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Sample records for hf minute ventilation

  1. Minute ventilation at different compression to ventilation ratios, different ventilation rates, and continuous chest compressions with asynchronous ventilation in a newborn manikin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solevåg Anne L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In newborn resuscitation the recommended rate of chest compressions should be 90 per minute and 30 ventilations should be delivered each minute, aiming at achieving a total of 120 events per minute. However, this recommendation is based on physiological plausibility and consensus rather than scientific evidence. With focus on minute ventilation (Mv, we aimed to compare today’s standard to alternative chest compression to ventilation (C:V ratios and different ventilation rates, as well as to continuous chest compressions with asynchronous ventilation. Methods Two investigators performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a newborn manikin with a T-piece resuscitator and manual chest compressions. The C:V ratios 3:1, 9:3 and 15:2, as well as continuous chest compressions with asynchronous ventilation (120 compressions and 40 ventilations per minute were performed in a randomised fashion in series of 10 × 2 minutes. In addition, ventilation only was performed at three different rates (40, 60 and 120 ventilations per minute, respectively. A respiratory function monitor measured inspiration time, tidal volume and ventilation rate. Mv was calculated for the different interventions and the Mann–Whitney test was used for comparisons between groups. Results Median Mv per kg in ml (interquartile range was significantly lower at the C:V ratios of 9:3 (140 (134–144 and 15:2 (77 (74–83 as compared to 3:1 (191(183–199. With ventilation only, there was a correlation between ventilation rate and Mv despite a negative correlation between ventilation rate and tidal volumes. Continuous chest compressions with asynchronous ventilation gave higher Mv as compared to coordinated compressions and ventilations at a C:V ratio of 3:1. Conclusions In this study, higher C:V ratios than 3:1 compromised ventilation dynamics in a newborn manikin. However, higher ventilation rates, as well as continuous chest compressions with asynchronous

  2. Two-minute training for improving neonatal bag and mask ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vonderen, Jeroen J; Witlox, Ruben S; Kraaij, Sascha; te Pas, Arjan B

    2014-01-01

    To test effectivity of a two-minute training consisting of a few key-points in ventilation using the self-inflating bag (SIB). Experienced and inexperienced caregivers were asked to mask ventilate a leak free manikin using the SIB before and after the training. Mask leak and pressures were measured using respiratory function monitoring. Pressures above 35 cm H2O were considered excessive. Parameters were compared using a Wilcoxon non-parametric test. Before and after the short training, experienced caregivers had minimal median (IQR) mask leak (14 (3-75) vs. 3 (0-53)%; ptraining (ptraining (94 (46-100) vs. 2 (0-70)%; ptraining of bag and mask ventilation was effective. This training could be incorporated into any training program.

  3. Two-minute training for improving neonatal bag and mask ventilation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen J van Vonderen

    Full Text Available To test effectivity of a two-minute training consisting of a few key-points in ventilation using the self-inflating bag (SIB.Experienced and inexperienced caregivers were asked to mask ventilate a leak free manikin using the SIB before and after the training. Mask leak and pressures were measured using respiratory function monitoring. Pressures above 35 cm H2O were considered excessive. Parameters were compared using a Wilcoxon non-parametric test.Before and after the short training, experienced caregivers had minimal median (IQR mask leak (14 (3-75 vs. 3 (0-53%; p<0.01. Inexperienced users had large leak which reduced from 51 (7-91% before to 11 (2-71% after training (p<0.01. Pressures above 35 cm H2O hardly occurred in experienced caregivers (0 (0-5 vs. 0 (0-0%; ns. In inexperienced caregivers this frequently occurred but decreased considerably after training (94 (46-100 vs. 2 (0-70%; p<0.01.A two-minute training of bag and mask ventilation was effective. This training could be incorporated into any training program.

  4. Cardiorespiratory Mechanical Simulator for In Vitro Testing of Impedance Minute Ventilation Sensors in Cardiac Pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelli, Emanuela; Cercenelli, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We developed a cardiorespiratory mechanical simulator (CRMS), a system able to reproduce both the cardiac and respiratory movements, intended to be used for in vitro testing of impedance minute ventilation (iMV) sensors in cardiac pacemakers. The simulator consists of two actuators anchored to a human thorax model and a software interface to control the actuators and to acquire/process impedance signals. The actuators can be driven separately or simultaneously to reproduce the cardiac longitudinal shortening at a programmable heart rate and the diaphragm displacement at a programmable respiratory rate (RR). A standard bipolar pacing lead moving with the actuators and a pacemaker case fixed to the thorax model have been used to measure impedance (Z) variations during the simulated cardiorespiratory movements. The software is able to discriminate the low-frequency component because of respiration (Z(R)) from the high-frequency ripple because of cardiac effect (Z(C)). Impedance minute ventilation is continuously calculated from Z(R) and RR. From preliminary tests, the CRMS proved to be a reliable simulator for in vitro evaluation of iMV sensors. Respiration impedance recordings collected during cardiorespiratory movements reproduced by the CRMS were comparable in morphology and amplitude with in vivo assessments of transthoracic impedance variations.

  5. Activation of the inflammatory reaction within minutes after birth in ventilated preterm lambs with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, AS; Geven, WB; van Oeveren, W; Oetomo, SB

    2004-01-01

    To study the activation of the inflammatory reaction within minutes after birth, we measured parameters of inflammation before and immediately after birth. To assess whether respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or birth itself initiates activation, we compared preterm ventilated lambs with term nonve

  6. Activation of the inflammatory reaction within minutes after birth in ventilated preterm lambs with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, AS; Geven, WB; van Oeveren, W; Oetomo, SB

    2004-01-01

    To study the activation of the inflammatory reaction within minutes after birth, we measured parameters of inflammation before and immediately after birth. To assess whether respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or birth itself initiates activation, we compared preterm ventilated lambs with term

  7. Exposure assessment by physiologic sampling pump--prediction of minute ventilation using a portable respiratory inductive plethysmograph system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-I; Groves, William A; Freivalds, Andris; Lee, Eun Gyung; Harper, Martin; Slaven, James E; Lee, Larry

    2008-10-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate a portable respiratory inductive plethysmograph (RIP) as a means to estimate minute ventilation (V(E)) for use in controlling the flow rate of a physiologic sampling pump (PSP). Specific aims were to: (1) evaluate the ability of the portable RIP system to measure V(E) using a direct (individual) fixed-volume calibration method (Direct RIP model), (2) develop and evaluate the performance of indirect (group) regression models for V(E) prediction using output data from the portable RIP and subject demographic characteristics (Indirect RIP model), and (3) compare V(E) estimates from indirect and direct portable RIP calibration with indirect estimation models published previously. Nine subjects (19-44 years) were divided into calibration (n = 6) and test (n = 3) datasets and performed step-tests on three different days while wearing the portable RIP and breathing through a pneumotachometer (reference). Minute ventilation and portable RIP output including heart rate, breathing rate, and a motion index were recorded simultaneously during the 80 minute sessions. Calibration data were used to develop a regression model for V(E) prediction that was subsequently applied to the test dataset. Direct calibration of the portable RIP system produced highly variable estimates of V(E) (R2 = 0.62, average % error = 15 +/- 50) while Indirect RIP model results were highly correlated with the reference (R2 = 0.80-0.88) and estimates of total volume were within 10% of reference values on average. Although developed from a limited dataset, the Indirect RIP model provided an alternative approach to estimation of V(E) and total volume with accuracy comparable to previously published models.

  8. Increased requirement for minute ventilation and negative arterial to end-tidal carbon dioxide gradient may indicate malignant hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Tien Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic signs of malignant hyperthermia (MH include unexplained tachycardia, increased end-tidal carbon dioxide (Etco2 concentration, metabolic and respiratory acidosis, and an increase in body temperature above 38.8°C. We present the case of a patient with highly probable MH. In addition to sinus tachycardia and metabolic and respiratory acidosis, this patient also had a negative arterial to Etco2 gradient and an increased requirement for minute ventilation to maintain a normal Etco2 concentration, with signs of increased CO2 production. Despite these signs of MH, the patient's rectal temperature monitoring equipment did not show an increase in temperature, although the temperature measured in the mouth was increased. This case illustrates the unreliability of measuring rectal temperature as a means of reflecting body temperature during MH and the usefulness of increased CO2 production signs in helping to diagnose MH.

  9. The effect of adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) on objective and subjective outcomes in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) with central sleep apnea (CSA) in heart failure (HF): A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyunju; Sawyer, Amy M

    2016-01-01

    To summarize the current evidence for adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) with central sleep apnea (CSA) in heart failure (HF) and advance a research agenda and clinical considerations for ASV-treated CSR-CSA in HF. CSR-CSA in HF is associated with higher overall mortality, worse outcomes and lower quality of life (QOL) than HF without CSR-CSA. Five databases were searched using key words (n = 234). Randomized controlled trials assessed objective sleep quality, cardiac, and self-reported outcomes in adults (≥18 years) with HF (n = 10). ASV has a beneficial effect on the reduction of central sleep apnea in adult patients with CSR-CSA in HF, but it is not be superior to CPAP, bilevel PPV, or supplemental oxygen in terms of sleep quality defined by polysomnography, cardiovascular outcomes, subjective daytime sleepiness, and quality of life. ASV is not recommended for CSR-CSA in HF. It is important to continue to refer HF patients for sleep evaluation to clearly discern OSA from CSR-CSA. Symptom management research, inclusive of objective and subjective outcomes, in CSR-CSA in HF adults is needed.

  10. Assessment of Adaptive Rate Response Provided by Accelerometer, Minute Ventilation and Dual Sensor Compared with Normal Sinus Rhythm During Exercise: A Self-controlled Study in Chronotropically Competent Subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Cao; Yiqun Zhang; Yangang Su; Jin Bai; Wei Wang; Junbo Ge

    2015-01-01

    Background:Dual sensor (DS) for rate adaption was supposed to be more physiological.To evaluate its superiority,the DS (accelerometer [ACC] and minute ventilation [MV]) and normal sinus rate response were compared in a self-controlled way during exercise treadmill testing.Methods:This self-controlled study was performed in atrioventricular block patients with normal sinus function who met the indications of pacemaker implant.Twenty-one patients came to the 1-month follow-up visit.Patients performed a treadmill test 1-month post implant while programmed in DDDR and sensor passive mode.For these patients,sensor response factors were left at default settings (ACC =8,MV =3) and sensor indicated rates (SIRs) for DS,ACC and MV sensor were retrieved from the pacemaker memories,along with measured sinus node (SN) rates from the beginning to 1-minute after the end of the treadmill test,and compared among study groups.Repeated measures analysis of variance and profile analysis,as well as variance analysis of randomized block designs,were used for statistical analysis.Results:Fifteen patients (15/2 l) were determined to be chronotropically competent.The mean differences between DS SIRs and intrinsic sinus rates during treadmill testing were smaller than those for ACC and MV sensor (mean difference between SIR and SN rate:ACC vs.SN,MV vs.SN,DS vs.SN,respectively,34.84,17.60,16.15 beats/min),though no sensors could mimic sinus rates under the default settings for sensor response factor (ACC vs.SN P-adjusted < 0.001; MV vs.SN P-adjusted =0.002; DS vs.SN P-adjusted =0.005).However,both in the range of 1st minute and first 3 minutes of exercise,only the DS SIR profile did not differ from sinus rates (P-adjusted =0.09,0.90,respectively).Conclusions:The DS under default settings provides more physiological rate response during physical activity than the corresponding single sensors (ACC or MV sensor).Further study is needed to determine if individual optimization would further

  11. Assessment of Adaptive Rate Response Provided by Accelerometer, Minute Ventilation and Dual Sensor Compared with Normal Sinus Rhythm During Exercise: A Self-controlled Study in Chronotropically Competent Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual sensor (DS for rate adaption was supposed to be more physiological. To evaluate its superiority, the DS (accelerometer [ACC] and minute ventilation [MV] and normal sinus rate response were compared in a self-controlled way during exercise treadmill testing. Methods: This self-controlled study was performed in atrioventricular block patients with normal sinus function who met the indications of pacemaker implant. Twenty-one patients came to the 1-month follow-up visit. Patients performed a treadmill test 1-month post implant while programmed in DDDR and sensor passive mode. For these patients, sensor response factors were left at default settings (ACC = 8, MV = 3 and sensor indicated rates (SIRs for DS, ACC and MV sensor were retrieved from the pacemaker memories, along with measured sinus node (SN rates from the beginning to 1-minute after the end of the treadmill test, and compared among study groups. Repeated measures analysis of variance and profile analysis, as well as variance analysis of randomized block designs, were used for statistical analysis. Results: Fifteen patients (15/21 were determined to be chronotropically competent. The mean differences between DS SIRs and intrinsic sinus rates during treadmill testing were smaller than those for ACC and MV sensor (mean difference between SIR and SN rate: ACC vs. SN, MV vs. SN, DS vs. SN, respectively, 34.84, 17.60, 16.15 beats/min, though no sensors could mimic sinus rates under the default settings for sensor response factor (ACC vs. SN P-adjusted < 0.001; MV vs. SN P-adjusted = 0.002; DS vs. SN P-adjusted = 0.005. However, both in the range of 1 st minute and first 3 minutes of exercise, only the DS SIR profile did not differ from sinus rates (P-adjusted = 0.09, 0.90, respectively. Conclusions: The DS under default settings provides more physiological rate response during physical activity than the corresponding single sensors (ACC or MV sensor. Further study is needed to

  12. Adaptive support ventilation with percutaneous dilatational tracheotomy: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veelo, Denise P; Dongelmans, Dave A; Middelhoek, Pauline; Korevaar, Johanna C; Schultz, Marcus J

    2008-09-01

    We determined the need for changes in minute ventilation with adaptive support ventilation after percutaneous dilatational tracheotomy under endoscopic guidance in 34 intensive care unit patients. During the procedure, minute ventilation was not changed; only maximum pressure limits were adjusted, if necessary. After insertion of the tracheotomy, cannula minute ventilation was adjusted only if Paco(2)-values changed >or=0.5 kPa from baseline. In 74% of patients, adaptive support ventilation was unable to maintain minute ventilation during the use of the endoscope, mandating pressure limitation adjustments. In a minority of patients (26%), minute ventilation had to be adjusted to achieve similar Paco(2) values.

  13. Human versus Computer Controlled Selection of Ventilator Settings: An Evaluation of Adaptive Support Ventilation and Mid-Frequency Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Mireles-Cabodevila

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are modes of mechanical ventilation that can select ventilator settings with computer controlled algorithms (targeting schemes. Two examples are adaptive support ventilation (ASV and mid-frequency ventilation (MFV. We studied how different clinician-chosen ventilator settings are from these computer algorithms under different scenarios. Methods. A survey of critical care clinicians provided reference ventilator settings for a 70 kg paralyzed patient in five clinical/physiological scenarios. The survey-derived values for minute ventilation and minute alveolar ventilation were used as goals for ASV and MFV, respectively. A lung simulator programmed with each scenario’s respiratory system characteristics was ventilated using the clinician, ASV, and MFV settings. Results. Tidal volumes ranged from 6.1 to 8.3 mL/kg for the clinician, 6.7 to 11.9 mL/kg for ASV, and 3.5 to 9.9 mL/kg for MFV. Inspiratory pressures were lower for ASV and MFV. Clinician-selected tidal volumes were similar to the ASV settings for all scenarios except for asthma, in which the tidal volumes were larger for ASV and MFV. MFV delivered the same alveolar minute ventilation with higher end expiratory and lower end inspiratory volumes. Conclusions. There are differences and similarities among initial ventilator settings selected by humans and computers for various clinical scenarios. The ventilation outcomes are the result of the lung physiological characteristics and their interaction with the targeting scheme.

  14. Non-Invasive Ventilation in Patients with Heart Failure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Hugo Souza; dos Reis, Helena França Correia; Lima, Melissa Santos; Gomes Neto, Mansueto

    2017-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) may perfect respiratory and cardiac performance in patients with heart failure (HF). The objective of the study to establish, through systematic review and meta-analysis, NIV influence on functional capacity of HF patients. A systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized studies was carried out through research of databases of Cochrane Library, SciELO, Pubmed and PEDro, using the key-words: heart failure, non-invasive ventilation, exercise tolerance; and the free terms: bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and functional capacity (terms were searched for in English and Portuguese) using the Boolean operators AND and OR. Methodological quality was ensured through PEDro scale. Weighted averages and a 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. The meta-analysis was done thorugh the software Review Manager, version 5.3 (Cochrane Collaboration). Four randomized clinical trials were included. Individual studies suggest NIV improved functional capacity. NIV resulted in improvement in the distance of the six-minute walk test (6MWT) (68.7m 95%CI: 52.6 to 84.9) in comparison to the control group. We conclude that the NIV is an intervention that promotes important effects in the improvement of functional capacity of HF patients. However, there is a gap in literature on which are the most adequate parameters for the application of this technique. PMID:28099587

  15. Taking minutes of meetings

    CERN Document Server

    Gutmann, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    aking Minutes of Meetings guides you through the entire process behind minute taking: arranging the meeting; writing the agenda; creating the optimum environment; structuring the meeting and writing notes up accurately. The minute-taker is one of the most important and powerful people in a meeting and you can use this opportunity to develop your knowledge, broaden your horizons and build credibility within the organization. Taking Minutes of Meetings is an easy to read 'dip-in, dip-out' guide which shows you how to confidently arrange meetings and produce minutes. It provides hands-on advice about the sections of a meeting as well as tips on how to create an agenda, personal preparation, best practice advice on taking notes and how to improve your accuracy. Brand new chapters of this 4th edition include guidance on using technology to maximize effectiveness and practical help with taking minutes for a variety of different types of meetings. The creating success series of books... With over one million copi...

  16. Ventilation effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Mathisen, Hans Martin; Nielsen, Peter V; Moser, Alfred

    2004-01-01

    Improving the ventilation effectiveness allows the indoor air quality to be significantly enhanced without the need for higher air changes in the building, thereby avoiding the higher costs and energy consumption associated with increasing the ventilation rates. This Guidebook provides easy-to-understand descriptions of the indices used to mesure the performance of a ventilation system and which indices to use in different cases.

  17. Noninvasive ventilation and exercise tolerance in heart failure: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana C. Bündchen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with heart failure (HF usually develop exercise intolerance. In this context, noninvasive ventilation (NIV can help to increase physical performance. Objective: To undertake a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of NIV on exercise tolerance in patients with HF. Method: Search Strategy: Articles were searched in the following databases: Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro, Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO, and MEDLINE. Selection Criteria: This review included only randomized controlled trials involving patients with HF undergoing NIV, with or without other therapies, that used exercise tolerance as an outcome, verified by the distance travelled in the six-minute walk test (6MWT, VO2peak in the cardiopulmonary test, time spent in testing, and dyspnea. Data Collection and Analysis: The methodological quality of the studies was rated according to the PEDro scale. Data were pooled in fixed-effect meta-analysis whenever possible. Results: Four studies were selected. A meta-analysis including 18 participants showed that the use of NIV prior to the 6MWT promoted increased distance, [mean difference 65.29 m (95% CI 38.80 to 91.78]. Conclusions: The use of NIV prior to the 6MWT in patients with HF may promote increased distance. However, the limited number of studies may have compromised a more definitive conclusion on the subject.

  18. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mendell, Mark J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davies, Molly [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Eliseeva, Ekaterina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faulkner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hong, Tienzen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sullivan, Douglas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling.

  19. Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    Displacement ventilation is an interesting new type of air distribution principle which should be considered in connection with design of comfort ventilation in both smal1 and large spaces. Research activities on displacement ventilation are large all over the world and new knowledge of design...... methods appears continuously. This book gives an easy introduction to the basis of displacement ventilation and the chapters are written in the order which is used in a design procedure. The main text is extended by five appendices which show some of the new research activities taking place at Aalborg...

  20. Ventilation Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundt, M.; Mathisen, H. M.; Moser, M.;

    Improving the ventilation effectiveness allows the indoor air quality to be significantly enhanced without the need for higher air changes in the building, thereby avoiding the higher costs and energy consumption associated with increasing the ventilation rates. This Guidebook provides easy...

  1. Liquid Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qutaiba A. Tawfic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammals have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases, as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen, as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of theoretical advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. The potential for multiple clinical applications for liquid-assisted ventilation will be clarified and optimized in future. Keywords: Liquid ventilation; perfluorochemicals; perfluorocarbon; respiratory distress; surfactant.

  2. Carbon dioxide production during mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Söderberg, D; Groth, T

    1987-01-01

    studied CO2 production (VCO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2) in mechanically ventilated ICU patients, where CO2 stores were altered by: a) changing minute ventilation by 15%, b) reducing body temperature, and c) changing the level of sedation. Expired gases went through a mixing chamber and were analyzed...

  3. Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Kolokotroni, Maria

    This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state-of-the-art of ventil......This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state...

  4. Ventilation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-05

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. The purposes of Revision 01 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of the discretization (Section 6.2.3.1), and the downstream applicability of the model results (i.e. wall heat fractions) to

  5. 10 Minutes of Bliss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Olynda

    2014-01-01

    For many of us, it is challenging to find the time to sleep enough each night or to sit down for a meal. So how can this author convince you that taking 10 minutes to do anything every day is actually worth it? The benefits of meditation--increased calm, clarity, compassion, and empathy, to name a few--have been known for centuries. Recently,…

  6. ExtraHF survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piepoli, Massimo F; Binno, Simone; Corrà, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: In heart failure (HF), exercise training programmes (ETPs) are a well-recognized intervention to improve symptoms, but are still poorly implemented. The Heart Failure Association promoted a survey to investigate whether and how cardiac centres in Europe are using ETPs in their HF patients...... of evidence on safety or benefit was cited. When implemented, an ETP was proposed to all HF patients in only 55% of the centres, with restriction according to severity or aetiology. CONCLUSIONS: With respect to previous surveys, there is evidence of increased availability of ETPs in HF in Europe, although too...

  7. Five minutes of heaven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Gárate

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Ganadora del principal premio del festival de cine de Sundance, “Five minutes of Heaven” constituye uno de aquellos filmes que demuestran que la calidad  y un presupuesto limitado pueden ir perfectamente de la mano, y alcanzar momentos de enorme calidad cinematográfica basados en un buen guión y una excelente dirección de actores. El realizador Olivier Hirschbiegel nos demuestra en esta película nuevamente su capacidad para entregarnos una obra de ficción sin dejar de lado su preocupación po...

  8. Five minutes of heaven

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Gárate

    2009-01-01

    Ganadora del principal premio del festival de cine de Sundance, “Five minutes of Heaven” constituye uno de aquellos filmes que demuestran que la calidad  y un presupuesto limitado pueden ir perfectamente de la mano, y alcanzar momentos de enorme calidad cinematográfica basados en un buen guión y una excelente dirección de actores. El realizador Olivier Hirschbiegel nos demuestra en esta película nuevamente su capacidad para entregarnos una obra de ficción sin dejar de lado su preocupación po....

  9. Personalized ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    existing knowledge on performance of personalized ventilation (PV) and on human response to it. The airflow interaction in the vicinity of the human body is analyzed and its impact on thermal comfort and inhaled air quality is discussed together with control strategies and the application of PV in practice...

  10. Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Erik; Mattsson, Magnus; Sandberg, Mats

    Full-scale experiments were made in a displacement ventilated room with two breathing thermal manikins to study the effect of movements and breathing on the vertical contaminant distribution, and on the personal exposure of occupants. Concentrations were measured with tracer gas equipment...

  11. Mixing Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandzia, Claudia; Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor;

    In this guidebook most of the known and used in practice methods for achieving mixing air distribution are discussed. Mixing ventilation has been applied to many different spaces providing fresh air and thermal comfort to the occupants. Today, a design engineer can choose from large selection of ...

  12. Naturlig ventilation med varmegenvinding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    2006-01-01

    Naturlig ventilation i kontorbyggerier har været et alternativ til me-kanisk ventilation i små 10 år. Naturlig ventilation har den klare fordel, at der ikke forbruges elenergi ved ventilering af bygningen, fordi ventilatorer ikke er påkrævet. Imidlertid lider naturlig ventila-tion under de ulemper...

  13. Methodology for ventilation/perfusion SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajc, Marika; Neilly, Brian; Miniati, Massimo;

    2010-01-01

    radiolabeled liquid aerosols are not restricted to the presence of obstructive lung disease. Radiolabeled macroaggregated human albumin is the imaging agent of choice for perfusion scintigraphy. An optimal combination of nuclide activities and acquisition times for ventilation and perfusion, collimators......Ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) is the scintigraphic technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and many other disorders that affect lung function. Data from recent ventilation studies show that the theoretic advantages of Technegas over......, and imaging matrix yields an adequate V/Q SPECT study in approximately 20 minutes of imaging time. The recommended protocol based on the patient remaining in an unchanged position during the initial ventilation study and the perfusion study allows presentation of matching ventilation and perfusion slices...

  14. Liquid Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter N Cox

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a recent explosion of interest in the use of liquid ventilation. Over time humans have lost the physiological attributes necessary for respiration in water. However, perfluorocarbons have high solubilities for oxygen and carbon dioxide, as well as a low surface tension. These characteristics allow them to be used as a medium to assist gas exchange and recruit atelectatic-dependent lung zones in respiratory distress syndrome. Current trials may prove perfluorocarbon to be a useful adjunct in lung protective strategies in respiratory distress syndrome.

  15. Frederiksberg HF kursus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maria Duclos

    2008-01-01

    Notatet bygger på et interviewmateriale med dimitterede HF-kursister 3 måneder efter endt eksamen. Notatet undersøger dels, hvad der har hjulpet til at gennemføre, dels hvad der har været negativt og vanskeligt ved uddannelsen. Endvidere belyser notatet hvad kursisterne oplever at tage med fra de...

  16. Initial ventilator settings for critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilickaya, Oguz; Gajic, Ognjen

    2013-03-12

    The lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategy has been standard practice for management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for more than a decade. Observational data, small randomized studies and two recent systematic reviews suggest that lung protective ventilation is both safe and potentially beneficial in patients who do not have ARDS at the onset of mechanical ventilation. Principles of lung-protective ventilation include: a) prevention of volutrauma (tidal volume 4 to 8 ml/kg predicted body weight with plateau pressurerespiratory rate 20 to 35 breaths per minute); and d) prevention of hyperoxia (titrate inspired oxygen concentration to peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels of 88 to 95%). Most patients tolerate lung protective mechanical ventilation well without the need for excessive sedation. Patients with a stiff chest wall may tolerate higher plateau pressure targets (approximately 35 cmH2O) while those with severe ARDS and ventilator asynchrony may require a short-term neuromuscular blockade. Given the difficulty in timely identification of patients with or at risk of ARDS and both the safety and potential benefit in patients without ARDS, lung-protective mechanical ventilation is recommended as an initial approach to mechanical ventilation in both perioperative and critical care settings.

  17. Development of a clinical applicable graphical user interface to automatically detect exercise oscillatory ventilation: The VOdEX-tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Justien; Denis, Tim; Beckers, Paul; Vrints, Christiaan; Vissers, Dirk; Goossens, Maggy

    2017-08-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) gained importance in the prognostic assessment of especially patients with heart failure (HF). A meaningful prognostic parameter for early mortality in HF is exercise oscillatory ventilation (EOV). This abnormal respiratory pattern is recognized by hypo- and hyperventilation during CPET. Up until now, assessment of EOV is mainly done upon visual agreement or manual calculation. The purpose of this research was to automate the interpretation of EOV so this prognostic parameter could be readily investigated during CPET. Preliminary, four definitions describing the original characteristics of EOV, were selected and integrated in the "Ventilatory Oscillations during Exercise-tool" (VOdEX-tool), a graphical user interface that allows automate calculation of EOV. A Discrete Meyer Level 2 wavelet transformation appeared to be the optimal filter to apply on the collected breath-by-breath minute ventilation CPET data. Divers aspects of the definitions i.e. cycle length, amplitude, regularity and total duration of EOV were combined and calculated. The oscillations meeting the criteria were visualised. Filter methods and cut-off criteria were made adjustable for clinical application and research. The VOdEX-tool was connected to a database. The VOdEX-tool provides the possibility to calculate EOV automatically and to present the clinician an overview of the presence of EOV at a glance. The computerized analysis of EOV can be made readily available in clinical practice by integrating the tool in the manufactures existing CPET software. The VOdEX-tool enhances assessment of EOV and therefore contributes to the estimation of prognosis in especially patients with HF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Gorrell

    1998-07-23

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options.

  19. Energy and IAQ Implications of Residential Ventilation Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the energy, humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of residential ventilation cooling in all U.S. IECC climate zones. A computer modeling approach was adopted, using an advanced residential building simulation tool with airflow, energy and humidity models. An economizer (large supply fan) was simulated to provide ventilation cooling while outdoor air temperatures were lower than indoor air temperatures (typically at night). The simulations were performed for a full year using one-minute time steps to allow for scheduling of ventilation systems and to account for interactions between ventilation and heating/cooling systems.

  20. Last-Minute Travel Application

    OpenAIRE

    Hubner, Andre; Lenz, Mario; Borch, Roman; Posthoff, Michael

    2000-01-01

    In this article, we present a last-minute travel application as part of a complete virtual travel agency. Each year, a significant amount of tour packages are sold as last minute tours in Germany. It is impossible for a travel agent to keep track of all the offered tour packages. Electronic-commerce applications might present the best possible tour package for a specific customer request. Traditional database-driven applications, as used by most of the tour operators, are not sufficient enoug...

  1. Pulsed inductive HF laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razhev, A M; Kargapol' tsev, E S [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Churkin, D S; Demchuk, S V [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-31

    We report the results of experimentally investigated dependences of temporal, spectral and spatial characteristics of an inductive HF-laser generation on the pump conditions. Gas mixtures H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF6{sub 6}) and He(Ne) – H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF{sub 6}) were used as active media. The FWHM pulse duration reached 0.42 μs. This value corresponded to a pulsed power of 45 kW. For the first time, the emission spectrum of an inductive HF laser was investigated, which consisted of seven groups of bands with centres around the wavelengths of 2732, 2736, 2739, 2835, 2837, 2893 and 2913 nm. The cross section profile of the laser beam was a ring with a diameter of about 20 mm and width of about 5 mm. Parameters of laser operation in the repetitively pulsed regime were sufficiently stable. The amplitude instability of light pulses was no greater than 5% – 6%. (lasers)

  2. Exercise oscillatory ventilation:Mechanisms and prognostic significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bishnu P Dhakal; Gregory D Lewis

    2016-01-01

    Alteration in breathing patterns characterized by cyclic variation of ventilation during rest and during exercise has been recognized in patients with advanced heart failure(HF) for nearly two centuries. Periodic breathing(PB) during exercise is known as exercise oscillatory ventilation(EOV) and is characterized by the periods of hyperpnea and hypopnea without interposed apnea. EOV is a non-invasive parameter detected during submaximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Presence of EOV during exercise in HF patients indicates significant impairment in resting and exercise hemodynamic parameters. EOV is also an independent risk factor for poor prognosis in HF patients both with reduced and preserved ejection fraction irrespective of other gas exchange variables. Circulatory delay, increased chemosensitivity, pulmonary congestion and increased ergoreflex signaling have been proposed as the mechanisms underlying the generation of EOV in HF patients. There is no proven treatment of EOV but its reversal has been noted with phosphodiesterase inhibitors, exercise training and acetazolamide in relatively small studies. In this review, we discuss the mechanistic basis of PB during exercise and the clinical implications of recognizing PB patterns in patients with HF.

  3. DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2014-01-06

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included: ? The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).? Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.? Currently-available optical people counting systems work well much of the time but have large counting errors in some situations. ? In meeting rooms, measurements of carbon dioxide at return-air grilles appear to be a better choice than wall-mounted sensors.? In California, demand controlled ventilation in general office spaces is projected to save significant energy and be cost effective only if typical VRs without demand controlled ventilation are very high relative to VRs in codes. Based on the research, several recommendations were developed for demand controlled ventilation specifications in the California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.The research on classroom ventilation collected data over two years on California elementary school classrooms to investigate associations between VRs and student illness absence (IA). Major findings included: ? Median classroom VRs in all studied climate zones were below the California guideline, and 40percent lower in portable than permanent buildings.? Overall, one additional L/s per person of VR was associated with 1.6percent less IA. ? Increasing average VRs in California K-12 classrooms from the current average to the required level is estimated to decrease IA by 3.4percent, increasing State attendance-based funding to school districts by $33M, with $6.2 M in increased energy costs. Further VR increases would provide additional benefits

  4. HF Interference, Procedures and Tools (Interferences HF, procedures et outils)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    such sources. The existing HF background noise possibly may be increased via ground wave and/or sky wave propagation. Increase of the existing HF...télécommunications filaires à large bande. Les télécommunications via le réseau électrique courant, dites PowerLine Communications (PLT ou PLC) et diverses...cumulative de nombreuses sources de même type. Le bruit de fond HF existant risque d’être augmenté par propagation de l’onde terrestre et/ou aérienne

  5. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    with conventional ventilation systems (mixing or displacement ventilation), diffuse ceiling ventilation can significantly reduce or even eliminate draught risk in the occupied zone. Moreover, this ventilation system presents a promising opportunity for energy saving, because of the low pressure loss, extended free......Diffuse ceiling ventilation is an innovative ventilation concept where the suspended ceiling serves as an air diffuser to supply fresh air into the room. Due to the large opening area, air is delivered to the room with very low velocity and no fixed direction, therefore the name ‘diffuse’. Compared......-cooling period and night cooling potential. The investment cost of this ventilation system is about 5-10% lower than the conventional ones, because the acoustic ceiling could be directly applied as air diffuser and the use of plenum to distribute air reduces the cost of ductwork. There is a growing interest...

  6. BOX: One Minute Volume 3

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Rose

    2009-01-01

    BOX is a digital short originally developed in 2004 documented on a 1920’s box camera. This early moving image work formed the basis of a practice which interrogates our experience of moving image through the remediation of analogue technology with new media. In 2009 it was included in One Minute Volume 3; a programme of artists moving image curated by Kerry Baldry including work by: Tony Hill, Tina Keane, Katherine Meynell, Kayla Parker and Stuart Moore, Dave Griffiths, Marty St Jam...

  7. Complications of mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drašković Biljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation of the lungs, as an important therapeutic measure, cannot be avoided in critically ill patients. However, when machines take over some of vital functions there is always a risk of complications and accidents. Complications associated with mechanical ventilation can be divided into: 1 airway-associated complications; 2 complications in the response of patients to mechanical ventilation; and 3 complications related to the patient’s response to the device for mechanical ventilation. Complications of artificial airway may be related to intubation and extubation or the endotracheal tube. Complications of mechanical ventilation, which arise because of the patient’s response to mechanical ventilation, may primarily cause significant side effects to the lungs. During the last two decades it was concluded that mechanical ventilation can worsen or cause acute lung injury. Mechanical ventilation may increase the alveolar/capillary permeability by overdistension of the lungs (volutrauma, it can exacerbate lung damage due to the recruitment/derecruitment of collapsed alveoli (atelectrauma and may cause subtle damages due to the activation of inflammatory processes (biotrauma. Complications caused by mechanical ventilation, beside those involving the lungs, can also have significant effects on other organs and organic systems, and can be a significant factor contributing to the increase of morbidity and mortality in critically ill of mechanically ventilated patients. Complications are fortunately rare and do not occur in every patient, but due to their seriousness and severity they require extensive knowledge, experience and responsibility by health-care workers.

  8. Assessment of minute volume of lung in NPP workers for Korean reference man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. J.; Song, S. H.; Lee, J.; Jin, Y. W.; Yim, Y. K.; Kim, J. S. [KNETEC, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To formulation of the reference Korean for radiation protection purpose, we measured the forced vital capacity(FVC), forced expiratory volume in second(FEVI), minute ventilation(MV) of Nuclear Power Plant workers using SP-1 Spirometry Unit(Schiller AG. 1998) and eatimated the liters of breathed for working and resting, also compared these data with ICRP 23.

  9. Effect of hydrofluoric acid (HF) concentration to pores size diameter of silicon membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burham, Norhafizah; Hamzah, Azrul Azlan; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies parameters which affect the pore size diameter of a silicon membrane. Electrochemical etching is performed in characterise the parameter involved in this process. The parameter has been studied is volume ratio of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and ethanol as an electrolyte aqueous for electrochemical etch. This electrolyte aqueous solution has been mixed between HF and ethanol with volume ratio 3:7, 5:5, 7:3 and 9:1. As a result, the higher volume of HF in this electrolyte gives the smallest pore size diameter compared to the lower volume of HF. These samples have been dipped into HF and ethanol electrolyte aqueous with supplied 25 mA/cm2 current density for 20, 30, 40, and 50 minutes. The samples will inspect under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to execute the pore formations on silicon membrane surface.

  10. Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever (Marburg HF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Marburg hemorrhagic fever (Marburg HF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, ...

  11. New generation ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersten, A D; Skowronski, G A; Oh, T E

    1986-08-01

    Desirable features of new generation intensive care ventilators include the ability to ventilate a wide range of patient sizes, an uncomplicated control panel, an appropriate but not excessive variety of ventilatory patterns, adequate patient monitoring and alarm functions, and simplicity of cleaning and routine maintenance. Examples of currently available ventilators include the Servo 900-C, CPU-1, Engstrom Erica, Bear 5, Drager EV-A and Hamilton Veolar. The incorporation of microcomputer control into some of these ventilators has resulted in improved flexibility and a limited number of automatic responses to detected patient changes. However, the function of components provided to allow spontaneous ventilation, such as demand valves, requires considerable improvement. Current trends in ventilator design include further refinement of computer control and the provision of graphic displays showing the results of continuous sophisticated analysis of respiratory function. The extent to which these developments will prove clinically useful will require careful evaluation.

  12. Hf Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Lawler, J E; Labby, Z E; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J; Ivans, I I

    2006-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements, accurate to about +/- 5 percent, are reported for 41 odd-parity levels of Hf II. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for 150 lines of Hf II. Approximately half of these new transition probabilities overlap with recent independent measurements using a similar approach. The two sets of measurements are found to be in good agreement for measurements in common. Our new laboratory data are applied to refine the hafnium photospheric solar abundance and to determine hafnium abundances in 10 metal-poor giant stars with enhanced r-process abundances. For the Sun we derive log epsilon (Hf) = 0.88 +/- 0.08 from four lines; the uncertainty is dominated by the weakness of the lines and their blending by other spectral features. Within the uncertainties of our analysis, the r-process-rich stars possess constant Hf/La and Hf/Eu abundance ratios, log epsilon (Hf...

  13. Design Principles for Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    For many years mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately. Naturally, the next step in this development is the development of ventilation concepts that utilize and combine the best features from each system to create a new type of ventilation system -Hybrid Ventilation....... The hybrid ventilation concepts, design challenges and - principles are discussed and illustrated by four building examples....

  14. Mechanical ventilation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendirli, Tanil; Kavaz, Asli; Yalaki, Zahide; Oztürk Hişmi, Burcu; Derelli, Emel; Ince, Erdal

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation can be lifesaving, but > 50% of complications in conditions that require intensive care are related to ventilatory support, particularly if it is prolonged. We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of patients who had mechanical ventilation in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) during a follow-up period between January 2002-May 2005. Medical records of 407 patients were reviewed. Ninety-one patients (22.3%) were treated with mechanical ventilation. Ages of all patients were between 1-180 (median: 8) months. The mechanical ventilation time was 18.8 +/- 14.1 days. Indication of mechanical ventilation could be divided into four groups as respiratory failure (64.8%), cardiovascular failure (19.7%), central nervous system disease (9.8%) and safety airway (5.4%). Tracheostomy was performed in four patients. The complication ratio of mechanically ventilated children was 42.8%, and diversity of complications was as follows: 26.3% atelectasia, 17.5% ventilator-associated pneumonia, 13.1% pneumothorax, 5.4% bleeding, 4.3% tracheal edema, and 2.1% chronic lung disease. The mortality rate of mechanically ventilated patients was 58.3%, but the overall mortality rate in the PICU was 12.2%. In conclusion, there are few published epidemiological data on the follow-up results and mortality in infants and children who are mechanically ventilated.

  15. Natural Ventilation in Atria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svidt, Kjeld; Heiselberg, Per; Hendriksen, Ole Juhl

    This case study comprises a monitoring programme as well as a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of a natural ventilated atrium. The purpose has been to analyse the performance of a typical natural ventilation system in Denmark under both summer and winter conditions.......This case study comprises a monitoring programme as well as a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of a natural ventilated atrium. The purpose has been to analyse the performance of a typical natural ventilation system in Denmark under both summer and winter conditions....

  16. Recommended Ventilation Strategies for Energy-Efficient Production Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, J.; Brown, R.; Koomey, J.; Warner, J.; Greenberg, S.

    1998-12-01

    This report evaluates residential ventilation systems for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} Homes program and recommends mechanical ventilation strategies for new, low-infiltration, energy-efficient, single-family, ENERGY STAR production (site-built tract) homes in four climates: cold, mixed (cold and hot), hot humid, and hot arid. Our group in the Energy Analysis Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab compared residential ventilation strategies in four climates according to three criteria: total annualized costs (the sum of annualized capital cost and annual operating cost), predominant indoor pressure induced by the ventilation system, and distribution of ventilation air within the home. The mechanical ventilation systems modeled deliver 0.35 air changes per hour continuously, regardless of actual infiltration or occupant window-opening behavior. Based on the assumptions and analysis described in this report, we recommend independently ducted multi-port supply ventilation in all climates except cold because this strategy provides the safety and health benefits of positive indoor pressure as well as the ability to dehumidify and filter ventilation air. In cold climates, we recommend that multi-port supply ventilation be balanced by a single-port exhaust ventilation fan, and that builders offer balanced heat-recovery ventilation to buyers as an optional upgrade. For builders who continue to install forced-air integrated supply ventilation, we recommend ensuring ducts are airtight or in conditioned space, installing a control that automatically operates the forced-air fan 15-20 minutes during each hour that the fan does not operate for heating or cooling, and offering ICM forced-air fans to home buyers as an upgrade.

  17. Effect of Peripheral Arterial Disease on Functional and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Heart Failure From HF-ACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. Schuyler; Clare, Robert; Ellis, Stephen J.; Mills, James S.; Fischman, David L.; Kraus, William E.; Whellan, David J.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Patel, Manesh R.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have lower functional capacity and worse clinical outcomes than age and gender matched patients. Few data exist on the relationship of PAD with functional and clinical outcomes in heart failure (HF) patients. We sought to compare HF patients with and without PAD for baseline functional capacity, response to exercise training, and clinical outcomes. HF-ACTION was a randomized controlled trial comparing usual care to structured exercise training plus usual care in HF patients with an ejection fraction ≤ 35% and NYHA class II – IV heart failure symptoms. Cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing occurred at enrollment, 3 months, and 1 year. Clinical follow-up occurred up to 4 years. Of the 2331 HF-ACTION patients, 157 (6.8%) had PAD. At baseline, HF patients with PAD had a lower exercise duration (8.0 vs. 9.8 minutes, p<0.001), lower peak oxygen consumption (VO2) (12.5 vs. 14.6 mL/kg/min, p<0.001), and shorter six minute walking distance (306 vs. 371 meters, p<0.001) compared to HF patients without PAD. At three months, HF patients with PAD had less improvement on CPX testing [exercise duration (0.5 vs. 1.1 minutes; p=0.002) and peak VO2 (mean change; 0.1 vs. 0.6 mL/kg/min; p=0.04)] compared to HF patients without PAD. PAD was an independent predictor of all-cause death or hospitalization [hazard ratio (95% CI); 1.31 (1.06 – 1.62), p=0.011]. PAD patients with HF have depressed baseline exercise capacity and decreased response to exercise training. In conclusion, PAD is an independent predictor of all-cause death or hospitalization in HF patients. PMID:21565325

  18. Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armin Rudd

    2005-08-30

    This paper reviews current and potential ventilation technologies for residential buildings, including a variety of mechanical systems, natural ventilation, and passive ventilation. with particular emphasis on North American climates and construction.

  19. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health care provider injects ...

  20. Sex differences in leptin modulate ventilation in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundrle, Ivan; Somers, Virend K; Singh, Prachi; Johnson, Bruce D; Scott, Christopher G; Olson, Lyle J

    Leptin modulates ventilation and circulating levels are higher in normal women than men. The aim of this study was to compare exercise ventilation and gas exchange in men and women with heart failure (HF) and their relation to circulating leptin concentration. Consecutive HF patients were studied by cardiopulmonary exercise testing and assay of circulating leptin concentration. Fifty-seven men and 20 women were similar with respect to age, BMI, NYHA class, left ventricular ejection fraction, and peak oxygen consumption (all p > 0.05). Leptin concentration was lower (10.3 ± 10 vs. 25.3 ± 16 ng/mL; p Leptin concentration was associated with peak exercise VE/VCO2 (b = -0.35; F = 5.6; p = 0.02). Men have significantly lower circulating leptin concentration and increased ventilatory drive during exercise than women with comparable HF. In men with HF, lower leptin concentration may account for an increased ventilatory drive. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. A noninvasive high frequency oscillation ventilator: Achieved by utilizing a blower and a valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, YueYang; Sun, JianGuo; Wang, Baicun; Feng, Pei; Yang, ChongChang

    2016-02-01

    After the High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (HFOV) has been applied in the invasive ventilator, the new technique of noninvasive High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (nHFOV) which does not require opening the patient's airway has attracted much attention from the field. This paper proposes the design of an experimental positive pressure-controlled nHFOV ventilator which utilizes a blower and a special valve and has three ventilation modes: spontaneous controlled ventilation combining HFOV, time-cycled ventilation combining HFOV (T-HFOV), and continuous positive airway pressure ventilation combining HFOV. Experiments on respiratory model are conducted and demonstrated the feasibility of using nHFOV through the control of fan and valve. The experimental ventilator is able to produce an air flow with small tidal volume (VT) and a large minute ventilation volume (MV) using regular breath tubes and nasal mask (e.g., under T-HFOV mode, with a maximum tidal volume of 100 ml, the minute ventilation volume reached 14,400 ml). In the process of transmission, there is only a minor loss of oscillation pressure. (Under experimental condition and with an oscillation frequency of 2-10 Hz, peak pressure loss was around 0%-50% when it reaches the mask.).

  2. 3 Level Ventilation: the First Clinical Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Torok

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the issues of artificial ventilation (AV in non-homogenous pathological lung processes (acute lung injury (ALI, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, pneumonia, etc., the authors applied the three-level lung ventilation to a group of 12 patients with non-homogenous lung injury. Three-level ventilation was defined as a type (modification of AV whose basic ventilation level was produced by the modes CMV, PCV or PS (ASB and add-on level, the so-called background ventilation was generated by two levels of PEEP. PEEP (constant and PEEPh (PEEP high with varying frequency and duration of transition between the individual levels of PEEP. Objective: to elucidate whether in cases of considerably non-homogenous gas distribution in acute pathological disorders, three-level ventilation (3LV can correct gas distribution into the so-called slow bronchoalveolar compartments, by decreasing the volume load of the so-called fast compartments and to improve lung gas exchange, by following the principles of safe ventilation. Results. 3LV was applied to 12 patients with severe non-homogenous lung injury/disorder (atypic pneumonia and ARDS/ALI and low-success PCV ventilation after recruitment manoeuvre (PaO2 (kPA /FiO2 = 5—6. There were pronounced positive changes in pulmonary gas exchange within 1—4 hours after initiation of 3LV at a fPCV of 26±4 breaths/min-1 and PEEPh at a fPEEPH of 7±2 breaths/min-1 with a minute ventilation of 12±4 l/min. 3LV reduced a intrapulmonary shunt fraction 50±5 to 30±5%, increased CO2 elimination, with PaCO2 falling to the values below 6±0.3 kPa, and PaO2 to 7.5±1.2 kPa, with FiO2 being decreased to 0.8—0.4. Lung recruitment also improved gas exchange: with PEEP=1.2±0.4 kPa, static tho-racopulmonary compliance (Cst elevated from 0.18±0.02 l/kPa to 0.3±0.02 l/kPa and then to 0.38±0.05 l/kPa. Airways resistance (Raw decreased by more than 30%. Improved lung aeration was also estimated as a manifestation of

  3. Multifamily Ventilation Retrofit Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation (BSC), Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation (BSC), Somerville, MA (United States); Bergey, D. [Building Science Corporation (BSC), Somerville, MA (United States)

    2012-12-01

    In multifamily buildings, central ventilation systems often have poor performance, overventilating some portions of the building (causing excess energy use), while simultaneously underventilating other portions (causing diminished indoor air quality). BSC and Innova Services Corporation performed a series of field tests at a mid-rise test building undergoing a major energy audit and retrofit, which included ventilation system upgrades.

  4. VENTILATION MODEL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-31

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their postclosure analyses.

  5. Diffuse ceiling ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen

    both thermal comfort and energy efficient aspects. The present study aims to characterize the air distribution and thermal comfort in the rooms with diffuse ceiling ventilation. Both the stand-alone ventilation system and its integration with a radiant ceiling system are investigated. This study also...

  6. Ventilation rates and health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundell, Jan; Levin, H; Nazaroff, W W

    2011-01-01

    The scientific literature through 2005 on the effects of ventilation rates on health in indoor environments has been reviewed by a multidisciplinary group. The group judged 27 papers published in peer-reviewed scientific journals as providing sufficient information on both ventilation rates...... and health effects to inform the relationship. Consistency was found across multiple investigations and different epidemiologic designs for different populations. Multiple health endpoints show similar relationships with ventilation rate. There is biological plausibility for an association of health outcomes...... studies of the relationship between ventilation rates and health, especially in diverse climates, in locations with polluted outdoor air and in buildings other than offices. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Ventilation with outdoor air plays an important role influencing human exposures to indoor pollutants...

  7. CFD and Ventilation Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Y.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2011-01-01

    There has been a rapid growth of scientific literature on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the research of ventilation and indoor air science. With a 1000–10,000 times increase in computer hardware capability in the past 20 years, CFD has become an integral part of scienti......There has been a rapid growth of scientific literature on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the research of ventilation and indoor air science. With a 1000–10,000 times increase in computer hardware capability in the past 20 years, CFD has become an integral part...... of scientific research and engineering development of complex air distribution and ventilation systems in buildings. This review discusses the major and specific challenges of CFD in terms of turbulence modelling, numerical approximation, and boundary conditions relevant to building ventilation. We emphasize...... analysis in ventilation research, rather it has become an increasingly important partner....

  8. Blown away: good ventilation is a bathroom must have

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, V.

    2010-10-15

    Ventilation is an often overlooked component of bathroom design despite its importance. Modern airtight homes have lost their natural ventilation, heightening the need to pay attention to proper mechanical ventilation. A good vent allows steam to exit the house without damaging the bathroom. Increased bathroom sizes require several smaller fans rather than one large one. Poor ventilation can cause not only unpleasant odours but also mould and mildew on surfaces and damage to the actual structure of the home. Ventilation increases the life of fixtures, grout, and tile. Many existing systems in Canada are inadequate. Although mechanical systems may be noisy, they are the best method to move enough air. The Home Ventilation Institute has developed a set of codes using simulated bathrooms, moisture and tracer gas to compare and test fans. A system should provide 8 air changes an hour, or one cubic foot per minute per foot of floor area. For efficiency, the system should be a controlled process and not occupancy-driven. A popular extra feature on ventilation systems is the ability to heat the bathroom while the fan is ventilating. 1 fig.

  9. Exercise 30 minutes a day (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    You get the most benefit from exercise if you do it for at least 30 minutes a day for 5 to 6 days a week. But you do not have to do 30 minutes in a row. Studies suggest that you ... for 10 minutes 3 times a day as you do during a longer session.

  10. Heliox Improves Carbon Dioxide Removal during Lung Protective Mechanical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte J. Beurskens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Helium is a noble gas with low density and increased carbon dioxide (CO2 diffusion capacity. This allows lower driving pressures in mechanical ventilation and increased CO2 diffusion. We hypothesized that heliox facilitates ventilation in patients during lung-protective mechanical ventilation using low tidal volumes. Methods. This is an observational cohort substudy of a single arm intervention study. Twenty-four ICU patients were included, who were admitted after a cardiac arrest and mechanically ventilated for 3 hours with heliox (50% helium; 50% oxygen. A fixed protective ventilation protocol (6 mL/kg was used, with prospective observation for changes in lung mechanics and gas exchange. Statistics was by Bonferroni post-hoc correction with statistical significance set at P<0.017. Results. During heliox ventilation, respiratory rate decreased (25±4 versus 23±5 breaths min−1, P=0.010. Minute volume ventilation showed a trend to decrease compared to baseline (11.1±1.9 versus 9.9±2.1 L min−1, P=0.026, while reducing PaCO2 levels (5.0±0.6 versus 4.5±0.6 kPa, P=0.011 and peak pressures (21.1±3.3 versus 19.8±3.2 cm H2O, P=0.024. Conclusions. Heliox improved CO2 elimination while allowing reduced minute volume ventilation in adult patients during protective mechanical ventilation.

  11. Interfaces and ventilator settings for long-term noninvasive ventilation in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callegari J

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Jens Callegari,1 Friederike Sophie Magnet,1 Steven Taubner,1 Melanie Berger,2 Sarah Bettina Schwarz,1 Wolfram Windisch,1 Jan Hendrik Storre3,4 1Department of Pneumology, Cologne-Merheim Hospital, Kliniken der Stadt Koeln, Witten/Herdecke University Hospital, 2Department of Pneumology, Malteser Hospital St Hildegardis, Cologne, 3Department of Pneumology, University Medical Hospital, Freiburg, 4Department of Intensive Care, Sleep Medicine and Mechanical Ventilation, Asklepios Fachkliniken Munich-Gauting, Gauting, Germany Introduction: The establishment of high-intensity (HI noninvasive ventilation (NIV that targets elevated PaCO2 has led to an increase in the use of long-term NIV to treat patients with chronic hypercapnic COPD. However, the role of the ventilation interface, especially in more aggressive ventilation strategies, has not been systematically assessed.Methods: Ventilator settings and NIV compliance were assessed in this prospective cross-sectional monocentric cohort study of COPD patients with pre-existing NIV. Daytime ­arterialized blood gas analyses and lung function testing were also performed. The primary end point was the distribution among study patients of interfaces (full-face masks [FFMs] vs nasal masks [NMs] in a real-life setting.Results: The majority of the 123 patients studied used an FFM (77%, while 23% used an NM. Ventilation settings were as follows: mean ± standard deviation (SD inspiratory positive airway pressure (IPAP was 23.2±4.6 mbar and mean ± SD breathing rate was 16.7±2.4/minute. Pressure support ventilation (PSV mode was used in 52.8% of patients, while assisted pressure-controlled ventilation (aPCV was used in 47.2% of patients. Higher IPAP levels were associated with an increased use of FFMs (IPAP <21 mbar: 73% vs IPAP >25 mbar: 84%. Mean compliance was 6.5 hours/day, with no differences between FFM (6.4 hours/day and NM (6.7 hours/day users. PaCO2 assessment of ventilation quality revealed

  12. Effectiveness of ventilation of nondependent lung for a brief period in improving arterial oxygenation during one-lung ventilation: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi Chigurupati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxemia is common during one-lung ventilation(OLV, predominantly due to transpulmonary shunt. None of the strategies tried showed consistent results. We evaluated the effectiveness of ventilating the operated, non-dependent lung (NDL with small tidal volumes in improving the oxygenation during OLV. Methods: 30 ASA 1 and 2 patients undergoing elective, open thoracotomy were studied. After standard induction of anesthesia, lung seperation was acheived with left sided DLT. The ventilatory settings for two lung ventilation (TLV were: FiO 2 of 0.5, tidal volume of 8-10ml/kg and respiratory rate of 10-12/min. After initiating OLV, the dependent lung alone was ventilated with the above settings for 15 minutes and an arterial blood gas (ABG analysis was done. Then the NDL was ventilated with a separate ventilator, with FiO 2 of 1, tidal volume of 70 ml, I:E ratio of 1:10 and respiratory rate of 6/min for 15 minutes. The NDL ventilation was started early if the patients desaturated to <95%. ABG was done at 5 and 15 mins of NDL ventilation. We compared the PaO 2 values. Results: The mean PaO 2 decreased from 232.2 ± 67.2 mm of Hg (TLV-ABG1 to 91.2 ± 31.7 mm of Hg on OLV (OLV-ABG1. The ABG after 5 minutes and 15 minutes after institution of NDL ventilation during OLV showed a PaO2 of 145.7 ± 50.2 mm of Hg and 170.6 ± 50.4 mm of Hg which were significantly higher compared to the one lung ventilation values.

  13. Why We Ventilate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Sherman, Max H.; Price, Phil N.; Singer, Brett C.

    2011-09-01

    It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of"good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

  14. Home Ventilator Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fit the ventilator under the seat in front. Second, its protected electronic panel prevents the settings from being changed inadvertently. Third, the Trilogy has six hours of battery life – three hours of internal battery and three hours ...

  15. The Effect of Pressure-Controlled Ventilation and Volume-Controlled Ventilation in Prone Position on Pulmonary Mechanics and Inflammatory Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şenay, Hasan; Sıvacı, Remziye; Kokulu, Serdar; Koca, Buğra; Bakı, Elif Doğan; Ela, Yüksel

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this present study is to compare the effect of pressure-controlled ventilation and volume-controlled ventilation on pulmonary mechanics and inflammatory markers in prone position. The study included 41 patients undergoing to vertebrae surgery. The patients were randomized into two groups: Group 1 received volume-controlled ventilation, while group 2 received pressure-controlled ventilation. The demographic data, pulmonary mechanics, the inflammatory marker levels just after the induction of anesthetics, at the 6th and 12th hours, and gas analysis from arterial blood samples taken at the beginning and the 30th minute were recorded. The inflammatory marker levels increased in both groups, without any significant difference among groups. Peak inspiratory pressure level was higher in the volume-controlled ventilation group. This study revealed that there is no difference regarding inflammatory marker levels between volume- and pressure-controlled ventilation.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of a Virulent Bacteriophage φPA-HF17 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Han

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important causative agent of nosocomial infection, is found throughout the hospital environment in moist reservoirs, and multidrug-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa have been increasingly reported worldwide. Bacteriophages are often considered potential therapeutic candidates in treating infectious diseases. In this study, a novel virulent bacteriophage φPA-HF17, specific infecting clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, was isolated and characterized from environmental sewage. Transmission electron microscopy showed that phage φPA-HF17 had an icosahedral head with a very short tail, and exhibited characteristics typical of a podovirus. Restriction analysis indicated that phage φPA-HF17 was a double-stranded DNA virus, which might be digested by some restriction endonucleases. Phage φPA-HF17 was highly infectious with a rapid adsorption (>90% adsorbed in 4 min. In a one-step growth experiment, phage φPA-HF17 was shown having a latent period of 10 minute, with corresponding burst sizes of 200 PFU/cell. Furthermore, when φPA-HF17 alone was incubated at different pHs and different temperatures, the phage was stable over a wide pH range (4 to 10 and at extreme temperature (50°C. These results suggest that φPA-HF17 may be candidate therapeutic phage to control P. aeruginosa infection.

  17. Conventional mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The provision of mechanical ventilation for the support of infants and children with respiratory failure or insufficiency is one of the most common techniques that are performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU. Despite its widespread application in the PICUs of the 21st century, before the 1930s, respiratory failure was uniformly fatal due to the lack of equipment and techniques for airway management and ventilatory support. The operating rooms of the 1950s and 1960s provided the arena for the development of the manual skills and the refinement of the equipment needed for airway management, which subsequently led to the more widespread use of endotracheal intubation thereby ushering in the era of positive pressure ventilation. Although there seems to be an ever increasing complexity in the techniques of mechanical ventilation, its successful use in the PICU should be guided by the basic principles of gas exchange and the physiology of respiratory function. With an understanding of these key concepts and the use of basic concepts of mechanical ventilation, this technique can be successfully applied in both the PICU and the operating room. This article reviews the basic physiology of gas exchange, principles of pulmonary physiology, and the concepts of mechanical ventilation to provide an overview of the knowledge required for the provision of conventional mechanical ventilation in various clinical arenas.

  18. Environmentally friendly HF (DF) lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the birth of Academician A M Prokhorov, this paper reviews the physics of self-sustained volume discharge without preionization—self-initiated volume discharge (SIVD)—in the working mixtures of non-chain hydrofluoride HF (deuterofluoride (DF)) lasers. The dynamics of SIVD in discharge gaps with different geometries is thoroughly described. The mechanisms for the restriction of current density in a diffuse channel in electric discharges in SF6 and SF6 based mixtures (which determines whether SIVD is possible) are proposed and analyzed using simple models. The most probable mechanisms are the electron impact dissociation of SF6 and other mixture components, electron-ion recombination and electron attachment to vibrationally excited SF6 molecules. Starting from a comparative analysis of the rate coefficients of these processes, it is shown that electron-ion recombination is capable of compensating for electron detachment from negative ions via electron impact. It is also established that SIVD is not only observed in SF6, but also in other strongly electronegative gases. The factors that determine the uniformity of the active medium in non-chain HF (DF) lasers are analyzed. Some special features of non-chain HF (DF) lasers with different apertures operating are carefully examined. Consideration is given to the problem of increasing the aperture and discharge volume of non-chain HF (DF) lasers. Based on our experimental results, the possibility of increasing the energy of such lasers to ~1 kJ and above is shown.

  19. Grindability of cast Ti-Hf alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Sato, Hideki; Okuno, Osamu; Nunn, Martha E; Okabe, Toru

    2006-04-01

    As part of our systematic studies characterizing the properties of titanium alloys, we investigated the grindability of a series of cast Ti-Hf alloys. Alloy buttons with hafnium concentrations up to 40 mass% were made using an argon-arc melting furnace. Each button was cast into a magnesia-based mold using a dental titanium casting machine; three specimens were made for each metal. Prior to testing, the hardened surface layer was removed. The specimens were ground at five different speeds for 1 min at 0.98 N using a carborundum wheel on an electric dental handpiece. Grindability was evaluated as the volume of metal removed per minute (grinding rate) and the volume ratio of metal removed compared to the wheel material lost (grinding ratio). The data were analyzed using ANOVA. A trend of increasing grindability was found with increasing amounts of hafnium, although there was no statistical difference in the grindability with increasing hafnium contents. We also found that hafnium may be used to harden or strengthen titanium without deteriorating the grindability.

  20. Smaller self-inflating bags produce greater guideline consistent ventilation in simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle Malcolm J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suboptimal bag ventilation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR has demonstrated detrimental physiological outcomes for cardiac arrest patients. In light of recent guideline changes for resuscitation, there is a need to identify the efficacy of bag ventilation by prehospital care providers. The objective of this study was to evaluate bag ventilation in relation to operator ability to achieve guideline consistent ventilation rate, tidal volume and minute volume when using two different capacity self-inflating bags in an undergraduate paramedic cohort. Methods An experimental study using a mechanical lung model and a simulated adult cardiac arrest to assess the ventilation ability of third year Monash University undergraduate paramedic students. Participants were instructed to ventilate using 1600 ml and 1000 ml bags for a length of two minutes at the correct rate and tidal volume for a patient undergoing CPR with an advanced airway. Ventilation rate and tidal volume were recorded using an analogue scale with mean values calculated. Ethics approval was granted. Results Suboptimal ventilation with the use of conventional 1600 ml bag was common, with 77% and 97% of participants unable to achieve guideline consistent ventilation rates and tidal volumes respectively. Reduced levels of suboptimal ventilation arouse from the use of the smaller bag with a 27% reduction in suboptimal tidal volumes (p = 0.015 and 23% reduction in suboptimal minute volumes (p = 0.045. Conclusion Smaller self-inflating bags reduce the incidence of suboptimal tidal volumes and minute volumes and produce greater guideline consistent results for cardiac arrest patients.

  1. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    -cooling period and night cooling potential. The investment cost of this ventilation system is about 5-10% lower than the conventional ones, because the acoustic ceiling could be directly applied as air diffuser and the use of plenum to distribute air reduces the cost of ductwork. There is a growing interest...... is not well structured with this system. These become the motivations in developing the design guide. This design guide aims to establish a systematic understanding of diffuse ceiling ventilation and provide assistance in designing of such a system. The guide is targeted at design engineers, architects...... and manufacturers and the users of diffuse ceiling technology. The design guide introduces the principle and key characteristics of room air distribution with diffuse ceiling ventilation. It provides an overview of potential benefit and limitations of this technology. The benefits include high thermal comfort, high...

  2. CFD and Ventilation Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Y.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2011-01-01

    There has been a rapid growth of scientific literature on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the research of ventilation and indoor air science. With a 1000–10,000 times increase in computer hardware capability in the past 20 years, CFD has become an integral part...... of scientific research and engineering development of complex air distribution and ventilation systems in buildings. This review discusses the major and specific challenges of CFD in terms of turbulence modelling, numerical approximation, and boundary conditions relevant to building ventilation. We emphasize...... the growing need for CFD verification and validation, suggest on-going needs for analytical and experimental methods to support the numerical solutions, and discuss the growing capacity of CFD in opening up new research areas. We suggest that CFD has not become a replacement for experiment and theoretical...

  3. Frequency dependence of lung volume changes during superimposed high-frequency jet ventilation and high-frequency jet ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sütterlin, R; Priori, R; Larsson, A; LoMauro, A; Frykholm, P; Aliverti, A

    2014-01-01

    Superimposed high-frequency jet ventilation (SHFJV) has proved to be safe and effective in clinical practice. However, it is unclear which frequency range optimizes ventilation and gas exchange. The aim of this study was to systematically compare high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) with HFJV by assessing chest wall volume variations (ΔEEV(CW)) and gas exchange in relation to variable high frequency. SHFJV or HFJV were used alternatively to ventilate the lungs of 10 anaesthetized pigs (21-25 kg). The low-frequency component was kept at 16 min(-1) in SHFJV. In both modes, high frequencies ranging from 100 to 1000 min(-1) were applied in random order and ventilation was maintained for 5 min in all modalities. Chest wall volume variations were obtained using opto-electronic plethysmography. Airway pressures and arterial blood gases were measured repeatedly. SHFJV increased ΔEEV(CW) compared with HFJV; the difference ranged from 43 to 68 ml. Tidal volume (V(T)) was always >240 ml during SHFJV whereas during HFJV ranged from 92 ml at the ventilation frequency of 100 min(-1) to negligible values at frequencies >300 min(-1). We observed similar patterns for Pa(O₂) and Pa(CO₂). SHFJV provided generally higher, frequency-independent oxygenation (Pa(O₂) at least 32.0 kPa) and CO₂ removal (Pa(CO₂) ∼5.5 kPa), whereas HFJV led to hypoxia and hypercarbia at higher rates (Pa(O₂) 10 kPa at f(HF)>300 min(-1)). In a porcine model, SHFJV was more effective in increasing end-expiratory volume than single-frequency HFJV, but both modes may provide adequate ventilation in the absence of airway obstruction and respiratory disease, except for HFJV at frequencies ≥300 min(-1).

  4. Ventilation with heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the experiences from the use of ventilation with heat recovery in several experimental single-family houses developed and built within the last four years to meet the new Danish energy requirements of 2005. Included are descriptions of the ventilation system components...... and the main functional demands as well as measurements of the thermal efficiency, electricity consumptions and building air tightness. The paper addresses the aspects of minimizing the heat loss from the duct system and the heat recovery unit (when placed in an unheated attic space) in order to obtain...

  5. Ventilation with heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    and the main functional demands as well as measurements of the thermal efficiency, electricity consumptions and building air tightness. The paper addresses the aspects of minimizing the heat loss from the duct system and the heat recovery unit (when placed in an unheated attic space) in order to obtain......This paper presents the experiences from the use of ventilation with heat recovery in several experimental single-family houses developed and built within the last four years to meet the new Danish energy requirements of 2005. Included are descriptions of the ventilation system components...

  6. Ventilator Circuits, Humidification and Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Hess

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Technical issues in the care of mechanically ventilated patients include those related to the ventilator circuit, humidification and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Principal issues related to ventilator circuits include leaks and compression volume. Circuit compression volume affects delivered tidal volume as well as measurements of auto-positive end-expiratory pressure and mixed expired PCO2. Resistance through the ventilator circuit contributes to patient-ventilator dyssynchrony during assisted modes of mechanical ventilation. Adequate humidification of inspired gas is necessary to prevent heat and moisture loss. Common methods of humidification of inspired gas during mechanical ventilation include use of active heated humidifiers and passive artificial noses. Artificial noses are less effective than active humidifiers and are best suited to short term use. With active humidifiers, the circuit can be heated to avoid condensate formation. However, care must be exercised when heated circuits are used to avoid delivery of a low relative humidity and subsequent drying of secretions in the artificial airway. Although pneumonia is a complication of mechanical ventilation, these pneumonias are usually the result of aspiration of pharyngeal secretions and are seldom related to the ventilator circuit. Ventilator circuits do not need to be changed more frequently than weekly for infection control purposes, and the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia may be greater with more frequent circuit changes.

  7. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2011-04-01

    Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outdoor pollutant levels are high, the importance of minimizing energy use particularly during times of peak electricity demand, and how the energy used to condition air as part of ventilation system operation changes with outdoor conditions. Dynamic control of ventilation systems can provide ventilation equivalent to or better than what is required by standards while minimizing energy costs and can also add value by shifting load during peak times and reducing intake of outdoor air contaminants. This article describes the logic that enables dynamic control of whole-house ventilation systems to meet the intent of ventilation standards and demonstrates the dynamic ventilation system control concept through simulations and field tests of the Residential Integrated Ventilation-Energy Controller (RIVEC).

  8. A Nomogram for Calculation of Oxygen Consumption from Minute Ventilation at Varying Workloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    T. S. Neuman Naval Health Research Center San Diego, Czalifornia 92152 K. M. Moser Pulmonary Divisin r Acession FrUCSD School of Medicine NTIS GRA&I...AODRESS(UI dilffeent from Controlling Office) IS. SECURITY CLASS. (of this reporl) Bureau of Medicine & Surgery - .,_.. "-.. / Unclassified Department of

  9. Demand controlled ventilation; Behovsstyrt ventilasjon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, Henning Holm

    2006-07-01

    The terms CAV and VAV have been known terms for many years in the ventilation business. The terms are also included in building regulations, but the time is now right to focus on demand controlled ventilation (DCV). The new building regulations and the accompanying energy framework underline the need for a more nuanced thinking when it comes to controlling ventilation systems. Descriptions and further details of the ventilation systems are provided (ml)

  10. 48 CFR 9901.312 - Minutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minutes. 9901.312 Section 9901.312 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL... maintaining Board files....

  11. U.S. 15 Minute Precipitation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. 15 Minute Precipitation Data is digital data set DSI-3260, archived at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). This is precipitation data. The primary source...

  12. Hybrid Ventilation Air Flow Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    The scope of this annex is therefore to obtain better knowledge of the use of hybrid ventilation technologies. The annex focus on development of control strategies for hybrid ventilation, on development of methods to predict hybrid ventilation performance in office buildings and on implementation...

  13. Ventilator and viral induced inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennus, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis expands current knowledge on ventilator induced lung injury and provides insights on the immunological effects of mechanical ventilation during viral respiratory infections. The experimental studies in the first part of this thesis improve our understanding of how mechanical ventilation

  14. Algebra success in 20 minutes a day

    CERN Document Server

    LearningExpress, LLC

    2014-01-01

    Stripped of unnecessary math jargon but bursting with algebra essentials, this handy guide covers vital algebra skills that apply to real-world scenarios. Whether you're new to algebra or just looking for a refresher, Algebra Success in 20 Minutes a Day offers a lesson plan that provides quick and thorough instruction in practical, critical skills. All lessons can be completed in just 20 minutes a day, for a manageable and non-intimidating learning experience.

  15. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  16. Elforbrug til mekanisk ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olufsen, P.

    I Energi 2000 er ventilationsområdet udpeget som et af de områder, hvor der bør tages initiativ til at fremme elbesparelser. I rapporten beskrives og analyseres målinger af elforbruget til ventilation i 12 bygninger, der alle anvendes til administration eller lignende formål. På grundlag af...

  17. A thirty second isomer in Hf-171

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, P; Billowes, J; Cochrane, ECA; Cooke, JL; Cooper, TG; Dendooven, P; Evans, DE; Grant, IS; Griffith, JAR; Honkanen, A; Huhta, M; Oinonen, M; Pearson, MR; Penttila, H; Persson, B.L.; Richardson, DS; Tungate, G; Wheeler, PD; Zybert, L; Aysto, J

    1997-01-01

    An isomer has been detected in Hf-171 with a half-life of T-1/2 = 29.5(9) s. The state was populated in the Yb-170(alpha,3n)Hf-171m reaction at a beam energy of E-alpha = 50 MeV in an on-line ion guide isotope separator. The isomeric Hf-17lm(+) beam was extracted from the ion guide, mass-analysed an

  18. Human response to ductless personalized ventilation coupled with displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalewski, Mariusz; Veselý, Michal; Melikov, Arsen K.

    2012-01-01

    A human subject experiment was carried out to investigate the extent to which ductless personalized ventilation (DPV) in conjunction with displacement ventilation can improve perceived air quality (PAQ) and thermal comfort at elevated room air temperature in comparison with displacement ventilation...... alone. The experimental conditions comprised displacement ventilation alone (room air temperature of 23 °C, 26 °C, 29 °C) and DPV with displacement ventilation (26 °C, 29 °C), both operating at supply air temperatures 3, 5 or 6K lower than room air temperature, as well as mixing ventilation (23 °C, 3 K......). During one hour exposure participants answered questionnaires regarding PAQ and thermal comfort. PAQ was significantly better with DPV than without DPV at the same background conditions. Thermal comfort improved when DPV was used. Combining DPV with displacement ventilation showed the potential...

  19. 单肺通气中右美托咪定辅助麻醉对肺通气/血流的影响%Single Lung Ventilation of Dexmedetomidine Assisted Anesthesia on Pulmonary Ventilation/Blood Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康忠奎

    2016-01-01

    Objective Observed in single lung ventilation,right the microphones on auxiliary anesthesia hemodynamic, whether to help to improve the single lung ventilation lung ventilation/blood flow abnormalities.Methods 60 cases of esophageal cancer radical under one-lung ventilation were divided into control group and experimental group.Control group 0.9% saline injec-tion 10 mL after anesthesia induction,the experimental group after anesthesia induction right set beauty holds the mi 0.6 mu g/kg (input) 10 minutes.Observe two groups of related indicators: single lung ventilation time,operation time,airway pressure,oxygen partial pressure;Observe preoperative,15 minutes before intubation and after intubation and after intubation,cut skin,into the chest,single lung ventilation when 60 minutes,90 minutes of single lung ventilation,double lung ventilation 15 minutes time point of the mean arterial pressure (MAP),heart rate (HR);Observe preoperatively,single lung ventilation 60 minutes,90 minutes of one-lung ventilation and oxygen index.Results This study results show that the oxygen and index in preoperative point in time,the ex-perimental group there was no statistically significant difference compared with control group (P>0.05);Oxygen index and one-lung ventilation 60 minutes,single lung ventilation in 90 minutes,the experimental group compared with control group difference was sta-tistically significant(P0.05);氧和指数在单肺通气60 min、单肺通气90 min时间点,实验组与对照组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),其机制可能就是减轻了单肺通气引起急性肺损伤。 HR、MAP在插管前、插管后、插管后15 min、切皮时、进胸、单肺通气60 min、单肺通气90 min、双肺通气15 min时间点,实验组与对照组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论在单肺通气中,右美托咪定辅助麻醉血流动力学更平稳,氧和指数增加,有助于改善单肺通气时的肺通气/血流异常。

  20. Different characteristics of ventilator application between tracheostomy- and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donghwi; Lee, Goo Joo; Kim, Ha Young; Ryu, Ju Seok

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the appropriate home ventilator settings for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).In total, 71 patients with ALS, who had received either a noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) or tracheostomy positive pressure ventilation (TPPV), were included. Accordingly, patients were divided into 2 groups (the TPPV and NIPPV groups). We retrospectively evaluated the values used in home ventilators for patients with ALS, who had maintained a stable level of CO2 on both the arterial blood gas analysis (ABGA) and transcutaneous blood gas monitoring. To measure the main outcome, we also investigated the actual body weight (ABW) and predicted body weight (PBW) of patients, and the following setting values of ventilators were also recorded: the inspired tidal volume (VTi), minute ventilation (MV), peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP), and inspiratory time (Tins).VTi and MV showed a significantly positive correlation with both PBW and ABW of patients in the TPPV group. However, both VTi and MV had greater significant correlation with PBW than ABW in the TPPV group. In addition, VTi and MV did not show a significantly positive correlation with either PBW or ABW in the NIPPV group.In patients with ALS, PBW was more useful for predicting VTi and MV than ABW. Moreover, it will be helpful to know the differences of setting values between TPPV and NIPPV, especially because ALS patients are usually treated with TPPV due to the initial difficulties associated with NIPPV.

  1. Advanced lung ventilation system (ALVS) with linear respiratory mechanics assumption for waveform optimization of dual-controlled ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecchia, F; Guerrisi, M; Canichella, A

    2007-03-01

    The present paper describes the functional features of an advanced lung ventilation system (ALVS) properly designed for the optimization of conventional dual-controlled ventilation (DCV), i.e. with pressure-controlled ventilation with ensured tidal or minute volume. Considering the particular clinical conditions of patients treated with controlled ventilation the analysis and synthesis of ALVS control have been performed assuming a linear respiratory mechanics. Moreover, new airways pressure waveforms with more physiological shape can be tested on simulators of respiratory system in order to evaluate their clinical application. This is obtained through the implementation of a compensation procedure making the desired airways pressure waveform independent on patient airways resistance and lung compliance variations along with a complete real-time monitoring of respiratory system parameters leading the ventilator setting. The experimental results obtained with a lung simulator agree with the theoretical ones and show that ALVS performance is useful for the research activity aiming at the improvement of both diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic outcome relative to mechanical ventilation treatments.

  2. Recurrent recruitment manoeuvres improve lung mechanics and minimize lung injury during mechanical ventilation of healthy mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Kathleen Reiss

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Mechanical ventilation (MV of mice is increasingly required in experimental studies, but the conditions that allow stable ventilation of mice over several hours have not yet been fully defined. In addition, most previous studies documented vital parameters and lung mechanics only incompletely. The aim of the present study was to establish experimental conditions that keep these parameters within their physiological range over a period of 6 h. For this purpose, we also examined the effects of frequent short recruitment manoeuvres (RM in healthy mice. METHODS: Mice were ventilated at low tidal volume V(T = 8 mL/kg or high tidal volume V(T = 16 mL/kg and a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP of 2 or 6 cm H(2O. RM were performed every 5 min, 60 min or not at all. Lung mechanics were followed by the forced oscillation technique. Blood pressure (BP, electrocardiogram (ECG, heart frequency (HF, oxygen saturation and body temperature were monitored. Blood gases, neutrophil-recruitment, microvascular permeability and pro-inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and blood serum as well as histopathology of the lung were examined. RESULTS: MV with repetitive RM every 5 min resulted in stable respiratory mechanics. Ventilation without RM worsened lung mechanics due to alveolar collapse, leading to impaired gas exchange. HF and BP were affected by anaesthesia, but not by ventilation. Microvascular permeability was highest in atelectatic lungs, whereas neutrophil-recruitment and structural changes were strongest in lungs ventilated with high tidal volume. The cytokines IL-6 and KC, but neither TNF nor IP-10, were elevated in the BAL and serum of all ventilated mice and were reduced by recurrent RM. Lung mechanics, oxygenation and pulmonary inflammation were improved by increased PEEP. CONCLUSIONS: Recurrent RM maintain lung mechanics in their physiological range during low tidal volume ventilation of healthy mice by

  3. Design Procedure for Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Tjelflaat, Per Olaf

    Mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately during many years. The natural next step in this development is development of ventilation concepts that utilises and combines the best features from each system into a new type of ventilation system - Hybrid Ventilation....... Buildings with hybrid ventilation often include other sustainable technologies and an energy optimisation requires an integrated approach in the design of the building and its mechanical systems. Therefore, the hybrid ventilation design procedure differs from the design procedure for conventional HVAC....... The first ideas on a design procedure for hybrid ventilation is presented and the different types of design methods, that is needed in different phases of the design process, is discussed....

  4. The study of multilayers Fe/Hf and Ni/Hf by slow positron beam technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Mutsumi; Nakajyo, Terunobu; Murashige, Yusuke; Koizumi, Tomoya; Kanazawa, Ikuzo; Komori, Fumio; Soe, We-Hyo; Yamamoto, Ryoichi; Ito, Yasuo

    1997-05-01

    The S-parameters versus the incident positron energy are measured in the Ni/Hf multilayer, thin Hf film, thin Fe film and the bilayer Fe/Hf. We have analyzed the change in vacancy-type defects in these multilayers and thin films with the deposition temperature in the MBE system.

  5. ASHRAE and residential ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01

    In the last quarter of a century, the western world has become increasingly aware of environmental threats to health and safety. During this period, people psychologically retreated away from outdoors hazards such as pesticides, smog, lead, oil spills, and dioxin to the seeming security of their homes. However, the indoor environment may not be healthier than the outdoor environment, as has become more apparent over the past few years with issues such as mold, formaldehyde, and sick-building syndrome. While the built human environment has changed substantially over the past 10,000 years, human biology has not; poor indoor air quality creates health risks and can be uncomfortable. The human race has found, over time, that it is essential to manage the indoor environments of their homes. ASHRAE has long been in the business of ventilation, but most of the focus of that effort has been in the area of commercial and institutional buildings. Residential ventilation was traditionally not a major concern because it was felt that, between operable windows and envelope leakage, people were getting enough outside air in their homes. In the quarter of a century since the first oil shock, houses have gotten much more energy efficient. At the same time, the kinds of materials and functions in houses changed in character in response to people's needs. People became more environmentally conscious and aware not only about the resources they were consuming but about the environment in which they lived. All of these factors contributed to an increasing level of public concern about residential indoor air quality and ventilation. Where once there was an easy feeling about the residential indoor environment, there is now a desire to define levels of acceptability and performance. Many institutions--both public and private--have interests in Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), but ASHRAE, as the professional society that has had ventilation as part of its mission for over 100 years, is the

  6. High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AC Bryan

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency oscillatory (HFO ventilation using low tidal volume and peak airway pressures is extremely efficient at eliminating carbon dioxide and raising pH in the newborn infant with acute respiratory failure. Improvement in oxygenation requires a strategy of sustained or repetitive inflations to 25 to 30 cm H2O in order to place the lung on the deflation limb of the pressure-volume curve. This strategy has also been shown to decrease the amount of secondary lung injury in animal models. Experience of the use of HFO ventilation as a rescue therapy as well as several published controlled trials have shown improved outcomes and a decrease in the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation when it has been used in newborns.

  7. Geometry success in 20 minutes a day

    CERN Document Server

    LLC, LearningExpress

    2014-01-01

    Whether you're new to geometry or just looking for a refresher, Geometry Success in 20 Minutes a Day offers a 20-step lesson plan that provides quick and thorough instruction in practical, critical skills. Stripped of unnecessary math jargon but bursting with geometry essentials, Geometry Success in 20 Minutes a Day: Covers all vital geometry skills, from the basic building blocks of geometry to ratio, proportion, and similarity to trigonometry and beyond Provides hundreds of practice exercises in test format Applies geometr

  8. HF radiation emitted by chaotic leader processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, J. S.; Edirisinghe, M.; Fernando, M.; Montaño, R.; Cooray, V.

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents direct measurements of narrowband 10 MHz HF radiation from so-called “chaotic leaders” associated with subsequent return strokes. Although the term is controversial and poorly defined, we find that more than 30% of subsequent strokes in close lightning flashes contain electric field characteristics that are best described as “chaotic”. In earlier studies, return strokes have consistently been observed to be the strongest sources of HF radiation, but the results for leader processes are less consistent. We also observe return strokes to be the main HF emitter, and the leaders before the first return stroke in a flash sequence also emit HF though somewhat less intensely. The leaders preceding subsequent strokes typically emit little or no HF radiation, whether they are dart or dart-stepped leaders. However, it was observed that the presence of a chaotic component increases the leader HF intensity dramatically Defining the HF intensity unequivocally can be problematic for processes like chaotic leaders which have a combination of continuous and impulsive phenomena. Two time-domain methods were used to measure the HF intensity, the peak energy and the RMS energy. In the frequency domain these correspond to the energy spectral density (ESD) and power spectral density (PSD), respectively. It was found that the methods are not necessarily compatible. Thus, it is suggested that to clarify future work, leader processes should be characterized by the PSD rather than the ESD.

  9. Non-Invasive Ventilation in Patients with Heart Failure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Hugo Souza; Reis, Helena França Correia Dos; Lima, Melissa Santos; Gomes, Mansueto

    2017-02-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) may perfect respiratory and cardiac performance in patients with heart failure (HF). The objective of the study to establish, through systematic review and meta-analysis, NIV influence on functional capacity of HF patients. A systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized studies was carried out through research of databases of Cochrane Library, SciELO, Pubmed and PEDro, using the key-words: heart failure, non-invasive ventilation, exercise tolerance; and the free terms: bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and functional capacity (terms were searched for in English and Portuguese) using the Boolean operators AND and OR. Methodological quality was ensured through PEDro scale. Weighted averages and a 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. The meta-analysis was done thorugh the software Review Manager, version 5.3 (Cochrane Collaboration). Four randomized clinical trials were included. Individual studies suggest NIV improved functional capacity. NIV resulted in improvement in the distance of the six-minute walk test (6MWT) (68.7m 95%CI: 52.6 to 84.9) in comparison to the control group. We conclude that the NIV is an intervention that promotes important effects in the improvement of functional capacity of HF patients. However, there is a gap in literature on which are the most adequate parameters for the application of this technique. Resumo A ventilação não invasiva (VNI) pode aperfeiçoar o desempenho cardíaco e respiratório dos pacientes com insuficiência cardíaca (IC). O objetivo do estudo é estabelecer, por meio de revisão sistemática e meta-análise, a influência da VNI na capacidade funcional (CF) de indivíduos com IC. Foi realizada uma revisão sistemática com meta-análise de estudos randomizados através da pesquisa nas bases de dados Biblioteca Cochrane, SciELO, Pubmed e PEDro, utilizando-se as palavras-chave: insuficiência cardíaca, ventilação n

  10. HfS, Hyperfine Structure Fitting Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Estalella, Robert

    2016-01-01

    HfS is a tool to fit the hyperfine structure of spectral lines, with multiple velocity components. The HfS_nh3 procedures included in HfS fit simultaneously the hyperfine structure of the NH$_3$ (J,K)= (1,1) and (2,2) transitions, and perform a standard analysis to derive $T_\\mathrm{ex}$, NH$_3$ column density, $T_\\mathrm{rot}$, and $T_\\mathrm{k}$. HfS uses a Monte Carlo approach for fitting the line parameters. Especial attention is paid to the derivation of the parameter uncertainties. HfS includes procedures that make use of parallel computing for fitting spectra from a data cube.

  11. 10-Minute Consultation Transient ischaemic attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vedamurthy Adhiyaman; Sonja Adhiyaman

    2009-01-01

    @@ A 64 year old man comes to your surgery five days after an episode of visual loss in his left eye, followed by fight sided weakness and speech disturbance lasting 10 minutes. He has made a complete recovery and has driven himself to the surgery to ask whether he can return to work.

  12. Grammar success in 20 minutes a day

    CERN Document Server

    Express, Learning

    2013-01-01

    Thorough and concise, Grammar Success in 20 Minutes a Day, covers all the essentials, including common and proper nouns; personal, reflexive, and demonstrative pronouns; regular and irregular verbs; adjectives, adverbs, misplaced modifiers, prepositions, subordinate and insubordinate clauses; coordinating and correlating conjunctions; compound sentences; and punctuation.

  13. Pretest Predictions for Ventilation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Sun; H. Yang; H.N. Kalia

    2007-01-17

    The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, concrete pipe walls, and insulation that will be developed during the ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as input to the following three areas: (1) Decisions regarding testing set-up and performance. (2) Assessing how best to scale the test phenomena measured. (3) Validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the ventilation tests, and develop and describe numerical methods that can be used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. Sensitivity studies to assess the impact of variation of linear power densities (linear heat loads) and ventilation air flow rates are included. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only.

  14. Pulmonary mechanics during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, William R; Sheel, A William

    2012-03-15

    The use of mechanical ventilation has become widespread in the management of hypoxic respiratory failure. Investigations of pulmonary mechanics in this clinical scenario have demonstrated that there are significant differences in compliance, resistance and gas flow when compared with normal subjects. This paper will review the mechanisms by which pulmonary mechanics are assessed in mechanically ventilated patients and will review how the data can be used for investigative research purposes as well as to inform rational ventilator management.

  15. Mechanical ventilation in neurosurgical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav Goyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation significantly affects cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood flow through changes in arterial carbon dioxide levels. Neurosurgical patients might require mechanical ventilation for correction and maintenance of changes in the pulmonary system that occur either due to neurosurgical pathology or following surgery during the acute phase. This review discusses the basics of mechanical ventilation relevant to the neurosurgeon in the day-to-day management of neurosurgical patient requiring artificial support of the respiration.

  16. Aspects of HF radio propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Saillant

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    radio systems. From the point of view Working Group 2 of the COST 296 Action, interest lies with effects associated

    with propagation via the ionosphere of signals within the HF band. Several aspects are covered in this paper:

    a The directions of arrival and times of flight of signals received over a path oriented along the trough have

    been examined and several types of propagation effects identified. Of particular note, combining the HF observations

    with satellite measurements has identified the presence of irregularities within the floor of the trough that

    result in propagation displaced from the great circle direction. An understanding of the propagation effects that

    result in deviations of the signal path from the great circle direction are of particular relevance to the operation

    of HF radiolocation systems.

    b Inclusion of the results from the above mentioned measurements into a propagation model of the northerly

    ionosphere (i.e. those regions of the ionosphere located poleward of, and including, the mid-latitude trough

    and the use of this model to predict the coverage expected from transmitters where the signals impinge on the

    northerly ionosphere

  17. Design Principles for Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    For many years mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately. Naturally, the next step in this development is the development of ventilation concepts that utilize and combine the best features from each system to create a new type of ventilation system- Hybrid Ventilation....... The hybrid ventilation concepts, design challenges and principles are discussed and illustrated by four building examples....

  18. Severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia improved by noninvasive positive pressure ventilation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Christian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This is the first report to describe the feasibility and effectiveness of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in the secondary treatment of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Case presentation A former male preterm of Caucasian ethnicity delivered at 29 weeks gestation developed severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia. At the age of six months he was in permanent tachypnea and dyspnea and in need of 100% oxygen with a flow of 2.0 L/minute via a nasal cannula. Intermittent nocturnal noninvasive positive pressure ventilation was then administered for seven hours daily. The ventilator was set at a positive end-expiratory pressure of 6 cmH2O, with pressure support of 4 cmH2O, trigger at 1.4 mL/second, and a maximum inspiratory time of 0.7 seconds. Over the course of seven weeks, the patient's maximum daytime fraction of inspired oxygen via nasal cannula decreased from 1.0 to 0.75, his respiratory rate from 64 breaths/minute to 50 breaths/minute and carbon dioxide from 58 mmHg to 44 mmHg. Conclusion Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation may be a novel therapeutic option for established severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In the case presented, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation achieved sustained improvement in ventilation and thus prepared our patient for safe home oxygen therapy.

  19. Height dependence of the observed spectrum of radar backscatter from HF-induced ionospheric Langmuir turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejer, J. A.; Sulzer, M. P.; Djuth, F. T.

    1991-09-01

    Results are presented of observations of the spectrum of the 430-MHz radar backscatter from HF-induced Langmuir turbulence with height discrimination. During very stable ionospheric conditions under which the height of the below-threshold backscatter spectrum changed by less than 300 m during a 7-min period, a 20-s-long temporary increase in the HF power from 3 MW ERP to 38-MW-equivalent-radiated HF power is found to result in subsequent strong above-threshold spectra extending to heights up to 1200 m greater than the height of the below-threshold spectrum for more than a minute. The generation of irregularities in the plasma density during the 20 s of enhanced HF power is suggested as a possible cause of this persistence of strong above-threshold spectra at greater heights. The initial temporal evolution of the backscatter spectrum from Langmuir turbulence after the start of HF transmissions is observed for different heights. The observational results are compared with the predictions of existing theories of Langmuir turbulence.

  20. Efficacy of Experimental Hydrofluoric Acid (HF on Bond Strength and Microleakage of Composite-Porcelain Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Mahvidyzadeh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of an experimental hydrofluoric acid (HF for preparation of porcelain and to compare it with two commercial hydrofluoric acids in Iranian trademark. Materials and Methods: A- Evaluation of etch pattern of experimental HF using scanning electron microscope (SEM: 6 feldespathic discs were divided into 3 groups. Each group was etched with related HF (experimental, Ultradent and Kimia for 1 minute. SEM images were recorded at 3 magnifications. B- Bond strength test: 18 feldespathic discs were considered for each acidic group. Then the porcelain surfaces were etched and bonded to composite with unfilled resin. Consequently, the microshear test was done. C- Microleakage test: 54 discs were divided into 3 groups (n=18. Then the porcelain surfaces were etched and bonded to composite with unfilled resin and finally observed under stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Smirnov tests. Results: SEM analysis showed no difference between groups in terms of etch pattern. Microshear bond strength values for experimental, Kimia, and Ultradent HF were 28.53 (±4.92, 28.21 (±6.61, and 26.14 (±7.61 MPa, respectively. There was no significant difference between the bond strength of test groups (P0.05. Conclusion: Quality of experimental HF in terms of etch pattern, microshear bond strength and microleakage of composite/porcelain interface was similar to that of two commercial hydrofluoric acids.

  1. Displacement ventilation in lecture halls

    OpenAIRE

    Egorov, Artem

    2013-01-01

    This thesis considers several important goals. The main purpose is to see how displacement ventilation sys-tem works in the lecture hall of M-building and compare obtained results with D2 and Indoor Climate Classi-fication. The second one is to analyze the function of the ventilation system. The last one is to realize when displacement ventilation is preferable to mixing ventilation. Analysis of the system was carried out with instruments from MUAS HVAC laboratory. In lecture hall were me...

  2. Monitoring during Mechnical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Hess

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring is a continuous, or nearly continuous, evaluation of the physiological function of a patient in real time to guide management decisions, including when to make therapeutic interventions and assessment of those interventions. Pulse oximeters pass two wavelengths of light through a pulsating vascular bed and determine oxygen saturation. The accuracy of pulse oximetry is about ±4%. Capnography measures carbon dioxide at the airway and displays a waveform called the capnogram. End-tidal PCO2 represents alveolar PCO2 and is determined by the ventilation-perfusion quotient. Use of end-tidal PCO2 as an indication of arterial PCO2 is often deceiving and incorrect in critically ill patients. Because there is normally very little carbon dioxide in the stomach, a useful application of capnography is the detection of esophageal intubation. Intra-arterial blood gas systems are available, but the clinical impact and cost effectiveness of these is unclear. Mixed venous oxygenation (PvO2 or SvO2 is a global indicator of tissue oxygenation and is affected by arterial oxygen content, oxygen consumption and cardiac output. Indirect calorimetry is the calculation of energy expenditure and respiratory quotient by the measurement of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. A variety of mechanics can be determined in mechanically ventilated patients including resistance, compliance, auto-peak end-expiratory pressure (PEEP and work of breathing. The static pressure-volume curve can be used to identify lower and upper infection points, which can be used to determine the appropriate PEEP setting and to avoid alveolar overdistension. Although some forms of monitoring have become a standard of care during mechanical ventilation (eg, pulse oximetry, there is little evidence that use of any monitor affects patient outcome.

  3. The DECam Minute Cadence Survey I

    CERN Document Server

    Belardi, Claudia; Munn, Jeffrey A; Gianninas, A; Barber, Sara D; Dey, Arjun; Stetson, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results from a minute cadence survey of a three square degree field obtained with the Dark Energy Camera. We imaged part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey area over eight half-nights. We use the stacked images to identify 111 high proper motion white dwarf candidates with g $\\leq24.5$ mag and search for eclipse-like events and other sources of variability. We find a new g = 20.64 mag pulsating ZZ Ceti star with pulsation periods of 11-13 min. However, we do not find any transiting planetary companions in the habitable zone of our target white dwarfs. Given the probability of eclipses of 1% and our observing window from the ground, the non-detection of such companions in this first field is not surprising. Minute cadence DECam observations of additional fields will provide stringent constraints on the frequency of planets in the white dwarf habitable zone.

  4. Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

  5. The elements of grammar in 90 minutes

    CERN Document Server

    Hollander, Robert

    2011-01-01

    An eminent scholar explains the essentials of English grammar to those who never studied the basics as well as those who need a refresher course. Inspired by Strunk & White's classic The Elements of Style, this user-friendly guide focuses exclusively on grammar, explaining the individual parts of speech and their proper arrangement in sentence form. A modest investment of 90 minutes can provide readers of all ages with simple but important tools that will improve their communication skills. Dover (2011) original publication.

  6. Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

  7. Plane Stratified Flow in a Room Ventilated by Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Nickel, J.; Baron, D. J. G.

    2004-01-01

    The air movement in the occupied zone of a room ventilated by displacement ventilation exists as a stratified flow along the floor. This flow can be radial or plane according to the number of wall-mounted diffusers and the room geometry. The paper addresses the situations where plane flow...

  8. HF Transverse Segmentation and Tagging Jet Capability

    CERN Document Server

    Doroshkevich, E A; Kuleshov, Sergey

    1998-01-01

    So called tagging jets and pile-up were simulated for the optimisation of the HF segmentation. The energy resolution, angular resolution and efficiency of jet reconstruction are defined for different calorimeter segmentation.

  9. Collisional quenching of highly rotationally excited HF

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Benhui; Forrey, R C; Stancil, P C; Balakrishnan, N

    2015-01-01

    Collisional excitation rate coefficients play an important role in the dynamics of energy transfer in the interstellar medium. In particular, accurate rotational excitation rates are needed to interpret microwave and infrared observations of the interstellar gas for nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line formation. Theoretical cross sections and rate coefficients for collisional deexcitation of rotationally excited HF in the vibrational ground state are reported. The quantum-mechanical close-coupling approach implemented in the nonreactive scattering code MOLSCAT was applied in the cross section and rate coefficient calculations on an accurate 2D HF-He potential energy surface. Estimates of rate coefficients for H and H$_2$ colliders were obtained from the HF-He collisional data with a reduced-potential scaling approach. The calculation of state-to-state rotational quenching cross sections for HF due to He with initial rotational levels up to $j=20$ were performed for kinetic energies from 10$^{-5}$ to 15000...

  10. Microhardness evaluation alloys Hf-Si-B; Avaliacao de microdureza de ligas Hf-Si-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gigolotti, Joao Carlos Janio; Costa, Eliane Fernandes Brasil [Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda (UNIFOA), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil); Nunes, Carlos Angelo; Rocha, Elisa Gombio; Coelho, Gilberto Carvalho, E-mail: carlosjanio@uol.com.br, E-mail: eliane-costabrasi@hotmail.com, E-mail: cnunes@demar.eel.usp.br, E-mail: elisarocha@alunos.eel.usp.br, E-mail: coelho@demar.eel.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The technological advance has generated increasing demand for materials that can be used under high temperature, what includes intermetallic MR-Si-B (MR = refractory metal) alloys with multiphase structures, that can also be applied in oxide environments. Thus, this work had for objective the micro hardness study of the Hf-Si-B system alloys, heat treated at 1600 deg C, in the Hf rich region. Hf-Si-B alloys had been produced with blades of Hf (min. 99.8%), Si (min. 99.998%) and B (min. 99.5%), in the voltaic arc furnace and heat treated at 1600 deg C under argon atmosphere. The relationship of the phases had been previously identified by X-ray diffraction and contrast in backscattered electron imaging mode. The alloys had their hardness analyzed by method Vickers (micro hardness) with load of 0.05 kgf and 0.2 kgf and application time of 20 s. The results, obtained from the arithmetic mean of measurements for each alloy on the heterogeneous region, showed a mean hardness of 11.08 GPA, with small coefficient of variation of 3.8%. The borides HfB2 (19.34 GPa) e HfB - 11.76 GPa, showed the hardness higher than the silicides Hf2Si (8.57 GPa), Hf5Si3 (9.63 GPa), Hf3Si2 (11.66 GPa), Hf5Si4 (10.00 GPa), HfSi (10.02 GPa) e HfSi2 (8.61 GPa). (author)

  11. Ventilation and Heat Recovering System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Bancea

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Some aspects concerning the heat reducing for ventilation, achieved by using heat recovering components and a combined heating--ventilating system, assuring both comfort and human health are presented. The floor imbedded systems together with air outlets elements could fulfill all the aesthetically desires, as well as comfort and they are ideal for family houses.

  12. Free Convection Personalized Ventilation (FCPV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    Normally we supply fresh air to a room with a diffuser, and this air is distributed in the room according to different principles as: mixing ventilation, displacement ventilation etc. That means we have to supply a very large amount of air to the whole room, although a person in the room totally...

  13. Thermal plumes in ventilated rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a displacement ventilation system involves determination of the flow rate in the thermal plumes. The flow rate in the plumes and the vertical temperature gradient influence each other, and they are influenced by many factors. This paper shows some descriptions of these effects. Free...... to be the only possible approach to obtain the volume flow in: thermal plumes in ventilated rooms....

  14. Inhalation therapy in mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Juçara Gasparetto; Teixeira, Cassiano; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Savi, Augusto; Dexheimer-Neto, Felippe Leopoldo; Knorst, Marli Maria

    2015-01-01

    Patients with obstructive lung disease often require ventilatory support via invasive or noninvasive mechanical ventilation, depending on the severity of the exacerbation. The use of inhaled bronchodilators can significantly reduce airway resistance, contributing to the improvement of respiratory mechanics and patient-ventilator synchrony. Although various studies have been published on this topic, little is known about the effectiveness of the bronchodilators routinely prescribed for patients on mechanical ventilation or about the deposition of those drugs throughout the lungs. The inhaled bronchodilators most commonly used in ICUs are beta adrenergic agonists and anticholinergics. Various factors might influence the effect of bronchodilators, including ventilation mode, position of the spacer in the circuit, tube size, formulation, drug dose, severity of the disease, and patient-ventilator synchrony. Knowledge of the pharmacological properties of bronchodilators and the appropriate techniques for their administration is fundamental to optimizing the treatment of these patients. PMID:26578139

  15. Concentration Distribution in a Mixing Ventilated Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Pedersen, D. N.; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2001-01-01

    Today there is an increasing focus on the importance of a proper ventilation system to obtain good working conditions in the term of air and thermal quality to ensure high productivity. Different ventilation principles are used, e.g., mixing ventilation and displacement ventilation. In order...... to ensure that the ventilation system meets the demands it is important to know which parameters that influence the performance of the system. In this work the mixing ventilation principle was investigated. When the mixing ventilation principle is used for the design of a ventilation system it is assumed...

  16. Home monitoring of daytime mouthpiece ventilation effectiveness in patients with neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Julie; Leroux, Karl; Orlikowski, David; Prigent, Hélène; Lofaso, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    Mouthpiece ventilation (MPV) allows patients with neuromuscular disease to receive daytime support from a portable ventilator, which they can disconnect at will, for example, for speaking, eating, swallowing, and coughing. However, MPV carries a risk of underventilation. Our purpose here was to evaluate the effectiveness of daytime MPV under real-life conditions. Eight wheelchair-bound patients who used MPV underwent daytime polygraphy at home with recordings of airflow, mouthpiece pressure, thoracic and abdominal movements, peripheral capillary oxygen saturation (SpO2), and transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PtcCO2). Times and durations of tasks and activities were recorded. The Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) was computed. Patient-ventilator disconnections ≥3 minutes and episodes of hypoventilation defined as PtcCO2>45 mmHg were counted. Patient-ventilator asynchrony events were analyzed. The AHI was >5 hour(-1) in two patients. Another patient experienced unexplained 3% drops in arterial oxygen saturations at a frequency of 70 hour(-1). Patient-ventilator disconnections ≥3 minutes occurred in seven of eight patients and were consistently associated with decreases in SpO2 and ≥5-mmHg increases in PtcCO2; PtcCO2 rose above 45 mmHg in two patients during these disconnections. The most common type of patient-ventilator asynchrony was ineffective effort. This study confirms that MPV can be effective as long as the patient remains connected to the mouthpiece. However, transient arterial oxygen desaturation and hypercapnia due to disconnection from the ventilator may occur, without inducing unpleasant sensations in the patients. Therefore, an external warning system based on a minimal acceptable value of minute ventilation would probably be useful. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Ventilation and respiratory mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheel, Andrew William; Romer, Lee M

    2012-04-01

    During dynamic exercise, the healthy pulmonary system faces several major challenges, including decreases in mixed venous oxygen content and increases in mixed venous carbon dioxide. As such, the ventilatory demand is increased, while the rising cardiac output means that blood will have considerably less time in the pulmonary capillaries to accomplish gas exchange. Blood gas homeostasis must be accomplished by precise regulation of alveolar ventilation via medullary neural networks and sensory reflex mechanisms. It is equally important that cardiovascular and pulmonary system responses to exercise be precisely matched to the increase in metabolic requirements, and that the substantial gas transport needs of both respiratory and locomotor muscles be considered. Our article addresses each of these topics with emphasis on the healthy, young adult exercising in normoxia. We review recent evidence concerning how exercise hyperpnea influences sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow and the effect this might have on the ability to perform muscular work. We also review sex-based differences in lung mechanics.

  18. Oxygenation with T-piece versus self-inflating bag for ventilation of extremely preterm infants at birth: a randomized controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dawson, Jennifer A

    2011-06-01

    To investigate whether infants < 29 weeks gestation who receive positive pressure ventilation (PPV) immediately after birth with a T-piece have higher oxygen saturation (SpO₂) measurements at 5 minutes than infants ventilated with a self inflating bag (SIB).

  19. Estimation of Lung Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Du, Kaifang; Amelon, Ryan; Christensen, Gary E.; Raghavan, Madhavan; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    Since the primary function of the lung is gas exchange, ventilation can be interpreted as an index of lung function in addition to perfusion. Injury and disease processes can alter lung function on a global and/or a local level. MDCT can be used to acquire multiple static breath-hold CT images of the lung taken at different lung volumes, or with proper respiratory control, 4DCT images of the lung reconstructed at different respiratory phases. Image registration can be applied to this data to estimate a deformation field that transforms the lung from one volume configuration to the other. This deformation field can be analyzed to estimate local lung tissue expansion, calculate voxel-by-voxel intensity change, and make biomechanical measurements. The physiologic significance of the registration-based measures of respiratory function can be established by comparing to more conventional measurements, such as nuclear medicine or contrast wash-in/wash-out studies with CT or MR. An important emerging application of these methods is the detection of pulmonary function change in subjects undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer. During RT, treatment is commonly limited to sub-therapeutic doses due to unintended toxicity to normal lung tissue. Measurement of pulmonary function may be useful as a planning tool during RT planning, may be useful for tracking the progression of toxicity to nearby normal tissue during RT, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment post-therapy. This chapter reviews the basic measures to estimate regional ventilation from image registration of CT images, the comparison of them to the existing golden standard and the application in radiation therapy.

  20. Metabolism, temperature, and ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortola, Jacopo P; Maskrey, Michael

    2011-10-01

    In mammals and birds, all oxygen used (VO2) must pass through the lungs; hence, some degree of coupling between VO2 and pulmonary ventilation (VE) is highly predictable. Nevertheless, VE is also involved with CO2 elimination, a task that is often in conflict with the convection of O2. In hot or cold conditions, the relationship between VE and VO2 includes the participation of the respiratory apparatus to the control of body temperature and water balance. Some compromise among these tasks is achieved through changes in breathing pattern, uncoupling changes in alveolar ventilation from VE. This article examines primarily the relationship between VE and VO2 under thermal stimuli. In the process, it considers how the relationship is influenced by hypoxia, hypercapnia or changes in metabolic level. The shuffling of tasks in emergency situations illustrates that the constraints on VE-VO2 for the protection of blood gases have ample room for flexibility. However, when other priorities do not interfere with the primary goal of gas exchange, VE follows metabolic rate quite closely. The fact that arterial CO2 remains stable when metabolism is changed by the most diverse circumstances (moderate exercise, cold, cold and exercise combined, variations in body size, caloric intake, age, time of the day, hormones, drugs, etc.) makes it unlikely that VE and metabolism are controlled in parallel by the condition responsible for the metabolic change. Rather, some observations support the view that the gaseous component of metabolic rate, probably CO2, may provide the link between the metabolic level and VE.

  1. APRV Mode in Ventilator Induced Lung Injury (VILI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata Mahmoodpoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI, being a significant iatrogenic complication in the ICU patients, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Numerous approaches, protocols and ventilation modes have been introduced and examined to decrease the incidence of VILI in the ICU patients. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV, firstly introduced by Stock and Downs in 1987, applies higher Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP levels in prolonged periods (P and T high in order to preserve satisfactory lung volume and consequently alveolar recruitment. This mode benefits a time-cycled release phase to a lower set of pressure for a short period of time (P and T low i.e. release time (1,2. While some advantages have been introduced for APRV such as efficiently recruited alveoli over time, more homogeneous ventilation, less volutrauma, probable stabilization of patent alveoli and reduction in atelectrauma, protective effects of APRV on lung damage only seem to be substantial if spontaneous breathing responds to more than 30% of total minute ventilation (3. APRV in ARDS patients should be administered cautiously; T low<0.6 seconds, for recruiting collapsed alveoli; however overstretching of alveoli especially during P high should not be neglected and appropriate sedation considered. The proposed advantages for APRV give the impression of being outstanding; however, APRV, as a non-physiologic inverse ratio mode of ventilation, might result in inflammation mainly due to impaired patient-ventilator interaction explaining the negative or minimally desirable effects of APRV on inflammation (4. Consequently, continuous infusion of neuromuscular blocking drugs during ARDS has been reported to reduce mortality (5. There are insufficient confirming data on the superiority of APRV above other ventilatory methods in regard to oxygenation, hemodynamics, regional blood flow, patient comfort and length of mechanical ventilation. Based on current findings

  2. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-25

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  3. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-12

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  4. Lecture Notes on Mixing Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The main task of the ventilation system or the air-conditioning system is to supply· and remove air and airborne materials and to supply or remove heat from a room. The necessary level of fresh air will be supplied to· a room by a ventilation system, and heat from equipment or solar radiation can...... be removed by an air-conditioning system. An industrial ventilation system may both take care of the occupants' comfort and the industrial processes in the area....

  5. Low-energy mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Wessel; Hviid, Christian Anker

    2014-01-01

    and with as little energy consumption as 41.1 kWh/m2/year including heating and all building services with no use of renewable energy such as PVcells or solar heating. One of the key means of reaching the objectives was to implement mechanical ventilation with low pressure loss and therefore low energy consumption....... The project consists of two buildings, building one is 6 stories high, and building two is 4 stories high. The buildings have a gross area of 50,500 m2 including underground parking. The ventilation and indoor climate concept was to use mechanical ventilation together with mechanical cooling and fanassisted...

  6. The LHC restart in one minute

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    On Friday March 25 2016, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) got its first proton beam of the year. In just over 1 minute this time-lapse provides a quick overview to some of the important milestones that preceded proton beam injection this year, against a background of activities over the last few days in the CERN Control Centre (CCC), the place where the CERN accelerator chain is operated and controlled. Read more: http://cern.ch/go/Z9cz Music From FruityAudio, entitled "New Groove". - Producer - Audiovisual production service Paola Catapano - Director - Julien Ordan - Camera - Julien Ordan Maximilien Brice - Graphics \\ Animations - Arzur Catel Torres - Infography - Daniel Dominguez Noemi Caraban - Music - FruityAudio - New groove Category Film & Animation License Standard YouTube License

  7. Long-term facilitation of ventilation and genioglossus muscle activity is evident in the presence of elevated levels of carbon dioxide in awake humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel P; Balasubramaniam, Arvind; Badr, M Safwan; Mateika, Jason H

    2006-10-01

    We hypothesized that long-term facilitation (LTF) of minute ventilation and peak genioglossus muscle activity manifests itself in awake healthy humans when carbon dioxide is sustained at elevated levels. Eleven subjects completed two trials. During trial 1, baseline carbon dioxide levels were maintained during and after exposure to eight 4-min episodes of hypoxia. During trial 2, carbon dioxide was sustained 5 mmHg above baseline levels during exposure to episodic hypoxia. Seven subjects were exposed to sustained elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the absence of episodic hypoxia, which served as a control experiment. Minute ventilation was measured during trial 1, trial 2, and the control experiment. Peak genioglossus muscle activity was measured during trial 2. Minute ventilation during the recovery period of trial 1 was similar to baseline (9.3 +/- 0.5 vs. 9.2 +/- 0.7 l/min). Likewise, minute ventilation remained unchanged during the control experiment (beginning vs. end of control experiment, 14.4 +/- 1.7 vs. 14.7 +/- 1.4 l/min). In contrast, minute ventilation and peak genioglossus muscle activity during the recovery period of trial 2 was greater than baseline (minute ventilation: 28.4 +/- 1.7 vs. 19.6 +/- 1.0 l/min, P levels of carbon dioxide.

  8. Mechanical ventilation of the premature neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Melissa K; DiBlasi, Robert M

    2011-09-01

    Although the trend in the neonatal intensive care unit is to use noninvasive ventilation whenever possible, invasive ventilation is still often necessary for supporting pre-term neonates with lung disease. Many different ventilation modes and ventilation strategies are available to assist with the optimization of mechanical ventilation and prevention of ventilator-induced lung injury. Patient-triggered ventilation is favored over machine-triggered forms of invasive ventilation for improving gas exchange and patient-ventilator interaction. However, no studies have shown that patient-triggered ventilation improves mortality or morbidity in premature neonates. A promising new form of patient-triggered ventilation, neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA), was recently FDA approved for invasive and noninvasive ventilation. Clinical trials are underway to evaluate outcomes in neonates who receive NAVA. New evidence suggests that volume-targeted ventilation modes (ie, volume control or pressure control with adaptive targeting) may provide better lung protection than traditional pressure control modes. Several volume-targeted modes that provide accurate tidal volume delivery in the face of a large endotracheal tube leak were recently introduced to the clinical setting. There is ongoing debate about whether neonates should be managed invasively with high-frequency ventilation or conventional ventilation at birth. The majority of clinical trials performed to date have compared high-frequency ventilation to pressure control modes. Future trials with premature neonates should compare high-frequency ventilation to conventional ventilation with volume-targeted modes. Over the last decade many new promising approaches to lung-protective ventilation have evolved. The key to protecting the neonatal lung during mechanical ventilation is optimizing lung volume and limiting excessive lung expansion, by applying appropriate PEEP and using shorter inspiratory time, smaller tidal

  9. "Take ten minutes": a dedicated ten minute medication review reduces polypharmacy in the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, E K

    2010-09-01

    Multiple and inappropriate medications are often the cause for poor health status in the elderly. Medication reviews can improve prescribing. This study aimed to determine if a ten minute medication review by a general practitioner could reduce polypharmacy and inappropriate prescribing in elderly patients. A prospective, randomised study was conducted. Patients over the age of 65 (n = 50) underwent a 10-minute medication review. Inappropriate medications, dosage errors, and discrepancies between prescribed versus actual medication being consumed were recorded. A questionnaire to assess satisfaction was completed following review. The mean number of medications taken by patients was reduced (p < 0.001). A medication was stopped in 35 (70%) patients. Inappropriate medications were detected in 27 (54%) patients and reduced (p < 0.001). Dose errors were detected in 16 (32%). A high level of patient satisfaction was reported. A ten minute medication review reduces polypharmacy, improves prescribing and is associated with high levels of patient satisfaction.

  10. "Take ten minutes": a dedicated ten minute medication review reduces polypharmacy in the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, E K

    2012-02-01

    Multiple and inappropriate medications are often the cause for poor health status in the elderly. Medication reviews can improve prescribing. This study aimed to determine if a ten minute medication review by a general practitioner could reduce polypharmacy and inappropriate prescribing in elderly patients. A prospective, randomised study was conducted. Patients over the age of 65 (n = 50) underwent a 10-minute medication review. Inappropriate medications, dosage errors, and discrepancies between prescribed versus actual medication being consumed were recorded. A questionnaire to assess satisfaction was completed following review. The mean number of medications taken by patients was reduced (p < 0.001). A medication was stopped in 35 (70%) patients. Inappropriate medications were detected in 27 (54%) patients and reduced (p < 0.001). Dose errors were detected in 16 (32%). A high level of patient satisfaction was reported. A ten minute medication review reduces polypharmacy, improves prescribing and is associated with high levels of patient satisfaction.

  11. Climate control of natural ventilated pig houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bontsema, J.; Straten, van G.; Salomons, L.; Klooster, van 't C.E.

    1996-01-01

    Ventilation in pig houses is important for maintaining a good climate for the welfare of animals and humans and for an optimal production. Mechanical ventilation has a good performance, since the ventilation rate can easily be controlled, but it is energy demanding, whereas natural ventilation is ch

  12. Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  13. 30 CFR 57.8520 - Ventilation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation plan. 57.8520 Section 57.8520... Underground Only § 57.8520 Ventilation plan. A plan of the mine ventilation system shall be set out by the... ventilation plan or revisions thereto shall be submitted to the District Manager for review and comments...

  14. Preoperational test, vent building ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-20

    Preoperational Test Procedure for Vent Building Ventilation System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The Vent Building ventilation system provides ventilation, heating, cooling, and zone confinement control for the W-030 Project Vent Building. The tests verify correct System operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control system.

  15. Concentration Distribution in a Mixing Ventilated Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Pedersen, D.N.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2001-01-01

    Today there is an increasing focus on the importance of a proper ventilation system to obtain good working conditions in the term of air and thermal quality to ensure high productivity. Different ventilation principles are used, e.g., mixing ventilation and displacement ventilation. In order to e...

  16. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. 111.103-1 Section 111.103-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. Each power ventilation system...

  17. Acute effects of deep breathing for a short duration (2-10 minutes) on pulmonary functions in healthy young volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, G; Prabhu, Krishnamoorthi; Baliga, Rekha; Pai, M Kirtana; Manjunatha, S

    2011-01-01

    Breathing is the most vital function for maintenance of life. Slow and deep breathing is an integral part of Pranayama and it reduces dead space ventilation and renews air throughout the lungs. The reported beneficial effects of deep breathing as a part of either long term or short term practice of Pranayama are well documented. However our knowledge about the effects of a few minutes' of deep breathing on human ventilatory parameters is poor. In the present study, we examined the relationship between exposure to short duration of deep breathing and performance on pulmonary function tests before and after the deep breathing. The study was conducted in a homogenous group of 12 volunteers containing 4 females and 8 males who were well trained in pulmonary function testing (PFT) before the start of the study. The volunteers performed deep breathing (DB) exercise for 2, 5 and 10 minutes at the rate of 6 breaths per minute under guidance, and the duration of DB exercise for that day was randomly selected for each group. PFT was done before and after the DB exercise. There was a significant (P vital capacity (VC) after 2 and 5 minutes' DB exercise and a consistent improvement in tidal volume (TV) and minute ventilation (MV) after the DB exercise in all the three groups, though it wasn't statistically significant. There was a significant (P vital capacity (FVC) after 2 minutes' of DB exercise and a consistent increase in all the three groups in forced inspiratory vital capacity (FIVC) and peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR), though this increase was not statistically significant. This shows that deep breathing exercise, even for a few minutes' duration is beneficial for the lung functions.

  18. ASHRAE Standard 62: tobacco industry's influence over national ventilation standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialous, S Aguinaga; Glantz, S A

    2002-12-01

    To describe the role of the tobacco industry in the development of ventilation standards for indoor air quality by influencing the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). Review of tobacco industry documents available on the internet between January 2001 and March 2002. Search terms included "ASHRAE", "ventilation", "minutes", "memo", and the names of key players and organisations as identified in the initial searches. Analysis of ASHRAE and other relevant documents publicly available and the personal files of a Standard 62 committee member; interviews of a selected number of ASHRAE players; observation of an ASHRAE meeting. The tobacco industry has been involved in the development of ventilation standards for over 20 years. It has successfully influenced the standard and continues to attempt to change the standard from a smoke-free framework into an "accommodation" framework. The industry acts directly and through consultants and allies. The major health groups have been largely absent and the health interests have been poorly represented in standard development. While concentrated in the USA, ASHRAE standards are adopted worldwide. The tobacco industry determined that allowing smoking in ventilation standards for indoor air quality was a high priority and dedicated significant human and financial resources to ensure that its interests were represented. The health groups, until recently, have largely ignored the policy implications for tobacco control of standard development. This situation is changing, but unless health groups maintain high visibility within ASHRAE, the tobacco industry may succeed in creating a standard that ignores the dangers of secondhand smoke.

  19. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  20. Measurement of the Air Chance Rate and Ventilation Characteristics During Short Term Transient Phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Perino, M.

    2004-01-01

    is assured throughout the test. However, due to the relatively slow response of the gas analysers, none of these procedures can usually be applied to fast transient phenomena that last 15 minutes or less. Moreover in many cases of natural ventilation strategies, the continuous mixing of the indoor air would...

  1. Mechanical ventilation in rural ICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieselmann; Bock; Hendryx; Wakefield; Helms; Bentler

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, rural hospitals have expanded their scope of specialized services, which has led to the development and staffing of rural intensive care units (ICUs). There is little information about the breadth, quality or outcomes of these services. This is particularly true for specialized ICU services such as mechanical ventilation, where little, if any, information exists specifically for rural hospitals. The long-term objectives of this project were to evaluate the quality of medical care provided to mechanically ventilated patients in rural ICUs and to improve patient care through an educational intervention. This paper reports baseline data on patient and hospital characteristics for both rural and rural referral hospitals. RESULTS: Twenty Iowa hospitals were evaluated. Data collected on 224 patients demonstrated a mean age of 70 years and a mean ICU admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score of 22, with an associated 36% mortality. Mean length of ICU stay was 10 days, with 7.7 ventilated days. Significant differences were found in both institutional and patient variables between rural referral hospitals and rural hospitals with more limited resources. A subgroup of patients with diagnoses associated with complex ventilation had higher mortality rates than patients without these conditions. Patients who developed nosocomial events had longer mean ventilator and ICU days than patients without nosocomial events. This study also found ICU practices that frequently fell outside the guidelines recommended by a task force describing minimum standards of care for critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure on mechanical ventilation. CONCLUSIONS: Despite distinct differences in the available resources between rural referral and rural hospitals, overall mortality rates of ventilated patients are similar. Considering the higher mortality rates observed in patients with complicated medical conditions requiring

  2. Comparison of different inspiratory triggering settings in automated ventilators during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yangyang; Sun, Feng; Zhang, Yazhi; Hu, Yingying; Walline, Joseph; Zhu, Huadong; Yu, Xuezhong

    2017-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation via automated in-hospital ventilators is quite common during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It is not known whether different inspiratory triggering sensitivity settings of ordinary ventilators have different effects on actual ventilation, gas exchange and hemodynamics during resuscitation. Methods 18 pigs enrolled in this study were anaesthetized and intubated. Continuous chest compressions and mechanical ventilation (volume-controlled mode, 100% O2, respiratory rate 10/min, and tidal volumes 10ml/kg) were performed after 3 minutes of ventricular fibrillation. Group trig-4, trig-10 and trig-20 (six pigs each) were characterized by triggering sensitivities of 4, 10 and 20 (cmH2O for pressure-triggering and L/min for flow-triggering), respectively. Additionally, each pig in each group was mechanically ventilated using three types of inspiratory triggering (pressure-triggering, flow-triggering and turned-off triggering) of 5 minutes duration each, and each animal matched with one of six random assortments of the three different triggering settings. Blood gas samples, respiratory and hemodynamic parameters for each period were all collected and analyzed. Results In each group, significantly lower actual respiratory rate, minute ventilation volume, mean airway pressure, arterial pH, PaO2, and higher end-tidal carbon dioxide, aortic blood pressure, coronary perfusion pressure, PaCO2 and venous oxygen saturation were observed in the ventilation periods with a turned-off triggering setting compared to those with pressure- or flow- triggering (all P<0.05), except when compared with pressure-triggering of 20 cmH2O (respiratory rate 10.5[10/11.3]/min vs 12.5[10.8/13.3]/min, P = 0.07; coronary perfusion pressure 30.3[24.5/31.6] mmHg vs 27.4[23.7/29] mmHg, P = 0.173; venous oxygen saturation 46.5[32/56.8]% vs 41.5[33.5/48.5]%, P = 0.575). Conclusions Ventilation with pressure- or flow-triggering tends to induce hyperventilation and

  3. Ventilation Model and Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Chipman

    2003-07-18

    This model and analysis report develops, validates, and implements a conceptual model for heat transfer in and around a ventilated emplacement drift. This conceptual model includes thermal radiation between the waste package and the drift wall, convection from the waste package and drift wall surfaces into the flowing air, and conduction in the surrounding host rock. These heat transfer processes are coupled and vary both temporally and spatially, so numerical and analytical methods are used to implement the mathematical equations which describe the conceptual model. These numerical and analytical methods predict the transient response of the system, at the drift scale, in terms of spatially varying temperatures and ventilation efficiencies. The ventilation efficiency describes the effectiveness of the ventilation process in removing radionuclide decay heat from the drift environment. An alternative conceptual model is also developed which evaluates the influence of water and water vapor mass transport on the ventilation efficiency. These effects are described using analytical methods which bound the contribution of latent heat to the system, quantify the effects of varying degrees of host rock saturation (and hence host rock thermal conductivity) on the ventilation efficiency, and evaluate the effects of vapor and enhanced vapor diffusion on the host rock thermal conductivity.

  4. Pulmonary hemodynamic responses to in utero ventilation in very immature fetal sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Beth J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The onset of ventilation at birth decreases pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR resulting in a large increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF. As the large cross sectional area of the pulmonary vascular bed develops late in gestation, we have investigated whether the ventilation-induced increase in PBF is reduced in immature lungs. Methods Surgery was performed in fetal sheep at 105 d GA (n = 7; term ~147 d to insert an endotracheal tube, which was connected to a neonatal ventilation circuit, and a transonic flow probe was placed around the left pulmonary artery. At 110 d GA, fetuses (n = 7 were ventilated in utero (IUV for 12 hrs while continuous measurements of PBF were made, fetuses were allowed to develop in utero for a further 7 days following ventilation. Results PBF changes were highly variable between animals, increasing from 12.2 ± 6.6 mL/min to a maximum of 78.1 ± 23.1 mL/min in four fetuses after 10 minutes of ventilation. In the remaining three fetuses, little change in PBF was measured in response to IUV. The increases in PBF measured in responding fetuses were not sustained throughout the ventilation period and by 2 hrs of IUV had returned to pre-IUV control values. Discussion and conclusion Ventilation of very immature fetal sheep in utero increased PBF in 57% of fetuses but this increase was not sustained for more than 2 hrs, despite continuing ventilation. Immature lungs can increase PBF during ventilation, however, the present studies show these changes are transient and highly variable.

  5. [A case of ventilation disorder and poor oxygenation after changing position from prone to supine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Kei; Kitamura, Jiro

    2013-01-01

    A 68-year-old obese woman (BMI 35) underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion in prone position. Immediately after changing position postoperatively from prone to supine, severe ventilation disorder and poor oxygenation occured. Chest X-ray showed severe atelectasis. Poor oxygenation was suspected to be the result of the atelectasis by the pressure of massive abdominal fatty tissue to the diaphragm. Ventilation disorder was suspected of the bronchospasm associated with inadequate anesthesia. We ventilated her manually with a bag in Fowler position for twenty minutes, and then mechanically by pressure controlled ventilation. She recovered gradually. It is concluded that in obese patients undergoing operation in prone position, changing position should be done very carefully during adequate anesthesia, understanding respiratory physiology in positioning and considering the effect of the abdominal fatty tissue to the diaphragm.

  6. [Comparison of the Effectiveness of Different Supraglottic Ventilation Methods during Bronchial Thermoplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Lin, Jiang-tao; Su, Nan; Nong, Ying; Hong, Hong; Yin, Yi-qing; Li, Cheng-hui

    2016-04-01

    To compare the effectiveness of high-frequency jet ventilation via Wei jet nasal airway and controlled ventilation with improved laryngeal mask airway during bronchial thermoplasty. Twenty-eight patients undergoing bronchial thermoplasty were equally divided into two groups: group A (high-frequency jet ventilation through Wei jet nasal airway) and group B (controlled ventilation with improved laryngeal mask airway). Pulse oxygenation,heart rate,and mean arterial blood pressure were recorded after entering the operating room (T0), 1 minute after administration/induction (T1), bronchoscope inserting (T2), 15 minutes (T3)/30 minutes (T4)/45 minutes (T5) after ventilation,at the end of the operation (T6), and at the recovery of patients' consciousness (T7). The pH,arterial oxygen partial pressure,and arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure were recorded at T0, T4, and T6. The endoscope indwelling duration,operative time,patients' awakening time,adverse events during anesthesia,satisfactions of patients and operators, anesthesic effectiveness were also recorded. The arterial carbon dioxide partial pressur in group A at T4 and T6 were significantly higher than in group B (P<0.05). The pH in group A at T4 and T6 was significantly lower than in group B (P<0.05). The endoscope indwelling duration and the operative time in group B were significantly shorter than in group A (P<0.05) while the recovery of consciousness in group B was significantly longer than in group A (P<0.05). The satisfaction for operators and the efficacy of anesthesia in group B were better than in group A (P<0.05). The number of adverse events in group B was significantly smaller than in group A (P<0.05). The improved laryngeal mask airway with controlled ventilation is more suitable for bronchial thermoplasty.

  7. General concepts of modern HF communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Jules

    Both conceptual and hardware advancements have led to substantial systems developments in military HF communications; the former encompass coding and error correction techniques for security, in order to minimize propagation and interference, while the latter prominently include digital equipment permitting the selection of a frequency for a particular path and propagation mode, as well as modulation selection. Propagation-related advancements involve better statistical models as well as advancements in short-term forecasting methods responsive to changes in solar-geophysical parameters. Adaptive HF systems have been developed for meteor-scatter radio communications.

  8. Research on Multi-Layer Distributed HF Radio Network Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Dai; Chun-Jiang Wang; Quan Yu

    2008-01-01

    High frequency (HF) transmission is an important communication techniques. However, conventional point-to-point transmission can be easily destroyed, which limits its utilization in practice. HF networking communication has the capability against demolishment. The network structure is one of the key factors for HF networking communication. In this paper, a novel analysis method of the network connectedness based on the eigenvalue is derived, and a multi-layer distributed HF radio network structure is proposed. Both the theore tical analysis and the computer simulation results verify that the application of the proposed network structure in the HF radio communication can improve the anti demolishment ability of the HF network efficiently.

  9. Simple nanosecond to minutes transient absorption spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhonin, Aleksandr V; Maurer, Marta K; Reese, Chad E; Asher, Sanford A

    2005-12-01

    We built a transient absorption spectrophotometer that can determine transient absorption spectral changes that occur at times as fast as approximately 200 ns and as slow as a minute. The transient absorption can be induced by a temperature-jump (T-jump) or by optical pumping from the deep ultraviolet (UV) to the infrared (IR) by use of single ns Nd:YAG laser pulses. Our use of a fiber-optic spectrometer coupled to a XeF flashlamp makes the collection of transient spectra easy and convenient in the spectral range from the near IR (1700 nm) down to the deep UV (200 nm), with high signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios. The spectral resolution is determined by the specific configuration of the fiber-optic spectrometer (grating groove density, fiber diameter, slit width) and varies between 0.3 and 10 nm. The utility of this spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the rate at which a polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanogel particles optically switch light due to a T-jump induced by nanosecond 1.9 microm laser pulses. In addition, we measured the rate of optical switching induced by a 3 ns 355 nm pump pulse in PCCA functionalized with azobenzene.

  10. Determinants of ventilation behavior in naturally ventilated dwellings: Identification and quantification of relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levie, D.; Kluizenaar, Y. de; Hoes-van Oeffelen, E.C.M.; Hofstetter, H.; Janssen, S.A.; Spiekman, M.E.; Koene, F.G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ventilation in dwellings is essential for well-being and health. However, insight in determinants of ventilation behavior is still limited. Aim: Identifying determinants of ventilation behavior and quantifying relationships. Secondly, identifying households characteristics associated wit

  11. UHF Radar observations at HAARP with HF pump frequencies near electron gyro-harmonics and associated ionospheric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Brenton; Fallen, Christopher; Secan, James

    Results for HF modification experiments at the HAARP facility in Alaska are presented for experiments with the HF pump frequency near third and fourth electron gyro-harmonics. A UHF diagnostic radar with range resolution of 600 m was used to determine time-dependent altitudes of scattering from plasma turbulence during heating experiments. Experiments were conducted with multiple HF frequencies stepped by 20 kHz above and below the gyro-harmonic values. During times of HF heating the HAARP facility has sufficient power to enhance large-scale ionospheric densities in the lower ionosphere (about 150-200 km altitude) and also in the topside ionosphere (above about 350 km). In the lower ionosphere, time-dependent decreases of the altitude of radar scatter result from electron density enhancements. The effects are substantially different even for relatively small frequency steps of 20 kHz. In all cases the time-varying altitude decrease of radar scatter stops about 5-10 km below the gyro-harmonic altitude that is frequency dependent; we infer that electron density enhancements stop at this altitude where the radar signals stop decreasing with altitude. Experiments with corresponding total electron content (TEC) data show that for HF interaction altitudes above about 170 km there is substantial topside electron density increases due to upward electron thermal conduction. For lower altitudes of HF interaction the majority of the thermal energy is transferred to the neutral gas and no significant topside density increases are observed. By selecting an appropriate HF frequency a little greater than the gyro-harmonic value we have demonstrated that the ionospheric response to HF heating is a self-oscillating mode where the HF interaction altitude moves up and down with a period of several minutes. If the interaction region is above about 170 km this also produces a continuously enhanced topside electron density and upward plasma flux. Experiments using an FM scan with the HF

  12. Effects of a 1:1 inspiratory to expiratory ratio on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation during one-lung ventilation in the lateral decubitus position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S H; Choi, Y S; Lee, J G; Park, I H; Oh, Y J

    2012-11-01

    Prolonged inspiratory to expiratory (I:E) ratio ventilation may have both positive and negative effects on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation during one-lung ventilation (OLV), but definitive information is currently lacking. We therefore compared the effects of volume-controlled ventilation with I:E ratios of 1:1 and 1:2 on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation during OLV. Fifty-six patients undergoing thoracoscopic lobectomy were randomly assigned volume-controlled ventilation with an I:E ratio of 1:1 (group 1:1, n=28) or 1:2 (group 1:2, n=28) during OLV. Arterial and central venous blood gas analyses and respiratory variables were recorded 15 minutes into two-lung ventilation, at 30 and 60 minutes during OLV, and 15 minutes after two-lung ventilation was re-initiated. Peak and plateau airway pressures in cmH2O [standard deviation] during OLV were significantly lower in group 1:1 than in group 1:2 (P ventilation with an I:E ratio of 1:1 reduced peak and plateau airway pressures improved dynamic compliance and efficiency of alveolar ventilation, but it did not improve arterial oxygenation in a substantial manner. Furthermore, the associated increase in mean airway pressure might have reduced cardiac output, resulting in a lower central venous oxygen saturation.

  13. Contaminants in ventilated filling boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, D. T.; Linden, P. F.

    While energy efficiency is important, the adoption of energy-efficient ventilation systems still requires the provision of acceptable indoor air quality. Many low-energy systems, such as displacement or natural ventilation, rely on temperature stratification within the interior environment, always extracting the warmest air from the top of the room. Understanding buoyancy-driven convection in a confined ventilated space is key to understanding the flow that develops with many of these modern low-energy ventilation schemes. In this work we study the transport of an initially uniformly distributed passive contaminant in a displacement-ventilated space. Representing a heat source as an ideal sourced of buoyancy, analytical and numerical models are developed that allow us to compare the average efficiency of contaminant removal between traditional mixing and modern low-energy systems. A set of small-scale analogue laboratory experiments was also conducted to further validate our analytical and numerical solutions.We find that on average traditional and low-energy ventilation methods are similar with regard to pollutant flushing efficiency. This is because the concentration being extracted from the system at any given time is approximately the same for both systems. However, very different vertical concentration gradients exist. For the low-energy system, a peak in contaminant concentration occurs at the temperature interface that is established within the space. This interface is typically designed to sit at some intermediate height in the space. Since this peak does not coincide with the extraction point, displacement ventilation does not offer the same benefits for pollutant flushing as it does for buoyancy removal.

  14. Influence of Persons' Movements on Ventilation Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Hyldig, Mikkel; Kamper, Simon

    2008-01-01

    of different kinds of movement compared with the case of no movements. It is found that mixing ventilation is considerably more robust compared with displacement ventilation. At the same time it is found that displacement ventilation on average is more effective than mixing ventilation when movements prevail......Most often the ventilation effectiveness of a ventilated room is determined without considering the influence of persons´ movements. Even though the main reason for supplying the ventilation may be to create a healthy and productive environment for the occupants, their own influence...... on the ventilation is usually disregarded. This paper presents results from a systematic investigation of the movements´ influence on the ventilation effectiveness using human subjects combined with tracer gas measurements. Several typical "movements" are defined and carefully repeated to determine the influence...

  15. Assessment of the potential of roof turbine ventilators for bathroom ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiow Kuo [National United Univ., Dept. of Architecture, Miao-li City (Taiwan); Chiming Lai [Leader Univ., Dept. of Construction Technology, Tainan City (Taiwan)

    2005-06-15

    This study set out to investigate the potential of installing a new common roof turbine ventilator on to an existing bathroom ventilation system which serves 14 bathrooms in the first dormitory block of Leader University in Taiwan, and evaluate the overall ventilation performance of this new combination. Field measurements of airflow in the ventilation ducts and low-speed wind tunnel experiments for this turbine ventilator were carried out. The results showed that the combination of the roof turbine ventilator and bathroom ventilation were successful in achieving sufficient air change rate in bathrooms, and this ventilation design alternative is now proposed as a method of improving the indoor air environment in bathrooms. (Author)

  16. Systematic Comparison of HF CMOS Transconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2003-01-01

    Transconductors are commonly used as active elements in high-frequency (HF) filters, amplifiers, mixers, and oscillators. This paper reviews transconductor design by focusing on the V-I kernel that determines the key transconductor properties. Based on bandwidth considerations, simple V-I kernels wi

  17. Electron impact on vibrationally cold {{HF}}^{+}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristian Stroe, Marius; Fifirig, Magda

    2016-12-01

    The dissociative recombination and vibrational excitation processes induced by electron impact on vibrationally cold {{HF}}+ are investigated in the framework of the multichannel quantum defect theory for electron energies below 1 eV. The thermal rate coefficients for the electron temperature range from 10 to 5000 K are reported.

  18. ORIGIN OF EXCESS (176)Hf IN METEORITES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Kristine; Connelly, James Norman; Bizzarro, Martin

    2010-01-01

    After considerable controversy regarding the (176)Lu decay constant (lambda(176)Lu), there is now widespread agreement that (1.867 +/- 0.008) x 10(-11) yr(-1) as confirmed by various terrestrial objects and a 4557 Myr meteorite is correct. This leaves the (176)Hf excesses that are correlated with...

  19. Contaminant Distribution Around Persons in Rooms Ventilated by Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    An optimal design of the ventilation system needs a proper prediction of the velocity, temperature and contaminant distribution in the room. Traditionally this is done either by the use of simplified models or by a somewhat more comprehensive CFD-simulation. Common to both methods is usually the ...... the lack of consideration for the persons present in the room. This paper deals with some of the effects of persons present in a displacement ventilated room, especially the effect on the contaminant distribution.......An optimal design of the ventilation system needs a proper prediction of the velocity, temperature and contaminant distribution in the room. Traditionally this is done either by the use of simplified models or by a somewhat more comprehensive CFD-simulation. Common to both methods is usually...

  20. Residential ventilation standards scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01

    The goals of this scoping study are to identify research needed to develop improved ventilation standards for California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The 2008 Title 24 Standards are the primary target for the outcome of this research, but this scoping study is not limited to that timeframe. We prepared this scoping study to provide the California Energy Commission with broad and flexible options for developing a research plan to advance the standards. This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the ventilation needs of California residences, determining the bases for setting residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and corresponding levels of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  1. 5-minute Gridded Global Relief Data (ETOPO5)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Earth topography five minute grid (ETOPO5) is a gridded data base of worldwide elevations derived from several sources at a resolution of 5 minutes of latitude and...

  2. Summary of after the first three minutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Bond, J.

    1991-04-01

    Readers of the New York Times over the past few years have variously learned that: the Big Bang is dead; dark matter isn't cold; the Universe is bubbly, spongy, periodic, replete with Great Voids, Attractors and Walls. And every six months or so obituaries appear for the CDM model of cosmic structure formation. The observational evidence for the Hot Big Bang model, for dark matter, for the large scale structure of the Universe as revealed by galaxy surveys and for the very large scale structure as constrained by microwave background observations was thoroughly explored in After The First Three Minutes. From this meeting we learned that: The Hot Big Bang model is healthier than ever. There is evidence from IRAS surveys that Ω>~0.5, but from Big Bang nucleosynthesis that ΩB>=0.07, suggesting a great deal of nonbaryonic dark matter exists, which cannot be vacuum energy (nonzero Λ). There are fewer viable candidates for cold dark matter (CDM) after the LEP results from CERN, but searches are still promising. Hot dark matter in the form of light massive neutrinos got a boost from the MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem. The standard ``biased'' CDM model, the `minimal' inflation model with adiabatic Gaussian scale invariant fluctuations and cold dark matter, probably should have been `unbiased' in its primordial amplitude all along - although some galaxy types and their relative velocities would be biased. The indications for extra density fluctuation power on large scales over that of the `minimal' CDM model continue to firm up. The emerging dilemma is what can give the observed large scale structure, and yet such CMB isotropy on slightly larger scales. The key clue may reside in cosmological background radiation. All wavebands are being experimentally mined to unearth it. Energy injection models with hot gas or dust are already under pressure in the sub-mm. The recuring invocation of the cosmological constant to solve our cosmological problems causes

  3. Air Distribution in a Furnished Room Ventilated by Mixing Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, June Richter; Nielsen, Peter V.; Svidt, Kjeld

    Using isothermal full-scale experiments and two-dimensional isothermal CFD simulations it is investigated how normal office furniture influences the air movements in a room with mixing ventilation. Three different set-ups are made in the experiments and different sizes and locations of the furnit......Using isothermal full-scale experiments and two-dimensional isothermal CFD simulations it is investigated how normal office furniture influences the air movements in a room with mixing ventilation. Three different set-ups are made in the experiments and different sizes and locations...

  4. [Nasopharyngeal myiasis during mechanical ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitomi, A; Sato, A; Suda, T; Chida, K

    1997-12-01

    We report a case of myiasis caused by Phaenicia sericata during mechanical ventilation. An 86-year-old woman with bronchiectasis was admitted to our hospital with severe respiratory failure. Treatment with mechanical ventilation and sedatives was initiated. On the 10th day of hospitalization, about 20 white larvae were found in the patient's oral or nasal cavities. The larvae were removed and identified as Phaenicia sericata. No mucosal injury was found in the patient's oral or nasal cavity by endoscopic examination. The patient died of multiple organ failure caused by sepsis that had no association with myiasis. From the clinical course and the fly's life cycle, it is considered that the fly laid eggs in the patient's oral or nasal cavity while she was sedated during mechanical ventilation. Myiasis can occur even in a hospital.

  5. Comparison of CT-derived ventilation maps with deposition patterns of inhaled microspheres in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Richard E.; Lamm, Wayne J.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Krueger, Melissa A.; Glenny, Robb W.; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Computer models for inhalation toxicology and drug-aerosol delivery studies rely on ventilation pattern inputs for predictions of particle deposition and vapor uptake. However, changes in lung mechanics due to disease can impact airflow dynamics and model results. It has been demonstrated that non-invasive, in vivo, 4DCT imaging (3D imaging at multiple time points in the breathing cycle) can be used to map heterogeneities in ventilation patterns under healthy and disease conditions. The purpose of this study was to validate ventilation patterns measured from CT imaging by exposing the same rats to an aerosol of fluorescent microspheres (FMS) and examining particle deposition patterns using cryomicrotome imaging. Materials and Methods Six male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with elastase to a single lobe to induce a heterogeneous disease. After four weeks, rats were imaged over the breathing cycle by CT then immediately exposed to an aerosol of ~1μm FMS for ~5 minutes. After the exposure, the lungs were excised and prepared for cryomicrotome imaging, where a 3D image of FMS deposition was acquired using serial sectioning. Cryomicrotome images were spatially registered to match the live CT images to facilitate direct quantitative comparisons of FMS signal intensity with the CT-based ventilation maps. Results Comparisons of fractional ventilation in contiguous, non-overlapping, 3D regions between CT-based ventilation maps and FMS images showed strong correlations in fractional ventilation (r=0.888, p<0.0001). Conclusion We conclude that ventilation maps derived from CT imaging are predictive of the 1μm aerosol deposition used in ventilation-perfusion heterogeneity inhalation studies. PMID:25513951

  6. Comparison of CT-derived Ventilation Maps with Deposition Patterns of Inhaled Microspheres in Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Rick E.; Lamm, W. J.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Krueger, Melissa; Glenny, Robb W.; Corley, Richard A.

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Computer models for inhalation toxicology and drug-aerosol delivery studies rely on ventilation pattern inputs for predictions of particle deposition and vapor uptake. However, changes in lung mechanics due to disease can impact airflow dynamics and model results. It has been demonstrated that non-invasive, in vivo, 4DCT imaging (3D imaging at multiple time points in the breathing cycle) can be used to map heterogeneities in ventilation patterns under healthy and disease conditions. The purpose of this study was to validate ventilation patterns measured from CT imaging by exposing the same rats to an aerosol of fluorescent microspheres (FMS) and examining particle deposition patterns using cryomicrotome imaging. Materials and Methods: Six male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with elastase to a single lobe to induce a heterogeneous disease. After four weeks, rats were imaged over the breathing cycle by CT then immediately exposed to an aerosol of ~1µm FMS for ~5 minutes. After the exposure, the lungs were excised and prepared for cryomicrotome imaging, where a 3D image of FMS deposition was acquired using serial sectioning. Cryomicrotome images were spatially registered to match the live CT images to facilitate direct quantitative comparisons of FMS signal intensity with the CT-based ventilation maps. Results: Comparisons of fractional ventilation in contiguous, non-overlapping, 3D regions between CT-based ventilation maps and FMS images showed strong correlations in fractional ventilation (r=0.888, p<0.0001). Conclusion: We conclude that ventilation maps derived from CT imaging are predictive of the 1µm aerosol deposition used in ventilation-perfusion heterogeneity inhalation studies.

  7. Total liquid ventilation reduces oleic acid-induced lung injury in piglets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yao-bin; LIU Dong-hai; ZHANG Yan-bo; LIU Ai-jun; FAN Xiang-ming; QIAO Chen-hui; WANG Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Pediatric patients are susceptible to lung injury that does not respond to traditional therapies.Total liquid ventilation has been developed as an alternative ventilatory strategy for severe lung injury.The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of total liquid ventilation on oleic acid (OA)-induced lung injury in piglets.Methods Twelve Chinese immature piglets were induced acute lung injury by OA.Twelve piglets were randomly treated with conventional gas ventilation (control group) or total liquid ventilation (study group) for 240 minutes.Samples for blood gas analysis were collected before,and at 60-minute intervals after OA-induced lung injury.The degree of lung injury was quantified by histologic examination.The inflammatory cells and the levels of IL-1β,IL-6,IL-10 and TNF-α in plasma,tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage were analyzed.Results Neutrophil and macrophage counts in bronchoalveolar lavage were significantly decreased in the study group (P<0.05).The total lung injury score was also reduced in the study group (P<0.05).The cconcentrations of IL-1β,IL-6,IL-10and TNF-α in plasma,tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage were significantly reduced in the study group (P<0.05).Conclusions Total liquid ventilation reduces biochemical and histologic OA-induced lung injury in piglets.

  8. Ventilation effectiveness : health benefits of heat recovery ventilators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-08-15

    Studies have shown that the installation of a heat recovery ventilator (HRV) in homes in northern Canada could improve indoor air quality and the respiratory health of inhabitants. Low ventilation rates are common in many homes in the North because the climate is severe, homes are smaller and lack basements, and occupancies are higher, leading to unhealthy indoor air quality. Northern communities also have a high rate of respiratory infections. HRVs recover much of the energy used to ventilate, which is desirable in cold regions with high heating costs. For the study, the test sample was divided into two types of houses, notably houses with active HRVs and those with control HRVs that were installed and operated but that did not function. The study results showed that HRVs provided increased ventilation. Complaints by residents about HRV noise, discomfort, or low humidity were common but equally spread between those with active and placebo HRVs. The study showed that the system design needs to be improved to better suit the needs of Inuit families. The nature of northern housing presents installation and maintenance challenges. It is hard to retrofit HRV ducting inside small, existing houses, and building supplies arrive infrequently, so detailed planning and careful take-offs of all supplies and materials must be done well in advance of construction. In addition, contractors are hard to locate and have variable expertise, and there is little technical follow-up. Robust technical support by local contractors and housing authorities is therefore important. 2 refs.

  9. The School Advanced Ventilation Engineering Software (SAVES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The School Advanced Ventilation Engineering Software (SAVES) package is a tool to help school designers assess the potential financial payback and indoor humidity control benefits of Energy Recovery Ventilation (ERV) systems for school applications.

  10. The practice of mine ventilation engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wallace Keith; Prosser Brian; Stinnette J. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The practice of ventilation is continually evolving with new technological advances developed in the mining industry. In recent years the advances in diesel engine technologies, ventilation modeling software, and ventilation management capacities have redefined the historical methods used to evaluate systems. The advances re-evaluate previous methods used to calculate the airflow requirements for the dilution of diesel exhaust fumes. Modeling software has become an integral part of planning and devel-oping ventilation systems in partnership with graphical mine design software packages to generate realistic representations of the mine. Significant advances in ventilation control strategies through remote sensors and monitoring capabilities have been developed to results in cost savings. Though there has been much advancement in mine ventilation technology, the practices and basic ventilation princi-pals enacted through the ventilation engineer cannot be placated with technological advances only.

  11. Intraoperative mechanical ventilation for the pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneyber, Martin C J

    2015-09-01

    Invasive mechanical ventilation is required when children undergo general anesthesia for any procedure. It is remarkable that one of the most practiced interventions such as pediatric mechanical ventilation is hardly supported by any scientific evidence but rather based on personal experience and data from adults, especially as ventilation itself is increasingly recognized as a harmful intervention that causes ventilator-induced lung injury. The use of low tidal volume and higher levels of positive end-expiratory pressure became an integral part of lung-protective ventilation following the outcomes of clinical trials in critically ill adults. This approach has been readily adopted in pediatric ventilation. However, a clear association between tidal volume and mortality has not been ascertained in pediatrics. In fact, experimental studies have suggested that young children might be less susceptible to ventilator-induced lung injury. As such, no recommendations on optimal lung-protective ventilation strategy in children with or without lung injury can be made.

  12. Minute Temperature Fluctuations Detected in Eta Bootis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    A group of astronomers from the Aarhus University (Denmark) and the European Southern Observatory (2) have for the first time succeeded in detecting solar-type oscillations in another star. They observed the temperature of the bright northern star Eta Bootis during six nights with the 2.5-metre Nordic Optical Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos observatory on the island of La Palma (Canary Islands) and were able to show that it varies periodically by a few hundredths of a degree. These changes are caused by pressure waves in the star and are directly dependent on its inner structure. A detailed analysis by the astronomers has shown that the observed effects are in good agreement with current stellar models. This is a most important, independent test of stellar theory. The Sun is an Oscillating Star About twenty years ago, it was discovered that the nearest star, our Sun, oscillates like the ringing of a bell with a period of about 5 minutes. The same phenomenon is known in the Earth, which begins to vibrate after earthquakes; in this way seismologists have been able to discern a layered structure in the Earth's interior. The recent impacts of a comet on Jupiter most likely had a similar effect on that planet. The observed solar oscillations concern the entire gaseous body of the Sun, but we can of course only observe them on its surface. It has been found that each mode moves the surface up and down by less than 25 metres; the combined motion is very complicated, because there are many different, simultaneous modes, each of which has a slightly different period. The exact values of these periods are sensitive to the speed of sound in the Sun's interior, which in turn depends on the density of the material there. Thus, by measuring the periods of solar oscillations, we may probe the internal structure of the Sun, that is otherwise inaccessible to observations. Why does the Sun oscillate and what is the cause of these oscillations ? We do not know yet, but it is

  13. Iatrogenic pneumothorax related to mechanical ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a potentially lethal complication associated with mechanical ventilation. Most of the patients with pneumothorax from mechanical ventilation have underlying lung diseases; pneumothorax is rare in intubated patients with normal lungs. Tension pneumothorax is more common in ventilated patients with prompt recognition and treatment of pneumothorax being important to minimize morbidity and mortality. Underlying lung diseases are associated with ventilator-related pneumothorax with...

  14. Evaluation of Security of Mine Ventilation Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何书建; 彭担任; 翟成

    2002-01-01

    A mine ventilation system has a deterministic function for the safety of coal production and for the control of mine accidents. So, it has an importa nt meaning to evaluate the security of a mine ventilation system. This paper studied the evaluation index system of the security of a mine ventilation system, and the security of a mine ventilation system was described quantitatively in the saf ety degree. Finally, an example of the security evaluation was given .

  15. Functionality of Ventilated Facades: Protection of Insulation

    OpenAIRE

    Petrichenko Mikhail; Musorina Tatiana; Statsenko Elena; Ostrovaia Anastasia; Tarasov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses about methods of construction of the ventilated facades. The ventilated facade is not only the element of facing, it is the supporting structure. Their main objective - creation of air ventilating space between a facade and an external wall of the building. Moving of air in this gap protects a heater from destruction, interfering with a moisture congestion. In addition, the ventilated facade protect the building from aggressive influence of external environment, have a ...

  16. REMPI Spectroscopy of HfF

    CERN Document Server

    Loh, Huanqian; Yahn, Tyler S; Looser, Herbert; Field, Robert W; Cornell, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum of electronic states at 30000--33000 cm$^{-1}$ in hafnium fluoride has been studied using (1+1) resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) and (1+1$'$) REMPI. Six $\\Omega' = 3/2$ and ten $\\Pi_{1/2}$ vibronic bands have been characterized. We report the molecular constants for these bands and estimate the electronic energies of the excited states using a correction derived from the observed isotope shifts. When either of two closely spaced $\\Pi_{1/2}$ electronic states is used as an intermediate state to access autoionizing Rydberg levels, qualitatively distinct autoionization spectra are observed. The intermediate state-specificity of the autoionization spectra bodes well for the possibility of using a selected $\\Pi_{1/2}$ state as an intermediate state to create ionic HfF$^+$ in various selected quantum states, an important requirement for our electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) search in HfF$^+$.

  17. Ventilation in Commercial and Residential Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    A number of areas have to be considered in connection with indoor air quality and ventilation. The selection of ventilation principle and components in the ventilation system will have influence on the indoor air quality and this subject will be discussed on the following pages. The main object o...

  18. Why this crisis in residential ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasselaar, E.

    2008-01-01

    Ventilation is the cornerstone of good indoor air quality. Ventilation requirements have major attention in building regulations, but ventilation in practice is often poor, resulting in increased concentration of pollutants and hence exposure to health risk. Inspection of 500 houses with interviews

  19. Decisional responsibility for mechanical ventilation and weaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Louise; Blackwood, Bronagh; Egerod, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    Optimal management of mechanical ventilation and weaning requires dynamic and collaborative decision making to minimize complications and avoid delays in the transition to extubation. In the absence of collaboration, ventilation decision making may be fragmented, inconsistent, and delayed. Our ob...... objective was to describe the professional group with responsibility for key ventilation and weaning decisions and to examine organizational characteristics associated with nurse involvement....

  20. Digitally Driven Antenna for HF Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    the 1-MHz carrier signal. This signal is then fed into the base terminals of an NPN/ PNP transistor pair arranged in a push–pull configura- tion. A dual...negative voltage connected to the collector terminal of the PNP transistor . Since it was not possible to explicitly simulate the radia- tion of the time...complementary pair of switching transistors is driven with a pulsewidth modulated HF signal, eliminating the requirement for a frequency-dependent

  1. RFID UHF i HF w bibliotekach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gładysz Bartłomiej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of the innovative Radio Frequency Identification (RFID technology to be applied for support, acceleration and automation of the circulation process of library collection is presented. Technology basics, and hardware and software components are described. Two different radio standards used in libraries are compared. The goal is to present the potential of RFID technology for libraries, to highlight the differences and to build a basis for further consideration of UHF and HF alternatives.

  2. Atrial Fibrillation on Intensive Care Unit Admission Independently Increases the Risk of Weaning Failure in Nonheart Failure Mechanically Ventilated Patients in a Medical Intensive Care Unit: A Retrospective Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yen-Han; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Tseng, Yen-Chiang; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Kou, Yu Ru

    2016-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the most frequent arrhythmias in clinical practice. Previous studies have reported the influence of AF on patients with heart failure (HF). The effect of AF on the non-HF critically ill patients in a medical intensive care unit (ICU) remains largely unclear. The study aimed to investigate the impact of AF presenting on ICU admission on the weaning outcome of non-HF mechanically ventilated patients in a medical ICU.A retrospective observational case-control study was conducted over a 1-year period in a medical ICU at Taipei Veterans General Hospital, a tertiary medical center in north Taiwan. Non-HF mechanically ventilated patients who were successful in their spontaneous breathing trial and underwent ventilator discontinuation were enrolled. The primary outcome measure was the ventilator status after the first episode of ventilator discontinuation.A total of 285 non-HF patients enrolled were divided into AF (n = 62) and non-AF (n = 223) groups. Compared with the non-AF patients, the AF patients were significantly associated with old age (P = 0.002), a higher rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome causing respiratory failure (P = 0.015), a higher percentage of sepsis before liberation from mechanical ventilation (MV) (P = 0.004), and a higher serum level of blood urea nitrogen on the day of liberation from MV (P = 0.003). Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that AF independently increased the risk of weaning failure [adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 3.268; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.254-8.517; P = 0.015]. Furthermore, the AF patients were found to be independently associated with a high rate of ventilator dependence (log rank test, P = 0.026), prolonged total ventilator use (AOR, 1.979; 95% CI, 1.032-3.794; P = 0.040), increased length of ICU stay (AOR, 2.256; 95% CI, 1.049-4.849; P = 0.037), increased length of hospital stay (AOR, 2.921; 95% CI, 1.363-6.260; P = 0

  3. Worker productivity and ventilation rate in a call center: Analyses of time-series data for a group of workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.; Price, Phillip; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas; Dibartolomeo, Dennis; Federspiel, Cliff; Liu, Gang; Lahiff, Maureen

    2002-01-01

    In previous studies, increased ventilation rates and reduced indoor carbon dioxide concentrations have been associated with improvements in health at work and increased performance in work-related tasks. Very few studies have assessed whether ventilation rates influence performance of real work. This paper describes part one of a two-part analysis from a productivity study performed in a call center operated by a health maintenance organization. Outside air ventilation rates were manipulated, indoor air temperatures, humidities, and carbon dioxide concentrations were monitored, and worker performance data for advice nurses, with 30-minute resolution, were analyzed via multivariate linear regression to look for an association of performance with building ventilation rate, or with indoor carbon dioxide concentration (which is related to ventilation rate per worker). Results suggest that the effect of ventilation rate on worker performance in this call center was very small (probably less than 1%) or nil, over most of the range of ventilation rate experienced during the study (roughly 12 L s{sup -1} to 48 L s{sup -1} per person). However, there is some evidence suggesting performance improvements of 2% or more when the ventilation rate per person is very high, as indicated by indoor CO{sub 2} concentrations exceeding outdoor concentrations by less than 75 ppm.

  4. Displacement Ventilation in Hospital Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yuguo; Nielsen, Peter V.; Sandberg, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Hospital differ from conventional buildings in terms of ventilation needs. Exhaled infectious droplets or droplet nuclei of an infected patient need to be removed in general wards, waiting areas and isolation rooms to minimize transmission to health-care workers, other patients and visitors...

  5. Displacement Ventilation in Hospital Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yuguo; Nielsen, Peter V.; Sandberg, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Hospital differ from conventional buildings in terms of ventilation needs. Exhaled infectious droplets or droplet nuclei of an infected patient need to be removed in general wards, waiting areas and isolation rooms to minimize transmission to health-care workers, other patients and visitors...

  6. International Ventilation Cooling Application Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzer, Peter; Psomas, Theofanis Ch.; OSullivan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The currently running International Energy Agency, Energy and Conservation in Buildings, Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling (VC) project, is coordinating research towards extended use of VC. Within this Annex 62 the joint research activity of International VC Application Database has been carried out, ...

  7. Thermal Plumes in Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.

    The design of a displacement ventilation system involves determination of the flow rate in the thermal plumes. The flow rate in the plumes and the vertical temperature gradient influence each other, and they are influenced by many factors. This paper shows some descriptions of these effects....

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Allard, Francis; Awbi, Hazim B.;

    2008-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation Design is a new title in the is a new title in the REHVA guidebook series. The guidebook is written for people who need to use and discuss results based on CFD predictions, and it gives insight into the subject for those who are not used to work with CFD...

  9. Cardiogenic oscillation induced ventilator autotriggering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narender Kaloria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiogenic oscillation during mechanical ventilation can auto-trigger the ventilator resembling patient initiated breadth. This gives a false sense of intact respiratory drive and determination brain death, even if other tests are positive, is not appropriate in such a situation. It will prolong the ICU stay and confound the brain-death determination. In this case report, we describe a 35 year old man who was brought to the hospital after many hours of critical delay following multiple gun shot injuries. The patient suffered a cardiac arrest while on the way from another hospital. After an emergency laparotomy, patient was shifted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score of E1VTM1 and was mechanically ventilated. Despite absence of brainstem reflexes, the ventilator continued to be triggered on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP mode and the patient maintained normal oxygen saturation and acceptable levels of carbon dioxide. An apnoea test confirmed absent respiratory drive. Ventilatory waveform graph analysis, revealed cardiogenic oscillation as the cause for autotrigerring.

  10. Chronotropic incompetence in Chagas disease: effectiveness of blended sensor (volume/minute and accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio da Silva Menezes Junior

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction:Technological progress of pacemakers has allowed the association of two or more sensors in one heart rate system response. The accelerometer sensor measures the intensity of the activity; it has a relatively rapid response to the beginning of it, however, it may present insufficient response to less strenuous or of less impact exercise. The minute ventilation sensor changes the pacing rate in response to changes in respiratory frequency in relation to tidal volume, allowing responses to situations of emotional stress and low impact exercises.Objective:To evaluate the cardiorespiratory response of the accelerometer with respect to the blended sensor (BS=accelerometer sensor+minute ventilation sensor to exercise in chagasic patients undergoing cardiopulmonary exercise test.Methods:This was a prospective, observational, randomized, cross-sectional study. Patients who met the inclusion criteria were selected. The maximum heart rate of the sensor was programmed by age (220-age. The results were analyzed through t test with paired samples (P<0.05.Results:Sample was comprised of 44 patients, with a mean age of 66±10.4 years, 58% were female, 54% as first implant, in 74% were functional class I and 26% were functional class II, left ventricular ejection fraction was 58±7. As for the cardiopulmonary test, maximum expected heart rate and VO2 were not achieved in both the accelerometer sensor and the blended sensor, however, metabolic equivalent in the blended sensor was higher than the expected, all data with P<0.001.Conclusion:Even though the maximal heart rate was not reached, the blended sensor provided a physiological electrical sequence when compared to the accelerometer sensor, providing better physical fitness test in cardiopulmonary hemodynamics and greater efficiency.

  11. Sustained inflation at birth did not alter lung injury from mechanical ventilation in surfactant-treated fetal lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah H Hillman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sustained inflations (SI are used with the initiation of ventilation at birth to rapidly recruit functional residual capacity and may decrease lung injury and the need for mechanical ventilation in preterm infants. However, a 20 second SI in surfactant-deficient preterm lambs caused an acute phase injury response without decreasing lung injury from subsequent mechanical ventilation. HYPOTHESIS: A 20 second SI at birth will decrease lung injury from mechanical ventilation in surfactant-treated preterm fetal lambs. METHODS: The head and chest of fetal sheep at 126±1 day GA were exteriorized, with tracheostomy and removal of fetal lung fluid prior to treatment with surfactant (300 mg in 15 ml saline. Fetal lambs were randomized to one of four 15 minute interventions: 1 PEEP 8 cmH2O; 2 20 sec SI at 40 cmH2O, then PEEP 8 cmH2O; 3 mechanical ventilation with 7 ml/kg tidal volume; or 4 20 sec SI then mechanical ventilation at 7 ml/kg. Fetal lambs remained on placental support for the intervention and for 30 min after the intervention. RESULTS: SI recruited a mean volume of 6.8±0.8 mL/kg. SI did not alter respiratory physiology during mechanical ventilation. Heat shock protein (HSP 70, HSP60, and total protein in lung fluid similarly increased in both ventilation groups. Modest pro-inflammatory cytokine and acute phase responses, with or without SI, were similar with ventilation. SI alone did not increase markers of injury. CONCLUSION: In surfactant treated fetal lambs, a 20 sec SI did not alter ventilation physiology or markers of lung injury from mechanical ventilation.

  12. Effectiveness of mask ventilation performed by hospital doctors in an Irish tertiary referral teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, K

    2012-02-03

    The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of mask ventilation performed by 112 doctors with clinical responsibilities at a tertiary referral teaching hospital. Participant doctors were asked to perform mask ventilation for three minutes on a Resusci Anne mannequin using a facemask and a two litre self inflating bag. The tidal volumes generated were quantified using a Laerdal skillmeter computer as grades 0-5, corresponding to 0, 334, 434, 561, 673 and > 800 ml respectively. The effectiveness of mask ventilation (i.e. the proportion of ventilation attempts which achieved a volume delivery of > 434 mls) was greater for anaesthetists [78.0 (29.5)%] than for non anaesthetists [54.6 (40.0)%] (P = 0.012). Doctors who had attended one or more resuscitation courses where no more effective at mask ventilation than their colleagues who had not undertaken such courses. It is likely that first responders to in-hospital cardiac arrests are commonly unable to perform adequate mask ventilation.

  13. In vitro growth and leaf anatomy of Cattleya walkeriana (Gardner, 1839 grown in natural ventilation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Bortolotti da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural ventilation system facilitates gaseous exchanges in in vitro plants promoting changes in the leaf tissue, which can be evaluated through the leaf anatomy, and it allows a cultivation closer to the photoautrophic micropropagation. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects on in vitro growth and on the leaf anatomy of Cattleya walkeriana grown in natural and conventional ventilation system with different concentrations of sucrose (0; 15; 30 and 45 L-1 combined with different cultivation systems (conventional micropropagation and natural ventilation system. The culture medium was composed of MS salts, solidified with 7 g L-1 of agar and pH adjusted to 5.8. Forty milliliters of culture medium were distributed in 250 mL flasks, autoclaved at 120 ºC for 20 minutes. The greater plant growth, as well as the greater thickness of the mesophyll was observed with the use of 20 g L-1 sucrose in natural ventilation system. Plants grown in natural ventilation system showed a thicker leaf mesophyll, which is directly related to photoautotrophic crops. The natural ventilation system induced more elliptical stomata and probably more functional formats.

  14. Analyze of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysel Sunnetcioglu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is the infection that is an important cause of morbidity and mortality developed in patients whom the invasive mechanical ventilation (MV were performed in intensive care units (ICU. In this study, the factors of VAP developing in patients whom the mechanical ventilation of ICU performed, antibiotic susceptibility to these factors and determining the risk factors were aimed. Material and Method: Between January 2009 and March 2013, 79 cases, followed with the mechanical ventilation for at least for 48 hours and developed VAP, were retrospectively reviewed at Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Unit of Reanimation at Faculty of Medicine at Yuzuncu Yil University, performing endotracheal intubation. The cases were evaluated in terms of microorganisms, antibiotic susceptibility and risk factors. Results: The rate of our VAP speed was calculated to be 19.68 on the day of 1000 ventilator. While a single microorganism could be isolated in 81.1% of the 74 VAP cases whose the active pathogen could be isolated, two or more than two microorganisms were isolated in 18.9% of them.While 83 of the strains (90.2% were gram-negative bacteria, 7 of them (7.6% were gram-positive bacteria. Acinetobacter spp. (40.2% was most commonly isolated as a gram-negative factor, but methicillin-resistant S. aureus (4.3% was isolated as a gram-positive factor. It was determined that the isolated factors in VAP cases were significantly resistant to the broad-spectrum antibiotics. Discussion: As a result, in patients with high-risk factors for the development of VAP, early and appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment should be started according to the results of the sensitivity of the unit and for the multi-drug-resistant microorganisms with common and high mortality.

  15. Assessing the influence of mechanical ventilation on blood gases and blood pressure in rattlesnakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mads F.; Buchanan, Rasmus; Jensen, Heidi M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the impact of mechanical positive pressure ventilation on heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure, blood gases, lactate, glucose, sodium, potassium and calcium concentrations in rattlesnakes during anesthesia and the subsequent recovery period. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective...... ventilation at a tidal volume of 30 mL kg(-1) at 1 breath every 90 seconds, 5 breaths minute(-1) , or 15 breaths minute(-1) . Arterial blood was collected from indwelling catheters at 30, 40, and 60 minutes and 2, 6, and 24 hours following induction of anesthesia and analyzed for pH, PaO2 , PaCO2...... , and selected variables. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and HR were recorded at 30, 40, 60 minutes and 24 hours. RESULTS: Spontaneous ventilation and 1 breath every 90 seconds resulted in a mild hypercapnia (PaCO2 22.4 ± 4.3 mmHg [3.0 ± 0.6 kPa] and 24.5 ± 1.6 mmHg [3.3 ± 0.2 kPa], respectively), 5 breaths...

  16. Short-term airing by natural ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perino, Marco; Heiselberg, Per

    2009-01-01

    traditional mechanical ventilation components with natural ventilation devices, such as motorized windows and louvers. Among the various ventilation strategies that are currently available, buoyancy driven single-sided natural ventilation has proved to be very effective and can provide high air change rates...... that was aimed at developing and validating numerical models for the analysis of buoyancy driven single-sided natural ventilation systems. Once validated, these models can be used to optimize control strategies in order to achieve satisfactory indoor comfort conditions and IAQ....

  17. Effects of manual hyperinflation in preterm newborns under mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Camila Chaves; Nicolau, Carla Marques; Juliani, Regina Celia Turola Passos; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Krebs, Vera Lucia Jornada

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of manual hyperinflation, performed with a manual resuscitator with and without the positive end-expiratory pressure valve, on the respiratory function of preterm newborns under mechanical ventilation. Methods Cross-sectional study of hemodynamically stable preterm newborns with gestational age of less than 32 weeks, under mechanical ventilation and dependent on it at 28 days of life. Manual hyperinflation was applied randomly, alternating the use or not of the positive end-expiratory pressure valve, followed by tracheal aspiration for ending the maneuver. For nominal data, the two-tailed Wilcoxon test was applied at the 5% significance level and 80% power. Results Twenty-eight preterm newborns, with an average birth weight of 1,005.71 ± 372.16g, an average gestational age of 28.90 ± 1.79 weeks, an average corrected age of 33.26 ± 1.78 weeks, and an average mechanical ventilation time of 29.5 (15 - 53) days, were studied. Increases in inspiratory and expiratory volumes occurred between time-points A5 (before the maneuver) and C1 (immediately after tracheal aspiration) in both the maneuver with the valve (p = 0.001 and p = 0.009) and without the valve (p = 0.026 and p = 0.001), respectively. There was also an increase in expiratory resistance between time-points A5 and C1 (p = 0.044). Conclusion Lung volumes increased when performing the maneuver with and without the valve, with a significant difference in the first minute after aspiration. There was a significant difference in expiratory resistance between the time-points A5 (before the maneuver) and C1 (immediately after tracheal aspiration) in the first minute after aspiration within each maneuver. PMID:27737427

  18. [Noninvasive, continuous monitoring of artificial respiration in premature and newborn infants by the constant measurement of respiratory minute volume, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide release].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidig, E; Noller, F; Mentzel, H

    1986-01-01

    A system of instrumentation for the continuous measurement of the respiratory gases during assisted ventilation of neonates and premature infants based upon "breath-by-breath-method" is described. The four respiratory parameters flow (V), ventilation pressure (p), oxygen-concentration and carbon dioxide-concentration are measured. These datas are processed by a computer to generate a continuous display of the respiratory minute volume, the tidal volume, the breath rate, the oxygen consumption and the carbon dioxide production. All parameters are stored and can be displayed or plotted as trends. The flow-measurement is performed using hot-wire-anemometry. The very small flow sensor is adapted directly to the tube. Next to this sensor, the respiratory gas for the analysis of the O2- and CO2- concentration is suctioned off continuously. First clinical experience in mechanically ventilated newborns is characterized.

  19. Performance of ductless personalized ventilation in conjunction with displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalewski, Mariusz; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Vesely, Michal

    2014-01-01

    movement decreased with DPV compared to corresponding conditions with displacement ventilation alone and reached the same level as mixing or displacement ventilation at 23 °C. Subjects were able to control the volume and speed of the personalized air flow in order to avoid eye irritation. However......, increased eye dryness sensation was reported by 30% of subjects. The personalized air flow selected by nearly 80% of the subjects at 26 °C was between 10 and 20 l/s corresponding to the target air velocity of 1.2–1.7 m/s. At 29 °C almost 90% of subjects chose a personalized air flow between 15 and 20 l/s (1...

  20. Night ventilation control strategies in office buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhaojun; Yi, Lingli; Gao, Fusheng [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2009-10-15

    In moderate climates night ventilation is an effective and energy-efficient approach to improve the indoor thermal environment for office buildings during the summer months, especially for heavyweight construction. However, is night ventilation a suitable strategy for office buildings with lightweight construction located in cold climates? In order to answer this question, the whole energy-consumption analysis software EnergyPlus was used to simulate the indoor thermal environment and energy consumption in typical office buildings with night mechanical ventilation in three cities in northern China. The summer outdoor climate data was analyzed, and three typical design days were chosen. The most important factors influencing night ventilation performance such as ventilation rates, ventilation duration, building mass and climatic conditions were evaluated. When night ventilation operation time is closer to active cooling time, the efficiency of night ventilation is higher. With night ventilation rate of 10 ach, the mean radiant temperature of the indoor surface decreased by up to 3.9 C. The longer the duration of operation, the more efficient the night ventilation strategy becomes. The control strategies for three locations are given in the paper. Based on the optimized strategies, the operation consumption and fees are calculated. The results show that more energy is saved in office buildings cooled by a night ventilation system in northern China than ones that do not employ this strategy. (author)

  1. Ventilation system design for educational facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsafty, A.F.; Abo Elazm, M.M. [Arab Academy for Science, Alexandria (Egypt). Technology and Maritime Transport; Safwan, M. [Arab Academy for Science, Cairo (Egypt). Technology and Maritime Transport

    2010-07-01

    In order to maintain acceptable indoor air quality levels in classrooms, high ventilation rates are needed to dilute the concentration of indoor contaminants, resulting in higher energy consumption for the operation of mechanical ventilation systems. Three factors are usually considered when determining the adequate ventilation rate for classrooms in educational facilities. These include the maximum population served in the classroom; carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) production rate by occupants; and outdoor air conditions. CO{sub 2} concentrations usually indicate the rate of ventilation required. This paper presented a newly developed computer software program for determining the ventilation rates needed to enhance indoor air quality and to maintain CO{sub 2} concentration within the recommended levels by ANSI/ASHRAE standards for best student performance. This paper also presented design curves for determining the ventilation rates and air changes per hour required for the ventilated educational zone. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  2. Summary of human responses to ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppanen, Olli A.; Fisk, William J.

    2004-06-01

    The effects of ventilation on indoor air quality and health is a complex issue. It is known that ventilation is necessary to remove indoor generated pollutants from indoor air or dilute their concentration to acceptable levels. But, as the limit values of all pollutants are not known, the exact determination of required ventilation rates based on pollutant concentrations and associated risks is seldom possible. The selection of ventilation rates has to be based also on epidemiological research (e.g. Seppanen et al., 1999), laboratory and field experiments (e.g. CEN 1996, Wargocki et al., 2002a) and experience (e.g. ECA 2003). Ventilation may also have harmful effects on indoor air quality and climate if not properly designed, installed, maintained and operated as summarized by Seppdnen (2003). Ventilation may bring indoors harmful substances that deteriorate the indoor environment. Ventilation also affects air and moisture flow through the building envelope and may lead to moisture problems that deteriorate the structures of the building. Ventilation changes the pressure differences over the structures of building and may cause or prevent the infiltration of pollutants from structures or adjacent spaces. Ventilation is also in many cases used to control the thermal environment or humidity in buildings. Ventilation can be implemented with various methods which may also affect health (e.g. Seppdnen and Fisk, 2002, Wargocki et al., 2002a). In non residential buildings and hot climates, ventilation is often integrated with air-conditioning which makes the operation of ventilation system more complex. As ventilation is used for many purposes its health effects are also various and complex. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on positive and negative effects of ventilation on health and other human responses. The focus of the paper is on office-type working environment and residential buildings. In the industrial premises the problems of air quality are usually

  3. Early predictors of success of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, D; Prasad, Bnbm; Tampi, P S; Ramprasad, R

    2011-10-01

    Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) has emerged as a significant advancement in the management of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure requiring ventilation therapy (respiratory rate [RR] of > 30 breaths per minutes, PaCO2 > 55 mmHg and arterial pH intubation was evaluated. Of the 100 patients, 76 (76%) showed improvement in clinical parameters and ABG. There was improvement in HR and RR, pH, and PCO2 within the first hour in the success group and these parameters continued to improve even after four and 24 hours of NIPPV treatment. Out of 24 (24%) patients who failed to respond, 13 (54%) needed endotracheal intubation within one hour. The failure group had higher baseline HR than the success group. Improvement in HR, RR, pH, and PCO2 one hour after putting the patient on NIPPV predicts success of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in hypercapnic respiratory failure.

  4. Cerebral Arterial Air Embolism Associated with Mechanical Ventilation and Deep Tracheal Aspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gursoy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial air embolism associated with pulmonary barotrauma has been considered a rare but a well-known complication of mechanical ventilation. A 65-year-old man, who had subarachnoid hemorrhage with Glasgow coma scale of 8, was admitted to intensive care unit and ventilated with the help of mechanical ventilator. Due to the excessive secretions, deep tracheal aspirations were made frequently. GCS decreased from 8–10 to 4-5, and the patient was reevaluated with cranial CT scan. In CT scan, air embolism was detected in the cerebral arteries. The patient deteriorated and spontaneous respiratory activity lost just after the CT investigation. Thirty minutes later cardiac arrest appeared. Despite the resuscitation, the patient died. We suggest that pneumonia and frequent tracheal aspirations are predisposing factors for cerebral vascular air embolism.

  5. Simplified modelling of displacement ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Mateus, Nuno André Marques, 1987-

    2016-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Energia e Ambiente (Energia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2016 With the aim of creating adequate indoor conditions, modern buildings use energy for space heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC). The environmental impact of this energy use creates an urgent need to develop strategies to reduce HVAC related energy consumption. This thesis contributes to this goal by testing and developing simplified models for hi...

  6. Improvements on Signal Processing for HF Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yongtan; SHEN Yiying

    2001-01-01

    In this paper improvements on signalprocessing are achieved to enhance the performancesof H-F radar system, being unobtainable by the con-ventional signal processing. Using the improved sig-nal processing both high range resolution and longcoherent integration time may be obtained for goodbenefit to the target resolution and weak signal de-tection. Modification to the unmatched correspon-dence between range delay samples and range resolu-tion ceils saves an additional accumulation loss in therange processing. Finally, comparisons between theimproved and the conventional signal processing aregiven by numerical simulation.

  7. The One-Minute Paper: Some Empirical Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizmar, John F.; Ostrosky, Anthony L

    1998-01-01

    Suggests that using the one-minute paper to teach an introductory economics course increases economic knowledge regardless of student ability level and instructor characteristics. The one-minute paper is a form of feedback where the students answer a few basic questions about the lesson at the end of the class. (MJP)

  8. Econometric Assessment of "One Minute" Paper as a Pedagogic Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amaresh

    2010-01-01

    This paper makes an econometric testing of one-minute paper used as a tool to manage and assess instruction in my statistics class. One of our findings is that the one minute paper when I have tested it by using an OLS estimate in a controlled Vs experimental design framework is found to statistically significant and effective in enhancing…

  9. 2-minute Gridded Global Relief Data (ETOPO2) v2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Two-minute gridded global relief for both ocean and land areas are available in the ETOPO2v2 (2006) database. ETOPO2v2 replaced ETOPO2 (2001). The historic 2-minute...

  10. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staff Scientist; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max; Dickerhoff, Darryl

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20percent, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

  11. Systematic Study on Triaxial Superdeformed Bands of Hf Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Da-Li; DING Bin-Gang

    2009-01-01

    Properties of the triaxial superdeformed (TSD) bands of Hf isotopes are investigated systematically within the supersymmetry scheme including many-body interactions and a perturbation possessing the SO(5) (or SU(5)) symmetry on the rotational symmetry. Quantitatively good results of the γ-ray energies, the dynamical moments of inertia,and the spin of the TSD bands in Hf isotopes are obtained. It shows that this approach is quite powerful in describing the properties of the triaxial superdeformation in Hf isotopes.

  12. Determining Energy Distributions of HF-Accelerated Electrons at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-18

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0383 Determining energy distributions of HF-accelerated electrons at HAARP Christopher Fallen University of Alaska Fairbanks...2012 - 11/14/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Determining energy distributions of HF-accelerated electrons at HAARP 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0424...transmitted from the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) transmitter in Alaska. For a given fixed HF-plasma interaction altitude

  13. Physics of the Geospace Response to Powerful HF Radio Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    studies of the response of the Earth’s space plasma to high-power HF radio waves from the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ...of HF heating and explored to simulate artificial ducts. DMSP- HAARP experiments revealed that HF-created ion outflows and artificial density ducts...in the topside ionosphere appeared faster than predicted by the models, pointing to kinetic (suprathermal) effects. CHAMP/GRACE- HAARP experiments

  14. Ventilation onset prior to umbilical cord clamping (physiological-based cord clamping) improves systemic and cerebral oxygenation in preterm lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polglase, Graeme R; Dawson, Jennifer A; Kluckow, Martin; Gill, Andrew W; Davis, Peter G; Te Pas, Arjan B; Crossley, Kelly J; McDougall, Annie; Wallace, Euan M; Hooper, Stuart B

    2015-01-01

    As measurement of arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) is common in the delivery room, target SpO2 ranges allow clinicians to titrate oxygen therapy for preterm infants in order to achieve saturation levels similar to those seen in normal term infants in the first minutes of life. However, the influence of the onset of ventilation and the timing of cord clamping on systemic and cerebral oxygenation is not known. We investigated whether the initiation of ventilation, prior to, or after umbilical cord clamping, altered systemic and cerebral oxygenation in preterm lambs. Systemic and cerebral blood-flows, pressures and peripheral SpO2 and regional cerebral tissue oxygenation (SctO2) were measured continuously in apnoeic preterm lambs (126±1 day gestation). Positive pressure ventilation was initiated either 1) prior to umbilical cord clamping, or 2) after umbilical cord clamping. Lambs were monitored intensively prior to intervention, and for 10 minutes following umbilical cord clamping. Clamping the umbilical cord prior to ventilation resulted in a rapid decrease in SpO2 and SctO2, and an increase in arterial pressure, cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen extraction. Ventilation restored oxygenation and haemodynamics by 5-6 minutes. No such disturbances in peripheral or cerebral oxygenation and haemodynamics were observed when ventilation was initiated prior to cord clamping. The establishment of ventilation prior to umbilical cord clamping facilitated a smooth transition to systemic and cerebral oxygenation following birth. SpO2 nomograms may need to be re-evaluated to reflect physiological management of preterm infants in the delivery room.

  15. Ventilation onset prior to umbilical cord clamping (physiological-based cord clamping improves systemic and cerebral oxygenation in preterm lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme R Polglase

    Full Text Available As measurement of arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2 is common in the delivery room, target SpO2 ranges allow clinicians to titrate oxygen therapy for preterm infants in order to achieve saturation levels similar to those seen in normal term infants in the first minutes of life. However, the influence of the onset of ventilation and the timing of cord clamping on systemic and cerebral oxygenation is not known.We investigated whether the initiation of ventilation, prior to, or after umbilical cord clamping, altered systemic and cerebral oxygenation in preterm lambs.Systemic and cerebral blood-flows, pressures and peripheral SpO2 and regional cerebral tissue oxygenation (SctO2 were measured continuously in apnoeic preterm lambs (126±1 day gestation. Positive pressure ventilation was initiated either 1 prior to umbilical cord clamping, or 2 after umbilical cord clamping. Lambs were monitored intensively prior to intervention, and for 10 minutes following umbilical cord clamping.Clamping the umbilical cord prior to ventilation resulted in a rapid decrease in SpO2 and SctO2, and an increase in arterial pressure, cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen extraction. Ventilation restored oxygenation and haemodynamics by 5-6 minutes. No such disturbances in peripheral or cerebral oxygenation and haemodynamics were observed when ventilation was initiated prior to cord clamping.The establishment of ventilation prior to umbilical cord clamping facilitated a smooth transition to systemic and cerebral oxygenation following birth. SpO2 nomograms may need to be re-evaluated to reflect physiological management of preterm infants in the delivery room.

  16. PEMISAHAN Zr – Hf SECARA SINAMBUNG MENGGUNAKAN MIXER SETTLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Biyantoro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK PEMISAHAN Zr – Hf SECARA SINAMBUNG MENGGUNAKANMIXER SETTLER. Telah dilakukan pemisahanZr – Hf secara sinambung menggunakan pengaduk pengenap (mixer settler 16 stage. Larutan umpan adalah zirkon nitrat dengan kadar Zr = 30786 ppm dan Hf = 499 ppm. Ekstraktan dipakai adalah solven 60 % TBP dalam kerosen dan larutan scrubbingyang dipakai adalah asam nitrat 1 M. Umpan masuk pada stageke 5 dikontakkan secara berlawanan arah dengan solven masuk pada stage ke 16 dan larutan scrubbing masuk pada stage ke 1. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah memisahkan unsur Zr dan Hf dari hasil olah pasir zirkon menggunakan solven TBP dengan alat mixer settler16 stage. Analisis umpan dan hasil proses pemisahan untuk zirkonium (Zr dilakukan dengan menggunakan alat pendar sinar-X, sedangkananalisis unsur hafnium (Hf menggunakan Analisis Pengaktifan Neutron (APN. Parameter penelitian dilakukan dengan variasi keasaman asam nitrat dalam umpan dan variasi waktu pada berbagai laju pengadukan. Hasil penelitian pemisahan unsur Zr dengan Hf diperolehkondisi optimum pada keasaman umpan 4 N HNO3, keseimbangan dicapai setelah 3jam dan laju pengadukan 3300 rpm. Hasil ekstrak  unsur zirkon (Zr diperoleh kadar sebesar 28577 ppm dengan efisiensi 92,76 % serta kadar pengotor hafnium (Hf sebesar 95 ppm. Kata Kunci: pemisahan Zr, Hf, ekstraksi, mixer settler, alat pendar sinar-X, APN. ABSTRACT SEPARATION of Zr - Hf CONTINUOUSLY USE THE MIXER SETTLER. Separation of Zr - Hf continuously using mixer settler 16 stage has been done. The feed solution is zircon nitrate concentration of Zr = 30786 ppm  and Hf = 499 ppm. As the solvent used extractant 60 % TBP in 40 % kerosene. Nitric acid solution used srubbing 1 M. The feed entered into stage to 5 is contacted with solvents direction on the stage to 16 and the scrubbing solution enter the stage to 1. The purpose of this study is to separate Zr and Hf of the results from the process of zircon sand using solvent TBP using 16 stage

  17. Mitigating Doppler shift effect in HF multitone data modem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonlu, Yasar

    1989-09-01

    Digital communications over High Frequency (HF) radio channels are getting important in recent years. Current HF requirements are for data transmission at rates 2.4 kbps or more to accommodate computer data links and digital secure voice. HF modems which were produced to meet these speeds are, serial modems and parallel modems. On the other hand, the HF sky-wave communication medium, the ionosphere, has some propagation problems such as multipath and Doppler shift. The effect of Doppler shift in a parallel modem which employs Differential Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (DQPSK) modulation is considered and a correction method to mitigate the Doppler Shift effect is introduced.

  18. Epitaxial Thin Films of Y doped HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Claudy; Khan, Asif; Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is one of a few metal oxides that is thermodynamically stable on silicon and silicon oxide. There has been renewed interest in HfO2 due to the recent discovery of ferroelectricity and antiferroelectricity in doped HfO2. Typical ferroelectrics - such as strontium bismuth tantalate (SBT) and lead zirconium titanate (PZT) - contain elements that easily react with silicon and silicon oxide at elevated temperatures; therefore, such ferroelectrics are not suited for device applications. Meanwhile, ferroelectric HfO2 offers promise regarding integration with silicon. The stable phase of HfO2 at room temperature is monoclinic, but HfO2 can be stabilized in the tetragonal, orthorhombic or even cubic phase by suitable doping. We stabilized Y-doped HfO2 thin films using pulsed laser deposition. The strain state can be controlled using various perovskite substrates and controlled growth conditions. We report on Y-doped HfO2 domain structures from piezo-response force microscopy (PFM) and structural parameters via X-ray reciprocal space maps (RSM). We hope this work spurs further interest in strain-tuned ferroelectricity in doped HfO2.

  19. Microstructural characterization of as-cast hf-b alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Jânio Gigolotti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available An accurate knowledge of several metal-boron phase diagrams is important to evaluation of higher order systems such as metal-silicon-boron ternaries. The refinement and reassessment of phase diagram data is a continuous work, thus the reevaluation of metal-boron systems provides the possibility to confirm previous data from an investigation using higher purity materials and better analytical techniques. This work presents results of rigorous microstructural characterization of as-cast hafnium-boron alloys which are significant to assess the liquid composition associated to most of the invariant reactions of this system. Alloys were prepared by arc melting high purity hafnium (minimum 99.8% and boron (minimum 99.5% slices under argon atmosphere in water-cooled copper crucible with non consumable tungsten electrode and titanium getter. The phases were identified by scanning electron microscopy, using back-scattered electron image mode and X-ray diffraction. In general, a good agreement was found between our data and those from the currently accepted Hafnium-Boron phase diagram. The phases identified are αHfSS and B-RhomSS, the intermediate compounds HfB and HfB2 and the liquide L. The reactions are the eutectic L ⇔ αHfSS + HfB and L ⇔ HfB2 + B-Rhom, the peritectic L + HfB2 ⇔ HfB and the congruent formation of HfB2.

  20. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippola, Mark Raymond [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 μm were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the

  1. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on

  2. A DFT study of temperature dependent dissociation mechanism of HF in HF(H2O)7 cluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swatantra K Yadav; Hirdyesh Mishra; Ashwani K Tiwari

    2015-10-01

    We report a Density Functional Theoretical (DFT) study of dissociation of Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) in HF(H2O)7 cluster, using B3LYP functional and empirical exchange correlation functional M06-2X along with 6-31+G(d,p) basis set. Dissociation constant, KRP, of HF dissociation and pKa values of HF in cluster at various temperatures have been reported. It has been found that both KRP and pKa are highly dependent on temperature. The variation of pKa with temperature suggests that HF is strong acid at lower temperatures. Our study also reveals that HF is a stronger acid in water cluster than in bulk water. Further, the results obtained by DFT calculations have been compared with the earlier reported results obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. It is found that DFT results are qualitatively consistent with the results of MC simulation but quantitatively different.

  3. The Effects of Guided Imagery on Patients Being Weaned from Mechanical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeeAnna Spiva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study purpose was to assess the effects of guided imagery on sedation levels, sedative and analgesic volume consumption, and physiological responses of patients being weaned from mechanical ventilation. Forty-two patients were selected from two community acute care hospitals. One hospital served as the comparison group and provided routine care (no intervention while the other hospital provided the guided imagery intervention. The intervention included two sessions, each lasting 60 minutes, offered during morning weaning trials from mechanical ventilation. Measurements were recorded in groups at baseline and 30- and 60-minute intervals and included vital signs and Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS score. Sedative and analgesic medication volume consumption were recorded 24 hours prior to and after the intervention. The guided imagery group had significantly improved RASS scores and reduced sedative and analgesic volume consumption. During the second session, oxygen saturation levels significantly improved compared to the comparison group. Guided imagery group had 4.88 less days requiring mechanical ventilation and 1.4 reduction in hospital length of stay compared to the comparison group. Guided imagery may be complementary and alternative medicine (CAM intervention to provide during mechanical ventilation weaning trials.

  4. Radiation protect during the ventilation scintigraphy of Tc99m DTPA radioaerosol in pediatric application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Dai, Zen-Kong; Huang, Ying-Fong; Jong, Shiang-Bing [Chou-Hon Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Univ., Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2000-05-01

    Lung ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy is of great value for the management of patients with both primary lung disease and heart disease, by proving patho- physiological information of importance for the diagnosis, follow-up and functional evaluation of the patients. Krypton 81m radioactive gas is preferable for pediatric application due to its short half-life. However, the rubidium-krypton 81m generator is not popular in hospital of our country. Tc99m DTPA radioaerosol ventilation scintigraphy has its unique convenient for clinical application. But, the most disadvantage of clinical application of Tc99m DTPA radioaerosol is contamination of environment when the poor-cooperative patient can't breathe by mouth. For this reason, we design the certain procedure to reduce the radioaerosol contamination. During May to Aug., 1999, we collect 36 pediatric patients (male to female ratio 2:1, age from 6 months to 20 years old) with clinical history of lung or heart disease, including congenital heart disease, asthma and so on. Before the cases receive 10 to 15 mCi Tc99m DTPA radioaerosol ventilation scan, all of them were trained with breath training. And during the ventilation scintigraphy, the special mouth mask is designed to prevent the radioaerosol leakage into atmosphere. Then Geiger-Muller survey meter was arranged to detect the environmental contamination of radioaerosol in the mask, one and two metes away from the mask every 10 minutes during ventilation scintigraphy procedure and 1 hour after finishing image. Two nuclear medicine physicians evaluated imaging quality of ventilation scintigraphy. Results: Among thirty-six pediatric patients with prior breath training, thirty-two cases are successful to proceed the Tc99m DTPA ventilation scintigraphy. The other four cases that were under three-year-old fail to receive ventilation scintigraphy. There is limited detectable radioactivity in the mouth mask at early 10 minute by Geiger-Muller counter. No significant

  5. End-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during bag valve ventilation: the use of a new portable device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindström Veronica

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For healthcare providers in the prehospital setting, bag-valve mask (BVM ventilation could be as efficacious and safe as endotracheal intubation. To facilitate the evaluation of efficacious ventilation, capnographs have been further developed into small and convenient devices able to provide end- tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a new portable device (EMMA™ attached to a ventilation mask would provide ETCO2 values accurate enough to confirm proper BVM ventilation. Methods A prospective observational trial was conducted in a single level-2 centre. Twenty-two patients under general anaesthesia were manually ventilated. ETCO2 was measured every five minutes with the study device and venous PCO2 (PvCO2 was simultaneously measured for comparison. Bland- Altman plots were used to compare ETCO2, and PvCO2. Results The patients were all hemodynamically and respiratory stable during anaesthesia. End-tidal carbon dioxide values were corresponding to venous gases during BVM ventilation under optimal conditions. The bias, the mean of the differences between the two methods (device versus venous blood gases, for time points 1-4 ranges from -1.37 to -1.62. Conclusion The portable device, EMMA™ is suitable for determining carbon dioxide in expired air (kPa as compared to simultaneous samples of PvCO2. It could therefore, be a supportive tool to asses the BVM ventilation in the demanding prehospital and emergency setting.

  6. A potential kidney-bone axis involved in the rapid minute-to-minute regulation of plasma Ca2+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm, Anders; Mace, Maria L; Gravesen, Eva;

    2015-01-01

    of plasma-Ca(2+) (p-Ca(2+)) takes place via an exchange mechanism of Ca(2+) between plasma and bone. A labile Ca storage pool exists on bone surfaces storing excess or supplying Ca when blood Ca is lowered. Aim was to examine minute-to-minute regulation of p-Ca(2+) in the very early phase of acute uremia...

  7. Hf-W chronometry of primitive achondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, T.; Münker, C.; Mezger, K.; Palme, H.

    2010-03-01

    Metal segregation and silicate melting on asteroids are the most incisive differentiation events in the early evolution of planetary bodies. The timing of these events can be constrained using the short-lived 182Hf- 182W radionuclide system. Here we present new 182Hf- 182W data for major types of primitive achondrites including acapulcoites, winonaites and one lodranite. These meteorites are of particular interest because they show only limited evidence for partial melting of silicates and are therefore intermediate between chondrites and achondrites. For acapulcoites we derived a 182Hf- 182W age of Δ tCAI = 4.1 +1.2/ -1.1 Ma. A model age for winonaite separates calculated from the intercept of the isochron defines an age of Δ tCAI = 4.8 +3.1/ -2.6 Ma (assuming a bulk Hf/W ratio of ˜1.2). Both ages most likely define primary magmatic events on the respective parent bodies, such as melting of metal, although metal stayed in place and did not segregate to form a core. A later thermal event is responsible for resetting of the winonaite isochron, yielding an age of Δ tCAI = 14.3 +2.7/ -2.2 Ma, significantly younger than the model age. Assuming a co-genetic relationship between winonaites and silicates present in IAB iron meteorites (based on oxygen isotope composition) and including data by Schulz et al. (2009), a common parent body chronology can be established. Magmatic activity occurred between ˜1.5 and 5 Ma after CAIs. More than 5 Ma later, intensive thermal metamorphism has redistributed Hf-W. Average cooling rates calculated for the winonaite/IAB parent asteroid range between ˜35 and ˜4 K/Ma, most likely reflecting different burial depths. Cooling rates obtained for acapulcoites were ˜40 K/Ma to ˜720 K and then ˜3 K/Ma to ˜550 K. Accretion and subsequent magmatism on the acapulcoite parent body occurred slightly later if compared to most achondrite parent bodies (e.g., angrites, ureilites and eucrites), in this case supporting the concept of an inverse

  8. A Comparison of Ventilation Rates Between a Standard Bag-Valve-Mask and a New Design in a Prehospital Setting During Training Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Joseph T; Allen, Paul B; Levesque, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Excessive ventilation of sick and injured patients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Combat Medical Systems® (CMS) is developing a new bag-valve-mask (BVM) designed to limit ventilation rates. The purpose of this study was to compare ventilation rates between a standard BVM device and the CMS device. This was a prospective, observational, semirandomized, crossover study using Army Medics. Data were collected during Brigade Combat Team Trauma Training classes at Camp Bullis, Texas. Subjects were observed during manikin simulation training in classroom and field environments, with total duration of manual ventilation and number of breaths given recorded for each device. Analysis was performed on overall ventilation rate in breaths per minute (BPM) and also by grouping the subjects by ventilation rates in low, correct, and high groups based on an ideal rate of 10-12 BPM. A total of 89 Medics were enrolled and completed the classroom portion of the study, with a subset of 36 evaluated in the field. A small but statistically significant difference in overall BPM between devices was seen in the classroom (ρ .05). The study device significantly decreased the incidence of high ventilation rates when compared by groups in both the classroom (ρ < .001) and the field (ρ = .044), but it also increased the rate of low ventilation rates. The study device effectively reduced rates of excessive ventilation in the classroom and the field. 2017.

  9. Pressure induced novel compounds in the Hf-O system from first-principles calculations

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Using first-principles evolutionary simulations, we have systematically investigated phase stability in the Hf-O system at pressure up to 120 GPa. New compounds Hf5O2, Hf3O2, HfO and HfO3 are discovered to be thermodynamically stable at certain pressure ranges and a new stable high-pressure phase is found for Hf2O with space group Pnnm and anti-CaCl2-type structure. Both P62m-HfO and P4m2-Hf2O3 show semimetallic character. Pnnm-HfO3 shows interesting structure, simultaneously containing oxide...

  10. Photospheric Origin of Three-minute Oscillations in a Sunspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jongchul; Lee, Jeongwoo; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Song, Donguk; Cho, Kyungsuk; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2017-02-01

    The origin of the three-minute oscillations of intensity and velocity observed in the chromosphere of sunspot umbrae is still unclear. We investigated the spatio-spectral properties of the 3 minute oscillations of velocity in the photosphere of a sunspot umbra as well as those in the low chromosphere using the spectral data of the Ni i λ5436, Fe i λ5435, and Na i D2 λ5890 lines taken by the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. As a result, we found a local enhancement of the 3 minute oscillation power in the vicinities of a light bridge (LB) and numerous umbral dots (UDs) in the photosphere. These 3 minute oscillations occurred independently of the 5 minute oscillations. Through wavelet analysis, we determined the amplitudes and phases of the 3 minute oscillations at the formation heights of the spectral lines, and they were found to be consistent with the upwardly propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves in the photosphere with energy flux large enough to explain the chromospheric oscillations. Our results suggest that the 3 minute chromospheric oscillations in this sunspot may have been generated by magnetoconvection occurring in the LB and UDs.

  11. Ferroelectricity of nondoped thin HfO2 films in TiN/HfO2/TiN stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tomonori; Xu, Lun; Shibayama, Shigehisa; Yajima, Takeaki; Migita, Shinji; Toriumi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    We report on the impact of TiN interfaces on the ferroelectricity of nondoped HfO2. Ferroelectric properties of nondoped HfO2 in TiN/HfO2/TiN stacks are shown in capacitance-voltage and polarization-voltage characteristics. The Curie temperature is also estimated to be around 500 °C. The ferroelectricity of nondoped HfO2 clearly appears by thinning HfO2 film down to ˜35 nm. We directly revealed in thermal treatments that the ferroelectric HfO2 film on TiN was maintained by covering the top surface of HfO2 with TiN, while it was followed by a phase transition to the paraelectric phase in the case of the open surface of HfO2. Thus, it is concluded that the ferroelectricity in nondoped HfO2 in this study was mainly driven by both of top and bottom TiN interfaces.

  12. Implementation of ventilation in existing schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Petersen, Steffen

    Present paper analyses the best-practice solutions for classrooms’ ventilation that fit the objective of quick and inexpensive implementation. The paper decomposes the relations between ventilation and building into manageable elements and analyzes them. The analyses are performed qualitatively......; they evaluate both scientific and practical implementation The analyses lead to a list of criteria associated with the implementation of ventilation in existing schools. Generic retrofitting scenarios which prioritize energy savings, indoor climate and building/facade integration are assembled and illustrated...

  13. Luftkvalitet i nyere skoler uden mekanisk ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerholm, Søren

    I skoler uden mekanisk ventilation må der udluftes konsekvent for at forbedre luftkvaliteten. Rapporten viser resultatet af målinger af kuldioxidkoncentrationen i fire skoler uden mekanisk ventilation og én skole med mekanisk udsugning. Kuldioxidkoncentrationen er brugt som indikator...... for luftkvaliteten. Rapporten beskriver desuden de energimæssige konsekvenser ved at etablere mekanisk ventilation. Resultaterne har især interesse for skoleforvaltninger og rådgivende teknikere....

  14. Single-lung ventilation in pediatric anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Dinesh K

    2005-12-01

    Single-lung ventilation is requested for an increasing spectrum of surgical procedures in infants and children. A clear understanding of the physiology of single-lung ventilation, the techniques of lung separation, and the technical skill necessary to apply these techniques are essential for an anesthesiologist practicing thoracic anesthesia. This article focuses on various devices available for single-lung ventilation in the pediatric age group, the relevant respiratory physiology, and the strategies that optimize oxygenation during one-lung anesthesia.

  15. Naturlig ventilation kombineret med varmegenvinding og natkøling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker

    2007-01-01

    Naturlig ventilation i kontorbyggerier har været et alternativ til mekanisk ventilation i små 10 år. Ventilation med naturlige drivkræfter har den klare fordel, at der ikke forbruges elenergi ved ventilering af bygningen, fordi ventilatorer ikke er påkrævet. Imidlertid lider naturlig ventilation...

  16. High-frequency chest wall oscillation. Assistance to ventilation in spontaneously breathing subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calverley, P M; Chang, H K; Vartian, V; Zidulka, A

    1986-02-01

    In five supine normal subjects breathing spontaneously, we studied the effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO), which was achieved by oscillating the pressure in an air-filled cuff wrapped around the lower thorax. Oscillations of 3.5 and 8 Hz (in randomized order) were applied for 15 minutes each at both maximal (mean of 90 to 102 cm H2O) and half-maximal peak tolerable cuff pressures. Fifteen minutes of control spontaneous ventilation preceded each HFCWO maneuver. The HFCWO resulted in a significant decrease in spontaneous minute ventilation (VES) at maximal and half-maximal pressures by 35 and 40 percent, respectively, at 3 Hz and by 26 and 35 percent, respectively, at 5 Hz, with little change in VES at 8 Hz. This occurred despite an unchanging arterial carbon dioxide tension at all frequencies. Arterial oxygen pressure increased at 3 Hz at maximal pressure but remained statistically unchanged at 3 Hz at half-maximal pressure and at 5 Hz and 8 Hz both at maximal and half-maximal pressures. We conclude that HFCWO may potentially assist ventilation in spontaneously breathing man without requiring an endotracheal tube.

  17. Air compressor battery duration with mechanical ventilation in a field anesthesia machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpisjak, Dale F; Giberman, Anthony A

    2015-05-01

    Compressed air to power field anesthesia machine ventilators may be supplied by air compressor with battery backup. This study determined the battery duration when the compPAC ventilator's air compressor was powered by NiCd battery to ventilate the Vent Aid Training Test Lung modeling high (HC = 0.100 L/cm H2O) and low (LC = 0.020 L/cm H2O) pulmonary compliance. Target tidal volumes (VT) were 500, 750, and 1,000 mL. Respiratory rate = 10 bpm, inspiratory-to-expiratory time ratio = 1:2, and fresh gas flow = 1 L/min air. N = 5 in each group. Control limits were determined from the first 150 minutes of battery power for each run and lower control limit = mean VT - 3SD. Battery depletion occurred when VT was below the lower control limit. Battery duration ranged from 185.8 (±3.2) minutes in the LC-1000 group to 233.3 (±3.6) minutes in the HC-750 group. Battery duration of the LC-1000 group was less than all others (p = 0.027). The differences among the non-LC-1000 groups were not clinically significant. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  18. Lung-protective ventilation in neonatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kaam, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) is considered an important risk factor in the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and is primarily caused by overdistension (volutrauma) and repetitive opening and collapse (atelectrauma) of terminal lung units. Lung-protective ventilation should therefore aim to reduce tidal volumes, and recruit and stabilize atelectatic lung units (open lung ventilation strategy). This review will summarize the available evidence on lung-protective ventilation in neonatology, discussing both high-frequency ventilation (HFV) and positive pressure ventilation (PPV). It shows that HFV does not appear to have a clear benefit over PPV, although most studies failed to apply a true open lung ventilation strategy during HFV. The evidence on the optimal tidal volume, positive end-expiratory pressure and the role for lung recruitment during lung-protective PPV is extremely limited. Volume-targeted ventilation seems to be a promising mode in terms of lung protection, but more studies are needed. Due to the lack of convincing evidence, lung-protective ventilation and modes seem to be implemented in daily clinical practice at a slow pace.

  19. Numerical simulation of ventilation in blinding heading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG De-qiang; LIU Jing-xian; CHEN Bao-zhi

    2008-01-01

    The way of ventilation in all its forms and characteristics in the blinding heading was studied. On the basis of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) the turbulence model of restrained ventilation in blinding heading was set up, and the calculation boundary condi-tions were analyzed. According to the practice application the three-dimensional flow field of ventilation in blinding heading was simulated by the computational fluid dynamics soft-ware. The characteristics of the ventilation flow field such as the temperature field zone and the flow filed zone and the rule of the flow velocity were obtained. The ventilation in blinding heading under certain circumstances was calculated and simulated for optimiza-tion. The optimal ventilation form and related parameters under given condition were ob-tained. The rule of the ventilation in blinding heading was theoretical analyzed, which pro-vided reference for the research on the process of mass transfer, the rule of hazardous substances transportation and ventilation efficiency, provided a new method for the study of reasonable and effective ventilation in blinding heading.

  20. Numerical simulation of ventilation in blinding heading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG De-qiang; LIU Jing-xian; CHEN Bao-zhi

    2008-01-01

    The way of ventilation in all its forms and characteristics in the blinding heading was studied.On the basis of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) the turbulence model of restrained ventilation in blinding heading was set up,and the calculation boundary conditions were analyzed.According to the practice application the three-dimensional flow field of ventilation in blinding heading was simulated by the computational fluid dynamics software.The characteristics of the ventilation flow field such as the temperature field zone and the flow filed zone and the rule of the flow velocity were obtained.The ventilation in blinding heading under certain circumstances was calculated and simulated for optimization.The optimal ventilation form and related parameters under given condition were obtained.The rule of the ventilation in blinding heading was theoretical analyzed,which provided reference for the research on the process of mass transfer,the rule of hazardous substances transportation and ventilation efficiency,provided a new method for the study of reasonable and effective ventilation in blinding heading.

  1. Comparison of volume controlled ventilation and pressure controlled ventilation in patients undergoing robot-assisted pelvic surgeries: An open-label trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaju, Rishabh; Jaju, Pooja Bihani; Dubey, Mamta; Mohammad, Sadik; Bhargava, AK

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Although volume controlled ventilation (VCV) has been the traditional mode of ventilation in robotic surgery, recently pressure controlled ventilation (PCV) has been used more frequently. However, evidence on whether PCV is superior to VCV is still lacking. We intended to compare the effects of VCV and PCV on respiratory mechanics and haemodynamic in patients undergoing robotic surgeries in steep Trendelenburg position. Methods: This prospective, randomized trial was conducted on sixty patients between 20 and 70 years belonging to the American Society of Anesthesiologist Physical Status I–II. Patients were randomly assigned to VCV group (n = 30), where VCV mode was maintained through anaesthesia, or the PCV group (n = 30), where ventilation mode was changed to PCV after the establishment of 40° Trendelenburg position and pneumoperitoneum. Respiratory (peak and mean airway pressure [APpeak, APmean], dynamic lung compliance [Cdyn] and arterial blood gas analysis) and haemodynamics variables (heart rate, mean blood pressure [MBP] central venous pressure) were measured at baseline (T1), post-Trendelenburg position at 60 min (T2), 120 min (T3) and after resuming supine position (T4). Results: Demographic profile, haemodynamic variables, oxygen saturation and minute ventilation (MV) were comparable between two groups. Despite similar values of APmean, APpeak was significantly higher in VCV group at T2 and T3 as compared to PCV group (P < 0.001). Cdyn and PaCO2 were also better in PCV group than in VCV group (P < 0.001 and 0.045, respectively). Conclusion: PCV should be preferred in robotic pelvic surgeries as it offers lower airway pressures, greater Cdyn and a better-preserved ventilation-perfusion matching for the same levels of MV. PMID:28216699

  2. Comparison of volume controlled ventilation and pressure controlled ventilation in patients undergoing robot-assisted pelvic surgeries: An open-label trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishabh Jaju

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Although volume controlled ventilation (VCV has been the traditional mode of ventilation in robotic surgery, recently pressure controlled ventilation (PCV has been used more frequently. However, evidence on whether PCV is superior to VCV is still lacking. We intended to compare the effects of VCV and PCV on respiratory mechanics and haemodynamic in patients undergoing robotic surgeries in steep Trendelenburg position. Methods: This prospective, randomized trial was conducted on sixty patients between 20 and 70 years belonging to the American Society of Anesthesiologist Physical Status I–II. Patients were randomly assigned to VCV group (n = 30, where VCV mode was maintained through anaesthesia, or the PCV group (n = 30, where ventilation mode was changed to PCV after the establishment of 40° Trendelenburg position and pneumoperitoneum. Respiratory (peak and mean airway pressure [APpeak, APmean], dynamic lung compliance [Cdyn] and arterial blood gas analysis and haemodynamics variables (heart rate, mean blood pressure [MBP] central venous pressure were measured at baseline (T1, post-Trendelenburg position at 60 min (T2, 120 min (T3 and after resuming supine position (T4. Results: Demographic profile, haemodynamic variables, oxygen saturation and minute ventilation (MV were comparable between two groups. Despite similar values of APmean,APpeakwas significantly higher in VCV group at T2 and T3 as compared to PCV group (P < 0.001. Cdynand PaCO2were also better in PCV group than in VCV group (P < 0.001 and 0.045, respectively. Conclusion: PCV should be preferred in robotic pelvic surgeries as it offers lower airway pressures, greater Cdynand a better-preserved ventilation-perfusion matching for the same levels of MV.

  3. Ventilation requirements for control of occupancy odor and tobacco smoke odor: laboratory studies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W.S.; Isseroff, R.; Leaderer, B.P.; Lipsitt, E.D.; Huey, R.J.; Perlman, D.; Bergland, L.G.; Dunn, J.D.

    1981-04-01

    Experiments on occupancy odor addressed the question of why required ventilation rate per occupant increased progressively with increases in the number of persons in a space. In order to investigate ventilation requirements under approximately ideal conditions, we constructed an aluminum-lined environmental chamber with excellent control over environmental conditions and a ventilation system that provided rapid and uniform mixing of air. Psychophysical experiments on occupancy odor explored 47 different combinations of occupancy density, temperature and humidity, and ventilation rate. The experiments collected judgements both from visitors, who smelled air from the chamber only once every few minutes, and from occupants, who remained in the chamber for an hour at a time. The judgements of visitors revealed that occupancy odor increased only gradually over time and rarely reached very high or objectionable levels. Judgements of occupants also revealed rather minor dissatisfaction. Only during combinations of high temperature and humidity did objectionability become more than a minor issue to either group. Experiments on cigarette smoking explored rates of 4, 8, and 16 cigarettes per hour under various environmental conditions and with ventilation rates as high as 68 cfm (34 L.s/sup -1/) per occupant. As soon as occupants lit cigarettes in the chamber, the odor level increased dramatically. At ventilation rates far greater than necessary to control occupancy odor, the odor from cigarette smoking remained quite intense. In general, the odor proved impossible to control adequately even with a ventilation rate of 68 cfm (34 L.s/sup -1/) per occupant (4 occupants) and even when only one occupant smoked at a time. As in the case of occupancy odor, a combination of high temperature and humidity exacerbated the odor problem.

  4. Performance of Ductless Personalized Ventilation in Conjunction with Displacement Ventilation: Impact of Workstations Layout and Partitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvonova, Barbara; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2010-01-01

    The performance of a new personalized ventilation system, referred to as ductless personalized ventilation (DPV), was studied in full-scale room experiments in conjunction with displacement ventilation (DV). The idea behind DPV is to utilize clean and cool air supplied via DV. In the experiment...

  5. Proportion and factors associated with low fifth minute Apgar score ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proportion and factors associated with low fifth minute Apgar score among ... with low Apgar scores are at an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. ... of meconium stained liquor, induced/ augmented labor and low birth weight.

  6. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Verified, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has verified (quality-controlled), 6-minute, water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS)....

  7. Jobs within a 30-minute transit ride - Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This mapping service summarizes the total number of jobs that can be reached within 30 minutes by transit. EPA modeled accessibility via transit by calculating total...

  8. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Preliminary, 1-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has recent, preliminary (not quality-controlled), 1-minute, water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and...

  9. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Preliminary, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has recent, preliminary (not quality-controlled), 6-minute, water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and...

  10. Minutes of September 21, 1993 Meeting [Stapleton outfall systems planning

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Letter including the minutes from the September 21, 1993 meeting on the Stapleton Outfall Systems Planning Study, as well as tentative agenda for the next meeting on...

  11. Synthesis of Freestanding HfO2 Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    Tang J, Fabbri J, Robinson RD, Zhu Y, Herman IP, Steigerwald ML, Brus LE: Solid-solution nanoparticles:use of a nonhydrolytic sol-gel synthesis to...colloidal HfO2 nanorods. Adv Mater 2007, 19:2608-2612. Page 21 5. Qiu X, Howe JY, Cardoso MB, Polat O, Heller W: Size control of highly ordered HfO2

  12. Parametric excitation of whistler waves by HF heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, S. P.; Lee, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Possible generation of whistler waves by Tromso HF heater is investigated. It is shown that the HF heater wave can parametrically decay into a whistler wave and a Langmuir wave. Since whistler waves may have a broad range of frequency, the simultaneously excited Langmuir waves can have a much broader frequency bandwidth than those excited by the parametric decay instability.

  13. Study of {sup 179}Hf{sup m2} excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnevsky, I. N.; Zheltonozhsky, V. A., E-mail: zhelton@kinr.kiev.ua; Savrasov, A. N. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute for Nuclear Research (Ukraine); Mazur, V. M. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Electronic Physics (Ukraine)

    2016-12-15

    Isomeric ratios of {sup 179}Hf{sup m2,g} yields in the (γ, n) reaction and the cross section for the {sup 179}Hf{sup m2} population in the (α, p) reaction are measured for the first time at the end-point energies of 15.1 and 17.5 MeV for bremsstrahlung photons and 26 MeV for alpha particles. The results are σ = (1.1 ± 0.11) × 10{sup −27} cm{sup 2} for the {sup 176}Lu(α, p){sup 179}Hf{sup m2} reaction and Y{sub m2}/Y{sub g} = (6.1 ± 0.3) × 10{sup −6} and (3.7 ± 0.2) × 10{sup −6} for the {sup 180}Hf(γ, n){sup 179}Hf{sup m22} reaction at E{sub ep} =15.1 and 17.5 MeV, respectively. The experimental data on the relative {sup 179}Hf{sup m2} yield indicate a single-humped shape of the excitation function for the {sup 180}Hf(γ, n){sup 179}Hf{sup m2} reaction. Simulation is performed using the TALYS-1.4 and EMPIRE-3.2 codes.

  14. Diffusion of Hf and Nb in Zr-19%Nb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Hood, G.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Schultz, R.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Matsuura, N. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Roy, J.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Jackman, J.A. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada). Met. Sci. and Technol.

    1996-05-01

    Diffusion of Hf and Nb in large-grained bcc Zr-19%Nb has been studied. Diffusion coefficients of Hf, D(Hf), were measured in the range 620-1173 K and D(Nb) was measured at 920 and 1167 K. The Hf diffusion profiles were determined by SIMS and the Nb profiles by microtome sectioning and radio-tracer counting. The Hf data show a smooth, temperature-dependent behaviour through the monotectoid temperature, 875 K, and may be characterised by D{approx}10{sup -9}.exp-1.4 (eV/kT) m{sup 2}/s. D(Nb) tends to be lower than the corresponding values for D(Hf). Overall, diffusion of Hf and Nb are characteristic of diffusion in bcc Zr. Surface hold-up (oxide film) at low temperatures was overcome by using ion-implanted Hf diffusion sources. The results are compared with earlier work and discussed in terms of diffusion mechanisms and the {beta}-phase transformation of commercial Zr-2.5Nb. (orig.).

  15. Six-minute-walk test in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polkey, Michael I; Spruit, Martijn A; Edwards, Lisa D

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes other than spirometry are required to assess nonbronchodilator therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Estimates of the minimal clinically important difference for the 6-minute-walk distance (6MWD) have been derived from narrow cohorts using nonblinded intervention.......Outcomes other than spirometry are required to assess nonbronchodilator therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Estimates of the minimal clinically important difference for the 6-minute-walk distance (6MWD) have been derived from narrow cohorts using nonblinded intervention....

  16. Practical math success in 20 minutes a day

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    LearningExpress's 20 Minutes a Day guides make challenging subject areas more accessible by tackling one small part of a larger topic and building upon that knowledge with each passing day. Practical Math Success in 20 Minutes a Day features: A walkthrough of the fundamental concepts of pre-algebra, algebra, and geometry Hundreds of practice exercises for essential practice A posttest, which reveals your progress Access to a free, instantly scored online practice test

  17. Multicenter Evaluation of a Novel Surveillance Paradigm for Complications of Mechanical Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klompas, Michael; Khan, Yosef; Kleinman, Kenneth; Evans, R. Scott; Lloyd, James F.; Stevenson, Kurt; Samore, Matthew; Platt, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) surveillance is time consuming, subjective, inaccurate, and inconsistently predicts outcomes. Shifting surveillance from pneumonia in particular to complications in general might circumvent the VAP definition's subjectivity and inaccuracy, facilitate electronic assessment, make interfacility comparisons more meaningful, and encourage broader prevention strategies. We therefore evaluated a novel surveillance paradigm for ventilator-associated complications (VAC) defined by sustained increases in patients' ventilator settings after a period of stable or decreasing support. Methods We assessed 600 mechanically ventilated medical and surgical patients from three hospitals. Each hospital contributed 100 randomly selected patients ventilated 2–7 days and 100 patients ventilated >7 days. All patients were independently assessed for VAP and for VAC. We compared incidence-density, duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, hospital mortality, and time required for surveillance for VAP and for VAC. A subset of patients with VAP and VAC were independently reviewed by a physician to determine possible etiology. Results Of 597 evaluable patients, 9.3% had VAP (8.8 per 1,000 ventilator days) and 23% had VAC (21.2 per 1,000 ventilator days). Compared to matched controls, both VAP and VAC prolonged days to extubation (5.8, 95% CI 4.2–8.0 and 6.0, 95% CI 5.1–7.1 respectively), days to intensive care discharge (5.7, 95% CI 4.2–7.7 and 5.0, 95% CI 4.1–5.9), and days to hospital discharge (4.7, 95% CI 2.6–7.5 and 3.0, 95% CI 2.1–4.0). VAC was associated with increased mortality (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3–3.2) but VAP was not (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.5–2.4). VAC assessment was faster (mean 1.8 versus 39 minutes per patient). Both VAP and VAC events were predominantly attributable to pneumonia, pulmonary edema, ARDS, and atelectasis. Conclusions Screening ventilator settings for VAC captures a

  18. Oxygen Recovery in Hf Oxide Films Fabricated by Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ran; LI Zi-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The chemical structure of ultrathin Hf oxide films (< 10 nm) fabricated by a standard sputtering method is investigated using x-ray spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. According to the experiments,oxygen species are impacted to the HfO2/Si interface during the initial sputtering, and then released back to the upper Hf02 region driven by the oxygen concentration grads. A vacuum annealing can greatly enhance this recovery process. Additionally, significant SiO2 reduction in the interface is observed after the vacuum annealing for the thick HfO2 films in our experiment. It might be an effective method to confine the interracial layer thickness by sputtering thick HfO2 in no-oxygen ambient.

  19. Crystal structure of Si-doped HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lili; Nelson, Matthew; Aldridge, Henry; Iamsasri, Thanakorn; Fancher, Chris M.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Nishida, Toshikazu; Moghaddam, Saeed; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-01-01

    Si-doped HfO2 was prepared by solid state synthesis of the starting oxides. Using Rietveld refinement of high resolution X-ray diffraction patterns, a substitutional limit of Si in HfO2 was determined as less than 9 at. %. A second phase was identified as Cristobalite (SiO2) rather than HfSiO4, the latter of which would be expected from existing SiO2-HfO2 phase diagrams. Crystallographic refinement with increased Si-dopant concentration in monoclinic HfO2 shows that c/b increases, while β decreases. The spontaneous strain, which characterizes the ferroelastic distortion of the unit cell, was calculated and shown to decrease with increasing Si substitution.

  20. The (178m2)Hf Controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J A; Gemmell, D S; Schiffer, J P; Wilhelmy, J B

    2003-07-24

    Since its discovery in the 1960's the {sup 178m2}Hf isomer has garnered high attention from both the basic and applied communities in nuclear science. It's combination of high spin (16+), long half life (31 yrs), and high excitation energy (2.446 MeV) offer unique possibilities as an energy storage medium. Interest in the isomer was rekindled beginning in 1999 when a series of publications began to appear from a group (referred to here as the ''Texas collaboration'') primarily based at the University of Texas, Dallas [1]. They reported observations that some of the stored energy could be released (''triggered'') when the isomer was exposed to a fluence of photons in the energy range {approx}10 to {approx}60 keV. The implications of this observation are profound. Even though the claimed cross section for the process was {approx}7 orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted from the known systematics of photon absorption by nuclei in this mass range [2], such a highly efficient method for triggering the isomeric deexcitation immediately suggested applications utilizing the explosive or the controlled gradual energy release from a very compact source. The prospect of such applications has focused considerable interest on realizing the promise that is implicit in the reported observations. However, two experiments performed by a group from ANL/LANL/LLNL at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne (the ''APS collaboration'') reported negative results for the observation of any photon-triggered deexcitation of the {sup 178m2}Hf isomer [3]. This has led to a continued controversy, where both sides have adamantly defended their observations. At this point an outsider has difficulty determining whether there is indeed a triggering effect that should be pursued energetically with substantial resources, or whether the phenomenon consists of overly optimistic interpretation of data.

  1. Frequently Asked Questions about Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button Frequently Asked Questions about Ventilator-associated Pneumonia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is a Ventilator-associated Pneumonia (VAP)? Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a lung ...

  2. Hypercapnia attenuates ventilator-induced diaphragm atrophy and modulates dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, W.J.M.; Hees, H.W.H. van; Kox, M.; Linkels, M.; Acuna, G.L.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Scheffer, G.J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Heunks, L.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Diaphragm weakness induced by prolonged mechanical ventilation may contribute to difficult weaning from the ventilator. Hypercapnia is an accepted side effect of low tidal volume mechanical ventilation, but the effects of hypercapnia on respiratory muscle function are largely unknown.

  3. 100 Days of ELF/VLF Generation via HF Heating with HAARP (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M.; Golkowski, M.

    2013-12-01

    ELF/VLF radio waves are difficult to generate with conventional antennas. Ionospheric HF heating facilities generate ELF/VLF waves via modulated heating of the lower ionosphere. HF heating of the ionosphere changes the lower ionospheric conductivity, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet, creates an antenna in the sky when heating is modulated at ELF/VLF frequencies. We present a summary of nearly 100 days of ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the 3.6 MW HAARP facility near Gakona, Alaska, and provide a baseline reference of ELF/VLF generation capabilities with HF heating. Between February 2007 and August 2008, HAARP was operated on close to 100 days for ELF/VLF wave generation experiments, at a variety of ELF/VLF frequencies, seasons and times of day. We present comprehensive statistics of generated ELF/VLF magnetic fields observed at a nearby site, in the 500-3500 Hz band. Transmissions with a specific HF beam configuration (3.25 MHz, vertical beam, amplitude modulation) are isolated so the data comparison is self-consistent, across nearly 5 million individual measurements of either a tone or a piece of a frequency-time ramp. There is a minimum in the average generation close to local midnight. It is found that generation during local nighttime is on average weaker, but more highly variable, with a small number of very strong generation periods. Signal amplitudes from day to day may vary by as much as 20-30 dB. Generation strengthens by ~5 dB during the first ~30 minutes of transmission, which may be a signature of slow electron density changes from sustained HF heating. Theoretical calculations are made to relate the amplitude observed to the power injected into the waveguide and reaching 250 km. The median power generated by HAARP and injected into the waveguide is ~0.05-0.1 W in this base-line configuration (vertical beam, 3.25 MHz, amplitude modulation), but may have generated hundreds of Watts for brief durations

  4. Effect of three porcelain etchants type (HF-APF-PHA on porcelain- composite shear bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kermanshah H.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Porcelain restorations are susceptible to fracture and a common method for repairing is the use of silane and composite on etched porcelain. Although HF is very effective in porcelain etching but has detrimental effects on tissues. Purpose: In this study, the effect of APF and PHA was compared with HF in porcelain etching. Also the role of silane, unfilled resin and dentin bonding in bond strength of composite- porcelain was evaluated. Methods and Materials: In this experimental in-vitro study, one-hundred twenty porcelain square blocks (552 mm were prepared and bonding surfaces of each sandblasted. Samples were divided into three groups. The first group (n=40 were etched with buffered HF 9.5% (Ultradent for 1 min., the second group (n=40 were etched with Iranian APF 1.23% (Kimia for 10 minutes and the third group (n=40 were etched with Iranian PHA 37% (Kimia for 1 min. Ultradent silane was applied on the surfaces of half of cases in each group. On the surfaces of half of silane-treated samples unfilled resin was applied and dentin bonding was used on the surfaces of the remaining. Samples without silane were treated in a similar manner. Composite cylinder with 4mm diameter and 2 mm height was bonded to porcelain. Specimens were stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours and subjected to 500 cycles. Shear bond strength was measured with an Instron machine and type of fracture was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Results were analyzed using 3 way ANOVA, Kaplan- Maier and Tukey HSD tests. Results: Findings showed that PHA and APF roughened the porcelain surface without creating retentive micro undercuts but HF etches porcelain and creates retentive microundercuts. Ultradent silane had no significant effect on bond strength of porcelain- composite. Unfilled resin with Ultradent silane compared with dentin bonding with the same silane is more effective in bond strength of composite- porcelain. Conclusion: Based on

  5. Dynamic Behaviour of Ventilated Hydrofoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Morten; Arndt, Roger; Wosnik, Martin

    2006-11-01

    In certain types of pumping applications oscillations are induced by operation with liquids containing a free gas load. In order to understand the physics of this process, a series of tests with a ventilated A 2D NACA 0015 hydrofoil were performed in the water tunnel at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory of the University of Minnesota. The special bubble removal feature of the water tunnel allowed continuous ventilation without experiencing visible bubbles upstream the hydrofoil. These studies build on previous work on cavitation-induced oscillations. Gas injection studies were made over a range of gas flow rates and test section pressure. The results clearly show that lift oscillations increase in intensity when the gas load is increased. The point of maximum unsteadiness is also associated the rapid decline of the foil performance as measured as average lift. Further increase of the gas injection load gives a steady behaviour with almost no lift. These experiments are compared with traditional cavitation experiments. The similarities between gas injection- and cavitation induced unsteadiness on the hydrofoil are many, but the amplitude of lift oscillations found on the foil with gas injection corresponds to about 50% of that found for cavitating hydrofoils. The fact that the oscillations are periodic leads to the consideration of both passive and active control.

  6. Thermal comfort of seated occupants in rooms with personalized ventilation combined with mixing or displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forejt, L.; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Cermak, Radim

    2004-01-01

    The performance of two personalized ventilation systems combined with mixing or displacement ventilation was studied under different conditions in regard to thermal comfort of seated occupants. The cooling performance of personalized ventilation was found to be independent of room air distribution....... Differences between the personalized air terminal devices were identified in terms of the cooling distribution over the manikin¿s body. The personalized ventilation supplying air from the front towards the face provided a more uniform cooling of the body than the personalized ventilation supplying air from...

  7. Oxygen therapy, continuous positive airway pressure, or noninvasive bilevel positive pressure ventilation in the treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Marcelo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of 3 types of noninvasive respiratory support systems in the treatment of acute pulmonary edema: oxygen therapy (O2, continuous positive airway pressure, and bilevel positive pressure ventilation. METHODS: We studied prospectively 26 patients with acute pulmonary edema, who were randomized into 1 of 3 types of respiratory support groups. Age was 69±7 years. Ten patients were treated with oxygen, 9 with continuous positive airway pressure, and 7 with noninvasive bilevel positive pressure ventilation. All patients received medicamentous therapy according to the Advanced Cardiac Life Support protocol. Our primary aim was to assess the need for orotracheal intubation. We also assessed the following: heart and respiration rates, blood pressure, PaO2, PaCO2, and pH at begining, and at 10 and 60 minutes after starting the protocol. RESULTS: At 10 minutes, the patients in the bilevel positive pressure ventilation group had the highest PaO2 and the lowest respiration rates; the patients in the O2 group had the highest PaCO2 and the lowest pH (p<0.05. Four patients in the O2 group, 3 patients in the continuous positive pressure group, and none in the bilevel positive pressure ventilation group were intubated (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Noninvasive bilevel positive pressure ventilation was effective in the treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, accelerated the recovery of vital signs and blood gas data, and avoided intubation.

  8. Methodology for ventilation/perfusion SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajc, Marika; Neilly, Brian; Miniati, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) is the scintigraphic technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and many other disorders that affect lung function. Data from recent ventilation studies show that the theoretic advantages of Technegas ov...

  9. Echocardiographic evaluation during weaning from mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciele Medianeira Schifelbain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Echocardiographic, electrocardiographic and other cardiorespiratory variables can change during weaning from mechanical ventilation. OBJECTIVES: To analyze changes in cardiac function, using Doppler echocardiogram, in critical patients during weaning from mechanical ventilation, using two different weaning methods: pressure support ventilation and T-tube; and comparing patient subgroups: success vs. failure in weaning. METHODS: Randomized crossover clinical trial including patients under mechanical ventilation for more than 48 h and considered ready for weaning. Cardiorespiratory variables, oxygenation, electrocardiogram and Doppler echocardiogram findings were analyzed at baseline and after 30 min in pressure support ventilation and T-tube. Pressure support ventilation vs. T-tube and weaning success vs. failure were compared using ANOVA and Student's t-test. The level of significance was p<0.05. RESULTS: Twenty-four adult patients were evaluated. Seven patients failed at the first weaning attempt. No echocardiographic or electrocardiographic differences were observed between pressure support ventilation and T-tube. Weaning failure patients presented increases in left atrium, intraventricular septum thickness, posterior wall thickness and diameter of left ventricle and shorter isovolumetric relaxation time. Successfully weaned patients had higher levels of oxygenation. CONCLUSION: No differences were observed between Doppler echocardiographic variables and electrocardiographic and other cardiorespiratory variables during pressure support ventilation and T-tube. However cardiac structures were smaller, isovolumetric relaxation time was larger, and oxygenation level was greater in successfully weaned patients

  10. New evidence in one-lung ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleiro, H; Correia, I; Charco Mora, P

    2017-09-26

    Mechanical ventilation in thoracic surgery has undergone significant changes in recent years due to the implementation of the protective ventilation. This review will analyze recent ventilatory strategies in one-lung ventilation. A MEDLINE research was performed using Mesh term "One-Lung Ventilation" including randomized clinical trials, metanalysis, reviews and systematic reviews published in the last 6 years. Search was performed on 21st March 2017. A total of 75 articles were initially found. After title and abstract review 14 articles were included. Protective ventilation is not simply synonymous of low tidal volume ventilation, but it also includes routine use of PEEP and alveolar recruitment maneuver. New techniques are still in discussion namely PEEP adjustment, ratio inspiration:expiration, ideal type of anesthesia during one-lung ventilation and hypercapnic ventilation. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Commissioning Ventilated Containment Systems in the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-08-01

    This Best Practices Guide focuses on the specialized approaches required for ventilated containment systems, understood to be all components that drive and control ventilated enclosures and local exhaust systems within the laboratory. Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, this guide provides information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

  12. Intelligent ventilation in the intensive care unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Automated, microprocessor-controlled, closed-loop mechanical ventilation has been used in our Medical Intensive ... by a programmed computer to provide optimal alveolar ventilation, ... Chronic diseases were defined per organ system as a previously ..... the ASV design, which uses feedback from on-line monitored SaO2.

  13. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  14. YMP Engineered Barrier Systems Scaled Ventilation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.D. Dunn; B. Lowry; B. Walsh; J.D. Mar; C. Howard; R. Johnston; T. Williams

    2002-11-22

    Yucca Mountain, approximately 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, has been selected as the site for the nation's first geologic repository for high level nuclear waste. The Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is currently developing the design for the underground facilities. Ventilation is a key component of the design as a way to maintain the desired thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts prior to closure. As a means of determining the effects of continuous ventilation on heat removal from the emplacement drifts two series of scaled ventilation tests have been performed. Both test series were performed in the DOE/North Las Vegas Atlas facility. The tests provided scaled (nominally 25% of the full scale emplacement drift design) thermal and flow process data that will be used to validate YMP heat and mass transport codes. The Phase I Ventilation Test series evaluated the ability of ambient ventilation air to remove energy under varying flow and input power conditions. The Phase II Ventilation Test series evaluated the ability of pre-conditioned ventilation air to remove energy under varying flow, input temperature and moisture content, and simulated waste package input power conditions. Twenty-two distinct ventilation tests were run.

  15. Ventilation in low energy housing retrofits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlecnik, E.

    2008-01-01

    According to the definition, passive houses in Europe meet a target energy demand for heating of less than 15 kWh per square meter and per year. This low level for the heating demand is based on heating by a small post-heater in the hygienic ventilation system at 52 °C maximum, while the ventilation

  16. Evaporation Controlled Emission in Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Nielsen, Peter V.; Heiselberg, Per

    -scale ventilated room when the emission is fully or partly evaporation controlled. The objective of the present research work has been to investigate the change of emission rates from small-scale experiments to full-scale ventilated rooms and to investigate the influence of the local air velocity field near...

  17. Ventilation-induced Alterations in Lung Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Kroon (André)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMechanical ventilation is a lifesaving treatment in critically ill neonates. However, mechanical ventilation is also one of the most important risk factors (Table 1) of Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), the most common chronic lung disease in infancy with long-term pulmonary and neurolog

  18. Ventilation in low energy housing retrofits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlecnik, E.

    2008-01-01

    According to the definition, passive houses in Europe meet a target energy demand for heating of less than 15 kWh per square meter and per year. This low level for the heating demand is based on heating by a small post-heater in the hygienic ventilation system at 52 °C maximum, while the ventilation

  19. Clinical analysis of ventilator-associated pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing-Qu Deng; Yong Liang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical analysis associated pneumonia in elderly ventilator. Methods:Through January 2011 to December 2013 in our hospital 165 cases of ventilator therapy in elderly patients with clinical data were retrospectively analyzed, discussed ventilator-associated pneumonia in the elderly risk factors, clinical symptoms, and the distribution of pathogens analysis of drug resistance.Results: The patient's age, sex, APACHE score, the incidence of aspiration, sedation and antacids, ventilator time were higher in patients (P<0.05); pathogens of ventilator-associated pneumonia in the elderly by high to low order of Pseudomonas aerations, Acinetobacter sop, etc.; pathogens commonly used in clinical antimicrobial drug resistance is higher.Conclusion:Take the risk factors associated pneumonia ventilator for elderly corresponding measures to reduce the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia, which Gram-negative bacteria as cause of ventilator-associated pneumonia in the elderly is an important pathogen occurs, the clinical course of treatment should be combined with a reasonable choice of antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

  20. New modes of assisted mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Sipmann, F

    2014-05-01

    Recent major advances in mechanical ventilation have resulted in new exciting modes of assisted ventilation. Compared to traditional ventilation modes such as assisted-controlled ventilation or pressure support ventilation, these new modes offer a number of physiological advantages derived from the improved patient control over the ventilator. By implementing advanced closed-loop control systems and using information on lung mechanics, respiratory muscle function and respiratory drive, these modes are specifically designed to improve patient-ventilator synchrony and reduce the work of breathing. Depending on their specific operational characteristics, these modes can assist spontaneous breathing efforts synchronically in time and magnitude, adapt to changing patient demands, implement automated weaning protocols, and introduce a more physiological variability in the breathing pattern. Clinicians have now the possibility to individualize and optimize ventilatory assistance during the complex transition from fully controlled to spontaneous assisted ventilation. The growing evidence of the physiological and clinical benefits of these new modes is favoring their progressive introduction into clinical practice. Future clinical trials should improve our understanding of these modes and help determine whether the claimed benefits result in better outcomes.

  1. Hybrid ventilation systems and high performance buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utzinger, D.M. [Wisconsin Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). School of Architecture and Urban Planning

    2009-07-01

    This paper described hybrid ventilation design strategies and their impact on 3 high performance buildings located in southern Wisconsin. The Hybrid ventilation systems combined occupant controlled natural ventilation with mechanical ventilation systems. Natural ventilation was shown to provide adequate ventilation when appropriately designed. Proper control integration of natural ventilation into hybrid systems was shown to reduce energy consumption in high performance buildings. This paper also described the lessons learned from the 3 buildings. The author served as energy consultant on all three projects and had the responsibility of designing and integrating the natural ventilation systems into the HVAC control strategy. A post occupancy evaluation of building energy performance has provided learning material for architecture students. The 3 buildings included the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center completed in 2003; the Urban Ecology Center completed in 2004; and the Aldo Leopold Legacy Center completed in 2007. This paper included the size, measured energy utilization intensity and percentage of energy supplied by renewable solar power and bio-fuels on site for each building. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  2. Pulmonary deposition of a nebulised aerosol during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S H; O'Doherty, M J; Fidler, H M; Page, C J; Treacher, D F; Nunan, T O

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing use of therapeutic aerosols in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. Few studies have measured aerosol delivery to the lungs under these conditions with adequate experimental methods. Hence this study was performed to measure pulmonary aerosol deposition and to determine the reproducibility of the method of measurement during mechanical ventilation. METHODS: Nine male patients were studied during mechanical ventilation after open heart surgery and two experiments were performed in each to determine the reproducibility of the method. A solution of technetium-99m labelled human serum albumin (99mTc HSA (50 micrograms); activity in experiment 1, 74 MBq; in experiment 2, 185 MBq) in 3 ml saline was administered with a Siemens Servo 945 nebuliser system (high setting) and a System 22 Acorn nebuliser unit. Pulmonary deposition was quantified by means of a gamma camera and corrections derived from lung phantom studies. RESULTS: Pulmonary aerosol deposition was completed in 22 (SD 4) minutes. Total pulmonary deposition (% nebuliser dose (SD)) was 2.2 (0.8)% with 1.5% and 0.7% depositing in the right and left lungs respectively; 0.9% of the nebuliser activity was detected in the endotracheal tube or trachea and 51% was retained within the nebuliser unit. Considerable variability between subjects was found for total deposition (coefficient of variation (CV) 46%), but within subject reproducibility was good (CV 15%). CONCLUSIONS: Administration of aerosol in this way is inefficient and further research is needed to find more effective alternatives in patients who require mechanical respiratory support. This method of measurement seems suitable for the assessment of new methods of aerosol delivery in these patients. Images PMID:8493630

  3. Ferroelectricity-modulated resistive switching in Pt/Si:HfO2/HfO2-x /Pt memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Jiang; Xianghao, Du; Zuyin, Han

    2016-08-01

    It is investigated for the effect of a ferroelectric Si:HfO2 thin film on the resistive switching in a stacked Pt/Si:HfO2/highly-oxygen-deficient HfO2-x /Pt structure. Improved resistance performance was observed. It was concluded that the observed resistive switching behavior was related to the modulation of the width and height of a depletion barrier in the HfO2-x layer, which was caused by the Si:HfO2 ferroelectric polarization field effect. Reliable switching reproducibility and long data retention were observed in these memory cells, suggesting their great potential in non-volatile memories applications with full compatibility and simplicity. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11374182), the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province (No. ZR2012FQ012), and the Jinan Independent Innovation Projects of Universities (No. 201303019).

  4. The ionospheric response to flux transfer events: the first few minutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Rodger

    Full Text Available We utilise high-time resolution measurements from the PACE HF radar at Halley, Antarctica to explore the evolution of the ionospheric response during the first few minutes after enhanced reconnection occurs at the magnetopause. We show that the plasma velocity increases associated with flux transfer events (FTEs occur first ~100–200 km equatorward of the region to which magnetosheath (cusp precipitation maps to the ionosphere. We suggest that these velocity variations start near the ionospheric footprint of the boundary between open and closed magnetic field lines. We show that these velocity variations have rise times ~100 s and fall times of ~10 s. When these velocity transients reach the latitude of the cusp precipitation, sometimes the equatorward boundary of the precipitation begins to move equatorward, the expected and previously reported ionospheric signature of enhanced reconnection. A hypothesis is proposed to explain the velocity variations. It involves the rapid outflow of magnetospheric electrons into the magnetosheath along the most recently reconnected field lines. Several predictions are made arising from the proposed explanation which could be tested with ground-based and space-based observations.

  5. A cost-effectiveness analysis of reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia at a Danish ICU with ventilator bundle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anders Holmen; Hansen, Louise; Jensen, Morten Sall;

    2012-01-01

    -based routine treatment or standard procedures. OBJECTIVE: To determine cost-effectiveness of implementing the Ventilator bundle (VB), thereby reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), when treating a ventilated patient, compared to standard procedure. SETTING AND PATIENTS: A hypothetical population...

  6. Improvement in ventilation at Stara Jama mine (Yugoslavia) on the introduction of the new Turmag ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elezovic, V.; Sucevic, L.

    1977-01-01

    The improvement effected in the mine ventilation on the installation of the Turmag system ZEL 22-500 in a new ventilation shaft is described. Several previous bottlenecks were eliminated by revising the ventilation network.

  7. A computerized aid in ventilating neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arrøe, M

    1991-01-01

    and contains a continuous evaluation of the last six values of pCO2 and pO2 resulting in statements and warnings in potentially harmful situations. The program is consistent with the written instructions of the department. The ventilator treatment of 30 premature babies is evaluated retrospectively using......A computer program for ventilating neonates using a volume controlled ventilator is presented. The program proposes directions for changes of ventilator settings decided from the actual arterial blood gas samples and ventilator settings. The program deals with up to six babies at the same time...... the program, showing a total agreement of 37.5%, lowest among the babies who died in respiratory insufficiency. The advantage of the use of the program is discussed....

  8. Potential of Natural Ventilation in Shopping Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Alice; Friis, Kristina; Brohus, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    The indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is a fundamental requirement for a well performing shopping centre. This paper contains a pilot study of the potential of using hybrid ventilation (a combination of automatically controlled natural and mechanical ventilation - respectively NV and MV) in shop......The indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is a fundamental requirement for a well performing shopping centre. This paper contains a pilot study of the potential of using hybrid ventilation (a combination of automatically controlled natural and mechanical ventilation - respectively NV and MV......) in shopping centres with focus on both the achieved IEQ and energy consumptions for air movement. By thermal building simulations it is found that there exists an interesting potential for hybrid ventilation of shopping centres, which can lead to great savings in the electrical energy consumptions...

  9. Functionality of Ventilated Facades: Protection of Insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrichenko Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses about methods of construction of the ventilated facades. The ventilated facade is not only the element of facing, it is the supporting structure. Their main objective - creation of air ventilating space between a facade and an external wall of the building. Moving of air in this gap protects a heater from destruction, interfering with a moisture congestion. In addition, the ventilated facade protect the building from aggressive influence of external environment, have a sound and thermal insulation properties. There are several problems of systems of the ventilated facades connected with an application of a heater. For more effective using it is necessary to minimize contact of a heater with environment.

  10. Mechanisms of natural ventilation in livestock buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Bjerg, Bjarne Schmidt; Batzanas, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the mechanisms of natural ventilation in livestock buildings are reviewed and influences on discharge and pressure coefficients are discussed. Compared to studies conducted on buildings for human occupation and industrial buildings which focus on thermal comfort, ventilation systems......, indoor air quality, building physics and energy etc., our understanding of the mechanisms involved in natural ventilation of livestock buildings are still limited to the application of the orifice equation. It has been observed that the assumptions made for application of the orifice equation...... are not valid for wind-induced cross ventilation through large openings. This review identifies that the power balance model, the concept of stream tube and the local dynamic similarity model has helped in the fundamental understanding of wind-induced natural ventilation in buildings for human occupation...

  11. Ventilated facades: review of main problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Nemova

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The design of ventilated facades becomes more and more popular.Ventilated facades are installed on erected and reconstructed public, office and residential buildings.In this article the basic problems relating to the ventilated facade system are considered. The design, installation process, thermotechnical properties, fire safety, economic efficiency are considered. The purpose of the article is the prevention in practice the most often errors which arise in time of installation, operation and dismantle of such systems.After the analysis following basic problems of systems with ventilated facades have been allocated:calculation of necessary air gap;selection of qualitative materials and installation;fire safety;maintenance of required hermal resistance.Application of ventilated facades systems for warming of buildings and increasing of their power efficiency demands the thought over and complex approach. Such systems are not so economic, energy effective and durable as it is considered to be.

  12. Design of Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    -energy approach. Natural ventilation can be used to provide fresh air for the occupants, necessary to maintain acceptable air quality levels, and to cool buildings in cases where the climatic conditions allow it. Natural ventilation is caused by pressure differences at the inlets and outlets of a building......The effectiveness of natural ventilation, i.e. its ability to ensure indoor air quality and passive cooling in a building, depends greatly on the design process. Mechanical ventilation systems can be designed separately from the design of the building in which they are installed. They can also...... be installed in existing buildings after a few modifications. In contrast, ventilation systems using only natural forces such as wind and thermal buoyancy need to be designed together with the building, since the building itself and its components are the elements that can reduce or increase air movement...

  13. Effect of four resuscitation methods on lung ventilation of pigs with respiratory arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-hua LIU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effects of four cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR methods on lung ventilation of pigs with respiratory arrest. The four CPR methods included chest compression CPR (C-CPR, compression under the diaphragm CPR (D-CPR, abdominal compression CPR (A-CPR, and abdominal wall lifting and compression CPR (L-CPR. Methods  A total of 28 healthy domestic pigs were randomly divided into four groups. The pig respiratory arrest model was reproduced by intravenous injection of suxamethonium. Instantly after respiratory arrest, one of the 4 CPR methods was performed immediately on the groups of pigs respectively. After 2min of CPR, compression was stopped. The experimental pigs were given assisted respiration using a ventilator until autonomous respiration recovered. The tidal volume (VT in basic status and that during resuscitation by the four respective resuscitation methods was determined, and minute ventilation (MV was calculated. Furthermore, heart rate (HR, mean arterial blood pressure, and recovery time of autonomous respiration were compared between all the groups. Results In basic status, there was no statistical difference (P > 0.05 in VT and MV between the four groups. Approximately 2min after resuscitation, the VT and MV of D-CPR were higher than that of C-CPR; that of A-CPR was higher than that of D-CPR; and that of L-CPR was higher than that of A-CPR. The differences were statistically significant (P 0.05. HR in C-CPR and D-CPR were notably lower than the basic value (P < 0.01. Two minutes after resuscitation, mechanical ventilation was given, and HR in all the groups was close to the basic value 5 min after resuscitation. In the respiratory arrest pig model, L-CPR could provide more effective VT and MV than the other methods. Conclusion For the porcine respiratory arrest model, L-CPR can provide more effective lung ventilation than the other methods.

  14. Exploring Market State and Stock Interactions on the Minute Timescale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Bo; Ouyang, Fang-Yan

    2016-01-01

    A stock market is a non-stationary complex system. The stock interactions are important for understanding the state of the market. However, our knowledge on the stock interactions on the minute timescale is limited. Here we apply the random matrix theory and methods in complex networks to study the stock interactions and sector interactions. Further, we construct a new kind of cross-correlation matrix to investigate the correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes within one trading day. Based on 50 million minute-to-minute price data in the Shanghai stock market, we discover that the market states in the morning and afternoon are significantly different. The differences mainly exist in three aspects, i.e. the co-movement of stock prices, interactions of sectors and correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes. In the afternoon, the component stocks of sectors are more robust and the structure of sectors is firmer. Therefore, the market state in the afternoon is more stable. Furthermore, we reveal that the information of the sector interactions can indicate the financial crisis in the market, and the indicator based on the empirical data in the afternoon is more effective. PMID:26900948

  15. Exploring Market State and Stock Interactions on the Minute Timescale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Tan

    Full Text Available A stock market is a non-stationary complex system. The stock interactions are important for understanding the state of the market. However, our knowledge on the stock interactions on the minute timescale is limited. Here we apply the random matrix theory and methods in complex networks to study the stock interactions and sector interactions. Further, we construct a new kind of cross-correlation matrix to investigate the correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes within one trading day. Based on 50 million minute-to-minute price data in the Shanghai stock market, we discover that the market states in the morning and afternoon are significantly different. The differences mainly exist in three aspects, i.e. the co-movement of stock prices, interactions of sectors and correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes. In the afternoon, the component stocks of sectors are more robust and the structure of sectors is firmer. Therefore, the market state in the afternoon is more stable. Furthermore, we reveal that the information of the sector interactions can indicate the financial crisis in the market, and the indicator based on the empirical data in the afternoon is more effective.

  16. Exploring Market State and Stock Interactions on the Minute Timescale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Bo; Ouyang, Fang-Yan

    2016-01-01

    A stock market is a non-stationary complex system. The stock interactions are important for understanding the state of the market. However, our knowledge on the stock interactions on the minute timescale is limited. Here we apply the random matrix theory and methods in complex networks to study the stock interactions and sector interactions. Further, we construct a new kind of cross-correlation matrix to investigate the correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes within one trading day. Based on 50 million minute-to-minute price data in the Shanghai stock market, we discover that the market states in the morning and afternoon are significantly different. The differences mainly exist in three aspects, i.e. the co-movement of stock prices, interactions of sectors and correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes. In the afternoon, the component stocks of sectors are more robust and the structure of sectors is firmer. Therefore, the market state in the afternoon is more stable. Furthermore, we reveal that the information of the sector interactions can indicate the financial crisis in the market, and the indicator based on the empirical data in the afternoon is more effective.

  17. The real-time HF frequency prediction service based on the development of an assimilative IRI model using the Digisonde observation in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Jun; Chung, Jong-Kyun; Lee, Sungho; Lee, Jeong-Deok; Moon, Joon-Cheol

    The IRI(International Reference Ionosphere) is an international project sponsored by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and the International Union of Radio Science (URSI), and it has produced an empirical standard model of the ionosphere based on all available data sources from the worldwide network of ionosonde. The model is now widely used to provide HF prediction services to HF users by the radio science-related organizations in the world. However, the accurate representation of the regional ionosphere, especially the effect of space weather, for a real-time HF prediction by using lRI, is hampered by the limitation of its performance since the model is designed as a climatological model. We have developed an assimilative IRI model using the real-time Digisonde data from two stations (Icheon and Jeju) in Korea. The data stream from the stations is ingested by the model every 30 minute to create the real-time updated CCIR/URSI maps of coefficients that are applied for the real-time usable HF frequency prediction service. Test results for the model output comparing with observed data are presented and we briefly introduce the HF prediction service operated by Korean Space Weather Center, Radio Research Agency (KSWC, RRA), Korea.

  18. Power-Stepped HF Cross Modulation Experiments at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S.; Moore, R. C.; Langston, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    High frequency (HF) cross modulation experiments are a well established means for probing the HF-modified characteristics of the D-region ionosphere. In this paper, we apply experimental observations of HF cross-modulation to the related problem of ELF/VLF wave generation. HF cross-modulation measurements are used to evaluate the efficiency of ionospheric conductivity modulation during power-stepped modulated HF heating experiments. The results are compared to previously published dependencies of ELF/VLF wave amplitude on HF peak power. The experiments were performed during the March 2013 campaign at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Observatory. HAARP was operated in a dual-beam transmission format: the first beam heated the ionosphere using sinusoidal amplitude modulation while the second beam broadcast a series of low-power probe pulses. The peak power of the modulating beam was incremented in 1-dB steps. We compare the minimum and maximum cross-modulation effect and the amplitude of the resulting cross-modulation waveform to the expected power-law dependence of ELF/VLF wave amplitude on HF power.

  19. International Ventilation Cooling Application Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzer, Peter; Psomas, Theofanis Ch.; OSullivan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The currently running International Energy Agency, Energy and Conservation in Buildings, Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling (VC) project, is coordinating research towards extended use of VC. Within this Annex 62 the joint research activity of International VC Application Database has been carried out...... European and international Low Energy buildings. Still it’s not really widespread. Obstacles are challenges as regards noise, dust, weather and burglary, proving the research efforts of the Annex being necessary. The VC database forms a worthwhile basis for both dissemination and further research targets......., systematically investigating the distribution of technologies and strategies within VC. The database is structured as both a ticking-list-like building-spreadsheet and a collection of building-datasheets. The content of both closely follows Annex 62 State-Of-The- Art-Report. The database has been filled, based...

  20. Analysis of one year of HF radar data acquired in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Stanev, E. V.; Seemann, J.

    2012-04-01

    Surface current measurements are taken on a pre-operational basis by three HF radar stations in the German Bight. This area is very shallow and dominated by tides. The HF radar is part of the COSYNA system, which aims at the implementation of an integrated observing system for the North Sea. The radars provide meridional and zonal current components at intervals of 20 minutes in areas where at least two stations overlap and only radial components elswhere. An analysis of the radar observations is performed for a data set of one year. A tidal decompositions is carried out to identify dominating constituents for different areas. Furthermore, the two dimensional surface current dynamics is analysed using tidal ellipses parameters.The generation of overtides in the shallow water areas is demonstrated. Different factors driving this mechanism are discussed. A closer look at the neap/spring tide cycle provides insight into the relative role of bottom friction processes. The relation between the inclination of tidal ellipses and bathymetric features is studied in this context as well. Current, salinity and temperature profile measurements taken at the offshore platform FINO-3 are used in addition to study stratification effects. The impact of the meteo forcing is investigated based on several case studies such as storm events and rapid changes of wind direction. For this purpose residual currents are estimated from the radar data. Finally the divergence of the observed current fields is analysed and the relation to water level dynamics is discussed. The study is meant to support the ongoing work on data assimilation and quality control within COSYNA. The relevance of the presented analysis for this work is explained and illustrated. The work is of value for the optimisation of HF radar system setups in other regions as well.

  1. HF dissociation in water clusters by computer simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Elena, Alin Marin

    2013-01-01

    We perform Restrained hybrid Monte Carlo simulations to compute the equilibrium constant of the dissociation reaction of HF in HF(H2O)7. We find that, like in the bulk, hydrofluoric acid, is a weak acid also in the cubic HF(H2O)7 cluster, and that its acidity is higher at lower T. This latter phenomenon has a (vibrational) entropic origin, namely it is due to the reduction of the (negative) T∆S contribution to the variation of free energy between the reactant and product. We found also ...

  2. Natural Ventilation Performance of Kedah Vernacular House

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izudinshah Abd. Wahab

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As processed energy becoming more expensive, people have started to look for natural sources for option to provide their needs and comfort. Natural ventilation is one of the passive approaches that have recently become one of the important approaches in building design. However, architecturally, this approach is not considered new as a lot of previous buildings before industry era are totally depending on natural sources to ventilate their indoor spaces. Therefore this study was done to look into how these architectural details in Malay vernacular houses may affect the air movement performance around them. Two case studies of vernacular houses were chosen with design elements identified as natural ventilation attributes. Several points were identified inside and outside of the house where the wind speed of their surrounding were taken hourly in daytime for three days. The data were than compared to the building elements of the spaces. Both houses shows how building orientation and position of ventilation openings play the major role in determine the indoor air movement performance. However due to having other unintentionally openings such as gaps on roof design and gaps in flooring construction installation may also allow air flow to sip into the building despite of not having proper opening facing the cross ventilation. Besides that, by having openings at high level at the high roof may also encourage natural air flow via stack effect ventilation. Wide and full height window design may also become one of the most significant element to allow ventilation as proven in this research.

  3. Electrical Impedance Tomography During Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian K; Smallwood, Craig D

    2016-10-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a noninvasive, non-radiologic imaging modality that may be useful for the quantification of lung disorders and titration of mechanical ventilation. The principle of operation is based on changes in electrical conductivity that occur as a function of changes in lung volume during ventilation. EIT offers potentially important benefits over standard imaging modalities because the system is portable and non-radiologic and can be applied to patients for long periods of time. Rather than providing a technical dissection of the methods utilized to gather, compile, reconstruct, and display EIT images, the present article seeks to provide an overview of the clinical application of this technology as it relates to monitoring mechanical ventilation and providing decision support at the bedside. EIT has been shown to be useful in the detection of pneumothoraces, quantification of pulmonary edema and comparison of distribution of ventilation between different modes of ventilation and may offer superior individual titration of PEEP and other ventilator parameters compared with existing approaches. Although application of EIT is still primarily done within a research context, it may prove to be a useful bedside tool in the future. However, head-to-head comparisons with existing methods of mechanical ventilation titration in humans need to be conducted before its application in general ICUs can be recommended. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  4. Infiltration as Ventilation: Weather-Induced Dilution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Turner, William J.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of outdoor air ventilation is to dilute or remove indoor contaminants to which occupants are exposed. It can be provided by mechanical or natural means. In most homes, especially older homes, weather-driven infiltration provides the dominant fraction of the total ventilation. As we seek to provide good indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is important to neither over-ventilate nor under-ventilate. Thus, it becomes critically important to evaluate correctly the contribution infiltration makes to the total outdoor air ventilation rate. Because weather-driven infiltration is dependent on building air leakage and weather-induced pressure differences, a given amount of air leakage will provide different amounts of infiltration. Varying rates of infiltration will provide different levels of contaminant dilution and hence effective ventilation. This paper derives these interactions and then calculates the impact of weather-driven infiltration for different climates. A new “N-factor” is introduced to provide a convenient method for calculating the ventilation contribution of infiltration for over 1,000 locations across North America. The results of this work could be used in indoor air quality standards (specifically ASHRAE 62.2) to account for the contribution of weather-driven infiltration towards the dilution of indoor pollutants.

  5. Ionospheric heating with oblique HF waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Edward C., Jr.; Bloom, Ron M.

    1990-10-01

    Calculations of ionospheric electron density perturbations and ground-level signal changes produce by intense oblique high frequency (HF) transmitters are presented. This analysis considers radio field focusing at caustics, the consequent joule-heating of the surrounding plasma, heat conduction, diffusion, and recombination processes: these being the effects of a powerful oblique 'modifying' wave. It neglects whatever plasma instabilities might occur. Then effects on a secondary 'test' wave that is propagated along the same path as the first are investigated. Calculations predict ground-level field-strength reductions of several dB in the test wave for modifying waves having ERP in the 85 to 90 dBW range. These field-strength changes are similar in sign, magnitude, and location to ones measured in Soviet experiments. The results are sensitive to the model ionosphere assumed, so future experiments should employ the widest possible range of frequencies and propagation conditions. An effective power of 90 dBW seems to be a sort of threshold that, if exceeded, results in substantial rather than small signal changes. The conclusions are based solely on joule-heating and subsequent defocusing of waves passing through caustic regions.

  6. Process Simulation Analysis of HF Stripping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaer A. Abdulla

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available    HYSYS process simulator is used for the analysis of existing HF stripping column in LAB plant (Arab Detergent Company, Baiji-Iraq. Simulated column performance and profiles curves are constructed. The variables considered are the thermodynamic model option, bottom temperature, feed temperature, and column profiles for the temperature, vapor flow rate, liquid flow rate and composition. The five thermodynamic models options used (Margules, UNIQUAC, van laar, Antoine, and Zudkevitch-Joffee, affecting the results within (0.1-58% variation for the most cases.        The simulated results show that about 4% of paraffin (C10 & C11 presents at the top stream, which may cause a problem in the LAB production plant. The major variations were noticed for the total top vapor flow rate with bottom temperature and with feed composition. The column profiles maintain fairly constants from tray 5 to tray 18. The study gives evidence about a successful simulation with HYSYS because the results correspond with the real plant operation data.

  7. The (178m2) Hf Controversy

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, J A; Schiffer, J P; Wilhelmy, J

    2003-01-01

    Since its discovery in the 1960's the sup 1 sup 7 sup 8 sup m sup 2 Hf isomer has garnered high attention from both the basic and applied communities in nuclear science. It's combination of high spin (16+), long half life (31 yrs), and high excitation energy (2.446 MeV) offer unique possibilities as an energy storage medium. Interest in the isomer was rekindled beginning in 1999 when a series of publications began to appear from a group (referred to here as the ''Texas collaboration'') primarily based at the University of Texas, Dallas [1]. They reported observations that some of the stored energy could be released (''triggered'') when the isomer was exposed to a fluence of photons in the energy range approx 10 to approx 60 keV. The implications of this observation are profound. Even though the claimed cross section for the process was approx 7 orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted from the known systematics of photon absorption by nuclei in this mass range [2], such a highly efficient method fo...

  8. Indicators of fatigue and of prolonged weaning from mechanical ventilation in surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, G E; Hawkins, K; Boynton, J; Burns, D

    2001-01-01

    Indicators of weaning success have been tested primarily in patients who have been ventilated for short periods of time, and they may not be as accurate in cases where support has been required for longer than a few days. In patients requiring longer periods of support it is difficult to estimate the likelihood of successful liberation. Therefore we evaluated established weaning indices for their accuracy in surgical patients who required > or = 72 hours of mechanical ventilation. Surgical patients who required mechanical ventilation for > or = 72 hours were prospectively followed (over 6 months). We obtained standard indices of ventilatory function daily once patients were ready to wean. These indices included the respiratory rate/tidal volume ratio (RSBI), the maximal inspiratory pressure, and the minute ventilation. The duration of weaning and explicitly defined episodes of fatigue were the outcomes of interest. Statistical analyses evaluated the multiple factors that might influence the duration of weaning. Ninety-five patients (66% trauma; 34% surgery) survived to begin weaning, and 93% were liberated. The median duration of mechanical ventilation prior to weaning was 4 days (range 3-16 days), and the median duration of weaning was 3 days (range 0-56 days). Fatigue occurred in 36 patients and was not reliably predicted by any of the weaning measurements. However, a RSBI of > 105 on the first day of weaning was associated with prolonged weaning. By multivariate analysis, an RSBI of > 105 on the first day of weaning predicted prolonged weaning (hazard ratio 1.9; p = 0.03). After 72 hours of mechanical ventilation, clinical fatigue and successful liberation are not reliably predicted by standard indices of respiratory muscle strength and reserve. However, an RSBI of >105 observed once the patient is ready to wean is associated with prolonged weaning.

  9. Effect of endobronchial valve therapy on pulmonary perfusion and ventilation distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Pizarro

    Full Text Available Endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR is an emerging therapy for emphysematous COPD. However, any resulting changes in lung perfusion and ventilation remain undetermined. Here, we report ELVR-mediated adaptations in lung perfusion and ventilation, as investigated by means of pulmonary scintigraphy.In this observational study, we enrolled 26 patients (64.9 ± 9.4 yrs, 57.7% male with COPD heterogeneous emphysema undergoing ELVR with endobronchial valves (Zephyr, Pulmonx, Inc.. Mean baseline FEV1 and RV were 32.9% and 253.8% predicted, respectively. Lung scintigraphy was conducted prior to ELVR and eight weeks thereafter. Analyses of perfusion and ventilation shifts were performed and complemented by correlation analyses between paired zones.After ELVR, target zone perfusion showed a mean relative reduction of 43.32% (p<0.001, which was associated with a significant decrease in target zone ventilation (p<0.001. Perfusion of the contralateral untreated zone and of the contralateral total lung exhibited significant increases post-ELVR (p = 0.002 and p = 0.005, respectively; both correlated significantly with the corresponding target zone perfusion adaptations. Likewise, changes in target zone ventilation correlated significantly with ventilatory changes in the contralateral untreated zone and the total contralateral lung (Pearson's r: -0.42, p = 0.04 and Pearson's r: -0.42, p = 0.03, respectively. These effects were observed in case of clinical responsiveness to ELVR, as assessed by changes in the six-minute walk test distance.ELVR induces a relevant decrease in perfusion and ventilation of the treated zone with compensatory perfusional and ventilatory redistribution to the contralateral lung, primarily to the non-concordant, contralateral zone.

  10. Effect of Minimally Invasive Surfactant Therapy on Lung Volume and Ventilation in Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Burg, Pauline S; de Jongh, Frans H; Miedema, Martijn; Frerichs, Inez; van Kaam, Anton H

    2016-03-01

    To assess the changes in (regional) lung volume and gas exchange during minimally invasive surfactant therapy (MIST) in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. In this prospective observational study, infants requiring a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) ≥ 0.30 during nasal continuous positive airway pressure of 6 cmH2O were eligible for MIST. Surfactant (160-240 mg/kg) was administered in supine position in 1-3 minutes via an umbilical catheter placed 2 cm below the vocal cords. Changes in end-expiratory lung volume (EELV), tidal volume, and its distribution were recorded continuously with electrical impedance tomography before and up to 60 minutes after MIST. Changes in transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2) and partial carbon dioxide pressure, FiO2, respiratory rate, and minute ventilation were recorded. A total of 16 preterm infants were included. One patient did not finish study protocol because of severe apnea 10 minutes after MIST. In the remaining infants (gestational age 29.8 ± 2.8 weeks, body weight 1545 ± 481 g) EELV showed a rapid and sustained increase, starting in the dependent lung regions, followed by the nondependent regions approximately 5 minutes later. Oxygenation, expressed as the SpO2/FiO2 ratio, increased from 233 (IQR 206-257) to 418 (IQR 356-446) after 60 minutes (P transcutaneous partial carbon dioxide pressure was comparable with pre-MIST values. Ventilation distribution remained unchanged. MIST results in a rapid and homogeneous increase in EELV, which is associated with an improvement in oxygenation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The magnetic properties of $^{\\rm 177}$Hf and $^{\\rm 180}$Hf in the strong coupling deformed model

    OpenAIRE

    Muto, S.; Stone, N. J.; Bingham, C. R.; STONE, J.R; Walker, P. M.; Audi, G.; Gaulard, C.; Köster, U.(Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble, France); Nikolov, J.; Nishimura,K; Ohtsubo, T.; Podolyak, Z.; Risegari, L.; Simpson, G.S.; Veskovic, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports NMR measurements of the magnetic dipole moments of two high-K isomers, the 37/2$^-$, 51.4 m, 2740 keV state in $^{\\rm 177}$Hf and the 8$^-$, 5.5 h, 1142 keV state in $^{\\rm 180}$Hf by the method of on-line nuclear orientation. Also included are results on the angular distributions of gamma transitions in the decay of the $^{\\rm 177}$Hf isotope. These yield high precision E2/M1 multipole mixing ratios for transitions in bands built on the 23/2$^+$, 1.1 s, isomer at 1315 keV ...

  12. Energy Analysis of the Ductless Personalized Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lelong, Cyril; Dalewski, Mariusz; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the impact of different occupancy profiles on the potential energy savings due to using ductless personalized ventilation (DPV) combined with displacement ventilation. Energy simulations were performed with the dynamic simulation software IDA-ICE in order to investigate optimal...... energy efficient strategies for implantation of DPV in practice. The impact of using DPV on annual energy use has been studied for different occupancy profiles in cold climates. The results suggest that using DPV combined with displacement ventilation may significantly reduce building energy use while...

  13. Simulating People Moving in Displacement Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, M.; Bjørn, Erik; Sandberg, M.

    A displacement ventilation system works better the more uni-directional the air flow through the ventilated room is: from floor to ceiling. Thus, from an air quality point of view, there should be as little vertical mixing of the room air as possible. It is therefore comprehensible that physical...... activity in the room -like peoples movements -in previous studies has been shown to influence the effectiveness of the ventilation. In this study we have compared results from previous tests, where a cylindrical person simulator was used, to results obtained when using a person simulator of more human...

  14. How to choose an anesthesia ventilator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coisel, Y; Millot, A; Carr, J; Castagnoli, A; Pouzeratte, Y; Verzilli, D; Futier, E; Jaber, S

    2014-01-01

    During the past few years, many manufacturers have developed a new generation anesthesia ventilators or anesthesia workstations with innovative technology and introduced so-called new ventilatory modes in the operating room. The aim of this article is to briefly explain how an anesthesia ventilator works, to describe the main differences between the technologies used, to describe the main criteria for evaluating technical and pneumatic performances and to list key elements not to be forgotten during the process of acquiring an anesthesia ventilator. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  15. Mechanical ventilation in neurological and neurosurgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Amlan; Bhagat, Hemant; Sahni, Neeru; Salunke, Pravin

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20% of all patients requiring mechanical ventilation suffer from neurological dysfunction. It is imperative in the ventilatory management of such patients to have a thorough understanding of the disease pathology that may require institution of mechanical ventilation as well as in realizing its effects on the injured brain. These patients have unique challenges pertaining to the assessment and securing of the airway, maintenance of mechanical ventilation, as well as weaning and extubation readiness. This manuscript aims to present the current evidence in ventilatory management of the important subset of patients with neuronal injury. The indications for ventilatory management include both neurological and neurosurgical causes.

  16. Using Minute Papers to Determine Student Cognitive Development Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Can anonymous written feedback collected during classroom assessment activities be used to assess students' cognitive development levels? After library instruction in a first-year engineering design class, students submitted minute papers that included answers to "what they are left wondering." Responses were coded into low, medium and…

  17. Using Minute Papers to Determine Student Cognitive Development Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Can anonymous written feedback collected during classroom assessment activities be used to assess students' cognitive development levels? After library instruction in a first-year engineering design class, students submitted minute papers that included answers to "what they are left wondering." Responses were coded into low, medium and…

  18. Interagency Advanced Power Group -- Steering group meeting minutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-18

    This document contains the draft meeting minutes of the Steering Group of the Interagency Advanced Power Group. Included are the discussions resulting from the presentation of working group reports and the results of a discussion of IAPG policies and procedures. In the appendix are the reports of the following working groups: Electrical, Mechanical, Solar, and Systems.

  19. A thirty second isomer in {sup 171}Hf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, P.; Billowes, J.; Cooper, T.G.; Grant, I.S.; Pearson, M.R.; Wheeler, P.D. [Schuster Laboratory, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cochrane, E.C.A.; Cooke, J.L.; Evans, D.E.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Persson, J.R.; Richardson, D.S.; Tungate, G.; Zybert, L. [School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Dendooven, P.; Honkanen, A.; Huhta, M.; Oinonen, M.; Penttilae, H.; Aeystoe, J. [Accelerator Laboratory, University of Jyvaeskylae, PL 35 Jyvaeskylae SF-403 51 (Finland)

    1997-09-01

    An isomer has been detected in {sup 171}Hf with a half-life of T{sub 1/2} 29.5(9) s. The state was populated in the {sup 170}Yb({alpha},3n){sup 171m}Hf reaction at a beam energy of E{sub {alpha}} = 50 MeV in an on-line ion guide isotope separator. The isomeric {sup 171m}Hf{sup +} beam was extracted from the ion guide, mass-analysed and implanted in the surface of a microchannel-plate. The half-life of the collected activity was measured from the decay of the microchannel-plate count rate. We associate the isomer with the first excited state in {sup 171}Hf with spin 1/2{sup -} at an excitation energy of 22(2) keV. (author)

  20. HF fiber stuffing in building 186 at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Tiziano Camporesi

    2003-01-01

    Each of the 36 HF wedges comprise ca 12000 quartz fibers which are the active element of the calorimeter. The fibers are produced by Polymicro (USA), cleaved and bundled at KFKI, Budapest, Hungary and inserted at CERN.

  1. Low-Frequency Waves in HF Heating of the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A. S.; Eliasson, B.; Milikh, G. M.; Najmi, A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Shao, X.; Vartanyan, A.

    2016-02-01

    Ionospheric heating experiments have enabled an exploration of the ionosphere as a large-scale natural laboratory for the study of many plasma processes. These experiments inject high-frequency (HF) radio waves using high-power transmitters and an array of ground- and space-based diagnostics. This chapter discusses the excitation and propagation of low-frequency waves in HF heating of the ionosphere. The theoretical aspects and the associated models and simulations, and the results from experiments, mostly from the HAARP facility, are presented together to provide a comprehensive interpretation of the relevant plasma processes. The chapter presents the plasma model of the ionosphere for describing the physical processes during HF heating, the numerical code, and the simulations of the excitation of low-frequency waves by HF heating. It then gives the simulations of the high-latitude ionosphere and mid-latitude ionosphere. The chapter also briefly discusses the role of kinetic processes associated with wave generation.

  2. Near-infrared LIF spectroscopy of HfF

    CERN Document Server

    Grau, Matt; Loh, Huanqian; Sinclair, Laura C; Stutz, Russel P; Yahn, Tylser S; Cornell, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    The molecular ion HfF$^+$ is the chosen species for a JILA experiment to measure the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM). Detailed knowledge of the spectrum of HfF is crucial to prepare HfF$^+$ in a state suitable for performing an eEDM measurement\\cite{Leanhardt}. We investigated the near-infrared electronic spectrum of HfF using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of a supersonic molecular beam. We discovered eight unreported bands, and assign each of them unambiguously, four to vibrational bands belonging to the transition $[13.8]0.5 \\leftarrow X1.5$, and four to vibrational bands belonging to the transition $[14.2]1.5 \\leftarrow X1.5$. Additionally, we report an improved measurement of vibrational spacing of the ground state, as well as anharmonicity $\\omega_e x_e$.

  3. Theoretical Assessment of 178m2Hf De-Excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartouni, E P; Chen, M; Descalle, M A; Escher, J E; Loshak, A; Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Pruet, J; Thompson, I J; Wang, T F

    2008-10-06

    This document contains a comprehensive literature review in support of the theoretical assessment of the {sup 178m2}Hf de-excitation, as well as a rigorous description of controlled energy release from an isomeric nuclear state.

  4. The Clinical Study of the Safety Time Limitation with One-lung Ventilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Haiqing; ZHAO Ruming; ZOU Xuechao; LIU Ji

    2002-01-01

    Objective To explore an extension of the safety time limitation during adult lung operations with one - lung ventilation(OLV). Methods Sixteen adult patients, all were introduced double lumen endobronchial tubes. Its demands were that counterpoints must be well. A compound solution of Procaine was dripped in vein to maintain anesthesia. Using anesthesia machine controlled ventilation: VT10ml/kg, RR 12b/min, FiO2 > 0.95, I:E = 1:2. Regularly sampling arterial blood made gases analysis from preanesthesia to the end of operations. Results PaO2 was the lowest at 30 minute after OLV in these patients. But it was still in the safety limitation. At 45 minute, it started to rise again and kept it at the high level to the end. Its length may attain four hours and a half. Meanwhile the circulation was stable. There were no postoperative anesthetic complication with hypoxemia during operations. Conclusion So long as the counterpoint of endobronchial tubes is accurate, ventilation properly managed, selectin from anesthetic suitable, circulatory function normal, the safety time limitation might last more than three hours and a half during adult lung operations with OLV.

  5. Effect of noninvasive, positive pressure ventilation on patients with severe, stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jia-xin; XU Jin; SUN Wen-kui; SU Xin; ZHANG Yan; SHI Yi

    2013-01-01

    Background This meta-analysis evaluated the effect of noninvasive,positive pressure ventilation on severe,stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods PUBMED,CNKI,Wanfang,EMBASE and the Cochrane trials databases were searched.Randomized controlled trials of patients with severe,stable COPD and receiving noninvasive positive pressure ventilation,compared with sham ventilation or no ventilation,were reviewed.The mortality,physiological and health related parameters were pooled to yield odds ratio (OR),weighted mean differences or standardized mean differences (SMD),with 95% confidence interval (C/).Results Eight parallel and three crossover randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria.Pooled analysis for parallel,randomized controlled trials showed noninvasive positive pressure ventilation:(1) Did not affect the 12-or 24-month mortality (OR 0.82,95% C/:0.48 to 1.41); (2) Improved the arterial carbon dioxide tension (SMD-0.88,95%C/:-1.43 to-0.34); (3) Did not improve forced expiratory volume in one second (SMD 0.20,95% C/:-0.06 to 0.46),maximal inspiratory pressure (SMD 0.01,95% C/:-0.28 to 0.29) or 6-minute walk distance (SMD 0.17,95% C/:-0.16 to 0.50); (4) Subgroup analysis showed noninvasive positive pressure ventilation improved the arterial carbon dioxide tension in hypercapnic patients.Pooled analysis for crossover randomized controlled trials did not show improvement in arterial blood gas or forced expiratory volume in one second with noninvasive positive pressure ventilation.Conclusions Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation improves the arterial carbon dioxide tension but does not improve the mortality,pulmonary function,or exercise tolerance and should be cautiously used in severe stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  6. The research analysis and application of stability of ventilation system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢国斌; 陈长华; 葛少成

    2002-01-01

    The stability of ventilation system includes stabilities of branch, network and main fan. The ventilation system is a dynamic process. The parameters in the ventilation system vary with time. In the paper, a group of mathematical models of quantitative analysis are set up, and the mathematical models are suitable to any ventilation system.

  7. 46 CFR 111.103-3 - Machinery space ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machinery space ventilation. 111.103-3 Section 111.103-3...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-3 Machinery space ventilation. (a) Each machinery space ventilation system must have two controls to stop the ventilation, one of which may be the...

  8. Integrated magnetics design for HF-link power converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljusev, Petar; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of integrated magnetics for HF-link converters, where the integrated magnetic components do not necessarily belong to the same voltage loop. Depending on the specific HF-link converter topology, the proposed integrated magnetics can either alleviate the derivation...... of independent auxiliary supply voltages from the main transformer or integrate other magnetic structures, thus saving board space and cutting costs....

  9. Integrated magnetics design for HF-link power converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljusev, P.; Andersen, Michael A.E.

    2005-07-01

    This paper deals with the design of integrated magnetics for HF-link converters, where the two integrated magnetic components on the same core do not necessarily belong to the same voltage loop. Depending on the specific HF-link converter topology, the proposed integrated magnetics can either alleviate the derivation of independent auxiliary supply voltages from the main transformer or integrate other magnetic structures, thus saving board space and cutting costs. (au)

  10. Dual HF radar study of the subauroral polarization stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Makarevich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The dual HF radars comprising the Tasman International Geophysical Environment Radar (TIGER system often observe localized high-velocity F-region plasma flows (≥1500 m/s in the midnight sector (20:00–02:00 MLT at magnetic latitudes as low as Λ=60° S. The flow channels exhibit large variability in the latitudinal extent and electric field strength, and are similar to the subauroral polarization stream or SAPS, a plasma convection feature thought to be related to the polarization electric field due to the charge separation during substorm and storm development. In this study, the 2-D plasma drift velocity within the channel is derived for each of the two TIGER radars from the maximum velocities measured in all 16 radar beams within the latitudinally narrow channel, and the time variation of the subauroral electric field is examined near substorm onset. It is demonstrated that the flow channel often does not have a clear onset, rather it manifests differently in different phases of its evolution and can persist for at least two substorm cycles. During the growth phase the electric fields within the flow channel are difficult to distinguish from those of the background auroral convection but they start to increase near substorm onset and peak during the recovery phase, in contrast to what has been reported previously for auroral convection which peaks just before the substorm onset and falls sharply at the substorm onset. The response times to substorm onset range from −5 to +40 min and show some dependence on the substorm location with longer delays observed for substorms eastward of the radars' viewing area. The propagation velocity of the high-velocity region is also investigated by comparing the observations from the two closely-spaced TIGER radars. The observations are consistent with the notion that the polarization electric field is established with the energetic ions drifting westward and equatorward from the initial substorm

  11. Respiratory care year in review 2010: part 2. Invasive mechanical ventilation, noninvasive ventilation, pediatric mechanical ventilation, aerosol therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintyre, Neil R; Nava, Stefano; Diblasi, Robert M; Restrepo, Ruben D; Hess, Dean R

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature related to invasive mechanical ventilation, NIV, pediatric mechanical ventilation, and aerosol therapy. Topics covered related to invasive mechanical ventilation topics include the role of PEEP in providing lung protection during mechanical ventilation, unconventional modes for severe hypoxemia, and strategies to improve patient-ventilator interactions. Topics covered related to NIV include real-life NIV use, NIV and extubation failure, and NIV and pandemics. For pediatric mechanical ventilation, the topics addressed are NIV, invasive respiratory support, and inhaled nitric oxide. Topics covered related to aerosol therapy include short-acting β-adrenergic agents, long-acting β-adrenergic agents, long-acting antimuscarinic agents, inhaled corticosteroid therapy, phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE4) inhibitors, long-acting β-adrenergic plus inhaled corticosteroid, long-acting antimuscarinic plus inhaled corticosteroid, nebulized hypertonic saline, inhaled mannitol, and inhaled antibiotic therapy. These topics were chosen and reviewed in a manner that is most likely to have interest to the readers of Respiratory Care.

  12. Boundary conditions for the use of personal ventilation over mixing ventilation in open plan offices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen; Hviid, Christian Anker

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the boundary conditions for choosing a combined Personal Ventilation (PV) and Mixing Ventilation (MV) over conventional mixing ventilation in an office with multiple workers. A simplified procedure for annual performance assessment of PV/MV systems in terms of air quality...... of the investigated PV/MV systems has similar performance to pure MV systems. This means that optimised PV/MV systems have the potential to generate energy savings....

  13. Synthesis of freestanding HfO2 nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle Kayla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two new methods for synthesizing nanostructured HfO2 have been developed. The first method entails exposing HfTe2 powders to air. This simple process resulted in the formation of nanometer scale crystallites of HfO2. The second method involved a two-step heating process by which macroscopic, freestanding nanosheets of HfO2 were formed as a byproduct during the synthesis of HfTe2. These highly two-dimensional sheets had side lengths measuring up to several millimeters and were stable enough to be manipulated with tweezers and other instruments. The thickness of the sheets ranged from a few to a few hundred nanometers. The thinnest sheets appeared transparent when viewed in a scanning electron microscope. It was found that the presence of Mn enhanced the formation of HfO2 by exposure to ambient conditions and was necessary for the formation of the large scale nanosheets. These results present new routes to create freestanding nanostructured hafnium dioxide. PACS: 81.07.-b, 61.46.Hk, 68.37.Hk.

  14. The isobutylene-isobutane alkylation process in liquid HF revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, P M; Araújo, C L; Horta, B A C; Alvarez, L J; Zicovich-Wilson, C M; Ramírez-Solís, A

    2005-07-07

    Details on the mechanism of HF catalyzed isobutylene-isobutane alkylation were investigated. On the basis of available experimental data and high-level quantum chemical calculations, a detailed reaction mechanism is proposed taking into account solvation effects of the medium. On the basis of our computational results, we explain why the density of the liquid media and stirring rates are the most important parameters to achieve maximum yield of alkylate, in agreement with experimental findings. The ab initio Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics calculations show that isobutylene is irreversibly protonated in the liquid HF medium at higher densities, leading to the ion pair formation, which is shown to be a minimum on the potential energy surface after optimization using periodic boundary conditions. The HF medium solvates preferentially the fluoride anion, which is found as solvated [FHF](-) or solvated F(-.)(HF)(3). On the other hand, the tert-butyl cation is weakly solvated, where the closest HF molecules appear at a distance of about 2.9 Angstrom with the fluorine termination of an HF chain.

  15. Observational study of patient-ventilator asynchrony and relationship to sedation level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Marjolein; Pedram, Sammy; Best, Al M; Epstein, Scott K

    2009-03-01

    Clinicians frequently administer sedation to facilitate mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between sedation level and patient-ventilator asynchrony. Airway pressure and airflow were recorded for 15 minutes. Patient-ventilator asynchrony was assessed by determining the number of breaths demonstrating ineffective triggering, double triggering, short cycling, and prolonged cycling. Ineffective triggering index (ITI) was calculated by dividing the number of ineffectively triggered breaths by the total number of breaths (triggered and ineffectively triggered). Sedation level was assessed by the following 3 methods: Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS), awake (yes or no), and delirium (Confusion Assessment Method for the intensive care unit [CAM-ICU]). Twenty medical ICU patients underwent 35 observations. Ineffective triggering was seen in 17 of 20 patients and was the most frequent asynchrony (88% of all asynchronous breaths), being observed in 9% +/- 12% of breaths. Deeper levels of sedation were associated with increasing ITI (awake, yes 2% vs no 11%; P CAM-ICU, coma [15%] vs delirium [5%] vs no delirium [2%]; P < .05; RASS, 0, 0% vs -5, 15%; P < .05). Diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sedative type or dose, mechanical ventilation mode, and trigger method had no effect on ITI. Asynchrony is common, and deeper sedation level is a predictor of ineffective triggering.

  16. Leakage Characteristics of Dual-Cannula Fenestrated Tracheostomy Tubes during Positive Pressure Ventilation: A Bench Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Berlet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the leakage characteristics of different types of dual-cannula fenestrated tracheostomy tubes during positive pressure ventilation. Fenestrated Portex® Blue Line Ultra®, TRACOE® twist, or Rüsch® Traceofix® tracheostomy tubes equipped with nonfenestrated inner cannulas were tested in a tracheostomy-lung simulator. Transfenestration pressures and transfenestration leakage rates were measured during positive pressure ventilation. The impact of different ventilation modes, airway pressures, temperatures, and simulated static lung compliance settings on leakage characteristics was assessed. We observed substantial differences in transfenestration pressures and transfenestration leakage rates. The leakage rates of the best performing tubes were <3.5% of the delivered minute volume. At body temperature, the leakage rates of these tracheostomy tubes were <1%. The tracheal tube design was the main factor that determined the leakage characteristics. Careful tracheostomy tube selection permits the use of fenestrated tracheostomy tubes in patients receiving positive pressure ventilation immediately after stoma formation and minimises the risk of complications caused by transfenestration gas leakage, for example, subcutaneous emphysema.

  17. Leakage Characteristics of Dual-Cannula Fenestrated Tracheostomy Tubes during Positive Pressure Ventilation: A Bench Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlet, Thomas; Marchon, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the leakage characteristics of different types of dual-cannula fenestrated tracheostomy tubes during positive pressure ventilation. Fenestrated Portex® Blue Line Ultra®, TRACOE® twist, or Rüsch® Traceofix® tracheostomy tubes equipped with nonfenestrated inner cannulas were tested in a tracheostomy-lung simulator. Transfenestration pressures and transfenestration leakage rates were measured during positive pressure ventilation. The impact of different ventilation modes, airway pressures, temperatures, and simulated static lung compliance settings on leakage characteristics was assessed. We observed substantial differences in transfenestration pressures and transfenestration leakage rates. The leakage rates of the best performing tubes were <3.5% of the delivered minute volume. At body temperature, the leakage rates of these tracheostomy tubes were <1%. The tracheal tube design was the main factor that determined the leakage characteristics. Careful tracheostomy tube selection permits the use of fenestrated tracheostomy tubes in patients receiving positive pressure ventilation immediately after stoma formation and minimises the risk of complications caused by transfenestration gas leakage, for example, subcutaneous emphysema.

  18. Hf impurity and defect interactions in helium-implanted NiHf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindaraj, R. E-mail: govind@igcar.ernet.in; Gopinathan, K.P.; Viswanathan, B

    2001-07-01

    TDPAC measurements on the reference and untreated sample indicate a loss in anisotropy which is attributed mainly to the association of probe atoms with defects produced by (n,{gamma}) reactions with isotopes of Ni and experiencing combined magnetic and quadrupole interactions of comparable strengths. Evolution of defect free and substitutional fraction of probe atoms experiencing Larmor frequency characteristic of Ni matrix has been studied as a function of isochronal annealing temperature in helium free {alpha}-irradiated and homogeneously helium-implanted samples. No defect associated Larmor precession frequency and/or quadrupole frequency could be deduced in these uncorrelated damage studies. Comparison of recovery stages in {alpha}-irradiated and helium-implanted samples indicates the binding of helium associated defects by Hf impurities. Segregation of Hf atoms is observed in the helium free {alpha}-irradiated sample for annealing treatment at 973 K, while no such effect is observed in the helium-implanted sample for isochronal annealing treatments up to 1273 K.

  19. Using a Ventilation Controller to Optimize Residential Passive Ventilation For Energy and Indoor Air Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    One way to reduce the energy impact of providing residential ventilation is to use passive and hybrid systems. However, these passive and hybrid (sometimes called mixed-mode) systems must still meet chronic and acute health standards for ventilation. This study uses a computer simulation approach to examine the energy and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of passive and hybrid ventilation systems, in 16 California climate zones. Both uncontrolled and flow controlled passive stacks are assessed. A new hybrid ventilation system is outlined that uses an intelligent ventilation controller to minimise energy use, while ensuring chronic and acute IAQ standards are met. ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010 – the United States standard for residential ventilation - is used as the chronic standard, and exposure limits for PM2.5, formaldehyde and NO2 are used as the acute standards.The results show that controlled passive ventilation and hybrid ventilation can be used in homes to provide equivalent IAQ to continuous mechanical ventilation, for less use of energy.

  20. Actual performance of mechanical ventilators in ICU: a multicentric quality control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govoni L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Leonardo Govoni,1 Raffaele L Dellaca,1 Oscar Peñuelas,2,3 Giacomo Bellani,4,5 Antonio Artigas,3,6 Miquel Ferrer,3,7 Daniel Navajas,3,8,9 Antonio Pedotti,1 Ramon Farré3,81TBM-Lab, Dipartimento di Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano University, Milano, Italy; 2Hospital Universitario de Getafe – CIBERES, Madrid, Spain; 3CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Bunyola, Spain; 4Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Milan, Bicocca, Italy; 5Department of Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, San Gerardo Hospital, Monza (MI, Italy; 6Critical Care Center, Sabadell Hospital, Corporació Sanitaria Universitaria Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, CIBERES, Spain; 7Department of Pneumology, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain; 8Unitat de Biofísica i Bioenginyeria, Facultat de Medicina, Universidad de Barcelona-IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain; 9Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Even if the performance of a given ventilator has been evaluated in the laboratory under very well controlled conditions, inappropriate maintenance and lack of long-term stability and accuracy of the ventilator sensors may lead to ventilation errors in actual clinical practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the actual performances of ventilators during clinical routines. A resistance (7.69 cmH2O/L/s – elastance (100 mL/cmH2O test lung equipped with pressure, flow, and oxygen concentration sensors was connected to the Y-piece of all the mechanical ventilators available for patients in four intensive care units (ICUs; n = 66. Ventilators were set to volume-controlled ventilation with tidal volume = 600 mL, respiratory rate = 20 breaths/minute, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP = 8 cmH2O, and oxygen fraction = 0.5. The signals from the sensors were recorded to compute the ventilation parameters. The average ± standard deviation and range (min–max of the ventilatory parameters were the following: inspired

  1. Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for quiet on-orbit crew quarters (CQ), Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise...

  2. 'Elective' ventilation: an unethical and harmful misnomer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammers, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    The demand for organs prompted the first use of elective ventilation in the UK in the 1990s. Recently the shortfall in supply of organs has once again prompted calls for elective ventilation to be instituted even in patients who are not brain dead. This paper proposes that the term 'elective' ventilation is a misnomer and the term non-therapeutic ventilation (NTV) should be used instead. It is further argued that the practice of NTV in cases of severe stroke is unethical and has the potential of causing a variety of harms to the patient, their relatives, and the healthcare professionals working in transplant teams and this may result in a backlash of reductions in the number of organ donations.

  3. [The choice of a pediatric anesthesia ventilator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, D; Larcher, C; Cottron, N; Ait Aissa, D; Fesseau, R; Alacoque, X; Delort, F; Masquère, P; Agnès, E; Visnadi, G; Fourcade, O

    2013-12-01

    The technology of anesthesia ventilators has substantially progressed during last years. The choice of a pediatric anesthesia ventilator needs to be led by multiple parameters: requirement, technical (pneumatic performance, velocity of halogenated or oxygen delivery), cost (purchase, in operation, preventive and curative maintenance), reliability, ergonomy, upgradability, and compatibility. The demonstration of the interest of pressure support mode during maintenance of spontaneous ventilation anesthesia makes this mode essential in pediatrics. In contrast, the financial impact of target controlled inhalation of halogenated has not be studied in pediatrics. Paradoxically, complex and various available technologies had not been much prospectively studied. Anesthesia ventilators performances in pediatrics need to be clarified in further clinical and bench test studies. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address NASA needs for quiet crew volumes in a space habitat, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise...

  5. Noninvasive ventilation in hypoxemic respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Dhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive ventilation (NIV refers to positive pressure ventilation delivered through a noninvasive interface (nasal mask, facemask, or nasal plugs etc. Over the past decade its use has become more common as its benefits are increasingly recognized. This review will focus on the evidence supporting the use of NIV in various conditions resulting in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF, that is, non-hypercapnic patients having acute respiratory failure in the absence of a cardiac origin or underlying chronic pulmonary disease. Outcomes depend on the patient's diagnosis and clinical characteristics. Patients should be monitored closely for signs of noninvasive ventilation failure and promptly intubated before a crisis develops. The application of noninvasive ventilation by a trained and experienced team, with careful patient selection, should optimize patient outcomes.

  6. Building cooling by night-time ventilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢军; 王曦; 甘灵丽

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays,the world is short of energy source,and larger proportion of building energy consumption is occupied by air conditioning system. It is urgent that not only importance should be attached on energy saving but also arcology energy technology based on green and sustainable thought should be advocated. Considering the ever growing energy consumption of residential buildings,intermittent ventilation is a solution to saving energy consumption and improving indoor thermal comfort. Aiming at reducing indoor air temperature by intermittent ventilation and decrease energy consumption of air conditioning system,with the help of DeST (Designer’s Simulation Toolkit) this paper analyzes the characteristics of air conditioning load and year round air conditioning time in Chongqing located in hot summer and cold winter zone,obtains the amount of energy consumption saved at different ventilation rates,and recommends suitable ventilation rate in hot summer and cold winter zone.

  7. Improving underground ventilation conditions in coal mines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyer, CF

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available projects could be initiated by miningtek in co-operation with different mines. This report deals with the findings of this project and also deals with the future of research within Miningtek with regard to underground ventilation....

  8. Reconciliation of the excess 176Hf conundrum in meteorites: Recent disturbances of the Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd isotope systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bast, Rebecca; Scherer, Erik E.; Sprung, Peter; Mezger, Klaus; Fischer-Gödde, Mario; Taetz, Stephan; Böhnke, Mischa; Schmid-Beurmann, Hinrich; Münker, Carsten; Kleine, Thorsten; Srinivasan, Gopalan

    2017-09-01

    The long-lived 176Lu-176Hf and 147Sm-143Nd radioisotope systems are commonly used chronometers, but when applied to meteorites, they can reveal disturbances. Specifically, Lu-Hf isochrons commonly yield dates up to ∼300 Myr older than the solar system and varying initial 176Hf/177Hf values. We investigated this problem by attempting to construct mineral and whole rock isochrons for eucrites and angrites. Meteorites from different parent bodies exhibit similar disturbance features suggesting that a common process is responsible. Minerals scatter away from isochron regressions for both meteorite classes, with low-Hf phases such as plagioclase and olivine typically being most displaced above (or left of) reference isochrons. Relatively Hf-rich pyroxene is less disturbed but still to the point of steepening Lu-Hf errorchrons. Using our Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd data, we tested various Hf and Lu redistribution scenarios and found that decoupling of Lu/Hf from 176Hf/177Hf must postdate the accumulation of significant radiogenic 176Hf. Therefore early irradiation or diffusion cannot explain the excess 176Hf. Instead, disturbed meteorite isochrons are more likely caused by terrestrial weathering, contamination, or common laboratory procedures. The partial dissolution of phosphate minerals may predominantly remove rare earth elements including Lu, leaving relatively immobile and radiogenic Hf behind. Robust Lu-Hf (and improved Sm-Nd) meteorite geochronology will require the development of chemical or physical methods for removing unsupported radiogenic Hf and silicate-hosted terrestrial contaminants without disturbing parent-daughter ratios.

  9. Tracking magmatic processes through Zr/Hf ratios in rocks and Hf and Ti zoning in zircons: An example from the Spirit Mountain batholith, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Claiborne L.E.; Miller, C.F.; Walker, B.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Mazdab, F.K.; Bea, F.

    2006-01-01

    Zirconium and Hf are nearly identical geochemically, and therefore most of the crust maintains near-chondritic Zr/Hf ratios of ???35-40. By contrast, many high-silica rhyolites and granites have anomalously low Zr/Hf (15-30). As zircon is the primary reservoir for both Zr and Hf and preferentially incorporates Zr, crystallization of zircon controls Zr/ Hf, imprinting low Zr/Hf on coexisting melt. Thus, low Zr/Hf is a unique fingerprint of effective magmatic fractionation in the crust. Age and compositional zonation in zircons themselves provide a record of the thermal and compositional histories of magmatic systems. High Hf (low Zr/ Hf) in zircon zones demonstrates growth from fractionated melt, and Ti provides an estimate of temperature of crystallization (TTiZ) (Watson and Harrison, 2005). Whole-rock Zr/Hf and zircon zonation in the Spirit Mountain batholith, Nevada, document repeated fractionation and thermal fluctuations. Ratios of Zr/Hf are ???30-40 for cumulates and 18-30 for high-SiO2 granites. In zircons, Hf (and U) are inversely correlated with Ti, and concentrations indicate large fluctuations in melt composition and TTiZ (>100??C) for individual zircons. Such variations are consistent with field relations and ion-probe zircon geochronology that indicate a >1 million year history of repeated replenishment, fractionation, and extraction of melt from crystal mush to form the low Zr/Hf high-SiO2 zone. ?? 2006 The Mineralogical Society.

  10. Natural ventilation for controlling the indoor microclimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, M.; Dell' Osso, G.R.; Iannone, F. [Politecnico di Bari (Italy). Dipt. di Architettura e Urbanistica

    2004-07-01

    The results of CFD numerical simulations show that the stairwell can have a fundamental role in the natural ventilation of low-rise multifamily buildings (three to five levels) in winter. The natural ventilation system here presented is characterized by low installation costs, quite easy operation and inexpensive management. In this case-study, the main design rules to obtain an effective natural ventilation system are: location and size of inlet and outlet (to move upward the neutral pressure level above the upper extraction grille device) and the aerodynamic characteristics of the openings (to equalize the flow rates). CFD simulations showed effective behaviour of the above mentioned ventilation system. The well known stack effect simplified model cannot be used in the case studied because the stairwell was characterized by complex geometry and boundary conditions. So, CFD codes are an invaluable tool in the design and verification of the behaviour of the stairwell performing as a chimney. The behaviour of the system studied is influenced by a great number of parameters depending on the external micro-climate (such as air temperature and solar radiation), the stairwell (such as the morphology and the geometry of the stairwell, the location and the aerodynamic characteristics of the openings, the thermal properties of the envelope), the dwellings (heating temperature, pressure losses along the internal flow path), the users (the control of the natural ventilation system and the heating scheduling/operation). The results shown only concern a certain number of the typical boundary conditions. However, these results can be useful for the design of other similar natural ventilation systems. Future research projects will concern the evaluation of different boundary conditions. The further aim is the definition of the most relevant parameters for the designing of similar systems. Further CFD simulations will be run to test different boundary conditions and different

  11. Determination of isothermal section of Ni-Re-Hf ternary system at 1173 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王日初; 柳春雷; 金展鹏

    2002-01-01

    The phase equilibriua in the Ni-Re-Hf ternary system at 1173K were investigated by means of diffusion triple technique and electron microprobe analysis(EMPA). The experimental results indicate that two ternary intermetallics (α and β) and five binary intermetallics (Ni3Hf, Ni10Hf7, Ni11Hf9, NiHf and NiHf2) exist in the Ni-Re-Hf system at 1173 K. A tentative isothermal section of this system at 1173 K was constructed on the basis of experimental results. The isothermal section consists of nine three-phase regions, five of which are supported by the experimental data.

  12. Influence of oxidative stress, diaphragm fatigue, and inspiratory muscle training on the plasma cytokine response to maximum sustainable voluntary ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Dean E; Johnson, Michael A; McPhilimey, Martin J; Williams, Neil C; Gonzalez, Javier T; Barnett, Yvonne A; Sharpe, Graham R

    2014-04-15

    The influence of oxidative stress, diaphragm fatigue, and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on the cytokine response to maximum sustainable voluntary ventilation (MSVV) is unknown. Twelve healthy males were divided equally into an IMT or placebo (PLA) group, and before and after a 6-wk intervention they undertook, on separate days, 1 h of (1) passive rest and (2) MSVV, whereby participants undertook volitional hyperpnea at rest that mimicked the breathing and respiratory muscle recruitment patterns commensurate with heavy cycling exercise. Plasma cytokines remained unchanged during passive rest. There was a main effect of time (P ventilation and increases in plasma IL-6 concentration. In conclusion, increases in plasma IL-1β and IL-6 concentrations during MSVV were not due to diaphragm fatigue or DNA damage in PBMC. Increases in plasma IL-6 concentration during MSVV are attenuated following IMT, and the plasma IL-6 response is dependent upon the level of respiratory muscle work and minute ventilation.

  13. High intensity positive pressure ventilation and long term pulmonary function responses in severe stable COPD. A delicate and difficult balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquinas, Antonio M; Petroianni, Angelo

    2014-06-01

    Method to improve minute ventilation (MV) during spontaneous breathing (SB) in stable severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a great clinical relevant in long term outcome. In this scenario, recommendations of early use of high-Intensity non-invasive Positive pressure Ventilation (HI-NPPV) or intelligent Volume Assured Pressure (iVAP) Support in Hypercapnic COPD have been proposed by safe therapeutics options. We analyze in this letter, Ekkernkamp et al. study that described the effect of HI-NPPV compared with SB on MV in patients receiving long-term treatment. We consider that interpretation of relationships between ABG, functional parameters, and respiratory mechanics reported need clarifications. Further prospective large clinical trials identifying the best mode of ventilation according to the characteristics in severe stable COPD are necessary to balance an effective approach and response on clinical symptoms and long-term effects.

  14. A novel Minute Feedback System for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David T; Leininger, Lisa; Reddy, Rishindra M; Sandhu, Gurjit; Ryszawa, Susan; Englesbe, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Medical students often report a lack of timely, useful feedback during clerkship rotations. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel Minute Feedback System and determine whether it would generate frequent, high quality, documented feedback for students during the third year surgery clerkship. The Minute Feedback System was created using the Qualtrics(©) survey software platform and piloted with surgery clerkship students. These students were surveyed about the frequency and quality of feedback and their overall rating of the surgery clerkship and compared to students who did not use the feedback system. The initial pilot of the Minute Feedback System involved 6/34 M3 surgery clerkship students and generated a total of 70 unique comments from faculty and residents over 3 weeks. When the 6 pilot students were compared to the 28 students without access to the Minute Feedback System, they respectively rated the frequency of feedback 4.50 vs 2.83 (p < 0.01); the quality of feedback 4.70 vs 3.33 (p < 0.01) and the overall rating of the surgery clerkship 4.67 vs 4.05 (p < 0.01) higher. The system was then made available to all students on the M3 surgery clerkship (n = 31) over the subsequent 2 month rotation. 354 unique feedback comments were generated from 399 student requests (89% response rate). Students using the Minute Feedback System (n = 31) compared to students in the previous academic year without (n = 170) rated the quality of feedback (3.76 vs 3.4, p < 0.01), that feedback was provided during clerkship (100% vs 90%, p < 0.01) and the overall quality of the clerkship (3.94 vs 3.87, p = 0.2) higher. The novel Minute Feedback System allows for frequent, timely, useful and documented feedback to medical students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluating Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Arena, Lois [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-02-01

    In an effort to improve housing options near Las Vegas, Nevada, the Clark County Community Resources Division (CCCRD) performs substantial renovations to foreclosed homes. After dramatic energy, aesthetic, and health and safety improvements are made, homes are rented or sold to qualified residents. This report describes the evaluation and selection of ventilation systems for these homes, including key considerations when selecting an ideal system. The report then describes CCCRD’s decision process with respect to ventilation.

  16. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient

    OpenAIRE

    Mantellini E.; Perrero L.; Provenzano G.; Petrozzino S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: the aim of this work is to highlight the importance of a correct management of the secretions in the patient submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV). Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and secretion in patients with mechanically ventilation. We focus on the use of in-ex suflator achine (cough machine) associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO).Results: we observe a reduction of pulmonary infection and a better managemen...

  17. Probabilistic Analysis Methods for Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Frier, Christian; Heiselberg, Per

    This paper discusses a general approach for the application of probabilistic analysis methods in the design of ventilation systems. The aims and scope of probabilistic versus deterministic methods are addressed with special emphasis on hybrid ventilation systems. A preliminary application of stoc...... of stochastic differential equations is presented comprising a general heat balance for an arbitrary number of loads and zones in a building to determine the thermal behaviour under random conditions....

  18. Humidification of inspired gases during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, J L; Park, G R

    2012-04-01

    Humidification of inspired gas is mandatory for all mechanically ventilated patients to prevent secretion retention, tracheal tube blockage and adverse changes occurring to the respiratory tract epithelium. However, the debate over "ideal" humidification continues. Several devices are available that include active and passive heat and moisture exchangers and hot water humidifiers Each have their advantages and disadvantages in mechanically ventilated patients. This review explores each device in turn and defines their role in clinical practice.

  19. Sensor-based demand controlled ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Almeida, A.T. [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dep. Eng. Electrotecnica; Fisk, W.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    In most buildings, occupancy and indoor pollutant emission rates vary with time. With sensor-based demand-controlled ventilation (SBDCV), the rate of ventilation (i.e., rate of outside air supply) also varies with time to compensate for the changes in pollutant generation. In other words, SBDCV involves the application of sensing, feedback and control to modulate ventilation. Compared to ventilation without feedback, SBDCV offers two potential advantages: (1) better control of indoor pollutant concentrations; and (2) lower energy use and peak energy demand. SBDCV has the potential to improve indoor air quality by increasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are high and occupants are present. SBDCV can also save energy by decreasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are low or occupants are absent. After providing background information on indoor air quality and ventilation, this report provides a relatively comprehensive discussion of SBDCV. Topics covered in the report include basic principles of SBDCV, sensor technologies, technologies for controlling air flow rates, case studies of SBDCV, application of SBDCV to laboratory buildings, and research needs. SBDCV appears to be an increasingly attractive technology option. Based on the review of literature and theoretical considerations, the application of SBDCV has the potential to be cost-effective in applications with the following characteristics: (a) a single or small number of dominant pollutants, so that ventilation sufficient to control the concentration of the dominant pollutants provides effective control of all other pollutants; (b) large buildings or rooms with unpredictable temporally variable occupancy or pollutant emission; and (c) climates with high heating or cooling loads or locations with expensive energy.

  20. Patient-ventilator interaction: the last 40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Richard D

    2011-01-01

    Patient-ventilator synchrony is a complex issue affected by ventilator performance, patient characteristics, and the patient-ventilator interface. The history of patient-ventilator interaction includes avoidance of pharmacalogic paralysis, the development of spontaneous breathing systems, microprocessor technology to maximize interaction, and closed-loop control. While most clinicians agree that patient-ventilator synchrony is desirable, there remain no cause-and-effect data that asynchrony is associated with poor outcome.

  1. Non-invasive ventilation for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Fidelma; Bradley, Judy M; Piper, Amanda J

    2017-02-20

    Non-invasive ventilation may be a means to temporarily reverse or slow the progression of respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis by providing ventilatory support and avoiding tracheal intubation. Using non-invasive ventilation, in the appropriate situation or individuals, can improve lung mechanics through increasing airflow and gas exchange and decreasing the work of breathing. Non-invasive ventilation thus acts as an external respiratory muscle. This is an update of a previously published review. To compare the effect of non-invasive ventilation versus no non-invasive ventilation in people with cystic fibrosis for airway clearance, during sleep and during exercise. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We searched the reference lists of each trial for additional publications possibly containing other trials.Most recent search: 08 August 2016. Randomised controlled trials comparing a form of pressure preset or volume preset non-invasive ventilation to no non-invasive ventilation used for airway clearance or during sleep or exercise in people with acute or chronic respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis. Three reviewers independently assessed trials for inclusion criteria and methodological quality, and extracted data. Ten trials met the inclusion criteria with a total of 191 participants. Seven trials evaluated single treatment sessions, one evaluated a two-week intervention, one evaluated a six-week intervention and one a three-month intervention. It is only possible to blind trials of airway clearance and overnight ventilatory support to the outcome assessors. In most of the trials we judged there was an unclear risk of bias with regards to blinding due to inadequate descriptions. The six-week trial was the only one judged to have a low risk of bias for all

  2. Spallation and fission products in the (p+{sup 179}Hf) and (p+{sup nat}Hf) reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamian, S.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow Region, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Ur, C.A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Induced Gamma Emission Foundation, P.O. Box 34-81, Bucharest 010044 (Romania)], E-mail: ur@pd.infn.it; Adam, J. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow Region, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Rez, Prague CZ-25068 (Czech Republic); Kalinnikov, V.G.; Lebedev, N.A.; Vostokin, G.K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow Region, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Collins, C.B. [Center for Quantum Electronics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Popescu, I.I. [Induced Gamma Emission Foundation, P.O. Box 34-81, Bucharest 010044 (Romania)

    2009-03-01

    Production of Hf and Lu high-spin isomers has been experimentally studied in spallation reactions induced by intermediate energy protons. Targets of enriched {sup 179}Hf (91%) and {sup nat}Hf were bombarded with protons of energy in the range from 90 to 650 MeV provided by the internal beam of the Dubna Phasotron synchrocyclotron. The activation yields of the reaction products were measured by using the {gamma}-ray spectroscopy and radiochemistry methods. The production cross-sections obtained for the {sup 179m2}Hf, {sup 178m2}Hf and {sup 177m}Lu isomers are similar to the previously measured values from the spallation of Ta, Re and W targets. Therefore, the reactions involving emission of only a few nucleons, like (p,p'), (p,p'n) and (p,2pn), can transfer high enough angular momentum to the final residual nuclei with reasonable large cross-sections. A significant gain in the isomeric yields was obtained when enriched {sup 179}Hf targets were used. The mass distribution of the residual nuclei was measured over a wide range of masses and the fission-to-spallation ratio could be deduced as a function of the projectile energy. Features of the reaction mechanism are briefly discussed.

  3. Feed mechanism and method for feeding minute items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Timothy Kent; Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2012-11-06

    A feeding mechanism and method for feeding minute items, such as capacitors, resistors, or solder preforms. The mechanism is adapted to receive a plurality of the randomly-positioned and randomly-oriented extremely small or minute items, and to isolate, orient, and position the items in a specific repeatable pickup location wherefrom they may be removed for use by, for example, a computer-controlled automated assembly machine. The mechanism comprises a sliding shelf adapted to receive and support the items; a wiper arm adapted to achieve a single even layer of the items; and a pushing arm adapted to push the items into the pickup location. The mechanism can be adapted for providing the items with a more exact orientation, and can also be adapted for use in a liquid environment.

  4. The beam has circulated 30 minutes in the LHC!

    CERN Multimedia

    Last night around 2 a.m. the beam circulated for the first time for about 30 minutes in the clockwise ring of the LHC. This confirms that the accelerating cavities are working well. During the night, the LHC team also increased the intensity of the single bunch to around 1/20th of the nominal LHC bunch intensity. You can follow the beam commissioning daily reports on: https://lhc-commissioning.web.cern.ch/lhc-commissioning/dailynews/index.htm

  5. Superresolution measurement on the minute fluctuation of cell membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; HUANG Yaoxiong; ZHAO Haiyan; TU Mei; CHEN Wenxin

    2006-01-01

    A novel method for measuring the minute fluctuation of cell membrane is developed by modifying the super-resolution theory, increasing dimension in Fourier space, enhancing brightness gradient and utilizing maximum adaptive weighted averaging filter (MAWA) in obstructing noise. The application of the method in studying aspergillus flavus cell (AFC) and red blood cell and the new findings from the study show that it is a useful tool.

  6. Analysis of 1-Minute Potentially Available Fluoride from Dentifrice

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Clifton M.; Erin C. Holahan; Schmuck, Burton D

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports found that some fluoride-containing dentifrices do not release effective concentrations of fluoride during brushing. Failure to release fluoride can be due to dentifrice matrix components that interfere with the solubilization of the fluoride salts during brushing. A new generation of dentifrices has the capability to precipitate beneficial fluoride salts during tooth brushing. Therefore, a method that assesses the potentially available fluoride during the 1-minute brushing i...

  7. Performance of Fixed Heart Rate Increment Targets of 20 vs 30 Beats per Minute for Exercise Rehabilitation Prescription in Outpatients With Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jennifer L; Blais, Angelica Z; Keast, Marja-Leena; Pipe, Andrew L; Reid, Robert D

    2017-06-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) should exercise at 40%-60% heart rate reserve (HRR) during the first 3 weeks of an outpatient cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program and at 50%-80% HRR thereafter. Arbitrary methods to prescribe exercise intensity such as resting HR (RHR) plus 20 or 30 beats per minute (bpm) (RHR + 20 or RHR + 30) are recommended for inpatients after a myocardial infarction or those recovering from heart surgery. This approach has been repurposed by outpatient CR programs to prescribe exercise intensity for patients with HF, yet its efficacy has not been evaluated. We examined the appropriateness of RHR + 20/30 for prescribing exercise intensity and improving functional capacity for 55 patients with HF in an outpatient CR program. RHR + 20/30 values were compared to % HRR derived from peak exercise testing in patients with HF. Changes in functional capacity as measured by 6-minute walk test (6MWT) distance, and differences in ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), were examined between patients exercising at RHR + 20-29 and those exercising at RHR + ≥ 30. During weeks 1-3 and exercise at RHR + 20, 26% of participants would exercise at 40%-60% HRR. At RHR + 30, 38% would exercise at 40%-60% HRR. During weeks 4-12 and exercise at RHR + 20, 20% of participants would exercise at 50%-80% HRR. At RHR + 30, 41% would exercise at 50%-80% HRR. A smaller change in 6MWT distance was observed in participants exercising at RHR + 20-29 than in those exercising at RHR + ≥ 30 (Δ86.6 ± 70.3 vs Δ135.8 ± 73.7 m; P = 0.005). No differences in RPE were observed between participants exercising at RHR + 20-29 and those exercising at RHR + ≥ 30 (P > 0.05). RHR + 30 was more effective than RHR + 20 in assisting outpatients with HF achieve recommended exercise intensities and improve functional capacity. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Ventilation With One-Handed Mask Seal With an Intraoral Mask Versus Conventional Cuffed Face Mask in a Cadaver Model: A Randomized Crossover Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amack, Andrew J; Barber, Gary A; Ng, Patrick C; Smith, Thomas B; April, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    We compare received minute volume with an intraoral mask versus conventional cuffed face mask among medics obtaining a 1-handed mask seal on a cadaver model. This study comprised a randomized crossover trial of adult US Army combat medic volunteers participating in a cadaver laboratory as part of their training. We randomized participants to obtain a 1-handed mask seal during ventilation of a fresh unembalmed cadaver, first using either an intraoral airway device or conventional cuffed face mask. Participants obtained a 1-handed mask seal while a ventilator delivered 10 standardized 750-mL breaths during 1 minute. After a 5-minute rest period, they repeated the study with the alternative mask. The primary outcome measure was received minute volume as measured by a respirometer. Of 27 recruited participants, all completed the study. Median received minute volume was higher with the intraoral mask compared with conventional cuffed mask by 1.7 L (95% confidence interval 1.0 to 1.9 L; P<.001). The intraoral mask resulted in greater received minute volume received compared with conventional cuffed face mask during ventilation with a 1-handed mask seal in a cadaver model. The intraoral mask may prove a useful airway adjunct for ventilation. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prompt Ion Outflows and Artificial Ducts during High-Power HF Heating at HAARP: Effect of Suprathermal Electrons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, E. V.; Milikh, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    In situ observations from the DMSP and Demeter satellites established that high-power HF heating of the ionosphere F-region results in significant ion outflows associated with 10-30% density enhancements in the topside ionosphere magnetically-conjugate to the heated region. As follows from the SAMI2 two-fluid model calculations, their formation time should exceed 5-7 minutes. However, specially designed DMSP-HAARP experiments have shown that artificial ducts and ion outflows appear on the topside within 2 minutes. We describe the results of these observations and present a semi-quantitative explanation of the fast timescale due to suprathermal electrons accelerated by HF-induced plasma turbulence. There are two possible effects of suprathermal electrons: (1) the increase of the ambipolar electric field over the usual thermal ambipolar diffusion and (2) excitation of heat flux-driven plasma instability resulting in an anomalous electron-ion momentum exchange. Both effects result in faster upward ion flows.

  10. Hf-Nd isotope and trace element constraints on subduction inputs at island arcs: Limitations of Hf anomalies as sediment input indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Heather K.; Turner, Simon; Macpherson, Colin G.; Gertisser, Ralf; Davidson, Jon P.

    2011-04-01

    New Nd-Hf isotope and trace element data for Javanese volcanoes are combined with recently published data to place constraints on subduction inputs at the Sunda arc in Indonesia and assess the value of Hf anomalies (expressed as Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios) as tracers of such inputs. Hf anomaly does not correlate with Hf isotope ratio in Javanese lavas, however, Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios do correlate with SiO 2. Contrary to previous work, we show that Hf anomaly variation may be controlled by fractionation of clinopyroxene and/or amphibole during magmatic differentiation and does not represent the magnitude or type of subduction input in some arcs. Correlation of Sm/Hf with indices of differentiation for other arcs (e.g., Vanuatu, New Britain, and Mariana) suggests that differentiation control on Sm/Hf ratios in volcanic arc rocks may be a relatively common phenomenon. This study corroborates the use of Nd-Hf isotope co-variations in arc volcanic rocks to ascertain subduction input characteristics. The trajectories of regional volcano groups (East, Central and West Java) in Nd-Hf isotope space reveal heterogeneity in the subducted sediment input along Java, which reflects present-day spatial variations in sediment compositions on the down-going plate in the Java Trench. The high Sm/Hf ratio required in the sediment end-member for some Javanese basalts suggests that partial melting of subducted sediment occurs in the presence of residual zircon, and is inconsistent with residual monazite or allanite.

  11. Investigation and Development of Data-Driven D-Region Model for HF Systems Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.; Sojka, J. J.; Hunsucker, R. D.

    2002-01-01

    Space Environment Corporation (SEC) and RP Consultants (RPC) are to develop and validate a weather-capable D region model for making High Frequency (HF) absorption predictions in support of the HF communications and radar communities. The weather-capable model will assimilate solar and earth space observations from NASA satellites. The model will account for solar-induced impacts on HF absorption, including X-rays, Solar Proton Events (SPE's), and auroral precipitation. The work plan includes: I . Optimize D-region model to quickly obtain ion and electron densities for proper HF absorption calculations. 2. Develop indices-driven modules for D-region ionization sources for low, mid, & high latitudes including X-rays, cosmic rays, auroral precipitation, & solar protons. (Note: solar spectrum & auroral modules already exist). 3. Setup low-cost monitors of existing HF beacons and add one single-frequency beacon. 4. Use PENEX HF-link database with HF monitor data to validate D-region/HF absorption model using climatological ionization drivers. 5. Develop algorithms to assimilate NASA satellite data of solar, interplanetary, and auroral observations into ionization source modules. 6. Use PENEX HF-link & HF-beacon data for skill score comparison of assimilation versus climatological D-region/HF absorption model. Only some satellites are available for the PENEX time period, thus, HF-beacon data is necessary. 7. Use HF beacon monitors to develop HF-link data assimilation algorithms for regional improvement to the D-region/HF absorption model.

  12. Serpentinization Changes Nd, but not Hf Isotopes of Abyssal Peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizimis, M.; Frisby, C. P.; Mallick, S.

    2015-12-01

    Serpentinization of the oceanic lithosphere is a known sink for fluid mobile elements (B, Cl, Li, Sr, etc.), while high field strength elements (HFSE: e.g., Hf, Zr, Ti, Nb) are thought to be unaffected by it. In contrast, the fate of REE during serpentinization is equivocal. Correlations between REE and HFSE concentrations in abyssal peridotites suggest control by magmatic processes (Niu, 2004, J. Pet), while some LREE enrichments in serpentinized peridotites compared to their clinopyroxene (cpx) and Nd, Sr isotope data (Delacour et al., 2008, Chem. Geol.) imply seawater-derived REE addition to the mantle protolith (Paulick et al., 2006, Chem. Geol). To further constrain peridotite-seawater interaction during serpentinization we compare bulk rock and cpx Hf and Nd isotope data in partially (up to ~70%) serpentinized abyssal peridotites (9-16°E South West Indian Ridge). We also present a new method that improves yields in Hf, Nd and Pb separations from depleted (90% of Hf, Zr, Ti are retained in the residue. LA-ICPMS data shows that serpentine after olivine typically has higher LREE/HREE ratios than cpx, pronounced negative Ce anomalies, high U, Sr concentrations and low HFSE, unlike the coexisting cpx. These data are consistent with some seawater-derived LREE addition to peridotite during serpentinization, localized in the serpentine and other secondary phases, while cpx retains the magmatic value. This process will lower the Sm/Nd relative to Lu/Hf ratio in the peridotite and can lead to decoupled radiogenic Hf and unradiogenic Nd isotopes upon recycling and aging. Our data further testifies to the fidelity of Hf isotopes in tracing mantle processes, even in serpentinized rocks.

  13. Severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome due to scrub typhus: Successful ventilation with airway pressure release ventilation mode after becoming refractory to protective ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Chandelia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus can affect lungs from mild illness like pneumonitis to a severe illness like acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Such patients may be very challenging to treat when their hypoxemia becomes severe and refractory to treatment. Main treatment is supportive in terms of mechanical ventilation. In adult ARDS, low tidal volume (TV ventilation has been recommended, but there is no consensus on most effective ventilation mode in children. We present a case of a 12-year-old girl who developed severe ARDS (PO 2 /FiO 2 ratio - 58, refractory to low TV ventilation. There was a rapid improvement in oxygenation on the application of airway pressure release ventilation (APRV mode within ΍ h. She was successfully ventilated and weaned off the ventilator over 5 days. This case highlights the utility of APRV mode of ventilation as a rescue therapy for severe refractory ARDS in children.

  14. Joint Efforts Towards European HF Radar Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, A.; Mader, J.; Griffa, A.; Mantovani, C.; Corgnati, L.; Novellino, A.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Quentin, C.; Wyatt, L.; Ruiz, M. I.; Lorente, P.; Hartnett, M.; Gorringe, P.

    2016-12-01

    During the past two years, significant steps have been made in Europe for achieving the needed accessibility to High Frequency Radar (HFR) data for a pan-European use. Since 2015, EuroGOOS Ocean Observing Task Teams (TT), such as HFR TT, are operational networks of observing platforms. The main goal is on the harmonization of systems requirements, systems design, data quality, improvement and proof of the readiness and standardization of HFR data access and tools. Particular attention is being paid by HFR TT to converge from different projects and programs toward those common objectives. First, JERICO-NEXT (Joint European Research Infrastructure network for Coastal Observatory - Novel European eXpertise for coastal observaTories, H2020 2015 Programme) will contribute on describing the status of the European network, on seeking harmonization through exchange of best practices and standardization, on developing and giving access to quality control procedures and new products, and finally on demonstrating the use of such technology in the general scientific strategy focused by the Coastal Observatory. Then, EMODnet (European Marine Observation and Data Network) Physics started to assemble HF radar metadata and data products within Europe in a uniform way. This long term program is providing a combined array of services and functionalities to users for obtaining free of charge data, meta-data and data products on the physical conditions of European sea basins and oceans. Additionally, the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) delivers from 2015 a core information service to any user related to 4 areas of benefits: Maritime Safety, Coastal and Marine Environment, Marine Resources, and Weather, Seasonal Forecasting and Climate activities. INCREASE (Innovation and Networking for the integration of Coastal Radars into EuropeAn marine SErvices - CMEMS Service Evolution 2016) will set the necessary developments towards the integration of existing European

  15. First-principles study of the Hf-based Heusler alloys: Hf2CoGa and Hf2CoIn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Min

    2017-01-01

    The electronic structures and magnetic properties of the new Heusler alloys Hf2CoGa and Hf2CoIn have been studied by using the first-principles projector augmented wave (PAW) potential within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Both Hf2CoGa and Hf2CoIn Heusler alloys have the half-metallic character and completely (100%) spin polarization at the Fermi level (EF) and the indirect band gaps of 0.733 eV and 0.654 eV, respectively, in the minority spin channel. The total magnetic moments μt are all 2μB per formula unit, linearly scaled with the total number of valence electrons (Zt) by μt=Zt-18 and the atomic magnetic moments have localized character due to less affected by deformations. The origin of the indirect band gaps for these two new Heusler alloys is well understood. These two new Heusler alloys are the ideal candidates for spintronic devices.

  16. Mechanical ventilation and the total artificial heart: optimal ventilator trigger to avoid post-operative autocycling - a case series and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arabia Francisco A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many patients with end-stage cardiomyopathy are now being implanted with Total Artificial Hearts (TAHs. We have observed individual cases of post-operative mechanical ventilator autocycling with a flow trigger, and subsequent loss of autocycling after switching to a pressure trigger. These observations prompted us to do a retrospective review of all TAH devices placed at our institution between August 2007 and May 2009. We found that in the immediate post-operative period following TAH placement, autocycling was present in 50% (5/10 of cases. There was immediate cessation of autocycling in all patients after being changed from a flow trigger of 2 L/minute to a pressure trigger of 2 cm H2O. The autocycling group was found to have significantly higher CVP values than the non-autocycling group (P = 0.012. Our data suggest that mechanical ventilator autocycling may be resolved or prevented by the use of a pressure trigger rather than a flow trigger setting in patients with TAHs who require mechanical ventilation.

  17. Partial liquid ventilation improves lung function in ventilation-induced lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Vazquez de Anda; R.A. Lachmann; S.J.C. Verbrugge (Serge); D.A.M.P.J. Gommers (Diederik); J.J. Haitsma (Jack); B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractDisturbances in lung function and lung mechanics are present after ventilation with high peak inspiratory pressures (PIP) and low levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Therefore, the authors investigated whether partial liquid ventilation can re-establish l

  18. HF omnidirectional spectral CW auroral radar (HF-OSCAR) at very high latitude. Part 1: Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, J. K.; Jacobsen, K. E.; Stauning, P.; Henriksen, S.

    1983-12-01

    An HF system for studies of very high latitude ionospheric irregularities was described. Radio aurora from field-aligned E-region irregularities of the Slant E Condition type were discussed. The complete system combines an ionosonde, a 12 MHz pulse radar and a 12 MHz bistatic CW Doppler-range set-up. The two latter units use alternately a 360 deg rotating Yagi antenna. High precision oscillators secure the frequency stability of the Doppler system in which the received signal is mixed down to a center frequency of 500 Hz. The Doppler shift range is max + or - 500 Hz. The received signal is recorded in analog form on magnetic tape and may be monitored visually and audibly. Echo range of the CW Doppler signal is obtained by a 150 Hz amplitude modulation of the transmitted signal and phase comparison with the backscattered signal.

  19. HF Doppler radar observations of sporadic E at an Indian low latitude station, Visakhapatnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. S. R. K. N Sarma

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available 5.5 MHz HF Doppler radar observations of Sporadic E over an Indian low latitude station, Visakhapatnam (17.7° N, 83.3° E and Dip 20° with 10 s resolution showed quasi-periodic variations of the echo strength and Doppler velocity variations with periods of a few minutes to a few tens of minutes. The echo strength and Doppler velocity variations with time in different range bins of the ES echo showed variations which are some times similar and some times significantly different in successive range bins at intervals of 7.5 km. The ES echo occurs with the height of maximum echo strength in the range of 100 km to 120 km and some times at 130 km. The altitude variation of the average Doppler velocity is highly variable and the height of maximum echo strength is not the same as the height of maximum Doppler velocity. Observations of ES echoes at different times of the day are presented to bring out the differences between the day and night time ES echoes. The relationship between Radar and ES parameters derived from Ionograms is poorer than that of mid latitudes which is quite consistent with the expectations based on gradient drift instability.

  20. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, HBOT is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. HBOT is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The HHC technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system to provide controlled pressurization and adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the patient and operating personnel, and physiological considerations. The simple schematic, comprised of easily acquired commercial hardware

  1. Comparison of HfAlO, HfO2/Al2O3, and HfO2 on n-type GaAs using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Lv, Hongliang; Zhang, Yuming; Zhang, Yimen; Liu, Chen

    2016-11-01

    Different high-permittivity (high-k) gate dielectric structures of HfO2, HfAlO, and HfO2/Al2O3 deposited on HF-etched n-GaAs using ALD have been investigated. It has been demonstrated that the stacked structure of HfO2/Al2O3 has the lowest interface state density of 8.12 × 1012eV-1 cm-2 due to the "self-cleaning" reaction process, but the sample of HfAlO shows much better frequency dispersion and much higher dielectric permittivity extracted from the C-V curves. The investigation reveals that the electrical properties of gate dielectrics are improved by introducing alumina into HfO2.

  2. Regenerative Blower for EVA Suit Ventilation Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Paul, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    Portable life support systems in future space suits will include a ventilation subsystem driven by a dedicated fan. This ventilation fan must meet challenging requirements for pressure rise, flow rate, efficiency, size, safety, and reliability. This paper describes research and development that showed the feasibility of a regenerative blower that is uniquely suited to meet these requirements. We proved feasibility through component tests, blower tests, and design analysis. Based on the requirements for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) ventilation fan, we designed the critical elements of the blower. We measured the effects of key design parameters on blower performance using separate effects tests, and used the results of these tests to design a regenerative blower that will meet the ventilation fan requirements. We assembled a proof-of-concept blower and measured its performance at sub-atmospheric pressures that simulate a PLSS ventilation loop environment. Head/flow performance and maximum efficiency point data were used to specify the design and operating conditions for the ventilation fan. We identified materials for the blower that will enhance safety for operation in a lunar environment, and produced a solid model that illustrates the final design. The proof-of-concept blower produced the flow rate and pressure rise needed for the CSSE ventilation subsystem while running at 5400 rpm, consuming only 9 W of electric power using a non-optimized, commercial motor and controller and inefficient bearings. Scaling the test results to a complete design shows that a lightweight, compact, reliable, and low power regenerative blower can meet the performance requirements for future space suit life support systems.

  3. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test): A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Macario; Ruoff, Chad M.; Kawai, Makoto; Modi, Rahul; Arbee, Jabri; Hekmat, Anahid; Robertson, Matthew; Certal, Victor; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test) was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm) between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure). Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (rs = 0.60 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0088), apnea-hypopnea index (rs = 0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p = 0.039), lowest oxygen saturation (rs = −0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p = 0.048), and oxygen desaturation index (rs = 0.62 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0057). Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP. PMID:26881088

  4. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macario Camacho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure. Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (rs=0.60 [strong positive relationship], p=0.0088, apnea-hypopnea index (rs=0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p=0.039, lowest oxygen saturation (rs=-0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p=0.048, and oxygen desaturation index (rs=0.62 [strong positive relationship], p=0.0057. Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP.

  5. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test): A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Macario; Ruoff, Chad M; Kawai, Makoto; Modi, Rahul; Arbee, Jabri; Hekmat, Anahid; Robertson, Matthew; Zaghi, Soroush; Certal, Victor; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test) was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm) between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure). Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (r s = 0.60 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0088), apnea-hypopnea index (r s = 0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p = 0.039), lowest oxygen saturation (r s = -0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p = 0.048), and oxygen desaturation index (r s = 0.62 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0057). Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP.

  6. Study of Coal Mine Ventilation System Optimization based on Ventsim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jing Gang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the situation of too large coal mine ventilation resistance in the Majiagou coal mine. According to Majiagou coal mine late production plans, it measures resistance comprehensively, analyses the resistance distributions and the problems exist in the ventilation systems and comes up with targeted optimization programs. By studying the ventilation system model, as well as adjusting the system parameters, Ventsim software is applied to study ventilation system in Majiagou coal mine. Design of mine ventilation is proved practical in the mine ventilation system optimizations, thus Ventsim software can not only be used in the ventilation network calculation and merry-demand simulation and dynamic of wind flow, but also can be used to assist in the short-term and long-term planning for ventilation system, it is of a certain significance of guidance to find the problems in the mine management and optimizations of the ventilation network.

  7. Comparison of gaseous contaminant diffusion under stratum ventilation and under displacement ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Lin; Wang, Qiuwang [State Key Lab of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Lin, Zhang [Building Energy and Environmental Technology Research Unit, Division of Building Science and Technology, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2010-09-15

    The gaseous contaminant diffusion under stratum ventilation is investigated by numerical method which is validated by experiments carried out. The concentration of gaseous contaminants along the supply air jet is found to be lower than the other parts of the room. Compared with displacement ventilation, the formaldehyde concentration in breathing zone is lower when a contaminant source locates close to the occupant. The concentration is at the same level when the contaminant source locates up-steam to the occupant. The concentration in the occupied zone (<1.9 m from the floor) is also lower when the contaminant source locates on the floor. At supply air temperature optimized for displacement ventilation, the toluene concentration in breathing zone for stratum ventilation is higher than that for displacement ventilation when the area source locates on the four surrounding walls of the room. (author)

  8. Mechanical properties of cast Ti-Hf alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hideki; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Komatsu, Masashi; Okuno, Osamu; Okabe, Toru

    2005-02-15

    This study examined the mechanical properties of a series of Ti-Hf alloys. Titanium alloys with 10 to 40 mass % Hf were made with titanium and hafnium sponge in an argon-arc melting furnace. Specimens cast into magnesia-based investment molds were tested for yield strength, tensile strength, percentage elongation, and modulus of elasticity. Vickers microhardness was determined at 25 to 600 microm from the cast surface. X-ray diffractometry was also performed. Commercially pure Ti (CP Ti) and pure Ti prepared from titanium sponge were used as controls. The data (n = 5) were analyzed with a one-way ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (alpha = 0.05). The diffraction peaks of all the metals matched those for alpha Ti; no beta phase peaks were found. Alloys with Hf > or = 25% had significantly (p 0.05) in elongation among all the Ti-Hf alloys and CP Ti, whereas the elongation of alloys with Hf > or = 30% was significantly (p alloys tested can be considered viable alternatives to CP Ti because they were stronger than CP Ti and had similar elongation.

  9. Ventilator versus manual hyperinflation in clearing sputum in ventilated intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Diane; Jacob, Wendy; Budgeon, Charley

    2012-01-01

    The aim of hyperinflation in the ventilated intensive care unit patient is to increase oxygenation, reverse lung collapse and clear sputum. The efficacy and consistency of manual hyperventilation is well supported in the literature, but there is limited published evidence supporting hyperventilation utilising a ventilator. Despite this, a recent survey established that almost 40% of Australian tertiary intensive care units utilise ventilator hyperinflation. The aim of this non-inferiority cross-over study was to determine whether ventilator hyperinflation was as effective as manual hyperinflation in clearing sputum from patients receiving mechanical ventilation using a prescriptive ventilator hyperinflation protocol. Forty-six patients received two randomly ordered physiotherapy treatments on the same day by the same physiotherapist. The efficacy of the hyperinflation modes was measured by sputum wet weight. Secondary measures included compliance, tidal volume, airway pressure and PaO2/FiO2 ratio. There was no difference in wet weight of sputum cleared using ventilator hyperinflation or manual hyperinflation (mean 3.2 g, P=0.989). Further, no difference in compliance (P=0.823), tidal volume (P=0.219), heart rate (P=0.579), respiratory rate (P=0.929) or mean arterial pressure (P=0.593) was detected. A statistically significant difference was seen in mean airway pressure (P=0.002) between techniques. The effect of techniques on the PaO2/FiO2 response ratio was dependent on time (interaction P=0.024). Physiotherapy using ventilator hyperinflation cleared a comparable amount of sputum and was as safe as manual hyperinflation. This research describes a ventilator hyperinflation protocol that will serve as a platform for continued discussion, research and development of its application in ventilated patients.

  10. System identification and closed-loop control of end-tidal CO2 in mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jin-Oh; Dumont, Guy A; Anersmino, J Mark

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach to system identification and closed-loop control of end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PETCO2) in mechanically ventilated patients. An empirical model consisting of a linear dynamic system followed by an affine transform is proposed to derive a low-order and high-fidelity representation that can reproduce the positive and inversely proportional dynamic input-output relationship between PETCO2 and minute ventilation (MV) in mechanically ventilated patients. The predictive capability of the empirical model was evaluated using experimental respiratory data collected from eighteen mechanically ventilated human subjects. The model predicted PETCO2 response accurately with a root-mean-squared error (RMSE) of 0.22+/-0.16 mmHg and a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.81+/-0.18 (mean+/-SD) when a second-order rational transfer function was used as its linear dynamic component. Using the proposed model, a closedloop control method for PETCO2 based on a proportionalintegral (PI) compensator was proposed by systematic analysis of the system root locus. For the eighteen mechanically ventilated patient models identified, the PI compensator exhibited acceptable closed-loop response with a settling time of 1.27+/- 0.20 min and a negligible overshoot (0.51+/-1.17%), in addition to zero steady-state PETCO2 set point tracking. The physiologic implication of the proposed empirical model was analyzed by comparing it with the traditional multi-compartmental model widely used in pharmacological modeling.

  11. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure: state of the art (II part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the last years Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV has been playing an important role in the treatment of Acute Respiratory Failure (ARF. Prospective randomised controlled trials have shown improvements in clinical features (respiratory rate, neurological score, pH and arterial blood gases and in particular clinical conditions (Acute Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema, ACPE, and acute exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, COPD systematic reviews and metha-analysis confirm a reduction in the need for intubation and in-hospital mortality compared to standard medical treatment. Methods: The most important techniques of ventilation in spontaneous breathing are: Continuous Positive Airway Pression (CPAP, usually performed with Venturi-like flow generators, and bi-level positive pressure ventilation (an high inspiratory pressure and a low expiratory pressure, performed with ventilators. Facial mask rather than nasal mask is used in ARF: the helmet is useful for prolonged treatments. Results: NIV’s success seems to be determined by early application, correct selection of patients and staff training. Controindications to NIV are: cardiac or respiratory arrest, a respiratory rate < 12 per minute, upper airway obstruction, hemodynamic instability or unstable cardiac arrhythmia, encephalopathy (Kelly score > 3, facial surgery trauma or deformity, inability to cooperate or protect the airway, high risk of aspiration and an inability to clear respiratory secretions. Conclusions: Bi-level ventilation for ARF due to COPD and CPAP or bi-level bentilation for ARF due to ACPE are feasible, safe and effective also in a General Medical ward if the selection of patients, the staff’s training and the monitoring are appropriate: they improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, prevent ETI, decrease mortality and hospitalisation. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting.

  12. Lung ventilation during treadmill locomotion in a semi-aquatic turtle, Trachemys scripta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landberg, Tobias; Mailhot, Jeffrey D; Brainerd, Elizabeth L

    2009-10-01

    It is reasonable to presume that locomotion should have a mechanical effect on breathing in turtles. The turtle shell is rigid, and when the limbs protract and retract, air in the lungs should be displaced. This expectation was met in a previous study of the green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas; breathing completely ceased during terrestrial locomotion (Jackson and Prange, 1979. J Comp Physiol 134:315-319). In contrast, another study found no direct effect of locomotion on ventilation in the terrestrial box turtle, Terrapene carolina (Landberg et al., 2003. J Exp Biol 206:3391-3404). In this study we measured lung ventilation during treadmill locomotion in a semi-aquatic turtle, the red-eared slider, Trachemys scripta. Sliders breathed almost continuously during locomotion and during brief pauses between locomotor bouts. Tidal volume was relatively small (approximately 1 mL) during locomotion and approximately doubled during pauses. Minute ventilation was, however, not significantly smaller during locomotion because breath frequency was higher than that during the pauses. We found no consistent evidence for phase coupling between breathing and locomotion indicating that sliders do not use locomotor movements to drive breathing. We also found no evidence for a buccal-pump mechanism. Sliders, like box turtles, appear to use abdominal musculature to breathe during locomotion. Thus, locomotion affects lung ventilation differently in the three turtle species studied to date: the terrestrial Te. carolina shows no measurable effect of locomotion on ventilation; the semi-aquatic Tr. scripta breathes with smaller tidal volumes during locomotion; and the highly aquatic C. mydas stops breathing completely during terrestrial locomotion. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Instantaneous responses to high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with acute pneumonic respiratory failure receiving mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ming-Lung; Chou, Yi-Ling; Lee, Chai-Yuan; Huang, Shih-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Endotracheal intubation and prolonged immobilization of patients receiving mechanical ventilation may reduce expectoration function. High-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) may ameliorate airway secretion movement; however, the instantaneous changes in patients’ cardiopulmonary responses are unknown. Moreover, HFCWO may influence ventilator settings by the vigorous oscillation. The aim of this study was to investigate these issues. Methods: Seventy-three patients (52 men) aged 71.5 ± 13.4 years who were intubated with mechanical ventilation for pneumonic respiratory failure were recruited and randomly classified into 2 groups (HFCWO group, n = 36; and control group who received conventional chest physical therapy (CCPT, n = 37). HFCWO was applied with a fixed protocol, whereas CCPT was conducted using standard protocols. Both groups received sputum suction after the procedure. Changes in ventilator settings and the subjects’ responses were measured at preset intervals and compared within groups and between groups. Results: Oscillation did not affect the ventilator settings (all P > 0.05). The mean airway pressure, breathing frequency, and rapid shallow breathing index increased, and the tidal volume and SpO2 decreased (all P < 0.05). After sputum suction, the peak airway pressure (Ppeak) and minute ventilation decreased (all P < 0.05). The HFCWO group had a lower tidal volume and SpO2 at the end of oscillation, and lower Ppeak and tidal volume after sputum suction than the CCPT group. Conclusions: HFCWO affects breathing pattern and SpO2 but not ventilator settings, whereas CCPT maintains a steadier condition. After sputum suction, HFCWO slightly improved Ppeak compared to CCPT, suggesting that the study extends the indications of HFCWO for these patients in intensive care unit. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02758106, retrospectively registered.) PMID:28248854

  14. Dangerous Pressurization and Inappropriate Alarms during Water Occlusion of the Expiratory Circuit of Commonly Used Infant Ventilators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Hinder

    Full Text Available Non-invasive continuous positive airways pressure is commonly a primary respiratory therapy delivered via multi-purpose ventilators in premature newborns. Expiratory limb occlusion due to water accumulation or 'rainout' from gas humidification is a frequent issue. A case of expiratory limb occlusion due to rainout causing unexpected and excessive repetitive airway pressurisation in a Draeger VN500 prompted a systematic bench test examination of currently available ventilators.To assess neonatal ventilator response to partial or complete expiratory limb occlusion when set to non-invasive continuous positive airway pressure mode.Seven commercially available neonatal ventilators connected to a test lung using a standard infant humidifier circuit with partial and/or complete expiratory limb occlusion were examined in a bench test study. Each ventilator was set to deliver 6 cmH2O in non-invasive mode and respiratory mechanics data for 75%, 80% and 100% occlusion were collected.Several ventilators responded inappropriately with complete occlusion by cyclical pressurisation/depressurisation to peak pressures of between 19·4 and 64·6 cm H2O at rates varying between 2 to 77 inflations per minute. Tidal volumes varied between 10·1 and 24·3mL. Alarm responses varied from 'specific' (tube occluded to 'ambiguous' (Safety valve open. Carefusion Avea responded by continuing to provide the set distending pressure and displaying an appropriate alarm message. Draeger Babylog 8000 did not alarm with partial occlusions and incorrectly displayed airways pressure at 6·1cmH2O compared to the measured values of 13cmH2O.This study found a potential for significant adverse ventilator response due to complete or near complete expiratory limb occlusion in CPAP mode.

  15. An evaluation of ventilation system flow rates and levels of carbon dioxide, ambient temperature, and relative humidity in restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Tan, Yin; Brown, Eric N; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2002-09-01

    Studies of the indoor air quality of restaurants have rarely focused on ventilation system performance in relation to air pollutants and climatic factors. This study was conducted in eight restaurants to examine this issue by determining the ventilation flow rates and the levels of carbon dioxide (CO2), ambient temperature, and relative humidity during at least one complete shift of serving a meal. The mean values of number of dining patrons, ventilation flow rates, and the levels of CO2, ambient temperature, and relative humidity were not significantly different in the nonsmoking dining rooms and the smoking dining rooms. The mean ventilation flow rates in individual restaurants ranged from 42-113 cubic feet per minute per person (cfm/person), overall exceeding the recommended lower limit of 30 cfm/person. The mean levels of CO2 in two restaurants (646 and 819 ppm) were below, and in the other six restaurants (ranging 1,012-1,820 ppm) were above the recommended upper limit of 1000 ppm. The levels of CO2 in each restaurant significantly correlated with the number of dining patrons and in four restaurants accumulated gradually over time. In the nonsmoking dining rooms, the levels of CO2 increased significantly as the ventilation How rates decreased. The mean ambient temperature in restaurants (ranging from 22 degrees C - 24 degrees C) were within the recommended range of 20 degrees C - 26 degrees C. The mean relative humidity in six restaurants (ranging from 46%-59%) were within the recommended upper limit of 60 percent, and in two restaurants (62% and 71%) were slightly higher than this recommended limit. It was concluded that although the mean ventilation flow rates in all restaurants exceeded the recommended value, the design of the ventilation system or the distribution of air flow rate in some sections of restaurants were not appropriate to keep the levels of CO2 and relative humidity at some measurement locations below the recommended limits.

  16. HfO2 Gate Dielectrics for Future Generation of CMOS Device Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Y.Yu; J.F.Kang; Ren Chi; M.F.Li; D.L.Kwong

    2004-01-01

    The material and electrical properties of HfO2 high-k gate dielectric are reported.In the first part,the band alignment of HfO2 and (HfO2)x(Al2O3)1-x to (100)Si substrate and their thermal stability are studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and TEM.The energy gap of (HfO2)x(Al2O3)1-x,the valence band offset,and the conduction band offset between (HfO2)x(Al2O3)1-x and the Si substrate as functions of x are obtained based on the XPS results.Our XPS results also demonstrate that both the thermal stability and the resistance to oxygen diffusion of HfO2 are improved by adding Al to form Hf aluminates.In the second part,a thermally stable and high quality HfN/HfO2 gate stack is reported.Negligible changes in equivalent oxide thickness (EOT),gate leakage,and work function (close to Si mid-gap) of HfN/HfO2 gate stack are demonstrated even after 1000℃ post-metal annealing(PMA),which is attributed to the superior oxygen diffusion barrier of HfN as well as the thermal stability of the HfN/HfO2 interface.Therefore,even without surface nitridation prior to HfO2 deposition,the EOT of HfN/HfO2 gate stack has been successfully scaled down to less than 1nm after 1000℃ PMA with excellent leakage and long-term reliability.The last part demonstrates a novel replacement gate process employing a HfN dummy gate and sub-1nm EOT HfO2 gate dielectric.The excellent thermal stability of the HfN/HfO2 gate stack enables its use in high temperature CMOS processes.The replacement of HfN with other metal gate materials with work functions adequate for n- and p-MOS is facilitated by a high etch selectivity of HfN with respect to HfO2,without any degradation to the EOT,gate leakage,or TDDB characteristics of HfO2.

  17. RESPONSE TO 6 MINUTE WALK TEST IN HEALTHY ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibhuti kiran shah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: 6Minute walk test (MWT has been used as a performance based measure of functional exercise capacity in all populations including healthy adults. 6MWT is recommended out of other all timed walked tests due to its reproducibility and ease of administration compared to other longer or shorter time duration tests. It detects changes following interventions to improve exercise tolerance in healthy individuals, to assess the fitness level, used as intervention to improve walking endurance and as predictor of objectively measured aerobic fitness in healthy adults. It is essential to know a level of fitness healthy adults possess in our community, thus aim of this study was to evaluate response to 6MWT in young healthy adults. Method: 50 healthy individuals (25 males and 25 females of 18 - 30 years of age were recruited. The 6MWT was performed as per standard guidelines. All subjects were assessed for the outcome measures by principal investigator at baseline i.e. before and post- 6MWT for following parameters. BP, PR, RR, SPO2, RPE. Results: The mean 6 minute walked distance (6MWD was 635.6+59.07, for men it was 675.0+46.88 and for women it was 596.5+41.41. Out of study population 18% of people covered 70%-80%, 54% people covered 80%-90% and 28% people covered 90%-100% of their predicted distance. Oxygen saturation remained unaltered throughout the walk. Mean resting and walking spo2 values were 96.80+13.55% and 96.71+13.55% (p-value: 0.2288. Pulse rate (PR and respiratory rate (RR were affected by the walk. Mean resting and walking PR was 79.82+9.18 and 142.6+19.62 (p-value: 0.0001 and RR was 18.48+2.78 and 30.20+4.35 (p-value: 0.0001 respectively. Mean resting and walking systolic and diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in males as compared to females. Conclusion: The 6 minute walk test is a useful measure of functional capacity in healthy adults. There was a difference between predicted distance covered and actual distance

  18. 积家莲花Master Minute Repeater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    积家莲花Master Minute Repeater三问手表,积家974型手动上弦机芯,动力储存15天,铂金表壳,直径43毫米,动力储存显示位于8点钟位置,四点钟位置为弹簧扭距0到8的数字显示,以辅助动力储存显示,全球限量1枚。

  19. Ventilator associated pneumonia in major paediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Alan David; Deal, Cailin; Argent, Andrew Charles; Hudson, Donald Anthony; Rode, Heinz

    2014-09-01

    More than three-quarters of deaths related to major burns are a consequence of infection, which is frequently ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). A retrospective study was performed, over a five-year period, of ventilated children with major burns. 92 patients were included in the study; their mean age was 3.5 years and their mean total body surface area burn was 30%. 62% of the patients sustained flame burns, and 31% scalds. The mean ICU stay was 10.6 days (range 2-61 days) and the mean ventilation time was 8.4 days (range 2-45 days). There were 59 documented episodes of pneumonia in 52 patients with a rate of 30 infections per 1000 ventilator days. Length of ventilation and the presence of inhalational injury correlate with the incidence of VAP. 17.4% of the patients died (n=16); half of these deaths may be attributed directly to pneumonia. Streptococcus pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii and Staphylococcus aureus were the most prominent aetiological organisms. Broncho-alveolar lavage was found to be more specific and sensitive at identifying the organism than other methods. This study highlights the importance of implementing strictly enforced strategies for the prevention, detection and management of pneumonia in the presence of major burns.

  20. Low resource ventilation unit; Ressourcebesparende ventilationsenhed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drivsholm, C.

    2012-03-15

    In the project a resource-saving ventilation device was developed which is based on the use of a regenerator and a reversible air flow. The regenerator is placed in the building envelope, and the concept works in the way that the heat in the air during ventilation is stored in the regenerator and brought back into the building by a reversible air change. The heated air is blown from inside the building out through the regenerator. In this way the regenerator accumulates the heat in the air. Over a period of 30-120 seconds, the regenerator capacity is utilized. When the regenerator cannot be further heated, the air flow is reversed and there is now blown cold air through the regenerator. Thereby the heat from the regenerator is released to the cold fresh air. Thus, the fresh air brings heat back into the building, whereby the air is replaced with a limited heat loss. Ventilation with a regenerator is described as micro-ventilation. The developed micro-ventilation unit was tested by the Danish Technological Institute. The test results shows that the unit performs according to expectations: 1) The heat recovery is 85%; 2) The flow through the unit is 80m3 per hour in a 5 section unit; 3) The noise level is 30 db(A) in a representative room; 4) The energy consumption is <300 J/m3. The unit is introduced into the market, and the first plants have been sold. (LN)

  1. Design Feature 7: Continuous Preclosure Ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.T. Watkins

    1999-06-22

    This design feature (DF) is intended to evaluate the effects of continuous ventilation in the emplacement drifts during preclosure and how the effects, if any, compare to the Viability Assessment (VA) reference design for postclosure long term performance. This DF will be evaluated against a set of criteria provided by the License Application Design Selection (LADS) group. The VA reference design included a continuous ventilation airflow quantity of 0.1 m{sup 3}/s in the emplacement drifts in the design of the repository subsurface facilities. The effects of this continuous ventilation during the preclosure was considered to have a negligible effect on postclosure performance and therefore is not included during postclosure in the assessment of the long term performance. This DF discusses the effects of continuous ventilation on the emplacement drift environment and surrounding rock conditions during preclosure for three increased airflow quantities. The three cases of continuous ventilation systems are: System A, 1.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 8), System B, 5.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 9), and System C, 10.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 10) in each emplacement drift split. An emplacement drift split is half total length of emplacement drift going from the east or west main to the exhaust main. The difference in each system is the quantity of airflow in the emplacement drifts.

  2. Pressure-induced novel compounds in the Hf-O system from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Oganov, Artem R.; Li, Xinfeng; Xue, Kan-Hao; Wang, Zhenhai; Dong, Huafeng

    2015-11-01

    Using first-principles evolutionary simulations, we have systematically investigated phase stability in the Hf-O system at pressure up to 120 GPa. New compounds Hf5O2,Hf3O2 , HfO, and HfO3 are discovered to be thermodynamically stable at certain pressure ranges. Two new high-pressure phases are found for Hf2O : one with space group Pnnm and anti-CaCl2-type structure, another with space group I 41/amd. Pnnm-HfO3 shows interesting structure, simultaneously containing oxide O2 - and peroxide [O-O]2 - anions. Remarkably, it is P 6 ¯2 m -HfO rather than OII-HfO2 that exhibits the highest mechanical characteristics among Hf-O compounds. Pnnm-Hf2O , Imm2-Hf5O2 ,P 3 ¯1 m -Hf2O , and P 4 ¯m 2 -Hf2O3 phases also show superior mechanical properties; theoretically these phases become metastable phases to ambient pressure and their properties can be exploited.

  3. Effect of HF leaching on 14C dates of pottery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslar, Tomasz; Kozłowski, Janusz; Szmyt, Marzena; Czernik, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the experiments with 14C dating of two potsherds, which contained carbon dispersed rather homogeneously in their clay fabric. After AAA treatment, the potsherds still appeared to be contaminated with young carbon, presumably connected with humic acids. To make removal of humic acids more effective, we treated the sherds with HF acid of different concentration. The 14C results obtained demonstrate that HF treatment indeed helps to remove humic contaminants, but it also mobilizes carbon bound to raw clay, which may make 14C dates too old. We conclude therefore, that using a simple combination of HF and AAA treatment seems insufficient in reliable 14C dating of carbon homogeneously dispersed in the volume of potsherds.

  4. Effects of a nasal ventilator restriction device on lung ventilation and gas exchange during exercise in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis González-Montesinos

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectives: A device called FeelBreathe® (FB has been designed, developed and patented for inspiratory muscle training (IMT. In order to examine the effects of FB on lung ventilation and gas exchange during exercise, 27 trained male healthy volunteers (age: 32.5 ± 7.2 years were measured. Methods: Maximum static inspiratory pressure (PImax and spirometry to determine lung capacity were measured at baseline. We continued with an incremental cycloergometer to determine the VO2 peak. Three days later, each subject performed randomly three identical submaximal cycloergometer tests at 50% between ventilatory thresholds under three different breathing conditions: a oronasal breathing (ONB, b nasal breathing (NB and c nasal breathing through the FB. Results: FB trial showed lower minute ventilation (VE and breathing frequency (BF than NB, which had lower BF, but similar VE than ONB (p < 0.001. Despite this, FB had similar values of VO2, respiratory exchange ratio (RER, heart rate (HR and peripheral capillary oxygen saturation (SpO2 compared to NB and ONB. The latter can occur partly due to increased tidal volume (VT and expiration time (Tex in FB until same level than NB, which were in both trials 15% and 14% respectively higher than ONB (p < 0.001. The percentage of inspiration time (Ti/Tot was 7% greater in FB compared to NB and ONB (p < 0.001. Increased end-tidal pressure of CO2 (P ET CO2 and reduced end-tidal pressure of O2 (P ET O2 and fraction of O2 expiration (FEO2 were found only in FB. Conclusions: FeelBreathe is a new nasal restriction device that stimulates the inspiratory muscles to produce a breathing pattern more efficiency during exercise in well-trained humans.

  5. Influence of changes in the pulmonary artery pressure on ventilation requirements in patients undergoing mitral valve replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar K

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to evaluate the influence of changes in pulmonary artery pressure on the ventilation requirements in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery. Thirty patients with mitral valve disease with significant pulmonary arterial hypertension undergoing mitral valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass were included in this prospective study. All patients had a pulmonary artery catheter placed after the anaesthetic induction. The minute ventilation was adjusted to achieve an arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2 of 35-40 mm Hg. After a stabilisation period of 15 minutes, the pulmonary artery pressure and the minute volume needed for maintaining a PaCO2 of 35-40 mm Hg in the precardiopulmonary bypass, post-cardiopulmonary bypass and six hours postoperatively were measured after ensuring stable haemodynamics and normothermia. There was a significant decrease in the mean pulmonary artery pressure from pre-cardiopulmonary bypass value of 41.3+/-15 mm Hg to 29.3+/-8 mm Hg in the postcardiopulmonary bypass period and subsequently to 25.5+/-7 mm Hg in the intensive care unit. There was a corresponding increase in the minute volume requirements from a pre-cardiopulmonary bypass value of 6.8+/-1 L/min to 8.0+/-1 L/min in the post cardiopulmonary bypass period and then to 9.4+/-1.2 L/min in the postoperative period. We conclude that there is a significant decrease in the pulmonary blood volume and a subsequent decrease in the pulmonary artery pressure after a successful mitral valve replacement in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. This is associated with a significant increase in the requirement of minute ventilation to maintain normocarbia.

  6. A 20-minute breath test for helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, B.J.; Plankey, M.W.; Hoffman, S.R.; Boyd, C.L.; Dye, K.R.; Frierson, H.F. Jr.; Guerrant, R.L.; McCallum, R.W. (Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville (USA))

    1991-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated a simplified rapid {sup 14}C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori. Fasting patients undergoing initial assessment for H. pylori drank 5 microCi of {sup 14}C-urea in 20 ml of water. Breath was collected at intervals for 30 min. Samples were counted in a beta-counter, and the results were expressed as counts per minute (cpm). In the same week, patients underwent endoscopy, and a blinded investigator examined biopsy samples of gastric mucosa by culture and histology for H. pylori. There were 49 H. pylori-negative (HP-) and 104 H. pylori-positive (HP+) patients in the study. HP+ patients expired a mean of 4398 cpm (SD 2468) per mmol CO{sub 2} in a sample taken 20 min after ingestion of the isotope. In contrast, HP--patients expired only 340 cpm (SD 196). If the mean +3 SD of HP- patients was used as a cutoff value, the 20-minute sample gave a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 100% for detecting H. pylori. The radiation exposure from this test is less than 1% of that received from an upper gastrointestinal series, and the short collection time makes it both convenient and cost effective.

  7. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantellini E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the aim of this work is to highlight the importance of a correct management of the secretions in the patient submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV. Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and secretion in patients with mechanically ventilation. We focus on the use of in-ex suflator achine (cough machine associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO.Results: we observe a reduction of pulmonary infection and a better management of bronchial secretion in patient undergone to the use of in-ex suflator machine (cough machine associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO.Conclusions: the correct approach to patients submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV expect the use of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO (VEST and in-ex suflator machine (cough machine to decrease pulmonary infection thank to a reduction of permanence of bronchial secretions in the lungs .

  8. Modelling of Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    be installed in existing buildings after a few modifications. In contrast, ventilation systems using only natural forces such as wind and thermal buoyancy need to be designed together with the building, since the building itself and its components are the elements that can reduce or increase air movement...... as well as influence the air content (dust, pollution etc.). Architects and engineers need to acquire qualitative and quantitative information about the interactions between building characteristics and natural ventilation in order to design buildings and systems consistent with a passive low......-energy approach. These lecture notes focus on modelling of natural and hybrid ventilation driven by thermal buoyancy, wind and/or mechanical driving forces for a single zone with one, two or several openings....

  9. Performance of displacement ventilation in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naidenov, K.; Pitchurov, G.; Langkilde, Gunnar

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents results of a field study in offices with displacement ventilation. It comprises detailed physical measurements of the thermal environment and collection of occupants´ response at 227 workplaces. The results, both physical measurements and human response, identified draught...... as the major local discomfort in the rooms with displacement ventilation. Twenty-three percent of the occupants were daily bothered by draught. In some buildings the maintenance personnel tried to improve occupants´ thermal comfort by raising the supply air temperature or office workers themselves blocked...... the diffusers by rearranging the furniture. Half of the surveyed occupants were not satisfied with the indoor air quality. The main conclusion is that displacement ventilation needs careful design and room furnishing in order to ensure a comfortable environment. Occupants must understand the underlying...

  10. Demand controlled ventilation in a bathroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Nielsen, Toke Rammer; Topp, Claus

    2008-01-01

    humidity in the bathroom. The two designs differed by the construction of the shower cubicle which in one case was sealed and in the other case unsealed. The construction influenced the relative humidity within the bathroom during a shower, i.e. the pollution source the ventilation rate was controlled by...... of the DCV system was slightly improved in the case with the sealed shower cubicle compared to the unsealed cubicle. The study indicated that indoor climate and energy optimizations of DCV systems should not be limited to considerations of the control system, but should also include considerations......In residential buildings moisture is a dominant pollution source removed by the ventilation system. The Danish building code requires a minimum air change rate of 0.5h-1 in residential buildings to avoid moisture related problems. However a constant ventilation rate results in unnecessary energy...

  11. VENTILATION SYSTEM WITH GROUND HEAT EXCHANGER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav Pisarev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ventilation systems consume more and more energy because of the often complex treatment of the air supplied to closed spaces. Looking for sources of energy allow for significant savings costs, which often translate into renewable energy sources. One of the more popular solutions is to use energy from the ground by various methods. Known and relatively common solutions are based on ground heat exchanger and ground collector cooperating with a heat pump. The paper presents the possibility of cooperation ventilation system with ground air heat exchanger and heat pump both in summer and winter period. A number solutions of this type of system, supported by calculation examples and moist air transformation in the Moliere chart have been presented. Support ventilation system with renewable energy sources allows significant savings in operating as shown in the article.

  12. Heating, ventilation and air conditioning system modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whalley, R.; Abdul-Ameer, A. [British University in Dubai (United Arab Emirates)

    2011-03-15

    Heating, ventilation and air conditioning modelling methods, for large scale, spatially dispersed systems are considered. Existing techniques are discussed and proposals for the application of novel analysis approaches are outlined. The use of distributed-lumped parameter procedures enabling the incorporation of the relatively concentrated and significantly dispersed, system element characteristics, is advocated. A dynamic model for a heating, ventilation and air conditioning system comprising inlet and exhaust fans, with air recirculation, heating/cooling and filtration units is presented. Pressure, airflow and temperature predictions within the system are computed following input, disturbance changes and purging operations. The generalised modelling advancements adopted and the applicability of the model for heating, ventilation and air conditioning system simulation, re-configuration and diagnostics is emphasised. The employment of the model for automatic, multivariable controller design purposes is commented upon. (author)

  13. Personal Exposure in Displacement Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    1996-01-01

    Personal exposure in a displacement ventilated room is examined. The stratified flow and the considerable concentration gradients necessitate an improvement of the widely used fully mixing compartmental approach. The exposure of a seated and a standing person in proportion to the stratification...... height is examined by means of full-scale measurements. A breathing thermal manikin is used to simulate a person. It is found that the flow in the boundary layer around a person is able to a great extent to entrain and transport air from below the breathing zone. In the case of non-passive, heated...... in the lower part of the room close to the occupant. A personal exposure model for displacement ventilated rooms is proposed. The model takes the influence of gradients and the human thermal boundary layer into account. Two new quantities describing the interaction between a person and the ventilation...

  14. The Status of Rotational Nonequilibrium in HF Chemical Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    later study from the same laboratory, Copeland et al. 5 3 used a NdYAG dye laser to pump HF into v = 2, j, and an HF pulsed laser to probe various P 2(J... Weston , Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 77, 4776 (1982). 51. J. J. Hinchen and R. H. Hobbs, Appl. Phys. 50, 628 (1979). 52. j. K. Lambert, G. M. Jursich, and F. F...Crim, Chem. Phys. Lett. 71, 258 (1980). 53. R. A. Copeland , D. J. Pearson, and F. F. Crim, Chem. Phys. Lett. 81, 541 (1981). 54. T. J. Foster and F. F

  15. New active load voltage clamp for HF-link converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljusev, P.; Andersen, M.A.E.

    2005-07-01

    This paper proposes a new active clamp for HF-link converters, which features very high efficiency by returning the clamped energy back to the primary side through a small auxiliary converter. It also increases the reliability of HF-link converters by providing an alternative load current path during malfunctions of the secondary bidirectional bridge. The feasibility of the approach is shown on audio power amplifier prototype. New integrated magnetics design is presented that incorporates both the main power and auxiliary transformer on the same magnetic core. (au)

  16. HF-induced airglow at magnetic zenith: theoretical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Mishin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of airglow at 630nm (red line and 557.7nm (green line during HF modification experiments at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP heating facility are analyzed. We propose a theoretical framework for understanding the generation of Langmuir and ion acoustic waves during magnetic zenith injections. We show that observations of HF-induced airglow in an underdense ionosphere as well as a decrease in the height of the emitting volume are consistent with this scenario.

  17. HF-hash : Hash Functions Using Restricted HFE Challenge-1

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Dhananjoy; Gupta, Indranath Sen

    2009-01-01

    Vulnerability of dedicated hash functions to various attacks has made the task of designing hash function much more challenging. This provides us a strong motivation to design a new cryptographic hash function viz. HF-hash. This is a hash function, whose compression function is designed by using first 32 polynomials of HFE Challenge-1 with 64 variables by forcing remaining 16 variables as zero. HF-hash gives 256 bits message digest and is as efficient as SHA-256. It is secure against the differential attack proposed by Chabaud and Joux as well as by Wang et. al. applied to SHA-0 and SHA-1.

  18. Hf--Co--B alloys as permanent magnet materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, Michael Alan; Rios, Orlando; Ghimire, Nirmal Jeevi

    2017-01-24

    An alloy composition is composed essentially of Hf.sub.2-XZr.sub.XCo.sub.11B.sub.Y, wherein 0Hf.sub.2-XZr.sub.XCo.sub.11B.sub.Y, wherein 0.ltoreq.X<2 and 0

  19. First HF radar measurements of summer mesopause echoes at SURA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Karashtin

    Full Text Available HF sounding of the mesosphere was first carried out at SURA in summer 1994 at frequencies in the range 8–9 MHz using one of the sub-arrays of the SURA heating facility. The observations had a range resolution of 3 km. Almost all measurements indicated the presence of strong radar returns from altitudes between 83 and 90 km with features very similar to VHF measurements of mesopause summer echoes at mid-latitudes and polar mesopause summer echoes. In contrast to VHF observations, HF mesopause echoes are almost always present.

  20. New active load voltage clamp for HF-link converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljusev, Petar; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a new active clamp for HF-link converters, which features very high efficiency by returning the clamped energy back to the primary side through a small auxiliary converter. It also increases the reliability of HF-link converters by providing an alternative load current path du...... during malfunctions of the secondary bidirectional bridge. The feasibility of the approach is shown on audio power amplifier prototype. New integrated magnetics design is presented that incorporates both the main power and auxiliary transformer on the same magnetic core....

  1. First HF radar measurements of summer mesopause echoes at SURA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karashtin, A. N.; Shlyugaev, Y. V.; Abramov, V. I.; Belov, I. F.; Berezin, I. V.; Bychkov, V. V.; Eryshev, E. B.; Komrakov, G. P.

    1997-07-01

    HF sounding of the mesosphere was first carried out at SURA in summer 1994 at frequencies in the range 8-9 MHz using one of the sub-arrays of the SURA heating facility. The observations had a range resolution of 3 km. Almost all measurements indicated the presence of strong radar returns from altitudes between 83 and 90 km with features very similar to VHF measurements of mesopause summer echoes at mid-latitudes and polar mesopause summer echoes. In contrast to VHF observations, HF mesopause echoes are almost always present.

  2. European coordination for coastal HF radar data in EMODnet Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Julien; Novellino, Antonio; Gorringe, Patrick; Griffa, Annalisa; Schulz-Stellenfleth, Johannes; Montero, Pedro; Montovani, Carlo; Ayensa, Garbi; Vila, Begoña; Rubio, Anna; Sagarminaga, Yolanda

    2015-04-01

    Historically, joint effort has been put on observing open ocean, organizing, homogenizing, sharing and reinforcing the impact of the acquired information based on one technology: ARGO with profilers Argo floats, EuroSites, ESONET-NoE, FixO3 for deep water platforms, Ferrybox for stations in ships of opportunities, and GROOM for the more recent gliders. This kind of networking creates synergies and makes easier the implementation of this source of data in the European Data exchange services like EMODnet, ROOSs portals, or any applied services in the Blue economy. One main targeted improvement in the second phase of EMODnet projects is the assembling of data along coastline. In that sense, further coordination is recommended between platform operators around a specific technology in order to make easier the implementation of the data in the platforms (4th EuroGOOS DATAMEQ WG). HF radar is today recognized internationally as a cost-effective solution to provide high spatial and temporal resolution current maps (depending on the instrument operation frequency, covering from a few kilometres offshore up to 200 km) that are needed for many applications for issues related to ocean surface drift or sea state characterization. Significant heterogeneity still exists in Europe concerning technological configurations, data processing, quality standards and data availability. This makes more difficult the development of a significant network for achieving the needed accessibility to HF Radar data for a pan European use. EuroGOOS took the initiative to lead and coordinate activities within the various observation platforms by establishing a number of Ocean Observing Task Teams such as HF-Radars. The purpose is to coordinate and join the technological, scientific and operational HF radar communities at European level. The goal of the group is on the harmonization of systems requirements, systems design, data quality, improvement and proof of the readiness and standardization of

  3. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mas A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Arantxa Mas, Josep MasipCritical Care Department, Consorci Sanitari Integral (CSI, Hospital Sant Joan Despí Moisès Broggi and Hospital General de l’Hospitalet, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique. Keywords

  4. Advanced design of local ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulmala, I. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Safety Technology

    1997-12-31

    Local ventilation is widely used in industry for controlling airborne contaminants. However, the present design practices of local ventilation systems are mainly based on empirical equations and do not take quantitatively into account the various factors affecting the performance of these systems. The aim of this study was to determine the applicability and limitations of more advanced fluid mechanical methods to the design and development of local ventilation systems. The most important factors affecting the performance of local ventilation systems were determined and their effect was studied in a systematic manner. The numerical calculations were made with the FLUENT computer code and they were verified by laboratory experiments, previous measurements or analytical solutions. The results proved that the numerical calculations can provide a realistic simulation of exhaust openings, effects of ambient air flows and wake regions. The experiences with the low-velocity local supply air showed that these systems can also be modelled fairly well. The results were used to improve the efficiency and thermal comfort of a local ventilation unit and to increase the effective control range of exhaust hoods. In the simulation of the interaction of a hot buoyant source and local exhaust, the predicted capture efficiencies were clearly higher than those observed experimentally. The deviations between measurements and non-isothermal flow calculations may have partly been caused by the inability to achieve grid independent solutions. CFD simulations is an advanced and flexible tool for designing and developing local ventilation. The simulations can provide insight into the time-averaged flow field which may assist us in understanding the observed phenomena and to explain experimental results. However, for successful calculations the applicability and limitations of the models must be known. (orig.) 78 refs.

  5. Ventilation-perfusion distribution in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kenneth C; Johnson, Bruce D; Olson, Thomas P; Wilson, Theodore A

    2012-09-01

    Functional values of LogSD of the ventilation distribution (σ(V)) have been reported previously, but functional values of LogSD of the perfusion distribution (σ(q)) and the coefficient of correlation between ventilation and perfusion (ρ) have not been measured in humans. Here, we report values for σ(V), σ(q), and ρ obtained from wash-in data for three gases, helium and two soluble gases, acetylene and dimethyl ether. Normal subjects inspired gas containing the test gases, and the concentrations of the gases at end-expiration during the first 10 breaths were measured with the subjects at rest and at increasing levels of exercise. The regional distribution of ventilation and perfusion was described by a bivariate log-normal distribution with parameters σ(V), σ(q), and ρ, and these parameters were evaluated by matching the values of expired gas concentrations calculated for this distribution to the measured values. Values of cardiac output and LogSD ventilation/perfusion (Va/Q) were obtained. At rest, σ(q) is high (1.08 ± 0.12). With the onset of ventilation, σ(q) decreases to 0.85 ± 0.09 but remains higher than σ(V) (0.43 ± 0.09) at all exercise levels. Rho increases to 0.87 ± 0.07, and the value of LogSD Va/Q for light and moderate exercise is primarily the result of the difference between the magnitudes of σ(q) and σ(V). With known values for the parameters, the bivariate distribution describes the comprehensive distribution of ventilation and perfusion that underlies the distribution of the Va/Q ratio.

  6. Oxygen consumption and ventilation during simulated escape from an offshore oil platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J A; Henderson, G D; Howie, R M

    1997-03-01

    Twenty-six male workers from the North Sea offshore oil industry took part in a simulated escape exercise at the Offshore Fire Training Centre. The course was 370 m long and had 19.4 m of vertical ascent and descent using the stairs on simulated offshore structures. Inspired ventilation and oxygen consumption were measured using the P. K. Morgan "Oxylog' and subjects breathed through the apparatus by mouthpiece and one-way valve assembly while wearing a nose clip. On comparison with anthropometric data from larger studies, this sample of the offshore work-force was thought to be representative. The mean duration of the exercise period was 371 s (SD = 24 s, range = 325-424 s). Mean oxygen consumption standing still at the start of the trial was 0.421 min-1 (SD = 0.101 min-1, max. = 0.611 min-1) and mean ventilation 12.351 min-1 (SD = 4.251 min-1, max. = 22.271 min-1). During exercise, the mean oxygen consumption rose to 2.711 min-1 (SD = 0.641 min-1, max = 4.051 min-1) and mean ventilation reached 46.341 min-1 (SD = 15.831 min-1, max = 87.361 min-1) during the fifth minute of exercise. At the end of the exercise period, oxygen consumption returned to resting values after 2 min and ventilation after 3 min. There was no indication of an oxygen debt. Oxygen consumption and ventilation were related to body weight and the maximum figures for ventilation and oxygen consumption were seen in individuals of over the 95th centile for weight who completed the exercise more quickly than other subjects. Draft standards for respiratory protective equipment for use during escape from fire do not specify the breathing volumes identified in this study, and which are considerably higher than those being currently considered. Additionally, the atmospheric conditions near a fire are likely to stimulate ventilation to considerably higher levels than those identified here. Accordingly, such equipment is likely to limit physical performance if a similar intensity of exercise is necessary

  7. Recent innovations in mechanical ventilator support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Chopra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation as a means to provide basic lifesaving ventilatory support has grown leaps and bounds in the recent years. The basic modes of ventilation have seen a sea change and in addition other innovative techniques have been developed to prevent lung injury, ease of weaning and improve patient comfort. These modes and techniques though easily available are not adequately utilized for benefits of patient usually due to lack of knowledge about them. This article reviews some of these newer modes and innovations in mechanical ventilatory support.

  8. Methods of evaluating cleanliness of ventilation ducts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹勇; 罗运有; 于丹; 甘丽斯

    2009-01-01

    A testing system for evaluating cleanliness of ventilation ducts was constructed. Comparisons of four evaluation methods for quantifying the amount of dust on the inner surface of ventilation ducts are presented. The experimental results show that the wiping by solvent method is more efficient than that by the wiping method,especially used on low cleanliness duct surface. The gravimetric tape method is an efficient method of collecting dust samples on the duct surface with low amounts of dust,particularly used to check the cleanliness level after the cleaning work. The optical method can be set up rapidly and is useful for fieldwork measurements.

  9. Preoperational test report, recirculation ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-11

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102 and supports the ability to exhaust air from each tank. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a fan, condenser, and moisture separator; equipment is located inside each respective tank farm in its own hardened building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  10. Short Term Airing by Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Perino, M.

    2010-01-01

    principles is necessary. The present study analyses and presents the results of an experimental evaluation of airing performance in terms of ventilation characteristics, IAQ and thermal comfort. It includes investigations of the consequences of opening time, opening frequency, opening area and expected...... airflow rate, ventilation efficiency, thermal comfort and dynamic temperature conditions. A suitable laboratory test rig was developed to perform extensive experimental analyses of the phenomenon under controlled and repeatable conditions. The results showed that short-term window airing is very effective...... and can provide both acceptable IAQ and thermal comfort conditions in buildings....

  11. Improving comfort and health with personalized ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    The thermal environment and air quality in buildings affects occupants¿ health, comfort and performance. The heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) of buildings today is designed to provide a uniform room environment. However, large individual differences exist between occupants in regard...... microenvironment. Furthermore, HVAC systems should be designed to protect occupants from airborne transmission of infectious agents that may be present in exhaled air. Personalized ventilation is a new development in the field of HVAC and has the potential to fulfil the above requirements. This paper reviews...

  12. Early Mobilization of Mechanically Ventilated Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Pam

    2016-12-01

    Critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation are least likely to be mobilized and, as a result, are at-risk for prolonged complications from weakness. The use of bed rest and sedation when caring for mechanically ventilated patients is likely shaped by historical practice; however, this review demonstrates early mobilization, with little to no sedation, is possible and safe. Assessing readiness for mobilization in context of progressing patients from passive to active activities can lead to long-term benefits and has been achievable with resource-efficient implementations and team work.

  13. VENTILATION INFLUENCE UPON INDOOR AIR RADON LEVEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田德源

    1995-01-01

    Levels of indoor radon in air are studied by a continuous electrostatic radon monitor under normal living conditions to evaluate the influence of air conditioned ventilation on indoor air radon level.Results show that the indoor air radon concentrations are not much more than those without household conditioner living condition.although using household conditioner requires a sealed room which should lead to a higher radon level.Turning on air conditioner helps lower indoor radon level.Therefore.the total indoor air Rn levels are normal>ventilation>exhaust or indraft> exhaust plus indraft.

  14. Design of Energy Efficient Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    The focus in the development has for both systems been to minimise energy consumption while maintaining a comfortable and healthy indoor environment. The natural next step in this development is to develop ventilation concepts that utilises and combines the best features from each system[Mechanic......The focus in the development has for both systems been to minimise energy consumption while maintaining a comfortable and healthy indoor environment. The natural next step in this development is to develop ventilation concepts that utilises and combines the best features from each system...

  15. Study of the Human Breathing Flow Profile in a Room with three Different Ventilation Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olmedo, Ines; Nielsen, Peter V.; de Adana, Manuel Ruiz;

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the characteristics of human exhalation through the mouth with three different ventilation strategies: displacement ventilation, mixing ventilation and without ventilation. Experiments were conducted with one breathing thermal manikin in a full scale test room where the ex...

  16. Study of the Human Breathing Flow Profile with Three Different Ventilation Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Cortes, Ines Olmedo; Ruiz de Adana, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the characteristics of human exhalation through the mouth with three different ventilation strategies: displacement ventilation, mixing ventilation and without ventilation. Experiments were conducted with one breathing thermal manikin in a full scale test room where the ex...

  17. Efficient ventilation in school buildings. Design guidebook; Ventilation performante dans les ecoles. Guide de conception

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This guidebook aims at giving practical advices for the design of ventilation systems for school buildings in order to maintain air quality levels and energy consumptions conformable with the real needs: 1 - the specific problem of schools (various types of rooms, particular indoor pollutions); 2 - main criteria to consider (air quality and hygiene, hygro-thermal comfort, ventilation efficiency, acoustic comfort, energy mastery); 3 - main existing solutions (simple-flux blow-off or blow-in mechanical ventilation systems, dual-flux systems, air conditioning systems); 4 - choice of an adapted solution (selection criteria, global solution for the school); setting-up and follow-up (rules, training, maintenance). (J.S.)

  18. Elective ventilation for organ donation: law, policy and public ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, John

    2013-03-01

    This paper examines questions concerning elective ventilation, contextualised within English law and policy. It presents the general debate with reference both to the Exeter Protocol on elective ventilation, and the considerable developments in legal principle since the time that that protocol was declared to be unlawful. I distinguish different aspects of what might be labelled elective ventilation policies under the following four headings: 'basic elective ventilation'; 'epistemically complex elective ventilation'; 'practically complex elective ventilation'; and 'epistemically and practically complex elective ventilation'. I give a legal analysis of each. In concluding remarks on their potential practical viability, I emphasise the importance not just of ascertaining the legal and ethical acceptability of these and other forms of elective ventilation, but also of assessing their professional and political acceptability. This importance relates both to the successful implementation of the individual practices, and to guarding against possible harmful effects in the wider efforts to increase the rates of posthumous organ donation.

  19. The Effects of Ventilation in Homes on Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wargocki, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    and to reduce emissions. Often, especially in existing buildings, this strategy is difficult to implement, in which case exposures are controlled by providing sufficient, presumably clean, outdoor ventilation air to dilute and remove the contaminants. The present paper attempts to find out how much ventilation...... in existing homes. No data were found indicating that buildings having dedicated natural ventilation systems perform less well than the dwellings in which mechanical ventilation systems are installed. Newly installed mechanical ventilation systems were observed to improve health conditions. In homes...... Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality and improving ventilation measurements). Exposures should also be controlled using different ventilation methods for comparison. Future studies should also advance the understanding of how ventilation systems should be operated to achieve optimal performance. These data...

  20. Adaptive support ventilation: State of the art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation is one of the most commonly applied interventions in intensive care units. Despite its life-saving role, it can be a risky procedure for the patient if not applied appropriately. To decrease risks, new ventilator modes continue to be developed in an attempt to improve patient outcomes. Advances in ventilator modes include closed-loop systems that facilitate ventilator manipulation of variables based on measured respiratory parameters. Adaptive support ventilation (ASV is a positive pressure mode of mechanical ventilation that is closed-loop controlled, and automatically adjust based on the patient′s requirements. In order to deliver safe and appropriate patient care, clinicians need to achieve a thorough understanding of this mode, including its effects on underlying respiratory mechanics. This article will discuss ASV while emphasizing appropriate ventilator settings, their advantages and disadvantages, their particular effects on oxygenation and ventilation, and the monitoring priorities for clinicians.

  1. Evolution of E2 transition strength in deformed hafnium isotopes from new measurements on $^{172}$Hf, $^{174}$Hf, and $^{176}$Hf

    CERN Document Server

    Rudigier, M; Dannhoff, M; Gerst, R-B; Jolie, J; Saed-Samii, N; Stegemann, S; Régis, J-M; Robledo, L M; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R; Blazhev, A; Fransen, Ch; Warr, N; Zell, K O

    2015-01-01

    The available data for E2 transition strengths in the region between neutron-deficient Hf and Pt isotopes are far from complete. More and precise data are needed to enhance the picture of structure evolution in this region and to test state-of-the-art nuclear models. In a simple model, the maximum collectivity is expected at the middle of the major shell. However, for actual nuclei, this picture may no longer be the case, and one should use a more realistic nuclear-structure model. We address this point by studying the spectroscopy of Hf. We remeasure the 2^+_1 half-lives of 172,174,176Hf, for which there is some disagreement in the literature. The main goal is to measure, for the first time, the half-lives of higher-lying states of the rotational band. The new results are compared to a theoretical calculation for absolute transition strengths. The half-lives were measured using \\gamma-\\gamma and conversion-electron-\\gamma delayed coincidences with the fast timing method. For the determination of half-lives i...

  2. Ral-GTPases: approaching their 15 minutes of fame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Larry A

    2003-08-01

    Andy Warhol, the famous pop artist, once claimed that "in the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes". The same, it seems, can be said of proteins, because at any given time some proteins become more "fashionable" to study than others. But most proteins have been highly conserved throughout millions of years of evolution, which implies that they all have essential roles in cell biology. Thus, each one will no doubt enter the limelight if the right experiment in the right cell type is done. A good example of this is the Ras-like GTPases (Ral-GTPases), which until recently existed in the shadow of their close cousins--the Ras proto-oncogenes. Recent studies have yielded insights into previously unappreciated roles for Ral-GTPases in intensively investigated disciplines such as vesicle trafficking, cell morphology, transcription and possibly even human oncogenesis.

  3. Electron Crystallographic Study on Structure Determination for Minute Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fanghua; FAN Haifu; WAN Zhenghua; HU Jianjun; TANG Dong

    2007-01-01

    @@ In the 1970s the development of high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) provided a new approach to structure determination for minute crystals, which is thoroughly different from the diffraction methods.However, the previous method of trial and error has its own limits, such as some preliminary structural information must be known in advance; the crystals must be sufficient strong under the electron beam irradiation;and not all atoms can be seen in the image. Two ideas were proposed to initiate the present research project:one is to transform an arbitrary image into the crystal structure map, and the other is to enhance the image resolution by combining the information contained in the image and the corresponding electron diffraction pattern. These ideas have been realized via the combination of electron microscopy and diffraction crystallography.

  4. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis: Probing the First 20 Minutes

    CERN Document Server

    Steigman, G

    2003-01-01

    Within the first 20 minutes of the evolution of the hot, dense, early Universe, astrophysically interesting abundances of deuterium, helium-3, helium-4, and lithium-7 were synthesized by the cosmic nuclear reactor. The primordial abundances of these light nuclides produced during Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) are sensitive to the universal density of baryons and to the early-Universe expansion rate which at early epochs is governed by the energy density in relativistic particles (``radiation'') such as photons and neutrinos. Some 380 kyr later, when the cosmic background radiation (CBR) radiation was freed from the embrace of the ionized plasma of protons and electrons, the spectrum of temperature fluctuations imprinted on the CBR also depended on the baryon and radiation densities. The comparison between the constraints imposed by BBN and those from the CBR reveals a remarkably consistent picture of the Universe at two widely separated epochs in its evolution. Combining these two probes leads to new and tig...

  5. Minutes of the fourth SALE program participants meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    This report is a documentation of the presentations made to the Fourth Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (S.A.L.E.) Program Participants Meeting at Argonne, Illinois, July 8-9, 1981. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and was coordinated by the S.A.L.E. Program of the New Brunswick Laboratory. The objective of the meeting was to provide a forum through which administration of the Program and methods appropriate to the analysis of S.A.L.E. Program samples could be discussed. The Minutes of the Meeting is a collection of presentations by the speakers at the meeting and of the discussions following the presentations. The presentations are included as submitted by the speakers. The discussion sections were transcribed from tape recordings of the meeting and were edited to clarify and emphasize important comments. Seventeen papers have been abstracted and indexed.

  6. Comparative study of atomic-layer-deposited HfO2/Al2O3, Hf0.8Al0.2Ox and Hf0.5Al0.5Ox on N-GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinjiang; Lv, Hongliang; Zhang, Yuming; Zhang, Yimen; Qin, Zaiyang

    2016-11-01

    Interfacial properties of n-GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOSCAPs) with the gate dielectrics of HfO2/Al2O3, Hf0.8Al0.2Ox and Hf0.5Al0.5Ox are investigated. The results reveal that Hf0.5Al0.5Ox has larger permittivity and lower interface trap density than that of HfO2/Al2O3. In order to explain the result from the physical perspective, the XPS tests of all three samples are performed. It is found that the main reason to form interface trap of three samples treated with 500 °C post-deposition annealing, is attributed to the interfacial component of Ga2O3 and The Hf0.5Al0.5Ox dielectric is beneficial to reducing the formation of Ga2O3.

  7. Universal functional form of 1-minute raindrop size distribution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugerone, Katia; De Michele, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall remains one of the poorly quantified phenomena of the hydrological cycle, despite its fundamental role. No universal laws describing the rainfall behavior are available in literature. This is probably due to the continuous description of rainfall, which is a discrete phenomenon, made by drops. From the statistical point of view, the rainfall variability at particle size scale, is described by the drop size distribution (DSD). With this term, it is generally indicated as the concentration of raindrops per unit volume and diameter, as the probability density function of drop diameter at the ground, according to the specific problem of interest. Raindrops represent the water exchange, under liquid form, between atmosphere and earth surface, and the number of drops and their size have impacts in a wide range of hydrologic, meteorologic, and ecologic phenomena. DSD is used, for example, to measure the multiwavelength rain attenuation for terrestrial and satellite systems, it is an important input for the evaluation of the below cloud scavenging coefficient of the aerosol by precipitation, and is of primary importance to make estimates of rainfall rate through radars. In literature, many distributions have been used to this aim (Gamma and Lognormal above all), without statistical supports and with site-specific studies. Here, we present an extensive investigation of raindrop size distribution based on 18 datasets, consisting in 1-minute disdrometer data, sampled using Joss-Waldvogel or Thies instrument in different locations on Earth's surface. The aim is to understand if an universal functional form of 1-minute drop diameter variability exists. The study consists of three main steps: analysis of the high order moments, selection of the model through the AIC index and test of the model with the use of goodness-of-fit tests.

  8. Comparison of efficacy of pressure-controlled ventilation and volume-controlled ventilation in children undergoing laparoscopic surgery%腹腔镜手术患儿压力控制通气和容量控制通气效果的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯继峰; 郑剑秋; 周蜀克

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy of pressure-controlled ventilation and volume-controlled ventilation in children undergoing laparoscopic surgery.Methods Thirty ASA Ⅰ or Ⅱ children of both sexes,aged 12-36 months,weighing 9-15 kg,scheduled for laparoscopic surgery,were randomly divided into two groups (n =15 each):pressure-controlled ventilation group (group P) and volume-controlled ventilation group (group Ⅴ).After anesthesia was induced with propofol 2-4 mg/kg,vecuronium 0.1 mg/kg and fentanyl 2 μg/kg,the children received endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation.The maximum inspiratory pressure was adjusted to make the tidal volume (VT) achieve 12 ml/kg in group P and the VT was set at 12 ml/kg in group V.The end-tidal pressure of carbon dioxide (PET CO2) was controlled at 35-45 mm Hg.The mean arterial blood pressure (MAP),heart rate (HR),arterial carbpn dioxide tension (PaCO2),PETCO2,minute ventilation and peak airway pressure were recorded immediately after intubation (T0),immediately before skin incision (T1),after 30 minutes of pneumoperitoneum (T2) and 15 minutes after the end of pneumoperitoneum (T3).Arterial blood samples were taken at the same time points mentioned above for blood gas analysis.Dynamic lung compliance and the ratio of the physiological dead space to the tidal volume were calculated.Results Compared with group Ⅴ,PaCO2 and PET CO2 were significantly decreased and dynamic lung compliance was significantly increased at T1-2,and minute ventilation and peak airway pressure were significantly decreased at T0-3 in group P (P < 0.01).There was no significant difference in MAP,HR and the ratio of the physiological dead space to the tidal volume between the two groups (P > 0.05).Conclusion Compared with volume-controlled ventilation,pressure-controlled ventilation can better improve the ventilatory efficacy,is more beneficial to gas exchange and reduces the influence of pneumoperitoneum on respiratory function in children

  9. First 100 ms of HF modification at Tromso, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuth, F. T.; Isham, B.; Rietveld, M. T.; Hagfors, T.; La Hoz, C.

    Experiments were performed with the high-power high-frequency HF facility at Troms o Norway to test theoretical predictions for the excitation of ion and Langmuir oscillations in the ionosphere The principal diagnostic of wave-plasma interactions was the VHF radar at the European Incoherent Scatter EISCAT facility High resolution radar techniques were used to monitor the temporal development of the ion and Langmuir oscillations HF pulses 100 ms in duration were periodically transmitted into a smooth background F region plasma Measurements of the radar backscatter spectra show that all key spectral features predicted by strong Langmuir turbulence SLT theory modified Zakharov model are simultaneously present in the plasma and that their evolution is in agreement with theoretical expectations However several new features have been observed that cannot be anticipated by current theory because of limitations in the electric field strength within the simulations The experimental results reinforce the notion that new theoretical developments are needed to accommodate the large HF electric fields produced at Troms o and HAARP Gakona Alaska and to treat the electron acceleration process in a self-consistent fashion The F region response to two HF effective radiated power levels sim 58 MW and sim 125 MW was investigated at Troms o These ERP values include absorptive losses resulting from the sunlit D region In general the results at 58 MW ERP and 125 MW ERP are consistent with many of the SLT

  10. The multilayer Fe/Hf studied with slow positron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashige, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Nakajyo, T.; Koizumi, T.; Kanazawa, I.; Komori, F.; Ito, Y.

    1997-04-01

    The positron annihilation parameter versus the incident positron energy is measured in the thin Fe films and the Fe/Hf bilayer on silica substrate, by means of the variable energetic slow-positron beam technique. We have analyzed the change in open-volume spaces and vacancy-type defects among the Fe microcrystals in these thin films with the deposition temperature.

  11. A CMOS OTA for HF filters with programmable transfer function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Zwan, Eric J.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Seevinck, E.; Seevinck, Evert

    1991-01-01

    A CMOS operational transconductance amplifier (OTA) for programmable HF filters is presented. When used in an OTA-C integrator, the unity-gain frequency phase error remains less than 0.3° for frequencies up to more than one tenth of the OTA bandwidth. The OTA has built-in phase compensation, which

  12. Hf isotope evidence for a hidden mantle reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizzarro, Martin; Simonetti, A.; Stevenson, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    High-precision Hf isotopic analyses and U-Pb ages of carbonatites and kimberlites from Greenland and eastern North America, including Earth's oldest known carbonatite (3 Ga), indicate derivation from an enriched mantle source. This previously unidentified mantle reservoir-marked by an unradiogeni...

  13. Origin of excess 176Hf in meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Kristine; Connelly, James; Bizzarro, Martin

    2010-01-01

    After considerable controversy regarding the (176)Lu decay constant (lambda(176)Lu), there is now widespread agreement that (1.867 +/- 0.008) x 10(-11) yr(-1) as confirmed by various terrestrial objects and a 4557 Myr meteorite is correct. This leaves the (176)Hf excesses that are correlated with...

  14. Very early passive cycling exercise in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients: physiological and safety aspects--a case series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruy Camargo Pires-Neto

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Early mobilization can be performed in critically ill patients and improves outcomes. A daily cycling exercise started from day 5 after ICU admission is feasible and can enhance functional capacity after hospital discharge. In the present study we verified the physiological changes and safety of an earlier cycling intervention (< 72 hrs of mechanical ventilation in critical ill patients. METHODS: Nineteen hemodynamically stable and deeply sedated patients within the first 72 hrs of mechanical ventilation were enrolled in a single 20 minute passive leg cycling exercise using an electric cycle ergometer. A minute-by-minute evaluation of hemodynamic, respiratory and metabolic variables was undertaken before, during and after the exercise. Analyzed variables included the following: cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, central venous blood oxygen saturation, respiratory rate and tidal volume, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and blood lactate levels. RESULTS: We enrolled 19 patients (42% male, age 55 ± 17 years, SOFA = 6 ± 3, SAPS3 score = 58 ± 13, PaO2/FIO2 = 223 ± 75. The median time of mechanical ventilation was 1 day (02, and 68% (n=13 of our patients required norepinephrine (maximum concentration = 0.47 µg.kg(-1.min(-1. There were no clinically relevant changes in any of the analyzed variables during the exercise, and two minor adverse events unrelated to hemodynamic instability were observed. CONCLUSIONS: In our study, this very early passive cycling exercise in sedated, critically ill, mechanically ventilated patients was considered safe and was not associated with significant alterations in hemodynamic, respiratory or metabolic variables even in those requiring vasoactive agents.

  15. Evaluating time between birth to cry or bag and mask ventilation using mobile delivery room timers in India: the NICHD Global Network's Helping Babies Breathe Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somannavar, Manjunath S; Goudar, Shivaprasad S; Revankar, Amit P; Moore, Janet L; McClure, Elizabeth M; Destefanis, Pablo; DeCain, Martha; Goco, Norman; Wright, Linda L

    2015-08-06

    The Golden Minute®, the first minute following birth of a newborn, is a critical period for establishing ventilation after delivery, as emphasized in the Helping Babies Breathe® and other resuscitation training programs. Previous studies have reinforced training through observers' evaluation of this time period; although observation is useful for research, it may not be a sustainable method to support resuscitation practice in low-resource settings where few birth attendants are available. In order to reinforce resuscitation within The Golden Minute®, we sought to develop a simple mobile delivery-room timer on an Android cell phone platform for birth attendants to use at the time of delivery. We developed and evaluated a mobile delivery room timer to document the time interval from birth to the initiation of newborn crying/spontaneous respiration or bag and mask ventilation in a convenience sample of women who delivered in five hospitals in Karnataka, India. The mobile delivery room timer is an Android cell phone-based application that recorded key events including crowning, delivery, and crying/spontaneous respiration or bag and mask ventilation. The mobile delivery room timer recorded the birth attendant verbally indicating the time of crowning, birth-(defined as when the entire baby was delivered), crying/spontaneous respiration or bag and mask ventilation. The mobile delivery room timer results were validated in a subsample by a trained observer (nurse) who independently recorded the time between delivery and initiation of crying/spontaneous respiration or bag and mask ventilation. Of the total 4,597 deliveries, 2,107 (46%) were timed; a sample (n = 438) of these deliveries was also observed by a trained nurse. There was high concordance between the mobile delivery room timer and observed time elapsed between birth and crying/spontaneous respiration or ventilation (correlation =0.94, p delivery room timer application was feasible to use during delivery and

  16. Self-diffusion of Er and Hf inpure and HfO/sub 2/-doped polycrystalline Er/sub 2/O/sub 3/. [Hf-175 and Er-169

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheidecker, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Using a tracer technique, self-diffusion of Er and Hf was measured over the approximate temperature interval of 1600 to 1970/sup 0/C in pure and HfO/sub 2/-doped polycryatalline Er/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Up to about 10 m/o HfO/sub 2/ dopant level, the Er self-diffusion coefficients followed a relationship based on cation vacancies. Above 10 m/o HfO/sub 2/, deviation from this relationship occurred, apparently due to clustering of cation vacancies and oxygen interstitials around the dopant hafnia ion. The activation energy for the self-diffusion of Er in pure Er/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was 82.2 Kcal/mole and increased with the HfO/sub 2/ dopant level present. Self-diffusion of Hf was measured in pure Er/sub 2/O/sub 3/ having two impurity levels, and a separation of the grain boundary. The volume diffusion of Hf showed both extrinsic and intrinsic behavior with the transition temperature increasing with the impurity level present in Er/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The activation energy for Hf volume diffusion in the intrinsic region was high, i.e. 235 -+ 9.5 Kcal/mole. The grain boundary diffusion was apparently extrinsic over the entire temperature interval Very low Hf self diffusion rates were found in both pure and HfO/sub 2/ doped Er/sub 2/O/sub 3/ compositions. Despite a clustering effect, the HfO/sub 2/ dopant increased the Hf volume diffusion coefficients.

  17. Ventilation modalities in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morini, Francesco; Capolupo, Irma; van Weteringen, Willem; Reiss, Irwin

    2017-06-01

    Neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia are among the more complex patients to support with mechanical ventilation. They have particular features that add to the difficulties already present in the neonatal patient. A ventilation strategy tailored to the patient's underlying physiology rather than mode of ventilation is a crucial issue for clinicians treating these delicate patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hybrid Ventilation in New and Retrofitted Office Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    The scope of this annex is to obtain better knowledge of the use of hybrid ventilation technologies. The annex will focus on development of control strategies for hybrid ventilation, on development of methods to predict hybrid ventilation performance in office buildings and on development...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5915 - Manual emergency ventilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual emergency ventilator. 868.5915 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5915 Manual emergency ventilator. (a) Identification. A manual emergency ventilator is a device, usually incorporating a bag and valve, intended...

  20. Study on the applicability of the desk replacement ventilation concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, M.G.L.C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes an experimental and numerical study into a ventilation concept that combines displacement ventilation with task conditioning, the so-called desk displace-ment ventilation (DDV) concept. The study uses steady-state and transient results to discuss the applicability of the DDV co

  1. Study on the applicability of the desk displacement ventilation concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, Marcel G.L.C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes an experimental and numerical study into a ventilation concept that combines displacement ventilation with task conditioning, the so-called desk displacement ventilation (DDV) concept. The study uses steady-state and transient results to discuss the applicability of the DDV con

  2. Experimental Analysis and Model Validation of an Opaque Ventilated Facade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, F. Peci; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Heiselberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Natural ventilation is a convenient way of reducing energy consumption in buildings. In this study an experimental module of an opaque ventilated façade (OVF) was built and tested for assessing its potential of supplying free ventilation and air preheating for the building. A numerical model was ...

  3. 21 CFR 888.4230 - Cement ventilation tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement ventilation tube. 888.4230 Section 888.4230...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4230 Cement ventilation tube. (a) Identification. A cement ventilation tube is a tube-like device usually made of plastic intended to be inserted...

  4. 49 CFR 192.173 - Compressor stations: Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressor stations: Ventilation. 192.173 Section... NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design of Pipeline Components § 192.173 Compressor stations: Ventilation. Each compressor station building must be ventilated to ensure...

  5. [Monitorization of respiratory mechanics in the ventilated patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Prieto, E; Amado-Rodríguez, L; Albaiceta, G M

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring during mechanical ventilation allows the measurement of different parameters of respiratory mechanics. Accurate interpretation of these data can be useful for characterizing the situation of the different components of the respiratory system, and for guiding ventilator settings. In this review, we describe the basic concepts of respiratory mechanics, their interpretation, and their potential use in fine-tuning mechanical ventilation.

  6. 21 CFR 868.5955 - Intermittent mandatory ventilation attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intermittent mandatory ventilation attachment. 868.5955 Section 868.5955 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... mandatory ventilation attachment. (a) Identification. An intermittent mandatory ventilation (IMV)...

  7. Proceedings of the 7th international mine ventilation congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasilewski, S. (ed.)

    2001-07-01

    The proceedings contains 139 papers covering the topics: ventilation analysis; heat assessment; methane emission and drainage; human factors; health and contaminations; fans and systems; dust generation and control; ventilation network and simulation systems and virtual reality; mine explosions; ventilation studies; mine fire determination planning; mine fires prevention studies; diesels; and case studies. Selected papers have been abstracted for IEA Coal Research coal abstract database.

  8. 46 CFR 58.01-45 - Machinery space, ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machinery space, ventilation. 58.01-45 Section 58.01-45... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-45 Machinery space, ventilation. Each machinery space must be ventilated to ensure that, when machinery or boilers are operating at full power in...

  9. Air Distribution and Ventilation Effectiveness in a room with Floor/Ceiling Heating and Mixing/Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Fang, Lei; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated different combinations of floor/ceiling heating with mixing/displacement ventilation and their impacts on the indoor air distribution and ventilation effectiveness. Measurements were performed in a room during heating season in December. The results show that indoor...... combined with floor/ceiling heating systems is approximately equal to 1.0, and ventilation effectiveness of displacement ventilation system combined with floor/ceiling heating systems ranges from 1.0 to 1.2. The floor/ceiling heating systems combined with mixing ventilation system have more uniform indoor...... air distribution but smaller ventilation effectiveness compared with the floor/ceiling heating systems combined with displacement ventilation system. With regard to the building heat loss increased by non-uniform indoor air distribution and small ventilation effectiveness, there should be an optimal...

  10. Helium implanted $\\rm\\underline{Al}$Hf as studied by 181Ta TDPAC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Govindaraj; K P Gopinathan; B Viswanathan

    2000-06-01

    Time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) measurement on $\\rm\\underline{Al}$Hf reference sample has shown that a fraction 0.88 of probe nuclei are defect free and are occupying the substitutional sites in fcc Al matrix, and the remaining are associated with Hf solute clusters. Measurements on helium implanted sample indicate the binding of helium associated defects by Hf solute clusters. Isochronal annealing measurements indicate the dissociation of the helium implantation induced defects from Hf solute clusters for annealing treatments beyond 650 K. On comparison of the present results with that reported in $\\rm\\underline{Cu}$Hf subjected to identical helium implantation, it is inferred that the Hf solute clusters in $\\rm\\underline{Al}$Hf bind less strongly the helium associated defects than in $\\rm\\underline{Cu}$Hf.

  11. Processing and crystallographic structure of non-equilibrium Si-doped HfO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Dong; Fancher, Chris M.; Esteves, Giovanni; Jones, Jacob L., E-mail: jacobjones@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Zhao, Lili [School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi' an 710127 (China)

    2015-06-28

    Si-doped HfO{sub 2} was confirmed to exist as a non-equilibrium state. The crystallographic structures of Si-doped HfO{sub 2} were studied using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction and the Rietveld refinement method. Incorporation of Si into HfO{sub 2} and diffusion of Si out of (Hf,Si)O{sub 2} were determined as a function of calcination temperature. Higher thermal energy input at elevated calcination temperatures resulted in the formation of HfSiO{sub 4}, which is the expected major secondary phase in Si-doped HfO{sub 2}. The effect of SiO{sub 2} particle size (nano- and micron-sized) on the formation of Si-doped HfO{sub 2} was also determined. Nano-crystalline SiO{sub 2} was found to incorporate into HfO{sub 2} more readily.

  12. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1CLMA-2HF5A [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1CLMA-2HF5A 1CLM 2HF5 A A LTEEQIAEFKEAFALFDKDGDGTITTKELGTVMRSLGQN...PTEAELQDMINEVDADGNGTIDFPEFLSLMARKMKEQDSEEELIEAFKVFDRDGNGLISAAELRHVMTNLGEKL--TDDEVDEMIREADIDGDGHINYEEFVRMMVS-...ntryChain> 1CLM A 1CLMA LGEKL--TD...ne> 1CLM A 1CLMA

  13. Ventilation in medium-sized and large boiler houses; Ventilation i medelstora och stoerre pannhus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotherus, Dan [AaF Installation AB, Oerebro (Sweden); Larsson, Tord [Oerebro Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Technology

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to exemplify and clarify the need for ventilation in medium-sized and large boiler houses. We will furthermore present some recommendations, guidelines and advice for the design and construction of a boiler house ventilation system to the plant owners and suppliers of equipment. Boiler house ventilation can be performed in different ways using mechanical or natural ventilation. The solution to be chosen depends on the following factors: Working environment requirements and a necessity to control temperature and pressure in the boiler house; The design of the boiler plant and house; The need for combustion air; The investment expenditure as well as operation and maintenance costs. Mechanical ventilation should be chosen if the aim is a controllable 'climate'. The mechanical ventilation can be either centrally situated or distributed with many aggregates in the boiler house. Centrally situated ventilation equipment will give a higher accessibility and lower maintenance costs than a distributed ventilation system. If the boiler house is designed with natural ventilation the air and flue gas fans will be the only ones installed. In this case temperature and pressure inside the boiler house will be difficult to control. The design factor for the ventilation plant in a boiler house is in most cases the demand to cool the air inside the boiler house to approximately 45 deg C. This is the highest temperature allowed by the Occupational Safety and Health Act in a work environment where the boiler operator is working alone. The air flow which is required for the combustion is normally less than the air flow needed to cool the air in the boiler house. The supply air which is cooling the air inside the boiler house should be supplied on several different levels to attain an efficient cooling. If the combustion air is taken from the heated indoor air the boiler house will work as a heat reclaimer. The difference between outdoor and indoor

  14. Monitoring Patient/Ventilator Interactions: Manufacturer's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Gerard; Loey, Carl Van

    2009-03-12

    The introduction of reduced and more powerful electronics has allowed the transition of medical equipment such as respiratory support devices from the hospital to the patient's home environment. Even if this move could be beneficial for the patient, the clinician ends up in a delicate situation where little or no direct supervision is possible on the delivered treatment.Progress in technologies led to an improved handling of patient-device interaction: manufacturers are promoting new or improved ventilation modes or cycling techniques for better patient-ventilator coupling. Even though these ventilation modes have become more responsive to patient efforts, adversely they might lead to events such as false triggering, autotriggering, delayed triggering.In addition, manufacturers are developing tools to enhance the follow-up, remotely or offline, of the treatment by using embedded memory in the respiratory devices. This logging might be beneficial for the caregiver to review and document the treatment and tune the settings to the patient's need and comfort. Also, remote telemedicine has been raised as a potential solution for many years without yet overall acceptance due to legal, technical and ethical problems.Benefits of new technologies in respiratory support devices give the technical foundation for the transition from hospital to home and reducing patient/ventilator asynchronies. Healthcare infrastructure has to follow this trend in terms of cost savings versus hospital stays.

  15. Ventilator associated pneumonia and infection control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alp, E.; Voss, A.

    2006-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. The incidence of VAP varies from 7% to 70% in different studies and the mortality rates are 20-75% according to the study population. Aspiration of colonized pathogenic microorganisms on

  16. Modeling ventilation time in forage tower silos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahloul, A; Chavez, M; Reggio, M; Roberge, B; Goyer, N

    2012-10-01

    The fermentation process in forage tower silos produces a significant amount of gases, which can easily reach dangerous concentrations and constitute a hazard for silo operators. To maintain a non-toxic environment, silo ventilation is applied. Literature reviews show that the fermentation gases reach high concentrations in the headspace of a silo and flow down the silo from the chute door to the feed room. In this article, a detailed parametric analysis of forced ventilation scenarios built via numerical simulation was performed. The methodology is based on the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, coupled with transport equations for the gas concentrations. Validation was achieved by comparing the numerical results with experimental data obtained from a scale model silo using the tracer gas testing method for O2 and CO2 concentrations. Good agreement was found between the experimental and numerical results. The set of numerical simulations made it possible to establish a simple analytical model to predict the minimum time required to ventilate a silo to make it safe to enter. This ventilation time takes into account the headspace above the forage, the airflow rate, and the initial concentrations of O2 and CO2. The final analytical model was validated with available results from the literature.

  17. Indirect Calorimetry in Mechanically Ventilated Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Matilde Jo; Kondrup, Jens; Perner, Anders

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The 2 currently available indirect calorimeters, CCM Express Indirect Calorimeter (MedGraphics, St Paul, MN) and Quark RMR ICU Indirect Calorimeter (COSMED, Rome, Italy), have not been validated against a gold standard in mechanically ventilated patients. Our aim was to do so...

  18. Improving comfort and health with personalized ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    existing knowledge on performance of personalized ventilation (PV) and on human response to it. The airflow interaction in the vicinity of the human body is analysed and its impact on thermal comfort and inhaled air quality is discussed together with control strategies and the application of PV in practice...

  19. Physiological Effects of Positive Pressure Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    CVP, and the use of PEEP up to 15cm H20 ( Teba , Dedhia, Schiebel, Blehschmidt, & Linder, 1990). Infection Nosocomial infections of the respiratory...1989). Nutritional support of the ventilator-dependent patient. Nursing Clinics of North America, 24, 407-414. Teba , L., Dedhia, H. V., Schiebel, F

  20. Displacement Ventilation by Different Types of Diffusers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Hoff, Lars; Pedersen, Lars Germann

    The paper describes measuring results of the air movement from three different types of diffusers for displacement ventilation. Two of the diffusers are lowlevel wall mounted diffusers, one with a low and one with a high initial entrainment. The third diffuser is of the floor mounted type....