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Sample records for hf mayetiola destructor

  1. Aestivation and diapause syndromes reduce the water balance requirements for pupae of the Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the water balance of aestivating (summer), diapausing (winter), and non-diapausing pupae of Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). Maintaining water requirements during pupal dormancy is particularly important because water cannot be replenished actively by drink...

  2. Avirulence effector discovery in a plant galling and plant parasitic arthropod, the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Rajat; Subramanyam, Subhashree; Zhao, Chaoyang; Chen, Ming-Shun; Harris, Marion O; Stuart, Jeff J

    2014-01-01

    Highly specialized obligate plant-parasites exist within several groups of arthropods (insects and mites). Many of these are important pests, but the molecular basis of their parasitism and its evolution are poorly understood. One hypothesis is that plant parasitic arthropods use effector proteins to defeat basal plant immunity and modulate plant growth. Because avirulence (Avr) gene discovery is a reliable method of effector identification, we tested this hypothesis using high-resolution molecular genetic mapping of an Avr gene (vH13) in the Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor), an important gall midge pest of wheat (Triticum spp.). Chromosome walking resolved the position of vH13, and revealed alleles that determine whether HF larvae are virulent (survive) or avirulent (die) on wheat seedlings carrying the wheat H13 resistance gene. Association mapping found three independent insertions in vH13 that appear to be responsible for H13-virulence in field populations. We observed vH13 transcription in H13-avirulent larvae and the salivary glands of H13-avirulent larvae, but not in H13-virulent larvae. RNA-interference-knockdown of vH13 transcripts allowed some H13-avirulent larvae to escape H13-directed resistance. vH13 is the first Avr gene identified in an arthropod. It encodes a small modular protein with no sequence similarities to other proteins in GenBank. These data clearly support the hypothesis that an effector-based strategy has evolved in multiple lineages of plant parasites, including arthropods.

  3. Application of pheromone traps for managing Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in the Southern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor Say, is an important pest of winter wheat in the Southern Great Plains of the U.S. As larvae feed behind the leaf sheath, infestations often go undetected until crop damage is evident and there are no remedial actions that can prevent economic loss once a field...

  4. The adult head morphology of the hessian fly Mayetiola destructor (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberg, Katharina; Polilov, Alexey; Harris, Marion O; Beutel, Rolf G

    2013-11-01

    The adult head of the Hessian fly Mayetiola destructor was examined and described in detail. Morphological features are evaluated with respect to phylogenetic implications and possible effects of miniaturisation. Preserved groundplan features of Diptera are the orthognathous orientation of the head, the vestiture of small microtrichia (possible autapomorphy), filiform antennae inserted frontally between the compound eyes, the presence of a clypeolabral muscle (possible autapomorphy), the presence of labellae (autapomorphy), and the presence of only one premental retractor. Potential synapomorphies of the groups assigned to Bibionomorpha are the origin of M. tentorioscapalis medialis on the frons and the loss of M. craniolacinialis. Further apomorphies of Cecidomyiidae identified in Mayetiola are the unusually massive anterior tentorial arm, the absence of the labro-epipharyngeal food channel, the absence of the lacinia, and the presence of antennal sensilla connected by a seta, a feature not known from any other group of Diptera. The very large size of the compound eyes (in relation to the entire head surface) and the complete loss of ocelli are possible effects of miniaturization. The large size of the brain (in relation to the cephalic lumen), the unusual shape of the optic lobes, and the absence of the frontal ganglion as a separate structure are probably also linked with size reduction.

  5. A sex pheromone receptor in the Hessian fly Mayetiola destructor (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin N. Andersson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor Say (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae, is a pest of wheat and belongs to a group of gall-inducing herbivores. This species has a unique life history and several ecological features that differentiate it from other Diptera such as Drosophila melanogaster and blood-feeding mosquitoes. These features include a short, non-feeding adult life stage (1-2 days and the use of a long-range sex pheromone produced and released by adult females. Sex pheromones are detected by members of the odorant receptor (OR family within the Lepidoptera, but no receptors for similar long-range sex pheromones have been characterized from the Diptera. Previously, 122 OR genes have been annotated from the Hessian fly genome, with many of them showing sex-biased expression in the antennae. Here we have expressed, in HEK293 cells, five MdesORs that display male-biased expression in antennae, and we have identified MdesOR115 as a Hessian fly sex pheromone receptor. MdesOR115 responds primarily to the sex pheromone component (2S,8E,10E-8,10-tridecadien-2-yl acetate, and secondarily to the corresponding Z,E-isomer. Certain sensory neuron membrane proteins (i.e., SNMP1 are important for responses of pheromone receptors in flies and moths. The Hessian fly genome is unusual in that it encodes six SNMP1 paralogues, of which five are expressed in antennae. We co-expressed each of the five antennal SNMP1 paralogues together with each of the five candidate sex pheromone receptors from the Hessian fly and found that they do not influence the response of MdesOR115, nor do they confer responsiveness in any of the non-responsive ORs to any of the sex pheromone components identified to date in the Hessian fly. Using Western blots, we detected protein expression of MdesOrco, all MdesSNMPs, and all MdesORs except for MdesOR113, potentially explaining the lack of response from this OR. In conclusion, we report the first functional characterization of an OR from the

  6. Genes encoding a group of related small secreted proteins from the gut of Hessian fly larvae [Mayetiola destructor (Say)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MING-SHUN CHEN; XIANG LIU; YU-CHENG ZHU; JOHN C. REESE; GERALD E. WILDE

    2006-01-01

    A group of related genes has been isolated and characterized from the gut of Hessian fly larvae [Mayetiola destructor (Say)]. Members in this group appear to encode proteins with secretary signal peptides at the N-terminals. The mature putative proteins are small, acidic proteins with calculated molecular masses of 14.5 to 15.3 kDa, and isoelectric points from 4.56 to 4.88. Northern blot analysis revealed that these genes are expressed predominantly in the gut of Hessian fly larvae and pupae. Two related genes, G10K1 and G10K2, were isolated as tandem repeats. Both genes contain three exons and two introns.The intron/exon boundaries were conserved in terms of amino acid encoding, suggesting that they arose by gene duplication. The fact that the frequency of this group of clones in a gut cDNA library higher than that of total cDNA clones encoding digestive enzymes suggested that this group of proteins may perform an important function in the gut physiology of this insect. However, the exact functions of these proteins are as yet known since no sequence similarity could be identified between these proteins and any known sequences in public databases using standard methods.

  7. A massive expansion of effector genes underlies gall-formation in the wheat pest Mayetiola destructor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Chaoyang; Escalante, Lucio Navarro; Chen, Hang

    2015-01-01

    -parasitic lifestyle. Among several adaptive modifications, we discovered an expansive reservoir of potential effector proteins. Nearly 5% of the 20,163 predicted gene models matched putative effector gene transcripts present in the M. destructor larval salivary gland. Another 466 putative effectors were discovered...... among the genes that have no sequence similarities in other organisms. The largest known arthropod gene family (family SSGP-71) was also discovered within the effector reservoir. SSGP-71 proteins lack sequence homologies to other proteins, but their structures resemble both ubiquitin E3 ligases...... in plants and E3-ligase-mimicking effectors in plant pathogenic bacteria. SSGP-71 proteins and wheat Skp proteins interact in vivo. Mutations in different SSGP-71 genes avoid the effector-triggered immunity that is directed by the wheat resistance genes H6 and H9. Results point to effectors as the agents...

  8. Unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways suggests potential involvement in plant defense against the gall midge mayetiola destructor in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glutathione, a thiol tripeptide of '-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. In this study, we found that the abundance of total glutathion...

  9. The reproductive ability of Varroa destructor in worker brood of Africanized and hybrid honey bees in Costa Rica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calderon, R.A.; Sommeijer, M.J.; Ruijter, de A.; Veen, van der J.W.

    2003-01-01

    From February to July 2001, the reproductive ability of Varroa destructor in artificially infested worker brood cells of Africanized honey bees (AHB) (Apis mellifera) and hybrids (HF1) of AHB x European honey bees was investigated in Costa Rica. No significant differences were found between AHB and

  10. Field efficacy of acaricides against Varroa destructor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, María Jesús; Moreno, Carlos; Ferrer, Montserrat; Sanz, Alfredo; Peribáñez, Miguel Ángel; Estrada, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Field trials were conducted in Northeast Spain (Aragón) to evaluate the effectiveness of two acaricides against Varroa destructor. These experiments took into account the season of the year, apiary, colony, and developmental state and strength of the colony. The acaricides used were a synthetic (amitraz, Apivar®) and a natural (formulated from Api Life Var®, thymol oil and thymol alcohol) product. The treatments used in the present study reduce high infestations of V. destructor, although they do not eliminate the infestation. Similar efficacies between treatments were found. Nevertheless, the efficacy of a treatment depends on the apiary where applied. Moreover, the detected variability in the apiary and hive poses a challenge to the identification of the significant factors. Therefore, more field studies to assess efficacies in several apiaries are needed to obtain a better understanding of the effects of the applied treatments. PMID:28158303

  11. Field efficacy of acaricides against Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, María Jesús; Moreno, Carlos; Ferrer, Montserrat; Sanz, Alfredo; Peribáñez, Miguel Ángel; Estrada, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Field trials were conducted in Northeast Spain (Aragón) to evaluate the effectiveness of two acaricides against Varroa destructor. These experiments took into account the season of the year, apiary, colony, and developmental state and strength of the colony. The acaricides used were a synthetic (amitraz, Apivar®) and a natural (formulated from Api Life Var®, thymol oil and thymol alcohol) product. The treatments used in the present study reduce high infestations of V. destructor, although they do not eliminate the infestation. Similar efficacies between treatments were found. Nevertheless, the efficacy of a treatment depends on the apiary where applied. Moreover, the detected variability in the apiary and hive poses a challenge to the identification of the significant factors. Therefore, more field studies to assess efficacies in several apiaries are needed to obtain a better understanding of the effects of the applied treatments.

  12. Immunotherapy with the storage mite lepidoglyphus destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentia-Medina, A; Tapias, J A; Martín, J F; Ventas, P; Fernández, A

    1995-01-01

    We carried out a double-blind clinical trial of immunotherapy on 35 patients sensitized to the storage mite Lepidoglyphus destructor (Ld). Before and after 12 months of specific hyposensitization (Abelló Lab., Spain) we performed in vivo (skin tests with Ld, methacholine and challenge tests), and in vitro tests (specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 to Ld and specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 to their major allergen Lep dI). We also monitored the efficacy and safety of the immunotherapy with clinical and analytical controls (symptoms and medication score, detection of immune complexes). After therapy we found a significant decrease in specific skin reactivity, dose of positive challenge tests, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Sputum eosinophilia decreased. Specific IgE to Ld was increased and we also observed an increase in specific IgG1 and IgG4 to Ld and Lep DI. The placebo group showed no changes in these variables. There were no severe secondary reactions after treatment with the extract. Patients-self-evaluation was favourable and their labour absence decreased. No development of circulating immune complexes was associated with this immunotherapy.

  13. Biology and control of Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, Peter; Aumeier, Pia; Ziegelmann, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    The ectoparasitic honey bee mite Varroa destructor was originally confined to the Eastern honey bee Apis cerana. After a shift to the new host Apis mellifera during the first half of the last century, the parasite dispersed world wide and is currently considered the major threat for apiculture. The damage caused by Varroosis is thought to be a crucial driver for the periodical colony losses in Europe and the USA and regular Varroa treatments are essential in these countries. Therefore, Varroa research not only deals with a fascinating host-parasite relationship but also has a responsibility to find sustainable solutions for the beekeeping. This review provides a survey of the current knowledge in the main fields of Varroa research including the biology of the mite, damage to the host, host tolerance, tolerance breeding and Varroa treatment. We first present a general view on the functional morphology and on the biology of the Varroa mite with special emphasis on host-parasite interactions during reproduction of the female mite. The pathology section describes host damage at the individual and colony level including the problem of transmission of secondary infections by the mite. Knowledge of both the biology and the pathology of Varroa mites is essential for understanding possible tolerance mechanisms in the honey bee host. We comment on the few examples of natural tolerance in A. mellifera and evaluate recent approaches to the selection of Varroa tolerant honey bees. Finally, an extensive listing and critical evaluation of chemical and biological methods of Varroa treatments is given. This compilation of present-day knowledge on Varroa honey bee interactions emphasizes that we are still far from a solution for Varroa infestation and that, therefore, further research on mite biology, tolerance breeding, and Varroa treatment is urgently needed.

  14. Lepidoglyphus destructor acarus in the urban house environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliá, J C; Martorell, A; Ventas, P; Cerdá, J C; Torró, I; Carreira, J; Guinot, E; Sanz, J; Alvarez, V

    1995-01-01

    To assess the presence of Lepidoglyphus destructor in the household environment of sensitized children living in an urban environment, samples of house dust were collected at the homes where two groups of patients were living, as well as in two bakeries in the city of Valencia, which were taken as a reference. Patients were divided into two groups. Group A included atopic children suffering from rhinitis and/or asthma, who were sensitized to L. destructor, as proven by prick test and specific IgE (CAP). Group B included children with the same features as those included in Group A, who were sensitized to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, with prick and CAP tests showing no significant sensitization to L. destructor. The samples of dust were analyzed, and the amounts of Der p I, Der f I, Der II and Lep d I per gram of dust were assessed through a solid-phase ELISA with monoclonal antibodies. In Group A, all patients but two showed a sensitization to D. pteronyssinus by prick test and serum IgE. At the homes of the patients from both groups, significant levels of Dermatophagoides were found. In Group A, only three houses showed levels of L. destructor which were comparable to those found in bakeries. Lep d I was not found in the houses of Group B patients. This means that a sensitization to L. destructor, as assessed with full extracts, is not always an indicator of its presence at the patient's house environment; it may rather refer to cross-reactivity to Dermatophagoides. Thus, availability of the main antigen Lep d I seems necessary to increase the specificity of the allergologic study.

  15. Morphotypes of Varroa destructor collected in Apis mellifera colonies from different geographic locations of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Matías D; Sardella, Norma H; Ruffinengo, Sergio R; Eguaras, Martín J

    2009-11-01

    Parasites display considerable phenotypic plasticity in life-history traits such as, body size. Varroa destructor is an ectoparasitic mite of the western honey bee Apis mellifera. Several studies have reported that in V. destructor, there is a wide phenotypic plasticity within a population of mites. However, it is unknown if there are morphologic variations in V. destructor populations affecting different A. mellifera populations. A morphometric study of V. destructor populations was conducted to provide information concerned to the relationships among parasite populations found in different geographic locations from A. mellifera colonies of Argentina. The hypothesis tested was different morphotypes of V. destructor populations parasitizing different A. mellifera populations from Argentina exist. A discriminant analysis employing eight morphologic variables revealed that it is possible to differentiate morphotypes of mites in Argentina. However, the level of discrimination detected among mites population varied according to the grouping of mite's population. Possible causes explaining the morphometric variability in the V. destructor populations were discussed.

  16. Resistance to the parasitic mite Varroa destructor in honey bees from far-eastern Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Rinderer, Thomas; Guzman, Lilia; Delatte, G.; Stelzer, J.; Lancaster, V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Beaman, L; Watts, R.; Harris, J.

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Varroa destructor is a parasitic mite of the Asian honey bee, Apis cerana. Owing to host range expansion, it now plagues Apis mellifera, the world's principal crop pollinator and honey producer. Evidence from A. mellifera in far-eastern Russia, Primorsky (P) originating from honey bees imported in the mid 1800's, suggested that many colonies were resistant to V. destructor. A controlled field study of the development of populations of V. destructor shows that P colonie...

  17. The antioxidant defense system of Varroa destructor mites facilitates the infestation of Apis mellifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmochowska-Ślęzak Kamila

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Varroa destructor is a parasitic mite of the Western honey bee. The activity of five antioxidant enzymes of V. destructor were analysed. Glutathione content and total antioxidant status was also evaluated. Our results suggest that antioxidant enzymes constitute the main line of defense against ROS in V. destructor, whereas low-molecular-weight antioxidants play a limited role in the antioxidant system of mites.

  18. Strategy for ecologic control in fighting Varroa destructor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanimirović Zoran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The ectoparasite Varroa destructor is one of the most wide-spread parasites of the honey bee, which is increasing its resistence to traditional synthetic acaricides more and more with each year. New regulations on quality of the European Union ban the presence of residue in bee products, which rules out the use of chemical means in the course of the honey harvest. The concept of ecologic control of Varroa destructor in honey bee colonies implies the complementary use of adequate biotechnical and biophysical measures and treatments using preparations based on etheric oils and organic acids. The combination of these treatments according to the presented strategy makes it possible to keep varroasis under control.

  19. 狄氏瓦螨(Varroa destructor)的研究进展%The research advances on Varroa destructor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜宏沪; 苏松坤; 陈盛禄; 梁勤

    2007-01-01

    狄氏瓦螨(Varroa destructor)是严重危害西方蜜蜂(Apis mellifera)的一种寄生螨,近几年对狄氏瓦螨的研究有了新的进展,本文就血统进化、生理机制、携带病原菌和最新的防治方法等领域作一综述.

  20. Tropilaelaps mercedesae and Varroa destructor: prevalence and reproduction in concurrently infested Apis mellifera colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prevalence of Tropilaelaps mercedesae and Varroa destructor in concurrently infested A. mellifera colonies in Thailand was monitored. We also assessed the reproductive ability of T. mercedesae and V. destructor in naturally infested brood and in brood cells deliberately infested with both mite g...

  1. Prevalence and reproduction of Tropilaelaps mercedesae and Varroa destructor in concurrently infested Apis mellifera colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prevalence of Tropilaelaps mercedesae and Varroa destructor in concurrently infested A. mellifera colonies in Thailand was monitored. We also assessed the fecundity of T. mercedesae and V. destructor in naturally infested brood and in brood cells deliberately infested with both mite genera. Resu...

  2. Recombinants between Deformed wing virus and Varroa destructor virus-1 may prevail in Varroa destructor-infested honeybee colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jonathan; Jironkin, Aleksey; Chandler, David; Burroughs, Nigel; Evans, David J; Ryabov, Eugene V

    2011-01-01

    We have used high-throughput Illumina sequencing to identify novel recombinants between Deformed wing virus (DWV) and Varroa destructor virus-1 (VDV-1), which accumulate to higher levels than DWV in both honeybees and Varroa destructor mites. The recombinants, VDV-1(VVD) and VDV-1(DVD), exhibit crossovers between the 5'-UTR and the regions encoding the structural (capsid) and non-structural viral proteins. This implies that the genomes are modular and that each region may evolve independently, as demonstrated in human enteroviruses. Individual honeybee pupae were infected with a mixture of observed recombinants and DWV. A strong correlation was observed between VDV-1(DVD) levels in honeybee pupae and associated mites, suggesting that this recombinant, with a DWV-derived 5'-UTR and non-structural protein region flanking a VDV-1-derived capsid-encoding region, is better adapted to transmission between V. destructor and honeybees than the parental DWV or a recombinant bearing the VDV-1-derived 5'-UTR (VDV-1(VVD)).

  3. ExtraHF survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piepoli, Massimo F; Binno, Simone; Corrà, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: In heart failure (HF), exercise training programmes (ETPs) are a well-recognized intervention to improve symptoms, but are still poorly implemented. The Heart Failure Association promoted a survey to investigate whether and how cardiac centres in Europe are using ETPs in their HF patients...... of evidence on safety or benefit was cited. When implemented, an ETP was proposed to all HF patients in only 55% of the centres, with restriction according to severity or aetiology. CONCLUSIONS: With respect to previous surveys, there is evidence of increased availability of ETPs in HF in Europe, although too...

  4. Repellency of the oily extract of neem seeds (Azadirachta indica) against Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gómez, Rebeca; Otero-Colina, Gabriel; Villanueva-Jiménez, Juan A; Peña-Valdivia, Cecilia Beatriz; Santizo-Rincón, José Antonio

    2012-03-01

    A crude oil extract of neem seed (Azadirachta indica, Sapindales: Meliaceae) was evaluated for repellency on Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman. Burgerjon's tower was used to spray worker bee pupae with 0.0, 0.3, 0.7, 1.3, 2.6, 5.3, 10.6 and 21.1% neem extract concentrations. Sprayed pupae were attached to observation arenas and incubated at 32 ± 2°C and 70 ± 10% RH. The ability of V. destructor to locate and feed on treated and untreated pupae was monitored from 30 min to 72 h after spray. Higher and more stable repellency was achieved with 2.6, 5.3, 10.6 and 21.1% neem extract. At the highest concentration, 98% of V. destructor were prevented to settle on bee pupae, resulting in 100% V. destructor mortality at 72 h.

  5. Effectiveness, persistence, and residue of amitraz plastic strips in the apiary control of Varroa destructor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Floris, I; Satta, A; Garau, VL; Melis, M; Cabras, P; Aloul, N

    2001-01-01

    An apiary trial was conducted in 1999 in Northern Sardinia (Italy) to evaluate the effectiveness and the persistence of amitraz impregnated in plastic strips against Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman...

  6. Resistance phenomena to amitraz from populations of the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Matías D; Ruffinengo, Sergio R; Negri, Pedro; Eguaras, Martín J

    2010-10-01

    In Argentina, Varroa destructor resistance to coumaphos has been previously reported. However, the status of mite susceptibility to other hard acaricides is still unknown. At present, high infestation levels of V. destructor are being detected in colonies of Apis mellifera after treatment with amitraz. The aim of the present study was to determine the LC(50) of amitraz in V. destructor from three apiaries with high mite density after treatment with the acaricide. The LC(50) values were 3.9, 3.5, and 3.7 μg/Petri dish for mites from three different apiaries. Significant LC(50) differences were detected between resistant and susceptible mites. LC(50) increased 35-39-fold when compared to the corresponding baseline, suggesting the development of resistance. These results are the first report of resistance to amitraz in V. destructor in Argentina and extend the knowledge according to the status of acaricides resistance in the country.

  7. Deformed wing virus: replication and viral load in mites (Varroa destructor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisder, Sebastian; Aumeier, Pia; Genersch, Elke

    2009-02-01

    Deformed wing virus (DWV) normally causes covert infections but can have devastating effects on bees by inducing morphological deformity or even death when transmitted by the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor. In order to determine the role of V. destructor in the development of crippled wings, we analysed individual mites for the presence and replication of DWV. The results supported the correlation between viral replication in mites and morphologically deformed bees. Quantification of viral genome equivalents revealed that mites capable of inducing an overt DWV infection contained 10(10)-10(12) genome equivalents per mite. In contrast, mites which could not induce crippled wings contained a maximum of only 10(8) viral genome equivalents per mite. We conclude that the development of crippled wings not only depends on DWV transmission by V. destructor but also on viral replication in V. destructor and on the DWV titre in the parasitizing mites.

  8. Purification and characterization of Lep d I, a major allergen from the mite Lepidoglyphus destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventas, P; Carreira, J; Polo, F

    1992-04-01

    A major allergen of the storage mite Lepidoglyphus destructor (Lep d I) has been purified by affinity chromatography using an anti-Lep d I monoclonal antibody. The purity of the protein obtained by this procedure was assessed by reverse-phase HPLC. Lep d I displayed a molecular weight of 14 kD on SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions, and 16 kD in the presence of a reducing agent. Analytical IEF revealed a little charge microheterogeneity, showing three bands with pIs 7.6-7.8. Purified Lep d I retained IgE-binding ability, as proved by immunoblotting experiments after SDS-PAGE and RAST with individual sera from L. destructor-sensitive patients. Results from the latter technique demonstrated that 87% of L. destructor-allergic patients had specific IgE to Lep d I, and a good correlation between IgE reactivity with L. destructor extract and Lep d I was found. In addition, RAST inhibition experiments showed that IgE-binding sites on Lep d I are major L. destructor-allergenic determinants, since Lep d I could inhibit up to 75% the binding of specific IgE to L. destructor extract; on the other hand, Lep d I did not cross-react with D. pteronyssinus allergens.

  9. The control of Varroa destructor using oxalic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorc, Ales; Planinc, I

    2002-05-01

    Twenty-four honeybee (Apis mellifera) colonies were used to monitor the efficacy of a solution of 2.9% oxalic acid (OA) and 31.9% sugar against the mite Varroa destructor. Mite mortality was established prior to and after OA treatments, which were conducted in August and September. The treatments resulted in 37% mite mortality as opposed to 1.11% in the controls. OA treatment conducted in September on previously untreated colonies resulted in 25% mite mortality. OA treatments in October and November resulted in approximately 97% mite mortality. These results suggest that OA is effective during the broodless period and less effective when applied to colonies with capped broods. The possible use of OA against the Varroa mite in honeybee colonies as an alternative to routine chemical treatments is discussed.

  10. Varroa destructor changes its cuticular hydrocarbons to mimic new hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Conte, Y; Huang, Z Y; Roux, M; Zeng, Z J; Christidès, J-P; Bagnères, A-G

    2015-06-01

    Varroa destructor (Vd) is a honeybee ectoparasite. Its original host is the Asian honeybee, Apis cerana, but it has also become a severe, global threat to the European honeybee, Apis mellifera. Previous studies have shown that Varroa can mimic a host's cuticular hydrocarbons (HC), enabling the parasite to escape the hygienic behaviour of the host honeybees. By transferring mites between the two honeybee species, we further demonstrate that Vd is able to mimic the cuticular HC of a novel host species when artificially transferred to this new host. Mites originally from A. cerana are more efficient than mites from A. mellifera in mimicking HC of both A. cerana and A. mellifera. This remarkable adaptability may explain their relatively recent host-shift from A. cerana to A. mellifera.

  11. Propolis chemical composition and honeybee resistance against Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, M; Reyes, M; Le Conte, Y; Bankova, V

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is known as honeybee chemical defence against infections and parasites. Its chemical composition is variable and depends on the specificity of the local flora. However, there are no data concerning the relationship between propolis chemical composition and honeybee colony health. We tried to answer this question, studying the chemical composition of propolis of bee colonies from an apiary near Avignon, which are tolerant to Varroa destructor, comparing it with colonies from the same apiary which are non-tolerant to the mites. The results indicated that non-tolerant colonies collected more resin than the tolerant ones. The percentage of four biologically active compounds - caffeic acid and pentenyl caffeates - was higher in propolis from tolerant colonies. The results of this study pave the way to understanding the effect of propolis in individual and social immunity of the honeybees. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between propolis chemical composition and honeybee colony health.

  12. Assessing Linearity of the Parasite Varroa destructor DNA Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ODAGIU Antonia

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of honeybee products make of disease prevention and control in honeybees one of the mainconcerns of beekeepers in the world. The PCR – RT reaction represents an alternative for amplification performed inorder to realize the Varroa destructor O. genotypization, very important stage in haoneybee resistance to parasitedescription and also in management of the treatments. The linearity data is a very important parameter and very usefulin determination of the amplification of the parasite DNA and success of the genotypization process. The amplificationefficiency was very satisfactory, fact revealed by the value of the regression line y = - 2.3103 * 26.552 together withcoefficient of determination equal (r2 = 0.9691, meaning that more than 96% of the reaction efficiency may beexplained by the process liniarity. The implementation of the RT-PCR method was successful and it represents apremise for validation process evolution.

  13. Frederiksberg HF kursus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maria Duclos

    2008-01-01

    Notatet bygger på et interviewmateriale med dimitterede HF-kursister 3 måneder efter endt eksamen. Notatet undersøger dels, hvad der har hjulpet til at gennemføre, dels hvad der har været negativt og vanskeligt ved uddannelsen. Endvidere belyser notatet hvad kursisterne oplever at tage med fra de...

  14. Winter Survival of Individual Honey Bees and Honey Bee Colonies Depends on Level of Varroa destructor Infestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dooremalen, van C.; Gerritsen, L.J.M.; Cornelissen, B.; Steen, van der J.J.M.; Langevelde, van F.; Blacquiere, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent elevated winter loss of honey bee colonies is a major concern. The presence of the mite Varroa destructor in colonies places an important pressure on bee health. V. destructor shortens the lifespan of individual bees, while long lifespan during winter is a primary requirement to

  15. Winter Survival of Individual Honey Bees and Honey Bee Colonies Depends on Level of Varroa destructor Infestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dooremalen, van C.; Gerritsen, L.J.M.; Cornelissen, B.; Steen, van der J.J.M.; Langevelde, van F.; Blacquiere, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent elevated winter loss of honey bee colonies is a major concern. The presence of the mite Varroa destructor in colonies places an important pressure on bee health. V. destructor shortens the lifespan of individual bees, while long lifespan during winter is a primary requirement to s

  16. Interactive effect of reduced pollen availability and Varroa destructor infestation limits growth and protein content of young honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dooremalen, C; Stam, E; Gerritsen, L; Cornelissen, B; van der Steen, J; van Langevelde, F; Blacquière, T

    2013-04-01

    Varroa destructor in combination with one or more stressors, such as low food availability or chemical exposure, is considered to be one of the main causes for honey bee colony losses. We examined the interactive effect of pollen availability on the protein content and body weight of young bees that emerged with and without V. destructor infestation. With reduced pollen availability, and the coherent reduced nutritional protein, we expected that V. destructor infestation during the pupal stage would have a larger negative effect on bee development than without infestation. Moreover, when raised with ample pollen available after emergence, infested pupae were expected not to be able to compensate for early losses due to V. destructor. We found that both V. destructor infestation and reduced pollen availability reduced body weight, abdominal protein level, and increased the head to abdomen protein ratio. The availability of pollen did indeed not result in compensation for reduced mass and protein content caused by V. destructor infestation in young bees after 1 week of their adult life. Both V. destructor and nutrition are top concerns for those studying honey bee health and this study demonstrates that both have substantial effects on young bees and that ample available pollen cannot compensate for reduced mass and protein content caused by V. destructor parasitism.

  17. Two novel viruses associated with the Apis mellifera pathogenic mite Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Sofia; Sela, Noa; Chejanovsky, Nor

    2016-11-24

    Varroa destructor infestation of Apis mellifera colonies carries and/or promotes replication of honey bee viruses like the Deformed wing virus, the Varroa destructor virus-1, the Acute bee paralysis virus, the Israeli acute bee paralysis virus and the Kashmir bee virus that have been well described and characterized; but viruses exclusively associated with Varroa were not found. To look for viruses that may associate with- or infect V. destructor we performed deep sequencing (RNA-seq) of RNA extracted from honey bees and mites in Varroa-infested untreated colonies. Comparative bioinformatic analysis of the two separate contig-assemblies generated from the sequences' reads annotated using Blastx enabled identification of new viruses unique to Varroa and absent in A. mellifera: an Iflavirus and a virus with homology to Ixodes scapularis associated virus 2, that we named Varroa destructor virus 2 (VDV-2) and 3(VDV-3), respectively. We validated these findings sequencing the mite- and honey bee-viromes and in separate mites and honey bees randomly sampled. The complete genomes of VDV-2 and VDV-3 bear 9576 nucleotides and 4202 nucleotides, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of VDV-3 suggests that it belongs to a new group of viruses. Our results open venues for investigating the pathogenicity of these V. destructor viruses.

  18. Immunolocalization of deformed wing virus particles within the mite Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillán-Galicia, Ma Teresa; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Ball, Brenda V; Alderson, Peter G

    2008-07-01

    Deformed wing virus (DWV) induces wing deformation when bees are infected during their pupal development. Field observations and laboratory experiments suggest that the mite Varroa destructor is a vector of the virus. Moreover, it has been stated that DWV replicates within this mite. In order to understand the role of V. destructor in the transmission of DWV, the objective of this work was to locate the sites of retention and/or replication of DWV within the mite by immunohistochemistry. There was no evidence that DWV was replicating in the mite as no tissues showed specific antibody binding to DWV. Also, there were no specific structures that could be suggested as retention sites. DWV was found only in the midgut lumen of V. destructor in structures resembling large, dense spheres, which were presumably faecal pellets.

  19. Variability of the honey bee mite Varroa destructor in Serbia, based on mtDNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajic, Bojan; Radulovic, Zeljko; Stevanovic, Jevrosima; Kulisic, Zoran; Vucicevic, Milos; Simeunovic, Predrag; Stanimirovic, Zoran

    2013-09-01

    Only two mitochondrial haplotypes (Korea and Japan) of Varroa destructor, the ectoparasitic honey bee mite, are known to be capable of infesting and successfully reproducing in Apis mellifera colonies worldwide. Varroa destructor (then called Varroa jacobsoni) was observed in Serbia for the first time in 1976. In order to obtain insight into the genetic variability of the mites parasitizing A. mellifera we analyzed 45 adult female mites sampled from nine localities dispersed throughout Serbia. Four fragments within cox1, atp6, cox3 and cytb mtDNA genes were sequenced. The Korea haplotype of V. destructor was found to be present at all localities, but also two new haplotypes (Serbia 1 and Peshter 1) were revealed, based on cox1 and cytb sequence variability. The simultaneous occurrence of Korea and Serbia 1 haplotypes was observed at five localities, whereas Peshter 1 haplotype was identifed at only one place.

  20. Bioactivity of propolis from different geographical origins on Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Natalia; Fernández, Natalia J; Maldonado, Luis M; Alvarez, Alejandro R; Eguaras, Martín J; Marcangeli, Jorge A

    2010-06-01

    Varroa destructor is an ectoparasitic mite that affects colonies of honey bee Apis mellifera worldwide. In the last years, substances of botanical origin have emerged as natural alternative acaricides to diminish the population levels of the mite. In the present work, the bioactivity of propolis from different geographical locations of Pampean region from Argentina on V. destructor was evaluated. Fourteen propolis samples were organoleptic and physicochemically characterized and, by means topical applications, their activity was tested on mites. All propolis had a homogeneous composition and the bioactivity levels against mites were comparable among the different propolis samples. The percentage of mites killed by the treatments ranged between 60.5% and 90% after 30 s of exposure. Thus, V. destructor was highly susceptible to propolis. Moreover, the mites remained anesthetized during the first hours after topical treatment. The results suggest that propolis from Argentinean pampas could be incorporated in honey bee colonies as acaricidal treatment by spraying.

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals mite (Varroa destructor) resistance-related proteins in Eastern honeybees (Apis cerana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, T; Shen, F; Liu, Z; Yin, L; Shen, J; Liang, Q; Luo, Y X

    2015-08-21

    The mite (Varroa destructor) has become the greatest threat to apiculture worldwide. As the original host of the mite, Apis cerana can effectively resist the mite. An increased understanding of the resistance mechanisms of Eastern honeybees against V. destructor may help researchers to protect other species against these parasites. In this study, the proteomes of 4 Apis cerana colonies were analyzed using an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation technology. We determined the differences in gene and protein expression between susceptible and resistant colonies that were either unchallenged or challenged by V. destructor. The results showed that a total of 1532 proteins were identified. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis suggested that the transcription factors and basic metabolic and respiratory processes were efficient and feasible factors controlling this resistance, and 12 differentially expressed proteins were identified in Venn analysis. The results were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. This study may provide insight into the genetic mechanisms underlying the resistance of honeybee to mites.

  2. Concurrent infestations by Aethina tumida and Varroa destructor alters thermoregulation in Apis mellifera winter clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    The small hive beetle, Aethina tumida, and the ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, are parasites of the honeybee, Apis mellifera. Both parasites overwinter in honeybee colonies. The efficacy of thermoregulation might be reduced in beetle and mite infested clusters, due to altered activity of host...

  3. Body size variability of Varroa destructor and its role in acaricide tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Matías; Peralta, Luciano; Ruffinengo, Sergio; Fuselli, S; Eguaras, Martín

    2012-06-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been defined as the ability of a genotype to produce different phenotypes when exposed to distinct environments throughout its ontogeny. Morphological variability of individuals is an example of this plasticity. Taking into account that several studies have reported a wide morphological variability in Varroa destructor populations, we evaluated if the body size plasticity of the parasite constituted a key factor able to modulate mites survival when they were exposed to a drug bioassays. Drug bioassays against mites were conducted using three different Syzygium aromaticum essential oil concentrations (0.5, 1, and 5 μl/capsule) and controls. After 4 h of exposition, mite mortality was registered. The width (WS) and length (LS) of the dorsal shield were measured in dead mites. General lineal models were carried to determine if V. destructor survival to acaricides was related to the explanatory variables. Data modelling confirmed that WS and LS variables, together with time interaction, were significantly related to V. destructor survival when the parasites were exposed to acaricides. The models proposed demonstrated that for the smaller S. aromaticum essential oil concentration, the larger the parasite body, the greater the probability that it remains alive at the end of the bioassay. Such relationship was inverse for the other two concentrations tested. Possible causes explaining the body size variability in V. destructor individuals were discussed.

  4. Brood removal influences fall of Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae) in honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hygienic removal of brood infested with Varroa destructor by Apis mellifera disrupts the reproduction of the infesting mites and exposes the foundress mites to potential removal from the colony by grooming. Using brood deliberately infested with marked Varroa, we investigated the association bet...

  5. Ligand selectivity in tachykinin and natalisin neuropeptidergic systems of the honey bee parasitic mite Varroa destructor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The varroa mite, Varroa destructor, is a devastating ectoparasite of the honey bees Apis mellifera and A. cerana. Control of these mites in beehives is a challenge in part due to the lack of toxic agents that are specific to mites and not to the host honey bee. In searching for a specific toxic targ...

  6. Selecting honey bees for worker brood that reduces the reproduction of Varroa destructor

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated an effect of Apis mellifera worker brood on the reproduction of Varroa destructor as a resistance trait by conducting seven generations of bidirectional selection. Initial tests showed two-fold differences in mite fecundity (progeny per foundress mites) between colonies of different...

  7. Disease dynamics of honeybees with Varroa destructor as parasite and virus vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    The worldwide decline in honeybee colonies during the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses carried by Varroa mites. In this article, we propose a honeybee-mite-virus model that incorporates (1) par...

  8. Comparative testing of different methods for evaluation of Varroa destructor infestation of honey bee colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay D. Dobrynin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Different methods for evaluation of the degree of Varroa destructor infestation of honey bee colonies were tested. The methods using in vivo evaluation were the most sparing for the bees but less precise. The methods using evaluation with the killing of the bees or brood were the most precise but less sparing for bees.

  9. Varroa destructor, a potential vector of Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus in honey bees, Apis mellifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the role of the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, as a vector in transmission of viruses between honey bees is well established, no study has shown that it can similarly transmit Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV), a virus that was found to be associated with Colony Collapse Disorder (CC...

  10. Pulsed inductive HF laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razhev, A M; Kargapol' tsev, E S [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Churkin, D S; Demchuk, S V [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-31

    We report the results of experimentally investigated dependences of temporal, spectral and spatial characteristics of an inductive HF-laser generation on the pump conditions. Gas mixtures H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF6{sub 6}) and He(Ne) – H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF{sub 6}) were used as active media. The FWHM pulse duration reached 0.42 μs. This value corresponded to a pulsed power of 45 kW. For the first time, the emission spectrum of an inductive HF laser was investigated, which consisted of seven groups of bands with centres around the wavelengths of 2732, 2736, 2739, 2835, 2837, 2893 and 2913 nm. The cross section profile of the laser beam was a ring with a diameter of about 20 mm and width of about 5 mm. Parameters of laser operation in the repetitively pulsed regime were sufficiently stable. The amplitude instability of light pulses was no greater than 5% – 6%. (lasers)

  11. Honey bee Apis mellifera parasites in the absence of Nosema ceranae fungi and Varroa destructor mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutler, Dave; Head, Krista; Burgher-MacLellan, Karen L; Colwell, Megan J; Levitt, Abby L; Ostiguy, Nancy; Williams, Geoffrey R

    2014-01-01

    Few areas of the world have western honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies that are free of invasive parasites Nosema ceranae (fungi) and Varroa destructor (mites). Particularly detrimental is V. destructor; in addition to feeding on host haemolymph, these mites are important vectors of several viruses that are further implicated as contributors to honey bee mortality around the world. Thus, the biogeography and attendant consequences of viral communities in the absence of V. destructor are of significant interest. The island of Newfoundland, Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, is free of V. destructor; the absence of N. ceranae has not been confirmed. Of 55 Newfoundland colonies inspected visually for their strength and six signs of disease, only K-wing had prevalence above 5% (40/55 colonies = 72.7%). Similar to an earlier study, screenings again confirmed the absence of V. destructor, small hive beetles Aethina tumida (Murray), tracheal mites Acarapis woodi (Rennie), and Tropilaelaps spp. ectoparasitic mites. Of a subset of 23 colonies screened molecularly for viruses, none had Israeli acute paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus, or sacbrood virus. Sixteen of 23 colonies (70.0%) were positive for black queen cell virus, and 21 (91.3%) had some evidence for deformed wing virus. No N. ceranae was detected in molecular screens of 55 colonies, although it is possible extremely low intensity infections exist; the more familiar N. apis was found in 53 colonies (96.4%). Under these conditions, K-wing was associated (positively) with colony strength; however, viruses and N. apis were not. Furthermore, black queen cell virus was positively and negatively associated with K-wing and deformed wing virus, respectively. Newfoundland honey bee colonies are thus free of several invasive parasites that plague operations in other parts of the world, and they provide a unique research arena to study independent pathology of the parasites that are present.

  12. Honey bee Apis mellifera parasites in the absence of Nosema ceranae fungi and Varroa destructor mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Shutler

    Full Text Available Few areas of the world have western honey bee (Apis mellifera colonies that are free of invasive parasites Nosema ceranae (fungi and Varroa destructor (mites. Particularly detrimental is V. destructor; in addition to feeding on host haemolymph, these mites are important vectors of several viruses that are further implicated as contributors to honey bee mortality around the world. Thus, the biogeography and attendant consequences of viral communities in the absence of V. destructor are of significant interest. The island of Newfoundland, Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, is free of V. destructor; the absence of N. ceranae has not been confirmed. Of 55 Newfoundland colonies inspected visually for their strength and six signs of disease, only K-wing had prevalence above 5% (40/55 colonies = 72.7%. Similar to an earlier study, screenings again confirmed the absence of V. destructor, small hive beetles Aethina tumida (Murray, tracheal mites Acarapis woodi (Rennie, and Tropilaelaps spp. ectoparasitic mites. Of a subset of 23 colonies screened molecularly for viruses, none had Israeli acute paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus, or sacbrood virus. Sixteen of 23 colonies (70.0% were positive for black queen cell virus, and 21 (91.3% had some evidence for deformed wing virus. No N. ceranae was detected in molecular screens of 55 colonies, although it is possible extremely low intensity infections exist; the more familiar N. apis was found in 53 colonies (96.4%. Under these conditions, K-wing was associated (positively with colony strength; however, viruses and N. apis were not. Furthermore, black queen cell virus was positively and negatively associated with K-wing and deformed wing virus, respectively. Newfoundland honey bee colonies are thus free of several invasive parasites that plague operations in other parts of the world, and they provide a unique research arena to study independent pathology of the parasites that are present.

  13. Evidence for passive chemical camouflage in the parasitic mite Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kather, Ricarda; Drijfhout, Falko P; Shemilt, Sue; Martin, Stephen J

    2015-02-01

    Social insect colonies provide a stable and safe environment for their members. Despite colonies being heavily guarded, parasites have evolved numerous strategies to invade and inhabit these hostile places. Two such strategies are (true) chemical mimicry via biosynthesis of host odor, and chemical camouflage, in which compounds are acquired from the host. The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor feeds on hemolymph of its honey bee host, Apis mellifera. The mite's odor closely resembles that of its host, which allows V. destructor to remain undetected as it lives on the adult host during its phoretic phase and while reproducing on the honeybee brood. During the mite life cycle, it switches between host adults and brood, which requires it to adjust its profile to mimic the very different odors of honey bee brood and adults. In a series of transfer experiments, using bee adults and pupae, we tested whether V. destructor changes its profile by synthesizing compounds or by using chemical camouflage. We show that V. destructor required direct access to host cuticle to mimic its odor, and that it was unable to synthesize host-specific compounds itself. The mite was able to mimic host odor, even when dead, indicating a passive physico-chemical mechanism of the parasite cuticle. The chemical profile of V. destructor was adjusted within 3 to 9 h after switching hosts, demonstrating that passive camouflage is a highly efficient, fast and flexible way for the mite to adapt to a new host profile when moving between different host life stages or colonies.

  14. Spread and strain determination of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in Madagascar since its first report in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasolofoarivao, Henriette; Clémencet, Johanna; Ravaomanarivo, Lala Harivelo Raveloson; Razafindrazaka, Dimby; Reynaud, Bernard; Delatte, Hélène

    2013-08-01

    Varroa destructor is a major pest in world beekeeping. It was first detected in Madagascar in 2010 on the endemic honeybee Apis mellifera unicolor. To evaluate V. destructor spread dynamics in Madagascar a global survey was conducted in 2011-2012. A total of 695 colonies from 30 districts were inspected for the presence of mites. 2 years after its introduction, nine districts were found infested. Varroa destructor spread was relatively slow compared to other countries with a maximum progression of 40 km per year, the five newly infested districts being located next to the first infested ones. The incidence of mite infestation was also investigated by monitoring 73 colonies from five apiaries during 1 year (2011-2012). Sixty percent of local colony mortality was recorded after 1 year of survey. Varroa destructor strain determination was done by partial sequencing of the cytochrome oxidase I gene of 13 phoretic mites sampled in five districts. A single V. destructor mitochondrial haplotype was detected, the Korean type, also present in the closest African countries. A global pathogen survey was also conducted on the colonies inspected for mite presence. The greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella has been found in all colonies all over the country. Two other pathogens and morphological abnormalities in workers, such as deformed wings, were found associated with only V. destructor presence. A prevention management plan must be implemented to delimit mite spread across the island.

  15. HF Interference, Procedures and Tools (Interferences HF, procedures et outils)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    such sources. The existing HF background noise possibly may be increased via ground wave and/or sky wave propagation. Increase of the existing HF...télécommunications filaires à large bande. Les télécommunications via le réseau électrique courant, dites PowerLine Communications (PLT ou PLC) et diverses...cumulative de nombreuses sources de même type. Le bruit de fond HF existant risque d’être augmenté par propagation de l’onde terrestre et/ou aérienne

  16. Selection of Entomopathogenic Fungi to Control Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae Selección de Hongos Entomopatógenos para el Control de Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rodríguez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was select entomopathogenic fungi tolerant to temperatures inside the brood area of honey bees (Apis mellifera for to control Varroa destructor. For this purpose, 50 Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo Vuillemin and 48 Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschn. Sorokin isolates were evaluated at 30 and 35 ºC. For each isolate, colony discs of 5 mm with mycelium were placed in the center of a Petri dish with Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA medium. The dishes were incubated at 30 and 35 °C, without light. Radial growth of each colony was measured daily. All the B. bassiana and M. anisopliae isolates presented a lineal growth rate at a temperature of 30 ºC. However, at 35 ºC, most of the isolates did not grow, except three B. bassiana and 14 M. anisopliae isolates (P El objetivo de este trabajo fue seleccionar hongos entomopatógenos tolerantes a las temperaturas del nido de cría de las abejas (Apis mellifera, para ser utilizados en el control de Varroa destructor. Se evaluaron 50 aislamientos de Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo Vuillemin y 48 de Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschn. Sorokin a temperaturas de 30 y 35 ºC. Discos de agar de 5 mm de diámetro con micelio de colonias de cada aislamiento, se depositaron en el centro de placas Petri con medio agar Sabouraud dextrosa (ASD. Las placas fueron incubadas a 30 y 35 °C y oscuridad y diariamente se midió el radio de cada colonia. Todos los aislamientos de B. bassiana y M. anisopliae var. anisopliae presentaron una tendencia lineal a través del tiempo a temperaturas de incubación de 30 °C. A 35 °C la mayoría de los aislamientos no crecieron, excepto tres aislamientos de B. bassiana y 14 de M. anisopliae (p < 0,001. Estos aislamientos fueron seleccionados para realizar pruebas de patogenicidad sobre V. destructor, aplicando una suspensión de 10(7 conidias mL-1. El aislamiento más efectivo fue Qu-M845 de M. anisopliae (p = 0,0033, produjo una mortalidad de 85%. La capacidad patogénica de este

  17. Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever (Marburg HF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Marburg hemorrhagic fever (Marburg HF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, ...

  18. [Biodegradation of polyhydroxyalkanoates by soil microbiocoenoses of different structures and detection of microorganisms-destructors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiandin, A N; Prudnikova, S V; Filipenko, M L; Khrapov, E A; Vasil'ev, A D; Volova, T G

    2012-01-01

    Biodegradation of microbial linear polymers of hydroxyalkanoic acids (polyhydroxyalkanoates, PHAs) by soil microbiocoenoses of different structures has been studied during two field seasons in different weather conditions. This process was shown to be influenced by the polymer chemical composition, temperature, humidity, and the microbial soil component. The PHA degradation was accompanied by a decrease in the polymer molecular weight and an increase in the degree of crystallinity, indicating the preferential destruction of the amorphous phase compared to the crystalline one. The quantity of the true PHA destructors developing at the surface of the polymer samples was lower than the quantity of accompanying bacteria. The dominant PHA destructors under the test conditions were identified as bacteria of the genera Variovorax, Stenotrophomonas, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, and Xanthomonas and as micromycetes from Penicillium, Paecilomyces, Acremonium, Verticillium. and Zygosporium.

  19. RAPD identification of Varroa destructor genotypes in Brazil and other regions of the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, J C V; Issa, M R C; Carneiro, F E; Strapazzon, R; Moretto, G

    2010-01-01

    The mite Varroa destructor is the main pest causing damage to apiculture worldwide. In Brazil and other parts of the world, where bees of African origin and their hybrids predominate, the bees can survive these mites without treatment. Studies have shown a correlation between the various genotypes of the mite and its fertility in different geographical regions. Information about mite genotype could be helpful in understanding the diverse effects and relationships of the mite with bees in different regions of the world. DNA analysis by RAPD technique has permitted identification of three distinct genotypes in the mite V. destructor, namely Russian, Japanese and Papua New Guinea. We found predominance of the Russian genotype in Brazil, along with other parts of South America, and in Cuba and Mexico. The Japanese genotype was exclusively found on Fernando de Noronha Island in Brazil.

  20. Varroa destructor Mites Can Nimbly Climb from Flowers onto Foraging Honey Bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, David T; Smith, Michael L; Seeley, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    Varroa destructor, the introduced parasite of European honey bees associated with massive colony deaths, spreads readily through populations of honey bee colonies, both managed colonies living crowded together in apiaries and wild colonies living widely dispersed in natural settings. Mites are hypothesized to spread between most managed colonies via phoretically riding forager bees when they engage in robbing colonies or they drift between hives. However, widely spaced wild colonies show Varroa infestation despite limited opportunities for robbing and little or no drifting of bees between colonies. Both wild and managed colonies may also exchange mites via another mechanism that has received remarkably little attention or study: floral transmission. The present study tested the ability of mites to infest foragers at feeders or flowers. We show that Varroa destructor mites are highly capable of phoretically infesting foraging honey bees, detail the mechanisms and maneuvers by which they do so, and describe mite behaviors post-infestation.

  1. Use of oxalic acid to control Varroa destructor in honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Akyol, Ethem; YENİNAR, Halil

    2009-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of oxalic acid (OA) on reducing Varroa mite (Varroa destructor) populations in honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the fall. Twenty honeybee colonies, in wooden Langstroth hives, were used in this experiment. Average Varroa infestation levels (%) of the OA and control groups were 25.87% and 24.57% on adult workers before the treatments. The OA treatments were applied twice, on 3 November and 13 November 2006. Average Varroa infestation ...

  2. Effectiveness, persistence, and residue of amitraz plastic strips in the apiary control of Varroa destructor

    OpenAIRE

    Floris, Ignazio; Satta, Alberto; Garau, Vincenzo; Melis, Marinella; Cabras, Paolo; Aloul, Naima

    2001-01-01

    International audience; An apiary trial was conducted in 1999 in Northern Sardinia (Italy) to evaluate the effectiveness and the persistence of amitraz impregnated in plastic strips against Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman. Twelve colonies of bees derived from Apis mellifera ligustica Spin. in Dadant Blatt hives were used; six colonies were treated with 2 strips per hive and the other six were left untreated control. Two methods for the evaluation of treatment efficacy were compared: th...

  3. Behavioral modulation of the coexistence between Apis melifera and Varroa destructor: A defense against colony collapse?

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Joyce F.; Coelho, Flávio C.; Bliman, Pierre-Alexandre J.

    2015-01-01

    Colony Collapse Disorder has become a global problem for beekeepers and for the crops which depend on bee polination. Multiple factors are known to increase the risk of colony colapse, and the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor that parasitizes honey bees (Apis melifera) is among the main threats to colony health. Although this mite is unlikely to, by itself, cause the collapse of hives, it plays an important role as it is a vector for many viral diseases. Such diseases are among the likely...

  4. Hf Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Lawler, J E; Labby, Z E; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J; Ivans, I I

    2006-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements, accurate to about +/- 5 percent, are reported for 41 odd-parity levels of Hf II. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for 150 lines of Hf II. Approximately half of these new transition probabilities overlap with recent independent measurements using a similar approach. The two sets of measurements are found to be in good agreement for measurements in common. Our new laboratory data are applied to refine the hafnium photospheric solar abundance and to determine hafnium abundances in 10 metal-poor giant stars with enhanced r-process abundances. For the Sun we derive log epsilon (Hf) = 0.88 +/- 0.08 from four lines; the uncertainty is dominated by the weakness of the lines and their blending by other spectral features. Within the uncertainties of our analysis, the r-process-rich stars possess constant Hf/La and Hf/Eu abundance ratios, log epsilon (Hf...

  5. Interaction between Varroa destructor and imidacloprid reduces flight capacity of honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanken, Lisa J; van Langevelde, Frank; van Dooremalen, Coby

    2015-12-01

    Current high losses of honeybees seriously threaten crop pollination. Whereas parasite exposure is acknowledged as an important cause of these losses, the role of insecticides is controversial. Parasites and neonicotinoid insecticides reduce homing success of foragers (e.g. by reduced orientation), but it is unknown whether they negatively affect flight capacity. We investigated how exposing colonies to the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and the neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid affect flight capacity of foragers. Flight distance, time and speed of foragers were measured in flight mills to assess the relative and interactive effects of high V. destructor load and a field-realistic, chronic sub-lethal dose of imidacloprid. Foragers from colonies exposed to high levels of V. destructor flew shorter distances, with a larger effect when also exposed to imidacloprid. Bee body mass partly explained our results as bees were heavier when exposed to these stressors, possibly due to an earlier onset of foraging. Our findings contribute to understanding of interacting stressors that can explain colony losses. Reduced flight capacity decreases the food-collecting ability of honeybees and may hamper the use of precocious foraging as a coping mechanism during colony (nutritional) stress. Ineffective coping mechanisms may lead to destructive cascading effects and subsequent colony collapse.

  6. The field efficacy of Lepidium latifolium and Zataria multiflora methanolic extracts against Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Seyed Mostafa; Asadpour, Mohammad; Jafari, Arash; Malekpour, Seyed Hossein

    2015-11-01

    Varroa destructor is the most serious pest of honeybee (Apis mellifera), causing high economic losses in the beekeeping industry worldwide. The intensive utilization of many chemical substances against the mites resulted in resistance development. One of the applicable and alternative treatments being used for their control is plant-derived products (PDSS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the acaricidal activity of Lepidium latifolium and Zataria multiflora leaf extracts on V. destructor in field conditions. Four different concentrations (100, 200, 400, and 500 ppm) of the methanolic extracts were sprayed to treat each colony. The efficacy and side effects on adult bees were compared to Apistan chemical strips (ACSS). The acaricidal activity was the highest (100%) for L. latifolium extract at 500 ppm after 12 days and 86.26% for Z. multiflora. The infestation rate was decreased to 0.0% with L. latifolium and to 13.74% with Z. multiflora. The highest reduction was observed with L. latifolium followed by Z. multiflora extract at 500 ppm concentration. Both of the extracts showed negligible effect on bees, and it can be concluded that these PDSS as biodegradable agents could be used for V. destructor control in honeybee colonies.

  7. Dead or alive: deformed wing virus and Varroa destructor reduce the life span of winter honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainat, Benjamin; Evans, Jay D; Chen, Yan Ping; Gauthier, Laurent; Neumann, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Elevated winter losses of managed honeybee colonies are a major concern, but the underlying mechanisms remain controversial. Among the suspects are the parasitic mite Varroa destructor, the microsporidian Nosema ceranae, and associated viruses. Here we hypothesize that pathogens reduce the life expectancy of winter bees, thereby constituting a proximate mechanism for colony losses. A monitoring of colonies was performed over 6 months in Switzerland from summer 2007 to winter 2007/2008. Individual dead workers were collected daily and quantitatively analyzed for deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), N. ceranae, and expression levels of the vitellogenin gene as a biomarker for honeybee longevity. Workers from colonies that failed to survive winter had a reduced life span beginning in late fall, were more likely to be infected with DWV, and had higher DWV loads. Colony levels of infection with the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and individual infections with DWV were also associated with reduced honeybee life expectancy. In sharp contrast, the level of N. ceranae infection was not correlated with longevity. In addition, vitellogenin gene expression was significantly positively correlated with ABPV and N. ceranae loads. The findings strongly suggest that V. destructor and DWV (but neither N. ceranae nor ABPV) reduce the life span of winter bees, thereby constituting a parsimonious possible mechanism for honeybee colony losses.

  8. The Ditylenchus destructor genome provides new insights into the evolution of plant parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jinshui; Peng, Donghai; Chen, Ling; Liu, Hualin; Chen, Feng; Xu, Mengci; Ju, Shouyong; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2016-07-27

    Plant-parasitic nematodes were found in 4 of the 12 clades of phylum Nematoda. These nematodes in different clades may have originated independently from their free-living fungivorous ancestors. However, the exact evolutionary process of these parasites is unclear. Here, we sequenced the genome sequence of a migratory plant nematode, Ditylenchus destructor We performed comparative genomics among the free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans and all the plant nematodes with genome sequences available. We found that, compared with C. elegans, the core developmental control processes underwent heavy reduction, though most signal transduction pathways were conserved. We also found D. destructor contained more homologies of the key genes in the above processes than the other plant nematodes. We suggest that Ditylenchus spp. may be an intermediate evolutionary history stage from free-living nematodes that feed on fungi to obligate plant-parasitic nematodes. Based on the facts that D. destructor can feed on fungi and has a relatively short life cycle, and that it has similar features to both C. elegans and sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes from clade 12, we propose it as a new model to study the biology, biocontrol of plant nematodes and the interaction between nematodes and plants.

  9. Effect of Varroa destructor, Wounding and Varroa Homogenate on Gene Expression in Brood and Adult Honey Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleoglu, Gun; Goodwin, Paul H.; Reyes-Quintana, Mariana; Hamiduzzaman, Mollah Md.; Guzman-Novoa, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) gene expression related to immunity for hymenoptaecin (AmHym) and defensin-1 (AmDef-1), longevity for vitellogenin (AmVit2) and stem cell proliferation for poly U binding factor 68 kDa (AmPuf68) was compared following Varroa destructor parasitism, buffer injection and injection of V. destructor compounds in its homogenate. In adults, V. destructor parasitism decreased expression of all four genes, while buffer injection decreased expression of AmHym, AmPuf68 and AmVit2, and homogenate injection decreased expression of AmPuf68 and AmVit2 but increased expression of AmDef-1 relative to their respective controls. The effect of V. destructor parasitism in adults relative to the controls was not significantly different from buffer injection for AmHym and AmVit2 expression, and it was not significantly different from homogenate injection for AmPuf68 and AmVit2. In brood, V. destructor parasitism, buffer injection and homogenate injection decreased AmVit2 expression, whereas AmHym expression was decreased by V. destructor parasitism but increased by buffer and homogenate injection relative to the controls. The effect of varroa parasitism in brood was not significantly different from buffer or homogenate injection for AmPuf68 and AmVit2. Expression levels of the four genes did not correlate with detectable viral levels in either brood or adults. The results of this study indicate that the relative effects of V. destructor parasitism on honey bee gene expression are also shared with other types of stresses. Therefore, some of the effects of V. destructor on honey bees may be mostly due to wounding and injection of foreign compounds into the hemolymph of the bee during parasitism. Although both brood and adults are naturally parasitized by V. destructor, their gene expression responded differently, probably the result of different mechanisms of host responses during development. PMID:28081188

  10. EFFICIENCY OF FORMING NUCLEUS COLONIES IN ORDER TO DECREASE POPULATION OF Varroa destructor (ANDRESON AND TRUEMAN, 2000 IN BEEHIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatko Puškadija

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Forming of nucleus colonies is efficient method in growth control of Varroa destructor population. Its goal is to decrease parasite’s pressure on bee colony. The advantage of this bio-technical measurement lays in its implement during vegetation season which delays use of the chemical resources for Varroa destructor control population in beehives for the post major honey harvest period. Nucleus colonies were formed from approx. half of sealed brood (35.5 ± 5.8 dm² and average of 5915 ± 912 bees. Results showed that there were 37.2 ± 5.6% mites removed from parental colonies. Minimum was 30.8%, and maximum was 45.5%. Due to such relatively small efficiency, this method cannot be recommended as unique, but it can be effective if it is applied in the post spring's honey harvest period as a part of growth reduction strategy of Varroa destructor population in beehive.

  11. Fine scale population genetic structure of Varroa destructor, an ectoparasitic mite of the honey bee (Apis mellifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynes, Travis L.; De Roode, Jacobus C.; Lyons, Justine I.; Berry, Jennifer A.; Delaplane, Keith S.; Brosi, Berry J.

    2016-01-01

    Varroa destructor is an obligate ectoparasitic mite and the most important biotic threat currently facing honey bees (Apis mellifera). We used neutral microsatellites to analyze previously unreported fine scale population structure of V. destructor, a species characterized by extreme lack of genetic diversity owing to multiple bottleneck events, haplodiploidy, and primarily brother-sister matings. Our results surprisingly indicate that detectable hierarchical genetic variation exists between apiaries, between colonies within an apiary, and even within colonies. This finding of within-colony parasite diversity provides empirical evidence that the spread of V. destructor is not accomplished solely by vertical transmission but that horizontal transmission (natural or human-mediated) must occur regularly. PMID:27812229

  12. The effects of clove oil on the enzyme activity of Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman (Arachnida: Acari: Varroidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Varroa destructor, a key biotic threat to the Western honey bee, has played a major role in colony losses over the past few years worldwide. Overuse of traditional acaricides, such as tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin, on V. destructor has only increased its tolerance to them. Therefore, the application of essential oils in place of traditional pesticides is an attractive alternative, as demonstrated by its high efficiency, lack of residue and tolerance resistance. To study the acaricidal activity of essential oils, we used clove oil (Syzygium aromaticum L., a typical essential oil with a wide range of field applications, and examined its effects on the enzyme activities of Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase, glutathione-S-transferase (GST and superoxide dismutase (SOD and its effects on the water-soluble protein content of V. destructor body extracts after exposure to 0.1 μl and 1.0 μl of clove oil for 30 min. Our results showed that the water-soluble protein content significantly decreased after the treatments, indicating that the metabolism of the mites was adversely affected. The bioactivity of GSTs increased significantly after a low dosage (0.1 μl exposure but decreased at a higher dosage (1.0 μl, while the activities of SOD and Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase were significantly elevated after treatments. These results suggest that the protective enzyme SOD and detoxifying enzymes Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase and GST contributed to the stress reaction of V. destructor to the essential oils and that the detoxification ability of V. destructor via GST was inhibited at higher dosages. Our findings are conducive to understanding the physiological reactions of V. destructor to treatment with essential oils and the underlying mechanisms behind the acaricidal activities of these natural products.

  13. Winter survival of individual honey bees and honey bee colonies depends on level of Varroa destructor infestation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coby van Dooremalen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent elevated winter loss of honey bee colonies is a major concern. The presence of the mite Varroa destructor in colonies places an important pressure on bee health. V. destructor shortens the lifespan of individual bees, while long lifespan during winter is a primary requirement to survive until the next spring. We investigated in two subsequent years the effects of different levels of V. destructor infestation during the transition from short-lived summer bees to long-lived winter bees on the lifespan of individual bees and the survival of bee colonies during winter. Colonies treated earlier in the season to reduce V. destructor infestation during the development of winter bees were expected to have longer bee lifespan and higher colony survival after winter. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mite infestation was reduced using acaricide treatments during different months (July, August, September, or not treated. We found that the number of capped brood cells decreased drastically between August and November, while at the same time, the lifespan of the bees (marked cohorts increased indicating the transition to winter bees. Low V. destructor infestation levels before and during the transition to winter bees resulted in an increase in lifespan of bees and higher colony survival compared to colonies that were not treated and that had higher infestation levels. A variety of stress-related factors could have contributed to the variation in longevity and winter survival that we found between years. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study contributes to theory about the multiple causes for the recent elevated colony losses in honey bees. Our study shows the correlation between long lifespan of winter bees and colony loss in spring. Moreover, we show that colonies treated earlier in the season had reduced V. destructor infestation during the development of winter bees resulting in longer bee lifespan and higher colony survival after winter.

  14. Produtos naturais para o controle do ácaro Varroa destructor em abelhas africanizadas

    OpenAIRE

    Guido Laércio Bragança Castagnino; Ricardo de Oliveira Orsi

    2012-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos do ácido oxálico e de óleos essenciais de plantas no controle da infestação pelo ácaro Varroa destructor em colônias de Apis mellifera africanizadas. O experimento foi realizado em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, em 30 colônias, com seis tratamentos e cinco repetições. As colmeias foram tratadas com óleos essenciais de arruda (Ruta graveolens), eucalipto (Eucalyptus spp.) e hortelã (Mentha piperita), além de timol, ácido oxálico e do tra...

  15. New Miticides for Integrated Pest Management of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in Honey Bee Colonies on the Canadian Prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervalk, L P; Nasr, M E; Dosdall, L M

    2014-12-01

    Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman 2000 (Acari: Varroidae) is an ectoparasitic mite of the honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Honey bee colonies require extensive management to prevent mortality caused by varroa mites and the viruses they vector. New miticides (Thymovar and HopGuard) to manage varroa mites were evaluated during the spring and fall treatment windows of the Canadian prairies to determine their effectiveness as part of an integrated management strategy. Thymovar and HopGuard were evaluated alongside the currently used industry standards: Apivar and formic acid. Results demonstrated that Apivar and formic acid remain effective V. destructor management options under spring and fall conditions. Applications of Thymovar during spring were associated with a reduction in brood area, and therefore should be limited to the fall season. The miticide HopGuard was not effective in managing V. destructor, and alteration of the current delivery system is necessary. This study demonstrates the potential for new effective treatment options to supplement currently used V. destructor integrated pest management systems.

  16. Immunogene and viral transcript dynamics during parasitic Varroa destructor mite infection of developing honey bee (Apis mellifera) pupae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Ryan D; Boncristiani, Humberto F; Rueppell, Olav

    2014-05-15

    The ectoparasitic Varroa destructor mite is a major contributor to the ongoing honey bee health crisis. Varroa interacts with honey bee viruses, exacerbating their pathogenicity. In addition to vectoring viruses, immunosuppression of the developing honey bee hosts by Varroa has been proposed to explain the synergy between viruses and mites. However, the evidence for honey bee immune suppression by V. destructor is contentious. We systematically studied the quantitative effects of experimentally introduced V. destructor mites on immune gene expression at five specific time points during the development of the honey bee hosts. Mites reproduced normally and were associated with increased titers of deformed wing virus in the developing bees. Our data on different immune genes show little evidence for immunosuppression of honey bees by V. destructor. Experimental wounding of developing bees increases relative immune gene expression and deformed wing virus titers. Combined, these results suggest that mite feeding activity itself and not immunosuppression may contribute to the synergy between viruses and mites. However, our results also suggest that increased expression of honey bee immune genes decreases mite reproductive success, which may be explored to enhance mite control strategies. Finally, our expression data for multiple immune genes across developmental time and different experimental treatments indicates co-regulation of several of these genes and thus improves our understanding of the understudied honey bee immune system. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Queen survival and oxalic acid residues in sugar stores after summer application against Varroa destructor in honey bees (Apis mellifera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, B.; Donders, J.N.L.C.; Stratum, van P.; Blacquière, T.; Dooremalen, van C.

    2012-01-01

    Methods using oxalic acid (OA) to control Varroa destructor in honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies are widely applied. In this study, the effects of an OA spray application in early summer on the survival of young and old queens, and on OA residues in sugar stores were investigated. A questionnaire

  18. Varroa destructor virus 1: a new picorna-like virus in Varroa mites as well as honey bees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongus, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Varroa destructor mite is an ectoparasite of the honey bee Apis mellifera. This species was recently differentiated from Varroa jacobsoni species which infests the Asian bee Apis cerana. Varroa mites feed entirely on the bee's haemolymph and have been associated with the spread of a number of viruse

  19. Responses to Varroa destructor and Nosema ceranae by several commercial strains of Australian and North American honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential impact of varroa (Varroa destructor, Anderson & Trueman. 2000) on Australian beekeeping and agriculture depends in part on the levels of resistance to this parasite expressed by Australian commercial honey bees (Apis mellifera). The responses of seven lines of Australian honey bees to ...

  20. Environment or beekeeping management: What explains better the prevalence of honey bee colonies with high levels of Varroa destructor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobino, Agostina; Pacini, Adriana; Molineri, Ana; Bulacio Cagnolo, N; Merke, J; Orellano, E; Bertozzi, E; Masciangelo, G; Pietronave, H; Signorini, M

    2017-01-06

    Varroa destructor is one of the major threats to honey bee colonies. The mite abundance in the colonies is affected by environmental conditions as well as by beekeeping management. The aim of this study was to recognize the main drivers associated with autumn V. destructor infestation in honey bee colonies when different regions from Argentina are compared. A total of 361 colonies distributed in five Argentinean eco-regions were examined to evaluate Varroa mite infestation rate during autumn and Nosema sp. presence. Regions were different regarding annual temperature, precipitation and especially vegetation landscape. In addition, beekeeping management practices were obtained from a checklist questionnaire answered by the beekeepers. The prevalence of colonies with high infestation level was lower in semi-arid Chaco followed by humid and transition Chaco regions. Also, colonies that were positive for Nosema sp. showed a higher Varroa infestation rate. The "environmental" effect was stronger compared with the influence of secondary drivers associated with beekeeping activities. As well, a significant association between V. destructor infestation rates and Nosema presence was identified. Under contrasting natural conditions, environment seems a predominant driver on Varroa destructor infestation level in honey bee colonies.

  1. Varroa destructor virus 1: a new picorna-like virus in Varroa mites as well as honey bees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongus, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Varroa destructor mite is an ectoparasite of the honey bee Apis mellifera. This species was recently differentiated from Varroa jacobsoni species which infests the Asian bee Apis cerana. Varroa mites feed entirely on the bee's haemolymph and have been associated with the spread of a number of

  2. Interactive effect of reduced pollen availability and Varroa destructor infestation limits growth and protein content of young honey bees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dooremalen, van C.; Stam, E.; Gerritsen, L.J.M.; Cornelissen, B.; Steen, van der J.J.M.; Langevelde, van F.; Blacquiere, T.

    2013-01-01

    Varroa destructor in combination with one or more stressors, such as low food availability or chemical exposure, is considered to be one of the main causes for honey bee colony losses. We examined the inter-active effect of pollen availability on the protein content and body weight of young bees tha

  3. Isolation, characterization, and expression analyses of ecdysone receptor 1, ecdysone receptor 2 and ultraspiracle genes in varroa destructor mite

    Science.gov (United States)

    The varroa mite, Varroa destructor, is a honeybee ectoparasite considered the most important pest in apiaries throughout the US. Ecdysone receptor is a hormone secreted by the prothoracic gland of insects that controls ecdysis and stimulates metamorphosis. The ecdysone receptor is a nuclear receptor...

  4. Molecular genetic analysis of Varroa destructor mites in brood, fallen injured mites and worker bee longevity in honey bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two important traits that contribute to honey bee (Apis mellifera) colony survival are resistance to Varroa destructor and longevity of worker bees. We investigated the relationship between a panel of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and three phenotypic measurements of colonies: a) perc...

  5. Queen survival and oxalic acid residues in sugar stores after summer application against Varroa destructor in honey bees (Apis mellifera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, B.; Donders, J.N.L.C.; Stratum, van P.; Blacquière, T.; Dooremalen, van C.

    2012-01-01

    Methods using oxalic acid (OA) to control Varroa destructor in honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies are widely applied. In this study, the effects of an OA spray application in early summer on the survival of young and old queens, and on OA residues in sugar stores were investigated. A questionnaire

  6. Environmentally friendly HF (DF) lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the birth of Academician A M Prokhorov, this paper reviews the physics of self-sustained volume discharge without preionization—self-initiated volume discharge (SIVD)—in the working mixtures of non-chain hydrofluoride HF (deuterofluoride (DF)) lasers. The dynamics of SIVD in discharge gaps with different geometries is thoroughly described. The mechanisms for the restriction of current density in a diffuse channel in electric discharges in SF6 and SF6 based mixtures (which determines whether SIVD is possible) are proposed and analyzed using simple models. The most probable mechanisms are the electron impact dissociation of SF6 and other mixture components, electron-ion recombination and electron attachment to vibrationally excited SF6 molecules. Starting from a comparative analysis of the rate coefficients of these processes, it is shown that electron-ion recombination is capable of compensating for electron detachment from negative ions via electron impact. It is also established that SIVD is not only observed in SF6, but also in other strongly electronegative gases. The factors that determine the uniformity of the active medium in non-chain HF (DF) lasers are analyzed. Some special features of non-chain HF (DF) lasers with different apertures operating are carefully examined. Consideration is given to the problem of increasing the aperture and discharge volume of non-chain HF (DF) lasers. Based on our experimental results, the possibility of increasing the energy of such lasers to ~1 kJ and above is shown.

  7. LD50 and repellent effects of essential oils from Argentinian wild plant species on Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffinengo, Sergio; Eguaras, Martin; Floris, Ignazio; Faverin, Claudia; Bailac, Pedro; Ponzi, Marta

    2005-06-01

    The repellent and acaricidal effects of some essential oils from the most typical wild plant species of northern Patagonia, Argentina, on Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman were evaluated using a complete exposure test. Honey bees, Apis mellifera L., and mites (five specimens of each per dish) were introduced in petri dishes having different oil concentrations (from 0.1 to 25 micro per cage). Survival of bees and mites was registered after 24, 48, and 72 h. An attraction/repellence test was performed using a wax tube impregnated with essential oil and another tube containing wax only. The lowest LD50 values for mites were registered for Acantholippia seriphioides (A. Gray) Mold. (1.27 microl per cage) and Schinus molle L. (2.65 microl per cage) after 24 h, and for Wedelia glauca (Ortega) O. Hoffm. ex Hicken (0.59 microl per cage) and A. seriphioides (1.09 microl per cage) after 72 h of treatment. The oil with the highest selectivity ratio (A. mellifera LD50/V. destructor LD50) was the one extracted from S. molle (>16). Oils of Lippia junelliana (Mold.) Troncoso, Minthostachys mollis (HBK) Grieseb., and Lippia turbinata Grieseb. mixed with wax had repellent properties. None of the oils tested had attractive effects on Varroa mites.

  8. Behavioral Modulation of Infestation by Varroa destructor in Bee Colonies. Implications for Colony Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueiró Santos, Joyce; Coelho, Flávio Codeço; Bliman, Pierre-Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) has become a global problem for beekeepers and for the crops that depend on bee pollination. While many factors are known to increase the risk of colony collapse, the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is considered to be the most serious one. Although this mite is unlikely to cause the collapse of hives itself, it is the vector for many viral diseases which are among the likely causes for Colony Collapse Disorder. The effects of V. destructor infestation differ from one part of the world to another, with greater morbidity and higher colony losses in European honey bees (EHB) in Europe, Asia and North America. Although this mite has been present in Brazil for many years, there have been no reports of colony losses amongst Africanized Honey Bees (AHB). Studies carried out in Mexico have highlighted different behavioral responses by the AHB to the presence of the mite, notably as far as grooming and hygienic behavior are concerned. Could these explain why the AHB are less susceptible to Colony Collapse Disorder? In order to answer this question, we have developed a mathematical model of the infestation dynamics to analyze the role of resistance behavior by bees in the overall health of the colony, and as a consequence, its ability to face epidemiological challenges.

  9. Efficacy of two fungus-based biopesticide against the honeybee ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdelaal A; Abd-Elhady, Hany K

    2013-08-15

    The varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson and Trueman) (Acari: Varroidae), is known as the most serious ectoparasitic mite on honeybee, Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in the world. Based on the spores of entomopathogenic fungi, two commercial preparations; Bioranza (Metarhizium anisopliae) and Biovar (Beauveria bassiana) were evaluated through application into the hives against varroa mite. Data showed significant differences between treatments with Bioranza and Biovar, the results were significant after 7 and 14 days post-treatment. Mean a daily fallen mite individual was significantly different between the hives before and after the applications of the two biopesticides and wheat flour. Also, mites' mortality was, significantly, different between the hives before and after treatments. There were significant differences between treatments with the two biopesticides in worker's body weight. Bioranza and Biovar did not infect the honeybee in larval, prepupal, pupal and adult stages. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy images showed spores and hyphae penetration through stigma and wounds on varroa. The results suggest that Bioranza and Biovar are potentially are effective biopesticides against V. destructor in honeybee colonies.

  10. Practical sampling plans for Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies and apiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K V; Moon, R D; Burkness, E C; Hutchison, W D; Spivak, M

    2010-08-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman (Acari: Varroidae) is arguably the most detrimental pest of the European-derived honey bee, Apis mellifera L. Unfortunately, beekeepers lack a standardized sampling plan to make informed treatment decisions. Based on data from 31 commercial apiaries, we developed sampling plans for use by beekeepers and researchers to estimate the density of mites in individual colonies or whole apiaries. Beekeepers can estimate a colony's mite density with chosen level of precision by dislodging mites from approximately to 300 adult bees taken from one brood box frame in the colony, and they can extrapolate to mite density on a colony's adults and pupae combined by doubling the number of mites on adults. For sampling whole apiaries, beekeepers can repeat the process in each of n = 8 colonies, regardless of apiary size. Researchers desiring greater precision can estimate mite density in an individual colony by examining three, 300-bee sample units. Extrapolation to density on adults and pupae may require independent estimates of numbers of adults, of pupae, and of their respective mite densities. Researchers can estimate apiary-level mite density by taking one 300-bee sample unit per colony, but should do so from a variable number of colonies, depending on apiary size. These practical sampling plans will allow beekeepers and researchers to quantify mite infestation levels and enhance understanding and management of V. destructor.

  11. Behavioral Modulation of Infestation by Varroa destructor in Bee Colonies. Implications for Colony Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) has become a global problem for beekeepers and for the crops that depend on bee pollination. While many factors are known to increase the risk of colony collapse, the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is considered to be the most serious one. Although this mite is unlikely to cause the collapse of hives itself, it is the vector for many viral diseases which are among the likely causes for Colony Collapse Disorder. The effects of V. destructor infestation differ from one part of the world to another, with greater morbidity and higher colony losses in European honey bees (EHB) in Europe, Asia and North America. Although this mite has been present in Brazil for many years, there have been no reports of colony losses amongst Africanized Honey Bees (AHB). Studies carried out in Mexico have highlighted different behavioral responses by the AHB to the presence of the mite, notably as far as grooming and hygienic behavior are concerned. Could these explain why the AHB are less susceptible to Colony Collapse Disorder? In order to answer this question, we have developed a mathematical model of the infestation dynamics to analyze the role of resistance behavior by bees in the overall health of the colony, and as a consequence, its ability to face epidemiological challenges. PMID:27583438

  12. An amino acid substitution (L925V associated with resistance to pyrethroids in Varroa destructor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel González-Cabrera

    Full Text Available The Varroa mite, Varroa destructor, is an important pest of honeybees and has played a prominent role in the decline in bee colony numbers over recent years. Although pyrethroids such as tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin can be highly effective in removing the mites from hives, their intensive use has led to many reports of resistance. To investigate the mechanism of resistance in UK Varroa samples, the transmembrane domain regions of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel (the main target site for pyrethroids were PCR amplified and sequenced from pyrethroid treated/untreated mites collected at several locations in Central/Southern England. A novel amino acid substitution, L925V, was identified that maps to a known hot spot for resistance within the domain IIS5 helix of the channel protein; a region that has also been proposed to form part of the pyrethroid binding site. Using a high throughput diagnostic assay capable of detecting the mutation in individual mites, the L925V substitution was found to correlate well with resistance, being present in all mites that had survived tau-fluvalinate treatment but in only 8 % of control, untreated samples. The potential for using this assay to detect and manage resistance in Varroa-infected hives is discussed.

  13. An amino acid substitution (L925V) associated with resistance to pyrethroids in Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cabrera, Joel; Davies, T G Emyr; Field, Linda M; Kennedy, Peter J; Williamson, Martin S

    2013-01-01

    The Varroa mite, Varroa destructor, is an important pest of honeybees and has played a prominent role in the decline in bee colony numbers over recent years. Although pyrethroids such as tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin can be highly effective in removing the mites from hives, their intensive use has led to many reports of resistance. To investigate the mechanism of resistance in UK Varroa samples, the transmembrane domain regions of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel (the main target site for pyrethroids) were PCR amplified and sequenced from pyrethroid treated/untreated mites collected at several locations in Central/Southern England. A novel amino acid substitution, L925V, was identified that maps to a known hot spot for resistance within the domain IIS5 helix of the channel protein; a region that has also been proposed to form part of the pyrethroid binding site. Using a high throughput diagnostic assay capable of detecting the mutation in individual mites, the L925V substitution was found to correlate well with resistance, being present in all mites that had survived tau-fluvalinate treatment but in only 8 % of control, untreated samples. The potential for using this assay to detect and manage resistance in Varroa-infected hives is discussed.

  14. Genetic structure of Varroa destructor populations infesting Apis mellifera colonies in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, M; Medici, S; Quintana, S; Ruffinengo, S; Marcángeli, J; Gimenez Martinez, P; Fuselli, S; Eguaras, M

    2012-04-01

    Although mitochondrial DNA mapping of Varroa destructor revealed the presence of several haplotypes, only two of them (Korean and Japanese haplotypes) were capable to infest Apis mellifera populations. Even though the Korean haplotype is the only one that has been reported in Argentina, these conclusions were based on mites sampled in apiaries from a specific geographical place (Buenos Aires province). To study mites from several sites of Argentina could reveal the presence of the Japanese genotype, especially considering sites near to Brazil, where Japanese haplotype was already detected. The aim of this work was to study the genetic structure of V. destructor populations from apiaries located in various provinces of Argentina, in order to determine the presence of different haplotypes. The study was carried out between January 2006 and December 2009. Phoretic adult Varroa mites were collected from honey bee workers sampled from colonies of A. mellifera located in Entre Ríos, Buenos Aires, Corrientes, Río Negro, Santa Cruz and Neuquén provinces. Twenty female mites from each sampling site were used to carry out the genetic analysis. For DNA extraction a nondestructive method was used. DNA sequences were compared to Korean haplotype (AF106899) and Japanese haplotype (AF106897). All DNA sequences obtained from mite populations sampled in Argentina, share 98% of similitude with Korean Haplotype (AF106899). Taking into account these results, we are able to conclude that Korean haplotype is cosmopolite in Argentina.

  15. Hessian fly-associated bacteria: transmission, essentiality, and composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Bansal

    Full Text Available Plant-feeding insects have been recently found to use microbes to manipulate host plant physiology and morphology. Gall midges are one of the largest groups of insects that manipulate host plants extensively. Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor is an important pest of wheat and a model system for studying gall midges. To examine the role of bacteria in parasitism, a systematic analysis of bacteria associated with HF was performed for the first time. Diverse bacteria were found in different developmental HF stages. Fluorescent in situ hybridization detected a bacteriocyte-like structure in developing eggs. Bacterial DNA was also detected in eggs by PCR using primers targeted to different bacterial groups. These results indicated that HF hosted different types of bacteria that were maternally transmitted to the next generation. Eliminating bacteria from the insect with antibiotics resulted in high mortality of HF larvae, indicating that symbiotic bacteria are essential for the insect to survive on wheat seedlings. A preliminary survey identified various types of bacteria associated with different HF stages, including the genera Enterobacter, Pantoea, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Ochrobactrum, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Nitrosomonas, Arcanobacterium, Microbacterium, Paenibacillus, and Klebsiella. Similar bacteria were also found specifically in HF-infested susceptible wheat, suggesting that HF larvae had either transmitted bacteria into plant tissue or brought secondary infection of bacteria to the wheat host. The bacteria associated with wheat seedlings may play an essential role in the wheat-HF interaction.

  16. Éster de sacarose no controle do Varroa destructor em abelhas africanizadas = Sucrose ester in the control of Varroa destructor in Africanized honeybees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Laércio Castagnino

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo verificar o efeito do éster de sacarose no controle da infestação do ácaro Varroa destructor em abelhas africanizadas. Nos testes “in vitro”, testou-se o produto em abelhas e ácaros com cinco concentrações diluídas em água (T0: 100% de água destilada; T1: 0,5%; T2: 1%; T3: 2,0%; T4: 5% e T5: 10% de éster de sacarose. Nos testes de campo, o delineamento experimental utilizado foi inteiramente casualizado, com quatro tratamentos e sete repetições, totalizando 28 colônias, sendo sete delas como controle, sete com 0,1% de éster de sacarose, sete com 0,2% de éster de sacarosee sete colmeias com 0,5% éster de sacarose, diluídas em água. Nos testes “in vitro” com concentração de 0,5%, o éster de sacarose promoveu a mortalidade dos ácaros e das abelhas. Os testes em campo demonstraram que o produto reduziu a infestação do Varroa destructorem abelhas na concentração de 0,2% e pode ser uma ferramenta no controle dessa praga. Nas concentrações de 0,1; 0,2 e 0,5%, não prejudicou o desenvolvimento de área de cria aberta, operculada e de alimento estocado na colmeia, sugerindo que não é tóxico para as abelhas.This study aimed to determine the effect of sucrose ester on the control of Varroa destructor mite infestation in Africanized honeybees. For the in vitro experiments, the product was tested in bees and mites at five concentrations obtained through dilution in water (T0: 100% distilled water; T1: 0.5%; T2: 1%; T3: 2%; T4: 5%; and T5: 10% sucrose ester. For the field studies, the experimental design was completely randomized, with four treatments and seven replicates, totaling 28 colonies, from which seven were the controls,seven were treated with 0.1% sucrose ester, seven with 0.2% sucrose ester, and seven hives with 0.5% sucrose ester diluted in water. In the in vitro study, the sucrose ester at 0.5% concentration caused mite and bee mortality. In the field tests, the

  17. Winter losses of honeybee colonies (Hymenoptera: Apidae): the role of infestations with Aethina tumida (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and Varroa destructor (Parasitiformes: Varroidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Marc O; Ritter, Wolfgang; Pettis, Jeff S; Neumann, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Multiple infections of managed honeybee, Apis mellifera, colonies are inevitable due to the ubiquitous ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor and might be an underlying cause of winter losses. Here we investigated the role of adult small hive beetles, Aethina tumida, alone and in combination with V. destructor for winter losses and for infections with the microsporidian endoparasite Nosema ceranae. We found no significant influence of A. tumida and V. destructor alone or in combination on the numbers of N. ceranae spores. Likewise, A. tumida alone had no significant effects on winter losses, which is most likely due to the observed high winter mortality of the adult beetles. Therefore, our data suggest that A. tumida is unlikely to contribute to losses of overwintering honeybee colonies. However, high losses occurred in all groups highly infested with V. destructor, supporting the central role of the mite for colony losses.

  18. A thirty second isomer in Hf-171

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, P; Billowes, J; Cochrane, ECA; Cooke, JL; Cooper, TG; Dendooven, P; Evans, DE; Grant, IS; Griffith, JAR; Honkanen, A; Huhta, M; Oinonen, M; Pearson, MR; Penttila, H; Persson, B.L.; Richardson, DS; Tungate, G; Wheeler, PD; Zybert, L; Aysto, J

    1997-01-01

    An isomer has been detected in Hf-171 with a half-life of T-1/2 = 29.5(9) s. The state was populated in the Yb-170(alpha,3n)Hf-171m reaction at a beam energy of E-alpha = 50 MeV in an on-line ion guide isotope separator. The isomeric Hf-17lm(+) beam was extracted from the ion guide, mass-analysed an

  19. Replication of Varroa destructor virus 1 (VDV-1) and a Varroa destructor virus 1-deformed wing virus recombinant (VDV-1-DWV) in the head of the honey bee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioni, Naama; Soroker, Victoria; Chejanovsky, Nor

    2011-08-15

    A country-wide screen for viral pathogens in Israeli apiaries revealed significant incidence of deformed wing virus (DWV) and Varroa destructor-1 virus (VDV-1). To understand these viruses' possible involvement in deformed wing syndrome of honey bees, we studied their replication in symptomatically and asymptomatically infected bees qualitatively and quantitatively, using RT-PCR, quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and immunodetection of the major viral capsid protein VP1. We found, for the first time, replication of VDV-1 and/or a VDV-1-DWV recombinant virus in the heads of recently emerged symptomatic bees. These viruses replicated to high copy numbers, yielding the major viral capsid VP1 processed for subsequent assembly of viral particles. Our results clearly distinguished between symptomatic and asymptomatic bees infected with VDV-1 and VDV-1-DWV and suggest the hypothesis that VDV-1, in addition to DWV, may be involved in inducing the deformed wing pathology. Thus VDV-1-DWV recombination may yield virulent strains able to cause overt infections in Varroa-infested bee colonies.

  20. The Progress on Varroa destructor research in China%中国狄斯瓦螨(Varroa destructor,大蜂螨)研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周婷; 王强; 姚军; 孙继虎; 黄双修; 黄智勇; 代平礼; 王星; 刘锋

    2007-01-01

    狄斯瓦螨(Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman 2000,通称“大蜂螨”)是对世界养蜂业威胁最大的蜜蜂病虫害。2000年重新命名之前,它一直被称为雅氏瓦螨(Varroa jacobsoni Oudemans1904)。2000年初,澳大利亚安德森(Denis L.Anderson)对采集自亚洲各地东方蜜蜂(蜂螨原始寄主)和世界各地西方蜜蜂的大量大蜂螨样本进行线粒体(mtDNA)测序的综合研究。结果表明:原被归入雅氏瓦螨的东方蜜蜂寄生螨,应划分为2个种,一个是新界定的雅氏瓦螨,主要分布在印尼和马来西亚,已发现9个基因型;另一个是新定名的狄斯瓦螨,分布于亚洲大陆的东方蜜蜂和世界各地的西方蜜蜂,已发现11个基因型。

  1. Gene expression in honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae exposed to pesticides and Varroa mites (Varroa destructor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorc, Aleš; Evans, Jay D; Scharf, Mike; Ellis, James D

    2012-08-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae reared in vitro were exposed to one of nine pesticides and/or were challenged with the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor. Total RNA was extracted from individual larvae and first strand cDNAs were generated. Gene-expression changes in larvae were measured using quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting transcripts for pathogens and genes involved in physiological processes, bee health, immunity, and/or xenobiotic detoxification. Transcript levels for Peptidoglycan Recognition Protein (PGRPSC), a pathogen recognition gene, increased in larvae exposed to Varroa mites (Ppesticide treated larvae. As expected, Varroa-parasitized brood had higher transcripts of Deformed Wing Virus than did control larvae (Ppesticides and Varroa parasitism on honey bee larval gene expression were demonstrated. Interactions between larval treatments and gene expression for the targeted genes are discussed.

  2. Bidirectional transfer of RNAi between honey bee and Varroa destructor: Varroa gene silencing reduces Varroa population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Garbian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The mite Varroa destructor is an obligatory ectoparasite of the honey bee (Apis mellifera and is one of the major threats to apiculture worldwide. We previously reported that honey bees fed on double-stranded RNA (dsRNA with a sequence homologous to that of the Israeli acute paralysis virus are protected from the viral disease. Here we show that dsRNA ingested by bees is transferred to the Varroa mite and from mite on to a parasitized bee. This cross-species, reciprocal exchange of dsRNA between bee and Varroa engendered targeted gene silencing in the latter, and resulted in an over 60% decrease in the mite population. Thus, transfer of gene-silencing-triggering molecules between this invertebrate host and its ectoparasite could lead to a conceptually novel approach to Varroa control.

  3. Varroa destructor is an effective vector of Israeli acute paralysis virus in the honeybee, Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prisco, Gennaro; Pennacchio, Francesco; Caprio, Emilio; Boncristiani, Humberto F; Evans, Jay D; Chen, Yanping

    2011-01-01

    The Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a significant marker of honeybee colony collapse disorder (CCD). In the present work, we provide the first evidence that Varroa destructor is IAPV replication-competent and capable of vectoring IAPV in honeybees. The honeybees became infected with IAPV after exposure to Varroa mites that carried the virus. The copy number of IAPV in bees was positively correlated with the density of Varroa mites and time period of exposure to Varroa mites. Further, we showed that the mite-virus association could possibly reduce host immunity and therefore promote elevated levels of virus replication. This study defines an active role of Varroa mites in IAPV transmission and sheds light on the epidemiology of IAPV infection in honeybees.

  4. Primary structure of Lep d I, the main Lepidoglyphus destructor allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, J; Ventas, P; Carreira, J; Barbas, J A; Gimenez-Gallego, G; Polo, F

    1994-10-01

    The most relevant allergen of the storage mite Lepidoglyphus destructor (Lep d I) has been characterized. Lep d I is a monomer protein of 13273 Da. The primary structure of Lep d I was determined by N-terminal Edman degradation and partially confirmed by cDNA sequencing. Sequence polymorphism was observed at six positions, with non-conservative substitutions in three of them. No potential N-glycosylation site was revealed by peptide sequencing. The 125-residue sequence of Lep d I shows approximately 40% identity (including the six cysteines) with the overlapping regions of group II allergens from the genus Dermatophagoides, which, however, do not share common allergenic epitopes with Lep d I.

  5. Physiological thermoregulation in a crustacean? Heart rate hysteresis in the freshwater crayfish Cherax destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudkamp, Jacqueline E; Seebacher, Frank; Ahern, Mark; Franklin, Craig E

    2004-07-01

    Differential heart rates during heating and cooling (heart rate hysteresis) are an important thermoregulatory mechanism in ectothermic reptiles. We speculate that heart rate hysteresis has evolved alongside vascularisation, and to determine whether this phenomenon occurs in a lineage with vascularised circulatory systems that is phylogenetically distant from reptiles, we measured the response of heart rate to convective heat transfer in the Australian freshwater crayfish, Cherax destructor. Heart rate during convective heating (from 20 to 30 degrees C) was significantly faster than during cooling for any given body temperature. Heart rate declined rapidly immediately following the removal of the heat source, despite only negligible losses in body temperature. This heart rate 'hysteresis' is similar to the pattern reported in many reptiles and, by varying peripheral blood flow, it is presumed to confer thermoregulatory benefits particularly given the thermal sensitivity of many physiological rate functions in crustaceans.

  6. Specific Cues Associated With Honey Bee Social Defence against Varroa destructor Infested Brood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondet, Fanny; Kim, Seo Hyun; de Miranda, Joachim R.; Beslay, Dominique; Le Conte, Yves; Mercer, Alison R.

    2016-01-01

    Social immunity forms an essential part of the defence repertoire of social insects. In response to infestation by the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its associated viruses, honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) have developed a specific behaviour (varroa-sensitive hygiene, or VSH) that helps protect the colony from this parasite. Brood cells heavily infested with mites are uncapped, the brood killed, and the cell contents removed. For this extreme sacrifice to be beneficial to the colony, the targeting of parasitized brood for removal must be accurate and selective. Here we show that varroa-infested brood produce uniquely identifiable cues that could be used by VSH-performing bees to identify with high specificity which brood cells to sacrifice. This selective elimination of mite-infested brood is a disease resistance strategy analogous to programmed cell death, where young bees likely to be highly dysfunctional as adults are sacrificed for the greater good of the colony. PMID:27140530

  7. Bidirectional transfer of RNAi between honey bee and Varroa destructor: Varroa gene silencing reduces Varroa population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbian, Yael; Maori, Eyal; Kalev, Haim; Shafir, Sharoni; Sela, Ilan

    2012-12-01

    The mite Varroa destructor is an obligatory ectoparasite of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and is one of the major threats to apiculture worldwide. We previously reported that honey bees fed on double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) with a sequence homologous to that of the Israeli acute paralysis virus are protected from the viral disease. Here we show that dsRNA ingested by bees is transferred to the Varroa mite and from mite on to a parasitized bee. This cross-species, reciprocal exchange of dsRNA between bee and Varroa engendered targeted gene silencing in the latter, and resulted in an over 60% decrease in the mite population. Thus, transfer of gene-silencing-triggering molecules between this invertebrate host and its ectoparasite could lead to a conceptually novel approach to Varroa control.

  8. Observation of Varroa destructor behavior in capped worker brood of Africanized honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Rafael A; Chaves, Guisella; Sánchez, Luis A; Calderón, Rolando

    2012-11-01

    The behavioral activity of Varroa destructor was observed using transparent cells. Mite oviposition started at 45.0 ± 25.0 h post capping, followed by the next eggs laid at regular 27.3 ± 2.0 h intervals. On the prepupa, mites were found to feed often and there was no preference for a specific segment as a feeding site. During the pupal stage the mite fed less often and almost always at the same point. Varroa showed a preference for defecation in the posterior part of the cell. A significant association was observed between the position of the feeding point in the pupa and the defecation site on the cell wall. Displacement behavior was observed in 71 % of the infested bee larvae and a major change in the free space available for varroa in the cell occurred when the prepupa molted into a pupa.

  9. Varroa destructor mite in Africanized honeybee colonies Apis mellifera L. under royal jelly or honey production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro da Rosa Santos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the level of invasion of Varroa mite into worker brood cells, the infestation rate on adult worker honeybees, total and effective reproduction rates of the mite in Africanized honeybee colonies under royal jelly or honey production. Invasion and infestation rates were not statistically different between honeybee colonies producing honey or royal jelly and the averages for these parameters were 5.79 and 8.54%, respectively. Colonies producing honey presented a higher (p < 0.05 total and effective reproduction of Varroa than colonies producing royal jelly. There was a negative correlation between levels of invasion and infestation with minimum external temperature, relative humidity and rainfall. The variables month and season influenced the development of the mite, but rates were low and within the range normally found in Brazil for Africanized honeybee colonies, which confirm the greater resistance of these honeybees to Varroa destructor than European honeybees.

  10. The study of multilayers Fe/Hf and Ni/Hf by slow positron beam technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Mutsumi; Nakajyo, Terunobu; Murashige, Yusuke; Koizumi, Tomoya; Kanazawa, Ikuzo; Komori, Fumio; Soe, We-Hyo; Yamamoto, Ryoichi; Ito, Yasuo

    1997-05-01

    The S-parameters versus the incident positron energy are measured in the Ni/Hf multilayer, thin Hf film, thin Fe film and the bilayer Fe/Hf. We have analyzed the change in vacancy-type defects in these multilayers and thin films with the deposition temperature in the MBE system.

  11. Produtos naturais para o controle do ácaro Varroa destructor em abelhas africanizadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Laércio Bragança Castagnino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos do ácido oxálico e de óleos essenciais de plantas no controle da infestação pelo ácaro Varroa destructor em colônias de Apis mellifera africanizadas. O experimento foi realizado em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, em 30 colônias, com seis tratamentos e cinco repetições. As colmeias foram tratadas com óleos essenciais de arruda (Ruta graveolens, eucalipto (Eucalyptus spp. e hortelã (Mentha piperita, além de timol, ácido oxálico e do tratamento controle sem aplicação de produtos. Foram avaliadas a mortalidade de varroas e as taxas de mortalidade de crias e de infestação de varroas em crias e em abelhas adultas, antes e depois da aplicação de cada produto. O ácido oxálico e os óleos de arruda, timol, eucalipto e de hortelã reduziram a mortalidade de crias parasitadas pelo ácaro em 92,1, 83,3, 81,7, 86,4 e 81,3%, respectivamente. O tratamento com ácido oxálico reduziu em 87,4% a infestação de varroas em abelhas adultas. O uso desses produtos é eficiente na redução da mortalidade de crias de A. mellifera parasitadas por V. destructor.

  12. Proteolysis on the body surface of pyrethroid-sensitive and resistant Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachecka, Aneta; Borsuk, Grzegorz; Olszewski, Krzysztof; Paleolog, Jerzy; Lipiński, Zbigniew

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the activity of proteases and protease inhibitors sampled from the body surface of tau-fluvalinate-sensitive and resistant V. destructor. Proteins were isolated from the tau-fluvalinate-sensitive and resistant mites, while mites untreated with tau-fluvalinate constituted the control. Subsequently, the following methodology was applied: protein concentration assay by the Lowry method - as modified by Schacterle and Pollack; assay of proteolytic activity in relation to various substrates (gelatine, haemoglobin, ovoalbumin, albumin, cytochrome C, casein) by the modified Anson method; identification of proteolytic activity in relation to diagnostic inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes (pepstatin A, PMSF, iodoacetamide, o-phenantrolin), using the Lee and Lin method; identification of acidic, neutral and basic protease activities by means of the modified Anson method; electrophoretic analysis of proteins in a polyacrylamide gel for protease detection with the Laemmli method and for protease inhibitor detection with the Felicioli method. The highest value of protein concentration was found in the tau-fluvalinate-sensitive V. destructor, while the highest activity levels of acidic, neutral and alkaline proteases were observed in the tau-fluvalinate-resistant mites. Aspartic, serine, thiolic and metallic proteases were found in the drug-resistant and drug-sensitive Varroa mites. The control samples were found to contain aspartic and serine proteases. In an acidic and alkaline environment, the results revealed a complete loss of inhibitor activities in the in vitro analyses and electrophoresis. Serine protease inhibitor activities (at pH 7.0) were high, especially in the group of tau-fluvalinate-resistant mites.

  13. Transcriptional responses in eastern honeybees (Apis cerana) infected with mites, Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, T; Yin, L; Liu, Z; Liang, Q; Luo, Y; Shen, J; Shen, F

    2014-10-31

    The Varroa destructor mite has become the greatest threat to Apis mellifera health worldwide, but rarely causes serious damage to its native host Apis cerana. Understanding the resistance mechanisms of eastern bees against Varroa mites will help researchers determine how to protect other species from this organism. The A. cerana genome has not been previously sequenced; hence, here we sequenced the A. cerana nurse workers transcriptome and monitored the differential gene expression of A. cerana bees challenged by V. destructor. Using de novo transcriptome assembly, we obtained 91,172 unigenes (transcripts) for A. cerana. Differences in gene expression levels between the unchallenged (Con) and challenged (Con2) samples were estimated, and a total of 36,691 transcripts showed a 2-fold difference (at least) between the 2 libraries. A total of 272 differentially expressed genes showed differences greater than 15-fold, and 265 unigenes were present at higher levels in Con2 than in Con. Among the upregulated unigenes in the Con2 colony, genes related to skeletal muscle movement (troponin and calcium-transporting ATPase), olfactory sensitivity (odorant binding proteins, and Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule gene) and transcription factors (cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein and transcription factor mblk-1) appeared to be involved in Varroa resistance. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to validate these differentially expressed genes screened by the sequencing approach, and sufficient consistency was observed between the two methods. These findings strongly support that hygienic and grooming behaviors play important roles in Varroa resistance.

  14. HF radiation emitted by chaotic leader processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, J. S.; Edirisinghe, M.; Fernando, M.; Montaño, R.; Cooray, V.

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents direct measurements of narrowband 10 MHz HF radiation from so-called “chaotic leaders” associated with subsequent return strokes. Although the term is controversial and poorly defined, we find that more than 30% of subsequent strokes in close lightning flashes contain electric field characteristics that are best described as “chaotic”. In earlier studies, return strokes have consistently been observed to be the strongest sources of HF radiation, but the results for leader processes are less consistent. We also observe return strokes to be the main HF emitter, and the leaders before the first return stroke in a flash sequence also emit HF though somewhat less intensely. The leaders preceding subsequent strokes typically emit little or no HF radiation, whether they are dart or dart-stepped leaders. However, it was observed that the presence of a chaotic component increases the leader HF intensity dramatically Defining the HF intensity unequivocally can be problematic for processes like chaotic leaders which have a combination of continuous and impulsive phenomena. Two time-domain methods were used to measure the HF intensity, the peak energy and the RMS energy. In the frequency domain these correspond to the energy spectral density (ESD) and power spectral density (PSD), respectively. It was found that the methods are not necessarily compatible. Thus, it is suggested that to clarify future work, leader processes should be characterized by the PSD rather than the ESD.

  15. HfS, Hyperfine Structure Fitting Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Estalella, Robert

    2016-01-01

    HfS is a tool to fit the hyperfine structure of spectral lines, with multiple velocity components. The HfS_nh3 procedures included in HfS fit simultaneously the hyperfine structure of the NH$_3$ (J,K)= (1,1) and (2,2) transitions, and perform a standard analysis to derive $T_\\mathrm{ex}$, NH$_3$ column density, $T_\\mathrm{rot}$, and $T_\\mathrm{k}$. HfS uses a Monte Carlo approach for fitting the line parameters. Especial attention is paid to the derivation of the parameter uncertainties. HfS includes procedures that make use of parallel computing for fitting spectra from a data cube.

  16. Frequency of Varroa destructor, Nosema spp and Acarapis woodi in commercial colonies of bees (Apis mellifera in Yucatan, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Puc Jesús Froylán

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Today it has been observed that diseases affecting bees (Apis mellifera have caused significant economic losses in the European continent and in parts of the United States due to high mortality in honey bee colonies without a cause apparent, which is known as the syndrome of depopulation of hives. It is noteworthy that this mortality is not yet presented in Yucatan. In order to determine the frequency and levels of infestation Acarapis woodi and Varroa destructor, and the frequency and levels of infection Nosema spp. commercial colonies of bees (A. mellifera in Yucatan, was collected from June to December 2006, a total of 165 samples distributed in 13 towns of Yucatan. V. destructor frequency was 63.6%, with an average level of infestation of 2.85 ± 0.79 (mites / 100 bees. The frequency of Nosema spp. was 81.8%, with an average infection level = 1'234000 ± 118000 (spores / bee, the presence of A. woodi in the samples analyzed was detected. The existence of an association between V. destructor and Nosema spp was observed. (X2 = 6.53, df = 1, p = 0.01.

  17. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cabrera, Joel; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Davies, T. G. Emyr; Field, Linda M.; Schmehl, Daniel; Ellis, James D.; Krieger, Klemens; Williamson, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V) of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes. PMID:27191597

  18. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel González-Cabrera

    Full Text Available The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes.

  19. High-throughput sequencing identification of genes involved with Varroa destructor resistance in the eastern honeybee, Apis cerana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, T; Yin, L; Liu, Z; Shen, F; Shen, J

    2014-10-31

    Varroa destructor is the greatest threat to the honeybee Apis mellifera worldwide, while it rarely causes serious harm to its native host, the Eastern honeybee Apis cerana. The genetic mechanisms underlying the resistance of A. cerana to Varroa remain unclear. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanism of resistance to Varroa may provide useful insights for reducing this disease in other organisms. In this study, the transcriptomes of two A. cerana colonies were sequenced using the Illumina Solexa sequencing method. One colony was highly affected by mites, whereas the other colony displayed strong resistance to V. destructor. We determined differences in gene expression in the two colonies after challenging the colonies with V. destructor. After de novo transcriptome assembly, we obtained 91,172 unigenes for A. cerana and found that 288 differentially expressed genes varied by more than 15-fold. A total of 277 unigenes were present at higher levels in the non-affected colony. Genes involved in resistance to Varroa included unigenes related to skeletal muscle movement, olfactory sensitivity, and transcription factors. This suggests that hygienic behavior and grooming behavior may play important roles in the resistance to Varroa.

  20. Resistance rather than tolerance explains survival of savannah honeybees (Apis mellifera scutellata) to infestation by the parasitic mite Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Ursula; Dietemann, Vincent; Human, Hannelie; Crewe, Robin M; Pirk, Christian W W

    2016-03-01

    Varroa destructor is considered the most damaging parasite affecting honeybees (Apis mellifera L.). However, some honeybee populations such as the savannah honeybee (Apis mellifera scutellata) can survive mite infestation without treatment. It is unclear if survival is due to resistance mechanisms decreasing parasite reproduction or to tolerance mechanisms decreasing the detrimental effects of mites on the host. This study investigates both aspects by quantifying the reproductive output of V. destructor and its physiological costs at the individual host level. Costs measured were not consistently lower when compared with susceptible honeybee populations, indicating a lack of tolerance. In contrast, reproduction of V. destructor mites was distinctly lower than in susceptible populations. There was higher proportion of infertile individuals and the reproductive success of fertile mites was lower than measured to date, even in surviving populations. Our results suggest that survival of savannah honeybees is based on resistance rather than tolerance to this parasite. We identified traits that may be useful for breeding programmes aimed at increasing the survival of susceptible populations. African honeybees may have benefited from a lack of human interference, allowing natural selection to shape a population of honeybees that is more resistant to Varroa mite infestation.

  1. Aspects of HF radio propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Saillant

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    radio systems. From the point of view Working Group 2 of the COST 296 Action, interest lies with effects associated

    with propagation via the ionosphere of signals within the HF band. Several aspects are covered in this paper:

    a The directions of arrival and times of flight of signals received over a path oriented along the trough have

    been examined and several types of propagation effects identified. Of particular note, combining the HF observations

    with satellite measurements has identified the presence of irregularities within the floor of the trough that

    result in propagation displaced from the great circle direction. An understanding of the propagation effects that

    result in deviations of the signal path from the great circle direction are of particular relevance to the operation

    of HF radiolocation systems.

    b Inclusion of the results from the above mentioned measurements into a propagation model of the northerly

    ionosphere (i.e. those regions of the ionosphere located poleward of, and including, the mid-latitude trough

    and the use of this model to predict the coverage expected from transmitters where the signals impinge on the

    northerly ionosphere

  2. Risk factors associated with the presence of Varroa destructor in honey bee colonies from east-central Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobino, A; Bulacio Cagnolo, N; Merke, J; Orellano, E; Bertozzi, E; Masciangelo, G; Pietronave, H; Salto, C; Signorini, M

    2014-08-01

    Varroa destructor is considered one of the major threats for worldwide apiculture. Damage caused by varroa mite includes body weight loss, malformation and weakening of the bees. It was also suggested as the main cause associated with colony winter mortality and as an important vector for several honey bee viruses. Little is known about multiple factors and their interaction affecting V. destructor prevalence in apiaries from South America. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with V. destructor prevalence in east-central Argentina. Parasitic mite infestation level and colony strength measures were evaluated in 63 apiaries distributed in 4 different regions in east-central Argentina in a cross sectional study. Data regarding management practices in each apiary were collected by means of a questionnaire. A mixed-effects logistic regression model was constructed to associate management variables with the risk of achieving mite infestation higher than 3%. Colonies owned by beekeepers who indicated that they did not monitor colonies after mite treatment (OR=2.305; 95% CI: 0.944-5.629) nor disinfect hives woodenware material (OR=2.722; 95% CI: 1.380-5.565) were associated with an increased risk of presenting high intensity infestation with V. destructor (>3%). On the other hand, beekeepers who reported replacing more than 50% of the queens in their operation (OR=0.305; 95% CI: 0.107-0.872), feeding colonies protein substitute containing natural pollen (OR=0.348; 95% CI: 0.129-0.941) and feeding colonies High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) (OR=0.108; 95% CI: 0.032-0.364), had colonies that were less likely to have V. destructor infestations above 3%, than beekeepers who did not report using these management practices. Further research should be conducted considering that certain management practices were associated to mite infestation level in order to improve the sanitary condition in the colonies. Epidemiological studies provide key information to

  3. Esterases of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae), parasitic mite of the honeybee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitryjuk, Małgorzata; Żołtowska, Krystyna; Frączek, Regina; Lipiński, Zbigniew

    2014-04-01

    Varroa destructor is an ectoparasite that causes serious damage to the population of the honeybee. Increasing resistance of the parasite to acaricides is related, among others, to metabolic adaptations of its esterases to facilitate decomposition of the chemicals used. Esterases are a large heterogeneous group of enzymes that metabolize a number of endogenous and exogenous substrates with ester binding. The aim of the present study was to determine the activity of esterases in the body extracts (BE) and excretion/secretion products (E/SP) of the mite. The enzymes contained in the E/SP should originate mainly from the salivary glands and the alimentary system and they may play a particularly important role in the first line of defence of the mite against acaricides. Activity of cholinesterases (ChEs) [acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase], carboxylesterases (CEs) and phosphatases [alkaline phosphatase (AP) and acid phosphatase (AcP)] was investigated. The activity of all the enzymes except AChE was higher in the E/SP than in the BE. ChEs from the BE and from the E/SP reacted differently on eserine, a ChE inhibitor. Eserine inhibited both enzymes from the BE, increased decomposition of acetylcholine, but did not influence hydrolysis of butyrylcholine by the E/SP. Activity of the CEs from the BE in relation to the esters of carboxylic acids can be presented in the following series: C10 > C12 > C14 > C8 > C2 > C4 = C16, while activity of the CEs from the E/SP was: C4 > C8 > C2 > C14 > C10 > C12 > C16. The inhibitor of CEs, triphenyl phosphate, reduced the activity of esterases C2–C8 and C14–C16; however, it acted in the opposite way to CEs C10 and C12. The activity of both phosphatases was higher in the E/SP than in the BE (AcP about twofold and AP about 2.6-fold); the activities of AP and AcP in the same material were similar. Given the role of esterases in resistance to pesticides, further studies are necessary to obtain complete biochemical

  4. HF Transverse Segmentation and Tagging Jet Capability

    CERN Document Server

    Doroshkevich, E A; Kuleshov, Sergey

    1998-01-01

    So called tagging jets and pile-up were simulated for the optimisation of the HF segmentation. The energy resolution, angular resolution and efficiency of jet reconstruction are defined for different calorimeter segmentation.

  5. Collisional quenching of highly rotationally excited HF

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Benhui; Forrey, R C; Stancil, P C; Balakrishnan, N

    2015-01-01

    Collisional excitation rate coefficients play an important role in the dynamics of energy transfer in the interstellar medium. In particular, accurate rotational excitation rates are needed to interpret microwave and infrared observations of the interstellar gas for nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line formation. Theoretical cross sections and rate coefficients for collisional deexcitation of rotationally excited HF in the vibrational ground state are reported. The quantum-mechanical close-coupling approach implemented in the nonreactive scattering code MOLSCAT was applied in the cross section and rate coefficient calculations on an accurate 2D HF-He potential energy surface. Estimates of rate coefficients for H and H$_2$ colliders were obtained from the HF-He collisional data with a reduced-potential scaling approach. The calculation of state-to-state rotational quenching cross sections for HF due to He with initial rotational levels up to $j=20$ were performed for kinetic energies from 10$^{-5}$ to 15000...

  6. Microhardness evaluation alloys Hf-Si-B; Avaliacao de microdureza de ligas Hf-Si-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gigolotti, Joao Carlos Janio; Costa, Eliane Fernandes Brasil [Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda (UNIFOA), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil); Nunes, Carlos Angelo; Rocha, Elisa Gombio; Coelho, Gilberto Carvalho, E-mail: carlosjanio@uol.com.br, E-mail: eliane-costabrasi@hotmail.com, E-mail: cnunes@demar.eel.usp.br, E-mail: elisarocha@alunos.eel.usp.br, E-mail: coelho@demar.eel.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The technological advance has generated increasing demand for materials that can be used under high temperature, what includes intermetallic MR-Si-B (MR = refractory metal) alloys with multiphase structures, that can also be applied in oxide environments. Thus, this work had for objective the micro hardness study of the Hf-Si-B system alloys, heat treated at 1600 deg C, in the Hf rich region. Hf-Si-B alloys had been produced with blades of Hf (min. 99.8%), Si (min. 99.998%) and B (min. 99.5%), in the voltaic arc furnace and heat treated at 1600 deg C under argon atmosphere. The relationship of the phases had been previously identified by X-ray diffraction and contrast in backscattered electron imaging mode. The alloys had their hardness analyzed by method Vickers (micro hardness) with load of 0.05 kgf and 0.2 kgf and application time of 20 s. The results, obtained from the arithmetic mean of measurements for each alloy on the heterogeneous region, showed a mean hardness of 11.08 GPA, with small coefficient of variation of 3.8%. The borides HfB2 (19.34 GPa) e HfB - 11.76 GPa, showed the hardness higher than the silicides Hf2Si (8.57 GPa), Hf5Si3 (9.63 GPa), Hf3Si2 (11.66 GPa), Hf5Si4 (10.00 GPa), HfSi (10.02 GPa) e HfSi2 (8.61 GPa). (author)

  7. Rotenone and oxalic acid as alternative acaricidal treatments for Varroa destructor in honeybee colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorc, Ales; Poklukar, Janez

    2003-02-27

    This experiment assessed the efficacy of rotenone and oxalic acid (OA) in an aqueous sugar solution in controlling the honeybee mite Varroa destructor. Colonies were populated with mite-infested brood combs and worker bees. Three rotenone or OA treatments administered during the period with capped brood on 31 July, 14 and 18 August resulted in an average efficacy of 24.10%. In untreated colonies mite mortality averaged 5.40%. No significant differences (P>0.05) were found between the rotenone and OA treatments. Three OA treatments administered on 9, 12 and 18 September resulted in a 77.93% mite mortality. An increase in mite drop (P<0.05) was observed at 2 and 4 days after each treatment. OA applications in broodless colonies resulted in significantly (P<0.001) higher mite mortality rates (98.65% average) than the three treatments of rotenone or OA in colonies with capped brood. The dynamics of mite mortality after each rotenone or OA treatment are discussed in this study.

  8. Comparing oxalic acid and sucrocide treatments for Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) control under desert conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammataro, D; Finley, J; Underwood, R

    2008-08-01

    The effectiveness of oxalic acid (OA) and Sucrocide (S) (AVA Chemical Ventures, L.L.C., Portsmouth, NH) in reducing populations of the varroa mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman (Acari: Varroidae) in honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies was measured under the desert conditions of Arizona, USA. OA and S were applied three times 7 d apart. A 3.2% solution of OA was applied in sugar syrup via a large volume syringe, trickling 5 ml per space between frames in the colony. S was applied at a concentration of 0.625% (mixed with water), according to the label directions, using a compressed air Chapin sprayer at 20 psi to apply 59 ml per frame space. Varroa mites, collected on a sticky board before, during, and after the treatments, were counted to assess the effectiveness of the treatments. This study showed that a desert climate zone did not confer any positive or negative results on the acaricidal properties of OA. Even with brood present in colonies, significant varroa mite mortality occurred in the OA colonies. In contrast, we found that Sucrocide was not effective as a mite control technique. Despite its ability to increase mite mortality in the short-term, varroa mite populations measured posttreatment were not affected any more by Sucrocide than by no treatment at all.

  9. Distance Between Honey Bee Apis mellifera Colonies Regulates Populations of Varroa destructor at a Landscape Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Maxcy P.; Delaplane, Keith S.

    2016-01-01

    Inter-colony distance of Apis mellifera significantly affects colony numbers of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor. We set up 15 apiaries, each consisting of two colonies. Each apiary pair was assigned an inter-colony distance of 0, 10, or 100 m. Colonies were rendered nearly mite-free, then one colony in each pair was seeded with 300 female mites (mite-donor colony), while the other remained uninoculated (mite-recipient colony). After four months of monitoring, a whole model analysis showed that apiaries in which colonies were spaced 100 m apart contained lower average mite numbers than 0 m or 10 m apiaries. There were interactions among colony type, distance, and sampling date; however, when there were significant differences mite numbers were always lower in 100 m apiaries than 10 m apiaries. These findings pose the possibility that Varroa populations are resource regulated at a landscape scale: near-neighbor colonies constitute reproductive resource for mites in the form of additional bee brood. PMID:27812228

  10. The effects of beta acids from hops (Humulus lupulus) on mortality of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Ahumada, Fabiana; Probasco, Gene; Schantz, Lloyd

    2012-12-01

    Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) beta acids (HBA) were tested for miticidal effects on varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman, a parasitic mite of the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.). When varroa were placed on bees that had topical applications of 1 % HBA, there was 100 % mite mortality. Bee mortality was unaffected. Cardboard strips saturated with HBA and placed in colonies resulted in mite drop that was significantly greater than in untreated hives. HBA was detected on about 60 % of the bees in colonies during the first 48 h after application. Mite drop in colonies lasted for about 7 days with the highest drop occurring in the first 2-3 days after treatment. There was a reduction in the percentages of bees with HBA and in the amounts on their bodies after 7 days. Bee and queen mortality in the colonies were not affected by HBA treatments. When cardboard strips saturated with HBA were put in packages of bees, more than 90 % of the mites were killed without an increase in bee mortality. HBA might have potential to control varroa when establishing colonies from packages or during broodless periods.

  11. Impact of Varroa destructor on honeybee (Apis mellifera scutellata) colony development in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Ursula; Pirk, Christian W W; Crewe, Robin M; Human, Hannelie; Dietemann, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The devastating effects of Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman on European honeybee colonies (Apis mellifera L.) have been well documented. Not only do these mites cause physical damage to parasitised individuals when they feed on them, they also transmit viruses and other pathogens, weaken colonies and can ultimately cause their death. Nevertheless, not all honeybee colonies are doomed once Varroa mites become established. Some populations, such as the savannah honeybee, A. m. scutellata, have become tolerant after the introduction of the parasite and are able to withstand the presence of these mites without the need for acaricides. In this study, we measured daily Varroa mite fall, Varroa infestation rates of adult honeybees and worker brood, and total Varroa population size in acaricide treated and untreated honeybee colonies. In addition, honeybee colony development was compared between these groups in order to measure the cost incurred by Varroa mites to their hosts. Daily Varroa mite fall decreased over the experimental period with different dynamics in treated and untreated colonies. Varroa infestation rates in treated adult honeybees and brood were lower than in untreated colonies, but not significantly so. Thus, indicating a minimal benefit of treatment thereby suggesting that A. m. scutellata have the ability to maintain mite populations at low levels. We obtained baseline data on Varroa population dynamics in a tolerant honeybee over the winter period. Varroa mites appeared to have a low impact on this honeybee population, given that colony development was similar in the treated and untreated colonies.

  12. Comparison of Varroa destructor and Worker Honeybee Microbiota Within Hives Indicates Shared Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Jan; Kamler, Martin; Nesvorna, Marta; Ledvinka, Ondrej; Kopecky, Jan; Erban, Tomas

    2016-08-01

    The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is a major pest of the honeybee Apis mellifera. In a previous study, bacteria were found in the guts of mites collected from winter beehive debris and were identified using Sanger sequencing of their 16S rRNA genes. In this study, community comparison and diversity analyses were performed to examine the microbiota of honeybees and mites at the population level. The microbiota of the mites and honeybees in 26 colonies in seven apiaries in Czechia was studied. Between 10 and 50 Varroa females were collected from the bottom board, and 10 worker bees were removed from the peripheral comb of the same beehive. Both bees and mites were surface sterilized. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed significant differences in the Varroa and honeybee microbiota. The Varroa microbiota was less diverse than was the honeybee microbiota, and the relative abundances of bacterial taxa in the mite and bee microbiota differed. The Varroa mites, but not the honeybees, were found to be inhabited by Diplorickettsia. The relative abundance of Arsenophonus, Morganella, Spiroplasma, Enterococcus, and Pseudomonas was higher in Varroa than in honeybees, and the Diplorickettsia symbiont detected in this study is specific to Varroa mites. The results demonstrated that there are shared bacteria between Varroa and honeybee populations but that these bacteria occur in different relative proportions in the honeybee and mite bacteriomes. These results support the suggestion of bacterial transfer via mites, although only some of the transferred bacteria may be harmful.

  13. Distance Between Honey Bee Apis mellifera Colonies Regulates Populations of Varroa destructor at a Landscape Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Maxcy P; Delaplane, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Inter-colony distance of Apis mellifera significantly affects colony numbers of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor. We set up 15 apiaries, each consisting of two colonies. Each apiary pair was assigned an inter-colony distance of 0, 10, or 100 m. Colonies were rendered nearly mite-free, then one colony in each pair was seeded with 300 female mites (mite-donor colony), while the other remained uninoculated (mite-recipient colony). After four months of monitoring, a whole model analysis showed that apiaries in which colonies were spaced 100 m apart contained lower average mite numbers than 0 m or 10 m apiaries. There were interactions among colony type, distance, and sampling date; however, when there were significant differences mite numbers were always lower in 100 m apiaries than 10 m apiaries. These findings pose the possibility that Varroa populations are resource regulated at a landscape scale: near-neighbor colonies constitute reproductive resource for mites in the form of additional bee brood.

  14. Genomic survey of the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, a major pest of the honey bee Apis mellifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsik Chris

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor has emerged as the primary pest of domestic honey bees (Apis mellifera. Here we present an initial survey of the V. destructor genome carried out to advance our understanding of Varroa biology and to identify new avenues for mite control. This sequence survey provides immediate resources for molecular and population-genetic analyses of Varroa-Apis interactions and defines the challenges ahead for a comprehensive Varroa genome project. Results The genome size was estimated by flow cytometry to be 565 Mbp, larger than most sequenced insects but modest relative to some other Acari. Genomic DNA pooled from ~1,000 mites was sequenced to 4.3× coverage with 454 pyrosequencing. The 2.4 Gbp of sequencing reads were assembled into 184,094 contigs with an N50 of 2,262 bp, totaling 294 Mbp of sequence after filtering. Genic sequences with homology to other eukaryotic genomes were identified on 13,031 of these contigs, totaling 31.3 Mbp. Alignment of protein sequence blocks conserved among V. destructor and four other arthropod genomes indicated a higher level of sequence divergence within this mite lineage relative to the tick Ixodes scapularis. A number of microbes potentially associated with V. destructor were identified in the sequence survey, including ~300 Kbp of sequence deriving from one or more bacterial species of the Actinomycetales. The presence of this bacterium was confirmed in individual mites by PCR assay, but varied significantly by age and sex of mites. Fragments of a novel virus related to the Baculoviridae were also identified in the survey. The rate of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the pooled mites was estimated to be 6.2 × 10-5per bp, a low rate consistent with the historical demography and life history of the species. Conclusions This survey has provided general tools for the research community and novel directions for investigating the biology and control of

  15. Disease dynamics of honeybees with Varroa destructor as parasite and virus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun; Blanco, Krystal; Davis, Talia; Wang, Ying; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria

    2016-05-01

    The worldwide decline in honeybee colonies during the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses carried by Varroa mites. In this paper, we propose a honeybee-mite-virus model that incorporates (1) parasitic interactions between honeybees and the Varroa mites; (2) five virus transmission terms between honeybees and mites at different stages of Varroa mites: from honeybees to honeybees, from adult honeybees to the phoretic mites, from brood to the reproductive mites, from the reproductive mites to brood, and from adult honeybees to the phoretic mites; and (3) Allee effects in the honeybee population generated by its internal organization such as division of labor. We provide completed local and global analysis for the full system and its subsystems. Our analytical and numerical results allow us have a better understanding of the synergistic effects of parasitism and virus infections on honeybee population dynamics and its persistence. Interesting findings from our work include: (a) due to Allee effects experienced by the honeybee population, initial conditions are essential for the survival of the colony. (b) Low adult honeybees to brood ratios have destabilizing effects on the system which generate fluctuating dynamics that lead to a catastrophic event where both honeybees and mites suddenly become extinct. This catastrophic event could be potentially linked to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) of honeybee colonies. (c) Virus infections may have stabilizing effects on the system, and parasitic mites could make disease more persistent. Our model illustrates how the synergy between the parasitic mites and virus infections consequently generates rich dynamics including multiple attractors where all species can coexist or go extinct depending on initial conditions. Our findings may provide important insights on honeybee viruses and parasites and how to best control them

  16. Asynchronous development of honey bee host and Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae) influences reproductive potential of mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirrane, Maria J; De Guzman, Lilia I; Rinderer, Thomas E; Frake, Amanda M; Wagnitz, Jeremy; Whelan, Pádraig M

    2011-08-01

    A high proportion of nonreproductive (NR) Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman (Mesostigmata: Varroidae), is commonly observed in honey bee colonies displaying the varroa sensitive hygienic trait (VSH). This study was conducted to determine the influence of brood removal and subsequent host reinvasion of varroa mites on mite reproduction. We collected foundress mites from stages of brood (newly sealed larvae, prepupae, white-eyed pupae, and pink-eyed pupae) and phoretic mites from adult bees. We then inoculated these mites into cells containing newly sealed larvae. Successful reproduction (foundress laid both a mature male and female) was low (13%) but most common in mites coming from sealed larvae. Unsuccessful reproductive attempts (foundress failed to produce both a mature male and female) were most common in mites from sealed larvae (22%) and prepupae (61%). Lack of any progeny was most common for mites from white-eyed (83%) and pink-eyed pupae (92%). We also collected foundress mites from sealed larvae and transferred them to cells containing newly sealed larvae, prepupae, white-eyed pupae, or pink-eyed pupae. Successful reproduction only occurred in the transfers to sealed larvae (26%). Unsuccessful reproductive attempts were most common in transfers to newly sealed larvae (40%) and to prepupae (25%). Unsuccessful attempts involved the production of immature progeny (60%), the production of only mature daughters (26%) or the production of only a mature male (14%). Generally, lack of progeny was not associated with mites having a lack of stored sperm. Our results suggest that mites exposed to the removal of prepupae or older brood due to hygiene are unlikely to produce viable mites if they invade new hosts soon after brood removal. Asynchrony between the reproductive status of reinvading mites and the developmental stage of their reinvasion hosts may be a primary cause of NR mites in hygienic colonies. Even if reinvading mites use hosts having the proper age

  17. Acaricidal activity of Swietenia mahogani and Swietenia macrophylla ethanolic extracts against Varroa destructor in honeybee colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zalabani, Soheir M; El-Askary, Hesham I; Mousa, Ola M; Issa, Marwa Y; Zaitoun, Ahmed A; Abdel-Sattar, Essam

    2012-02-01

    The acaricidal (miticidal) activity of 90% ethanolic extracts of leaves and stem bark of Swietenia mahogani and Swietenia macrophylla were tested against Varroa destructor mite. Four concentrations were used over two different time intervals under laboratory and field conditions. In general, it was noticed that the acaricidal effect based on mortality and LC(50) of all tested extracts against the Varroa mite was concentration and time dependant. The acaricidal action against Varroa mites was relatively the least for the S. macrophylla stem bark extract at 500 ppm concentration after 48 h while it reached 100% and 95% in case of S. mahogani bark and S. macrophylla leaves, respectively. The% infestation with Varroa in colonies treated with the different extracts at various time intervals showed that the rate of infestation decreased to 0.0% after 12 days from the beginning of treatments with 500 ppm of S. mahogani leaves extract compared to 0.79% decrease after treatment with Mitac, a reference drug (60 mg/colony). The rate of infestation in case of treatments with S. mahogani bark, S. macrophylla leaves and S. macrophylla bark was decreased to 0.11%, 2.41% and 1.08%, respectively. The highest reduction was observed with S. mahogani leaves extract followed by S. mahogani bark. All the tested extracts showed less or no effect on honey bees at the different concentrations and at different bioassay times. This study suggested that the use of natural plant extracts or their products as ecofriendly biodegradable agents could be of high value for the control of Varroa mite.

  18. Regular dorsal dimples and damaged mites of Varroa destructor in some Iranian honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardestani, Masoud M; Ebadi, Rahim; Tahmasbi, Gholamhossein

    2011-07-01

    The frequency of damaged Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman (Mesostigmata: Varroidae) found on the bottom board of hives of the honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) has been used as an indicator of the degree of tolerance or resistance of honey bee colonies against mites. However, it is not clear that this measure is adequate. These injuries should be separated from regular dorsal dimples that have a developmental origin. To investigate damage to Varroa mites and regular dorsal dimples, 32 honey bee (A. mellifera) colonies were selected from four Iranian provinces: Isfahan, Markazi, Qazvin, and Tehran. These colonies were part of the National Honey bee Breeding Program that resulted in province-specific races. In April, Varroa mites were collected from heavily infested colonies and used to infest the 32 experimental colonies. In August, 20 of these colonies were selected (five colonies from each province). Adult bees from these colonies were placed in cages and after introducing mites, damaged mites were collected from each cage every day. The average percentage of injured mites ranged from 0.6 to 3.0% in four provinces. The results did not show any statistical differences between the colonies within provinces for injuries to mites, but there were some differences among province-specific lines. Two kinds of injuries to the mites were observed: injuries to legs and pedipalps, and injuries to other parts of the body. There were also some regular dorsal dimples on dorsal idiosoma of the mites that were placed in categories separate from mites damaged by bees. This type of classification helps identifying damage to mites and comparing them with developmental origin symptoms, and may provide criteria for selecting bees tolerant or resistant to this mite.

  19. Can we disrupt the sensing of honey bees by the bee parasite Varroa destructor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit Eliash

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, is considered to be one of the most significant threats to apiculture around the world. Chemical cues are known to play a significant role in the host-finding behavior of Varroa. The mites distinguish between bees from different task groups, and prefer nurses over foragers. We examined the possibility of disrupting the Varroa--honey bee interaction by targeting the mite's olfactory system. In particular, we examined the effect of volatile compounds, ethers of cis 5-(2'-hydroxyethyl cyclopent-2-en-1-ol or of dihydroquinone, resorcinol or catechol. We tested the effect of these compounds on the Varroa chemosensory organ by electrophysiology and on behavior in a choice bioassay. The electrophysiological studies were conducted on the isolated foreleg. In the behavioral bioassay, the mite's preference between a nurse and a forager bee was evaluated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that in the presence of some compounds, the response of the Varroa chemosensory organ to honey bee headspace volatiles significantly decreased. This effect was dose dependent and, for some of the compounds, long lasting (>1 min. Furthermore, disruption of the Varroa volatile detection was accompanied by a reversal of the mite's preference from a nurse to a forager bee. Long-term inhibition of the electrophysiological responses of mites to the tested compounds was a good predictor for an alteration in the mite's host preference. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate the potential of the selected compounds to disrupt the Varroa--honey bee associations, thus opening new avenues for Varroa control.

  20. Activation and interruption of the reproduction of Varroa destructor is triggered by host signals (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Eva; Odemer, Richard; Blum, Thomas; Rosenkranz, Peter

    2013-05-01

    The reproductive cycle of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor is closely linked to the development of the honey bee host larvae. Using a within colony approach we introduced phoretic Varroa females into brood cells of different age in order to analyze the capacity of certain stages of the honey bee larva to either activate or interrupt the reproduction of Varroa females. Only larvae within 18 h (worker) and 36 h (drones), respectively, after cell capping were able to stimulate the mite's oogenesis. Therewith we could specify for the first time the short time window where honey bee larvae provide the signals for the activation of the Varroa reproduction. Stage specific volatiles of the larval cuticle are at least part of these activation signals. This is confirmed by the successful stimulation of presumably non-reproducing mites to oviposition by the application of a larval extract into the sealed brood cells. According to preliminary quantitative GC-MS analysis we suggest certain fatty acid ethyl esters as candidate compounds. If Varroa females that have just started with egg formation are transferred to brood cells containing host larvae of an elder stage two-thirds of these mites stopped their oogenesis. This confirms the presence of an additional signal in the host larvae allowing the reproducing mites to adjust their own reproductive cycle to the ontogenetic development of the host. From an adaptive point of view that sort of a stop signal enables the female mite to save resources for a next reproductive cycle if the own egg development is not sufficiently synchronized with the development of the host. The results presented here offer the opportunity to analyze exactly those host stages that have the capacity to activate or interrupt the Varroa reproduction in order to identify the crucial host signals.

  1. A selective sweep in a Varroa destructor resistant honeybee (Apis mellifera) population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattorff, H Michael G; Buchholz, Josephine; Fries, Ingemar; Moritz, Robin F A

    2015-04-01

    The mite Varroa destructor is one of the most dangerous parasites of the Western honeybee (Apis mellifera) causing enormous colony losses worldwide. Various chemical treatments for the control of the Varroa mite are currently in use, which, however, lead to residues in bee products and often to resistance in mites. This facilitated the exploration of alternative treatment methods and breeding for mite resistant honeybees has been in focus for breeders in many parts of the world with variable results. Another approach has been applied to a honeybee population on Gotland (Sweden) that was exposed to natural selection and survived Varroa-infestation for more than 10years without treatment. Eventually this population became resistant to the parasite by suppressing the reproduction of the mite. A previous QTL mapping study had identified a region on chromosome 7 with major loci contributing to the mite resistance. Here, a microsatellite scan of the significant candidate QTL regions was used to investigate potential footprints of selection in the original population by comparing the study population on Gotland before (2000) and after selection (2007). Genetic drift had caused an extreme loss of genetic diversity in the 2007 population for all genetic markers tested. In addition to this overall reduction of heterozygosity, two loci on chromosome 7 showed an even stronger and significant reduction in diversity than expected from genetic drift alone. Within the selective sweep eleven genes are annotated, one of them being a putative candidate to interfere with reduced mite reproduction. A glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase (GMCOX18) might be involved in changing volatiles emitted by bee larvae that might be essential to trigger oogenesis in Varroa.

  2. Differential gene expression of the honey bee Apis mellifera associated with Varroa destructor infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans JD

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, is the most serious pest of the western honey bee, Apis mellifera, and has caused the death of millions of colonies worldwide. This mite reproduces in brood cells and parasitizes immature and adult bees. We investigated whether Varroa infestation induces changes in Apis mellifera gene expression, and whether there are genotypic differences that affect gene expression relevant to the bee's tolerance, as first steps toward unravelling mechanisms of host response and differences in susceptibility to Varroa parasitism. Results We explored the transcriptional response to mite parasitism in two genetic stocks of A. mellifera which differ in susceptibility to Varroa, comparing parasitized and non-parasitized full-sister pupae from both stocks. Bee expression profiles were analyzed using microarrays derived from honey bee ESTs whose annotation has recently been enhanced by results from the honey bee genome sequence. We measured differences in gene expression in two colonies of Varroa-susceptible and two colonies of Varroa-tolerant bees. We identified a set of 148 genes with significantly different patterns of expression: 32 varied with the presence of Varroa, 116 varied with bee genotype, and 2 with both. Varroa parasitism caused changes in the expression of genes related to embryonic development, cell metabolism and immunity. Bees tolerant to Varroa were mainly characterized by differences in the expression of genes regulating neuronal development, neuronal sensitivity and olfaction. Differences in olfaction and sensitivity to stimuli are two parameters that could, at least in part, account for bee tolerance to Varroa; differences in olfaction may be related to increased grooming and hygienic behavior, important behaviors known to be involved in Varroa tolerance. Conclusion These results suggest that differences in behavior, rather than in the immune system, underlie Varroa tolerance in honey

  3. Detection and localisation of picorna-like virus particles in tissues of Varroa destructor, an ectoparasite of the honey bee, Apis mellifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Ongus, J.R.; Boot, W.J.; Calis, J.; Bonmatin, J.M.; Bengsch, E.; Peters, D.

    2007-01-01

    Virus-like particles, 27 nm in diameter, were observed in extracts of individual Varroa destructor mites and in sections of mite tissue. Application of a purification procedure resulted in virus preparations that were used to prepare an antiserum to detect the virus in individual mites.

  4. Examining the role of foraging and malvolio in host-finding behavior in the honey bee parasite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman)

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a female varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), invades a honey bee brood cell, the physiology rapidly changes from the feeding phoretic to reproductive. Changes in the foraging and malvolio transcript levels in the brain have been associated with modulated intra-specific food sea...

  5. Detection and localisation of picorna-like virus particles in tissues of Varroa destructor, an ectoparasite of the honey bee, Apis mellifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Ongus, J.R.; Boot, W.J.; Calis, J.; Bonmatin, J.M.; Bengsch, E.; Peters, D.

    2007-01-01

    Virus-like particles, 27 nm in diameter, were observed in extracts of individual Varroa destructor mites and in sections of mite tissue. Application of a purification procedure resulted in virus preparations that were used to prepare an antiserum to detect the virus in individual mites. Immunohistol

  6. Cloning and submission to the Natural Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database of two complete vitellogenin genes from the varroa mite, Varroa destructor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The varroa mite, Varroa destructor, is a honeybee ectoparasite considered the most important pest in apiaries throughout the US. Vitellogenins are the yolk proteins produced by the ovipositing female mite and deposited into the oocytes to provide nutrients to the developing embryo. Scientists at CMA...

  7. General concepts of modern HF communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Jules

    Both conceptual and hardware advancements have led to substantial systems developments in military HF communications; the former encompass coding and error correction techniques for security, in order to minimize propagation and interference, while the latter prominently include digital equipment permitting the selection of a frequency for a particular path and propagation mode, as well as modulation selection. Propagation-related advancements involve better statistical models as well as advancements in short-term forecasting methods responsive to changes in solar-geophysical parameters. Adaptive HF systems have been developed for meteor-scatter radio communications.

  8. Research on Multi-Layer Distributed HF Radio Network Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Dai; Chun-Jiang Wang; Quan Yu

    2008-01-01

    High frequency (HF) transmission is an important communication techniques. However, conventional point-to-point transmission can be easily destroyed, which limits its utilization in practice. HF networking communication has the capability against demolishment. The network structure is one of the key factors for HF networking communication. In this paper, a novel analysis method of the network connectedness based on the eigenvalue is derived, and a multi-layer distributed HF radio network structure is proposed. Both the theore tical analysis and the computer simulation results verify that the application of the proposed network structure in the HF radio communication can improve the anti demolishment ability of the HF network efficiently.

  9. Expression of the Prophenoloxidase Gene and Phenoloxidase Activity, During the Development of Apis Mellifera Brood Infected with Varroa Destructor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaobidna Ewa A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of varroasis has not been fully explained despite intensive research. Earlier studies suggested that parasitic infections caused by Varroa destructor mites were accompanied by immunosuppression in the host organism. The objective of this study was to analyse the influence of varroasis on one of the immune pathway in Apis mellifera measured by the expression of the prophenoloxidase (proPO gene and the enzymatic activity of this gene’s product, phenoloxidase (EC 1.14.18.1. An evaluation was done of five developmental stages of honey bee workers and drones. The relative expression of proPO decreased in infected individuals. The only exceptions were worker prepupae (PP and drone pupae with brown eyes and dark brown thorax (P5 where propo gene expression was 1.8-fold and 1.5-fold higher, respectively, than in the control. Phenoloxidase (PO activity was 2.8-fold higher in infected pp workers and 2-fold higher in p5 drones in comparison with uninfected bees. Phenoloxidase activity was reduced in the remaining developmental stages of infected workers and drones. The relative expression of proPO was positively correlated with the relative PO activity in both workers (r = 0.988 and drones (r = 0.996. The results of the study indicate that V. destructor significantly influences the phenoloxidase-dependent immune pathway in honey bees.

  10. Acaricidal and insecticidal activity of essential oils on Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) and Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Natalia; Gende, Liesel B; Bailac, Pedro; Marcangeli, Jorge A; Eguaras, Martín J

    2009-12-01

    Varroa destructor is an external parasitic mite that is a serious pest of honeybees and has caused severe losses of colonies worldwide. One of the feasible alternative treatments being used for their control is essential oils. The aim of this work was to evaluate the bioactivity of some essential oils on V. destructor and Apis mellifera in relation with their chemical composition and physicochemical properties. Lavender, lavendin and laurel essential oils showed linalool as main compound in their composition. 1,8-Cineole was also present as a predominant component in the laurel essential oil. However, thyme oil was characterized by a high concentration of thymol. Mites and bees toxicity was tested by means of complete exposure method. For mites, LC(50) values for laurel, lavender and lavendin essential oil did not show significant variation throughout all observation times. However, the LC(50) values for thyme oil at 48 and 72 h were lower than at 24 h. Bee mortality was evident only in treatment with thyme oil. At 48 and 72 h, lavender essential oil presented better selectivity indexes. In this research, all essential oils caused mite mortality without severe harmful effects on adult bees. The simultaneous evaluation of the physicochemical analysis of the essential oils, the characterization of the dosage response relationships among them, and the mortality effects on mite and bees, give us the possibility to obtain comparative results for future research in Varroa control.

  11. Biological activity of some plant essential oils against Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae), an ectoparasitic mite of Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Vahid; Moharramipour, Saeid; Tahmasbi, Gholamhosein

    2011-10-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate acaricidal activity of the essential oils of Thymus kotschyanus, Ferula assa-foetida and Eucalyptus camaldulensis against Varroa destructor under laboratory conditions. Moreover, fumigant toxicity of these oils was tested on Apis mellifera. After preliminary dose-setting experiments, mites and honey bees were exposed to different concentrations of the oil, with 10 h exposure time. Essential oil of T. kotschyanus appeared the most potent fumigant for V. destructor (LC(50) = 1.07, 95% confidence limit (CL) = 0.87-1.26 μl/l air), followed by E. camaldulensis (LC(50) = 1.74, 95% CL = 0.96-2.50 μl/l air). The lowest acaricidal activity (LC(50) = 2.46, 95% CL = 2.10-2.86 μl/l air) was attributed to essential oil of F. assa-foetida. Surprisingly, among the three oils tested, essential oil of T. kotschyanus had the lowest insecticidal activity against A. mellifera (LC(50) = 5.08, 95% CL = 4.54-5.06 μl/l air). These findings proved that essential oil of T. kotschyanus has potential of practical value for use as alternative acaricide in the management of varroa in apiaries.

  12. Transcriptome analysis of the synganglion from the honey bee mite, Varroa destructor and RNAi knockdown of neural peptide targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ewan M; Budge, Giles E; Watkins, Max; Bowman, Alan S

    2016-03-01

    Varroa mites (Varroa destructor) and the viruses that they transmit are one of the major contributing factors to the global honey bee crisis. Gene products within the nervous system are the targets of all the insecticides currently used to control Varroa but there is a paucity of transcriptomic data available for Varroa neural tissues. A cDNA library from the synganglia ("brains") of adult female Varroa was constructed and 600 ESTs sequenced and analysed revealing several current and potential druggable targets. Contigs coding for the deformed wing virus (DWV) variants V. destructor virus-1 (VDV-1) and the recombinant (VDV-1DVD) were present in the synganglion library. Negative-sense RNA-specific PCR indicated that VDV-1 replicates in the Varroa synganglion and all other tissues tested, but we could not detect DWV replicating in any Varroa tissue. Two neuropeptides were identified in the synganlion EST library: a B-type allatostatin and a member of the crustacean hyperglycaemic hormone (CHH) superfamily. Knockdown of the allatostatin or the CHH-like gene by double-stranded RNA-interference (dsRNAi) resulted in 85% and 55% mortality, respectively, of Varroa. Here, we present the first transcriptomic survey in Varroa and demonstrate that neural genes can be targeted by dsRNAi either for genetic validation of putative targets during drug discovery programmes or as a potential control measure in itself.

  13. Susceptibility of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) to synthetic acaricides in Uruguay: Varroa mites' potential to develop acaricide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Matías Daniel; Ruffinengo, Sergio Roberto; Mendoza, Yamandú; Ojeda, Pilar; Ramallo, Gustavo; Floris, Iganazio; Eguaras, Martín Javier

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the acaricide susceptibility of Varroa destructor populations from Uruguay, which had never been exposed to synthetic acaricides. It was also to determine whether acaricide resistance to coumaphos occurred in apiaries in which acaricide rotation had been applied. Bioassays with acaricides against mite populations that had never been exposed to synthetic acaricides were performed, also against mite populations in which control failures with coumaphos had been reported. Additionally, coumaphos' effectiveness in honeybee colonies was experimentally tested. The lethal concentration that kills 50% of the exposed animals (LC(50)) for susceptible mite populations amounted to 0.15 μg/Petri dish for coumaphos and to less than 0.3 μg/Petri dish for the other acaricides. Coumaphos LC(50) was above 40 μg/Petri dish for resistant mites. The effectiveness of coumaphos in honeybee colonies parasitized by V. destructor ranged from 17.6% to 93.9%. LC(50) for mite populations susceptible to the most commonly applied miticides was determined, and the first case of coumaphos resistance recorded in Uruguay was established.

  14. Differential responses of Africanized and European honey bees (Apis mellifera) to viral replication following mechanical transmission or Varroa destructor parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamiduzzaman, Mollah Md; Guzman-Novoa, Ernesto; Goodwin, Paul H; Reyes-Quintana, Mariana; Koleoglu, Gun; Correa-Benítez, Adriana; Petukhova, Tatiana

    2015-03-01

    For the first time, adults and brood of Africanized and European honey bees (Apis mellifera) were compared for relative virus levels over 48 h following Varroa destructor parasitism or injection of V. destructor homogenate. Rates of increase of deformed wing virus (DWV) for Africanized versus European bees were temporarily lowered for 12h with parasitism and sustainably lowered over the entire experiment (48 h) with homogenate injection in adults. The rates were also temporarily lowered for 24h with parasitism but were not affected by homogenate injection in brood. Rates of increase of black queen cell virus (BQCV) for Africanized versus European bees were similar with parasitism but sustainably lowered over the entire experiment with homogenate injection in adults and were similar for parasitism and homogenate injection in brood. Analyses of sac brood bee virus and Israeli acute paralysis virus were limited as detection did not occur after both homogenate injection and parasitism treatment, or levels were not significantly higher than those following control buffer injection. Lower rates of replication of DWV and BQCV in Africanized bees shows that they may have greater viral resistance, at least early after treatment.

  15. Africanized honey bees (Apis mellifera) have low infestation levels of the mite Varroa destructor in different ecological regions in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Flores, C A; Guzmán-Novoa, E; Hamiduzzaman, M M; Aréchiga-Flores, C F; López-Carlos, M A

    2014-02-21

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies of African and European descent were compared for levels of Varroa destructor infestation in 3 different ecological regions in Mexico. The 300 colonies that were studied were located in subtropical, temperate sub-humid, and temperate dry climates. The morphotype and mitotype of adult bees as well as their rates of infestation by varroa mites were determined. Additionally, the number of combs with brood and covered with bees was recorded for each colony. The highest frequency of colonies that were classified as African-derived was found in the subtropical environment, whereas the lowest occurred in the temperate dry region. Overall, the colonies of African genotype had significantly lower mite infestation rates (3.5±0.34%) than the colonies of European genotype (4.7±0.49%) regardless of the region sampled. Significant effects of genotype and region on Varroa infestation rates were evident, and there were no differences in bee population or capped brood between genotypes. Mite infestation levels were significantly lower in the colonies of the temperate dry region than in the colonies of the other 2 regions. These results are discussed within the context of results from studies that were previously conducted in Brazil. This is the first study that demonstrates the effects of Africanization and ecological environment on V. destructor infestation rates in honey bee colonies in North America.

  16. Key management practices to prevent high infestation levels of Varroa destructor in honey bee colonies at the beginning of the honey yield season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobino, Agostina; Molineri, Ana; Bulacio Cagnolo, Natalia; Merke, Julieta; Orellano, Emanuel; Bertozzi, Ezequiel; Masciangelo, Germán; Pietronave, Hernán; Pacini, Adriana; Salto, Cesar; Signorini, Marcelo

    2016-09-01

    Varroa destructor is considered one of the main threats to worldwide apiculture causing a variety of physiological effects at individual and colony level. Also, Varroa mites are often associated with several honey bee viruses presence. Relatively low levels of Varroa during the spring, at the beginning of the honey yield season, can have a significant economic impact on honey production and colony health. Winter treatments against Varroa and certain management practices may delay mite population growth during following spring and summer improving colonies performance during the honey yield season. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with the presence of Varroa destructor in late spring in apiaries from temperate climate. A longitudinal study was carried out in 48 apiaries, randomly selected to evaluate V. destructor infestation level throughout the year. The percentage of infestation with V. destructor was assessed four times during one year and the beekeepers answered a survey concerning all management practices applied in the colonies. We used a generalized linear mixed model to determine association between risk of achieving 2% infestation on adult bees at the beginning of the honey yield season and all potential explanatory variables. The complete dataset was scanned to identify colonies clusters with a higher probability of achieving damage thresholds throughout the year. Colonies that achieved ≥2% of infestation with V. destructor during spring were owned by less experienced beekeepers. Moreover, as Varroa populations increase exponentially during spring and summer, if the spring sampling time is later this growth remains unobserved. Monitoring and winter treatment can be critical for controlling mite population during the honey production cycle. Spatial distribution of colonies with a higher risk of achieving high Varroa levels seems to be better explained by management practices than a geographical condition. Copyright © 2016

  17. Systematic Comparison of HF CMOS Transconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2003-01-01

    Transconductors are commonly used as active elements in high-frequency (HF) filters, amplifiers, mixers, and oscillators. This paper reviews transconductor design by focusing on the V-I kernel that determines the key transconductor properties. Based on bandwidth considerations, simple V-I kernels wi

  18. Electron impact on vibrationally cold {{HF}}^{+}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristian Stroe, Marius; Fifirig, Magda

    2016-12-01

    The dissociative recombination and vibrational excitation processes induced by electron impact on vibrationally cold {{HF}}+ are investigated in the framework of the multichannel quantum defect theory for electron energies below 1 eV. The thermal rate coefficients for the electron temperature range from 10 to 5000 K are reported.

  19. ORIGIN OF EXCESS (176)Hf IN METEORITES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Kristine; Connelly, James Norman; Bizzarro, Martin

    2010-01-01

    After considerable controversy regarding the (176)Lu decay constant (lambda(176)Lu), there is now widespread agreement that (1.867 +/- 0.008) x 10(-11) yr(-1) as confirmed by various terrestrial objects and a 4557 Myr meteorite is correct. This leaves the (176)Hf excesses that are correlated with...

  20. Reproductive biology of Varroa destructor in Africanized honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, R A; van Veen, J W; Sommeijer, M J; Sanchez, L A

    2010-04-01

    Since its first contact with Apis mellifera, the population dynamics of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor varies from one region to another. In many regions of the world, apiculture has come to depend on the use of acaricides, because of the extensive damage caused by varroa to bee colonies. At present, the mite is considered to contribute to the recent decline of honey bee colonies in North America and Europe. Because in tropical climates worker brood rearing and varroa reproduction occurs all year round, it could be expected that here the impact of the parasite will be even more devastating. Yet, this has not been the case in tropical areas of South America. In Brazil, varroa was introduced more than 30 years ago and got established at low levels of infestation, without causing apparent damage to apiculture with Africanized honey bees (AHB). The tolerance of AHB to varroa is apparently attributable, at least in part, to resistance in the bees. The low fertility of this parasite in Africanized worker brood and the grooming and hygienic behavior of the bees are referred as important factors in keeping mite infestation low in the colonies. It has also been suggested that the type of mite influences the level of tolerance in a honey bee population. The Korea haplotype is predominant in unbalanced host-parasite systems, as exist in Europe, whereas in stable systems, as in Brazil, the Japan haplotype used to predominate. However, the patterns of varroa genetic variation have changed in Brazil. All recently sampled mites were of the Korea haplotype, regardless whether the mites had reproduced or not. The fertile mites on AHB in Brazil significantly increased from 56% in the 1980s to 86% in recent years. Nevertheless, despite the increased fertility, no increase in mite infestation rates in the colonies has been detected so far. A comprehensive literature review of varroa reproduction data, focusing on fertility and production of viable female mites, was conducted to

  1. Gene-knockdown in the honey bee mite Varroa destructor by a non-invasive approach: studies on a glutathione S-transferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Ewan M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The parasitic mite Varroa destructor is considered the major pest of the European honey bee (Apis mellifera and responsible for declines in honey bee populations worldwide. Exploiting the full potential of gene sequences becoming available for V. destructor requires adaptation of modern molecular biology approaches to this non-model organism. Using a mu-class glutathione S-transferase (VdGST-mu1 as a candidate gene we investigated the feasibility of gene knockdown in V. destructor by double-stranded RNA-interference (dsRNAi. Results Intra-haemocoelic injection of dsRNA-VdGST-mu1 resulted in 97% reduction in VdGST-mu1 transcript levels 48 h post-injection compared to mites injected with a bolus of irrelevant dsRNA (LacZ. This gene suppression was maintained to, at least, 72 h. Total GST catalytic activity was reduced by 54% in VdGST-mu1 gene knockdown mites demonstrating the knockdown was effective at the translation step as well as the transcription steps. Although near total gene knockdown was achieved by intra-haemocoelic injection, only half of such treated mites survived this traumatic method of dsRNA administration and less invasive methods were assessed. V. destructor immersed overnight in 0.9% NaCl solution containing dsRNA exhibited excellent reduction in VdGST-mu1 transcript levels (87% compared to mites immersed in dsRNA-LacZ. Importantly, mites undergoing the immersion approach had greatly improved survival (75-80% over 72 h, approaching that of mites not undergoing any treatment. Conclusions Our findings on V. destructor are the first report of gene knockdown in any mite species and demonstrate that the small size of such organisms is not a major impediment to applying gene knockdown approaches to the study of such parasitic pests. The immersion in dsRNA solution method provides an easy, inexpensive, relatively high throughput method of gene silencing suitable for studies in V. destructor, other small mites and

  2. REMPI Spectroscopy of HfF

    CERN Document Server

    Loh, Huanqian; Yahn, Tyler S; Looser, Herbert; Field, Robert W; Cornell, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum of electronic states at 30000--33000 cm$^{-1}$ in hafnium fluoride has been studied using (1+1) resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) and (1+1$'$) REMPI. Six $\\Omega' = 3/2$ and ten $\\Pi_{1/2}$ vibronic bands have been characterized. We report the molecular constants for these bands and estimate the electronic energies of the excited states using a correction derived from the observed isotope shifts. When either of two closely spaced $\\Pi_{1/2}$ electronic states is used as an intermediate state to access autoionizing Rydberg levels, qualitatively distinct autoionization spectra are observed. The intermediate state-specificity of the autoionization spectra bodes well for the possibility of using a selected $\\Pi_{1/2}$ state as an intermediate state to create ionic HfF$^+$ in various selected quantum states, an important requirement for our electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) search in HfF$^+$.

  3. Digitally Driven Antenna for HF Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    the 1-MHz carrier signal. This signal is then fed into the base terminals of an NPN/ PNP transistor pair arranged in a push–pull configura- tion. A dual...negative voltage connected to the collector terminal of the PNP transistor . Since it was not possible to explicitly simulate the radia- tion of the time...complementary pair of switching transistors is driven with a pulsewidth modulated HF signal, eliminating the requirement for a frequency-dependent

  4. RFID UHF i HF w bibliotekach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gładysz Bartłomiej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of the innovative Radio Frequency Identification (RFID technology to be applied for support, acceleration and automation of the circulation process of library collection is presented. Technology basics, and hardware and software components are described. Two different radio standards used in libraries are compared. The goal is to present the potential of RFID technology for libraries, to highlight the differences and to build a basis for further consideration of UHF and HF alternatives.

  5. Identification of IgE-binding proteins from Lepidoglyphus destructor and production of monoclonal antibodies to a major allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventas, P; Carreira, J; Polo, F

    1991-08-01

    The allergen composition of one of the most important storage mites, Lepidoglyphus destructor, has been studied by immunodetection after SDS-PAGE with individual patient sera. An allergenic polypeptide of 14 kDa was identified with 95% of the sera. This major allergen was isolated in the supernatant of 60% ammonium sulfate salt precipitation of the whole extract, which was subsequently used to immunize BALB/c mice so as to produce monoclonal antibodies. Four mAbs recognizing molecules with IgE-binding ability were obtained. The specificity of the mAbs was assayed against different allergenic extracts, and the molecules recognized by them were characterized by immunoblotting. Two mAbs (Le5B5 and Le9E4) were directed to the 14-kDa allergen; the other two to several proteins of lesser allergenic significance.

  6. Composition of fatty acids in the Varroa destructor mites and their hosts, Apis mellifera drone-prepupae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitryjuk, Małgorzata; Zalewski, Kazimierz; Raczkowski, Marek; Żółtowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    The fatty acid (FA) profile of lipids extracted from the Varroa destructor parasitic mite and its host, drone-prepupae of Apis mellifera, was determined by gas chromatography (GC). The percentages of saturated fatty acids (SFAs), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) were generally similar in parasites and their hosts. Fatty acids were arranged in the following descending order based on their content: MUFAs (ca. 52-55%), SFAs (ca. 41%) and PUFAs (ca. 3%). The predominant fatty acids were oleic acid (46% in mites, 44% in prepupae) and palmitic acid (23% and 30%, respectively). Varroa parasites differed from their hosts in the quantity of individual FAs and in their FA profiles. Three PUFAs noted in the host were not observed in parasitic mites, whereas the presence of C21:0, C24:0 and C22:1 FAs was reported in mites, but not in drones.

  7. Importance of brood maintenance terms in simple models of the honeybee - Varroa destructor - acute bee paralysis virus complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann J. Eberl

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple mathematical model of the infestation of a honeybee colony by the Acute Paralysis Virus, which is carried by parasitic varroa mites (Varroa destructor. This is a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the dependent variables: number of mites that carry the virus, number of healthy bees and number of sick bees. We study this model with a mix of analytical and computational techniques. Our results indicate that, depending on model parameters and initial data, bee colonies in which the virus is present can, over years, function seemingly like healthy colonies before they decline and disappear rapidly (e.g. Colony Collapse Disorder, wintering losses. This is a consequence of the fact that a certain number of worker bees is required in a colony to maintain and care for the brood, in order to ensure continued production of new bees.

  8. Comparison of the efficacy of Apiguard (thymol and Apivar (amitraz in the control of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mar Leza

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study compared the efficacy of Apivar (a.i. amitraz and Apiguard (a.i. thymol in controlling the mite Varroa destructor during spring 2010 and autumn 2011, in the Balearic Islands (Spain. Number of fallen mites (NFM was counted weekly and the efficacy of treatments was evaluated by using the percentage of reduction of the average daily fallen mites (%R. During spring assay, the average NFM was highly reduced in Apiguard (89.8% compared to Apivar (64.3% group, with significant differences between Apiguard and control group (untreated group in post-treatment week. In autumn assay, Apivar and Apiguard colonies had an average reduction of the NFM of 17.9% and 30.8% respectively, showing a tendency in reduction between control and Apiguard group in post-treatment week. In both assays, %R was higher in Apiguard than in Apivar, but no significant differences were found between treatments in any of the seasons. Apiguard was less efficacious during November-December, probably due to the low external temperatures that hampered an optimal volatilization of the product. The lower efficacy of Apivar is probably related to the resistance of V. destructor to this chemical miticide, which has been used during the last 30 years. Results of this study showed that in Mediterranean conditions, spring is an appropriate period for applying Apiguard to the colonies, whereas application in late autumn would decrease the efficacy of the product. Apiguard may represent an alternative product for integrated control due to the low risk of mite resistance and residues in bee products.

  9. Comparison of the efficacy of Apiguard (thymol) and Apivar (amitraz) in the control of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leza, M.M.; Lladó, G.; Miranda-Chueca, M.A.

    2015-07-01

    The present study compared the efficacy of Apivar (a.i. amitraz) and Apiguard (a.i. thymol) in controlling the mite Varroa destructor during spring 2010 and autumn 2011, in the Balearic Islands (Spain). Number of fallen mites (NFM) was counted weekly and the efficacy of treatments was evaluated by using the percentage of reduction of the average daily fallen mites (%R). During spring assay, the average NFM was highly reduced in Apiguard (89.8%) compared to Apivar (64.3%) group, with significant differences between Apiguard and control group (untreated group) in post-treatment week. In autumn assay, Apivar and Apiguard colonies had an average reduction of the NFM of 17.9% and 30.8% respectively, showing a tendency in reduction between control and Apiguard group in post-treatment week. In both assays, %R was higher in Apiguard than in Apivar, but no significant differences were found between treatments in any of the seasons. Apiguard was less efficacious during November-December, probably due to the low external temperatures that hampered an optimal volatilization of the product. The lower efficacy of Apivar is probably related to the resistance of V. destructor to this chemical miticide, which has been used during the last 30 years. Results of this study showed that in Mediterranean conditions, spring is an appropriate period for applying Apiguard to the colonies, whereas application in late autumn would decrease the efficacy of the product. Apiguard may represent an alternative product for integrated control due to the low risk of mite resistance and residues in bee products. (Author)

  10. Reproduction of Varroa destructor and offspring mortality in worker and drone brood cells of Africanized honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, R A; Ureña, S; van Veen, J W

    2012-04-01

    Varroa destructor is known to be the most serious parasite of Apis mellifera worldwide. In order to reproduce varroa females enter worker or drone brood shortly before the cell is sealed. From March to December 2008, the reproductive rate and offspring mortality (mature and immature stages), focusing on male absence and male mortality of V. destructor, was investigated in naturally infested worker and drone brood of Africanized honey bees (AHB) in Costa Rica. Data were obtained from 388 to 403 single infested worker and drone brood cells, respectively. Mite fertility in worker and drone brood cells was 88.9 and 93.1%, respectively. There was no difference between the groups (X(2) = 3.6, P = 0.06). However, one of the most significant differences in mite reproduction was the higher percentage of mites producing viable offspring in drone cells (64.8%) compared to worker cells (37.6%) (X(2) = 57.2, P drone cells was high in the protonymph stage (mobile and immobile). A significant finding was the high rate of male mortality. The worker and drone brood revealed that 23.9 and 6.9%, respectively, of the adult male offspring was found dead. If the absence (missing) of the male and adult male mortality are taken together the percentage of cells increased to 40.0 and 21.3% in worker and drone cells, respectively (X(2) = 28.8, P < 0.05). The absence of the male or male mortality in a considerable number of worker cells naturally infested with varroa is the major factor in our study which reduces the production of viable daughters in AHB colonies in Costa Rica.

  11. The mutual influence of proteins from Varroa destructor extracts and from honeybee haemolymph on their proteolytic activity--in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frączek, Regina J; Żółtowska, Krystyna; Lipiński, Zbigniew; Dmitryjuk, Małgorzata

    2013-09-01

    The influence of extracts from Varroa destructor, a parasitic mite of the honeybee Apis mellifera, on the proteinase activity of worker bee haemolymph was analysed in vitro, along with the influence of bee haemolymph on the proteolytic activity of V. destructor extract. The study was conducted in three different environments: pH 7.5 (high activity of bee enzymes and very low activity of parasite enzymes), pH 5 (moderate activity of enzymes from both sources) and pH 3.5 (limited activity of bee proteinases and high activity of mite proteinases). Based on electrophoretic studies, the inhibition of the activity of bee haemolymph proteinases by V. destructor extracts was observed at each pH. The study at pH 7.5 with commercial inhibitors of the 4 main classes of proteinases (pepstatin A, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), E-64 (trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)-butane), soybean trypsin inhibitor and Kunitz inhibitor) suggested that parasite extracts mainly inhibited serine proteinases and, to a lower degree, cysteine and aspartyl proteinases. At pH 3.5 and pH 5, a decrease of approximately 40% in parasite proteinase activity was also observed in the presence of bee haemolymph. The result points to the presence of aspartyl proteinase inhibitors in bee haemolymph, which may be an important defence element for bees during food intake by a mite. It was demonstrated that trypsin and trypsin inhibitors are active in the excretion/secretion products of V. destructor, the proteinases of which may assist the parasite in food suckling by preventing haemolymph coagulation, among other things.

  12. Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae) Parasitism and Climate Differentially Influence the Prevalence, Levels, and Overt Infections of Deformed Wing Virus in Honey Bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguiano-Baez, Ricardo; Guzman-Novoa, Ernesto; Md Hamiduzzaman, Mollah; Espinosa-Montaño, Laura G; Correa-Benítez, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and loads of deformed wing virus (DWV) between honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies from a tropical and a temperate environment were compared. The interaction between these environments and the mite Varroa destructor in relation to DWV prevalence, levels, and overt infections, was also analyzed. V. destructor rates were determined, and samples of mites, adult bees, brood parasitized with varroa mites and brood not infested by mites were analyzed. DWV was detected in 100% of the mites and its prevalence and loads in honey bees were significantly higher in colonies from the temperate climate than in colonies from the tropical climate. Significant interactions were found between climate and type of sample, with the highest levels of DWV found in varroa-parasitized brood from temperate climate colonies. Additionally, overt infections were observed only in the temperate climate. Varroa parasitism and DWV loads in bees from colonies with overt infections were significantly higher than in bees from colonies with covert infections. These results suggest that interactions between climate, V. destructor, and possibly other factors, may play a significant role in the prevalence and levels of DWV in honey bee colonies, as well as in the development of overt infections. Several hypotheses are discussed to explain these results.

  13. Improvements on Signal Processing for HF Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yongtan; SHEN Yiying

    2001-01-01

    In this paper improvements on signalprocessing are achieved to enhance the performancesof H-F radar system, being unobtainable by the con-ventional signal processing. Using the improved sig-nal processing both high range resolution and longcoherent integration time may be obtained for goodbenefit to the target resolution and weak signal de-tection. Modification to the unmatched correspon-dence between range delay samples and range resolu-tion ceils saves an additional accumulation loss in therange processing. Finally, comparisons between theimproved and the conventional signal processing aregiven by numerical simulation.

  14. Systematic Study on Triaxial Superdeformed Bands of Hf Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Da-Li; DING Bin-Gang

    2009-01-01

    Properties of the triaxial superdeformed (TSD) bands of Hf isotopes are investigated systematically within the supersymmetry scheme including many-body interactions and a perturbation possessing the SO(5) (or SU(5)) symmetry on the rotational symmetry. Quantitatively good results of the γ-ray energies, the dynamical moments of inertia,and the spin of the TSD bands in Hf isotopes are obtained. It shows that this approach is quite powerful in describing the properties of the triaxial superdeformation in Hf isotopes.

  15. Determining Energy Distributions of HF-Accelerated Electrons at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-18

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0383 Determining energy distributions of HF-accelerated electrons at HAARP Christopher Fallen University of Alaska Fairbanks...2012 - 11/14/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Determining energy distributions of HF-accelerated electrons at HAARP 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0424...transmitted from the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) transmitter in Alaska. For a given fixed HF-plasma interaction altitude

  16. Physics of the Geospace Response to Powerful HF Radio Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    studies of the response of the Earth’s space plasma to high-power HF radio waves from the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ...of HF heating and explored to simulate artificial ducts. DMSP- HAARP experiments revealed that HF-created ion outflows and artificial density ducts...in the topside ionosphere appeared faster than predicted by the models, pointing to kinetic (suprathermal) effects. CHAMP/GRACE- HAARP experiments

  17. Approved quarantine treatment for Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in large-size bales and Hessian fly and cereal leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) control by bale compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    An approved quarantine treatment using bale compression (32 kg/sq cm of pressure) and phosphine fumigation (61 g/28.2 cu m) aluminum phosphide for 7 d at 20 degrees C) was determined to control Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), in large-size, polypropylene fabric-wrapped bales exported from t...

  18. Pheromone trapping to determine Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) activity in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), has been a historically significant pest of wheat throughout the Great Plains, including Kansas. However, it has been many decades since the flies’ activity has been monitored throughout the year in the field. This paper presents research on the activity ...

  19. Hessian fly mortality by phosphine-carbon dioxide fumigation and postharvest drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), puparia, the stage of regulatory concern that may be found in weeds contaminating exported hay, may be controlled with a phosphine and carbon dioxide gas mixture dispensed from cylinders at a minimum dose of 750 ppm, temperature of 20°C (68°F) or higher, and ...

  20. The Japan disaster and U.S. hay exports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarantine control of Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), by agricultural systems used to produce export quality hay for the Japan market was studied in the laboratory and field. Survival of Hessian fly puparia was evaluated under simulated seasonal weather conditions in incubators, regional o...

  1. A genome-wide survey of small interfering RNA and micro RNA pathway genes in a galling insect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayetiola destructor (Say), Hessian fly, is a significant pest of wheat in most production regions worldwide. Deployment of resistance (R) genes is the most effective control for this pest; however, deployment of R genes results in an increased frequency of pest genotypes that display virulence to t...

  2. Impact of transient heat stress on polar lipid metabolism in seedlings of wheat near-isogenic lines contrasting in resistance to hessian fly (Cecidomyiidae) infestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transient heat stress compromises resistance of host plants to Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), and other biotic stresses. However, the mechanism for the loss of plant resistance under heat stress remains to be determined. In this study, we determined polar lipid profiles in control and Hess...

  3. Genes Expressed Differentially in Hessian Fly Larvae Feeding in Resistant and Susceptible Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor, is a destructive pest of wheat worldwide and mainly controlled by deploying resistant cultivars. Hessian fly larvae manipulate susceptible plants extensively, but are unable to manipulate resistant plants and thus die in them. The mechanisms for Hessian fly l...

  4. Rapid mobilization of membrane lipids in wheat leaf-sheathes during incompatible interactions with hessian fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) is a biotrophic parasitic insect that interacts with wheat on a typical gene-for-gene basis. In this study, we systematically profiled changes in membrane lipids in two isogenic wheat lines: a susceptible line and its backcrossed offspring containing resistance ge...

  5. Localization and Characterization of 170 BAC-derived clones and mapping of Ninety-Four Microsatellites in the Hessian Fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninety-four microsatellites from enriched genomic libraries of Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor (Say)) were localized to 170 cognate clones in a Hessian fly bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. These microsatellite-positive BAC clones were physically mapped to polytene chromosomes by fl...

  6. PEMISAHAN Zr – Hf SECARA SINAMBUNG MENGGUNAKAN MIXER SETTLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Biyantoro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK PEMISAHAN Zr – Hf SECARA SINAMBUNG MENGGUNAKANMIXER SETTLER. Telah dilakukan pemisahanZr – Hf secara sinambung menggunakan pengaduk pengenap (mixer settler 16 stage. Larutan umpan adalah zirkon nitrat dengan kadar Zr = 30786 ppm dan Hf = 499 ppm. Ekstraktan dipakai adalah solven 60 % TBP dalam kerosen dan larutan scrubbingyang dipakai adalah asam nitrat 1 M. Umpan masuk pada stageke 5 dikontakkan secara berlawanan arah dengan solven masuk pada stage ke 16 dan larutan scrubbing masuk pada stage ke 1. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah memisahkan unsur Zr dan Hf dari hasil olah pasir zirkon menggunakan solven TBP dengan alat mixer settler16 stage. Analisis umpan dan hasil proses pemisahan untuk zirkonium (Zr dilakukan dengan menggunakan alat pendar sinar-X, sedangkananalisis unsur hafnium (Hf menggunakan Analisis Pengaktifan Neutron (APN. Parameter penelitian dilakukan dengan variasi keasaman asam nitrat dalam umpan dan variasi waktu pada berbagai laju pengadukan. Hasil penelitian pemisahan unsur Zr dengan Hf diperolehkondisi optimum pada keasaman umpan 4 N HNO3, keseimbangan dicapai setelah 3jam dan laju pengadukan 3300 rpm. Hasil ekstrak  unsur zirkon (Zr diperoleh kadar sebesar 28577 ppm dengan efisiensi 92,76 % serta kadar pengotor hafnium (Hf sebesar 95 ppm. Kata Kunci: pemisahan Zr, Hf, ekstraksi, mixer settler, alat pendar sinar-X, APN. ABSTRACT SEPARATION of Zr - Hf CONTINUOUSLY USE THE MIXER SETTLER. Separation of Zr - Hf continuously using mixer settler 16 stage has been done. The feed solution is zircon nitrate concentration of Zr = 30786 ppm  and Hf = 499 ppm. As the solvent used extractant 60 % TBP in 40 % kerosene. Nitric acid solution used srubbing 1 M. The feed entered into stage to 5 is contacted with solvents direction on the stage to 16 and the scrubbing solution enter the stage to 1. The purpose of this study is to separate Zr and Hf of the results from the process of zircon sand using solvent TBP using 16 stage

  7. Mitigating Doppler shift effect in HF multitone data modem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonlu, Yasar

    1989-09-01

    Digital communications over High Frequency (HF) radio channels are getting important in recent years. Current HF requirements are for data transmission at rates 2.4 kbps or more to accommodate computer data links and digital secure voice. HF modems which were produced to meet these speeds are, serial modems and parallel modems. On the other hand, the HF sky-wave communication medium, the ionosphere, has some propagation problems such as multipath and Doppler shift. The effect of Doppler shift in a parallel modem which employs Differential Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (DQPSK) modulation is considered and a correction method to mitigate the Doppler Shift effect is introduced.

  8. Epitaxial Thin Films of Y doped HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Claudy; Khan, Asif; Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is one of a few metal oxides that is thermodynamically stable on silicon and silicon oxide. There has been renewed interest in HfO2 due to the recent discovery of ferroelectricity and antiferroelectricity in doped HfO2. Typical ferroelectrics - such as strontium bismuth tantalate (SBT) and lead zirconium titanate (PZT) - contain elements that easily react with silicon and silicon oxide at elevated temperatures; therefore, such ferroelectrics are not suited for device applications. Meanwhile, ferroelectric HfO2 offers promise regarding integration with silicon. The stable phase of HfO2 at room temperature is monoclinic, but HfO2 can be stabilized in the tetragonal, orthorhombic or even cubic phase by suitable doping. We stabilized Y-doped HfO2 thin films using pulsed laser deposition. The strain state can be controlled using various perovskite substrates and controlled growth conditions. We report on Y-doped HfO2 domain structures from piezo-response force microscopy (PFM) and structural parameters via X-ray reciprocal space maps (RSM). We hope this work spurs further interest in strain-tuned ferroelectricity in doped HfO2.

  9. Microstructural characterization of as-cast hf-b alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Jânio Gigolotti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available An accurate knowledge of several metal-boron phase diagrams is important to evaluation of higher order systems such as metal-silicon-boron ternaries. The refinement and reassessment of phase diagram data is a continuous work, thus the reevaluation of metal-boron systems provides the possibility to confirm previous data from an investigation using higher purity materials and better analytical techniques. This work presents results of rigorous microstructural characterization of as-cast hafnium-boron alloys which are significant to assess the liquid composition associated to most of the invariant reactions of this system. Alloys were prepared by arc melting high purity hafnium (minimum 99.8% and boron (minimum 99.5% slices under argon atmosphere in water-cooled copper crucible with non consumable tungsten electrode and titanium getter. The phases were identified by scanning electron microscopy, using back-scattered electron image mode and X-ray diffraction. In general, a good agreement was found between our data and those from the currently accepted Hafnium-Boron phase diagram. The phases identified are αHfSS and B-RhomSS, the intermediate compounds HfB and HfB2 and the liquide L. The reactions are the eutectic L ⇔ αHfSS + HfB and L ⇔ HfB2 + B-Rhom, the peritectic L + HfB2 ⇔ HfB and the congruent formation of HfB2.

  10. The Research Advances on Control of Varroa destructor%狄斯瓦螨综合防治方法最新研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵红霞; 曾鑫年; 张学锋; 陈华生; 黄文忠; 罗岳雄

    2011-01-01

    狄斯瓦螨是严重危害西方蜜蜂(Apis mellifera)的一种体外寄生螨,是威胁世界养蜂业蜜蜂病虫害之一.狄斯瓦螨寄生于成年工蜂体表,影响工蜂的哺育采集防卫等行为;狄斯瓦螨进入巢房底部产卵,进而影响蜂群幼虫的发育;最终影响蜂群的繁殖与生产.养蜂业美其名日"甜蜜的事业",由于狄斯瓦螨的危害,甜蜜的事业变得苦涩.随着狄斯瓦螨抗药性及其蜂产品中药残问题,已引起世界各地养蜂业的高度关注.近几年,对狄氏瓦螨防治的研究有了新的进展.笔者分别从物理防治、化学防治、天然源物质防治、生物防治方法等方面作一综述,便于深入了解狄斯瓦螨的防治现状,及其存在的问题,找出更好的防治措施,不仅利于蜂群繁殖生产,而且提供给人类优质的天然蜂产品.%The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor poses a major threat to the survival of western honey-bee (Apis mellifera) populations. Varroa destructor parasite in adult' s worker body and influent nurse or forage behavior, et al. Varroa destructor lays eggs in the bottom of nestroom, then affects the development of bee larvae. Apis is ‘sweet career’, but Varroa destructor harms Apis mellifera, sweet career becomes bitter. With varroa mite drug-resistant and bee products medicine residual problem, has caused the high attention in the world. There were new advances on researches of Varroa destructor in recently years. The essay summarized the progress, including physical method, chemical methods, natural material, and biology control.

  11. Evaluación de extractos de ocho especies vegetales en el control de mildeo velloso (Peronospora destructor Berk en cebolla de bulbo (Allium cepa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Enrique Cubides-Hernández

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extractos de ocho especies vegetales: eucalipto (Eucalytus globulus, cola de caballo (Equisetum bogotense, ortiga (Urtica urens, manzanilla (Matricaria chamomilla, caléndula (Calendula officinalis, yerbabuena (Menta viridis, ajo (Allium sativum y clavo (Syzygum aromaticum, preparados por el método de decocción (100 g/l, fueron evaluados en cuanto a su eficiencia en el control de P. destructor en cebolla de bulbo. Se utilizó el diseño experimental de bloques al azar con cuatro repeticiones y siete aplicaciones (52, 60, 68, 76,84, 92 y 100 días después del trasplante, incluyendo un testigo químico Ridomil (metalaxil + mancozeb (2 g/l y el testigo absoluto; se evaluaron la incidencia y severidad de P. destructor, y el número y el peso de bulbos cosechados. El ANOVA mostró que de las siete aplicaciones realizadas, la última presentó efectos estadísticos en el control de la incidencia y severidad de P. destructor. El extracto de manzanilla superó al Ridomil en el control de la incidencia y severidad de P. destructor sin diferencias estadísticas entre sí, y fue significativamente mejor al observado con los extractos de eucalipto, cola de caballo, caléndula y el testigo; el extracto de manzanilla superó al testigo químico en el número y peso de bulbos de cebolla sin presentar diferencias estadísticas, y fue significativamente mejor al obtenido con los extractos de eucalipto, cola de caballo, ortiga, caléndula, yerbabuena, clavo y el testigo absoluto. El extracto de manzanilla es una alternativa ecológica que se debe tener en cuenta en el manejo integrado de P. destructor en cebolla de bulbo.

  12. A DFT study of temperature dependent dissociation mechanism of HF in HF(H2O)7 cluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swatantra K Yadav; Hirdyesh Mishra; Ashwani K Tiwari

    2015-10-01

    We report a Density Functional Theoretical (DFT) study of dissociation of Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) in HF(H2O)7 cluster, using B3LYP functional and empirical exchange correlation functional M06-2X along with 6-31+G(d,p) basis set. Dissociation constant, KRP, of HF dissociation and pKa values of HF in cluster at various temperatures have been reported. It has been found that both KRP and pKa are highly dependent on temperature. The variation of pKa with temperature suggests that HF is strong acid at lower temperatures. Our study also reveals that HF is a stronger acid in water cluster than in bulk water. Further, the results obtained by DFT calculations have been compared with the earlier reported results obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. It is found that DFT results are qualitatively consistent with the results of MC simulation but quantitatively different.

  13. Hf-W chronometry of primitive achondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, T.; Münker, C.; Mezger, K.; Palme, H.

    2010-03-01

    Metal segregation and silicate melting on asteroids are the most incisive differentiation events in the early evolution of planetary bodies. The timing of these events can be constrained using the short-lived 182Hf- 182W radionuclide system. Here we present new 182Hf- 182W data for major types of primitive achondrites including acapulcoites, winonaites and one lodranite. These meteorites are of particular interest because they show only limited evidence for partial melting of silicates and are therefore intermediate between chondrites and achondrites. For acapulcoites we derived a 182Hf- 182W age of Δ tCAI = 4.1 +1.2/ -1.1 Ma. A model age for winonaite separates calculated from the intercept of the isochron defines an age of Δ tCAI = 4.8 +3.1/ -2.6 Ma (assuming a bulk Hf/W ratio of ˜1.2). Both ages most likely define primary magmatic events on the respective parent bodies, such as melting of metal, although metal stayed in place and did not segregate to form a core. A later thermal event is responsible for resetting of the winonaite isochron, yielding an age of Δ tCAI = 14.3 +2.7/ -2.2 Ma, significantly younger than the model age. Assuming a co-genetic relationship between winonaites and silicates present in IAB iron meteorites (based on oxygen isotope composition) and including data by Schulz et al. (2009), a common parent body chronology can be established. Magmatic activity occurred between ˜1.5 and 5 Ma after CAIs. More than 5 Ma later, intensive thermal metamorphism has redistributed Hf-W. Average cooling rates calculated for the winonaite/IAB parent asteroid range between ˜35 and ˜4 K/Ma, most likely reflecting different burial depths. Cooling rates obtained for acapulcoites were ˜40 K/Ma to ˜720 K and then ˜3 K/Ma to ˜550 K. Accretion and subsequent magmatism on the acapulcoite parent body occurred slightly later if compared to most achondrite parent bodies (e.g., angrites, ureilites and eucrites), in this case supporting the concept of an inverse

  14. Pressure induced novel compounds in the Hf-O system from first-principles calculations

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Using first-principles evolutionary simulations, we have systematically investigated phase stability in the Hf-O system at pressure up to 120 GPa. New compounds Hf5O2, Hf3O2, HfO and HfO3 are discovered to be thermodynamically stable at certain pressure ranges and a new stable high-pressure phase is found for Hf2O with space group Pnnm and anti-CaCl2-type structure. Both P62m-HfO and P4m2-Hf2O3 show semimetallic character. Pnnm-HfO3 shows interesting structure, simultaneously containing oxide...

  15. Ferroelectricity of nondoped thin HfO2 films in TiN/HfO2/TiN stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tomonori; Xu, Lun; Shibayama, Shigehisa; Yajima, Takeaki; Migita, Shinji; Toriumi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    We report on the impact of TiN interfaces on the ferroelectricity of nondoped HfO2. Ferroelectric properties of nondoped HfO2 in TiN/HfO2/TiN stacks are shown in capacitance-voltage and polarization-voltage characteristics. The Curie temperature is also estimated to be around 500 °C. The ferroelectricity of nondoped HfO2 clearly appears by thinning HfO2 film down to ˜35 nm. We directly revealed in thermal treatments that the ferroelectric HfO2 film on TiN was maintained by covering the top surface of HfO2 with TiN, while it was followed by a phase transition to the paraelectric phase in the case of the open surface of HfO2. Thus, it is concluded that the ferroelectricity in nondoped HfO2 in this study was mainly driven by both of top and bottom TiN interfaces.

  16. Synthesis of Freestanding HfO2 Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    Tang J, Fabbri J, Robinson RD, Zhu Y, Herman IP, Steigerwald ML, Brus LE: Solid-solution nanoparticles:use of a nonhydrolytic sol-gel synthesis to...colloidal HfO2 nanorods. Adv Mater 2007, 19:2608-2612. Page 21 5. Qiu X, Howe JY, Cardoso MB, Polat O, Heller W: Size control of highly ordered HfO2

  17. Parametric excitation of whistler waves by HF heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, S. P.; Lee, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Possible generation of whistler waves by Tromso HF heater is investigated. It is shown that the HF heater wave can parametrically decay into a whistler wave and a Langmuir wave. Since whistler waves may have a broad range of frequency, the simultaneously excited Langmuir waves can have a much broader frequency bandwidth than those excited by the parametric decay instability.

  18. Study of {sup 179}Hf{sup m2} excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnevsky, I. N.; Zheltonozhsky, V. A., E-mail: zhelton@kinr.kiev.ua; Savrasov, A. N. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute for Nuclear Research (Ukraine); Mazur, V. M. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Electronic Physics (Ukraine)

    2016-12-15

    Isomeric ratios of {sup 179}Hf{sup m2,g} yields in the (γ, n) reaction and the cross section for the {sup 179}Hf{sup m2} population in the (α, p) reaction are measured for the first time at the end-point energies of 15.1 and 17.5 MeV for bremsstrahlung photons and 26 MeV for alpha particles. The results are σ = (1.1 ± 0.11) × 10{sup −27} cm{sup 2} for the {sup 176}Lu(α, p){sup 179}Hf{sup m2} reaction and Y{sub m2}/Y{sub g} = (6.1 ± 0.3) × 10{sup −6} and (3.7 ± 0.2) × 10{sup −6} for the {sup 180}Hf(γ, n){sup 179}Hf{sup m22} reaction at E{sub ep} =15.1 and 17.5 MeV, respectively. The experimental data on the relative {sup 179}Hf{sup m2} yield indicate a single-humped shape of the excitation function for the {sup 180}Hf(γ, n){sup 179}Hf{sup m2} reaction. Simulation is performed using the TALYS-1.4 and EMPIRE-3.2 codes.

  19. Diffusion of Hf and Nb in Zr-19%Nb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Hood, G.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Schultz, R.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Matsuura, N. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Roy, J.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Jackman, J.A. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada). Met. Sci. and Technol.

    1996-05-01

    Diffusion of Hf and Nb in large-grained bcc Zr-19%Nb has been studied. Diffusion coefficients of Hf, D(Hf), were measured in the range 620-1173 K and D(Nb) was measured at 920 and 1167 K. The Hf diffusion profiles were determined by SIMS and the Nb profiles by microtome sectioning and radio-tracer counting. The Hf data show a smooth, temperature-dependent behaviour through the monotectoid temperature, 875 K, and may be characterised by D{approx}10{sup -9}.exp-1.4 (eV/kT) m{sup 2}/s. D(Nb) tends to be lower than the corresponding values for D(Hf). Overall, diffusion of Hf and Nb are characteristic of diffusion in bcc Zr. Surface hold-up (oxide film) at low temperatures was overcome by using ion-implanted Hf diffusion sources. The results are compared with earlier work and discussed in terms of diffusion mechanisms and the {beta}-phase transformation of commercial Zr-2.5Nb. (orig.).

  20. Oxygen Recovery in Hf Oxide Films Fabricated by Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ran; LI Zi-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The chemical structure of ultrathin Hf oxide films (< 10 nm) fabricated by a standard sputtering method is investigated using x-ray spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. According to the experiments,oxygen species are impacted to the HfO2/Si interface during the initial sputtering, and then released back to the upper Hf02 region driven by the oxygen concentration grads. A vacuum annealing can greatly enhance this recovery process. Additionally, significant SiO2 reduction in the interface is observed after the vacuum annealing for the thick HfO2 films in our experiment. It might be an effective method to confine the interracial layer thickness by sputtering thick HfO2 in no-oxygen ambient.

  1. Crystal structure of Si-doped HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lili; Nelson, Matthew; Aldridge, Henry; Iamsasri, Thanakorn; Fancher, Chris M.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Nishida, Toshikazu; Moghaddam, Saeed; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-01-01

    Si-doped HfO2 was prepared by solid state synthesis of the starting oxides. Using Rietveld refinement of high resolution X-ray diffraction patterns, a substitutional limit of Si in HfO2 was determined as less than 9 at. %. A second phase was identified as Cristobalite (SiO2) rather than HfSiO4, the latter of which would be expected from existing SiO2-HfO2 phase diagrams. Crystallographic refinement with increased Si-dopant concentration in monoclinic HfO2 shows that c/b increases, while β decreases. The spontaneous strain, which characterizes the ferroelastic distortion of the unit cell, was calculated and shown to decrease with increasing Si substitution.

  2. The (178m2)Hf Controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J A; Gemmell, D S; Schiffer, J P; Wilhelmy, J B

    2003-07-24

    Since its discovery in the 1960's the {sup 178m2}Hf isomer has garnered high attention from both the basic and applied communities in nuclear science. It's combination of high spin (16+), long half life (31 yrs), and high excitation energy (2.446 MeV) offer unique possibilities as an energy storage medium. Interest in the isomer was rekindled beginning in 1999 when a series of publications began to appear from a group (referred to here as the ''Texas collaboration'') primarily based at the University of Texas, Dallas [1]. They reported observations that some of the stored energy could be released (''triggered'') when the isomer was exposed to a fluence of photons in the energy range {approx}10 to {approx}60 keV. The implications of this observation are profound. Even though the claimed cross section for the process was {approx}7 orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted from the known systematics of photon absorption by nuclei in this mass range [2], such a highly efficient method for triggering the isomeric deexcitation immediately suggested applications utilizing the explosive or the controlled gradual energy release from a very compact source. The prospect of such applications has focused considerable interest on realizing the promise that is implicit in the reported observations. However, two experiments performed by a group from ANL/LANL/LLNL at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne (the ''APS collaboration'') reported negative results for the observation of any photon-triggered deexcitation of the {sup 178m2}Hf isomer [3]. This has led to a continued controversy, where both sides have adamantly defended their observations. At this point an outsider has difficulty determining whether there is indeed a triggering effect that should be pursued energetically with substantial resources, or whether the phenomenon consists of overly optimistic interpretation of data.

  3. Acaricide treatment affects viral dynamics in Varroa destructor-infested honey bee colonies via both host physiology and mite control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Barbara; Forsgren, Eva; Fries, Ingemar; de Miranda, Joachim R

    2012-01-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies are declining, and a number of stressors have been identified that affect, alone or in combination, the health of honey bees. The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, honey bee viruses that are often closely associated with the mite, and pesticides used to control the mite population form a complex system of stressors that may affect honey bee health in different ways. During an acaricide treatment using Apistan (plastic strips coated with tau-fluvalinate), we analyzed the infection dynamics of deformed wing virus (DWV), sacbrood virus (SBV), and black queen cell virus (BQCV) in adult bees, mite-infested pupae, their associated Varroa mites, and uninfested pupae, comparing these to similar samples from untreated control colonies. Titers of DWV increased initially with the onset of the acaricide application and then slightly decreased progressively coinciding with the removal of the Varroa mite infestation. This initial increase in DWV titers suggests a physiological effect of tau-fluvalinate on the host's susceptibility to viral infection. DWV titers in adult bees and uninfested pupae remained higher in treated colonies than in untreated colonies. The titers of SBV and BQCV did not show any direct relationship with mite infestation and showed a variety of possible effects of the acaricide treatment. The results indicate that other factors besides Varroa mite infestation may be important to the development and maintenance of damaging DWV titers in colonies. Possible biochemical explanations for the observed synergistic effects between tau-fluvalinate and virus infections are discussed.

  4. Supplementing with vitamin C the diet of honeybees (Apis mellifera carnica) parasitized with Varroa destructor: effects on antioxidative status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjan, Marek; Łopieńska-Biernat, Elżbieta; Lipiński, Zbigniew; Dmitryjuk, Małgorzata; Żółtowska, Krystyna

    2014-05-01

    We studied a total of eight developmental stages of capped brood and newly emerged workers of Apis mellifera carnica colonies naturally parasitized with Varroa destructor. During winter and early spring four colonies were fed syrup containing 1.8 mg vitamin C kg(-1) (ascorbic acid group; group AA) while four colonies were fed syrup without the vitamin C (control group C). Selected elements of the antioxidative system were analysed including total antioxidant status (TAS), glutathione content and antioxidative enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase). Body weight, protein content and indices of infestation were also determined. The prevalence (8.11%) and intensity (1·15 parasite per bee) of the infestation were lower in group AA compared with group C (11.3% and 1.21, respectively). Changes in the indicators of antioxidative stress were evidence for the strengthening of the antioxidative system in the brood by administration of vitamin C. In freshly emerged worker bees of group AA, despite the infestation, protein content, TAS, and the activity of all antioxidative enzymes had significantly higher values in relation to group C.

  5. ULTRASTRUCURAL STUDY OF BEE LOUSE VARROA DESTRUCTOR ANDERSON & TRUEMAN 2000 (ACARI: VARROIDAE) WITH RESISTANCE MODELS FROM APIS MELLIFERA L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Khalaf Nour Abd El-Wahed

    2015-08-01

    The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is the most dangerous pest of honeybee Egyptian race Apis mellifera L., as it causes many losses in apiculture worldwide. Adult female mites are flattened with a dome-shaped dorsal shield. The present SEM study revealed that the flat ventral surface is composed of series of plates. There are 5 rows of small, chemoreceptor papillae posterior to the genito-ventro anal shield, and a unique respiratory structure (peritreme) is located laterally above Coxa III. Peritreme is a chitinized elongated area surrounding stigma opening, provided by a lid that looks like a rose with a curly thick inner membrane which has numerous teeth-like projections. Mite' legs appeared to be modified for parasitism and each is tipped by one distal empodium. The pretarsus of the first pair of legs becomes a concave sucker and the pretarsus of the 3 pairs of the posterior legs consists of membranous amblacral pad (the caruncle). The mouthparts appeared well modified for its diet on bee hernolymph with its' powerful pedipalp for host attachment. High magnification revealed different types of setae distributed on the body, the mechano-receptor pedipalp short. and long anal setae and dorsal shield sensory simple setae.

  6. Artificial feeding of Varroa destructor through a chitosan membrane: a tool for studying the host-microparasite relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabart, Jeremy; Colin, Marc-Edouard; Carayon, Jean-Luc; Tene, Nathan; Payre, Bruno; Vetillard, Angelique

    2013-09-01

    Rearing pests or parasites of very small size in the absence of their living host is a challenge for behavioural, physiological and pathological studies. For feeding Varroa destructor, an ectoparasitic mite of Apis mellifera, a confinement space with a membrane separating the nutritive solution and the space was designed. The mite measures less than 2 mm and bears a perforating apparatus with a length of 15 μm. The membrane, an essential element of the chamber, has a thickness of 0.1 μm, and is made of chitosan. It closes one face of the individual confinement chamber and allows piercing and the ingestion of the nutritive solution. Factors inducing feeding can be applied on the inner walls or on the membrane. In the particular case of Varroa, the highest percentages of feeding mites are obtained by addition of host haemolymph to the nutritive solution, suggesting the kairomonal role of haemolymph in addition to its nutritional one. The membrane concept can be easily applied to several mites or other micro-pests.

  7. Genomic organization and reproductive regulation of a large lipid transfer protein in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, A R; Shirk, P D; Duehl, A J; Donohue, K V; Grozinger, C M; Evans, J D; Teal, P E A

    2013-10-01

    The complete genomic region and corresponding transcript of the most abundant protein in phoretic varroa mites, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), were sequenced and have homology with acarine hemelipoglycoproteins and the large lipid transfer protein (LLTP) super family. The genomic sequence of VdLLTP included 14 introns and the mature transcript coded for a predicted polypeptide of 1575 amino acid residues. VdLLTP shared a minimum of 25% sequence identity with acarine LLTPs. Phylogenetic assessment showed VdLLTP was most closely related to Metaseiulus occidentalis vitellogenin and LLTP proteins of ticks; however, no heme binding by VdLLTP was detected. Analysis of lipids associated with VdLLTP showed that it was a carrier for free and esterified C12 -C22 fatty acids from triglycerides, diacylglycerides and monoacylglycerides. Additionally, cholesterol and β-sitosterol were found as cholesterol esters linked to common fatty acids. Transcript levels of VdLLTP were 42 and 310 times higher in phoretic female mites when compared with males and quiescent deutonymphs, respectively. Coincident with initiation of the reproductive phase, VdLLTP transcript levels declined to a third of those in phoretic female mites. VdLLTP functions as an important lipid transporter and should provide a significant RNA interference target for assessing the control of varroa mites.

  8. Towards a better understanding of Apis mellifera and Varroa destructor microbiomes: introducing 'phyloh' as a novel phylogenetic diversity analysis tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandionigi, A; Vicario, S; Prosdocimi, E M; Galimberti, A; Ferri, E; Bruno, A; Balech, B; Mezzasalma, V; Casiraghi, M

    2015-07-01

    The study of diversity in biological communities is an intriguing field. Huge amount of data are nowadays available (provided by the innovative DNA sequencing techniques), and management, analysis and display of results are not trivial. Here, we propose for the first time the use of phylogenetic entropy as a measure of bacterial diversity in studies of microbial community structure. We then compared our new method (i.e. the web tool phyloh) for partitioning phylogenetic diversity with the traditional approach in diversity analyses of bacteria communities. We tested phyloh to characterize microbiome in the honeybee (Apis mellifera, Insecta: Hymenoptera) and its parasitic mite varroa (Varroa destructor, Arachnida: Parasitiformes). The rationale is that the comparative analysis of honeybee and varroa microbiomes could open new perspectives concerning the role of the parasites on honeybee colonies health. Our results showed a dramatic change of the honeybee microbiome when varroa occurs, suggesting that this parasite is able to influence host microbiome. Among the different approaches used, only the entropy method, in conjunction with phylogenetic constraint as implemented in phyloh, was able to discriminate varroa microbiome from that of parasitized honeybees. In conclusion, we foresee that the use of phylogenetic entropy could become a new standard in the analyses of community structure, in particular to prove the contribution of each biological entity to the overall diversity.

  9. Genome Characterization, Prevalence and Distribution of a Macula-Like Virus from Apis mellifera and Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miranda, Joachim R; Cornman, R Scott; Evans, Jay D; Semberg, Emilia; Haddad, Nizar; Neumann, Peter; Gauthier, Laurent

    2015-07-06

    Around 14 distinct virus species-complexes have been detected in honeybees, each with one or more strains or sub-species. Here we present the initial characterization of an entirely new virus species-complex discovered in honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) and varroa mite (Varroa destructor) samples from Europe and the USA. The virus has a naturally poly-adenylated RNA genome of about 6500 nucleotides with a genome organization and sequence similar to the Tymoviridae (Tymovirales; Tymoviridae), a predominantly plant-infecting virus family. Literature and laboratory analyses indicated that the virus had not previously been described. The virus is very common in French apiaries, mirroring the results from an extensive Belgian survey, but could not be detected in equally-extensive Swedish and Norwegian bee disease surveys. The virus appears to be closely linked to varroa, with the highest prevalence found in varroa samples and a clear seasonal distribution peaking in autumn, coinciding with the natural varroa population development. Sub-genomic RNA analyses show that bees are definite hosts, while varroa is a possible host and likely vector. The tentative name of Bee Macula-like virus (BeeMLV) is therefore proposed. A second, distantly related Tymoviridae-like virus was also discovered in varroa transcriptomes, tentatively named Varroa Tymo-like virus (VTLV).

  10. Differences in Varroa destructor infestation rates of two indigenous subspecies of Apis mellifera in the Republic of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Ashley N; Schmehl, Daniel R; Allsopp, Mike; Bustamante, Tomas A; Kimmel, Chase B; Dykes, Mark E; Ellis, James D

    2016-04-01

    Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman (Varroa) is a damaging pest of the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera, in North America, Europe, and Asia. However, Varroa infestations have not produced equivalent colony losses of African subspecies of honey bee throughout Africa and parts of the Americas. We surveyed the Varroa infestation rates (number of Varroa per 100 adult honey bees) in colonies of A. m. scutellata, A. m. capensis, and hybrids of the two subspecies throughout the Republic of South Africa in the fall of 2014. We found that A. m. scutellata colonies had significantly higher Varroa infestations than did A. m. capensis colonies. Furthermore, hybridized colonies of the two subspecies had Varroa infestations intermediate to those of A. m. scutellata and A. m. capensis. This is the first documentation of a clear difference in Varroa infestation rates of A. m. scutellata, A. m. capensis, and hybridized colonies in South Africa. Furthermore, our data confirm that Varroa populations in A. m. scutellata colonies are within the range of populations that are damaging to European honey bees.

  11. Ferroelectricity-modulated resistive switching in Pt/Si:HfO2/HfO2-x /Pt memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Jiang; Xianghao, Du; Zuyin, Han

    2016-08-01

    It is investigated for the effect of a ferroelectric Si:HfO2 thin film on the resistive switching in a stacked Pt/Si:HfO2/highly-oxygen-deficient HfO2-x /Pt structure. Improved resistance performance was observed. It was concluded that the observed resistive switching behavior was related to the modulation of the width and height of a depletion barrier in the HfO2-x layer, which was caused by the Si:HfO2 ferroelectric polarization field effect. Reliable switching reproducibility and long data retention were observed in these memory cells, suggesting their great potential in non-volatile memories applications with full compatibility and simplicity. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11374182), the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province (No. ZR2012FQ012), and the Jinan Independent Innovation Projects of Universities (No. 201303019).

  12. Power-Stepped HF Cross Modulation Experiments at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S.; Moore, R. C.; Langston, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    High frequency (HF) cross modulation experiments are a well established means for probing the HF-modified characteristics of the D-region ionosphere. In this paper, we apply experimental observations of HF cross-modulation to the related problem of ELF/VLF wave generation. HF cross-modulation measurements are used to evaluate the efficiency of ionospheric conductivity modulation during power-stepped modulated HF heating experiments. The results are compared to previously published dependencies of ELF/VLF wave amplitude on HF peak power. The experiments were performed during the March 2013 campaign at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Observatory. HAARP was operated in a dual-beam transmission format: the first beam heated the ionosphere using sinusoidal amplitude modulation while the second beam broadcast a series of low-power probe pulses. The peak power of the modulating beam was incremented in 1-dB steps. We compare the minimum and maximum cross-modulation effect and the amplitude of the resulting cross-modulation waveform to the expected power-law dependence of ELF/VLF wave amplitude on HF power.

  13. Eficacia del Oxavar® para el Control del Ácaro Varroa destructor (Varroidae en Colmenas de Apis mellifera (Apidae Efficacy of Oxavar® to control the mite Varroa destructor (Varroidae in honeybee colonies of Apis mellifera (Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Augusto Marcangeli

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo fue evaluar la eficacia del producto Oxavar® para el control del ácaro Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman en colmenas de abejas Apis mellifera durante la primavera de 2002 y otoño de 2003. El trabajo se llevó a cabo en el apiario experimental del Centro de Extensión Apícola ubicado en Coronel Vidal, provincia de Buenos Aires. Se trabajó sobre un total de 20 colmenas tipo Langstroth que se dividieron en dos grupos iguales. El primer grupo recibió 5 ml de Oxavar® (323 g en 5000 ml de agua destilada por cuadro cubierto por abejas. El segundo grupo, el testigo, recibió 5 ml de agua destilada por cuadro cubierto por abejas. Ambos grupos recibieron tres dosis a intervalos de siete días. Semanalmente, se recolectaron los ácaros muertos caídos en pisos especiales que evitaban que las abejas los eliminen. Posteriormente, en los dos grupos se colocaron tiras del producto Apistan® para eliminar los ácaros remanentes en las colonias y poder así calcular la eficacia del tratamiento. El producto Oxavar® presentó una eficacia promedio de 85,5 % ± 2,8 durante la primavera y 86,1% ± 2,6 durante el otoño, no mostrando diferencias significativas entre las estaciones (p> 0,05. En ambos casos se registraron diferencias significativas frente al grupo control (pThe aim of this work was to evaluate the acaricide efficacy of Oxavar® to control Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman in Apis mellifera (L colonies during the spring 2002 and the autumn 2003. Work was done at “Centro de Extensión Apícola” experimental apiary located in Coronel Vidal, province of Buenos Aires. Twenty Langstroth hives were used divided in two equal groups. The first group received 5 ml of Oxavar® (323 g in 5000 ml of destiled water per comb covered by honeybees and the second one received 5 ml of destiled water. Both groups received three dosages at seven day periods. Dead mites were collected weekly from special floors in order to avoid

  14. HF dissociation in water clusters by computer simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Elena, Alin Marin

    2013-01-01

    We perform Restrained hybrid Monte Carlo simulations to compute the equilibrium constant of the dissociation reaction of HF in HF(H2O)7. We find that, like in the bulk, hydrofluoric acid, is a weak acid also in the cubic HF(H2O)7 cluster, and that its acidity is higher at lower T. This latter phenomenon has a (vibrational) entropic origin, namely it is due to the reduction of the (negative) T∆S contribution to the variation of free energy between the reactant and product. We found also ...

  15. Ionospheric heating with oblique HF waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Edward C., Jr.; Bloom, Ron M.

    1990-10-01

    Calculations of ionospheric electron density perturbations and ground-level signal changes produce by intense oblique high frequency (HF) transmitters are presented. This analysis considers radio field focusing at caustics, the consequent joule-heating of the surrounding plasma, heat conduction, diffusion, and recombination processes: these being the effects of a powerful oblique 'modifying' wave. It neglects whatever plasma instabilities might occur. Then effects on a secondary 'test' wave that is propagated along the same path as the first are investigated. Calculations predict ground-level field-strength reductions of several dB in the test wave for modifying waves having ERP in the 85 to 90 dBW range. These field-strength changes are similar in sign, magnitude, and location to ones measured in Soviet experiments. The results are sensitive to the model ionosphere assumed, so future experiments should employ the widest possible range of frequencies and propagation conditions. An effective power of 90 dBW seems to be a sort of threshold that, if exceeded, results in substantial rather than small signal changes. The conclusions are based solely on joule-heating and subsequent defocusing of waves passing through caustic regions.

  16. Process Simulation Analysis of HF Stripping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaer A. Abdulla

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available    HYSYS process simulator is used for the analysis of existing HF stripping column in LAB plant (Arab Detergent Company, Baiji-Iraq. Simulated column performance and profiles curves are constructed. The variables considered are the thermodynamic model option, bottom temperature, feed temperature, and column profiles for the temperature, vapor flow rate, liquid flow rate and composition. The five thermodynamic models options used (Margules, UNIQUAC, van laar, Antoine, and Zudkevitch-Joffee, affecting the results within (0.1-58% variation for the most cases.        The simulated results show that about 4% of paraffin (C10 & C11 presents at the top stream, which may cause a problem in the LAB production plant. The major variations were noticed for the total top vapor flow rate with bottom temperature and with feed composition. The column profiles maintain fairly constants from tray 5 to tray 18. The study gives evidence about a successful simulation with HYSYS because the results correspond with the real plant operation data.

  17. The (178m2) Hf Controversy

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, J A; Schiffer, J P; Wilhelmy, J

    2003-01-01

    Since its discovery in the 1960's the sup 1 sup 7 sup 8 sup m sup 2 Hf isomer has garnered high attention from both the basic and applied communities in nuclear science. It's combination of high spin (16+), long half life (31 yrs), and high excitation energy (2.446 MeV) offer unique possibilities as an energy storage medium. Interest in the isomer was rekindled beginning in 1999 when a series of publications began to appear from a group (referred to here as the ''Texas collaboration'') primarily based at the University of Texas, Dallas [1]. They reported observations that some of the stored energy could be released (''triggered'') when the isomer was exposed to a fluence of photons in the energy range approx 10 to approx 60 keV. The implications of this observation are profound. Even though the claimed cross section for the process was approx 7 orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted from the known systematics of photon absorption by nuclei in this mass range [2], such a highly efficient method fo...

  18. Grindability of cast Ti-Hf alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Sato, Hideki; Okuno, Osamu; Nunn, Martha E; Okabe, Toru

    2006-04-01

    As part of our systematic studies characterizing the properties of titanium alloys, we investigated the grindability of a series of cast Ti-Hf alloys. Alloy buttons with hafnium concentrations up to 40 mass% were made using an argon-arc melting furnace. Each button was cast into a magnesia-based mold using a dental titanium casting machine; three specimens were made for each metal. Prior to testing, the hardened surface layer was removed. The specimens were ground at five different speeds for 1 min at 0.98 N using a carborundum wheel on an electric dental handpiece. Grindability was evaluated as the volume of metal removed per minute (grinding rate) and the volume ratio of metal removed compared to the wheel material lost (grinding ratio). The data were analyzed using ANOVA. A trend of increasing grindability was found with increasing amounts of hafnium, although there was no statistical difference in the grindability with increasing hafnium contents. We also found that hafnium may be used to harden or strengthen titanium without deteriorating the grindability.

  19. The magnetic properties of $^{\\rm 177}$Hf and $^{\\rm 180}$Hf in the strong coupling deformed model

    OpenAIRE

    Muto, S.; Stone, N. J.; Bingham, C. R.; STONE, J.R; Walker, P. M.; Audi, G.; Gaulard, C.; Köster, U.(Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble, France); Nikolov, J.; Nishimura,K; Ohtsubo, T.; Podolyak, Z.; Risegari, L.; Simpson, G.S.; Veskovic, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports NMR measurements of the magnetic dipole moments of two high-K isomers, the 37/2$^-$, 51.4 m, 2740 keV state in $^{\\rm 177}$Hf and the 8$^-$, 5.5 h, 1142 keV state in $^{\\rm 180}$Hf by the method of on-line nuclear orientation. Also included are results on the angular distributions of gamma transitions in the decay of the $^{\\rm 177}$Hf isotope. These yield high precision E2/M1 multipole mixing ratios for transitions in bands built on the 23/2$^+$, 1.1 s, isomer at 1315 keV ...

  20. An Observational Study of Honey Bee Colony Winter Losses and Their Association with Varroa destructor, Neonicotinoids and Other Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zee, Romée; Gray, Alison; Pisa, Lennard; de Rijk, Theo

    2015-01-01

    This article presents results of an analysis of honey bee losses over the winter of 2011-2012 in the Netherlands, from a sample of 86 colonies, located at 43 apiaries. The apiaries were selected using spatially stratified random sampling. Colony winter loss data were collected and related to various measures of colony strength recorded in summer, as well as data from laboratory analysis of sample material taken from two selected colonies in each of the 43 apiaries. The logistic regression model which best explained the risk of winter loss included, in order of statistical importance, the variables (1) Varroa destructor mite infestation rate in October 2011, (2) presence of the cyano-substituted neonicotinoids acetamiprid or thiacloprid in the first 2 weeks of August 2011 in at least one of the honey bee matrices honey, bees or bee bread (pollen), (3) presence of Brassica napus (oilseed rape) or Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard) pollen in bee bread in early August 2011, and (4) a measure of the unexplained winter losses for the postal code area where the colonies were located, obtained from a different dataset. We consider in the discussion that reduced opportunities for foraging in July and August because of bad weather may have added substantially to the adverse effects of acetamiprid and thiacloprid. A novel feature of this work is its use of postal code random effects from two other independent datasets collected in the annual national monitoring by questionnaires of winter losses of honey bees in the Netherlands. These were used to plan the sample selection and also in the model fitting of the data in this study. It should however be noted that the results of the present pilot study are based on limited data, which may consequently reveal strong factors but fail to demonstrate possible interaction effects. PMID:26154346

  1. Removal of drone brood from Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies to control Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) and retain adult drones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wantuch, Holly A; Tarpy, David R

    2009-12-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman (Acari: Varroidae) has plagued European honey bees, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae), in the Americas since its introduction in the 1980s. For many years, these mites were sufficiently controlled using synthetic acaricides. Recently, however, beekeepers have experienced increased resistance by mites to chemical pesticides, which are also known to leave residues in hive products such as wax and honey. Thus there has been increased emphasis on nonchemical integrated pest management control tactics for Varroa. Because mites preferentially reproduce in drone brood (pupal males), we developed a treatment strategy focusing on salvaging parasitized drones while removing mites from them. We removed drone brood from colonies in which there was no acaricidal application and banked them in separate "drone-brood receiving" colonies treated with pesticides to kill mites emerging with drones. We tested 20 colonies divided into three groups: 1) negative control (no mite treatment), 2) positive control (treatment with acaricides), and 3) drone-brood removal and placement into drone-brood receiving colonies. We found that drone-brood trapping significantly lowered mite numbers during the early months of the season, eliminating the need for additional control measures in the spring. However, mite levels in the drone-brood removal group increased later in the summer, suggesting that this benefit does not persist throughout the entire season. Our results suggest that this method of drone-brood trapping can be used as an element of an integrated control strategy to control varroa mites, eliminating a large portion of the Varroa population with limited chemical treatments while retaining the benefits of maintaining adult drones in the population.

  2. An Observational Study of Honey Bee Colony Winter Losses and Their Association with Varroa destructor, Neonicotinoids and Other Risk Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romée van der Zee

    Full Text Available This article presents results of an analysis of honey bee losses over the winter of 2011-2012 in the Netherlands, from a sample of 86 colonies, located at 43 apiaries. The apiaries were selected using spatially stratified random sampling. Colony winter loss data were collected and related to various measures of colony strength recorded in summer, as well as data from laboratory analysis of sample material taken from two selected colonies in each of the 43 apiaries. The logistic regression model which best explained the risk of winter loss included, in order of statistical importance, the variables (1 Varroa destructor mite infestation rate in October 2011, (2 presence of the cyano-substituted neonicotinoids acetamiprid or thiacloprid in the first 2 weeks of August 2011 in at least one of the honey bee matrices honey, bees or bee bread (pollen, (3 presence of Brassica napus (oilseed rape or Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard pollen in bee bread in early August 2011, and (4 a measure of the unexplained winter losses for the postal code area where the colonies were located, obtained from a different dataset. We consider in the discussion that reduced opportunities for foraging in July and August because of bad weather may have added substantially to the adverse effects of acetamiprid and thiacloprid. A novel feature of this work is its use of postal code random effects from two other independent datasets collected in the annual national monitoring by questionnaires of winter losses of honey bees in the Netherlands. These were used to plan the sample selection and also in the model fitting of the data in this study. It should however be noted that the results of the present pilot study are based on limited data, which may consequently reveal strong factors but fail to demonstrate possible interaction effects.

  3. An Observational Study of Honey Bee Colony Winter Losses and Their Association with Varroa destructor, Neonicotinoids and Other Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zee, Romée; Gray, Alison; Pisa, Lennard; de Rijk, Theo

    2015-01-01

    This article presents results of an analysis of honey bee losses over the winter of 2011-2012 in the Netherlands, from a sample of 86 colonies, located at 43 apiaries. The apiaries were selected using spatially stratified random sampling. Colony winter loss data were collected and related to various measures of colony strength recorded in summer, as well as data from laboratory analysis of sample material taken from two selected colonies in each of the 43 apiaries. The logistic regression model which best explained the risk of winter loss included, in order of statistical importance, the variables (1) Varroa destructor mite infestation rate in October 2011, (2) presence of the cyano-substituted neonicotinoids acetamiprid or thiacloprid in the first 2 weeks of August 2011 in at least one of the honey bee matrices honey, bees or bee bread (pollen), (3) presence of Brassica napus (oilseed rape) or Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard) pollen in bee bread in early August 2011, and (4) a measure of the unexplained winter losses for the postal code area where the colonies were located, obtained from a different dataset. We consider in the discussion that reduced opportunities for foraging in July and August because of bad weather may have added substantially to the adverse effects of acetamiprid and thiacloprid. A novel feature of this work is its use of postal code random effects from two other independent datasets collected in the annual national monitoring by questionnaires of winter losses of honey bees in the Netherlands. These were used to plan the sample selection and also in the model fitting of the data in this study. It should however be noted that the results of the present pilot study are based on limited data, which may consequently reveal strong factors but fail to demonstrate possible interaction effects.

  4. A thirty second isomer in {sup 171}Hf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, P.; Billowes, J.; Cooper, T.G.; Grant, I.S.; Pearson, M.R.; Wheeler, P.D. [Schuster Laboratory, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cochrane, E.C.A.; Cooke, J.L.; Evans, D.E.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Persson, J.R.; Richardson, D.S.; Tungate, G.; Zybert, L. [School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Dendooven, P.; Honkanen, A.; Huhta, M.; Oinonen, M.; Penttilae, H.; Aeystoe, J. [Accelerator Laboratory, University of Jyvaeskylae, PL 35 Jyvaeskylae SF-403 51 (Finland)

    1997-09-01

    An isomer has been detected in {sup 171}Hf with a half-life of T{sub 1/2} 29.5(9) s. The state was populated in the {sup 170}Yb({alpha},3n){sup 171m}Hf reaction at a beam energy of E{sub {alpha}} = 50 MeV in an on-line ion guide isotope separator. The isomeric {sup 171m}Hf{sup +} beam was extracted from the ion guide, mass-analysed and implanted in the surface of a microchannel-plate. The half-life of the collected activity was measured from the decay of the microchannel-plate count rate. We associate the isomer with the first excited state in {sup 171}Hf with spin 1/2{sup -} at an excitation energy of 22(2) keV. (author)

  5. HF fiber stuffing in building 186 at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Tiziano Camporesi

    2003-01-01

    Each of the 36 HF wedges comprise ca 12000 quartz fibers which are the active element of the calorimeter. The fibers are produced by Polymicro (USA), cleaved and bundled at KFKI, Budapest, Hungary and inserted at CERN.

  6. Low-Frequency Waves in HF Heating of the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A. S.; Eliasson, B.; Milikh, G. M.; Najmi, A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Shao, X.; Vartanyan, A.

    2016-02-01

    Ionospheric heating experiments have enabled an exploration of the ionosphere as a large-scale natural laboratory for the study of many plasma processes. These experiments inject high-frequency (HF) radio waves using high-power transmitters and an array of ground- and space-based diagnostics. This chapter discusses the excitation and propagation of low-frequency waves in HF heating of the ionosphere. The theoretical aspects and the associated models and simulations, and the results from experiments, mostly from the HAARP facility, are presented together to provide a comprehensive interpretation of the relevant plasma processes. The chapter presents the plasma model of the ionosphere for describing the physical processes during HF heating, the numerical code, and the simulations of the excitation of low-frequency waves by HF heating. It then gives the simulations of the high-latitude ionosphere and mid-latitude ionosphere. The chapter also briefly discusses the role of kinetic processes associated with wave generation.

  7. Near-infrared LIF spectroscopy of HfF

    CERN Document Server

    Grau, Matt; Loh, Huanqian; Sinclair, Laura C; Stutz, Russel P; Yahn, Tylser S; Cornell, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    The molecular ion HfF$^+$ is the chosen species for a JILA experiment to measure the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM). Detailed knowledge of the spectrum of HfF is crucial to prepare HfF$^+$ in a state suitable for performing an eEDM measurement\\cite{Leanhardt}. We investigated the near-infrared electronic spectrum of HfF using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of a supersonic molecular beam. We discovered eight unreported bands, and assign each of them unambiguously, four to vibrational bands belonging to the transition $[13.8]0.5 \\leftarrow X1.5$, and four to vibrational bands belonging to the transition $[14.2]1.5 \\leftarrow X1.5$. Additionally, we report an improved measurement of vibrational spacing of the ground state, as well as anharmonicity $\\omega_e x_e$.

  8. Theoretical Assessment of 178m2Hf De-Excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartouni, E P; Chen, M; Descalle, M A; Escher, J E; Loshak, A; Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Pruet, J; Thompson, I J; Wang, T F

    2008-10-06

    This document contains a comprehensive literature review in support of the theoretical assessment of the {sup 178m2}Hf de-excitation, as well as a rigorous description of controlled energy release from an isomeric nuclear state.

  9. Prevalence of sensitization to the storage mites Acarus siro, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, and Lepidoglyphus destructor in allergic patients with different degrees of sensitization to the house-dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, S; Niemeijer, NR; Hovenga, H; de Monchy, JGR; Dubois, AEJ; Kauffman, HF

    The prevalence of sensitization to the storage mites Acarus sire (AS), Tyrophagus putrescentiae (TP), and Lepidoglyphus destructor (LD) was studied in 250 sera of patients with different degrees of sensitization to the house-dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP) by measuring IgE binding to

  10. Prevalence of sensitization to the storage mites Acarus siro, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, and Lepidoglyphus destructor in allergic patients with different degrees of sensitization to the house-dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, S; Niemeijer, NR; Hovenga, H; de Monchy, JGR; Dubois, AEJ; Kauffman, HF

    1998-01-01

    The prevalence of sensitization to the storage mites Acarus sire (AS), Tyrophagus putrescentiae (TP), and Lepidoglyphus destructor (LD) was studied in 250 sera of patients with different degrees of sensitization to the house-dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP) by measuring IgE binding to e

  11. Integrated magnetics design for HF-link power converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljusev, Petar; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of integrated magnetics for HF-link converters, where the integrated magnetic components do not necessarily belong to the same voltage loop. Depending on the specific HF-link converter topology, the proposed integrated magnetics can either alleviate the derivation...... of independent auxiliary supply voltages from the main transformer or integrate other magnetic structures, thus saving board space and cutting costs....

  12. Integrated magnetics design for HF-link power converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljusev, P.; Andersen, Michael A.E.

    2005-07-01

    This paper deals with the design of integrated magnetics for HF-link converters, where the two integrated magnetic components on the same core do not necessarily belong to the same voltage loop. Depending on the specific HF-link converter topology, the proposed integrated magnetics can either alleviate the derivation of independent auxiliary supply voltages from the main transformer or integrate other magnetic structures, thus saving board space and cutting costs. (au)

  13. Synthesis of freestanding HfO2 nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle Kayla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two new methods for synthesizing nanostructured HfO2 have been developed. The first method entails exposing HfTe2 powders to air. This simple process resulted in the formation of nanometer scale crystallites of HfO2. The second method involved a two-step heating process by which macroscopic, freestanding nanosheets of HfO2 were formed as a byproduct during the synthesis of HfTe2. These highly two-dimensional sheets had side lengths measuring up to several millimeters and were stable enough to be manipulated with tweezers and other instruments. The thickness of the sheets ranged from a few to a few hundred nanometers. The thinnest sheets appeared transparent when viewed in a scanning electron microscope. It was found that the presence of Mn enhanced the formation of HfO2 by exposure to ambient conditions and was necessary for the formation of the large scale nanosheets. These results present new routes to create freestanding nanostructured hafnium dioxide. PACS: 81.07.-b, 61.46.Hk, 68.37.Hk.

  14. The isobutylene-isobutane alkylation process in liquid HF revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, P M; Araújo, C L; Horta, B A C; Alvarez, L J; Zicovich-Wilson, C M; Ramírez-Solís, A

    2005-07-07

    Details on the mechanism of HF catalyzed isobutylene-isobutane alkylation were investigated. On the basis of available experimental data and high-level quantum chemical calculations, a detailed reaction mechanism is proposed taking into account solvation effects of the medium. On the basis of our computational results, we explain why the density of the liquid media and stirring rates are the most important parameters to achieve maximum yield of alkylate, in agreement with experimental findings. The ab initio Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics calculations show that isobutylene is irreversibly protonated in the liquid HF medium at higher densities, leading to the ion pair formation, which is shown to be a minimum on the potential energy surface after optimization using periodic boundary conditions. The HF medium solvates preferentially the fluoride anion, which is found as solvated [FHF](-) or solvated F(-.)(HF)(3). On the other hand, the tert-butyl cation is weakly solvated, where the closest HF molecules appear at a distance of about 2.9 Angstrom with the fluorine termination of an HF chain.

  15. A Field Experiment to Assess the Rate of Infestation in Honey Bee Populations of Two Metarhizium anisopliae Isolates on Varroa destructor (Acari: Mesostigmata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodadad Pirali-Kheirabadi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of two isolates of an entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae (DEMI 002 and Iran 437C on the adult stage of Varroa destructor was evaluated in comparison with fluvalinate strips in the field.A total of 12 honey bee colonies were provided from an apiculture farm. The selected hives were divided into 4 groups (3 hives per group. The first group was the control, treated with distilled water. The other two groups were exposed to different fungi (M. anisopliae isolates DEMI 002 and Iran 437C and the last group was treated with one strip of fluvalinate per colony. The number of fallen mites was counted using sticky traps during a 6-day period, six days before and after treatments. A fungal suspension at a concentration of 5× 10(6 conidia/mL was sprayed onto the frames and the number of fallen mites was counted.Metarhizium anisopliae DEMI 002 and Iran 437C isolates were as effective (i.e., caused as much mite fall as the fluvalinate strip in controlling bee colonies than no treatment.Both M. anisopliae isolates are promising candidates as agents in the control of Varroa mites under field conditions. Isolate DEMI 002 can be considered as a possible non-chemical biocontrol agent for controlling bee infestation with V. destructor in the field. In order to substantiate this hypothesis, tests are currently being performed using larger colonies and larger doses than tested in the present study in our beekeeping.

  16. Evaluation of drone brood removal for management of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in colonies of Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in the northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderone, N W

    2005-06-01

    The efficacy of drone brood removal for the management of Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman in colonies of the honey bee, A. mellifera L., was evaluated. Colonies were treated with CheckMite+ in the fall of 2002. The following spring, quantities of bees and brood were equalized, but colonies were not retreated. The brood nest of each colony consisted of 18 full-depth worker combs and two full-depth drone combs. Each worker comb had drone cells. Standard management practices were used throughout the season. Colonies were randomly assigned to one of two groups. In the control group, drone combs remained in place throughout the season. In the treatment group, drone combs were removed on 16 June, 16 July, 16 August, and 16 September and replaced with empty drone combs (16 June) or with drone combs removed on the previous replacement date. In the early fall, the average mite-to-bee ratio in the control group was significantly greater than the corresponding ratio in the treatment group. Drone brood removal did not adversely affect colony health as measured by the size of the worker population or by honey production. Fall worker populations were similar in the two groups. Honey production in treatment colonies was greater than or similar to production in control colonies. These data demonstrate that drone brood removal can serve as a valuable component in an integrated pest management program for V. destructor and may reduce the need for other treatments on a colony-by-colony basis.

  17. Bioactivity of Rosmarinus officinalis essential oils against Apis mellifera, Varroa destructor and Paenibacillus larvae related to the drying treatment of the plant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, M; Gende, L; Russo, K; Fritz, R; Eguaras, M

    2011-02-01

    In this study, chemical composition, physicochemical properties and bioactivity of two essential oils of Rosmarinus officinalis extracted from plant material with different drying treatments against Apis mellifera, Varroa destructor and Paenibacillus larvae were assessed. The lethal concentration 50 (LC50) for mites and bees was estimated using a complete exposure method test. The broth microdilution method was followed in order to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the essential oils against P. larvae. Physicochemical properties were similar in both the essential oils, but the percentage of components showed certain differences according to their drying treatment. β-Myrcene and 1,8-cineole were the main constituents in the oils. The LC50 for complete exposure method at 24, 48 and 72 h was minor for mites exposed to R. officinalis essential oil dried in oven conditions. MIC values were 700-800 µg mL(-1) and 1200 µg mL(-1) for R. officinalis dried in air and oven conditions, respectively. The results reported in this research show that oil toxicity against V. destructor and P. larvae differed depending on the drying treatment of the plant material before the distillation of essential oil.

  18. Screening and Characterization of Nematicidal Bacillus thuringiensis Strains against Ditylenchus destructor%对甘薯茎线虫具有杀虫活性的苏云金芽胞杆菌筛选及特性鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金辉; 侯艳飞; 郭红森; 李明顺; 喻子牛

    2012-01-01

    为筛选对甘薯茎线虫具有高毒力的苏云金芽胞杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis,Bt)菌株,提取12株供试Bt菌株的晶体蛋白,溶解后加入到甘薯茎线虫悬浮液中,统计3d和7d后甘薯茎线虫的死亡率.经初筛和复筛后得到一株对甘薯茎线虫具有高毒力的Bt菌株YBT-008,其对甘薯茎线虫的LC50值为203.76 μg/mL.研究了YBT-008的生物学特性,结果表明,YBT-008在LB培养基上培养约12h后进入稳定期,并且伴随芽胞的形成产生卵圆形的伴胞晶体;SDS-PAGE分析表明YBT-008可产生多种待鉴定的晶体蛋白类型,质粒检测显示该菌株有5条质粒条带.YBT-008的获得为利用Bt防治甘薯茎线虫提供了新型菌株和基因资源.%The nematicidal activities of 12 Bacillus thuringiensis strains against Ditylenchus destructor were tested to obtain nematicidal B. thuringiensis strains with high toxicity to D. destructor. The insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) were extracted from each B. thuringiensis strain and dissolved. The larva and adult of D. destructor were incubated with ICPs, and the mortalities of D. destructor were counted after 3 and 7 days. After primary and secondary screening, one Bt strain, YBT-008, which showed high toxicity to D. destructor, was obtained. The result of bioassay indicated that the estimated LC50 of YBT-008 against D. destructor was 203.76 ug/mL. The primary characterization of strain YBT-008 was also analyzed. The growth curve showed that YBT-008 was in the stationary phase after 12 h incubation. The ovate parasopral crystals could be obviously observed by microscope. The electrophoresis result indicated that plasmids from YBT-008 displayed 5 bands. The SDS-PAGE analysis showed that YBT-008 produced a variety of unidentified proteins. The finding of YBT-008 strain would provide new strain and gene resources for the biological control against D. destructor. Fig 6, Tab 1, Ref 19

  19. Hf impurity and defect interactions in helium-implanted NiHf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindaraj, R. E-mail: govind@igcar.ernet.in; Gopinathan, K.P.; Viswanathan, B

    2001-07-01

    TDPAC measurements on the reference and untreated sample indicate a loss in anisotropy which is attributed mainly to the association of probe atoms with defects produced by (n,{gamma}) reactions with isotopes of Ni and experiencing combined magnetic and quadrupole interactions of comparable strengths. Evolution of defect free and substitutional fraction of probe atoms experiencing Larmor frequency characteristic of Ni matrix has been studied as a function of isochronal annealing temperature in helium free {alpha}-irradiated and homogeneously helium-implanted samples. No defect associated Larmor precession frequency and/or quadrupole frequency could be deduced in these uncorrelated damage studies. Comparison of recovery stages in {alpha}-irradiated and helium-implanted samples indicates the binding of helium associated defects by Hf impurities. Segregation of Hf atoms is observed in the helium free {alpha}-irradiated sample for annealing treatment at 973 K, while no such effect is observed in the helium-implanted sample for isochronal annealing treatments up to 1273 K.

  20. Reconciliation of the excess 176Hf conundrum in meteorites: Recent disturbances of the Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd isotope systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bast, Rebecca; Scherer, Erik E.; Sprung, Peter; Mezger, Klaus; Fischer-Gödde, Mario; Taetz, Stephan; Böhnke, Mischa; Schmid-Beurmann, Hinrich; Münker, Carsten; Kleine, Thorsten; Srinivasan, Gopalan

    2017-09-01

    The long-lived 176Lu-176Hf and 147Sm-143Nd radioisotope systems are commonly used chronometers, but when applied to meteorites, they can reveal disturbances. Specifically, Lu-Hf isochrons commonly yield dates up to ∼300 Myr older than the solar system and varying initial 176Hf/177Hf values. We investigated this problem by attempting to construct mineral and whole rock isochrons for eucrites and angrites. Meteorites from different parent bodies exhibit similar disturbance features suggesting that a common process is responsible. Minerals scatter away from isochron regressions for both meteorite classes, with low-Hf phases such as plagioclase and olivine typically being most displaced above (or left of) reference isochrons. Relatively Hf-rich pyroxene is less disturbed but still to the point of steepening Lu-Hf errorchrons. Using our Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd data, we tested various Hf and Lu redistribution scenarios and found that decoupling of Lu/Hf from 176Hf/177Hf must postdate the accumulation of significant radiogenic 176Hf. Therefore early irradiation or diffusion cannot explain the excess 176Hf. Instead, disturbed meteorite isochrons are more likely caused by terrestrial weathering, contamination, or common laboratory procedures. The partial dissolution of phosphate minerals may predominantly remove rare earth elements including Lu, leaving relatively immobile and radiogenic Hf behind. Robust Lu-Hf (and improved Sm-Nd) meteorite geochronology will require the development of chemical or physical methods for removing unsupported radiogenic Hf and silicate-hosted terrestrial contaminants without disturbing parent-daughter ratios.

  1. Tracking magmatic processes through Zr/Hf ratios in rocks and Hf and Ti zoning in zircons: An example from the Spirit Mountain batholith, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Claiborne L.E.; Miller, C.F.; Walker, B.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Mazdab, F.K.; Bea, F.

    2006-01-01

    Zirconium and Hf are nearly identical geochemically, and therefore most of the crust maintains near-chondritic Zr/Hf ratios of ???35-40. By contrast, many high-silica rhyolites and granites have anomalously low Zr/Hf (15-30). As zircon is the primary reservoir for both Zr and Hf and preferentially incorporates Zr, crystallization of zircon controls Zr/ Hf, imprinting low Zr/Hf on coexisting melt. Thus, low Zr/Hf is a unique fingerprint of effective magmatic fractionation in the crust. Age and compositional zonation in zircons themselves provide a record of the thermal and compositional histories of magmatic systems. High Hf (low Zr/ Hf) in zircon zones demonstrates growth from fractionated melt, and Ti provides an estimate of temperature of crystallization (TTiZ) (Watson and Harrison, 2005). Whole-rock Zr/Hf and zircon zonation in the Spirit Mountain batholith, Nevada, document repeated fractionation and thermal fluctuations. Ratios of Zr/Hf are ???30-40 for cumulates and 18-30 for high-SiO2 granites. In zircons, Hf (and U) are inversely correlated with Ti, and concentrations indicate large fluctuations in melt composition and TTiZ (>100??C) for individual zircons. Such variations are consistent with field relations and ion-probe zircon geochronology that indicate a >1 million year history of repeated replenishment, fractionation, and extraction of melt from crystal mush to form the low Zr/Hf high-SiO2 zone. ?? 2006 The Mineralogical Society.

  2. Determination of isothermal section of Ni-Re-Hf ternary system at 1173 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王日初; 柳春雷; 金展鹏

    2002-01-01

    The phase equilibriua in the Ni-Re-Hf ternary system at 1173K were investigated by means of diffusion triple technique and electron microprobe analysis(EMPA). The experimental results indicate that two ternary intermetallics (α and β) and five binary intermetallics (Ni3Hf, Ni10Hf7, Ni11Hf9, NiHf and NiHf2) exist in the Ni-Re-Hf system at 1173 K. A tentative isothermal section of this system at 1173 K was constructed on the basis of experimental results. The isothermal section consists of nine three-phase regions, five of which are supported by the experimental data.

  3. Spallation and fission products in the (p+{sup 179}Hf) and (p+{sup nat}Hf) reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamian, S.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow Region, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Ur, C.A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Induced Gamma Emission Foundation, P.O. Box 34-81, Bucharest 010044 (Romania)], E-mail: ur@pd.infn.it; Adam, J. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow Region, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Rez, Prague CZ-25068 (Czech Republic); Kalinnikov, V.G.; Lebedev, N.A.; Vostokin, G.K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow Region, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Collins, C.B. [Center for Quantum Electronics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Popescu, I.I. [Induced Gamma Emission Foundation, P.O. Box 34-81, Bucharest 010044 (Romania)

    2009-03-01

    Production of Hf and Lu high-spin isomers has been experimentally studied in spallation reactions induced by intermediate energy protons. Targets of enriched {sup 179}Hf (91%) and {sup nat}Hf were bombarded with protons of energy in the range from 90 to 650 MeV provided by the internal beam of the Dubna Phasotron synchrocyclotron. The activation yields of the reaction products were measured by using the {gamma}-ray spectroscopy and radiochemistry methods. The production cross-sections obtained for the {sup 179m2}Hf, {sup 178m2}Hf and {sup 177m}Lu isomers are similar to the previously measured values from the spallation of Ta, Re and W targets. Therefore, the reactions involving emission of only a few nucleons, like (p,p'), (p,p'n) and (p,2pn), can transfer high enough angular momentum to the final residual nuclei with reasonable large cross-sections. A significant gain in the isomeric yields was obtained when enriched {sup 179}Hf targets were used. The mass distribution of the residual nuclei was measured over a wide range of masses and the fission-to-spallation ratio could be deduced as a function of the projectile energy. Features of the reaction mechanism are briefly discussed.

  4. Hf-Nd isotope and trace element constraints on subduction inputs at island arcs: Limitations of Hf anomalies as sediment input indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Heather K.; Turner, Simon; Macpherson, Colin G.; Gertisser, Ralf; Davidson, Jon P.

    2011-04-01

    New Nd-Hf isotope and trace element data for Javanese volcanoes are combined with recently published data to place constraints on subduction inputs at the Sunda arc in Indonesia and assess the value of Hf anomalies (expressed as Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios) as tracers of such inputs. Hf anomaly does not correlate with Hf isotope ratio in Javanese lavas, however, Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios do correlate with SiO 2. Contrary to previous work, we show that Hf anomaly variation may be controlled by fractionation of clinopyroxene and/or amphibole during magmatic differentiation and does not represent the magnitude or type of subduction input in some arcs. Correlation of Sm/Hf with indices of differentiation for other arcs (e.g., Vanuatu, New Britain, and Mariana) suggests that differentiation control on Sm/Hf ratios in volcanic arc rocks may be a relatively common phenomenon. This study corroborates the use of Nd-Hf isotope co-variations in arc volcanic rocks to ascertain subduction input characteristics. The trajectories of regional volcano groups (East, Central and West Java) in Nd-Hf isotope space reveal heterogeneity in the subducted sediment input along Java, which reflects present-day spatial variations in sediment compositions on the down-going plate in the Java Trench. The high Sm/Hf ratio required in the sediment end-member for some Javanese basalts suggests that partial melting of subducted sediment occurs in the presence of residual zircon, and is inconsistent with residual monazite or allanite.

  5. Investigation and Development of Data-Driven D-Region Model for HF Systems Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.; Sojka, J. J.; Hunsucker, R. D.

    2002-01-01

    Space Environment Corporation (SEC) and RP Consultants (RPC) are to develop and validate a weather-capable D region model for making High Frequency (HF) absorption predictions in support of the HF communications and radar communities. The weather-capable model will assimilate solar and earth space observations from NASA satellites. The model will account for solar-induced impacts on HF absorption, including X-rays, Solar Proton Events (SPE's), and auroral precipitation. The work plan includes: I . Optimize D-region model to quickly obtain ion and electron densities for proper HF absorption calculations. 2. Develop indices-driven modules for D-region ionization sources for low, mid, & high latitudes including X-rays, cosmic rays, auroral precipitation, & solar protons. (Note: solar spectrum & auroral modules already exist). 3. Setup low-cost monitors of existing HF beacons and add one single-frequency beacon. 4. Use PENEX HF-link database with HF monitor data to validate D-region/HF absorption model using climatological ionization drivers. 5. Develop algorithms to assimilate NASA satellite data of solar, interplanetary, and auroral observations into ionization source modules. 6. Use PENEX HF-link & HF-beacon data for skill score comparison of assimilation versus climatological D-region/HF absorption model. Only some satellites are available for the PENEX time period, thus, HF-beacon data is necessary. 7. Use HF beacon monitors to develop HF-link data assimilation algorithms for regional improvement to the D-region/HF absorption model.

  6. Serpentinization Changes Nd, but not Hf Isotopes of Abyssal Peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizimis, M.; Frisby, C. P.; Mallick, S.

    2015-12-01

    Serpentinization of the oceanic lithosphere is a known sink for fluid mobile elements (B, Cl, Li, Sr, etc.), while high field strength elements (HFSE: e.g., Hf, Zr, Ti, Nb) are thought to be unaffected by it. In contrast, the fate of REE during serpentinization is equivocal. Correlations between REE and HFSE concentrations in abyssal peridotites suggest control by magmatic processes (Niu, 2004, J. Pet), while some LREE enrichments in serpentinized peridotites compared to their clinopyroxene (cpx) and Nd, Sr isotope data (Delacour et al., 2008, Chem. Geol.) imply seawater-derived REE addition to the mantle protolith (Paulick et al., 2006, Chem. Geol). To further constrain peridotite-seawater interaction during serpentinization we compare bulk rock and cpx Hf and Nd isotope data in partially (up to ~70%) serpentinized abyssal peridotites (9-16°E South West Indian Ridge). We also present a new method that improves yields in Hf, Nd and Pb separations from depleted (90% of Hf, Zr, Ti are retained in the residue. LA-ICPMS data shows that serpentine after olivine typically has higher LREE/HREE ratios than cpx, pronounced negative Ce anomalies, high U, Sr concentrations and low HFSE, unlike the coexisting cpx. These data are consistent with some seawater-derived LREE addition to peridotite during serpentinization, localized in the serpentine and other secondary phases, while cpx retains the magmatic value. This process will lower the Sm/Nd relative to Lu/Hf ratio in the peridotite and can lead to decoupled radiogenic Hf and unradiogenic Nd isotopes upon recycling and aging. Our data further testifies to the fidelity of Hf isotopes in tracing mantle processes, even in serpentinized rocks.

  7. Joint Efforts Towards European HF Radar Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, A.; Mader, J.; Griffa, A.; Mantovani, C.; Corgnati, L.; Novellino, A.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Quentin, C.; Wyatt, L.; Ruiz, M. I.; Lorente, P.; Hartnett, M.; Gorringe, P.

    2016-12-01

    During the past two years, significant steps have been made in Europe for achieving the needed accessibility to High Frequency Radar (HFR) data for a pan-European use. Since 2015, EuroGOOS Ocean Observing Task Teams (TT), such as HFR TT, are operational networks of observing platforms. The main goal is on the harmonization of systems requirements, systems design, data quality, improvement and proof of the readiness and standardization of HFR data access and tools. Particular attention is being paid by HFR TT to converge from different projects and programs toward those common objectives. First, JERICO-NEXT (Joint European Research Infrastructure network for Coastal Observatory - Novel European eXpertise for coastal observaTories, H2020 2015 Programme) will contribute on describing the status of the European network, on seeking harmonization through exchange of best practices and standardization, on developing and giving access to quality control procedures and new products, and finally on demonstrating the use of such technology in the general scientific strategy focused by the Coastal Observatory. Then, EMODnet (European Marine Observation and Data Network) Physics started to assemble HF radar metadata and data products within Europe in a uniform way. This long term program is providing a combined array of services and functionalities to users for obtaining free of charge data, meta-data and data products on the physical conditions of European sea basins and oceans. Additionally, the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) delivers from 2015 a core information service to any user related to 4 areas of benefits: Maritime Safety, Coastal and Marine Environment, Marine Resources, and Weather, Seasonal Forecasting and Climate activities. INCREASE (Innovation and Networking for the integration of Coastal Radars into EuropeAn marine SErvices - CMEMS Service Evolution 2016) will set the necessary developments towards the integration of existing European

  8. First-principles study of the Hf-based Heusler alloys: Hf2CoGa and Hf2CoIn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Min

    2017-01-01

    The electronic structures and magnetic properties of the new Heusler alloys Hf2CoGa and Hf2CoIn have been studied by using the first-principles projector augmented wave (PAW) potential within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Both Hf2CoGa and Hf2CoIn Heusler alloys have the half-metallic character and completely (100%) spin polarization at the Fermi level (EF) and the indirect band gaps of 0.733 eV and 0.654 eV, respectively, in the minority spin channel. The total magnetic moments μt are all 2μB per formula unit, linearly scaled with the total number of valence electrons (Zt) by μt=Zt-18 and the atomic magnetic moments have localized character due to less affected by deformations. The origin of the indirect band gaps for these two new Heusler alloys is well understood. These two new Heusler alloys are the ideal candidates for spintronic devices.

  9. HF omnidirectional spectral CW auroral radar (HF-OSCAR) at very high latitude. Part 1: Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, J. K.; Jacobsen, K. E.; Stauning, P.; Henriksen, S.

    1983-12-01

    An HF system for studies of very high latitude ionospheric irregularities was described. Radio aurora from field-aligned E-region irregularities of the Slant E Condition type were discussed. The complete system combines an ionosonde, a 12 MHz pulse radar and a 12 MHz bistatic CW Doppler-range set-up. The two latter units use alternately a 360 deg rotating Yagi antenna. High precision oscillators secure the frequency stability of the Doppler system in which the received signal is mixed down to a center frequency of 500 Hz. The Doppler shift range is max + or - 500 Hz. The received signal is recorded in analog form on magnetic tape and may be monitored visually and audibly. Echo range of the CW Doppler signal is obtained by a 150 Hz amplitude modulation of the transmitted signal and phase comparison with the backscattered signal.

  10. Comparison of HfAlO, HfO2/Al2O3, and HfO2 on n-type GaAs using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Lv, Hongliang; Zhang, Yuming; Zhang, Yimen; Liu, Chen

    2016-11-01

    Different high-permittivity (high-k) gate dielectric structures of HfO2, HfAlO, and HfO2/Al2O3 deposited on HF-etched n-GaAs using ALD have been investigated. It has been demonstrated that the stacked structure of HfO2/Al2O3 has the lowest interface state density of 8.12 × 1012eV-1 cm-2 due to the "self-cleaning" reaction process, but the sample of HfAlO shows much better frequency dispersion and much higher dielectric permittivity extracted from the C-V curves. The investigation reveals that the electrical properties of gate dielectrics are improved by introducing alumina into HfO2.

  11. The influence of Nosema (Microspora: Nosematidae) infection on honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) defense against Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreini, Rassol; Currie, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to quantify the costs and benefits of co-parasitism with Varroa (Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman) and Nosema (Nosema ceranae Fries and Nosema apis Zander) on honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) with different defense levels. Newly-emerged worker bees from either high-mite-mortality-rate (high-MMR) bees or low-mite-mortality-rate (low-MMR) bees were confined in forty bioassay cages which were either inoculated with Nosema spores [Nosema (+) group] or were left un-inoculated [Nosema (-) group]. Caged-bees were then inoculated with Varroa mites [Varroa (+) group] or were left untreated [Varroa (-) group]. This established four treatment combinations within each Nosema treatment group: (1) low-MMR Varroa (-), (2) high-MMR Varroa (-), (3) low-MMR Varroa (+) and (4) high-MMR Varroa (+), each with five replicates. Overall mite mortality in high-MMR bees (0.12±0.02 mites per day) was significantly greater than in the low-MMR bees (0.06±0.02 mites per day). In the Nosema (-) groups bee mortality was greater in high-MMR bees than low-MMR bees but only when bees had a higher mite burden. Overall, high-MMR bees in the Nosema (-) group showed greater reductions in mean abundance of mites over time compared with low-MMR bees, when inoculated with additional mites. However, high-MMR bees could not reduce mite load as well as in the Nosema (-) group when fed with Nosema spores. Mean abundance of Nosema spores in live bees and dead bees of both strains of bees was significantly greater in the Nosema (+) group. Molecular analyses confirmed the presence of both Nosema species in inoculated bees but N. ceranae was more abundant than N. apis and unlike N. apis increased over the course of the experiment. Collectively, this study showed differential mite mortality rates among different genotypes of bees, however, Nosema infection restrained Varroa removal success in high-MMR bees.

  12. Mechanical properties of cast Ti-Hf alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hideki; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Komatsu, Masashi; Okuno, Osamu; Okabe, Toru

    2005-02-15

    This study examined the mechanical properties of a series of Ti-Hf alloys. Titanium alloys with 10 to 40 mass % Hf were made with titanium and hafnium sponge in an argon-arc melting furnace. Specimens cast into magnesia-based investment molds were tested for yield strength, tensile strength, percentage elongation, and modulus of elasticity. Vickers microhardness was determined at 25 to 600 microm from the cast surface. X-ray diffractometry was also performed. Commercially pure Ti (CP Ti) and pure Ti prepared from titanium sponge were used as controls. The data (n = 5) were analyzed with a one-way ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (alpha = 0.05). The diffraction peaks of all the metals matched those for alpha Ti; no beta phase peaks were found. Alloys with Hf > or = 25% had significantly (p 0.05) in elongation among all the Ti-Hf alloys and CP Ti, whereas the elongation of alloys with Hf > or = 30% was significantly (p alloys tested can be considered viable alternatives to CP Ti because they were stronger than CP Ti and had similar elongation.

  13. HfO2 Gate Dielectrics for Future Generation of CMOS Device Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Y.Yu; J.F.Kang; Ren Chi; M.F.Li; D.L.Kwong

    2004-01-01

    The material and electrical properties of HfO2 high-k gate dielectric are reported.In the first part,the band alignment of HfO2 and (HfO2)x(Al2O3)1-x to (100)Si substrate and their thermal stability are studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and TEM.The energy gap of (HfO2)x(Al2O3)1-x,the valence band offset,and the conduction band offset between (HfO2)x(Al2O3)1-x and the Si substrate as functions of x are obtained based on the XPS results.Our XPS results also demonstrate that both the thermal stability and the resistance to oxygen diffusion of HfO2 are improved by adding Al to form Hf aluminates.In the second part,a thermally stable and high quality HfN/HfO2 gate stack is reported.Negligible changes in equivalent oxide thickness (EOT),gate leakage,and work function (close to Si mid-gap) of HfN/HfO2 gate stack are demonstrated even after 1000℃ post-metal annealing(PMA),which is attributed to the superior oxygen diffusion barrier of HfN as well as the thermal stability of the HfN/HfO2 interface.Therefore,even without surface nitridation prior to HfO2 deposition,the EOT of HfN/HfO2 gate stack has been successfully scaled down to less than 1nm after 1000℃ PMA with excellent leakage and long-term reliability.The last part demonstrates a novel replacement gate process employing a HfN dummy gate and sub-1nm EOT HfO2 gate dielectric.The excellent thermal stability of the HfN/HfO2 gate stack enables its use in high temperature CMOS processes.The replacement of HfN with other metal gate materials with work functions adequate for n- and p-MOS is facilitated by a high etch selectivity of HfN with respect to HfO2,without any degradation to the EOT,gate leakage,or TDDB characteristics of HfO2.

  14. Pressure-induced novel compounds in the Hf-O system from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Oganov, Artem R.; Li, Xinfeng; Xue, Kan-Hao; Wang, Zhenhai; Dong, Huafeng

    2015-11-01

    Using first-principles evolutionary simulations, we have systematically investigated phase stability in the Hf-O system at pressure up to 120 GPa. New compounds Hf5O2,Hf3O2 , HfO, and HfO3 are discovered to be thermodynamically stable at certain pressure ranges. Two new high-pressure phases are found for Hf2O : one with space group Pnnm and anti-CaCl2-type structure, another with space group I 41/amd. Pnnm-HfO3 shows interesting structure, simultaneously containing oxide O2 - and peroxide [O-O]2 - anions. Remarkably, it is P 6 ¯2 m -HfO rather than OII-HfO2 that exhibits the highest mechanical characteristics among Hf-O compounds. Pnnm-Hf2O , Imm2-Hf5O2 ,P 3 ¯1 m -Hf2O , and P 4 ¯m 2 -Hf2O3 phases also show superior mechanical properties; theoretically these phases become metastable phases to ambient pressure and their properties can be exploited.

  15. Effect of HF leaching on 14C dates of pottery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslar, Tomasz; Kozłowski, Janusz; Szmyt, Marzena; Czernik, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the experiments with 14C dating of two potsherds, which contained carbon dispersed rather homogeneously in their clay fabric. After AAA treatment, the potsherds still appeared to be contaminated with young carbon, presumably connected with humic acids. To make removal of humic acids more effective, we treated the sherds with HF acid of different concentration. The 14C results obtained demonstrate that HF treatment indeed helps to remove humic contaminants, but it also mobilizes carbon bound to raw clay, which may make 14C dates too old. We conclude therefore, that using a simple combination of HF and AAA treatment seems insufficient in reliable 14C dating of carbon homogeneously dispersed in the volume of potsherds.

  16. The Status of Rotational Nonequilibrium in HF Chemical Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    later study from the same laboratory, Copeland et al. 5 3 used a NdYAG dye laser to pump HF into v = 2, j, and an HF pulsed laser to probe various P 2(J... Weston , Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 77, 4776 (1982). 51. J. J. Hinchen and R. H. Hobbs, Appl. Phys. 50, 628 (1979). 52. j. K. Lambert, G. M. Jursich, and F. F...Crim, Chem. Phys. Lett. 71, 258 (1980). 53. R. A. Copeland , D. J. Pearson, and F. F. Crim, Chem. Phys. Lett. 81, 541 (1981). 54. T. J. Foster and F. F

  17. New active load voltage clamp for HF-link converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljusev, P.; Andersen, M.A.E.

    2005-07-01

    This paper proposes a new active clamp for HF-link converters, which features very high efficiency by returning the clamped energy back to the primary side through a small auxiliary converter. It also increases the reliability of HF-link converters by providing an alternative load current path during malfunctions of the secondary bidirectional bridge. The feasibility of the approach is shown on audio power amplifier prototype. New integrated magnetics design is presented that incorporates both the main power and auxiliary transformer on the same magnetic core. (au)

  18. HF-induced airglow at magnetic zenith: theoretical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Mishin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of airglow at 630nm (red line and 557.7nm (green line during HF modification experiments at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP heating facility are analyzed. We propose a theoretical framework for understanding the generation of Langmuir and ion acoustic waves during magnetic zenith injections. We show that observations of HF-induced airglow in an underdense ionosphere as well as a decrease in the height of the emitting volume are consistent with this scenario.

  19. HF-hash : Hash Functions Using Restricted HFE Challenge-1

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Dhananjoy; Gupta, Indranath Sen

    2009-01-01

    Vulnerability of dedicated hash functions to various attacks has made the task of designing hash function much more challenging. This provides us a strong motivation to design a new cryptographic hash function viz. HF-hash. This is a hash function, whose compression function is designed by using first 32 polynomials of HFE Challenge-1 with 64 variables by forcing remaining 16 variables as zero. HF-hash gives 256 bits message digest and is as efficient as SHA-256. It is secure against the differential attack proposed by Chabaud and Joux as well as by Wang et. al. applied to SHA-0 and SHA-1.

  20. Hf--Co--B alloys as permanent magnet materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, Michael Alan; Rios, Orlando; Ghimire, Nirmal Jeevi

    2017-01-24

    An alloy composition is composed essentially of Hf.sub.2-XZr.sub.XCo.sub.11B.sub.Y, wherein 0Hf.sub.2-XZr.sub.XCo.sub.11B.sub.Y, wherein 0.ltoreq.X<2 and 0

  1. First HF radar measurements of summer mesopause echoes at SURA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Karashtin

    Full Text Available HF sounding of the mesosphere was first carried out at SURA in summer 1994 at frequencies in the range 8–9 MHz using one of the sub-arrays of the SURA heating facility. The observations had a range resolution of 3 km. Almost all measurements indicated the presence of strong radar returns from altitudes between 83 and 90 km with features very similar to VHF measurements of mesopause summer echoes at mid-latitudes and polar mesopause summer echoes. In contrast to VHF observations, HF mesopause echoes are almost always present.

  2. New active load voltage clamp for HF-link converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljusev, Petar; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a new active clamp for HF-link converters, which features very high efficiency by returning the clamped energy back to the primary side through a small auxiliary converter. It also increases the reliability of HF-link converters by providing an alternative load current path du...... during malfunctions of the secondary bidirectional bridge. The feasibility of the approach is shown on audio power amplifier prototype. New integrated magnetics design is presented that incorporates both the main power and auxiliary transformer on the same magnetic core....

  3. First HF radar measurements of summer mesopause echoes at SURA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karashtin, A. N.; Shlyugaev, Y. V.; Abramov, V. I.; Belov, I. F.; Berezin, I. V.; Bychkov, V. V.; Eryshev, E. B.; Komrakov, G. P.

    1997-07-01

    HF sounding of the mesosphere was first carried out at SURA in summer 1994 at frequencies in the range 8-9 MHz using one of the sub-arrays of the SURA heating facility. The observations had a range resolution of 3 km. Almost all measurements indicated the presence of strong radar returns from altitudes between 83 and 90 km with features very similar to VHF measurements of mesopause summer echoes at mid-latitudes and polar mesopause summer echoes. In contrast to VHF observations, HF mesopause echoes are almost always present.

  4. European coordination for coastal HF radar data in EMODnet Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Julien; Novellino, Antonio; Gorringe, Patrick; Griffa, Annalisa; Schulz-Stellenfleth, Johannes; Montero, Pedro; Montovani, Carlo; Ayensa, Garbi; Vila, Begoña; Rubio, Anna; Sagarminaga, Yolanda

    2015-04-01

    Historically, joint effort has been put on observing open ocean, organizing, homogenizing, sharing and reinforcing the impact of the acquired information based on one technology: ARGO with profilers Argo floats, EuroSites, ESONET-NoE, FixO3 for deep water platforms, Ferrybox for stations in ships of opportunities, and GROOM for the more recent gliders. This kind of networking creates synergies and makes easier the implementation of this source of data in the European Data exchange services like EMODnet, ROOSs portals, or any applied services in the Blue economy. One main targeted improvement in the second phase of EMODnet projects is the assembling of data along coastline. In that sense, further coordination is recommended between platform operators around a specific technology in order to make easier the implementation of the data in the platforms (4th EuroGOOS DATAMEQ WG). HF radar is today recognized internationally as a cost-effective solution to provide high spatial and temporal resolution current maps (depending on the instrument operation frequency, covering from a few kilometres offshore up to 200 km) that are needed for many applications for issues related to ocean surface drift or sea state characterization. Significant heterogeneity still exists in Europe concerning technological configurations, data processing, quality standards and data availability. This makes more difficult the development of a significant network for achieving the needed accessibility to HF Radar data for a pan European use. EuroGOOS took the initiative to lead and coordinate activities within the various observation platforms by establishing a number of Ocean Observing Task Teams such as HF-Radars. The purpose is to coordinate and join the technological, scientific and operational HF radar communities at European level. The goal of the group is on the harmonization of systems requirements, systems design, data quality, improvement and proof of the readiness and standardization of

  5. 腐烂茎线虫单异活体繁殖方法研究%Monoxenic culture of Ditylenchus destructor on Botrytis cinerea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘斌; 郑经武

    2006-01-01

    腐烂茎线虫(Ditylenchus destructor)系世界上一重要的植物病原线虫.试验通过用玉米培养基培养的灰葡萄孢菌(Botrytis cinerea)对腐烂茎线虫进行的单异活体培养,系统地比较了20℃和25℃两个不同的温度对培养的影响,建立了在室内快速和大量繁殖腐烂茎线虫的方法.该方法繁殖的线虫可用于线虫的生物学和遗传学等方面的研究.

  6. A Field Experiment to Assess the Rate of Infestation in Honey Bee Populations of Two Metarhizium Anisopliae Isolates on Varroa Destructor (Acari: Mesostigmata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodadad Pirali-kheirabadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The protective effect of two isolates of an entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae (DEMI 002 and Iran 437C on the adult stage of Varroa destructor was evaluated in comparison with fluvalinate strips in the field.Methods: A total of 12 honey bee colonies were provided from an apiculture farm. The selected hives were divided into 4 groups (3 hives per group. The first group was the control, treated with distilled water. The other two groups were exposed to different fungi (M. anisopliae isolates DEMI 002 and Iran 437C and the last group was treated with one strip of fluvalinate per colony. The number of fallen mites was counted using sticky traps during a 6-day period, six days before and after treatments. A fungal suspension at a concentration of 5× 106 conidia/mL was sprayed onto the frames and the number of fallen mites was counted.Results: Metarhizium anisopliae DEMI 002 and Iran 437C isolates were as effective (i.e., caused as much mite fall as the fluvalinate strip in controlling bee colonies than no treatment.Conclusion: Both M. anisopliae isolates are promising candidates as agents in the control of Varroa mites under field conditions. Isolate DEMI 002 can be considered as a possible non-chemical biocontrol agent for controlling bee infestation with V. destructor in the field. In order to substantiate this hypothesis, tests are currently being performed using larger colonies and larger doses than tested in the present study in our beekeeping.

  7. On the front line: quantitative virus dynamics in honeybee (Apis mellifera L. colonies along a new expansion front of the parasite Varroa destructor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Mondet

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past fifty years, annual honeybee (Apis mellifera colony losses have been steadily increasing worldwide. These losses have occurred in parallel with the global spread of the honeybee parasite Varroa destructor. Indeed, Varroa mite infestations are considered to be a key explanatory factor for the widespread increase in annual honeybee colony mortality. The host-parasite relationship between honeybees and Varroa is complicated by the mite's close association with a range of honeybee viral pathogens. The 10-year history of the expanding front of Varroa infestation in New Zealand offered a rare opportunity to assess the dynamic quantitative and qualitative changes in honeybee viral landscapes in response to the arrival, spread and level of Varroa infestation. We studied the impact of de novo infestation of bee colonies by Varroa on the prevalence and titres of seven well-characterised honeybee viruses in both bees and mites, using a large-scale molecular ecology approach. We also examined the effect of the number of years since Varroa arrival on honeybee and mite viral titres. The dynamic shifts in the viral titres of black queen cell virus and Kashmir bee virus mirrored the patterns of change in Varroa infestation rates along the Varroa expansion front. The deformed wing virus (DWV titres in bees continued to increase with Varroa infestation history, despite dropping infestation rates, which could be linked to increasing DWV titres in the mites. This suggests that the DWV titres in mites, perhaps boosted by virus replication, may be a major factor in maintaining the DWV epidemic after initial establishment. Both positive and negative associations were identified for several pairs of viruses, in response to the arrival of Varroa. These findings provide important new insights into the role of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor in influencing the viral landscape that affects honeybee colonies.

  8. Genetic characterization of the mite Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) collected from honey bees Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera, Apidae) in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapazzon, R; Carneiro, F E; Guerra, J C V; Moretto, G

    2009-08-18

    The mite Varroa destructor is an ectoparasite that is considered a major pest for beekeeping with European honey bees. However, Africanized bee colonies are less threatened by this ectoparasite, because infestation levels remain low in these bees. The low reproductive ability of female mites of the Japanese biotype (J), introduced to Brazil early in the 1970s was initially considered the main factor for the lack of virulence of this parasite on Africanized bees. In other regions of the world where the Korean (K) biotype of this mite was introduced, there have been serious problems with Varroa due to the high reproductive potential of the mite. However, a significant increase in the reproductive rate of females of Varroa in Brazil has been recently demonstrated; the cause could be a change in the type of Varroa in the bee colonies. We evaluated the prevalence of haplotypes J and K in mite samples collected from the State of Santa Catarina and from the island of Fernando de Noronha in the State of Pernambuco. The analysis of the mitochondrial genome (PCR + RFLP) revealed haplotype K in all samples from Santa Catarina and haplotype J in all samples from Fernando de Noronha. The analysis of microsatellites (nuclear genome) in bees from Fernando de Noronha showed only the specific alleles of haplotype J, while in bees from Santa Catarina, these alleles were found in only 2.8% of the samples. The high frequency of individuals with Korean genetic material is probably to the reason for the current high reproductive capacity of the mite V. destructor recorded in Santa Catarina.

  9. On the front line: quantitative virus dynamics in honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies along a new expansion front of the parasite Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondet, Fanny; de Miranda, Joachim R; Kretzschmar, Andre; Le Conte, Yves; Mercer, Alison R

    2014-08-01

    Over the past fifty years, annual honeybee (Apis mellifera) colony losses have been steadily increasing worldwide. These losses have occurred in parallel with the global spread of the honeybee parasite Varroa destructor. Indeed, Varroa mite infestations are considered to be a key explanatory factor for the widespread increase in annual honeybee colony mortality. The host-parasite relationship between honeybees and Varroa is complicated by the mite's close association with a range of honeybee viral pathogens. The 10-year history of the expanding front of Varroa infestation in New Zealand offered a rare opportunity to assess the dynamic quantitative and qualitative changes in honeybee viral landscapes in response to the arrival, spread and level of Varroa infestation. We studied the impact of de novo infestation of bee colonies by Varroa on the prevalence and titres of seven well-characterised honeybee viruses in both bees and mites, using a large-scale molecular ecology approach. We also examined the effect of the number of years since Varroa arrival on honeybee and mite viral titres. The dynamic shifts in the viral titres of black queen cell virus and Kashmir bee virus mirrored the patterns of change in Varroa infestation rates along the Varroa expansion front. The deformed wing virus (DWV) titres in bees continued to increase with Varroa infestation history, despite dropping infestation rates, which could be linked to increasing DWV titres in the mites. This suggests that the DWV titres in mites, perhaps boosted by virus replication, may be a major factor in maintaining the DWV epidemic after initial establishment. Both positive and negative associations were identified for several pairs of viruses, in response to the arrival of Varroa. These findings provide important new insights into the role of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor in influencing the viral landscape that affects honeybee colonies.

  10. In-depth proteomic analysis of Varroa destructor: Detection of DWV-complex, ABPV, VdMLV and honeybee proteins in the mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erban, Tomas; Harant, Karel; Hubalek, Martin; Vitamvas, Pavel; Kamler, Martin; Poltronieri, Palmiro; Tyl, Jan; Markovic, Martin; Titera, Dalibor

    2015-09-11

    We investigated pathogens in the parasitic honeybee mite Varroa destructor using nanoLC-MS/MS (TripleTOF) and 2D-E-MS/MS proteomics approaches supplemented with affinity-chromatography to concentrate trace target proteins. Peptides were detected from the currently uncharacterized Varroa destructor Macula-like virus (VdMLV), the deformed wing virus (DWV)-complex and the acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV). Peptide alignments revealed detection of complete structural DWV-complex block VP2-VP1-VP3, VDV-1 helicase and single-amino-acid substitution A/K/Q in VP1, the ABPV structural block VP1-VP4-VP2-VP3 including uncleaved VP4/VP2, and VdMLV coat protein. Isoforms of viral structural proteins of highest abundance were localized via 2D-E. The presence of all types of capsid/coat proteins of a particular virus suggested the presence of virions in Varroa. Also, matches between the MWs of viral structural proteins on 2D-E and their theoretical MWs indicated that viruses were not digested. The absence/scarce detection of non-structural proteins compared with high-abundance structural proteins suggest that the viruses did not replicate in the mite; hence, virions accumulate in the Varroa gut via hemolymph feeding. Hemolymph feeding also resulted in the detection of a variety of honeybee proteins. The advantages of MS-based proteomics for pathogen detection, false-positive pathogen detection, virus replication, posttranslational modifications, and the presence of honeybee proteins in Varroa are discussed.

  11. Evolution of E2 transition strength in deformed hafnium isotopes from new measurements on $^{172}$Hf, $^{174}$Hf, and $^{176}$Hf

    CERN Document Server

    Rudigier, M; Dannhoff, M; Gerst, R-B; Jolie, J; Saed-Samii, N; Stegemann, S; Régis, J-M; Robledo, L M; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R; Blazhev, A; Fransen, Ch; Warr, N; Zell, K O

    2015-01-01

    The available data for E2 transition strengths in the region between neutron-deficient Hf and Pt isotopes are far from complete. More and precise data are needed to enhance the picture of structure evolution in this region and to test state-of-the-art nuclear models. In a simple model, the maximum collectivity is expected at the middle of the major shell. However, for actual nuclei, this picture may no longer be the case, and one should use a more realistic nuclear-structure model. We address this point by studying the spectroscopy of Hf. We remeasure the 2^+_1 half-lives of 172,174,176Hf, for which there is some disagreement in the literature. The main goal is to measure, for the first time, the half-lives of higher-lying states of the rotational band. The new results are compared to a theoretical calculation for absolute transition strengths. The half-lives were measured using \\gamma-\\gamma and conversion-electron-\\gamma delayed coincidences with the fast timing method. For the determination of half-lives i...

  12. Comparative study of atomic-layer-deposited HfO2/Al2O3, Hf0.8Al0.2Ox and Hf0.5Al0.5Ox on N-GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinjiang; Lv, Hongliang; Zhang, Yuming; Zhang, Yimen; Qin, Zaiyang

    2016-11-01

    Interfacial properties of n-GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOSCAPs) with the gate dielectrics of HfO2/Al2O3, Hf0.8Al0.2Ox and Hf0.5Al0.5Ox are investigated. The results reveal that Hf0.5Al0.5Ox has larger permittivity and lower interface trap density than that of HfO2/Al2O3. In order to explain the result from the physical perspective, the XPS tests of all three samples are performed. It is found that the main reason to form interface trap of three samples treated with 500 °C post-deposition annealing, is attributed to the interfacial component of Ga2O3 and The Hf0.5Al0.5Ox dielectric is beneficial to reducing the formation of Ga2O3.

  13. First 100 ms of HF modification at Tromso, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuth, F. T.; Isham, B.; Rietveld, M. T.; Hagfors, T.; La Hoz, C.

    Experiments were performed with the high-power high-frequency HF facility at Troms o Norway to test theoretical predictions for the excitation of ion and Langmuir oscillations in the ionosphere The principal diagnostic of wave-plasma interactions was the VHF radar at the European Incoherent Scatter EISCAT facility High resolution radar techniques were used to monitor the temporal development of the ion and Langmuir oscillations HF pulses 100 ms in duration were periodically transmitted into a smooth background F region plasma Measurements of the radar backscatter spectra show that all key spectral features predicted by strong Langmuir turbulence SLT theory modified Zakharov model are simultaneously present in the plasma and that their evolution is in agreement with theoretical expectations However several new features have been observed that cannot be anticipated by current theory because of limitations in the electric field strength within the simulations The experimental results reinforce the notion that new theoretical developments are needed to accommodate the large HF electric fields produced at Troms o and HAARP Gakona Alaska and to treat the electron acceleration process in a self-consistent fashion The F region response to two HF effective radiated power levels sim 58 MW and sim 125 MW was investigated at Troms o These ERP values include absorptive losses resulting from the sunlit D region In general the results at 58 MW ERP and 125 MW ERP are consistent with many of the SLT

  14. The multilayer Fe/Hf studied with slow positron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashige, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Nakajyo, T.; Koizumi, T.; Kanazawa, I.; Komori, F.; Ito, Y.

    1997-04-01

    The positron annihilation parameter versus the incident positron energy is measured in the thin Fe films and the Fe/Hf bilayer on silica substrate, by means of the variable energetic slow-positron beam technique. We have analyzed the change in open-volume spaces and vacancy-type defects among the Fe microcrystals in these thin films with the deposition temperature.

  15. A CMOS OTA for HF filters with programmable transfer function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Zwan, Eric J.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Seevinck, E.; Seevinck, Evert

    1991-01-01

    A CMOS operational transconductance amplifier (OTA) for programmable HF filters is presented. When used in an OTA-C integrator, the unity-gain frequency phase error remains less than 0.3° for frequencies up to more than one tenth of the OTA bandwidth. The OTA has built-in phase compensation, which

  16. Hf isotope evidence for a hidden mantle reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizzarro, Martin; Simonetti, A.; Stevenson, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    High-precision Hf isotopic analyses and U-Pb ages of carbonatites and kimberlites from Greenland and eastern North America, including Earth's oldest known carbonatite (3 Ga), indicate derivation from an enriched mantle source. This previously unidentified mantle reservoir-marked by an unradiogeni...

  17. Origin of excess 176Hf in meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Kristine; Connelly, James; Bizzarro, Martin

    2010-01-01

    After considerable controversy regarding the (176)Lu decay constant (lambda(176)Lu), there is now widespread agreement that (1.867 +/- 0.008) x 10(-11) yr(-1) as confirmed by various terrestrial objects and a 4557 Myr meteorite is correct. This leaves the (176)Hf excesses that are correlated with...

  18. Self-diffusion of Er and Hf inpure and HfO/sub 2/-doped polycrystalline Er/sub 2/O/sub 3/. [Hf-175 and Er-169

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheidecker, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Using a tracer technique, self-diffusion of Er and Hf was measured over the approximate temperature interval of 1600 to 1970/sup 0/C in pure and HfO/sub 2/-doped polycryatalline Er/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Up to about 10 m/o HfO/sub 2/ dopant level, the Er self-diffusion coefficients followed a relationship based on cation vacancies. Above 10 m/o HfO/sub 2/, deviation from this relationship occurred, apparently due to clustering of cation vacancies and oxygen interstitials around the dopant hafnia ion. The activation energy for the self-diffusion of Er in pure Er/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was 82.2 Kcal/mole and increased with the HfO/sub 2/ dopant level present. Self-diffusion of Hf was measured in pure Er/sub 2/O/sub 3/ having two impurity levels, and a separation of the grain boundary. The volume diffusion of Hf showed both extrinsic and intrinsic behavior with the transition temperature increasing with the impurity level present in Er/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The activation energy for Hf volume diffusion in the intrinsic region was high, i.e. 235 -+ 9.5 Kcal/mole. The grain boundary diffusion was apparently extrinsic over the entire temperature interval Very low Hf self diffusion rates were found in both pure and HfO/sub 2/ doped Er/sub 2/O/sub 3/ compositions. Despite a clustering effect, the HfO/sub 2/ dopant increased the Hf volume diffusion coefficients.

  19. Comparación de la habilidad reproductiva y mortalidad del ácaro Varroa destructor en celdas con cría de obrera y zángano en abejas africanizadas de Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón, Rafael A.; Ureña, Susana; Sánchez, Luis; Calderón, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    Se estudió la reproducción del ácaro Varroa destructor en celdas con cría de obrera y zángano. Además se evaluó la mortalidad de la progenie de V. destructor, especialmente la muerte o ausencia del macho. El estudio se realizó de marzo a diciembre de 2010, utilizando 15 colmenas de abejas africanizadas ubicadas en Barreal de Heredia y Ciudad Colón, San José. Se examinaron 388 celdas de obrera y 403 celdas de zángano infestadas de manera natural con un ácaro adulto. La reproducción de cada áca...

  20. Türkiye’de Varroa Destructor ile Doğal Enfeste Bal Arısı Kolonilerinde Apıvar®’ın (Amitraz) Etkisi

    OpenAIRE

    AYDIN, Levent; GİRİŞGİN, A. Onur

    2014-01-01

    Bu çalışmada, Bursa yöresinde Varroa destructor ile doğal bulaşık olan balarısı kolonilerinde (polen tuzaklı kovanlarda) Apivar’ın (Amitraz) etkinliği araştırılmıştır. V.destructor ile doğal olarak bulaşık 40 koloni yirmişer koloniden oluşan 2 gruba ayrılmıştır. Birinci grup Apivar strip ile 6 hafta süre ile sonbaharda tedavi edilmiş, ikinci grup ise tedavisiz kontrol bırakılmıştır. Tedavi sonrası Apivar strip’in etkinlii istatistiki olarak Henderson-Tilton ve Yüzde Değişim Testleri ile karşı...

  1. Helium implanted $\\rm\\underline{Al}$Hf as studied by 181Ta TDPAC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Govindaraj; K P Gopinathan; B Viswanathan

    2000-06-01

    Time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) measurement on $\\rm\\underline{Al}$Hf reference sample has shown that a fraction 0.88 of probe nuclei are defect free and are occupying the substitutional sites in fcc Al matrix, and the remaining are associated with Hf solute clusters. Measurements on helium implanted sample indicate the binding of helium associated defects by Hf solute clusters. Isochronal annealing measurements indicate the dissociation of the helium implantation induced defects from Hf solute clusters for annealing treatments beyond 650 K. On comparison of the present results with that reported in $\\rm\\underline{Cu}$Hf subjected to identical helium implantation, it is inferred that the Hf solute clusters in $\\rm\\underline{Al}$Hf bind less strongly the helium associated defects than in $\\rm\\underline{Cu}$Hf.

  2. Processing and crystallographic structure of non-equilibrium Si-doped HfO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Dong; Fancher, Chris M.; Esteves, Giovanni; Jones, Jacob L., E-mail: jacobjones@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Zhao, Lili [School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi' an 710127 (China)

    2015-06-28

    Si-doped HfO{sub 2} was confirmed to exist as a non-equilibrium state. The crystallographic structures of Si-doped HfO{sub 2} were studied using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction and the Rietveld refinement method. Incorporation of Si into HfO{sub 2} and diffusion of Si out of (Hf,Si)O{sub 2} were determined as a function of calcination temperature. Higher thermal energy input at elevated calcination temperatures resulted in the formation of HfSiO{sub 4}, which is the expected major secondary phase in Si-doped HfO{sub 2}. The effect of SiO{sub 2} particle size (nano- and micron-sized) on the formation of Si-doped HfO{sub 2} was also determined. Nano-crystalline SiO{sub 2} was found to incorporate into HfO{sub 2} more readily.

  3. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1CLMA-2HF5A [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1CLMA-2HF5A 1CLM 2HF5 A A LTEEQIAEFKEAFALFDKDGDGTITTKELGTVMRSLGQN...PTEAELQDMINEVDADGNGTIDFPEFLSLMARKMKEQDSEEELIEAFKVFDRDGNGLISAAELRHVMTNLGEKL--TDDEVDEMIREADIDGDGHINYEEFVRMMVS-...ntryChain> 1CLM A 1CLMA LGEKL--TD...ne> 1CLM A 1CLMA

  4. Geographic variations in the PARADIGM-HF heart failure trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Martinez, Felipe; Jhund, Pardeep S; Arango, Juan Luis; Bĕlohlávek, Jan; Boytsov, Sergey; Cabrera, Walter; Gomez, Efrain; Hagège, Albert A; Huang, Jun; Kiatchoosakun, Songsak; Kim, Kee-Sik; Mendoza, Iván; Senni, Michele; Squire, Iain B; Vinereanu, Dragos; Wong, Raymond Ching-Chiew; Gong, Jianjian; Lefkowitz, Martin P; Rizkala, Adel R; Rouleau, Jean L; Shi, Victor C; Solomon, Scott D; Swedberg, Karl; Zile, Michael R; Packer, Milton; McMurray, John J V

    2016-11-01

    The globalization of clinical trials has highlighted geographic variations in patient characteristics, event rates, and treatment effects. We investigated these further in PARADIGM-HF, the largest and most globally representative trial in heart failure (HF) to date. We looked at five regions: North America (NA) 602 (8%), Western Europe (WE) 1680 (20%), Central/Eastern Europe/Russia (CEER) 2762 (33%), Latin America (LA) 1433 (17%), and Asia-Pacific (AP) 1487 (18%). Notable differences included: WE patients (mean age 68 years) and NA (65 years) were older than AP (58 years) and LA (63 years) and had more coronary disease; NA and CEER patients had the worst signs, symptoms, and functional status. North American patients were the most likely to have a defibrillating-device (54 vs. 2% AP) and least likely prescribed a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist (36 vs. 65% LA). Other evidence-based therapies were used most frequently in NA and WE. Rates of the primary composite outcome of cardiovascular (CV) death or HF hospitalization (per 100 patient-years) varied among regions: NA 13.6 (95% CI 11.7-15.7) WE 9.6 (8.6-10.6), CEER 12.3 (11.4-13.2), LA 11.2 (10.0-12.5), and AP 12.5 (11.3-13.8). After adjustment for prognostic variables, relative to NA, the risk of CV death was higher in LA and AP and the risk of HF hospitalization lower in WE. The benefit of sacubitril/valsartan was consistent across regions. There were many regional differences in PARADIGM-HF, including in age, symptoms, comorbidity, background therapy, and event-rates, although these did not modify the benefit of sacubitril/valsartan. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01035255. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  5. Mid-Latitude Mobile Wideband HF- NVIS Channel Analysis: Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    communications (SATCOM) for beyond line-of- sight (LOS) links. However, standard HF systems operating over a 3-kHz bandwidth do not provide sufficient...wideband mid-latitude HF channel soundings and three-dimensional (3-D) ray-tracing simulations to develop a statistical model of a particular nearly...46 5 THE HF-NVIS CHANNEL SOUNDING SYSTEM ...................................................................... 47 5.1 TRANSMIT AND RECEIVE HF

  6. HF Radar observations of the Dardanelles outflow current in North Eastern Aegean using validated WERA HF radar data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. KOKKINI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-site WERA HF radar station was installed in November 2009 at the eastern coast of Lemnos Island in North Aegean Sea, aiming to monitor the surface inflow of Black Sea waters exiting from the Dardanelles Strait, as well as to constitute a coastal management tool for incidents of oil-pollution or save-and-rescue operations. Strong interference by foreign transmissions is a source of noise deteriorating the quality of the backscattered signal, thus significantly reducing the HF radar’s effective data return rate. In order to ameliorate this problem, further quality-control and data gap interpolating procedures have been developed and applied, to be used in addition to the procedures incorporated and used by the manufacturer’s signal processing software. The second-level processing involves traditional despiking in the temporal domain, preceding Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis. The latter is used not only to filter high-frequency noise but also to fill data gaps in time and space. The data reconstruction procedure has been assessed via comparison of (a HF radial with CODE-type drifter radial velocities as well as (b HF-derived virtual drifter tracks with actual drifter tracks. The main circulation features and their variability, as revealed by the reconstructed fields, are presented.

  7. HF Radar observations of the Dardanelles outflow current in North Eastern Aegean using validated WERA HF radar data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. KOKKINI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A two-site WERA HF radar station was installed in November 2009 at the eastern coast of Lemnos Island in North Aegean Sea, aiming to monitor the surface inflow of Black Sea waters exiting from the Dardanelles Strait, as well as to constitute a coastal management tool for incidents of oil-pollution or save-and-rescue operations. Strong interference by foreign transmissions is a source of noise deteriorating the quality of the backscattered signal, thus significantly reducing the HF radar’s effective data return rate. In order to ameliorate this problem, further quality-control and data gap interpolating procedures have been developed and applied, to be used in addition to the procedures incorporated and used by the manufacturer’s signal processing software. The second-level processing involves traditional despiking in the temporal domain, preceding Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis. The latter is used not only to filter high-frequency noise but also to fill data gaps in time and space. The data reconstruction procedure has been assessed via comparison of (a HF radial with CODE-type drifter radial velocities as well as (b HF-derived virtual drifter tracks with actual drifter tracks. The main circulation features and their variability, as revealed by the reconstructed fields, are presented.

  8. The stability of the bifluoride ion (HF - 2) in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heni, Martin; Illenberger, Eugen

    1985-12-01

    The bifluoride ion (HF-2) has been generated by dissociative electron attachment to trans-1,2-difluorethylene and cis-1,2-difluoroethylene. Evaluation of the energetics for these reactions leads to ΔH0f (HF-2) ≤-6.9 eV and E. A. (HF2)≥4.8 eV.

  9. Photon strength function in the Hf-181 nucleus by method of two-step cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Le Hong Khiem

    2003-01-01

    The applicability of sum-coincidence measurements of two-step cascade gamma ray spectra determining Photon Strength Function (PSF) of Hf-181 induced from Hf-180 (n,2 gamma) Hf-181 reaction is presented. Up to 80% intensity of the primary gamma ray transitions in a wide energy range have been deduced and compared to model calculation.

  10. Suppression Factor of ~(182)W for ~(182)Hf AMS at CIAE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Suppression factor of 182W is an important index in the measurement of 182Hf with AMS method. This factor is defined as the value of 182W/180Hf in blank samples divised by the measured value of 182 W/180Hf with AMS method. In order to satisfy a

  11. 40 CFR 180.1273 - Beauveria bassiana HF23; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Beauveria bassiana HF23; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1273 Beauveria bassiana HF23; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Beauveria bassiana HF23 are exempt from the requirement of a tolerance on all...

  12. Two-dimensional semiconductor HfSe{sub 2} and MoSe{sub 2}/HfSe{sub 2} van der Waals heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aretouli, K. E.; Tsipas, P.; Tsoutsou, D.; Marquez-Velasco, J.; Xenogiannopoulou, E.; Giamini, S. A.; Vassalou, E.; Kelaidis, N.; Dimoulas, A., E-mail: a.dimoulas@inn.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Center for Scientific Research “Demokritos,” 15310, Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece)

    2015-04-06

    Using molecular beam epitaxy, atomically thin 2D semiconductor HfSe{sub 2} and MoSe{sub 2}/HfSe{sub 2} van der Waals heterostructures are grown on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates. Details of the electronic band structure of HfSe{sub 2} are imaged by in-situ angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy indicating a high quality epitaxial layer. High-resolution surface tunneling microscopy supported by first principles calculations provides evidence of an ordered Se adlayer, which may be responsible for a reduction of the measured workfunction of HfSe{sub 2} compared to theoretical predictions. The latter reduction minimizes the workfunction difference between the HfSe{sub 2} and MoSe{sub 2} layers resulting in a small valence band offset of only 0.13 eV at the MoSe{sub 2}/HfSe{sub 2} heterointerface and a weak type II band alignment.

  13. Impulso destructor: (SExperiencia perversa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Viña Hernández

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Desde la Ilustración, la sexualidad ha quedado sometida a un discurso normativo. Aspectos como la pasión y el impulso se ven rígidamente constreñidos por esquemas morales y prejuicios heredados de una idiosincrasia aburguesada. Los intentos por esquivar y transgredir estos modelos han sido llevados a la pantalla, casi siempre bajo la tónica común del fracaso y la fatalidad. Desde Hitchcock a Pasolini, pasando por Truffaut o Kubrick, se trazará un recorrido cronológico, que estudia los ejemplos más paradigmáticos de la subversión erótica.

  14. Evaluacion del efecto de Beauveria bassiana en el control biológico de Varroa destructor, parasito de la abeja melífera (Apis mellifera en la finca Felisa en el municipio de los Patios, Norte de Santander - Evaluacion del efecto de Beauveria bassiana en el control biológico de Varroa destructor, parasito de la abeja melífera (Apis mellifera en la finca Felisa en el municipio de los Patios, Norte de Santander

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francy Liliana Duarte

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Beekeeping is an activity that produces significant benefits to agriculture and the environment; Through the pollination action of bees helps to increase productivity as well as biodiversity in the ecosystem. In recent years, has significantly increased prevalence of parasites in this species, particularly the Varroasis, a disease caused by the mite Varroa destructor. The causal agent produces losses between 30% and 50% of total production and in turn can cause damage to the quality of honey by the excessive use of chemicals for disease control and the slow and progressive deterioration health of producers. Noting this, we evaluated the incidence of fungus Beauveria bassiana in natural populations of Varroa destructor in acarofauna associated, and the remains of the hive by pathogenicity tests in laboratory conditions to evaluate the effect of the biocontrol entomopathogenic then enter in apiaries infected with the disease. According to the results obtained in the adult infestation of V. destructor in Apis mellifera Africanized sampling Felisa made on the farm in the municipality of Los Patios, recorded rates of infestation in hives from 3.4% to 8.3% on the infection status of breeding was 4.5% to 13.7%. In laboratory tests it was possible to observe thatthe fungus B. bassiana attacked by an effective control mites without harming bees, propolis and honey allowing the insect to continue their normal activities, controlling the disease in a biological, not chemical.

  15. Charge storage characteristics and tunneling mechanism of amorphous Ge-doped HfOx films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, X. Y.; Zhang, S. Y.; Zhang, T.; Wang, R. X.; Li, L. T.; Zhang, Y.; Dai, J. Y.

    2016-09-01

    Amorphous Ge-doped HfOx films have been deposited on p-Si(100) substrates by means of RF magnetron sputtering. Microstructural investigations reveal the partial oxidation of doped Ge atoms in the amorphous HfOx matrix and the existence of HfSiOx interfacial layer. Capacitance-voltage hysteresis of the Ag-/Ge-doped HfOx/Si/Ag memory capacitor exhibits a memory window of 3.15 V which can maintain for >5 × 104 cycles. Current-voltage characteristics reveal that Poole-Frenkel tunneling is responsible for electron transport in the Ge-doped HfOx film.

  16. Clinical trials update from the Heart Failure Society of America Meeting 2009: FAST, IMPROVE-HF, COACH galectin-3 substudy, HF-ACTION nuclear substudy, DAD-HF, and MARVEL-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainscak, Mitja; Coletta, Alison P; Sherwi, Nasser; Cleland, John G F

    2010-02-01

    This article presents findings and a commentary on late-breaking trials presented during the meeting of the Heart Failure Society of America in September 2009. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary, since analyses may change in the final publication. The FAST trial showed somewhat better performance of intrathoracic impedance for prediction of deterioration in patients with heart failure (HF) when compared with daily weighing. The IMPROVE-HF study reported the benefits of education on the management of patients with systolic HF. Galectin-3 appeared a useful method for improving risk stratification of patients with chronic HF in a substudy of the COACH trial. A nuclear substudy of the HF-ACTION trial failed to demonstrate that resting myocardial perfusion imaging, a measure of myocardial scar and viability, was clinically useful. A small randomized controlled trial (DAD-HF) suggested that the use of low-dose dopamine in patients with acutely decompensated HF was associated with less deterioration in renal function and less hypokalaemia. The MARVEL-1 trial raises further concerns about the safety of myoblast transplantation in ischaemic HF.

  17. The anisotropy of Hf diffusion in {alpha}-Zr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, G.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.]|[Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Zou, H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.]|[Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Roy, J.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.]|[Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Schultz, R.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.]|[Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Matsuura, N. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.]|[Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Jackman, J.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.]|[Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-02-01

    Hf diffusion coefficients (D) have been measured ({proportional_to}870-1100 K) in directions parallel (D{sub pa}) and perpendicular (D{sub pe}) to the c-axis of double-faced, single-crystal specimens of both high purity (HP) and nominally pure (NP) {alpha}-Zr. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Hf diffusion in HP {alpha}-Zr is characterised by an activation energy of about 3.0 eV and a pre-exponential factor of about 10{sup -5} m{sup 2}/s. The anisotropy ratio, D{sub pa}/D{sub pe}, is {proportional_to}<1.0 for the HP specimens and mostly >1.0 for the NP specimens. A dependence of D on diffusion time/depth is indicated for some experiments on NP Zr. (orig.).

  18. Photodetachment of HF-in an Electric Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-Hua

    2008-01-01

    @@ Photdetachment of a negative HF-ion in an electric field is studied by using the two-centre model and the closed orbit theory.An analytic formula is presented for the electron flux of HF- in the presence of an electric field.The results show that the oscillation in the electron flux distribution is caused by the rescattering effect of the molecular ion core and the interference betweed the two nuclei.In addition,the interference between the orbits passing through the given spatial point also plays an important role in the electron flux distribution.This study provides a new understanding of the photodetachment of polar molecules in the presence of external field.

  19. Generation of ionospheric ducts by the HAARP HF heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, J A; Pradipta, R; Burton, L M; Labno, A; Lee, M C [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Watkins, B J; Fallen, C [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Kuo, S P [New York University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Burke, W J [Air Force Research Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA 01731 (United States); Mabius, D; See, B Z, E-mail: mclee@mit.edu [Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We report an investigation of ionospheric ducts having the shape of large plasma sheets, generated by vertically transmitted HAARP HF heater waves in several experiments conducted in Gakona, Alaska. Theory predicts that O-mode heater wave-created ionospheric ducts form parallel-plate waveguides within the meridional plane, and those generated by the X-mode heater waves are orthogonal to the meridional plane. Our theoretical prediction is supported by measurements of ionosonde data (namely ionograms), range-time-intensity (RTI) plots of UHF and HF backscatter radars, as well as magnetometer data analyses. When these plasma sheets experienced ExB drifts, they were intercepted by the HAARP UHF radar and seen as slanted stripes in the RTI plots. This striking feature was also observed in our earlier experiments using the Arecibo UHF radar.

  20. Use of GPS network data for HF Doppler measurements interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Petrova, Inna R; Latypov, Ruslan R

    2014-01-01

    The method of measurement of Doppler frequency shift of ionospheric signal - HF Doppler technique - is one of well-known and widely used methods of ionosphere research. It allows to research various disturbances in the ionosphere. There are some sources of disturbances in the ionosphere. These are geomagnetic storms, solar flashes, metrological effects, atmospheric waves. This method allows to find out the influence of earthquakes, explosions and other processes on the ionosphere, which occur near to the Earth. HF Doppler technique has the high sensitivity to small frequency variations and the high time resolution, but interpretation of results is difficult. In this work we make an attempt to use GPS data for Doppler measurements interpretation. Modeling of Doppler frequency shift variations with use of TEC allows to separate ionosphere disturbances of medium scale.

  1. Imaging HF-induced large-scale irregularities above HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuth, Frank T.; Reinisch, Bodo W.; Kitrosser, David F.; Elder, John H.; Snyder, A. Lee; Sales, Gary S.

    2006-02-01

    The University of Massachusetts-Lowell digisonde is used with the HAARP high-frequency (HF), ionospheric modification facility to obtain radio images of artificially-produced, large-scale, geomagnetic field-aligned irregularities. F region irregularities generated with the HAARP beam pointed in the vertical and geomagnetic field-aligned directions are examined in a smooth background plasma. It is found that limited large-scale irregularity production takes place with vertical transmissions, whereas there is a dramatic increase in the number of source irregularities with the beam pointed parallel to the geomagnetic field. Strong irregularity production appears to be confined to within ~5° of the geomagnetic zenith and does not fill the volume occupied by the HF beam. A similar effect is observed in optical images of artificial airglow.

  2. Performance Analysis of HF Band FB-MC-SS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein Moradi; Stephen Andrew Laraway; Behrouz Farhang-Boroujeny

    2016-01-01

    Abstract—In a recent paper [1] the filter bank multicarrier spread spectrum (FB-MC-SS) waveform was proposed for wideband spread spectrum HF communications. A significant benefit of this waveform is robustness against narrow and partial band interference. Simulation results in [1] demonstrated good performance in a wideband HF channel over a wide range of conditions. In this paper we present a theoretical analysis of the bit error probably for this system. Our analysis tailors the results from [2] where BER performance was analyzed for maximum ration combining systems that accounted for correlation between subcarriers and channel estimation error. Equations are give for BER that closely match the simulated performance in most situations.

  3. Investigation of new type Cu-Hf-Al bulk glassy alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, E.; Rontó, V.; Sólyom, J.; Roósz, A.

    2009-01-01

    In the last years new type Cu-Hf-Al ternary alloys were developed with high glass forming ability and ductility. The addition of Al to Cu-Hf alloys results in improvements in glass formation, thermal stability and mechanical properties of these alloys. We have investigated new Cu-based bulk amorphous alloys in Cu-Hf-Al ternary system. The alloys with Cu49Hf42Al9, Cu46Hf45Al9, Cu50Hf42.5Al7.5 and Cu50Hf45Al5 compositions were prepared by arc melting. The samples were made by centrifugal casting and were investigated by X-ray diffraction method. Thermodynamic properties were examined by differential scanning calorimetry and the structure of the crystallising phases by scanning electron microscopy. The determination of liquidus temperatures of alloys were measured by differential thermal analysis.

  4. First-principles studies of HF molecule adsorption on intrinsic graphene and Al-doped graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Chen, Li; Zhang, Feiwu; Li, Daoyong; Pan, Hongzhe; Ye, Jun

    2010-10-01

    In the search for a high-sensitivity sensor for HF gas, the adsorption of HF molecules on both intrinsic and Al-doped graphene sheets is studied by first-principles calculations. We find that the adsorption mechanisms of HF molecules are different for intrinsic graphene and Al-doped graphene. Al-doped graphene has higher adsorption energy and shorter connecting distance to the HF molecule than intrinsic graphene. The calculated net electron transfers, electronic density difference images and densities of states give evidence that the adsorption of HF molecules on Al-doped graphene is by chemisorption, while there is weak physisorption on intrinsic graphene. Therefore, Al-doped graphene can be expected to have applications as a novel sensor for the detection of HF gas. The HF molecules adsorbed on Al-doped graphene material can be reactivated by applying an external electric field of 0.013 a.u.

  5. Ferroelectric HfO2 for Emerging Ferroelectric Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florent, Karine

    The spontaneous polarization in ferroelectrics (FE) makes them particularly attractive for non-volatile memory and logic applications. Non-volatile FRAM memories using perovskite structure materials, such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) and Strontium Bismuth Tantalate (SBT) have been studied for many years. However, because of their scaling limit and incompatibility with CMOS beyond 130 nm node, floating gate Flash memory technology has been preferred for manufacturing. The recent discovery of ferroelectricity in doped HfO2 in 2011 has opened the door for new ferroelectric based devices compatible with CMOS technology, such as Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistor (FeFET) and Ferroelectric Tunnel Junctions (FTJ). This work began with developing ferroelectric hysteresis characterization capabilities at RIT. Initially reactively sputtered aluminum doped HfO 2 films were investigated. It was observed that the composition control using co-sputtering was not achievable within the existing capabilities. During the course of this study, collaboration was established with the NaMLab group in Germany to investigate Si doped HfO2 deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Metal Ferroelectric Metal (MFM) devices were fabricated using TiN as the top and bottom electrode with Si:HfO2 thickness ranging from 6.4 nm to 22.9 nm. The devices were electrically tested for P-E, C-V and I-V characteristics. Structural characterizations included TEM, EELS, XRR, XRD and XPS/Auger spectroscopy. Higher remanant polarization (Pr) was observed for films of 9.3 nm and 13.1 nm thickness. Thicker film (22.9 nm) showed smaller Pr. Devices with 6.4 nm thick films exhibit tunneling behavior showing a memristor like I-V characteristics. The tunnel current and ferroelectricity showed decrease with cycling indicating a possible change in either the structure or the domain configurations. Theoretical simulations using the improved FE model were carried out to model the ferroelectric behavior of

  6. Centrifugal stretching of 170Hf in the interacting boson model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a recent experiment to deduce lifetimes of members of the ground state rotational band of 170Hf, which show the effect of centrifugal stretching in this deformed isotope. Results are compared to the geometrical confined beta-soft(CBS rotor model, as well as to the interacting boson model (IBM. Two methods to correct for effects due to the finite valence space within the IBM are proposed.

  7. Electrochemical characterization of cast Ti-Hf binary alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Z; Koike, M; Sato, H; Brezner, M; Guo, Q; Komatsu, M; Okuno, O; Okabe, T

    2005-05-01

    This study characterized the electrochemical behavior of Ti-Hf binary alloys in a simulated oral environment. Ti-Hf alloys (10, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 mass% Hf) were prepared by arc-melting titanium sponge and hafnium sponge. Specimens of each alloy (n = 4) were prepared using a dental titanium casting system with a MgO-based investment. Specimens were inspected with X-ray radiography to ensure minimal internal porosity. Castings (n = 4) made from pure titanium and commercially pure titanium were used as controls. The ground flat surface (10 mm x 10 mm) on each specimen where approximately 30 microm was removed was used for the characterization. Sixteen-hour open-circuit potential (OCP) measurement, linear polarization and potentiodynamic cathodic polarization were performed sequentially in aerated (air + 10% CO2) MTZ synthetic saliva at 37 degrees C. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization was conducted in the same medium but deaerated (N2 + 10% CO2) 2 h before and during testing. Polarization resistance (R(P)) and Tafel slopes were determined, as were corrosion current density (I(CORR)) and passive current density (I(PASS)). Results were subjected to nonparametric statistical analysis (alpha = 0.05). The OCP stabilized (mean values -229 mV to -470 mV vs. SCE) for all specimens after the 16-h immersion. Similar passivation was observed for all the metals on their anodic polarization diagrams. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed significant differences in OCP among the test groups (p = 0.006). No significant differences were found in R(P), I(CORR) or I(PASS) among all the metals (p>0.3). Results indicate that the electrochemical behavior of the Ti-Hf alloys examined resembles that of pure titanium.

  8. Self-healing structural properties of thermoplastics in HF field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Filippenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article concerns one of the possible ways for safe operation of polymer products with initiating a process of their self-healing. This is especially true for products from polymer materials, used in hard-to-reach areas and units of machines and mechanisms. In this regard, the aim of this study was to develop techniques for a self-healing process of the mechanical properties of products from polymer materials.To achieve this goal, the author has solved problems to define a complex method of HF self-healing of polymer material: damage detection in products from polymer materials, determination of signal initiating the recovery process, determining the efficiency of material regeneration. The present study uses proposed and developed by the author methods for the determination of necessary and sufficient indicators of the strength characteristics of products under realmeteorological and climatic conditions of their operation.To determine the practical results of the developed algorithm for self-healing the polymer products in the HF field, a series of experimental studies has been conducted to regenerate the polyamide cage fatigue destruction of the rolling stock axle equipment of Russian Railways JSC.The obtained results of the strength characteristics of the material under investigation prove the self-healing process of polymer materials in HF field.According to research results, the conclusion is drawn that it is required to provide a technological HF self-healing process of products from polymer materials. The created algorithm of regeneration enables a new approach to study the effects of electromagnetic fields on polymer and polymer-based composite materials when solving the practical tasks to improve the quality of repairing parts from thermoplastics.

  9. Hf--Co--B alloys as permanent magnet materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Michael Alan; Rios, Orlando; Ghimire, Nirmal Jeevi

    2017-01-24

    An alloy composition is composed essentially of Hf.sub.2-XZr.sub.XCo.sub.11B.sub.Y, wherein 0B.sub.Y, wherein 0.ltoreq.X<2 and 0

  10. Ionizing wave via high-power HF acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Mishin, Evgeny

    2010-01-01

    Recent ionospheric modification experiments with the 3.6 MW transmitter at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska led to discovery of artificial ionization descending from the nominal interaction altitude in the background F-region ionosphere by ~60 km. This paper presents a physical model of an ionizing wavefront created by suprathermal electrons accelerated by the HF-excited plasma turbulence.

  11. Study on Preparation of 182Hf AMS Standards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YINXin-yi; JIANGShan; HEMing; ZHANGChun-hua; ZHANGSheng-dong

    2003-01-01

    The neutron-rich isotope 182Hf with its half-life of (9±2)×106 a produced by neutron activation can be used to determine the neutron flux of some places, in order to study the transport of radioactive nuclides and the safe disposal of nuclear waste. AMS is a kind of relative measurement method with high sensitivity (10-15), it requires corresponding standard samples.

  12. Ionizing wave via high-power HF acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Mishin, Evgeny; Pedersen, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Recent ionospheric modification experiments with the 3.6 MW transmitter at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska led to discovery of artificial ionization descending from the nominal interaction altitude in the background F-region ionosphere by ~60 km. This paper presents a physical model of an ionizing wavefront created by suprathermal electrons accelerated by the HF-excited plasma turbulence.

  13. On the Onset of HF-Induced Airglow at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    AFRL-VS-HA-TR-2005-1061 JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 109, A02305, doi:10.1029/2003JA010205, 2004 On the onset of HF-induced airglow at HAARP ...line) during the February 2002 campaign at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) heating facility are analyzed. We find that... HAARP , J. Geophys. Res., 109, A02305, doi: 10.1029/2003JA010205. 1. Introduction known as the parametric decay (PDI) or oscillating two- [2] A

  14. HF Over-the-Horizon Radar System Performance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    target detection technique and radar equations are applied. Chapter V uses PROPLAB model simulation to bring in the principle of raytracing and... RADAR SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS by Bin-Yi Liu September 2007 Thesis Co-Advisors: Phillip E. Pace Jeffrey B. Knorr THIS PAGE...Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE HF Over-the-Horizon Radar System Performance Analysis 6. AUTHOR(S) Bin-Yi Liu 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING

  15. Wideband high frequency (HF) skywave channel parameters from narrowband measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausman, Cynthia L.; Uffelman, Donald R.; Walton, Thomas L.

    The HF wideband channel allow the use of spread-spectrum techniques to provide covert communications with low probability of intercept (LPI) and antijam protection. The objective of this work is to determine the extent to which oblique narrowband channel measurements can be used to infer effects in the wideband skywave channel. If oblique narrowband channel measurements can be used as a basis for developing wideband channel models, a large number of existing narrowband measurements can be made available for this task.

  16. Detection of HCl and HF by TTFMS and WMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Anna Chiara; Pesce, Giuseppe; Rusciano, Giulia; Sasso, Antonio

    2006-04-01

    In this work we discuss on a compact spectrometer based on DFB diode lasers for detection of chloridric and fluoridric acids. HCl and HF concentrations are determined through optical absorption of the P(4) line (lambda=1.7 microm) and the R(3) line (lambda=1.3 microm), respectively. Both lines belong to first overtone vibrational bands and their line strengths are 7.8 x 10(-21)cm/molecule for HCl and 2.8 x 10(-20)cm/molecule for HF. We chose these lines for their relative high intensities and because they are quite far from water vapour lines which represent the main interfering gas for trace-gases analysis. To detect these species we used two different high frequency modulation techniques: two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy (f(1)=800 MHz and f(2)=804 MHz) was used for HCl while for HF we followed a simpler approach based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy (f=600 kHz). We demonstrate that the two techniques provide comparable detection limit of about 80 ppbV at atmospheric pressure. Positive testing of our spectrometer makes it suitable for in situ measurements of exhaust gases coming from waste incinerators.

  17. Multiple excitation modes in 163Hf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yadav, Rachita; Ma, J.C.; Marsh, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Excited states of Hf163 were populated using the Zr94(Ge74,5n) reaction and the decay γ rays were measured with the Gammasphere spectrometer. Two previously known bands were extended to higher spins, and nine new bands were identified. In addition to bands associated with three- and five-quasipar......Excited states of Hf163 were populated using the Zr94(Ge74,5n) reaction and the decay γ rays were measured with the Gammasphere spectrometer. Two previously known bands were extended to higher spins, and nine new bands were identified. In addition to bands associated with three- and five......-quasiparticle configurations, two γ−vibrational bands coupled to the i13/2 excitation were also observed. The lowest level of a newly identified, negative-parity band is proposed to be the ground state of the nucleus. A systematic delay of the high-spin proton crossing frequency with increasing quadrupole deformation from Hf...

  18. Electronic structures and properties of Ti, Zr and Hf metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The electronic structures of pure Ti, Zr and Hf metals with hcp structure were determined by one-atom (OA) theory. According to the electronic structures of these metals,their potential curves, cohesive energies, lattice constants, elasticities and the temperature dependence of linear thermal expansion coefficients were calculated. The electronic structures and characteristic properties of these metals with bcc and fcc structures and liquids were also studied. The results show that the electronic structures of Ti, Zr and Hf metals are respectively [Ar](3dn)0.481 0(3dc)2.085 7(4sc)1.000 0(4sf)0.433 3, [Kr](4dn)0.396 8(4dc)2.142 8(5sc)1.262 0(5sf)0.198 4, [Xe](5dn)0.368 0(5dc)2.041 4(6sc)1.406 6(6sf)0.184 0. It is explained why the pure Ti, Zr and Hf metals with hcp and bcc structures can exist naturally, while those with fcc structure can not.

  19. Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd garnet geochronology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Matthijs Arjen; Scherer, Erik E.; Mezger, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    are similar among grains having radii larger than 1.3 mm (weighted mean: 2714±6 Ma2714±6 Ma; 2 s.d.) and up to 20 Myr younger for finer fractions. In contrast, Sm–Nd dates are equal to or younger than the 2641–2637 Ma age of peak metamorphism. The roles of concurrently digested inclusions and core–rim Lu......To investigate the systematics of the 176Lu–176Hf and 147Sm–143Nd garnet chronometers, we performed REE and isotope analyses on garnet crystals of different size (0.55–3.1 mm radius) from a single granulite specimen (Archean Pikwitonei Granulite Domain, Manitoba, Canada). The Lu–Hf dates....../Sm fractionation are quantitatively evaluated and excluded as causes for the observed age heterogeneity. Instead, the isotope dates are interpreted to reflect partial loss of radiogenic 176Hf and 143Nd, and are used to constrain the systematics of the garnet chronometers at high temperature. The data constrain...

  20. TID measurement using oblique transmissions of HF pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkin, Ivan; Reinisch, Bodo; Huang, Xueqin; Paznukhov, Vadym; Hamel, Ryan; Kozlov, Alexander; Belehaki, Anna

    2017-04-01

    The Traveling Ionospheric Disturbance (TID), a wave-like signature of moving plasma density modulation in the ionosphere, is widely acknowledged for its utility in backtracking the anomalous events responsible for the TID generation, and as a major inconvenience to high-frequency (HF) operational systems because of its deleterious impact on the accuracy of navigation and geolocation. The pilot project "Net-TIDE" for the real-time detection and evaluation of TIDs began its operation in 2016 based on the remote-sensing data from synchronized, network-coordinated HF sounding between pairs of DPS4D ionosondes at five participating observatories in Europe. Measurement of all signal properties (Doppler frequency, angle of arrival, and time-of-flight from transmitter to receiver) proved to be instrumental in detecting the TID and deducing the TID parameters: amplitude, wavelength, phase velocity, and direction of propagation. Processing of the measured HF signal data required a specialized signal processing technique that is capable of consistently extracting different signals that have propagated along different ionospheric paths. The multi-path signal environment proved to be the greatest challenge for the reliable TID specification by Net-TIDE, demanding the development of an intelligent system for "signal tracking". The intelligent system is based on a neural network model of a pre-attentive vision capable of extracting continuous signal tracks from the multi-path signal ensemble. Specific examples of the Net-TIDE algorithm suite operation and its suitability for a fully automated TID warning service are discussed.

  1. High-spin positive-parity states in 179Hf studied by the 180Hf(τ, α) 179Hf reaction AT 32 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsen, T. F.; Løvhøiden, G.; Vaagen, J. S.; Bjørnberg, A.; Burke, D. G.

    1981-06-01

    Full angular distributions are presented for states populated in the reaction 180Hf(τ, α) 179Hf at 32 MeV beam energy. Positive-parity states associated with the i {13}/{2} unique parity intruder orbital are given special attention. Thus, angular distributions for the five first members of the [624 {9}/{2}] groundstate sequence are given, as well as for a number of more highly excited states, some being new assignments. The distribution of l = 6 transfer strength is quite characteristic, two {13}/{2}+ states being substantially more populated than the rest. The characteristic features of the data are explained by a quasiparticle-rotor calculation employing deformed Woods-Saxon orbitals, but only if the hexadecapole shape parameter of the nuclear potential is β 4 ˜ -0.08. The often anomalous differential cross sections for I π ≠ {13}/{2}+ band members are well accounted for by a rotor model CCBA calculation employing transfer form factors extracted from the orbitals of the deformed Woods-Saxon field, and including non-adiabatic Coriolis mixing effects.

  2. Hf isotopic compositions of the standard zircons for U-Pb dating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ping; WU Fuyuan; XIE Liewen; YANG Yueheng

    2004-01-01

    Using the newly published Yb isotopic abundances and the mass bias relationship between Yb and Hf, we carried out an analysis of Hf isotopes in the standard zircon 91500 by means of 193 nm laser attached to Neptune multi-collector ICP-MS (LA-MC-ICPMS). The obtained Hf isotopic data, in either in situ or line scan modes, are not only identical for different spot sizes, but also are consistent with previously published results obtained on TIMS or other MC-ICPMS machines within errors. This indicates that it is possible to obtain reliable 176Hf/177Hf isotopic ratios for zircon in either in situ or line scan conditions on LA-MC-ICPMS machine, and the applied procedures in our study for elemental interfering correction are appropriate for the purpose of acquiring satisfactory accuracy for Hf isotope analyses. The Hf isotopic compositions of four zircon standards in high spatial resolution U-Pb dating, 91500, CZ3,CN92-1 and TEMORA, are measured, respectively. The obtained 176Hf/177Hf ratios are 0.282316+4 (n = 34, 2σ) for 91500, 0.281704±6 (n = 16, 2σ) for CZ3, 0.282200±6 (n = 20,2σ-) for CN92-1 and 0.282684±14 (n = 24, 2σ) for TEMORA,respectively, with 176Lu/177Hf ratios of ~0.00031, 0.000036,0.00083 and 0.00127. Zircons 91500 and CZ3 show narrower variations in 176Hf/177Hf and 176Lu/177Hf ratios than those of zircons CN92-1 and TEMORA, and thus are appropriate standards for the Hf isotope analysis.

  3. Research progress of anti-mite (Varroa destructor) in honeybee%蜜蜂抗狄斯瓦螨机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘娇; 李志国; 吴俪楠; 苏松坤

    2012-01-01

    狄斯瓦螨Varroa destructor已蔓延至世界各地,给养蜂生产带来巨大挑战,被认为是世界养蜂业的主要威胁.因此,抗螨机制的研究和抗螨蜂种的培育显得尤为重要,而掌握蜜蜂的抗螨机制则是成功培育抗螨蜂种的前提条件.本文从行为、生理及分子机制等多个不同角度对国内外蜜蜂抗狄斯瓦螨机制研究的最新进展进行了详细的阐述.尤其是从分子水平研究蜜蜂的抗螨机制对选育抗螨蜂种具有重要意义,将为利用分子遗传辅助标记筛选方法和先进的生物工程技术并结合传统的育种手段成功培育出具有抗螨性能的优良蜜蜂品系奠定基础.%The global spread of Varroa destructor, one of the most destructive apicultural pests, has brought huge challenges to beekeeping. Consequently, research on the tolerance mechanisms and breeding of Varroa tolerant honey bees has become particularly important. Mastering tolerance mechanisms has become a prerequisite for the successful cultivation of honey bees. This review summarizes major advances in research on behavioral, physiological and molecular tolerance mechanisms to Varroa destructor. It is particularly important to study tolerance mechanisms at the molecular level as this can provide a genetic basis for cultivating tolerant breeds bees with the help of marker-assisted selection and advanced modern bio-engineering technologies, in combination with conventional breeding methods.

  4. Infestation rate of the mite Varroa destructor in commercial apiaries of the Vale do Paraíba and Serra da Mantiqueira, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A. Pinto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nos últimos anos, grandes perdas de colônias de abelhas melíferas vêm sendo registradas em várias regiões do mundo. Contudo, os motivos desse acontecimento permanecem obscuros. O ácaro ectoparasita Varroa destructor Anderson e Trueman (Acari: Varroidae pode ser um dos responsáveis por esse fato, principalmente como vetor de vírus. Neste estudo, avaliaram-se as taxas de infestação (TIs do ácaro V. destructor em abelhas africanizadas Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae e correlacionaram-se os dados com as médias de temperatura de 16 municípios das regiões do Vale do Paraíba e da Serra da Mantiqueira (São Paulo, Brasil, onde a apicultura comercial atua de maneira significativa. Em cada município, um apiário comercial foi selecionado para coleta de amostras de três colônias populosas (padrão Langstroth, totalizando 48 colônias amostradas. Aproximadamente 300 abelhas adultas localizadas na área de cria foram coletadas em cada colônia. As TIs variaram de 0.0 a 5.5%, níveis considerados baixos para causar danos significativos às colônias. As TIs mais baixas foram encontradas em municípios com clima mais ameno durante a estação avaliada (verão. Adicionalmente, cofatores como variações na disponibilidade de alimento entre os municípios e a variabilidade genética das abelhas podem interagir na interação entre parasita e hospedeiro. A variação nas TIs entre os municípios indica que, mesmo presente, a tolerância das abelhas africanizadas ao varroa pode variar drasticamente em uma pequena região, devido à dinâmica multifatorial de infestação do ácaro.

  5. Electrical characteristics of MOS capacitor with HfTiON gate dielectric and HfTiSiON interlayer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Wei-Bing; Xu Jing-Ping; Lai Pui-To; Li Yan-Ping; Xu Sheng-Guo; Chan Chu-Lok

    2006-01-01

    The paper reports that HfTiO dielectric is deposited by reactive co-sputtering of Hf and Ti targets in an Ar/O2 ambience, followed by an annealing in different gas ambiences of N2, NO and NHa at 600°C for 2 min. Capacitance-voltage and gate-leakage properties are characterized and compared. The results indicate that the NO-annealed sample exhibits the lowest interface-state and dielectric-charge densities and best device reliability. This is attributed to the fact that nitridation can create strong Si≡N bonds to passivate dangling Si bonds and replace strained Si- O bonds, thus the sample forms a hardened dielectric/Si interface with high reliability.

  6. Éster de sacarose no controle do Varroa destructor em abelhas africanizadas - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v31i3.4988 Sucrose ester in the control of Varroa destructor in Africanized honeybees - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v31i3.4988

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Regina da Cunha Funari

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo verificar o efeito do éster de sacarose no controle da infestação do ácaro Varroa destructor em abelhas africanizadas. Nos testes “in vitro”, testou-se o produto em abelhas e ácaros com cinco concentrações diluídas em água (T0: 100% de água destilada; T1: 0,5%; T2: 1%; T3: 2,0%; T4: 5% e T5: 10% de éster de sacarose. Nos testes de campo, o delineamento experimental utilizado foi inteiramente casualizado, com quatro tratamentos e sete repetições, totalizando 28 colônias, sendo sete delas como controle, sete com 0,1% de éster de sacarose, sete com 0,2% de éster de sacarose e sete colmeias com 0,5% éster de sacarose, diluídas em água. Nos testes “in vitro” com concentração de 0,5%, o éster de sacarose promoveu a mortalidade dos ácaros e das abelhas. Os testes em campo demonstraram que o produto reduziu a infestação do Varroa destructor em abelhas na concentração de 0,2% e pode ser uma ferramenta no controle dessa praga. Nas concentrações de 0,1, 0,2, e 0,5%, não prejudicou o desenvolvimento de área de cria aberta, operculada e de alimento estocado na colmeia, sugerindo que não é tóxico para as abelhas.This study aimed to determine the effect of sucrose ester on the control of Varroa destructor mite infestation in Africanized honeybees. For the in vitro experiments, the product was tested in bees and mites at five concentrations obtained through dilution in water (T0: 100% distilled water; T1: 0.5%; T2: 1%; T3: 2%; T4: 5%; and T5: 10% sucrose ester. For the field studies, the experimental design was completely randomized, with four treatments and seven replicates, totaling 28 colonies, from which seven were the controls, seven were treated with 0.1% sucrose ester, seven with 0.2% sucrose ester, and seven hives with 0.5% sucrose ester diluted in water. In the in vitro study, the sucrose ester at 0.5% concentration caused mite and bee mortality. In the field tests, the

  7. Nightside studies of coherent HF Radar spectral width behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    Full Text Available A previous case study found a relationship between high spectral width measured by the CUTLASS Finland HF radar and elevated electron temperatures observed by the EISCAT and ESR incoherent scatter radars in the post-midnight sector of magnetic local time. This paper expands that work by briefly re-examining that interval and looking in depth at two further case studies. In all three cases a region of high HF spectral width (>200 ms-1 exists poleward of a region of low HF spectral width (<200 ms-1. Each case, however, occurs under quite different geomagnetic conditions. The original case study occurred during an interval with no observed electrojet activity, the second study during a transition from quiet to active conditions with a clear band of ion frictional heating indicating the location of the flow reversal boundary, and the third during an isolated sub-storm. These case studies indicate that the relationship between elevated electron temperature and high HF radar spectral width appears on closed field lines after 03:00 magnetic local time (MLT on the nightside. It is not clear whether the same relationship would hold on open field lines, since our analysis of this relationship is restricted in latitude. We find two important properties of high spectral width data on the nightside. Firstly the high spectral width values occur on both open and closed field lines, and secondly that the power spectra which exhibit high widths are both single-peak and multiple-peak. In general the regions of high spectral width (>200 ms-1 have more multiple-peak spectra than the regions of low spectral widths whilst still maintaining a majority of single-peak spectra. We also find that the region of ion frictional heating is collocated with many multiple-peak HF spectra. Several mechanisms for the generation of high spectral width have been proposed which would produce multiple-peak spectra, these are discussed in relation to

  8. The magnetic properties of $^{\\rm 177}$Hf and $^{\\rm 180}$Hf in the strong coupling deformed model

    CERN Document Server

    Muto, S; Bingham, C R; Stone, J R; Walker, P M; Audi, G; Gaulard, C; Köster, U; Nikolov, J; Nishimura, K; Ohtsubo, T; Podolyak, Z; Risegari, L; Simpson, G S; Veskovic, M; Walters, W B

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports NMR measurements of the magnetic dipole moments of two high-K isomers, the 37/2$^-$, 51.4 m, 2740 keV state in $^{\\rm 177}$Hf and the 8$^-$, 5.5 h, 1142 keV state in $^{\\rm 180}$Hf by the method of on-line nuclear orientation. Also included are results on the angular distributions of gamma transitions in the decay of the $^{\\rm 177}$Hf isotope. These yield high precision E2/M1 multipole mixing ratios for transitions in bands built on the 23/2$^+$, 1.1 s, isomer at 1315 keV and on the 9/2$^+$, 0.663 ns, isomer at 321 keV. The new results are discussed in the light of the recently reported finding of systematic dependence of the behavior of the g$_{\\rm R}$ parameter upon the quasi-proton and quasi-neutron make up of high-K isomeric states in this region.

  9. Efecto del Fosfito de Potasio en Combinación con el Fungicida Metalaxyl + Mancozeb en el Control de Mildeo Velloso (Peronospora destructor Berk en Cebolla de Bulbo (Allium cepa L. Effect of the Potasium Phosphite in Combination with the Fungicide Metalaxyl plus Mancozeb on the Control of Downy Mildew (Peronospora destructor Berk in Onion Bulb (Allium cepa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Velandia Monsalve

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen. El hongo Peronospora destructor causa considerables pérdidas en la producción de cebolla de bulbo en el mundo. Fosfito de potasio en combinación con el fungicida Metalaxyl + Mancozeb, fue evaluado por su eficiencia en el control de este patógeno en el híbrido de cebolla de bulbo Yellow Granex. Los tratamientos consistieron en una aplicación de fosfito (5 mL L-1 alternada con una de fungicida (2 g L-1; dos y tres aplicaciones consecutivas de fosfito alternadas con una de fungicida; una aplicación de fungicida alternada con una de fosfito; dos y tres aplicaciones consecutivas de fungicida alternadas con una de fosfito; aplicaciones de sólo fosfito y sólo fungicida y un testigo. Se utilizó el diseño experimental de bloques completos al azar con tres repeticiones. Se evaluó la incidencia y severidad de la enfermedad, el número, tamaño y peso de bulbos de primera, segunda, tercera y peso total de bulbos. Los resultados mostraron que las aplicaciones de fosfito de potasio durante dos semanas consecutivas alternadas en la tercera semana con una de fungicida y las aplicaciones semanales de sólo fosfito, tuvieron efectos altamente significativos en el control de la incidencia y severidad de P. destructor y diferencias significativas en el peso de los bulbos de primera (28,1 y 27,9 t ha-1 y peso total de bulbos (55,5 y 52,1 t ha-1, representando en relación al testigo, un incremento de 200 y 196% en el peso de los bulbos de primera y de 55 y 45,7% en el peso total de bulbos, respectivamente. Se concluye que con el fosfito de potasio se reduce la aplicación de fungicidas y ello es una alternativa viable para el manejo ecológico de P. destructor en la producción de cebolla de bulbo.Abstract. Peronospora destructor fungi causes considerable loses in the production of onion bulb in the world. Potassium phosphite in combination with the fungicide Metalaxyl + Mancozeb was evaluated for its efficiency in the control of this pathogen

  10. Polarity reversion of the operation mode of HfO2-based resistive random access memory devices by inserting Hf metal layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ching-Shiang; Chang, Wen-Yuan; Lin, Ming-Ho; Chen, Wei-Su; Chen, Frederick; Tsai, Ming-Jinn

    2013-03-01

    The reversion of polarity within bipolar resistive switching operation occurs in Pt/HfO2/TiN and Pt/Hf/HfO2/TiN resistive random access memory devices. This reversion of voltage polarity is the result of interface generation which induces a conduction mechanism transformation from Poole-Frenkel emission to space charge limited current mechanism. To prove the reversion of polarity, this study uses curve fitting of I-V relations to verify the conduction mechanism theoretically and physical analysis to verify the oxygen ion distribution practically. The proposed Pt/Hf/HfO2/TiN devices exhibit good resistive switching characteristics, such as good uniformity, low voltage operation, robust endurance (10(3) dc sweep), and long retention (3 x 10(4) s at 85 degrees C).

  11. Vertically oriented few-layered HfS2 nanosheets: growth mechanism and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Binjie; Chen, Yuanfu; Wang, Zegao; Qi, Fei; Huang, Zhishuo; Hao, Xin; Li, Pingjian; Zhang, Wanli; Li, Yanrong

    2016-09-01

    For the first time, large-area, vertically oriented few-layered hafnium disulfide (V-{{{HfS}}}2) nanosheets have been grown by chemical vapor deposition. The individual {{{HfS}}}2 nanosheets are well [001] oriented, with highly crystalline quality. Far different from conventional van der Waals epitaxial growth mechanism for two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides, a novel dangling-bond-assisted self-seeding growth mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of V-{{{HfS}}}2 nanosheets: difficult migration of {{{HfS}}}2 adatoms on substrate surface results in {{{HfS}}}2 seeds growing perpendicularly to the substrate; V-{{{HfS}}}2 nanosheets inherit the growth direction of {{{HfS}}}2 seeds; V-{{{HfS}}}2 nanosheets further expand in the in-plane direction with time evolution. Moreover, the V-{{{HfS}}}2 nanosheets show strong and broadened photons absorption from near infrared to ultraviolet; the V-{{{HfS}}}2-based photodetector exhibits an ultrafast photoresponse time of 24 ms, and a high photosensitivity ca. 103 for 405 nm laser.

  12. Empirical Study of the Multiaxial, Thermomechanical Behavior of NiTiHf Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Dhwanil; Noebe, Ronald D.; Stebner Aaron P.

    2013-01-01

    An empirical study was conducted to characterize the multiaxial, thermomechanical responses of new high temperature NiTiHf alloys. The experimentation included loading thin walled tube Ni(sub 50.3)Ti(sub 29.7)Hf(sub 20) alloy samples along both proportional and nonproportional axial-torsion paths at different temperatures while measuring surface strains using stereo digital image correlation. A Ni(sub 50.3)Ti(sub 33.7)Hf(sub 16) alloy was also studied in tension and compression to document the effect of slightly depleting the Hf content on the constitutive responses of NiTiHf alloys. Samples of both alloys were made from nearly texture free polycrystalline material processed by hot extrusion. Analysis of the data shows that very small changes in composition significantly alter NiTiHf alloy properties, as the austenite finish (Af) temperature of the 16-at Hf alloy was found to be approximately 60 C less than the 20-at Hf alloy (approximately 120 C vs. 180 C). In addition, the 16-at Hf alloy exhibited smaller compressive transformation strains (2 vs. 2.5 percent). Multi-axial characterization of the 20-at % Hf alloy showed that while the random polycrystal transformation strains in tension (4 percent) and compression (2.5 percent) are modest in comparison with binary NiTi (6 percent, 4 percent), the torsion performance is superior (7 vs. 4 shear strain width to the pseudoelastic plateau).

  13. Effects of HfB2 and HfN Additions on the Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of TiB2-Based Ceramic Tool Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing An

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of HfB2 and HfN additions on the microstructures and mechanical properties of TiB2-based ceramic tool materials were investigated. The results showed that the HfB2 additive not only can inhibit the TiB2 grain growth but can also change the morphology of some TiB2 grains from bigger polygons to smaller polygons or longer ovals that are advantageous for forming a relatively fine microstructure, and that the HfN additive had a tendency toward agglomeration. The improvement of flexural strength and Vickers hardness of the TiB2-HfB2 ceramics was due to the relatively fine microstructure; the decrease of fracture toughness was ascribed to the formation of a weaker grain boundary strength due to the brittle rim phase and the poor wettability between HfB2 and Ni. The decrease of the flexural strength and Vickers hardness of the TiB2-HfN ceramics was due to the increase of defects such as TiB2 coarse grains and HfN agglomeration; the enhancement of fracture toughness was mainly attributed to the decrease of the pore number and the increase of the rim phase and TiB2 coarse grains. The toughening mechanisms of TiB2-HfB2 ceramics mainly included crack bridging and transgranular fracture, while the toughening mechanisms of TiB2-HfN ceramics mainly included crack deflection, crack bridging, transgranular fracture, and the core-rim structure.

  14. Crystallography of the NiHfSi Phase in a NiAl (0.5 Hf) Single-Crystal Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, A.; Noebe, R. D.; Darolia, R.

    1996-01-01

    Small additions of Hf to conventionally processed NiAl single crystals result in the precipitation of a high density of cuboidal G-phase along with a newly identified silicide phase. Both of these phases form in the presence of Si which is not an intentional alloying addition but is a contaminant resulting from contact with the ceramic shell molds during directional solidification of the single-crystal ingots. The morphology, crystal structure and Orientation Relationship (OR) of the silicide phase in a NiAl (0.5 at.%Hf) single-crystal alloy have been determined using transmission electron microscopy, electron microdiffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Qualitative elemental analysis and indexing of the electron microdiffraction patterns from the new phase indicate that it is an orthorhombic NiHfSi phase with unit cell parameters, a = 0.639 nm, b = 0.389 nm and c = 0.72 nm, and space group Pnma. The NiHfSi phase forms as thin rectangular plates on NiAl/111/ planes with an OR that is given by NiHfSi(100))(parallel) NiAl(111) and NiHfSi zone axes(010) (parallel) NiAl zone axes (101). Twelve variants of the NiHfSi phase were observed in the alloy and the number of variants and rectangular morphology of NiHfSi plates are consistent with symmetry requirements. Quenching experiments indicate that nucleation of the NiHfSi phase in NiAI(Hf) alloys is aided by the formation of NiAl group of zone axes (111) vacancy loops that form on the NiAl /111/ planes.

  15. An ab initio study of the C2H2-HF, C2H(CH3)-HF and C2(CH3)2-HF hydrogen-bonded complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Mozart N; Lopes, Kelson C; Silva, Washington L V; Tavares, Alessandra M; Castriani, Fátima A; do Monte, Silmar A; Ventura, Elizete; Araújo, Regiane C M U

    2006-02-01

    MP2/6-31++G** and B3LYP/6-31++G** ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been performed in order to obtain molecular geometries, binding energies and vibrational properties of the C2H2-HF, C2H(CH3)-HF and C2(CH3)2-HF H-bonded complexes. As expected, the more pronounced effects on the structural properties of the isolated molecules due to complexation was verified for the C[triple bond]C and H-F bond lengths, which are directly involved in the H-bond formation. These bond distances increased after complexation. BSSE uncorrected B3LYP binding energies are always lower than the corresponding MP2 values. However, the opposite trend has been verified after BSSE correction by the counterpoise method since it is much lower at B3LYP than at MP2 level. The binding energies for these complexes as well as for the HF acid submolecule modes (the HF stretching and vibrational frequency modes) showed an increasing hydrogen-bonding strength with increasing methyl substitution. The splitting in the HF in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes reflects the anisotropy in the hydrogen-bonding interaction with the pi system of the C[triple bond]C bond. The H-F stretching frequency is shifted downward after complexation and it increases with the methyl substitution. The IR intensities of the HF acid submolecule fundamentals are adequately interpreted through the atomic polar tensor of the hydrogen atom using the charge-charge flux-overlap model. The skeletal stretching modes of the Alkyne submolecule are decreased in the complex. The new vibrational modes arising from complexation show several interesting features.

  16. Producción de miel e infestación con Varroa destructor de abejas africanizadas (Apis mellifera con alto y bajo comportamiento higiénico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Aurelio Medina-Flores

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del estudio fue comparar la producción de miel y los niveles de Varroa destructor entre colonias de abejas africanizadas (AA ( Apis mellifera con alto y bajo comportamiento higiénico (CH en el altiplano semiárido de México. Se midió el nivel de CH a 57 colonias por congelamiento de la cría con nitrógeno líquido (N 2 . Las colonias se clasificaron en dos grupos: alto CH (> 95 % y bajo CH (0.05. Estos resultados sugieren que aparentemente el comportamiento higiénico no tiene un efecto mayor en la resistencia de las AA al crecimiento poblaci onal del ácaro. También sugieren que el comportamiento higiénico alto podría contribuir a incrementar la producción de miel en épocas del año con flujo reducido de néctar.

  17. A comparison of the reproductive ability of Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata:Varroidae) in worker and drone brood of Africanized honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Rafael A; Zamora, Luis G; Van Veen, Johan W; Quesada, Mariela V

    2007-01-01

    Colony infestation by the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor is one of the most serious problems for beekeeping worldwide. In order to reproduce varroa females, enter worker or drone brood shortly before the cell is sealed. To test the hypothesis that, due to the preference of mites to invade drone brood to reproduce, a high proportion of the mite reproduction should occur in drone cells, a comparative study of mite reproductive rate in worker and drone brood of Africanized honey bees (AHB) was done for 370 mites. After determining the number, developmental stage and sex of the offspring in worker cells, the foundress female mite was immediately transferred into an uninfested drone cell. Mite fertility in single infested worker and drone brood cells was 76.5 and 79.3%, respectively. There was no difference between the groups (X(2)= 0.78, P = 0.37). However, one of the most significant differences in mite reproduction was the higher percentage of mites producing viable offspring (cells that contain one live adult male and at least one adult female mite) in drone cells (38.1%) compared to worker cells (13.8%) (X(2)= 55.4, P drone cells (X(2)= 69, P drone brood.

  18. Associations of parameters related to the fall of Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae) in Russian and Italian honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderer, Thomas E; De Guzman, Lilia I; Frake, Amanda M

    2013-04-01

    Varroa destructor (Anderson and Truman) trapped on bottom boards were assessed as indirect measurements of colony mite populations and mite fall in colonies of Russian and Italian honey bees using 29 candidate measurements. Measurements included damaged and nondamaged younger mites, damaged and nondamaged older mites, fresh mites and all mites, each as a proportion of total mites in the colonies and as a proportion of all trapped mites or all trapped fresh mites. Regression analyses were used to determine the relationships of these candidate measurements to the number of mites in the colonies. The largest positive regressions were found for trapped younger mites (Y) and trapped fresh mites (F). Measurments of Y and F across time could be used to estimate mite population growth for the purposes of selective breeding. The largest negative regressions with colony mites were observed for: trapped older mites/trapped mites (O/T), trapped older mites/trapped younger mites (O/Y), and trapped injured older mites/injured mites (IO/I). O/T and O/Y are significantly higher for Russian honey bee colonies suggesting that they are related to at least some of the mechanisms used by Russian honey bee to resist Varroa population growth. O/T and O/Y have strong negative relationships with colony mites for both Russian honey bee and Italian colonies suggesting that both strains possibly could be selected for reduced colony mites using O/T or O/Y.

  19. The ectoparasite mite Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman in southeastern Brazil apiaries: effects of the hygienic behavior of Africanized honey bees on infestation rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A. Pinto

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, the ectoparasitic mite of bees Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman (Acari: Varroidae remains at low levels of infestation causing no major damage. However, with the introduction and possible dominance of a new haplotype (K of the mite, usually found in areas with high infestation rates (IR, it is necessary to monitor and select beehives that are resistant to the pest in order to avoid future problems. Several factors are listed as potentially being responsible for the dynamics of mite infestation, among which hygienic behavior (HB stands out. In this context we sought to evaluate the HB of Africanized honey bees Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae compared with the mite IR in apiaries of two municipalities of southeastern Brazil (Taubaté and Viçosa. For the municipality of Taubaté, the average IR was 4.9% (3.4 to 5.8%, while the HB averaged 98.6% (96 to 100%. In Viçosa, the average mite IR was found to be 10.0% (5.4 to 21.0% with an average value for HB of 57.7% (0 to 79.0%. Results from this research show that IR and HB were negatively correlated (R = -0.9627, P<0.01, suggesting that hives with higher HB have lower IR.

  20. Increased tolerance and resistance to virus infections: a possible factor in the survival of Varroa destructor-resistant honey bees (Apis mellifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Locke

    Full Text Available The honey bee ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, has a world-wide distribution and inflicts more damage than all other known apicultural diseases. However, Varroa-induced colony mortality is more accurately a result of secondary virus infections vectored by the mite. This means that honey bee resistance to Varroa may include resistance or tolerance to virus infections. The aim of this study was to see if this is the case for a unique population of mite-resistant (MR European honey bees on the island of Gotland, Sweden. This population has survived uncontrolled mite infestation for over a decade, developing specific mite-related resistance traits to do so. Using RT-qPCR techniques, we monitored late season virus infections, Varroa mite infestation and honey bee colony population dynamics in the Gotland MR population and compared this to mite-susceptible (MS colonies in a close by apiary. From summer to autumn the deformed wing virus (DWV titres increased similarly between the MR and MS populations, while the black queen cell virus (BQCV and sacbrood virus (SBV titres decreased substantially in the MR population compared to the MS population by several orders of magnitude. The MR colonies all survived the following winter with high mite infestation, high DWV infection, small colony size and low proportions of autumn brood, while the MS colonies all perished. Possible explanations for these changes in virus titres and their relevance to Varroa resistance and colony winter survival are discussed.

  1. Controlling Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae in honeybee Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae colonies by using Thymovar® and BeeVital®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Yeninar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the effects of Thymovar® and BeeVital® on reducing Varroa mite (Varroa destructor damage in honey bee (Apis mellifera L. colonies in spring season. Average percentage of Varroa infestation level was determined as 24.27 on adult workers before the treatments. The drugs were applied two times on 25 September and 16 October 2006. Average percentage of Varroa infestation levels were determined as 5.18%, 10.78% and 35.45% after the first application, 1.90%, 7.05% and 61.15% after the second application in Thymovar®, BeeVital® and control groups, respectively. Average efficacies of Thymovar® and BeeVital® were found to be 96.91% and 88.66%, respectively. Difference between drug efficacies on Varroa mite was found significant (P<0.01. There was no queen, brood and adult honeybee mortality in all group colonies during the research.

  2. Genotypic variability and relationships between mite infestation levels, mite damage, grooming intensity, and removal of Varroa destructor mites in selected strains of worker honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Novoa, Ernesto; Emsen, Berna; Unger, Peter; Espinosa-Montaño, Laura G; Petukhova, Tatiana

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate genotypic variability and analyze the relationships between the infestation levels of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor in honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies, the rate of damage of fallen mites, and the intensity with which bees of different genotypes groom themselves to remove mites from their bodies. Sets of paired genotypes that are presumably susceptible and resistant to the varroa mite were compared at the colony level for number of mites falling on sticky papers and for proportion of damaged mites. They were also compared at the individual level for intensity of grooming and mite removal success. Bees from the "resistant" colonies had lower mite population rates (up to 15 fold) and higher percentages of damaged mites (up to 9 fold) than bees from the "susceptible" genotypes. At the individual level, bees from the "resistant" genotypes performed significantly more instances of intense grooming (up to 4 fold), and a significantly higher number of mites were dislodged from the bees' bodies by intense grooming than by light grooming (up to 7 fold) in all genotypes. The odds of mite removal were high and significant for all "resistant" genotypes when compared with the "susceptible" genotypes. The results of this study strongly suggest that grooming behavior and the intensity with which bees perform it, is an important component in the resistance of some honey bee genotypes to the growth of varroa mite populations. The implications of these results are discussed.

  3. Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae) in Costa Rica: population dynamics and its influence on the colony condition of Africanized honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Rafael A; van Veen, Johan W

    2008-12-01

    The development of Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman (Mesostigmata: Varroidae) population dynamics in Africanized honey bees, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies was monitored from February to July 2004 in Atenas, Costa Rica. A correlation between the mite infestation level and the colony condition was evaluated. For each colony, infestation of varroa in adult bees was measured twice a month. Sticky boards were placed on the bottom boards of each colony to collect fallen mites. The condition of the colonies was evaluated by measuring the amount of brood and adult bees. Our results consistently showed that mite infestation on adult bees increased significantly in the experimental colonies, rising to 10.0% by the end of the experiment. In addition, the mean mite fall increased significantly over the course of the study in the treated (R = 0.72, P varroa infestation coincided with a decrease in the amount of brood. Furthermore, adult bees with deformed wings or even without wings crawling in front of their hive occurred in highly infested colonies (mite infestation = 10.0% or more).

  4. Age-related changes in the behavioural response of honeybees to Apiguard®, a thymol-based treatment used to control the mite Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondet, Fanny; Goodwin, Mark; Mercer, Alison

    2011-11-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor is responsible for heavy losses in honey bee colonies and represents a major threat to the beekeeping industry. Essential oils offer an attractive alternative to the use of synthetic chemicals for the control of varroa. Amongst them, thymol appears to be particularly promising. However, treatments using thymol as their active substance, such as the gel formulation Apiguard(®), are suspected to have adverse effects on honey bee colonies. In this study, laboratory assays are used to investigate the effects of Apiguard(®) exposure on honey bee behaviour. Our results reveal that honey bee responses to this anti-varroa treatment change with honey bee age. While 2-day-old bees respond neutrally to Apiguard(®), older bees generally avoid the Apiguard(®) gel. Responses of forager bees were particularly striking. Foragers appear to be repelled by Apiguard(®). Touching their antennae with Apiguard(®) induces robust fanning behaviour. Our data suggest, however, that forager bees exposed to Apiguard(®) in the hive can become habituated to this treatment. These results offer interesting new perspectives on the effects of Apiguard(®) on honey bee behaviour and serve to highlight age-related changes in honey bee responses to gustatory, as well as olfactory cues.

  5. Impact of the Phoretic Phase on Reproduction and Damage Caused by Varroa destructor (Anderson and Trueman) to Its Host, the European Honey Bee (Apis mellifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piou, Vincent; Tabart, Jérémy; Urrutia, Virginie; Hemptinne, Jean-Louis; Vétillard, Angélique

    2016-01-01

    Varroa destructor is a parasitic mite of the honeybee that causes thousands of colony losses worldwide. The parasite cycle is composed of a phoretic and a reproductive phase. During the former, mites stay on adult bees, mostly on nurses, to feed on hemolymph. During the latter, the parasites enter brood cells and reproduce. We investigated if the type of bees on which Varroa stays during the phoretic phase and if the duration of this stay influenced the reproductive success of the parasite and the damage caused to bees. For that purpose, we used an in vitro rearing method developed in our laboratory to assess egg laying rate and the presence and number of fully molted daughters. The expression level of two Varroa vitellogenin genes (VdVg1 and VdVg2), known to vary throughout reproduction, was also quantified. Results showed that the status of the bees or time spent during the phoretic phase impacts neither reproduction parameters nor the Varroa vitellogenin genes levels of expression. However, we correlated these parameters to the gene expression and demonstrated that daughters expressed the vitellogenin genes at lower levels than their mother. Regarding the damage to bees, the data indicated that a longer stay on adult bees during the phoretic phase resulted in more frequent physical deformity in newborn bees. We showed that those mites carry more viral loads of the Deformed Wing Virus and hence trigger more frequently overt infections. This study provides new perspectives towards a better understanding of the Varroa-honeybee interactions.

  6. Progress in research of honey bee mite Varroa destructor%蜜蜂寄生螨—狄斯瓦螨的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张祎; 韩日畴

    2012-01-01

    Varroa destructor is the most important ectoparasite of honey bees and currently considered the major threat for apiculture. This parasite not only causes damage to the population and individuals of honey bees, but also carries the honey bee viruses. The safety of honey bees and their friendly products need environmentally friendly control methods for the Varroa mites, which also depend on the Varroa research. The present review provides a survey of the current knowledge about three fields of Varroa research including reproduction characteristics of female mites, damage to the host, Varroa control methods.%狄斯瓦螨Varroa destructor是对世界养蜂业危害最大的蜜蜂寄生虫,严重危害蜜蜂封盖幼虫、蛹和成蜂,并携带和传播蜜蜂病毒,造成蜂群生产力严重下降乃至全群毁灭.狄斯瓦螨的有效防治措施的研发有赖于对其研究进展的了解,本文综述了以下3方面的研究概况:1)狄斯瓦螨的繁殖特性;2)对蜜蜂的危害;3)主要防治方法.以期为蜂螨相关的研究和应用奠定基础.

  7. Increased tolerance and resistance to virus infections: a possible factor in the survival of Varroa destructor-resistant honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Barbara; Forsgren, Eva; de Miranda, Joachim R

    2014-01-01

    The honey bee ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, has a world-wide distribution and inflicts more damage than all other known apicultural diseases. However, Varroa-induced colony mortality is more accurately a result of secondary virus infections vectored by the mite. This means that honey bee resistance to Varroa may include resistance or tolerance to virus infections. The aim of this study was to see if this is the case for a unique population of mite-resistant (MR) European honey bees on the island of Gotland, Sweden. This population has survived uncontrolled mite infestation for over a decade, developing specific mite-related resistance traits to do so. Using RT-qPCR techniques, we monitored late season virus infections, Varroa mite infestation and honey bee colony population dynamics in the Gotland MR population and compared this to mite-susceptible (MS) colonies in a close by apiary. From summer to autumn the deformed wing virus (DWV) titres increased similarly between the MR and MS populations, while the black queen cell virus (BQCV) and sacbrood virus (SBV) titres decreased substantially in the MR population compared to the MS population by several orders of magnitude. The MR colonies all survived the following winter with high mite infestation, high DWV infection, small colony size and low proportions of autumn brood, while the MS colonies all perished. Possible explanations for these changes in virus titres and their relevance to Varroa resistance and colony winter survival are discussed.

  8. Resistance to Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae) when mite-resistant queen honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae) were free-mated with unselected drones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbo, J R; Harris, J W

    2001-12-01

    This study demonstrated (1) that honey bees, Apis mellifera L, can express a high level of resistance to Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman when bees were selected for only one resistant trait (suppression of mite reproduction); and (2) that a significant level of mite-resistance was retained when these queens were free-mated with unselected drones. The test compared the growth of mite populations in colonies of bees that each received one of the following queens: (1) resistant--queens selected for suppression of mite reproduction and artificially inseminated in Baton Rouge with drones from similarly selected stocks; (2) resistant x control--resistant queens, as above, produced and free-mated to unselected drones by one of four commercial queen producers; and (3) control--commercial queens chosen by the same four queen producers and free-mated as above. All colonies started the test with approximately 0.9 kg of bees that were naturally infested with approximately 650 mites. Colonies with resistant x control queens ended the 115-d test period with significantly fewer mites than did colonies with control queens. This suggests that beekeepers can derive immediate benefit from mite-resistant queens that have been free-mated to unselected drones. Moreover, the production and distribution of these free-mated queens from many commercial sources may be an effective way to insert beneficial genes into our commercial population of honey bees without losing the genetic diversity and the useful beekeeping characteristics of this population.

  9. Ratios of colony mass to thermal conductance of tree and man-made nest enclosures of Apis mellifera: implications for survival, clustering, humidity regulation and Varroa destructor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Derek

    2016-05-01

    In the absence of human intervention, the honeybee ( Apis mellifera L.) usually constructs its nest in a tree within a tall, narrow, thick-walled cavity high above the ground (the enclosure); however, most research and apiculture is conducted in the thin-walled, squat wooden enclosures we know as hives. This experimental research, using various hives and thermal models of trees, has found that the heat transfer rate is approximately four to seven times greater in the hives in common use, compared to a typical tree enclosure in winter configuration. This gives a ratio of colony mass to lumped enclosure thermal conductance (MCR) of less than 0.8 kgW-1 K for wooden hives and greater than 5 kgW-1 K for tree enclosures. This result for tree enclosures implies higher levels of humidity in the nest, increased survival of smaller colonies and lower Varroa destructor breeding success. Many honeybee behaviours previously thought to be intrinsic may only be a coping mechanism for human intervention; for example, at an MCR of above 2 kgW-1 K, clustering in a tree enclosure may be an optional, rare, heat conservation behaviour for established colonies, rather than the compulsory, frequent, life-saving behaviour that is in the hives in common use. The implied improved survival in hives with thermal properties of tree nests may help to solve some of the problems honeybees are currently facing in apiculture.

  10. Coalescence of silver clusters by immersion in diluted HF solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milazzo, R. G.; Mio, A. M.; D’Arrigo, G.; Spinella, C. [CNR-IMM Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, I-95121 Catania (Italy); Grimaldi, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Università di Catania, I-95123 Catania (Italy); MATIS IMM-CNR, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Rimini, E. [CNR-IMM Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, I-95121 Catania (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Università di Catania, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2015-07-14

    The galvanic displacement deposition of silver on H-terminated Si (100) in the time scale of seconds is instantaneous and characterized by a cluster density of 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}. The amount of deposited Ag follows a t{sup 1/2} dependence in agreement with a Cottrell diffusion limited mechanism. At the same time, during the deposition, the cluster density reduces by a factor 5. This behavior is in contrast with the assumption of immobile clusters. We show in the present work that coalescence and aggregation occur also in the samples immersed in the diluted hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution without the presence of Ag{sup +}. Clusters agglomerate according to a process of dynamic coalescence, typical of colloids, followed by atomic redistribution at the contact regions with the generation of multiple internal twins and stacking-faults. The normalized size distributions in terms of r/r{sub mean} follow also the prediction of the Smoluchowski ripening mechanism. No variation of the cluster density occurs for samples immersed in pure H{sub 2}O solution. The different behavior might be associated to the strong attraction of clusters to oxide-terminated Si surface in presence of water. The silver clusters are instead weakly bound to hydrophobic H-terminated Si in presence of HF. HF causes then the detachment of clusters and a random movement on the silicon surface with mobility of about 10{sup −13} cm{sup 2}/s. Attractive interaction (probably van der Waals) among particles promotes coarsening.

  11. Strong photoluminescence of the porous silicon with HfO2-filled microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ran; Wu, Zhengran; Du, Xianghao; Han, Zuyin; Sun, Weideng

    2015-06-01

    Greatly enhanced blue emission was observed at room temperature in the single-crystal silicon with HfO2 filled into its microcavities. The broad blue band light was emitted from both the HfO2 dielectric and the porous Si. The ferroelectricity of HfO2 enhances the blue emission from Si by its filling into the microcaivities. At the same time, HfO2 contributes to the light emission for the transitions of the defect levels for oxygen vacancy. The observation of greatly enhanced blue light emission of the porous Si filled with HfO2 dielectric is remarkable as both HfO2 and Si are highly compatible with Si-based electronic industry.

  12. Ozone Treatment Improved the Resistive Switching Uniformity of HfAlO2 Based RRAM Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HfAlO2 based resistive random access memory (RRAM devices were fabricated using atomic layer deposition by modulating deposition cycles for HfO2 and Al2O3. Effect of ozone treatment on the resistive switching uniformity of HfAlO2 based RRAM devices was investigated. Compared to the as-fabricated devices, the resistive switching uniformity of HfAlO2 based RRAM devices with the ozone treatment is significantly improved. The uniformity improvement of HfAlO2 based RRAM devices is related to changes in compositional and structural properties of the HfAlO2 resistive switching film with the ozone treatment.

  13. Medium-Range Order Structure and Fragility of Superheated Melts of Amorphous CuHf Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Xiu-Fang; SUN Bao-An; HU Li-Na

    2006-01-01

    @@ The structural factors of amorphous CuHf alloys at different temperatures are determined by using a high temperature x-ray diffractometer. It is found that not only the short-range order structure but also the medium-range order structure exists in amorphous CuHf alloys. The dynamic viscosities of CuHf alloy melts are measured by a torsional oscillation viscometer. The fragility of superheated melts of CuHf alloys is calculated based on the viscosity data. The experimental results show that the glass-forming ability of the CuHf alloys is closely related to the fragility of their superheated melt. The relationship between the medium-range order structures and the fragility of superheated melts has also been established in amorphous CuHf alloys. In contrast to the fragility of supercooled liquids, the fragility of superheated liquids promises a better approach to reflecting the dynamics of glass forming liquids.

  14. Ionosphere research with a HF/MF cubesat radio instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Esa; Aikio, Anita; Alho, Markku; Fontell, Mathias; Harri, Ari-Matti; Kauristie, Kirsti; Kestilä, Antti; Koskimaa, Petri; Mäkelä, Jakke; Mäkelä, Miika; Turunen, Esa; Vanhamäki, Heikki; Verronen, Pekka

    2017-04-01

    New technology provides new possibilities to study geospace and 3D ionosphere by using spacecraft and computer simulations. A type of nanosatellites, CubeSats, provide a cost effective possibility to provide in-situ measurements in the ionosphere. Moreover, combined CubeSat observations with ground-based observations gives a new view on auroras and associated electromagnetic phenomena. Especially joint and active CubeSat - ground based observation campaigns enable the possibility of studying the 3D structure of the ionosphere. Furthermore using several CubeSats to form satellite constellations enables much higher temporal resolution. At the same time, increasing computation capacity has made it possible to perform simulations where properties of the ionosphere, such as propagation of the electromagnetic waves in the medium frequency, MF (0.3-3 MHz) and high frequency, HF (3-30 MHz), ranges is based on a 3D ionospheric model and on first-principles modelling. Electromagnetic waves at those frequencies are strongly affected by ionospheric electrons and, consequently, those frequencies can be used for studying the plasma. On the other hand, even if the ionosphere originally enables long-range telecommunication at MF and HF frequencies, the frequent occurrence of spatiotemporal variations in the ionosphere disturbs communication channels, especially at high latitudes. Therefore, study of the MF and HF waves in the ionosphere has both a strong science and technology interests. We introduce recently developed simulation models as well as measuring principles and techniques to investigate the arctic ionosphere by a polar orbiting CubeSat whose novel AM radio instrument measures HF and MF waves. The cubesat, which contains also a white light aurora camera, is planned to be launched in late 2017 (http://www.suomi100satelliitti.fi/eng). The new models are (1) a 3D ray tracing model and (2) a 3D full kinetic electromagnetic simulation. We also introduce how combining of the

  15. HF beacon network for ionospheric specification in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysell, D. L.; Milla, M. A.; Vierinen, J.

    2016-12-01

    A growing network of HF beacon transmitters and receivers is being deployed in Peru for specifying the F region ionosphere regionally. The effort is motivated by ionospheric disturbances associated with equatorial spread F (ESF), especially disturbances arising under inauspicious ESF conditions. The beacons use dual frequencies (2.72 and 3.64 MHz). They incorporate PRN coding to afford group-delay measurements. Scatered power, Doppler shift, bearing, and polarization are also measured. An algorithm for inverting the beacon data combined with electron density profiles from Jicamarca is described. Data and representative solutions from recent campaigns will be reviewed.

  16. A SYNCHRONIZATION ALGORITHM FOR HF (HIGH FREQUENCY) BROADBAND OFDM SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Lei; Zhang You'ai

    2008-01-01

    In this letter, a kind of associated synchronization algorithm which is suitable for HF (High Frequency) broadband OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) system is presented based on describing and constructing the GMW (Gorden, Mills and Welch) sequence. The algorithm is based on the Schmidl and Minn's symbol timing principle, the constructed GMW sequence is transmitted and disposed, and the synchronization is adjudicated using the correlation of GMW sequence. The simulation result indicates that this algorithm has high performance synchronization ability under the low SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) at two different kinds of channel models.

  17. Meteorite zircon constraints on the bulk Lu-Hf isotope composition and early differentiation of the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Takao; Hibiya, Yuki; Amelin, Yuri

    2015-04-28

    Knowledge of planetary differentiation is crucial for understanding the chemical and thermal evolution of terrestrial planets. The (176)Lu-(176)Hf radioactive decay system has been widely used to constrain the timescales and mechanisms of silicate differentiation on Earth, but the data interpretation requires accurate estimation of Hf isotope evolution of the bulk Earth. Because both Lu and Hf are refractory lithophile elements, the isotope evolution can be potentially extrapolated from the present-day (176)Hf/(177)Hf and (176)Lu/(177)Hf in undifferentiated chondrite meteorites. However, these ratios in chondrites are highly variable due to the metamorphic redistribution of Lu and Hf, making it difficult to ascertain the correct reference values for the bulk Earth. In addition, it has been proposed that chondrites contain excess (176)Hf due to the accelerated decay of (176)Lu resulting from photoexcitation to a short-lived isomer. If so, the paradigm of a chondritic Earth would be invalid for the Lu-Hf system. Herein we report the first, to our knowledge, high-precision Lu-Hf isotope analysis of meteorite crystalline zircon, a mineral that is resistant to metamorphism and has low Lu/Hf. We use the meteorite zircon data to define the Solar System initial (176)Hf/(177)Hf (0.279781 ± 0.000018) and further to identify pristine chondrites that contain no excess (176)Hf and accurately represent the Lu-Hf system of the bulk Earth ((176)Hf/(177)Hf = 0.282793 ± 0.000011; (176)Lu/(177)Hf = 0.0338 ± 0.0001). Our results provide firm evidence that the most primitive Hf in terrestrial zircon reflects the development of a chemically enriched silicate reservoir on Earth as far back as 4.5 billion years ago.

  18. Thermodynamic modeling of the Co–Hf system supported by key experiments and first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xingxu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Liu, Shuhong, E-mail: shhliu@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Sino-German Cooperation Group “Microstructure in Al alloys”, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Cheng, Kaiming; Tang, Ying [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Ou, Pengfei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Nash, Philip [Thermal Processing Technology Center, Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), 10 West 32nd Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Sundman, Bo [INSTN, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Du, Yong [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Sino-German Cooperation Group “Microstructure in Al alloys”, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Zheng, Feng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2015-05-20

    Highlights: • Heat contents of Co{sub 2}Hf and CoHf{sub 2} were measured by drop calorimetry. • Enthalpy of formation for Co{sub 23}Hf{sub 6} was computed via first-principles calculations. • Co–Hf system was assessed by means of CALPHAD approach. • Order–disorder model is used to describe B2 (CoHf) and A2 (βHf). • Glass forming range of the Co–Hf amorphous alloys was predicted. - Abstract: Phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of the Co–Hf system were investigated via calorimetric measurements, first-principles calculations and thermodynamic modeling. Heat contents of Co{sub 2}Hf and CoHf{sub 2} were measured by drop calorimetry from 300 to 1200 °C. The enthalpy of formation for Co{sub 23}Hf{sub 6} at 0 K was computed via first-principles calculations. Based on the experimental measurements and first-principles calculations from the present work and the literature, the Co–Hf system was assessed by means of CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagram) approach. The excess Gibbs energy of solution phases was modeled with Redlich–Kister polynomial. Sublattice models were employed to describe the homogeneity ranges of Co{sub 2}Hf, CoHf and CoHf{sub 2}. The order–disorder transition between B2 (CoHf) and A2 (βHf) phases was taken into account in the current optimization. Using the optimized parameters, glass forming range (GFR) of the Co–Hf amorphous alloys was predicted to be 15–75 at.% Hf, which is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental observation.

  19. Description of $^{178}$Hf$^{m2}$ in the constrained relativistic mean field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Zhang; Shuang-Quan, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The properties of the ground state of $^{178}$Hf and the isomeric state $^{178}$Hf$^{m2}$ are studied within the adiabatic and diabatic constrained relativistic mean field (RMF) approaches. The RMF calculations reproduce well the binding energy and the deformation for the ground state of $^{178}$Hf. Using the ground state single-particle eigenvalues obtained in the present calculation, the lowest excitation configuration with $K^\\pi=16^+$ is found to be $\

  20. Assembly of the CMS HF (hadron forward) calorimeter, April 2003 to June 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee, CERN

    2005-01-01

    The forward calorimeters (HF) of the CMS hadron calorimeter system are located 11.2 m from the interaction point. Each HF module is composed by 18 wedges, made of steel absorbers and radiation-hard quartz fibers. The photogallery shows the wedges (Figs. 1-3, April 2003), the assembly of one HF module (Figs. 4-9, May and June 2004) and the assembly of the other (Figs. 10-11, June 2005)

  1. Far-Field Testing Method of Spurious Emission Produced by HF RFID

    OpenAIRE

    Nikola Gvozdenovic; Ralph Prestros; Mecklenbräuker, Christoph F.

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of spurious emission produced by high-frequency radio frequency identification (HF RFID) using carrier frequency of 13.56 MHz. HF RFID tags produce unwanted emission due to rectification and more generally due to nonlinearity of analog front end. Depending on the conducting material of an HF RFID coil and surrounding dielectric material, the coil behaves as more or less good antenna on some harmonic frequencies. Exact characterization and analysis of unwanted emission ...

  2. Enhanced resistive switching and multilevel behavior in bilayered HfAlO/HfAlO{sub x} structures for non-volatile memory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faita, F. L., E-mail: fabriciofaita@gmail.com [Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Silva, J. P. B., E-mail: josesilva@fisica.uminho.pt [Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); IFIMUP and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Pereira, M.; Gomes, M. J. M. [Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2015-12-14

    In this work, hafnium aluminum oxide (HfAlO) thin films were deposited by ion beam sputtering deposition technique on Si substrate. The presence of oxygen vacancies in the HfAlO{sub x} layer deposited in oxygen deficient environment is evidenced from the photoluminescence spectra. Furthermore, HfAlO(oxygen rich)/HfAlO{sub x}(oxygen poor) bilayer structures exhibit multilevel resistive switching (RS), and the switching ratio becomes more prominent with increasing the HfAlO layer thickness. The bilayer structure with HfAlO/HfAlO{sub x} thickness of 30/40 nm displays the enhanced multilevel resistive switching characteristics, where the high resistance state/intermediate resistance state (IRS) and IRS/low resistance state resistance ratios are ≈10{sup 2} and ≈5 × 10{sup 5}, respectively. The switching mechanisms in the bilayer structures were investigated by the temperature dependence of the three resistance states. This study revealed that the multilevel RS is attributed to the coupling of ionic conduction and the metallic conduction, being the first associated to the formation and rupture of conductive filaments related to oxygen vacancies and the second with the formation of a metallic filament. Moreover, the bilayer structures exhibit good endurance and stability in time.

  3. Ferroelectric phase stabilization of HfO2 by nitrogen doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lun; Nishimura, Tomonori; Shibayama, Shigehisa; Yajima, Takeaki; Migita, Shinji; Toriumi, Akira

    2016-09-01

    We report that nitrogen (N) doping can drive the ferroelectricity of HfO2. It was found that N doping can cause the transition from a monoclinic phase to a highly symmetric phase. The role of N doping is discussed from the viewpoints of charge balance and bond-constraining effects. The former is responsible for the structural transformation from a paraelectric phase to a ferroelectric phase by forming an oxygen vacancy. In addition, Hf-N and N-O bonds with covalent characteristics have strong effects on HfO2 structural and electrical properties, and thus contribute to a marked HfO2 para-/ferroelectric transition.

  4. Efficient noble metal nanocatalysts supported on HfC(001 for O2 dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyan Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption and dissociation of O2 on the M4 (M=Au, Pd, Pt clusters supported on HfC(001 (Hafnium Carbide are investigated using ab initio density functional theory calculations. The geometric and electronic structures are analyzed in detail. It is found that the dissociation barriers of O2 on Au4/HfC(001 (0.26 eV, Pd4/HfC(001 (0.49 eV and Pt4/HfC(001 (0.09 eV are much smaller than those on the clean surfaces of HfC(001 (1.60 eV, Au(111 (1.37 eV, Pd(111 (1.0 and 0.91 eV and Pt(111 (0.27–0.7 eV, respectively. The low dissociation barriers imply that the Pt4/HfC(001 exhibits the highest catalytic activity for O2 dissociation, and the Au4/HfC(001 and Pd4/HfC(001 may also be possible substitutes with lower cost for the current Pt/C catalyst for O2 dissociation. The present study is conductive to designing new efficient noble metal catalyst using HfC support for efficiently promoting O2 dissociation.

  5. Efficient noble metal nanocatalysts supported on HfC(001) for O2 dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyan; Zhang, Xilin; Zhang, Yanxing; Mao, Jianjun; Yang, Zongxian

    2017-03-01

    The adsorption and dissociation of O2 on the M4 (M=Au, Pd, Pt) clusters supported on HfC(001) (Hafnium Carbide) are investigated using ab initio density functional theory calculations. The geometric and electronic structures are analyzed in detail. It is found that the dissociation barriers of O2 on Au4/HfC(001) (0.26 eV), Pd4/HfC(001) (0.49 eV) and Pt4/HfC(001) (0.09 eV) are much smaller than those on the clean surfaces of HfC(001) (1.60 eV), Au(111) (1.37 eV), Pd(111) (1.0 and 0.91 eV) and Pt(111) (0.27-0.7 eV), respectively. The low dissociation barriers imply that the Pt4/HfC(001) exhibits the highest catalytic activity for O2 dissociation, and the Au4/HfC(001) and Pd4/HfC(001) may also be possible substitutes with lower cost for the current Pt/C catalyst for O2 dissociation. The present study is conductive to designing new efficient noble metal catalyst using HfC support for efficiently promoting O2 dissociation.

  6. Study of Direct-Contact HfO2/Si Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Miyata

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Controlling monolayer Si oxide at the HfO2/Si interface is a challenging issue in scaling the equivalent oxide thickness of HfO2/Si gate stack structures. A concept that the author proposes to control the Si oxide interface by using ultra-high vacuum electron-beam HfO2 deposition is described in this review paper, which enables the so-called direct-contact HfO2/Si structures to be prepared. The electrical characteristics of the HfO2/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors are reviewed, which suggest a sufficiently low interface state density for the operation of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs but reveal the formation of an unexpected strong interface dipole. Kelvin probe measurements of the HfO2/Si structures provide obvious evidence for the formation of dipoles at the HfO2/Si interfaces. The author proposes that one-monolayer Si-O bonds at the HfO2/Si interface naturally lead to a large potential difference, mainly due to the large dielectric constant of the HfO2. Dipole scattering is demonstrated to not be a major concern in the channel mobility of MOSFETs.

  7. Structural degradation of thin HfO2 film on Ge during the postdeposition annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Noriyuki; Yasuda, Tetsuji; Abe, Yasuhiro

    2010-05-01

    Securing the thermal robustness of thin hafnium oxide (HfO2) film on the semiconductor surface is an important technical issue in the fabrication of the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor devices, as the HfO2-based high-k gate stacks usually undergo high-temperature processes. In this study, the structural development of thin HfO2 film on a Ge surface during postdeposition annealing in an ultrahigh vacuum was examined to explore the origin for the initial degradation of thin HfO2 film. Void nucleation and subsequent two-dimensional void growth take place at 780-840 °C, while the chemical composition of the remaining Hf oxide is virtually stable. Both the void nucleation and growth processes show similar larger activation energy of about 10 eV. Based on the observed manner of void growth and the estimated activation energies, the authors propose that mass transport on the HfO2 surface is responsible for void nucleation in the HfO2 films on Ge. The authors also compare the present results with the previous studies on HfO2/Si structures, and suggest that similar surface process leads to the local Hf silicidation.

  8. The effect of Cu doping concentration on resistive switching of HfO{sub 2} film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Tingting; Tan, Tingting, E-mail: tantt@nwpu.edu.cn; Liu, Zhengtang

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The Cu doped and undoped HfO{sub 2} films were fabricated. • The improved RS behaviors were observed for Cu doped HfO{sub 2} film with BRS. • The 9.7% doped HfO{sub 2}:Cu film showed both BRS and URS behaviors. • The related switching mechanisms were illustrated. - Abstract: The Cu-doped and undoped HfO{sub 2} films were fabricated and the effect of Cu doping concentration on resistive switching (RS) of HfO{sub 2} film was demonstrated. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was carried out to investigate the chemical bonding states of Cu in HfO{sub 2}:Cu film. The improved RS behaviors in terms of ON/OFF ratio and switching parameters were observed for Cu-doped HfO{sub 2} film with bipolar resistive switching (BRS) behavior. With the increase of Cu doping concentration, the 9.7% Cu-doped HfO{sub 2} film showed both BRS and unipolar resistive switching (URS) behaviors with large operating voltages. The space charge limited current (SCLC) effect was proposed to interpret the switching mechanism of HfO{sub 2}:Cu films with BRS behavior and the URS behavior can be explained by the migration of Cu ions.

  9. Lu-hf total-rock isochron for the eucrite meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchett, P.J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1980-01-01

    The isotope 176Lu (2.6% of natural lutetium) decays by ??- to 176Hf, with a long half life. We present here the first Lu-Hf isochron. The eucrite meteorites, a suite of planetary igneous rocks of known age, 4,550 Myr, define a 10-point total-rock isochron with a slope of 0.0934 ?? 40, leading to a value of 3.53 ?? 0.14 ??1010yr for the ??--decay half life of 176Lu. The isochron intercept of 0.27973 ?? 12 gives the initial 176Hf/177Hf for the inner Solar System at the time of accretion. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  10. Chemical stability and defect formation in CaHfO3

    KAUST Repository

    Alay-E-Abbas, Syed Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    Defects in CaHfO3 are investigated by ab initio calculations based on density functional theory. Pristine and anion-deficient CaHfO 3 are found to be insulating, whereas cation-deficient CaHfO 3 is hole-doped. The formation energies of neutral and charged cation and anion vacancies are evaluated to determine the stability in different chemical environments. Moreover, the energies of the partial and full Schottky defect reactions are computed. We show that clustering of anion vacancies in the HfO layers is energetically favorable for sufficiently high defect concentrations and results in metallicity. © 2014 EPLA.

  11. Anticooperativity of FHF hydrogen bonds in clusters of the type F- × (HF)n, RF × (HF)n and XF × (HF)n, R = alkyl and X = H, Br, Cl, F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherov, S. Yu.; Bureiko, S. F.; Denisov, G. S.

    2016-02-01

    Properties of twenty five hydrogen-bonded complexes, namely, F- × (HF)n (n = 1-6), RF × (HF)n (R = t-Bu, i-Pr, Et, Me; n = 1-3), XF × (HF)n (X = H, Br, Cl; n = 1-2), and FF…HF with the hydrogen bond energy varying in a wide range have been calculated using ab initio methods at the MP2/6-31++G** level. For the first time, the energies, geometrical parameters and vibrational frequencies are obtained for the series of clusters, where the bonding character changes from covalent to van der Waals on the variation of proton-acceptor ability of the base, and the energies are in the range of 45-1 kcal/mol. The mutual influence of multiple hydrogen bonds of F…HF type in clusters, in which a fluorine anion or an atom participates in hydrogen bond formation as the acceptor, is systematically investigated. The relative changes in the values of the considered parameters on the sequential addition of an HF molecule (anticooperativity) were determined. It was shown that non-additivity of the interaction is most strongly pronounced in the energy and vibrational frequency values, geometrical parameters of hydrogen bonds are less sensitive to the mutual influence. The anticooperative effect is more pronounced on the hydrogen bridge length R(F...F) than on the geometry of proton donor r(HF). The hydrogen bond formation and the increase of the number n of ligands lead to successive lengthening of the r(XF) bond adjacent to the hydrogen bridge. The length of an XF bond changes stronger on formation of each hydrogen bond than the HF bond length.

  12. Effects of Hf Incorporation on Negative Bias-Illumination Stress Stability in Hf-In-Zn-O Thin-Film Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwook; Park, Jae Chul; Kim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2013-04-01

    In this study, highly reliable amorphous oxide semiconductor-based thin-film transistors (TFTs) were developed. The Hf concentration was systematically changed in the Hf-incorporated In-Zn-O (HIZO) TFTs, and Hf played an important role in determining the negative bias-illumination instability. The process parameters were optimized in order to obtain HIZO TFTs with an excellent stability. HIZO can be processed on a 6-in. wafer at low temperatures and is almost transparent in the visible range. Thus this material is promising for use in current TFTs as well as future transparent electronic device components with good electrical performance and excellent stability.

  13. Phase1 upgrade of the CMS-HF Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Gulmez, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    In this presentation, results of the Phase I upgrade of the CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeter (HF) are discussed. The CMS-HF Calorimeter was using regular PMTs. Cherenkov light produced in the quartz fibers embedded in the iron absorber was read out with the PMTs. However, occasionally, stray muons hitting the PMT windows cause Cherenkov radiation in the PMT itself and produce large signals. These large signals mimic a very high-energy particle and are tagged as important by the trigger. To reduce this problem, PMTs had to be replaced. The four-anode PMTs that were chosen have thinner windows; thereby reducing the Cherenkov radiation in the PMT window. As part of the upgrade, the read-out electronics is to be replaced so that the PMTs are read out in two channels by connecting each pair of anodes to a single channel. Information provided by these two channels will help us reject the false signals due to the stray muons since the Cherenkov radiation in the PMT window is more likely to produce a signal only in one...

  14. Reversible spin texture in ferroelectric Hf O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, L. L.; Paudel, Tula R.; Kovalev, Alexey A.; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2017-06-01

    Spin-orbit coupling effects occurring in noncentrosymmetric materials are known to be responsible for nontrivial spin configurations and a number of emergent physical phenomena. Ferroelectric materials may be especially interesting in this regard due to reversible spontaneous polarization making possible a nonvolatile electrical control of the spin degrees of freedom. Here, we explore a technologically relevant oxide material, Hf O2 , which has been shown to exhibit robust ferroelectricity in a noncentrosymmetric orthorhombic phase. Using theoretical modelling based on density-functional theory, we investigate the spin-dependent electronic structure of the ferroelectric Hf O2 and demonstrate the appearance of chiral spin textures driven by spin-orbit coupling. We analyze these spin configurations in terms of the Rashba and Dresselhaus effects within the k .p Hamiltonian model and find that the Rashba-type spin texture dominates around the valence-band maximum, while the Dresselhaus-type spin texture prevails around the conduction band minimum. The latter is characterized by a very large Dresselhaus constant λD= 0.578 eV Å, which allows using this material as a tunnel barrier to produce tunneling anomalous and spin Hall effects that are reversible by ferroelectric polarization.

  15. Radiation effects in Zr and Hf containing garnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittle, Karl R. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Blackford, Mark G.; Smith, Katherine L. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Zaluzec, Nestor J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Weyland, Matthew [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Lumpkin, Gregory R. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    Garnets have been considered as host phases for the safe immobilisation of high-level nuclear waste, as they have been shown to accommodate a wide range of elements across three different cation sites, such as Ca, Y, Mn on the a-site, Fe, Al, U, Zr, and Ti on the b-site, and Si, Fe, Al on the c-site. Garnets, due to their ability to have variable composition, make ideal model materials for the examination of radiation damage and recovery in nuclear materials, including as potential waste forms. Kimzeyite, Ca{sub 3}Zr{sub 2}FeAlSiO{sub 12}, has been shown naturally to contain up to 30 wt% Zr, and has previously been examined to elucidate both the structure and ordering within the lattice. This study examines the effects of radiation damage and recovery using in-situ ion beam irradiation with 1 MeV Kr ions at the IVEM-TANDEM facility, Argonne National Laboratory. The complementary Hf containing system Ca{sub 3}Hf{sub 2}FeAlSiO{sub 12} was also examined, and found to have a different response to irradiation damage. A sample of irradiated Ca{sub 3}Zr{sub 2}FeAlSiO{sub 12}, at 1000 K, was characterised using aberration corrected (S)TEM and found to contain discreet, nano-sized, crystalline Fe rich particles, indicating a competing process during recovery is occurring.

  16. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, W. A.; Hysell, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  17. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, William; Hysell, David

    2016-07-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  18. Interrogation zone determination in HF RFID systems with multiplexed antennas*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankowski-Mihułowicz Piotr

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The operation of an anti-collision RFID system is characterized by the interrogation zone which should be estimated in any direction of 3D space for a group of electronic transponders. The interrogation zone should be as large as possible. However, the many problems in this area are due to the fact that energy can be transferred to transponders only on a limited distance. The greatest flexibility in developing RFID applications and shaping the interrogation zone can be achieved using the system with an antenna multiplexer. Therefore the problem of the interrogation zone determination in HF RFID systems with two orthogonal RWD antennas is presented in the paper. The perceived issues have been effectively dealt with and the solution has been proposed on the basis of the elaborated model. Conducted studies have been used to develop the software tool JankoRFIDmuxHF in the Mathcad environment. The research results are analysed in an example system configuration. The specialized measuring stand has been used for experimental verification of the identification efficiency. The convergence of the measurements and calculations confirms a practical usefulness of the presented concept of interrogation zone determination in anti-collision systems. It also shows the practical utility of the developed model and software tools.

  19. The role of Upper Hybrid Turbulence on HF Artificial Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Konstantinos Dennis; Najmi, Amir; Eliasson, Bengt; Milikh, Gennady

    2016-07-01

    One of the most fascinating and scientifically interesting phenomena of active space experiments is the discovery of artificial ionization by Todd Pedersen when the HAARP ERP reached the GW level. The phenomenon has been well documented experimentally. A theoretical model based on ionization by energetic electrons accelerated by 50-100 V/m localized electric fields due to Strong Langmuir Turbulence (SLT) near the reflection surface of the HF pump wave, reproduced the observed dynamics of the descending plasma layer quite accurately. A major defect of the model was that the electron temperature in the SLT region was a free parameter. When taken as the 2000 K representing the ambient electron temperature the SLT driven electron flux was insufficient to produce ionization. An equivalent electron temperature of 5000 K or higher was necessary to reproduce the observations. The needed electron heating was attributed to the interaction of the HF at the Upper Hybrid (UH) resonant layer, approximately 5 Km below the reflection region where the HF electric field is perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The heated electrons expanded upwards along the magnetic field line and interacted with SLT fields near the resonance region. A consequence of this defect was that the theory could not explain the puzzling double resonance effect. Namely the observation that the ionization level was much stronger when the HF frequency and the UH resonance were a multiple of the electron cyclotron frequency. To remedy this we used a series of Vlasov simulations to explore the HF-plasma interaction in the vicinity of the UH resonance. The simulations followed the evolution of the spectral density of the electric field over a 7.5 MHz frequency band and cm scale lengths and of the electron distribution function over one millisecond for both double resonant and non-resonant cases. Many new features were revealed by the analysis of the simulations such as: 1. Broadening of the wave

  20. Electron Microprobe Analysis of Hf in Zircon: Suggestions for Improved Accuracy of a Difficult Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournelle, J.; Hanchar, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    It is not commonly recognized as such, but the accurate measurement of Hf in zircon is not a trivial analytical issue. This is important to assess because Hf is often used as an internal standard for trace element analyses of zircon by LA-ICPMS. The issues pertaining to accuracy revolve around: (1) whether the Hf Ma or the La line is used; (2) what accelerating voltage is applied if Zr La is also measured, and (3) what standard for Hf is used. Weidenbach, et al.'s (2004) study of the 91500 zircon demonstrated the spread (in accuracy) of possible EPMA values for six EPMA labs, 2 of which used Hf Ma, 3 used Hf La, and one used Hf Lb, and standards ranged from HfO2, a ZrO2-HfO2 compound, Hf metal, and hafnon. Weidenbach, et al., used the ID-TIMS values as the correct value (0.695 wt.% Hf.), for which not one of the EPMA labs came close to that value (3 were low and 3 were high). Those data suggest: (1) that there is a systematic underestimation error of the 0.695 wt% Hf (ID-TIMS Hf) value if Hf Ma is used; most likely an issue with the matrix correction, as the analytical lines and absorption edges of Zr La, Si Ka and Hf Ma are rather tightly packed in the electromagnetic spectrum. Mass absorption coefficients are easily in error (e.g., Donovan's determination of the MAC of Hf by Si Ka of 5061 differs from the typically used Henke value of 5449 (Donovan et al, 2002); and (2) For utilization of the Hf La line, however, the second order Zr Ka line interferes with Hf La if the accelerating voltage is greater than 17.99 keV. If this higher keV is used and differential mode PHA is applied, only a portion of the interference is removed (e.g., removal of escape peaks), causing an overestimation of Hf content. Unfortunately, it is virtually impossible to apply an interference correction in this case, as it is impossible to locate Hf-free Zr probe standard. We have examined many of the combinations used by those six EPMA labs and concluded that the optimal EPMA is done with Hf

  1. Atomic scale engineering of HfO{sub 2}-based dielectrics for future DRAM applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudek, Piotr

    2011-02-14

    Modern dielectrics in combination with appropriate metal electrodes have a great potential to solve many difficulties associated with continuing miniaturization process in the microelectronic industry. One significant branch of microelectronics incorporates dynamic random access memory (DRAM) market. The DRAM devices scaled for over 35 years starting from 4 kb density to several Gb nowadays. The scaling process led to the dielectric material thickness reduction, resulting in higher leakage current density, and as a consequence higher power consumption. As a possible solution for this problem, alternative dielectric materials with improved electrical and material science parameters were intensively studied by many research groups. The higher dielectric constant allows the use of physically thicker layers with high capacitance but strongly reduced leakage current density. This work focused on deposition and characterization of thin insulating layers. The material engineering process was based on Si cleanroom compatible HfO{sub 2} thin films deposited on TiN metal electrodes. A combined materials science and dielectric characterization study showed that Ba-added HfO{sub 2} (BaHfO{sub 3}) films and Ti-added BaHfO{sub 3} (BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}) layers are promising candidates for future generation of state-of-the-art DRAMs. In especial a strong increase of the dielectric permittivity k was achieved for thin films of cubic BaHfO{sub 3} (k{proportional_to}38) and BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} (k{proportional_to}90) with respect to monoclinic HfO{sub 2} (k{proportional_to}19). Meanwhile the CET values scaled down to 1 nm for BaHfO{sub 3} and {proportional_to}0.8 nm for BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} with respect to HfO{sub 2} (CET=1.5 nm). The Hf{sup 4+} ions substitution in BaHfO{sub 3} by Ti{sup 4+} ions led to a significant decrease of thermal budget from 900 C for BaHfO{sub 3} to 700 C for BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}. Future studies need to focus

  2. Evolution of continental crust and mantle heterogeneity: Evidence from Hf isotopes

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    Jonathan, Patchett P.; Kouvo, O.; Hedge, C.E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1982-01-01

    We present initial 176Hf/177 Hf ratios for many samples of continental crust 3.7-0.3 Gy old. Results are based chiefly on zircons (1% Hf) and whole rocks: zircons are shown to be reliable carriers of essentially the initial Hf itself when properly chosen on the basis of U-Pb studies. Pre-3.0 Gy gneisses were apparently derived from an unfractionated mantle, but both depleted and undepleted mantle are evident as magma sources from 2.9 Gy to present. This mantle was sampled mainly from major crustal growth episodes 2.8, 1.8 and 0.7 Gy ago, all of which show gross heterogeneity of 176Hf/177Hf in magma sources from ??Hf=0 to +14, or about 60% of the variability of the present mantle. The approximate ??Hf=2??Nd relationship in ancient and modern igneous rocks shows that 176Lu/177Hf fractionates in general twice as much as 147Sm/144Nd in mantle melting processes. This allows an estimation of the relative value of the unknown bulk solid/liquid distribution coefficient for Hf. DLu/DHf=??? 2.3 holds for most mantle source regions. For garnet to be an important residual mantle phase, it must hold Hf strongly in order to preserve Hf-Nd isotopic relationships. The ancient Hf initials are consistent with only a small proportion of recycled older cratons in new continental crust, and with quasi-continuous, episodic growth of the continental crust with time. However, recycling of crust less than 150 My old cannot realistically be detected using Hf initials. The mantle shows clearly the general positive ??Hf resulting from a residual geochemical state at least back to 2.9 Gy ago, and seems to have repeatedly possessed a similar degree of heterogeneity, rather than a continuously-developing depletion. This is consistent with a complex dynamic disequilibrium model for the creation, maintenance and destruction of heterogeneity in the mantle. ?? 1981 Springer-Verlag.

  3. What Hf isotopes in zircon tell us about crust-mantle evolution

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    Iizuka, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Takao; Itano, Keita; Hibiya, Yuki; Suzuki, Kazue

    2017-03-01

    The 176Lu-176Hf radioactive decay system has been widely used to study planetary crust-mantle differentiation. Of considerable utility in this regard is zircon, a resistant mineral that can be precisely dated by the U-Pb chronometer and record its initial Hf isotope composition due to having low Lu/Hf. Here we review zircon U-Pb age and Hf isotopic data mainly obtained over the last two decades and discuss their contributions to our current understanding of crust-mantle evolution, with emphasis on the Lu-Hf isotope composition of the bulk silicate Earth (BSE), early differentiation of the silicate Earth, and the evolution of the continental crust over geologic history. Meteorite zircon encapsulates the most primitive Hf isotope composition of our solar system, which was used to identify chondritic meteorites best representative of the BSE (176Hf/177Hf = 0.282793 ± 0.000011; 176Lu/177Hf = 0.0338 ± 0.0001). Hadean-Eoarchean detrital zircons yield highly unradiogenic Hf isotope compositions relative to the BSE, providing evidence for the development of a geochemically enriched silicate reservoir as early as 4.5 Ga. By combining the Hf and O isotope systematics, we propose that the early enriched silicate reservoir has resided at depth within the Earth rather than near the surface and may represent a fractionated residuum of a magma ocean underlying the proto-crust, like urKREEP beneath the anorthositic crust on the Moon. Detrital zircons from world major rivers potentially provide the most robust Hf isotope record of the preserved granitoid crust on a continental scale, whereas mafic rocks with various emplacement ages offer an opportunity to trace the Hf isotope evolution of juvenile continental crust (from εHf[4.5 Ga] = 0 to εHf[present] = + 13). The river zircon data as compared to the juvenile crust composition highlight that the supercontinent cycle has controlled the evolution of the continental crust by regulating the rates of crustal generation and intra

  4. Evaluation of Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae Qu-M845 Isolate to Control Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae in Laboratory and Field Trials Evaluación del Aislamiento Qu-M845 de Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae para el Control de Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae en Ensayos de Laboratorio y Terreno

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    Marta Rodríguez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of the Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschinkoff Qu-M845 isolate was evaluated in laboratory and field trials. It was previously selected for thermal resistance (at 30 and 35 ºC and pathogenicity on Varroa destructor (Anderson and Trueman. In the laboratory, the first evaluations were carried out by spraying and increasing the concentration from zero to 10(8 conidia mL-1 on varroa adults. Lethal concentrations required for 50 and 90% mite mortality (LC50 and LC90 were 3.8 x 10(5 and 8 x 10(7 conidia mL-1, respectively (χ2 = 2.03. In the autumn field trials, three application methods (doses of 5 x 10(10 conidia per hive were evaluated. The treatments were: a conidia stamped on filter paper, located on every second frame inside the hive; b dry conidia sprinkled on and between frames; and c dry conidia in a dispenser path at the entrance of the hive. Furthermore, untreated hives were included as controls. After 21 days of treatment, the dry conidia sprinkled on and between frames showed 67% less bees infested by the mite than the control (p La efectividad del aislamiento Qu-M845 de Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschinkoff, seleccionado previamente por su resistencia a temperaturas de 30 y 35 ºC, y patogenicidad sobre Varroa destructor Anderson y Trueman fue evaluada en laboratorio y en ensayos de terreno. Las primeras pruebas consistieron en pulverizar concentraciones crecientes de 0 a 10(8 conidias mL-1 sobre varroas adultas. La concentración letal para matar el 50 y 90% de la población (CL50 y CL90 fueron de 3,8 x 10(5 y 8 x 10(7 conidias mL-1, respectivamente (χ² = 2,03. En otoño se evaluaron en terreno tres métodos de aplicación de una dosis de 5 x 10(10 conidias por colmena. Los tratamientos fueron: a conidias estampadas en papel filtro ubicado cada dos panales móviles al interior de la colmena; b conidias espolvoreadas sobre y entre los panales; y c dispensador de conidias ubicado en la piquera de las colmenas. Además se

  5. Influence of Hf contents on interface state properties in a-HfInZnO thin-film transistors with SiNx/SiOx gate dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Sik; Jeon, Sanghun; Kim, Hojung; Shin, Jaikwang; Kim, Changjung; Chung, U.-In

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated the interface properties of amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc-oxide (a-HIZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) with respect to various Hf contents. To this end, the subthreshold swing and the low-frequency noise (LFN) of the a-HIZO TFTs were measured and compared. From LFNs providing more accurate information, we quantitatively analyzed the interface trap densities and found that they decrease with increasing Hf contents. Although the acceptor-like tail state densities in bulk channel increase with Hf contents, higher Hf contents show lower threshold voltage shift under bias stress, implying that reliability characteristics of a-HIZO TFTs are more sensitive to interface quality rather than bulk property.

  6. Distribution of p-process 174Hf in early solar system materials and the origin of nucleosynthetic Hf and W isotope anomalies in Ca-Al rich inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Stefan T. M.; Münker, Carsten; Pfeifer, Markus; Elfers, Bo-Magnus; Sprung, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Some nuclides that were produced in supernovae are heterogeneously distributed between different meteoritic materials. In some cases these heterogeneities have been interpreted as the result of interaction between ejecta from a nearby supernova and the nascent solar system. Particularly in the case of the oldest objects that formed in the solar system - Ca-Al rich inclusions (CAIs) - this view is confirm the hypothesis that a nearby supernova event facilitated or even triggered solar system formation. We present Hf isotope data for bulk meteorites, terrestrial materials and CAIs, for the first time including the low-abundance isotope 174Hf (∼0.16%). This rare isotope was likely produced during explosive O/Ne shell burning in massive stars (i.e., the classical "p-process"), and therefore its abundance potentially provides a sensitive tracer for putative heterogeneities within the solar system that were introduced by supernova ejecta. For CAIs and one LL chondrite, also complementary W isotope data are reported for the same sample cuts. Once corrected for small neutron capture effects, different chondrite groups, eucrites, a silicate inclusion of a IAB iron meteorite, and terrestrial materials display homogeneous Hf isotope compositions including 174Hf. Hafnium-174 was thus uniformly distributed in the inner solar system when planetesimals formed at the system composition, and also variable r-process (or s-process) Hf and W contributions. Based on combined Hf and W isotope compositions, we show that CAIs sampled at least one component in which the proportion of r- and s-process derived Hf and W deviates from that of supernova ejecta. The Hf and W isotope anomalies in CAIs are therefore best explained by selective processing of presolar carrier phases prior to CAI formation, and not by a late injection of supernova materials. Likewise, other isotope anomalies in additional elements in CAIs relative to the bulk solar system may reflect the same process. The isotopic

  7. Varroa destructor Macula-like virus, Lake Sinai virus and other new RNA viruses in wild bumblebee hosts (Bombus pascuorum, Bombus lapidarius and Bombus pratorum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Laurian; Smagghe, Guy; de Graaf, Dirk C; Meeus, Ivan

    2016-02-01

    Pollinators such as bumblebees (Bombus spp.) are in decline worldwide which poses a threat not only for ecosystem biodiversity but also to human crop production services. One main cause of pollinator decline may be the infection and transmission of diseases including RNA viruses. Recently, new viruses have been discovered in honeybees, but information on the presence of these in wild bumblebees is largely not available. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of new RNA viruses in Bombus species, and can report for the first time Varroa destructor Macula-like virus (VdMLV) and Lake Sinai virus (LSV) infection in multiple wild bumblebee hosts of Bombus pascuorum, Bombus lapidarius and Bombus pratorum. We sampled in 4 locations in Flanders, Belgium. Besides, we confirmed Slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV) in wild bumblebees, but no positive samples were obtained for Big Sioux river virus (BSRV). Secondly, we screened for the influence of apiaries on the prevalence of these viruses. Our results indicated a location effect for the prevalence of VdMLV in Bombus species, with a higher prevalence in the proximity of honeybee apiaries mainly observed in one location. For LSV, the prevalence was not different in the proximity or at a 1.5 km-distance of apiaries, but we reported a different isolate with similarities to LSV-2 and "LSV-clade A" as described by Ravoet et al. (2015), which was detected both in Apis mellifera and Bombus species. In general, our results indicate the existence of a disease pool of new viruses that seems to be associated to a broad range of Apoidae hosts, including multiple Bombus species.

  8. Population Growth of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in Colonies of Russian and Unselected Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Stocks as Related to Numbers of Foragers With Mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Ahumada, Fabiana; Danka, Robert; Chambers, Mona; DeJong, Emily Watkins; Hidalgo, Geoff

    2017-06-01

    Varroa (Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman) is an external parasite of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) and a leading cause of colony losses worldwide. Varroa populations can be controlled with miticides, but mite-resistant stocks such as the Russian honey bee (RHB) also are available. Russian honey bee and other mite-resistant stocks limit Varroa population growth by affecting factors that contribute to mite reproduction. However, mite population growth is not entirely due to reproduction. Numbers of foragers with mites (FWM) entering and leaving hives also affect the growth of mite populations. If FWM significantly contribute to Varroa population growth, mite numbers in RHB colonies might not differ from unselected lines (USL). Foragers with mites were monitored at the entrances of RHB and USL hives from August to November, 2015, at two apiary sites. At site 1, RHB colonies had fewer FWM than USL and smaller phoretic mite populations. Russian honey bee also had fewer infested brood cells and lower percentages with Varroa offspring than USL. At site 2, FWM did not differ between RHB and USL, and phoretic mite populations were not significantly different. At both sites, there were sharp increases in phoretic mite populations from September to November that corresponded with increasing numbers of FWM. Under conditions where FWM populations are similar between RHB and USL, attributes that contribute to mite resistance in RHB may not keep Varroa population levels below that of USL. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. A virulent strain of deformed wing virus (DWV of honeybees (Apis mellifera prevails after Varroa destructor-mediated, or in vitro, transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene V Ryabov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The globally distributed ectoparasite Varroa destructor is a vector for viral pathogens of the Western honeybee (Apis mellifera, in particular the Iflavirus Deformed Wing Virus (DWV. In the absence of Varroa low levels DWV occur, generally causing asymptomatic infections. Conversely, Varroa-infested colonies show markedly elevated virus levels, increased overwintering colony losses, with impairment of pupal development and symptomatic workers. To determine whether changes in the virus population were due Varroa amplifying and introducing virulent virus strains and/or suppressing the host immune responses, we exposed Varroa-naïve larvae to oral and Varroa-transmitted DWV. We monitored virus levels and diversity in developing pupae and associated Varroa, the resulting RNAi response and transcriptome changes in the host. Exposed pupae were stratified by Varroa association (presence/absence and virus levels (low/high into three groups. Varroa-free pupae all exhibited low levels of a highly diverse DWV population, with those exposed per os (group NV exhibiting changes in the population composition. Varroa-associated pupae exhibited either low levels of a diverse DWV population (group VL or high levels of a near-clonal virulent variant of DWV (group VH. These groups and unexposed controls (C could be also discriminated by principal component analysis of the transcriptome changes observed, which included several genes involved in development and the immune response. All Varroa tested contained a diverse replicating DWV population implying the virulent variant present in group VH, and predominating in RNA-seq analysis of temporally and geographically separate Varroa-infested colonies, was selected upon transmission from Varroa, a conclusion supported by direct injection of pupae in vitro with mixed virus populations. Identification of a virulent variant of DWV, the role of Varroa in its transmission and the resulting host transcriptome changes furthers

  10. Comparison of tau-fluvalinate, acrinathrin, and amitraz effects on susceptible and resistant populations of Varroa destructor in a vial test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamler, Martin; Nesvorna, Marta; Stara, Jitka; Erban, Tomas; Hubert, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor is a major pest of the western honeybee, Apis mellifera. The development of acaricide resistance in Varroa populations is a global issue. Discriminating concentrations of acaricides are widely used to detect pest resistance. Two methods, using either glass vials or paraffin capsules, are used to screen for Varroa resistance to various acaricides. We found the glass vial method to be useless for testing Varroa resistance to acaridices, so we developed a polypropylene vial bioassay. This method was tested on tau-fluvalinate-, acrinathrin-, and amitraz-resistant mite populations from three apiaries in Czechia. Acetone was used as a control and technical grade acaricide compounds diluted in acetone were applied to the polypropylene vials. The solutions were spread on the vial surface by rolling the vial, and were then evaporated. Freshly collected Varroa females were placed in the vials and the mortality of the exposed mites was measured after 24 h. The Varroa populations differed in mortality between the apiaries and the tested compounds. Mites from the Kyvalka site were resistant to acrinathrin, tau-fluvalinate, and amitraz, while mites from the Postrizin site were susceptible to all three acaricides. In Prelovice apiary, the mites were susceptible to acrinathrin and amitraz, but not to tau-fluvalinate. The calculated discriminating concentrations for tau-fluvalinate, acrinathrin, and amitraz were 0.66, 0.26 and 0.19 µg/mL, respectively. These results indicate that polyproplyne vial tests can be used to determine discriminating concentrations for the early detection of acaricide resistant Varroa. Finally, multiple-resistance in Kyvalka may indicate metabolic resistance.

  11. Estudio sobre la Eficacia a Campo del Amivar® contra Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae en Colmenas de Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae

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    Jorge MARCANGELI

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo fue evaluar la eficacia del producto Amivar® para el control del ácaro Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman, en colmenas de abejas durante el otoño de 2003. El trabajo se llevó a cabo en el apiario experimental del Centro de Extensión Apícola ubicado en Coronel Vidal, provincia de Buenos Aires. Se trabajó sobre un total de 20 colmenas tipo Langstroth que se dividieron en dos grupos iguales. En el primer grupo se introdujo una tira de Amivar® (amitraz, 1gr, Apilab, Argentina en el centro del nido de cría de las colmenas. El segundo grupo, sólo recibió el tratamiento de Oxavar® para determinar el número total de ácaros presentes en las colmenas. Semanalmente, se recolectaron los ácaros muertos caídos en pisos especiales que evitaban que las abejas los eliminen. Posteriormente, los dos grupos recibieron tres dosis en total a intervalos de siete días de 5 ml del producto Oxavar® (Apilab-INTA, Argentina; 64,6 g/l; ácido oxálico en agua destilada por cuadro cubierto por abejas para eliminar los ácaros remanentes en las colonias y poder así calcular la eficacia del tratamiento. El producto Amivar® presentó una eficacia promedio de 85,05% ± 3,39 (rango = 79,5 – 91,6, registrándose diferencias significativas frente al grupo control (p< 0,05. No seobservaron efectos negativos del producto sobre la cría de abejas en desarrollo. Estos resultados demuestran que este producto es efectivo para el control de la parasitosis.

  12. Entomopathogenic fungi as potential biocontrol agents of the ecto-parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, and their effect on the immune response of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamiduzzaman, Mollah Md; Sinia, Alice; Guzman-Novoa, Ernesto; Goodwin, Paul H

    2012-11-01

    Three isolates of each of the entomopathogenic fungi, Metarhizium anisopliae, Beauveria bassiana and Clonostachys rosea, were assessed for their pathogenicity to the honey bee parasitic mite, Varroa destructor. The fungi were applied to varroa mites by immersing them in a spore solution, and then the inoculated mites were placed on honey bee brood inside capped cells. At 7 days post inoculation (dpi), the three fungi caused significant varroa mortality compared to non-inoculated mites. In brood treated only with varroa mites, expression of the honey bee genes, hymenoptaecin and poly U binding factor 68 Kd (pUf68), decreased over time, while expression of blue cheese (BlCh) and single minded (SiMd) was not affected. In brood inoculated directly only with M. anisopliae or B. bassiana, the emerged adults showed reduced weight indicating infection by the fungi, which was confirmed by observation of hyphae in the brood. Fungal infection of the brood resulted in increased expression of hymenoptaecin, pUf68 and BlCh, but not SiMd. In brood treated with varroa mites that had been inoculated with the fungi, expression of hymenoptaecin, pUf68 and BlCh, but not SiMd, was even more up-regulated. While varroa mites can suppress gene expression in honey bee brood, varroa mites infected with entomopathogenic fungi induced their expression. This may be due to a low level of fungal infection of the bee, which negated the immunosuppression by the mites. Therefore, entomopathogenic fungi could reduce varroa mite damage to honey bee brood by both infecting the parasite and preventing varroa-associated suppression of honey bee immunity.

  13. Autumn invasion rates of Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae) into honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies and the resulting increase in mite populations.

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    Frey, Eva; Rosenkranz, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The honey bee parasite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman can disperse and invade honey bee colonies by attaching to "drifting" and "robbing" honey bees that move into nonnatal colonies. We quantified the weekly invasion rates and the subsequent mite population growth from the end of July to November 2011 in 28 honey bee colonies kept in two apiaries that had high (HBD) and low (LBD) densities of neighboring colonies. At each apiary, half (seven) of the colonies were continuously treated with acaricides to kill all Varroa mites and thereby determine the invasion rates. The other group of colonies was only treated before the beginning of the experiment and then left untreated to record Varroa population growth until a final treatment in November. The numbers of bees and brood cells of all colonies were estimated according to the Liebefeld evaluation method. The invasion rates varied among individual colonies but revealed highly significant differences between the study sites. The average invasion rate per colony over the entire 3.5-mo period ranged from 266 to 1,171 mites at the HBD site compared with only 72 to 248 mites at the LBD apiary. In the untreated colonies, the Varroa population reached an average final infestation in November of 2,082 mites per colony (HBD) and 340 mites per colony (LBD). All colonies survived the winter; however, the higher infested colonies lost about three times more bees compared with the lower infested colonies. Therefore, mite invasion and late-year population growth must be considered more carefully for future treatment concepts in temperate regions.

  14. Variable induction of vitellogenin genes in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), by the honeybee, Apis mellifera L, host and its environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Cordon, A R; Shirk, P D; Duehl, A J; Evans, J D; Teal, P E A

    2013-02-01

    Transcript levels of vitellogenins (Vgs) in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), were variably induced by interactions between the developing honeybee, Apis mellifera L, as a food source and the capped honeybee cell environment. Transcripts for two Vgs of varroa mites were sequenced and putative Vg protein products characterized. Sequence analysis of VdVg1 and VdVg2 proteins showed that each had greater similarity with Vg1 and Vg2 proteins from ticks, respectively, than between themselves and were grouped separately by phylogenetic analyses. This suggests there was a duplication of the ancestral acarine Vg gene prior to the divergence of the mites and ticks. Low levels of transcript were detected in immature mites, males and phoretic females. Following cell invasion by phoretic females, VdVg1 and VdVg2 transcript levels were up-regulated after cell capping to a maximum at the time of partial cocoon formation by the honeybee. During oviposition the two transcripts were differentially expressed with higher levels of VdVg2 being observed. A bioassay based on assessing the transcript levels was established. Increases in VdVg1 and VdVg2 transcripts were induced experimentally in phoretic females when they were placed inside a cell containing an early metamorphosing last instar bee but not when exposed to the metamorphosing bee alone. The variable response of Vg expression to the food source as well as environmental cues within the capped cell demonstrates that perturbation of host-parasite interactions may provide avenues to disrupt the reproductive cycle of the varroa mites and prevent varroasis.

  15. Influence of Honey Bee Genotype and Wintering Method on Wintering Performance of Varroa destructor (Parasitiformes: Varroidae)-Infected Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Colonies in a Northern Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreini, Rassol; Currie, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a cooperative breeding program designed to enhance winter survival of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) when exposed to high levels of varroa (Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman) in outdoor-wintered and indoor-wintered colonies. Half of the colonies from selected and unselected stocks were randomly assigned to be treated with late autumn oxalic acid treatment or to be left untreated. Colonies were then randomly assigned to be wintered either indoors (n = 37) or outdoors (n = 40). Late autumn treatment with oxalic acid did not improve wintering performance. However, genotype of bees affected colony survival and the proportion of commercially viable colonies in spring, as indicated by greater rates of colony survival and commercially viable colonies for selected stock (43% survived and 33% were viable) in comparison to unselected stock (19% survived and 9% were viable) across all treatment groups. Indoor wintering improved spring bee population score, proportion of colonies surviving, and proportion of commercially viable colonies relative to outdoor wintering (73% of selected stock and 41% of unselected stock survived during indoor wintering). Selected stock showed better "tolerance" to varroa as the selected stock also maintained higher bee populations relative to unselected stock. However, there was no evidence of "resistance" in selected colonies (reduced mite densities). Collectively, this experiment showed that breeding can improve tolerance to varroa and this can help minimize colony loss through winter and improve colony wintering performance. Overall, colony wintering success of both genotypes of bees was better when colonies were wintered indoors than when colonies were wintered outdoors.

  16. Evaluation of Mite-Away-II for fall control of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in colonies of the honey bee Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in the northeastern USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderone, Nicholas W

    2010-02-01

    Mite-Away II, a recently-registered product with a proprietary formulation of formic acid, was evaluated under field conditions in commercial apiaries in upstate New York (USA) for the fall control of Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman in colonies of the honey bee, Apis mellifera L. Ambient temperatures during the treatment period were in the lower half of the range recommended on the label, but were typical for early fall in upstate New York. Average mite mortality was 60.2 +/- 2.2% in the Mite-Away II group and 23.3 +/- 2.6% in the untreated control group. These means were significantly different from each other, but the level of control was only moderate. These results demonstrate that Mite-Away II may not always provide an adequate level of control even when the temperature at the time of application falls within the recommended range stated on the product's label. To make the best use of temperature-sensitive products, I suggest that the current, single-value, economic treatment threshold be replaced with an economic treatment range. The limits for this range are specified by two pest density values. The lower limit is the usual pest density that triggers a treatment. The upper limit is the maximum pest density that one can expect to reduce to a level below the lower limit given the temperatures expected during the treatment period. When the actual pest density exceeds the upper limit, the product should not be recommended; or, a warning should be included indicating that acceptable control may not be achieved.

  17. Relationship between some semiochemicals and the taxis of Varroa destructor%大蜂螨对一些气味物质的趋性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙艳; 秦玉川

    2008-01-01

    狄斯瓦螨Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman是意大利蜜蜂Apis mellifera Spinola的主要外寄生螨.雌成螨在幼虫巢房封盖前不久侵入幼虫巢房,并开始繁殖为害.从雌成螨在一个很短的时间内进入蜜蜂幼虫巢房,以及雄蜂幼虫巢房蜂螨的寄生率明显高于工蜂幼虫巢房的现象,表明蜜蜂幼虫体表一些信息素(semiochemicals)可能起着重要的引诱作用.作者对与大蜂螨相关的19种气味物质进行筛选,并对封盖前工蜂幼虫和雄蜂幼虫表皮挥发物进行气谱及气-质联谱测定.结果表明:雄蜂6龄幼虫对大蜂螨的引诱作用显著高于丁香水等10种气味物质.工蜂和雄蜂末龄幼虫体表挥发物的共有组份是9-二十三烯(C23H46),但它在雄蜂幼虫中所占的比例要明显高于工蜂幼虫.工蜂幼虫的特有主要组分是十八烷(C18H38)和9-甲基十九烷(C19H40);而雄蜂幼虫的特有主要组分是二十五烷(C25H52)和二十三烷(C23H48).

  18. A virulent strain of deformed wing virus (DWV) of honeybees (Apis mellifera) prevails after Varroa destructor-mediated, or in vitro, transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabov, Eugene V; Wood, Graham R; Fannon, Jessica M; Moore, Jonathan D; Bull, James C; Chandler, Dave; Mead, Andrew; Burroughs, Nigel; Evans, David J

    2014-06-01

    The globally distributed ectoparasite Varroa destructor is a vector for viral pathogens of the Western honeybee (Apis mellifera), in particular the Iflavirus Deformed Wing Virus (DWV). In the absence of Varroa low levels DWV occur, generally causing asymptomatic infections. Conversely, Varroa-infested colonies show markedly elevated virus levels, increased overwintering colony losses, with impairment of pupal development and symptomatic workers. To determine whether changes in the virus population were due Varroa amplifying and introducing virulent virus strains and/or suppressing the host immune responses, we exposed Varroa-naïve larvae to oral and Varroa-transmitted DWV. We monitored virus levels and diversity in developing pupae and associated Varroa, the resulting RNAi response and transcriptome changes in the host. Exposed pupae were stratified by Varroa association (presence/absence) and virus levels (low/high) into three groups. Varroa-free pupae all exhibited low levels of a highly diverse DWV population, with those exposed per os (group NV) exhibiting changes in the population composition. Varroa-associated pupae exhibited either low levels of a diverse DWV population (group VL) or high levels of a near-clonal virulent variant of DWV (group VH). These groups and unexposed controls (C) could be also discriminated by principal component analysis of the transcriptome changes observed, which included several genes involved in development and the immune response. All Varroa tested contained a diverse replicating DWV population implying the virulent variant present in group VH, and predominating in RNA-seq analysis of temporally and geographically separate Varroa-infested colonies, was selected upon transmission from Varroa, a conclusion supported by direct injection of pupae in vitro with mixed virus populations. Identification of a virulent variant of DWV, the role of Varroa in its transmission and the resulting host transcriptome changes furthers our

  19. Air sensitivity of MoS2, MoSe2, MoTe2, HfS2, and HfSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli, Gioele; McGeough, Conor; Schmidt, Michael; McCarthy, Eoin K.; Monaghan, Scott; Povey, Ian M.; McCarthy, Melissa; Gity, Farzan; Nagle, Roger; Hughes, Greg; Cafolla, Attilio; Hurley, Paul K.; Duffy, Ray

    2016-09-01

    A surface sensitivity study was performed on different transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) under ambient conditions in order to understand which material is the most suitable for future device applications. Initially, Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy studies were carried out over a period of 27 days on mechanically exfoliated flakes of 5 different TMDs, namely, MoS2, MoSe2, MoTe2, HfS2, and HfSe2. The most reactive were MoTe2 and HfSe2. HfSe2, in particular, showed surface protrusions after ambient exposure, reaching a height and width of approximately 60 nm after a single day. This study was later supplemented by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) cross-sectional analysis, which showed hemispherical-shaped surface blisters that are amorphous in nature, approximately 180-240 nm tall and 420-540 nm wide, after 5 months of air exposure, as well as surface deformation in regions between these structures, related to surface oxidation. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of atmosphere exposed HfSe2 was conducted over various time scales, which indicated that the Hf undergoes a preferential reaction with oxygen as compared to the Se. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy showed that the blisters are Se-rich; thus, it is theorised that HfO2 forms when the HfSe2 reacts in ambient, which in turn causes the Se atoms to be aggregated at the surface in the form of blisters. Overall, it is evident that air contact drastically affects the structural properties of TMD materials. This issue poses one of the biggest challenges for future TMD-based devices and technologies.

  20. Varroa destructor mite mortality rate according to the amount of worker broods in africanized honey bee (Apis mellifera L. colonies = Taxa de mortalidade do ácaro Varroa destructor de acordo com a quantidade de crias em colônias de abelhas africanizadas (Apis mellifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Moretto

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The Varroa destructor mite has caused the death of hundreds of thousands of Apis mellifera colonies in several countries worldwide. However, the effects determined by the Varroa mite change according to the A. mellifera subspecies. In Africanized bee colonies from South and Central America, the parasite causes little damage, as the infestation levels are relatively stable and low, thus treatments against the pest are not required. Among several factors, the grooming behavior of Africanized worker bees plays an important role in the maintenance of the low infestation levels. This study determined the daily rate of live and dead mites found at the bottom of the hive in five Africanized honey bee colonies. During fifteen days of observations, a significant increase was verified in the number of live and dead mites at the bottom of the hive as the amount of worker broods from each honey bee colony decreased. This suggests a more intense grooming activity as the Varroa concentration in the adult honey bee population increases.O ácaro Varroa destructor tem causado a mortalidade de centenas de milhares de colônias de abelhas Apis mellifera em várias partes do mundo. Os efeitos determinados pelo ácaro Varroa variam com a subespécie de Apis mellifera. Nas Américas do Sul e Central, o parasita causa poucos danos às colônias de abelhas africanizadas, a taxa de infestação é estável e baixa, não sendo necessário o tratamento químico contra a praga. Entre vários fatores que são responsáveis pela tolerância das abelhas africanizadas a esse parasita, o comportamento de grooming executado pelas operárias deve exercer importante papel na manutenção dos baixos níveis deinfestação. Neste estudo, foram avaliadas as taxas diárias de ácaros vivos e mortos encontrados no fundo das colméias de cinco colônias de abelhas africanizadas. Durante 15 dias de observações, foi verificado significativo aumento de ácaros no fundo da colméia

  1. Control del Ácaro Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae en Colmenas de Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae mediante la Aplicación de distintos Principios Activos Control of Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae in honeybee colonies of Apis mellifera Hymenoptera: Apidae by means of different active agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Augusto Marcangeli

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la eficacia acaricida de cuatro productos utilizados para el control del ácaro Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman en colmenas de Apis mellifera (L.. Se seleccionaron 25 colmenas dividivas en cinco lotes iguales a las que se les suministró Apistan®, Bayvarol®, Apitol® y Folbex®. El último lote representó el control. Los ácaros muertos se recolectaron en pisos especiales que se controlaron semanalmente. Finalizada la experiencia cada lote fue sometido a un cruzamiento con otros productos con el fin de eliminar los ácaros remanentes y poder calcular las eficacias. El producto Apistan® fue el más efectivo con un valor promedio de 85,38% seguido por el Bayvarol® (83,83%, Apitol® (71,77% y Folbex® (62,78%. En todos los casos, los valores obtenidos resultaron inferiores a los estipulados por los laboratorios productores. Estos resultados alertan sobre la posible generación de resistencias por parte de las poblaciones del ácaro y la necesidad de buscar nuevos agentes de control eficaces para esta enfermedad.The aim of this work was to evaluate the acaricide efficacy of four commercial products against the mite Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman in honeybee colonies of Apis mellifera (L.. Twenty five honeybee colonies divided in five equal groups were selected. Groups received Apistan®, Bayvarol®, Apitol® and Folbex®. Final group was the control. Dead mites were collected weekly in special floors. After treatment, each colony received a shock treatment with the other three products to kill remnant mites and to obtain acaricide efficacy. Average values of efficacy were Apistan® 85,38%, Bayvarol® 83,83%, Apitol® 71,77% and Folbex® 62,78%. In all cases these values were lower than those reported by the laboratories that produce them. These results alert about the possible generation of resistant mite populations and justify research directed to search for alternative products for the

  2. EURObservational Research Programme : The Heart Failure Pilot Survey (ESC-HF Pilot)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggioni, Aldo P.; Dahlstrom, Ulf; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Crespo Leiro, Marisa; Drozdz, Jaroslaw; Fruhwald, Friedrich; Gullestad, Lars; Logeart, Damien; Metra, Marco; Parissis, John; Persson, Hans; Ponikowski, Piotr; Rauchhaus, Mathias; Voors, Adriaan A.; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe; Zannad, Faiez; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the new ESC-HF Pilot Survey was to describe the clinical epidemiology of outpatients and inpatients with heart failure (HF) and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across 12 participating European countries. This pilot study was specifically aimed at validating the

  3. EURObservational Research Programme: the Heart Failure Pilot Survey (ESC-HF Pilot)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggioni, Aldo P; Dahlström, Ulf; Filippatos, Gerasimos;

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the new ESC-HF Pilot Survey was to describe the clinical epidemiology of outpatients and inpatients with heart failure (HF) and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across 12 participating European countries. This pilot study was specifically aimed at validating...... the structure, performance, and quality of the data set, for continuing the survey into a permanent registry....

  4. Effects of sol aging on resistive switching behaviors of HfO{sub x} resistive memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Chih-Chieh, E-mail: cchsu@yuntech.edu.tw [Graduate School of Engineering Science and Technology, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliu 64002, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliu 64002, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate School of Electronic Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliu 64002, Taiwan, ROC (China); Sun, Jhen-Kai; Tsao, Che-Chang; Chen, Yu-Ting [Graduate School of Electronic Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliu 64002, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2017-03-01

    This work investigates effects of long-term sol-aging time on sol-gel HfO{sub x} resistive random access memories (RRAMs). A nontoxic solvent of ethanol is used to replace toxic 2-methoxyethanol, which is usually used in sol-gel processes. The top electrodes are fabricated by pressing indium balls onto the HfO{sub x} surface rather than by using conventional sputtering or evaporation processes. The maximum process temperature is limited to be 100 ℃. Therefore, influences of plasma and high temperature on HfO{sub x} film can be avoided. Under this circumstance, effects of sol aging time on the HfO{sub x} films can be more clearly studied. The current conduction mechanisms in low and high electric regions of the HfO{sub x} RRAM are found to be dominated by Ohmic conduction and trap-filled space charge limited conduction (TF-SCLC), respectively. When the sol aging time increases, the resistive switching characteristic of the HfO{sub x} layer becomes unstable and the transition voltage from Ohmic conduction to TF-SCLC is also increased. This suggests that an exceedingly long aging time will give a HfO{sub x} film with more defect states. The XPS results are consistent with FTIR analysis and they can further explain the unstable HfO{sub x} resistive switching characteristic induced by sol aging.

  5. The effects of composition on mechanical properties of W-4Re-Hf-C alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzke, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    Studies were made of the effects of alloy composition on the mechanical behavior of as-worked W-4Re-Hf-C alloys containing up to about 0.8 mol % Hfc. Extracted second-phase particles were analyzed and related to alloy composition and creep strength. While strengthening is attributed to HfC particles, the presence of excess hafnium or carbon (above the calculated amounts for stoichiometric HfC) in swaged W-4Re-Hf-C alloys generally causes a reduction of the high-temperature (1930 C) tensile strength; maximum creep strength is, however, indicated for alloys with a slight (about 0.05 to 0.1 at. %) excess of hafnium. Particle strengthening is reduced by WC in solid solution with HfC for allow compositions with an excess of carbon. The low-temperature ductility of worked W-4Re-Hf-C alloys appears to be far more dependent on the amount of excess C or Hf present than on the HfC particle content in the range studies.

  6. First results on the sorption behaviour of Rutherfordium from HCl/HF containing aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, D.; Nitsche, H. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Taut, S. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR), Dresden (Germany); Jost, D.T.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Yakushev, A.B.; Buklanov, G.V.; Domanov, V.P.; Lien Din Thi [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kubica, B.; Misiak, R.; Szeglowski, Z. [NINP Cracow (Poland)

    1997-09-01

    Rutherfordium shows strong sorption on the cation exchanger DOWEX 50x8 at a concentration of 0.1 M HCl/10{sup -2} M HF. This shows that Rf behaves under these conditions differently from Hf and Zr and more like Th under these conditions. (author) 1 fig., 5 refs.

  7. Effects of sol aging on resistive switching behaviors of HfOx resistive memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Sun, Jhen-Kai; Tsao, Che-Chang; Chen, Yu-Ting

    2017-03-01

    This work investigates effects of long-term sol-aging time on sol-gel HfOx resistive random access memories (RRAMs). A nontoxic solvent of ethanol is used to replace toxic 2-methoxyethanol, which is usually used in sol-gel processes. The top electrodes are fabricated by pressing indium balls onto the HfOx surface rather than by using conventional sputtering or evaporation processes. The maximum process temperature is limited to be 100 ℃. Therefore, influences of plasma and high temperature on HfOx film can be avoided. Under this circumstance, effects of sol aging time on the HfOx films can be more clearly studied. The current conduction mechanisms in low and high electric regions of the HfOx RRAM are found to be dominated by Ohmic conduction and trap-filled space charge limited conduction (TF-SCLC), respectively. When the sol aging time increases, the resistive switching characteristic of the HfOx layer becomes unstable and the transition voltage from Ohmic conduction to TF-SCLC is also increased. This suggests that an exceedingly long aging time will give a HfOx film with more defect states. The XPS results are consistent with FTIR analysis and they can further explain the unstable HfOx resistive switching characteristic induced by sol aging.

  8. The Modulation of Ionospheric Alfven Resonator on Heating HF Waves and the Doppler Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NiBin-bin; ZhaoZheng-yu; XieShu-guo

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of HF waves in IAR can produce many nonlinear effects, including the modulation effect of IAR on HF waves and the Doppler effect. To start with the dependence of the ionospheric electron temperature varia-tions on the Alfven resonant field, We discuss the mechanism of the modulation effect and lucubrate possible reasons for the Doppler effect. The results show that the Alfven resonant field can have an observable modulation effect on HF waves while its mechanism is quite different from that of Schumann resonant field on HF waves. The depth of modulation of IAR on HF waves has a quasi-quadratic relation with the Alfven field, which directly inspires the formation of cross-spectrum between ULF waves and HF waves and results in spectral peaks at some gyro-frequencies of IAR. With respect to the Doppler effect during the propagation of HF waves in IAR, it is mainly caused by the motion of the high-speed flyer and the drifting electrons and the frequency shift from the phase vari-ation of the reflected waves can be neglected when the frequency of HF incident wave is high enough.

  9. New PWM method and commutation strategy for HF-link converters for fuel cells and photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljusev, Petar; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new PWM method and commutation strategy for HF-link converters, which leads to safe commutation of the load current in the output bidirectional bridge. The proposed implementation is independent of the particular HF-link converter topology and bidirectional switch selection...

  10. The first HF table, after heat treatment and ready to be machined in HEPCO, Arak (IRAN)

    CERN Multimedia

    Tiziano Camporesi

    2003-01-01

    The first HF support table 'load' tested by the team of people who have contributed to it from design to welding. This table will support the 240 tons of 1 HF detector and will integrate the raisers which will push it up to the beam line level. It is the first Iranian contribution to an HEP experiment.

  11. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.758 Section 73.758 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... § 73.758 System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service. (a... digital audio broadcasting and datacasting are authorized. The RF requirements for the DRM system...

  12. Computed tomographic coronary angiography for patients with heart failure (CTA-HF): a randomized controlled trial (IMAGE HF Project 1-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Benjamin J W; Green, Rachel E; Coyle, Doug; Laine, Mika; Hanninen, Helena; Leskinen, Hanna; Rajda, Miroslav; Larose, Eric; Hartikainen, Juha; Hedman, Marja; Mielniczuk, Lisa; O'Meara, Eileen; deKemp, Robert A; Klein, Ran; Paterson, Ian; White, James A; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo; Leber, Alex; Tandon, Vikas; Lee, Ting; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Hessian, Renee; Dowsley, Taylor; Kass, Malek; Kelly, Cathy; Garrard, Linda; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Knuuti, Juhani; Beanlands, Rob S; Wells, George A

    2013-12-26

    The prevalence of heart failure (HF) is rising in industrialized and developing countries. Though invasive coronary angiography (ICA) remains the gold standard for anatomical assessment of coronary artery disease in HF patients, alternatives are being sought. Computed tomographic coronary angiography (CTA) has emerged as an accurate non-invasive diagnostic tool for coronary artery disease (CAD) and has been demonstrated to have prognostic value. Whether or not CTA can be used in HF patients is unknown. Acknowledging the aging population, the growing prevalence of HF and the increasing financial burden of healthcare, we need to identify non-invasive diagnostic tests that are available, safe, accurate and cost-effective. The proposed study aims to provide insight into the efficacy of CTA in HF patients. A multicenter randomized controlled trial will enroll 250 HF patients requiring coronary anatomical definition. Enrolled patients will be randomized to either CTA or ICA (n = 125 per group) as the first test to define coronary anatomy. The primary outcomes will be collected to determine downstream resource utilization. Secondary outcomes will include the composite clinical events and major adverse cardiac events. In addition, the accuracy of CTA for detecting coronary anatomy and obstruction will be assessed in patients who subsequently undergo both CTA and ICA. It is expected that CTA will be a more cost-effective strategy for diagnosis: yielding similar outcomes with fewer procedural risks and improved resource utilization. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01283659. Team grant #CIF 99470.

  13. Signal processing technique for randomly discontinuous spectra HF radar waveforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张东坡; 刘兴钊

    2004-01-01

    A major problem with all high frequency (HF) radars is a relatively poor range resolution available due to many interference sources. To avoid the interferences in frequency domain and operate with wideband, the randomly discontinuous spectra (RDS) signal is employed. However, it results in high range sidelobes when matching the reflected echo, which is much more difficult for target detection. A new signal processing technique that is radically different from the conventional technique to lower range sidelobes is introduced. This method is based on suppressing the selfclutter of the radar range ambiguity function (AF) by mismatched filtering. An effective algorithm is adopted to solve the filter coefficients. Simulation results show that the peak sidelobe level can be reduced to -30dB and the achievable system bandwidth is about 400KHz. The technique is adaptable to practical radar systems and applicable for other realtime signal processing.

  14. Modification of polarization filtering technique in HF ground wave radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Guoyi; Tan Zhongji; Wang Jiantao

    2006-01-01

    The polarization filter using three orthogonal linear polarization antennas can suppress more disturbances than the polarization filter using two orthogonal linear polarization antennas in HF ground wave radar. But the algorithm of the threedimension filter is relatively complicated and not suitable for real-time processing. It can't use linear and nonlinear polarization vector translation technique directly. A modified polarization filter which is simple and has same suppressing ability as the three-dimension polarization filter is given. It only has half parameters of the primary one. Some problems about estimation of polarization parameters and selection of disturbances are discussed. A method of holding the phase of radar backscatter signal constantly is put forward so that unstationary disturbance signal can be processed.

  15. Toward an european Med HF-radar coastal monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molcard, A.; Fraunie, P.

    2010-12-01

    The monitoring of coastal areas through HF radar is developping in the european Mediterranean coasts, through national and international projects. Surface current maps may be used for process studies, forecast correction through assimilation, or for practical applications in transport studies (jellyfish, oil-spill, search-and-rescue operations). Results of radar campaigns in the North-western Mediterranean (evidence of mesoscale eddy in the Gulf of Lions and identification of dynamical structures by FSLE in the Ligurian Sea) are shown, as well as techniques for current reconstruction using a single site. A new inter-regional european project started in summer 2010, regrouping 5 countries for an integrated oil-spill coastal awarness network is presented.

  16. Telemonitoring Adherence to Medications in Heart Failure Patients (TEAM-HF): A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Benjamin D; Moise, Nathalie; Haerizadeh, Mytra; Ye, Siqin; Medina, Vivian; Kronish, Ian M

    2017-04-01

    Medication nonadherence contributes to hospitalizations in recently discharged patients with heart failure (HF). We aimed to test the feasibility of telemonitoring medication adherence in patients with HF. We randomized 40 patients (1:1) hospitalized for HF to 30 days of loop diuretic adherence monitoring with telephonic support or to passive adherence monitoring alone. Eighty-three percent of eligible patients agreed to participate. The median age of patients was 64 years, 25% were female, and 45% were Hispanic. Overall, 67% of patients were nonadherent (percentage of days that the correct number of doses were taken telemonitoring was acceptable to most patients with HF. Diuretic nonadherence was common even when patients knew they were being monitored. Future studies should assess whether adherence telemonitoring can improve adherence and reduce readmissions among patients with HF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The electronic structure of HfF5- and WF5-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongshan; Andersson, Pontus; Lindahl, Anton O.; Hanstorp, Dag

    2011-08-01

    The electronic structure of HfF5-, WF5- and the related species HfF n and WF n is studied using ab initio methods. Computation reveals that the hafnium fluorides are much more stable than the corresponding tungsten fluorides. The detachment energy of HfF5- is 8.8 eV, whereas the corresponding quantity of WF5- is only 3.9 eV. These results show that WF5- can be photodetached while HfF5- is unaffected, and so it is possible by using photodetachment to suppress the interfering isobar 182W in the ion beam of 182Hf. Such information is the precondition for the successful implementation of a future photodetachment process in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

  18. Effect of hydrofluoric acid (HF) concentration to pores size diameter of silicon membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burham, Norhafizah; Hamzah, Azrul Azlan; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies parameters which affect the pore size diameter of a silicon membrane. Electrochemical etching is performed in characterise the parameter involved in this process. The parameter has been studied is volume ratio of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and ethanol as an electrolyte aqueous for electrochemical etch. This electrolyte aqueous solution has been mixed between HF and ethanol with volume ratio 3:7, 5:5, 7:3 and 9:1. As a result, the higher volume of HF in this electrolyte gives the smallest pore size diameter compared to the lower volume of HF. These samples have been dipped into HF and ethanol electrolyte aqueous with supplied 25 mA/cm2 current density for 20, 30, 40, and 50 minutes. The samples will inspect under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to execute the pore formations on silicon membrane surface.

  19. Suspended HfO{sub 2} photonic crystal slab on III-nitride/Si platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yongjin; Feng, Jiao; Cao, Ziping; Zhu, Hongbo [Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Grueenberg Research Centre, Nanjing, Jiang-Su (China)

    2014-06-15

    We present here the fabrication of suspended hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) photonic crystal slab on a III-nitride/Si platform. The calculations are performed to model the suspended HfO{sub 2} photonic crystal slab. Aluminum nitride (AlN) film is employed as the sacrificial layer to form air gap. Photonic crystal patterns are defined by electron beam lithography and transferred into HfO{sub 2} film, and suspended HfO{sub 2} photonic crystal slab is achieved on a III-nitride/Si platform through wet-etching of AlN layer in the alkaline solution. The method is promising for the fabrication of suspended HfO{sub 2} nanostructures incorporating into a III-nitride/Si platform, or acting as the template for epitaxial growth of III-nitride materials. (orig.)

  20. Crystal structure of Si-doped HfO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lili [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi' an 710127 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Nelson, Matthew; Fancher, Chris M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Aldridge, Henry [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Iamsasri, Thanakorn; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L., E-mail: jacobjones@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Nishida, Toshikazu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Moghaddam, Saeed [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    Si-doped HfO{sub 2} was prepared by solid state synthesis of the starting oxides. Using Rietveld refinement of high resolution X-ray diffraction patterns, a substitutional limit of Si in HfO{sub 2} was determined as less than 9 at. %. A second phase was identified as Cristobalite (SiO{sub 2}) rather than HfSiO{sub 4}, the latter of which would be expected from existing SiO{sub 2}-HfO{sub 2} phase diagrams. Crystallographic refinement with increased Si-dopant concentration in monoclinic HfO{sub 2} shows that c/b increases, while β decreases. The spontaneous strain, which characterizes the ferroelastic distortion of the unit cell, was calculated and shown to decrease with increasing Si substitution.

  1. Lower virus infections in Varroa destructor-infested and uninfested brood and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera) of a low mite population growth colony compared to a high mite population growth colony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emsen, Berna; Hamiduzzaman, Mollah Md; Goodwin, Paul H; Guzman-Novoa, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    A comparison was made of the prevalence and relative quantification of deformed wing virus (DWV), Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV), black queen cell virus (BQCV), Kashmir bee virus (KBV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) and sac brood virus (SBV) in brood and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera) from colonies selected for high (HMP) and low (LMP) Varroa destructor mite population growth. Two viruses, ABPV and SBV, were never detected. For adults without mite infestation, DWV, IAPV, BQCV and KBV were detected in the HMP colony; however, only BQCV was detected in the LMP colony but at similar levels as in the HMP colony. With mite infestation, the four viruses were detected in adults of the HMP colony but all at higher amounts than in the LMP colony. For brood without mite infestation, DWV and IAPV were detected in the HMP colony, but no viruses were detected in the LMP colony. With mite infestation of brood, the four viruses were detected in the HMP colony, but only DWV and IAPV were detected and at lower amounts in the LMP colony. An epidemiological explanation for these results is that pre-experiment differences in virus presence and levels existed between the HMP and LMP colonies. It is also possible that low V. destructor population growth in the LMP colony resulted in the bees being less exposed to the mite and thus less likely to have virus infections. LMP and HMP bees may have also differed in susceptibility to virus infection.

  2. Lower virus infections in Varroa destructor-infested and uninfested brood and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera of a low mite population growth colony compared to a high mite population growth colony.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Emsen

    Full Text Available A comparison was made of the prevalence and relative quantification of deformed wing virus (DWV, Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV, black queen cell virus (BQCV, Kashmir bee virus (KBV, acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV and sac brood virus (SBV in brood and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera from colonies selected for high (HMP and low (LMP Varroa destructor mite population growth. Two viruses, ABPV and SBV, were never detected. For adults without mite infestation, DWV, IAPV, BQCV and KBV were detected in the HMP colony; however, only BQCV was detected in the LMP colony but at similar levels as in the HMP colony. With mite infestation, the four viruses were detected in adults of the HMP colony but all at higher amounts than in the LMP colony. For brood without mite infestation, DWV and IAPV were detected in the HMP colony, but no viruses were detected in the LMP colony. With mite infestation of brood, the four viruses were detected in the HMP colony, but only DWV and IAPV were detected and at lower amounts in the LMP colony. An epidemiological explanation for these results is that pre-experiment differences in virus presence and levels existed between the HMP and LMP colonies. It is also possible that low V. destructor population growth in the LMP colony resulted in the bees being less exposed to the mite and thus less likely to have virus infections. LMP and HMP bees may have also differed in susceptibility to virus infection.

  3. Genetic Variation of Ditylenchus destructor and Its Association with Ecological Factors%马铃薯腐烂茎线虫的遗传变异及其与生态因子的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文坤; 何旭峰; 丁中; 彭德良

    2012-01-01

    Ditylenchus destructor is a quarantine plant-parasitic nematode that distributed worldly. The genetic variation of D. Destructor may be modified with the change of ecological environment. The effect of ecological factor on the genetic structure may be induced by the genetic variation of different population of Ditylenchus destructor. The genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of D. Destructor were analyzed with inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular marker in this study. The effect of ecological factor on genetic diversity of D. Destructor was analyzed with SPSS software. Results showed that genetic diversity was relative high in D. Destructor. At the population level, the higest genetic diversity existed in the Taihe population of Anhui Provinbe, the lowest genetic diversity existed in the Changli population of Hebei Province. At the group level, the genetic diversity of five groups was arranged as Anhui >Shandong >Jiangsu >Hebei >Beijing. Relativey low genetic differentiation and high gene flow were existed in five groups with which coefficient of genetic differentiation^,) was 0.0725 and gene flow (Nm) was 6.3933. Correlation analysis showed a positive relationship between Shannon genetic diversity and altitude, longitude, latitude and annual precipitation, while a negative relativeship existed between Shannon genetic diversity and average temperature, maximum temperature and minimum temperature. A positive relationship also existed between genetic distance and geographical distance. The results imply that D. Destructor adapts to low temperature and it will be suitable to propagate in northern China. The management of seedling and seedtuber of sweet potato (Solarium tuberosum) shall be reinforced to prevent it's distribution and spreading in northern China.%马铃薯腐烂茎线虫(Ditylenchus destructor)是世界范围内广泛分布的检疫性线虫,严重危害多种作物.马铃薯腐烂茎线虫为适应不同的生活环境而发生相应

  4. Tsunami Arrival Detection with High Frequency (HF Radar

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    Donald Barrick

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative real-time observations of a tsunami have been limited to deep-water, pressure-sensor observations of changes in the sea surface elevation and observations of sea level fluctuations at the coast, which are essentially point measurements. Constrained by these data, models have been used for predictions and warning of the arrival of a tsunami, but to date no system exists for local detection of an actual incoming wave with a significant warning capability. Networks of coastal high frequency (HF-radars are now routinely observing surface currents in many countries. We report here on an empirical method for the detection of the initial arrival of a tsunami, and demonstrate its use with results from data measured by fourteen HF radar sites in Japan and USA following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake off Sendai, Japan, on 11 March 2011. The distance offshore at which the tsunami can be detected, and hence the warning time provided, depends on the bathymetry: the wider the shallow continental shelf, the greater this time. We compare arrival times at the radars with those measured by neighboring tide gauges. Arrival times measured by the radars preceded those at neighboring tide gauges by an average of 19 min (Japan and 15 min (USA The initial water-height increase due to the tsunami as measured by the tide gauges was moderate, ranging from 0.3 to 2 m. Thus it appears possible to detect even moderate tsunamis using this method. Larger tsunamis could obviously be detected further from the coast. We find that tsunami arrival within the radar coverage area can be announced 8 min (i.e., twice the radar spectral time resolution after its first appearance. This can provide advance warning of the tsunami approach to the coastline locations.

  5. New Adaptive Data Transmission Scheme Over HF Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil H. Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acceptable Bit Error rate can be maintained by adapting some of the design parameters such as modulation, symbol rate, constellation size, and transmit power according to the channel state.An estimate of HF propagation effects can be used to design an adaptive data transmission system over HF link. The proposed system combines the well known Automatic Link Establishment (ALE together with variable rate transmission system. The standard ALE is modified to suite the required goal of selecting the best carrier frequency (channel for a given transmission. This is based on measuring SINAD (Signal plus Noise plus Distortion to Noise plus Distortion, RSL (Received Signal Level, multipath phase distortion and BER (Bit Error Rate for each channel in the frequency list. Channel condition evaluation is done by two arrangements. In the first an FFT analysis is used where a pilot signal is transmitted over the channel, while the data itself is used in the second arrangement. Passive channel assessment is used to avoid bad channels hence limiting the frequency pool size to be used in the point to point communication and the time required for scanning and linking. An exchange of channel information between the transmitting and receiving stations is considered to select the modulation scheme for transmission. Mainly MPSK and MFSK are considered with different levels giving different data rate according to the channel condition. The results of the computer simulation have shown that when transmitting at a fixed channel symbol rate of 1200 symbol/sec, the information rate ranges from 2400 bps using 4FSK up to 3600 bps using 8PSK for SNR ranges from 11dB up to 26dB.

  6. The Thermodynamic Characterization of ZrCo–H, HfCo−H, HfNi−H and Zr{sub 1–x}HfxNi(Co) Alloy–H Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, Ted B., E-mail: ted.flanagan@uvm.edu; Noh, Hak; Luo, Suifang

    2016-08-25

    ZrCo and HfCo intermetallic compounds have the same cubic (CsCl-type) structure and their ternary (Zr{sub 1−x}Hf{sub x})Co alloys are also cubic. ZrNi and HfNi intermetallic compounds have the orthorhombic structure (CrB-type) and the ternary (Zr{sub 1−x}Hf{sub x})Ni alloys also have this structure. Thermodynamic data for hydride formation and decomposition in ZrCo, HfCo and HfNi intermetallic compounds have been determined from reaction calorimetry and from pressure-composition isotherms. Thermodynamic data have been determined for the three ternary alloys: (Zr{sub 0.75}Hf{sub 0.25})Co, (Zr{sub 0.50}Hf{sub 0.50})Co, and (Zr{sub 0.25}Hf{sub 0.75})Co and the four ternary alloys: (Zr{sub 0.875}Hf{sub 0.125})Ni, (Zr{sub 0.75}Hf{sub 0.25})Ni, (Zr{sub 0.50}Hf{sub 0.50})Ni, and (Zr{sub 0.25}Hf{sub 0.75})Ni. This offers the opportunity to learn how the thermodynamic properties of the ternary alloy-H systems change with the stoichiometry of alloys with the same structure. - Highlights: • Calorimetric enthalpies determined for H absorption by ZrCo, HfCo, HfNi are determined. • Ternary alloys, e.g., Zr{sub 1−x}Hf{sub x}Ni, prepared and characterized by x-ray diffraction. • Isotherms for the ternary alloys give thermodynamic parameters for H solution.

  7. Single layer of Ge quantum dots in HfO2 for floating gate memory capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepadatu, A M; Palade, C; Slav, A; Maraloiu, A V; Lazanu, S; Stoica, T; Logofatu, C; Teodorescu, V S; Ciurea, M L

    2017-04-28

    High performance trilayer memory capacitors with a floating gate of a single layer of Ge quantum dots (QDs) in HfO2 were fabricated using magnetron sputtering followed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The layer sequence of the capacitors is gate HfO 2/floating gate of single layer of Ge QDs in HfO 2/tunnel HfO 2/p-Si wafers. Both Ge and HfO2 are nanostructured by RTA at moderate temperatures of 600-700 °C. By nanostructuring at 600 °C, the formation of a single layer of well separated Ge QDs with diameters of 2-3 nm at a density of 4-5 × 10(15) m(-2) is achieved in the floating gate (intermediate layer). The Ge QDs inside the intermediate layer are arranged in a single layer and are separated from each other by HfO2 nanocrystals (NCs) about 8 nm in diameter with a tetragonal/orthorhombic structure. The Ge QDs in the single layer are located at the crossing of the HfO2 NCs boundaries. In the intermediate layer, besides Ge QDs, a part of the Ge atoms is segregated by RTA at the HfO2 NCs boundaries, while another part of the Ge atoms is present inside the HfO2 lattice stabilizing the tetragonal/orthorhombic structure. The fabricated capacitors show a memory window of 3.8 ± 0.5 V and a capacitance-time characteristic with 14% capacitance decay in the first 3000-4000 s followed by a very slow capacitance decrease extrapolated to 50% after 10 years. This high performance is mainly due to the floating gate of a single layer of well separated Ge QDs in HfO2, distanced from the Si substrate by the tunnel oxide layer with a precise thickness.

  8. Garnet effect on Nd-Hf isotope decoupling: Evidence from the Jinfosi batholith, Northern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Niu, Yaoling; Mo, Xuanxue

    2017-03-01

    The initial Nd and Hf isotope ratios of a 420 Ma post-collisional dioritic-granitic batholith from the Northern Tibetan plateau define a negative trend above and orthogonal to the ԐHf(t)-ԐNd(t) terrestrial array. This uncommon trend offers an insight into the origin of the puzzling Nd-Hf isotope decoupling in the crustal rocks. On this trend, samples depleted in heavy rare earth elements (HREEs, i.e., [Dy/Yb]N ≫ 1) deviate most from the terrestrial array whereas samples with flat HREEs (i.e., [Dy/Yb]N ≥ 1) deviate less or plot within the terrestrial array, pointing to the controlling effect of garnet in the magma source. Ancient garnet-bearing residues after melt extraction will have elevated Lu/Hf ratios and can evolve with time to produce high ԐHf(t) at a low ԐNd(t) value. Mixing of melts derived from such source lithologies (high Lu/Hf) with melts possessing a within-terrestrial array Nd-Hf isotopic composition (low Lu/Hf) best explains the observed trend orthogonal to the terrestrial array. The samples from the Jinfosi batholith with the most decoupled Nd-Hf isotope compositions require a larger degree (> 40%) and ancient (i.e., ≥ 1.8 Gyr) previous melt extraction from their source. It follows that the ancient melts with depleted HREEs complementary to those garnet-bearing residues should have low ԐHf values and plot below the terrestrial array, which is indeed shown by some Archean/Paleoproterozic TTGs.

  9. Hardness and Second Phase Percentage of Ni-Ti-Hf Compounds After Heat Treatment at 700C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Malcolm K.

    2017-01-01

    The Vickers hardness and second phase precipitation of three ternary intermetallic Ni-Ti-Hf compounds containing either 1, 3 or 5 at.% Hf were compared to 60-Nitinol (55 at.% Ni - 45 at.% Ti). Heat treatment either at 700 C or with a subsequent aging step, hardened the 3 and 5 at.% Hf-containing ternaries to approximately 620 HV (56 HRC). Heat treatment increased the hardness of the 1 at.% Hf compound by more than 25 percent. Average hardness of the 3 and 5 at.% Hf ternaries, though higher than that of the binary Ni-Ti or the Ni-Ti-Hf compound containing 1 at.% Hf, appeared to be fairly insensitive to the different heat treatments. There was a drastic reduction of fatigue-enhancing second phase precipitates for the 5 at.% Hf ternaries compared to the other compounds. These results should guide materials selection for development of aerospace componentry.

  10. Mixing and melt sources in the Miocene Aztec Wash pluton (Nevada, USA) as revealed by zircon Hf and O and whole rock Sr, Nd, and Hf isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M.; Miller, J. S.; Miller, C. F.; Bromley, S.; Davies, G. R.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    The 15.6 Ma Aztec Wash Pluton (AWP) is one of several Miocene intrusions located within the northern Colorado River extensional corridor. Extensive E-W tilting of fault blocks has exposed the pluton from the roof to 5 km structural depth. Earlier field and petrologic studies subdivided the AWP into two distinct zones: (1) a Granite Zone (GZ) comprised of relatively homogeneous granite with subtle differences in textures and mineralogy; (2) a Heterogeneous Zone (HZ), which interfingers the GZ, contains evidence for mafic and felsic magma input with a wide compositional range (42-78 wt% SiO2), and abundant field evidence for hybridization. Previous whole rock geochemistry and zircon trace element analyses indicated that compositional variation was produced by multi-component mixing between mafic and felsic melts within the HZ. New whole rock Sr, Nd, and Hf isotope data from the HZ show that all rocks (including high-silica granites) formed by mixing Precambrian crust and enriched mantle, with mixtures having a large mantle fraction (≥50%). New Hf (n=189) and O (n=241) isotope analyses of zircon from samples in the HZ confirm these melt sources and provide a broader perspective on hybridization processes within the AWP. Zircon grains from all samples show heterogeneous Hf and O isotopic compositions (-5 to -18 ɛHf; 4.5-7.5% δ18O), but despite the clear signature of Precambrian crust in the whole rock data, obvious Precambrian zircons (or cores) were mostly absent; only one zircon was clearly Precambrian (ɛHf = -25). Resolvable intragrain variability is relatively limited (including the Precambrian grain, which is unzoned). Zircons from hand samples and from compositional groups also show heterogeneous ɛHf and δ18O values, although the spreads are more restricted than in the whole data set (6-10 ɛHf in granites, 5-7 ɛHf in intermediate "hybrids", 5-6 ɛHf in gabbro/diorite sheets). Oxygen isotope values for the zircons also show intra-handsample heterogeneity

  11. Computational-Experimental Processing of Boride/Carbide Composites by Reactive Infusion of Hf Alloy Melts into B4C

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-16

    elements from the Hf family (i.e., Hf, Ti and Zr ) into a capillary to understand the effects of surface tension and viscosity during processing of melts...project primarily investigated computationally the infusion of liquid elements from the Hf family (i.e., Hf, Ti and Zr ) into a capillary to understand the... effects of surface tension and viscosity during processing of melts with a packed bed of B4C to form boride-carbide precipitates. Although the

  12. Structure, optical properties and thermal stability of HfErO films deposited by simultaneous RF and VHF magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.Y. [Soochow University, College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Suzhou (China); Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, School of Tongda, Nanjing (China); Soochow University, Key Lab of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Technologies of Jiangsu Province and Key Lab of Modern Optical Technologies of Education Ministry of China, Suzhou (China); He, H.J.; Zhang, Z.; Jin, C.G.; Yang, Y.; Wang, Y.Y.; Ye, C. [Soochow University, College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Suzhou (China); Soochow University, Key Lab of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Technologies of Jiangsu Province and Key Lab of Modern Optical Technologies of Education Ministry of China, Suzhou (China); Zhuge, L.J. [Soochow University, Key Lab of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Technologies of Jiangsu Province and Key Lab of Modern Optical Technologies of Education Ministry of China, Suzhou (China); Soochow University, Analysis and Testing Center, Suzhou (China); Wu, X.M. [Soochow University, College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Suzhou (China); Soochow University, Key Lab of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Technologies of Jiangsu Province and Key Lab of Modern Optical Technologies of Education Ministry of China, Suzhou (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2015-01-23

    HfErO films are deposited on Si substrates by simultaneous radio frequency (RF) and very high frequency (VHF) magnetron sputtering technique. The content of the doped ingredient of Er and the body composition of HfO{sub x} are, respectively, controlled through the VHF and RF powers. Low content of Er doping in the HfErO films can be achieved, because the VHF source of 27.12 MHz has higher ion energy and lower ion flux than the RF source resulting in low sputtering rate in the magnetron sputtering system. The structure, optical properties and thermal stability of the HfErO films are investigated in this work. Results show that the doped content of Er is independently controlled by the VHF power. The oxygen vacancies are created by the Er incorporation. The hafnium in the HfErO films forms mixed valence of Hf{sup 2+} and Hf{sup 4+}. The HfErO films are composed with the structures of HfO{sub 2}, HfO and ErO{sub x}, which can be optimized through the VHF power. At high VHF power, the Hf-Er-O bonds are formed, which demonstrates that the Er atoms are doped into the lattice of HfO{sub 2} in the HfErO films. The HfErO films have bad thermal stability as the crystallization temperature decreases from 900 to 800 C. After thermal annealing, cubic phase of HfO{sub 2} are stabilized, which is ascribed to the oxygen vacancies creation by the Er incorporation. The optical properties such as the refractive index and the optical band gap of the HfErO films are optimized by the VHF power. (orig.)

  13. Archean Lithosphere Beneath Arctic Canada: Lu-Hf Isotope Systematics for Kimberlite-Hosted Garnet-Peridotites From Somerset Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidberger, S. S.; Simonetti, A.; Francis, D.; Gariepy, C.

    2001-05-01

    Knowledge of the age of lithospheric mantle underlying the continents provides valuable constraints for the timing of formation and stabilization of Archean cratons. This study reports Lu-Hf isotopic data for garnet-peridotites, and their constituent garnets, from the Nikos kimberlite (100 Ma) on Somerset Island in the Canadian Arctic obtained using a Micromass IsoProbe multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) at GEOTOP-UQAM. The low temperature peridotites (1100 C; 160-190 km) and their 176Hf/177Hf(0.1Ga) isotopic compositions (0.28265-0.28333; \\epsilonHf(0.1Ga)=-2 to +22) are less radiogenic than those of the shallow xenoliths. A Lu-Hf isochron for six peridotites yields a mid Archean age of 3.4\\pm0.3 Ga and an initial 176Hf/177Hf ratio of 0.28101\\pm24. The remaining peridotites (n=9), in contrast, are characterized by extremely high (+35) initial \\epsilonHf(3.4Ga) values, which correlate negatively with their 176Lu/177Hf ratios, suggesting addition of Hf as a result of metasomatic interaction with the host kimberlite. The garnets from the low temperature (3.4 Ga old) peridotites are characterized by high 176Lu/177Hf ratios and define an errorchron age of 1.4\\pm0.2 Ga, which may reflect re-equilibration of Hf during kimberlite magmatism.

  14. Design for human factors (DfHF): a grounded theory for integrating human factors into production design processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Village, Judy; Searcy, Cory; Salustri, Filipo; Patrick Neumann, W

    2015-01-01

    The 'design for human factors' grounded theory explains 'how' human factors (HF) went from a reactive, after-injury programme in safety, to being proactively integrated into each step of the production design process. In this longitudinal case study collaboration with engineers and HF Specialists in a large electronics manufacturer, qualitative data (e.g. meetings, interviews, observations and reflections) were analysed using a grounded theory methodology. The central tenet in the theory is that when HF Specialists acclimated to the engineering process, language and tools, and strategically aligned HF to the design and business goals of the organisation, HF became a means to improve business performance. This led to engineers 'pulling' HF Specialists onto their team. HF targets were adopted into engineering tools to communicate HF concerns quantitatively, drive continuous improvement, visibly demonstrate change and lead to benchmarking. Senior management held engineers accountable for HF as a key performance indicator, thus integrating HF into the production design process. Practitioner Summary: Research and practice lack explanations about how HF can be integrated early in design of production systems. This three-year case study and the theory derived demonstrate how ergonomists changed their focus to align with design and business goals to integrate HF into the design process.

  15. Photocurrent generation in carbon nanotube/cubic-phase HfO2 nanoparticle hybrid nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protima Rauwel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid material consisting of nonfunctionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and cubic-phase HfO2 nanoparticles (NPs with an average diameter of 2.6 nm has been synthesized. Free standing HfO2 NPs present unusual optical properties and a strong photoluminescence emission in the visible region, originating from surface defects. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that these NPs decorate the MWCNTs on topological defect sites. The electronic structure of the C K-edge in the nanocomposites was probed by electron energy loss spectroscopy, highlighting the key role of the MWCNT growth defects in anchoring HfO2 NPs. A combined optical emission and absorption spectroscopy approach illustrated that, in contrast to HfO2 NPs, the metallic MWCNTs do not emit light but instead expose their discrete electronic structure in the absorption spectra. The hybrid material manifests characteristic absorption features with a gradual merger of the MWCNT π-plasmon resonance band with the intrinsic defect band and fundamental edge of HfO2. The photoluminescence of the nanocomposites indicates features attributed to combined effects of charge desaturation of HfO2 surface states and charge transfer to the MWCNTs with an overall reduction of radiative recombination. Finally, photocurrent generation under UV–vis illumination suggests that a HfO2 NP/MWCNT hybrid system can be used as a flexible nanodevice for light harvesting applications.

  16. Superelasticity and Shape Memory Behavior of NiTiHf Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehitoglu, H.; Wu, Y.; Patriarca, L.; Li, G.; Ojha, A.; Zhang, S.; Chumlyakov, Y.; Nishida, M.

    2017-06-01

    The NiTiHf high-temperature shape memory alloys represent a significant advancement in extending the functionality of binary NiTi to elevated temperatures above 100 °C. Despite this potential, the previous results in the literature point to a disappointingly low shape memory strains with addition of Hf. On the other hand, based on theoretical analysis using the lattice constants, the transformation strains should increase substantially with increase in Hf content. The present paper addresses this discrepancy, and using atomistic simulations, determination of twinning modes in martensite with transmission electron microscopy, digital image measurements of habit plane orientation, and strains in single-crystal specimens show that the experimental transformation strains in NiTiHf indeed increase with increasing Hf to unprecedented strain levels near 20%. The Hf contents considered were in the range 6.25-25 at.%, and NiTi (0% Hf) results are provided as the baseline. The current work represents more than 60 experiments representing an extremely thorough study on single crystals and polycrystals.

  17. Isolation and Characterization of a Virulent Bacteriophage φPA-HF17 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Han

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important causative agent of nosocomial infection, is found throughout the hospital environment in moist reservoirs, and multidrug-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa have been increasingly reported worldwide. Bacteriophages are often considered potential therapeutic candidates in treating infectious diseases. In this study, a novel virulent bacteriophage φPA-HF17, specific infecting clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, was isolated and characterized from environmental sewage. Transmission electron microscopy showed that phage φPA-HF17 had an icosahedral head with a very short tail, and exhibited characteristics typical of a podovirus. Restriction analysis indicated that phage φPA-HF17 was a double-stranded DNA virus, which might be digested by some restriction endonucleases. Phage φPA-HF17 was highly infectious with a rapid adsorption (>90% adsorbed in 4 min. In a one-step growth experiment, phage φPA-HF17 was shown having a latent period of 10 minute, with corresponding burst sizes of 200 PFU/cell. Furthermore, when φPA-HF17 alone was incubated at different pHs and different temperatures, the phage was stable over a wide pH range (4 to 10 and at extreme temperature (50°C. These results suggest that φPA-HF17 may be candidate therapeutic phage to control P. aeruginosa infection.

  18. In-situ atomic layer deposition growth of Hf-oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karavaev, Konstantin

    2010-06-17

    We have grown HfO{sub 2} on Si(001) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using HfCl{sub 4}, TEMAHf, TDMAHf and H{sub 2}O as precursors. The early stages of the ALD were investigated with high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We observed the changes occurring in the Si 2p, O 1s, Hf 4f, Hf 4d, and Cl 2p (for HfCl{sub 4} experiment) core level lines after each ALD cycle up to the complete formation of two layers of HfO{sub 2}. The investigation was carried out in situ giving the possibility to determine the properties of the grown film after every ALD cycle or even after a half cycle. This work focused on the advantages in-situ approach in comparison with ex-situ experiments. The study provides to follow the evolution of the important properties of HfO{sub 2}: contamination level, density and stoichiometry, and influence of the experimental parameters to the interface layer formation during ALD. Our investigation shows that in-situ XPS approach for ALD gives much more information than ex-situ experiments. (orig.)

  19. Linear Trimeric Hafnium Clusters in Hf0.86(1I3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Beekhuizen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of hafnium tetraiodide, HfI4, with aluminum at 600 °C or 850 °C in the presence of a NaI flux resulted in black single crystals of Hf0.86(1I3. This composition corresponds well to the upper end of the non-stoichiometry range 0.89 ≤ x ≤ 1.00 previously reported for HfxI3. The crystal structure (a = 1250.3(2, c = 1999.6(3 pm, R-3m, Z = 18 is made up of hexagonal closest packed layers of iodide ions. One third of the octahedral holes would be filled as in TiI3 or ZrI3 if it were Hf1.00I3. In Hf0.86(1I3, one out of six octahedral holes along [001] are, however, only occupied by 16%. In contrast to TiI3-I and ZrI3, one striking structural feature is in the formation of linear hafnium trimers with identical Hf―Hf distances of 318.3(2 pm rather than the formation of dimers. These may be associated with Hf―Hf bonding although only 2.64 electrons are available for one Hf5.16I18 column.

  20. Microstructure and Phase Stability of Single Crystal NiAl Alloyed with Hf and Zr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locci, I. E.; Dickerson, R. M.; Garg, A.; Noebe, R. D.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Darolia, R.

    1996-01-01

    Six near stoichiometric, NiAl single-crystal alloys, with 0.05-1.5 at.% of Hf and Zr additions plus Si impurities, were microstructurally analyzed in the as-cast, homogenized, and aged conditions. Hafnium-rich interdendritic regions, containing the Heusler phase (Ni2AlHf), were found in all the as-cast alloys containing Hf. Homogenization heat treatments partially reduced these interdendritic segregated regions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of the as-cast and homogenized microstructures revealed the presence of a high density of fine Hf (or Zr) and Si-rich precipitates. These were identified as G-phase, Nil6X6Si7, or as an orthorhombic NiXSi phase, where X is Hf or Zr. Under these conditions the expected Heusler phase (beta') was almost completely absent. The Si responsible for the formation of the G and NiHfSi phases is the result of molten metal reacting with the Si-containing crucible used during the casting process. Varying the cooling rates after homogenization resulted in the refinement or complete suppression of the G and NiHfSi phases. In some of the alloys studied, long-term aging heat treatments resulted in the formation of Heusler precipitates, which were more stable at the aging temperature and coarsened at the expense of the G-phase. In other alloys, long-term aging resulted in the formation of the NiXSi phase. The stability of the Heusler or NiXSi phases can be traced to the reactive element (Hf or Zr) to silicon ratio. If the ratio is high, then the Heusler phase appears stable after long time aging. If the ratio is low, then the NiHfSi phase appears to be the stable phase.

  1. Vibrational relaxation of hydrogen fluoride by HF dimers in a laser excited nozzle beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, E.L.; Rubahn, H.; Toennies, J.P.; Wanner, J.

    1986-09-01

    An HF nozzle beam and a cw HF laser beam in a coaxial and antiparallel arrangement facilitated exciting HF molecules vibrationally in v-italic = 1,J-italic up to the saturation limit. A beam consisting exclusively of monomeric HF was generated by heating the beam source to 600 K and was confirmed using a mass spectrometer. Energy-flux measurements made using a bolometer indicate that the vibrational energy distribution initiated by the laser is conserved, confirming that V--T energy transfer to monomers is slow. The maximum measured flux of HF(v-italic = 1,J-italic) molecules was 1.5 x 10/sup 17/ molecules s/sup -1/ sr/sup -1/ at 670 mbar stagnation pressure. Beams consisting of a mixture of monomeric and polymeric HF were generated using appropriate combinations of source temperature and pressure. In the presence of dimers, the excited monomers relax rapidly by a fast V--V transfer and subsequent predissociation of the metastable dimers. The loss of beam energy due to energy transport by the departing dimer fragments was detected bolometrically. The laser-induced depletion of dimers was determined over a wide source pressure range at T-italic/sub 0/ = 300 K using a mass spectrometer. From a kinetic model of these dimer-depletion data, the product of cross section and transfer probability for V--V energy transfer from HF (v-italic = 1) monomers to dimers was deduced to be 14 A-circle/sup 2/. The terminal-dimer-concentration equation for HF nozzle beams was refined. An analysis of the energy fluxes measured by the bolometer with no laser excitation of the beam revealed that, for an HF nozzle beam, the flow from the source to the detector is, in general, nonisenthalpic due to the onset of dimerization. Mach-number focusing enriches the dimer mole fractions detected by the bolometer.

  2. Properties of HfAlO film deposited by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Duo [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changning Road 865, Shanghai 200050 (China); Cheng, Xinhong, E-mail: xh_cheng@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changning Road 865, Shanghai 200050 (China); Jia, Tingting; Zheng, Li; Xu, Dawei; Wang, Zhongjian; Xia, Chao; Yu, Yuehui [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changning Road 865, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) method can reduce film growing temperature, and allow in situ plasma treatment. In this work, HfAlO and HfO{sub 2} films were deposited with PEALD at 160 °C. Microstructure analysis showed that both films were amorphous after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatment, and HfAlO sample showed better interfacial structure than HfO{sub 2}. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra indicated that main component of the interfacial layer of HfAlO sample was Hf–Si–O and Al–Si–O bonds, the valence band offset value between the HfAlO film and Si substrate was calculated to be 2.5 eV. The dominant leakage current mechanism of the samples was Schottky emission at a low electric field (<1.4 MV/cm), and Poole–Frenkel emission mechanism at a higher electric field (>1.4 MV/cm). The equivalent oxide thicknesses (EOT) of the HfAlO samples were 1.0 nm and 1.3 nm, respectively. The density of interface states between dielectric and substrate were calculated to be 1.2 × 10{sup 12} eV{sup −1}cm{sup −2} and 1.3 × 10{sup 12} eV{sup −1}cm{sup −2}, respectively. In comparison with HfO{sub 2} film, HfAlO film has good interfacial structure and electrical performance.

  3. Ti insertion in the MTe5 (M = Zr, Hf structure type: Hf0.78Ti0.22Te5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoseop Yun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The group 5 mixed-metal telluride, Hf0.78Ti0.22Te5 (hafnium titanium pentatelluride, is isostructural with the binary phases HfTe5 and ZrTe5 and forms a layered structure extending parallel to (010. The layers are made up from chains of bicapped metal-centered trigonal prisms and zigzag Te chains. The metal site (site symmetry m2m is occupied by statistically disordered Hf [78.1 (5%] and Ti [21.9 (5%]. In addition to the regular Te—Te pair [2.7448 (13 Å] forming the short base of the equilateral triangle of the trigonal prism, an intermediate Te...Te separation [2.9129 (9 Å] is also found. The classical charge balance of the compound can be described as [M4+][Te2−][Te22−][Te20] (M = Hf, Ti. The individual metal content can vary in different crystals, apparently forming a random substitutional solid solution (Hf1-xTixTe5, with 0.15 ≤ x ≤ 0.22.

  4. First-principles calculated spin-gapless semiconducting behavior in quaternary VCoHfGa and CrFeHfGa Heusler compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiude; Wu, Xiaolin [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Zunyi Normal College, Zunyi 563002 (China); Wu, Bo, E-mail: fqwubo@zync.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Zunyi Normal College, Zunyi 563002 (China); School of Marine Science and Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xian 710072 (China); Feng, Yu [School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Li, Ping [Institute for Clean Energy & Advanced Materials (ICAEM), Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Huang, Haishen [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Zunyi Normal College, Zunyi 563002 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of quaternary Heusler alloy [VCo,CrFe]HfGa were detected theoretically. • The quaternary Heusler alloy [VCo,CrFe]HfGa are (or are nearly) spin gapless semiconductors at the lowest energy state. • The ferromagnetic coupling plays an important role in magnetism. - Abstract: By using generalized gradient approximation (GGA) scheme within the density functional theory (DFT), the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of LiMgPdSn-type quaternary Heusler alloy CrFeHfGa and VCoHfGa were detected compressively. The results reveal that the two alloys are (or are nearly) potential spin gapless semiconductors with a magnetic moment of 3 μ{sub B} per primitive cell and the minority-spin gap of 0.8 eV and 0.6 eV at Fermi level (ε{sub F}) during the rate of lattice change of about −5%, respectively. We deduce that the ferromagnetic coupling among transitional metals plays an important role in magnetism of Heusler alloy [CrFe,VCo]HfGa.

  5. First-principles study of the (001) surface of cubic PbHfO3 and BaHfO3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ni Guang-Xin; Wang Yuan-Xu

    2009-01-01

    Using first-principles techniques, we investigate the (001) surfaces of cubic PbHfO3 (PHO) and BaHfO3 (BHO) terminated with both AO (A=Pb and Ba) and HfO2- Surface structure, partial density of states, band structure, and surface energy are obtained. The BaO surface is found to be similar to its counterpart in BHO. For the HfO2-terminated surface of cubic PHO, the largest relaxation appears on the second-layer atoms but not on the first-layer ones. The analysis of the structure relaxation parameters reveals that the rumpling of the (001) surface for PHO is stronger than that for BHO. The surface thermodynamic stability is explored, and it is found that both the PbO- and the BaO-terminated surfaces are more stable than the HfO2-terminated surfaces for PHO and BHO, respectively. The surface energy calculations show that the (001) surface of PHO is more easily constructed than that of BHO.

  6. Recent progress in AMS measurement of 182Hf at the CIAE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhen-Yu; LI Heng; WU Shao-Yong; YUAN Jian; JIANG Shan; HE Ming; DONG Ke-Jun; HE Guo-Zhu; LI Chao-Li; HE Xian-Wen; ZHANG Wei; HU Hao; ZHENG Guo-Wen

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurement for 182Hf/180Hf,a series of measurements have been taken in the AMS laboratory at the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE).The major ones include the instantaneous monitoring of 180HfF-5current,testing the stability of transmission,the alternate measurements of an unknown sample and standard,and the origin identification and minimization of background 182W.The experimental details and the improvement in the measurement accuracy,as well as some useful suggestions for better satisfying the requirements of certain practical applications,are presented in this paper.

  7. Crystal structure of Na2HfSi2O7 by Rietveld refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Massoni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The structure of triclinic disodium hafnium disilicate, Na2HfSi2O7, has been determined by laboratory powder X-ray diffraction and refined by the Rietveld refinement. The structure is a framework made of alternate layers of HfO6 octahedra and SiO4 tetrahedra linked by common O atoms. Sodium atoms are located in the voids of the framework, aligned into tunnels along the [010] direction. Na2HfSi2O7 is isostructural with the parakeldyshite Na2ZrSi2O7 phase.

  8. Structural and thermal properties of Cu-Hf-Ti bulk amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontó, V.; Nagy, E.; Svéda, M.; Roósz, A.; Tranta, F.

    2009-01-01

    Cu-Hf-Ti amorphous alloys are high strength and wear resistant materials. Master alloys of Cu57.5Hf27.5Ti15 and Cu57.5Hf25Ti17.5 ternary alloys have been prepared by arc melting, and wedge and rod shaped samples have been cast by centrifugal casting. Liquidus and solidus temperatures of the alloys were determined by DTA. The fully amorphous size was determined by X-ray diffraction. Thermodynamic properties of the amorphous alloys were studied by DSC measurements and Kissinger analyses were performed.

  9. Artificial Ionization and UHF Radar Response Associated with HF Frequencies near Electron Gyro-Harmonics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, B. J.; Fallen, C. T.; Secan, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results from O-mode ionospheric heating experiments at the HAARP facility in Alaska to demonstrate that the magnitude of artificial ionization production is critically dependent on the choice of HF frequency near gyro-harmonics. For O-mode heating in the lower F-region ionosphere, typically about 200 km altitude, artificial ionization enhancements are observed in the lower ionosphere (about 150 - 220 km) and also in the topside ionosphere above about 500 km. Lower ionosphere density enhancements are inferred from HF-enhanced ion and plasma-line signals observed with UHF radar. Upper ionospheric density enhancements have been observed with TEC (total electron content) experiments by monitoring satellite radio beacons where signal paths traverse the HF-modified ionosphere. Both density enhancements and corresponding upward plasma fluxes have also been observed in the upper ionosphere via in-situ satellite observations. The data presented focus mainly on observations near the third and fourth gyro-harmonics. The specific values of the height-dependent gyro-harmonics have been computed from a magnetic model of the field line through the HF heated volume. Experiments with several closely spaced HF frequencies around the gyro-harmonic frequency region show that the magnitude of the lower-ionosphere artificial ionization production maximizes for HF frequencies about 1.0 - 1.5 MHz above the gyro-harmonic frequency. The response is progressively larger as the HF frequency is increased in the frequency region near the gyro-harmonics. For HF frequencies that are initially greater than the gyro-harmonic value the UHF radar scattering cross-section is relatively small, and non-existent or very weak signals are observed; as the signal returns drop in altitude due to density enhancements the HF interaction region passes through lower altitudes where the HF frequency is less than the gyro-harmonic value, for these conditions the radar scattering cross-section is

  10. Graphene contacts to a HfSe2/SnS2 heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shanshan; Das, Protik; Ge, Supeng; Lake, Roger K.

    2017-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures and all-2D contacts are of high interest for electronic device applications, and the SnS2/HfSe2 bilayer heterostructure with graphene contacts has some unique, advantageous properties. The SnS2/HfSe2 heterostructure is interesting because of the strong intermixing of the two conduction bands and the large work function of the SnS2. The band lineup of the well separated materials indicates a type II heterostructure, but the conduction band minimum of the SnS2/HfSe2 bilayer is a coherent superposition of the orbitals from the two layers with a spectral weight of 60% on the SnS2 and 40% on the HfSe2 for AA stacking. These relative weights can be either increased or reversed by an applied vertical field. A 3 ×3 supercell of graphene and a 2 ×2 supercell of SnS2/HfSe2 have a lattice mismatch of 0.1% and both the SnS2/HfSe2 conduction band at M and the graphene Dirac point at K are zone-folded to Γ . Placing graphene on the SnS2/HfSe2 bilayer results in large n-type charge transfer doping of the SnS2/HfSe2 bilayer, on the order of 1013/cm2, and the charge transfer is accompanied by a negative Schottky barrier contact for electron injection from the graphene into the SnS2/HfSe2 bilayer conduction band. Binding energies and the anti-crossing gaps of the graphene and the SnS2/HfSe2 electronic bands both show that the coupling of graphene to the HfSe2 layer is significantly larger than its coupling to the SnS2 layer. A tunneling Hamiltonian estimate of the contact resistance of the graphene to the SnS2/HfSe2 heterostructure predicts an excellent low-resistance contact.

  11. Control of photoassociation reaction F+H→HF with ultrashort laser pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The laser-induced vibrational state-selectivity of product HF in photoassociation reaction H+F→HF is theoretically investigated by using the time-dependent quantum wave packet method. The population transfer process from the continuum state down to the bound vibrational states can be controlled by the driving laser. The effects of laser pulse parameters and the initial momentum of the two collision atoms on the vibrational population of the product HF are discussed in detail. Photodissociation accompanied with the photoassociation process is also described.

  12. [18F]Fluoride recovery via gaseous [18F]HF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiessen, Bente; Jensen, Mikael; Zhuravlev, Fedor

    2011-01-01

    Acidification of target water with H2SO4 in a specially constructed glassy carbon/polyethylene apparatus allowed for recovery of up to 82% of [18F]fluoride as [18F]HF gas. The [18F]HF distillate was found to be acid-free but moist; when passed through a solution of tBuPh2SiOTf, it yielded [18F......]tBuPh2SiF. The multivariate design of experiment showed that the key to high yield of [18F]HF was the efficient degassing of the reaction mixture....

  13. The role of phosphates for the Lu-Hf chronology of meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaille, Vinciane; Van Orman, James; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Amelin, Yuri

    2017-09-01

    The 176Lu-176Hf isotopic system is widely used for dating and tracing cosmochemical and geological processes, but still suffers from two uncertainties. First, Lu-Hf isochrons for some early Solar System materials have excess slope of unknown origin that should not be expected for meteorites with ages precisely determined with other isotopic chronometers. This observation translates to an apparent Lu decay constant higher than the one calculated by comparing ages obtained with various dating methods on terrestrial samples. Second, unlike the well constrained Sm/Nd value (to within 2%) for the chondritic uniform reservoir (CHUR), the Lu/Hf ratios in chondrites vary up to 18% when considering all chondrites, adding uncertainty to the Lu/Hf CHUR value. In order to better understand the Lu-Hf systematics of chondrites, we analyzed mineral fractions from the Richardton H5 chondrite to construct an internal Lu-Hf isochron, and set up a numerical model to investigate the effect of preferential diffusion of Lu compared to Hf from phosphate, the phase with the highest Lu-Hf ratio in chondrites, to other minerals. The isochron yields an age of 4647 ± 210 million years (Myr) using the accepted 176Lu decay constant of 1.867 ± 0.008 ×10-11yr-1. Combining this study with the phosphate fractions measured in a previous study yields a slope of 0.08855 ± 0.00072, translating to a 176Lu decay constant of 1.862 ± 0.016 ×10-11yr-1 using the Pb-Pb age previously obtained, in agreement with the accepted value. The large variation of the Lu/Hf phosphates combined with observations in the present study identify phosphates as the key in perturbing Lu-Hf dating and generating the isochron slope discrepancy. This is critical as apatite has substantially higher diffusion rates of rare earth elements than most silicate minerals that comprise stony meteorites. Results of numerical modeling depending of temperature peak, size of the grains and duration of the metamorphic event, show that

  14. Interaction of La2O3 capping layers with HfO2 gate dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copel, M.; Guha, S.; Bojarczuk, N.; Cartier, E.; Narayanan, V.; Paruchuri, V.

    2009-11-01

    We report the effect of La2O3 capping layers on HfO2/SiO2/Si dielectrics, proposed for use in threshold voltage tuning of field effect transistors. Depth profiling with medium energy ion scattering shows that an initial surface layer of La2O3 diffuses through the HfO2 at elevated temperatures, ultimately converting some of the thin interfacial SiO2 into a silicate. Core-level photoemission measurements indicate that the additional band-bending induced by the La2O3 only appears after diffusion, and the added charge resides between the HfO2 and the substrate.

  15. Evaluation of spring organic treatments against Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in honey bee Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies in eastern Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovenazzo, Pierre; Dubreuil, Pascal

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the efficacy of two organic acid treatments, formic acid (FA) and oxalic acid (OA) for the spring control of Varroa destructor (Anderson and Trueman) in honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies. Forty-eight varroa-infested colonies were randomly distributed amongst six experimental groups (n = 8 colonies per group): one control group (G1); two groups tested applications of different dosages of a 40 g OA/l sugar solution 1:1 trickled on bees (G2 and G3); three groups tested different applications of FA: 35 ml of 65% FA in an absorbent Dri-Loc(®) pad (G4); 35 ml of 65% FA poured directly on the hive bottom board (G5) and MiteAwayII™ (G6). The efficacy of treatments (varroa drop), colony development, honey yield and hive survival were monitored from May until September. Five honey bee queens died during this research, all of which were in the FA treated colonies (G4, G5 and G6). G6 colonies had significantly lower brood build-up during the beekeeping season. Brood populations at the end of summer were significantly higher in G2 colonies. Spring honey yield per colony was significantly lower in G6 and higher in G1. Summer honey flow was significantly lower in G6 and higher in G3 and G5. During the treatment period, there was an increase of mite drop in all the treated colonies. Varroa daily drop at the end of the beekeeping season (September) was significantly higher in G1 and significantly lower in G6. The average number of dead bees found in front of hives during treatment was significantly lower in G1, G2 and G3 versus G4, G5 and G6. Results suggest that varroa control is obtained from all spring treatment options. However, all groups treated with FA showed slower summer hive population build-up resulting in reduced honey flow and weaker hives at the end of summer. FA had an immediate toxic effect on bees that resulted in queen death in five colonies. The OA treatments that were tested have minimal toxic impacts on the

  16. A Toolbox for Quantitative Gene Expression in Varroa destructor: RNA Degradation in Field Samples and Systematic Analysis of Reference Gene Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ewan M; McIntosh, Catriona H; Bowman, Alan S

    2016-01-01

    Varroa destructor is the major pest of Apis mellifera and contributes to the global honey bee health crisis threatening food security. Developing new control strategies to combat Varroa will require the application of molecular biology, including gene expression studies by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Both high quality RNA samples and suitable stable internal reference genes are required for accurate gene expression studies. In this study, ten candidate genes (succinate dehydrogenase (SDHA), NADH dehydrogenase (NADH), large ribsosmal subunit, TATA-binding protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, 18S rRNA (18S), heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90), cyclophilin, α-tubulin, actin), were evaluated for their suitability as normalization genes using the geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and comparative ΔCq algorithims. Our study proposes the use of no more than two of the four most stable reference genes (NADH, 18S, SDHA and HSP90) in Varroa gene expression studies. These four genes remain stable in phoretic and reproductive stage Varroa and are unaffected by Deformed wing virus load. When used for determining changes in vitellogenin gene expression, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the relatively unstable genes actin and α-tubulin was much lower than for the stable gene combinations (NADH + HSP90 +18S; NADH + HSP90; or NADH). Using both electropherograms and RT-qPCR for short and long amplicons as quality controls, we demonstrate that high quality RNA can be recovered from Varroa up to 10 days later stored at ambient temperature if collected into RNAlater and provided the body is pierced. This protocol allows the exchange of Varroa samples between international collaborators and field sample collectors without requiring frozen collection or shipping. Our results make important contributions to gene expression studies in Varroa by proposing a validated sampling protocol to obtain high quality Varroa RNA and the

  17. Rapid method for DNA extraction from the honey bee Apis mellifera and the parasitic bee mite Varroa destructor using lysis buffer and proteinase K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, M R C; Figueiredo, V L C; De Jong, D; Sakamoto, C H; Simões, Z L P

    2013-10-22

    We developed a rapid method for extraction of DNA from honey bees, Apis mellifera, and from the parasitic bee mite, Varroa destructor. The advantages include fast processing and low toxicity of the substances that are utilized. We used lysis buffer with nonionic detergents to lyse cell walls and proteinase K to digest proteins. We tested whole thorax, thoracic muscle mass, legs, and antennae from individual bees; the mites were processed whole (1 mite/sample). Each thorax was incubated whole, without cutting, because exocuticle color pigment darkened the extraction solution, interfering with PCR results. The procedure was performed with autoclaved equipment and laboratory gloves. For each sample, we used 100 µL lysis buffer (2 mL stock solution of 0.5 M Tris/HCl, pH 8.5, 10 mL stock solution of 2 M KCl, 500 µL solution of 1 M MgCl2, 2 mL NP40, and 27.6 g sucrose, completed to 200 mL with bidistilled water and autoclaved) and 2 µL proteinase K (10 mg/mL in bidistilled water previously autoclaved, as proteinase K cannot be autoclaved). Tissues were incubated in the solutions for 1-2 h in a water bath (62°-68 °C) or overnight at 37 °C. After incubation, the tissues were removed from the extraction solution (lysis buffer + proteinase K) and the solution heated to 92 °C for 10 min, for proteinase K inactivation. Then, the solution with the extracted DNA was stored in a refrigerator (4°-8 °C) or a freezer (-20 °C). This method does not require centrifugation or phenol/chloroform extraction. The reduced number of steps allowed us to sample many individuals/day. Whole mites and bee antennae were the most rapidly processed. All bee tissues gave the same quality DNA. This method, even using a single bee antenna or a single mite, was adequate for extraction and analysis of bee genomic and mitochondrial DNA and mite genomic DNA.

  18. A Toolbox for Quantitative Gene Expression in Varroa destructor: RNA Degradation in Field Samples and Systematic Analysis of Reference Gene Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ewan M.; McIntosh, Catriona H.; Bowman, Alan S.

    2016-01-01

    Varroa destructor is the major pest of Apis mellifera and contributes to the global honey bee health crisis threatening food security. Developing new control strategies to combat Varroa will require the application of molecular biology, including gene expression studies by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Both high quality RNA samples and suitable stable internal reference genes are required for accurate gene expression studies. In this study, ten candidate genes (succinate dehydrogenase (SDHA), NADH dehydrogenase (NADH), large ribsosmal subunit, TATA-binding protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, 18S rRNA (18S), heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90), cyclophilin, α-tubulin, actin), were evaluated for their suitability as normalization genes using the geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and comparative ΔCq algorithims. Our study proposes the use of no more than two of the four most stable reference genes (NADH, 18S, SDHA and HSP90) in Varroa gene expression studies. These four genes remain stable in phoretic and reproductive stage Varroa and are unaffected by Deformed wing virus load. When used for determining changes in vitellogenin gene expression, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the relatively unstable genes actin and α-tubulin was much lower than for the stable gene combinations (NADH + HSP90 +18S; NADH + HSP90; or NADH). Using both electropherograms and RT-qPCR for short and long amplicons as quality controls, we demonstrate that high quality RNA can be recovered from Varroa up to 10 days later stored at ambient temperature if collected into RNAlater and provided the body is pierced. This protocol allows the exchange of Varroa samples between international collaborators and field sample collectors without requiring frozen collection or shipping. Our results make important contributions to gene expression studies in Varroa by proposing a validated sampling protocol to obtain high quality Varroa RNA and the

  19. A Toolbox for Quantitative Gene Expression in Varroa destructor: RNA Degradation in Field Samples and Systematic Analysis of Reference Gene Stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan M Campbell

    Full Text Available Varroa destructor is the major pest of Apis mellifera and contributes to the global honey bee health crisis threatening food security. Developing new control strategies to combat Varroa will require the application of molecular biology, including gene expression studies by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Both high quality RNA samples and suitable stable internal reference genes are required for accurate gene expression studies. In this study, ten candidate genes (succinate dehydrogenase (SDHA, NADH dehydrogenase (NADH, large ribsosmal subunit, TATA-binding protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, 18S rRNA (18S, heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90, cyclophilin, α-tubulin, actin, were evaluated for their suitability as normalization genes using the geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and comparative ΔCq algorithims. Our study proposes the use of no more than two of the four most stable reference genes (NADH, 18S, SDHA and HSP90 in Varroa gene expression studies. These four genes remain stable in phoretic and reproductive stage Varroa and are unaffected by Deformed wing virus load. When used for determining changes in vitellogenin gene expression, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR for the relatively unstable genes actin and α-tubulin was much lower than for the stable gene combinations (NADH + HSP90 +18S; NADH + HSP90; or NADH. Using both electropherograms and RT-qPCR for short and long amplicons as quality controls, we demonstrate that high quality RNA can be recovered from Varroa up to 10 days later stored at ambient temperature if collected into RNAlater and provided the body is pierced. This protocol allows the exchange of Varroa samples between international collaborators and field sample collectors without requiring frozen collection or shipping. Our results make important contributions to gene expression studies in Varroa by proposing a validated sampling protocol to obtain high quality Varroa

  20. A first-principles high-pressure study of Hf2PX (X=B, C, N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Luo, Zhili; Liu, Zhe; Sun, Guodong; Wang, Zhenjun

    2017-06-01

    New members of MAX family Hf2PX (X=B, C, N) were studied by first-principles calculations under pressure range of 0-100 GPa. Their structural, elastic and electronic properties were reported. The results show that they are energetically stable at zero pressure and mechanically stable under pressure range from 0 to 100 GPa. It reveals that Hf2PB>Hf2PC>Hf2PN for the structural parameters of a and V, and Hf2PBpressure environments.

  1. Fabrication and characteristics of high-K HfO2 gate dielectrics on n-germanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han De-Dong; Kang Jin-Feng; Liu Xiao-Yan; Sun Lei; Luo Hao; Han Ru-Qi

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports that the high-K HfO2 gate dielectrics are fabricated on n-germanium substrates by sputtering Hf on Ge and following by a furnace annealing. The impacts of sputtering ambient, annealing ambient and annealing temperature on the electrical properties of high-K HfO2 gate dielectrics on germanium substrates are investigated.Experimental results indicate that high-K HfO2 gate dielectrics on germanium substrates with good electrical characteristics are obtained, the electrical properties of high-K HfO2 gate dielectrics is strongly correlated with sputtering ambient, annealing ambient and annealing temperature.

  2. Low modulus Ti-Nb-Hf alloy for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, M; Peña, J; Gil, F J; Manero, J M

    2014-09-01

    β-Type titanium alloys with a low elastic modulus are a potential strategy to reduce stress shielding effect and to enhance bone remodeling in implants used to substitute failed hard tissue. For biomaterial application, investigation on the mechanical behavior, the corrosion resistance and the cell response is required. The new Ti25Nb16Hf alloy was studied before and after 95% cold rolling (95% C.R.). The mechanical properties were determined by tensile testing and its corrosion behavior was analyzed by potentiostatic equipment in Hank's solution at 37°C. The cell response was studied by means of cytotoxicity evaluation, cell adhesion and proliferation measurements. The stress-strain curves showed the lowest elastic modulus (42GPa) in the cold worked alloy and high tensile strength, similar to that of Ti6Al4V. The new alloy exhibited better corrosion resistance in terms of open circuit potential (EOCP), but was similar in terms of corrosion current density (iCORR) compared to Ti grade II. Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the chemical composition of the alloy does not induce cytotoxic activity. Cell studies in the new alloy showed a lower adhesion and a higher proliferation compared to Ti grade II presenting, therefore, mechanical features similar to those of human cortical bone and, simultaneously, a good cell response.

  3. Anomalous phenomena on HF radio paths during geomagnetic disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoveshchenskii, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze ionospheric oblique sounding data on three high-latitude and one high-latitude-midlatitude HF radio paths for February 15 and 16, 2014, when two substorms and one magnetic storm occurred. We investigate cases of anomalous propagation of signals: their reflection from sporadic layer Es, lateral reflections, type "M" or "N" modes, the presence of traveling ionospheric disturbances, and the diffusivity of signals and triplets. The most significant results are the following. In geomagnetically undisturbed times, sporadic Es-layers with reduced maximum observed frequencies (MOF Es) on three high-latitude paths were observed in both days. The values of MOF Es during disturbances are large, which leads to the screening of other oblique sounding signals reflected from the ionosphere. On all four paths, the most frequently traveling ionospheric disturbances due to the terminator were observed in quiet hours from 03:00 to 15:00 UT on the first day and from 06:00 to 13:00 UT on the second day of the experiment. In addition, both the sunset terminator and the magnetic storm on the high-latitude-mid-latitude path were found to generate traveling ionospheric disturbances jointly. No such phenomenon was found on high-latitude paths.

  4. Large ionospheric disturbances produced by the HAARP HF facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Paul A.; Siefring, Carl L.; Briczinski, Stanley J.; McCarrick, Mike; Michell, Robert G.

    2016-07-01

    The enormous transmitter power, fully programmable antenna array, and agile frequency generation of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska have allowed the production of unprecedented disturbances in the ionosphere. Using both pencil beams and conical (or twisted) beam transmissions, artificial ionization clouds have been generated near the second, third, fourth, and sixth harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency. The conical beam has been used to sustain these clouds for up to 5 h as opposed to less than 30 min durations produced using pencil beams. The largest density plasma clouds have been produced at the highest harmonic transmissions. Satellite radio transmissions at 253 MHz from the National Research Laboratory TACSat4 communications experiment have been severely disturbed by propagating through artificial plasma regions. The scintillation levels for UHF waves passing through artificial ionization clouds from HAARP are typically 16 dB. This is much larger than previously reported scintillations at other HF facilities which have been limited to 3 dB or less. The goals of future HAARP experiments should be to build on these discoveries to sustain plasma densities larger than that of the background ionosphere for use as ionospheric reflectors of radio signals.

  5. Equatorial ionospheric disturbance observed through a transequatorial HF propagation experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Maruyama

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A transequatorial radio-wave propagation experiment at shortwave frequencies (HF-TEP was done between Shepparton, Australia, and Oarai, Japan, using the radio broadcasting signals of Radio Australia. The receiving facility at Oarai was capable of direction finding based on the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification algorithm. The results were plotted in azimuth-time diagrams (AT plots. During the daytime, the propagation path was close to the great circle connecting Shepparton and Oarai, thus forming a single line in the AT plots. After sunset, off-great-circle paths, or satellite traces in the AT plot, often appeared abruptly to the west and gradually returned to the great circle direction. However, there were very few signals across the great circle to the east. The off-great-circle propagation was very similar to that previously reported and was attributed to reflection by an ionospheric structure near the equator. From the rate of change in the direction, we estimated the drift velocity of the structure to range mostly from 100 to 300 m/s eastward. Multiple instances of off-great-circle propagation with a quasi-periodicity were often observed and their spatial distance in the east-west direction was within the range of large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (LS-TIDs. Off-great-circle propagation events were frequently observed in the equinox seasons. Because there were many morphological similarities, the events were attributed to the onset of equatorial plasma bubbles.

  6. Evaluación de la resistencia del ácaro Varroa destructor al fluvalinato en colonias de abejas (Apis mellifera en Yucatán, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Froylán Martínez Puc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La constante aplicación de piretroides para el control del ácaro Varroa destructor ha ocasionado la aparición de poblaciones de ácaros resistentes a este producto en diversas partes del mundo. Con la finalidad de detectar la posible existencia de poblaciones de ácaros resistentes al fluvalinato en el estado de Yucatán, uno de los principales estados productores de miel en México, se colectó un total de 12 muestras por cada apiario, seleccionando cuatro apiarios donde se ha utilizado de manera constante el fluvalinato para el control de V. destructor por un periodo de cinco años, y una cantidad de muestras similar provenientes de apiarios donde se han utilizado métodos de control alternativo durante un tiempo similar. Para determinar el porcentaje de mortalidad de los ácaros al fluvalinato, estos fueron expuestos a una pieza de 2.5 x 1.0 cm de Apistan® al 10%, por un periodo de 24 h. El porcentaje de mortalidad de varroas provenientes de apiarios tratados de manera constante con fluvalinato fue de 83.6 ± 0.51 %, inferior al porcentaje de mortalidad obtenido en los apiarios que sólo han recibido tratamiento alternativo el cual fue de 93.9 ± 1.98 %, existiendo diferencias entre ambos grupos (t=-3.93, P=0.01, gl= 46, lo cual indica una reducción en el porcentaje de mortalidad obtenido con el fluvalinato, sin embargo, esta reducción, aun no alcanza los niveles necesarios para reportar la presencia de ácaros resistentes, siendo importante cambiar las prácticas de manejo encaminadas a reducir los niveles de infestación de V. destructor, por lo que es recomendable la aplicación de métodos de control alternativo los cuales no ocasionan el desarrollo de resistencia en las poblaciones de ácaros.

  7. Formation of Al2O3-HfO2 Eutectic EBC Film on Silicon Carbide Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyosuke Seya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure, the preparation method, and the formation mechanism of the eutectic EBC layer on the silicon carbide substrate are summarized. Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic EBC film is prepared by optical zone melting method on the silicon carbide substrate. At high temperature, a small amount of silicon carbide decomposed into silicon and carbon. The components of Al2O3 and HfO2 in molten phase also react with the free carbon. The Al2O3 phase reacts with free carbon and vapor species of AlO phase is formed. The composition of the molten phase becomes HfO2 rich from the eutectic composition. HfO2 phase also reacts with the free carbon and HfC phase is formed on the silicon carbide substrate; then a high density intermediate layer is formed. The adhesion between the intermediate layer and the substrate is excellent by an anchor effect. When the solidification process finished before all of HfO2 phase is reduced to HfC phase, HfC-HfO2 functionally graded layer is formed on the silicon carbide substrate and the Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure grows from the top of the intermediate layer.

  8. Effects of Modified Precursor Solution on Microstructure of (Y,Yb)MnO3/HfO2/Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2007-10-01

    Ferroelectric/insulator/silicon structures were prepared using (Y,Yb)MnO3 films as ferroelectrics and HfO2 thin films as insulators through alkoxy-derived precursor solutions. The HfO2 solution was chemically modified in order to decrease the number of heating cycles required. The HfO2 films prepared using a partially hydrolyzed alkoxide solution had a uniform structure. From the results of measurements of the roughness level and refractive index of the HfO2 films, the partial hydrolysis of the HfO2 solution was found to be effective for the formation of a uniform microstructure in a thin insulator film. (Y,Yb)MnO3/HfO2/Si structures were constructed using the resultant HfO2 thin films prepared using the modified solutions.

  9. Effects of C and Hf concentration on phase relations and microstructure of a wrought powder-metallurgy superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    NASA IIB-11, a candidate alloy for advanced temperature turbine engine disks, and four modifications with varying C and Hf concentrations were produced from prealloyed powders. Several notable effects of C and Hf concentration in the alloys were observed. Both the amount of the gamma-prime phase and its solvus temperature increased with decreasing C, but only the gamma-prime solvus was affected by Hf, increasing with increasing Hf. Hf also promoted a cellular gamma-prime precipitation. Hf was, however, about equally distributed between gamma-prime and gamma. Hf and C both affected the carbides formed. Increasing both promoted formation of an MC relative to that of an M6C.

  10. The Modulation of Ionospheric Alfvén Resonator on Heating HF Waves and the Doppler Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ni Bin-bin; Zhao Zheng-yu; Xie Shu-guo

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: The propagation of HF waves in IAR can produce many nonlinear effects, including the modulation effect of IAR on HF waves and the Doppler effect. To start with the dependence of the ionospheric electron temperature variaof the modulation effect and lucubrate possible reasons for the field can have an observable modulation effect on HF waves while its mechanism is quite different from that of Schumann resonant field on HF waves. The depth of modulation of IAR field, which directly inspires the formation of cross-spectrum between ULF waves and HF waves and results in spectral peaks at some gyro-frequencies of IAR. With respect to the Doppler effect during the propagation of HF waves in IAR, it is mainly caused by the motion of the high-speed flyer and the drifting electrons and the frequency shift from the phase variation of the reflected waves can be neglected when the frequency of HF incident wave is high enough.

  11. Ferroelectric modulation of terahertz waves with graphene/ultrathin-Si:HfO2/Si structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ran; Han, Zuyin; Sun, Weideng; Du, Xianghao; Wu, Zhengran; Jung, Hyung-Suk

    2015-10-01

    Ferroelectric-field-effect-tunable modulation of terahertz waves in graphene/Si:HfO2/Si stack structure was observed. The modulation shows distinct behaviors when the samples under different gate polarities. At a negative voltage, a transmission modulation depth up to ˜74% was present without depending on the photo illumination power, whereas, at a positive voltage, the modulation of Thz wave shows dependence on the illumination power, which is ascribed to the creation/elimination of an extra barrier in Si layer in response to the polarization in the ferroelectric Si:HfO2 layer. Considering the good compatibility of HfO2 on Si-based semiconductor process, the ferroelectricity layer of Si:HfO2 may open up an avenue for the tunable modulation of Thz wave.

  12. Modulation of auroral electrojet currents using dual HF beams with ELF phase offset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkowski, M.; Cohen, M.; Moore, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The modulation of naturally occuring ionospheric currents with high power radio waves in the high frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) band is a well known technique for generation of extremely low frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) and very low frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) waves. We use the heating facility of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) to investigate the effect of using dual HF beams with an ELF/VLF phase offset between the modulation waveforms. Experiments with offset HF beams confirm the model of independent ELF/VLF sources. Experiments with co-located HF beams exhibit interaction between the first and second harmonics of the modulated tones when square and sine wave modulation waveforms are employed. Using ELF/VLF phase offsets for co-loacted beams is also shown to be a potential diagnostic for the D-region ionospheric profile.

  13. Hf diffusion in dilute Fe-free Zr(Nb) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, H.; Hood, G.M.; Roy, J.A.; Schultz, R.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Jackman, J.A. [Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1995-04-01

    Hf diffusion coefficients D have been measured in the {alpha}-phase of the Fe-free binary alloys Zr-1.0 at.% Nb and Zr-2.5 at.% Nb in the temperature range 830-1100 K. The D values for the two alloys are essentially indistinguishable and little different from extant Hf diffusion coefficients measured in Fe-free polycrystalline {alpha}-Zr. The temperature dependence of D in the alloys is characteristic of intrinsic {alpha}-Zr bulk behaviour. The present hf D values are much lower than corresponding values measured in commercial Zr-2.5 Nb. The difference is attributable to the influence of solid-solution Fe. In addition, the absence of a strong enhancement of Hf diffusion in {alpha}-Zr by Nb suggests that intrinsic Nb diffusion in {alpha}-Zr may not be controlled by a normal vacancy mechanism. (author).

  14. HF183/BFDrev and HumM2 qPCR data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Concentration estimates for HF183/BFDrev and HumM2 qPCR genetic markers in raw sewage collected from 54 geographic locations across the United States. This dataset...

  15. Phase Transformation and Thermal Stability of Aged Ti-Ni-Hf High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianglong MENG; Wei CAI; K.T.Lau; L.M.Zhou; Liancheng ZHAO

    2006-01-01

    The use of Ni-rich TiNiHf alloys as high temperature shape memory alloys(SMAs)through aging has been presented. For Ni-rich Ti80-xNixHf20 alloys, their phase transformation temperatures are averagely increased more than 100 K by aging at 823 K for 2 h. Especially for the alloys with Ni-content of 50.4 at. pct and 50.6 at. pct, their martensitic transformation start temperatures(Ms)are more than 473 K after aging. TEM observation confirmed that some fine particles precipitate from the matrix during aging. The aged Ni-rich TiNiHf SMAs show the better thermal stability of phase transformation temperatures than the solutiontreated TiNiHf alloys. The fine particles precipitated during aging should be responsible for the increase of phase transformation temperatures and its high stability.

  16. Luminescence and scintillation properties of Rb2HfCl6 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Keiichiro; Wakai, Yuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Koshimizu, Masanori; Yanagida, Takayuki; Nakauchi, Daisuke; Asai, Keisuke

    2016-11-01

    We developed a scintillator based on a Rb2HfCl6 crystal as a ternary halide crystal with intrinsic luminescence. In the photoluminescence spectra, two emission bands are observed at 383 and 434 nm. The 434 nm emission band for Rb2HfCl6 may be attributed to [HfCl6]2- complex ion or [ZrCl6]2- impurity, since the Rb2HfCl6 contained Zr as impurity at 0.62 mol %. The radioluminescence band is observed at 420 nm and can be attributed to the same origin as the photoluminescence band at 434 nm. The scintillation decay-time constants were 0.84 and 5.4 µs. The light yield was estimated to be 24,100 photons/MeV.

  17. Development of Hf(4+)-immobilized polydopamine-coated magnetic graphene for highly selective enrichment of phosphopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haizhu; Deng, Chunhui

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we first designed and synthesized an IMAC material with Hf(4+) immobilized on polydopamine-coated magnetic graphene and applied it to phosphopeptides enrichment successfully. The newly prepared material gathered the advantages of large specific surface area of graphene, good hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of polydopamine and superparamagnetism of Fe3O4. We investigated the performance of Hf(4+)-immobilized polydopamine-coated magnetic graphene (denoted as magG@PDA-Hf(4+)) in phosphopeptides enrichment and the results showed high selectivity and sensitivity of the new material. Finally, we successfully applied magG@PDA-Hf(4+) to phosphopeptides enrichment from non-fat milk digests and human serum, further demonstrating excellent performance of this new material in phosphopeptides enrichment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Intergrowth Structure in U- and Hf-Bearing Pyrochlore and Zirconolite: TEM Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H; Wang, Y; Zhao, P; Bourcier, W L; Van Konynenburg, R; Shaw, H F

    2002-12-04

    Transmission electron microscopy results from a sintered ceramics with stoichiometry of Ca(U{sub 0.5}Ce{sub 0.25}Hf{sub 0.25})Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} show the material contains both pyrochlore and zirconolite phases and structural intergrowth of zirconolite lamellae within pyrochlore. (001) plane of zirconolite is parallel to (111) plane of pyrochlore because of their structural similarities. The pyrochlore is relatively rich in U, Ce, and Ca with respect to the coexisting zirconolite. Average compositions for the coexisting pyrochlore and zirconolite produced by sintering at 1350 C are (Ca{sub 1.01}Ce{sub 0.13}{sup 3+}Ce{sub 0.19}{sup 4+}U{sub 0.52}Hf{sub 0.18})(Ti{sub 1.95}Hf{sub 0.05})O{sub 7} (with U/(U+Hf) (in the AB sites) = 0.74) and (Ca{sub 0.91}Ce{sub 0.09})(Ce{sub 0.08}{sup 3+}U{sub 0.26}Hf{sub 0.66}Ti{sub 0.01})Ti{sub 2.00}O{sub 7} (with U/(U+Hf) = 0.28) respectively. A single pyrochlore ((Ca,U,Hf){sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}) phase may be synthesized at 1350 C if the ratio of U/(U+Hf) is greater than 0.72, and a single zirconolite (Ca(Hf,U)Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}) phase may be synthesized at 1350 C if the ratio of U/(U+Hf) is less than 0.28. An amorphous leached layer that is rich in Ti and Hf forms on the surface after the ceramics has been leached in pH 4 buffered solution. The thickness of the layer ranges from 5 nm to 15 nm. It is suggested that under these conditions, the leached layer functions as a protective layer, and reduces the leaching rate over time.

  19. Subduction Controls of Hf and Nd Isotopes in Lavas of the Aleutian Island Arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yogodzinski, Gene; Vervoort, Jeffery; Brown, Shaun Tyler; Gerseny, Megan

    2010-08-29

    The Hf and Nd isotopic compositions of 71 Quaternary lavas collected from locations along the full length of the Aleutian island arc are used to constrain the sources of Aleutian magmas and to provide insight into the geochemical behavior of Nd and Hf and related elements in the Aleutian subduction-magmatic system. Isotopic compositions of Aleutian lavas fall approximately at the center of, and form a trend parallel to, the terrestrial Hf-Nd isotopic array with {var_epsilon}{sub Hf} of +12.0 to +15.5 and {var_epsilon}{sub Nd} of +6.5 to +10.5. Basalts, andesites, and dacites within volcanic centers or in nearby volcanoes generally all have similar isotopic compositions, indicating that there is little measurable effect of crustal or other lithospheric assimilation within the volcanic plumbing systems of Aleutian volcanoes. Hafnium isotopic compositions have a clear pattern of along-arc increase that is continuous from the eastern-most locations near Cold Bay to Piip Seamount in the western-most part of the arc. This pattern is interpreted to reflect a westward decrease in the subducted sediment component present in Aleutian lavas, reflecting progressively lower rates of subduction westward as well as decreasing availability of trench sediment. Binary bulk mixing models (sediment + peridotite) demonstrate that 1-2% of the Hf in Aleutian lavas is derived from subducted sediment, indicating that Hf is mobilized out of the subducted sediment with an efficiency that is similar to that of Sr, Pb and Nd. Low published solubility for Hf and Nd in aqueous subduction fluids lead us to conclude that these elements are mobilized out of the subducted component and transferred to the mantle wedge as bulk sediment or as a silicate melt. Neodymium isotopes also generally increase from east to west, but the pattern is absent in the eastern third of the arc, where the sediment flux is high and increases from east to west, due to the presence of abundant terrigenous sediment in the

  20. Microstructure and Elevated Temperature Properties of a Refractory TaNbHfZrTi Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    alloy was prepared by vacuum arc melting of the equimolar mixtures of the corresponding elements. Titanium, zirconium, and hafnium were in the form of...AND ELEVATED TEMPERATURE PROPERTIES OF A REFRACTORY TaNbHfZrTi ALLOY (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...6260-2. 14. ABSTRACT Compression properties of a refractory multicomponent alloy , Ta20Nb20Hf20Zr20Ti20, were determined in the temperature range

  1. The Instagram: A Novel Sounding Technique for Enhanced HF Propagation Advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The Instagram : A Novel Sounding Technique for Enhanced HF Propagation Advice Rod I. Barnes, G. Fred Earl Riverside Research Organization Rosslyn...low transmit powers, is reduced over conventional methods by up to three orders of magnitude leading to the term ‘ Instagram ’. The technique is...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Instagram : A Novel Sounding Technique for Enhanced HF Propagation Advice

  2. High-reflectivity HfO2/SiO2 ultraviolet mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchio, Philippe; Gatto, Alexandre; Alvisi, Marco; Albrand, Gérard; Kaiser, Norbert; Amra, Claude

    2002-06-01

    High-reflectivity dense multilayer coatings were produced for the ultraviolet spectral region. Thin-film single layers and UV mirrors were deposited by ion plating and plasma ion-assisted deposition high-energetic technologies. Optical characterizations of HfO2 and SiO2 single layers are made. The optical constants obtained for these two materials are presented. HfO2 and SiO2 mirrors with a reflectance of approximately 99% near 250 nm are reported.

  3. Soft Magnetic Thin Films FeCoHfO for High-Frequency Noise Suppression Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Guang-Duo; ZHANG Huai-Wu; TANG Xiao-Li

    2010-01-01

    @@ A series of FeCoHfO films were fabricated by dc magnetron reactive sputtering at varying partial pressure of oxygen(Po2)from 0 to 11.7%,and the electrical and magnetic properties of films have been studied.It is shown that optimal Fe43.29 Co19.51 Hf7.49O29.71 films with desired properties can be obtained when the films were prepared under Po2 = 5.1%.

  4. Creation of Artificial Ionospheric Layers Using High-Power HF Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-30

    Program ( HAARP ) transmitter in Gakona, Alaska. The HF- driven ionization process is initiated near the 2nd electron gyroharmonic at 220 km altitude in...the 3.6 MW High-Frequency Active Auroral Program ( HAARP ) transmitter in Gakona, Alaska. The HF-driven ionization process is initiated near the 2nd...Maine. USA. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union. 0094-8276/I0/2009GLO41895SO5.0O Research Program ( HAARP ) transmitter facility, however

  5. Characterization of Ionosphere Waveguide Propagation by Monitoring HAARP HF Transmissions in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-17

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2015-0024 CHARACTERIZATION OF IONOSPHERE WAVEGUIDE PROPAGATION BY MONITORING HAARP HF TRANSMISSIONS IN ANTARCTICA *Yuri M...31 December 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CHARACTERIZATION OF IONOSPHERE WAVEGUIDE PROPAGATION BY MONITORING HAARP HF TRANSMISSIONS IN ANTARCTICA 5a...investigating the possibility of exciting the ionospheric interlayer duct channel using powerful radiation from the heaters HAARP (Alaska, USA) and EISCAT

  6. Longitudinal Plasmoid in High-Speed Vortex Gas Flow Created by Capacity HF Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    instrumentation will be used in this Project to study plasma and gas flow parameters, including new shadow device with excimer KrF laser, MW...vortex decay (attenuation) by HF plasma. The additional experiments with small helium jet injection prove the conclusion about vortex attenuation by a...equilibrium HF plasma. Plasma and airflow parameters are measured by different diagnostic instrumentation including shadow optical device with excimer

  7. Electron scattering cross sections with HF, OH, NH and CH molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshipura, K.N. [Sardar Patel Univ., Vallabh Vidyanagar (India). Dept. of Physics; Vinodkumar, M. [Sardar Patel Univ., Vallabh Vidyanagar (India). Dept. of Physics

    1997-01-20

    Total cross sections including elastic scattering, electronic excitation-ionisation and the dipole rotational excitation are calculated for electron impact on HF, OH, NH, and CH molecules. The additivity rules as well as single-centre expansion are employed for this purpose. A comparison was possible for the e-HF system only. Our results are expected to be good at intermediate to high energies (>50 eV). (orig.).

  8. Estudio sobre la Eficacia a Campo del Amivar® contra Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae en Colmenas de Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae Research on Amivar® efficacy against Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae in honey bee colonies of Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Marcangeli

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo fue evaluar la eficacia del producto Amivar® para el control del ácaro Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman, en colmenas de abejas durante el otoño de 2003. El trabajo se llevó a cabo en el apiario experimental del Centro de Extensión Apícola ubicado en Coronel Vidal, provincia de Buenos Aires. Se trabajó sobre un total de 20 colmenas tipo Langstroth que se dividieron en dos grupos iguales. En el primer grupo se introdujo una tira de Amivar® (amitraz, 1gr, Apilab, Argentina en el centro del nido de cría de las colmenas. El segundo grupo, sólo recibió el tratamiento de Oxavar® para determinar el número total de ácaros presentes en las colmenas. Semanalmente, se recolectaron los ácaros muertos caídos en pisos especiales que evitaban que las abejas los eliminen. Posteriormente, los dos grupos recibieron tres dosis en total a intervalos de siete días de 5 ml del producto Oxavar® (Apilab-INTA, Argentina; 64,6 g/l; ácido oxálico en agua destilada por cuadro cubierto por abejas para eliminar los ácaros remanentes en las colonias y poder así calcular la eficacia del tratamiento. El producto Amivar® presentó una eficacia promedio de 85,05%±3,39 (rango=79,5 91,6, registrándose diferencias significativas frente al grupo control (pThe aim of this work was to evaluate the acaricide efficacy of Amivar® (amitraz, Apilab, Argentina to control Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman, in Apis mellifera colonies during the autumn 2003. Work was done at "Centro de Extensión Apícola" experimental apiary located in Coronel Vidal, province of Buenos Aires. Twenty Langstroth hives were used divided in two equal groups. The first group received one strip of Amivar® (amitraz, 1 gr in the center of brood area. The second one represented the control group. Dead mites were collected weekly from special floors designed to avoid mite removal by adult honeybees. Then, a total of three doses of 5 ml of Oxavar® at seven days

  9. Efecto de la cantidad de cría de abeja Apis mellifera (Apidae sobre la eficacia del Oxavar® para el control del ácaro Varroa destructor (Varroidae Effect of Apis mellifera (Apidae honeybee brood amount on Oxavar® acaricide efficacy against the mite Varroa destructor (Varroidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Marcangeli

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente trabajo fue evaluar la eficacia acaricida del Oxavar® en el control del ácaro ectoparásito Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman. El trabajo fue realizado en el apiario experimental del Centro de Extensión Apícola ubicado en Coronel Vidal, provincia de Buenos Aires. Se seleccionaron diez colmenas tipo Langstroth que fueron divididas en dos grupos: a cinco colmenas con tres cuadros cubiertos completamente de cría en desarrollo y b cinco colmenas con seis cuadros cubiertos por cría. Ambos grupos recibieron cinco ml of Oxavar® (Apilab, Argentina; 64,6 g/l de ácido oxálico en agua destilada por cuadro cubierto por abejas adultas en tres dosis a intervalos de siete días. Semanalmente, se colectaron los ácaros muertos de los pisos especiales provistos a las colmenas de estudio con el objeto de evitar su remoción por parte de las abejas. Una vez concluido el tratamiento, en cada colmena se introdujeron dos tiras plásticas de Apistan® (Roteh, Argentina para eliminar los ácaros remanentes y poder así calcular la eficacia acaricida del Oxavar®. Los resultados mostraron que la eficacia del Oxavar® en el primer grupo (85,6% ± 1,4 resultó significativamente superior a la registrada en el segundo grupo (75,7 ± 1,7. Estas diferencias fueron testeadas a partir del número total de ácaros eliminados por el Oxavar® y Apistan® en ambos grupos de colmenas (pThe aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of honeybee brood on acaricide efficacy of Oxavar® to control the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman. Work was done at Centro de Extensión Apícola experimental apiary located at Coronel Vidal, province of Buenos Aires. Ten Langstroth hives were selected and divided in two groups: a hives containing three honeybee combs full of brood and b hives containing six honeybee brood combs. Both groups received five ml of Oxavar® (Laboratorio Apilab, Argentina; 64.6 g/l oxalic acid in destilled water

  10. Ensayo a campo sobre la eficacia del Colmesan® contra el ácaro Varroa destructor (Varroidae en colmenas de Apis mellifera (Apidae Field assay of Colmesan® efficacy against the mite Varroa destructor (Varroidae in honey bee colonies of Apis mellifera (Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Marcangeli

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo fue evaluar la eficacia del producto Colmesan® para el control del ácaro Varroa destructor (Anderson &Trueman en colmenas de abejas durante el otoño de 2003. El trabajo se llevó a cabo en el apiario experimental ubicado en la ciudad de La Plata, provincia de Buenos Aires. Se trabajó sobre un total de 10 colmenas tipo "Langstroth" que se dividieron en dos grupos iguales. El primer grupo recibió dos dosis de Colmesan® (amitraz, 2,05 g, aplicadas a intervalos de 10 días. El segundo grupo, no recibió ningún tipo de tratamiento. Semanalmente, se recolectaron los ácaros muertos caídos en pisos especiales que evitaban que las abejas los eliminen. Posteriormente, los dos grupos recibieron tres dosis semanales de 5 ml del producto Oxavar® (64,6g/l ácido oxálico en agua destilada por cuadro cubierto por abejas para eliminar los ácaros remanentes en las colonias y poder así calcular la eficacia del tratamiento. El producto Colmesan® presentó una eficacia promedio de 70,92% ± 11,93 (rango = 57,92 - 85,42, registrándose diferencias significativas frente al grupo control (pThe aim of this work was to evaluate the acaricide efficacy of Colmesan® to control Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman in Apis mellifera (L. colonies during the autumn 2003. Work was done at an experimental apiary located in La Plata city, province of Buenos Aires. Ten Langstroth hives were used divided in two equal groups. The first group received Colmesan® (amitraz, 2,05 g in 2 doses at 10 days period. The second one represented the control group. Dead mites were collected weekly from special floors designed to avoid mite removal by adult honeybees. Then, 3 weekly doses of 5 ml of Oxavar® (64.6 g/l oxalic acid in destilled water were placed in each colony to kill remanent mites and the acaricide efficacy was calculated. Colmesan® showed an average acaricide efficacy of 70.92% ± 11.93 (range = 57.92 -85.42, showing significant

  11. Control del parásito Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae en colmenas de la abeja Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae mediante la aplicación de la técnica de entrampado Control of the parasite Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae in honeybee colonies of Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae applying brood trap combs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Damiani

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available La parasitosis causada por el ácaro Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman es, actualmente considerada el mayor escollo para el desarrollo de la apicultura. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue evaluar la técnica del entrampamiento de ácaros en panales de cría, como posible método de control de la parasitosis. El trabajo se llevó a cabo en Coronel Vidal, provincia de Buenos Aires. Se trabajó sobre colmenas tipo Langstroth del híbrido regional de Apis mellifera (Linneaus. En cada colmena experimental se procedió a confinar a la reina en panales trampa específicos, con el fin de poder controlar la oviposición. Estos panales, luego de ser operculados por las obreras, fueron llevados al laboratorio donde se desoperculó cada una de las celdas de cría, y se contabilizó el número de ácaros presentes. Esta técnica se aplicó variando el número de panales trampa (1-3 colocados, tanto para los constituidos por celdas de cría de obreras como de zánganos. También, se evaluó el impacto de la aplicación de esta técnica sobre el desarrollo de las colonias, mediante la medición de su productividad. Los resultados indican, que la técnica empleada sólo es efectiva, cuando se aplican tres panales de cría de zánganos de manera consecutiva, alcanzando una efectividad máxima de 84%. Cuando se aplican tres panales de obreras, la técnica mostró niveles de efectividad muy inferiores (14%. En las colonias sobre las que se aplicó esta técnica, la productividad de miel se redujo significativamente, comparada con las colonias control. Esta técnica resulta ideal para ser combinada con otros mecanismos de control, disminuyendo la aplicación de sustancias químicas que puedan contaminar la miel, y la generación de resistencia por parte del ácaro frente a los principios activos utilizados para su control.At present, Varroosis is considered the major problem to beekeeping development. The aim of this work was to evaluate brood tramp combs

  12. Ultrathin Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 Ferroelectric Films on Si.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernikova, Anna; Kozodaev, Maksim; Markeev, Andrei; Negrov, Dmitrii; Spiridonov, Maksim; Zarubin, Sergei; Bak, Ohheum; Buragohain, Pratyush; Lu, Haidong; Suvorova, Elena; Gruverman, Alexei; Zenkevich, Andrei

    2016-03-23

    Because of their immense scalability and manufacturability potential, the HfO2-based ferroelectric films attract significant attention as strong candidates for application in ferroelectric memories and related electronic devices. Here, we report the ferroelectric behavior of ultrathin Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 films, with the thickness of just 2.5 nm, which makes them suitable for use in ferroelectric tunnel junctions, thereby further expanding the area of their practical application. Transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction analysis of the films grown on highly doped Si substrates confirms formation of the fully crystalline non-centrosymmetric orthorhombic phase responsible for ferroelectricity in Hf0.5Zr0.5O2. Piezoresponse force microscopy and pulsed switching testing performed on the deposited top TiN electrodes provide further evidence of the ferroelectric behavior of the Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 films. The electronic band lineup at the top TiN/Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 interface and band bending at the adjacent n(+)-Si bottom layer attributed to the polarization charges in Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 have been determined using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The obtained results represent a significant step toward the experimental implementation of Si-based ferroelectric tunnel junctions.

  13. ELF/VLF wave generation from the beating of two HF ionospheric heating sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. B.; Moore, R. C.; Golkowski, M.; Lehtinen, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    It is well established that Extremely Low Frequency (ELF, 0.3-3 kHz) and Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio waves can be generated via modulated High Frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) heating of the lower ionosphere (60-100 km). The ionospheric absorption of HF power modifies the conductivity of the lower ionosphere, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet, creates an `antenna in the sky.' We utilize a theoretical model of the HF to ELF/VLF conversion and the ELF/VLF propagation, and calculate the amplitudes of the generated ELF/VLF waves when two HF heating waves, separated by the ELF/VLF frequency, are transmitted from two adjacent locations. The resulting ELF/VLF radiation pattern exhibits a strong directional dependence (as much as 15 dB) that depends on the physical spacing of the two HF sources. This beat wave source can produce signals 10-20 dB stronger than those generated using amplitude modulation, particularly for frequencies greater than 5-10 kHz. We evaluate recent suggestions that beating two HF waves generates ELF/VLF waves in the F-region (>150 km), and conclude that those experimental results may have misinterpreted, and can be explained strictly by the much more well established D region mechanism.

  14. Superconductivity in HfTe5 across weak to strong topological insulator transition induced via pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Long, Y J; Zhao, L X; Nie, S M; Zhang, S J; Weng, Y X; Jin, M L; Li, W M; Liu, Q Q; Long, Y W; Yu, R C; Gu, C Z; Sun, F; Yang, W G; Mao, H K; Feng, X L; Li, Q; Zheng, W T; Weng, H M; Dai, X; Fang, Z; Chen, G F; Jin, C Q

    2017-03-16

    Recently, theoretical studies show that layered HfTe5 is at the boundary of weak &strong topological insulator (TI) and might crossover to a Dirac semimetal state by changing lattice parameters. The topological properties of 3D stacked HfTe5 are expected hence to be sensitive to pressures tuning. Here, we report pressure induced phase evolution in both electronic &crystal structures for HfTe5 with a culmination of pressure induced superconductivity. Our experiments indicated that the temperature for anomaly resistance peak (Tp) due to Lifshitz transition decreases first before climbs up to a maximum with pressure while the Tp minimum corresponds to the transition from a weak TI to strong TI. The HfTe5 crystal becomes superconductive above ~5.5 GPa where the Tp reaches maximum. The highest superconducting transition temperature (Tc) around 5 K was achieved at 20 GPa. Crystal structure studies indicate that HfTe5 transforms from a Cmcm phase across a monoclinic C2/m phase then to a P-1 phase with increasing pressure. Based on transport, structure studies a comprehensive phase diagram of HfTe5 is constructed as function of pressure. The work provides valuable experimental insights into the evolution on how to proceed from a weak TI precursor across a strong TI to superconductors.

  15. Resistive switching characteristics of Pt/TaOx/HfNx structure and its performance improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qigang Zhou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The refractory transition metal nitride (TMN film Hafnium nitride (HfNx was successfully prepared on silicon-based substrates as bottom electrodes for resistive random access memory (RRAM cells in Pt (top/metal oxide/ HfNx (bottom sandwich structure. The reproducible resistive switching (RS characteristics of the memory cells were studied systematically for RRAM applications. The advantages of adopting HfNx instead of Pt as bottom electrode material were demonstrated, including the improvement of the low resistive state value, the RS endurance and the uniformity of RS parameters. The composition and chemical bonding states of the prepared HfNx was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS technique. The nitrogen content in the HfNx and the Gibbs free energy of the corresponding metal oxide formation has great influences on the RS properties. The oxygen reservoir ability and diffusion barrier effect of the HfNx play a key role in the RS performance improvement of the RRAM devices.

  16. First-principles calculations of adhesion, bonding and magnetism of the Fe/HfC interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si Abdelkader, H., E-mail: hayet.siabdelkader@mail.univ-tlemcen.dz [Laboratoire d' Etude et Prediction des Materiaux, Unite de Recherche Materiaux et Energies Renouvelables. LEPM-URMER. Universite de Tlemcen, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Faraoun, H.I. [Laboratoire d' Etude et Prediction des Materiaux, Unite de Recherche Materiaux et Energies Renouvelables. LEPM-URMER. Universite de Tlemcen, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria)

    2012-12-15

    First-principles plane-wave pseudopotential calculations of the adhesion, bonding and magnetism of the interface between the ferromagnetic bcc Fe and non-magnetic HfC are performed. The work of adhesion for C- and Hf-site Fe/HfC interfaces is calculated. High adhesion at C-site interface is found and Fe-C polar covalent bonds are formed across the interface. The magnetic moments of Fe atoms at interface are increased in both interfaces. The effect of the magnetism on the electronic structure of Fe/HfC interface is also investigated. It is shown that the change in band of majority-spin leads to enhance the magnetic moment of Fe. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion, electronic and magnetism of Fe(110)/HfC(100) interface are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High adhesion at C-site interface is found and Fe-C polar covalent bonds are formed across the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic moments of interfacial Fe atoms are increased in both C-site and Hf-site interfaces.

  17. Hf, Zr, and REE partition coefficients between ilmenite and liquid - Implications for lunar petrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Y.; Fujimaki, H.; Nakamura, N.; Tatsumoto, M.; Mckay, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    Partition coefficients (D) between ilmenite and coexisting liquid were determined under near-lunar conditions for Hf, Zr, and REE. Through isotope dilution analysis, ilmenite D values of 0.41 and 0.33 were obtained for Hf and Zr respectively, values significantly lower than those of ilmenite from a kimberlite megacryst. Partition coefficients of REE for the synthesized ilmenite are slightly smaller than those of ilmenite from the kimberlite megacryst, and the lunar (Lu) partition coefficient is 0.056. These results suggest that ilmenite was significant in the lunar-Hf evolution of lunar mare basalts. Using lunar and Hf D values for ilmenite, the Lu-Hf evolution of lunar cumulates and the coexisting magma was examined for various crystallization sequences. The Lu-Hf variation trend of most high-Ti mare basalts is explained by a small degree of partial cumulate melting, though a higher degree is required to explain the variation of very low-Ti basalts, green glass, and Apollo 12 low-Ti basalts. Apollo 15 low-Ti basalts may require chromite crystallization as well.

  18. Partition coefficients of Hf, Zr, and REE between phenocrysts and groundmasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, H.; Tatsumoto, M.; Aoki, K.-I.

    1984-01-01

    Partition coefficients of Hf, Zr, and REE between olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, plagioclase, garnet, amphibole, ilmenite, phlogopite, and liquid are presented. Samples consist of megacrysts in kimberlite, phenocrysts in alkaline basalts, tholeiitic basalts and andesitic to dacitic rocks, and synthetic garnet and clinopyroxene in Hawaiian tholeiites. The Hf-Lu and Zr-Lu elemental fractionations are as large as the Lu-Sm or Lu-Nd fractionation. The Hf and Zr partition coefficients between mafic phenocrysts and liquids are smaller than the Lu partition coefficients, but are similar to the Nd or Sm partition coefficients. The Hf and Zr partition coefficients between ilmenite, phlogopite, and liquid are larger than the Lu partition coefficients for these minerals and their corresponding liquids. The Hf-Zr elemental fractionation does not occur except for extreme fractionation involving Zr-minerals and extremely low fO2. These data have an important bearing on chronological and petrogenetic tracer studies involving the Lu-Hf isotopic system.

  19. Power-Stepped HF Cross-Modulation Experiments: Simulations and Experimental Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S.; Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    High frequency (HF) cross modulation experiments are a well established means for probing the HF-modified characteristics of the D-region ionosphere. The interaction between the heating wave and the probing pulse depends on the ambient and modified conditions of the D-region ionosphere. Cross-modulation observations are employed as a measure of the HF-modified refractive index. We employ an optimized version of Fejer's method that we developed during previous experiments. Experiments were performed in March 2013 at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) observatory in Gakona, Alaska. During these experiments, the power of the HF heating signal incrementally increased in order to determine the dependence of cross-modulation on HF power. We found that a simple power law relationship does not hold at high power levels, similar to previous ELF/VLF wave generation experiments. In this paper, we critically compare these experimental observations with the predictions of a numerical ionospheric HF heating model and demonstrate close agreement.

  20. Ergonomics action research II: a framework for integrating HF into work system design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, W P; Village, J

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual framework that can support efforts to integrate human factors (HF) into the work system design process, where improved and cost-effective application of HF is possible. The framework advocates strategies of broad stakeholder participation, linking of performance and health goals, and process focussed change tools that can help practitioners engage in improvements to embed HF into a firm's work system design process. Recommended tools include business process mapping of the design process, implementing design criteria, using cognitive mapping to connect to managers' strategic goals, tactical use of training and adopting virtual HF (VHF) tools to support the integration effort. Consistent with organisational change research, the framework provides guidance but does not suggest a strict set of steps. This allows more adaptability for the practitioner who must navigate within a particular organisational context to secure support for embedding HF into the design process for improved operator wellbeing and system performance. There has been little scientific literature about how a practitioner might integrate HF into a company's work system design process. This paper proposes a framework for this effort by presenting a coherent conceptual framework, process tools, design tools and procedural advice that can be adapted for a target organisation.