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Sample records for hf hydrogen fluoride

  1. Vibrational relaxation of hydrogen fluoride by HF dimers in a laser excited nozzle beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, E.L.; Rubahn, H.; Toennies, J.P.; Wanner, J.

    1986-09-01

    An HF nozzle beam and a cw HF laser beam in a coaxial and antiparallel arrangement facilitated exciting HF molecules vibrationally in v-italic = 1,J-italic up to the saturation limit. A beam consisting exclusively of monomeric HF was generated by heating the beam source to 600 K and was confirmed using a mass spectrometer. Energy-flux measurements made using a bolometer indicate that the vibrational energy distribution initiated by the laser is conserved, confirming that V--T energy transfer to monomers is slow. The maximum measured flux of HF(v-italic = 1,J-italic) molecules was 1.5 x 10/sup 17/ molecules s/sup -1/ sr/sup -1/ at 670 mbar stagnation pressure. Beams consisting of a mixture of monomeric and polymeric HF were generated using appropriate combinations of source temperature and pressure. In the presence of dimers, the excited monomers relax rapidly by a fast V--V transfer and subsequent predissociation of the metastable dimers. The loss of beam energy due to energy transport by the departing dimer fragments was detected bolometrically. The laser-induced depletion of dimers was determined over a wide source pressure range at T-italic/sub 0/ = 300 K using a mass spectrometer. From a kinetic model of these dimer-depletion data, the product of cross section and transfer probability for V--V energy transfer from HF (v-italic = 1) monomers to dimers was deduced to be 14 A-circle/sup 2/. The terminal-dimer-concentration equation for HF nozzle beams was refined. An analysis of the energy fluxes measured by the bolometer with no laser excitation of the beam revealed that, for an HF nozzle beam, the flow from the source to the detector is, in general, nonisenthalpic due to the onset of dimerization. Mach-number focusing enriches the dimer mole fractions detected by the bolometer.

  2. Acute toxicity of uranium hexafluoride, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Just, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) released into the atmosphere will react rapidly with moisture in the air to form the hydrolysis products uranyl fluoride (UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Uranium compounds such as UF/sub 6/ and UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ exhibit both chemical toxicity and radiological effects, while HF exhibits only chemical toxicity. This paper describes the development of a methodology for assessing the human health consequences of a known acute exposure to a mixture of UF/sub 6/, UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/, and HF. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  4. Hydrogen Fluoride in High-mass Star-forming Regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emprechtinger, M.; Monje, R. R.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Lis, D. C.; Neufeld, D.; Phillips, T. G.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J = 1-0 toward two high-mass

  5. Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention Advisory: Hydrogen Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    This advisory recommends ways Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs) and chemical facilities can reduce risks posed by the presence of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a strong inorganic acid used to manufacture CFCs, in their communities.

  6. Hydrogen fluoride overtone technology: Status review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, William A.; Patterson, Stanley P.; Graves, Bruce R.; Holloman, Miles E.; Sollee, Jeffrey L.

    The hydrogen fluoride (HF) overtone chemical laser concept is being developed as a shorter wavelength alternative to the well known HF fundamental chemical laser to achieve higher brightness space-based laser platforms. This paper provides a brief review of the overtone experimental data base and then concentrates on the design of versatile gain generator hardware for optimizing the Hypersonic Low-Temperature (HYLTE) nozzle concept for HF overtone laser performance. The paper also describes a recent high power demonstration of overtone lasing on a scalable gain generator device that is directly traceable to a space-based laser weapon, utilizing uncooled resonator optics.

  7. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Dugheri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen fluoride (HF is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC/mass spectrometry (MS. After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90. In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n=10, 4.3%, sensitivity (0.2 μg/filter, and linearity (2.0–4000 μg/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913 were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation.

  8. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonari, Alessandro; Pompilio, Ilenia; Monti, Alessandro; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS). After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90). In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n = 10, 4.3%), sensitivity (0.2 μg/filter), and linearity (2.0–4000 μg/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913) were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day) and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation. PMID:27829835

  9. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned in...

  10. Glycine hydrogen fluoride: Remarkable hydrogen bonding in the dimeric glycine glycinium cation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, M.; Ghazaryan, V. V.; Petrosyan, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Crystals of glycine hydrogen fluoride (Gly·HF) were prepared from an aqueous solution containing stoichiometric quantities of the components. The crystal structure of Gly·HF was determined, IR and Raman spectra were registered and are discussed. Gly·HF crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca with Z = 32. The most remarkable feature of the structure is the existence of symmetric dimeric glycine-glycinium cations with short hydrogen bonds (O⋯O distance of 2.446 Å), charge-counterbalanced by hydrogen bifluoride (F sbnd H⋯F) - anions - in addition to the expected glycinium cations and fluoride anions. These results were compared with previously published data on crystals grown in the system glycine-HF-H 2O.

  11. Advanced nozzle characterization for hydrogen fluoride overtone chemical lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, William A.; Patterson, Stanley P.; Graves, Bruce R.; Sollee, Jeffrey L.; Yonehara, Gordon N.; Dering, John P.

    1992-07-01

    The parametric characterization and optimization of the hypersonic, low-temperature (HYLTE) nozzle concept for the hydrogen fluoride (HF) overtone and HF fundamental performance are reviewed. The HF fundamental space-based laser for weapons systems is considered to be more mature, nearer term potential application than the overtone. Emphasis is placed on the Task 3 advanced gain generator technology configurations (AGGTC) aimed at a thorough characterization in the fundamental regime. The experiments were based on advanced multilayer dielectric coatings on uncooled silicon substrates. It is concluded that the Task 3 AGGTC hardware functioned quite well in optimizing the performance of the HYLTE nozzle concept.

  12. HYDROGEN FLUORIDE IN HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emprechtinger, M.; Monje, R. R.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Van der Tak, F. F. S.; Van der Wiel, M. H. D. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, NL-9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Neufeld, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ceccarelli, C., E-mail: emprecht@caltech.edu [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, F-38041 Grenoble (France)

    2012-09-10

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J = 1-0 toward two high-mass star formation sites, NGC 6334 I and AFGL 2591. In NGC 6334 I the HF line is seen in absorption in foreground clouds and the source itself, while in AFGL 2591 HF is partially in emission. We find an HF abundance with respect to H{sub 2} of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} in the diffuse foreground clouds, whereas in the denser parts of NGC 6334 I we derive a lower limit on the HF abundance of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}. Lower HF abundances in dense clouds are most likely caused by freezeout of HF molecules onto dust grains in high-density gas. In AFGL 2591, the view of the hot core is obstructed by absorption in the massive outflow, in which HF is also very abundant (3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}) due to the desorption by sputtering. These observations provide further evidence that the chemistry of interstellar fluorine is controlled by freezeout onto gas grains.

  13. Effects of long term exposure to hydrogen fluoride on grapevines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, F.

    1984-01-01

    Grapevines Vitis vinifera L. Shiraz were exposed to hydrogen fluoride in open-top chambers for 189 days at mean atmospheric fluoride concentrations of 0.27, 0.17 or 0.07 ..mu..g HFm/sup -3/. Grapevines growing under ambient conditions outside the chambers were exposed to a mean atmospheric fluoride concentration of 0.08 ..mu..g HFm/sup -3/. The maximum leaf fluoride concentrations associated with these treatments were 62, 27, 9 and 15 ..mu..g Fg/sup -1/, respectively. Foliar necrosis was first observed on grapevines exposed to 0.27 and 0.17 ..mu..g HFm/sup -3/ after 83 and 99 days, respectively. Exposure to fluoride increased the fluoride content of berries and peduncles, and reduced leaf chlorophyll a and total chlorophyll concentration at both mid-season and harvest. Exposure to 0.17 ..mu..g HF m/sup -3/ was associated with higher total acid content of grapes than other treatments. Fluoride had no significant effect on bunch weight, number of bunches, grape yield, grape water or potential alcohol content, leaf chlorophyll b or leaf protein concentration. The high accumulation of fluoride in peduncles, but low fluoride accumulation in berries, suggests that the peduncle acts to block the translocation of fluoride from sites of uptake to the fruit. 42 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  14. Hydrogen Fluoride in High-Mass Star-forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Emprechtinger, Martin; van der Tak, Floris F S; van der Wiel, Matthijs H D; Lis, Dariusz C; Neufeld, David; Phillips, Thomas G; Ceccarelli, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J=1-0 toward two high-mass star formation sites, NGC6334 I and AFGL 2591. In NGC6334 I the HF line is seen in absorption in foreground clouds and the source itself, while in AFGL 2591 HF is partially in emission. We find an HF abundance with respect to H2 of 1.5e-8 in the diffuse foreground clouds, whereas in the denser parts of NGC6334 I, we derive a lower limit on the HF abundance of 5e-10. Lower HF abundances in dense clouds are most likely caused by freeze out of HF molecules onto dust grains in high-density gas. In AFGL 2591, the view of the hot core is obstructed by absorption in the massive outflow, in which HF is also very abundant 3.6e-8) due to the desorption by sputtering. These observations provide further evidence that the chemistry of...

  15. Effects of hydrogen fluoride on plant-pathogen interactions. [Lycopersicon esculentum; Phaseolus vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, D.C.; Weinstein, L.H.; Mancini, J.F.; van Lueken, P.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments in fumigation chambers with tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants were performed to assess the effects of hydrogen fluoride on plant-pathogen (fungal and bacterial) interactions. Hydrogen fluoride was found to alter the plant-pathogen interaction, although the kind and consistency of effect caused by HF depended upon the host, pathogen, and several other factors. A reduction in powdery mildew probably indicates that HF was affecting the infectivity of the pathogen itself because reduction in disease was proportional to the length of the exposure period, infection was continuous during the exposure period, and the pathogen itself was epiphytic. The effect of fluoride on bean rust may have been due to accumulated fluoride in the leaf having a direct or indirect effect on the pathogen because both pre- and post-inoculation exposures to HF were effective and additive. Other evidence for an indirect effect of fluoride was found in halo-blight where stem collapse was affected but foliar symptoms were not, and the site affected was spatially removed from the site of fluoride accumulation. Effects on early blight of tomato also indicated an effect of fluoride in the leaf.

  16. HIFI detection of hydrogen fluoride in the carbon star envelope IRC +10216

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agúndez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; Decin, L.; Encrenaz, P.; Neufeld, D.; Teyssier, D.; Daniel, F.

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of emission in the J = 1−0 rotational transition of hydrogen fluoride (HF), together with observations of the J = 1−0 to J = 3−2 rotational lines of H35Cl and H37Cl, towards the envelope of the carbon star IRC +10216. High-sensitivity, high-spectral resolution observations ha

  17. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of hydrogen fluoride at several thermodynamic states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreitmeir, M.; Bertagnolli, H.; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen;

    2003-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen fluoride is a simple but interesting system for studies of the influence of hydrogen bonds on physical properties. We have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of HF at several thermodynamic states, where we examine the microscopic structure of the liquid as well...... as its static and dynamic properties. The results obtained show good agreement with well established data, and, moreover, we were able to show significant changes within the structure depending on the system's temperature and density....

  18. Development and demonstration of a personal monitoring system for exposure to hydrogen fluoride. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, M.S.; Monat, J.P.

    1993-09-01

    A good, functional Hydrogen Fluoride Gasbadge dosimeter has been developed for sampling of airborne HF vapor. The device is small (7.7 cm {times} 5.4 cm {times} 1.9 cm) and can easily and conveniently be worn on one`s lapel. It consists of polyethylene and polypropylene parts and a triethanolamine-impregnated polyproylene collection element. It is completely self contained, requiring no pumps, impingers, or sampling tubes. Subsequent to sampling, the collection element is analyzed quickly and easily with a fluoride selective-ion electrode. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine precision, linearity, interference effects, influences of temperature and humidity, and collection element stability over time. Results of the tests indicate that the Abcor Gasbadge HF dosimeter is an excellent passive HF monitor for work spaces, and that results obtained with it are accurate within {plus_minus}25%. These results have been corroborated in a field study.

  19. A test chamber for experimental hydrogen fluoride exposure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søstrand, P; Kongerud, J; Eduard, W; Nilsen, T; Skogland, M; Boe, J

    1997-07-01

    An inhalation chamber was built to perform experimental studies with hydrogen fluoride (HF), other gases, and particulate matter. The present study sought to describe a new gas delivery system and the distribution and concentration of HF gas in the chamber. The aluminum chamber has a volume of 19.2 m3 and a variable ventilation rate of about 1 to 10 air changes per hour. The negative pressure difference between the chamber and outside air can be regulated from 0 to 300 Pa. HF was fed at concentrations of up to 4000 mg/m3 directly into the ventilation duct feeding the chamber through openings with diameters as small as 50 microns, oriented opposite to the airflow. Gas flow was varied from about 0.1 dm3/min at a pressure of 4 atm. The dilution factor of HF concentration from cylinder to chamber was on the order of 10(3) to 10(4). The standard deviation (SD) of the HF concentrations at a fixed measurement point during a 1-hour test was typically 0.05 mg/m3 at a time-weighted average (TWA) concentration of 2.66 mg/m3. The SD of the TWA HF concentrations at six locations in the chamber was typically 0.05 mg/m3 and 0.29 mg/m3 at 0.61 and 3.46 mg/m3, respectively. Human exposure could be predicted from calculations based on ventilation data, gas flow, and observed ratio between calculated and measured concentrations. When the target exposure concentration was 1.5 mg/m3, the measured mean exposure concentration was typically 1.54 mg/m3 (range: 1.4-1.7 mg/m3, SD 0.09 mg/m3, n = 8). The chamber is well-suited for inhalation studies in humans. Chamber atmosphere was controlled and has proved to be stable and homogeneous, even in tests with HF, a highly reactive gas in the class of superacids.

  20. Discovery of Hydrogen Fluoride in the Cloverleaf Quasar at z = 2.56

    CERN Document Server

    Monje, R R; Peng, R; Lis, D C; Neufeld, D A; Emprechtinger, M; 10.1088/2041-8205/742/2/L21

    2012-01-01

    We report the first detection of hydrogen fluoride (HF) toward a high redshift quasar. Using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) we detect the HF J = 1 - 0 transition in absorption toward the Cloverleaf, a broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar object (QSO) at z=2.56. The detection is statistically significant at the ~ 6 sigma level. We estimate a lower limit of 4 \\times 1014 cm-2 for the HF column density and using a previous estimate of the hydrogen column density, we obtain a lower limit of 1.7 \\times 10-9 for the HF abundance. This value suggests that, assuming a Galactic N(HF)/NH ratio, HF accounts for at least ~10% of the fluorine in the gas phase along the line of sight to the Cloverleaf quasar. This observation corroborates the prediction that HF should be a good probe of the molecular gas at high redshift. Measurements of the HF abundance as a function of redshift are urgently needed to better constrain the fluorine nucleosynthesis mechanism(s).

  1. DISCOVERY OF HYDROGEN FLUORIDE IN THE CLOVERLEAF QUASAR AT z = 2.56

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monje, R. R.; Phillips, T. G.; Lis, D. C.; Emprechtinger, M. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125-4700 (United States); Peng, R. [Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, 111 Nowelo Street, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Neufeld, D. A., E-mail: raquel@caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We report the first detection of hydrogen fluoride (HF) toward a high-redshift quasar. Using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, we detect the HF J = 1-0 transition in absorption toward the Cloverleaf, a broad absorption line quasi-stellar object at z = 2.56. The detection is statistically significant at the {approx}6{sigma} level. We estimate a lower limit of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} for the HF column density and using a previous estimate of the hydrogen column density, we obtain a lower limit of 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} for the HF abundance. This value suggests that, assuming a Galactic N(HF)/N{sub H} ratio, HF accounts for at least {approx}10% of the fluorine in the gas phase along the line of sight to the Cloverleaf quasar. This observation corroborates the prediction that HF should be a good probe of the molecular gas at high redshift. Measurements of the HF abundance as a function of redshift are urgently needed to better constrain the fluorine nucleosynthesis mechanism(s).

  2. Structural and dynamical properties of hydrogen fluoride in aqueous solution: an ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritayakornupong, Chinapong; Vchirawongkwin, Viwat; Hofer, Thomas S; Rode, Bernd M

    2008-09-25

    The novel ab initio quantum mechanical charge field (QMCF) molecular dynamics simulation at the Hartree-Fock level has been employed to investigate hydration structure and dynamics of hydrogen fluoride in aqueous solution. The average H-F bond length of 0.93 A obtained from the QMCF MD simulation is in good agreement with the experimental data. The HHF...Ow distance of 1.62 A was evaluated for the first hydration shell, and 2.00 A was observed for the FHF...Hw distance. The stability of hydrogen bonding is more pronounced in the hydrogen site of hydrogen fluoride, with a single water molecule in this part of the first hydration shell. A wide range of coordination numbers between 3 and 9 with an average value of 5.6 was obtained for the fluorine site. The force constants of 819.1 and 5.9 N/m were obtained for the HHF-FHF and HHF...Ow interactions, respectively, proving the stability of the nondissociated form of hydrogen fluoride in aqueous solution. The mean residence times of 2.1 and 2.5 ps were determined for ligand exchange processes in the neighborhood of fluorine and hydrogen atoms of hydrogen fluoride, respectively, indicating a weak structure-making effect of hydrogen fluoride in water. The corresponding H-bond lifetimes attribute this effect to the H atom site of HF.

  3. [18F]Fluoride recovery via gaseous [18F]HF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiessen, Bente; Jensen, Mikael; Zhuravlev, Fedor

    2011-01-01

    Acidification of target water with H2SO4 in a specially constructed glassy carbon/polyethylene apparatus allowed for recovery of up to 82% of [18F]fluoride as [18F]HF gas. The [18F]HF distillate was found to be acid-free but moist; when passed through a solution of tBuPh2SiOTf, it yielded [18F......]tBuPh2SiF. The multivariate design of experiment showed that the key to high yield of [18F]HF was the efficient degassing of the reaction mixture....

  4. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  5. Hydrogen fluoride effects on local mung bean and maize cereal crops from peri-urban brick kilns in south asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, M.N.; Ahmad, S.S.; Zia, A.; Iqbal, M.S.; Shah, H.; Mian, A.A.; Shah, R.U.

    2014-01-01

    Increased urbanisation throughout South Asia has increased the number and output of the brick kilns that typically surround major cities, but the environmental and health impacts of their atmospheric emissions are poorly understood in Pakistan. We report the negative effects of hydrogen fluoride (HF

  6. Bifluoride ([HF2](-)) formation at the fluoridated aluminium hydroxide/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kenichi; Driver, Gordon W; Lucas, Marie; Sparrman, Tobias; Shchukarev, Andrey; Boily, Jean-François

    2016-05-31

    This study uncovers bifluoride-type (difluorohydrogenate(i); [HF2](-)) species formed at mineral/water interfaces. Bifluoride forms at [triple bond, length as m-dash]Al-F surface sites resulting from the partial fluoridation of gibbsite (γ-Al(OH3)) and bayerite (α-Al(OH3)) particles exposed to aqueous solutions of 50 mM NaF. Fluoride removal from these solutions is proton-promoted and results in a strongly self-buffered suspensions at circumneutral pH, proceeds at a F : H consumption ratio of 2 : 1, and with recorded losses of up to 17 mM fluoride (58 F nm(-2)). These loadings exceed crystallographic site densities by a factor of 3-4, yet the reactions have no resolvable impact on particle size, shape and mineralogy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of frozen (-155 °C) wet mineral pastes revealed coexisting surface F(-) and HF(0) species. Electron energy loss features pointed to multilayer distribution of these species at the mineral/water interface. XPS also uncovered a distinct form of Na(+) involved in binding fluoride-bearing species. XPS and solid state magic angle spinning (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance measurements showed that these fluoride species were highly comparable to a sodium-bifluoride (NaHF2) reference. First layer surface species are represented as [triple bond, length as m-dash]Al-F-H-F-Al[triple bond, length as m-dash] and [triple bond, length as m-dash]Al-F-Na-F-Al[triple bond, length as m-dash], and may form multi-layered species into the mineral/water interface. These results consequently point to a potentially overlooked inorganic fluorine species in a technologically relevant mineral/water interfacial systems.

  7. Active biomonitoring of airborne fluoride near an HF producing factory using standardised grass cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzaring, J.; Klumpp, A.; Fangmeier, A.

    In order to study the pollution gradient in the vicinity of an HF producing factory, a biomonitoring programme was performed employing VDI standardised grass cultures. Specimen plants of Lolium multiflorum cv. Lema were exposed at 11 sites over five monthly periods and the biomass produced was used for subsequent F-analyses. Meteorological data from the study region confirmed that wind direction accounted for changes in the pollution pattern over periods of time. Fluoride concentrations in the grass cultures, however, were unrelated to temperature and precipitation sums during the exposures. The biomass production of the grass cultures proved to be unrelated to these parameters as well but, with the enhanced growth of the plants, the fluoride concentrations were lower due to the dilution of the element with higher biomass accumulation. Because the contribution of particulate fluoride was unknown, both the washed grass cultures and the washing water were analysed in order to determine the amount of external fluoride. Washing reduced the fluoride concentrations by 22% on average, indicating that most of the element was internal fluoride stemming from stomatal uptake. Larger amounts of fluoride, however, could be washed off from grass cultures exposed at sites close to the factory indicating that dust emissions played a greater role at these locations. Because particulate emissions were supposed to arise from CaF 2 and the waste-product anhydrite, grass cultures were also analysed for calcium and sulphur. While calcium concentrations were generally high but unrelated to fluoride, sulphur concentrations showed a slight relationship to the F-concentrations determined in the unwashed plants. Latter findings indicate the co-deposition of the two elements as surface bound, external loads, but bioindication could not clarify to what extent both elements were partitioned in the gas-to-particle phase. We therefore recommend using the grass culture method in air quality

  8. Herschel/HIFI Observations of Hydrogen Fluoride Toward Sagittarius B2(M)

    CERN Document Server

    Monje, R R; Phillips, T G; Lis, D C; Goldsmith, P F; Bergin, E A; Bell, T A; Neufeld, D A; Sonnentrucker, P; 10.1088/2041-8205/734/1/L23

    2011-01-01

    Herschel/HIFI observations have revealed the presence of widespread absorption by hydrogen fluoride (HF) J = 1-0 rotational transition, toward a number of Galactic sources. We present observations of HF J = 1-0 toward the high-mass star-forming region Sagittarius B2(M). The spectrum obtained shows a complex pattern of absorption, with numerous features covering a wide range of local standard of rest velocities (-130 to 100 km -1). An analysis of this absorption yields HF abundances relative to H2 of ~1.3 {\\times}10-8, in most velocity intervals. This result is in good agreement with estimates from chemical models, which predict that HF should be the main reservoir of gas-phase fluorine under a wide variety of interstellar conditions. Interestingly, we also find velocity intervals in which the HF spectrum shows strong absorption features that are not present, or are very weak, in spectra of other molecules, such as 13CO (1-0) and CS (2-1). HF absorption reveals components of diffuse clouds with small extinctio...

  9. Strong absorption by interstellar hydrogen fluoride: Herschel/HIFI observations of the sight-line to G10.6-0.4 (W31C)

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, D A; Phillips, T G; Lis, D C; De Luca, M; Goicoechea, J R; Black, J H; Gerin, M; Bell, T; Boulanger, F; Cernicharo, J; Coutens, A; Dartois, E; Kazmierczak, M; Encrenaz, P; Falgarone, E; Geballe, T R; Giesen, T; Godard, B; Goldsmith, P F; Gry, C; Gupta, H; Hennebelle, P; Herbst, E; Hily-Blant, P; Joblin, C; Kolos, R; Krelowski, J; Martin-Pintado, J; Menten, K M; Monje, R; Mookerjea, B; Pearson, J; Perault, M; Persson, C; Plume, R; Salez, M; Schlemmer, S; Schmidt, M; Stutzki, J; Teyssier, D; Vastel, C; Yu, S; Cais, P; Caux, E; Liseau, R; Morris, P; Planesas, P

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of strong absorption by interstellar hydrogen fluoride along the sight-line to the submillimeter continuum source G10.6-0.4 (W31C). We have used Herschel's HIFI instrument, in dual beam switch mode, to observe the 1232.4763 GHz J=1-0 HF transition in the upper sideband of the Band 5a receiver. The resultant spectrum shows weak HF emission from G10.6-0.4 at LSR velocities in the range -10 to -3 km/s, accompanied by strong absorption by foreground material at LSR velocities in the range 15 to 50 km/s. The spectrum is similar to that of the 1113.3430 GHz 1(11)-0(00) transition of para-water, although at some frequencies the HF (hydrogen fluoride) optical depth clearly exceeds that of para-H2O. The optically-thick HF absorption that we have observed places a conservative lower limit of 1.6E+14 cm-2 on the HF column density along the sight-line to G10.6-0.4. Our lower limit on the HF abundance, 6E-6 relative to hydrogen nuclei, implies that hydrogen fluoride accounts for between ~ 30 and 10...

  10. New insights about the hydrogen bonds formed between acetylene and hydrogen fluoride: π ⋯ H, C ⋯ H and F ⋯ H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Denize S.; Oliveira, Boaz G.

    2017-02-01

    A theoretical study of hydrogen bond strength and bond properties in the C2H2 ⋯(HF)-T, C2H2 ⋯ 2(HF)-T, C2H2 ⋯ 2(HF), C2H2 ⋯ 3(HF) and C2H2 ⋯ 4(HF) complexes was carried out at the B3LYP/6-311 ++G(d,p) theory level. In these systems, a strength competition between the π ⋯ H and C ⋯ H interactions was examined. Specifically the F ⋯ H hydrogen bond, its properties were studied through a comparison between the hydrogen fluoride and the higher-order complexes (trimer, tetramer and pentamer). Regarding the electronic properties, the hydrogen bond strength could not be determined by the supermolecule approach. Thus, the hydrogen bond energies were computed via NBO calculations. Additionally to NBO, the ChelpG charge calculations were used to interpret the intermolecular charge transfer. The QTAIM integrations were useful to predict the covalent character of the π ⋯ H, C ⋯ H and F ⋯ H hydrogen bonds. Moreover, values of hybrid orbitals (s and p) and atomic radii were also determined in order to justify the red shifts in the stretch frequencies of the Hsbnd F bonds.

  11. Reactivity of aminodeoxyalditols and derivatives in hydrogen fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Jens Chr.

    Reactions of a series of aminodeoxy-pentitols and -hexitols in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with formic acid as catalyst gave the corresponding 2,5 and 3,6-anhydro-aminodeoxyhexitols respectively in yields of more than 95%. In the analogous reaction of 3-amino-3-deoxy-D-altritol a dianhydride......-closure was obstructed, were treated with hydrogen fluoride in the presence of a carboxylic acid catalyst. The products from these reactions, including 2,6-anhydrides, were assigned. In case of 1-amino-1,6-dideoxy- or 1-benzylamino-1,3,6-trideoxy-hexitols very efficient and regioselective conversions...... and treated with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. Very stereo- and regioselective reactions to the C-2 inverted 2,5-anhydrides were observed in yields of more than 80%. The reactions proceed via 1,2-fused 2-trifluoromethyl-oxazolinium ions which react by an intramolecular attack by HO-5 at C-2 forming a five...

  12. Gain generator optimization for hydrogen fluoride overtone and fundamental chemical lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, William A.; Patterson, Stanley P.; Graves, Bruce R.; Sollee, Jeffrey L.; Yonehara, Gordon N.; Dering, John P.

    1993-06-01

    The hydrogen fluoride (HF) chemical laser is the baseline concept for SDIO space based laser (SBL) weapons systems. Ground based tests at power levels appropriate for this application have been demonstrated. Because the brightness of a laser beam projected to the far field is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength, shorter wavelengths are desirable to enhance brightness on target. Development of the HF overtone chemical laser ((lambda) equals 1.3 - 1.4 micrometers ) as a growth technology for SBL applications has proceeded rapidly during the past several years. This paper reviews the parametric characterization and optimization of the Hypersonic, Low-Temperature (HYLTE) nozzle concept for HF overtone and HF fundamental performance. The experiments utilize advanced multilayer dielectric coatings on uncooled silicon substrates. The experimental results reported include laser power, small signal gain, mode footprint, and spectral content. The design of a multiple nozzle HYLTE module as a building block to an advanced high power HF chemical laser device is presented. Design philosophy emphasizes traceability from an intermediate size linear module to a full scale cylindrical gain generator for SBL applications. The key issues addressed are power scalability, fabricability, regenerative cooling capability, and thermal/structural performance.

  13. Absorption, distribution and excretion of inhaled hydrogen fluoride in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    Rats were subjected to whole body HF exposure for 6 hrs or to nose-only HF exposure for 1 hr. Total and/or ionic fluoride concentrations in selected tissues were determined at various times following exposure. In rats sacrificed 6 hrs after whole body exposure, dose-dependent increases in lung, plasma, and kidney total and ionic fluoride concentration occurred. Rats excreted more fluoride in the urine after whole body exposure than could be explained by the amount of HF inhaled. Considerable evidence suggests that airborne HF deposits on fur and is then ingested due to preening activity. Urinary fluoride excretion was increased by nose-only exposure. The urinary fluoride excretion accounted for approximately twice the fluoride estimated to be inhaled during exposure. Tissue fluoride concentrations were elevated immediately after nose-only exposure. Fluoride concentrations in lung and kidney returned to control levels within 12 hrs. Plasma fluoride concentration was slightly elevated 24 hrs after the start of the 1 hr exposure but was at control levels at 96 hrs. Immediately following nose-only exposure, lung ionic fluoride concentrations were less than plasma ionic fluoride concentrations suggesting that the fluoride in the lung had reached that site via plasma transport rather than by inhalation. A dose-dependent increase in plasma ionic fluoride concentration occurred after upper respiratory tract HF exposure providing strong evidence that fluoride is absorbed systemically from that site. The plasma ionic fluoride concentration after upper respiratory tract exposure was of sufficient magnitude to account for the plasma fluoride concentrations observed in intact nose-only exposed rats. (ERB)

  14. Continuous measurement of peak hydrogen fluoride exposures in aluminum smelter potrooms: instrument development and in-plant evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Neal; Xu, Weizong; Peace, Jon Nathaniel

    2008-02-01

    The aluminum smelting process continuously evolves both sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) gases. The vast majority of these evolved gases are captured by local exhaust ventilation systems and transported to fume treatment centers. Any gas escaping the ventilation systems could create the potential for workplace exposures. Currently, there are no commercially available sensors that are capable of selectively measuring peak concentrations (< 10 sec) of HF in the presence of SO2. This measurement capability is critical for facilitating a better understanding of the etiology of respiratory health effects. This article presents the development and in-plant testing of a portable, tunable diode-based HF sensor that shows equivalent or improved performance relative to NIOSH Method 7902 and is capable of measuring short-term personal peak HF exposure potentials in operating aluminum smelters.

  15. Detection of hydrogen fluoride absorption in diffuse molecular clouds with Herschel/HIFI: a ubiquitous tracer of molecular gas

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnentrucker, P; Phillips, T G; Gerin, M; Lis, D C; De Luca, M; Goicoechea, J R; Black, J H; Bell, T A; Boulanger, F; Cernicharo, J; Coutens, A; Dartois, E; Kazmierczak, M; Encrenaz, P; Falgarone, E; Geballe, T R; Giesen, T; Godard, B; Goldsmith, P F; Gry, C; Gupta, H; Hennebelle, P; Herbst, E; Hily-Blant, P; Joblin, C; Kolos, R; Krelowski, J; Mart\\in-Pintado, J; Menten, K M; Monje, R; Mookerjea, B; Pearson, J; Perault, M; Persson, C M; Plume, R; Salez, M; Schlemmer, S; Schmidt, M; Stutzki, J; Teyssier, D; Vastel, C; Yu, S; Caux, E; Gusten, R; Hatch, W A; Klein, T; Mehdi, I; Morris, P; Ward, J S

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the detection of absorption by interstellar hydrogen fluoride (HF) along the sight line to the submillimeter continuum sources W49N and W51. We have used Herschel's HIFI instrument in dual beam switch mode to observe the 1232.4762 GHz J = 1 - 0 HF transition in the upper sideband of the band 5a receiver. We detected foreground absorption by HF toward both sources over a wide range of velocities. Optically thin absorption components were detected on both sight lines, allowing us to measure - as opposed to obtain a lower limit on - the column density of HF for the first time. As in previous observations of HF toward the source G10.6-0.4, the derived HF column density is typically comparable to that of water vapor, even though the elemental abundance of oxygen is greater than that of fluorine by four orders of magnitude. We used the rather uncertain N(CH)-N(H2) relationship derived previously toward diffuse molecular clouds to infer the molecular hydrogen column density in the clouds exhibiting HF abs...

  16. Hydrogen fluoride toward luminous nearby galaxies: NGC 253 and NGC 4945

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monje, R. R.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125-4700 (United States); Lord, S. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Falgarone, E. [LERMA/LRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure and Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France); Neufeld, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Güsten, R., E-mail: raquel@caltech.edu [Max-Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-04-10

    We present the detection of hydrogen fluoride (HF) in two luminous nearby galaxies, NGC 253 and NGC 4945 using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on board the Herschel Space Observatory. The HF line toward NGC 253 has a P-Cygni profile, while an asymmetric absorption profile is seen toward NGC 4945. The P-Cygni profile in NGC 253 suggests an outflow of molecular gas with a mass of M(H{sub 2}){sub out} ∼ 1 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} and an outflow rate as large as M-dot ∼6.4 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. In the case of NGC 4945, the axisymmetric velocity components in the HF line profile are compatible with the interpretation of a fast-rotating nuclear ring surrounding the nucleus and the presence of inflowing gas. The gas falls into the nucleus with an inflow rate of ≤1.2 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, inside an inner radius of ≤200 pc. The gas accretion rate to the central active galactic nucleus is much smaller, suggesting that the inflow may be triggering a nuclear starburst. From these results, the HF J = 1-0 line is seen to provide an important probe of the kinematics of absorbing material along the sight-line to nearby galaxies with bright dust continuum and a promising new tracer of molecular gas in high-redshift galaxies.

  17. Hydrogen Fluoride toward Luminous Nearby Galaxies: NGC 253 and NGC 4945

    CERN Document Server

    Monje, R R; Falgarone, E; Lis, D C; Neufeld, D A; Phillips, T G; Güsten, R

    2014-01-01

    We present the detection of hydrogen fluoride, HF, in two luminous nearby galaxies NGC 253 and NGC 4945 using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) on board the Herschel Space Observatory. The HF line toward NGC 253 has a P-Cygni profile, while an asymmetric absorption profile is seen toward NGC 4945. The P-Cygni profile in NGC 253 suggests an outflow of molecular gas with a mass of M(H$_2$)$_{out}$ $\\sim$ 1 $\\times$ 10$^7$ M$_\\odot$ and an outflow rate as large as \\.{M} $\\sim$ 6.4 M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. In the case of NGC 4945, the axisymmetric velocity components in the HF line profile is compatible with the interpretation of a fast-rotating nuclear ring surrounding the nucleus and the presence of inflowing gas. The gas falls into the nucleus with an inflow rate of $\\le$ 1.2 M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, inside a inner radius of $\\le$ 200 pc. The gas accretion rate to the central AGN is much smaller, suggesting that the inflow can be triggering a nuclear starburst. From these results, the HF $J = 1-0$ ...

  18. Rugged, Portable, Real-Time Optical Gaseous Analyzer for Hydrogen Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey; Gonzales, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a primary evolved combustion product of fluorinated and perfluorinated hydrocarbons. HF is produced during combustion by the presence of impurities and hydrogen- containing polymers including polyimides. This effect is especially dangerous in closed occupied volumes like spacecraft and submarines. In these systems, combinations of perfluorinated hydrocarbons and polyimides are used for insulating wiring. HF is both highly toxic and short-lived in closed environments due to its reactivity. The high reactivity also makes HF sampling problematic. An infrared optical sensor can detect promptly evolving HF with minimal sampling requirements, while providing both high sensitivity and high specificity. A rugged optical path length enhancement architecture enables both high HF sensitivity and rapid environmental sampling with minimal gaseous contact with the low-reactivity sensor surfaces. The inert optical sample cell, combined with infrared semiconductor lasers, is joined with an analog and digital electronic control architecture that allows for ruggedness and compactness. The combination provides both portability and battery operation on a simple camcorder battery for up to eight hours. Optical detection of gaseous HF is confounded by the need for rapid sampling with minimal contact between the sensor and the environmental sample. A sensor is required that must simultaneously provide the required sub-parts-permillion detection limits, but with the high specificity and selectivity expected of optical absorption techniques. It should also be rugged and compact for compatibility with operation onboard spacecraft and submarines. A new optical cell has been developed for which environmental sampling is accomplished by simply traversing the few mm-thick cell walls into an open volume where the measurement is made. A small, low-power fan or vacuum pump may be used to push or pull the gaseous sample into the sample volume for a response time of a few

  19. Effect of hydrogen fluoride on two pigments in coleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamprecht, W.O. Jr.; Powell, R.D.

    Coleus blumei Benth. Cv. 12th Man was fumigated with hydrogen fluoride gas. The treatment caused the development of lesions which originally involved the mesophyll but spread to and eventually included the epidermis. An anthocyanin, cyanidin-3,5-diglucoside acylated with p-coumaric acid, was destroyed and it was postulated that the flavanonol, dihydrokaempferol, was converted to the flavone, apigenin. The anthocyanin destruction and pigment conversion occurred following membrane injury and mixing of the cellular constituents. 17 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  20. Anion exchange behaviour of Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta and Pa as homologues of RF and Db in fluoride medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroy G, F. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Trubert, D.; Brillard, L.; Hussonnois, M.; Constantinescu, O.; Le Naour, C., E-mail: fabiola.monroy@inin.gob.m [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, F-91406 Orsay, France (France)

    2010-07-01

    Studies of the chemical property of trans actinide elements are very difficult due to their short half-lives and extremely small production yields. However it is still possible to obtain considerable information about their chemical properties, such as the most stable oxidation states in aqueous solution, complexing ability, etc., comparing their behaviour with their lighter homologous in the periodic table. In order to obtain a better knowledge of the behaviour of rutherfordium, RF (element 104), dub nium, Db (element 105) in HF medium, the sorption properties of Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta an Pa, homologues of RF and Db, were studied in NH{sub 4}F/HClO{sub 4} medium in this work. Stability constants of the fluoride complexes of these elements were experimentally obtained from K{sub d} obtained at different F{sup -} and H{sup +} concentrations. The anionic complexes: [Zr(Hf)F{sub 5}]{sup -}, [Zr(Hf)F{sub 6}]{sup 2-}, [Zr(Hf)F{sub 7}]{sup 3-}, [Ta(Pa)F{sub 6}]{sup -}, [Ta(Pa)F{sub 7}]{sup 2-}, [Ta(Pa)F{sub 8}]{sup 3-}, [NbOF{sub 4}]{sup -} and [NbOF{sub 5}]{sup 2-} are present as predominant species in the HF range over investigation. (Author)

  1. Herschel observations of extra-ordinary sources: Detection of Hydrogen Fluoride in absorption towards Orion~KL

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, T G; Lis, D C; Neufeld, D A; Bell, T A; Wang, S; Crockett, N R; Emprechtinger, M; Blake, G A; Caux, E; Ceccarelli, C; Cernicharo, J; Comito, C; Daniel, F; Dubernet, M -L; Encrenaz, P; Gerin, M; Giesen, T F; Goicoechea, J R; Goldsmith, P F; Herbst, E; Joblin, C; Johnstone, D; Langer, W D; Latter, W D; Lord, S D; Maret, S; Martin, P G; Melnick, G J; Menten, K M; Morris, P; Muller, H S P; Murphy, J A; Ossenkopf, V; Pearson, J C; Perault, M; Plume, R; Qin, S -L; Schilke, P; Schlemmer, S; Stutzki, J; Trappe, N; van der Tak, F F S; Vastel, C; Yorke, H W; Yu, S; Zmuidzinas, J; Boogert, A; Gusten, R; Hartogh, P; Honingh, N; Karpov, A; Kooi, J; Krieg, J -M; Schieder, R

    2010-01-01

    We report a detection of the fundamental rotational transition of hydrogen fluoride in absorption towards Orion KL using Herschel/HIFI. After the removal of contaminating features associated with common molecules ("weeds"), the HF spectrum shows a P-Cygni profile, with weak redshifted emission and strong blue-shifted absorption, associated with the low-velocity molecular outflow. We derive an estimate of 2.9 x 10^13 cm^-2 for the HF column density responsible for the broad absorption component. Using our best estimate of the H2 column density within the low-velocity molecular outflow, we obtain a lower limit of ~1.6 x 10^-10 for the HF abundance relative to hydrogen nuclei, corresponding to 0.6% of the solar abundance of fluorine. This value is close to that inferred from previous ISO observations of HF J=2--1 absorption towards Sgr B2, but is in sharp contrast to the lower limit of 6 x 10^-9 derived by Neufeld et al. (2010) for cold, foreground clouds on the line of sight towards G10.6-0.4.

  2. Quantum mechanical force field for hydrogen fluoride with explicit electronic polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazack, Michael J. M., E-mail: mazack@mazack.org [Department of Chemistry and Supercomputing Institute, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street, SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0431 (United States); Gao, Jiali, E-mail: gao@jialigao.org [Department of Chemistry and Supercomputing Institute, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street, SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0431 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin Province 130028 (China)

    2014-05-28

    The explicit polarization (X-Pol) theory is a fragment-based quantum chemical method that explicitly models the internal electronic polarization and intermolecular interactions of a chemical system. X-Pol theory provides a framework to construct a quantum mechanical force field, which we have extended to liquid hydrogen fluoride (HF) in this work. The parameterization, called XPHF, is built upon the same formalism introduced for the XP3P model of liquid water, which is based on the polarized molecular orbital (PMO) semiempirical quantum chemistry method and the dipole-preserving polarization consistent point charge model. We introduce a fluorine parameter set for PMO, and find good agreement for various gas-phase results of small HF clusters compared to experiments and ab initio calculations at the M06-2X/MG3S level of theory. In addition, the XPHF model shows reasonable agreement with experiments for a variety of structural and thermodynamic properties in the liquid state, including radial distribution functions, interaction energies, diffusion coefficients, and densities at various state points.

  3. Effect of Magnesium Fluoride on Hydrogenation Properties of Magnesium Hydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya Jain

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A cost effective catalyst is of great importance for consideration of MgH2 as potential hydrogen storage material. In this regard, we investigated the catalytic role of alkaline metal fluoride on the hydrogen storage behavior of MgH2. Samples were synthesized by admixing 5 mol % MgF2 into MgH2 powder using planetary ball mill. Hydrogenation measurements made at 335 °C showed that in comparison to only 70% absorption by pure MgH2, catalyzed material absorbed 92% of theoretical capacity in less than 20 min and desorbed completely in almost the same time. Sorption studies done at lower temperatures revealed that complete absorption at temperature as low as 145 °C is possible. This is due to uniform distribution of MgF2 nano particles within the MgH2 powder. X-ray diffraction patterns also showed the presence of stable MgF2 phase that does not decompose upon hydrogen absorption-desorption. Cyclic measurements done at 310 °C showed negligible loss in the overall storage capacity with cycling. These results reveal that the presence of the chemically inert and stable MgF2 phase is responsible for good reversible characteristic and improved kinetics.

  4. Hydrogen doping in HfO{sub 2} resistance change random access memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, D.; Magyari-Köpe, B.; Nishi, Y. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-01-25

    The structures and energies of hydrogen-doped monoclinic hafnium dioxide were calculated using density-functional theory. The electronic interactions are described within the LDA + U formalism, where on-site Coulomb corrections are applied to the 5d orbital electrons of Hf atoms and 2p orbital electrons of the O atoms. The effects of charge state, defect-defect interactions, and hydrogenation are investigated and compared with experiment. It is found that hydrogenation of HfO{sub 2} resistance-change random access memory devices energetically stabilizes the formation of oxygen vacancies and conductive vacancy filaments through multiple mechanisms, leading to improved switching characteristic and device yield.

  5. On isoelectronic fluorides [H 3tren]ṡ(AlF 6)ṡH 2O, [H 3tren]ṡ(AlF 6)ṡHF, [H 4tren]ṡ(AlF 6)ṡ(F) and the iron analogue [H 4tren]ṡ(FeF 6)ṡ(F)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, K.; Ben Ali, A.; Leblanc, M.; Maisonneuve, V.

    2006-06-01

    [H 3tren]ṡ(AlF 6)ṡH 2O, [H 3tren]ṡ(AlF 6)ṡHF and [H 4tren]ṡ( MF 6)ṡ(F) ( M=Al, Fe), are obtained by hydrothermal technique and microwave heating in the (Al(OH) 3,FeF 3)- tren-(HF/H 2O)-ethanol system. Structure determinations are performed from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. All phases are built up from ( MF 6) 3- anions linked by hydrogen bonds to [H 3tren] 3+ or [H 4tren] 4+ cations and to water or HF molecules or "isolated" fluoride anions. [H 3tren] 3+ and [H 4tren] 4+ cations adopt a "spider" shape configuration. Surprisingly, the HF molecule is strongly hydrogen bonded with one fluoride ion of the AlF 6 octahedron (d=2.38 Å) in [H 3tren]ṡ(AlF 6)ṡHF while "isolated" fluoride ion is weakly coordinated by three hydrogen atoms in [H 4tren]ṡ( MF 6)ṡ(F). The evolution of the formulations, from [H 3tren]ṡ(AlF 6)ṡH 2O to [H 3tren]ṡ(AlF 6)ṡHF and to [H 4tren]ṡ( MF 6)ṡ(F) ( M=Al, Fe), is linked with the increase of the HF content of the starting solution. The volumes per formula unit decrease from 321.3(1) Å 3 and 320.6(1) Å 3 in [H 3tren]ṡ(AlF 6)ṡH 2O and [H 3tren]ṡ(AlF 6)ṡHF, respectively, to 298.5(4) Å 3 in [H 4tren]ṡ(AlF 6)ṡ(F).

  6. Mathematical Modelling of the Process of Tungsten Fluorides Reduction by Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Brendakov Roman; Shvab Alexander; Brendakov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The process of tungsten fluorides reduction by hydrogen is a component part of Fluoride technology of tungsten conversion. Nowadays the researchers are definitely interested in studying this process. It is connected with common use of metal tungsten products in different sectors of the economy, which is the result of unique qualities of this metal. With the help of physical and mathematical modelling of the process of tungsten hexafluoride reduction by hydrogen, it becomes possible to create ...

  7. Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay. It is taken up by teeth and helps to strengthen ... and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children and adults whose ...

  8. Enhanced half-metallicity in the zigzag graphene nanoribbons by adsorption of the zigzag hydrogen fluoride molecular chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Gong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive theoretical study of the half-metallicity in the zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs by adsorption of the zigzag hydrogen fluoride chains was presented. The ZGNR by adsorption of the hydrogen fluoride chains could be half-metallic when a critical length of the hydrogen fluoride chain is achieved on the ZGNR at low temperature. It was found that the strong dipole moments of the hydrogen fluoride chains act as the constant electric field. Our results suggest a huge possibility in spintronics device applications for achieving half-metallicity in the ZGNRs without the excessively high external electric fields.

  9. Anticooperativity of FHF hydrogen bonds in clusters of the type F- × (HF)n, RF × (HF)n and XF × (HF)n, R = alkyl and X = H, Br, Cl, F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherov, S. Yu.; Bureiko, S. F.; Denisov, G. S.

    2016-02-01

    Properties of twenty five hydrogen-bonded complexes, namely, F- × (HF)n (n = 1-6), RF × (HF)n (R = t-Bu, i-Pr, Et, Me; n = 1-3), XF × (HF)n (X = H, Br, Cl; n = 1-2), and FF…HF with the hydrogen bond energy varying in a wide range have been calculated using ab initio methods at the MP2/6-31++G** level. For the first time, the energies, geometrical parameters and vibrational frequencies are obtained for the series of clusters, where the bonding character changes from covalent to van der Waals on the variation of proton-acceptor ability of the base, and the energies are in the range of 45-1 kcal/mol. The mutual influence of multiple hydrogen bonds of F…HF type in clusters, in which a fluorine anion or an atom participates in hydrogen bond formation as the acceptor, is systematically investigated. The relative changes in the values of the considered parameters on the sequential addition of an HF molecule (anticooperativity) were determined. It was shown that non-additivity of the interaction is most strongly pronounced in the energy and vibrational frequency values, geometrical parameters of hydrogen bonds are less sensitive to the mutual influence. The anticooperative effect is more pronounced on the hydrogen bridge length R(F...F) than on the geometry of proton donor r(HF). The hydrogen bond formation and the increase of the number n of ligands lead to successive lengthening of the r(XF) bond adjacent to the hydrogen bridge. The length of an XF bond changes stronger on formation of each hydrogen bond than the HF bond length.

  10. Separative recovery with lime of phosphate and fluoride from an acidic effluent containing H3PO4, HF and/or H2SiF6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouider, Mbarka; Feki, Mongi; Sayadi, Sami

    2009-10-30

    Fluoride content and flow-rate of fertilizer plant wastewater from phosphoric acid and/or triple superphosphate (TSP) production lead to the discharge of several thousand tons of fluoride (F(-)) per year and even more for phosphate (PO4(3-)). Since sustainability is an important environmental concern, the removal methods should allow phosphorus and fluoride to be recycled as a sustainable products for use as raw materials either in agricultural or industrial applications. In the present work, separative recovery with lime of these two target species was investigated. A preliminary speciation study, carried out on the crude effluent, showed that two forms of fluoride: HF and H2SiF6 are present in a highly acidic medium (pH approximately 2). Evidence that fluoride is present under both free (HF) and combined (H2SiF6) forms, in the phosphate-containing effluent, was provided by comparing potentiometric titration curves of a crude wastewater sample and synthetic acid mixtures containing H3PO4, HF and H2SiF6. In a second step synthetic effluent containing mixtures of the following acids: HF, H2SiF6 and H3PO4, were treated with lime. The behaviour of these compounds under lime treatment was analysed. The data showed that fluoride has a beneficial effect on phosphate removal. Moreover, by acting on the precipitation pH, a "selective" recovery of fluoride and phosphate ions was possible either from phosphoric acid/hydrofluoric acid or phosphoric acid/hexafluorosilicic acid mixtures. Indeed, the first stage of the separative recovery, led to a fluoride removal efficiency of 97-98% from phosphoric acid/hydrofluoric acid mixture. It was of 93-95% from phosphoric acid/hexafluorosilicic acid mixture. During the second stage, the phosphate precipitation reached 99.8% from both acidic mixtures whereas it did not exceed 82% from a solution containing H3PO4 alone. The XRD and IR analyses showed that during lime treatment, a H2SiF6 hydrolysis occurred, instead of CaSiF6 solid

  11. Evaluation of hydrogenation properties on MgHx-transition metal fluoride composites by planetary ball milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Min-Hyuk; Park, So-Hyun; Kim, Whan-Gi; Hong, Tae-Whan

    2015-11-01

    To improve the disadvantages of Mg hydrides, a few studies were conducted for MgHx intermixed with transition metal fluorides. MgF2 formed from the MgHx-transition metal fluoride system can be replaces the initial surface oxide layer and provides a reactive and protective fluorinated surface for for hydrogen uptake. Thus, the absorption/desorption kinetics will be enhanced. In this research, MgHx-transition metal fluoride composites mixture has been prepared by hydrogen induced planetary ball milling. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy and simultaneous thermogravimetric, differential scanning calorimetric analysis. The hydrogenation behaviors were evaluated by using a sievert's type automatic pressure-composition-temperature apparatus without any activation treatment. From the characteristics of the absorption kinetics and curves observed, the role of transition metal fluoride was catalyst in hydrogen absorption. The results of Pressure-Composition Isotherm curve, available hydrogen storage amount for MgHx-5 vol% CoF2 composites were 4.85 wt%, for MgHx-5 vol%TiF3 composites were 4.88 wt%. at 623K in the 5th cycle.

  12. Histological responses of some plant leaves to hydrogen fluoride and sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.F.; Solberg, R.A.

    1956-12-01

    Dicotyledonous plants were fumigated with hydrogen fluoride and/or sulfur dioxide. Samples were taken of injured and control leaves, processed microtechnically, and examined microscopically. Histological responses to hydrogen fluoride and sulfur dioxide were indistinguishable. The spongy mesophyll and lower epidermis first collapsed, followed by distortion and chloroplast disruption in the palisade cells. The upper epidermis finally distorted and collapsed. Microscopically injured leaf tissues were selectively stained with safranin. Various postulates are discussed concerning the means and pathways by which a phytotoxic air pollutant may enter the leaf and produce injury therein. The evidence indicates that should fluoride enter a leaf in sub-phytotoxic concentrations, it is transported acropetally. Should phytotoxic levels be reached, visible marginal injury results.

  13. Effects of gaseous hydrogen fluoride on oxidative enzymes of Pelargonium zonale leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poovaiah, B.W.; Wiebe, H.H.

    1971-10-01

    Changes in peroxidase and cytochrome oxidase enzymes were established histochemically in hydrogen fluoride fumigated leaves of Pelargonium zonale. Highest peroxidase and cytochrome oxidase activities were localized near the injured areas of fumigated leaves, and the greatest increase was observed in the phloem region.

  14. An ab initio study of the C2H2-HF, C2H(CH3)-HF and C2(CH3)2-HF hydrogen-bonded complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Mozart N; Lopes, Kelson C; Silva, Washington L V; Tavares, Alessandra M; Castriani, Fátima A; do Monte, Silmar A; Ventura, Elizete; Araújo, Regiane C M U

    2006-02-01

    MP2/6-31++G** and B3LYP/6-31++G** ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been performed in order to obtain molecular geometries, binding energies and vibrational properties of the C2H2-HF, C2H(CH3)-HF and C2(CH3)2-HF H-bonded complexes. As expected, the more pronounced effects on the structural properties of the isolated molecules due to complexation was verified for the C[triple bond]C and H-F bond lengths, which are directly involved in the H-bond formation. These bond distances increased after complexation. BSSE uncorrected B3LYP binding energies are always lower than the corresponding MP2 values. However, the opposite trend has been verified after BSSE correction by the counterpoise method since it is much lower at B3LYP than at MP2 level. The binding energies for these complexes as well as for the HF acid submolecule modes (the HF stretching and vibrational frequency modes) showed an increasing hydrogen-bonding strength with increasing methyl substitution. The splitting in the HF in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes reflects the anisotropy in the hydrogen-bonding interaction with the pi system of the C[triple bond]C bond. The H-F stretching frequency is shifted downward after complexation and it increases with the methyl substitution. The IR intensities of the HF acid submolecule fundamentals are adequately interpreted through the atomic polar tensor of the hydrogen atom using the charge-charge flux-overlap model. The skeletal stretching modes of the Alkyne submolecule are decreased in the complex. The new vibrational modes arising from complexation show several interesting features.

  15. [H 4tren] 3/2·(Al 6F 24)·3H 2O, the most condensed fluoride in the Al(OH) 3- tren-HF aq.-ethanol system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, K.; Marrot, J.; Leblanc, M.; Maisonneuve, V.

    2007-06-01

    The most condensed crystalline fluoride that appears in the Al(OH) 3- tren-HF aq.-ethanol system at 190 °C is found to be [H 4tren] 3/2·(Al 6F 24)·3H 2O. The structure is monoclinic, P2 1/ c, with a = 21.939(1) Å, b = 6.7180(2) Å, c = 23.329(1) Å, β = 111.324(2)°. ∞(Al 6F 24) chains result from the connection of (Al 7F 30) 9- polyanions by opposite AlF 6 octahedra. Hydrogen bonds are established between the ∞(Al 6F 24) chains and ordered or disordered [H 4tren] 4+ cations and water molecules.

  16. Mathematical Modelling of the Process of Tungsten Fluorides Reduction by Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendakov Roman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of tungsten fluorides reduction by hydrogen is a component part of Fluoride technology of tungsten conversion. Nowadays the researchers are definitely interested in studying this process. It is connected with common use of metal tungsten products in different sectors of the economy, which is the result of unique qualities of this metal. With the help of physical and mathematical modelling of the process of tungsten hexafluoride reduction by hydrogen, it becomes possible to create an import substitution technology of metal tungsten conversion. Fluoride technology of tungsten conversion allows putting different coverings and make tungsten products of different shapes, which is impossible to get traditionally. The process of tungsten fluorides reduction by hydrogen can be referred to CVD processes (Chemical Vapor Deposition. Common use of CVD technologies for getting metal products and coverings is limited by definite problems, connected with access difficulties to initial components of research and the lack of information about their basic thermal characteristics. Therefore, mathematical description of the initial components mass-moving process, which provides with optimal value of their concentration in gas flow and in precipitation zone, is a question of current importance.

  17. Deglycosylation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan by hydrogen fluoride in pyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, C A; Krueger, R; Schwartz, N B

    1985-04-01

    The original deglycosylation procedure using HF/pyridine has been modified for maximal removal of carbohydrate from chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, with minimal alteration of the core protein. Gas-liquid chromatography analysis after treatment for various times showed that 95% of xylose and mannose and 70-85% of other sugars were removed within 30 min, indicating that almost all chondroitin sulfate chains and about 80% of N- and O-linked oligosaccharides were removed. In contrast to the loss of carbohydrate, no change in amino acid composition or loss of immunoreactivity occurred. Longer treatment of up to 16 h resulted in little additional removal of carbohydrate, but did cause a significant decrease in solubility and recovery of the deglycosylated product. Optimal removal of xylose residues after about 1 h was also shown by maximal acceptor activity of the product in a xylosyltransferase assay. Rapid removal of the HF reagent by vacuum evacuation and ion-exchange chromatography, coupled with the reduced time of treatment allowed recovery of an intact, homogenous protein core that is amenable to structural and sequence studies.

  18. Acid-catalyzed hydrogenation of olefins. A theoretical study of the HF- and H/sub 3/O/sup +/-catalyzed hydrogenation of ethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siria, J.C.; Duran, M.; Lledos, A.; Bertran, J.

    1987-12-09

    The HF- and H/sub 3/O/sup +/-catalyzed hydrogenation of ethylene and the direct addition of molecular hydrogen to ethylene have been studied theoretically by means of ab initio MO calculations using different levels of theory. The main results are that catalysis by HF lowers the potential energy barrier to a large extent, while catalysis by H/sub 3/O/sup +/ diminishes dramatically the barrier for the reaction. Entropic contributions leave these results unchanged. The mechanisms of the two acid-catalyzed hydrogenations are somewhat different. While catalysis by HF exhibits bifunctional characteristics, catalysis by H/sub 3/O/sup +/ proceeds via an initial formation of a carbocation. It is shown that catalysis by strong acids may be an alternate way for olefin hydrogenation.

  19. Catalase and sodium fluoride mediated rehabilitation of enamel bleached with 37% hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching agents bring about a range of unwanted changes in the physical structure of enamel which needs to be restored qualitatively and timely. Catalase being an antioxidant ensures the effective removal of free radicals and improvement in fluoride mediated remineralization from the enamel microstructure which if retained may harm the integrity and affect the hardness of enamel. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted incisors were sectioned to 6 slabs which were divided into 5 groups: Group A, control; Group B, treatment with 37% hydrogen peroxide (HP; Group C, treatment with 37% HP and catalase, Group D, treatment with 37% HP and 5% sodium fluoride application, Group E, treatment with 37% HP followed by catalase and 5% sodium fluoride. Scanning electron microscope and microhardness analysis were done for all slabs. One-way ANOVA test was applied among different groups. Results: Vicker′s microhardness number (VHN of Group B and C was significantly lower. No significant difference between VHN of Group B and C. VHN of Group D was significantly higher than Group A, B, and C; but significantly lower than Group E. VHN of Group E was significantly higher than any other experimental group. One-way ANOVA revealed a highly significant P value (P = 0.0001 and so Tukey′s post-hoc Test for the group comparisons was employed. Conclusion: Subsequent treatment of bleached enamel with catalase and fluoride varnish separately results in repairing and significantly increasing the microhardness.

  20. Basis set effects on the energy and hardness profiles of the hydrogen fluoride dimer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Miquel Torrent-Sucarrat; Miquel Duran; Josep M Luis; Miquel Solà

    2005-09-01

    In earlier work, the present authors have shown that hardness profiles are less dependent on the level of calculation than energy profiles for potential energy surfaces (PESs) having pathological behaviors. At variance with energy profiles, hardness profiles always show the correct number of stationary points. This characteristic has been used to indicate the existence of spurious stationary points on the PESs. In the present work, we apply this methodology to the hydrogen fluoride dimer, a classical difficult case for the density functional theory methods.

  1. A DFT study of temperature dependent dissociation mechanism of HF in HF(H2O)7 cluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swatantra K Yadav; Hirdyesh Mishra; Ashwani K Tiwari

    2015-10-01

    We report a Density Functional Theoretical (DFT) study of dissociation of Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) in HF(H2O)7 cluster, using B3LYP functional and empirical exchange correlation functional M06-2X along with 6-31+G(d,p) basis set. Dissociation constant, KRP, of HF dissociation and pKa values of HF in cluster at various temperatures have been reported. It has been found that both KRP and pKa are highly dependent on temperature. The variation of pKa with temperature suggests that HF is strong acid at lower temperatures. Our study also reveals that HF is a stronger acid in water cluster than in bulk water. Further, the results obtained by DFT calculations have been compared with the earlier reported results obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. It is found that DFT results are qualitatively consistent with the results of MC simulation but quantitatively different.

  2. Crystal structure of μ-fluorido-bis{(η4-cyclooctadiene[hexafluoridoantimonato(V]platinum(II} hexafluoridoantimonate(V hydrogen fluoride 0.75-solvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Seppelt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the complex cation of the binuclear solvated title salt, [Pt2F(SbF62(C8H122]SbF6·0.75HF, an F atom bridges the two platinum(II atoms with a bond angle of 123.3 (2°. The corresponding Pt—F bond lengths are in the range of other fluorine-bridged binuclear platinum(II complexes. Two of the three SbF6− anions each coordinate with one F atom to one platinum(II atom. Including the η4-bound cyclooctadiene (COD ligands, the overall coordination sphere of each platinum(II atom is square-planar. The third SbF6− anion is not bound to the complex. Hydrogen fluoride is present in the crystal structure as a solvent disordered over three positions, each with an occupancy of 0.25. F...F distances of 2.5512 (7, 2.6076 (8 and 3.2215 (10 Å to surrounding SbF6− anions are indicative of F—H...F hydrogen-bonding interactions although no H atoms could be localized for the disordered solvent molecules. The resulting hydrogen-bonded network is three-dimensional.

  3. Enhanced hydrogen desorption property of MgH{sub 2} with the addition of cerium fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Huai-Jun, E-mail: huaijun.lin.489@s.kyushu-u.ac.jp [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Matsuda, Junko [International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Li, Hai-Wen [International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Research Center for Hydrogen Energy, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Zhu, Min [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); China–Australia Joint Laboratory for Energy & Environmental Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Akiba, Etsuo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Research Center for Hydrogen Energy, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Activation energy of MgH{sub 2} desorption is remarkably reduced with the dopant of CeF{sub 4}. • The improvement might be attributed to new Ce–F–Mg species at the CeF{sub 4}/MgH{sub 2} interface. • Easy electron transfer induced from the high valence Ce-cation benefits MgH{sub 2} desorption. - Abstract: Hydrogen desorption property of MgH{sub 2} doped with cerium fluorides with different valences prepared using ball milling has been studied. CeF{sub 4} is catalytically active for hydrogen desorption of MgH{sub 2}. Hydrogen desorption temperature and apparent activation energy of MgH{sub 2} are significantly reduced with dopant of 2 mol% of CeF{sub 4}, which might be attributed to the formation of a new Ce–F–Mg specie at the CeF{sub 4}/MgH{sub 2} interface and the easy electron transfer induced from the high valence Ce-cation. The apparent activation energy of hydrogen desorption of MgH{sub 2} is reduced from ∼160 kJ/mol to ∼110 kJ/mol with the dopant of CeF{sub 4}.

  4. Response of anaerobes to methyl fluoride, 2-bromoethanesulfonate and hydrogen during acetate degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Hao; Fan Lü; Lei Li; Liming Shao; Pinjing He

    2013-01-01

    To use the selective inhibition method for quantitative analysis of acetate metabolism in methanogenic systems,the responses of microbial communities and metabolic activities,which were involved in anaerobic degradation of acetate,to the addition of methyl fluoride (CH3F),2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) and hydrogen were investigated in a thermophilic batch experiment.Both the methanogenic inhibitors,i.e.,CH3F and BES,showed their effectiveness on inhibiting CH4 production,whereas acetate metabolism other than acetoclastic methanogenesis was stimulated by BES,as reflected by the fluctuated acetate concentration.Syntrophic acetate oxidation was thermodynamically blocked by hydrogen (H2),while H2-utilizing reactions as hydrogenotrophic methanogencsis and homoacetogenesis were correspondingly promoted.Results of PCR-DGGE fingerprinting showed that,CH3F did not influence the microbial populations significantly.However,the BES and hydrogen notably altered the bacterial community structures and increased the diversity.BES gradually changed the methanogenic community structure by affecting the existence of different populations to different levels,whilst H2 greatly changed the abundance of different methanogenic populations,and induced growth of new species.

  5. Response of anaerobes to methyl fluoride, 2-bromoethanesulfonate and hydrogen during acetate degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Liping; Lü, Fan; Li, Lei; Shao, Liming; He, Pinjing

    2013-05-01

    To use the selective inhibition method for quantitative analysis of acetate metabolism in methanogenic systems, the responses of microbial communities and metabolic activities, which were involved in anaerobic degradation of acetate, to the addition of methyl fluoride (CH3F), 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) and hydrogen were investigated in a thermophilic batch experiment. Both the methanogenic inhibitors, i.e., CH3F and BES, showed their effectiveness on inhibiting CH4 production, whereas acetate metabolism other than acetoclastic methanogenesis was stimulated by BES, as reflected by the fluctuated acetate concentration. Syntrophic acetate oxidation was thermodynamically blocked by hydrogen (H2), while H2-utilizing reactions as hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and homoacetogenesis were correspondingly promoted. Results of PCR-DGGE fingerprinting showed that, CH3F did not influence the microbial populations significantly. However, the BES and hydrogen notably altered the bacterial community structures and increased the diversity. BES gradually changed the methanogenic community structure by affecting the existence of different populations to different levels, whilst H2 greatly changed the abundance of different methanogenic populations, and induced growth of new species.

  6. Hydrogen fluoride damage to vegetation from peri-urban brick kilns in Asia: a growing but unrecognised problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Nauman; van den Berg, Leon J L; Shah, Hamid Ullah; Masood, Tariq; Büker, Patrick; Emberson, Lisa; Ashmore, Mike

    2012-03-01

    The rapid urbanisation of many cities in south and south-east Asia has increased the demand for bricks, which are typically supplied from brick kilns in peri-urban areas. We report visible foliar damage to mango, apricot and plum trees in the vicinity of traditional Bull's Trench brick kilns in Peshawar, Pakistan. Visible injury symptoms, hydrogen fluoride concentrations in air, and foliar fluoride concentrations were all greater in the vicinity of brick kilns than at more distant sites, indicating that fluoride emissions from brick kilns were the main cause of damage. Interviews with local farmers established the significant impact of this damage on their livelihoods. Since poorly regulated brick kilns are often found close to important peri-urban agricultural areas, we suggest that this may be a growing but unrecognised environmental problem in regions of Asia where emission control in brick kilns has not been improved.

  7. Diethylenetriaminium hexafluoridotitanate(IV fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lhoste

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, (C6H21N4[TiF6]F, was synthesized by the reaction of TiO2, tris(2-aminoethylamine, HF and ethanol at 463 K in a microwave oven. The crystal structure consists of two crystallographically independent [TiF6]2− anions, two fluoride anions and two triply-protonated tris(2-aminoethylamine cations. The Ti atoms are coordinated by six F atoms within slightly distorted octahedra. The anions and cations are connected by intermolecular N—H...F hydrogen bonds.

  8. A theoretical study of hydrogen complexes of the XH-pi type between propyne and HF, HCL or HCN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Alessandra M; da Silva, Washington L V; Lopes, Kelson C; Ventura, Elizete; Araújo, Regiane C M U; do Monte, Silmar A; da Silva, João Bosco P; Ramos, Mozart N

    2006-05-15

    The present manuscript reports a systematic investigation of the basis set dependence of some properties of hydrogen-bonded (pi type) complexes formed by propyne and a HX molecule, where X=F, Cl and CN. The calculations have been performed at Hartree-Fock, MP2 and B3LYP levels. Geometries, H-bond energies and vibrational have been considered. The more pronounced effects on the structural parameters of the isolated molecules, as a result of complexation, are verified on RCtriple bondC and HX bond lengths. As compared to double-zeta (6-31G**), triple-zeta (6-311G**) basis set leads to an increase of RCtriple bondC bond distance, at all three computational levels. In the case where diffuse functions are added to both hydrogen and 'heavy' atoms, the effect is more pronounced. The propyne-HX structural parameters are quite similar to the corresponding parameters of acetylene-HX complexes, at all levels. The largest difference is obtained for hydrogen bond distance, RH, with a smaller value for propyne-HX complex, indicating a stronger bond. Concerning the electronic properties, the results yield the following ordering for H-bond energies, DeltaE: propynecdots, three dots, centeredHF>propynecdots, three dots, centeredHCl>propynecdots, three dots, centeredHCN. It is also important to point out that the inclusion of BSSE and zero-point energies (ZPE) corrections cause significant changes on DeltaE. The smaller effect of ZPE is obtained for propynecdots, three dots, centeredHCN at HF/6-311++G** level, while the greatest difference is obtained at MP2/6-31G** level for propynecdots, three dots, centeredHF system. Concerning the IR vibrational it was obtained that larger shift can be associated with stronger hydrogen bonds. The more pronounced effect on the normal modes of the isolated molecule after the complexation is obtained for HX stretching frequency, which is shifted downward.

  9. Synthesis of reagents for fluoride technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gordienko; P.; S.; Kolzunov; V.; A.; Dostovalov; V.; A.; Kaidalova; T.; A.

    2005-01-01

    Growing demand for fluorinating reagents to be used in rare-metal industry has stimulated conducting research in the field of production for these reagents. That is why the fluorinating reagents production has recently formed an independent segment of industry. Main industrial fluorinating reagents include hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, technical ammonium hydrodifluoride, fluorosilicic acid and its salts. To produce technical etching acid, fluor-spar with calcium fluoride content at least 92% is used in most cases. To produce anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, fluor-spar with calcium fluoride content 96 %-97 % is necessary. The fluorine-containing raw materials refinement from silica by means of flotation makes the fluorinating reagents production substantially more expensive. In this work we have attempted to process unconcentrated raw materials by fluorine removal in the form of volatile silicon tetrafluoride. In this process silicon tetrafluoride was recovered by liquid ammonia with subsequent hydrolysis of the formed ammonia hexafluorosilicate. Hydrolysis occurred according to the reaction:(NH4)2 SiF6 + 4NH3 + 2 H2O= 6NH4F+ SiO2 The products of the ammonia hexafluorosilicate hydrolysis included ammonia fluoride and amorphous silica gel ("white soot") as by-product. This "white soot" was of high purity-with main component content 99.95% and total admixture content 0.05%. Silica gel is a superfine material with specific surface of 267.6 m2/g and is recommended as filler in the production of rubber, plastics and for other applications.Ammonia fluoride was transformed into ammonia hydrodifluoride (main processing product) according to the reaction:2NH4F→NH3+NH4 HF2 It was stated that the NH4F: NH4 HF2 ratio depends on boiling point temperature-with its increase the ammonia hydrofluoride concentration in solution increases as well.

  10. DFT study of hydrogen fluoride and sulfur trioxide interactions on the surface of Pt-decorated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Ali Shokuhi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the adsorption properties of hydrogen florid (HF) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) on the surface of platinum decorated graphene (PtG) using density functional theory. We found one optimized configuration for HF and two ones for SO3 upon adsorption on the surface of PtG. Our result show significant adsorption on PtG with calculated energy adsorption of -73.6 (-54.2 BSSE) kJ/mol for HF at its only position and -172.4 (-144.8 BSSE) and -62.7 (-53.7 BSSE) kJ/mol for SO3 at its two positions; P1 and P2, respectively), whereas there is weak physisorption of these analytes on pristine graphene (PG). Results of charge analyses reveled interesting net charge transfer; while the direction of charge is from HF to PtG, reverse direction is found for SO3 for its two configurations. To deep understand the concept of adsorption properties, we used orbital analyses including density of states for interaction of mentioned analytes on the surface of PtG.

  11. Effects of N{sub 2}-annealing conditions on the sensing properties of Pt/HfO{sub 2}/SiC Schottky-diode hydrogen sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, W.M., E-mail: wmtang@eee.hku.hk; Leung, C.H.; Lai, P.T.

    2010-10-29

    Hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) used as the gate insulator of metal-insulator-SiC Schottky-diode hydrogen sensors is annealed in nitrogen at different temperatures and durations for achieving a better performance. The hydrogen-sensing properties of these samples are compared with each other by taking measurements under various temperatures and hydrogen concentrations using a computer-controlled measurement system. The sensor response of the device is found to increase with the annealing temperature and time because higher annealing temperature and longer annealing time can enhance the densification of the HfO{sub 2} film; improve the oxide stoichiometry and facilitate the growth of an interfacial layer to give better interface quality, thus causing a significant reduction of the current of the sensor under air ambient. The effects of hydrogen adsorption on the barrier height and conduction mechanism of the devices are also investigated.

  12. Toxic fluoride gas emissions from lithium-ion battery fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Petra; Blomqvist, Per; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2017-08-30

    Lithium-ion battery fires generate intense heat and considerable amounts of gas and smoke. Although the emission of toxic gases can be a larger threat than the heat, the knowledge of such emissions is limited. This paper presents quantitative measurements of heat release and fluoride gas emissions during battery fires for seven different types of commercial lithium-ion batteries. The results have been validated using two independent measurement techniques and show that large amounts of hydrogen fluoride (HF) may be generated, ranging between 20 and 200 mg/Wh of nominal battery energy capacity. In addition, 15-22 mg/Wh of another potentially toxic gas, phosphoryl fluoride (POF3), was measured in some of the fire tests. Gas emissions when using water mist as extinguishing agent were also investigated. Fluoride gas emission can pose a serious toxic threat and the results are crucial findings for risk assessment and management, especially for large Li-ion battery packs.

  13. Um estudo teórico de propriedades moleculares em complexos de hidrogênio trimoleculares C2H4···2HF, C2H2···2HF e C3h6···2HF A theoretical study of molecular properties of C2H4···2HF, C2H2···2HF AND C3H6···2HF trimolecular hydrogen-bonded complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz G. Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical study of molecular properties in C2H4···2HF, C2H2···2HF and C3H6···2HF trimolecular hydrogen-bonded complexes. From B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p calculations, the most important structural deformations are related to the C=C (C2H4, C≡C (C2H2, C-C (C3H6 and HF bond lengths. According to the Bader's atoms in molecules and CHELPG calculations, it was identified a tertiary interaction between the fluorine atom of the second hydrofluoric acid molecule and hydrogen atoms of the ethylene and acetylene within the C2H4···2HF and C2H2···2HF complexes, respectively. Additionally, the evaluation of the infrared spectrum characterized the new vibrational modes and bathochromic effect of the HF molecules.

  14. Three-dimensional distribution of hydrogen fluoride gas toward NGC6334 I and I(N)

    CERN Document Server

    van der Wiel, M H D; Makiwa, G; Satta, M; Abergel, A

    2016-01-01

    Aims. We investigate the spatial distribution of a collection of absorbing gas clouds, some associated with the dense, massive star-forming core NGC6334 I, and others with diffuse foreground clouds. For the former category, we aim to study the dynamical properties of the clouds in order to assess their potential to feed the accreting protostellar cores. Methods. We use spectral imaging from the Herschel SPIRE iFTS to construct a map of HF absorption at 243 micron in a 6x3.5 arcmin region surrounding NGC6334 I and I(N). Results. The combination of new, spatially fully sampled, but spectrally unresolved mapping with a previous, single-pointing, spectrally resolved HF signature yields a 3D picture of absorbing gas clouds in the direction of NGC6334. Toward core I, the HF equivalent width matches that of the spectrally resolved observation. The distribution of HF absorption is consistent with three of the seven components being associated with this dense star-forming envelope. For two of the remaining four compon...

  15. Adsorption of hydrogen fluoride onto activated carbon under vacuum conditions: Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahrami Hussein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the adsorption of HF gas by three types of activated carbon has been investigated under vacuum condition. The effects of experimental parameters such as initial pressure of the HF gas, contact time and temperature on adsorption process have been investigated. The results showed that the adsorption of the HF gas onto activated carbon increased by increasing initial pressure of gas, while it decreased with increase in temperature. The Freundlich isotherm model fitted the equilibrium data better than the other isotherm models. Using Langmuir isotherm model, the maximum adsorption capacities of the first type, the second type and third type of activated carbon were 226.4, 268.8 and 258.9 mg/g, respectively. Experimental data were also evaluated in terms of kinetic characteristics of adsorption and it was found that the adsorption process followed well pseudo-second-order kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters, the change of free energy (ΔG°, enthalpy (ΔH° and entropy (ΔS° of adsorption were calculated at the temperature range of 28-55°C. The results showed that the adsorption of HF on activated carbon is feasible, spontaneous and exothermic.

  16. Physiological effects of the air pollutant hydrogen fluoride on phloem transport in soybean plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madkour, S.A.A.S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of continuous exposure to HF at ca. 0, 1, and 5 ugF m/sup -3/ for 8-10 days on the transport and relative distribution of /sup 14/C-labelled photosynthetic assimilates in Hodgson soybean plants at three stages of development (vegetative, flowering and early fruit set, and pod filling) were investigated. Fumigated and non-fumigated plants were supplied with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ by enclosing the second fully-expanded trifoliolate leaf in a cuvette designed for the purpose. Results from these experiments indicate that transport from the source leaves of /sup 14/C-labelled assimilates to sink tissues was partially inhibited by exposure to both concentrations of HF and at each stage of development. However, the greatest degree of inhibition in the transport occurred in plants that were exposed during the flowering stage. Results indicated that there was a greater retention of sugars and a greater incorporation of the /sup 14/C into non-transport compounds in the source leaves accompanied by a reduced transport to sink tissue as the HF concentration increases. This suggested that F-induced inhibition of phloem loading of sugars. The effect of HF fumigation on phloem loading was investigated by monitoring the uptake of /sup 14/C-sucrose supplied to source leaf discs, collected from fumigated and non-fumigated plants. HF was shown to inhibit the loading of /sup 14/C-sucrose. The effect of F on the activity of plasma membrane ATPase was investigated both in vivo, by isolating plasma membranes from fumigated and non-fumigated plants, and in vitro by exposure of plasma membranes to NaF. F was shown to inhibit ATPase activity both in vivo and in vitro. It is concluded that plasma membrane ATPases is the target site for F inhibition of phloem transport, and that the inhibition occurs through the formation of Mg/sup +2/-fluorophosphate complexes.

  17. Hydrogen bonds determine the structures of the ternary heterocyclic complexes C₂H₄O···2HF, C₂H₅N···2HF and C₂H₄S···2HF: density functional theory and topological calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Boaz G; Araújo, Regiane C M U; Carvalho, Antônio B; Ramos, Mozart N

    2011-11-01

    A theoretical study of structural, electronic, topological and vibrational parameters of the ternary hydrogen-bonded complexes C(2)H(4)O···2HF, C(2)H(5)N···2HF and C(2)H(4)S···2HF is presented here. Different from binary systems with a single proton donor, the tricomplexes have the property of forming multiple hydrogen bonds, which are analyzed from a structural and vibrational point of view, but verified only by means of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). As traditionally done in the hydrogen bond theory, the charge transfer between proton donors and acceptors was computed using the CHELPG calculations, which also revealed agreement with dipole moment variation and a cooperative effect on the tricomplexes. Furthermore, redshift events on proton donor bonds were satisfactorily identified, although, in this case, an absence of experimental data led to the use of a theoretical argument to interpret these spectroscopic shifts. It was therefore the use of the QTAIM parameters that enabled all intermolecular vibrational modes to be validated. The most stable tricomplex in terms of energy was identified via the strength of the hydrogen bonds, which were modeled as directional and bifurcated.

  18. Electroless deposition of bismuth on Si(111) wafer from hydrogen fluoride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romann, T., E-mail: tavo.romann@ut.e [Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, 2 Jakobi Street, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Anderson, E.; Kallip, S. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, 2 Jakobi Street, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Maendar, H.; Matisen, L. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, 142 Riia Street, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Lust, E. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, 2 Jakobi Street, 51014 Tartu (Estonia)

    2010-05-03

    Thin Bi layers were deposited by simple immersion of silicon chip into diluted HF aqueous solution, containing bismuth(III) ions. Bi nanoparticles or continuous up to 300 nm thick Bi film can be grown on silicon by the variation of the temperature and deposition time. Prepared surfaces have been characterized by atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman scattering, photoluminescence and resistivity measurement methods. It was found that thinner Bi layers have a yellowish colour.

  19. Analysis of the interactions between difluoroacetylene and one or two hydrogen fluoride molecules based on calculated spin–spin coupling constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Provasi, Patricio F.; Caputo, María Cristina; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical study of FCCF:(HF)n complexes, with n = 1 and 2, has been carried out by means of ab initio computational methods. Two types of complexes are formed: those with FH···p interactions and those with FH···FC hydrogen bonds. The indirect spin–spin coupling constants have been calculated ...

  20. Facile Routes to NiF(6)(2)(-), AgF(4)(-), AuF(6)(-), and PtF(6)(-) Salts Using O(2)(+) as a Source of O(2)F in Anhydrous HF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucier, G. M.; Shen, C.; Elder, S. H.; Bartlett, N.

    1998-07-27

    O(2)(+) salts dissolved in liquid anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (aHF) at 20 degrees C or below oxidize aHF solutions of PtF(6)(2)(-) to PtF(6)(-). The parent base of O(2)(+) salts in aHF (O(2)F((solv))) generated with alkali fluoride is long-lived below -50 degrees C. An aHF solution of O(2)F((solv)) oxidizes Au(III) to Au(V) below -50 degrees C (2O(2)F((solv)) + AuF(4)(-)((solv)) --> AuF(6)(-)((solv)) +2O(2(g))). In situ generation of O(2)F((solv)) (O(2)(+)((solv)) + F(-)((solv)) --> O(2)F((solv))) with AgF(2) or NiF(2) in suspension in the aHF made basic with alkali fluoride gives AgF(4)(-) and NiF(6)(2)(-)salts. Low solubility of AAsF(6)(A = Cs, K) in aHF provides for the metathetical preparation of (O(2))(2)PdF(6) solutions in aHF. Removal of aHF, even at -60 degrees C, results in some O(2) and F(2) loss, to a composition approaching (O(2))PdF(5).

  1. Effects of hydrogen fluoride on production and organic reserves of bean seed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, M.R.

    1971-11-01

    The response of bean fruiting to HF gas was investigated in a series of experiments in growth chambers. No response was found when plants were fumigated at 4.5 to 8.0 ..mu..g (F)/m/sup 3/ for 7 to 14 days during or near flowering. Bean plants exposed from seeding to harvest to as little as 2.1 ..mu..g (F)/m/sup 3/ produced fewer fruit and (or) fewer seed per fruit than control plants. In lower HF treatments and in one experiment at 2.2 ..mu..g (F)/m/sup 3/, no effects were evident. Where fruiting was affected, the mature seed had a somewhat faded, shriveled appearance, weighted less, and had a markedly lower starch content than seed of control plants. There were no definite differences in reducing sugars, total sugars, protein, or ether extract. The effects on bean fruiting were independent of visible injury to the foliage. 16 references, 4 tables.

  2. Thermal atomic layer etching of crystalline aluminum nitride using sequential, self-limiting hydrogen fluoride and Sn(acac){sub 2} reactions and enhancement by H{sub 2} and Ar plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Nicholas R.; Sun, Huaxing; Sharma, Kashish [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado at Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); George, Steven M., E-mail: Steven.George@Colorado.Edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado at Boulder, Colorado 80309 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Thermal atomic layer etching (ALE) of crystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) films was demonstrated using sequential, self-limiting reactions with hydrogen fluoride (HF) and tin(II) acetylacetonate [Sn(acac){sub 2}] as the reactants. Film thicknesses were monitored versus number of ALE reaction cycles at 275 °C using in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). A low etch rate of ∼0.07 Å/cycle was measured during etching of the first 40 Å of the film. This small etch rate corresponded with the AlO{sub x}N{sub y} layer on the AlN film. The etch rate then increased to ∼0.36 Å/cycle for the pure AlN films. In situ SE experiments established the HF and Sn(acac){sub 2} exposures that were necessary for self-limiting surface reactions. In the proposed reaction mechanism for thermal AlN ALE, HF fluorinates the AlN film and produces an AlF{sub 3} layer on the surface. The metal precursor, Sn(acac){sub 2}, then accepts fluorine from the AlF{sub 3} layer and transfers an acac ligand to the AlF{sub 3} layer in a ligand-exchange reaction. The possible volatile etch products are SnF(acac) and either Al(acac){sub 3} or AlF(acac){sub 2}. Adding a H{sub 2} plasma exposure after each Sn(acac){sub 2} exposure dramatically increased the AlN etch rate from 0.36 to 1.96 Å/cycle. This enhanced etch rate is believed to result from the ability of the H{sub 2} plasma to remove acac surface species that may limit the AlN etch rate. The active agent from the H{sub 2} plasma is either hydrogen radicals or radiation. Adding an Ar plasma exposure after each Sn(acac){sub 2} exposure increased the AlN etch rate from 0.36 to 0.66 Å/cycle. This enhanced etch rate is attributed to either ions or radiation from the Ar plasma that may also lead to the desorption of acac surface species.

  3. Effect of hydrogen fluoride on pollen germination and pollen tube growth in Prunus avium L. cv. Royal Ann

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facteau, T.J.; Wang, S.Y.; Rowe, K.E.

    1973-05-01

    Increased fluoride (F) fumigation levels resulted in decrease in percent Royal Ann pollen germination and pollen tube growth. As dose (hour x concentration in ..mu.. gF/m/sup 3/) increased, Van pollen tube growth in vivo decreased. A linear relationship between increased dose and fluoride residue in the flowers was shown. 14 references, 5 figures.

  4. Getting down to the Fundamentals of Hydrogen Bonding: Anharmonic Vibrational Frequencies of (HF)2 and (H2O)2 from Ab Initio Electronic Structure Computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J Coleman; Gray, Jessica L; Hardwick, Amanda J; Nguyen, Linh T; Tschumper, Gregory S

    2014-12-09

    This work presents a systematic investigation into the basis set convergence of harmonic vibrational frequencies of (H2O)2 and (HF)2 computed with second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and the coupled-cluster singles and doubles method with perturbative connected triples, CCSD(T), while employing correlation-consistent basis sets as large as aug-cc-pV6Z. The harmonic vibrational frequencies presented here are expected to lie within a few cm(-1) of the complete basis set (CBS) limit. For these important hydrogen-bonding prototype systems, a basis set of at least quadruple-ζ quality augmented with diffuse functions is required to obtain harmonic vibrational frequencies within 10 cm(-1) of the CBS limit. In addition, second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) anharmonic corrections yield CCSD(T) vibrational frequencies in excellent agreement with experimental spectra, differing by no more than a few cm(-1) for the intramonomer fundamental vibrations. D0 values predicted by CCSD(T) VPT2 computations with a quadruple-ζ basis set reproduce the experimental values of (HF)2 and (H2O)2 to within 2 and 21 cm(-1), respectively.

  5. Oxidative aliphatic C-H fluorination with manganese catalysts and fluoride ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Xiongyi; Groves, John T

    2013-12-01

    Fluorination is a reaction that is useful in improving the chemical stability and changing the binding affinity of biologically active compounds. The protocol described here can be used to replace aliphatic, C(sp(3))-H hydrogen in small molecules with fluorine. Notably, isolated methylene groups and unactivated benzylic sites are accessible. The method uses readily available manganese porphyrin and manganese salen catalysts and various fluoride ion reagents, including silver fluoride (AgF), tetrabutylammonium fluoride and triethylamine trihydrofluoride (TREAT·HF), as the source of fluorine. Typically, the reactions afford 50-70% yield of mono-fluorinated products in one step. Two representative examples, the fragrance component celestolide and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen, are described; they produced useful isolated quantities (250-300 mg, ~50% yield) of fluorinated material over periods of 1-8 h. The procedures are performed in a typical fume hood using ordinary laboratory glassware. No special precautions to rigorously exclude water are required.

  6. Resistless photochemical etching of a silicon wafer by UV laser with an H2O2 and HF aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new resistless etching method has been developed for Silicon wafers. This new method uses an aqueous solution consisting of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) as the activating etchants. A 193 nm ArF excimer laser and a 266 nm fourth harmonic generation Nd:YAG laser were used as the photon sources. Results showed that pattern etching has been achieved without any photoresist film. In the case of the 193 nm laser, the optimal etching appeared at a 1.3 H2O2/HF ratio, where an etch depth of 210 nm was achieved with a fluence of 29 mJ/cm2 and shot number of 10000. At the same conditions, the etch depth with H2O2 and HF solution was three times of that by using H2O and HF mixture. In the case of the 266 nm Nd:YAG laser, the optimal etching appeared at twice ratio of H2O2/HF, where the etch depth of 420 nm was achieved with a fluence of 12 mJ/cm2 and shot number of 30000. Results showed that the etch effect of the 266 nm Nd: YAG laser was more desirable than that of the 193 nm ArF excimer laser.``Keyords: UV laser, resistless photochemical etching, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2).

  7. Heavy Metal Fluoride Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    i 2N E ihhhhh1112h MEmhhhhEEEohhhhE I.’....momo 111111111’-20 LA ’Ll2. AFWL-TR-86-37 AFWL-TR- 86-37 oT C ,l C ’-’ N HEAVY METAL FLUORIDE GLASSES 0nI...Secwrit CkasmfcationJ HEAVY METAL FLUORIDE GLASSES 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Reisfield, Renata; and Eyal, Mrek 13. TYPE OF REPORT 113b. TIME COVERED 114...glasses containing about 50 mole% of ZrF4 [which can be replaced by HfF 4 or TIF 4 (Refs. 1-3) or heavy metal fluorides based on PbF2 and on 3d-group

  8. Coherent-states dynamics of the H + + HF reaction at ELab = 30 eV: A complete electron nuclear dynamics investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Buddhadev; Sadeghi, Raymond; Austin, Anthony; Morales, Jorge A.

    2007-11-01

    Results of a complete investigation of the H + + HF reaction at ELab = 30 eV with the electron nuclear dynamics (END) and the coherent-states dynamics (CSD) theories are herein presented. Current END-CSD methodology employs frozen Gaussian wave packet in the semiclassical limit of ℏ → 0 for the nuclei, and a single-determinantal Thouless coherent state (CS) for the electrons. The simulated 400 CS trajectories from five independent HF target orientations provide a complete description of the reactive processes in this system, including: non-charge-transfer scattering (NCTS), charge-transfer scattering (CTS), hydrogen fluoride dissociation (H-F D), and hydrogen rearrangement (HR). Several aspects of the reactions dynamics, such as mechanistic details and rainbow angles effects, are discussed. Differential and integral cross sections are evaluated via a novel CS formulation of those properties in conjunction with semiclassical techniques. The calculated total differential cross section shows an excellent agreement with available experimental results.

  9. The differences of tooth density changes in the applications of 45% carbamide peroxide PF and 38% hydrogen peroxide PF as dental bleaching agents and after the application of 1.2% acidulated phosphoric fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devriza Jurnalis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The changes of tooth density is caused by the dissolutions of mineral enamel (demineralization by bleaching agent. The purpose of this research was intended to know tooth density changes after the application of bleaching agent using 45% carbamide peroxide potassium fluoride (PF and 38% hydrogen peroxide potassium fluoride (PF and after the application of 1.2% acidulated phosphoric fluoride (APF.This research was true experimental in-vitro. Sample taking was by random sampling. The sample consisted of 32 maxillary central incisive permanent teeth. The tooth density was measured using RVG (Radiovisiography. The research results were analyzed and tested in a pair and in a pair of two sample for means using t student method. The conclusion of the research was a decrease of tooth density after the application of bleaching agent with 45% carbamide peroxide PF and 38% hydrogen peroxide PF with statistically significant. After the application of 1.2% APF the density increased significantly but the density was lower than original density. There was no significant difference between bleached with 45% carbamide peroxide potassium fluoride and 38% hydrogen peroxide potassium fluoride.

  10. NCO与HF氢键选择性的理论研究%Theoretical Study of the Hydrogen Bond Character Between NCO and HF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    和芹

    2011-01-01

    在MP2(full)/6-311+ +G(2d,2p)、MP2(full) /6-311+ +G(2df,2p)、MP2(full)/6-311+ +G (3df,3p)与MP2 (full)/6-311+ +G (3df,3pd)水平上优化单体及二聚物结构,进一步在MP2 (full)/6-311+ +G (3df,3pd)水平上探讨氢键作用特征.综合分析二聚物几何结构、能量,采用自然键轨道NBO分析氢键成键特征,发现氢键形成导致F-H键长增长,振动频率红移,属于典型红移型氢键,NRT分析表明氢键以静电作用为主.进一步引入静电势分析氢键选择性原因,发现N周围静电势更负,因而氢键选择性强.%The dimers formed between NCO and HF were fully optimized with the MP2 method and 6-311 + +G(2d,2p), 6-311 + +G(2df,2p), 6-311 ++G(3df,3p) as well as 6-311++G(3df, 3pd) basis sets. The relevant geometrical characteristics, energy properties and the characters of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds have been analysed systematically at the level of MP2/6-311 + +G(3df,3pd). The formation of a hydrogen bond has been found accompanied by an elongation of the F-H bond distance and a red shift of the frequency, thus on can conclude that the N(O)…H -F belongs to classical red shift hydrogen bond, furthermore , the NRT analysis suggested that the ionic interaction play an essential role. In addition, the electrostatic potential were presented for further understanding the nature of hydrogen bond, the results showed that stronger hydrogen bond for N site should result from more negative electrostatic potential of N atom.

  11. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sauerheber

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings.

  12. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerheber, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings. PMID:23840230

  13. The effects of acidic fluoride solutions on early enamel erosion in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortsjö, C; Jonski, G; Thrane, P S; Saxegaard, E; Young, A

    2009-01-01

    Acidic fluoride solutions may reduce dental erosion. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different acidic fluoride solutions on enamel dissolution using an established in vivo model. When possible 4 anterior teeth (255 teeth in a total of 67 subjects) were isolated and exposed to 0.01 M citric acid. The acid was collected in test tubes before (etch I) and 5 min after (etch II) application of test fluoride preparations. Acidic fluoride solutions (pH range 1.5-2.9), i.e. SnF(2), TiF(4) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) (all approx. 0.1 M F), HF (0.027, 0.055, 0.082 M F) and neutral NaF solution (0.1 M F) as control were applied to the labial surfaces of the teeth for 1 min (6 ml/min). Enamel dissolution was examined by chemical analysis of calcium content in the citric acid etch solutions using atom absorption spectrometry. The change in calcium concentration (DeltaCa) and the percentage of mean calcium reduction were calculated from the difference in calcium loss between etch I and etch II. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and Kruskal-Wallis tests with Dunn's multiple comparison. Results showed a mean DeltaCa of 0.671 mg/l (SD 0.625) for SnF(2), and ranged from 0.233 mg/l (SD 0.248) for the weakest HF solution to 0.373 mg/l (SD 0.310) for the strongest HF solution. This represented a 67% reduction in enamel dissolution for SnF(2) and a 40-76% reduction for the HF solutions. No reduction was observed for TiF(4) or NaF. The types of metal, pH and fluoride concentration are all important for the in vivo effect. 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Rovibrational and dynamical properties of the hydrogen bonded complex (CH2)2S-HF: a combined free jet, cell, and neon matrix-Fourier transform infrared study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, P; Goubet, M; Lewerenz, M; Soulard, P; Perchard, J P

    2004-09-15

    Fourier transform infrared spectra of the nu(s) (HF stretching) band of the (CH(2))(2)S-HF complex have been recorded at 0.1-0.5 cm(-1) resolution in a cooled cell, in a supersonic jet expansion seeded with argon and in a neon matrix at 4.5 K. The combination of controlled temperature effects over a range of 40-250 K and a sophisticated band contour simulation program allows the separation of homogeneous and inhomogeneous contributions and reveals significant anharmonic couplings between intramolecular and intermolecular vibrational modes similar to our previous work on (CH(2))(2)S-DF. The sign of the coupling constants is consistent with the expected strengthening of the hydrogen bond upon vibrational excitation of HF which also explains the observed small variations of the geometrical parameters in the excited state. The analysis of sum and difference combination bands involving nu(s) provides accurate values of intermolecular harmonic frequencies and anharmonicities and a good estimate of the dissociation energy of the complex. Frequencies and coupling parameters derived from gas phase spectra compare well with results from neon matrix experiments. The effective linewidth provides a lower bound for the predissociation lifetime of 10 ps. The comparison between effective linewidths and vibrational densities of states for (CH(2))(2)S-HF and -DF complexes highlights the important role of intramolecular vibrational redistribution in the vibrational dynamics of medium strength hydrogen bonds.

  15. Uranium hexafluoride liquid thermal expansion, elusive eutectic with hydrogen fluoride, and very first production using chlorine trifluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutledge, G.P. [Central Environmental, Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Three unusual incidents and case histories involving uranium hexafluoride in the enrichment facilities of the USA in the late 1940`s and early 1950`s are presented. The history of the measurements of the thermal expansion of liquids containing fluorine atoms within the molecule is reviewed with special emphasis upon uranium hexafluoride. A comparison is made between fluorinated esters, fluorocarbons, and uranium hexafluoride. The quantitative relationship between the thermal expansion coefficient, a, of liquids and the critical temperature, T{sub c} is presented. Uranium hexafluoride has an a that is very high in a temperature range that is used by laboratory and production workers - much higher than any other liquid measured. This physical property of UF{sub 6} has resulted in accidents involving filling the UF{sub 6} containers too full and then heating with a resulting rupture of the container. Such an incident at a uranium gaseous diffusion plant is presented. Production workers seldom {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} uranium hexafluoride. The movement of UF{sub 6} from one container to another is usually trailed by weight, not sight. Even laboratory scientists seldom {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} solid or liquid UF{sub 6} and this can be a problem at times. This inability to {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} the UF{sub 6}-HF mixtures in the 61.2{degrees}C to 101{degrees}C temperature range caused a delay in the understanding of the phase diagram of UF{sub 6}-HF which has a liquid - liquid immiscible region that made the eutectic composition somewhat elusive. Transparent fluorothene tubes solved the problem both for the UF{sub 6}-HF phase diagram as well as the UF{sub 6}-HF-CIF{sub 3} phase diagram with a miscibility gap starting at 53{degrees}C. The historical background leading to the first use of CIF{sub 3} to produce UF{sub 6} in both the laboratory and plant at K-25 is presented.

  16. Fluorination utilizing thermodynamically unstable fluorides and fluoride salts thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, Neil (Orinda, CA); Whalen, J. Marc (Corning, NY); Chacon, Lisa (Corning, NY)

    2000-12-12

    A method for fluorinating a carbon compound or cationic carbon compound utilizes a fluorination agent selected from thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides and salts thereof in liquid anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. The desired carbon compound or cationic organic compound to undergo fluorination is selected and reacted with the fluorination agent by contacting the selected organic or cationic organic compound and the chosen fluorination agent in a reaction vessel for a desired reaction time period at room temperature or less.

  17. Shock tube study on the thermal decomposition of fluoroethane using infrared laser absorption detection of hydrogen fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsugi, Akira; Shiina, Hiroumi

    2014-08-28

    Motivated by recent shock tube studies on the thermal unimolecular decomposition of fluoroethanes, in which unusual trends have been reported for collisional energy-transfer parameters, the rate constants for the thermal decomposition of fluoroethane were investigated using a shock tube/laser absorption spectroscopy technique. The rate constants were measured behind reflected shock waves by monitoring the formation of HF by IR absorption at the R(1) transition in the fundamental vibrational band near 2476 nm using a distributed-feedback diode laser. The peak absorption cross sections of this absorption line have also been determined and parametrized using the Rautian-Sobel'man line shape function. The rate constant measurements covered a wide temperature range of 1018-1710 K at pressures from 100 to 290 kPa, and the derived rate constants were successfully reproduced by the master equation calculation with an average downward energy transfer, ⟨ΔEdown⟩, of 400 cm(-1).

  18. Dentifrice Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakita, Philip E.

    2004-05-01

    The effectiveness of the fluoride ion in lowering the incidence of dental caries is a major factor in the field of dental health. Observations and research studies in the first half of the 20th century have lead to the widespread adoption of fluoridated water and the use of inorganic fluoride compounds in oral care products, such as toothpaste and dental rinses. This article provides a brief review of the types of compounds used and the chemistry involved.

  19. HIFI detection of HF in the carbon star envelope IRC +10216

    CERN Document Server

    Agundez, M; Waters, L B F M; Decin, L; Encrenaz, P; Neufeld, D; Teyssier, D; Daniel, F

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of emission in the J=1-0 rotational transition of hydrogen fluoride (HF), together with observations of the J=1-0 to J=3-2 rotational lines of H35Cl and H37Cl, towards the envelope of the carbon star IRC +10216. High-sensitivity, high-spectral resolution observations have been carried out with the HIFI instrument on board Herschel, allowing us to resolve the line profiles and providing insights into the spatial distribution of the emission. Our interpretation of the observations, with the use of radiative transfer calculations, indicates that both HF and HCl are formed in the inner regions of the envelope close to the AGB star. Thermochemical equilibrium calculations predict HF and HCl to be the major reservoirs of fluorine and chlorine in the atmospheres of AGB stars. The abundances relative to H2 derived for HF and HCl, 8e-9 and 1e-7 respectively, are substantially lower than those predicted by thermochemical equilibrium, indicating that F and Cl are likely affected by significant de...

  20. Proposed replacement and operation of the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride supply and fluidized-bed reactor system at Building 9212. Draft environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to replace the existing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems for the Weapons Grade Highly Enriched Uranium Chemical Recovery and Recycle Facility, Building 9212, which is Iocated within the Y-12 Plant on DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The current AHF supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems were designed and constructed more than 40 years ago. Because of their deteriorating condition, the corrosive nature of the materials processed, and the antiquated design philosophy upon which they are based, their long-term reliability cannot be assured. The current AHF supply system cannot mitigate an accidental release of AHF and vents fugitive AHF directly to the atmosphere during operations. the proposed action would reduce the risk of exposing the Y-12 Plant work force, the public, and the environment to an accidental release of AHF and would ensure the continuing ability of the Y-12 Plant to manufacture highly enriched uranium metal and process uranium from retired weapons for storage.

  1. Proposed replacement and operation of the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride supply and fluidized-bed chemical processing systems at Building 9212, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to replace the existing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems for the Weapons Grade Highly Enriched Uranium Chemical Recovery and Recycle Facility, Building 9212, which is located within the Y-12 Plant on DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The proposed replacement system would be based upon modern design criteria and safety analyses. The replacement AHF supply and distribution system equipment would be located on the existing Dock 8/8A at Building 9212. Utilities would be extended to the dock to service the process equipment. The following process equipment modules would be prefabricated for installation at the modified dock: an AHF cylinder enclosure, an AHF supply manifold and vaporizer module, an AHF sump tank and transfer skid, and an AHF supply off-gas scrubber assembly module. The fluidized-bed reactor system would be constructed in an area adjacent to the existing system in Building 9212. The replacement equipment would consist of a new reduction fluidized-bed reactor, a hydrofluorination fluidized-bed reactor, and associated air emission control equipment. The no-action alternative, which is the continued operation of the existing AHF supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems, was also evaluated.

  2. Environmental fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marier, J.R.; Rose, D.

    1971-01-01

    Modern-day man is probably exposed to more environmental fluoride than was heretofore suspected, and consideration must be given to the total ingestion from various sources as well as the types of fluoride present in air, foods, beverages, and other commodities. An effort should also be made to study the symptomology of chronic fluorine intoxication, especially the early non-skeletal manifestations of arthritic-like symptoms that may be complicated by metabolic and/or nutritional inadequacies. Finally, it must be emphasized again that dental fluorosis (i.e. mottling) will only be seen in subjects who have been exposed to fluoride during the time when the enamel of the permanent teeth is being formed, and its absence cannot be assumed to indicate freedom from other fluoride-induced effects including effects of organofluorides and their metabolites. 168 references.

  3. Corresponding-states behavior of a dipolar model fluid with variable dispersion interactions and its relevance to the anomalies of hydrogen fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Volker C.; Leroy, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    More than two decades ago, the elusiveness of a liquid-vapor equilibrium and a corresponding critical point in simulations of the supposedly simple model of dipolar hard spheres came as a surprise to many liquid matter theorists. van Leeuwen and Smit [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 3991 (1993)] showed that a minimum of attractive dispersion interactions among the dipolar particles may be needed to observe regular fluid behavior. Here, we adopt their approach and use an only slightly modified model, in which the original point dipole is replaced by a dipole moment produced by charges that are separated in space, to study the influence of dispersion interactions of variable strength on the coexistence and interfacial properties of a polar fluid. The thermophysical properties are discussed in terms of Guggenheim's corresponding-states approach. In this way, the coexistence curve, the critical compressibility factor, the surface tension, Guggenheim's ratio, and modifications of Guldberg's and Trouton's rules (related to the vapor pressure and the enthalpy of vaporization) are analyzed. As the importance of dispersion is decreased, a crossover from simple-fluid behavior to that characteristic of strongly dipolar systems takes place; for some properties, this transition is monotonic, but for others it occurs non-monotonically. For strongly dipolar systems, the reduced surface tension is very low, whereas Guggenheim's ratio and Guldberg's ratio are found to be high. The critical compressibility factor is smaller, and the coexistence curve is wider and more skewed than for simple fluids. For very weak dispersion, liquid-vapor equilibrium is still observable, but the interfacial tension is extremely low and may, eventually, vanish marking the end of the existence of a liquid phase. We discuss the implications of our findings for real fluids, in particular, for hydrogen fluoride.

  4. Corresponding-states behavior of a dipolar model fluid with variable dispersion interactions and its relevance to the anomalies of hydrogen fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Volker C; Leroy, Frédéric

    2016-06-14

    More than two decades ago, the elusiveness of a liquid-vapor equilibrium and a corresponding critical point in simulations of the supposedly simple model of dipolar hard spheres came as a surprise to many liquid matter theorists. van Leeuwen and Smit [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 3991 (1993)] showed that a minimum of attractive dispersion interactions among the dipolar particles may be needed to observe regular fluid behavior. Here, we adopt their approach and use an only slightly modified model, in which the original point dipole is replaced by a dipole moment produced by charges that are separated in space, to study the influence of dispersion interactions of variable strength on the coexistence and interfacial properties of a polar fluid. The thermophysical properties are discussed in terms of Guggenheim's corresponding-states approach. In this way, the coexistence curve, the critical compressibility factor, the surface tension, Guggenheim's ratio, and modifications of Guldberg's and Trouton's rules (related to the vapor pressure and the enthalpy of vaporization) are analyzed. As the importance of dispersion is decreased, a crossover from simple-fluid behavior to that characteristic of strongly dipolar systems takes place; for some properties, this transition is monotonic, but for others it occurs non-monotonically. For strongly dipolar systems, the reduced surface tension is very low, whereas Guggenheim's ratio and Guldberg's ratio are found to be high. The critical compressibility factor is smaller, and the coexistence curve is wider and more skewed than for simple fluids. For very weak dispersion, liquid-vapor equilibrium is still observable, but the interfacial tension is extremely low and may, eventually, vanish marking the end of the existence of a liquid phase. We discuss the implications of our findings for real fluids, in particular, for hydrogen fluoride.

  5. Other Fluoride Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Other Fluoride Products Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... August 17, 2001;50(RR-14):1–42. Fluoride Products Fluoride Toothpaste Form Concentrations of fluoride in ...

  6. Bottled Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bottled water and fluoride. Does bottled water contain fluoride? Bottled water products may contain fluoride, depending on ... How can I find out the level of fluoride in bottled water? The FDA does not require ...

  7. Other Fluoride Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Water Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Other Fluoride Products Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Use the information listed below to compare the other fluoride products that may lower the risk for ...

  8. Development of a reaxff reactive force field for silicon/oxygen/hydrogen/fluoride interactions and applications to hydroxylation and friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Jejoon

    higher strain energy. In addition, we found three distinct hydroxylation paths -- H3O+ formation reaction from the adsorbed water, proton donation from H3O+, and the direct dissociation of the adsorbed water molecule. Because water molecules and their hydrogen bond network behave differently with respect to temperature ranges, silanol formation is also affected by temperature. The formation of surface hydroxyl in an amorphous silica double slit displays a similar tendency: SiOH formation prefers high-strain sites. Silanol formation related with H3O + formation and dissociation is observed in hydroxylation of amorphous SiO2, similar with the results from silica nano wire simulation. These results are particularly relevant to the tribological characteristics of surfaces, enabling the prediction of the attachment site of the lubrication film on silica surfaces with a locally strained geometry.

  9. 含氟灭火剂受热释放HF及抑制技术研究进展%Research progress of Hydrogen Fluoride Releasing of Heated Fluoride Containing Extinguishing and the Suppression Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李云龙; 杜建科; 牛世栋

    2015-01-01

    含氟灭火剂已成为目前最常用的清洁气体灭火剂,但含氟灭火剂在灭火过程中HF释放的问题严重。综合分析了几种含氟灭火剂热解和遇火时的HF释放量及其影响因素,结合理论分析结果讨论了含氟灭火剂的HF释放机理,探讨了抑制含氟灭火剂HF释放量的技术措施,从而有效减少含氟灭火剂使用时HF的释放量,保证火场中人员和精密仪器的安全。%At present fluorine-containing fire extinguishing agent has become the most commonly used clean gas fire extinguishing agent. But the HF releasing problem is becoming more and more serious when fluorine-containing fire extinguishing agent works. This paper analyzes some influencing factors when fluorine-containing fire agents start to fire. And HF releasing mechanism is discussed combining the result of certain theories. Also it studies some techni-cal measures to restrain HF releasing. So,to ensure the safety of personnel and precision instruments in the fire,we should reduce the HF releasing from the fluorine-containing fire extinguishing agent.

  10. The synthesis, characterization and reactivity of high oxidation state nickel fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon, L.C. [Univ. of Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

    1997-12-01

    The research described in this thesis has mainly addressed the challenge of the synthesis of thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides, which cannot be made by traditional thermal methods. A low-temperature approach towards the synthesis of such transition metal fluorides exploits the greater thermodynamic stability of high oxidation states in anions and involves the use of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (aHF) as a solvent. The general method consists of combining an aHF soluble starting material (e.g., K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6}) with a Lewis fluoroacid (e.g., BF{sub 3}), which precipitates a neutral polymeric solid state fluoride: 2 K{sup +} + NiF{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} + BF{sub 3} {r_arrow} NiF{sub 4} + 2 BF{sub 4}{sup {minus}} + 2 K{sup +}. At room temperature, this reaction yields a different structural phase, with composition K{sub x}NiF{sub 3} (x {approx} 0.18). This material has a pseudo-hexagonal tungsten bronze structure (H{sub 0}-K{sub x}NiF{sub 3}), and is an ionic conductor, probably due to K{sup +} ions hosted in the lattice channels. R-NiF{sub 3} is capable of fluorinating a wide range of inorganic and organic substrates. These reactions have probably shed light on the mechanism of the Simons Electrochemical Fluorination (ECF) Process, an important industrial method of fluorinating organic compounds. It has long been speculated that NiF{sub 3} plays a role in the ECF process, which uses nickel electrodes in aHF solvent. K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6} also fluorinates organic compounds in aHF, but interestingly, yields different fluorinated products. The reduction of R-NiF{sub 3} and K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6} during fluorination reactions yields NiF{sub 2}. A method has been developed to regenerate NiF{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} from NiF{sub 2}.

  11. The synthesis, characterization and reactivity of high oxidation state nickel fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon, L.C. [Univ. of Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

    1997-12-01

    The research described in this thesis has mainly addressed the challenge of the synthesis of thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides, which cannot be made by traditional thermal methods. A low-temperature approach towards the synthesis of such transition metal fluorides exploits the greater thermodynamic stability of high oxidation states in anions and involves the use of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (aHF) as a solvent. The general method consists of combining an aHF soluble starting material (e.g., K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6}) with a Lewis fluoroacid (e.g., BF{sub 3}), which precipitates a neutral polymeric solid state fluoride: 2 K{sup +} + NiF{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} + BF{sub 3} {r_arrow} NiF{sub 4} + 2 BF{sub 4}{sup {minus}} + 2 K{sup +}. At room temperature, this reaction yields a different structural phase, with composition K{sub x}NiF{sub 3} (x {approx} 0.18). This material has a pseudo-hexagonal tungsten bronze structure (H{sub 0}-K{sub x}NiF{sub 3}), and is an ionic conductor, probably due to K{sup +} ions hosted in the lattice channels. R-NiF{sub 3} is capable of fluorinating a wide range of inorganic and organic substrates. These reactions have probably shed light on the mechanism of the Simons Electrochemical Fluorination (ECF) Process, an important industrial method of fluorinating organic compounds. It has long been speculated that NiF{sub 3} plays a role in the ECF process, which uses nickel electrodes in aHF solvent. K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6} also fluorinates organic compounds in aHF, but interestingly, yields different fluorinated products. The reduction of R-NiF{sub 3} and K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6} during fluorination reactions yields NiF{sub 2}. A method has been developed to regenerate NiF{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} from NiF{sub 2}.

  12. Fluoride release from newly marketed fluoride varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, Beth L; Bartoloni, Joseph A; Hensley, Donna M; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2012-03-01

    New fluoride varnishes have been marketed that reportedly release more fluoride (Enamel Pro) or release fluoride more slowly (Vanish XT). The purpose of this study was to compare the amount and rate of fluoride release of new fluoride varnishes with other traditional fluoride varnishes. Extracted molars were cut into block sections. The enamel surfaces of the sections were painted with Enamel Pro, Duraphat, Vanish, or Vanish XT fluoride varnishes. One group was not treated and served as a negative control. The tooth sections were immersed in artificial saliva. The concentration of fluoride in parts per million was measured after the first 30 minutes, daily for the first week, and weekly until the level was below the limit of detection. Fluoride release was plotted over time. Cumulative fluoride release and rate of release (slope) were analyzed using one-way ANOVA/Tukey (α = .05). Enamel Pro had the greatest cumulative fluoride release. There was no significant difference between Duraphat and Vanish. Vanish XT had the lowest cumulative fluoride release. The rate of fluoride release from 1 week to limit of detection was Enamel Pro > Vanish > Duraphat > Vanish XT. The two newly marketed fluoride varnishes (Enamel Pro and Vanish XT) had significantly different fluoride release from the two conventional fluoride varnishes (Duraphat and Vanish).

  13. Fluoridation Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... level in water is not enough to prevent tooth decay; however, some groundwater and natural springs can have ... the tooth’s surface, or enamel. Water fluoridation prevents tooth decay by providing frequent and consistent contact with low ...

  14. [Enamel fluoride uptake following fluoride application and fluoride precipitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchalla, Wolfgang; Lennon, Aine M; Trage, Katrin; Becker, Klaus; Attin, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This study is on fluoride uptake into enamel following fluoride precipitation with calcium hydroxide. Five specimens each from 12 bovine incisors were polished, covered with a salivary pellicle, and distributed into five groups (n=12). A fluoride solution (43,500 ppm F from magnesiumfluorosilicate, copper-(II)-fluorosilicate and sodium-fluoride, pH 2; Tiefenfluorid Touchierlösung, Humanchemie) and Ca(OH)2-solution (Tiefenfluorid Nachtouchierlösung) were applied subsequently in group TN. "Touchierlosung" only was used in group T, sodium-fluoride (43,500 ppm F, pH 2) in group NaF, and aminefluoride (Elmex fluid, 10,000 ppm F, pH 4) in group EF. No fluoride was used in group NK (negative control). Following rinsing and 24 h storage in artificial saliva surface KOH-soluble fluoride content (KOHF), and structurally bound fluoride content (SBF) from three layers (0-33, 33-66 and 66-99 pm) was determined by fluoride electrode procedures. KOHF (median in microg/cm2) of NK was below the lower limit of quantification of the fluoride electrode. The other group values were significantly higher (Mann-Whitney test, p precipitation reaction with Ca(OH)2 following fluoridation did not increase enamel fluoride uptake.

  15. Oxidation of Fluoroalkanesulfonyl fluoride/hydrogen peroxide/base/acetone System with Benzyl Alcohol Derivatives%氟烷磺酰氟/双氧水/碱/丙酮体系与苄醇衍生物的氧化反应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严兆华; 胡伟; 田伟生; 许云

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of fluoroalkanesulfonyl fluoride/hydrogen peroxide/base/acetone system with six benzyl alcohol derivative substrates was reported. Fluoroalkanesulfonyl fluorides(RfSO2F) include 5-H-3-oxa-l ,1,2, 2,4,4,5, 5-octafluoropentanesulfonyl fluoride ( HCF2CF2OCF2CF2SO2F ) , perfluorobutanesulfonyl fluoride (n-C4F9SO2F) and perfluorooctanesulfonyl fluoride( n-C8F17SO2F). The optimized reaction condition was n ( Substrate) : n ( Rf SO2 F):n(H2O2):?( NaOH) = 1 : 4 : 8 : 8, solvent was acetone, reaction temperature was 20 °C and reaction time was 24 h. Yield of product ketones was 23%—92%. A plausible mechanism was proposed. Experimental results showed that in-situ generated fluorinatedalkano persulfonic acid intermediate could efficiently oxidize acetone and resulted dimethyl dioxirane could oxidize benzyl alcohol derivatives yielding corresponding ketones. The oxidizing ability of fluoroalkanesulfonyl fluoride/hydrogen peroxide/base/acetone system for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol derivatives is similar to that of the traditional Oxone/CH3COCH3 system. A novel method for the in-situ generation of dimethyl dioxirane was developed.%研究了氟烷磺酰氟/双氧水/氢氧化钠/丙酮体系与6个苄醇衍生物的氧化反应,其中氟烷磺酰氟包括HCF2CF2OCF2 CF2SO2F,n-C4F9 SO2F和n-C8F17SO2F.最优反应条件为n(苄醇衍生物)∶n(氟烷磺酰氟)∶n(双氧水)∶n(氢氧化钠)=1∶4∶8∶8,溶剂为丙酮,反应温度为20℃,反应时间为24 h.产物酮的收率为23% ~92%.探讨了该氧化反应的机理,原位生成的氟烷基过氧磺酸中间体可将丙酮氧化为二甲基二氧杂环丙烷,进而将反应体系中共存的苄醇衍生物氧化成相应的产物酮.氟烷磺酰氟/双氧水/氢氧化钠/丙酮体系原位生成的二甲基二氧杂环丙烷氧化苄位羟基的能力和传统的Oxone/CH3COCH3体系相当.本研究提供了一种新颖的原位制备二甲基二氧杂环丙烷的方法.

  16. Fluoride complexation of element 104, rutherfordium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Hiromitsu; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Toyoshima, Atsushi; Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Hirata, Masaru; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Ichikawa, Shin-Ichi; Nagame, Yuichiro; Yasuda, Ken-Ichiro; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Kaneko, Tetsuya; Goto, Shin-Ichi; Ono, Sawako; Hirai, Toshiyuki; Kudo, Hisaaki; Shigekawa, Mitsuru; Shinohara, Atsushi; Oura, Yasuji; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Sueki, Keisuke; Kikunaga, Hidetoshi; Kinoshita, Norikazu; Tsuruga, Naoya; Yokoyama, Akihiko; Sakama, Minoru; Enomoto, Shuich; Schädel, Matthias; Brüchle, Willy; Kratz, Jens V

    2004-04-28

    Fluoride complexation of element 104, rutherfordium (Rf), produced in the 248Cm(18O,5n)261Rf reaction has been studied by anion-exchange chromatography on an atom-at-a-time scale. The anion-exchange chromatographic behavior of Rf was investigated in 1.9-13.9 M hydrofluoric acid together with those of the group-4 elements Zr and Hf produced in the 18O-induced reactions on Ge and Gd targets, respectively. It was found that the adsorption behavior of Rf on anion-exchange resin is quite different from those of Zr and Hf, suggesting the influence of relativistic effects on the fluoride complexation of Rf.

  17. Fluorescent Sensing of Fluoride in Cellular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F- detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F- including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F- are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F-, mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be developed

  18. The electronic structure of HfF5- and WF5-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongshan; Andersson, Pontus; Lindahl, Anton O.; Hanstorp, Dag

    2011-08-01

    The electronic structure of HfF5-, WF5- and the related species HfF n and WF n is studied using ab initio methods. Computation reveals that the hafnium fluorides are much more stable than the corresponding tungsten fluorides. The detachment energy of HfF5- is 8.8 eV, whereas the corresponding quantity of WF5- is only 3.9 eV. These results show that WF5- can be photodetached while HfF5- is unaffected, and so it is possible by using photodetachment to suppress the interfering isobar 182W in the ion beam of 182Hf. Such information is the precondition for the successful implementation of a future photodetachment process in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

  19. REMPI Spectroscopy of HfF

    CERN Document Server

    Loh, Huanqian; Yahn, Tyler S; Looser, Herbert; Field, Robert W; Cornell, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum of electronic states at 30000--33000 cm$^{-1}$ in hafnium fluoride has been studied using (1+1) resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) and (1+1$'$) REMPI. Six $\\Omega' = 3/2$ and ten $\\Pi_{1/2}$ vibronic bands have been characterized. We report the molecular constants for these bands and estimate the electronic energies of the excited states using a correction derived from the observed isotope shifts. When either of two closely spaced $\\Pi_{1/2}$ electronic states is used as an intermediate state to access autoionizing Rydberg levels, qualitatively distinct autoionization spectra are observed. The intermediate state-specificity of the autoionization spectra bodes well for the possibility of using a selected $\\Pi_{1/2}$ state as an intermediate state to create ionic HfF$^+$ in various selected quantum states, an important requirement for our electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) search in HfF$^+$.

  20. Coherent-states dynamics of the H{sup +} + HF reaction at E{sub Lab} = 30 eV: A complete electron nuclear dynamics investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, Buddhadev [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, P.O. Box 41061, Lubbock, TX 79409-1061 (United States); Sadeghi, Raymond [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249-0698 (United States); Austin, Anthony [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, P.O. Box 41061, Lubbock, TX 79409-1061 (United States); Morales, Jorge A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, P.O. Box 41061, Lubbock, TX 79409-1061 (United States)], E-mail: jorge.morales@ttu.edu

    2007-11-09

    Results of a complete investigation of the H{sup +} + HF reaction at E{sub Lab} = 30 eV with the electron nuclear dynamics (END) and the coherent-states dynamics (CSD) theories are herein presented. Current END-CSD methodology employs frozen Gaussian wave packet in the semiclassical limit of h {yields} 0 for the nuclei, and a single-determinantal Thouless coherent state (CS) for the electrons. The simulated 400 CS trajectories from five independent HF target orientations provide a complete description of the reactive processes in this system, including: non-charge-transfer scattering (NCTS), charge-transfer scattering (CTS), hydrogen fluoride dissociation (H-F D), and hydrogen rearrangement (HR). Several aspects of the reactions dynamics, such as mechanistic details and rainbow angles effects, are discussed. Differential and integral cross sections are evaluated via a novel CS formulation of those properties in conjunction with semiclassical techniques. The calculated total differential cross section shows an excellent agreement with available experimental results.

  1. Exraction and separation of CERIUM(IV)/FLUORINE in fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution with fluoride coordination agent

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Y; J. G. He; X. X. Xue; Ru, H. Q.; X. W. Huang; Yang, H.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the extraction and separation of cerium/fluorine in fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution with fluoride coordination agent has been studied. The UV-vis spectra suggest that Zr6+ and Al3+ can scrub the F- from [CeF2] 2+ complex. The separation and conductivity studies show that aluminum salt is the most suitable fluoride coordination agent, and an ion-exchange reaction is involved between Ce4+/ [CeF2] 2+ and hydrogen ion.

  2. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  3. Occupational fluoride exposure. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, H.C. (Univ. of California, San Francisco); Smith, F.A.

    1977-01-01

    Effects of airborne fluoride on industrial health are discussed with regard to acute and chronic effects. Injuries to lungs and skin from acute exposures are described. Chronic effects are discussed with regard to industrial sources of fluoride and air concentrations vs. urinary concentrations of fluoride. An extensive literature review is presented in the form of a table showing responses in man exposed to industrial airborne fluorides. Osteosclerosis is discussed with regard to the fluoride air standard, bone fluoride, and air fluoride concentrations. Occupational exposures to fluoride are also discussed with regard to arthritis, shortness of breath, asthma, upper respiratory infections, chronic respiratory disease, effects on kidneys, effects on pregnancy, and indices of fluoride intoxication. A table is presented showing references to studies on responses in neighborhood residents exposed to fluoride emissions. (HLW)

  4. ExtraHF survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piepoli, Massimo F; Binno, Simone; Corrà, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: In heart failure (HF), exercise training programmes (ETPs) are a well-recognized intervention to improve symptoms, but are still poorly implemented. The Heart Failure Association promoted a survey to investigate whether and how cardiac centres in Europe are using ETPs in their HF patients...... of evidence on safety or benefit was cited. When implemented, an ETP was proposed to all HF patients in only 55% of the centres, with restriction according to severity or aetiology. CONCLUSIONS: With respect to previous surveys, there is evidence of increased availability of ETPs in HF in Europe, although too...

  5. The role of boron nitride nanotube as a new chemical sensor and potential reservoir for hydrogen halides environmental pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoosefian, Mehdi; Etminan, Nazanin; Moghani, Maryam Zeraati; Mirzaei, Samaneh; Abbasi, Shima

    2016-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) studies on the interaction of hydrogen halides (HX) environmental pollutants and the boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have been reported. To exploit the possibility of BNNTs as gas sensors, the adsorption of hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl) and hydrogen bromide (HBr) on the side wall of armchair (5,5) boron nitride nanotubes have been investigated. B3LYP/6-31G (d) level were used to analyze the structural and electronic properties of investigate sensor. The adsorption process were interpreted by highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), natural bond orbital (NBO) and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) analysis. Topological parameters of bond critical points have been used to calculate as measure of hydrogen bond (HB) strength. Stronger binding energy, larger charge transfer and charge density illustrate that HF gas possesses chemisorbed adsorption process. The obtained results also show the strongest HB in HF/BNNT complex. We expect that results could provide helpful information for the design of new BNNTs based sensing devices.

  6. Fluoride geochemistry of thermal waters in Yellowstone National Park: I. Aqueous fluoride speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Blaine, McCleskey R.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal water samples from Yellowstone National Park (YNP) have a wide range of pH (1–10), temperature, and high concentrations of fluoride (up to 50 mg/l). High fluoride concentrations are found in waters with field pH higher than 6 (except those in Crater Hills) and temperatures higher than 50 °C based on data from more than 750 water samples covering most thermal areas in YNP from 1975 to 2008. In this study, more than 140 water samples from YNP collected in 2006–2009 were analyzed for free-fluoride activity by ion-selective electrode (ISE) method as an independent check on the reliability of fluoride speciation calculations. The free to total fluoride concentration ratio ranged from 99% at high pH. The wide range in fluoride activity can be explained by strong complexing with H+ and Al3+ under acidic conditions and lack of complexing under basic conditions. Differences between the free-fluoride activities calculated with the WATEQ4F code and those measured by ISE were within 0.3–30% for more than 90% of samples at or above 10−6 molar, providing corroboration for chemical speciation models for a wide range of pH and chemistry of YNP thermal waters. Calculated speciation results show that free fluoride, F−, and major complexes (HF(aq)0">HF(aq)0, AlF2+, AlF2+">AlF2+and AlF30">AlF30) account for more than 95% of total fluoride. Occasionally, some complex species like AlF4-">AlF4-, FeF2+, FeF2+">FeF2+, MgF+ and BF2(OH)2-">BF2(OH)2- may comprise 1–10% when the concentrations of the appropriate components are high. According to the simulation results by PHREEQC and calculated results, the ratio of main fluoride species to total fluoride varies as a function of pH and the concentrations and ratios of F and Al.

  7. Molecular anions sputtered from fluorides

    CERN Document Server

    Gnaser, H

    2002-01-01

    The emission of negatively charged ions from different fluoride samples (LiF, CaF sub 2 , LaF sub 3 and HfF sub 4) induced by sputtering with a 14.5-keV Cs sup + ion beam was studied. Sputtered ions were detected in a high-sensitivity double-focusing mass spectrometer. In particular, the possible existence of small doubly charged negative molecular ions was investigated. But whereas singly charged species of the general type MF sub n sup - (where M represents a metal atom) were detected with high abundances, stable dianions were observed in an unambiguous way only for one molecule: HfF sub 6 sup 2 sup -. The flight time through the mass spectrometer of approx 35 mu s establishes a lower limit with respect to the intrinsic lifetime of this doubly charged ion. For singly charged anions abundance distributions and, in selected cases, emission-energy spectra were recorded. For two ion species (Ca sup - and HfF sub 5 sup -) isotopic fractionation effects caused by the (velocity dependent) ionization process were d...

  8. Hydrogen bonding and multiphonon structure in copper pyrazine coordination polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S; Cao, J; Musfeldt, J L; Conner, M M; McConnell, A C; Southerland, H I; Manson, J L; Schlueter, J A; Phillips, M D; Turnbull, M M; Landee, C P

    2007-10-15

    We report a systematic investigation of the temperature-dependent infrared vibrational spectra of a family of chemically related coordination polymer magnets based upon bridging bifluoride (HF(2)-) and terminal fluoride (F-) ligands in copper pyrazine complexes including Cu(HF(2))(pyz)(2)BF(4), Cu(HF(2))(pyz)(2)ClO(4), and CuF(2)(H(2)O)(2)(pyz). We compare our results with several one- and two-dimensional prototype materials including Cu(pyz)(NO(3))(2) and Cu(pyz)(2)(ClO(4))(2). Unusual low-temperature hydrogen bonding, local structural transitions associated with stronger low-temperature hydrogen bonding, and striking multiphonon effects that derive from coupling of an infrared-active fundamental with strong Raman-active modes of the pyrazine building-block molecule are observed. On the basis of the spectroscopic evidence, these interactions are ubiquitous to this family of coordination polymers and may work to stabilize long-range magnetic ordering at low temperature. Similar interactions are likely to be present in other molecule-based magnets.

  9. Fluoride inhibition of Klebsiella aerogenes urease: mechanistic implications of a pseudo-uncompetitive, slow-binding inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, M J; Hausinger, R P

    2000-05-09

    Klebsiella aerogenes urease uses a dinuclear nickel active site to catalyze the hydrolysis of urea. Here, we describe the steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics of urease inhibition by fluoride. Urease is slowly inhibited by fluoride in both the presence and absence of substrate. Steady-state rate studies yield parallel double-reciprocal plots; however, we show that fluoride interaction with urease is not compatible with classical uncompetitive inhibition. Rather, we propose that fluoride binds to an enzyme state (E) that is in equilibrium with resting enzyme (E) and produced during catalysis. Fluoride binding rates are directly proportional to inhibitor concentration. Substrate reduces both the rate of fluoride binding to urease and the rate of fluoride dissociation from the complex, consistent with urea binding to E and E.F in addition to E. Fluoride inhibition is pH-dependent due to a protonation event linked to fluoride dissociation. Fluoride binding is pH-independent, suggesting that fluoride anion, not HF, is the actual inhibitor. We assess the kinetic results in terms of the known protein crystal structure and evaluate possible molecular interpretations for the structure of the E state, the site of fluoride binding, and the factors associated with fluoride release. Finally, we note that the apparent uncompetitive inhibition by fluoride as reported for several other metalloenzymes may need to be reinterpreted in terms of fluoride interaction with the corresponding E states.

  10. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  11. Private Well Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... well. What do I need to know about fluoride and groundwater from a well? Fluoride is present ... well has less than the recommended level of fluoride for preventing tooth decay? The recommended fluoride level ...

  12. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Fluoride and Water KidsHealth > For Parents > Fluoride and Water ... in healthy tooth development and cavity prevention. About Fluoride Fluoride, which exists naturally in water sources, is ...

  13. Fluoride varnish or fluoride mouth rinse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, M K; Klausen, B J; Twetman, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In many Danish communities, school-based fluoride programs are offered to children with high caries risk in adjunct to tooth brushing. The purpose of this field trial was to compare the caries-preventive effectiveness of two different fluoride programs in 6-12 year olds. BASIC RESEARCH...... different schools were enrolled after informed consent and their class unit was randomly allocated to one of two fluoride programs. INTERVENTIONS: One group received a semi-annual fluoride varnish applications (FV) and the other group continued with an existing program with fluoride mouth rinses once per...... in caries development over two years among children participating in a school-based fluoride varnish or mouth rinse program....

  14. Hydrothermal chemistry, structures, and luminescence studies of alkali hafnium fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Christopher C; McMillen, Colin D; Chen, Hongyu; Anker, Jeffery N; Kolis, Joseph W

    2013-01-07

    This paper describes the hydrothermal chemistry of alkali hafnium fluorides, including the synthesis and structural characterization of five new alkali hafnium fluorides. Two ternary alkali hafnium fluorides are described: Li(2)HfF(6) in space group P31m with a = 4.9748(7) Å and c = 4.6449(9) Å and Na(5)Hf(2)F(13) in space group C2/m with a = 11.627(2) Å, b = 5.5159(11) Å, and c = 8.4317(17) Å. Three new alkali hafnium oxyfluorides are also described: two fluoroelpasolites, K(3)HfOF(5) and (NH(4))(3)HfOF(5), in space group Fm3m with a = 8.9766(10) and 9.4144(11) Å, respectively, and K(2)Hf(3)OF(12) in space group R3m with a = 7.6486(11) Å and c = 28.802(6) Å. Infrared (IR) spectra were obtained for the title solids to confirm the structure solutions. Comparison of these materials was made based on their structures and synthesis conditions. The formation of these species in hydrothermal fluids appears to be dependent upon both the concentration of the alkali fluoride mineralizer solution and the reaction temperature. Both X-ray and visible fluorescence studies were conducted on compounds synthesized in this study and showed that fluorescence was affected by a variety of factors, such as alkali metal size, the presence/absence of oxygen in the compound, and the coordination environment of Hf(4+).

  15. Structural and Magnetic Properties of Copper(II) Coordination Polymers Containing Fluoride-Based Anions and Ancillary Organic Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, M.; McConnell, A.; Schlueter, J.; Manson, J.

    2006-02-01

    The fluoride (F-) and bifluoride (HF 2 - ) anions have been little used in the self-assembly of molecular and polymeric magnets. We have recently synthesized several new compounds, namely CuF2(3-OHpy)4 (OHpy = hydroxypyridine) (1), Cu(SiF6)(2,6-me2pyz)4 (me2pyz = dimethylpyrazine) (2), CuF2(H2O)2(pyz) (pyz = pyrazine) (3) and [Cu(HF2)(pyz)2]BF4 (4). Compound 1 contains coordinate covalent and hydrogen bonding interactions that link the Cu(II) ions into 3D networks while 2 features square-pyramidal Cu(II) ions that are weakly bridged by SiF 6 2- anions into 1D chains. Preliminary structural data indicate that compound 3 contains 1D Cu-pyz-Cu chains while 4 contains two dimensional [Cu(pyz)2]2+ layers, which held together via HF 2 - anions so as to form an unprecedented 3D network. The magnetic properties of each are briefly described herein.

  16. Fluoride in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - fluoride ... bones and teeth. Too much fluoride in the diet is very rare. Rarely, infants who get too ... of essential vitamins is to eat a balanced diet that contains a variety of foods from the ...

  17. Observed and simulated time evolution of HCl, ClONO2, and HF total column abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.-M. Sinnhuber

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Time series of total column abundances of hydrogen chloride (HCl, chlorine nitrate (ClONO2, and hydrogen fluoride (HF were determined from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectra recorded at 17 sites belonging to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC and located between 80.05° N and 77.82° S. These measurements are compared with calculations from five different models: the two-dimensional Bremen model, the two chemistry-transport models KASIMA and SLIMCAT, and the two chemistry-climate models EMAC and SOCOL. The overall agreement between the measurements and models for the total column abundances and the seasonal cycles is good. Trends of HCl, ClONO2, and HF are calculated from both measurement and model time series data, with a focus on the time range 2000–2009. Their precision is estimated with the bootstrap resampling method. The sensitivity of the trend results with respect to the fitting function, the time of year chosen and time series length is investigated, as well as a bias due to the irregular sampling of the measurements. For the two chlorine species, a decrease is expected during this period because the emission of their prominent anthropogenic source gases (solvents, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs was restricted by the Montreal Protocol 1987 and its amendments and adjustments. As most of the restricted source gases also contain fluorine, the HF total column abundance was also influenced by the above-mentioned regulations in the time period considered. The measurements and model results investigated here agree qualitatively on a decrease of the chlorine species by around −1 % yr−1. The models simulate an increase of HF of around +1 % yr−1. This also agrees well with most of the measurements, but some of the FTIR series in the Northern Hemisphere show a stabilisation or even a decrease in the last few years. In general, for all three gases, the measured trends vary more strongly with

  18. Photochemistry of UV-excited trifluoroacetylacetone and hexafluoroacetylacetone II: Quantum yield and rate constants of hydrogen fluoride photoelimination forming fluorinated methylfuranones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disselkoen, Kyle R.; Alsum, Joel R.; Thielke, Timothy A.; Muyskens, Mark A.

    2017-03-01

    The photochemistry of gas-phase 1,1,1-trifluoroacetylacetone (TFAA) and 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFAA) excited with ultraviolet light involves a significant photoelimination channel producing HF and difluoromethylfuranone or pentafluoromethylfuranone, respectively. We report collisional self-quenching of the experimentally-determined relative quantum yield, and determine rate constants of 0.27 ± 0.03 and 0.33 ± 0.04 μs-1, for HFAA and TFAA respectively. A strong collision model is consistent with the observed quenching. The data suggest that this elimination is the primary photochemical fate at low pressure in both cases. The TFAA rate constant is larger than that for HFAA, in spite of TFAA having half as many fluorine atoms as HFAA.

  19. Measurements of fluoride emissions in aluminum smelters by tunable diode laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiff, H.; Pisano, J.; Chanda, A.; Karecki, D.; Mackay, G.

    1999-07-01

    Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry (TDLAS) is an effective method for measuring the emissions of fluoride compounds from primary aluminum production. Hydrogen fluoride is a highly toxic substance, harmful to both human health and the environment. The perfluorocarbons, CF{sub 4} and C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, are strong greenhouse gases with atmospheric lifetimes of more than 5,000 years. The LasIR systems based on near infrared tunable diode lasers have been used to measure HF in stacks, on both sides of scrubbers and in the pot-rooms of the smelter. Examples of these measurements are presented. The perfluorocarbons have been measured with a mid infrared TDLAS system by continuous extraction into a multipath White cell. Earlier measurements by this method clearly revealed the factors, which govern perfluorocarbon emissions and have led to improvement in aluminum production technology. Recent measurements have shown that the use of these technologies does, in fact, result in appreciable reduction in the emissions of the perfluorocarbons. The examples given in this paper demonstrate the ability and versatility of TDLAS systems for providing reliable, interference-free measurements of important gases in a complex mixture and in hostile environments.

  20. The isobutylene-isobutane alkylation process in liquid HF revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, P M; Araújo, C L; Horta, B A C; Alvarez, L J; Zicovich-Wilson, C M; Ramírez-Solís, A

    2005-07-07

    Details on the mechanism of HF catalyzed isobutylene-isobutane alkylation were investigated. On the basis of available experimental data and high-level quantum chemical calculations, a detailed reaction mechanism is proposed taking into account solvation effects of the medium. On the basis of our computational results, we explain why the density of the liquid media and stirring rates are the most important parameters to achieve maximum yield of alkylate, in agreement with experimental findings. The ab initio Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics calculations show that isobutylene is irreversibly protonated in the liquid HF medium at higher densities, leading to the ion pair formation, which is shown to be a minimum on the potential energy surface after optimization using periodic boundary conditions. The HF medium solvates preferentially the fluoride anion, which is found as solvated [FHF](-) or solvated F(-.)(HF)(3). On the other hand, the tert-butyl cation is weakly solvated, where the closest HF molecules appear at a distance of about 2.9 Angstrom with the fluorine termination of an HF chain.

  1. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  2. Kr对HF(X1Σ+)基频和泛频的影响%Influence of Kr Atoms on the Fundamental and Overtone Vibrational Frequency for HF(X1Σ+)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢洪平; 陈泽琴; 蒋刚; 杨迎春; 朱正和

    2000-01-01

    运用Monte-Carlo轨迹法研究了Kr(1Sg)+HF(X1Σ+;ν=1,2,3;J=4)→Kr(1Sg)+HF(X1Σ+,ν',J')的碰撞过程,从而分析Kr原子对HF基频和泛频的影响。研究表明:在初始相对平动能Et≤251.0kJ/mol时,Kr原子能够减少产生基频的粒子数反转,增加产生泛频特别是ν'=2能级的粒子数反转,并且,Kr原子有较强的弛豫高转动态(J'≥4)的能力,因此,Kr原子对HF泛频激光在提高光强和增强大气传输能力方面均有 较大的改善。%The collision reaction that Kr(1Sg)+HF(X1Σ+;ν=1,2,3;J=4)→Kr(1Sg)+HF(X1Σ+;ν',J')has been studied using Monte-Carlo trajectory method,and it has been found that Kr atoms have in fluence on the fundamental and overtone vibrational frequency for HF(X1Σ+).The studying results show that,when the initial relative translational energy Et≤251.0kJ/mol,Kr atoms can reduce the particle number reversion of the fundamental vibrational frequency,and increase it of the overtone vibrational frequency,particularly in the energy level ν'=2,and Kr atoms are more strong on relaxing the higher rotational states(J'≥4).Thus,for hydrogen fluoride(HF)overtone frequency laser Kr atoms can obviously increase the strength of light and improve the transmission property in the air.

  3. Calcium fluoride recovery from fluoride wastewater in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaco, R; Garea, A; Irabien, A

    2007-02-01

    In order to contribute to better resource efficiency and industrial waste management leading to a sustainable production and consumption pattern new processes must be developed, which should be operated in such a way that waste production is reduced or avoided. Fluoride removal by precipitation generates huge amounts of a water rich sludge. Calcium fluoride is not recovered from the waste streams and it is not recycled due to the high water content and the low quality of the sludge. Crystallization process in a fluidized bed reactor (FBR) appears as an alternative technology to the conventional chemical precipitation process. In the crystallization process in a FBR silica sand is usually used as seed material, however silica is a deleterious impurity because it causes losses in the yield of HF and its content should be less than 1%. In this paper, granular calcite has been used as seed material in order to obtain synthetic calcium fluoride. According to the composition (CaF(2)>97%, SiO(2)fluoride from the crystallization process in a FBR is able to be recycled as raw material for the manufacture of hydrofluoric acid leading to a reduction of raw materials consumption. The crystallization process in a FBR to remove fluoride from industrial wastewaters contributes to an environmental friendly production, because it allows to reduce the waste production as well as to increase the recovery of materials.

  4. Synthesis of nanocrystalline mixed metal fluorides in nonaqueous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neetu Tyagi; Epsita Ghanti; Nikesh Gupta; N P Lalla; Rajamani Nagarajan

    2009-12-01

    Synthesis of mixed metal fluorides of the general formula, KMF3 (M = Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn), possessing perovskite structure was investigated in non-aqueous medium. The fluorides were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, FT–IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, SEM and TEM. Monophasic cubic phases were obtained for the central metal ions such as Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, and Zn and a tetragonally distorted phase was observed for Cu. The usage of non-aqueous medium is advantageous for the bulk synthesis of these fluorides, since it eliminated the generation and handling of the hazardous HF that has usually been encountered during aqueous preparations. The average crystallite size of the fluorides obtained by this approach was estimated to be in the range of 9–30 nm. SEM micrographs of KZnF3 showed cubic morphology of perovskite phases. TEM studies on KCuF3 confirmed the presence of tetragonal distortion. The fluoride content was determined by titrimetry and found to be nearly stoichiometric. Some of these fluorides were found to be thermally stable up to 225°C in air. These fluorides were employed as fluorinating agents in organic fluorination reactions, thereby suggesting their possible utilization for selective fluorination of aliphatic and aromatic hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) that are industrially relevant.

  5. Fluoride toothpastes and fluoride mouthrinses for home use

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Rugg-Gunn; Jolan Bánóczy

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To provide a brief commentary review of fluoride-containing toothpastes and mouthrinses with emphasis on their use at home. Toothpastes and mouthrinses are just two of many ways of providing fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. The first investigations into incorporating fluoride into toothpastes and mouthrinses were reported in the middle 1940s. Unlike water fluoridation (which is ‘automatic fluoridation’), fluoride-containing toothpastes and fluoride-containing mouthrins...

  6. Histochemical investigations on the in vivo effects of fluoride on tricarboxylic acid cycle dehydrogenases from Pelargonium zonale. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelace, C.J.; Miller, G.W.

    1967-01-01

    In vivo effects of fluoride on tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle dehydrogenase enzymes of Pelargonium zonale were studied using p-nitro blue tetrazoleum chloride. Plants were exposed to 17 ppb HF, and enzyme activities in treated plants were compared to those in controls. Leaves of control plants were incubated in 5 x 10/sup -3/ M sodium fluoride. Injuries observed in fumigation and solution experiments were similar. Leaf tissue subjected to HF or sodium fluoride evidenced less succinic p-nitro blue tetrazoleum reductase activity than did control tissue. Other TCA cycle dehydrogenase enzymes were not observably affected by the fluoride concentrations used in these experiments. Excised leaves cultured in 5 x 10/sup -3/ M sodium fluoride exhibited less succinic p-nitro blue tetrazoleum reductase activity after 24 hr than did leaves cultured in 5 x 10/sup -3/ M sodium chloride. 8 references, 8 figures.

  7. Synthesis, structure, and reactivity of high oxidation state silver fluorides and related compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucier, George Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This thesis has been largely concerned with defining the oxidizing power of Ag(III) and Ag(II) in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (aHF) solution. Emphasis was on cationic species, since in a cation the electronegativity of a given oxidation state is greatest. Cationic Ag(III) solv has a short half life at ordinary temperatures, oxidizing the solvent to elemental fluorine with formation of Ag(II). Salts of such a cation have not yet been preparable, but solutions which must contain such a species have proved to be effective and powerful oxidizers. In presence of PtF6-, RuF6-, or RhF6-, Ag(III) solv effectively oxidizes the anions to release the neutral hexafluorides. Such reactivity ranks cationic Ag(III) as the most powerfully oxidizing chemical agent known as far. Unlike its trivalent relative Ag (II) solv is thermodynamically stable in acid aHF. Nevertheless, it oxidizes IrF6- to IrF6 at room temperature, placing its oxidizing potential not more than 2 eV below that of cationic Ag(III). Range of Ag2+ (MF6-2 salts attainable in aHF has been explored. An anion must be stable with respect to electron loss to Ag2+. The anion must also be a poor F- donor; otherwise, either AgF+ salts or AgF2 are generated.

  8. Hydrogen Bonding and Multiphonon Structure in One- and Two-Dimensional Polymeric Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musfeldt, J. L.; Brown, S.; Cao, J.; Conner, M. M.; McConnell, A. C.; Southerland, H. I.; Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; Phillips, M. D.; Turnbull, M. M.; Landee, C. P.

    2007-03-01

    We report a systematic investigation of the temperature dependent infrared vibrational spectra of a family of chemically related coordination polymeric magnets based upon two different bridging anions, fluoride (F^-) and bifluoride (HF2^-), in copper-pyrazine complexes including Cu(HF2)(pyz)2BF4, Cu(HF2)(pyz)2ClO4, and CuF2(H2O)(pyz)). We compare our results with several one- and two-dimensional prototype materials including Cu(NO3)2(pyz) and Cu(ClO4)(pyz) 2. Unusual low temperature hydrogen bonding, local structural transitions associated with stronger low-temperature hydrogen bonding, and striking multiphonon effects that derive from coupling of an infrared-active fundamental with strong Raman-active modes of the pyrazine building-block molecule are observed. Based on the spectroscopic evidence, these interactions are common to this family of coordination polymers and work to stabilize the low temperature magnetic state. Similar interactions are likely to be present in other molecule-based magnets.

  9. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  10. Frederiksberg HF kursus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maria Duclos

    2008-01-01

    Notatet bygger på et interviewmateriale med dimitterede HF-kursister 3 måneder efter endt eksamen. Notatet undersøger dels, hvad der har hjulpet til at gennemføre, dels hvad der har været negativt og vanskeligt ved uddannelsen. Endvidere belyser notatet hvad kursisterne oplever at tage med fra de...

  11. Exraction and separation of CERIUM(IV/FLUORINE in fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution with fluoride coordination agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the extraction and separation of cerium/fluorine in fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution with fluoride coordination agent has been studied. The UV-vis spectra suggest that Zr6+ and Al3+ can scrub the F- from [CeF2] 2+ complex. The separation and conductivity studies show that aluminum salt is the most suitable fluoride coordination agent, and an ion-exchange reaction is involved between Ce4+/ [CeF2] 2+ and hydrogen ion.

  12. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse......, moderate for fluoride gel and very low for acidulated fluoride foam. No conclusions could be drawn on the cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS: This review, covering the recent decade, has further substantiated the evidence for a caries-preventive effect of fluoride mouth rinse, fluoride gel and foam...

  13. Trends of HCl, ClONO 2 and HF column abundances from ground-based FTIR measurements in Kiruna (Sweden in comparison with KASIMA model calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Raffalski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trends of hydrogen chloride (HCl, chlorine nitrate (ClONO2 and hydrogen fluoride (HF column abundances above Kiruna (Northern Sweden, 67.84° N, 20.41° E derived from nearly 14 years (1996–2009 of measurement and model data are presented. The measurements have been performed with a Bruker 120 HR (later Bruker 125 HR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrometer and the model used was KASIMA (KArlsruhe SImulation model of the Middle Atmosphere. To calculate the long-term trends, a linear function combined with an annual cycle was fitted to the data using a least squares method. The precision of the resulting trends was estimated with the so-called bootstrap resampling method. The relative trends were calculated on the basis of the linear fit result on 1 January 2000, 12:00 UTC. For hydrogen fluoride, both model and measurements show a positive trend that seems to decrease in the last few years. This suggests a stabilisation of the HF total column abundance. For the summer data (August to November, the FTIR trend of (+1.25 ± 0.28%/yr agrees within errors with the KASIMA one of (+1.55 ± 0.11%/yr. The trends determined for HCl and ClONO2 are significantly negative over the time period considered here. This corresponds to the expectations because the emission of their precursors (chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons has been restricted in the Montreal Protocol in 1987 and its amendments and adjustments. The relative trend for ClONO2 from the FTIR measurements amounts to (−3.28 ± 0.56%/yr and the one for HCl to (−0.81± 0.23%/yr. KASIMA simulates a weaker decrease: For ClONO2, the result is (−0.90 ± 0.10%/yr and for HCl (−0.17± 0.06%/yr. Part of the difference between measurement and model data can be explained by sampling and the stronger annual cycle indicated by the measurements. There is a factor of about four between the trends of HCl and ClONO2 above Kiruna for both measurement and model data. The absolute values of

  14. Fluorides and non-fluoride remineralization systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaechi, Bennett T; van Loveren, Cor

    2013-01-01

    Caries develops when the equilibrium between de- and remineralization is unbalanced favoring demineralization. De- and remineralization occur depending on the degree of saturation of the interstitial fluids with respect to the tooth mineral. This equilibrium is positively influenced when fluoride, calcium and phosphate ions are added favoring remineralization. In addition, when fluoride is present, it will be incorporated into the newly formed mineral which is then less soluble. Toothpastes may contain fluoride and calcium ions separately or together in various compounds (remineralization systems) and may therefore reduce demineralization and promote remineralization. Formulating all these compounds in one paste may be challenging due to possible premature calcium-fluoride interactions and the low solubility of CaF2. There is a large amount of clinical evidence supporting the potent caries preventive effect of fluoride toothpastes indisputably. The amount of clinical evidence of the effectiveness of the other remineralization systems is far less convincing. Evidence is lacking for head to head comparisons of the various remineralization systems. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Probability of foliar injury for Acer sp. based on foliar fluoride concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Andrew M; Dixon, Murray J; Terry, Debbie T; Todd, Aaron K; Luciani, Michael A; Williamson, Michele L; Roszak, Danuta S; Farias, Kim A

    2016-12-01

    Fluoride is considered one of the most phytotoxic elements to plants, and indicative fluoride injury has been associated over a wide range of foliar fluoride concentrations. The aim of this study was to determine the probability of indicative foliar fluoride injury based on Acer sp. foliar fluoride concentrations using a logistic regression model. Foliage from Acer nedundo, Acer saccharinum, Acer saccharum and Acer platanoides was collected along a distance gradient from three separate brick manufacturing facilities in southern Ontario as part of a long-term monitoring programme between 1995 and 2014. Hydrogen fluoride is the major emission source associated with the manufacturing facilities resulting with highly elevated foliar fluoride close to the facilities and decreasing with distance. Consistent with other studies, indicative fluoride injury was observed over a wide range of foliar concentrations (9.9-480.0 μg F(-) g(-1)). The logistic regression model was statistically significant for the Acer sp. group, A. negundo and A. saccharinum; consequently, A. negundo being the most sensitive species among the group. In addition, A. saccharum and A. platanoides were not statistically significant within the model. We are unaware of published foliar fluoride values for Acer sp. within Canada, and this research provides policy maker and scientist with probabilities of indicative foliar injury for common urban Acer sp. trees that can help guide decisions about emissions controls. Further research should focus on mechanisms driving indicative fluoride injury over wide ranging foliar fluoride concentrations and help determine foliar fluoride thresholds for damage.

  16. PRODUCTION OF THORIUM FLUORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariasen, W.H.

    1959-08-11

    A process is presented for producing anhydrous thorium fluoride comprising the step of contacting a saturated aqueous solution of thorium nitrate with an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid having a concentration of about 45 to 50% by weight at a temperature above 70 deg C whereby anhydrous thorium fluoride precipitates.

  17. INTERACTION OF FLUORIDE COMPLEXES DERIVED FROM GLASS-IONOMER CEMENTS WITH HYDROXYAPATITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis S. M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A study has been undertaken of the interaction of complexed fluoride extracted from glass-ionomer dental cements with synthetic hydroxyapatite powder. Extracts were prepared from two commercial glass-ionomers (Fuji IX and ChemFlex under both neutral and acidic conditions. They were analysed by ICP-OES and by fluoride-ion selective electrode with and without added TISAB to decomplex the fluoride. The pH of the acid extracts was 4, conditions under which fluoride complexes with protons as HF or HF2-, it also complexes with aluminium, which was found to be present in higher amounts in the acid extracts. Fluoride was found to be almost completely complexed in acid extracts, but not in neutral extracts, which contained free fluoride ions. Exposure of these extracts to synthetic hydroxyapatite powder showed that fluoride was taken up rapidly (within 5 minutes, whether or not it was complexed. SEM (EDAX study of recovered hydroxyapatite showed only minute traces of aluminium taken up under all conditions. This showed that aluminium interacts hardly at all with hydroxyapatite, and hence is probably not involved in the remineralisation process.

  18. Fluoride varnishes and enamel caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, Hugo de

    1987-01-01

    Topical fluoride applications have the aim of increasing the fluoride uptake in enamel and consequently reducing caries. In the early ‘60s fluoride varnishes were introduced because they had a long contact period with the enamel which resulted in a higher fluoride uptake than from other topical appl

  19. Fluoride varnishes and enamel caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, Hugo de

    1987-01-01

    Topical fluoride applications have the aim of increasing the fluoride uptake in enamel and consequently reducing caries. In the early ‘60s fluoride varnishes were introduced because they had a long contact period with the enamel which resulted in a higher fluoride uptake than from other topical

  20. Tris(dimethylamino)oxosulfonium difluorotrimethylsilicate, (Me(2)N)(3)SO(+)Me(3)SiF(2)(-) (TAOS Fluoride).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Jens; Behrens, Ulrich; Lork, Enno; Borrmann, Tobias; Stohrer, Wolf-Dieter; Mews, Rüdiger

    2002-09-01

    In the OSF(4)/Me(2)NSiMe(3) system besides the long known Me(2)NS(O)F(3) only the trisubstituted derivative is isolated as (Me(2)N)(3)SO(+)Me(3)SiF(2)(-) (3). Similar to (Me(2)N)(3)S(+)Me(3)SiF(2)(-) compound 3 is an excellent fluoride ion donor. With AsF(5) and HF the corresponding hexafluoroarsenate (Me(2)N)(3)SO(+)AsF(6)(-) (4) and the hydrogen bifluoride (Me(2)N)(3)SO(+)HF(2)(-) (5) are formed in almost quantitative yield. X-ray structure determinations of 3-5 surprisingly showed two different types of structures for the cation. In 3 and 5 this cation has C(3) symmetry, while in the hexafluoroarsenate 4 a (Me(2)N)(3)S(+)-like structure with C(s)() symmetry is determined. The experimental results for (Me(2)N)(3)SO(+) and (Me(2)N)(3)S(+) are compared with theoretical calculations for these cations and their isoelectronic neutral counterparts, the phosphorus amides (Me(2)N)(3)PO and (Me(2)N)(3)P, respectively.

  1. Studies on fluoride complexing of hexavalent actinides using a fluoride ion selective electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, R.M.; Chaudhuri, N.K.; Rizvi, G.H.; Patil, S.K.

    1985-08-01

    Complex formation between actinide(VI) and fluoride ions in aqueous solutions was investigated using a fluoride ion selective electrode (F-ISE). As fairly high acidity used to suppress hydrolysis of the actinide(VI) ions, significant liquid junction potentials (Esub(j)) existed in the system. An iterative procedure was developed for computing free hydrogen ion concentration (Hsup(+)) as it could not be measured directly, using data obtained with F-ISE. Esub(j) values were estimated from known (Hsup(+)) and the stability constants of fluoride complexes of actinide(VI) ions were calculated following King and Gallagher's method using a computer program. The stability constants were found to follow the order U(VI) > Np(VI) > Pu(VI). (author). 18 refs.; 3 figs.; 9 tables.

  2. FORMATION OF PHOSPHATE-CONTAINING CALCIUM-FLUORIDE AT THE EXPENSE OF ENAMEL, HYDROXYAPATITE AND FLUORAPATITE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHRISTOFFERSEN, J; CHRISTOFFERSEN, MR; ARENDS, J; LEONARDSEN, ES

    1995-01-01

    During the caries process complex reactions involving calcium, phosphate, hydrogen and fluoride ions as main species take place. In this study the precipitation and dissolution reactions occurring in suspensions of enamel, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and fluorapatite (FAP) on addition of fluoride were inve

  3. A receptor incorporating OH, NH and CH binding motifs for a fluoride selective chemosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Li, Yongjun; Yu, Yanwen; Liu, Taifeng; Cheng, Songhua; Liu, Huibiao; Li, Yuliang

    2012-06-14

    An anion receptor combined different types of hydrogen bond donors such as OH, NH and CH groups has been synthesized. By rotation of the sub methyl group, this receptor showed evident (1)H NMR response to both fluoride and sulfate, while colorimetric and fluorescent responses were only observed in the presence of fluoride.

  4. FORMATION OF PHOSPHATE-CONTAINING CALCIUM-FLUORIDE AT THE EXPENSE OF ENAMEL, HYDROXYAPATITE AND FLUORAPATITE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHRISTOFFERSEN, J; CHRISTOFFERSEN, MR; ARENDS, J; LEONARDSEN, ES

    1995-01-01

    During the caries process complex reactions involving calcium, phosphate, hydrogen and fluoride ions as main species take place. In this study the precipitation and dissolution reactions occurring in suspensions of enamel, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and fluorapatite (FAP) on addition of fluoride were

  5. Salt fluoridation and oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas M. Marthaler

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the cariesprotective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich,...

  6. The cariostatic mechanisms of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Kata Rošin-Grget; Kristina Peroš; Ivana Šutej; Krešimir Bašić

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the possible cariostatic mechanisms of the action of fluoride. In the past, fluoride inhibition of caries was ascribed to reduced solubility of enamel due to incorporation of fluoride (F–) into the enamel minerals. The present evidence from clinical and laboratory studies suggests that the caries-preventive mode of action of fluoride is mainly topical. There is convincing evidence that fluoride has a major effect on demineralisation and remineralisation of dental hard t...

  7. Effect of HF concentration on the composition and distribution of Ge species in the framework of ITQ-13 and ITQ-17 zeolites

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xiaolong

    2013-04-01

    Two germanosilicates with zeolitic structures, namely ITQ-13 and ITQ-17, have been synthesized from gels containing various amounts of hydrofluoric acid. Although both zeolites possess similar compositions, they differ not only by their pore size and framework topology but also by the nature of the cavities surrounding fluoride species in the structure. For ITQ-17, in which fluoride is almost exclusively located in D4R units, a decrease in HF concentration in the gel has no influence on the fluoride content in the zeolite. However, it favors the incorporation of germanium species in the framework, particularly in D4R units. Zeolites obtained at low HF concentrations are characterized by high Ge contents and Si/Ge atomic ratios close to 1 in D4R units. In the case of ITQ-13, the possibility for fluoride to reside not only in D4R units but also in the larger [415262] cages minimizes the influence of the HF concentration on the zeolite framework composition. Reducing the HF concentration in the gel has no effect on the Si/Ge ratio in the final zeolite but it decreases the fluoride content in the structure. At low HF concentration, fluoride is absent from [415262] cages and is almost exclusively present in all-silica D4R units. As the concentration increases, fluoride starts to occupy Ge-rich D4R and [415 262] cages, as clearly evidenced by 19F NMR. By contrast to ITQ-17, the amount of HF in the gel does not influence the distribution of Ge species in the framework. © 2012 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lockner, Frida; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2017-01-01

    the levels with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste. DESIGN: Fifteen healthy children were enrolled to a randomized crossover trial that was performed in two parts: Part I with twice-daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and Part II with twice-daily brushing with a non-fluoride toothpaste......: There was a statistically significant increase in the 6-h fluoride excretion after application of both experimental varnishes, with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste (P toothpaste was used, the mean fluoride excretion was 0.20 mg/6 h after application of Duraphat and 0.29 mg/6 h...... after application of Profluorid Varnish (P = 0.18). CONCLUSIONS: Topical applications of 0.1 mL of fluoride varnish significantly increased the 6-h fluoride excretion. As some individuals displayed excretion levels exceeding the optimal fluoride exposure, a restricted use of fluoride toothpaste...

  9. Fluoridation: strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, R

    1981-07-01

    Of 19 referenda on community water fluoridation held in the first six months of 1980, 17 were defeated. Among the postulated reasons are a growing distrust of government and the health establishment. The public remains largely ignorant of the purpose and benefits of fluoridation. The emotionalism surrounding the issue has made it difficult to generate public support outside of the health professions. Opponents have also learned to fight fluoridation with increasingly sophisticated techniques. Some of the strategies used in recent successful campaigns in Oakland, California, and Portland, Oregon are described; recommendations that can be applied to communities considering fluoridation include careful wording of ballot measures so they are unequivocally clear and simple; timing ballot measures with elections likely to draw the largest voter turnout; broadening the base of political and financial support; using a figurehead if possible; and making maximum use of the media.

  10. Pulsed inductive HF laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razhev, A M; Kargapol' tsev, E S [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Churkin, D S; Demchuk, S V [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-31

    We report the results of experimentally investigated dependences of temporal, spectral and spatial characteristics of an inductive HF-laser generation on the pump conditions. Gas mixtures H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF6{sub 6}) and He(Ne) – H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF{sub 6}) were used as active media. The FWHM pulse duration reached 0.42 μs. This value corresponded to a pulsed power of 45 kW. For the first time, the emission spectrum of an inductive HF laser was investigated, which consisted of seven groups of bands with centres around the wavelengths of 2732, 2736, 2739, 2835, 2837, 2893 and 2913 nm. The cross section profile of the laser beam was a ring with a diameter of about 20 mm and width of about 5 mm. Parameters of laser operation in the repetitively pulsed regime were sufficiently stable. The amplitude instability of light pulses was no greater than 5% – 6%. (lasers)

  11. Selective separation of phosphate and fluoride from semiconductor wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmadewanthi, B; Liu, J C

    2009-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid (HF) and phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)) are widely used in semiconductor industry for etching and rinsing purposes. Consequently, significant amount of wastewater containing phosphate and fluoride is generated. Selective separation of phosphate and fluoride from the semiconductor wastewater, containing 936 mg/L of fluoride, 118 mg/L of phosphate, 640 mg/L of sulfate, and 26.7 mg/L of ammonia, was studied. Chemical precipitation and flotation reactions were utilized in the two-stage treatment processes. The first-stage reaction involved the addition of magnesium chloride (MgCl(2)) to induce selective precipitation of magnesium phosphate. The optimal condition was pH 10 and molar ratio, [Mg(2 + )]/[(PO(4) (3-))], of 3:1, and 66.2% of phosphate was removed and recovered as bobierrite (Mg(3)(PO(4))(2).8H(2)O). No reaction was found between MgCl(2) and fluoride. Calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) was used in the second-stage reaction to induce precipitation of calcium fluoride and calcium phosphate. The optimum molar ratio, [Ca(2 + )]/[F(-)], was 0.7 at pH 10, and residual fluoride concentration of 10.7 mg/L and phosphate concentration of lower than 0.5 mg/L was obtained. Thermodynamic equilibrium was modeled with PHREEQC and compared with experimental results. Sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) was an effective collector for subsequent solid-liquid removal via dispersed air flotation (DiAF). The study demonstrated that phosphate can be selectively recovered from the wastewater. Potential benefits include recovery of phosphate for reuse, lower required dosage of calcium for fluoride removal, and less amount of CaF(2) sludge.

  12. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014. Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  13. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014 Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  14. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014. Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  15. Preparation of high density heavy metal fluoride glasses with extended ultraviolet and infra red ranges, and such high density heavy metal fluoride glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Steven W. (Inventor); Huebsch, Jesse (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A heavy metal fluoride glass composition range (in mol percent) consisting essentially of: (16-30)BaF.sub.2.(8-26)HfF.sub.4.(6-24)InF.sub.3 or GaF.sub.3.(4-16)CdF.sub.2.(6-24)YbF.sub.3.(4-22)ZnF.sub.2. In an alternative embodiment, a heavy metal fluoride glass composition range (in mol percent) comprises (16-30)BaF.sub.2.(8-26)HfF.sub.4.(6-24) of (0-24)InF.sub.3, (0-24)GaF.sub.3 and (0-19)AlF.sub.3.(1-16)CdF.sub.2.(6-24)YbF.sub.3.(4-26)ZnF.sub.2. A preferred heavy metal fluoride glass produced in accordance with the present invention comprises a composition (in mol %) and comprises about 26BaF.sub.2.18HfF.sub.4.7InF.sub.3.5GaF.sub.3.10CdF.sub.2.18YbF.sub.3. 16ZnF.sub.2. A preferred heavy metal fluoride glass has maximum thickness of most preferably about 3 mm. Another preferred heavy metal fluoride glass comprises a composition (in mol %) and comprises about 26BaF.sub.2.18HfF.sub.4.12AlF.sub.3.10CdF.sub.2.18YbF.sub.3.16ZnF.sub.2.

  16. Permeability and fluoride release of lining materials containing amine fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbö, H; Eriksen, H M

    1976-11-01

    The addition of amine fluorides to a copal recin (Copalite) and a chlorine caoutchouc varnish (Pergut S-40) has been studied. The permeability of Copalite films was only slightly increased whereas the excellent film-forming qualities of Pergut S-40 were destroyed by the addition of fluorides. A high fluoride release was found initially from test films of the materials but within 2-3 weeks a decrease to very low fluoride levels was observed.

  17. HF Interference, Procedures and Tools (Interferences HF, procedures et outils)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    such sources. The existing HF background noise possibly may be increased via ground wave and/or sky wave propagation. Increase of the existing HF...télécommunications filaires à large bande. Les télécommunications via le réseau électrique courant, dites PowerLine Communications (PLT ou PLC) et diverses...cumulative de nombreuses sources de même type. Le bruit de fond HF existant risque d’être augmenté par propagation de l’onde terrestre et/ou aérienne

  18. Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, Frida; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2017-01-20

    The efficacy and safety of combined use of topical fluoride products are essential issues that must be monitored. To assess urinary excretion of fluoride after application of two different dental varnishes containing 2.26% fluoride in 3- to 4-year-old children and to compare the levels with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste. Fifteen healthy children were enrolled to a randomized crossover trial that was performed in two parts: Part I with twice-daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and Part II with twice-daily brushing with a non-fluoride toothpaste. After a 1-week run-in period, 0.1 mL of the two fluoride varnishes (Duraphat and Profluorid Varnish) was topically applied in a randomized order. Baseline and experimental urine was collected during 6-h periods. The fluoride content was determined with an ion-sensitive electrode. There was a statistically significant increase in the 6-h fluoride excretion after application of both experimental varnishes, with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste (P fluoridated toothpaste was used, the mean fluoride excretion was 0.20 mg/6 h after application of Duraphat and 0.29 mg/6 h after application of Profluorid Varnish (P = 0.18). Topical applications of 0.1 mL of fluoride varnish significantly increased the 6-h fluoride excretion. As some individuals displayed excretion levels exceeding the optimal fluoride exposure, a restricted use of fluoride toothpaste in connection with the varnish applications would decrease fluoride exposure. © 2017 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Observed and simulated time evolution of HCl, ClONO2, and HF total column abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.-M. Sinnhuber

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Time series of total column abundances of hydrogen chloride (HCl, chlorine nitrate (ClONO2, and hydrogen fluoride (HF were determined from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectra recorded at 17 sites belonging to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC and located between 80.05° N and 77.82° S. By providing such a near-global overview on ground-based measurements of the two major stratospheric chlorine reservoir species, HCl and ClONO2, the present study is able to confirm the decrease of the atmospheric inorganic chlorine abundance during the last few years. This decrease is expected following the 1987 Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, where restrictions and a subsequent phase-out of the prominent anthropogenic chlorine source gases (solvents, chlorofluorocarbons were agreed upon to enable a stabilisation and recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer. The atmospheric fluorine content is expected to be influenced by the Montreal Protocol, too, because most of the banned anthropogenic gases also represent important fluorine sources. But many of the substitutes to the banned gases also contain fluorine so that the HF total column abundance is expected to have continued to increase during the last few years. The measurements are compared with calculations from five different models: the two-dimensional Bremen model, the two chemistry-transport models KASIMA and SLIMCAT, and the two chemistry-climate models EMAC and SOCOL. Thereby, the ability of the models to reproduce the absolute total column amounts, the seasonal cycles, and the temporal evolution found in the FTIR measurements is investigated and inter-compared. This is especially interesting because the models have different architectures. The overall agreement between the measurements and models for the total column abundances and the seasonal cycles is good. Linear trends of HCl, ClONO2, and HF are calculated from both

  20. Complex polyfluoride additives in Fmoc-amino acid fluoride coupling processes. Enhanced reactivity and avoidance of stereomutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpino, Louis A; Ionescu, Dumitru; El-Faham, Ayman; Beyermann, Michael; Henklein, Peter; Hanay, Christiane; Wenschuh, Holger; Bienert, Michael

    2003-04-01

    [reaction: see text] Isolated Fmoc amino acid fluorides have previously been shown to be among the most efficient reagents for peptide bond formation. Now, it has been found that anionic, polyhydrogen fluoride additives are capable of diverting many of the classical peptide coupling processes to acid fluoride couplings. Examples include the use of N-HBTU or N-HATU and the carbodiimide technique. As HF-containing species, these additives provide a more suitable medium for the coupling of systems that are sensitive to loss of configuration at the reactive carboxyl function.

  1. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p...

  2. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after an el...... brushing with fluoride toothpaste....

  3. Fluoride resistance in Streptococcus mutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Fluoride has been used as the most effective anti-caries agent for over five decades. It functions not only on the dental hard tissues, but also as an antimicrobial agent. It is known that oral bacteria are able to develop resistance to fluoride, which may affect the effectiveness of fluoride in

  4. Synthesis of Fluoridated Hydroxyapatite Containing Potassium and Its Effect on Dentin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to produce a nanoscale fluoridated and potassium containing hydroxyapatite via sol-gel method and to observe the effect of occlusion of the dentin tubule under scanning electron microscopy. HF was selected as fluorine-containing reagent which was added into mixed Ca ( NO3 )2-P2 O5 ethanol solutions to obtain dipping sols. All of the resulting samples showed apatite structure in their X- ray diffraction pattern. The lattice parameter a and the crystallite size were calculated to demonstrate the crystalline structure of fluoridated and potassium containing HA. Extracted paired premolars were chosen to obtain a flat surface with opened tubules. It was observed that the tubules were covered by α 10μm layer of fluoridated and potassium containing HA under the SEM. As the experimental results show the nanoscale fluoridated and potassium containing hydroxyapatite occludes the dentin tubules.

  5. Relationships of human plasma fluoride and bone fluoride to age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, F.M.; Tinanoff, N.; Moutinho, M.; Anstey, M.B.; Waziri, M.H.

    1976-04-01

    There is evidence that fluoride levels in plasma correlate with the fluoride content in bones. The authors determined whether or not fluoride in plasma and bones might correlate with age. In 41 in-patients at the University Hospital, Iowa City, 36 of whom had been residing in fluoridated communities plasma fluoride was determined in the fasting stage by the fluoride ion selective electrode. The teeth of these children were compared with those of a neighboring city where the natural fluoride content in drinking water was 0.1 ppm. For the second sampling 42 months following the beginning of the program only 10 and 11 year old children - who had been 6 and 7 years old at the beginning of the experiment - were selected. Twenty-five boys and girls in each group were compared with a similar group of children as controls. After 28 months (approximately 33 rinsing with sodium fluoride solution) the DMF index in the fluoride-treated children was 18.4% less than in the controls. In the second group among 10 and 11 year old children after 42 months with 55 rinsings the difference was 35.0%. The author acknowledged that factors other than applications of sodium fluoride may have contributed to the prevention of caries in the fluoride-treated groups.

  6. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, F

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the in vitro fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions. Poly(methyl methacrylate) blocks (Perspex, n=3 per group) were painted with 80 ± 5 mg fluoride varnish (n=10) and placed into artificial saliva for 30 min. Then, blocks were placed into either 1% citric acid (pH 2.27) or 0.3% citric acid (pH 3.75) solutions (n=3 per solution and varnish) for 30 min with the solutions being replaced every 5 min. Saliva and acid solutions were analyzed for fluoride content. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA (varnish, solution, time). The three-way interaction was significant (p>0.0001). Fluoride release and release patterns varied considerably between varnishes. Fluoride release in saliva varied by a factor of more than 10 between varnishes. Some varnishes (CavityShield, Nupro, ProFluorid, Vanish) showed higher fluoride release in saliva than during the first 5 min of acid exposure, whereas other varnishes (Acclean, Enamel-Pro, MI Varnish, Vella) showed the opposite behavior. There was little difference between acidic solutions. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes varies considerably and also depends on the dissolution medium. Bearing in mind the limitations of laboratory research, the consumption of acidic drinks after fluoride varnish application should be avoided to optimize the benefit/risk ratio.

  7. Response of grapevines to fluoride under field conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, F.

    1983-07-01

    Grapevines (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz) were fumigated in open-top chambers with hydrogen fluoride for 64 days at mean atmospheric fluoride concentrations of 0.17 or 0.28 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/. Other grapevines grown under ambient conditions in the vineyard or maintained in control chambers were exposed to 0.13 or 0.05 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/, respectively. Leaves of grapevines exposed to 0.28, 0.17, 0.13, or 0.05 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/ accumulated up to 85, 55, 20, or 11 ..mu..gFg/sup -1/, respectively. Foliar necrosis was observed on plants exposed to 0.28 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/, but no injury symptoms were observed at 0.17 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/ or in control plants. Grapevines growing under ambient conditions had significantly greater mean bunch weight, peduncle weight, number of grapes per bunch, and leaf protein levels than the fumigated treatments. However, these differences may be associated with a chamber effect rather than with an effect of fluoride on grapevines. No significant differences were found between treatments for grape potential alcohol content, fruit acids, number of bunches or grapes per vine, fresh weight of grapes, or leaf chlorophyll content, despite foliar fluoride concentrations in the highest fluoride fumigation level reaching 85 ..mu..gFg/sup -1/. No evidence was found of significant fluoride accumulation in berries or canes. 26 references, 4 tables.

  8. Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever (Marburg HF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Marburg hemorrhagic fever (Marburg HF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, ...

  9. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... an electronic search for literature published in English between 2003 and 2014. The included papers were assessed for their risk of bias and the results were narratively synthesized due to study heterogeneity. The quality of evidence was expressed according to GRADE. RESULTS: A total of 19 papers were included...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse...

  11. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  12. Hf Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Lawler, J E; Labby, Z E; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J; Ivans, I I

    2006-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements, accurate to about +/- 5 percent, are reported for 41 odd-parity levels of Hf II. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for 150 lines of Hf II. Approximately half of these new transition probabilities overlap with recent independent measurements using a similar approach. The two sets of measurements are found to be in good agreement for measurements in common. Our new laboratory data are applied to refine the hafnium photospheric solar abundance and to determine hafnium abundances in 10 metal-poor giant stars with enhanced r-process abundances. For the Sun we derive log epsilon (Hf) = 0.88 +/- 0.08 from four lines; the uncertainty is dominated by the weakness of the lines and their blending by other spectral features. Within the uncertainties of our analysis, the r-process-rich stars possess constant Hf/La and Hf/Eu abundance ratios, log epsilon (Hf...

  13. Environmental monitoring of fluoride emissions using precipitation, dust, plant and soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzaring, J; Hrenn, H; Schumm, C; Klumpp, A; Fangmeier, A

    2006-11-01

    A pollution gradient was observed in precipitation, plants and soils sampled at different locations around a fluoride producing chemical plant in Germany. In all samples the influence of emissions was discernible up to a distance of 500 m from the plant. However, fluoride concentrations in plant bioindicators (leaves of birch and black berry) and in bulk precipitation showed a more pronounced relationship with the distance from the source than fluoride concentrations in soil. Vegetables sampled in the vicinity of the plant also had elevated concentrations of fluoride, but only the consumption of larger quantities of this material would lead to exceedances of recommended daily F-intake. The present study did not indicate the existence of low phytotoxicity thresholds for fluoride in the plant species used in the study. Even at very high fluoride concentrations in leaf tissue (963 ppm) plants did not show injury due to HF. Dust sampling downwind of the chemical plant confirmed that particulate fluoride was of minor importance in the study area.

  14. Ion-chromatographic determination of chloride and fluoride in electrolyte from the halogen tin-plating process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, W; Ellis, J

    1984-06-01

    A simple and rapid procedure is proposed for the determination of chloride and free fluoride in tin electroplating fluid. Suppressor-column ion-chromatography is used after oxidation of hexafluorostannate(II) to hexafluorostannate(IV) with hydrogen peroxide. Concurrent determination of tin(II) and total tin then allows calculation of the concentrations of fluoride, hexafluorostannate(II) and hexafluorostannate(IV).

  15. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of ‘Fluoride and Oral Health’ has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fl uoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published...

  16. How Does Fluoride Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Movies & More Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading 7 Videos: Kids Talk About ... There's fluoride in your toothpaste and even in your water. But how does it work to keep teeth ...

  17. Salt fluoridation and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Marthaler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the cariesprotective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Conclusions. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%. In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67% and Switzerland (85%. In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method.

  18. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B; Zholobak, Nadezhda M; Baranchikov, Alexander E; Ryabova, Anastasia V; Ivanov, Vladimir K

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF3:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF3 nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of cointercalated HF on the electrochemical behavior of highly fluorinated graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Gupta, Vinay; Ohzawa, Yoshimi; Groult, Henri; Mazej, Zoran; Žemva, Boris

    Highly fluorinated graphite was prepared at room temperature using high oxidation state transition metal complex fluoride (K 2PdF 6, K 2MnF 6, K 2NiF 6 or KAgF 4) and elemental fluorine under pressure ((5.9-11.8) ×10 5 Pa) in anhydrous liquid HF (aHF). The composition of the fluorinated graphite samples ranged from C 1.1F to C 1.9F containing small amounts of HF. IR absorption spectra revealed that stage 1 phase of C xF contained several different phases with planar (sp 2) and puckered (sp 3) graphene layers. Electrochemical discharge of the fluorinated graphite showed that profile of discharge potential and discharge capacity varied depending on the amount of cointercalated HF. The C xF samples with less amounts of HF and HF 2δ- had relatively flat discharge potentials and large discharge capacities. The discharge capacity reached 500-600 mAh/g in 1 mol/dm 3 LiClO 4-propylene carbonate solution at 25 °C. Chemical diffusion coefficients of Li + ion in the intermediate discharge products were (4.4-13) ×10 -12 cm 2/s from impedance measurement.

  20. Health Effects Associated with Water Fluoridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Virginia L.

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is presented concerning fluoridation of water supplies. Correlation between fluoride in drinking water and improved dental health is reviewed. Relationship is expressed between fluoridation and reduced tooth decay. Use of fluoride in treating skeletal disorders is discussed. Author advocates fluoridating water supplies. (SA)

  1. Fluoridation and oxidation characteristics of JLF-1 and NIFS-HEAT-2 low-activation structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Takuya [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi 322-6, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)], E-mail: nagasaka@nifs.ac.jp; Kondo, Masatoshi; Muroga, Takeo; Noda, Nobuaki; Sagara, Akio; Motojima, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi 322-6, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Suzuki, Akihiro [Nuclear Professional School, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Terai, Takayuki [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2009-04-30

    Fluoridation and oxidation of JLF-1 (Fe-9Cr-2W-0.1C) and NIFS-HEAT-2 (V-4Cr-4Ti) were examined under various corrosion conditions, such as Flibe (2LiF + BeF{sub 2}) molten salt at 823 K for 2003 h, H{sub 2}O-47%HF solution at RT for 2 min, and He-(0-1%)HF gas mixture containing moisture and O{sub 2} gas impurities at 823 K for 2.5-100 h. Oxidation dominated fluoridation under all test conditions, even when the fluoridation agent, the F atoms in HF, was 16x more plentiful than the oxidation agent, O atoms in H{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2}. Corrosion products were mainly considered as Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, while fluoride was indicated in a very limited surface region. JLF-1 exhibited better corrosion resistance in He-HF gas mixture tests than NIFS-HEAT-2.

  2. Industrial fluoride pollution: chronic fluoride poisoning in Cornwall Island cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krook, L.; Maylin, G.A.

    1979-04-01

    An aluminum plant on the south bank of the St. Lawrence River, southwest of Cornwall Island, Ontario, Canada, has emitted 0.816 metric tons of fluoride daily since 1973. Considerably higher amounts were emitted from 1959 to 1973. The plant was designated as the major source of fluoride emissions impacting on Cornwall Island. Cattle located on this island showed signs of chronic fluoride poisoning. This poisoning was manifested clinically by stunted growth and dental fluorosis to a degree of severe interference with drinking and mastication. This Cornwall Island herds study indicates that the established tolerance level of fluoride for performance of dairy and beef cattle is not valid since the tolerance level was set based on experiments with healthy calves which were exposed to dietary fluoride from 3 to 4 months of age and not on cattle which were chronically exposed to fluoride from conception to death. 56 references.

  3. Development of anti-corrosion coating on low activation materials against fluoridation and oxidation in Flibe blanket environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Takuya, E-mail: Nagasaka@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi 322-6, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kondo, Masatoshi; Muroga, Takeo; Sagara, Akio; Motojima, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi 322-6, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Tsutsumi, Tatsuya; Oishi, Tatsuya [Shinto Industrial Co., Ltd., Kururi 376-10, Tokitsu, Nagasaki 851-2107 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    W coating by vacuum plasma spray process and Cr coating by chromizing process were performed on fusion low activation materials, JLF-1 ferritic steel and NIFS-HEAT-2 vanadium alloy. The present study discusses feasibility of the coatings as anti-corrosion coating against fluoridation in Flibe for fusion low activation materials. Coatings were characterized by microstructural analysis and examination on chemical stability by corrosion tests. The corrosion tests were conducted with H{sub 2}O-47% HF solution at RT and He-1% HF-0.06 H{sub 2}O gas mixture at 823 K to simulate fluoridation and oxidation in Flibe. The coatings presented suppression of fluoride formation compared with JLF-1 or NIFS-HEAT-2, however weight loss due to WF{sub 6} formation was induced, and much Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was formed.

  4. Fluoride Content in Alcoholic Drinks

    OpenAIRE

    Goschorska, Marta; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Ra?, Monika Ewa; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of alcoholic drinks as a potential source of dietary fluoride by means of measuring fluoride levels in selected alcoholic drinks available on the Polish market that are also diverse in terms of the percentage content of ethanol. The study was conducted on 48 types of drinks with low, medium, and high alcohol content available on the Polish market and offered by various manufacturers, both Polish and foreign. Fluoride concentrations in individual ...

  5. Fluoride ion release and solubility of fluoride enriched interim cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, Israel; Block, Jonathan; Melamed, Guy; Dolev, Eran; Matalon, Shlomo; Ormianer, Zeev

    2014-08-01

    Interim and definitive restorations cemented with interim cements for a prolonged interval are susceptible to bacterial infiltration and caries formation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the long-term fluoride release and solubility of aged ZnO-based interim cements enriched separately with 0.4% NaF and SnF2. Four different brands of cements (Tempbond, Tempbond NE, Procem, and Freegenol) were tested for fluoride release and solubility. For every test, 6 disk specimens of each cement with NaF and SnF2, and 6 with no fluoride enrichment (control) were fabricated, for a total of 72 specimens. The disks were incubated in deionized water. Fluoride ion release was recorded at 1, 7, 14, 21, 63, 91, and 182 days. Solubility was calculated as weight percent after 90 days of incubation. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance with repeated measures and the Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc test (Pfluorides released fluoride ions for at least 182 days. Cements mixed with NaF released more fluoride ions than those mixed with SnF2 (P.97), indicating a diffusion-controlled fluoride release. Cement and fluoride types were the main affecting factors in fluoride ion release. The addition of fluorides slightly increased the solubility of the cements. Given their long-term sustained and diffusive controlled release, these fluorides, particularly NaF when mixed with ZnO-based interim cements, may be useful for caries prevention under provisionally cemented restorations. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrastructural evaluation of enamel after dental bleaching associated with fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, John A; Bittencourt, Bruna; Michel, Milton; Sabino, Nilson; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara M M

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects on human enamel after two bleaching procedures: with a fluoridated bleaching agent and with topical fluoride application postbleaching. It used 43 enamel blocks (3 mm(2) ) that were ground flat (600-2,000 grit) and polished with polishing paste (one and one-fourth). Specimens were randomly divided into three groups according to the bleaching procedure: (1) control group, (2) hydrogen peroxide 35% (HPF) and topical application of fluoride 1.23%, and (3) HP 38% (OP) with fluoride in its composition. Bleaching agents were used according to the manufacturer's instructions. Three methodologies were used: nanoindentation, to observe surface hardness and elastic modulus; atomic force microscopy, to observe surface roughness (R(a) - R(z)); and scanning electron microscopy, to observe the enamel surface effects. Group OP had a decrease in the elastic modulus after bleaching, which was recovered at 14 days. An increased roughness (R(a); 32%) was observed on group HPF and had an increased erosion on enamel surface (67%). It was concluded that topical application of fluoride, after using the nonfluoridated whitening agent, increased the roughness values and erosion of enamel.

  7. A FORMAÇÃO DE LIGAÇÕES DE HIDROGÊNIO π‧‧‧H, F‧‧‧H E C‧‧‧H NOS COMPLEXOS C2H2‧‧‧(HF, C2H2‧‧‧2(HF E C2H2‧‧‧3(HF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz G. Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a theoretical study on the basis of structural, vibrational, electronic and topological parameters of the C2H2‧‧‧(HF, C2H2‧‧‧2(HF and C2H2‧‧‧3(HF complexes concerning the formation of π‧‧‧H, F‧‧‧H and C‧‧‧H hydrogen bonds is presented. The main difference among these complexes is not properly the interaction strength, but the hydrogen bond type whose benchmark is ruled justly by the structure. Meanwhile, the occurrence of π‧‧‧H hydrogen bonds was unveiled in both C2H2‧‧‧(HF dimer and C2H2‧‧‧3(HF tetramer, although in latter, this interaction is stronger than C‧‧‧H of the C2H2‧‧‧2(HF trimer. However, the F‧‧‧H hydrogen bonds within the subunits of hydrofluoric acid are the strongest ones, reaching a partial covalent limit, and thereby contribute decisively to the stabilization of the tetramer structure. In line with this, the largest red-shifts were observed on the hydrofluoric acid trimer of the C2H2‧‧‧3(HF complex.

  8. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels and high Ni-Cr alloys to acid fluoride wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, H.D.; Mackey, D.B.; Pool, K.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Schwenk, E.B. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-04-01

    TRUEX processing of Hanford Site waste will utilize potentially corrosive acid fluoride processing solutions. Appropriate construction materials for such a processing facility need to be identified. Toward this objective, candidate stainless steels and high Ni-Cr alloys have been corrosion tested in simulated acid fluoride process solutions at 333K. The high Ni-Cr alloys exhibited corrosion rates as low as 0.14 mm/y in a solution with an HF activity of about 1.2 M, much lower than the 19 to 94 mm/y observed for austenitic stainless steels. At a lower HF activity (about 0.008 M), stainless steels display delayed passivation while high Ni-Cr alloys display essentially no reaction.

  9. Remote sensing of volcanic CO2, HF, HCl, SO2, and BrO in the downwind plume of Mt. Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, André; Solvejg Dinger, Anna; Bobrowski, Nicole; Kostinek, Julian; Fieber, Lukas; Fischerkeller, Constanze; Giuffrida, Giovanni Bruno; Hase, Frank; Klappenbach, Friedrich; Kuhn, Jonas; Lübcke, Peter; Tirpitz, Lukas; Tu, Qiansi

    2017-01-01

    Remote sensing of the gaseous composition of non-eruptive, passively degassing volcanic plumes can be a tool to gain insight into volcano interior processes. Here, we report on a field study in September 2015 that demonstrates the feasibility of remotely measuring the volcanic enhancements of carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and bromine monoxide (BrO) in the downwind plume of Mt. Etna using portable and rugged spectroscopic instrumentation. To this end, we operated the Fourier transform spectrometer EM27/SUN for the shortwave-infrared (SWIR) spectral range together with a co-mounted UV spectrometer on a mobile platform in direct-sun view at 5 to 10 km distance from the summit craters. The 3 days reported here cover several plume traverses and a sunrise measurement. For all days, intra-plume HF, HCl, SO2, and BrO vertical column densities (VCDs) were reliably measured exceeding 5 × 1016, 2 × 1017, 5 × 1017, and 1 × 1014 molec cm-2, with an estimated precision of 2.2 × 1015, 1.3 × 1016, 3.6 × 1016, and 1.3 × 1013 molec cm-2, respectively. Given that CO2, unlike the other measured gases, has a large and well-mixed atmospheric background, derivation of volcanic CO2 VCD enhancements (ΔCO2) required compensating for changes in altitude of the observing platform and for background concentration variability. The first challenge was met by simultaneously measuring the overhead oxygen (O2) columns and assuming covariation of O2 and CO2 with altitude. The atmospheric CO2 background was found by identifying background soundings via the co-emitted volcanic gases. The inferred ΔCO2 occasionally exceeded 2 × 1019 molec cm-2 with an estimated precision of 3.7 × 1018 molec cm-2 given typical atmospheric background VCDs of 7 to 8 × 1021 molec cm-2. While the correlations of ΔCO2 with the other measured volcanic gases confirm the detection of volcanic CO2 enhancements, correlations were found of variable

  10. Fluoride Content in Alcoholic Drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goschorska, Marta; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Rać, Monika Ewa; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of alcoholic drinks as a potential source of dietary fluoride by means of measuring fluoride levels in selected alcoholic drinks available on the Polish market that are also diverse in terms of the percentage content of ethanol. The study was conducted on 48 types of drinks with low, medium, and high alcohol content available on the Polish market and offered by various manufacturers, both Polish and foreign. Fluoride concentrations in individual samples were measured by potentiometric method with a fluoride ion-selective electrode. The highest fluoride levels were determined in the lowest percentage drinks (less than 10 % v/v ethanol), with the lowest fluoride levels observed in the highest percentage drinks (above 40 % v/v ethanol). In terms of types of alcoholic drinks, the highest fluoride levels were determined in beers and wines, while the lowest levels were observed in vodkas. These data confirm the fact that alcoholic beverages need to be considered as a significant source of fluoride delivered into the body.

  11. Ultrastructural changes in the cemento-enamel junction after vital tooth bleaching with fluoride and fluoride-free agents - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasic, Jovanka; Kesic, Ljiljana; Popovic, Jelena; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolic, Marija; Stankovic, Sasa; Barac, Radomir

    2012-03-01

    The impact of bleaching on the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) is not well known. Due to frequent sensitivity of the cervical region of teeth after the vital bleaching, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the morphological features of the CEJ of human teeth after application of fluoridated and fluoride-free bleaching agents, as well as post-bleaching fluoridation treatment, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Thirty-five extracted permanent human teeth were longitudinally cut, yielding 70 specimens. Thirty specimens were randomly divided into the 3 experimental groups, and 20 specimens, were used as (2) control groups, each: negative (untreated) control group; positive control group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide; experimental group 1, bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP); experimental group 2, treatment with a mixture of 10% CP and fluoride; and experimental group 3, treatment with 10% CP and 2% sodium fluoride gel applied 30 minutes after bleaching. Experimental groups were treated 8 h per day for 14 days. The samples were examined by SEM. The bleaching materials tested caused morphological changes to the surface of the CEJ. There was a statistically significant difference between experimental groups (Kruskal Wallis Test chi-square=11,668; p<0.005). Mean value of experimental group 2 scores showed statistically significant difference from groups 1 and 3. Bleaching gel with fluorides does not significantly change morphological appearance of the CEJ and represents a better choice than the hard tissue fluoridation process after bleaching.

  12. Topical fluoride for caries prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyant, Robert J.; Tracy, Sharon L.; Anselmo, Theresa (Tracy); Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D.; Donly, Kevin J.; Frese, William A.; Hujoel, Philippe P.; Iafolla, Timothy; Kohn, William; Kumar, Jayanth; Levy, Steven M.; Tinanoff, Norman; Wright, J. Timothy; Zero, Domenick; Aravamudhan, Krishna; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Meyer, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A panel of experts convened by the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs presents evidence-based clinical recommendations regarding professionally applied and prescription-strength, home-use topical fluoride agents for caries prevention. These recommendations are an update of the 2006 ADA recommendations regarding professionally applied topical fluoride and were developed by using a new process that includes conducting a systematic review of primary studies. Types of Studies Reviewed The authors conducted a search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library for clinical trials of professionally applied and prescription-strength topical fluoride agents—including mouthrinses, varnishes, gels, foams and pastes—with caries increment outcomes published in English through October 2012. Results The panel included 71 trials from 82 articles in its review and assessed the efficacy of various topical fluoride caries-preventive agents. The panel makes recommendations for further research. Practical Implications The panel recommends the following for people at risk of developing dental caries: 2.26 percent fluoride varnish or 1.23 percent fluoride (acidulated phosphate fluoride) gel, or a prescription-strength, home-use 0.5 percent fluoride gel or paste or 0.09 percent fluoride mouthrinse for patients 6 years or older. Only 2.26 percent fluoride varnish is recommended for children younger than 6 years. The strengths of the recommendations for the recommended products varied from “in favor” to “expert opinion for.” As part of the evidence-based approach to care, these clinical recommendations should be integrated with the practitioner's professional judgment and the patient's needs and preferences. PMID:24177407

  13. Urinary Fluoride Concentration in Children with Disabilities Following Long-Term Fluoride Tablet Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Jung-Ren; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Hsiao, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shun-Te; Chen, Hong-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Urine is the most commonly utilized biomarker for fluoride excretion in public health and epidemiological studies. Approximately 30-50% of fluoride is excreted from urine in children. Urinary fluoride excretion reflects the total fluoride intake from multiple sources. After administering fluoride tablets to children with disabilities, urinary…

  14. Profiles of plasma parameters and density of negative hydrogen ions by laser detachment measurements in RF-driven ion sources; Profile der Plasmaparameter und Dichte negativer Wasserstoffionen mittels Laserdetachmentmessungen in HF-angeregten Ionenquellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ-Koch, Sina

    2007-12-20

    This work shows the application of the Laserdetachment method for spatially resolved measurements of negative Hydrogen/Deuterium ion density. It was applied on a high power low pressure RF-driven ion source. The Laser detachment method is based on the measurement of electron currents on a positively biased Langmuir probe before and during/after a laser pulse. The density ratio of negative ions to electrons can be derived from the ratio of currents to the probe. The absolute density of negative ions can be obtained when the electron density is measured with the standard Langmuir probe setup. Measurements with the Langmuir probe additionally yield information about the floating and plasma potential, the electron temperature and the density of positive ions. The Laser detachment setup had to be adapted to the special conditions of the RF-driven source. In particular the existence of RF fields (1 MHz), high source potential (-20 kV), magnetic fields ({proportional_to} 7 mT) and caesium inside the source had to be considered. The density of negative ions could be identified in the range of n(H{sup -})=1.10{sup 17} 1/m{sup 3}, which is in the same order of magnitude as the electron density. Only the application of the Laser detachment method with the Langmuir probe measurements will yield spatially resolved plasma parameters and H- density profiles. The influence of diverse external parameters, such as pressure, RF-power, magnetic fields on the plasma parameters and their profiles were studied and explained. Hence, the measurements lead to a detailed understanding of the processes inside the source. (orig.)

  15. Growth of fluoride treated Kalanchoe pinnata plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, H.N.; Applegate, H.G.

    1962-01-01

    Kalanchoe pinnata plants can absorb fluoride through roots. The absorption is related to the amount of fluoride applied to the soil. There appeared to be a relationship between the amount of fluoride adsorbed and the subsequent growth of the plants. Plants which adsorbed the largest amounts of fluoride had the greatest increase in growth.

  16. Effect of fluoride on oxidative phosphorylation and dehydrogenase systems in higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelace, C.J.

    1966-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the in vitro effect of fluoride on the succinic oxidase system utilizing mitochondria obtained from cauliflower. Methods are described for extracting mitochondria and determining maximum activities and inhibition using various treatments. Experiments were conducted in the absence of fluoride and using various concentrations of phosphate to determine the effect of phosphate alone on the succinic 2.6-dichlorophenolindophenol reductase component of the succinic oxidase system. These studies showed that phosphate had only slight effects on succinic 2.6-dichlorophenolindophenol reductase. An oxidative phosphorylation study was conducted to determine effects of fluoride on phosphorus esterification and oxygen uptake. It was found in general that respiration and phosphorylation were inhibited. The effects of phosphate in the presence of sodium fluoride were studied using various concentrations of phosphate. It was found that the middle range of phosphate concentrations used in these studies inhibited oxidation to a greater degree than at the extremes. An increased oxygen uptake at higher concentrations was observed. In vivo effects of fluoride on TCA cycle dehydrogenase enzymes of Pelargonium zonale were studied using p-nitro-blue-tetrazoleum chloride. Plants were exposed to 17 ppb HF and enzyme activities were compared to control plants. Leaves of control plants were also incubated in 5 X 10/sup -3/ M NaF. Injury observed in both fumigation and solution experiments was similar. Leaf tissue subjected to HF or NaF had less succinic p-nitro-blue-tetrazoleum chloride reductase activity than did the control tissue. Other Kreb's acid dehydrogenases were not inhibited by fluoride concentrations used in these experiments.

  17. Fluoride-induced chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, O; Jouvin, M H; De Vernejoul, M C; Druet, P

    1987-08-01

    Renal fluoride toxicity in human beings is difficult to assess in the literature. Although experimental studies and research on methoxyflurane toxicity have shown frank renal damage, observations of renal insufficiency related to chronic fluoride exposure are scarce. We report a case of fluoride intoxication related to potomania of Vichy water, a highly mineralized water containing 8.5 mg/L of fluoride. Features of fluoride osteosclerosis were prominent and end-stage renal failure was present. The young age of the patient, the long duration of high fluoride intake, and the absence of other cause of renal insufficiency suggest a causal relationship between fluoride intoxication and renal failure.

  18. Validation of ACE-FTS v2.2 measurements of HCl, HF, CCl3F and CCl2F2 using space-, balloon- and ground-based instrument observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Servais

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen chloride (HCl and hydrogen fluoride (HF are respectively the main chlorine and fluorine reservoirs in the Earth's stratosphere. Their buildup resulted from the intensive use of man-made halogenated source gases, in particular CFC-11 (CCl3F and CFC-12 (CCl2F2, during the second half of the 20th century. It is important to continue monitoring the evolution of these source gases and reservoirs, in support of the Montreal Protocol and also indirectly of the Kyoto Protocol. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS is a space-based instrument that has been performing regular solar occultation measurements of over 30 atmospheric gases since early 2004. In this validation paper, the HCl, HF, CFC-11 and CFC-12 version 2.2 profile data products retrieved from ACE-FTS measurements are evaluated. Volume mixing ratio profiles have been compared to observations made from space by MLS and HALOE, and from stratospheric balloons by SPIRALE, FIRS-2 and Mark-IV. Partial columns derived from the ACE-FTS data were also compared to column measurements from ground-based Fourier transform instruments operated at 12 sites. ACE-FTS data recorded from March 2004 to August 2007 have been used for the comparisons. These data are representative of a variety of atmospheric and chemical situations, with sounded air masses extending from the winter vortex to summer sub-tropical conditions. Typically, the ACE-FTS products are available in the 10–50 km altitude range for HCl and HF, and in the 7–20 and 7–25 km ranges for CFC-11 and -12, respectively. For both reservoirs, comparison results indicate an agreement generally better than 5–10% above 20 km altitude, when accounting for the known offset affecting HALOE measurements of HCl and HF. Larger positive differences are however found for comparisons with single profiles from FIRS-2 and SPIRALE. For CFCs, the few coincident measurements available suggest that the differences

  19. Validation of ACE-FTS v2.2 measurements of HCl, HF, CCl3F and CCl2F2 using space-, balloon- and ground-based instrument observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tétard

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen chloride (HCl and hydrogen fluoride (HF are respectively the main chlorine and fluorine reservoirs in the Earth's stratosphere. Their buildup resulted from the intensive use of man-made halogenated source gases, in particular CFC-11 (CCl3F and CFC-12 (CCl2F2, during the second half of the 20th century. It is important to continue monitoring the evolution of these source gases and reservoirs, in support of the Montreal Protocol and also indirectly of the Kyoto Protocol. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS is a space-based instrument that has been performing regular solar occultation measurements of over 30 atmospheric gases since early 2004. In this validation paper, the HCl, HF, CFC-11 and CFC-12 version 2.2 profile data products retrieved from ACE-FTS measurements are evaluated. Volume mixing ratio profiles have been compared to observations made from space by MLS and HALOE, and from stratospheric balloons by SPIRALE, FIRS-2 and Mark-IV. Partial columns derived from the ACE-FTS data were also compared to column measurements from ground-based Fourier transform instruments operated at 12 sites. ACE-FTS data recorded from March 2004 to August 2007 have been used for the comparisons. These data are representative of a variety of atmospheric and chemical situations, with sounded air masses extending from the winter vortex to summer sub-tropical conditions. Typically, the ACE-FTS products are available in the 10–50 km altitude range for HCl and HF, and in the 7–20 and 7–25 km ranges for CFC-11 and CFC-12, respectively. For both reservoirs, comparison results indicate an agreement generally better than 5–10%, when accounting for the known offset affecting HALOE measurements of HCl and HF. Larger positive differences are however found for comparisons with single profiles from FIRS-2 and SPIRALE. For CFCs, the few coincident measurements available suggest that the differences probably remain

  20. Characteristics of fluoride in pore-water at accidental hydrofluoric acid spillage site, Gumi, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, E. H.; Lee, H. A.; Lee, J.; Kim, D.; Lee, S.; Yoon, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    A leakage accident of hydrofluoric acid (HF) occurred in Gumi, South Korea at Sep. 2012. The study site is located in the borderline between a large-scale industrial complex and a rural area. The HF plume was made immediately, and moved toward the rural area through air. After the accident, 212 ha of farm land were influenced and most of crops were withered. To recover the soil, CaO was applied after six months. Although several studies have done to estimate the extension and movement of HF plume in the air and to assess the impact on human health or plant after the incident, the long-term fate of fluoride (F) in the affected soils is not identified clearly. Thus, this study aimed to understand the behavior of F in the soil after HF releasing from accident site through chemical analysis and geochemical modeling. Within the radius of 1 km of accident site, 16 pore-water and soil samples were collected. The semi-quantitative soil composition (i.e., Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Ti), total F, total P, OM contents in soil, and soil pH have already been measured, and pore-water compositions are also identified. From these experimental and modeling data, we could be evaluate if impact of accident exists until now, and also could be select and identify existing form of fluoride in soil and pore-water.

  1. Environmentally friendly HF (DF) lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the birth of Academician A M Prokhorov, this paper reviews the physics of self-sustained volume discharge without preionization—self-initiated volume discharge (SIVD)—in the working mixtures of non-chain hydrofluoride HF (deuterofluoride (DF)) lasers. The dynamics of SIVD in discharge gaps with different geometries is thoroughly described. The mechanisms for the restriction of current density in a diffuse channel in electric discharges in SF6 and SF6 based mixtures (which determines whether SIVD is possible) are proposed and analyzed using simple models. The most probable mechanisms are the electron impact dissociation of SF6 and other mixture components, electron-ion recombination and electron attachment to vibrationally excited SF6 molecules. Starting from a comparative analysis of the rate coefficients of these processes, it is shown that electron-ion recombination is capable of compensating for electron detachment from negative ions via electron impact. It is also established that SIVD is not only observed in SF6, but also in other strongly electronegative gases. The factors that determine the uniformity of the active medium in non-chain HF (DF) lasers are analyzed. Some special features of non-chain HF (DF) lasers with different apertures operating are carefully examined. Consideration is given to the problem of increasing the aperture and discharge volume of non-chain HF (DF) lasers. Based on our experimental results, the possibility of increasing the energy of such lasers to ~1 kJ and above is shown.

  2. Structural, morphological and surface characteristics of two types of octacalcium phosphate-derived fluoride-containing apatitic calcium phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwaku, Y; Anada, T; Yamazaki, H; Honda, Y; Morimoto, S; Sasaki, K; Suzuki, O

    2012-12-01

    Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) has been reported to stimulate bone regeneration during hydrolysis into hydroxyapatite (HA). The present study was designed to characterize structural, morphological and surface properties of fluoride-containing apatitic calcium phosphates (CaP) obtained through OCP hydrolysis or direct precipitation of OCP in the presence of 12-230ppm of fluoride (F). The products were characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) as well as measurements of surface area, solubility, osteoblastic activities and bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption. XRD analysis re-confirmed that both preparations yielded more apatitic CaP with a higher concentration of F. However, the co-precipitated products (CF-CaP) maintained the properties of OCP, in particular the solubility, whereas the hydrolysis products (HF-CaP) had the characteristics of fluoridated apatite. The crystals of plate-like OCP were changed to the crystals of rod-like CF-CaP and small irregular HF-CaP with the advance of the hydrolysis. The SAED analysis detected both OCP and apatite crystals even in the most hydrolyzed CF-CaP. Mouse bone marrow stromal ST-2 cells grew better on CF-CaP compared with HF-CaP. BSA adsorption was inhibited on HF-CaP more than on CF-CaP. These results show that OCP produces physicochemically distinct apatitic fluoridated CaP during hydrolysis, regarding the structure, the crystal morphology and the protein adsorption, depending on the fluoride introduction route, which provides biologically interesting material. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Portland Water Fluoridation: A Newspaper Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Allison; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Lewis, Patricia Ryan

    2017-03-01

    Portland, Oregon is the largest city in the United States without community water fluoridation (CWF). A newspaper analysis was conducted of the failed 2013 CWF campaign to evaluate anti-fluoridation and pro-fluoridation messaging provided by newspapers during the campaign. News content was categorized by type and slant (pro-fluoridation, anti-fluoridation, or neutral) and 34 variables were tabulated (23 anti-fluoridation, 11 pro-fluoridation). Results showed overall messaging was slightly pro-fluoridation, as compared to anti-fluoridation or neutral content (35%, 32%, and 33% respectively). Editorial content was 85% pro-fluoridation and 15% anti-fluoridation. The most frequent anti-fluoridation variables were alternatives to water fluoridation, mass/forced medication and concerns about the political process. Conversely, tooth decay and social justice were the most commonly cited pro-fluoridation variables. Newspapers can be influential in shaping public policy opinions in the fight for community water fluoridation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Estimated Fluoride Doses from Toothpastes Should be Based on Total Soluble Fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Cury,Jaime A.; Saul M Paiva; Tenuta,Livia M.A; Oliveira,Maria José L.; Martins, Carolina C.

    2013-01-01

    The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF) rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride-TSF) in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80) or children's toothpaste (n = 78)). The esti...

  5. Reuse of nuclear byproducts, NaF and HF in metal glass industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.W.; Lee, H.W. [Korea Power Engineering Co., Inc., Kyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, S.H.; Moon, H.S.; Cho, N.C. [Korea Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd., Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-02-01

    A study has been performed to evaluate the radiological safety and feasibility associated with reuse of NaF(Sodium Fluoride) and HF(Hydrofluoric Acid) which are generated as byproducts from the nuclear fuel fabrication process. The investigation of oversea`s experience reveals that the byproduct materials are most often used in the metal and glass industries. For the radiological safety evaluation, the uranium radioactivities in the byproduct materials were examined and shown to be less than radioactivities in natural materials. The radiation doses to plant personnel and the general public were assessed to be very small and could be ignored. The Korea nuclear regulatory body permits the reuse of NaF in the metal industry on the basis of associated radioactivity being {open_quote}below regulatory concern{close_quote}. HF is now under review for reuse acceptability in the steel and glass industries.

  6. Structural characteristics of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bifluoride: HF-deficient form of a highly conductive room temperature molten salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Hagiwara, Rika; Ito, Yasuhiko; Tamada, Osamu

    2002-01-01

    EMIF·HF, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bifluoride, has been obtained by eliminating HF from a room temperature molten salt EMIF·2.3HF at around 400 K. EMIF·HF crystallizes in space group P2 1/m with a=7.281(1) Å, b=6.762(1) Å, c=8.403(1) Å, β=107.26(1)°, V=395.09(18) Å 3, Z=2 at room temperature. The cations are stacked in pillars via the hydrogen bonding between the C4 proton and the ring π-electrons of the adjacent cation. The cations and the anions coupled by strong hydrogen bondings are co-planar.

  7. Corrosion action and passivation mechanism of magnesium alloy in fluoride solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian-zhong; HUANG Jiu-gui; TIAN Yan-wen; LIU Chang-sheng

    2009-01-01

    Corrosion action and passive mechanism of magnesium alloy in the fluoride solution were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy(SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy(EDS), and electrochemistry methods. The results show that an insoluble MgF2 film is generated on the surface of magnesium alloy activated in the hydrofluoric acid. And the mass of the deposited MgF2 film may reach a constant value, when the mass ratio of Mg/F on the magnesium alloy surface is fixed at 11.3-1. The activated magnesium alloy gains a 'passivation state' in a mixture of sulfuric acid and hydrofluoric acid at a volume ratio of less than 1.2. At the same time the mass of magnesium alloy is maintained as a function of the time. When the ratio is above 1.4, the mass of magnesium alloy rapidly decreases. The passive film formed through adsorption of HF2- (or H2F3-, H3F4-) ions by the deposited MgF2 film can protect the magnesium alloy from corrosion in fluoride solution, but not in non-fluoride solutions. The passive state is maintained for activated magnesium alloy in an acidic sulfuric nickel solution with added fluoride. If fluoride and carbonate are added to the acidic sulfuric nickel solution, a replacement reaction between magnesium alloy and solution takes place.

  8. An in vitro assessment of fluoride uptake by tooth enamel from four different fluoride dentifrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, V H; Anegundi, R T

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fluoride uptake by tooth enamel with four different fluoride dentifrices. Sixty human premolars extracted for orthodontic purpose were selected for the study. The teeth were covered with nail varnish leaving a window of 4 × 4 mm on the enamel surface of the buccal and lingual sides. The teeth were demineralised and were divided into four groups with 15 teeth in each group. The buccal window served as experimental and the lingual as control. The teeth were immersed in toothpaste slurry containing: sodium fluoride (Group A); sodium monofluorophosphate (Group B); stannous fluoride (Group C) and amine fluoride (Group D). The fluoride content in the etched superficial enamel layer in the windows was analysed using a fluoride ion-specific electrode. Within the parameters of this study, the uptake of fluoride was statistically significant in Group D (p fluoride by tooth enamel in an increasing order was Group A fluoride had the highest fluoride uptake.

  9. Ultrastructural changes in the cemento-enamel junction after vital tooth bleaching with fluoride and fluoride-free agents – a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasic, Jovanka; Kesic, Ljiljana; Popovic, Jelena; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolic, Marija; Stankovic, Sasa; Barac, Radomir

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The impact of bleaching on the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) is not well known. Due to frequent sensitivity of the cervical region of teeth after the vital bleaching, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the morphological features of the CEJ of human teeth after application of fluoridated and fluoride-free bleaching agents, as well as post-bleaching fluoridation treatment, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Material/Methods Thirty-five extracted permanent human teeth were longitudinally cut, yielding 70 specimens. Thirty specimens were randomly divided into the 3 experimental groups, and 20 specimens, were used as (2) control groups, each: negative (untreated) control group; positive control group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide; experimental group 1, bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP); experimental group 2, treatment with a mixture of 10% CP and fluoride; and experimental group 3, treatment with 10% CP and 2% sodium fluoride gel applied 30 minutes after bleaching. Experimental groups were treated 8 h per day for 14 days. The samples were examined by SEM. Results The bleaching materials tested caused morphological changes to the surface of the CEJ. There was a statistically significant difference between experimental groups (Kruskal Wallis Test chi-square=11,668; pfluorides does not significantly change morphological appearance of the CEJ and represents a better choice than the hard tissue fluoridation process after bleaching. PMID:22367139

  10. A thirty second isomer in Hf-171

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, P; Billowes, J; Cochrane, ECA; Cooke, JL; Cooper, TG; Dendooven, P; Evans, DE; Grant, IS; Griffith, JAR; Honkanen, A; Huhta, M; Oinonen, M; Pearson, MR; Penttila, H; Persson, B.L.; Richardson, DS; Tungate, G; Wheeler, PD; Zybert, L; Aysto, J

    1997-01-01

    An isomer has been detected in Hf-171 with a half-life of T-1/2 = 29.5(9) s. The state was populated in the Yb-170(alpha,3n)Hf-171m reaction at a beam energy of E-alpha = 50 MeV in an on-line ion guide isotope separator. The isomeric Hf-17lm(+) beam was extracted from the ion guide, mass-analysed an

  11. FLUORIDE TOXICITY – A HARSH REALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandlapalli Pavani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available There are many incidents of fluoride toxicity whether it is acute or chronic. Fluoride toxicity is an environmental hazard which arises from the upper layers of geological crust and is dissolved in water. Prolonged drinking of such water causes chronic fluoride toxicity. Use of fluoride containing compounds for various purposes such as dental products, metal, glass, refrigerator and chemical industries act as a source of fluoride poisoning and increase the risk of toxicity. This review reflects the deleterious effects of fluorides on various organs in the physiological system.

  12. Taurine Ameliorates Renal Oxidative Damage and Thyroid Dysfunction in Rats Chronically Exposed to Fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedara, Isaac A; Ojuade, Temini Jesu D; Olabiyi, Bolanle F; Idris, Umar F; Onibiyo, Esther M; Ajeigbe, Olufunke F; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2017-02-01

    Excessive exposure to fluoride poses several detrimental effects to human health particularly the kidney which is a major organ involved in its elimination from the body. The influence of taurine on fluoride-induced renal toxicity was investigated in a co-exposure paradigm for 45 days using five groups of eight rats each. Group I rats received normal drinking water alone, group II rats were exposed to sodium fluoride (NaF) in drinking water at 15 mg/L alone, group III received taurine alone at a dose of 200 mg/kg group IV rats were co-administered with NaF and taurine (100 mg/kg), while group V rats were co-administered with NaF and taurine (200 mg/kg). Administration of taurine significantly reversed the fluoride-mediated decrease in absolute weight and organo-somatic index of the kidney in the exposed rats. Taurine significantly prevented fluoride-induced elevation in plasma urea and creatinine levels in the exposed rats. Moreover, taurine restored fluoride-mediated decrease in the circulatory concentrations of triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and the ratio of triiodothyronine to thyroxine. Taurine ameliorated fluoride-mediated decrease in renal antioxidant status by significantly enhancing the antioxidant enzyme activities as well as glutathione level in the exposed rats. Additionally, taurine inhibited fluoride-induced renal oxidative damage by markedly decreasing the hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde levels as well as improved the kidney architecture in the treated rats. Collectively, taurine protected against fluoride-induced renal toxicity via enhancement of thyroid gland function, renal antioxidant status, and histology in rats.

  13. Fluoride bioavailability in saliva and plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Different fluoride formulations may have different effects on caries prevention. It was the aim of this clinical study to assess the fluoride content, provided by NaF compared to amine fluoride, in saliva and plaque. Methods Eight trained volunteers brushed their teeth in the morning for 3 minutes with either NaF or amine fluoride, and saliva and 3-day-plaque-regrowth was collected at 5 time intervals during 6 hours after tooth brushing. The amount of collected saliva and plaque was measured, and the fluoride content was analysed using a fluoride sensitive electrode. All subjects repeated all study cycles 5 times, and 3 cycles per subject underwent statistical analysis using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results Immediately after brushing the fluoride concentration in saliva increased rapidly and dropped to the baseline level after 360 minutes. No difference was found between NaF and amine fluoride. All plaque fluoride levels were elevated after 30 minutes until 120 minutes after tooth brushing, and decreasing after 360 minutes to baseline. According to the highly individual profile of fluoride in saliva and plaque, both levels of bioavailability correlated for the first 30 minutes, and the fluoride content of saliva and plaque was back to baseline after 6 hours. Conclusions Fluoride levels in saliva and plaque are interindividually highly variable. However, no significant difference in bioavailability between NaF and amine fluoride, in saliva, or in plaque was found. PMID:22230722

  14. Studies of fluoride varnishes in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppä, L

    1991-01-01

    Despite the artificial fluoridation of drinking water in Kuopio, part of the children have high caries incidence. We therefore started our studies on fluoride varnishes in 1977 in an attempt to find a feasible means of applying fluoride topically in children at high risk of caries. In our first trial, the sodium fluoride varnish Duraphat was found to be effective in preventing caries, but the effectiveness of the silane fluoride varnish Fluor Protector could not be unequivocally established, despite the fact that Fluor Protector deposited markedly more fluoride in enamel than Duraphat. In a second study in children in a low-fluoride area, use of Duraphat was found to be more effective than fortnightly fluoride rinses or Fluor Protector. Increasing the frequency of application from two to four times a year did not increase the effectiveness of Duraphat even in highly caries-prone children in a 2-year trial. On the basis of peak values of fluoride in parotid saliva after application, use of either fluoride varnishes was considered safe. Although the fluoride content of the enamel remained elevated for at least two years after discontinuation of treatment with both varnishes, the caries preventive effect did not continue after the applications were stopped. This shows that increasing the fluoride content of enamel is not the main mechanism by which fluoride varnishes prevent caries, and that the applications need to be continued as long as caries is a problem.

  15. Methods of using ionic liquids having a fluoride anion as solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoria, Philip; Maiti, Amitesh; Gash, Alexander; Han, Thomas Yong; Orme, Christine; Fried, Laurence

    2011-12-06

    A method in one embodiment includes contacting a strongly hydrogen bonded organic material with an ionic liquid having a fluoride anion for solubilizing the strongly hydrogen bonded organic material; and maintaining the ionic liquid at a temperature of about 90.degree. C. or less during the contacting. A method in another embodiment includes contacting a strongly hydrogen bonded organic material with an ionic liquid having an acetate or formate anion for solubilizing the strongly hydrogen bonded organic material; and maintaining the ionic liquid at a temperature of less than about 90.degree. C. during the contacting.

  16. Chronic Fluoride Toxicity: Dental Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DenBesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2–3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface; with more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix/mineral interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the doserelated decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffleended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As

  17. Chronic fluoride toxicity: dental fluorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denbesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2-3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface. With more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the dose-related decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffle-ended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As further

  18. The study of multilayers Fe/Hf and Ni/Hf by slow positron beam technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Mutsumi; Nakajyo, Terunobu; Murashige, Yusuke; Koizumi, Tomoya; Kanazawa, Ikuzo; Komori, Fumio; Soe, We-Hyo; Yamamoto, Ryoichi; Ito, Yasuo

    1997-05-01

    The S-parameters versus the incident positron energy are measured in the Ni/Hf multilayer, thin Hf film, thin Fe film and the bilayer Fe/Hf. We have analyzed the change in vacancy-type defects in these multilayers and thin films with the deposition temperature in the MBE system.

  19. Dynamics of Fluoride Bioavailability in the Biofilms of Different Oral Surfaces after Amine Fluoride and Sodium Fluoride Application

    OpenAIRE

    Ella A. Naumova; Christoph Dickten; Rico Jung; Florian Krauss; Henrik Rübesamen; Katharina Schmütsch; Tudor Sandulescu; Stefan Zimmer; Wolfgang H. Arnold

    2016-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate differences in fluoride bioavailability in different oral areas after the application of amine fluoride (AmF) and sodium fluoride (NaF). The null hypothesis suggested no differences in the fluoride bioavailability. The tongue coating was removed and biofilm samples from the palate, oral floor and cheeks were collected. All subjects brushed their teeth with toothpaste containing AmF or NaF. Specimens were collected before, as well as immediately afte...

  20. Fluoride level in saliva after bonding orthodontic brackets with a fluoride containing adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogaard, B; Arends, J; Helseth, H; Dijkman, G; vanderKuijl, M

    1997-01-01

    The fluoride level in saliva is considered an important parameter in caries prevention. Elevation of the salivary fluoride level by a fluoride-releasing orthodontic bonding adhesive would most likely be beneficial in the prevention of enamel caries. In this study, the fluoride level in saliva was me

  1. Fluoride level in saliva after bonding orthodontic brackets with a fluoride containing adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogaard, B; Arends, J; Helseth, H; Dijkman, G; vanderKuijl, M

    The fluoride level in saliva is considered an important parameter in caries prevention. Elevation of the salivary fluoride level by a fluoride-releasing orthodontic bonding adhesive would most likely be beneficial in the prevention of enamel caries. In this study, the fluoride level in saliva was

  2. Water Fluoridation Reporting System (Public Water Systems)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Water Fluoridation Reporting System (WFRS) has been developed to provide tools to assist states in managing fluoridation programs. WFRS is designed to track all...

  3. Removal of fluoride from aqueous phase by biosorption onto algal biosorbent Spirogyra sp.-IO2: Sorption mechanism elucidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkata Mohan, S. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500007 (India)]. E-mail: vmohan_s@yahoo.com; Ramanaiah, S.V. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500007 (India); Rajkumar, B. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500007 (India); Sarma, P.N. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500007 (India)]. E-mail: sarma1950@yahoo.com

    2007-03-22

    This communication presents results pertaining to the adsorptive studies carried out on fluoride removal onto algal biosorbent (Spirogyra IO2). Batch sorption studies were performed and the results revealed that biosorbent demonstrated ability to adsorb the fluoride. Influence of varying the conditions for removal of fluoride, such as the fluoride concentration, the pH of aqueous solution, the dosage of adsorbent, the temperature on removal of fluoride, and the adsorption-desorption studies were investigated. Sorption interaction of fluoride on to algal species obeyed the pseudo first order rate equation. Experimental data showed good fit with the Langmuir's adsorption isotherm model. Fluoride sorption was found to be dependent on the aqueous phase pH and the uptake was observed to be greater at lower pH. Maximum fluoride sorption was observed at operating 30 deg. C operating temperature. Adsorption-desorption of fluoride into inorganic solutions and distilled water was observed and this indicated the combined effect of ion exchange and physical sorption phenomena. Significant changes in the FT-IR spectra was observed after fluoride sorption which is indicative of the participation of surface function groups associated with hydrogen atoms in the carboxylic groups in sorption interaction. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis a marginal increase in the area for the binding energy peak at 287.4 eV was observed which could be due to the formation of -C-F- bonds. Thermogravimetric (TGA) analysis of the fluoride loaded sorbent showed that the biosorbent underwent three steps decomposition process when heated from 25 to 100 deg. C. The maximum weight loss was observed to be between 200 and 400 deg. C and 700 and 800 deg. C.

  4. Fluoridation and oxidation behavior of JLF-1 and NIFS-HEAT-2 low activation structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, T.; Muroga, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science - NIFS, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Kondo, M. [Fusion Engineering Research Center, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Nishimura, H. [Tokyo Univ., Graduate School of Engineering, Nuclear Pressional School, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Noda, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Corrosion of structural materials, such as JLF-1 (Fe-9Cr-2W-0.1C-V-Ta) and NIFSHEAT- 2 (V-4Cr-4Ti), is paid attention most in Flibe (LiF-BeF{sub 2}) blanket development. In a previous corrosion study on steels, only oxides were identified as corrosion products after a conventional Flibe exposure test, while fluorides were indicated in another report with high purity Flibe after dehydration treatment. In order to clarify the corrosion mechanism in Flibe, it is essential to understand the competitive process by fluoridation and oxidation. Purpose of the present study is to characterize corrosion products of the low activation materials after fluoridation, oxidation and Flibe exposure tests, and to evaluate corrosion resistance of the materials in various conditions. JLF-1 JOYO-II heat and NIFS-HEAT-2 were machined and polished into specimens with 1 x 10 x 20 mm or 1 x 10 x 15 mm in size. The same size specimens of pure Fe, Cr, W, V and Ti were also prepared. The specimens were exposed to HF-H{sub 2}O solution at room temperature, and to flowing He-HF-O{sub 2} gas mixture and static molten salt Flibe at 673-873 K. High purity HF gas was made by a reaction between NiF{sub 2} and dehydrated He-H{sub 2} gas mixture. Flibe was dehydrated by HF gas bubbling treatment. After the exposure tests, weight change was measured. Corrosion products and microstructural change at the surface were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). In a XRD spectrum of JLF-1 after Flibe exposure at 823 K for 2003 hr, some peaks considered as FeF{sub 2} and CrF{sub 2} were observed, however their intensity was not enough to identify the compounds. The morphology and composition of the corrosion products were analyzed by SEM and compared with the one made in accelerated fluoridation tests with various composition of He-HF-O{sub 2} gas mixture. (authors)

  5. Fluoridering af drikkevandet i Danmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Spliid, Henrik; Bruvo, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Første gang sammenhængen mellem caries (huller i tænderne) og fluoridindholdet i drikkevand blev diskuteret i vandværkskredse i Danmark var ved årsmødet i 1958. Her blev det oplyst, at fluorid i drikkevand beskytter mod caries, men man konstaterede også, at der nok ikke var stemning for fluorid......-tilsætning til drikkevandet (fluoridering). Siden da er emnet ikke taget op. Formålet med dette indlæg er at besvare spørgsmålene: 1. Er der behov for fluoridering af drikkevandet i Danmark? 2. Er der alternativer? Hvordan påvirker blødgøring af vand og andre vandbehandlingsmetoder dental caries hos børn og unge......? Som baggrund herfor vil vi redegøre for resultaterne af et netop afsluttet studium af sammenhængen mellem caries og drikkevandets sammensætning, specielt m.h.t. luoridindholdet og vandets calciumindhold (hårdhed). Undersøgelsen bekræfter, at fluorid i drikkevand i væsentlig grad beskytter mod caries...

  6. HF radiation emitted by chaotic leader processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, J. S.; Edirisinghe, M.; Fernando, M.; Montaño, R.; Cooray, V.

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents direct measurements of narrowband 10 MHz HF radiation from so-called “chaotic leaders” associated with subsequent return strokes. Although the term is controversial and poorly defined, we find that more than 30% of subsequent strokes in close lightning flashes contain electric field characteristics that are best described as “chaotic”. In earlier studies, return strokes have consistently been observed to be the strongest sources of HF radiation, but the results for leader processes are less consistent. We also observe return strokes to be the main HF emitter, and the leaders before the first return stroke in a flash sequence also emit HF though somewhat less intensely. The leaders preceding subsequent strokes typically emit little or no HF radiation, whether they are dart or dart-stepped leaders. However, it was observed that the presence of a chaotic component increases the leader HF intensity dramatically Defining the HF intensity unequivocally can be problematic for processes like chaotic leaders which have a combination of continuous and impulsive phenomena. Two time-domain methods were used to measure the HF intensity, the peak energy and the RMS energy. In the frequency domain these correspond to the energy spectral density (ESD) and power spectral density (PSD), respectively. It was found that the methods are not necessarily compatible. Thus, it is suggested that to clarify future work, leader processes should be characterized by the PSD rather than the ESD.

  7. The Effect of Fluoride in Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, L. R.; Gallagher, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of fluoride on bone tissue and the possible role of fluoride in the treatment of osteoporosis. At present, fluoride treatment should be restricted to clinical trials until its risks and benefits have been further evaluated. (Author/MT)

  8. Fluoride in African groundwater: Occurrence and mitigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasak, S.; Griffioen, J.; Feenstra, L.

    2010-01-01

    Fluoride in groundwater has both natural and anthropogenic sources. Fluoride bearing minerals, volcanic gases and various industrial and agricultural activities can contribute to high concentrations. High intake of fluoride from drinking water is the main cause of fluorosis and may lead to many othe

  9. HfS, Hyperfine Structure Fitting Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Estalella, Robert

    2016-01-01

    HfS is a tool to fit the hyperfine structure of spectral lines, with multiple velocity components. The HfS_nh3 procedures included in HfS fit simultaneously the hyperfine structure of the NH$_3$ (J,K)= (1,1) and (2,2) transitions, and perform a standard analysis to derive $T_\\mathrm{ex}$, NH$_3$ column density, $T_\\mathrm{rot}$, and $T_\\mathrm{k}$. HfS uses a Monte Carlo approach for fitting the line parameters. Especial attention is paid to the derivation of the parameter uncertainties. HfS includes procedures that make use of parallel computing for fitting spectra from a data cube.

  10. Fluoride: its role in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Maria Andaló Tenuta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of decades of research on fluoride and the recognition of its role as the cornerstone of dental caries reduction in the last fifty years, questions still arise on its use at community, self-applied and professional application levels. Which method of fluoride delivery should be used? How and when should it be used? How can its benefits be maximized and still reduce the risks associated with its use? These are only some of the challenging questions facing us daily. The aim of this paper is to present scientific background to understand the importance of each method of fluoride use considering the current caries epidemiological scenario, and to discuss how individual or combined methods can be used based on the best evidence available.

  11. Molten fluorides for nuclear applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie. Delpech

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of pyrochemistry is being increasingly acknowledged and becomes unavoidable in the nuclear field. Molten salts may be used for fuel processing and spent fuel recycling, for heat transfer, as a homogeneous fuel and as a breeder material in fusion systems. Fluorides that are stable at high temperature and under high neutron flux are especially promising. Analysis of several field cases reveals that corrosion in molten fluorides is essentially due to the oxidation of metals by uranium fluoride and/or oxidizing impurities. The thermodynamics of this process are discussed with an emphasis on understanding the mass transfer in the systems, selecting appropriate metallic materials and designing effective purification methods.

  12. Microcratering in Polyvinylidene Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Anthony John

    Dust is defined as macroparticles as small as a few molecules up to several micrometers in diameter. In the context of space exploration, it was originally seen only as a technical obstacle to applications; dust can damage instrument surfaces, coat mating surfaces preventing proper seals, and impair or obstruct measurements. Because of the ubiquity of dust in the solar system and its role in the origin of planets and other bodies, the study of dust and related phenomena has evolved to a scientific subdiscipline which can provide us insight into the origins and evolution of our solar system. In order to facilitate this, a hypervelocity dust accelerator has been built at the University of Colorado at Boulder and is being used to probe impact phenomena, dust mitigation techniques, dust detection techniques, and more. One such dust detector is a Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) dust detector. The PVDF dust detector is very lightweight and consumes little power. Due to these properties, PVDF detectors can potentially be used on any spacecraft to gain information on the local dust environment. It is not fully understood how this PVDF dust detector signal is generated, so at present can only be used as a dust counter. In this thesis I discuss the importance of the study of dust phenomena, describe the accelerator experiment, and describe a study conducted to determine the underlying physical principles of PVDF dust detectors. This included measuring crater size scaling laws, measuring the detailed shape of craters, and applying this data to simulations of the signals being generated by PVDF detectors.

  13. High-fluoride groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N Subba

    2011-05-01

    Fluoride (F(-)) is essential for normal bone growth, but its higher concentration in the drinking water poses great health problems and fluorosis is common in many parts of India. The present paper deals with the aim of establishment of facts of the chemical characteristics responsible for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater, after understanding the chemical behavior of F(-) in relation to pH, total alkalinity (TA), total hardness (TH), carbonate hardness (CH), non-carbonate hardness (NCH), and excess alkalinity (EA) in the groundwater observed from the known areas of endemic fluorosis zones of Andhra Pradesh that have abundant sources of F(-)-bearing minerals of the Precambrians. The chemical data of the groundwater shows that the pH increases with increase F(-); the concentration of TH is more than the concentration of TA at low F(-) groundwater, the resulting water is represented by NCH; the TH has less concentration compared to TA at high F(-) groundwater, causing the water that is characterized by EA; and the water of both low and high concentrations of F(-) has CH. As a result, the F(-) has a positive relation with pH and TA, and a negative relation with TH. The operating mechanism derived from these observations is that the F(-) is released from the source into the groundwater by geochemical reactions and that the groundwater in its flowpath is subjected to evapotranspiration due to the influence of dry climate, which accelerates a precipitation of CaCO(3) and a reduction of TH, and thereby a dissolution of F(-). Furthermore, the EA in the water activates the alkalinity in the areas of alkaline soils, leading to enrichment of F(-). Therefore, the alkaline condition, with high pH and EA, and low TH, is a more conducive environment for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater.

  14. Effect of pH and fluoride on behavior of dental ZrO{sub 2} ceramics in artificial saliva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukaeda, L.E.; Robin, A.; Santos, C.; Taguchi, S.P.; Borges Junior, L.A., E-mail: luizamukaeda@gmail.com, E-mail: alain@demar.eel.usp.br, E-mail: claudinei@demar.eel.usp.br, E-mail: simone@demar.eel.usp.br, E-mail: borges.jr@itelefonica.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EEL/DEMAR/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Machado, J.P.B., E-mail: joaopaulo@las.inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    A considerable increase in the ceramic products demand occurred due to the evolution of dental restoration techniques and these materials must resist to the complex mouth environment. The pH of saliva can decrease significantly due to the ingestion of acidic foods and beverages and mainly due to reactions occurring during bacteria metabolism that lead to the formation of organic acids. Fluorides are also present in the mouth since fluorides are usually added in drinking water, mouth washes, tooth pastes and gels for the prevention of plaque and caries formation. The combination of low pH and presence of fluorides can lead to the formation of HF and HF{sub 2}{sup -} which are detrimental to metallic and probably to ceramic devices. In this work, commercial blocks of ZrO{sub 2} ceramics (ProtMat Materiais Avancados® and Ivoclar®) were immersed in Fusayama artificial saliva of different pHs and fluoride concentrations. The properties of the as-produced ceramics (crystalline phases (XRD), microstructure (SEM), roughness (3D surface topography AFM) and mechanical resistance - Vickers hardness (Hv) and fracture toughness (KIC) were evaluated. Some of these properties were also determined after the immersion tests as well as the mass variation of the samples in order to evaluate the resistance of these ZrO{sub 2} ceramics to degradation under these conditions. (author)

  15. Fluoride and lead adsorption on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuguang; LI Yanhui

    2004-01-01

    The properties and applications of CNT have been studied extensively since Iijima discovered them in 1991[1,2]. They have exceptional mechanical properties and unique electrical property, highly chemical stability and large specific surface area. Thus far, they have widely potential applications in many fields. They can be used as reinforcing materials in composites[3], field emissions[4], hydrogen storage[5], nanoelectronic components[6], catalyst supports[7], adsorption material and so on. However, the study on the potential application of CNT, environmental protection field in particular, was hardly begun.Long[8] et al. reported that CNT had a significantly higher dioxin removal efficiency than that of activated carbon. The Langmuir adsorption constant is 2.7 × 1052, 1.3 × 1018 respectively. The results indicated that CNT is potential candidate for the removal of micro-organic pollutants. However, the reports on the CNT used as fluoride and heavy metal adsorbent are seldom.In this paper, A novel material, alumina supported on carbon nanotubes (Al2O3/CNT), was prepared from carbon nanotubes and Al(NO3)3. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra demonstrate that alumina is amorphous, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that CNT and alumina are homogeneously mixed. Furthermore, the fluoride adsorption behavior on the surface of Al2O3/CNT has been investigated and compared with other adsorbents. The results indicate that Al2O3/CNT has a high adsorption capacity, with a saturation adsorption capacity of 39.4 mg/g. It is also found that the adsorption capacity of Al2O3/CNT is 3.0~4.5 times that of γ-Al2O3while almost equal to that of IRA-410 polymeric resin at 25 ℃. The adsorption isotherms of fluoride on Al2O3/CNT is fit the Freundlich equation well, optimal pH ranging from 5.0 to 9.0.Also in this paper, a novel material, modified carbon nanotubes (CNT), was prepared from carbon nanotubes and HNO3 under boiling condition. Infrared spectroscopy (IR

  16. An infrared study of thin-film formation on Si and Ge surfaces treated with aqueous NH4F and HF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yota, J.; Burrows, V. A.

    1991-05-01

    The surface chemistry of Si and Ge after treatment with hydrofluoric acid buffered with ammonium fluoride (BHF) was studied using surface infrared spectroscopy. For each of these materials, the BHF not only dissolved the native oxide, but also deposited a thin inorganic film comprised of ammonium salts (NH4F and NH4F.HF). Through one or more complex reactions with the substrate, these salts slowly disappear as the thermodynamically very stable hexafluorometallate compounds [(NH4)2SiF6 and (NH4)2GeF6] form. The NH4F.HF disappearance correlates directly with the hexafluorometallate formation. Though the original fluoride and bifluoride salts are quite soluble in alcohols as well as in aqueous solutions, the hexafluorometallates are completely insoluble in alcohols, and can only be removed by thorough water rinse.

  17. Aspects of HF radio propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Saillant

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    radio systems. From the point of view Working Group 2 of the COST 296 Action, interest lies with effects associated

    with propagation via the ionosphere of signals within the HF band. Several aspects are covered in this paper:

    a The directions of arrival and times of flight of signals received over a path oriented along the trough have

    been examined and several types of propagation effects identified. Of particular note, combining the HF observations

    with satellite measurements has identified the presence of irregularities within the floor of the trough that

    result in propagation displaced from the great circle direction. An understanding of the propagation effects that

    result in deviations of the signal path from the great circle direction are of particular relevance to the operation

    of HF radiolocation systems.

    b Inclusion of the results from the above mentioned measurements into a propagation model of the northerly

    ionosphere (i.e. those regions of the ionosphere located poleward of, and including, the mid-latitude trough

    and the use of this model to predict the coverage expected from transmitters where the signals impinge on the

    northerly ionosphere

  18. Uptake of fluoride by human surface enamel from ammonium bifluoride and consequent reduction in the penetration in vitro by caries-like lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, J E; Poole, D F

    1984-01-01

    In-vitro fluoride uptake by mid-coronal, premolar enamel surfaces from topically-applied solutions of NH4HF2 was determined using a multi-electrode system for fluoride and calcium analyses. In tooth surfaces dehydrated with 100 per cent ethanol before the topical application of 1 per cent aqueous NH4HF2, there was a 2-3-fold increase in fluoride concentration up to a depth of 50 microns and fluoride enhancement to a total depth of 100 microns into the enamel. Caries-like lesions were induced in vitro in both treated and untreated enamel by the use of acidified, 6 per cent hydroxymethyl-cellulose gel containing 0.04 per cent hydroxyapatite at pH 4.5. After 120 days exposure, the mean depth of lesion penetration in the controls was 149 (+/- 34) microns. No lesions occurred in half the treated specimens; in specimens with lesions, the mean depth of penetration was 19 (+/- 3) microns. Thus, NH4HF2 was a potent inhibitor of caries-like lesion formation in vitro.

  19. Chemical isolation of dubnium (element 105) in fluoride media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trubert, D.; Naour, C. le; Hussonnois, M.; Brillard, L.; Du, J.F. le [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire Radiochimie; Guzman, F.M. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Constantinescu, O. [JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation). Flerov Lab. of Nuclear Reactions; Gasparro, J.; Barci, V.; Weiss, B.; Ardisson, G. [Nice Univ. (France). Lab. de Radiochimie

    2002-07-01

    The isotope {sup 262}Db was produced by irradiation of a {sup 248}Cm target with 106-MeV {sup 19}F ions at the 15 MV MP Tandem accelerator of Orsay (France). The reaction products were continuously and rapidly transported with a KCl aerosol helium jet system to the chemistry setup. They were dissolved in HF medium and the solution was passed through three successive ion exchange columns, allowing a continuous high level purification of Db from actinides on a first cation exchange column, the isolation of Db on an anion exchange one, and the retention of the long-lived decay products of {sup 262}Db (3.24 h-{sup 254}Fm) on a second cation exchange column. Just after the end of irradiation, the decay products were desorbed from this column, purified and {alpha}-sources were prepared on carbon foil by electrospray. In 13 effective irradiation hours, 22 events corresponding to the {alpha}-decay of {sup 254}Fm were recorded. Almost 70 atoms of {sup 262}Db, produced in the reaction {sup 248}Cm + {sup 19}F were isolated in dilute HF medium. Like its homologues/analogues Nb, Ta and Pa, dubnium forms, with fluoride ions, negatively charged complexes which are strongly retained on anion exchanger. (orig.)

  20. Gas chromatographic determination of volatile sulfur fluorides in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezkin, V.G.; Drugov, Yu.S.

    1984-07-01

    An analytical method was developed for the determination of toxic products from thermooxidative destruction of sulfur hexafluoride (650-850/sup 0/C) found in the surrounding air of the work zone in production of high quality magnesium alloys. Sulfur hexafluoride (0.6-1.2%) and carbon dioxide (3-6%) are used as the protective atmosphere. The method involved preliminary concentration of lower sulfur fluorides in a cold trap filled with porapak Q followed with thermodesorption of concentrated impurities and their determination using a flame-photometric detector. The sensitivity of this method was 0.01 mg/m/sup 3/ and relative standard deviation 0.22-0.26. It was shown that when the temperature of the alloy increased from 720 to 800/sup 0/C, the content of HF over it increased from 6.7 to 15.5 mg/m/sup 3/. When zirconium alloy was introduced into this product, the concentration of HF above it reached the level of 52 mg/m/sup 3/, showing that it catalyzed the CF/sub 6/ thermodestruction process. 15 references, 2 figures.

  1. The role of fluoride in erosion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Young, Alix; Ganss, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The role of fluoride in erosion therapy has long been questioned. However, recent research has yielded positive results. In this chapter, an overview of the literature is provided regarding the application of fluorides in the prevention and treatment of erosion and erosive wear. The results are presented and discussed for different fluoride sources such as monovalent and polyvalent fluorides, and for different vehicles such as toothpastes, solutions and rinses, as well as varnishes and gels. It is concluded that fluoride applications are very likely to be of use in the preventive treatment of erosive wear. Most promising are high-concentration, acidic formulations and the polyvalent fluoride sources, with the best evidence available for stannous fluoride. However, the evidence base for clinical effectiveness is still small. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Comparison of salivary fluoride levels following use of dentifrices containing different concentrations of fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagpal D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Many industrialized countries have reported a decline in caries prevalence over the past few decades. These reductions have been related to the regular use of fluoride dentifrices. Fluoride dentifrices are the most cost-effective and efficient means of caries prevention. However, there have been concerns regarding the risk of fluorosis in children due to the ingestion of dentifrices. This has led to the use of dentifrices with low concentration of fluoride. Salivary fluoride levels after tooth-brushing have been shown to be related to the anticaries efficacy of fluoride dentifrices. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the concentration of fluoride in the dentifrice, on the salivary fluoride level in children. Twenty children in the age group of five to six years were randomly selected and divided into two groups using, either 500ppm or 1000ppm fluoride dentifrice (sodium monofluorophosphate. Salivary fluoride levels at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, minutes after brushing were estimated. The data collected was statistically evaluated using the unpaired t-test. The results showed that salivary fluoride levels following use of 500ppm fluoride dentifrice were significantly lower than 1000ppm fluoride dentifrice. The low salivary fluoride levels may thereby reduce the anticaries efficacy. Hence, the pros and cons of recommending a low fluoride concentration dentifrice must be judiciously considered.

  3. Fluoride remediation using floating macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naba Kumar Mondal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Six aquatic macrophytes, such as Pistia stratiotes, Ceratophyllum demersum, Nymphoides indica, Lemna major, Azolla pinnata,and Eichhornia crassipes were considered for remove fluoride from aqueous solution. Five different concentrations (10, 30, 50, and 100 ppm of fluoride solution were taken in 1 L plastic container. Fixed weight (20 g of macrophytes along with 500 ml fluoride solution was taken in each plastic container for 72 hours observation. Results demonstrated all the macrophytes show highest fluoride removal during 24 h to 48 h, but after 72 h their efficiency reduced drastically. The species N. indica showed better removal efficiency than other experimental macrophytes. In general, pigment measurement data indicated higher concentration at 72 h. However, Pistia sp. showed higher concentration of pigmentation at intermediate time interval (48 h. Higher level of dry weight to fresh weight ratio was recorded for L. major and A. pinnata at all concentrations, excepting at 10 ppm. In addition, all macrophytes showed lower RGR at higher concentration. Isotherm study indicated that macrophyte C. demersum is a good fitted with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm whereas L. major with Langmuir isotherm during 24 hours.

  4. Special Report: Fluoridation of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hileman, Bette

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the controversy regarding water fluoridation in the United States during the last 50 years. Discusses the current status; benefits; and health risks including skeletal fluorosis, kidney disease, hypersensitivity, mutagenic effects, birth defects, and cancer. Presents statistics and anecdotal accounts. (CW)

  5. Special Report: Fluoridation of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hileman, Bette

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the controversy regarding water fluoridation in the United States during the last 50 years. Discusses the current status; benefits; and health risks including skeletal fluorosis, kidney disease, hypersensitivity, mutagenic effects, birth defects, and cancer. Presents statistics and anecdotal accounts. (CW)

  6. Alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The knowledge of background alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children is of utmost importance for introducing optimal and safe caries preventive measures for both individuals and communities. The aim of this study was to assess the daily fluoride intake analyzing duplicate samples of food and beverages. An attempt was made to calculate the daily intake of fluoride from food and swallowed toothpaste. Methods Daily alimentary fluoride intake was measured in a group of 36 children with an average age of 4.75 years and an average weight of 20.69 kg at baseline, by means of a double plate method. This was repeated after six months. Parents recorded their child's diet over 24 hours and collected duplicated portions of food and beverages received by children during this period. Pooled samples of food and beverages were weighed and solid food samples were homogenized. Fluoride was quantitatively extracted from solid food samples by a microdiffusion method using hexadecyldisiloxane and perchloric acid. The content of fluoride extracted from solid food samples, as well as fluoride in beverages, was measured potentiometrically by means of a fluoride ion selective electrode. Results Average daily fluoride intake at baseline was 0.389 (SD 0.054) mg per day. Six months later it was 0.378 (SD 0.084) mg per day which represents 0.020 (SD 0.010) and 0.018 (SD 0.008) mg of fluoride respectively calculated per kg bw/day. When adding the values of unwanted fluoride intake from the toothpaste shown in the literature (0.17-1.21 mg per day) the estimate of the total daily intake of fluoride amounted to 0.554-1.594 mg/day and recalculated to the child's body weight to 0.027-0.077 mg/kg bw/day. Conclusions In the children studied, observed daily fluoride intake reached the threshold for safe fluoride intake. When adding the potential fluoride intake from swallowed toothpaste, alimentary intake reached the optimum range for daily fluoride intake. These results showed that

  7. Synthesis and Anion Recognition of Novel Molecular Tweezer Receptors Based on Carbonyl Thiosemicarbazide for Fluoride Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI,Wei; ZHANG,You-Ming; WEI,Tai-Bao

    2008-01-01

    Three title compounds have been designed and synthesized in high yields as novel anion receptors, which show a higher selectivity for F- than other halide ions. The binding properties for fluoride ions of the receptors have been examined by UV-Vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy, indicating that a 1 : 1 stoichiometry complex is formed between the receptors and fluoride ions through hydrogen bonding interactions in DMSO solution. In addition, because these receptors have more binding points, they have better binding properties for anions than the molecular tweezer receptors based on thiourea we reported last time.

  8. New Neutral Receptors for Fluoride Based on Calix[4]arene Bearing Thiourea and Amide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘顺英; 徐括喜; 何永炳; 秦海娟; 孟令芝

    2005-01-01

    Two-armed neutral anion receptors (4,5), calix[4]arenes beating thiourea and amide binding sites, were prepared and examined their anion-binding ability by the UV-vis spectra. The results of non-linear curve fitting and Job plot indicate that 4 or 5 forms 1:1 stoichiometry complex with fluoride by hydrogen bonding interactions. Receptors 4 and 5 have an excellent selectivity for fluoride but have no binding ability with acetate, dihydrogen phosphate and the halogen anions (Cl-,Br-,I-).

  9. Fissure seal or fluoride varnish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deery, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register and the World Health Organization (WHO) Clinical Trials Registry PlatformStudy selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) with at least 12 months follow-up, in which fissure sealants, or fissure sealants together with fluoride varnishes, were compared with fluoride varnishes alone for preventing caries in occlusal surfaces of permanent teeth of children and adolescents.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers independently screened search results, extracted data and assessed risk of bias of included studies. Studies were grouped and analysed on the basis of sealant material type (resin-based sealant and glass ionomer-based sealant, glass ionomer and resin-modified glass ionomer) and different follow-up periods. Odds ratio were calculated for caries or no caries on occlusal surfaces of permanent molar teeth. Mean differences were calculated for continuous outcomes and data. Evidence quality was assessed using GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methods.ResultsEight RCTs involving a total of 1747 children aged five to ten years of age were included. Three trials compared resin-based fissure sealant versus fluoride varnish. Results from two studies (358 children) after two years were combined. Sealants prevented more caries, pooled odds ratio (OR) = 0.69 (95%CI; 0.50 to 0.94). One trial with follow-up at four and nine years found that the caries-preventive benefit for sealants was maintained, with 26% of sealed teeth and 55.8% of varnished teeth having developed caries at nine years. Evidence for glass-ionomer sealants was of low quality. One split-mouth trial analysing 92 children at two-year follow-up found a significant difference in favour of resin-based fissure sealant together with fluoride varnish compared with fluoride varnish only (OR

  10. Synthesis of Lithium Fluoride from Spent Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela S. Suarez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lithium (Li is considered a strategic element whose use has significantly expanded. Its current high demand is due to its use in lithium ion batteries for portable electronic devices, whose manufacture and market are extensively growing every day. These days there is a great concern about the final disposal of these batteries. Therefore, the possibility of developing new methodologies to recycle their components is of great importance, both commercially and environmentally. This paper presents results regarding important operational variables for the dissolution of the lithium and cobalt mixed-oxide (LiCoO2 cathodes from spent lithium ion batteries (LIBs with hydrofluoric acid. The recovery and synthesis of Co and Li compounds were also investigated. The dissolution parameters studied were: temperature, reaction time, solid-liquid ratio, stirring speed, and concentration of HF. The investigated recovery parameters included: pH, temperature, and time with and without stirring. The final precipitation of lithium fluoride was also examined. The results indicate that an increase in the HF concentration, temperature, and reaction time favors the leaching reaction of the LiCoO2. Dissolutions were close to 60%, at 75 °C and 120 min with a HF concentration of 25% (v/v. The recovery of Co and Li were 98% and 80%, respectively, with purities higher than 94%. Co and Li compounds, such as Co3O4 and LiF, were synthesized. Furthermore, it was possible to almost completely eliminate the F− ions as CaF2.

  11. Urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after intake of fluoridated milk and use of fluoride-containing toothpaste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, M; Twetman, S; Hultgren Talvilahti, A

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after drinking fluoridated milk with 0.185 mg F and 0.375 mg F and to study the impact of use of fluoride toothpaste. Basic research design: Double-blind cross-over study. Participants: Nine healthy children, 2.5-4.5 years...... of age. Intervention: In a randomized order, participants drank 1.5 dl milk once daily for 7 days with no fluoride added (control), 0.185 mg fluoride added and 0.375 mg fluoride added. The experiment was performed twice with (Part I) and without (Part II) parental tooth brushing with 1,000 ppm fluoride...... toothpaste. The fluoride content in the piped drinking water was 0.5 mg F/L. Main outcome measure: Urinary fluoride excretion. Results: The 24-hour urinary fl uoride excretion/kg body weight varied from 0.014 mg F for the placebo intervention and non-fluoride toothpaste to 0.027 mg F for the 0.375 mg...

  12. Global affordability of fluoride toothpaste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmgren Christopher J

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Dental caries remains the most common disease worldwide and the use of fluoride toothpaste is a most effective preventive public health measure to prevent it. Changes in diets following globalization contribute to the development of dental caries in emerging economies. The aim of this paper is to compare the cost and relative affordability of fluoride toothpaste in high-, middle- and low-income countries. The hypothesis is that fluoride toothpaste is not equally affordable in high-, middle- and low-income countries. Methods Data on consumer prices of fluoride toothpastes were obtained from a self-completion questionnaire from 48 countries. The cost of fluoride toothpaste in high-, middle- and low-income countries was compared and related to annual household expenditure as well as to days of work needed to purchase the average annual usage of toothpaste per head. Results The general trend seems to be that the proportion of household expenditure required to purchase the annual dosage of toothpaste increases as the country's per capita household expenditure decreases. While in the UK for the poorest 30% of the population only 0.037 days of household expenditure is needed to purchase the annual average dosage (182.5 g of the lowest cost toothpaste, 10.75 days are needed in Kenya. The proportion of annual household expenditure ranged from 0.02% in the UK to 4% in Zambia to buy the annual average amount of lowest cost toothpaste per head. Conclusion Significant inequalities in the affordability of this essential preventive care product indicate the necessity for action to make it more affordable. Various measures to improve affordability based on experiences from essential pharmaceuticals are proposed.

  13. Dipotassium hydrogencarbonate fluoride monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Kahlenberg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of the title compound, K2(HCO3F·H2O, were obtained as a secondary product after performing flux synthesis experiments aimed at the preparation of potassium rare earth silicates. The basic building unit of the structure is an [(HCO3(H2OF]2− zigzag chain running parallel to [001]. Both types of anions as well as the water molecules reside on mirror planes perpendicular to [010] at y = 0.25 and y = 0.75, respectively. Linkage between the different constituents of the chains is provided by O—H...O and O—H...F hydrogen bonding. The K+ cations are located between the chains and are coordinated by two F and five O atoms in form of a distorted monocapped trigonal prism.

  14. Preparation and characterization of γ-AlOOH @CS magnetic nanoparticle as a novel adsorbent for removing fluoride from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhen; Chen, Wei; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Yu; Dong, Changlong

    2015-04-01

    For this study, a novel adsorbent of γ-AlOOH @CS (pseudoboehmite and chitosan shell) magnetic nanoparticles (ACMN) with magnetic separation capabilities was developed to remove fluoride from drinking water. The adsorbent was first characterized, and then its performance in removing fluoride was evaluated. Kinetic data demonstrated rapid fluoride adsorption with more than 80% fluoride adsorption within the initial 20 min and equilibrium reached in 60 min. Based on the results of kinetic and isotherm models, the fluoride adsorption process on the ACMN's surface was a monolayer adsorption on a homogeneous surface. Thermodynamic parameters presented that the adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The mechanism for the adsorption involved electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding. Moreover, the calculated adsorption capacity of the ACMN for fluoride using the Langmuir model was 67.5 mg/g (20°C, pH=7.0±0.1), higher than other fluoride removal adsorbents. This nanoadsorbent performed well over a pH range of 4-10. The study found that PO4(3-) was the co-existing anion most able to hinder the nanoparticle's fluoride adsorption, followed by NO3(-) then Cl(-). Experimental results suggest that ACMN is a promising adsorbent for treating fluoride-contaminated water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Groundwater fluoride enrichment in an active rift setting: Central Kenya Rift case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaka, Lydia A., E-mail: lydiaolaka@gmail.com [Department of Geology, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 30197, Nairobi (Kenya); Wilke, Franziska D.H. [Geoforschungs Zentrum, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Olago, Daniel O.; Odada, Eric O. [Department of Geology, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 30197, Nairobi (Kenya); Mulch, Andreas [Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, Senckenberganlage 25, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany); Institut für Geowissenschaften, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Altenhöferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Musolff, Andreas [UFZ-Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Hydrogeology, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater is used extensively in the Central Kenya Rift for domestic and agricultural demands. In these active rift settings groundwater can exhibit high fluoride levels. In order to address water security and reduce human exposure to high fluoride in drinking water, knowledge of the source and geochemical processes of enrichment are required. A study was therefore carried out within the Naivasha catchment (Kenya) to understand the genesis, enrichment and seasonal variations of fluoride in the groundwater. Rocks, rain, surface and groundwater sources were sampled for hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigations, the data was statistically and geospatially analyzed. Water sources have variable fluoride concentrations between 0.02–75 mg/L. 73% exceed the health limit (1.5 mg/L) in both dry and wet seasons. F{sup −} concentrations in rivers are lower (0.2–9.2 mg/L) than groundwater (0.09 to 43.6 mg/L) while saline lake waters have the highest concentrations (0.27–75 mg/L). The higher values are confined to elevations below 2000 masl. Oxygen (δ{sup 18}O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopic values range from − 6.2 to + 5.8‰ and − 31.3 to + 33.3‰, respectively, they are also highly variable in the rift floor where they attain maximum values. Fluoride base levels in the precursor vitreous volcanic rocks are higher (between 3750–6000 ppm) in minerals such as cordierite and muscovite while secondary minerals like illite and kaolinite have lower remnant fluoride (< 1000 ppm). Thus, geochemical F{sup −} enrichment in regional groundwater is mainly due to a) rock alteration, i.e. through long residence times and natural discharge and/or enhanced leakages of deep seated geothermal water reservoirs, b) secondary concentration fortification of natural reservoirs through evaporation, through reduced recharge and/or enhanced abstraction and c) through additional enrichment of fluoride after volcanic emissions. The findings are useful to help improve water management

  16. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J

  17. HF Transverse Segmentation and Tagging Jet Capability

    CERN Document Server

    Doroshkevich, E A; Kuleshov, Sergey

    1998-01-01

    So called tagging jets and pile-up were simulated for the optimisation of the HF segmentation. The energy resolution, angular resolution and efficiency of jet reconstruction are defined for different calorimeter segmentation.

  18. Collisional quenching of highly rotationally excited HF

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Benhui; Forrey, R C; Stancil, P C; Balakrishnan, N

    2015-01-01

    Collisional excitation rate coefficients play an important role in the dynamics of energy transfer in the interstellar medium. In particular, accurate rotational excitation rates are needed to interpret microwave and infrared observations of the interstellar gas for nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line formation. Theoretical cross sections and rate coefficients for collisional deexcitation of rotationally excited HF in the vibrational ground state are reported. The quantum-mechanical close-coupling approach implemented in the nonreactive scattering code MOLSCAT was applied in the cross section and rate coefficient calculations on an accurate 2D HF-He potential energy surface. Estimates of rate coefficients for H and H$_2$ colliders were obtained from the HF-He collisional data with a reduced-potential scaling approach. The calculation of state-to-state rotational quenching cross sections for HF due to He with initial rotational levels up to $j=20$ were performed for kinetic energies from 10$^{-5}$ to 15000...

  19. Microhardness evaluation alloys Hf-Si-B; Avaliacao de microdureza de ligas Hf-Si-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gigolotti, Joao Carlos Janio; Costa, Eliane Fernandes Brasil [Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda (UNIFOA), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil); Nunes, Carlos Angelo; Rocha, Elisa Gombio; Coelho, Gilberto Carvalho, E-mail: carlosjanio@uol.com.br, E-mail: eliane-costabrasi@hotmail.com, E-mail: cnunes@demar.eel.usp.br, E-mail: elisarocha@alunos.eel.usp.br, E-mail: coelho@demar.eel.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The technological advance has generated increasing demand for materials that can be used under high temperature, what includes intermetallic MR-Si-B (MR = refractory metal) alloys with multiphase structures, that can also be applied in oxide environments. Thus, this work had for objective the micro hardness study of the Hf-Si-B system alloys, heat treated at 1600 deg C, in the Hf rich region. Hf-Si-B alloys had been produced with blades of Hf (min. 99.8%), Si (min. 99.998%) and B (min. 99.5%), in the voltaic arc furnace and heat treated at 1600 deg C under argon atmosphere. The relationship of the phases had been previously identified by X-ray diffraction and contrast in backscattered electron imaging mode. The alloys had their hardness analyzed by method Vickers (micro hardness) with load of 0.05 kgf and 0.2 kgf and application time of 20 s. The results, obtained from the arithmetic mean of measurements for each alloy on the heterogeneous region, showed a mean hardness of 11.08 GPA, with small coefficient of variation of 3.8%. The borides HfB2 (19.34 GPa) e HfB - 11.76 GPa, showed the hardness higher than the silicides Hf2Si (8.57 GPa), Hf5Si3 (9.63 GPa), Hf3Si2 (11.66 GPa), Hf5Si4 (10.00 GPa), HfSi (10.02 GPa) e HfSi2 (8.61 GPa). (author)

  20. Endothelialization of novel magnesium-rare earth alloys with fluoride and collagen coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Workman, Benjamin; Zhu, Donghui

    2014-03-25

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys are promising scaffolds for the next generation of cardiovascular stents because of their better biocompatibility and biodegradation compared to traditional metals. However, insufficient mechanical strength and high degradation rate are still the two main limitations for Mg materials. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) treatment and collagen coating were used in this research to improve the endothelialization of two rare earth-based Mg alloys. Results demonstrated that a nanoporous film structure of fluoride with thickness of ~20 µm was formed on the Mg material surface, which improved the corrosion resistance. Primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) had much better attachment, spreading, growth and proliferation (the process of endothelialization) on HF-treated Mg materials compared to bare- or collagen-coated ones.

  1. Endothelialization of Novel Magnesium-Rare Earth Alloys with Fluoride and Collagen Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg alloys are promising scaffolds for the next generation of cardiovascular stents because of their better biocompatibility and biodegradation compared to traditional metals. However, insufficient mechanical strength and high degradation rate are still the two main limitations for Mg materials. Hydrofluoric acid (HF treatment and collagen coating were used in this research to improve the endothelialization of two rare earth-based Mg alloys. Results demonstrated that a nanoporous film structure of fluoride with thickness of ~20 µm was formed on the Mg material surface, which improved the corrosion resistance. Primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs had much better attachment, spreading, growth and proliferation (the process of endothelialization on HF-treated Mg materials compared to bare- or collagen-coated ones.

  2. An experimental study of the solubility and speciation of tantalum in fluoride-bearing aqueous solutions at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, A.; Migdisov, Art. A.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    The solubility of Ta2O5 (solid) and the speciation of tantalum in HF-bearing aqueous solutions have been determined at temperatures of 100-250 °C and vapour-saturated water pressure. Tantalum is transported as the species Ta(OH)50 at low HF concentration and pH ∼1-3. At higher HF concentration, tantalum mobility is controlled by the species TaF3(OH)3- and TaF50; the presence of TaF50 is only evident at ⩽150 °C. Equilibrium constants range from -17.4 ± 0.45 to -16.4 ± 0.12 for the formation of Ta(OH)50 from crystalline Ta2O5 and from -8.24 ± 0.64 to -8.55 ± 0.68 for the formation of TaF3(OH)3- at 100 and 250 °C, respectively. For TaF50, they were determined to be 0.13 at 100 °C and -0.35 at 150 °C. In many respects, the behaviour of tantalum in acidic fluoride-bearing solutions is similar to that of niobium. The solubility of Ta2O5 (solid) is not dependent on HF concentration in fluoride-poor fluids, but rises rapidly at higher HF concentration. However, at the conditions of our experiments, namely a pH of ∼2, temperature up to 250 °C, and a wide range of HF concentrations, Ta2O5 (solid) solubility is almost invariably lower than that of Nb2O5 (solid). Modelling of Nb and Ta leaching confirmed the preferential mobility of niobium under most conditions expected in natural fluoride-rich hydrothermal systems. This modelling also demonstrated that both niobium and tantalum are rapidly deposited upon removal of fluoride from an acidic brine. As a result of hydrothermal alteration, the Nb/Ta ratios of secondary minerals may increase relative to those of the primary mineral, or remain largely unaffected, depending on the pH of the fluid.

  3. Focus on fluorides: update on the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M

    2014-06-01

    Improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies reduces dental caries and lowers fluoride exposure. Fluoride is delivered to the teeth systemically or topically to aid in the prevention of dental caries. Systemic fluoride from ingested sources is in blood serum and can be deposited only in teeth that are forming in children. Topical fluoride is from sources such as community water, processed foods, beverages, toothpastes, mouthrinses, gels, foams, and varnishes. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Dental Association (ADA) have proposed changes in their long standing recommendations for the amount of fluoride in community drinking water in response to concerns about an increasing incidence of dental fluorosis in children. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. The purpose of this update is to inform the reader about new research and policies related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Reviews of the current research and recent evidence based systematic reviews on the topics of fluoride are presented. Topics discussed include: updates on community water fluoridation research and policies; available fluoride in dentifrices; fluoride varnish compositions, use, and recommendations; and other fluoride containing dental products. This update provides insights into current research and discusses proposed policy changes for the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. The dental profession is adjusting their recommendations for fluoride use based on current observations of the halo effect and subsequent outcomes. The research community is focused on improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies thus reducing dental caries and lowering the amount of fluoride required for efficacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fluoride Varnishes--Is There a Correlation Between Fluoride Release and Deposition on Enamel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolis, Carlo; Härtli, Gian Peider; Lendenmann, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride uptake of enamel after application of fluoride varnishes was compared with fluoride release into artificial saliva. The hypothesis was that fluoride uptake is higher for products exhibiting faster fluoride release. Fluoride varnishes, i.e. Fluor Protector S, Duraphat, MI Varnish, Clinpro White Varnish, Profluorid Varnish and Enamel Pro Varnish were applied on bovine enamel specimens. Subsequently, specimens were incubated in artificial saliva. After removal of the varnishes, surface bound fluoride was extracted with potassium hydroxide and measured with an ion-selective electrode. Structurally bound fluoride was etched from the same specimens with perchloric acid. Fluoride release of varnish films into artificial saliva was measured for comparison. After 4 h in artificial saliva, the highest total enamel fluoride uptake of 47.9 μg F·cm-² was found with Fluor Protector S, followed by Enamel Pro Varnish with 22.1 μg F·cm-². The other products ranged between 12-16 μg F·cm-². This was several times higher than the negative control. Fluoride uptake did not correlate with release into artificial saliva. During the first 4 h, Duraphat released the lowest and MI Varnish the highest amount of fluoride with 7.7 and 249 μg F·cm-², respectively. The fluoride uptake of these two products was not statistically different. Enamel fluoride uptake cannot be predicted from the fluoride release rate of a product. Hence, based on the results of this study, fluoride release into artificial saliva is no measure for the efficacy of a fluoride varnish.

  5. Focus on Fluorides: Update on the Use of Fluoride for the Prevention of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M.

    2014-01-01

    Declarative Title: Improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies reduces dental caries and lowers fluoride exposure. Background Fluoride is delivered to the teeth systemically or topically to aid in the prevention of dental caries. Systemic fluoride from ingested sources is in blood serum and can be deposited only in teeth that are forming in children. Topical fluoride is from sources such as community water, processed foods, beverages, toothpastes, mouthrinses, gels, foams, and varnishes. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Dental Association (ADA) have proposed changes in their long standing recommendations for the amount of fluoride in community drinking water in response to concerns about an increasing incidence of dental fluorosis in children. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. The purpose of this update is to inform the reader about new research and policies related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Methods Reviews of the current research and recent evidence based systematic reviews on the topics of fluoride are presented. Topics discussed include: updates on community water fluoridation research and policies; available fluoride in dentifrices; fluoride varnish compositions, use, and recommendations; and other fluoride containing dental products. This update provides insights into current research and discusses proposed policy changes for the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Conclusions The dental profession is adjusting their recommendations for fluoride use based on current observations of the halo effect and subsequent outcomes. The research community is focused on improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies thus reducing dental caries and lowering the amount of fluoride required for efficacy. PMID:24929594

  6. Fluoride retention in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Correia Cavalcante SOUZA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This single-blind, randomized, crossover study aimed at assessing the long-term fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments. The study volunteers (n = 38 were residents of an area with fluoridated drinking water. They were administered four treatments, each of which lasted for one week: twice-daily placebo dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice and once-daily fluoride mouthrinse, and thrice-daily fluoride dentifrice. At the end of each treatment period, samples of unstimulated saliva and dental biofilm were collected 8 h after the last oral hygiene procedure. Fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm were analyzed using a specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm 8 h after the last use of fluoride products did not differ among treatments. The results of this study suggest that treatments with home-use fluoride products have no long-term effect on fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm of residents of an area with a fluoridated water supply.

  7. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D.; Davis, Jared H.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Breaker, Ronald R.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, 18F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions. PMID:24173035

  8. Fluoride retention in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Daniela Correia Cavalcante; Maltz, Marisa; Hashizume, Lina Naomi

    2014-01-01

    This single-blind, randomized, crossover study aimed at assessing the long-term fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments. The study volunteers (n = 38) were residents of an area with fluoridated drinking water. They were administered four treatments, each of which lasted for one week: twice-daily placebo dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice and once-daily fluoride mouthrinse, and thrice-daily fluoride dentifrice. At the end of each treatment period, samples of unstimulated saliva and dental biofilm were collected 8 h after the last oral hygiene procedure. Fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm were analyzed using a specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm 8 h after the last use of fluoride products did not differ among treatments. The results of this study suggest that treatments with home-use fluoride products have no long-term effect on fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm of residents of an area with a fluoridated water supply.

  9. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit shell carbon: A calcium-rich promising adsorbent for fluoride removal from groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankar, V; Rajkumar, S; Murugesh, S; Darchen, A

    2012-07-30

    Tamarindus indica fruit shells (TIFSs) are naturally calcium rich compounds. They were impregnated with ammonium carbonate and then carbonized, leading to ammonium carbonate activated ACA-TIFS carbon. The resulting materials and carbon arising from virgin fruit shells V-TIFS were characterized and assayed as adsorbent for the removal of fluoride anions from groundwater. The fluoride scavenging ability of TIFS carbons was due to naturally dispersed calcium compounds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that TIFS carbon contained a mixture of calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate. Batch studies on the fluoride removal efficiency of TIFS carbons with respect to contact time, pH, initial fluoride concentration, and co-ion interference were conducted. Applicability of various kinetic models (viz., pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich) and sorption isotherms were tested for batch techniques. The fluoride removal capacity of TIFS carbons was found to be 91% and 83% at a pH of 7.05 for V-TIFS and ACA-TIFS carbons, respectively. The practical applicability of TIFS carbons using groundwater samples was approved. The fluoride removal was greater in groundwater without hydrogen carbonate ions than those containing these ions. The characterizations of fluoride unloaded and loaded TIFS carbons were done by SEM and XRD studies.

  10. An overlooked yet ubiquitous fluoride congenitor: binding bifluoride in triazolophanes using computer-aided design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramabhadran, Raghunath O; Liu, Yun; Hua, Yuran; Ciardi, Moira; Flood, Amar H; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2014-04-01

    Despite its ubiquity during the binding and sensing of fluoride, the role of bifluoride (HF2(-)) and its binding properties are almost always overlooked. Here, we give one of the first examinations of bifluoride recognition in which we use computer-aided design to modify the cavity shape of triazolophanes to better match with HF2(-). Computational investigation indicates that HF2(-) and Cl(-) should have similar binding affinities to the parent triazolophane in the gas phase. Evaluation of the binding geometries revealed a preference for binding of the linear HF2(-) along the north-south axis with a smaller Boltzmann weighted population aligned east-west and all states being accessed rapidly through in-plane precessional rotations of the anion. While the (1)H NMR spectroscopy studies are consistent with the calculated structural aspects, binding affinities in solution were determined to be significantly smaller for the bifluoride than the chloride. Computed geometries suggested that a 20° tilting of the bifluoride (stemming from the cavity size) could account for the 25-fold difference between the two binding affinities, HF2(-) bifluoride's binding affinity (K ∼ 10(6) M(-1)) increased and was also found to remain equal to chloride in the gas and solution phases. The new oblate cavity appeared to hold the HF2(-) in a single east-west arrangement. Our findings demonstrate the promising ability of computer-aided design to fine-tune the structural and electronic match in anion receptors as a means to control the arrangement and binding strength of a desired guest.

  11. 76 FR 37129 - Determination That SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (Sodium Fluoride F-18) Injection, 10 to 200 Millicuries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (Sodium Fluoride F... Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (sodium fluoride F-18) injection, 10... FLUORIDE F 18 injection, 10 to 200 mCi/mL, if all other legal and regulatory requirements are met. FOR...

  12. Salivary fluoride levels after use of high-fluoride dentifrice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Glauber Campos; Cruz, Priscila Figueiredo; Bohn, Ana Clarissa Cavalcante Elvas; de Moura, Marcoeli Silva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate salivary fluoride (F) availability after toothbrushing with a high-F dentifrice. Twelve adult volunteers took part in this crossover and blind study. F concentration in saliva was determined after brushing with a high-F dentifrice (5000 µg F/g) or with a conventional F concentration dentifrice (1100 µg F/g) followed by a 15 mL distilled water rinse. Samples of nonstimulated saliva were collected on the following times: before (baseline), and immediately after spit (time = 0) and after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min. F analysis was performed with a fluoride-sensitive electrode and the area under curve of F salivary concentration × time (µg F/mL × min(-1)) was calculated. At baseline, no significant difference was found among dentifrices (P > 0.05). After brushing, both dentifrices caused an elevated fluoride level in saliva; however salivary F concentration was significantly higher at all times, when high-F dentifrice was used (P dentifrices (P dentifrice enhanced the bioavailability of salivary F, being an option for caries management in patients with high caries risk.

  13. Renal fluoride excretion in children following topical application of fluoride varnish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hoyos, F; Barbería, E; García-Camba, P; Varela, M

    2012-12-01

    To demonstrate that the application of dental fluoride varnishes in children increases urinary fluoride excretion. From a randomly assembled group of 42 children aged between 5 and 8 years, residing in a community with non-fluoridated water, spot urinary samples were taken before the topical application of dental fluoride varnish and 2 hours afterwards. In an age-matched control group of 16 children from the same community, who received no treatment, samples were taken the same way. The urinary excretion of fluoride was analysed by determining fluoride ion (F-) level and fluoride/creatinine (F/Cr) ratio in the urine. In the study group, the average pre- and post-treatment F/Cr ratios were 0.42 and 1.38 mg/g, respectively (p fluoride varnish leads to a significant increase in urine F-, which is attributable to the application of the product.

  14. Fluoride Removal from pretreated Photovoltaic Wastewater by Electrocoagulation: An Investigation of The Effect of Operational Parameters

    KAUST Repository

    Drouiche, Nadjib

    2012-03-20

    In this paper, application of electrocoagulation using common iron electrode to a simulated photovoltaic wastewater after precipitation with lime (Ca(OH)2) was investigated. Electrocoagulation process delivers the coagulant in situ as the sacrificial anode corrodes, while the simultaneous evolution of hydrogen at the cathode allows pollutant removal by flotation. Several working parameters, such as initial pH, applied potential and distance between the electrodes, were studied in an attempt to achieve higher fluoride removal efficiency. The optimum conditions for the process were identified as pH = 6, the distance between electrodes = 1 and an applied potential of 30 V. Furthermore fluoride removal is under the direct discharge standards.Results showed high effectivenessof the electrocoagulation method in removing fluoride from aqueous solutions.

  15. Fluoride intake from fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by young children in Kuwait: a non-fluoridated community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpata, Enosakhare S; Behbehani, Jawad; Akbar, Jaber; Thalib, Lukman; Mojiminiyi, Olusegun

    2014-06-01

    To determine the pattern of fluid consumption, fluoride intake from the fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by children aged 1-9 years in Kuwait, a nonfluoridated community. Using the cluster sampling technique, children aged 1-9 years were chosen from 2000 randomly selected households in Kuwait. Questionnaires were then administered to their mothers to determine the children's daily fluid intake. Fluoride concentrations in tap water as well as all brands of bottled water and beverages consumed by the children were measured, using the fluoride ion-specific electrode. Fluoride excretion was determined in 400 randomly selected children, based on fluoride/creatinine ratio. The mean daily fluid consumption by the children was high, being 1115-1545 ml. About 40% of the fluid intake was plain (tap and bottled) water and approximately 10% of the children drank bottled water exclusively. Fluoride concentration in tap water was low (0.04±SD 0.02 ppm), but was higher in bottled water (0.28±SD 0.40 ppm). Mean daily fluoride ingestion from fluids was 0.013-0.018 mg/kg body weight (bw). Even after allowing for fluoride ingestion from other sources, mean daily fluoride ingestion was still below 0.1 mg/kg bw set by the United States of America Institute of Medicine as the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level for moderate enamel fluorosis in children aged up to 8 years. Furthermore, the mean daily urinary fluoride excretion of 128-220 μg was below the provisional standard of 360-480 μg for optimal fluoride usage by children aged 3-5 years. Fluoride ingestion from fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by the children were below the recommendations for optimal fluoride usage. Thus, there is room for an upward adjustment of fluoride level in public drinking water supplies in Kuwait, as a caries preventive measure. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Intrinsic single-band upconversion emission in colloidal Yb/Er(Tm):Na3Zr(Hf)F7 nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daqin; Lei, Lei; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Anping; Xu, Ju; Wang, Yuansheng

    2012-11-07

    Novel Yb/Er(Tm):Na(3)MF(7) (M = Zr, Hf) nanocrystals with intrinsic single-band upconversion emission, in contrast to the routine lanthanide-doped fluoride nanocrystals which show typical multi-band upconversion emissions, are reported for the first time. Specifically, the red upconversion intensity of the Yb/Er:Na(3)ZrF(7) nanocrystals is about 5 times as high as that of the hexagonal Yb/Er:NaYF(4) ones with a similar crystal size.

  17. The dimers of glyoxal and acrolein with H 2O and HF: Negative intramolecular coupling and blue-shifted C-H stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpfen, Alfred; Kryachko, Eugene S.

    2010-04-01

    The structures and the vibrational spectra of the hydrogen-bonded complexes: glyoxal-H 2O, glyoxal-HF, acrolein-H 2O, and acrolein-HF, are investigated within the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ computational approach. It is demonstrated that the calculated blue shifts of the C-H stretching frequencies in the glyoxal-H 2O complexes are only indirectly pertinent to hydrogen bonding to the C-H group. The comparison with the glyoxal-HF and the acrolein-HF complexes reveals that these blue shifts are a direct consequence of a negative intramolecular coupling between vicinal C dbnd O and C-H bonds in the aldehyde groups of isolated glyoxal and acrolein molecules. To support this interpretation, the halogen-bonded complexes glyoxal-BrF and acrolein-BrF are discussed.

  18. Determination of Fluoride in Various Samples and Some Infusions Using a Fluoride Selective Electrode

    OpenAIRE

    TOKALIOĞLU, Şerife; Kartal, Şenol; ŞAHİN, Uğur

    2004-01-01

    The determination of fluoride in some environmental samples was performed using a fluoride ion-selective electrode. Fluoride concentrations were determined in drinking waters (from different provinces, districts and villages in Turkey), fruit juices, bottled water samples, toothpastes and tooth powders, liquors of Turkish coffee, coffee, linden, rose hip, and various brand tea infusions, and dust samples collected from the Erciyes University campus car park. The average fluoride conc...

  19. Estuarine response of fluoride - Investigations in Azhikode Estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Joseph, T.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Concentrations of fluoride in Azhikode estuarine region (Kerala, India) were measured as a function of chlorinity during the different seasons. The type of behaviour indicated that fluoride was regulated by sea water incursion alone. Fluoride...

  20. Patrón de liberación de flúor in vitro en sellantes fluorados de resina In vitro fluoride-release profile of fluoridated resin-based sealants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gómez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Comparar in vitro la cantidad de fluoruros liberados por los principales sellantes de puntos y fisuras basados en resina comercialmente disponibles en Latinoamérica. Material y Métodos: Se evaluó la liberación de fluoruros in vitro en tres sellantes fluorados de puntos y fisuras: Helioseal F (HF, Fissurit F (FF, Clinpro (CF y Delton (D, sin flúor como control. Se utilizaron 28 discos de 12 mm de diámetro y 2 mm de espesor (n=7 por grupo. Las muestras fueron almacenadas en 5 ml de agua ultra de-ionizada con pH neutro a 37º C por 93 días. La liberación de fluoruros fue medida mediante un electrodo iónico selectivo a los 1, 2, 3, 8, 15, 28 y 93 días. Los datos fueron analizados con el test ANOVA y Tukey (pAim: To compare in vitro the amount of fluoride released from the main pit and fissure sealant resin-based on commercially available in Latin America. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight samples of 12 x 2 mm were made from three commercial fluoridated resin-based sealants: Helioseal F (HF, Fissurit F (FF, Clinpro (CF and without fluoride Delton (D, as a control. Samples were stored in 5 ml of deionized water at 37° C and neutral pH. Fluoride releases were measured at 1, 2, 3, 8, 15, 28 and 93 days with an ion-selective electrode. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and one-way and Tukey (p0.05. Conclusion: The fluoride-release profile is similar for the fluoridated resin-based sealants under study: a high release during the first two days and afterwards, a very slow release. These results can explain the lack of differences in caries rate between fluoridated and non-fluoridated resin-based sealants observed in clinical trials.

  1. Magnesium Fluoride Reduction Vessel Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-26

    Carolina Metals, the fluoride is reduced to power by means of a Mikro #2 hemmer mill (Figure 5). The material is then separated into the different...The jolter table previously referred to in the liner pro - ceasing operation, is the knockout station. As shown in Figure 36, the vessel is inverted...was much more extensive than normally performed to establish the quality of thý metal pro - duced using the MgF2 liners. There are no indications of

  2. Fluoride Importance in Controlling Caries and Fluorosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorides for oral health has always involved a balance between the protective benefit against dental caries and the risk of developing fluorosis. The link between fluoride and dental health was established to determining the causes of dental fluorosis or enamel mottling. Fluorosis in Indian children was highly prevalent in the early 1990s. Policy were introduced to control fluoride exposure and to reduce the prevalence of fluorosis. The study aimed of describing the prevalence, se...

  3. Fluoride Importance in Controlling Caries and Fluorosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorides for oral health has always involved a balance between the protective benefit against dental caries and the risk of developing fluorosis. The link between fluoride and dental health was established to determining the causes of dental fluorosis or enamel mottling. Fluorosis in Indian children was highly prevalent in the early 1990s. Policy were introduced to control fluoride exposure and to reduce the prevalence of fluorosis. The study aimed of describing the prevalence, se...

  4. Effect of titanium tetrafluoride, amine fluoride and fluoride varnish on enamel erosion in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A; Ruben, JL; Huysmans, MCDNJM

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of 1 and 4% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) gels, amine fluoride (AmF) 1 and 0.25% and a fluoride varnish (FP) on the prevention of dental erosion. Two experimental groups served as controls, one with no pretreatment and another one pre-treated with a fluoride

  5. The effect of fluoride surface modification of ceramic TiO{sub 2} on the surface properties and biological response of osteoblastic cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiainen, H; Knychala, J; Lyngstadaas, S P; Haugen, H J [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1109 Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway); Monjo, M [Department of Fundamental Biology and Health Sciences, Research Institute on Health Sciences (IUNICS), University of the Balearic Islands, Cra. de Valldemossa, km 7.5, 07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Nilsen, O [Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1033 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Ellingsen, J E, E-mail: h.j.haugen@odont.uio.no [Oral Research Laboratory, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1109 Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-08-15

    This study investigates the effect of fluoride surface modification on the surface properties of polycrystalline ceramic TiO{sub 2} and the biological response of murine osteoblast cells to fluoride-modified TiO{sub 2} in vitro. Fluoride concentrations up to 9 at.% were detected and the fluoride was found to bind to the surface in a ligand exchange reaction between surface hydroxyl groups and the fluoride anions from the HF. No significant changes in the surface topography were detected. In vitro experiments were performed in order to evaluate the biological response of the MC3T3-E1 cells to the fluoride-modified ceramic TiO{sub 2} surfaces. No difference in the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was seen in comparison to unmodified samples, apart from the highest fluoride concentration ({approx}9 at.%) which was found to be more toxic to the cells. Real-time PCR analysis showed no conclusive evidence for the fluoride-induced promotion of osteoblast differentiation as no significant increase in the collagen-1, osteocalcin, or BMP-2 mRNA levels was detected on the fluoride-modified ceramic TiO{sub 2} surfaces apart from one group, which showed an elevated osteocalcin level and higher number of cells. Since the observed grain boundary corrosion is also anticipated to reduce the mechanical properties of ceramic TiO{sub 2}, this surface modification method may not be an ideal method for improving the osteogenic response of ceramic TiO{sub 2} scaffolds.

  6. Effect of low-concentration daily topical fluoride application on fluoride release of giomer and compomer: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Dhull

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objective: To determine the effect of low-concentration daily topical fluoride application on fluoride release of Giomer and Compomer and to compare the amount of fluoride release from Giomer to that of Compomer. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight specimens of each Giomer and Compomer were divided into four treatment groups, namely, control group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once-daily group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm twice-daily group and fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once-daily + fluoridated mouthwash (225 ppm group. Each specimen was suspended in demineralising solution for 6 h and remineralising solution for 18 h. Fluoride release was measured in both the demineralising solution and the remineralising solution daily for 21 days. Total daily fluoride release for each specimen was calculated by adding the amount released in the demineralising solution to that released in the remineralising solution. Results and Conclusion: The fluoride release (ppm was found to be higher in Giomer when compared with Compomer. The fluoride released from Giomer and Compomer was significantly higher in the acidic demineralising solution than in the neutral remineralising solution. It was found that increasing fluoride exposure significantly increased fluoride release from Giomer and Compomer. It was found that the fluoride release from the subgroups of Giomer and Compomer was in the following order: fluoridated dentifrice twice-daily > fluoridated dentifrice once-daily + fluoridated mouthwash > fluoridated dentifrice once-daily > control group. It was found that Giomer showed a greater fluoride uptake Compomer.

  7. Gramicidin D enhances the antibacterial activity of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, James W.; ZHOU, ZHIYUAN; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride is a toxic anion found in many natural environments. One of the major bacterial defenses against fluoride is the cell envelope, which limits passage of the membrane-impermeant fluoride anion. Accordingly, compounds that enhance the permeability of bacterial membranes to fluoride should also enhance fluoride toxicity. In this study, we demonstrate that the pore-forming antibiotic gramicidin D increases fluoride uptake in B. subtilis and that the antibacterial activity of this compound...

  8. Analysis of 1-Minute Potentially Available Fluoride from Dentifrice

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Clifton M.; Erin C. Holahan; Schmuck, Burton D

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports found that some fluoride-containing dentifrices do not release effective concentrations of fluoride during brushing. Failure to release fluoride can be due to dentifrice matrix components that interfere with the solubilization of the fluoride salts during brushing. A new generation of dentifrices has the capability to precipitate beneficial fluoride salts during tooth brushing. Therefore, a method that assesses the potentially available fluoride during the 1-minute brushing i...

  9. Mechanical properties of a metal-organic framework containing hydrogen-bonded bifluoride linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Kiran, M S R N; Manson, Jamie L; Schlueter, John A; Thirumurugan, A; Ramamurty, U; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2013-05-18

    We report the mechanical properties of a framework structure, [Cu2F(HF)(HF2)(pyz)4][(SbF6)2]n (pyz = pyrazine), in which [Cu(pyz)2](2+) layers are pillared by HF2(-) anions containing the exceptionally strong F-H···F hydrogen bonds. Nanoindentation studies on single-crystals clearly demonstrate that such bonds are extremely robust and mechanically comparable with coordination bonds in this system.

  10. Fluoride assay methodology for carbonated beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, Judith R; Levy, Steven M; Wefel, James S; Patterson, Kristine Y; Cutrufelli, Rena; Pehrsson, Pamela R; Holden, Joanne M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review different methodological techniques used for the assessment of fluoride in carbonated beverages, and compare results using a fluoride ion electrode direct read method with and without a prior decarbonation treatment. The carbonated beverages in this study were either purchased locally at grocery stores in Iowa City, Iowa, or purchased as part of a national representative sampling approach included in the National Fluoride Database and Intake Assessment Study (NFDIAS). The samples were compared with and without a decarbonating process. Soda pop and beer samples were analyzed by removing a 1-ml sample and adding a 1-ml buffer solution. The fluoride concentration of the sample and buffer combination was then determined using a fluoride ion specific electrode. There was no significant difference in the fluoride concentration of the samples with or without prior decarbonation. The mean absolute difference between the soda pop group with and without decarbonation was 0.01 ppm F, while results from the beer samples showed variation of 0.00 to 0.02 parts per million fluoride (ppm F). These differences were not statistically significant for the soda pop or beer groups (P=.50 and P=.74, respectively). Whether or not decarbonation was conducted prior to analysis, the fluoride assay results were the same. Therefore, decarbonation of soda pop and beer was deemed unnecessary prior to fluoride analysis.

  11. High fluoride exposure in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, V A; Gitelman, H J

    1990-04-01

    The observation of higher plasma flouride levels in our hemodialysis (HD) patients than our continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients (4.0 +/- 0.5 mumol/L [n = 17] v 2.5 +/- 0.3 mumol/L [n = 17], P less than 0.005) prompted an evaluation of fluoride metabolism during HD. We found that serum fluoride was completely ultrafiltrable across cuprophane membranes (99% +/- 4%) and that HD produced acute changes in plasma fluoride levels that correlated well with the fluoride gradient between plasma and dialysis fluid at the start of dialysis. Our HD fluids contained significantly higher fluoride concentrations than were present in commercially prepared peritoneal dialysis fluid. Our fluids are prepared from fluoridated tap water that is purified by reverse osmosis (RO). We conclude that the different concentrations of fluoride in our dialysis fluids account for the differences in the plasma flouride concentrations between our dialysis groups. Since many HD units rely on RO systems to purify fluoridated tap water, it is likely that many HD patients are being exposed inadvertently to increased concentrations of fluoride.

  12. Application of fluoride iontophoresis to improve remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H E; Kwon, H K; Kim, B I

    2009-10-01

    Iontophoresis is generally used to maximize the therapeutic action of drugs in medicine. This technique can be used to improve the remineralization effect of topical fluoride applications in dentistry. The aim of this study was to compare the remineralization effect of fluoride iontophoresis (FI) with the conventional fluoride application (CFA) method in vitro. Sixty bovine enamel specimens were divided into three groups: no fluoride treatment, CFA and FI. Fluoride was applied to the demineralized specimens for 4 min in each experimental group. The types of fluoride system used for application were 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (12 300 p.p.m. F, pH 3.5) and 2% sodium fluoride solution (9050 p.p.m. F, pH 7) in the experimental groups. All the specimens were then placed in a remineralizing solution for 24 h. This cycle was repeated five times. An iontophoresis device (0.4 mA, 12 V) was used in the FI groups. The efficacy of this technique was evaluated by measuring changes in the surface microhardness and lesion depth of the specimens using confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Data were analysed using anova and Tukey's post hoc test (P fluoride application methods (P > 0.05). When the lesion depth was measured using CLSM imaging, there was also no significant difference between the FI and CFA groups (P > 0.05). In conclusion, FI was not significantly superior to CFA in terms of the remineralization effect.

  13. Interactions of hydrogen with amorphous hafnium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Moloud; Afanas'ev, Valeri V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2017-02-01

    We used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the interaction of hydrogen with amorphous hafnia (a -HfO2 ) using a hybrid exchange-correlation functional. Injection of atomic hydrogen, its diffusion towards electrodes, and ionization can be seen as key processes underlying charge instability of high-permittivity amorphous hafnia layers in many applications. Hydrogen in many wide band gap crystalline oxides exhibits negative-U behavior (+1 and -1 charged states are thermodynamically more stable than the neutral state) . Our results show that in a -HfO2 hydrogen is also negative-U, with charged states being the most thermodynamically stable at all Fermi level positions. However, metastable atomic hydrogen can share an electron with intrinsic electron trapping precursor sites [Phys. Rev. B 94, 020103 (2016)., 10.1103/PhysRevB.94.020103] forming a [etr -+O -H ] center, which is lower in energy on average by about 0.2 eV. These electron trapping sites can affect both the dynamics and thermodynamics of the interaction of hydrogen with a -HfO2 and the electrical behavior of amorphous hafnia films in CMOS devices.

  14. Effects of different kinds of fluorides on enolase and ATPase activity of a fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loveren, C.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Deng, D.M.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Enolase and ATPase are sensitive to fluoride. It is unclear whether this sensitivity differs for F-sensitive and F-resistant cells or for different types of fluoride. Permeabilized cells of the fluoride-sensitive strain Streptococcus mutans C180-2 and its fluoride-resistant mutant strain C180-2 FR w

  15. Effects of different kinds of fluorides on enolase and ATPase activity of a fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loveren, C.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Deng, D.M.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Enolase and ATPase are sensitive to fluoride. It is unclear whether this sensitivity differs for F-sensitive and F-resistant cells or for different types of fluoride. Permeabilized cells of the fluoride-sensitive strain Streptococcus mutans C180-2 and its fluoride-resistant mutant strain C180-2 FR

  16. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit shell carbon: A calcium-rich promising adsorbent for fluoride removal from groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivasankar, V., E-mail: vsivasankar@tce.edu [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College of Engineering (Autonomous), Madurai 625015, Tamil Nadu (India); Rajkumar, S. [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College of Engineering (Autonomous), Madurai 625015, Tamil Nadu (India); Murugesh, S. [Department of Chemistry, SACS M.A.V.M.M. Engineering College, Madurai 625301, Tamil Nadu (India); Darchen, A. [UMR CNRS No. 6226 Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, ENSCR, Avenue du General Leclerc, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes, Cedex 7 (France)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbonization of Tamarind fruit shell improved its defluoridation efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcium carbonate particles were involved in the defluoridation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorbent dose, pH, and fluoride concentration showed significant effects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum adsorption of fluoride was achieved at pH 7-8. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prepared carbons were efficient in treating three natural waters. - Abstract: Tamarindus indica fruit shells (TIFSs) are naturally calcium rich compounds. They were impregnated with ammonium carbonate and then carbonized, leading to ammonium carbonate activated ACA-TIFS carbon. The resulting materials and carbon arising from virgin fruit shells V-TIFS were characterized and assayed as adsorbent for the removal of fluoride anions from groundwater. The fluoride scavenging ability of TIFS carbons was due to naturally dispersed calcium compounds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that TIFS carbon contained a mixture of calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate. Batch studies on the fluoride removal efficiency of TIFS carbons with respect to contact time, pH, initial fluoride concentration, and co-ion interference were conducted. Applicability of various kinetic models (viz., pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich) and sorption isotherms were tested for batch techniques. The fluoride removal capacity of TIFS carbons was found to be 91% and 83% at a pH of 7.05 for V-TIFS and ACA-TIFS carbons, respectively. The practical applicability of TIFS carbons using groundwater samples was approved. The fluoride removal was greater in groundwater without hydrogen carbonate ions than those containing these ions. The characterizations of fluoride unloaded and loaded TIFS carbons were done by SEM and XRD studies.

  17. Naphthalenyl appended semicarbazone as ;turn on; fluorescent chemosensor for selective recognition of fluoride ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheer, Sabeel M.; Haribabu, Jebiti; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S. P.; Karvembu, Ramasamy; Sreekanth, Anandaram

    2017-10-01

    The reaction of 1-isocyanatonaphthalene with hydrazine hydrate in presence of acetone resulted in the formation of napthyl based semicarbazone (1). The compound has been characterized using UV-Visible, FT-IR, NMR, mass spectroscopic and single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) tools. The interaction between 1 and fluoride ion has been investigated by means of UV-Visible and fluorescence spectra. The fluoride ion sensing mechanism of 1 has been studied by hybrid density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) methods. The added fluoride ion formed intermolecular hydrogen bonds with the protons of N1sbnd H1 and N2sbnd H2 groups of 1 in the ground state. The N1sbnd H1 proton which is closer to naphthalene moiety prefers to bind fluoride anion in the excited state after deprotonation, which lead to excited state proton transfer (ESPT). The fluoride ion sensing process shows a moderate (31.99 kcal/mol) Gibbs free energy. To understand the dynamic features, the transition state (TS) calculation is performed and the change in entropy is found to be -0.6259 kJ/mol, which shows that the sensing process is thermodynamically allowed.

  18. Interaction between a transition-metal fluoride and a transition-metal hydride: water-mediated hydrofluoric acid evolution following fluoride solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chierotti, Michele R; Rossin, Andrea; Gobetto, Roberto; Peruzzini, Maurizio

    2013-11-04

    The reaction between the nickel(II) PCP pincer fluoride complex ((tBu)PCP)Ni(F) [(tBu)PCP = 2,6-C6H3(CH2P(t)Bu2)2] and the tungsten(II) carbonyl hydride CpW(H)(CO)3 (Cp = η(5)-C5H5(-)) leads to hydrofluoric acid evolution and formation of the bimetallic isocarbonylic species [CpW(CO)2(μ-κ,C:κ,O-CO)···Ni((tBu)PCP)]. The process has been monitored through multinuclear ((19)F, (31)P{(1)H}, (1)H) variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy, collecting (19)F T1 data values for a fluoride ligand bound to a transition metal. The extremely short relaxation time (minimum value of 13 ms at 193 K) is ascribed to the large chemical shift anisotropy of the Ni-F bond (688 ppm). The in-depth NMR analysis has revealed that the fluoride-hydride interaction is not direct but water-mediated, at odds with what was previously observed for the "hydride-hydride" case ((tBu)PCP)Ni(H)/CpW(H)(CO)3. Kinetic measurements have unveiled that the first step of the overall mechanism is thought to be solvation of the fluoride ligand (as a result of Ni-F···H2O hydrogen bonding), while further reaction of the solvated fluoride with CpW(H)(CO)3 is extremely slow and competes with the side reaction of fluoride replacement by a water molecule on the nickel center to form the [((tBu)PCP)Ni(H2O)](+) aquo species. Finally, density functional theory analysis of the solvation process through a discrete + continuum model has been accomplished, at the M06//6-31+G(d,p) level of theory, to support the mechanistic hypothesis.

  19. Urinary fluoride output in children following the use of a dual-fluoride varnish formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Polido Kaneshiro Olympio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the bioavailability of fluoride after topical application of a dual-fluoride varnish commercially available in Brazil, when compared to DuraphatTM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The urinary fluoride output was evaluated in seven 5-year-old children after application of the fluoride varnishes, in two different phases. In the first phase (I, children received topical application of the fluoride varnish Duofluorid XII (2.92% fluorine, calcium fluoride + 2.71% fluorine, sodium fluoride, FGM TM. After 1-month interval (phase II, the same amount (0.2 mL of the fluoride varnish Duraphat (2.26% fluorine, sodium fluoride, ColgateTM was applied. Before each application all the volunteers brushed their teeth with placebo dentifrice for 7 days. Urinary collections were carried out 24 h prior up to 48 h after the applications. Fluoride intake from the diet was also estimated. Fluoride concentration in diet samples and urine was analyzed with the fluoride ion-specific electrode and a miniature calomel reference electrode coupled to a potentiometer. Data were tested by ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (p<0.05. RESULTS: There were significant differences in the urinary fluoride output between phases I and II. The use of Duofluorid XII did not significantly increase the urinary fluoride output, when compared to baseline levels. The application of Duraphat caused a transitory increase in the urinary fluoride output, returning to baseline levels 48 h after its use. CONCLUSIONS: The tested varnish formulation, which has been shown to be effective in in vitro studies, also can be considered safe.

  20. Behaviour at the indicator scale of the elements Zr, Hf and 104, Nb,Ta and Pa (105) in very complexation media; Comportement a l`echelle des indicateurs des elements Zr, Hf, et 104, Nb, Ta, et Pa (105) en milieux tres complexants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroy Guzman, F. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS - IN2P3 Universite Paris Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    1997-12-31

    In order to determine the chemical properties of the trans-actinide elements of Z = 104 and 105 in aqueous solutions we studied their behaviour to ion exchange resin in different complex media. Due to the very short lifetimes (some tens of seconds) et to the low yield of these elements (a few atoms per irradiation hour) only very fast radiochemical techniques can be used. These severe constraints impose comparative studies of these elements with their most likely homologues to be carried out. The corresponding homologues were the elements of group 4 (Zr and Hf) for the element 104 and the elements of group 5 (Nb and Ta) and also Pa for the element 105. The complexation properties of the elements at indicator scale were determined in the media of HF, NH{sub 4}/HClO{sub 4}, NH{sub 4}SCN/HClO{sub 4}, NH{sub 4}SCN/HF and HCl/HF by ion exchange chromatography. The studies in fluorides media allowed us to identify the complexes in solution and to explain the shape of the experimentally observed sorption curves. The decrease of sorption for higher acid concentration in case of HF/HCl medium was interpreted by formation of chloro-fluoro-complexes. In case of the mixture NH{sub 4}SCN/HF, the particularly pronounced anti-synergic effects were observed and discussed. At the same time studies of the Hf and Ta short-lived isotopes were carried out by means of the RACHEL facility operating by the Orsay Tandem accelerator. These realistic simulations allowed optimization of different production, transportation and separation stages of the trans-actinide elements. The two experiments of 104 element production showed that this element forms in HF very stable anionic complexes similarly to its homologues Zr and Hf. (authors). 181 refs.

  1. Total rock dissolution using ammonium bifluoride (NH4HF2) in screw-top Teflon vials: a new development in open-vessel digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Hu, Zhaochu; Liu, Yongsheng; Chen, Haihong; Gao, Shan; Gaschnig, Richard M

    2012-12-18

    Complete sample digestion is a prerequisite for achieving reproducible and accurate analytical results for geological samples. Open-vessel acid digestions successfully dissolve mafic samples, but this method cannot achieve complete dissolution of felsic samples, because of the presence of refractory minerals such as zircon. In this study, an efficient and simplified digestion technique using the solid compound NH(4)HF(2) in a screw-top vial has been developed for multielement analysis of different types of rock samples. NH(4)HF(2) has a higher boiling point (239.5 °C) than conventional acids such as HF, HNO(3) and HCl, which allows for an elevated digestion temperature in open vessels, enabling the decomposition of refractory phases. Similar to HF, HNO(3) and HCl, ultrapure NH(4)HF(2) can be produced using a conventional PFA sub-boiling (heating and cooling) purification system. A digestion time of 2-3 h for 200 mg NH(4)HF(2) in a Savillex Teflon vial at 230 °C is sufficient to digest 50 mg of the felsic rock GSP-2, which is ~6 times faster than using conventional closed-vessel acid digestion at 190 °C (high-pressure PTFE digestion bomb). The price of a Savillex Teflon vial is far less than the price of a high-pressure PTFE digestion bomb (consisting of a PTFE inner vessel and an outer stainless steel pressure jacket). Moreover, the NH(4)HF(2)-open-vessel acid digestion is not hampered by the formation of insoluble fluorides. We have successfully applied the NH(4)HF(2)-open-vessel acid digestion to the digestion of a series of international geological reference materials, including mafic to felsic igneous rocks and shales. This method provides an effective, simple, economical, and comparatively safe dissolution method that combines the advantages of both the open- and closed-vessel digestion methods.

  2. Comparative Evaluation of Longevity of Fluoride Release From three Different Fluoride Varnishes – An Invitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, NM; Poornima, P; Nagaveni, NB; Neena, IE; Bharath, KP

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluoride varnishes play a pivotal role in inhibition of dental caries by increasing remineralization. Aim To determine the longevity of fluoride release from 3 different fluoride varnishes over a period of time through salivary fluoride estimation. Materials and Methods Twenty four extracted human deciduous anterior teeth were divided into four groups, i.e., ClinproTM XT, Flouritop SR, Flourprotector and Control group. Fluoride varnishes were applied on 3mm x 3mm window on labial surface of the teeth and then the teeth were immersed and stored in artificial saliva. The concentration of fluoride in ppm was measured after 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months. Fluoride release at each time interval for different groups was statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Post Hoc Tukey’s test. Results Although all the fluoride varnishes released fluoride, with greatest release observed during 1st week by Fluoritop SR (66.92±16.30ppm), ClinproTM XT Varnish released consistently and substantially more fluoride than Fluoritop SR and Fluorprotector during 6 months analysis (pVarnish released consistently and substantially more fluoride than other tested products. PMID:27656559

  3. Fluoride intake and its safety among heavy tea drinkers in a British fluoridated city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, G N

    1991-01-01

    Tea-drinking in very young children has been studied in a British city. The results suggested that the fluoride in tea would, in some cases, be sufficient to influence caries. Clinical findings to some extent supported this. The main purpose of the investigation reported here was to determine maximum possible fluoride intake in adults who were heavy tea drinkers in a fluoridated city and relate it to toxic thresholds. Heavy tea drinkers were traced through Health Visitors and voluntary organizations and the volumes and fluoride concentrations of their drinks were measured. Even the highest intake found (9 mg) is below the probable intake in Bartlett, Texas (8 ppm of fluoride), in relation to which no undesirable symptoms have been reported (Leone et al. 1954). This confirms the safety of fluoridation. The effects on fluoride concentration of evaporating soft and hard fluoride-containing waters to small bulk were compared. The results showed ceilings of 3 ppm of fluoride in hard water and about 14 ppm in soft water, much higher than the levels expected on the basis of the usually stated solubility of CaF2 (16 or 8 ppm of fluoride). However, under normal household conditions, it is most unlikely that dangerous levels of fluoride would be ingested from boiled water.

  4. Review on fluoride, with special emphasis on calcium fluoride mechanisms in caries prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M

    1997-10-01

    Low concentrations of fluoride have a beneficial effect on enamel and dentin de- and remineralization. After fluoride treatments, such as topical applications, rinses or dentifrices, salivary fluoride concentrations decrease exponentially in a biphasic manner to very low concentrations within a few hours. For treatments to be effective over periods longer than the brushing and the following salivary clearance, fluoride needs to be deposited and slowly released. Calcium fluoride (or like) deposits act in such a way, owing to a surface covering of phosphate and/or proteins, which makes the CaF2 less soluble under in vivo conditions than in a pure form in inorganic solutions. Moreover, due to the phosphate groups on the surface of the calcium fluoride globules, fluoride is assumed to be released with decreasing pH when the phosphate groups are protonated in the dental plaque.

  5. Ab Initio Calculation of 19F NMR Chemical Shielding for Alkaline-earth-metal Fluorides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI,Shu-Hui(蔡淑惠); CHEN,Zhong,(陈忠); LU,Xin(吕鑫); CHEN,Zhi-Wei(陈志伟); WAN,Hui-Lin(万惠霖)

    2001-01-01

    Gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method atHartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFr) lev-els,respectively,was employed to calculate 19F NMR chemi-cal shieldings of solid state alkaline-earth-metal fluorides MF2 (M = Mg,Ca,Sr,Ba).The results show that,although thecalculated19F chemical shieldings tend to be larger than the experinental values,they have a fairly good linear relation-ship with the observed ones.The calculated results based on different combinations of basis sets show that the B3LYP (ahybrid of DFT with HF) predictions are greatly superior tothe I-IF predictions.When a basis set of metal atom with ef- fecfive core potential (ECP) has well representation of valencewavefunction,especially wavefuncfion of d component,andproper definition of core electron nmnher,it can be applied toobtain 19F chemical shielding which is dose to that of all-elec-tron calculation.Tne variation of 19F chemical shielding of al-kaline-earth-metal fluorides correlates well with the latticefactor A/R2.``

  6. Mn 3+ stabilization in complex phosphate-fluoride fluxes and its incorporation into langbeinite framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnyk, Ivan V.; Zatovsky, Igor V.; Baumer, Vyacheslav N.; Slobodyanik, Nikolay S.; Shishkin, Oleg V.; Vorona, Igor P.

    2007-10-01

    Two new mixed valence manganese-containing orthophosphates with a langbeinite structure have been obtained from the complex fluoride-phosphate melts using the high-temperature flux technique. MIVF 4 and K 2MIVF 6 ( MIV—Zr, Hf) were used as fluoride and polyvalent metal precursors. Obtained langbeinites were investigated using a single-crystal X-ray diffraction, FTIR-, UV-VIS- and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spectroscopy. Both compounds crystallize in a cubic system (sp. gr. P2 13) with cell parameters a=10.2106(12) and 10.1896(9) Å for K 1.96Mn 0.57Zr 1.43(PO 4) 3 and K 1.93Mn 0.53Hf 1.47(PO 4) 3, respectively. The rigid langbeinite-like framework is built up from the isolated [MO 6] octahedra and [PO 4] tetrahedra interlinked via oxygen vertices. Potassium cations occupy positions in the large closed cavities of the framework. Statistical distribution of manganese and tetravalent metal over two crystallographic positions in octahedral oxygen environment can be observed. The presence of the mixed valence manganese in the reported phosphates was confirmed using UV-VIS and EPR-spectroscopy.

  7. Unusual kinetic behavior in cathodic H2 evolution from KF.2HF melts at mild-steel and alloy electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conway Con B.E.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Apart from its interest as a "model" process for kinetic studies of gas-evolving electrode reactions, the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (her is involved in several processes that are of importance in applied electrochemistry, e.g., as the cathodic co-reactions in the commercial production of C12 and F2, in electrolyses for production of hydrogen, in electrochemical hydrogenation and, indirectly, as the partial process in corrosion of base metals in the absence of oxygen. The present paper reports several aspects of the unusual behavior of the her that is involved as the co-reaction to electrolytic production of F2 from KF/HF melts using carbon anodes and Fe or mild-steel cathodes. Anomalous anodic polarization behavior that arises in electrolytic generation of F2 from KF/HF melts at carbon electrodes is well known. It is characterized by very high Tafel slopes associated with "CF" film formation and by sluggish F2 bubble disengagement from the electrode. Interest in such effects has, however, tended to overshadow rather similar, so-called "hyper polarization" effects that also arise in the cathodic reaction, but for different reasons. The origins and nature of such effects are described and characterized in the present paper, and comparisons are made between behavior of Hz evolution from KF.2HF and that from the aquo-system analogue, KOH.2H2O. An important aspect is the very different interfacial behavior in KF/HF or KF.2HF melts from that in the corresponding aquo-system. Effects of As-species in HF feeds is investigated in terms of electro catalysis and poisoning effects on the her.

  8. General concepts of modern HF communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Jules

    Both conceptual and hardware advancements have led to substantial systems developments in military HF communications; the former encompass coding and error correction techniques for security, in order to minimize propagation and interference, while the latter prominently include digital equipment permitting the selection of a frequency for a particular path and propagation mode, as well as modulation selection. Propagation-related advancements involve better statistical models as well as advancements in short-term forecasting methods responsive to changes in solar-geophysical parameters. Adaptive HF systems have been developed for meteor-scatter radio communications.

  9. Solvent Effects on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 2J(C,Hf and 1J(C,Hf Spin–Spin Coupling Constants in Acetaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Esteban

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The known solvent dependence of 1J(Cc,Hf and 2J(C1,Hf couplings in acetaldehyde is studied from a theoretical viewpoint based on the density functional theory approach where the dielectric solvent effect is taken into account with the polarizable continuum model. The four terms of scalar couplings, Fermi contact, paramagnetic spin orbital, diamagnetic spin orbital and spin dipolar, are calculated but the solvent effect analysis is restricted to the first term since for both couplings it is by far the dominant contribution. Experimental trends of Δ1J(Cc,Hf and Δ2J(C1,Hf Vs ε (the solvent dielectric constant are correctly reproduced although they are somewhat underestimated. Specific interactions between solute and solvent molecules are studied for dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, solutions considering two different one-to-one molecular complexes between acetaldehyde and DMSO. They are determined by interactions of type C=O---H---C and S=O---H---C, and the effects of such interactions on 1J(Cc,Hf and 2J(C1,Hf couplings are analyzed. Even though only in a semiquantitative way, it is shown that the effect of such interactions on the solvent effects, of Δ1J(Cc,Hf and Δ2J(C1,Hf, tend to improve the agreement between calculated and experimental values. These results seem to indicate that a continuum dielectric model has not enough flexibility for describing quantitatively solvent effects on spin-spin couplings. Apparently, even for relatively weak hydrogen bonding, the contribution from “direct” interactions is of the same order of magnitude as the “dielectric” effect.

  10. Research on Multi-Layer Distributed HF Radio Network Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Dai; Chun-Jiang Wang; Quan Yu

    2008-01-01

    High frequency (HF) transmission is an important communication techniques. However, conventional point-to-point transmission can be easily destroyed, which limits its utilization in practice. HF networking communication has the capability against demolishment. The network structure is one of the key factors for HF networking communication. In this paper, a novel analysis method of the network connectedness based on the eigenvalue is derived, and a multi-layer distributed HF radio network structure is proposed. Both the theore tical analysis and the computer simulation results verify that the application of the proposed network structure in the HF radio communication can improve the anti demolishment ability of the HF network efficiently.

  11. Determination of fluoride content in drinking water and tea infusions using fluoride ion selective electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Potentiometric analysis of fluoride content (as F- ion in solutions by using fluoride ion-selective electrode is simple, reliable and cheap. Very small concentrations of fluoride-ions (to 10-6 mol/dm3 can be determined by fluoride selective electrode, with regulation of ion strength of a solution and control of concentration of hydroxide ions and interfering ions of metals. The influence of pH and complexing ions of metals can be successfully regulated by the TISAB solution and by preserving pH value in the range from 5.00 to 7.00. The content of fluorides in the samples can be determined by the method of direct potentiometer, and in the case of very low concentration by standard addition method. In this paper it was analyzed the determination of fluoride ions concentration in bottled mineral waters and water from Belgrade plumbing in two Belgrade districts (Palilula and Novi Beograd and in tea, by using the fluoride selective electrode. It was determined that the content of fluoride ions in bottled mineral water significantly differs from values given on declaration, and that content of fluoride ions varies over a period of time. The content of fluoride ions in water from plumbing in two Belgrade districts at the time of analysis was significantly increased and exceeded values given in Regulation for drinking water quality. The received results from the analysis of fluorides in teas show that fluorides exist in teas in different concentrations. There are also differences between the same kinds of tea, which is noted with mint (Mentha piperitae folium, as a consequence of differences between soils where it was planted. As taking of fluorides, according to World Health Organisation recommendation (WHO, is limited in the range from 2 to 4 mg per day, it is necessary to give the content of fluorides on all products that are used in human consumption.

  12. Ion release from, and fluoride recharge of a composite with a fluoride-containing bioactive glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Harry B.; Gwinner, Fernanda; Mitchell, John C.; Ferracane, Jack L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Materials that are capable of releasing ions such as calcium and fluoride, that are necessary for remineralization of dentin and enamel, have been the topic of intensive research for many years. The source of calcium has most often been some form of calcium phosphate, and that for fluoride has been one of several metal fluoride or hexafluorophosphate salts. Fluoride-containing bioactive glass (BAG) prepared by the sol-gel method acts as a single source of both calcium and fluoride ions in aqueous solutions. The objective of this investigation was to determine if BAG, when added to a composite formulation, can be used as a single source for calcium and fluoride ion release over an extended time period, and to determine if the BAG-containing composite can be recharged upon exposure to a solution of 5,000 ppm fluoride. Methods BAG 61 (61% Si; 31% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) and BAG 81 (81% Si; 11% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) were synthesized by the sol gel method. The composite used was composed of 50/50 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA, 0.8% EDMAB, 0.4% CQ, and 0.05% BHT, combined with a mixture of BAG (15%) and strontium glass (85%) to a total filler load of 72% by weight. Disks were prepared, allowed to age for 24 h, abraded, then placed into DI water. Calcium and fluoride release was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy and fluoride ion selective electrode methods, respectively, after 2, 22, and 222 h. The composite samples were then soaked for 5 min in an aqueous 5,000 ppm fluoride solution, after which calcium and fluoride release was again measured at 2, 22, and 222 h time points. Results Prior to fluoride recharge, release of fluoride ions was similar for the BAG 61 and BAG 81 composites after 2 h, and also similar after 22 h. At the four subsequent time points, one prior to, and three following fluoride recharge, the BAG 81 composite released significantly more fluoride ions (pfluoride, although the BAG 81 composite was recharged more than the BAG 61 composite. The BAG 61

  13. FLUORIDE LEVELS IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE RICE IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    2013-05-05

    May 5, 2013 ... There are several studies reporting the dietary intake of fluoride from water, ..... fluoride in rice samples showed the trend BR > ERR > NERICA > JR > RR > EWR. .... in cooked rice in Iran ranged from 0.2-1.6 mg F/kg [2].

  14. HOUSEHOLD PURIFICATION OF FLUORIDE CONTAMINATED MAGADI (TRONA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    Purification of fluoride contaminated magadi is studied using bone char sorption and calcium precipitation. The bone char treatment is found to be workable both in columns and in batches where the magadi is dissolved in water prior to treatment. The concentrations in the solutions were 89 g magadi...... treatment method. A procedure for purification of fluoride contaminated magadi at household level is described....

  15. Inhibition of erosive wear by fluoride varnish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A.; Jager, D. H. J.; Ruben, J. L.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that fluoride products with a protective mechanical component are advantageous in the prevention of erosive wear. The aim of this study was to evaluate in situ the effect of fluoride varnish (FV) in the prevention of wear due to erosion and combined erosion and toothbrush abras

  16. Potentiometric Determination of Fluoride Concentration in Beers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaudenes, Juan Ramón; Hardisson, Arturo; Paz, Soraya; Rubio, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Angel José; Burgos, Antonio; Revert, Consuelo

    2017-04-26

    Beer is a widely consumed drink throughout the world, and because its manufacture involves the use of water, beer can be, in some cases, a source of fluorides. For this reason, the objective of this study was to determine the concentration of fluorides in 50 samples of beers from different sources sold in two different types of container (aluminum can and glass bottle). The possible significant differences between the different types of packaging and the intake of fluoride from the consumption of these beers were evaluated. The concentration of fluoride in beers has been determined using the potentiometric method of fluoride determination by standard addition. The concentration of fluoride ranged between 0.06 and 1.77 mg/L. In general, the concentration was below 1 mg/L, except for three beer samples from Ireland and the USA, whose concentration was over 1.5 mg/L. No significant differences were found between the types of packaging. The contribution of fluoride to the diet from beer consumption is not high (fluoride in the water supply.

  17. Inhibition of erosive wear by fluoride varnish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A.; Jager, D. H. J.; Ruben, J. L.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that fluoride products with a protective mechanical component are advantageous in the prevention of erosive wear. The aim of this study was to evaluate in situ the effect of fluoride varnish (FV) in the prevention of wear due to erosion and combined erosion and toothbrush

  18. CORRELATION AMONG FLUORIDE AND METALS IN IRRIGATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    For comparative analysis of fluoride and metals in soil and water, water samples were ..... one is from rapidly soluble fluoride complex like cryolite (Na3AlF6) found in water ..... Atlabachew, M.; Chandravanshi, B.S.; Zewge, F.; Redi, M. Toxicol.

  19. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cunningham, Richard Burns [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fugate, David L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peretz, Fred J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Effective high-temperature thermal energy exchange and delivery at temperatures over 600°C has the potential of significant impact by reducing both the capital and operating cost of energy conversion and transport systems. It is one of the key technologies necessary for efficient hydrogen production and could potentially enhance efficiencies of high-temperature solar systems. Today, there are no standard commercially available high-performance heat transfer fluids above 600°C. High pressures associated with water and gaseous coolants (such as helium) at elevated temperatures impose limiting design conditions for the materials in most energy systems. Liquid salts offer high-temperature capabilities at low vapor pressures, good heat transport properties, and reasonable costs and are therefore leading candidate fluids for next-generation energy production. Liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled, graphite-moderated reactors, referred to as Fluoride Salt Reactors (FHRs), are specifically designed to exploit the excellent heat transfer properties of liquid fluoride salts while maximizing their thermal efficiency and minimizing cost. The FHR s outstanding heat transfer properties, combined with its fully passive safety, make this reactor the most technologically desirable nuclear power reactor class for next-generation energy production. Multiple FHR designs are presently being considered. These range from the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) [1] design originally developed by UC-Berkeley to the Small Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR) and the large scale FHR both being developed at ORNL [2]. The value of high-temperature, molten-salt-cooled reactors is also recognized internationally, and Czechoslovakia, France, India, and China all have salt-cooled reactor development under way. The liquid salt experiment presently being developed uses the PB-AHTR as its focus. One core design of the PB-AHTR features multiple 20 cm diameter, 3.2 m long fuel channels

  20. Reactivity of aminodeoxyalditols and derivatives in hydrogen fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Jens Chr.

    to the corresponding 2,5-anhydrides were achieved. These compounds can be recognized as muscarine analogues or precursors. The general mechanism of the reactions was evaluated by 13C NMR spectroscopic studies of the acyloxonium ion intermediates.A series of 1-deoxy-1-trifluoroacetamido-hexitols was prepared...

  1. Study of structure and antireflective properties of LaF3/HfO2/SiO2 and LaF3/HfO2/MgF2 trilayers for UV applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszalek, K.; Jaglarz, J.; Sahraoui, B.; Winkowski, P.; Kanak, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study antireflective properties of the tree-layer systems LaF3/HfO2/SiO2 and LaF3/HfO2/MgF2 deposited on heated optical glass substrates. The films were evaporated by the use two deposition techniques. In first method oxide films were prepared by means of e-gun evaporation in vacuum of 5 × 10-5 mbar in the presence of oxygen. The second was used for the deposition of fluoride films. They were obtained by means of thermal source evaporation. Simulation of reflectance was performed for 1M2H1L (Quarter Wavelength Optical Thickness) film stack on an optical quartz glass with the refractive index n = 1.46. The layer thickness was optimized to achieve the lowest light scattering from glass surface covered with dioxide and fluoride films. The values of the interface roughness were determined through atomic force microscopy measurements. The essence of performed calculation was to find minimum reflectance of light in wide ultraviolet region. The spectral dispersion of the refractive index needed for calculations was determined from ellipsometric measurements using the spectroscopic ellipsometer M2000. Additionally, the total reflectance measurements in integrating sphere coupled with Perkin Elmer 900 spectrophotometer were performed. These investigations allowed to determine the influence of such film features like surface and interface roughness on light scattering.

  2. Fluoride Importance in Controlling Caries and Fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of fluorides for oral health has always involved a balance between the protective benefit against dental caries and the risk of developing fluorosis. The link between fluoride and dental health was established to determining the causes of dental fluorosis or enamel mottling. Fluorosis in Indian children was highly prevalent in the early 1990s. Policy were introduced to control fluoride exposure and to reduce the prevalence of fluorosis. The study aimed of describing the prevalence, severity and risk factors for fluorosis, and to describe the trend of fluorosis among Indian children. The study also aimed of exploring the effect of the change in fluoride exposure on dental fluorosis and caries. Establishing an appropriate use of fluoride toothpaste could be successful in reducing fluorosis without a significant increase in caries experience.

  3. Enrichment of fluoride in groundwater under the impact of saline water intrusion at the salt lake area of Yuncheng basin, northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xubo; Wang, Yanxin; Li, Yilian; Guo, Qinghai

    2007-12-01

    Long-term intake of high-fluoride groundwater causes endemic fluorosis. This study, for the first time, discovered that the salt lake water intrusion into neighboring shallow aquifers might result in elevation of fluoride content of the groundwater. Two cross-sections along the groundwater flow paths were selected to study the geochemical processes controlling fluoride concentration in Yuncheng basin, northern China. There are two major reasons for the observed elevation of fluoride content: one is the direct contribution of the saline water; the other is the undersaturation of the groundwater with respect to fluorite due to salt water intrusion, which appears to be more important reason. The processes of the fluorine activity reduction and the change of Na/Ca ratio in groundwater induced by the intrusion of saline water favor further dissolution of fluorine-bearing mineral, and it was modeled using PHREEQC. With the increase in Na concentration (by adding NaCl or Na2SO4 as Na source, calcium content kept invariable), the increase of NaF concentration was rapid at first and then became slower; and the concentrations of HF, HF{2/-}, CaF+, and MgF+ were continuously decreasing. The geochemical conditions in the study area are advantageous to the complexation of F- with Na+ and the decline of saturation index of CaF2, regardless of the water type (Cl-Na or SO4-Na type water).

  4. Superior hydrogen storage in high entropy alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlberg, Martin; Karlsson, Dennis; Zlotea, Claudia; Jansson, Ulf

    2016-11-01

    Metal hydrides (MHx) provide a promising solution for the requirement to store large amounts of hydrogen in a future hydrogen-based energy system. This requires the design of alloys which allow for a very high H/M ratio. Transition metal hydrides typically have a maximum H/M ratio of 2 and higher ratios can only be obtained in alloys based on rare-earth elements. In this study we demonstrate, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, that a high entropy alloy of TiVZrNbHf can absorb much higher amounts of hydrogen than its constituents and reach an H/M ratio of 2.5. We propose that the large hydrogen-storage capacity is due to the lattice strain in the alloy that makes it favourable to absorb hydrogen in both tetrahedral and octahedral interstitial sites. This observation suggests that high entropy alloys have future potential for use as hydrogen storage materials.

  5. Use of Nitrogen Trifluoride To Purify Molten Salt Reactor Coolant and Heat Transfer Fluoride Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2017-05-02

    Abstract: The molten salt cooled nuclear reactor is included as one of the Generation IV reactor types. One of the challenges with the implementation of this reactor is purifying and maintaining the purity of the various molten fluoride salts that will be used as coolants. The method used for Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s molten salt experimental test reactor was to treat the coolant with a mixture of H2 and HF at 600°C. In this article we evaluate thermal NF3 treatment for purifying molten fluoride salt coolant candidates based on NF3’s 1) past use to purify fluoride salts, 2) other industrial uses, 3) commercial availability, 4) operational, chemical, and health hazards, 5) environmental effects and environmental risk management methods, 6) corrosive properties, and 7) thermodynamic potential to eliminate impurities that could arise due to exposure to water and oxygen. Our evaluation indicates that nitrogen trifluoride is a viable and safer alternative to the previous method.

  6. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  7. Systematic Comparison of HF CMOS Transconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2003-01-01

    Transconductors are commonly used as active elements in high-frequency (HF) filters, amplifiers, mixers, and oscillators. This paper reviews transconductor design by focusing on the V-I kernel that determines the key transconductor properties. Based on bandwidth considerations, simple V-I kernels wi

  8. Electron impact on vibrationally cold {{HF}}^{+}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristian Stroe, Marius; Fifirig, Magda

    2016-12-01

    The dissociative recombination and vibrational excitation processes induced by electron impact on vibrationally cold {{HF}}+ are investigated in the framework of the multichannel quantum defect theory for electron energies below 1 eV. The thermal rate coefficients for the electron temperature range from 10 to 5000 K are reported.

  9. ORIGIN OF EXCESS (176)Hf IN METEORITES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Kristine; Connelly, James Norman; Bizzarro, Martin

    2010-01-01

    After considerable controversy regarding the (176)Lu decay constant (lambda(176)Lu), there is now widespread agreement that (1.867 +/- 0.008) x 10(-11) yr(-1) as confirmed by various terrestrial objects and a 4557 Myr meteorite is correct. This leaves the (176)Hf excesses that are correlated with...

  10. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. 175.270 Section 175... Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.270 Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. Poly(vinyl fluoride... the purpose of this section, poly(vinyl fluoride) resins consist of basic resins produced by the...

  11. Fluoride Programs in the School Setting: Preventive Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebich, Theodore, Jr.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Two types of school-based programs that increase students' use of fluoride for preventive dental health are described. In fluoride mouthrinse programs, teachers give their students a fluoride solution once a week in a paper cup. In areas where the level of fluoride in the water supply is insufficient, the flouride tablet program is used. (JN)

  12. Fluoride in saliva and dental biofilm after 1500 and 5000 ppm fluoride exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staun Larsen, Line; Baelum, Vibeke; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Richards, Alan; Nyvad, Bente

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this randomized, double-blind, crossover study was to measure fluoride in saliva and 7-day-old biofilm fluid and biofilm solids after rinsing three times per day for 3 weeks with 0, 1500, or 5000 ppm fluoride (NaF). Following the 3-week wash-in/wash-out period, including 1 week of biofilm accumulation, saliva and biofilm samples were collected from 12 participants immediately before (background fluoride), and 10, 30, and 60 min after a single rinse. Biofilm samples were separated into fluid and solids, and samples were analyzed using a fluoride electrode (microanalysis). The background fluoride concentration was statistically significantly higher in the 5000 compared to the 1500 ppm F rinse group in all three compartments (22.3 and 8.1 μM in saliva, 126.8 and 58.5 μM in biofilm fluid, and 10,940 and 4837 μmol/kg in biofilm solids). The 1-h fluoride accumulation for the 5000 ppm F rinse was higher than for the 1500 ppm F rinse in all three compartments, although not statistically significant for saliva and biofilm solids. Regular exposure to 5000 ppm fluoride elevates background fluoride concentrations in saliva, biofilm fluid, and biofilm solids compared to 1500 ppm fluoride. Increasing the fluoride concentration almost 3.5 times (from 1500 to 5000 ppm) only elevates the background fluoride concentrations in saliva, biofilm fluid, and biofilm solids twofold. Even though fluoride toothpaste may be diluted by saliva, the results of the present study indicate that use of 5000 ppm fluoride toothpaste might lead to improved caries control.

  13. Antibacterial and antibiofilm properties of yttrium fluoride nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lellouche J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan Lellouche,1,2 Alexandra Friedman,2 Aharon Gedanken,2 Ehud Banin11Biofilm Research Laboratory, The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, 2Kanbar Laboratory for Nanomaterials, Department of Chemistry, Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, IsraelAbstract: Antibiotic resistance has prompted the search for new agents that can inhibit bacterial growth. Moreover, colonization of abiotic surfaces by microorganisms and the formation of biofilms is a major cause of infections associated with medical implants, resulting in prolonged hospitalization periods and patient mortality. In this study we describe a water-based synthesis of yttrium fluoride (YF3 nanoparticles (NPs using sonochemistry. The sonochemical irradiation of an aqueous solution of yttrium (III acetate tetrahydrate [Y(Ac3 • (H2O4], containing acidic HF as the fluorine ion source, yielded nanocrystalline needle-shaped YF3 particles. The obtained NPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray elemental analysis. NP crystallinity was confirmed by electron and powder X-ray diffractions. YF3 NPs showed antibacterial properties against two common bacterial pathogens (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus at a µg/mL range. We were also able to demonstrate that antimicrobial activity was dependent on NP size. In addition, catheters were surface modified with YF3 NPs using a one-step synthesis and coating process. The coating procedure yielded a homogeneous YF3 NP layer on the catheter, as analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. These YF3 NP-modified catheters were investigated for their ability to restrict bacterial biofilm formation. The YF3 NP-coated catheters were able to significantly reduce bacterial colonization compared to the uncoated surface. Taken together, our results highlight the potential to further develop the concept of utilizing these metal fluoride NPs

  14. Theoretical proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji; Viggiano, Al A

    2010-12-23

    Proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX at all of its possible sites were calculated at the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31G* and RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels, respectively. The protonation leads to various unique structures, with H(+) attached to oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms; among which the nitrogen site possesses the highest proton affinity of -ΔE ∼ 251 kcal/mol, suggesting that this is likely to be the major product. In addition some H(2), CH(4) dissociation as well as destruction channels have been found, among which the CH(4) + [Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-S-(CH(2))(2)-N(+)(iPr)═CHMe] product and the destruction product forming Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-SMe + CH(2)═N(+)(iPr)(2) are only 9 kcal/mol less stable than the most stable N-protonated product. For fluoridization, the S-P destruction channel to give Et-O-P(═O)(Me)(F) + [S-(CH(2))(2)-N-(iPr)(2)](-) is energetically the most favorable, with a fluoride affinity of -ΔE ∼ 44 kcal. Various F(-) ion-molecule complexes are also found, with the one having F(-) interacting with two hydrogen atoms in different alkyl groups to be only 9 kcal/mol higher than the above destruction product. These results suggest VX behaves quite differently from surrogate systems.

  15. Characterisation of a new adsorbent (beta cyclodextrin modified hybrid hydrous iron-zirconium oxide) to remove fluoride from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Indranil

    2017-04-01

    Prolonged use of fluoride contaminated water (>1.5mg L -1) causes serious problems to public health and ultimately leads to skeletal fluorosis. There is an urgent need to develop more efficient fluoride scavenging materials for designing water filters. A simple and efficient adsorbent (CHIZO, beta-Cyclodextrin (b-CD) amended hydrous iron-zirconium hybrid oxide), has been developed, characterised and tested. The results indicate the efficacy of CHIZO on fluoride removal from an aqueous solution. The agglomerated micro structured composite material has several new features such as very poor crystallinity confirmed from TEM images. BET experiment reveals a surface area of 0.2070 m2 g- 1 and pore volume of 0.0476 cm3 g -1. The findings also indicate the highly pH dependent fluoride adsorption by CHIZO which decreases with an increase in pH, and pseudo-second order kinetics control the reaction.Isotherm study indicates Langmuir isotherm was the best fit model to describe the adsorption equilibrium. Significantly higher monolayer adsorption capacity of fluoride (31.35 mg g -1) than the host hydrous Fe-Zr oxide (8.21 mg g -1) at pH 7.0 and 303 K was observed. Thermodynamic parameter indicates spontaneous nature of CHIZO which is due to the exothermic nature of the reaction. Apart from this phosphate and sulphate have some impact (interference) on fluoride adsorption. b-CD forms inclusion complexes by taking up fluoride ions from water into its central cavity. Several factors are involved regarding high efficacy of the system such as the release of enthalpy-rich water molecules from its cavity, electrostatic interactions, hydrogen bonding and release of conformational strain. However, the regeneration is difficult because of probable entrapping of fluoride inside the cavity of b-CD with hydrogen bonding. It has been found that only 0.9 g of CHIZO is able to reduce the fluoride level to below 1.0 mg L -1 in one-litre of fluoride spiked (5.0 mg L- 1) natural water sample

  16. Determination of the stability constant of Np(V) fluoride complex using a fluoride ion selective electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, R.M.; Rizvi, G.H.; Chaudhuri, N.K.; Patil, S.K. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiochemistry Div.)

    1985-04-01

    Fluoride complexing of Np(V) was studied using fluoride ion selective electrode (F-ISE). Free fluoride ion concentrations in the presence of Np(V) were measured at 0.1 and 0.01M ionic strength. The data were used to calculate the stability constant of the fluoride complex of Np(V) and the values obtained are reported.

  17. Acid demineralization susceptibility of dental enamel submitted to different bleaching techniques and fluoridation regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomão, Dlf; Santos, Dm; Nogueira, Rd; Palma-Dibb, Rg; Geraldo-Martins, Vr

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the acid demineralization susceptibility of bleached dental enamel submitted to different fluoride regimens. One hundred bovine enamel blocks (6×6×3 mm) were randomly divided into 10 groups (n=10). Groups 1 and 2 received no bleaching. Groups 3 to 6 were submitted to an at-home bleaching technique using 6% hydrogen peroxide (HP; G3 and G4) or 10% carbamide peroxide (CP; G5 and G6). Groups 7 to 10 were submitted to an in-office bleaching technique using 35% HP (G7 and G8) or 35% CP (G9 and G10). During bleaching, a daily fluoridation regimen of 0.05% sodium fluoride (NaF) solution was performed on groups 3, 5, 7, and 9, while weekly fluoridation with a 2% NaF gel was performed on groups 4, 6, 8, and 10. The samples in groups 2 to 10 were pH cycled for 14 consecutive days. The samples from all groups were then assessed by cross-sectional Knoop microhardness at different depths from the outer enamel surface. The average Knoop hardness numbers (KHNs) were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The comparison between groups 1 and 2 showed that the demineralization method was effective. The comparison among groups 2 to 6 showed the same susceptibility to acid demineralization, regardless of the fluoridation method used. However, the samples from groups 8 and 10 showed more susceptibility to acid demineralization when compared with group 2 (penamel to acid demineralization. However, the use of 35% HP and 35% CP must be associated with a daily fluoridation regimen, otherwise the in-office bleaching makes the bleached enamel more susceptible to acid demineralization.

  18. Fluoride Adsorption by Pumice from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Mahvi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Drinking water provides many vital elements for the human body, but the presence of some dissolved elements more than permissible concentration can endanger human health. Among the dissolved elements in drinking water, fluoride is noticeable, because both the very low or very high concentrations have adverse health impacts such as dental caries. Therefore, fluoride concentration should be kept in acceptable levels. In this study Pumice was used for fluoride removal. It was found that Fluoride sorption kinetic was fitted by pseudo-second-order model. The maximum sorption capacity of Pumice was found to be 13.51 mg/g at laboratory temperature (24°C. Maximum sorption study occurred at pH= 3. Results of Isotherm showed the fluoride sorption has been well fitted with Freundlich isotherm model. This study has demonstrated that Pumice can be used as effective adsorbents for fluoride removal from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent prepared in this study was cheap and efficient in removal of fluoride than other adsorbents.

  19. Current status of fluoride volatility method development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlir, J.; Marecek, M.; Skarohlid, J. [UJV - Nuclear Research Institute, Research Centre Rez, CZ-250 68 Husinec - Rez 130 (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-01

    The Fluoride Volatility Method is based on a separation process, which comes out from the specific property of uranium, neptunium and plutonium to form volatile hexafluorides whereas most of fission products (mainly lanthanides) and higher transplutonium elements (americium, curium) present in irradiated fuel form nonvolatile tri-fluorides. Fluoride Volatility Method itself is based on direct fluorination of the spent fuel, but before the fluorination step, the removal of cladding material and subsequent transformation of the fuel into a powdered form with a suitable grain size have to be done. The fluorination is made with fluorine gas in a flame fluorination reactor, where the volatile fluorides (mostly UF{sub 6}) are separated from the non-volatile ones (trivalent minor actinides and majority of fission products). The subsequent operations necessary for partitioning of volatile fluorides are the condensation and evaporation of volatile fluorides, the thermal decomposition of PuF{sub 6} and the finally distillation and sorption used for the purification of uranium product. The Fluoride Volatility Method is considered to be a promising advanced pyrochemical reprocessing technology, which can mainly be used for the reprocessing of oxide spent fuels coming from future GEN IV fast reactors.

  20. Effect of fluoride mouth rinses on various orthodontic archwire alloys tested by modified bending test: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamna Srivastava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Fluorides can cause corrosion and degradation in mechanical properties of commonly used archwires by forming hydrofluoric acid HF and causing disruption of protective titanium oxide layer. Hence, the aim of this study was to assess the change in load deflection characteristics of Ni-Ti, Cu Ni-Ti, S.S, and β-Ti wires on immersing in fluoride mouth rinses of two types- Phosflur and neutral NaF mouth rinse utilizing a modified bending test and comparing it to control. Materials and Methods: Round preformed wires were immersed in 10 ml of control and test solution (Phosflur and S-Flo mouth rinse for 1.5 hours and incubated at 37°C. Modified bending test was carried out to evaluate load-deflection characteristics of different wires using Instron. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was applied to determine if statistically significant difference exist among the mean load values obtained at various deflections in control and test solutions. Results: There was no statistically significant reduction in load deflection characteristics of Ni-Ti, copper Ni-Ti, β-Ti, and S.S wires on immersing in Phosflur mouth rinse and neutral sodium fluoride mouth rinses as compared to control at 2.5 and 1 mm of deflection in unloading phase. Conclusion: Phosflur and a neutral sodium fluoride mouth rinse did not affect the mechanical bending properties of Ni-Ti, copper Ni-Ti, B-Ti, and SS wires in in vitro conditions.

  1. Effect of fluoride mouth rinses on various orthodontic archwire alloys tested by modified bending test: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Kamna; Chandra, Pavan Kumar; Kamat, Nandini

    2012-01-01

    Fluorides can cause corrosion and degradation in mechanical properties of commonly used archwires by forming hydrofluoric acid HF and causing disruption of protective titanium oxide layer. Hence, the aim of this study was to assess the change in load deflection characteristics of Ni-Ti, Cu Ni-Ti, S.S, and β-Ti wires on immersing in fluoride mouth rinses of two types- Phosflur and neutral NaF mouth rinse utilizing a modified bending test and comparing it to control. Round preformed wires were immersed in 10 ml of control and test solution (Phosflur and S-Flo mouth rinse) for 1.5 hours and incubated at 37°C. Modified bending test was carried out to evaluate load-deflection characteristics of different wires using Instron. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to determine if statistically significant difference exist among the mean load values obtained at various deflections in control and test solutions. There was no statistically significant reduction in load deflection characteristics of Ni-Ti, copper Ni-Ti, β-Ti, and S.S wires on immersing in Phosflur mouth rinse and neutral sodium fluoride mouth rinses as compared to control at 2.5 and 1 mm of deflection in unloading phase. Phosflur and a neutral sodium fluoride mouth rinse did not affect the mechanical bending properties of Ni-Ti, copper Ni-Ti, B-Ti, and SS wires in in vitro conditions.

  2. Topical fluoride as a cause of dental fluorosis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, MCM; Lo, ECM; Glenny, AM; Tsang, BWK; Worthington, HV; Marinho, VCC

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For many years, topical use of fluorides has gained greater popularity than systemic use of fluorides. A possible adverse effect associated with the use of topical fluoride is the development of dental fluorosis due to the ingestion of excessive fluoride by young children with developing teeth. OBJECTIVES: To describe the relationship between the use of topical fluorides in young children and the risk of developing dental fluorosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: Electronic search of the Cochra...

  3. A study of fluoride groundwater occurrence in Nathenje, Lilongwe, Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msonda, K. W. M.; Masamba, W. R. L.; Fabiano, E.

    A study was carried out to determine fluoride concentration in groundwaters of Nathenje area situated in Lilongwe District in the central region of Malawi. Water samples were collected from 176 boreholes and shallow wells during different months in 2001 and 2002. Samples were then analysed for fluoride by using a fluoride electrode and an ion selective meter. The results showed that fluoride concentrations for the rainy season varied from dental fluorosis in areas where the fluoride concentration was high.

  4. A fluoride release-adsorption-release system applied to fluoride-releasing restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suljak, J P; Hatibovic-Kofman, S

    1996-09-01

    This investigation compared the initial fluoride release and release following refluoridation of three resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (Photac-Fil Applicap, Vitremer, and Fuji II LC) and a new polyacid-modified resin composite material (Dyract). After daily flouride release was measured for 8 days, specimens were refluoridated in 1,000-ppm solutions of fluoride ion for 10 minutes and fluoride release was measured for 5 days. Two further 5-day refluoridation-release periods were carried out. All materials released fluoride initially. Photac released the most; Dyract released the least. Initial release was greatest over the first few days. All materials released significantly more fluoride for 24 to 48 hours after refluoridation. Less fluoride was released with each successive refluoridation for the three glass-ionomer cements. The release from the Dyract compomer remained at a comparatively constant and significantly lower level following each refluoridation.

  5. The role of nonbonding interactions and the presence of fluoride on the conformational isomerism of 1,2-ethanediol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Weslley G. D. P.; Silla, Josué M.; Cormanich, Rodrigo A.; Fernandes, Sergio A.; Freitas, Matheus P.

    2016-07-01

    This work reports the analysis of the effects ruling the conformational preference of 1,2-ethanediol (1,2-ED) using theoretical calculations, since there is no general consensus about the role of intramolecular hydrogen bond on the conformational isomerism of 1,2-ED. While the predominance of the gauche conformers along with the Osbnd Csbnd Csbnd O fragment relative to the trans ones was found to be mainly due to hyperconjugation, the orientation of the hydroxyl groups is better described by a balance between low steric hindrance and high stabilization from hyperconjugation than by intramolecular hydrogen bond. Nevertheless, the presence of a fluoride anion induces a conformational change in 1,2-ED that maximizes hydrogen bonds between the fluoride and the hydroxyl groups. This effect was observed experimentally by the shift of 1H(O) and 19F NMR signals upon complexation, then suggesting that compounds containing the 1,2-ED moiety can be possible anion transporters.

  6. Development of electrochemical separation methods from molten fluoride salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straka, M.; Tulackova, R.; Chuchvalcova Bimova, K. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, 250 68 Husinec, Rez 130, (Czech Republic)

    2008-07-01

    Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is liquid-fueled reactor that can be used for actinide burning, production of electricity, production of hydrogen, and production of fissile fuels (breeding). The MSR concept was identified, along with five other concepts, as a suitable candidate of cooperative development by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). The MSR concept takes into account a circulating molten fluoride salts fuel mixture. Use of liquid fuel mixture results in possibility of its continuous (online) reprocessing. Within the proposed MSR fuel cycle, the electro-separation methods are considered as important techniques. The main aim of this work is to determine the electrochemical behaviour of selected actinides and lanthanides, which represents the fissile material and fission products, in suitable molten fluoride media as the general framework of our work is to verify the separation capability of the electrochemical methods and proposal of its integration into the MSR fuel cycle. Presented results were obtained by the method of cyclic voltammetry. The experimental set-up, preparation of the melt and results of selected measurements are presented in this paper and electrochemical behaviour of uranium and selected lanthanides are demonstrated by respective voltammograms evaluation. (authors)

  7. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B.; Zholobak, Nadezhda M. [Zabolotny Institute of Microbiology and Virology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv D0368 (Ukraine); Baranchikov, Alexander E. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ryabova, Anastasia V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Vladimir K., E-mail: van@igic.ras.ru [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. - Highlights: • Facile method of CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. • Naked CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to be non-toxic and to protect cells from the action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles are shown to protect living cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus.

  8. An experimental study of HF photodissociation: Spin{endash}orbit branching ratio and infrared alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.; Riehn, C.W.; Dulligan, M.; Wittig, C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0482 (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Single rotational levels of HF ({ital v}=3) were prepared by using overtone excitation and these molecules were then photodissociated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation at 193.3 nm. Time-of-flight spectra of the hydrogen atom fragment provided the spin{endash}orbit state distribution of the fluorine fragment. Changing the UV photolysis laser polarization confirmed an {ital A}{sup 1}{Pi}{l_arrow}{ital X}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} electronic transition in the photodissociation step. Photodissociation of HF at 121.6 nm is also reported. Infrared (IR) induced alignment of the diatom was studied by monitoring the IR laser polarization dependence of the H-atom product angular distribution. Depolarization due to hyperfine interaction was studied by using the {ital R}(0) transition. Agreement with theory is excellent. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. An experimental study of HF photodissociation: Spin-orbit branching ratio and infrared alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Riehn, C. W.; Dulligan, M.; Wittig, C.

    1996-05-01

    Single rotational levels of HF (v=3) were prepared by using overtone excitation and these molecules were then photodissociated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation at 193.3 nm. Time-of-flight spectra of the hydrogen atom fragment provided the spin-orbit state distribution of the fluorine fragment. Changing the UV photolysis laser polarization confirmed an A 1Π←X 1Σ+ electronic transition in the photodissociation step. Photodissociation of HF at 121.6 nm is also reported. Infrared (IR) induced alignment of the diatom was studied by monitoring the IR laser polarization dependence of the H-atom product angular distribution. Depolarization due to hyperfine interaction was studied by using the R(0) transition. Agreement with theory is excellent.

  10. [Remineralization of artificial root caries by fluoride dentifrice of different fluoride concentration in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Chun; Yu, Shao-Jie; Hu, De-Yu

    2010-12-01

    Although the effectiveness of fluoride dentifrice in remineralizing enamel caries has been established, the optimum fluoride concentration for remineralization root caries has not been defined. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the effect of 1.1g/L, 1.45g/L and 5g/L fluoride dentifrices in remineralization of artificial root caries. Sound human tooth fragments obtained from the cervical portion of root were stored in a demineralization solution for 96h at 37 degrees centigrade to induce artificial root caries lesions. The fragments were then randomly divided into four treatment groups including 1.1g/L, 1.45g/L, 5g/L fluoride dentifrice group and non-fluoride dentifrice control group. The demineralized samples were pH-cycled through treatment solutions, acidic buffer and neutral buffer for 8 days at 6 cycles per day. The samples were evaluated using electrical caries monitor(ECM), polarized light microscopy (PLM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The data was analyzed using ANOVA with SPSS13.0 software package. Variations of LgECM, total fluorescence and average fluorescence from CLSM after remineralization in fluoride dentifrice groups were significantly higher than those in the control group(Pdentifrice group were significantly higher than those in the 1.1g/L and 1.45g/L fluoride dentifrice groups(Pdentifrice groups. A wider mineral band was seen in the 5g/L fluoride dentifrice group than in the 1.1g/L and 1.45g/L fluoride dentifrice groups. Fluoride dentifrice is effective in remineralizing artificial root caries and 5g/L fluoride dentifrice has better effect than 1.1g/L and 1.45g/L fluoride dentifrices.

  11. Fluoride content in plaque solids and fluid after ingestion of fluoridated milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Mier, Esperanza A; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Buckley, Christine; Weitz, Andrea; Villa, Alberto; Zero, Domenick T

    2013-09-01

    This study explored differences in dental biofilm solids and fluid fluoride after ingestion of NaF or Na2FPO3 in milk or non-fluoridated milk. Eighteen volunteers ingested 1 mg fluoride in 200 mL of milk or 200 mL of non-fluoridated milk. Biofilm samples were collected at baseline, 30, 60, and 240 min and biofilm solids and fluid were micro-analyzed for fluoride. Analysis of variance was performed and the total delivery, retention, and clearance of fluoride to biofilm solids and fluid were estimated as the area under the curve between 0 and 240 min. No statistically significant differences were found for baseline values. Biofilm fluid fluoride values ranged from 0.11 ± 0.05 to 0.21 ± 0.08 µg F/mL while biofilm solid values ranged from 0.62 ± 0.39 to 1.75 ± 1.16 µg F/g. Biofilm fluid values were significantly lower at 60 min for Na2FPO3 in milk. Clearance profiles for biofilm fluid diverged after the initial 60 min. Na2FPO3 had a smaller area under the curve from 60 to 240 min than NaF. Results of this study indicate that the release and clearance of fluoride in biofilm vary among fluoridation compounds and that the concentrations in biofilm solids and fluid also vary and are not correlated to each other in many cases.

  12. Removal of fluoride from fluoride-bering cerium sulfate solution by hydrous zirconium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. He

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the removal of fluoride from fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution by amorphous hydrous zirconium oxide was studied. The FTIR, SEM, EDS and UV-vis spectra show that fluoride is successfully adsorbed on hydrous zirconium oxide, and cerium exists as Ce4+ in solution. The study indicates that it is feasible to separate fluorine and cerium from fluorine-bearing rare earth sulfate solution using hydrous zirconium oxide, and eliminate the influence of fluoride on the extraction separation of rare earths.

  13. Dental fluorosis and skeletal fluoride content as biomarkers of excess fluoride exposure in marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Death, Clare; Coulson, Graeme; Kierdorf, Uwe; Kierdorf, Horst; Morris, William K; Hufschmid, Jasmin

    2015-11-15

    Particulate and gaseous fluoride emissions contaminate vegetation near fluoride-emitting industries, potentially impacting herbivorous wildlife in neighboring areas. Dental fluorosis has been associated with consumption of fluoride-contaminated foliage by juvenile livestock and wildlife in Europe and North America. For the first time, we explored the epidemiology and comparative pathology of dental fluorosis in Australian marsupials residing near an aluminium smelter. Six species (Macropus giganteus, Macropus rufogriseus, Wallabia bicolor, Phascolarctos cinereus, Trichosurus vulpecula, Pseudocheirus peregrinus) demonstrated significantly higher bone fluoride levels in the high (n=161 individuals), compared to the low (n=67 individuals), fluoride areas (pdental lesions considered characteristic of dental fluorosis in eutherian mammals. Within the high-fluoride area, 67% of individuals across the six species showed dental enamel lesions, compared to 3% in the low-fluoride areas. Molars that erupted before weaning were significantly less likely to display pathological lesions than those developing later, and molars in the posterior portion of the dental arcade were more severely fluorotic than anterior molars in all six species. The severity of dental lesions was positively associated with increasing bone fluoride levels in all species, revealing a potential biomarker of excess fluoride exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Descriptive in vitro Electron Microscopic Study of Acidic Fluoride-Treated Enamel: Potential Anti-Erosion Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortsjö, Carl; Young, Alix; Kiesow, Andreas; Cismak, Andreas; Berthold, Lutz; Petzold, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the surface zones of acidic fluoride-treated enamel. Human teeth were each divided into three or four enamel specimens that were treated for 10 min with solutions of 0.2 and 0.4% HF (pH 3.09 and 2.94), 1.74% SnF2 (pH 2.9), 0.68% TiF4 (pH 1.6) and 0.84% NaF (pH 4.5). Untreated specimens functioned as negative controls. The microstructure and elemental composition of the surface zones were studied by scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanospot-EDX following cross-sectional preparation using focused ion beam technology. TEM/EDX analyses of NaF-treated specimens showed a 500-nm-thick closed surface film containing 20-40 at% (atomic percent) F. HF-treated specimens had a distinct surface film 200-600 nm thick (dense, not globular) containing 45-47 at% F. TiF4-treated specimens had a surface film of 200-300 nm in thickness containing 8-11 at% Ti but no detectable fluoride. SnF2-treated specimens had a modified surface enamel layer varying in thickness from 200 to 800 nm with an inhomogeneous distribution of Sn. Local spots were detected with as high as 8 at% Sn (30 wt%, weight percent). The results suggest that the reaction mechanisms of SnF2 and TiF4 solutions with dental enamel differ from those occurring after enamel exposure to acidulated NaF and HF solutions. While the HF and NaF treatments resulted in the formation of CaF2-like material as shown by EDX, no significant surface fluoridation was found for SnF2 and TiF4 solutions within the TEM/EDX detection limits. These results suggest that the erosion-protective mechanisms of these latter compounds probably relate more to the formation of hardly soluble and acid-resistant reaction surface films and less to surface fluoride incorporation.

  15. TD-DFT study on the excited-state proton transfer in the fluoride sensing of a turn-off type fluorescent chemosensor based on anthracene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ping; Ding, Jun-Xia; Chu, Tian-Shu

    2012-11-01

    The sensing mechanism for fluoride chemosensor based on anthracene structure has been investigated by DFT and TDDFT methods. The results show that the similar geometries in S(0) and S(1) states in the absence of the fluoride anion induce the local excited (LE) state over the anthracene moiety, which is responsible for the strong fluorescence. The fluorescence quenching phenomenon for F-coordinated complex can be explained by the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process from benzylic amide to anthracene moiety. Moreover, the strong electronegativity for fluoride anion in the F-complex constructs the intermolecular hydrogen bond of N-H…F in the ground state. In contrast, the upper proton in the urea group close to phenyl group prefers to bind fluoride anion in S(1) state of the F-complex, and it presents excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) to form another hydrogen bond like N…H-F, which has been confirmed by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and the potential energy curve of S(1) state for the function of N-H bond. In this novel and efficient fluoride fluorescent chemosensor based on anthracene, the anthracene moiety is regarded as not only the fluorescent source, but the template for introducing the binding sites for fluoride anion.

  16. High density fluoride glass calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Q.; Scheltzbaum, J.; Akgun, U.

    2014-04-01

    The unprecedented radiation levels in current Large Hadron Collider runs, and plans to even increase the luminosity creates a need for new detector technologies to be investigated. Quartz plates to replace the plastic scintillators in current LHC calorimeters have been proposed in recent reports. Quartz based Cherenkov calorimeters can solve the radiation damage problem, however light production and transfer have proven to be challenging. This report summarizes the results from a computational study on the performance of a high-density glass calorimeter. High-density, scintillating, fluoride glass, CHG3, was used as the active material. This glass has been developed specifically for hadron collider experiments, and is known for fast response time, in addition to high light yield. Here, the details of a Geant4 model for a sampling calorimeter prototype with 20 layers, and its hadronic as well as electromagnetic performances are reported.

  17. Spectrometric analysis of process etching solutions of the photovoltaic industry--determination of HNO3, HF, and H2SiF6 using high-resolution continuum source absorption spectrometry of diatomic molecules and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücker, Stefan; Acker, Jörg

    2012-05-30

    The surface of raw multicrystalline silicon wafers is treated with HF-HNO(3) mixtures in order to remove the saw damage and to obtain a well-like structured surface of low reflectivity, the so-called texture. The industrial production of solar cells requires a consistent level of texturization for tens of thousands of wafers. Therefore, knowing the actual composition of the etch bath is a key element in process control in order to maintain a certain etch rate through replenishment of the consumed acids. The present paper describes a novel approach to quantify nitric acid (HNO(3)), hydrofluoric acid (HF), and hexafluosilicic acid (H(2)SiF(6)) using a high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace absorption spectrometer. The concentrations of Si (via Si atom absorption at the wavelength 251.611 nm, m(0),(Si)=130 pg), of nitrate (via molecular absorption of NO at the wavelength 214.803 nm, [Formula: see text] ), and of total fluoride (via molecular absorption of AlF at the wavelength 227.46 nm, m(0,F)=13 pg) were measured against aqueous standard solutions. The concentrations of H(2)SiF(6) and HNO(3) are directly obtained from the measurements. The HF concentration is calculated from the difference between the total fluoride content, and the amount of fluoride bound as H(2)SiF(6). H(2)SiF(6) and HNO(3) can be determined with a relative uncertainty of less than 5% and recoveries of 97-103% and 96-105%, respectively. With regards to HF, acceptable results in terms of recovery and uncertainty are obtained for HF concentrations that are typical for the photovoltaic industry. The presented procedure has the unique advantage that the concentration of both, acids and metal impurities in etch solutions, can be routinely determined by a single analytical instrument. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Digitally Driven Antenna for HF Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    the 1-MHz carrier signal. This signal is then fed into the base terminals of an NPN/ PNP transistor pair arranged in a push–pull configura- tion. A dual...negative voltage connected to the collector terminal of the PNP transistor . Since it was not possible to explicitly simulate the radia- tion of the time...complementary pair of switching transistors is driven with a pulsewidth modulated HF signal, eliminating the requirement for a frequency-dependent

  19. RFID UHF i HF w bibliotekach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gładysz Bartłomiej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of the innovative Radio Frequency Identification (RFID technology to be applied for support, acceleration and automation of the circulation process of library collection is presented. Technology basics, and hardware and software components are described. Two different radio standards used in libraries are compared. The goal is to present the potential of RFID technology for libraries, to highlight the differences and to build a basis for further consideration of UHF and HF alternatives.

  20. FLUORIDE REMOVAL BY ADSORPTION ON THERMALLY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    is strong correlation between fluoride removal capacity and gibbsite content of the soil. From this .... obtained from market were tested in the same experiments. The soil ... prepared from this stock solution by dilution with distilled water. In order ...

  1. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J

  2. Materials processing apparatus development for fluoride glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Guy A.; Kosten, Sue; Workman, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Fluoride glasses have great potential for optical fiber communications due to the high transmittance when no microcrystallites occur during drawing operations. This work has developed apparatus to test the occurrence of microcrystallites during recrystallization in reduced gravity on the KC-135. The apparatus allows fluoride glass fiber, such as ZBLAN, to be melted and recrystallized during both the low and high g portions the parabolic flight.

  3. Magnetic exchange interaction via HF 2--bridges? Structure and magnetism of pipzH 2[MnF 4(HF 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentrup, U.; Harms, K.; Massa, W.; Pebler, J.

    2000-05-01

    pipzH 2[MnF 4(HF 2)] (pipz=piperazine) has been prepared from an aqueous hydrofluoric acid solution of Mn(III) acetate and its crystal structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray analysis: triclinic, space group Poverline11¯, Z=1, a=5.636(1), b=6.151(1), c=6.498(1) Å, α=99.52(1), β=90.62(1), γ=107.43(1)°, wR2=0.063, R=0.023. The structure consists of hitherto unique anionic chains where [MnF 4] units are bridged by HF 2- anions. The resulting [MnF 6] octahedra are strongly elongated, mainly due to the Jahn-Teller effect ( 1.84 Å, MnF ax 2.19 Å). The geometry of the centrosymmetrical bifluoride anion is close to that of KHF 2 (HF 1.14 Å), the angles at the angular bridge MnFH are 111.7°. Surprisingly, magnetic investigations revealed pure paramagnetic behavior. Thus, in contrast to several examples where antiferromagnetic coupling was observed via OH⋯F hydrogen bonds, the very strong hydrogen bonds in the symmetric F⋯H⋯F - anion are obviously not able to mediate magnetic exchange interactions.

  4. Topical laser application enhances enamel fluoride uptake and tribological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Y-R; Lin, T-T; Huang, J-S; Peng, S-R; Shieh, D-B

    2013-07-01

    Topical fluoride treatment prevents dental caries. However, the resulting calcium-fluoride-like deposits are soft and have poor wear resistance; therefore, frequent treatment is required. Lasers quickly heat surfaces and can be made portable and suitable for oral remedies. We examined the morphology, nanohardness, elastic modulus, nanowear, and fluoride uptake of fluoride-treated enamel followed by CO2 laser irradiation for 5 and 10 sec, respectively. We found that laser treatments significantly increased the mechanical properties of the calcium-fluoride-like deposits. The wear resistance of the calcium-fluoride-like deposits improved about 34% after laser irradiation for 5 sec and about 40% following irradiation for 10 sec. We also found that laser treatments increased fluoride uptake by at least 23%. Overall, laser treatment significantly improved fluoride incorporation into dental tissue and the wear resistance of the protective calcium-fluoride layer.

  5. Analysis of fluoride concentration in solutions prepared at dispensing pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pizzatto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fluoride plays an important role in oral health promotion and is considered important in dental caries prevention both in children and adults. Fluoride is widely used at high-risk conditions of caries, when the use of fluoride-containing mouthwashes is recommended, considering that fluoride itself reduces the risk of dental caries. Objective: To evaluate the fluoride concentration in solutions prepared at different dispensing pharmacies in the city of Curitiba – PR, Brazil. Material and methods: The analysis of fluoride concentration was preformed through Ion Chromatography method (DIONEX. Results: The results obtained through this analysis showed that all solutions presented fluoride concentration above that required in the dentist’s prescription, varying between 5.48% and 24.02% more fluoride, at absolute concentration. Conclusion: This finding highlights the increasing risk of fluoride acute intoxication in cases of accidental ingestion of the solution.

  6. Fluoride release and uptake capacities of fluoride-releasing restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Nuray; Turgut, Melek D

    2003-01-01

    Many fluoride-releasing dental materials are being sold on the basis of their cariostatic properties. However, the amount fluoride release of these materials is still uncertain. This study investigated the fluoride release and uptake characteristics of four flowable resin composites (Heliomolar Flow, Tetric Flow, Wave, Perma Flo), one flowable compomer (Dyract flow), one conventional glass ionomer cement mixed with two different powder/liquid ratios (ChemFlex Syringeable and ChemFlex Condensable), one packable resin composite (SureFil), one ion-releasing composite (Ariston pHc) and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer). Seven discs (6-mm diameter and 1.5-mm height) were prepared for each material. Each disc was immersed in 3.5 ml of deionized water within a plastic vial and stored at 37 degrees C. The deionized water was changed every 24 hours and the release of fluoride was measured for 30 days. At the end of this period, the samples were recharged with 2 ml of 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel for four minutes. Then, all samples were reassessed for an additional 10 days. The fluoride release of all samples was measured with a specific fluoride electrode and an ionanalyzer. Statistical analyses were conducted using two-way repeated measure ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests. For all tested materials, the greatest fluoride release was observed after the first day of the study (p0.05). Ariston pHc released the highest amount of fluoride, followed by ChemFlex Syringeable, Vitremer and ChemFlex Condensable. There were statistically significant differences among these materials (p<0.05). Fluoride release of all materials were significantly increased after the first day following refluoridation and Ariston pHc released the greatest among all materials (p<0.01). At the end of two days of refluoridation, the fluoride release rate for each material dropped quickly and stabilized within three days.

  7. The effective use of fluorides in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sheila; Burt, Brian A.; Petersen, Poul Erik; Lennon, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Dental caries remain a public health problem for many developing countries and for underprivileged populations in developed countries. This paper outlines the historical development of public health approaches to the use of fluoride and comments on their effectiveness. Early research and development was concerned with waterborne fluorides, both naturally occurring and added, and their effects on the prevalence and incidence of dental caries and dental fluorosis. In the latter half of the 20th century, the focus of research was on fluoride toothpastes and mouth rinses. More recently, systematic reviews summarizing these extensive databases have indicated that water fluoridation and fluoride toothpastes both substantially reduce the prevalence and incidence of dental caries. We present four case studies that illustrate the use of fluoride in modern public health practice, focusing on: recent water fluoridation schemes in California, USA; salt fluoridation in Jamaica; milk fluoridation in Chile; and the development of "affordable" fluoride toothpastes in Indonesia. Common themes are the concern to reduce demands for compliance with fluoride regimes that rely upon action by individuals and their families, and the issue of cost. We recommend that a community should use no more than one systemic fluoride (i.e. water or salt or milk fluoridation) combined with the use of fluoride toothpastes, and that the prevalence of dental fluorosis should be monitored in order to detect increases in or higher-than-acceptable levels. PMID:16211158

  8. Well Waters Fluoride in Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISI Ogbu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal fluoride levels in drinking water have been associated with adverse health effects. To determine the fluoride content of well waters in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria, water samples from 50 artisan wells chosen by multistage sampling procedure from the 5 zones of Enugu municipality were analyzed in duplicates for their fluoride content. The zonal mean values were 0.60, 0.70, 0.62, 0.62, and 0.63 mg/L for Abakpa Nike, Achara Layout, Obiagu/ Ogui, Trans Ekulu and Uwani, respectively (p<0.05. The mean value for the whole city was 0.63 mg/L. Although, the mean level of fluoride recorded in this study is currently within safe limits (1.5 mg/L, WHO 2011, it is important to monitor continuously the fluoride content of well waters in the municipality in view of the increasing industrial activities going on in the city and heavy reliance on well water for domestic purposes and the widespread use of consumer products containing fluoride.

  9. Analysis of 1-Minute Potentially Available Fluoride from Dentifrice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M; Holahan, Erin C; Schmuck, Burton D

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports found that some fluoride-containing dentifrices do not release effective concentrations of fluoride during brushing. Failure to release fluoride can be due to dentifrice matrix components that interfere with the solubilization of the fluoride salts during brushing. A new generation of dentifrices has the capability to precipitate beneficial fluoride salts during tooth brushing. Therefore, a method that assesses the potentially available fluoride during the 1-minute brushing is needed. A new filter-paper absorption method to assess the 1-min bioavailable fluoride concentration was developed to meet this need. This method utilizes coiled filter paper that rapidly absorbs the aqueous phase of the dentifrice slurry followed by centrifugation to recover that fluid for fluoride measurement via fluoride ion-selective electrode. The analytical method was used to successfully determine the total fluoride and 1-min bioavailable fluoride in eight dentifrice products containing sodium fluoride (NaF), disodium monofluorophosphate (Na2FPO3, MFP), stannous fluoride (SnF2), or NaF with amorphous calcium phosphate (NaF + ACP). The results showed that some of the dentifrices tested had significantly lower potentially available fluoride than the total fluoride. For a MFP-containing sample, aged seven years past its expiry date, there was significant reduction in the bioavailable fluoride compared to MFP products that were not aged. Other than the aged MFP and the SnF2-containing samples the bioavailable fluoride for all products tested had at least 80 % of the label fluoride concentration. The filter paper absorption method yielded reproducible results for the products tested with MFP samples showing the largest variations. PMID:25821392

  10. Cancer incidence and mortality in workers exposed to fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P; Olsen, J H; Jensen, O M;

    1992-01-01

    Although a recent bioassay showed increased frequency of bone cancer in rats with high oral intake of fluoride, the data are reported as equivocal evidence of carcinogenicity. In humans, occupational fluoride exposure may cause skeletal fluorosis, and our earlier follow-up of fluoride-exposed wor......Although a recent bioassay showed increased frequency of bone cancer in rats with high oral intake of fluoride, the data are reported as equivocal evidence of carcinogenicity. In humans, occupational fluoride exposure may cause skeletal fluorosis, and our earlier follow-up of fluoride...

  11. Utilization of waste phosphogypsum to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and its application towards removal of fluoride from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Deyi, E-mail: xixizhang@lut.cn [College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); State Key Laboratory of Gansu Advanced Non-ferrous Metal Materials, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Luo, Heming; Zheng, Liwen; Wang, Kunjie; Li, Hongxia; Wang, Yi; Feng, Huixia [College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel approach on recycle of waste phosphogypsum was exploited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphogypsum was utilized to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with high purity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer nHAp derived from PG exhibits excellent adsoprtion capacity for fluoride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluoride adsorbs onto nHAp mainly by electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond. - Abstract: In the present study, waste phosphogypsum (PG) was utilized firstly to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAp) via microwave irradiation technology. The nHAp derived from PG exhibited a hexagonal structure with the particle size about 20 nm Multiplication-Sign 60 nm and high purity. Meanwhile, the adsorption behaviour of fluoride onto the nHAp derived from PG was investigated to evaluate the potential application of this material for the treatment of the wastewater polluted with fluoride. The results indicate that the nHAp derived from PG can be used as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. The maximum adsorption capacities calculated from Langmuir-Freundlich model were 19.742, 26.108, 36.914 and 40.818 mg F{sup -}/g nHAp for 298, 308, 318 and 328 K, respectively. The pseudo-second order kinetic model was found to provide the best correlation of the used experimental data compared to the pseudo-first order and the adsorption isotherm could be well defined by Langmuir-Freundlich equation. The adsorption mechanism investigation shows that electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond are the main driving force for fluoride uptake onto nHAp derived from waste PG.

  12. Fluoride release and cariostatic potential of orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride rinsing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, Yeen; Sandham, John; Rumachik, Elena N.; Ruben, Jan L.; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the fluoride-release profiles and caries lesion development in an enamel model with brackets cemented with 4 orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride exposure. Methods: Four orthodontic adhesives (Ketac Cem mu, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany;

  13. Plaque formation and lactic acid production after use of amine fluoride/stannous fluoride mouthrinse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerardu, V.A.M.; Buijs, M.; Loveren, C. van; Cate, J.M. ten

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was lo determine the effects of 3 wk of daily rinsing with amine fluoride/stannous fluoride (AmF/SnF2) mouthrinse on plaque formation at buccal and interproximal sites, and on the acid production in plaque. in a randomized clinical trial with 30 participants. The amount of plaq

  14. Fluoride release, recharge and flexural properties of polymethylmethacrylate containing fluoridated glass fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bakri, I A; Swain, M V; Naoum, S J; Al-Omari, W M; Martin, E; Ellakwa, A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fluoridated glass fillers on fluoride release, recharge and the flexural properties of modified polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Specimens of PMMA denture base material with various loading of fluoridated glass fillers (0%, 1%, 2.5%, 5% and 10% by weight) were prepared. Flexural properties were evaluated on rectangular specimens (n = 10) aged in deionized water after 24 hours, 1 and 3 months. Disc specimens (n = 10) were aged for 43 days in deionized water and lactic acid (pH 4.0) and fluoride release was measured at numerous intervals. After ageing, specimens were recharged and fluoride re-release was recorded at 1, 3 and 7 days after recharge. Samples containing 2.5%, 5% and 10% glass fillers showed significantly (p glass fillers specimens. All experimental specimens exhibited fluoride release in both media. The flexural strength of specimens decreased in proportion to the percentage filler inclusion with the modulus of elasticity values remaining within ISO Standard 1567. The modified PMMA with fluoridated glass fillers has the ability to release and re-release fluoride ion. Flexural strength decreased as glass filler uploading increased. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  15. Fluoride concentration in plaque in adolescents after topical application of different fluoride varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sköld-Larsson, K; Modéer, T; Twetman, S

    2000-03-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the fluoride (F) concentration in plaque after a single topical application of different fluoride varnishes with contrasting levels of F. Thirty adolescents (12-17 years) with fixed orthodontic appliances were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Bifluoride (6% F), Duraphat (2.23% F) and Fluor Protector (0.1% F). The varnishes were applied after professional cleaning in one upper quadrant, leaving the opposite quadrant untreated according to the split-mouth technique. Pooled plaque samples from each quadrant were collected at baseline and 3 days, 7 days and 30 days after the varnish treatment, and fluoride was analysed by microdiffusion. All fluoride varnishes increased the fluoride concentration in plaque compared with baseline, and the mean values varied between 23 and 138 ng F/mg after 3 days, depending on varnish F concentration. Compared with the control quadrant, statistically significant elevations were recorded for Bifluoride after 3 days and 7 days and Duraphat after 3 days, while no significant differences were revealed in the Fluor Protector group. The fluoride concentration in plaque was back to baseline levels for all participants in the Duraphat group after 7 days, while some individuals in the Bifluoride and Fluor Protector groups still registered slightly increased levels after 30 days. The results suggest that fluoride varnish treatments resulted in elevated fluoride levels in plaque adjacent to fixed orthodontic appliances for a period of up to 1 week, although different patterns was disclosed for the various brands.

  16. Intraoral fluoride levels after use of conventional and high-fluoride dentifrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessan, Juliano P; Conceição, Juliana M; Grizzo, Larissa T; Székely, Melinda; Fazakas, Zita; Buzalaf, Marília Ar

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate saliva and plaque as indicators of intraoral fluoride (F) levels after the use of conventional and high-fluoride dentifrices. Subjects were randomly assigned to brush their teeth with conventional (1000 ppm F), high-fluoride (5000 ppm F), and placebo dentifrices (fluoride free) for 10 days, following a double-blind, crossover protocol. Saliva and plaque samples were collected on the morning of the 5(th) and 10th days, respectively at 1 and 12 h after brushing, and analyzed with an ion-selective electrode after HMDS-facilitated diffusion. Data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA, Tukey's test and Spearman's correlation coefficient (p dentifrices when compared to values obtained for placebo, except plaque 12 h after the use of conventional dentifrice. A positive and significant correlation was found between fluoride concentrations in plaque and saliva for both times of sample collection. Both indicators assessed were able to detect significant differences among treatments and between times after brushing. The use of a high-fluoride dentifrice is able to significantly increase intraoral fluoride levels throughout the day, being therefore a useful therapy for patients at high caries risk. A dentifrice with high fluoride concentration could be regarded as a useful therapy of F delivery for high caries-risk patients, since intraoral F levels were sustained throughout most of the day after using this formulation.

  17. Effect of titanium tetrafluoride, amine fluoride and fluoride varnish on enamel erosion in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A; Ruben, JL; Huysmans, MCDNJM

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of 1 and 4% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) gels, amine fluoride (AmF) 1 and 0.25% and a fluoride varnish (FP) on the prevention of dental erosion. Two experimental groups served as controls, one with no pretreatment and another one pre-treated with a

  18. Fluoride release and recharge abilities of contemporary fluoride-containing restorative materials and dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of five fluoride-releasing restorative materials and three dental adhesives, before and after NaF solution treatment. Five restorative materials (Fuji IX GP, GC Corp.; Ketac N100, 3M ESPE; Dyract Extra, Dentsply; Beautifil II, Shofu Inc.; Wave, SDI) and three dental adhesives (Stae, SDI; Fluorobond II - Shofu Inc.; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) were investigated before and after NaF solution treatment. A fluoride ion-selective electrode was to measure fluoride concentrations. During the 86-day period before NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP released the highest amount of fluoride among the restorative materials while Prime & Bond NT was the highest among the dental adhesives. After NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP again ranked the highest in fluoride release among the restorative materials while Fluorobond II ranked the highest among dental adhesives. It was concluded that the compositions and setting mechanisms of fluoride-containing dental materials influenced their fluoride release and recharge abilities.

  19. Pit and fissure sealants or fluoride varnishes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglia, L

    2016-09-01

    Despite the general advances in dental care, dental caries is still a global health problem affecting many children. Occlusal surfaces of first permanent molars are the most susceptible sites in the developing permanent dentition. Dentists should use sealants or fluoride varnish - as well as other means - to limit the onset of tooth decay. Application of sealants is a recommended procedure to prevent or control caries. Sealing occlusal surfaces of newly erupted permanent molars in children and teenagers delays caries onset up to 48 months compared with unsealed teeth. However longer follow-ups shows a reduction of the preventive effect [Tikhonova et al., 2015]. A review of 2013 pointed out how sealants are effective in high risk children, however information about the benefits of sealing in other conditions is still scant [Ahovuo-Saloranta et al., 2013]. Fluoride varnishes are frequently used to prevent early childhood caries and reduce caries increment in very young children [Weintraub et al., 2006] and in the most vulnerable populations, where the prevalence of caries is higher and specialist visits are occasional [Chu et al., 2010]. Many studies have reported the effectiveness of different types and forms of fluoride agents in preventing dental caries among children and adolescents [Divaris et al., 2013]. A review clarifies that professional application of a 5% sodium fluoride varnish leads to remineralisation of early enamel caries in children. Solutions of 38% silver diamine fluoride are effective in arresting active dentine caries [Gao et al., 2016]. The last systematic review [Ahovuo-Saloranta et al., 2016], comparing pit and fissure sealants with fluoride varnishes explains that the pooled estimate slightly favours resin sealants over fluoride varnishes at two years. At four and nine years, the only comparative study (with high drop-out rates) found more caries on fluoride-varnished occlusal surfaces than on resin-sealed surfaces. There is evidence

  20. Removal of fluoride from fluoride contaminated industrial waste water by electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vijaya A; Nanoti, Madan V

    2003-01-01

    Wastewater containing fluoride are generally treated with lime or calcium salt supplemented with aluminium salts. Wastewater generated from different industries does not always behave in the same way due to the presence of interfering contaminants. A number of techniques have been developed and studied for the removal of excessive fluoride. Most of these are based on use of aluminium salt. In alum coagulation the sorption properties of product of hydrolysis of aluminium salts and capacity of fluoride for complex formation plays a very important role. These hydrolysis products of aluminium can be produced by passing direct current through aluminium electrode. The text presented in the paper deals with the various aspect of removal of fluoride by electrolysis using aluminium electrode from fluoride chemical based industrial wastewater.

  1. Influence of the method of fluoride administration on toxicity and fluoride concentrations in Japanese quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, W.J.; Schuler, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Young Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were administered NaF for 16 d either in their diet or by esophageal intubation. Based on the total fluoride ion (Emg F-) intake over the l6-d experimental period, fluoride administered by intubation was at least six times more toxic than that fed in the diet. Dietary concentrations of 1,000 ppm F- (Emg F- for 16 d = approx. 144) produced no mortality, whereas intubated doses produced 73% or greater mortality in all groups administered 54 mg F- /kg/d or more (Emg F- for 16 d _ approx. 23 mg). GraphIc companson of the regression of log F- ppm in femurs/mg F- intake showed that fluoride levels in the femurs of quail administered fluoride by intubation were higher than in those administered fluoride in the diet.

  2. Two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides and oxides for hydrogen evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibilities of hydrogen evolution by basal planes of 2D metal dichalcogenides and oxides in the 2H and 1T class of structures using the hydrogen binding energy as a computational activity descriptor. For some groups of systems like the Ti, Zr, and Hf dichalcogenides the hydrogen...... of the two phases will be active for the hydrogen evolution reaction; however, in most cases the two phases are very close in formation energy, opening up the possibility for stabilizing the active phase. The study points to many new possible 2D HER materials beyond the few that are already known....

  3. The effect of fluoride exposure on the load-deflection properties of superelastic nickel-titanium-based orthodontic archwires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrari, Farzaneh; Ramazanzadeh, Barat-Ali; Sabzevari, Berahman; Ahrari, Ali

    2012-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that fluoride prophylactic agents may cause hydrogen absorption in NiTi wires and degrade their mechanical properties. To investigate the effect of a fluoride mouthwash on load-deflection characteristics of three types of nickel-titanium-based orthodontic archwires. Twenty maxillary 0.016 inch round specimens from each of the single-strand NiTi (Rematitan 'Lite'), multi-strand NiTi (SPEED Supercable) and Copper NiTi (Damon Copper NiTi) wires were selected. The specimens were kept in either 0.2% NaF or artificial saliva solutions at 37 degrees C for 24 hours (N = 10). The wire load-deflection properties were measured by a Zwick testing machine, using a three-point bending test. An un-paired student's t-test, a one-way ANOVA and a Tukey post-hoc test were used to assess statistical significance. Immersion in NaF solution affected the load-deflection properties of NiTi wires. The unloading forces at 0.5 and 1.0 mm deflections were significantly lower in fluoride-treated specimens compared with the control groups (p fluoride- and saliva-treated specimens (p > 0.05). The results suggested that subjecting NiTi wires to fluoride agents decreased associated unloading forces, especially at lower deflections, and may result in delayed tooth alignment.

  4. Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  5. Hydrogen storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C.J.; Sloan, E.D.

    2005-01-01

    The invention relates to the storage of hydrogen. The invention relates especially to storing hydrogen in a clathrate hydrate. The clathrate hydrate according to the present invention originates from a composition, which comprises water and hydrogen, as well as a promotor compound. The promotor comp

  6. The future of fluorides and other protective agents in erosion prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussi, Adrian; Carvalho, Thiago Saads

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of fluoride in caries prevention has been convincingly proven. In recent years, researchers have investigated the preventive effects of different fluoride formulations on erosive tooth wear with positive results, but their action on caries and erosion prevention must be based on different requirements, because there is no sheltered area in the erosive process as there is in the subsurface carious lesions. Thus, any protective mechanism from fluoride concerning erosion is limited to the surface or the near surface layer of enamel. However, reports on other protective agents show superior preventive results. The mechanism of action of tin-containing products is related to tin deposition onto the tooth surface, as well as the incorporation of tin into the near-surface layer of enamel. These tin-rich deposits are less susceptible to dissolution and may result in enhanced protection of the underlying tooth. Titanium tetrafluoride forms a protective layer on the tooth surface. It is believed that this layer is made up of hydrated hydrogen titanium phosphate. Products containing phosphates and/or proteins may adsorb either to the pellicle, rendering it more protective against demineralization, or directly to the dental hard tissue, probably competing with H(+) at specific sites on the tooth surface. Other substances may further enhance precipitation of calcium phosphates on the enamel surface, protecting it from additional acid impacts. Hence, the future of fluoride alone in erosion prevention looks grim, but the combination of fluoride with protective agents, such as polyvalent metal ions and some polymers, has much brighter prospects. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Improvements on Signal Processing for HF Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yongtan; SHEN Yiying

    2001-01-01

    In this paper improvements on signalprocessing are achieved to enhance the performancesof H-F radar system, being unobtainable by the con-ventional signal processing. Using the improved sig-nal processing both high range resolution and longcoherent integration time may be obtained for goodbenefit to the target resolution and weak signal de-tection. Modification to the unmatched correspon-dence between range delay samples and range resolu-tion ceils saves an additional accumulation loss in therange processing. Finally, comparisons between theimproved and the conventional signal processing aregiven by numerical simulation.

  8. Ferroelectricity and antiferroelectricity of doped thin HfO2-based films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Hyuk; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Han Joon; Kim, Yu Jin; Moon, Taehwan; Kim, Keum Do; Müller, Johannes; Kersch, Alfred; Schroeder, Uwe; Mikolajick, Thomas; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2015-03-18

    The recent progress in ferroelectricity and antiferroelectricity in HfO2-based thin films is reported. Most ferroelectric thin film research focuses on perovskite structure materials, such as Pb(Zr,Ti)O3, BaTiO3, and SrBi2Ta2O9, which are considered to be feasible candidate materials for non-volatile semiconductor memory devices. However, these conventional ferroelectrics suffer from various problems including poor Si-compatibility, environmental issues related to Pb, large physical thickness, low resistance to hydrogen, and small bandgap. In 2011, ferroelectricity in Si-doped HfO2 thin films was first reported. Various dopants, such as Si, Zr, Al, Y, Gd, Sr, and La can induce ferro-electricity or antiferroelectricity in thin HfO2 films. They have large remanent polarization of up to 45 μC cm(-2), and their coercive field (≈1-2 MV cm(-1)) is larger than conventional ferroelectric films by approximately one order of magnitude. Furthermore, they can be extremely thin (5 eV). These differences are believed to overcome the barriers of conventional ferroelectrics in memory applications, including ferroelectric field-effect-transistors and three-dimensional capacitors. Moreover, the coupling of electric and thermal properties of the antiferroelectric thin films is expected to be useful for various applications, including energy harvesting/storage, solid-state-cooling, and infrared sensors.

  9. The influence of saliva on the dissolution of calcium fluoride after application of different fluoride gels in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Elmar; Polydorou, Olga; Lussi, Adrian; Kielbassa, Andrej M; Altenburger, Markus J

    2010-10-01

    To determine the formation and dissolution of calcium fluoride on the enamel surface after application of two fluoride gel-saliva mixtures. From each of 80 bovine incisors, two enamel specimens were prepared and subjected to two different treatment procedures. In group 1, 80 specimens were treated with a mixture of an amine fluoride gel (1.25% F-; pH 5.2; 5 minutes) and human saliva. In group 2, 80 enamel blocks were subjected to a mixture of sodium fluoride gel (1.25% F; pH 5.5; 5 minutes) and human saliva. Subsequent to fluoride treatment, 40 specimens from each group were stored in human saliva and sterile water, respectively. Ten specimens were removed after each of 1 hour, 24 hours, 2 days, and 5 days and analyzed according to potassium hydroxide-soluble fluoride. Application of amine fluoride gel resulted in a higher amount of potassium hydroxide-soluble fluoride than did sodium fluoride gel 1 hour after application. Saliva exerted an inhibitory effect according to the dissolution rate of calcium fluoride. However, after 5 days, more than 90% of the precipitated calcium fluoride was dissolved in the amine fluoride group, and almost all potassium hydroxide-soluble fluoride was lost in the sodium fluoride group. Calcium fluoride apparently dissolves rapidly, even at almost neutral pH. Considering the limitations of an in vitro study, it is concluded that highly concentrated fluoride gels should be applied at an adequate frequency to reestablish a calcium fluoride-like layer.

  10. Fluoride removal from water by zirconium (IV) doped chitosan bio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    bio-composite was at par with commercial alumina to mitigate water fluoride limit .... analyzed for residual fluoride concentration by ion selective ..... zirconium (IV) doped chitosan were reused in another ... desalination in India: Review Article.

  11. State and National Water Fluoridation System (Public Water Systems)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Water Fluoridation Reporting System (WFRS) has been developed to provide tools to assist states in managing fluoridation programs. WFRS is designed to track all...

  12. Chemically modified field effect transistors with nitrite or fluoride selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, Martijn M.G.; Snellink-Ruël, Bianca H.M.; Engbersen, Johan F.J.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    1998-01-01

    Polysiloxanes with different types of polar substituents are excellent membrane materials for nitrite and fluoride selective chemically modified field effect transistors (CHEMFETs). Nitrite selectivity has been introduced by incorporation of a cobalt porphyrin into the membrane; fluoride selectivity

  13. Chemically modified field effect transistors with nitrite or fluoride selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, M.M.G.; Ruel, Bianca H.M.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    Polysiloxanes with different types of polar substituents are excellent membrane materials for nitrite and fluoride selective chemically modified field effect transistors (CHEMFETs). Nitrite selectivity has been introduced by incorporation of a cobalt porphyrin into the membrane; fluoride selectivity

  14. Fluoride removal studies in water using natural materials : technical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fluoride removal studies in water using natural materials : technical note. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL ... The removal of fluoride was attempted using natural materials such as red soil, ...

  15. Systematic Study on Triaxial Superdeformed Bands of Hf Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Da-Li; DING Bin-Gang

    2009-01-01

    Properties of the triaxial superdeformed (TSD) bands of Hf isotopes are investigated systematically within the supersymmetry scheme including many-body interactions and a perturbation possessing the SO(5) (or SU(5)) symmetry on the rotational symmetry. Quantitatively good results of the γ-ray energies, the dynamical moments of inertia,and the spin of the TSD bands in Hf isotopes are obtained. It shows that this approach is quite powerful in describing the properties of the triaxial superdeformation in Hf isotopes.

  16. Determining Energy Distributions of HF-Accelerated Electrons at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-18

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0383 Determining energy distributions of HF-accelerated electrons at HAARP Christopher Fallen University of Alaska Fairbanks...2012 - 11/14/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Determining energy distributions of HF-accelerated electrons at HAARP 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0424...transmitted from the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) transmitter in Alaska. For a given fixed HF-plasma interaction altitude

  17. Physics of the Geospace Response to Powerful HF Radio Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    studies of the response of the Earth’s space plasma to high-power HF radio waves from the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ...of HF heating and explored to simulate artificial ducts. DMSP- HAARP experiments revealed that HF-created ion outflows and artificial density ducts...in the topside ionosphere appeared faster than predicted by the models, pointing to kinetic (suprathermal) effects. CHAMP/GRACE- HAARP experiments

  18. Why are Hydrogen Bonds Directional?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABHISHEK SHAHI; ELANGANNAN ARUNAN

    2016-10-01

    The recent IUPAC recommendation on the definition of hydrogen bonding points out that directionality is a defining characteristic of a hydrogen bond and the angle ∠X-H-Y is generally linear or 180◦. It also suggests that the X-H· · ·Y angle be greater than 110◦ for an interaction to be characterized as a hydrogenbond but does not provide any rationale for the same. This article reports a rationale for limiting the angle, based on the electron density topology using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Electron density topology for common hydrogen bond donors HF, HCl, HBr, HNC, HCN and HCCH are reported in this work. These calculations lead to an interesting observation that the atomic basins of H atom in all these donor molecules are limited justifying the restriction of hydrogen bond angle. Moreover, similar analysis on some hydrogen bonded complexes confirms that beyond this angle the acceptor atom Y starts interacting with the atomic basin on X. However, conclusions based on bond lengths and angles have to be treated with care and as the IUPAC recommendation points out that independent ‘evidence for bond formation’ in every case is important.

  19. Thermodynamic data-base for metal fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Hyung; Lee, Byung Gik; Kang, Young Ho and others

    2001-05-01

    This study is aimed at collecting useful data of thermodynamic properties of various metal fluorides. Many thermodynamic data for metal fluorides are needed for the effective development, but no report of data-base was published. Accordingly, the objective of this report is to rearrange systematically the existing thermodynamic data based on metal fluorides and is to use it as basic data for the development of pyrochemical process. The physicochemical properties of various metal fluorides and metals were collected from literature and such existing data base as HSC code, TAPP code, FACT code, JANAF table, NEA data-base, CRC handbook. As major contents of the thermodynamic data-base, the physicochemical properties such as formation energy, viscosity, density, vapor pressure, etc. were collected. Especially, some phase diagrams of eutectic molten fluorides are plotted and thermodynamic data of liquid metals are also compiled. In the future, the technical report is to be used as basic data for the development of the pyrochemical process which is being carried out as a long-term nuclear R and D project.

  20. Fluoride and chlorhexidine release from filled resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C; Zhang, N-Z; Anusavice, K J

    2010-09-01

    Resin-based materials that release either fluoride or chlorhexidine have been formulated for inhibiting caries activity. It is not known if the two agents, when incorporated into one material, would interact and affect their release potential. We hypothesized that the ratio of fluoride to chlorhexidine incorporated into a resin, and the pH of the storage medium, will affect their releases from the material. The material investigated contained 23 wt% of filler, and the ratios of calcium fluoride to chlorhexidine diacetate were 8/2, 5/5, and 2/8. The release was conducted in pH 4, 5, and 6 acetate buffers. The results showed that release of either agent increased as the pH of the medium decreased. The presence of fluoride salt substantially reduced the chlorhexidine release, while the presence of a specific quantity of chlorhexidine significantly increased fluoride release. This interaction can be utilized to optimize the release of either agent for therapeutic purposes.

  1. Buffer layer investigations on MFIS capacitors consisting of ferroelectric poly[vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, K.; Seime, B.; Paloumpa, I.; Müller, K.; Schmeißer, D.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we present capacitance-voltage (CV) measurements on metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) capacitors with poly[vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene] (P[VDF/TrFE] as ferroelectric layer and SiO2, Al2O3 and HfO2 as buffering insulator layer. In order to discuss our data in a quantitative manner we perform fits to the data based on a model proposed by Miller and McWorther. The improvement of the polarization values and subsequently its effect on the hysteresis of the CV curve by the successive shrinking of the buffer layer thickness and the following choice of a high-k buffer material is demonstrated. Our data underline that a saturated polarization of P[VDF/TrFE] cannot be controlled with a SiO2 buffer layer and the insertion of a high-k buffer layer is essential for further improvements of the characteristics of MFIS stacks.

  2. Fabrication of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) Nanofibers Containing Nickel Nanoparticles as Future Energy Server Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Faheem A; Cantu, Travis; Macossay, Javier; Kim, Hern

    2011-04-01

    In the present study, we introduce Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanofibers containing nickel (Ni) nanoparticles (NPs) as a result of an electrospinning. Typically, a colloidal solution consisting of PVDF/Ni NPs was prepared to produce nanofibers embedded with solid NPs by electrospinning process. The resultant nanostructures were studied by SEM analyses, which confirmed well oriented nanofibers and good dispersion of Ni NPs over them. The XRD results demonstrated well crystalline feature of PVDF and Ni in the obtained nanostructures. Physiochemical aspects of prepared nano-structures were characterized for TEM which confirmed nanofibers were well-oriented and had good dispersion of Ni NPs. Furthermore, the prepared nano-structures were studied for hydrogen production applications. Due to high surface to volume ratio of nanofibers form than the thin film ones, there was tremendous increase in the rate of hydrogen production. Overall, results satisfactorily confirmed the use of these materials in hydrogen production.

  3. Thiourea Based Tweezer Anion Receptors for Selective Sensing of Fluoride Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG,You-Ming; CAO,Cheng; WEI,Wei; WEI,Tai-Bao

    2007-01-01

    Three 3,3'-di(4-substituted-phenyl)-1,1'-isophthaloylbis(thiourea) compounds were designed as novel neutral anion receptors, and synthesized by simple steps in good yields. The single crystal structure of receptor 1 shows that a solvent molecule was captured by the host molecule through intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Moreover, it was self-assembled as a supramolecular system for the presence of abundant inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding and π-π interactions between phenyl groups. Their application as anion receptors has been examined by UV-Vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy, showing that they had a higher selectivity for fluoride than other halides. The host and guest formed a 1∶1 stoichiometry complex through hydrogen bonding interactions in the first step, then following a process of deprotonation in presence of an excess of F- in the solvent of DMF.

  4. PEMISAHAN Zr – Hf SECARA SINAMBUNG MENGGUNAKAN MIXER SETTLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Biyantoro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK PEMISAHAN Zr – Hf SECARA SINAMBUNG MENGGUNAKANMIXER SETTLER. Telah dilakukan pemisahanZr – Hf secara sinambung menggunakan pengaduk pengenap (mixer settler 16 stage. Larutan umpan adalah zirkon nitrat dengan kadar Zr = 30786 ppm dan Hf = 499 ppm. Ekstraktan dipakai adalah solven 60 % TBP dalam kerosen dan larutan scrubbingyang dipakai adalah asam nitrat 1 M. Umpan masuk pada stageke 5 dikontakkan secara berlawanan arah dengan solven masuk pada stage ke 16 dan larutan scrubbing masuk pada stage ke 1. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah memisahkan unsur Zr dan Hf dari hasil olah pasir zirkon menggunakan solven TBP dengan alat mixer settler16 stage. Analisis umpan dan hasil proses pemisahan untuk zirkonium (Zr dilakukan dengan menggunakan alat pendar sinar-X, sedangkananalisis unsur hafnium (Hf menggunakan Analisis Pengaktifan Neutron (APN. Parameter penelitian dilakukan dengan variasi keasaman asam nitrat dalam umpan dan variasi waktu pada berbagai laju pengadukan. Hasil penelitian pemisahan unsur Zr dengan Hf diperolehkondisi optimum pada keasaman umpan 4 N HNO3, keseimbangan dicapai setelah 3jam dan laju pengadukan 3300 rpm. Hasil ekstrak  unsur zirkon (Zr diperoleh kadar sebesar 28577 ppm dengan efisiensi 92,76 % serta kadar pengotor hafnium (Hf sebesar 95 ppm. Kata Kunci: pemisahan Zr, Hf, ekstraksi, mixer settler, alat pendar sinar-X, APN. ABSTRACT SEPARATION of Zr - Hf CONTINUOUSLY USE THE MIXER SETTLER. Separation of Zr - Hf continuously using mixer settler 16 stage has been done. The feed solution is zircon nitrate concentration of Zr = 30786 ppm  and Hf = 499 ppm. As the solvent used extractant 60 % TBP in 40 % kerosene. Nitric acid solution used srubbing 1 M. The feed entered into stage to 5 is contacted with solvents direction on the stage to 16 and the scrubbing solution enter the stage to 1. The purpose of this study is to separate Zr and Hf of the results from the process of zircon sand using solvent TBP using 16 stage

  5. Mitigating Doppler shift effect in HF multitone data modem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonlu, Yasar

    1989-09-01

    Digital communications over High Frequency (HF) radio channels are getting important in recent years. Current HF requirements are for data transmission at rates 2.4 kbps or more to accommodate computer data links and digital secure voice. HF modems which were produced to meet these speeds are, serial modems and parallel modems. On the other hand, the HF sky-wave communication medium, the ionosphere, has some propagation problems such as multipath and Doppler shift. The effect of Doppler shift in a parallel modem which employs Differential Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (DQPSK) modulation is considered and a correction method to mitigate the Doppler Shift effect is introduced.

  6. Epitaxial Thin Films of Y doped HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Claudy; Khan, Asif; Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is one of a few metal oxides that is thermodynamically stable on silicon and silicon oxide. There has been renewed interest in HfO2 due to the recent discovery of ferroelectricity and antiferroelectricity in doped HfO2. Typical ferroelectrics - such as strontium bismuth tantalate (SBT) and lead zirconium titanate (PZT) - contain elements that easily react with silicon and silicon oxide at elevated temperatures; therefore, such ferroelectrics are not suited for device applications. Meanwhile, ferroelectric HfO2 offers promise regarding integration with silicon. The stable phase of HfO2 at room temperature is monoclinic, but HfO2 can be stabilized in the tetragonal, orthorhombic or even cubic phase by suitable doping. We stabilized Y-doped HfO2 thin films using pulsed laser deposition. The strain state can be controlled using various perovskite substrates and controlled growth conditions. We report on Y-doped HfO2 domain structures from piezo-response force microscopy (PFM) and structural parameters via X-ray reciprocal space maps (RSM). We hope this work spurs further interest in strain-tuned ferroelectricity in doped HfO2.

  7. Microstructural characterization of as-cast hf-b alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Jânio Gigolotti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available An accurate knowledge of several metal-boron phase diagrams is important to evaluation of higher order systems such as metal-silicon-boron ternaries. The refinement and reassessment of phase diagram data is a continuous work, thus the reevaluation of metal-boron systems provides the possibility to confirm previous data from an investigation using higher purity materials and better analytical techniques. This work presents results of rigorous microstructural characterization of as-cast hafnium-boron alloys which are significant to assess the liquid composition associated to most of the invariant reactions of this system. Alloys were prepared by arc melting high purity hafnium (minimum 99.8% and boron (minimum 99.5% slices under argon atmosphere in water-cooled copper crucible with non consumable tungsten electrode and titanium getter. The phases were identified by scanning electron microscopy, using back-scattered electron image mode and X-ray diffraction. In general, a good agreement was found between our data and those from the currently accepted Hafnium-Boron phase diagram. The phases identified are αHfSS and B-RhomSS, the intermediate compounds HfB and HfB2 and the liquide L. The reactions are the eutectic L ⇔ αHfSS + HfB and L ⇔ HfB2 + B-Rhom, the peritectic L + HfB2 ⇔ HfB and the congruent formation of HfB2.

  8. Estimated fluoride doses from toothpastes should be based on total soluble fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria José L; Martins, Carolina C; Paiva, Saul M; Tenuta, Livia M A; Cury, Jaime A

    2013-11-01

    The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF) rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride-TSF) in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80) or children's toothpaste (n = 78)). The estimated dose (mg F/day/Kg of body weight) of TF or TSF ingested was calculated from the chemical analysis of the toothpastes. Although the ingested dose of TF from the family toothpastes was higher than that from the children's toothpastes (0.074 ± 0.007 and 0.039 ± 0.003 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p toothpaste was found regarding the ingested dose based on TSF (0.039 ± 0.005 and 0.039 ± 0.005 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p > 0.05). The fluoride dose ingested by children from toothpastes may be overestimated if based on the TF of the product. This finding suggests that the ingested dose should be calculated based on TSF. Dose of TSF ingested by children is similar whether family or children's toothpaste is used.

  9. A simple and colorimetric fluoride receptor and its fluoride-responsive organogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Xudong, E-mail: 081022009@fudan.edu.cn [College of Science, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Yuhua Road 70, Shijiazhuang 050080 (China); Li Yajuan [College of Science, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Yuhua Road 70, Shijiazhuang 050080 (China); Yin Yaobing; Yu Decai [College of Science, Hebei University of Engineering, 199 South street of Guangming, Handan 056038 (China)

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a new p-nitrophenylhydrozine-based anion receptor 1 containing cholesterol group had been designed and synthesized. It could selectively recognize fluoride among different anions tested with color changes from pale yellow to red for visual detection. Simultaneously, it could gel in cyclohexane, and the gel was also fluoride-responsive. When treated with TBAF (tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride), the gel could undergo gel-sol transition accompanied by color, morphology and surface changes. The binding mechanism had been investigated by UV-vis and {sup 1}HNMR (proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra) titrations. From SEM (scanning electron microscope), SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering), IR (Infrared Spectroscopy) and CA (contact angle) experiments, it was indicated that the addition of F{sup -} could destroy the molecule assembly of host 1 in the gel state, thus resulting in the gel-to-sol transition due to the binding site competition effect. To the best of our knowledge, this was the simplest fluoride-responsive organogel with high selectivity. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel kind receptor for selective recognition of fluoride had been designed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its organogel was also fluoride-responsive. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the simplest fluoride-responsive organogel with high selectivity.

  10. Method for the analysis of total fluoride in fluoride-releasing dental varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, C M; Coleman, S S

    2014-01-01

    Today's fluoride-releasing varnishes (F-varnish) contain a wide variety of ingredients which present analytical challenges for measuring their total fluoride content. This study reports improved methods to measure fluoride content in F-varnishes. Six different commercially available F-varnishes that contain difluorosilane (0.1% F) or NaF (2.26% F) alone or in combination with calcium-phosphates were analyzed. In a vial, 1-3 drops (0.05-0.15 g) of varnish product was dispensed, dissolved in chloroform, equilibrated in TISAB and analyzed via fluoride ion-selective electrode. The average weight percentage of fluoride for all F-varnishes containing NaF ranged from 2.03 to 2.24% F, which is within 90% of the declared label concentration of 2.26% F. Analysis of the difluorosilane-containing product required an additional hydrolysis step. ANOVA found no significant difference between the 5% NaF varnishes at p fluoride analysis yields reliable and reproducible results and can be used for a wide variety of F-varnishes. The standard uncertainty for this method is ±4%. This method may become the basis for national and international standards that ensure the F-varnish products used in clinical practice have the fluoride content declared in the product literature. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Method for the Analysis of Total Fluoride in Fluoride-Releasing Dental Varnishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, C.M.; Coleman, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    Today’s fluoride-releasing varnishes (F-varnish) contain a wide variety of ingredients which present analytical challenges for measuring their total fluoride content. This study reports improved methods to measure fluoride content in F-varnishes. Six different commercially available F-varnishes that contain difluorosilane (0.1% F) or NaF (2.26% F) alone or in combination with calcium-phosphates were analyzed. In a vial, 1–3 drops (0.05–0.15 g) of varnish product was dispensed, dissolved in chloroform, equilibrated in TISAB and analyzed via fluoride ion-selective electrode. The average weight percentage of fluoride for all F-varnishes containing NaF ranged from 2.03 to 2.24% F, which is within 90% of the declared label concentration of 2.26% F. Analysis of the difluorosilane-containing product required an additional hydrolysis step. ANOVA found no significant difference between the 5% NaF varnishes at p fluoride analysis yields reliable and reproducible results and can be used for a wide variety of F-varnishes. The standard uncertainty for this method is ±4%. This method may become the basis for national and international standards that ensure the F-varnish products used in clinical practice have the fluoride content declared in the product literature. PMID:24557443

  12. Pharmacokinetics of fluoride in toddlers after application of 5% sodium fluoride dental varnish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Taves, Donald M; Kim, Amy S; Watson, Gene E; Horst, Jeremy A

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of dental caries (tooth decay) among preschool children is increasing, driven partially by an earlier age of onset of carious lesions. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends application of 5% sodium fluoride varnish at intervals increasing with caries risk status, as soon as teeth are present. However, the varnishes are marketed for treatment of tooth sensitivity and are regulated as medical devices rather than approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for prevention of dental caries (tooth decay). The objective of this research is to examine the safety of use in toddlers by characterizing the absorption and distribution profile of a currently marketed fluoride varnish. We measured urinary fluoride for 5 hours after application of fluoride varnish to teeth in 6 toddlers aged 12 to 15 months. Baseline levels were measured on a separate day. The urine was extracted from disposable diapers, measured by rapid diffusion, and extrapolated to plasma levels. The mean estimated plasma fluoride concentration was 13 μg/L (SD, 9 μg/L) during the baseline visit and 21 μg/L (SD, 8 μg/L) during the 5 hours after treatment. Mean estimated peak plasma fluoride after treatment was 57 μg/L (SD, 22 μg/L), and 20 μg/kg (SD, 4 μg/L) was retained on average. Retained fluoride was 253 times lower than the acute toxic dose of 5 mg/kg. Mean plasma fluoride after placement of varnish was within an SD of control levels. Occasional application of fluoride varnish following American Academy of Pediatrics guidance is safe for toddlers. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated use...

  14. Cancer incidence and mortality in workers exposed to fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P; Olsen, J H; Jensen, O M

    1992-01-01

    Although a recent bioassay showed increased frequency of bone cancer in rats with high oral intake of fluoride, the data are reported as equivocal evidence of carcinogenicity. In humans, occupational fluoride exposure may cause skeletal fluorosis, and our earlier follow-up of fluoride...

  15. Uses of sodium fluoride varnish in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C H; Lo, Edward

    2008-06-01

    Fluoride varnish is developed to prolong the contact time between fluoride and tooth surface, so that the tooth becomes more resistant to caries attack. The active ingredient of fluoride varnish is usually 5% sodium fluoride, (22,600 ppm fluoride). Studies have found that fairly insoluble globules of calcium fluoride-like material formed on the tooth surface after topical fluoride application. These globules act as a reservoir of fluoride in the mouth for a prolonged period of time. Systematic reviews corroborate evidence for the efficacy of fluoride varnish in the prevention of dental caries. Sodium fluoride varnish is used to prevent caries development, arrest early enamel and even soft dentine caries through promotion of remineralization of carious tooth substance. It is also used to treat tooth hypersensitivity. Some use it as a provisional luting agent by itself or combined with other provisional luting agents for cementing provisional crowns. Fluoride varnish has recently gained much attention in dentistry because it is quick and easy to apply. It sets rapidly on teeth, and gagging and swallowing is unusual. Side-effects or complications of its use are rare. Studies show that fluoride varnish is safe for young children and the risk of dental fluorosis is minimal. The simplicity of its application makes it very suitable and practical for use in dental clinics and outreach dental services, especially in young children and in other special needs groups.

  16. 49 CFR 179.102-4 - Vinyl fluoride, stabilized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vinyl fluoride, stabilized. 179.102-4 Section 179...-4 Vinyl fluoride, stabilized. Each tank used to transport vinyl fluoride, stabilized, must comply... subchapter), Type 304, 304L, 316 or 316L, in which case impact tests are not required; or (2) Steel complying...

  17. Health effects of fluoride pollution caused by coal burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, M.; Tadano, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Tamura, K.; Chen, X. [Regional Environment Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, 305-0083 Ibaraki (Japan); Asanuma, S. [Japan Institute of Rural Medicine, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Saku Central Hospital, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Kondo, T. [Matsumoto Dental College, Shiojiri, Nagano (Japan); Sakurai, S. [Otsuma Women' s University, Tama, Tokyo (Japan); Ji, R.; Liang, C.; Cao, S. [Institute of Environmental Health and Engineering, Beijing (China); Hong, Z. [Shanxi Maternity and Children' s Hospital, Taiyuan (China)

    2001-04-23

    Recently a huge amount of fluoride in coal has been released into indoor environments by the combustion of coal and fluoride pollution seems to be increasing in some rural areas in China. Combustion of coal and coal bricks is the primary source of gaseous and aerosol fluoride and these forms of fluoride can easily enter exposed food products and the human respiratory tract. Major human fluoride exposure was caused by consumption of fluoride contaminated food, such as corn, chilies and potatoes. For each diagnostic syndrome of dental fluorosis, a log-normal distribution was observed on the logarithm of urinary fluoride concentration in students in China. Urinary fluoride content was found to be a primary health indicator of the prevalence of dental fluorosis in the community. In the fluorosis areas, osteosclerosis in skeletal fluorosis patients was observed with a high prevalence. A biochemical marker of bone resorption, urinary deoxypyridinoline content was much higher in residents in China than in residents in Japan. It was suggested that bone resorption was stimulated to a greater extent in residents in China and fluoride may stimulate both bone resorption and bone formation. Renal function especially glomerular filtration rate was very sensitive to fluoride exposure. Inorganic phosphate concentrations in urine were significantly lower in the residents in fluorosis areas in China than in non-fluorosis area in China and Japan. Since airborne fluoride from the combustion of coal pollutes extensively both the living environment and food, it is necessary to reduce fluoride pollution caused by coal burning.

  18. Hf-W chronometry of primitive achondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, T.; Münker, C.; Mezger, K.; Palme, H.

    2010-03-01

    Metal segregation and silicate melting on asteroids are the most incisive differentiation events in the early evolution of planetary bodies. The timing of these events can be constrained using the short-lived 182Hf- 182W radionuclide system. Here we present new 182Hf- 182W data for major types of primitive achondrites including acapulcoites, winonaites and one lodranite. These meteorites are of particular interest because they show only limited evidence for partial melting of silicates and are therefore intermediate between chondrites and achondrites. For acapulcoites we derived a 182Hf- 182W age of Δ tCAI = 4.1 +1.2/ -1.1 Ma. A model age for winonaite separates calculated from the intercept of the isochron defines an age of Δ tCAI = 4.8 +3.1/ -2.6 Ma (assuming a bulk Hf/W ratio of ˜1.2). Both ages most likely define primary magmatic events on the respective parent bodies, such as melting of metal, although metal stayed in place and did not segregate to form a core. A later thermal event is responsible for resetting of the winonaite isochron, yielding an age of Δ tCAI = 14.3 +2.7/ -2.2 Ma, significantly younger than the model age. Assuming a co-genetic relationship between winonaites and silicates present in IAB iron meteorites (based on oxygen isotope composition) and including data by Schulz et al. (2009), a common parent body chronology can be established. Magmatic activity occurred between ˜1.5 and 5 Ma after CAIs. More than 5 Ma later, intensive thermal metamorphism has redistributed Hf-W. Average cooling rates calculated for the winonaite/IAB parent asteroid range between ˜35 and ˜4 K/Ma, most likely reflecting different burial depths. Cooling rates obtained for acapulcoites were ˜40 K/Ma to ˜720 K and then ˜3 K/Ma to ˜550 K. Accretion and subsequent magmatism on the acapulcoite parent body occurred slightly later if compared to most achondrite parent bodies (e.g., angrites, ureilites and eucrites), in this case supporting the concept of an inverse

  19. Pressure induced novel compounds in the Hf-O system from first-principles calculations

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Using first-principles evolutionary simulations, we have systematically investigated phase stability in the Hf-O system at pressure up to 120 GPa. New compounds Hf5O2, Hf3O2, HfO and HfO3 are discovered to be thermodynamically stable at certain pressure ranges and a new stable high-pressure phase is found for Hf2O with space group Pnnm and anti-CaCl2-type structure. Both P62m-HfO and P4m2-Hf2O3 show semimetallic character. Pnnm-HfO3 shows interesting structure, simultaneously containing oxide...

  20. HOUSEHOLD PURIFICATION OF FLUORIDE CONTAMINATED MAGADI (TRONA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    Purification of fluoride contaminated magadi is studied using bone char sorption and calcium precipitation. The bone char treatment is found to be workable both in columns and in batches where the magadi is dissolved in water prior to treatment. The concentrations in the solutions were 89 g magadi....../L and 95 and 400 mg F/L respectively in natural and synthetic solutions. The fluoride removal capacities observed were 4.6 mg F/g bone char for the column system and 2.7 mg F/g bone char for the batch system in case of synthetic magadi solution. It is however concluded that the batch system is the best...... treatment method. A procedure for purification of fluoride contaminated magadi at household level is described....

  1. Infrared spectra of hydrazine and products of its reactions with HF, F/sub 2/, and O/sub 3/ in solid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascola, R.; Withnall, R.; Andrews, L.

    1988-02-24

    Hydrazine, N/sub 2/H/sub 4/, and its reactions with HF, F/sub 2/, and O/sub 3/ have been studied in an argon matrix. Vibrational assignments have been made for hydrazine, including clarification of the /nu//sub 6/, /nu//sub 10/, and 2/nu//sub 7/ bands. Complexation of N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ with HF produced a strong band at 2928 cm/sup /minus/1/ (/nu//sub s/(HF)) and sharp bands at 940 and 922 cm/sup /minus/1/ (/nu//sub 1/(HF)), as well as several perturbed N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ submolecule absorptions; the frequencies of these bands suggest a chelated structure similar to that for the NH/sub 2/OH-HF complex. Hydrazine and fluorine reacted during deposition to give the NH/sub 2/NHF-HF complex (/nu//sub s/ = 3113 cm/sup /minus/1/, /nu//sub 1/ = 726, 680 cm/sup /minus/1/). Reaction of hydrazine and ozone produced hydroxyhydrazine, NH/sub 2/NHOH, and minor products during deposition; photolysis increased the yield of hydroxyhydrazine. Evidence for an intramolecular hydrogen bond was found for NH/sub 2/NHOH. This matrix study presents the first spectroscopic evidence for both NH/sub 2/NHF and NH/sub 2/NHOH. 32 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  2. Vitrification of strontium-90 fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, D.M.; Schulz, W.W.

    1977-04-01

    At Hanford, strontium-90 is removed from high-level nuclear fuel reprocessing waste and converted to strontium-90 fluoride. This /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ is doubly encapsulated in high-integrity containers which are placed under water in monitored storage pools. Conversion of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ to a more immobile compound may be necessary and/or desirable as part of the overall plan for the long-term management of Hanford Defense Wastes. Glasses containing up to 40 mass percent SrF/sub 2/ and having leach rates in the range 1 x 10/sup -8/ to 1 x 10/sup -5/ gram Sr/(m/sup 2/ . s) (1 x 10/sup -7/ to 1 x 10/sup -4/ g Sr/cm/sup 2/ . day)) have now been prepared. From 0.2 to 5 percent of the fluorine is volatilized during the melting of the glass batch at temperatures up to 1500/sup 0/K. At present, the heat generation limit for commercial glasses stored at a nuclear waste repository is 5 kW per canister. All glasses described here would exceed that limit by more than a factor of five. The stored /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ may be treated separately from the bulk of Hanford waste, in which case it would be diluted to an acceptable power level with inert chemicals in the glass batch. Another option is to blend the /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ with the bulk of the other Hanford wastes when those wastes are converted to some immobile form.

  3. Ferroelectricity of nondoped thin HfO2 films in TiN/HfO2/TiN stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tomonori; Xu, Lun; Shibayama, Shigehisa; Yajima, Takeaki; Migita, Shinji; Toriumi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    We report on the impact of TiN interfaces on the ferroelectricity of nondoped HfO2. Ferroelectric properties of nondoped HfO2 in TiN/HfO2/TiN stacks are shown in capacitance-voltage and polarization-voltage characteristics. The Curie temperature is also estimated to be around 500 °C. The ferroelectricity of nondoped HfO2 clearly appears by thinning HfO2 film down to ˜35 nm. We directly revealed in thermal treatments that the ferroelectric HfO2 film on TiN was maintained by covering the top surface of HfO2 with TiN, while it was followed by a phase transition to the paraelectric phase in the case of the open surface of HfO2. Thus, it is concluded that the ferroelectricity in nondoped HfO2 in this study was mainly driven by both of top and bottom TiN interfaces.

  4. Enhanced fluoride sorption by mechanochemically activated kaolinites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenakshi, S; Sundaram, C Sairam; Sukumar, Rugmini

    2008-05-01

    Kaolinite clay obtained from the mines was processed and studied for its fluoride sorption capacity. The surface area of the clay mineral was increased from 15.11 m(2)/g (raw) to 32.43 m(2)/g (activated) by mechanochemical activation. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to optimize various equilibrating conditions like the effect of contact time, dosage, pH for both raw and micronized kaolinites (RK and MK). The effect of other interfering anions on the defluoridation capacity (DC) of the sorbents was studied. Sorption of fluoride by the sorbents was observed over a wide pH range of 3-11. The studies revealed there is an enhanced fluoride sorption on MK. FTIR and XRD were used for the characterization of the sorbent. The surface morphology of the clay material was observed using SEM. The adsorption of fluoride was studied at three different temperatures, viz., 303, 313 and 323 K. The sorption data obtained at optimized conditions were subjected to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Sorption intensity (1/n) (0.770-0.810) has been evaluated using Freundlich isotherm, whereas the values of sorption capacity Q(0) (0.609, 0.714 and 0.782 mg/g) and binding energy b (0.158, 0.145 and 0.133 L/mg) at three different temperatures have been estimated using Langmuir isotherm. Adsorption process was found to be controlled by both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the sorption of fluoride on MK is endothermic and a spontaneous process. The kinetic studies indicate that the sorption of fluoride on MK follows pseudo-first-order and intraparticle diffusion models.

  5. Enhanced fluoride sorption by mechanochemically activated kaolinites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meenakshi, S. [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624302, Tamilnadu (India)], E-mail: drs_meena@rediffmail.com; Sundaram, C. Sairam [Department of Science and Humanities, Karaikal Polytechnic College, Karaikal 609609, Puducherry (India); Sukumar, Rugmini [Chemical Sciences and Technologies, Regional Research Laboratory, Trivandrum 695019, Kerala (India)

    2008-05-01

    Kaolinite clay obtained from the mines was processed and studied for its fluoride sorption capacity. The surface area of the clay mineral was increased from 15.11 m{sup 2}/g (raw) to 32.43 m{sup 2}/g (activated) by mechanochemical activation. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to optimize various equilibrating conditions like the effect of contact time, dosage, pH for both raw and micronized kaolinites (RK and MK). The effect of other interfering anions on the defluoridation capacity (DC) of the sorbents was studied. Sorption of fluoride by the sorbents was observed over a wide pH range of 3-11. The studies revealed there is an enhanced fluoride sorption on MK. FTIR and XRD were used for the characterization of the sorbent. The surface morphology of the clay material was observed using SEM. The adsorption of fluoride was studied at three different temperatures, viz., 303, 313 and 323 K. The sorption data obtained at optimized conditions were subjected to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Sorption intensity (1/n) (0.770-0.810) has been evaluated using Freundlich isotherm, whereas the values of sorption capacity Q{sup 0} (0.609, 0.714 and 0.782 mg/g) and binding energy b (0.158, 0.145 and 0.133 L/mg) at three different temperatures have been estimated using Langmuir isotherm. Adsorption process was found to be controlled by both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the sorption of fluoride on MK is endothermic and a spontaneous process. The kinetic studies indicate that the sorption of fluoride on MK follows pseudo-first-order and intraparticle diffusion models.

  6. Fluoride removal using lanthanum incorporated chitosan beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansiwal, Amit; Thakre, Dilip; Labhshetwar, Nitin; Meshram, Siddharth; Rayalu, Sadhana

    2009-11-01

    Highly selective material based on naturally occurring biomaterial namely chitosan has been designed for the defluoridation of water. Lanthanum incorporated chitosan beads (LCB) were prepared using precipitation method. The synthesis was optimized by varying different synthesis parameters namely lanthanum loading, complexation and precipitation time, strength of ammonia solution used for precipitation, drying time, etc. Lanthanum incorporated chitosan beads were characterized using SEM, FTIR, XRD and EDX. Surface area of LCB was observed to be 2.76 m(2)g(-1). The equilibrium adsorption data fitted well to Langmuir adsorption isotherm and showing maximum fluoride adsorption capacity of 4.7 mg g(-1) with negligible lanthanum release. Kinetic study reveals that adsorption of fluoride is fast and follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. The effect of pH was also studied and the best efficiency was observed at pH 5. Presence of sulphate, nitrate and chloride marginally affected the removal efficiency, however drastic reduction in fluoride uptake was observed in the presence of carbonate and bicarbonate. Negative value of change in free energy (DeltaG degrees) and positive value of change in entropy (DeltaS degrees) suggest the adsorption of fluoride by LCB is feasible and spontaneous process. Positive value of change in enthalpy (DeltaH degrees) suggests the process of fluoride adsorption is endothermic in nature. Regeneration study reveals that 1M ammonium chloride solution appears to be the promising regeneration media showing 81.22% regeneration. The adsorption capacity of LCB was similar in fluoride-contaminated ground water collected from Dhar district of Madhya Pradesh, India, as compared to simulated water.

  7. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  8. Modification of zeolities with ammonium fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosinski, E.J.

    1988-05-17

    A method for enhancing the shape selectivity and adjusting catalytic activity of a crystalline zeolite, including a highly siliceous zeolite, is disclosed. Such a method involves contacting the zeolite with an ammonium fluoride solution in the absence of an aluminum source, optionally contacting the treated zeolite with a warm aqueous solution of an ammonium salt, and then calcining the fluoride and ammonium treated zeolite to produce a more shape selective zeolite material. Such treated zeolite are useful in catalysts which promote shape selective conversion of organic compounds including, for example, hydrocarbon cracking reactions.

  9. Distribution of fluoride and calcium in plaque biofilms after the use of conventional and low-fluoride dentifrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessan, Juliano Pelim; Pinto Alves, Karina Mirela Ribeiro; Italiani, Flávia de Moraes; Ramires, Irene; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Whitford, Gary Milton; Toumba, Kyriacos Jack; Robinson, Colin; Buzalaf, Marilia Afonso Rabelo

    2014-07-01

    The distribution of fluoride and calcium in plaque after the use of fluoride dentifrices has not yet been determined. To evaluate fluoride and calcium distribution in sections of biofilms generated in situ after the use of conventional and low-fluoride dentifrices. Children (n = 11, 8–10 years old) brushed with placebo (fluoride-free), low-fluoride (513 mgF/kg), and conventional (1072 mgF/kg) dentifrices twice daily for 1 week, following a double-blind, cross-over protocol. Biofilms were generated using Leeds in situ devices, which were collected 1 and 12 h after brushing, and sectioned through their depth. Sections were grouped (10 x 5 μm) for fluoride and calcium analysis. Sections 4 lm thick were used for image analysis and determination of biomass fraction. Results were analysed by ANOVA, Tukey’s test, and linear regression analysis (P dentifrices tested, and these ions were directly correlated throughout most of biofilm’s sections. Results for conventional dentifrice were significantly higher than for the placebo, but did not differ from those for the low-fluoride dentifrice. The use of a low-fluoride dentifrice did not promote a higher fluoride uptake in inner biofilms’ sections, as hypothesized. As plaque fluoride was significantly elevated only after the use of the conventional dentifrice, the recommendation of low-fluoride formulations should be done with caution, considering both risks and benefits.

  10. Heat Source Neutron Emission Rate Reduction Studies - Water Induced HF Liberation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matonic, John; Brown, John; Foltyn, Liz; Garcia, Lawrence; Hart, Ron; Herman, David; Huling, Jeff; Pansoy-Hjelvik, M. E. Lisa; Sandoval, Fritz; Spengler, Diane

    2004-02-01

    Plutonium-238 oxide (238PuO2) is used in the fabrication of general purpose heat sources (GPHS) or light-weight radioisotope heater units (LWRHUs). The heat sources supply the thermal energy used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators to power spacecraft for deep space missions and to heat critical components in the cold environs of space. Los Alamos National Laboratory has manufactured heat sources for approximately two decades. The aqueous purification of 238PuO2 is required, due to rigorous total Pu-content, actinide and non-actinide metal impurity, and neutron emission rate specifications. The 238PuO2 aqueous purification process is a new capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory as previously, aqueous purified 238PuO2 occurred at other DOE complexes. The Pu-content and actinide and non-actinide metal impurity specifications are met well within specification in the Los Alamos process, though reduction in neutron emission rates have been challenging. High neutron emission rates are typically attributed to fluoride content in the oxide. The alpha decay from 238Pu results in α,n reactions with light elements such as 17O, 18O, and 19F resulting in high neutron emission rates in the purified 238PuO2. Simple 16O-exchange takes care of the high NER due to 17O, and 18O. A new method to reduce the NER due to 19F in the purified 238PuO2 is presented in this paper. The method involves addition of water to purified 238PuO2, followed by heating to remove the water and liberating fluoride as HF.

  11. Comparative evaluation of fluoride release from PRG-composites and compomer on application of topical fluoride: An in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhull K

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objective: To determine the fluoride release from Giomer and Compomer, using different topical fluoride regimes, and to compare the amount of fluoride release from giomer with that of compomer. Materials and Method: Forty-eight specimens of each giomer and compomer were divided into four treatment groups, namely, control group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once daily group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm twice daily group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once daily + fluoridated mouthwash (225 ppm group. Each specimen was suspended in demineralizing solution for six hours and remineralizing solution for 18 hours. Fluoride release was measured in both the demineralizing solution and remineralizing solution daily for seven days. Total daily fluoride release for each specimen was calculated by adding the amount released in the demineralizing solution to that released in remineralizing solution. Results and Conclusion: The fluoride release (ppm was found to be more in Giomer when compared to Compomer. The fluoride released from Giomer and Compomer was significantly greater in the acidic demineralizing solution than in the neutral remineralizing solution. It was found that increasing fluoride exposure significantly increased fluoride release from the giomer and compomer. It was found that the fluoride release from the subgroups of giomer and compomer was in the following order: fluoridated dentifrice twice daily > fluoridated dentifrice once daily + fluoridated mouthwash > fluoridated dentifrice once daily > control group. It was found that the giomer showed a greater fluoride uptake than the compomer.

  12. Hydrogen Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The series of absorption or emission lines that are characteristic of the hydrogen atom. According to the Bohr theory of the hydrogen atom, devised by Danish physicist Neils Bohr (1885-1962) in 1913, the hydrogen atom can be envisaged as consisting of a central nucleus (a proton) around which a single electron revolves. The electron is located in one of a number of possible permitted orbits, each...

  13. Synthesis of complex fluorides for optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepleton, Seth Eugene

    Large single crystals of alkali metal fluorides are desirable for many reasons. Fluoride laser crystals have a wide transmission range and on account of their low phonon energies, many efficient laser emissions have been obtained from 285 nm to 4.34 microm.1,2 Inorganic fluoride single crystals feature large bandgaps, very wide optical transmittance ranges from vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) to mid-IR wavelength regions, lower refractive indices than those of oxides, and typically lower phonon energies (which drastically reduce multiphonon relaxation rates of rare earth ions).3 The main goal of this work was to investigate the hydrothermal synthesis of alkali metal fluorides. Melt techniques have been used thoroughly to research a variety of fluoride systems and showed many phases that were inaccessible due to incongruent melting or phase stability. The existence of these phases was shown but never characterized or grown as a crystalline material. Solution growth in supercritical water was an ideal way to attempt the synthesis of novel compounds and phases. New synthetic routes to known phases and compounds also arose as a part of this work. Optically clear colorless crystals of K2BeF4 were synthesized up to 2 mm in size, and showed no phase transitions up to 1029 K, which suggests paraelectricitys at room temperature, contradicting previous reports.4 Attempts to incorporate a rare earth ion into the fluoroberyllate lattice proved unsuccessful however reactions between beryllium fluoride and lanthanide fluorides could be exploited as a synthetic route to single crystal rare earth fluorides. Hydrothermal reactions with KF produced crystals of three different phases: hexagonal KY2F7, trigonal KYF4 and orthorhombic K2YF5. All were optically clear, colorless crystals, with the K2YF5 crystals growing the largest. This compound is beneficial due to its application as a radiation dosimeter and laser host. 5,6 Optical quality colorless crystals of RbY2F7 and CsY2F7 up to 4 mm in

  14. Fluoride in Drinking Water -Its Effects and Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Gopal

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of fluoride in water, its metabolism, excretion. effect oingestion in human and cattle system and methods of fluoridation and defluoridation have been discussed. The presence of fluoride in waters occurring in India, with special reference to Rajasthan desert has been reviewed. Based on the survey and physico-chemical analyses of about 2,700 water samples of Rajasthan, distribution of fluoride in this area has been discussed wrth reference to drinking water standards. A water resources map showing concentrations of fluoride in four arid districts of Rajasthan is also presented.

  15. Effect of fluoride ion on the stability of DNA hairpin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Zhai, Weili; Gong, Hongling; Liu, Yanhui; Chen, Hu

    2017-06-01

    Fluoride prevents tooth decay as an additive in oral hygiene products, while high dose intake of fluoride from contaminated drinking water leads to fluorosis. Here we studied the effect of fluoride ion on the stability of DNA double helix using magnetic tweezers. The equilibrium critical force decreases with increasing concentration of fluoride in the range from 1 mM to 100 mM. Our results give the first quantitative measurement of DNA stability in the presence of fluoride ion, which might disturb DNA-related biological processes to cause fluorosis.

  16. [Chemical form changes of exogenous water solution fluoride and bioavailability in tea garden soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hui-Mei; Peng, Chuan-Yi; Chen, Jing; Hou, Ru-Yan; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2013-11-01

    Pot experiments and the sequential extraction method were conducted to study the chemical form changes of exogenous water solution fluoride in tea garden soil and their contribution to fluoride accumulation of tea plant. The results showed that the background concentration of all chemical forms of fluoride had little changes with time treatment, which was in a relatively stable state. The exogenous water solution fluoride adding to the soils was rapidly transformed to other fractions. Under the 10 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment, the concentration of water solution fluoride increased firstly and then decreased with time treatment, the concentration of organic matter fluoride and Fe/Mn oxides fluoride decreased, the concentration of exchangeable fluoride was not different before and after the treatment (P > 0.05), and the concentration of residual fluoride was in a relatively stable state; under the 200 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment, the concentration of water solution fluoride, Fe/Mn oxides fluoride and organic matter fluoride decreased with time treatment, the concentration of exchangeable fluoride increased firstly and then decreased, showed no difference before and after the treatment (P > 0.05), and the concentration of residual fluoride increased, with some differences compared with 10 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment. The concentration of total fluoride in root, stem and leaf had significant differences under 0-10 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment (P 0.05). Step regression analysis suggested the contribution of all chemical forms of fluoride to the concentration of water solution fluoride and total fluoride of root, stem and leaf had some differences, there was a remarkable regression relationship among the content of total fluoride in leaf and water solution fluoride, organic matter fluoride, Fe/Mn oxides fluoride and residual fluoride in soil, however, no significant difference for water solution fluoride of leaf was found.

  17. Assessment of total and soluble fluoride content in commercial dentifrices in Davangere: A cross sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    D J Veeresh; Umesh Wadgave

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The major reason for decline in dental caries across globe is because of widespread use of fluoride dentifrices. For a fluoride dentifrice to be effective in the control of dental caries, an adequate concentration of the fluoride must be soluble. Objective: To assess soluble fluoride and total fluoride content in selected commercial dentifrices in Davangere. Materials and Methods: The soluble fluoride and total fluoride content in six selected commercial dentifrices in Davangere...

  18. Synthesis of Freestanding HfO2 Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    Tang J, Fabbri J, Robinson RD, Zhu Y, Herman IP, Steigerwald ML, Brus LE: Solid-solution nanoparticles:use of a nonhydrolytic sol-gel synthesis to...colloidal HfO2 nanorods. Adv Mater 2007, 19:2608-2612. Page 21 5. Qiu X, Howe JY, Cardoso MB, Polat O, Heller W: Size control of highly ordered HfO2

  19. Parametric excitation of whistler waves by HF heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, S. P.; Lee, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Possible generation of whistler waves by Tromso HF heater is investigated. It is shown that the HF heater wave can parametrically decay into a whistler wave and a Langmuir wave. Since whistler waves may have a broad range of frequency, the simultaneously excited Langmuir waves can have a much broader frequency bandwidth than those excited by the parametric decay instability.

  20. Study of {sup 179}Hf{sup m2} excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnevsky, I. N.; Zheltonozhsky, V. A., E-mail: zhelton@kinr.kiev.ua; Savrasov, A. N. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute for Nuclear Research (Ukraine); Mazur, V. M. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Electronic Physics (Ukraine)

    2016-12-15

    Isomeric ratios of {sup 179}Hf{sup m2,g} yields in the (γ, n) reaction and the cross section for the {sup 179}Hf{sup m2} population in the (α, p) reaction are measured for the first time at the end-point energies of 15.1 and 17.5 MeV for bremsstrahlung photons and 26 MeV for alpha particles. The results are σ = (1.1 ± 0.11) × 10{sup −27} cm{sup 2} for the {sup 176}Lu(α, p){sup 179}Hf{sup m2} reaction and Y{sub m2}/Y{sub g} = (6.1 ± 0.3) × 10{sup −6} and (3.7 ± 0.2) × 10{sup −6} for the {sup 180}Hf(γ, n){sup 179}Hf{sup m22} reaction at E{sub ep} =15.1 and 17.5 MeV, respectively. The experimental data on the relative {sup 179}Hf{sup m2} yield indicate a single-humped shape of the excitation function for the {sup 180}Hf(γ, n){sup 179}Hf{sup m2} reaction. Simulation is performed using the TALYS-1.4 and EMPIRE-3.2 codes.

  1. Diffusion of Hf and Nb in Zr-19%Nb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Hood, G.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Schultz, R.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Matsuura, N. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Roy, J.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Jackman, J.A. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada). Met. Sci. and Technol.

    1996-05-01

    Diffusion of Hf and Nb in large-grained bcc Zr-19%Nb has been studied. Diffusion coefficients of Hf, D(Hf), were measured in the range 620-1173 K and D(Nb) was measured at 920 and 1167 K. The Hf diffusion profiles were determined by SIMS and the Nb profiles by microtome sectioning and radio-tracer counting. The Hf data show a smooth, temperature-dependent behaviour through the monotectoid temperature, 875 K, and may be characterised by D{approx}10{sup -9}.exp-1.4 (eV/kT) m{sup 2}/s. D(Nb) tends to be lower than the corresponding values for D(Hf). Overall, diffusion of Hf and Nb are characteristic of diffusion in bcc Zr. Surface hold-up (oxide film) at low temperatures was overcome by using ion-implanted Hf diffusion sources. The results are compared with earlier work and discussed in terms of diffusion mechanisms and the {beta}-phase transformation of commercial Zr-2.5Nb. (orig.).

  2. [New recommendations concerning the fluoride content of toddler toothpaste - consequences for systemic application of fluoride].

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, K G

    2002-01-01

    A group of experts from 4 European countries who gathered at a convention at Basel in November 1998, arrived at the recommendation to increase the fluoride (= F) content of toddler toothpastes from 250 ppm to 500 ppm. It was recommended to make parents brush the children's teeth with a pea-size piece of this toothpaste once a day, starting when the first deciduous teeth were erupting. Routine application of F-tablets would no longer be routinely prescribed, but restricted to individual indications in special high caries risk cases. This recommendation did not consider previous ones and was based exclusively on new scientific, mainly epidemiological evidence. In April 2000 the recommendation was officially issued by the German scientific dental association DGZMK.A careful case-control study resulted in the analysis of the risk to develop mottling of enamel under the influence of fluoridated water (1 ppm F) and fluoride toothpaste (1000 ppm F) when used in early childhood. It was found that excessive use of the fluoride toothpaste doubled the fluorosis risk, whereas when fluoride supplements (tablets, drops) were given the risk was about 20 times higher than without a fluoride supplement. Experiments in Germany and the Netherlands had shown that remineralisation of enamel under influence of 500 ppm F is achieved much more quickly than under application of 250 ppm F. A panel of WHO experts came to the conclusion that there was no evidence for the effectiveness of toothpastes containing less than 500 ppm. Statistics from the Netherlands have shown that the amount of fluoride tablets sold there is barely sufficient for the use by a quarter of all children 0 to 4 years old. In contrast to this low level of acceptance of fluoride tablets, fluoride toothpastes is widely accepted. It is their extensive use which explains the marked improvement of dentitions among the youth in this country during the last 20 years; the influence of topical fluoride gels, varnishes and other

  3. Oxygen Recovery in Hf Oxide Films Fabricated by Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ran; LI Zi-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The chemical structure of ultrathin Hf oxide films (< 10 nm) fabricated by a standard sputtering method is investigated using x-ray spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. According to the experiments,oxygen species are impacted to the HfO2/Si interface during the initial sputtering, and then released back to the upper Hf02 region driven by the oxygen concentration grads. A vacuum annealing can greatly enhance this recovery process. Additionally, significant SiO2 reduction in the interface is observed after the vacuum annealing for the thick HfO2 films in our experiment. It might be an effective method to confine the interracial layer thickness by sputtering thick HfO2 in no-oxygen ambient.

  4. Crystal structure of Si-doped HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lili; Nelson, Matthew; Aldridge, Henry; Iamsasri, Thanakorn; Fancher, Chris M.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Nishida, Toshikazu; Moghaddam, Saeed; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-01-01

    Si-doped HfO2 was prepared by solid state synthesis of the starting oxides. Using Rietveld refinement of high resolution X-ray diffraction patterns, a substitutional limit of Si in HfO2 was determined as less than 9 at. %. A second phase was identified as Cristobalite (SiO2) rather than HfSiO4, the latter of which would be expected from existing SiO2-HfO2 phase diagrams. Crystallographic refinement with increased Si-dopant concentration in monoclinic HfO2 shows that c/b increases, while β decreases. The spontaneous strain, which characterizes the ferroelastic distortion of the unit cell, was calculated and shown to decrease with increasing Si substitution.

  5. The (178m2)Hf Controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J A; Gemmell, D S; Schiffer, J P; Wilhelmy, J B

    2003-07-24

    Since its discovery in the 1960's the {sup 178m2}Hf isomer has garnered high attention from both the basic and applied communities in nuclear science. It's combination of high spin (16+), long half life (31 yrs), and high excitation energy (2.446 MeV) offer unique possibilities as an energy storage medium. Interest in the isomer was rekindled beginning in 1999 when a series of publications began to appear from a group (referred to here as the ''Texas collaboration'') primarily based at the University of Texas, Dallas [1]. They reported observations that some of the stored energy could be released (''triggered'') when the isomer was exposed to a fluence of photons in the energy range {approx}10 to {approx}60 keV. The implications of this observation are profound. Even though the claimed cross section for the process was {approx}7 orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted from the known systematics of photon absorption by nuclei in this mass range [2], such a highly efficient method for triggering the isomeric deexcitation immediately suggested applications utilizing the explosive or the controlled gradual energy release from a very compact source. The prospect of such applications has focused considerable interest on realizing the promise that is implicit in the reported observations. However, two experiments performed by a group from ANL/LANL/LLNL at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne (the ''APS collaboration'') reported negative results for the observation of any photon-triggered deexcitation of the {sup 178m2}Hf isomer [3]. This has led to a continued controversy, where both sides have adamantly defended their observations. At this point an outsider has difficulty determining whether there is indeed a triggering effect that should be pursued energetically with substantial resources, or whether the phenomenon consists of overly optimistic interpretation of data.

  6. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  7. Fluoride in Dental Biofilm Varies across Intra-Oral Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, Line; Baelum, Vibeke; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló

    2017-01-01

    Information on differences in biofilm fluoride concentration across intra-oral regions may help explain the distribution of caries within the dentition. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe the fluoride concentration in saliva and in biofilm fluid and biofilm solids across 6 intra......-oral regions. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected from 42 participants and biofilm harvested from the buccal sites in the 4 molar and 2 anterior regions. Samples were collected at least 1 h after use of fluoride dentifrice. No attempt was made to control the participants' food consumption or use of other...... topical agents. Centrifuged saliva, biofilm fluid, and biofilm solids were analysed for fluoride using a fluoride ion-selective electrode, adapted for microanalysis. Fluoride in biofilm varied across intra-oral regions. The mean biofilm fluid fluoride concentrations across the oral cavity ranged from 11...

  8. The effective use of fluorides in public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sheila; Burt, Brian A; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2005-01-01

    Dental caries remain a public health problem for many developing countries and for underprivileged populations in developed countries. This paper outlines the historical development of public health approaches to the use of fluoride and comments on their effectiveness. Early research......, systematic reviews summarizing these extensive databases have indicated that water fluoridation and fluoride toothpastes both substantially reduce the prevalence and incidence of dental caries. We present four case studies that illustrate the use of fluoride in modern public health practice, focusing on...... and their families, and the issue of cost. We recommend that a community should use no more than one systemic fluoride (i.e. water or salt or milk fluoridation) combined with the use of fluoride toothpastes, and that the prevalence of dental fluorosis should be monitored in order to detect increases in or higher...

  9. Prevention of dental caries through the effective use of fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    , lifestyles, and the existence of preventive oral health programmes. Research conducted in high income countries documents that systematic use of fluoride reduces the burden of dental caries; such research is scarce in low and middle income countries. Objectives: This article reviews the evidence on effective...... use of fluoride, highlights the public health approach to fluoridation, and clarifies how automatic fluoridation contributes to breaking social inequities in dental caries. Data collection: Scientific publications on fluoride administration stored in PubMed/Medline and caries data from the WHO...... databank. Outcome: Dental caries identified from national surveys or country relevant data; extraction of scientific reports is based on their public health relevance. Conclusions: The article outlines the history of fluoridation programmes and describes the sound evidence on automatic fluoridation through...

  10. FLUORIDE CONTENT OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE SOY MILK PRODUCTS IN THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rirattanapong, Opas; Rirattanapong, Praphasri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In Thailand, the consumption of soy milk products is common but there is limited data about their fluoride content. The purpose of this study was to es- timate the fluoride content of soy milk products available in Thailand. Fluoride content was determined for 76 brands of soy milk using a F-ion-specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 3.78 μg/ml. The fluoride content was not related to sugar content, soy bean content or the sterilization process. Among 3 brands of soy milk containing tea powder extract, the fluoride content was high (1.25 to 3.78 μg/ml). Most brands of soy milk tested in our study had fluoride content below the optimal daily intake but brands containing tea powder extract if consumed by children may increase their risk for fluorosis.

  11. Adverse effects of fluoride towards thyroid hormone metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enggar Abdullah Idris MZ

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available An easily ionized fluoride compound like Sodium Fluoride (NaF has been used thus far as a dental caries prevention substance. However, fluoride ions also have a negative effect because it is very toxic. Several types of research on the effect of fluoride on guinea pigs and human beings indicate the presence synthesis obstruction of T3 and T4 that causes declined production, known as hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism condition may obstruct tissue growth process and metabolism so as to impact various body organ systems. Preventive efforts against hypothyroidism caused by fluoride include avoiding diffusible fluoride compound intake, like NaF, in a long run systemic use, whereas efforts to overcome fluoride intoxication include consuming food that is rich in calcium, vitamin D, and antioxidant.

  12. Plasma chemical production of stable isotopes of germanium from its fluorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, Roman; Sennikov, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The reduction process of 72GeF4 in hydrogen plasma of RF-discharge (13.56 MHz) was experimentally investigated. It was found that 72Ge, polyfluorogermanes and gaseous HF were the main products of conversion. The behavior of the main electroactive impurities and of metal impurities in the process of hydrogen reduction of 72GeF4 was considered. Based on the data of emission spectroscopy of chemically active plasma, assumptions were made about the main plasma-chemical reactions responsible for the process of hydrogen reduction of 72GeF4. A single crystal of n-type with concentration of charge carriers of Czochralski method after the process of zone recrystallization of 72Ge. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  13. Crystal Structures of Fluoride and Chloride Complexes of Tris[(2-benzimidazolyl)methyl]amine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structures of fluoride and chloride complexes of tris[(2-benzimida-zolyl)methyl]amine 1 were characterized by X-ray crystallography.1 adopts C3 symmetrical geometry and cone-like conformation so as to allow its three NHs to associate with the anions through hydrogen bonds.Despite the different sizes of the anions, the two crystals are unexpectedly isostructural.The binding ability of the anions of 1 in solution was also studied by using of UV-vis spectroscopy.

  14. Fluoride Anion Recognition by a Multifunctional Urea Derivative: An Experimental and Theoretical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Jana; Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Sampedro, Diego; Marqués-López, Eugenia; Herrera, Raquel P.; Díaz Díaz, David

    2016-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate the ability of a multifaceted N,N′-disubstituted urea to selectively recognize fluoride anion (F−) among other halides. This additional function is now added to its already reported organocatalytic and organogelator properties. The signaling mechanism relies on the formation of a charge-transfer (CT) complex between the urea-based sensor and F¯ in the ground state with a high association constant as demonstrated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The nature of the hydrogen bonding interaction between the sensor and F¯ was established by 1H-NMR studies and theoretical calculations. Moreover, the recovery of the sensor was achieved by addition of methanol. PMID:27171087

  15. Preparation and properties of poly(vinylidene fluoride nanocomposites blended with graphene oxide coated silica hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Fu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide coated silica hybirds (SiO2-GO were fabricated through electrostatic assembly in this work, then blended with poly(vinylidene fluoride (PVDF by solution mixing to make PVDF nanocomposites. The interfacial interaction was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, polarized optical microscopy (POM and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The results showed that the interfacial interaction was enhanced by adding of SiO2-GO and strong hydrogen bonds were observed. The as-made nanocomposites were investigated using standard tensile test and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA measurements, mechanical properties of PVDF with SiO2-GO hybrids showed limited improvement.

  16. Design and performance of a lead fluoride detector as a luminosity monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Benito, R.; Khaneft, D. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz (Germany); O' Connor, C., E-mail: colton@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Capozza, L. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz (Germany); Diefenbach, J. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Gläser, B.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F.E.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    Precise luminosity measurements for the OLYMPUS two-photon exchange experiment at DESY were performed by counting scattering events with alternating beams of electrons and positrons incident on atomic electrons in a gaseous hydrogen target. Final products of Møller, Bhabha, and pair annihilation interactions were observed using a pair of lead fluoride Cherenkov calorimeters with custom housings and electronics, adapted from a system used by the A4 parity violation experiment at MAMI. This paper describes the design, calibration, and operation of these detectors. An explanation of the Monte Carlo methods used to simulate the physical processes involved both at the scattering vertices and in the detector apparatus is also included.

  17. Fluoride Anion Recognition by a Multifunctional Urea Derivative: An Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Jana; Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Sampedro, Diego; Marqués-López, Eugenia; Herrera, Raquel P; Díaz Díaz, David

    2016-05-09

    In this work we demonstrate the ability of a multifaceted N,N'-disubstituted urea to selectively recognize fluoride anion (F(-)) among other halides. This additional function is now added to its already reported organocatalytic and organogelator properties. The signaling mechanism relies on the formation of a charge-transfer (CT) complex between the urea-based sensor and F¯ in the ground state with a high association constant as demonstrated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The nature of the hydrogen bonding interaction between the sensor and F¯ was established by ¹H-NMR studies and theoretical calculations. Moreover, the recovery of the sensor was achieved by addition of methanol.

  18. Fluoride concentration in urine after silver diamine fluoride application on tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, D. L.; Bahar, A.; Gunawan, H. A.; Adiatman, M.; Rahardjo, A.; Maharani, D. A.; Toptanci, I. R.; Yavuz, I.

    2017-08-01

    Silver Diammine Fluoride (SDF), which contains fluoride, is known to inhibit tooth enamel demineralization and increase fluoride concentrations in saliva and urine. The aim of this study is to analyze the fluoride concentration in urine after application of SDF on tooth enamel. Urine from four subjects was collected prior to, 30 minutes after, and two and three hours after the application of SDF, and an ion-selective electrode was used to measure the fluoride concentrations. There was no significant difference between time 1 and time 2, time 1 and time 3, time 1 and time 4, time 2 and 3 (p > 0.05), and there was a significant difference between time 2 and time 4 as well as time 3 and time 4 (p < 0.05). There was a decrease in the concentration of fluoride ions in urine from the baseline to 30 minutes after application, and an increase from baseline to two and three hours after the application of SDF.

  19. Estimated Fluoride Doses from Toothpastes Should be Based on Total Soluble Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime A. Cury

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride—TSF in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80 or children’s toothpaste (n = 78. The estimated dose (mg F/day/Kg of body weight of TF or TSF ingested was calculated from the chemical analysis of the toothpastes. Although the ingested dose of TF from the family toothpastes was higher than that from the children’s toothpastes (0.074 ± 0.007 and 0.039 ± 0.003 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p 0.05. The fluoride dose ingested by children from toothpastes may be overestimated if based on the TF of the product. This finding suggests that the ingested dose should be calculated based on TSF. Dose of TSF ingested by children is similar whether family or children’s toothpaste is used.

  20. Estimated Fluoride Doses from Toothpastes Should be Based on Total Soluble Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria José L.; Martins, Carolina C.; Paiva, Saul M.; Tenuta, Livia M. A.; Cury, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF) rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride—TSF) in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80) or children’s toothpaste (n = 78)). The estimated dose (mg F/day/Kg of body weight) of TF or TSF ingested was calculated from the chemical analysis of the toothpastes. Although the ingested dose of TF from the family toothpastes was higher than that from the children’s toothpastes (0.074 ± 0.007 and 0.039 ± 0.003 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p 0.05). The fluoride dose ingested by children from toothpastes may be overestimated if based on the TF of the product. This finding suggests that the ingested dose should be calculated based on TSF. Dose of TSF ingested by children is similar whether family or children’s toothpaste is used. PMID:24189183

  1. Fluoride varnish or fluoride mouth rinse? A comparative study of two school-based programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, M K; Klausen, B J; Twetman, S

    2016-03-01

    In many Danish communities, school-based fluoride programs are offered to children with high caries risk in adjunct to tooth brushing. The purpose of this field trial was to compare the caries-preventive effectiveness of two different fluoride programs in 6-12 year olds. Clinical controlled trial. The 2-year study was conducted in Public Dental Clinics in a multicultural low-socioeconomic suburban area of Odense, Denmark with an elevated prevalence of caries compared to the city average. 1,018 children (aged 6-12 years) from 9 different schools were enrolled after informed consent and their class unit was randomly allocated to one of two fluoride programs. One group received a semi-annual fluoride varnish applications (FV) and the other group continued with an existing program with fluoride mouth rinses once per week (FMR). All children received oral hygiene instructions and comprehensive dental care at the local Public Dental Clinics throughout the study period. Increment of caries lesions in permanent teeth at both cavitated and initial caries levels. The groups were balanced at baseline. After two years, 961 children (94.4%) were reexamined. The FV group showed a mean DMFS increment of 0.36 compared to 0.41 in the FMR group. The corresponding values for initial caries lesions were 0.83 and 0.91 respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in caries development over two years among children participating in a school-based fluoride varnish or mouth rinse program.

  2. Solid electrolytes for fluoride ion batteries: ionic conductivity in polycrystalline tysonite-type fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongeat, Carine; Reddy, M Anji; Witter, Raiker; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2014-02-12

    Batteries based on a fluoride shuttle (fluoride ion battery, FIB) can theoretically provide high energy densities and can thus be considered as an interesting alternative to Li-ion batteries. Large improvements are still needed regarding their actual performance, in particular for the ionic conductivity of the solid electrolyte. At the current state of the art, two types of fluoride families can be considered for electrolyte applications: alkaline-earth fluorides having a fluorite-type structure and rare-earth fluorides having a tysonite-type structure. As regard to the latter, high ionic conductivities have been reported for doped LaF3 single crystals. However, polycrystalline materials would be easier to implement in a FIB due to practical reasons in the cell manufacturing. Hence, we have analyzed in detail the ionic conductivity of La(1-y)Ba(y)F(3-y) (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.15) solid solutions prepared by ball milling. The combination of DC and AC conductivity analyses provides a better understanding of the conduction mechanism in tysonite-type fluorides with a blocking effect of the grain boundaries. Heat treatment of the electrolyte material was performed and leads to an improvement of the ionic conductivity. This confirms the detrimental effect of grain boundaries and opens new route for the development of solid electrolytes for FIB with high ionic conductivities.

  3. Oral fluoride retention after professional topical application in children with caries activity: comparison between 1.23% fluoride foam and fluoride gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Claudia Costa Ribeiro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated fluoride retention in the saliva of children with caries activity after topical fluoride application in the form of gel and foam. Methods: A cross-sectional, blind and randomized study, conducted with ten caries-active children aged between 8 and 10 years, in two stage, with a washout interval of two weeks between them. The treatments consisted of: a application of 2mL acidulated phosphate fluoride of the gel type in a mold and b application of 2mL acidulated phosphate fluoride of the foam type in a mold. After the washout, the treatments were inverted. Non-stimulated saliva was collected from the children at the times of 5, 15, 30 and 60 minutes after topical fluoride application. For statistical analysis the Student’s-t test was used, with a level of significance of 5%. Results: Saliva analysis was performed using a fluoride-specific electrode (ISE25F/ Radiometer, Copenhagen, Denmark at the Aquatic Science Center of the Federal University of Marana, which revealed differences after 5 minutes (p=0.0055 and 15 minutes (p=0.0208. The topical application of fluoride in the gel form revealed a higher concentration of fluoride in the saliva. Conclusion: There were differences in the retention of fluoride in the saliva of children with caries activity after the topical application of fluoride gel and the topical application of fluoride foam after 5 and 15 minutes of their application. The topical application of fluoride foam is recommended, on the basis of the lower probability of toxicity during its use.

  4. Sorption of sulfuryl fluoride by food commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriranjini, Venkata-rao; Rajendran, Somiahnadar

    2008-08-01

    The use of sulfuryl fluoride, a structural fumigant for termite and woodborer control, has recently been expanded to treating stored food commodities and food facilities. There is, however, a lack of data on the sorption of sulfuryl fluoride by food commodities. Knowledge about sorption is important in the context of effective treatment and residues. When sulfuryl fluoride was applied at a dose of 50 g m(-3) to various food commodities (total 68) with 300 g per replicate in 0.75 L gas wash bottles (fumigation chambers) at 25 +/- 1 degrees C, in most cases (81%) the gas concentrations in the free space of the commodities exceeded 50 g m(-3) (range 51-80 g m(-3)) at the end of 24 h exposure. In chambers without the substrate, an average concentration of 49.7 g m(-3) was recorded. About 54% of the commodities showed low-level ( 50%). The latter include white oats (terminal gas concentration 17.8 g m(-3)), some of the decorticated split pulses (24.0-29.3 g m(-3)), chickpea flour (26.3 g m(-3)), dried ginger (29.0 g m(-3)), refined wheat flour (30.3 g m(-3)) and coriander powder (40.5 g m(-3)). In unfumigated control commodities, owing to interfering volatiles, Fumiscope readings in the range 0-13 were noted. Sulfuryl fluoride has the advantage of a low or moderate level of sorption with the majority of the food commodities.

  5. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornett, R.J., E-mail: Jack.Cornett@uottawa.ca [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Kazi, Z.H. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Zhao, X.-L. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Chartrand, M.G. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Charles, R.J.; Kieser, W.E. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF{sub 3}. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF{sub 3} precipitates were diluted about 6–8 fold with PbF{sub 2}. The measured concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  6. ADSORPTIVE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE FROM WATER USING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    fluoride solutions for adsorption and analysis were prepared by diluting an ..... The rate constant k2, can be determined by plotting t/qt vs. t based on ... aqueous solution is complex process and the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-.

  7. Effects of fluoridated milk on root dentin remineralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang H Arnold

    Full Text Available The prevalence of root caries is increasing with greater life expectancy and number of retained teeth. Therefore, new preventive strategies should be developed to reduce the prevalence of root caries. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of fluoridated milk on the remineralization of root dentin and to compare these effects to those of sodium fluoride (NaF application without milk.Thirty extracted human molars were divided into 6 groups, and the root cementum was removed from each tooth. The dentin surface was demineralized and then incubated with one of the following six solutions: Sodium chloride NaCl, artificial saliva, milk, milk+2.5 ppm fluoride, milk+10 ppm fluoride and artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. Serial sections were cut through the lesions and investigated with polarized light microscopy and quantitative morphometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The data were statistically evaluated using a one-way ANOVA for multiple comparisons.The depth of the lesion decreased with increasing fluoride concentration and was the smallest after incubation with artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. SEM analysis revealed a clearly demarcated superficial remineralized zone after incubation with milk+2.5 ppm fluoride, milk+10 ppm fluoride and artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. Ca content in this zone increased with increasing fluoride content and was highest after artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride incubation. In the artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride group, an additional crystalline layer was present on top of the lesion that contained elevated levels of F and Ca.Incubation of root dentin with fluoridated milk showed a clear effect on root dentin remineralization, and incubation with NaF dissolved in artificial saliva demonstrated a stronger effect.

  8. Water fluoridation in 40 Brazilian cities: 7 year analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzely Adas Saliba MOIMAZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Fluoride levels in the public water supplies of 40 Brazilian cities were analyzed and classified on the basis of risk/benefit balance. Material and Methods Samples were collected monthly over a seven-year period from three sites for each water supply source. The samples were analyzed in duplicate in the laboratory of the Center for Research in Public Health - UNESP using an ion analyzer coupled to a fluoride-specific electrode. Results A total of 19,533 samples were analyzed, of which 18,847 were artificially fluoridated and 686 were not artificially fluoridated. In samples from cities performing water fluoridation, 51.57% (n=9,720 had fluoride levels in the range of 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L; 30.53% (n=5,754 were below 0.55 mg F/L and 17.90% (n=3,373 were above 0.84 mg F/L (maximum concentration=6.96 mg F/L. Most of the cities performing fluoridation that had a majority of samples with fluoride levels above the recommended parameter had deep wells and more than one source of water supply. There was some variability in the fluoride levels of samples from the same site and between collection sites in the same city. Conclusions The majority of samples from cities performing fluoridation had fluoride levels within the range that provides the best combination of risks and benefits, minimizing the risk of dental fluorosis while preventing dental caries. The conduction of studies about water distribution systems is suggested in cities with high natural fluoride concentrations in order to optimize the use of natural fluoride for fluoridation costs and avoid the risk of dental fluorosis.

  9. Fluoride in the environment and its metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Sunil Kumar; Mishra, Vinay Kumar; Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Damodaran, Thukkaram

    2011-01-01

    The presence of environmental fluoride and its impact on human health is well documented. When consumed in adequate quantity, fluoride prevents dental caries, assists in the formation of dental enamels, and prevents deficiencies in bone mineralization. At excessive exposure levels, ingestion of fluoride causes dental fluorosis skeletal fluorosis, and manifestations such as gastrointestinal, neurological, and urinary problems. The distribution of fluoride in the environment is uneven and largely is believed to derive from geogenic causes. The natural sources of fluoride are fluorite, fluorapatite, and cryolite, whereas anthropogenic sources include coal burning, oil refining, steel production, brick-making industries, and phosphatic fertilizer plants, among others. Among the various sources of fluoride in the environment, those of anthropogenic origin have occasionally been considered to be major ones. The gourndwater is more susceptible to fluoride accumulation and contamination than are other environmental media, primarily because of its contact with geological substrates underneath. The high fluoride concentration in water usually reflects the solubility of fluoride (CaF₂). High concentrations are also often associated with soft, alkaline, and calcium-deficient waters. The fluoride compounds that occur naturally in drinking water are almost totally bioavailable (90%) and are completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. As a result, drinking water is considered to be the potential source of fluoride that causes fluorosis. Because the bioavailability of fluoride is generally reduced in humans when consumed with milk or a calcium-rich diet, it is highly recommended that the inhabitants of fluoride-contaminated areas should incorporate calcium-rich foods in their routine diet. Guidelines for limiting the fluoride intake from drinking water have been postulated by various authorities. Such limits are designed to protect public health and should reflect all

  10. Hydrogen Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  11. Fluorine for Hydrogen Exchange in the Hydrofluorobenzene Derivatives C6HxF(6-x), where x = 2, 3, 4 and 5 by Monomeric [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH; The Solid State Isomerization of [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2Ce(2,3,4,5-C6HF4) to [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2Ce(2,3,4,6-C6HF4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Richard; Werkema, Evan L.; Andersen, Richard A.

    2008-04-21

    The reaction between monomeric bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium hydride, Cp'2CeH, and several hydrofluorobenzene derivatives is described. The aryl derivatives that are the primary products, Cp'2Ce(C6H5-xFx) where x = 1,2,3,4, are thermally stable enough to be isolated in only two cases, since all of them decompose at different rates to Cp'2CeF and a fluorobenzyne; the latter is trapped by either solvent when C6D6 is used or by a Cp'H ring when C6D12 is the solvent. The trapped products are identified by GCMS analysis after hydrolysis. The aryl derivatives are generated cleanly by reaction of the metallacycle, Cp'((Me3C)2C5H2C(Me2)CH2)Ce, with a hydrofluorobenzene and the resulting arylcerium products, in each case, are identified by their 1H and 19F NMR spectra at 20oC. The stereochemical principle that evolves from these studies is that the thermodynamic isomer is the one in which the CeC bond is flanked by two ortho-CF bonds. This orientation is suggested to arise from the negative charge that is localized on the ipso-carbon atom due to Co(delta+)-Fo(delta-) polarization. The preferred regioisomer is determined by thermodynamic rather than kinetic effects; this is illustrated by the quantitative, irreversible solid-state conversion at 25oC over two months of Cp'2Ce(2,3,4,5-C6HF4) to Cp'2Ce(2,3,4,6-C6HF4), an isomerization that involves a CeC(ipso) for C(ortho)F site exchange.

  12. Fluorine for Hydrogen Exchange in the Hydrofluorobenzene Derivatives C6HxF(6-x), where x = 2, 3, 4 and 5 by Monomeric [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH; The Solid State Isomerization of [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2Ce(2,3,4,5-C6HF4) to [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2Ce(2,3,4,6-C6HF4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Richard; Werkema, Evan L.; Andersen, Richard A.

    2008-04-21

    The reaction between monomeric bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium hydride, Cp'2CeH, and several hydrofluorobenzene derivatives is described. The aryl derivatives that are the primary products, Cp'2Ce(C6H5-xFx) where x = 1,2,3,4, are thermally stable enough to be isolated in only two cases, since all of them decompose at different rates to Cp'2CeF and a fluorobenzyne; the latter is trapped by either solvent when C6D6 is used or by a Cp'H ring when C6D12 is the solvent. The trapped products are identified by GCMS analysis after hydrolysis. The aryl derivatives are generated cleanly by reaction of the metallacycle, Cp'((Me3C)2C5H2C(Me2)CH2)Ce, with a hydrofluorobenzene and the resulting arylcerium products, in each case, are identified by their 1H and 19F NMR spectra at 20oC. The stereochemical principle that evolves from these studies is that the thermodynamic isomer is the one in which the CeC bond is flanked by two ortho-CF bonds. This orientation is suggested to arise from the negative charge that is localized on the ipso-carbon atom due to Co(delta+)-Fo(delta-) polarization. The preferred regioisomer is determined by thermodynamic rather than kinetic effects; this is illustrated by the quantitative, irreversible solid-state conversion at 25oC over two months of Cp'2Ce(2,3,4,5-C6HF4) to Cp'2Ce(2,3,4,6-C6HF4), an isomerization that involves a CeC(ipso) for C(ortho)F site exchange.

  13. Water Fluoridation: A Critical Review of the Physiological Effects of Ingested Fluoride as a Public Health Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine is the world's 13th most abundant element and constitutes 0.08% of the Earth crust. It has the highest electronegativity of all elements. Fluoride is widely distributed in the environment, occurring in the air, soils, rocks, and water. Although fluoride is used industrially in a fluorine compound, the manufacture of ceramics, pesticides, aerosol propellants, refrigerants, glassware, and Teflon cookware, it is a generally unwanted byproduct of aluminium, fertilizer, and iron ore manufacture. The medicinal use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries began in January 1945 when community water supplies in Grand Rapids, United States, were fluoridated to a level of 1 ppm as a dental caries prevention measure. However, water fluoridation remains a controversial public health measure. This paper reviews the human health effects of fluoride. The authors conclude that available evidence suggests that fluoride has a potential to cause major adverse human health problems, while having only a modest dental caries prevention effect. As part of efforts to reduce hazardous fluoride ingestion, the practice of artificial water fluoridation should be reconsidered globally, while industrial safety measures need to be tightened in order to reduce unethical discharge of fluoride compounds into the environment. Public health approaches for global dental caries reduction that do not involve systemic ingestion of fluoride are urgently needed. PMID:24719570

  14. Water Fluoridation: A Critical Review of the Physiological Effects of Ingested Fluoride as a Public Health Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Peckham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorine is the world’s 13th most abundant element and constitutes 0.08% of the Earth crust. It has the highest electronegativity of all elements. Fluoride is widely distributed in the environment, occurring in the air, soils, rocks, and water. Although fluoride is used industrially in a fluorine compound, the manufacture of ceramics, pesticides, aerosol propellants, refrigerants, glassware, and Teflon cookware, it is a generally unwanted byproduct of aluminium, fertilizer, and iron ore manufacture. The medicinal use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries began in January 1945 when community water supplies in Grand Rapids, United States, were fluoridated to a level of 1 ppm as a dental caries prevention measure. However, water fluoridation remains a controversial public health measure. This paper reviews the human health effects of fluoride. The authors conclude that available evidence suggests that fluoride has a potential to cause major adverse human health problems, while having only a modest dental caries prevention effect. As part of efforts to reduce hazardous fluoride ingestion, the practice of artificial water fluoridation should be reconsidered globally, while industrial safety measures need to be tightened in order to reduce unethical discharge of fluoride compounds into the environment. Public health approaches for global dental caries reduction that do not involve systemic ingestion of fluoride are urgently needed.

  15. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  16. Hydrogen carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Teng; Pachfule, Pradip; Wu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to be a major energy vector in a renewable and sustainable future energy mix. The efficient production, storage and delivery of hydrogen are key technical issues that require improvement before its potential can be realized. In this Review, we focus on recent advances in materials development for on-board hydrogen storage. We highlight the strategic design and optimization of hydrides of light-weight elements (for example, boron, nitrogen and carbon) and physisorbents (for example, metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks). Furthermore, hydrogen carriers (for example, NH3, CH3OH-H2O and cycloalkanes) for large-scale distribution and for on-site hydrogen generation are discussed with an emphasis on dehydrogenation catalysts.

  17. Ferroelectricity-modulated resistive switching in Pt/Si:HfO2/HfO2-x /Pt memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Jiang; Xianghao, Du; Zuyin, Han

    2016-08-01

    It is investigated for the effect of a ferroelectric Si:HfO2 thin film on the resistive switching in a stacked Pt/Si:HfO2/highly-oxygen-deficient HfO2-x /Pt structure. Improved resistance performance was observed. It was concluded that the observed resistive switching behavior was related to the modulation of the width and height of a depletion barrier in the HfO2-x layer, which was caused by the Si:HfO2 ferroelectric polarization field effect. Reliable switching reproducibility and long data retention were observed in these memory cells, suggesting their great potential in non-volatile memories applications with full compatibility and simplicity. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11374182), the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province (No. ZR2012FQ012), and the Jinan Independent Innovation Projects of Universities (No. 201303019).

  18. Power-Stepped HF Cross Modulation Experiments at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S.; Moore, R. C.; Langston, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    High frequency (HF) cross modulation experiments are a well established means for probing the HF-modified characteristics of the D-region ionosphere. In this paper, we apply experimental observations of HF cross-modulation to the related problem of ELF/VLF wave generation. HF cross-modulation measurements are used to evaluate the efficiency of ionospheric conductivity modulation during power-stepped modulated HF heating experiments. The results are compared to previously published dependencies of ELF/VLF wave amplitude on HF peak power. The experiments were performed during the March 2013 campaign at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Observatory. HAARP was operated in a dual-beam transmission format: the first beam heated the ionosphere using sinusoidal amplitude modulation while the second beam broadcast a series of low-power probe pulses. The peak power of the modulating beam was incremented in 1-dB steps. We compare the minimum and maximum cross-modulation effect and the amplitude of the resulting cross-modulation waveform to the expected power-law dependence of ELF/VLF wave amplitude on HF power.

  19. Arsenic from community water fluoridation: quantifying the effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Emily; Shapiro, Howard; Li, Ye; Minnery, John G; Copes, Ray

    2016-04-01

    Community water fluoridation is a WHO recommended strategy to prevent dental carries. One debated concern is that hydrofluorosilicic acid, used to fluoridate water, contains arsenic and poses a health risk. This study was undertaken to determine if fluoridation contributes to arsenic in drinking water, to estimate the amount of additional arsenic associated with fluoridation, and compare this to the National Sanitation Foundation/American National Standards Institute (NSF/ANSI) standard and estimates from other researchers. Using surveillance data from Ontario drinking water systems, mixed effects linear regression was performed to examine the effect of fluoridation status on the difference in arsenic concentration between raw water and treated water samples. On average, drinking water treatment was found to reduce arsenic levels in water in both fluoridated and non-fluoridated systems by 0.2 μg/L. However, fluoridated systems were associated with an additional 0.078 μg/L (95% CI 0.021, 0.136) of arsenic in water when compared to non-fluoridated systems (P = 0.008) while controlling for raw water arsenic concentrations, types of treatment processes, and source water type. Our estimate is consistent with concentrations expected from other research and is less than 10% of the NSF/ANSI standard of 1 μg/L arsenic in water. This study provides further information to inform decision-making regarding community water fluoridation.

  20. Effects of different amine fluoride concentrations on enamel remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, E A; Niemann, N; Aretz, L; Arnold, W H

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of decreasing fluoride concentrations on repeated demineralizing challenges on human enamel. In 24 teeth, 3mm×3mm windows were prepared on the buccal and lingual sides and treated in a cycling demineralization-remineralization model. Remineralization was achieved with 100, 10 and 0.1 ppm fluoride from anime fluoride. Coronal sections were cut through the artificial lesions, and three sections per tooth were investigated using polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with quantitative element analysis. The morphology of the lesions was studied, and the extensions of the superficial layer and the body of the lesion were measured. Using element analysis, the Ca, P and F content were determined. The body of the lesion appeared remineralized after application of 100 ppm fluoride, while remineralization of the lesion was less successful after application of 10 and 0.1 ppm fluoride. The thickness of the superficial layer increased with decreasing fluoride concentrations, and also the extension of the body of the lesion increased. Ca and P content increased with increasing fluoride concentrations. The effectiveness of fluoride in enamel remineralization increased with increasing fluoride concentration. A consistently higher level of fluoride in saliva should be a goal in caries prevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.