabetz, V. F. Fusco, and S. Karode, "Balanced subharmonic mixers for retrodirective- array applications," IEEE Trans...Murakami, J.D. Roque, S. S. Sung, G. S. Shiroma, R. Y. Miyamoto, and W. A. Shi- roma, "A quadruple subharmonic phase-conjugating array for secure

  20. All Orthogonal Arrays with 18 Runs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoen, E.D.

    2009-01-01

    All combinatorially inequivalent orthogonal arrays with 18 runs and eight or less factors are generated. Their potential as practical experimental designs is evaluated by a classification using generalized word-length patterns of the original arrays and those of their projections into less factors.