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Sample records for hexavalent chromium delays

  1. Groundwater contaminant by hexavalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium has been investigated as a function of total manganese in soils as well as various incubation conditions. Chromium and manganese contents were analyzed by atomic absorption (graphite furnace and flame emission respectively) following acid digestion. Total hexavalent chromium generation capacity was determined by addition of 0.001 M CrCL3, incubation, and analysis by s-diphenyl carbazide. Samples were then leached with CaSO{sub 4} and MgSO{sub 4} and incubated in various environments (oven, freeze-drier, field moist, ultrafreeze) to test for geogenic generation of Cr(IV). The degree of geogenic generation of hexavalent chromium was compared with total Mn and Cr content as well as hexavalent generational capacity.

  2. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    Also, acute systemic poisoning can result from high exposure to hexavalent chromium [2]. Most of the chromium ions in wastewater especially hexavalent chromium originates from industries such as electroplating, metal finishing and magnetic tape manufacturing. For these industrial groups, chromium is a problematic one.

  3. seasonal variation in chromium hexavalent and copper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    that chromium hexavalent and copper enrichment occurred in the rainy season in the order of Cr+6chromium hexavalent and ...

  4. Hexavalent Chromium IV-Free Primer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, Michael J.; Buck, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Primer materials provide corrosion protection for metal parts as well as an increased adhesion between metallic substrates and thermal protection systems (TPSs). Current primers for use in cryogenic applications contain hexavalent chromium. This hexavalent chromium provides excellent corrosion protection even in a cryogenic environment, but it is a carcinogen that requires special equipment and waste control procedures to use. The hazardous nature of hexavalent chromium makes it an obsolescence risk in the future. This study included two phases of evaluation. Thirteen primers were initially identified as candidates and twelve of those primers were tested in phase 1. Four of the best performing candidates from phase 1 continued into phase 2 testing. Phase 1 testing consisted mostly of liquid constituent and physical property testing. Cryoflex and salt fog testing were included in phase 1 because of their importance to the overall success of a candidate material. Phase 2 consisted of physical, thermal, and mechanical properties for nominally processed and fabricated specimens.

  5. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from water at pH≤7 and in 90 min contact time. Maximum adsorption capacity was determined to be 0.788 mg Cr+6/g granular ferric hydroxide. Although relatively good adsorption of sulfate and chloride had been specified in this study, the interfering effects of these two anions had not been detected in concentrations of 200 and 400 mg/L. The absorbability of hexavalent chromium by granular ferric hydroxide could be expressed by Freundlich isotherm with R2>0.968. However, the disadvantage was that the iron concentration in water was increased by the granular ferric hydroxide. Nevertheless, granular ferric hydroxide is a promising adsorbent for chromium removal, even in the presence of other interfering compounds, because granular ferric hydroxide treatment can easily be accomplished and removal of excess iron is a simple practice for conventional water treatment plants. Thus, this method could be regarded as a safe and convenient solution to the problem of chromium-polluted water resources.

  6. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium (chromium (VI) ion from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    taye

    2015-04-01

    Apr 1, 2015 ... An experimental effluent analysis was conducted in conjunction with bioremediation process from ... Hexavalent Chromium (Cr (VI) is a by-product released .... Agriculture waste either saw dust or rice husk was procured from. Sabon Gari market, Zaria, Nigeria and brought to the Laboratory for analysis.

  7. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute Severe Chromium Poisoning After Dermal Exposure to Hexavalent Chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chi Lin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute chromium poisoning related to dermal involvement has rarely been reported in the literature. We report a case of acute severe chromium poisoning through skin exposure as a result of a chemical burn of 15% of the body surface area and multiple organ failure after short-term exposure. Medical interventions, including mechanical ventilation, continuous venovenous hemofiltration, and plasmapheresis were performed. In addition, a chelating agent, dimercapto-propane sulfonic acid, was infused intravenously, combined with intravenous N-acetylcysteine and ascorbic acid as adjuvant therapy. The patient was discharged on day 33 without long-term sequelae. The consequence of transdermal exposure of hexavalent chromium should not be overlooked.

  9. 40 CFR 749.68 - Hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals in cooling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... municipality; any interstate body; and any department, agency, or instrumentality of the Federal Government... the following language: WARNING: This product contains hexavalent chromium. Inhalation of hexavalent...

  10. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (Peer Review Plan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hexavalent chromium that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  11. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Graphite chitosan binary (GCB) composite was prepared for hexavalent chromium adsorption from studied water. GCB was ... Sorption mechanisms based on metal ionic interactions, intrusion/diffusion and chemisorptions onto composite.

  12. 75 FR 18041 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Minimizing Use of Hexavalent Chromium (DFARS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... Supplement; Minimizing Use of Hexavalent Chromium (DFARS Case 2009-D004) AGENCY: Defense Acquisition... requirements for minimizing the use of hexavalent chromium in defense weapon systems, subsystems, components, and other items. The proposed rule prohibits the delivery of items containing hexavalent chromium...

  13. Review article. Adverse hematological effects of hexavalent chromium: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Rina Rani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Workers of tanneries, welding industries, factories manufacturing chromate containing paints are exposed to hexavalent chromium that increas¬es the risk of developing serious adverse health effects. This review elucidates the mode of action of hexavalent chromium on blood and its adverse effects. Both leukocyte and erythrocyte counts of blood sharply decreased in Swiss mice after two weeks of intraperitoneal treatment with Cr (VI, with the erythrocytes transforming into echinocytes. The hexavalent chromium in the blood is readily reduced to trivalent form and the reductive capacity of erythrocytes is much greater than that of plasma. Excess Cr (VI, not reduced in plasma, may enter erythrocytes and lymphocytes and in rodents it induces microcytic anemia. The toxic effects of chromium (VI include mitochondrial injury and DNA damage of blood cells that leads to carcinogenicity. Excess Cr (VI increases cytosolic Ca2+ activity and ATP depletion thereby inducing eryptosis. Se, vitamin C, and quercetin are assumed to have some protective effect against hexavalent chromium induced hematological disorders.

  14. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [1]. Among heavy metals, chromium is non-biodegradable, bio-available and persists as trivalent and hexavalent species. Cr(VI) moves readily via soils and water appeared more toxic as it causes lung cancer, besides absorption through skin. [2], while Cr(III) is less toxicity and relatively innocuous. Cr(VI) generates in waste ...

  15. Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hexavalent chromium exists in aquatic media as water soluble complex anions and persist. These are concentrated in industrial waste water especially from the tannery industries and release of effluents from industries adversely affects the environment. The removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions is carried ...

  16. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium onto sisal pulp/polypyrrole composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Y. Y.; Wei, C.; Gong, Y. Y.; Du, L. L.

    2017-02-01

    Sisal pulp/polypyrrole composites(SP/PPy) utilized for the removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from wastewater, were prepared via in-situ chemical oxidation polymerization approach. The structure and morphology of the SP/PPy were analyzed by polarizing optical microscopy (POM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM)), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the results indicated SP could be efficient dispersion of PPy. The hexavalent chromium adsorption results indicate adsorption capacity of the SP/PPy were dependent on the initial pH, with an optimum pH of 2.0. The sorption kinetic data fitted well to the pseudo-second order model and isotherm data fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity determined from the Langmuir isotherm is 336.70 mg/g at 25° C.

  17. Biosorption of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Medium with Opuntia Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    José A. Fernández-López; José M. Angosto; Avilés, María D.

    2014-01-01

    The biosorption of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by Opuntia cladodes and ectodermis from cactus fruits was investigated. Both types of biomass are considered low-cost, natural, and ecofriendly biosorbents. Batch experiments were carried out to determine Cr(VI) biosorption capacity and the efficiency of the biosorption process under different pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration, and sorbent dosage. The biosorption of Cr(VI) by Opuntia biomass was highly pH dependent, favoring higher ...

  18. Removal and transformation of hexavalent chromium in sequencing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the efficiency of removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and to ascertain the fate of Cr(VI) in the treatment process. An SBR was operated with the FILL, REACT, SETTLE, DRAW and IDLE periods in the time ratio of 2:12:2:1.5:6.5 for a cycle ...

  19. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  20. Biological groundwater treatment for hexavalent chromium removal at low chromium concentrations under anoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panousi, E; Mamais, D; Noutsopoulos, C; Mpertoli, K; Kantzavelou, C; Nyktari, E; Kavallari, I; Nasioka, M; Kaldis, A

    2017-10-31

    The objective of this work is to evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range under anoxic conditions. The effect of type of organic substrate added as feed to the groundwater treatment system (milk, sugar and cheese whey), the effect of different concentrations of chemical oxygen demand added in the feed (100, 150 and 200 mg/L) and the effect of different hydraulic residence time (1.7, 0.9 and 0.7 d) on process performance were evaluated through the operation of a series of sequential batch reactors under anoxic conditions. Biomass receiving Cr(VI) contaminated groundwater with a low nitrates content exhibited similar Cr(VI) removal efficiency under reductive conditions, with biomass receiving Cr(VI) contaminated groundwater with a high nitrates content. The concentration of organic substrate was crucial for the microbial reduction of Cr(VI). The different hydraulic residence time of the reactors and the different types of organic substrates added did not affect the efficiency of hexavalent chromium removal which was complete. This study demonstrates that biological systems operating under reductive conditions can efficiently treat groundwater containing low or high nitrates concentration and can provide complete hexavalent chromium removal at initial Cr(VI) concentrations of 200 μg/L.

  1. Slag-Based Nanomaterial in the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalamurugan, J.; Ganesh Kumar, V.; Govindaraju, K.; Naveen Prasad, B. S.; Bupesh Raja, V. K.; Padmapriya, R.

    Slag-based nanomaterial is a by-product obtained during steel production and has wide range of components in the form of oxides. In this study, Induction Furnace (IF) steel slag-based application in adsorption of hexavalent chromium is investigated. IF slag has mixture of oxides mainly Fe2O3 and Chromium (VI) a highly toxic pollutant leads to environmental pollution and causes problem to human health mainly, carcinogenetic diseases. Slag-based nanomaterial is characterized using High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscope (HR-SEM) in which the size was around 100nm and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. Further inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used for adsorption studies. Slag activation using NaOH (alkali activation) to the intent of surface hydroxyl (‑OH) group attachment will be a cost-effective process in the removal of hexavalent chromium. Cr(VI) ions are adsorbed on the surface of alkali activated slag material. The core-shell formation of Fe(II)/Fe(III)/Cr(VI) and the adsorption are investigated in detail in the present study.

  2. Isolation of Electrogenic Microorganisms with Potential to Reduce Hexavalent Chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mora Collazos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of cultivable microorganisms was made from the biofilm formed on the anode of a microbial fuel cell put into operation for 30 days; isolated microorganisms were evaluated for their ability to produce energy and reduce the hexavalent chromium Cr (VI. Five microorganisms were isolated, which were characterized by analysis of 16S rRNA gene, placing them in four bacterial genera: Exiguobacterium (CrMFC1, Acinetobacter (CrMFC2, Aeromonas (CrMFC3 and CrMFC5 and Serratia (CrMFC4. All isolates showed electrogenic activity and ability to reduce hexavalent chromium; the Acinetobacter CrMFC1 strain showed the best electrochemical performance registering a maximum power density of 18.61 mW/m2; the other strains showed values of maximum power density between 4.6 mW/m2and 7.1 mW/m2. Strains Aeromonas CrMFC5 and Exiguobacterium CrMFC1 showed the best rates of chromium reduction being able to reduce 100 % of the Cr (VI in less than 24 hours, the Aeromonas CrMFC5 strain was the most efficient, reducing 100 % of Cr (VI in 10 hours; the other strains reduced 100% of the contaminant after 28 to 30 hours. The microorganisms isolated in this study are hardly known for their electrogenic capacity and for reducing Cr (VI; however, show promise for their use in combined systems involving energy production system coupled to bioremediation of chromium contaminated water.

  3. Hexavalent Chromium Induces Chromosome Instability in Human Urothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S.; Holmes, Amie L.; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-01-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of Cr(VI) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24 h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer specifically and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer in general. PMID:26908176

  4. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Using Sorbaria sorbifolia Aqueous Leaf Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Prabha Dubey

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous plant leaves extract (PLE of an abundant shrub, Sorbaria sorbifolia, was explored for the reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI, to trivalent chromium, Cr(III. The effect of contact time, pH, PLE quantity, ionic strength, hardness, temperature and effective initial Cr(VI ion concentration were tested; Cr(VI reduction followed the pseudo-first order rate kinetics and maximum reduction was observed at pH 2. Significantly, Cr(VI reduction efficacies varied from 97 to 66% over the pH range of 2 to 10, which bodes well for PLE to be used for the reduction of Cr(VI also at a higher pH. PLE-mediated Cr(VI reduction displays considerable efficiency at various ionic strengths; however, hardness strongly affects the reduction ability. Higher temperature significantly enhances the Cr(VI reduction. This study reveals the potential use of PLE as a green reducing agent in aqueous extract for the efficient reduction of Cr(VI to Cr(III.

  5. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie L; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-04-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Natural and induced reduction of hexavalent chromium in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leita, Liviana; Margon, Alja; Sinicco, Tania; Mondini, Claudio; Valentini, Massimiliano; Cantone, Pierpaolo

    2013-04-01

    Even though naturally elevated levels of chromium can be found naturally in some soils, distressing amounts of the hexavalent form (CrVI) are largely restricted to sites contaminated by anthropogenic activities. In fact, the widespread use of chromium in various industries and the frequently associated inadequate disposal of its by-products and wastes have created serious environmental pollution problems in many parts of the world. CrVI is toxic to plants, animals and humans and exhibits also mutagenic effects. However, being a strong oxidant, CrVI can be readily reduced to the much less harmful trivalent form (CrIII) when suitable electron donors are present in the environment. CrIII is relatively insoluble, less available for biological uptake, and thus definitely less toxic for web-biota. Various electron donors in soil can be involved in CrVI reduction in soil. The efficiency of CrVI reducing abiotic agents such as ferrous iron and sulphur compounds is well documented. Furthermore, CrVI reduction is also known to be significantly enhanced by a wide variety of cell-produced monosaccharides, including glucose. In this study we evaluated the dynamics of hexavalent chromium (CrVI) reduction in contaminated soil amended or not with iron sulphate or/and glucose and assessed the effects of CrVI on native or glucose-induced soil microbial biomass size and activity. CrVI negatively affected both soil microbial activity and the size of the microbial biomass. During the incubation period, the concentration of CrVI in soil decreased over time whether iron sulphate or/and glucose was added or not, but with different reduction rates. Soil therefore displayed a natural attenuation capacity towards chromate reduction. Addition of iron sulphate or/and glucose, however, increased the reduction rate by both abiotic and biotic mechanisms. Our data suggest that glucose is likely to have exerted an indirect role in the increased rate of CrVI reduction by promoting growth of

  7. Sex hormones and semen quality in welders exposed to hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, J P; Ernst, E

    1992-07-01

    Recent experimental studies in rodents document the spermatotoxic effects of water-soluble hexavalent chromium. Welders comprise, worldwide, a major occupational group with acknowledged exposure to chromium. This study examines the relationship between semen quality and chromium in the urine and blood of a population of 30 tungsten inert gas (TIG) stainless steel welders, 30 mild steel welders and 47 non-welding workers. Each subject provided two to three semen samples. The chromium concentration ranged from 0.17 to 4.74 nmol mmol1 creatinine (median 1.08) in post-shift spot urine and from 6.0 to 46.4 nmol l-1 in blood. None of several semen parameters deteriorated with increasing level of internal exposure to chromium. Low-level exposure to hexavalent chromium associated with TIG stainless steel and mild steel welding do not appear to be a major hazard for human spermatogenesis.

  8. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium from aqueous medium with Opuntia biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-López, José A; Angosto, José M; Avilés, María D

    2014-01-01

    The biosorption of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by Opuntia cladodes and ectodermis from cactus fruits was investigated. Both types of biomass are considered low-cost, natural, and ecofriendly biosorbents. Batch experiments were carried out to determine Cr(VI) biosorption capacity and the efficiency of the biosorption process under different pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration, and sorbent dosage. The biosorption of Cr(VI) by Opuntia biomass was highly pH dependent, favoring higher metal uptake at low pH. The higher biosorption capacity was exhibited at pH 2. The optimal conditions were obtained at a sorbent dosage of 1 g L(-1) and initial metal concentration of 10 mg L(-1). Biosorption kinetic data were properly fitted with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The rate constant, the initial biosorption rate, and the equilibrium biosorption capacity were determined. The experimental equilibrium data obtained were analyzed using two-parameter isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin). The Langmuir maximum monolayer biosorption capacity (q max) was 18.5 mg g(-1) for cladodes and 16.4 mg g(-1) for ectodermis. The results suggest that Opuntia biomass could be considered a promising low-cost biosorbent for the ecofriendly removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous systems.

  9. Hexavalent Chromium as an Electrocatalyst in DNA Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi Zadeh Zhad, Hamid R; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2017-11-16

    We report for the first time the use of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) as an electrocatalyst in electrochemical DNA sensing. For both stem-loop probe and linear probe electrochemical DNA sensors, the increase in probe rigidity upon target hybridization alters the accessibility of Cr(VI) to the methylene blue label on the surface-immobilized DNA probes. This change results in an enhancement in the electrocatalytic current when the sensors are interrogated using cyclic voltammetry at a slow scan rate. The incorporation of this electrocatalyst does not affect the normal "signal-off" sensing behavior observed in alternating current voltammetry; instead it enables simultaneous "signal-on" and "signal-off" detection of the target, while maintaining noted attributes of this class of folding- and dynamics-based sensors such as reusability and high selectivity. It is also capable of improving the limit of detection of the sensors by an order of magnitude. Importantly, this accessibility-based electrocatalytic sensing strategy is versatile and can potentially be used with other folding- and dynamics-based electrochemical biosensors.

  10. Effects of hexavalent chromium on mouse splenic T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lu; Xu, Wenhua; Li, Hui; Frank, Jacqueline A; He, Caigu; Zhang, Zhuo; Chen, Gang

    2017-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is widely used in various industrial processes and has been recognized as a carcinogen. As the first line of host defense system, the immune system can be a primary target of Cr(VI). T cell population represents a major arm of the immune system that plays a critical role in host anti-tumor immunity. Dysfunction of T cells, such as exhaustion under the persistent presence of tumor antigen, compromise host anti-tumor immunity resulting in oncogenesis. Previous studies have shown Cr(VI) exposure alters the phenotype of human peripheral blood lymphocytes. However, the mechanism of the alteration and whether such an alteration in immunity affects immunosurveillance and promotes carcinogenicity are not clear. Using a culture of mouse splenic T cells as an in vitro model system, the present study assessed the effects of Cr(VI) on T cells, as the first step in our investigation of the mechanism underlying Cr(VI)-inhibited immunosurveillance and carcinogenesis. Our results showed that Cr(VI) decreased the viability of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and inhibited their activation, proliferation, cytokine release and cytolytic function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Selecting Processes to Minimize Hexavalent Chromium from Stainless Steel Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    KEANE, M.; SIERT, A.; STONE, S.; CHEN, B.; SLAVEN, J.; CUMPSTON, A.; ANTONINI, J.

    2015-01-01

    Eight welding processes/shielding gas combinations were assessed for generation of hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) in stainless steel welding fumes. The processes examined were gas metal arc welding (GMAW) (axial spray, short circuit, and pulsed spray modes), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). The Cr6+ fractions were measured in the fumes; fume generation rates, Cr6+ generation rates, and Cr6+ generation rates per unit mass of welding wire were determined. A limited controlled comparison study was done in a welding shop including SMAW, FCAW, and three GMAW methods. The processes studied were compared for costs, including relative labor costs. Results indicate the Cr6+ in the fume varied widely, from a low of 2800 to a high of 34,000 ppm. Generation rates of Cr6+ ranged from 69 to 7800 μg/min, and Cr6+ generation rates per unit of wire ranged from 1 to 270 μg/g. The results of field study were similar to the findings in the laboratory. The Cr6+ (ppm) in the fume did not necessarily correlate with the Cr6+ generation rate. Physical properties were similar for the processes, with mass median aerodynamic diameters ranging from 250 to 336 nm, while the FCAW and SMAW fumes were larger (360 and 670 nm, respectively). Conclusion: The pulsed axial spray method was the best choice of the processes studied based on minimal fume generation, minimal Cr6+ generation, and cost per weld. This method is usable in any position, has a high metal deposition rate, and is relatively simple to learn and use. PMID:26690276

  12. The survey of biological absorption of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by Wastewater stabilization pond algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nourisepehr

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contamination of aquatic habitats due to toxicity and accumulation of heavy metals leading to serious damage to organisms and their advance to the food chain. Chrome is one of these heavy metals for the three and six-valence oxides used in industry. Health risks such as carcinogenic hexavalent chromium have been For this reason, removal and reduction of environment is essential. Target of this study hexavalent chromium biosorption by waste stabilization pond algae is of the aquatic environment. Methods: This study was a fundamental applied; In this batch reactor, variables Was investigated pH(3,5,7,9,11, Contact time(30,60,120,180,240,300min, The concentration of hexavalent chromium(0.5,1,5mg And the concentration of algae(0.25, 0.5, 1, 3g. Liquid mixed municipal wastewater treatment stabilization pond was used for insemination. For the investigate the effects of variables pH, contact time, the concentration of hexavalent chromium values in a 250 ml Erlenmeyer flask prepared and various amounts of dried algae (0.25-0.5-1- 3 g were added to it. Then became the shakers. After mixing, the filter paper was passed. The lab temperature was centrifuged for min10-5 rpm 2700 rpm. Then it was read at a wavelength absorbed by 540 nm. . Then collected was data to Excel and SPSS software. Finally was used for hexavalent chromium adsorption isotherm model equation of Langmuir and Freundlich. Results: This study shows that PH, contact time, the concentration of hexavalent chromium and chromium concentrations of algae optimal absorption by algae concentrations, respectively, in5 mg / l, min 120, 0.5 mg / l and is 1gr. Average maximum absorption of chromium Wastewater stabilization ponds by algae 97/2%, respectively. Correlation coefficients absorption curves of these models showed that Cr (VI adsorption isotherm on wastewater stabilization pond algae follows (= R.  Conclusion: The results showed that wastewater stabilization pond algae as a

  13. A new method in estimation of total hexavalent chromium in Portland pozzolan cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sharma

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Variamine blue was used first time for the detection of hexavalent chromium from cement samples. In present method, cement was treated sequentially with water, sulphate and carbonate buffer to extract soluble, sparingly soluble and insoluble hexavalent chromium respectively. Extracted Cr (VI was determined using variamine blue as chromogenic reagent. The determination is based on the reaction of hexavalent chromium with potassium iodide in an acid medium to liberate iodine. This oxidizes variamine blue to form a violet coloured species having an absorption to maximum at 556 nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR confirmed the complete extraction of hexavalent chromium by sequential extraction process. SRM 2701 (Reference material from NIST, USA was used for revalidating the results. The percentage of recovery for proposed and reference method (diphelycarbazide method varied from 98.5 to 101 and 97.5 to 100.5. Whereas, their relative error percentage varied from -1.5 to 0.33 and -2.5 to 0.5.

  14. Characterisation of exposure to total and hexavalent chromium of welders using biological monitoring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Heussen, G.A.; Peer, P.G.M.; Verbist, K.; Anzion, R.; Willems, J.

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation exposure to total and hexavalent chromium (TCr and HCr) was assessed by personal air sampling and biological monitoring in 53 welders and 20 references. Median inhalation exposure levels of TCr were 1.3, 6.0, and 5.4 microg/m(3) for welders of mild steel (MS, <5% alloys), high alloy

  15. An assessment of the environmental toxicity of hexavalent chromium in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putte, van der I.

    1981-01-01

    At present chromium is a common contaminant in surface waters in many countries. In water the metal may be present in the trivalent form (CrIII) or in the hexavalent form (CrVI), the latter of which is more toxic to aquatic organisms.
    The investigations presented in this thesis

  16. Hexavalent chromium exposure and control in welding tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, John D; Susi, Pam; Flynn, Michael R

    2010-11-01

    Studies of exposure to the lung carcinogen hexavalent chromium (CrVI) from welding tasks are limited, especially within the construction industry where overexposure may be common. In addition, despite the OSHA requirement that the use of engineering controls such as local exhaust ventilation (LEV) first be considered before relying on other strategies to reduce worker exposure to CrVI, data on the effectiveness of LEV to reduce CrVI exposures from welding are lacking. The goal of the present study was to characterize breathing zone air concentrations of CrVI during welding tasks and primary contributing factors in four datasets: (1) OSHA compliance data; (2) a publicly available database from The Welding Institute (TWI); (3) field survey data of construction welders collected by the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR); and (4) controlled welding trials conducted by CPWR to assess the effectiveness of a portable LEV unit to reduce CrVI exposure. In the OSHA (n = 181) and TWI (n = 124) datasets, which included very few samples from the construction industry, the OSHA permissible exposure level (PEL) for CrVI (5 μg/m(3)) was exceeded in 9% and 13% of samples, respectively. CrVI concentrations measured in the CPWR field surveys (n = 43) were considerably higher, and 25% of samples exceeded the PEL. In the TWI and CPWR datasets, base metal, welding process, and LEV use were important predictors of CrVI concentrations. Only weak-to-moderate correlations were found between total particulate matter and CrVI, suggesting that total particulate matter concentrations are not a good surrogate for CrVI exposure in retrospective studies. Finally, in the controlled welding trials, LEV reduced median CrVI concentrations by 68% (p = 0.02). In conclusion, overexposure to CrVI in stainless steel welding is likely widespread, especially in certain operations such as shielded metal arc welding, which is commonly used in construction. However, exposure could be

  17. Investigation of Total and Hexavalent Chromium in Filtered and Unfiltered Groundwater Samples at the Tucson International Airport Superfund Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Fred D; McCleskey, R Blaine; Hermosillo, Edyth

    2016-10-01

    Potential health effects from hexavalent chromium in groundwater have recently become a concern to regulators at the Tucson International Airport Area Superfund site. In 2016, the U.S. Geological Survey sampled 46 wells in the area to characterize the nature and extent of chromium in groundwater, to understand what proportion of total chromium is in the hexavalent state, and to determine if substantial differences are present between filtered and unfiltered chromium concentrations. Results indicate detectable chromium concentrations in all wells, over 75 % of total chromium is in the hexavalent state in a majority of wells, and filtered and unfiltered results differ substantially in only a few high-turbidity total chromium samples.

  18. Determination of hexavalent chromium in traditional Chinese medicines by high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Li, Li-Min; Xia, Jing; Cao, Shuai; Hu, Xin; Lian, Hong-Zhen; Ji, Shen

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method that combined high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been developed for the determination of hexavalent chromium in traditional Chinese medicines. Hexavalent chromium was extracted using the alkaline solution. The parameters such as the concentration of alkaline and the extraction temperature have been optimized to minimize the interconversion between trivalent chromium and hexavalent chromium. The extracted hexavalent chromium was separated on a weak anion exchange column in isocratic mode, followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry determination. To obtain a better chromatographic resolution and sensitivity, 75 mM NH4 NO3 at pH 7 was selected as the mobile phase. The linearity of the proposed method was investigated in the range of 0.2-5.0 μg L(-1) (r(2) = 0.9999) for hexavalent chromium. The limits of detection and quantitation are 0.1 and 0.3 μg L(-1) , respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of hexavalent chromium in Chloriti lapis and Lumbricus with satisfactory recoveries of 95.8-112.8%. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Genesis and transport of hexavalent chromium in the system ophiolitic rocks - groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchegolikhina, Anastasia; Guadagnini, Laura; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Our study aims at contributing to the quantification and characterization of chromium transport processes from host rocks and soil matrices to groundwater. We focus on dissolved hexavalent chromium detected in groundwaters of geological regions with ophiolitic rocks (ophiolites and serpentinites) inclusions due to its critical ecological impact. (Oze et al., 2004). Despite the large number of analyses on the occurrence of high concentrations of hazardous hexavalent chromium ions in natural waters, only few studies were performed with the objective of identifying and investigating the geochemical reactions which could occur in the natural system rock - groundwater - dissolved chromium (Fantoni et al., 2002, Stephen and James, 2004, Lelli et al., 2013). In this context, there is a need for integration of results obtained from diverse studies in various regions and settings to improve our knowledge repository. Our theoretical analyses are grounded and driven by practical scenarios detected in subsurface reservoirs exploited for civil and industrial use located in the Emilia-Romagna region (Italy). Available experimental datasets are complemented with data from other international regional-scale settings (Altay mountains region, Russia). Modeling of chromium transformation and migration particularly includes characterization of the multispecies geochemical system. A key aspect of our study is the analysis of the complex competitive sorption processes governing heavy metal evolution in groundwater. The results of the research allow assessing the critical qualitative features of the mechanisms of hexavalent chromium ion mobilization from host rocks and soils and the ensuing transformation and migration to groundwater under the influence of diverse environmental factors. The study is then complemented by the quantification of the main sources of uncertainty associated with prediction of heavy metal contamination levels in the groundwater system explored. Fantoni, D

  20. The Growth of Gypsum in the Presence of Hexavalent Chromium: A Multiscale Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Morales

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of dissolved inorganic pollutants into the structure of minerals is an important process that controls the mobility and fate of these pollutants in the Earth’s crust. It also modifies the surface structure and composition of the host mineral, affecting its crystallization kinetics. Here, we investigate the effect of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI, on the nucleation and growth of gypsum by conducting two types of experiments: (i in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM observations of the growth of gypsum {010} surfaces in the presence of Cr(VI and (ii gypsum precipitation experiments by mixing aqueous solutions containing variable amounts of Cr(VI. Gypsum precipitation is progressively delayed when occurring from solutions bearing increasing Cr(VI concentrations. Chemical analyses of gypsum precipitates show that gypsum incorporates small Cr(VI amounts that correlate with the content of this ion in the aqueous solution. Gypsum cell parameters variation reflects this incorporation. At the molecular scale, Cr(VI induces a slowdown of step advance rates on gypsum {010} surfaces accompanied by the roughening of nanostep edges and the so-called “template effect”. This effect involves the reproduction of the original nanotopography after the completion of individual advancing monolayers and appears as a general nanoscale phenomenon occurring during growth of solid solutions from aqueous solutions even in the case of compositionally-restricted solid solutions.

  1. A Comparative Survey on Parameters Influencing on Hexavalent Chromium Measurement as an Occupational Carcinogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tirgar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Hexavalent chromium, Cr+6, is a very harmful pollutant and a relatively unstable compound that is present in many industries. It is a known human respiratory carcinogen and occupational exposure to this chemical is associated with different health hazards. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of four parameters including: type of sampling head, sampling height from the surface of electroplating solution, sampling duration, and sample storage duration on Cr+6 mist monitoring.Materials & Methods: To evaluate the influence of the main parameters as an experimental study, the 24 factorial design was applied at constant electroplating condition. A chromium electroplating bath with the ability to produce homogenous mist was used to create Cr+6 mist in laboratory setting. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH method 7600 was used to determine the Cr+6 concentration. Results: The results of 48 Cr+6 mist samples showed that Cr+6 concentration was higher: (1 for sampling by closed-face filter cassettes than for sampling by open-face filter cassettes (P<0.001; (2 for samples collected at 35 cm above the electroplating solution surface than for samples collected at 50 cm (P <0.001; (3 for sampling duration of 30 minutes than for sampling duration of 180 minutes (P <0.001; and, (4 for samples extracted immediately after sampling than for samples with delayed extraction (24 hours after sampling (P <0.001. Conclusion: It is concluded that the accuracy of Cr+6 mist sampling in electroplating shops will be enhanced when: (1 a closed-face filter cassette is used to prevent liquid splash contamination; (2 the sampling height is suitable as determined by further research; (3 the sampling duration is short (approximately 30 minutes; and, (4 the extraction of the Cr+6 sample is performed as soon as the sampling is completed.

  2. Activated carbons and low cost adsorbents for remediation of tri- and hexavalent chromium from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Dinesh; Pittman, Charles U

    2006-09-21

    Hexavalent chromium is a well-known highly toxic metal, considered a priority pollutant. Industrial sources of Cr(VI) include leather tanning, cooling tower blowdown, plating, electroplating, anodizing baths, rinse waters, etc. The most common method applied for chromate control is reduction of Cr(VI) to its trivalent form in acid (pH approximately 2.0) and subsequent hydroxide precipitation of Cr(III) by increasing the pH to approximately 9.0-10.0 using lime. Existing overviews of chromium removal only cover selected technologies that have traditionally been used in chromium removal. Far less attention has been paid to adsorption. Herein, we provide the first review article that provides readers an overview of the sorption capacities of commercial developed carbons and other low cost sorbents for chromium remediation. After an overview of chromium contamination is provided, more than 300 papers on chromium remediation using adsorption are discussed to provide recent information about the most widely used adsorbents applied for chromium remediation. Efforts to establish the adsorption mechanisms of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on various adsorbents are reviewed. Chromium's impact environmental quality, sources of chromium pollution and toxicological/health effects is also briefly introduced. Interpretations of the surface interactions are offered. Particular attention is paid to comparing the sorption efficiency and capacities of commercially available activated carbons to other low cost alternatives, including an extensive table.

  3. Hexavalent chromium induces apoptosis in male somatic and spermatogonial stem cells via redox imbalance

    OpenAIRE

    Joydeep Das; Min-Hee Kang; Eunsu Kim; Deug-Nam Kwon; Yun-Jung Choi; Jin-Hoi Kim

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], an environmental toxicant, causes severe male reproductive abnormalities. However, the actual mechanisms of toxicity are not clearly understood and have not been studied in detail. The present in vitro study aimed to investigate the mechanism of reproductive toxicity of Cr(VI) in male somatic cells (mouse TM3 Leydig cells and TM4 Sertoli cells) and spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) because damage to or dysfunction of these cells can directly affect spermatogenesis...

  4. Germination and sporophytic development of Regnellidium diphyllum Lindman (Marsileaceae) in the presence of hexavalent chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Kieling-Rubio,MA.; Droste,A.; Windisch,PG

    2010-01-01

    Regnellidium diphyllum Lindman is a heterosporous fern, growing in aquatic environments and surrounding wetlands, which is assumed to be threatened by increasing water pollution and disappearance of its natural habitats. Among contaminants, hexavalent chromium - Cr(VI) - is known to be present in effluents from some leather tanning factories. Megaspore germination tests were performed using Meyer's solution, at concentrations 0 (control), 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 50, and 80 mg.L-1, fro...

  5. Biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) in wastewater using Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. bacterial strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qasim, Muhammad [Department of Chemical Engineering, American University of Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)

    2013-07-01

    The recovery of toxic metal compounds is a deep concern in all industries. Hexavalent chromium is particularly worrying because of its toxic influence on human health. In this paper, biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) present in wastewater has been studied using two different bacterial strains; Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. A chemostat (with and without recycle of cells) with 10 L liquid culture volume was used to study the substrate and the biomass cell concentrations with time. Also, the degree of substrate conversion was studied by the varying the dilution rate as an independent parameter. The dilution rate (ratio of feed flow rate to the culture volume) was varied by varying the feed volumetric rate from 110-170 mL/h for inlet hexavalent chromium concentrations of 70 mg/dm3. The results show that a chemostat with recycle gives a better performance in terms of substrate conversion than a chemostat without a recycle. Moreover, the degree of substrate conversion decreases as the dilution rate is increased. Also, Bacillus sp. was found to give higher conversions compared to pseudomonas sp.

  6. Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solution by Using Adsorption onto Commerical Iron Powder; Study of Equilibrium and Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Rahmani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Industrial wastewaters including heavy metals, are one of the important sources of environmental pollution. Heavy metals such as chromium is found in plating wastewater and is harmful for human health and environment. The purpose of the present study was to investigate adsorption of hexavalent chromium Cr (VI from aqueous solution onto commerical Iron powder as an effective, faster ,and cheaper adsorbent. Materials & Methods: This research was an experimental- lablatory study done in batch system. This study investigated the removal of hexavalent chromium by using commerical Iron powder with variation pH, contact time, Iron powder dose and initial hexavalent chromium concentration in batch system , and the result was analyzed by Excel software.Results: The results showed that the removal efficiency decreased with increasing pH and initial chromium concentration. Also the results showed that the removal efficiency increased with increasing Iron powder dose and contact time. With increasing adsorbent dose from 0.1g/100cc to 1.5 g/100cc, the removal efficiency increased from 47.5% to 92.5 % in constant conditions (pH=7, initial hexavalent chromium concentration = 20 mg/L . Also removal efficiency increased from 41.1% to 48.5% with increasing contact time from 2 min to 120 min in constant conditions (pH=7, Iron powder= 0.1g/100cc, initial hexavalent chromium concentration= 20 mg/L. Experimental isotherms and kinetics models were assessed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order kinetics and modifed pseudo-first-order models. The results showed that the data were acceptably explained by Langmuir isotherms and pseudo-second-order kinetics models, respectively. Conclusion: The results showed that the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution using sawdust can be done faster and cheaper. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2011;18(3:33-39

  7. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by Palmyra palm fruit seed carbon (PPFSC) and commercial activated carbon (CAC) was investigated. The metal adsorption capacity has been studied as a function of contact time, pH and carbon dosage. The adsorption yields increased with the increasing of ...

  8. Removal and transformation of hexavalent chromium in sequencing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-07

    Apr 7, 2011 ... reactor (SBR) and to ascertain the fate of Cr(VI) in the treatment process. An SBR was operated with the FILL, ... technology in treating chromium-containing wastewater. Biological treatment methods such as the ..... ment of cellulosic –O-H in sequestering Cr(III) and to a lesser extent Cr(VI). This showed that ...

  9. An Evaluation of Welding Processes to Reduce Hexavalent Chromium Exposures and Reduce Costs by Using Better Welding Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Keane, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    A group of stainless steel arc welding processes was compared for emission rates of fume and hexavalent chromium, and costs per meter length of weld. The objective was to identify those with minimal emissions and also compare relative labor and consumables costs. The selection included flux-cored arc welding (FCAW), shielded-metal arc welding (SMAW), and multiple gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, and fume generation rates and hexavalent chr...

  10. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Rhizopus Oryzae | Sukumar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability of Rhizopus oryzae to reduce Cr6+ was evaluated in batch microcosms. The optimum pH of R. oryzae growth was between 6.0 and 7.0. The maximum chromium reduction efficiency of 91.15% and biomass growth was achieved at a pH of 7, temperature of 37°C, with an initial Cr6+ concentration of 400 ppm and ...

  11. Exposure to particulate hexavalent chromium exacerbates allergic asthma pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Brent C. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Constant, Stephanie L. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Patierno, Steven R. [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); GW Cancer Institute, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Jurjus, Rosalyn A. [Department of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Ceryak, Susan M., E-mail: phmsmc@gwumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Airborne hexavalent chromate, Cr(VI), has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a possible health threat in urban areas, due to the carcinogenic potential of some of its forms. Particulate chromates are produced in many different industrial settings, with high levels of aerosolized forms historically documented. Along with an increased risk of lung cancer, a high incidence of allergic asthma has been reported in workers exposed to certain inhaled particulate Cr(VI) compounds. However, a direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma has not been established. We recently showed that inhaled particulate Cr(VI) induces an innate neutrophilic inflammatory response in BALB/c mice. In the current studies we investigated how the inflammation induced by inhaled particulate Cr(VI) might alter the pathology of an allergic asthmatic response. We used a well-established mouse model of allergic asthma. Groups of ovalbumin protein (OVA)-primed mice were challenged either with OVA alone, or with a combination of OVA and particulate zinc chromate, and various parameters associated with asthmatic responses were measured. Co-exposure to particulate Cr(VI) and OVA mediated a mixed form of asthma in which both eosinophils and neutrophils are present in airways, tissue pathology is markedly exacerbated, and airway hyperresponsiveness is significantly increased. Taken together these findings suggest that inhalation of particulate forms of Cr(VI) may augment the severity of ongoing allergic asthma, as well as alter its phenotype. Such findings may have implications for asthmatics in settings in which airborne particulate Cr(VI) compounds are present at high levels. -- Highlights: ► Allergic asthma correlated with exposure to certain inhaled particulate chromates. ► Direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma not established. ► Cr exacerbated pathology and airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-challenged mouse. ► Particulate Cr

  12. Study on Leaching of Hexavalent Chromium from Hardened Concretes Using Tank Leaching Test

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Sakai, Etsuo; Sugiyama, Takafumi

    2007-01-01

    Tank leaching tests were carried out to investigate the behavior of leaching trace elements from monolith samples. This study consists of two series, and the trace element used was hexavalent chromium. In Series I, the influence of the leachant/surface area of the specimen (L/S ratio) on the leaching amount was investigated. The leaching amount was found to increase with the amount of worked water. This shows that any L/S ratio can be selected in the tank leaching test. In Series II, th...

  13. Ferrous sulphate mono and heptahydrate reduction of hexavalent chromium in cement: effectiveness and storability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valverde, J. L.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In Community legislation, substances containing hexavalent chromium are classified as carcinogenic, mutagenic and sensitizing. In cement, hexavalent chromium intensifies sensitization and may set off severe allergic reactions in workers in routine contact with the product, whether in the factory or on construction sites. The allergic or contact dermatitis causes is a very painful disease that may lead to permanent worker disability. According to Directive 2003/53/EC of the European Parliament and the Council, Governments of all member countries will be required to prohibit the marketing and use, as of 17 January 2005, of any cement or cement preparation containing more than 2 ppm of chromium (VI. Hexavalent chromium can be reduced with ferrous sulphate to trivalent chromium, which is water-insoluble and therefore innocuous to the skin. The present paper reports the effects of adding ferrous sulphate mono- or heptahydrate to a commercial cement and the storage time of the mix on the concentration of hexavalent chromium. The salts studied were found to effectively reduce hexavalent chromium in cement for at least three months.

    Las sustancias que contienen cromo hexavalente están clasificadas en la legislación comunitaria como sustancias carcinogénicas, mutagénicas y sensibilizantes. El cromo hexavalente del cemento potencia la sensibilización y provoca graves reacciones alérgicas que sufren bastante a menudo los trabajadores que lo manipulan habitualmente, ya sea en fábrica o en el sector de la construcción. La dermatitis alérgica o de contacto que produce es muy dolorosa y puede dejar a los trabajadores en estado de discapacidad. La Directiva 2003/53/CE del Parlamento Europeo y del Consejo, exige a los Gobiernos de los países miembros, que a partir del 17 de enero de 2005, prohiban el uso y la comercialización de todos aquellos cementos y preparados que contengan cemento, cuyo contenido en cromo (VI soluble, una vez hidratados

  14. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Accumulation by Acinetobacter AB1 Isolated from Fez Tanneries in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essahale, A; Malki, M; Marín, I; Moumni, M

    2012-03-01

    Hexavalent chromium reduction and accumulation by Acinetobacter AB1 isolated from Fez tanneries effluents were tested. The effects of some environmental factors such as pH, temperature, and exposure time on Cr(VI) reduction and resistance were investigated. We found that this strain was able to resist to concentrations as high as 400 mg/l of Cr(VI). Moreover, pH 10 and the temperature 30°C constitute favourable conditions to the growth and reduction of Acinetobacter AB1. Complete reduction of Cr(VI) was observed at low initial Cr(VI) concentrations of 50 mg/l after 72 h of incubation. Furthermore, Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis showed morphological changes in AB1 strain due 48H exposure to 100 mg/l chromate concentration and revealed circular electron dense (dark black point) inclusion within the cell cytoplasm suggesting chromium deposition within the cells.

  15. Ecotoxicology of Hexavalent Chromium in Freshwater Fish: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velma, Venkatramreddy; Vutukuru, S.S.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a naturally occurring element found in rocks, animals, plants, and soil, predominantly in its insoluble trivalent form [Cr(III)]. Intense industrialization and other anthropogenic activities have led to the global occurrence of soluble Cr(VI), which is readily leached from soil to groundwater or surface water, in concentrations above permissible levels. The ecotoxicology of Cr(VI) is linked to its environmental persistence and the ability to induce a variety of adverse effects in biologic systems, including fish. In aquatic ecosystems, Cr(VI) exposure poses a significant threat to aquatic life. This paper reviews the fate and transport of Cr(VI) in the environment and its acute and chronic effects on fish. We also discuss Cr(VI) toxicity at the cellular, biochemical, and genetic levels. An attempt is made in this review to comprehend the staggered data on the toxic effects of Cr(VI) to various species of fish. Such data are extremely useful to the scientific community and public officials involved in health risk assessment and management of environmental contaminants as a guide to the best course of action to restore ecosystems and, in turn, to preserve human health. PMID:19658319

  16. Remediation of hexavalent chromium through adsorption by bentonite based Arquad® 2HT-75 organoclays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Binoy; Xi, Yunfei; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Krishnamurti, Gummuluru S R; Rajarathnam, Dharmarajan; Naidu, Ravi

    2010-11-15

    Unlike hydrophobic organic pollutants, the potential of organoclays to adsorb inorganic ionic contaminants is relatively underexplored. The present study attempts to characterise bentonite (QB) based organoclays synthesised from a commercially available, low-cost alkyl ammonium surfactant Arquad® 2HT-75 (Aq) and test their ability to adsorb hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) in aqueous solution. XRD, FTIR and TGA characterisation techniques prove successful modification of the bentonite structure and reveal that higher surfactant loadings gives rise to more ordered surfactant conformation in the organoclays. The zeta potential values indicate that higher surfactant loadings also create positive charges on the organoclay surfaces. Detailed isothermal and kinetic studies show that the organoclays effectively remove hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) from aqueous solution by both physical and chemical adsorption processes. Higher surfactant loadings provide better adsorption efficiency. The adsorption performance is reasonably efficient under the levels of pH, temperature, electrolyte concentration and natural organic matter concentration that generally prevail in contaminated soil and water. This study shows that organoclay sorbents offer good potential for remediating Cr (VI) under real environmental conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Wastewater remediation using a spiral shaped reactor for photochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Tiele Caprioli; Lansarin, Marla Azário; Ribeiro, Camila Silva

    2015-03-01

    The hexavalent chromium contained in wastewater of some industries is toxic to most microorganisms and potentially harmful to human health. The application of photochemical reduction of Cr(VI) in the treatment of wastewater from the electroplating industry was studied, and a continuous reactor in spiral shape made of borosilicate was designed and constructed (SSR). The statistical model of a circumscribed central composite design (CCCD) was used to investigate the influence of the amount of ethanol and the initial concentration of hexavalent chromium on total Cr(VI) reduction. A total Cr(VI) reduction of 46.0% was achieved under the optimal conditions established by the experimental design, using a synthetic Cr(VI) solution. In addition, the photochemical reduction of Cr(VI) follows pseudo first-order kinetics. The SSR exhibited similar behavior to that of the plug flow reactor (PFR), and presented higher photonic efficiency than the batch reactor. Finally, the designed reactor was effective when applied to real wastewater, showing a total Cr(VI) reduction of 51.8%, and its configuration is suitable for scale up.

  18. Reduction of hexavalent chromium with the brown seaweed Ecklonia biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donghee; Yun, Yeoung-Sang; Park, Jong Moon

    2004-09-15

    A new type of biomass, protonated brown seaweed Ecklonia sp., was used for the removal of Cr(VI). When synthetic wastewater containing Cr(VI) was placed in contact with the biomass, the Cr(VI) was completely reduced to Cr(III). The converted Cr(III) appeared in the solution phase or was partly bound to the biomass. The Cr(VI) removal efficiency was always 100% in the pH range of this study (pH 1 to approximately 5). Furthermore, the Cr(VI) reduction was independent of the Cr(III) concentration, the reaction product, suggesting that the reaction was an irreversible process under our conditions. Proton ions were consumed in the ratio of 1.15 +/- 0.02 mol of protons/mol of Cr(VI), and the rate of Cr(VI) reduction increased with decreasing the pH. An optimum pH existed for the removal efficiency of total chromium (Cr(VI) plus Cr(III)), but this increased with contact time, eventually reaching approximately pH 4 when the reaction was complete. The electrons required for the Cr(VI) reduction also caused the oxidation of the organic compounds in the biomass. One gram of the biomass could reduce 4.49 +/- 0.12 mmol of Cr(VI). From a practical viewpoint, the abundant and inexpensive Ecklonia biomass could be used for the conversion of toxic Cr(VI) into less toxic or nontoxic Cr(III).

  19. Oral ingestion of hexavalent chromium through drinking water and cancer mortality in an industrial area of Greece - An ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoltidis Melina

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen when inhaled, but its carcinogenic potential when orally ingested remains controversial. Water contaminated with hexavalent chromium is a worldwide problem, making this a question of significant public health importance. Methods We conducted an ecological mortality study within the Oinofita region of Greece, where water has been contaminated with hexavalent chromium. We calculated gender, age, and period standardized mortality ratios (SMRs for all deaths, cancer deaths, and specific cancer types of Oinofita residents over an 11-year period (1999 - 2009, using the greater prefecture of Voiotia as the standard population. Results A total of 474 deaths were observed. The SMR for all cause mortality was 98 (95% CI 89-107 and for all cancer mortality 114 (95% CI 94-136. The SMR for primary liver cancer was 1104 (95% CI 405-2403, p-value Conclusions Elevated cancer mortality in the Oinofita area of Greece supports the hypothesis of hexavalent chromium carcinogenicity via the oral ingestion pathway of exposure. Further studies are needed to determine whether this association is causal, and to establish preventive guidelines and public health recommendations.

  20. The Survey of Melia Azaderach L. ash in Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Synthetic Electroplating Industry Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MT Ghaneian

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: Melia azedarach ash is an effective adsorbent in removal of hexavalent chromium from synthetic electroplating industries wastewater. In addition, the use of this biosorbent in preparation and application aspects is simple and cheap compared to many other natural and man-made adsorbent.

  1. An evaluation of in vivo models for toxicokinetics of hexavalent chromium in the stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasso, A.F., E-mail: sasso.alan@epa.gov; Schlosser, P.M., E-mail: schlosser.paul@epa.gov

    2015-09-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6) is a drinking water contaminant that has been detected in most of the water systems throughout the United States. In 2-year drinking water bioassays, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) found clear evidence of carcinogenic activity in male and female rats and mice. Because reduction of Cr6 to trivalent chromium (Cr3) is an important detoxifying step in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract prior to systemic absorption, models have been developed to estimate the extent of reduction in humans and animals. The objective of this work was to use a revised model of ex vivo Cr6 reduction kinetics in gastric juice to analyze the potential reduction kinetics under in vivo conditions for mice, rats and humans. A published physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was adapted to incorporate the new reduction model. This paper focuses on the toxicokinetics of Cr6 in the stomach compartment, where most of the extracellular Cr6 reduction is believed to occur in humans. Within the range of doses administered by the NTP bioassays, neither the original nor revised models predict saturation of stomach reducing capacity to occur in vivo if applying default parameters. However, both models still indicate that mice exhibit the lowest extent of reduction in the stomach, meaning that a higher percentage of the Cr6 dose may escape stomach reduction in that species. Similarly, both models predict that humans exhibit the highest extent of reduction at low doses. - Highlights: • We outline a new in vivo model for hexavalent chromium reduction in the stomach. • We examine in vivo reduction for mice, rats, and humans under varying conditions. • Species differences in toxicokinetics may explain susceptibility. • We show that a simplified stomach reduction model is adequate for extrapolation. • Internal dose uncertainties still exist.

  2. Genotoxicity of Tri- and Hexavalent Chromium Compounds In Vivo and Their Modes of Action on DNA Damage In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhijia; Zhao, Min; Zhen, Hong; Chen, Lifeng; Shi, Ping; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Chromium occurs mostly in tri- and hexavalent states in the environment. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are extensively used in diverse industries, and trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] salts are used as micronutrients and dietary supplements. In the present work, we report that they both induce genetic mutations in yeast cells. They both also cause DNA damage in both yeast and Jurkat cells and the effect of Cr(III) is greater than that of Cr(VI). We further show that Cr(III) and Cr(VI) cause DNA damage through different mechanisms. Cr(VI) intercalates DNA and Cr(III) interferes base pair stacking. Based on our results, we conclude that Cr(III) can directly cause genotoxicity in vivo. PMID:25111056

  3. AN IN-SITU PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN GROUNDWATER: VOLUME 3 MULTICOMPONENT REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive transport modeling has been conducted to describe the performance of the permeable reactive barrier at the Coast Guard Support Center near Elizabeth City, NC. The reactive barrier was installed to treat groundwater contaminated by hexavalent chromium and chlorinated org...

  4. Impact of inorganic pollutants perchlorate and hexavalent chromium on efficacy of Bacillus sphaericus and Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis against Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Mary A; Walton, William E; Trumble, John T

    2007-09-01

    The effects of two widespread environmental pollutants, perchlorate and hexavalent chromium, were assessed on the efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) and Bacillus sphaericus (Bsph) against fourth instars of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) in 24-h laboratory bioassays. Although 250 mg/liter perchlorate, a level somewhat higher than would be considered ecologically relevant, did not affect the control provided by either larvicide, presence of 1.04 mg/liter hexavalent chromium, an ecologically relevant concentration, increased the efficacy of both Bti and Bsph by 21 and 80%, respectively. In the presence of hexavalent chromium, improved suppression could be expected from Bacillus applications at the current label rates. However, because hexavalent chromium has been shown to affect many taxa, we propose that the potential exists for increased susceptibility of nontarget organisms to Bacillus products in polluted habitats.

  5. Photocatalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Induced by Photolysis of Ferric/tartrate Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xianghua; Ding, Shimin; Zhang, Lixian [Yangtze Normal Univ., Fuling (China)

    2012-11-15

    Photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in ferric-tartrate system under irradiation of visible light was investigated. Effects of light resources, initial pH value and initial concentration of various reactants on Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction were studied. Photoreaction kinetics was discussed and a possible photochemical pathway was proposed. The results indicate that Fe(III)-tartrate system is able to rapidly and effectively photocatalytically reduce Cr(VI) utilizing visible light. Initial pH variations results in the concentration changes of Fe(III)-tartrate complex in this system, and pH at 3.0 is optimal for Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction. Efficiency of Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction increases with increasing initial concentrations of Cr(VI), Fe(III) and tartrate. Kinetics analysis indicates that initial Fe(III) concentration affects Cr(VI) photoreduction most significantly.

  6. Assessment of Hexavalent Chromium Natural Attenuation for the Hanford Site 100 Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Szecsody, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sahajpal, Rahul [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhong, Lirong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawter, Amanda R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) plumes are present in the 100 Area at the Hanford Site. Remediation efforts are under way with objectives of restoring the groundwater to meet the drinking-water standard (48 µg/L) and protecting the Columbia River by ensuring that discharge of groundwater to the river is below the surface-water quality standard (10 µg/L). Current remedies include application of Pump-and-Treat (P&T) at the 100-D, 100-H, and 100-K Areas and Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) at the 100-F/IU Area. Remedy selection is still under way at the other 100 Areas. Additional information about the natural attenuation processes for Cr(VI) is important in all of these cases. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to demonstrate and quantify natural attenuation mechanisms using 100 Area sediments and groundwater conditions.

  7. Iron(II modified natural zeolites for hexavalent chromium removal from contaminated water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofù Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Three different types of Fe(II-modified natural zeolites were tested as supports in continuous-flow columns for the treatment of Cr(VI contaminated water. The natural zeolites chosen as support were commercially available Zeosand (80% clinoptilolite, ATZ (79% phillipsite/chabazite, and ZS-55RW (90% Chabazite. All the examined modified zeolites turned out active for hexavalent chromium abatement, lowering its concentration below the European regulation level, even at relatively high flow rates (40 mL/h, linear velocity 15 cm/h. Zeosand, having a broader pH range of stability, was found to be the best one in terms of both Fe(II uptake (0.54 wt% and Cr removal (90 mg Cr/Kg zeolite.

  8. The effects of water rock interaction and the human activities on the occurrence of hexavalent chromium in waters. The case study of the Psachna basin, Central Euboea, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiou, Eleni; Perraki, Maria; Stamatis, George; Gartzos, Efthimios

    2014-05-01

    High concentrations of heavy metals, particularly of the toxic hexavalent chromium, are recorded in surface and ground waters in many areas, and constitute one of the most severe environmental problems nowadays. The natural genesis of chromium is associated with the geological environment (peridotites and serpentintites). Chromium is structured in many minerals, mainly in spinel (e.g. chromite), in silicate minerals such as phyllosilicate serpentine minerals, chlorite, talc and chain-silicate minerals of pyroxene and amphibole group. Chromium is found in two forms in soils, waters and rocks, the hexavalent and the trivalent one. The relation between Cr(III) and Cr(VI) strongly depends on pH and oxidative properties of the area; however, in most cases, Cr(III) is the dominating variant. The natural oxidation of trivalent to hexavalent chromium can be achieved by manganese oxides, H2O2, O2 gas and oxy-hydroxides of trivalent iron. Anthropogenic factors may also cause the process of chromium's oxidation. In the Psachna basin, Central Euboea, Greece, high concentrations of hexavalent chromium were recently measured in spring- and drill- waters. In this work, we study the effect of the geological environment and of the anthropogenic activities on the water quality with emphasis on chromium. A detailed geochemical, petrological and mineralogical study of rocks and soils was carried out by means of optical microscopy, XRF, XRD and SEM/EDS. Ground and surface water samples were physically characterized and hydrochemically studied by means of ICP and AAF. Combined result evaluation indicates a natural source for the trivalent chromium in waters, attributed to the alteration of Cr-bearing minerals of the ultramafic rocks. However the oxidation of trivalent to hexavalent chromium results from anthropogenic activities, mainly from intensive agricultural activities and the extensive use of fertilizers and pesticides causing nitrate pollution in groundwater. It has been shown

  9. Quantification of total and hexavalent chromium in lager beers: variability between styles and estimation of daily intake of chromium from beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Elsa; Soares, M Elisa; Kozior, Marta; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O; Bastos, M Lourdes

    2014-09-17

    A survey of the presence of total and hexavalent chromium in lager beers was conducted to understand the variability between different styles of lager beer packaged in glass or cans and to estimate daily intake of total Cr and hexavalent chromium from beer. Graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy using validated methodologies was applied. Selective extraction of hexavalent chromium was performed using a Chromabond NH2/500 mg column and elution with nitric acid. The detection limits were 0.26 and 0.68 μg L(-1) for total Cr and Cr(VI), respectively. The mean content of total Cr ranged between 1.13 μg L(-1) in canned pale lager and 4.32 μg L(-1) in low-alcohol beers, whereas the mean content of Cr(VI) was beer, beer consumption can contribute approximately 2.28-8.64 and 1.6-6.17% of the recommended daily intake of chromium for women and men, respectively.

  10. Regeneration of pilot-scale ion exchange columns for hexavalent chromium removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korak, Julie A; Huggins, Richard; Arias-Paic, Miguel

    2017-07-01

    Due to stricter regulations, some drinking water utilities must implement additional treatment processes to meet potable water standards for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), such as the California limit of 10 μg/L. Strong base anion exchange is effective for Cr(VI) removal, but efficient resin regeneration and waste minimization are important for operational, economic and environmental considerations. This study compared multiple regeneration methods on pilot-scale columns on the basis of regeneration efficiency, waste production and salt usage. A conventional 1-Stage regeneration using 2 N sodium chloride (NaCl) was compared to 1) a 2-Stage process with 0.2 N NaCl followed by 2 N NaCl and 2) a mixed regenerant solution with 2 N NaCl and 0.2 N sodium bicarbonate. All methods eluted similar cumulative amounts of chromium with 2 N NaCl. The 2-Stage process eluted an additional 20-30% of chromium in the 0.2 N fraction, but total resin capacity is unaffected if this fraction is recycled to the ion exchange headworks. The 2-Stage approach selectively eluted bicarbonate and sulfate with 0.2 N NaCl before regeneration using 2 N NaCl. Regeneration approach impacted the elution efficiency of both uranium and vanadium. Regeneration without co-eluting sulfate and bicarbonate led to incomplete uranium elution and potential formation of insoluble uranium hydroxides that could lead to long-term resin fouling, decreased capacity and render the resin a low-level radioactive solid waste. Partial vanadium elution occurred during regeneration due to co-eluting sulfate suppressing vanadium release. Waste production and salt usage were comparable for the 1- and 2-Stage regeneration processes with similar operational setpoints with respect to chromium or nitrate elution. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Using L-Cysteine Capped Nickel Nanocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razium Ali Soomro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reduce the highly toxic hexavalent chromium Cr(VI into less toxic chromium Cr(III species by using nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs as catalysts in order to provide safety to the aqueous environment. In the first phase Ni NPs were synthesized in ethylene glycol and capped with l-cysteine by a modified microwave irradiation method using NaOH as the accelerator. The formed Ni NPs were characterized by various techniques such as UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. In the second phase the formed Ni NPs were immobilized on glass surfaces and employed as catalyst for the reduction of Cr(VI ions. According to observations, 99% reduction of Cr(VI ions was achieved in the presence of 0.5 mg of Ni NPs catalyst in just five minutes as compared to nickel powder that showed only 16% reduction in 15 minutes. The study has a great impact on the aqueous pollution control of Cr(VI especially caused by the discharge of waste water from several industries utilizing Cr(VI containing salt as one of the essential gradients.

  12. NOM and alkalinity interference in trace-level hexavalent chromium analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Jeffrey L; McNeill, Laurie; Edwards, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Three analytical methods were evaluated for hexavalent and trivalent chromium analyses in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and alkalinity. Each method was tested using a simulated tap water with 1 μg L(-1) Cr(VI) and 0.8 μg L(-1) Cr(III) and several concentrations of NOM and/or alkalinity. An ion chromatograph with post column reaction cell conforming to USEPA Method 218.7 could accurately quantify Cr(VI) in the presence of up to 8 mg CL(-1) NOM and up to 170 mg L(-1) as CaCO3 alkalinity, and no oxidation of chromium was observed when 0.8 μg L(-1) Cr(III) was also present. A high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma (HPLC-ICPMS) method and a field speciation method were also evaluated. Each of these methods was unaffected by the presence of alkalinity; however, the presence of NOM created issues. For the HPLC-ICPMS method, as the concentration of NOM increased the recovery of Cr(VI) decreased, resulting in a 'false negative' for Cr(VI). However, for the field speciation method, Cr(III) was complexed by NOM and carried through the ion exchange column, resulting in a 'false positive' for Cr(VI). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of temperature on phytoextraction of hexavalent and trivalent chromium by hybrid willows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Peng, Xiao-Ying; Xing, Li-Qun

    2010-01-01

    The removal of hexavalent and trivalent chromium from hydroponic solution by plants to changes in temperature was investigated. Pre-rooted hybrid willows (Salix matsudana Koidz x alba L.) were exposed to a nutrient solution spiked with potassium chromate (K(2)CrO(4)) or chromium chloride (CrCl(3)) for 4 days. Ten different temperatures were tested ranging from 11 to 32 degrees C. Total Cr in solutions and in plant materials were all analyzed quantitatively. The results revealed that large amounts of the applied Cr were removed from the hydroponic solution in the presence of the plants. Significantly faster removal of Cr(III) than Cr(VI) was achieved by hybrid willows from the hydroponic solutions at all temperatures (P or = 24 degrees C. The temperature coefficient values (Q(10)) were 2.41 and 1.42 for Cr(VI) and Cr(III), respectively, indicating that the removal of Cr(VI) by hybrid willows was much more susceptible to changes in temperature than that of Cr(III). This information suggests that changes in temperature have a substantial influence on the uptake and accumulation of both chemical forms of Cr by plants.

  14. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Its Distribution in the Cell and Medium by Chromium Resistant Fusarium solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, batch biosorption of Cr(VI was studied using the fungal strain isolated from soil. The fungal strain was characterized as Fusarium solani. The total Cr distribution in the biomass (fungus and in the media obtained from the experiment conducted at 500 mg l -1 initial Cr(VI concentration and pH 5.0. The results indicated both intracellular and extracellular accumulation and enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI and this was supported by the Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM observation at the same Cr(VI concentration and pH value. Chromium elution from Fusarium solani containing Cr was then tried out using a number of chromium eluting reagents and a maximum Cr could be eluted using 0.5N sodium hydroxide solution without destructing the biomass structure. The total Cr was recovered by pH adjustment from both biomass and media was found to be 44% of the initial Cr(VI concentration (500 mg l-1.

  15. Electrochemical removal of hexavalent chromium from wastewater using Platinum-Iron/Iron-carbon nanotubes and bipolar Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshyar Hossini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent decades, electrocoagulation (EC has engrossed much attention as an environmental-friendly and effectiveness process. In addition, the EC process is a potential suitable way for treatment of wastewater with concern to costs and environment. The object of this study was electrochemical evaluation of chromium removal from industrial wastewater using Platinum and carbon nanotubes electrodes. Materials and Methods: The effect of key variables including pH (3–9, hexavalent chromium concentration (50–300 mg/l, supporting electrolyte (NaCl, KCl, Na2CO3 and KNO3 and its dosage, Oxidation-Reduction variations, sludge generation rate and current density (2–20 mA/cm2 was determined. Results: Based on experimental data, optimum conditions were determined in 20, 120 min, pH 3, NaCl 0.5% and 100 mg/L initial concentration of chromium. Conclusions: Removal of hexavalent chromium from the wastewater could be successfully performanced using Platinum-Iron/Iron-carbon nanotubes and bipolar Electrodes.

  16. Mitigation of Hexavalent Chromium in Storm Water Resulting from Demolition of Large Concrete Structure at the East Tennessee Technology Park - 12286

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britto, Ronnie; Brown, Bridget; Hale, Timothy B.; Hensley, Janice L.; Johnson, Robert T.; Patel, Madhu [Tetra Tech, Inc. (United States); Emery, Jerry A. [Energy Solutions, Inc. (United States); Gaston, Clyde [LATA-SHARP Remediation Services - LSRS (United States); Queen, David C. [U.S. DOE-ORO (United States)

    2012-07-01

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding was provided to supplement the environmental management program at several DOE sites, including the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Demolition of the ETTP K-33 Building, the largest building to be demolished to date in Oak Ridge, was awarded to LSRS in FY-2010 under the ARRA program. The K-33 building was an 82 foot tall 2-story structure covering approximately 32 acres. Once this massive building was brought down to the ground, the debris was segregated and consolidated into piles of concrete rubble and steel across the remaining pad. The process of demolishing the building, tracking across concrete debris with heavy equipment, and stockpiling the concrete rubble caused it to become pulverized. During and after storm events, hexavalent chromium leached from the residual cement present in the large quantities of concrete. Storm water control measures were present to preclude migration of contaminants off-site, but these control measures were not designed to control hexavalent chromium dissolved in storm water from reaching nearby receiving water. The following was implemented to mitigate hexavalent chromium in storm water: - Steel wool was distributed around K-33 site catch basins and in water pools as an initial step in addressing hexavalent chromium. - Since the piles of concrete were too massive and unsafe to tarp, they were placed into windrows in an effort to reduce total surface area. - A Hach colorimetric field meter was acquired by the K-33 project to provide realtime results of hexavalent chromium in site surface water. - Three hexavalent chromium treatment systems were installed at three separate catch basins that receive integrated storm water flow from the K-33 site. Sodium bisulfite is being used as a reducing agent for the immobilization of hexavalent chromium while also assisting in lowering pH. Concentrations initially were 310 - 474 ppb of hexavalent chromium in

  17. Removal of hexavalent chromium upon interaction with biochar under acidic conditions: mechanistic insights and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Bharat; Paul, Debajyoti; Singh, Abhas; Gupta, Tarun

    2017-07-01

    Chromium pollution of soil and water is a serious environmental concern due to potential carcinogenicity of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] when ingested. Eucalyptus bark biochar (EBB), a carbonaceous black porous material obtained by pyrolysis of biomass at 500 °C under oxygen-free atmosphere, was used to investigate the removal of aqueous Cr(VI) upon interaction with the EBB, the dominant Cr(VI) removal mechanism(s), and the applicability to treat Cr(VI)-contaminated wastewater. Batch experiments showed complete removal of aqueous Cr(VI) at pH 1-2; sorption was negligible at pH 1, but ~55% of total Cr was sorbed onto the EBB surface at pH 2. Detailed investigations on unreacted and reacted EBB through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) indicate that the carboxylic groups in biochar played a dominant role in Cr(VI) sorption, whereas the phenolic groups were responsible for Cr(VI) reduction. The predominance of sorption-reduction mechanism was confirmed by XPS studies that indicated ~82% as Cr(III) and ~18% as Cr(VI) sorbed on the EBB surface. Significantly, Cr(VI) reduction was also facilitated by dissolved organic matter (DOM) extracted from biochar. This reduction was enhanced by the presence of biochar. Overall, the removal of Cr(VI) in the presence of biochar was affected by sorption due to electrostatic attraction, sorption-reduction mediated by surface organic complexes, and aqueous reduction by DOM. Relative dominance of the aqueous reduction mechanism depended on a critical biochar dosage for a given electrolyte pH and initial Cr(VI) concentration. The low-cost EBB developed here successfully removed all Cr(VI) in chrome tanning acidic wastewater and Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater after pH adjustment, highlighting its potential applicability in effective Cr(VI) remediation.

  18. Effects of citrate on hexavalent chromium reduction by structural Fe(II) in nontronite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaolei; Dong, Hailiang; Yang, Xuewei; Kovarik, Libor; Chen, Yu; Zeng, Qiang

    2018-02-01

    Iron-bearing clay minerals and organic matter are two important components in natural environments that influence hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) reduction. Previous studies have shown that organic ligands could influence Cr(VI) reduction by aqueous Fe2+ and pyrite. However, the effects of organic ligands on Cr(VI) reduction by structural Fe(II) in clays are not well understood. In this study, the effects of citrate on Cr(VI) reduction by nontronite (NAu-2) were investigated under near neutral pH condition (pH=6). Our results showed that the presence of citrate decreased the rate but increased the amount of Cr(VI) reduction by structural Fe(II) in NAu-2. The decreased reaction rate was likely due to competitive sorption of citrate and polyanionic dichromate (Cr2O7- ), because sorption of dichromate appeared to be the first step for subsequent Cr(VI) reduction. The increased amount of Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of citrate was likely because citrate provided additional reducing power through ligand-metal electron transfer in the presence of soluble Fe 3+ derived from dissolution of reduced NAu-2. Soluble Cr(III)-citrate complex was the possible form of reduced chromium when citrate was present. In contrast, nanometer-sized Cr2O3 particles were the product of Cr(VI) reduction by reduced NAu-2 without citrate. Our study highlights the importance of organic ligands on Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization when iron-bearing clay minerals are applied to treat Cr(VI) contaminant in organic matter rich environments.

  19. Accumulation, depuration dynamics and effects of dissolved hexavalent chromium in juvenile Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongxing; Guo, Zhongbao; Zhou, Yu; Li, Dan; Mu, Lei; Klerks, Paul L; Luo, Yongju; Xie, Lingtian

    2017-10-22

    We previously demonstrated that chronic exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) causes a variety of adverse effects in the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). The present study investigated the transition of acute to chronic effects by assessing the influences of Cr(VI) exposure concentration and exposure duration on Cr accumulation and their effects on fish growth and antioxidant physiology. Juvenile fish were exposed to 0.05, 0.5, 4 or 8mg/L Cr(VI) for 28 days. Endpoints were evaluated on days 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28. In addition, Cr depuration was examined for fish from two exposure groups (0.5 and 8mg/L). Chromium accumulation was rapid initially, then continued at a slower rate till the end of the exposure period without showing signs of reaching a steady state. Depuration patterns differed between the two exposure groups, but both reached 50% in 14 days. The rapid initial accumulation was accompanied by increased lipid peroxidation and elevated activities of antioxidants (e.g., GST, SOD and CAT). Activities of these enzymes had mostly returned to baseline levels by day 7, but there was no evidence of further cellular damage from ROS. Effects on fish length and weight continued to be evident over the 28-day exposure period. Our study suggest that the initial effects of Cr(VI) exposure may not be a good predictor of more-chronic effects in fish as a consequence of an efficient acclimation response by the antioxidant system that limits ROS-mediated toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hexavalent chromium disrupts mitosis by stabilizing microtubules in Lens culinaris root tip cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Fatsiou, Maria; Panteris, Emmanuel

    2013-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is an accumulating environmental pollutant due to anthropogenic activities, toxic for humans, animals and plants. Therefore, the effects of Cr(VI) on dividing root cells of lentil (Lens culinaris) were investigated by tubulin immunofluorescence and DNA staining. In Cr(VI)-treated roots, cell divisions were perturbed, the chromosomes formed irregular aggregations, multinucleate cells were produced and tubulin clusters were entrapped within the nuclei. All cell cycle-specific microtubule (MT) arrays were affected, indicating a stabilizing effect of Cr(VI) on the MTs of L. culinaris. Besides, a time- and concentration-dependent gradual increase of acetylated α-tubulin, an indicator of MT stabilization, was observed in Cr(VI)-treated roots by both immunofluorescence and western blotting. Evidence is also provided that reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by Cr(VI), determined with the specific marker dichlorofluorescein, may be responsible for MT stabilization. Combined treatments with Cr(VI) and oryzalin revealed that Cr(VI) overcomes the depolymerizing ability of oryzalin, as it does experimentally introduced hydrogen peroxide, further supporting its stabilizing effect. In conclusion, it is suggested that the mitotic aberrations caused by Cr(VI) in L. culinaris root cells may be the result of MT stabilization rather than depolymerization, which consequently disturbs MT dynamics and their related functions. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  1. Reduction of hexavalent chromium: photocatalysis and photochemistry and their application in wastewater remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Tiele Caprioli; Lansarin, Marla Azário; Matte, Natália

    2014-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium present in wastewater discharge of galvanic industries is toxic to most microorganisms and potentially harmful to human health. This work examines the photochemical reduction of Cr(VI) with ethanol under ultraviolet (UV) and visible radiation, and photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) with TiO2 in the presence of ethanol under UV radiation. By means of different experimental designs, this study investigates the influence of the initial pH, ethanol amount, catalyst concentration and initial Cr(VI) concentration on total Cr(VI) reduction. The results obtained showed that photochemistry with ethanol under UV radiation (96.10%) was more efficient than photochemistry with ethanol under visible light (48.07%). Furthermore, photocatalysis with TiO2 in the presence of ethanol under UV radiation showed high values of total Cr(VI) reduction: 94.15%, under the optimal conditions established by the experimental design. Finally, experiments were carried out with wastewater discharge from an electroplating plant in its original concentration, and higher values of total Cr(VI) reduction were observed.

  2. Removal of hexavalent chromium by using red mud activated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Deliang; Ding, Ying; Li, Lingling; Chang, Zhixian; Rao, Zhengyong; Lu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    The removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solution by using red mud activated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was studied. The optimum operation parameters, such as CTAB concentration, pH values, contact time, and initial Cr(VI) concentration, were investigated. The best concentration of CTAB for modifying red mud was found to be 0.50% (mCTAB/VHCl,0.6 mol/L). The lower pH (mud activated with CTAB can greatly improve the removal ratio of Cr(VI) as high as four times than that of original red mud. Adsorption equilibrium was reached within 30 min under the initial Cr(VI) concentration of 100 mg L(-1). The isotherm data were analysed using Langmuir and Freundlich models. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on activated red mud fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm model, and the maximum adsorption capacity was estimated as 22.20 mg g(-1) (Cr/red mud). The adsorption process could be well described using the pseudo-second-order model. The result shows that activated red mud is a promising agent for low-cost water treatment.

  3. The Photocatalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Controllable Mesoporous Anatase TiO2 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorrada Loryuenyong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Titania (TiO2 nanoparticles with periodical mesopore size (up to 150 Å have successfully been synthesized by sol-gel template method, using titanium(IV tetraisopropoxide as a starting precursor and isopropanol as a solvent. Different quantities of activated carbon (0%, 5%, and 10% by weight were used as templates to control the porosity and particle size of titania nanoparticles. The templates were completely removed during the calcination in air at 500°C for 3 hr. The results showed that the specific surface area of titania is increased with increasing activated carbon content. The optical bandgap of synthesized titania exhibits a blue shift by 0.3–0.6 eV when compared to the reported value for the bulk anatase and rutile phases. The photocatalytic activity of porous titania is determined with its reduction efficiency of hexavalent chromium (Cr6+. The reduction efficiency is optimized under ultraviolet illumination.

  4. Hexavalent chromium induces apoptosis in male somatic and spermatogonial stem cells via redox imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Joydeep; Kang, Min-Hee; Kim, Eunsu; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Choi, Yun-Jung; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], an environmental toxicant, causes severe male reproductive abnormalities. However, the actual mechanisms of toxicity are not clearly understood and have not been studied in detail. The present in vitro study aimed to investigate the mechanism of reproductive toxicity of Cr(VI) in male somatic cells (mouse TM3 Leydig cells and TM4 Sertoli cells) and spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) because damage to or dysfunction of these cells can directly affect spermatogenesis, resulting in male infertility. Cr(VI) by inducing oxidative stress was cytotoxic to both male somatic cells and SSCs in a dose-dependent manner, and induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Although the mechanism of Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity was similar in both somatic cells, the differences in sensitivity of TM3 and TM4 cells to Cr(VI) could be attributed, at least in part, to cell-specific regulation of P-AKT1, P-ERK1/2, and P-P53 proteins. Cr(VI) affected the differentiation and self-renewal mechanisms of SSCs, disrupted steroidogenesis in TM3 cells, while in TM4 cells, the expression of tight junction signaling and cell receptor molecules was affected as well as the secretory functions were impaired. In conclusion, our results show that Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and impairs the physiological functions of male somatic cells and SSCs. PMID:26355036

  5. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by Macadamia nutshell powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakade, Vusumzi Emmanuel; Ntuli, Themba Dominic; Ofomaja, Augustine Enakpodia

    2017-10-01

    Macadamia nutshell biosorbents treated in three different activating agents [raw Macadamia nutshell powder (RMN), acid-treated Macadamia nutshell (ATMN) and base-treated Macadamia nutshell (BTMN)] were investigated for the adsorption of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra of free and Cr(VI)-loaded sorbents as well as thermogravimetric analysis revealed that the acid and base treatments modified the surface properties of the sorbent. Surface characteristics were also evaluated by the scanning electron microscopy and surface area analyzer. The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Cr(VI) by sorbents were pH 2, contact time 10 h, adsorbent mass 0.2 g and concentration 100 mg L-1. The equilibrium data were fitted into the Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Sips isotherms, and no single model could clearly explain the sorption mechanism. Maximum binding capacities of 45.23, 44.83 and 42.44 mg g-1 for RMN, ATMN and BTMN, respectively, were obtained. The kinetic data were analyzed using the pseudo-first, pseudo-second and Elovich kinetic models, and it was observed that the pseudo-second-order model produced the best fit for the experimental data. Macadamia nutshell sorbents showed potential as low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution.

  6. Investigation of Hexavalent Chromium Flux to Groundwater at the 100-C-7:1 Excavation Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Horner, Jacob A.; Johnson, Christian D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2012-11-16

    Deep excavation of soil has been conducted at the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 waste sites within the 100-BC Operable Unit at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) contamination with the excavations reaching to near the water table. Soil sampling showed that Cr(VI) contamination was still present at the bottom of the 100-C-7:1 excavation. In addition, Cr(VI) concentrations in a downgradient monitoring well have shown a transient spike of increased Cr(VI) concentration following initiation of excavation. Potentially, the increased Cr(VI) concentrations in the downgradient monitoring well are due to Cr(VI) from the excavation site. However, data were needed to evaluate this possibility and to quantify the overall impact of the 100-C-7:1 excavation site on groundwater. Data collected from a network of aquifer tubes installed across the floor of the 100-C-7:1 excavation and from temporary wells installed at the bottom of the entrance ramp to the excavation were used to evaluate Cr(VI) releases into the aquifer and to estimate local-scale hydraulic properties and groundwater flow velocity.

  7. Hexavalent chromium removal by multilayer membrane assisted by photocatalytic couple nanoparticle from both permeate and retentate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Maryamossadat; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Peyravi, Majid

    2017-10-03

    In this study, a novel photocatalytic thin film nanocomposite (TFC) membrane was prepared for removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from aqueous solution. In this regards, a TFC membrane was modified by a layer of chitosan as an adsorbent and then was coated with a layer of synthesized photocatalytic nanoscale zerovalent iron@titanium dioxide (nZVI@TiO2) nanoparticles via layer-by-layer (LBL) technology. Prepared membranes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle analysis. The Cr(VI) removal efficiency of the membranes was evaluated by batch removal and dynamic filtration tests. The water flux was increased from 26.2 to 39.7l/m(2)h as a consequence of improved hydrophilicity which was approved by contact angle analysis. The modified TFC membrane has shown the significant removal of Cr(VI) in retentate as well as the permeate stream. Further, the Cr(VI) removal of retentate flow decreased with increasing pH and feed concentration whereas the Cr(VI) removal of permeate was enhanced with increasing initial feed concentration. Increasing the flux recovery from 62% (for neat TFC) to 87% (for modified TFC membrane) demonstrated that the modification of membrane improved the anti-fouling property of the modified membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes performance in adsorption and desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholipour Mina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs has been investigated as a function of adsorbent dosage, initial Cr(VI concentration, initial pH, contact time and temperature. Low pH, low initial concentrations of Cr(VI, increasing contact time and high temperature were found as optimal conditions. A comparison of kinetics models applied to the adsorption of Cr(VI ions on the MWCNTs was evaluated for the pseudo first-order, the pseudo second-order, and Elovich kinetics models, respectively. Pseudo second-order kinetics model was found to correlate the experimental data well. Equilibrium isotherms were measured experimentally and results show that data were fitted well by the BET model. Thermodynamic parameters were estimated and results suggest that the adsorption process is spontaneous, physical and endothermic. The reversibility of Cr(VI adsorption onto MWCNTs by desorption process and the effect of operating factors such as regeneration solution characteristics, contact time and temperature on this process was investigated. Results show that MWCNTs are effective Cr(VI adsorbents and can be reused through many cycles of regeneration without any high decreasing in their performance.

  9. The simultaneous detection of trivalent & hexavalent chromium in exhaled breath condensate: A feasibility study comparing workers and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leese, Elizabeth; Morton, Jackie; Gardiner, Philip H E; Carolan, Vikki A

    2017-04-01

    The analytical method outlined in this feasibility study has been used to show that trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) and hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) can be detected and measured in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) samples. EBC samples and urine samples were collected from a cohort of 58 workers occupationally exposed to hexavalent chromium compounds and 22 unexposed volunteers (control group). Levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were determined in EBC samples and total chromium levels were determined in urine samples. Pre and post working week samples for both EBC and urine were collected in tandem. Total chromium in urine samples was analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Analysis of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in EBC samples used a hyphenated micro liquid chromatography (μLC) system coupled to an ICP-MS. Separation was achieved using an anion exchange micro-sized column. The results showed that the occupationally exposed workers had significantly higher levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in their EBC samples than the control group, as well as higher levels of total chromium in their urine samples. However, for the exposed workers no significant difference was found between pre and post working week EBC samples for either Cr(III) or Cr(VI). This study has established that Cr(III) and Cr(VI) can simultaneously be detected and measured in 'real' EBC samples and will help in understanding inhalation exposure. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Hexavalent Chromium: Analysis of the Mechanism of Groundwater Contamination in a Former Industrial Site in the Province of Vicenza (Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Accoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study consisted in the analysis of the mobilization mechanisms of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI into groundwater from a decommissioned contaminated factory. The site is located in the Province of Vicenza and formerly was a chrome-plating plant. The subsoil consists predominantly of gravelly deposits with a thickness of at least one hundred meters. An unconfined aquifer is present with water table at about 23 m depth bgl. During the seven years of monitoring (2008-2014, the fluctuation of groundwater level was more than 6 m; hydraulic conductivity is about 1.0E-03 m/s and groundwater seepage velocity about 12 m/day. At the area of the source of contamination, the unsaturated soil is contaminated by hexavalent chromium throughout the thickness: concentrations range from 200 to 500 mg/kg. At the bottom of zone of groundwater level fluctuation, the hexavalent chromium concentration decreases to below the detection limit. The available data (e.g. hexavalent chromium concentrations in groundwater, groundwater level, local rainfall give the opportunity to assess the effects, on the magnitude of groundwater contamination, of the effective infiltration versus the fluctuation of groundwater level. The main analysis was performed on a statistical basis, in order to find out which of the two factors was most likely related to the periodic peaks of hexavalent chromium concentration in groundwater. Statistical analysis results were verified by a mass balance. Data show that at the site both the effective infiltration through the unsaturated zone and the leaching of soil contaminated by groundwater, when it exceeds a certain piezometric level, lead to peak concentrations of hexavalent chromium, even if with characteristics and effects different.

  11. Recovery of hexavalent chromium from water using photoactive TiO2-montmorillonite under sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Djellabi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium was removed from water under sunlight using a synthesized TiO2-montmorillonite (TiO2-M employing tartaric acid as a hole scavenger. Cr(VI species was then reduced to Cr(III species by electrons arising from TiO2 particles. After that, the produced Cr(III species  was transferred to montmorillonite  due to electrostatic attractions leading to  set free TiO2 particles for a further Cr(VI species reduction. Furthermore, produced Cr(III, after Cr(VI reduction, does not  penetrate into the solution. The results indicate that no dark adsorption of Cr(VI species on TiO2-M is present, however, the reduction of Cr(VI species under sunlight increased strongly as a function of tartaric acid concentration up to 60 ppm, for which the extent of reduction is maximum within 3 h. On the other hand, the reduction extent of Cr(VI species is maximum with an initial concentration of Cr(VI species lower than 30 ppm by the use of 0.2 g/L of TiO2-M. Nevertheless, the increase of the Cr(VI initial concentration led to increase the amount of Cr(VI species reduced (capacity of reduction until a Cr(VI concentration of 75 and 100 ppm, for which  it remained constant at around 221 mg/g. For comparison, the increase of Cr(VI species concentration in the case of the commercial TiO2 P25 under the same conditions exhibited its deactivation when the reduced amount decreased from 198.1 to 157.6 mg/g as the concentration increased from 75 to 100 ppm.

  12. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to hawksbill sea turtle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Sandra S., E-mail: sandra.wise@maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Xie, Hong, E-mail: hongxie@usm.maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Fukuda, Tomokazu, E-mail: tomofukuda009@gmail.com [Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Tohoku University, Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Second Research Building, Rm 112, 1-1 Amamiyamachi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Douglas Thompson, W., E-mail: dougt@usm.maine.edu [Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); and others

    2014-09-01

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7% relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36% of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3% relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29% of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general. - Highlights: • Particulate Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Soluble Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Cr(VI) may be a risk factor for hawksbill sea turtle health.

  13. Performance evaluation of granular iron for removing hexavalent chromium under different geochemical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Blowes, David W; Gillham, Robert W

    2008-01-07

    Long-term column experiments were conducted under different geochemical conditions to estimate the longevity of Fe 0 permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) treating hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). Secondary carbonate minerals were precipitated, and their effects on the performance, such as differences in the mechanism for Cr removal and the changes in system hydraulics, were assessed. Sequestration of Cr(VI) occurred primarily by precipitation of Fe(III)-Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxides. Trace amounts of Cr were observed in iron hydroxy carbonate presumably due to substitution of Cr3+ for Fe3+. The formation of Fe(III)-Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxide greatly decreased the reactivity of the Fe 0 and thus resulted in migration of the Cr removal front. Carbonate minerals did not appear to contribute to further passivation with regard to reactivity toward Cr removal; rather, the column receiving high contents of dissolved calcium carbonate showed slightly enhanced Cr removal by means of a higher corrosion rate of Fe 0 and because of sequestration by an iron hydroxy carbonate. Precipitation of carbonates, however, governed other geochemical parameters. The porosity and hydraulic conductivity in the column receiving high contents of dissolved calcium carbonate did not indicate a great loss in system permeability because the accumulation of carbonates declined as the Fe 0 was passivated over time. However, the accumulated carbonates and associated Fe(III)-Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxide could cause problems because the presence of these solids resulted in a decline in flow rate after about 1400 pore volumes of operation.

  14. Photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium with illuminated amorphous FeOOH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarghandi, Mohammad-Reza; Yang, Jae-Kyu; Giahi, Omid; Shirzad-Siboni, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] by amorphous FeOOH was investigated with variations in FeOOH dosage, pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration, purging gas, organic compounds and initial hydrogen peroxide concentration. Reduction and adsorption were identified as important processes for the removal of Cr(VI). FeOOH dosage was also an important parameter for the removal of Cr(VI). As the FeOOH dosage increased up to 0.5 g/L, the removal of Cr(VI) was continuously enhanced and then decreased above 0.5 g/L due to increased blockage of the incident UV light. The removal efficiency of Cr(VI) decreased with increasing pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration and initial hydrogen peroxide concentration. While the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) increased with purging of nitrogen gas compared to that of oxygen gas because of less competition between dissolved oxygen and Cr(VI) with the electron in the conduction band of FeOOH. The photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) was increased in the presence of citric acid and phenol, while it was decreased in the presence of EDTA and oxalic acid. The reaction rate constant (kobs) was decreased from 0.2141 to 0.0026 1/min and the value of electrical energy per order (EEo) was increased from 22.41 to 1846.15 (kWh/m3) with increasing initial Cr(VI) concentration from 10 to 50 mg/L, respectively. Finally, proper photocatalytic activity was maintained even after five successive cycles.

  15. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction under Fermentative Conditions with Lactate Stimulated Native Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somenahally, Anil C [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Yuan, Tong [University of Oklahoma; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Hazen, Terry C [ORNL; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D. [Oklahoma University; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM) and continuously amended with Cr(VI) at 0.0 (No-Cr), 0.1 (Low-Cr) and 3.0 (High-Cr) mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI), 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%). Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  16. Ovipositional response, developmental effects and toxicity of hexavalent chromium to Megaselia scalaris, a terrestrial detritivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumble, John T; Jensen, Peter D

    2004-04-01

    The effects of hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) on ovipositional response, development, and survival of a common terrestrial detritivore, Megaselia scalaris (Diptera: Phoridae), were assessed in the laboratory. Ovipositing females did not discriminate between substrates containing 0, 50, 500, or 1000 microg/g, indicating a lack of avoidance behavior. Eggs placed on artificial diets containing up to 1000 microg/g either did not absorb Cr VI or were unaffected as measured by eclosion rates. However, development and survival of larvae were significantly reduced at the higher concentrations tested. Concentrations of 500 microg/g in their food increased larval development times by nearly 65%. At 1000 microg/g, larval developmental times doubled. The time required from onset to completion of pupariation was not significantly different regardless of Cr VI concentration. Although males eclosed before females, there was no significant difference between the sexes in the time required for adult eclosion. In addition, there were no significant differences in the percentage of males and females emerging from any of the treatments. At concentrations of 500 or 1000 microg/g, Cr VI decreased larval survival. Survival was reduced by 44.3% at 500 microg/g as compared with the controls. There was no additional mortality from the onset of the puparial stage to adult eclosion for larvae fed diets containing 500 microg/g Cr VI. At 1000 microg/g Cr VI, larval survival decreased by 86.6%. An additional 7.4% mortality was recorded in the puparial stage, for a decrease in total survival (larval plus puparial stages) of 94%. Thus, nearly all of the observed mortality occurred during the larval stage rather than the puparial stage. The population level implications of lack of avoidance of contaminated food and the effects of increased developmental times and reduced survivorship are discussed.

  17. Hexavalent chromium adsorption from aqueous solution using carbon nano-onions (CNOs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakulthaew, Chainarong; Chokejaroenrat, Chanat; Poapolathep, Amnart; Satapanajaru, Tunlawit; Poapolathep, Saranya

    2017-10-01

    The capacity of carbon nano-onions (CNOs) to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from aqueous solution was investigated. Batch experiments were performed to quantify the effects of the dosage rate, pH, counter ions, and temperature. The adsorption of Cr(VI) onto CNOs was best described by a pseudo-second order rate expression. The adsorption efficiency increased with increasing adsorbent dosage and contact time and reached equilibrium in 24 h. The equilibrium data showed better compliance with a Langmuir isotherm than a Freundlich isotherm. Effective removal of Cr(VI) was demonstrated at pH values ranging from 2 to 10. The adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) was found to be highest (82%) at pH 3.4 and greatly depended on the solution pH. We found that Cr(VI) adsorption decreased with increasing pH over the pH range of 3.4-10. The adsorption capacity increased dramatically when the temperature increased from 10 °C to 50 °C regardless of the amount of CNOs used. Cr(VI) removal decreased by ∼13% when Zn(II), Cu(II), and Pb(II) were present, while there were no significant changes observed when NO 3 - or SO 4 2- was present. The overall results support that CNOs can be used as an alternative adsorbent material to remove Cr(VI) in the water treatment industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium at gold nanoparticles modified titania nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandikumar, Alagarsamy; Ramaraj, Ramasamy, E-mail: ramarajr@yahoo.com

    2013-09-16

    N-[3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (EDAS) silicate supported titanium dioxide nanotubes-gold ((TiO{sub 2} NTs-Au){sub NCM}) nanocomposite material (EDAS/(TiO{sub 2} NTs-Au){sub NCM}) was prepared by deposition–precipitation method and characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra, X-ray diffraction pattern, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis, transmission electron micrographs, scanning electron micrographs and energy-dispersive X-ray spectra analysis. The photocatalytic activity of the EDAS/(TiO{sub 2} NTs-Au){sub NCM} in the film form was investigated towards the reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) into trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) in the presence of oxalic acid as an electron donor. The EDAS/(TiO{sub 2} NTs-Au){sub NCM} film exhibited higher photocatalytic activity when compared to the photocatalytic activities of pristine TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (TiO{sub 2} NTs) which can be attributed to the effective photoinduced interfacial charge transfer from the (TiO{sub 2} NTs-Au){sub NCM} to Cr(VI) through Au nanoparticles (Au{sub nps}). The Au{sub nps} present in the TiO{sub 2} NTs act as an electron sink for the photogenerated electrons that minimizes the charge recombination process at the TiO{sub 2} NTs. The Au{sub nps} on the TiO{sub 2} NTs surface facilitates the transfer of photogenerated electrons to the Cr(VI) leading to the formation of Cr(III) ions. - Highlights: • Gold modified titania nanotubes are used to design solid-phase photocatalyst. • Gold nanoparticles deposition increases the surface area of titania nanotubes. • Gold on titania nanotubes improves the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI). • The holes produced at the titania nanotubes are scavenged by oxalic acid. • Gold modified titania nanotubes is a potential candidate for treatment of heavy metals.

  19. Fixed-bed column study for hexavalent chromium removal and recovery by short-chain polyaniline synthesized on jute fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Potsangbam Albino; Chakraborty, Saswati

    2009-03-15

    Fixed-bed column studies were conducted to evaluate performance of a short-chain polymer, polyaniline, synthesized on the surface of jute fiber (PANI-jute) for the removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in aqueous environment. Influent pH, column bed depth, influent Cr(VI) concentrations and influent flow rate were variable parameters for the present study. Optimum pH for total chromium removal was observed as 3 by electrostatic attraction of acid chromate ion (HCrO(4)(-)) with protonated amine group (NH(3)(+)) of PANI-jute. With increase in column bed depth from 40 to 60 cm, total chromium uptake by PANI-jute increased from 4.14 to 4.66 mg/g with subsequent increase in throughput volume from 9.84 to 12.6L at exhaustion point. The data obtained for total chromium removal were well described by BDST equation till 10% breakthrough. Adsorption rate constant and dynamic bed capacity at 10% breakthrough were observed as 0.01 L/mgh and 1069.46 mg/L, respectively. Adsorbed total chromium was recovered back from PANI-jute as non-toxic Cr(III) after ignition with more than 97% reduction in weight, minimizing the problem of solid waste disposal.

  20. Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron in continuous-flow system. Part 2: Effect of scrap iron shape and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheju, M; Balcu, I

    2010-10-15

    Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron has the advantage that two wastes are treated simultaneously. The reduction of hexavalent chromium by scrap iron was investigated in continuous system, using as reducing agent the following scrap iron shapes and sizes: (1) spiral fibers, (2) shavings, and (3) powder. The shape and size of scrap iron were found to have a significant influence on chromium and iron species concentration in column effluent, on column effluent pH and on Cr(VI) reduction mechanism. While for large scrap iron particles (spiral fibers) homogeneous reduction is the dominant Cr(VI) reduction process, for small scrap iron particles (powder) heterogeneous reduction appears to be the dominant reaction contributing to Cr(VI) reduction. All three shapes and sizes investigated in this work have both advantages and disadvantages. If found in sufficient quantities, scrap iron powder seem to be the optimum shape and size for the continuous reduction of Cr(VI), due to the following advantages: (1) the greatest reduction capacity, (2) the most important pH increase in column effluent (up to 6.3), (3) no chromium was detected in the column effluent during the first 60 h of the experiment, and (4) the lowest steady-state Cr(VI) concentration observed in column effluent (3.7 mg/L). But, despite of a lower reduction capacity in comparison with powder particles, spiral fibers and shavings have the advantage to result in large quantities from the mechanic processing of steel. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. An evaluation of welding processes to reduce hexavalent chromium exposures and reduce costs by using better welding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    A group of stainless steel arc welding processes was compared for emission rates of fume and hexavalent chromium, and costs per meter length of weld. The objective was to identify those with minimal emissions and also compare relative labor and consumables costs. The selection included flux-cored arc welding (FCAW), shielded-metal arc welding (SMAW), and multiple gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, and fume generation rates and hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) were measured. GMAW processes used were short-circuit (SC) and pulsed-spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding. Costs were estimated per meter of a 6.3-mm thick horizontal butt weld. Emission rates of Cr(6+) were lowest for GMAW processes and highest for SMAW; several GMAW processes had less than 2% of the SMAW generation rate. Labor and consumable costs for the processes studied were again highest for SMAW, with those of several GMAW types about half that cost. The results show that use of any of the GMAW processes (and flux-cored welding) could substantially reduce fume and Cr(6+) emissions, and greatly reduce costs relative to SMAW.

  2. Chronic exposure to sublethal hexavalent chromium affects organ histopathology and serum cortisol profile of a teleost, Channa punctatus (Bloch)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Ashish K. [Department of Zoology, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Mohanty, Banalata, E-mail: drbana_mohanty@rediffmail.com [Department of Zoology, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India)

    2009-09-01

    Effects of chronic exposures (one and two months) to sublethal doses of hexavalent chromium (2 and 4 mg/L potassium dichromate) on organ histopathology and serum cortisol profile were investigated and their overall impact on growth and behavior of a teleost fish, Channa punctatus was elucidated. Histopathological lesions were distinct in the vital organs gill, kidney and liver. The gill lamellae became lifted, fused, and showed oedema. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of lamellar epithelial cells were distinct with desquamation. Hypertrophy of epithelial cells of renal tubules and reduction in tubular lumens were observed in the trunk kidney. The atrophy of the head kidney interrenal cells and decreased serum cortisol level indicated exhaustion of interrenal activity. Hepatocyte vacuolization and shrinkage, nuclear pyknosis and increase of sinusoidal spaces were observed in the liver. Abnormal behavioral patterns and reduced growth rate were also noticed in the exposed fish. The chronic hexavalent chromium exposure thus by affecting histopathology of gill, kidney (including interrenal tissue) and liver could impair the vital functions of respiration, excretion, metabolic regulation and maintenance of stress homeostasis which in the long-run may pose serious threat to fish health and affect their population.

  3. 76 FR 71926 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium Policy to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... policy addressing the serious human health and environmental risks related to the use of hexavalent... prescribed at 223.7306. * * * * * PART 244--SUBCONTRACTING POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 3. Revise section 244.403...

  4. Lithium salts as leachable corrosion inhibitors and potential replacement for hexavalent chromium in organic coatings for the protection of aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, P; Liu, Y; Terryn, H.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium salts are being investigated as leachable corrosion inhibitor and potential replacement for hexavalent chromium in organic coatings. Model coatings loaded with lithium carbonate or lithium oxalate demonstrated active corrosion inhibition and the formation of a protective layer in a

  5. Reproductive outcomes after non-occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium, Willits California, 1983-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Linda L; Byers, Vera; Clay, Ted

    2017-03-06

    From 1963-1995, a factory in Willits, Mendocino County, CA used toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) without adequate measures to protect the population. We use longitudinal hospital data to compare reproductive outcomes for two generations in Willits and two generations in the Rest of County (ROC). This is the first study to quantify the reproductive impact of Cr(VI) in a non-occupational population. We searched California hospital discharge data (1983-2014) to find Mendocino County residents born 1950 or later. ZIP-code 95490 identifies Willits residents, with all others living in ROC. We used the Multi-Level Clinical Classification Software (CCS) to classify health outcomes. First, we calculated the crude birth rate using an external census denominator. The next two models used self-contained denominators to assess health of infants and two generations of pregnant women. Finally, we focused on non-pregnant females and, for comparison, males. Here we added admissions for people who moved, linked and summarized admissions to the person level, and calculated rates per census population. We found 29311 newborn records in ROC and 5036 from Willits. At start of period, Willits birth rate was low and did not recover until 12 years after Plant closure. While the Plant was open, respiratory conditions, perinatal jaundice, and birth defect rates were higher for Willits infants compared to ROC, but improved post-closure. Risk for abnormal birthweight and term was high and remained high over the study period. During the period under study, we identified 31444 admissions of pregnant ROC women and 5558 from Willits. Willits women had significantly higher risk of pregnancy loss compared to ROC, whether stratified by generation, age group, or pre- and post-closure. Regardless of when exposed, Willits women continued to have significantly higher rates of in-hospital terminations, as animal studies of Cr(VI) exposure predict. In life course models, non-pregnant Willits women

  6. Adsorption characteristics of hexavalent chromium on HCB/TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yonggang, E-mail: 13502182420@163.com

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sol–gel method was adopted to prepare HCB/TiO{sub 2}. • Its adsorption performance of Cr(VI) was investigated. • The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was at 27.33 mg g{sup −1} in an acidic medium. • The value is worth comparable with other low-cost adsorbents. - Abstract: Sol–gel method was adopted to prepare HCB/TiO{sub 2} and its adsorption ability of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), and removal from aqueous solution were investigated. The samples were characterized by Power X-ray diffraction (XRD) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) which showed that the TiO{sub 2} was deposited on the surface of HCB. FTIR was used to identify the changes of the surface functional groups before and after adsorption. Potentiometric titration method was used to characterize the zero charge (pH{sub pzc}) characteristics of the surface of HCB/TiO{sub 2} which showed more acidic functional groups containing. Batch experiments showed that initial pH, absorbent dosage, contact time and initial concentration of Cr(VI) were important parameters for the Cr(VI) adsorption studies. The Freundlich isotherm model better reflected the experimental data better. Cr(VI) adsorption process followed the pseudo-second order kinetic model, which illustrated chemical adsorption. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy (ΔG), changes in enthalpy change (ΔH) and changes in entropy change (ΔS) were also evaluated. Negative value of free energy occurred at temperature range of 25–45 °C, so Cr(VI) adsorption by HCB/TiO{sub 2} is spontaneous. Desorption results showed that the adsorption capacity could maintain 80% after five cycles. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was at 27.33 mg g{sup −1} in an acidic medium, of which the value is worth comparable with other low-cost adsorbents.

  7. Exposure to hexavalent chromium in welders: Results of the WELDOX II field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Beate; Lehnert, Martin; Weiss, Tobias; Kendzia, Benjamin; Menne, Eleonore; Lotz, Anne; Heinze, Evelyn; Behrens, Thomas; Gabriel, Stefan; Schneider, Wolfgang; Brüning, Thomas

    2018-02-12

    Exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) has been primarily studied in chromate production. Here, we measured personal exposure to respirable Cr(VI) together with airborne and urinary Cr and Ni in welders to explore levels and associations between various measures of exposure. Shift concentrations of Cr(VI), Cr, and Ni were measured in respirable welding fumes in 50 men who used either gas metal arc welding (GMAW) (n = 24) or tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) (n = 19) as their major technique. Cr and Ni were determined in pre- and post-shift urine samples. Concentrations below the limit of quantification (LOQ) were multiply imputed. Spearman correlation coefficients (rs) were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to explore associations between the exposure variables, and regression models were applied to estimate the effect of the parent metal on the urinary concentration. Regarding the respirable Cr(VI), 62% of the measurements were below the LOQ, the 75th percentile was 0.50 µg m-3, and 8 out of 50 (16%) welders exceeded 1 µg m-3. The highest shift concentration that occurred as a result of shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) was 180 µg m-3. The Cr(VI) content in total Cr ranged from 4 to 82% (median 20%), although the concentration correlated with total Cr (rs 0.55, 95% CI 0.46; 0.64). The correlation between Cr(VI) and Ni was weaker (rs 0.42, 95% CI 0.34; 0.51) than that between total Cr and Ni in welding fumes (rs 0.83, 95% CI 0.74; 0.92). Both Cr(VI) and total Cr influenced the urinary Cr concentrations in post-shift samples (P = 0.0008 and P ≤ 0.0001, respectively). The airborne shift exposure was a weaker determinant than the Cr content in pre-shift urine samples, which strongly correlated with post-shift urinary Cr (rs 0.78, 95% CI 0.69; 0.87). The Cr(VI) content in total Cr varied considerably in welding fumes. The majority of welders using GMAW or TIG presented with shift concentrations of respirable Cr(VI) below 1 µg m-3. However, very high

  8. Melanin-embedded materials effectively remove hexavalent chromium (CrVI) from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuong, An Manh; Le Na, Nguyen Thi; Thang, Pham Nhat; Diep, Trinh Ngoc; Thuy, Ly Bich; Thanh, Nguyen Lai; Thang, Nguyen Dinh

    2018-02-23

    Currently, it is recognized that water polluted with toxic heavy metal ions may cause serious effects on human health. Therefore, the development of new materials for effective removal of heavy metal ions from water is still a widely important area. Melanin is being considered as a potential material for removal of heavy metal from water. In this study, we synthesized two melanin-embedded beads from two different melanin powder sources and named IMB (Isolated Melanin Bead originated from squid ink sac) and CMB (Commercial Melanin Bead originated from sesame seeds). These beads were of globular shape and 2-3 mm in diameter. We investigated and compared the sorption abilities of these two bead materials toward hexavalent-chromium (Cr VI ) in water. The isotherm sorption curves were established using Langmuir and Freundlich models in the optimized conditions of pH, sorption time, solid/liquid ratio, and initial concentration of Cr VI . The FITR analysis was also carried out to show the differences in surface properties of these two beads. The optimized conditions for isotherm sorption of Cr VI on IMB/CMB were set at pH values of 2/2, sorption times of 90/300 min, and solid-liquid ratios of 10/20 mg/mL. The maximum sorption capacities calculated based on the Langmuir model were 19.60 and 6.24 for IMB and CMB, respectively. However, the adsorption kinetic of Cr VI on the beads fitted the Freundlich model with R 2 values of 0.992 for IMB and 0.989 for CMB. The deduced Freundlich constant, 1/n, in the range of 0.2-0.8 indicated that these beads are good adsorption materials. In addition, structure analysis data revealed great differences in physical and chemical properties between IMB and CMB. Interestingly, FTIR analysis results showed strong signals of -OH (3295.35 cm - 1 ) and -C=O (1608.63 cm - 1 ) groups harboring on the IMB but not CMB. Moreover, loading of Cr VI on the IMB caused a shift of broad peaks from 3295.35 cm - 1 and 1608.63 cm - 1 to 3354

  9. Equilibrium and kinetics study on hexavalent chromium adsorption onto diethylene triamine grafted glycidyl methacrylate based copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksin, Danijela D., E-mail: dmaksin@vinca.rs [University of Belgrade, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade (Serbia); Nastasovic, Aleksandra B., E-mail: anastaso@chem.bg.ac.rs [University of Belgrade, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, Njegoseva 12, Belgrade (Serbia); Milutinovic-Nikolic, Aleksandra D., E-mail: snikolic@nanosys.ihtm.bg.ac.rs [University of Belgrade, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, Njegoseva 12, Belgrade (Serbia); Surucic, Ljiljana T., E-mail: ljilja_m@yahoo.com [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Forestry, Kneza Viseslava 1, Belgrade (Serbia); Sandic, Zvjezdana P., E-mail: zvjezdana.sandic@gmail.com [Faculty of Science, Mladena Stojanovica 2, Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Hercigonja, Radmila V., E-mail: radah@ffh.bg.ac.rs [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Physical Chemistry, Studentski trg 12-16, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Onjia, Antonije E., E-mail: onjia@vinca.rs [University of Belgrade, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methacrylate based copolymers grafted with diethylene triamine as Cr(VI) sorbents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemisorption and pore diffusion are characteristics of this sorption system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Langmuir isotherm provided best fit and maximum adsorption capacity was 143 mg g{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr(VI) sorption onto amino-functionalized copolymer was endothermic and spontaneous. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simple, efficient and cost-effective hexavalent chromium removal method. - Abstract: Two porous and one non-porous crosslinked poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) [abbreviated PGME] were prepared by suspension copolymerization and functionalized with diethylene triamine [abbreviated PGME-deta]. Samples were characterized by elemental analysis, mercury porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption by PGME-deta were investigated in batch static experiments, in the temperature range 25-70 Degree-Sign C. Sorption was rapid, with the uptake capacity higher than 80% after 30 min. Sorption behavior and rate-controlling mechanisms were analyzed using five kinetic models (pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich, intraparticle diffusion and Bangham model). Kinetic studies showed that Cr(VI) adsorption adhered to the pseudo-second-order model, with definite influence of pore diffusion. Equilibrium data was tested with Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin adsorption isotherm models. Langmuir model was the most suitable indicating homogeneous distribution of active sites on PGME-deta and monolayer sorption. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir model, Q{sub max}, at pH 1.8 and 25 Degree-Sign C was 143 mg g{sup -1} for PGME2-deta (sample with the highest amino group concentration) while at 70 Degree-Sign C Q{sub max} reached the high value of 198

  10. Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solution by Modified Holly Sawdust: A Study of Equilibrium and Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Azizian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Industrial wastewaters including heavy metals, are among the important sources of environmental pollution. Heavy metals such as chromium are found in plating wastewater and is harmful for human health and environment. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the absorption of heavy metals such as chromium onto modified holly sawdust as an cheaper absorbent. Materials & Methods: This study was a fundamental- application study done in Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, hygiene faculty water and wastewater chemistry laboratory. This study investigated the removal of hexavalent chromium by using modified holly sawdust with pH changes ,contact time ,absorbent dose and Cr(VI concentrations in batch system. Then the result was analyzed by Excel software.Results: The results showed that the removal efficiency decrease is accompanied by the increase of pH and initial chromium concentration. pH increase from 2 to 12(equilibrium time= 180 min, adsorbent dose= 0.6g/100CC, Cr(VI concentrations= 60 mg/L,leaded to the removal efficiency decrease from 99.67 % to 29.78 %. Also removal efficiency decreased from 99.37 % to 40.24 % after increasing the initial chromium concentrations from 20 mg/L to 100 mg/L. Moreover the results showed the removal efficiency increased after increasing the adsorbent dose and contact time. By increasing adsorbent dose from 0.2 g/100CC to 1 g/100CC, the removal efficiency increased from 34.65 % to 99.76 %.Additionally, the removal efficiency increased from 48.53%to 99.76% by increasing contact time from 5 mins to 180 mins. Experimental isotherms and kinetics models were assessed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics models. The results showed that the data were acceptably explained acceptably by Langmuir isotherms and pseudo-second-order kinetics models respectively.Conclusion: The results showed that the removal of hexavalent chromium

  11. 77 FR 61431 - Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... monitoring, notifying workers of their chromium exposures, implementing medical surveillance of workers... personnel of chromium hazards and maintaining workers' exposure monitoring and medical surveillance records... other technological information collection and transmission techniques. III. Proposed Actions OSHA is...

  12. Photo-reduction of Hexavalent Chromium in Aqueous Solution in the Presence of TiO2 as Semiconductor Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorab M. F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to determine the optimal conditions for the reduction of the hexavalent chromium in water using the photocatalytic system TiO2/ UV. The results show that the effectiveness of this system was significantly higher compared to direct photolysis. The influence of parameters such as photocatalyst loading and initial concentration of the substrate was studied. The study of the influence of pH shows that the reduction rates are grater for acid solutions. Furthermore the experimental results show that the presence of H2O2 at small concentration (10-6M accelerates the reduction. However at higher concentration (10-4M H2O2 inhibits the reduction. The presence of inorganic ions such as Cl- and SO42- does not seem to have any significant influence on the reduction rate of Cr (VI.

  13. Effect of ventilation velocity on hexavalent chromium and isocyanate exposures in aircraft paint spraying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, James; Marlow, David; Nourian, Fariba; Breay, James; Feng, Amy; Methner, Mark

    2017-11-20

    Exposure control system performance was evaluated during aircraft paint spraying at a military facility. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, tracer gas testing, and exposure monitoring examined contaminant exposure versus crossflow ventilation velocity. CFD modeling using the RNG k-ϵ turbulence model showed exposures to simulated methyl isobutyl ketone of 294 and 83.6 ppm, as a spatial average of five worker locations, for velocities of 0.508 and 0.381 m/s (100 and 75 fpm) respectively. In tracer gas experiments, observed supply/exhaust velocities of 0.706/0.503 m/s (136/99 fpm) were termed full-flow, and reduced velocities were termed 3/4-flow and half-flow. Half-flow showed higher tracer gas concentrations than 3/4-flow, which had the lowest time-averaged concentration, with difference in log means significant at the 95% confidence level. Half-flow compared to full-flow and 3/4-flow compared to full-flow showed no statistically significant difference. CFD modeling using these ventilation conditions agreed closely with the tracer results for the full-flow and 3/4-flow comparison, yet not for the 3/4-flow and half-flow comparison. Full-flow conditions at the painting facility produced a velocity of 0.528 m/s (104 fpm) midway between supply and exhaust locations, with the supply rate of 94.4 m3/s (200,000 cfm) exceeding the exhaust rate of 68.7 m3/s (146,000 cfm). Ventilation modifications to correct this imbalance created a mid-hangar velocity of 0.406 m/s (80.0 fpm). Personal exposure monitoring for two worker groups-sprayers and sprayer helpers ("hosemen")-compared process duration means for the two velocities. Hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) exposures were 500 vs. 360 µg/m3 for sprayers and 120 vs. 170 µg/m3 for hosemen, for 0.528 m/s (104 fpm) and 0.406 m/s (80.0 fpm) respectively. Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) monomer means were 32.2 vs. 13.3 µg/m3 for sprayers and 3.99 vs. 8.42 µg/m3 for hosemen. Crossflow velocities

  14. Investigation of alternative phosphating treatments for nickel and hexavalent chromium elimination; Investigacao de tratamentos alternativos de fosfatizacao para eliminacao do niquel e cromo hexavalente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jazbinsek, Luiz Antonio Rossi

    2014-07-01

    The phosphating processes are widely used in industry as surface treatments for metals, especially for low thickness plates, improving the adhesion between the metallic surface and the paint coating, and increasing the durability of paint systems against corrosion attacks. The tricationic phosphates containing zinc, nickel and manganese are commonly applied on steel. There is much discussion about the replacement of nickel by another element in order to have an environmentally friendly phosphating process. Niobium as a replacement for nickel has been evaluated. The most significant environmental impacts of phosphating processes are related to the presence of nickel and hexavalent chromium used in the process, this last as a passivation treatment. Nickel and hexavalent chromium are harmful to human and environment leading to contamination of water and soil. In the present study phosphate layers containing zinc, manganese and niobium have been evaluated and characterized on galvanized steel, and the results were compared with phosphates containing zinc, manganese and nickel, or a bicationic phosphate layer with zinc and manganese. Although the use of hexavalent chromium is not recommended worldwide, it is still used in processes for sealing the porosity of phosphate layers. This element is carcinogenic and has been associated with various diseases. Due to the passivation characteristics of niobium, this study also evaluated the tricationic bath containing niobium ammonium oxalate as a passivation treatment. The results showed that it could act as a replacement for the hexavalent chromium. The results of the present study showed that formulations containing niobium are potential replacements for hexavalent chromium and similar corrosion protection was obtained for the phosphate containing nickel or that with niobium. The morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy, gravimetric tests, porosity and adhesion evaluation results indicated that the phosphate

  15. Precursor preparation for Ca-Al layered double hydroxide to remove hexavalent chromium coexisting with calcium and magnesium chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Lihua; He, Xiaoman; Qu, Jun; Li, Xuewei; Lei, Zhiwu; Zhang, Qiwu [School of Resources and Environment Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Liu, Xinzhong [College of Ecological Environment and Urban Construction, Fujian University of Technology, Fuzhou 350118 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Al(OH){sub 3} and Ca(OH){sub 2} powders are co-ground to prepare a precursor which hydrates into a layered double hydroxide (LDH) phase by agitation in aqueous solution with target hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) at room temperature, to achieve an obvious improvement in removal efficiency of Cr(VI) through an easy incorporation into the structure. Although the prepared precursor transforms into LDH phases also when agitated in the solutions of calcium and magnesium chlorides, it incorporates Cr(VI) preferentially to the chloride salts when they coexist. The adsorption isotherm and kinetic studies show that the phenomena occurring on the Al-Ca precursor fit a pseudo-second-order kinetics with a Langmuir adsorption capacity of 59.45 mg/g. Besides, characterizations of the prepared precursor and the samples after adsorption are also performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) to understand the reason of the preferential incorporation of Cr(VI) to the coexisting chloride salts during the LDH phase formation. - Graphical abstract: Activated Ca-Al hydroxides (C{sub 3}A) transformed into Ca-Al-OH compound when agitated in water. Ca-Al precursor (C{sub 3}A) was agitated in a hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) solution to form Al-Ca-CrO{sub 4} LDH product. Ca-Al-CrO{sub 4} LDH phase occurred preferentially to Ca-Al-MCl{sub 2} LDH phases in the solutions of calcium and magnesium chlorides, it incorporates Cr(VI) preferentially to the chloride salts when they coexist. - Highlights: • Activated Ca-Al hydroxides transformed into LDH when agitated in water with some inorganic substances. • Hexavalent Cr was incorporated in the LDH structure at high adsorption capacity. • Ca-Al-Cr LDH phase occurred preferentially to Ca-Al-MCl{sub 2} LDH phases with coexistence. • The prepared Ca-Al hydroxides had high performance as adsorbent even with high salinity of the solution.

  16. Exposure to Hexavalent Chromium Resulted in Significantly Higher Tissue Chromium Burden Compared With Trivalent Chromium Following Similar Oral Doses to Male F344/N Rats and Female B6C3F1 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Bradley J.; Stout, Matthew D.; Levine, Keith E.; Kissling, Grace E.; Fennell, Timothy R.; Walden, Ramsey; Abdo, Kamal; Pritchard, John B.; Fernando, Reshan A.; Burka, Leo T.; Hooth, Michelle J.

    2010-01-01

    In National Toxicology Program 2-year studies, hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] administered in drinking water was clearly carcinogenic in male and female rats and mice, resulting in small intestine epithelial neoplasms in mice at a dose equivalent to or within an order of magnitude of human doses that could result from consumption of chromium-contaminated drinking water, assuming that dose scales by body weight3/4 (body weight raised to the 3/4 power). In contrast, exposure to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] at much higher concentrations may have been carcinogenic in male rats but was not carcinogenic in mice or female rats. As part of these studies, total chromium was measured in tissues and excreta of additional groups of male rats and female mice. These data were used to infer the uptake and distribution of Cr(VI) because Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III) in vivo, and no methods are available to speciate tissue chromium. Comparable external doses resulted in much higher tissue chromium concentrations following exposure to Cr(VI) compared with Cr(III), indicating that a portion of the Cr(VI) escaped gastric reduction and was distributed systemically. Linear or supralinear dose responses of total chromium in tissues were observed following exposure to Cr(VI), indicating that these exposures did not saturate gastric reduction capacity. When Cr(VI) exposure was normalized to ingested dose, chromium concentrations in the liver and glandular stomach were higher in mice, whereas kidney concentrations were higher in rats. In vitro studies demonstrated that Cr(VI), but not Cr(III), is a substrate of the sodium/sulfate cotransporter, providing a partial explanation for the greater absorption of Cr(VI). PMID:20843897

  17. Fixed bed adsorption of hexavalent chromium onto natural zeolite from air stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Golbabaei

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: Due to the extensive use of chromium in various industries and regulatory requirements related to workplace health and safety, Cr emission control in the occupational environment is essential. The adsorption process is one of the controlling measures of chromium emissions. The results indicated that natural zeolite has a high efficiency in Cr (VI adsorption.

  18. Toxicokinetics of hexavalent chromium in the rat after intratracheal administration of chromates of different solubilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragt, P.C.; Dura, E.A. van

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of chromium in the rat after a single intratracheal dose of sodium, zinc or lead 51Cr-chromate have been investigated. Sodium chromate and the less soluble zinc chromate were absorbed into the blood and this resulted in increased excretion of chromium into the urine. The insoluble lead

  19. Comparative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble hexavalent chromium in human and sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Chen, Tânia; LaCerte, Carolyne; Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie; Martino, Julieta; Wise, John Pierce; Thompson, W Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2012-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a global marine pollutant, present in marine mammal tissues. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known human carcinogen. In this study, we compare the cytotoxic and clastogenic effects of Cr(VI) in human (Homo sapiens) and sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) skin fibroblasts. Our data show that increasing concentrations of both particulate and soluble Cr(VI) induce increasing amounts of cytotoxicity and clastogenicity in human and sperm whale skin cells. Furthermore, the data show that sperm whale cells are resistant to these effects exhibiting less cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than the human cells. Differences in Cr uptake accounted for some but not all of the differences in particulate and soluble Cr(VI) genotoxicity, although it did explain the differences in particulate Cr(VI) cytotoxicity. Altogether, the data indicate that Cr(VI) is a genotoxic threat to whales, but also suggest that whales have evolved cellular mechanisms to protect them against the genotoxicity of environmental agents such as Cr(VI). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of the mutagenic potential of hexavalent chromium in the duodenum of big blue® rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chad M; Young, Robert R; Dinesdurage, Harshini; Suh, Mina; Harris, Mark A; Rohr, Annette C; Proctor, Deborah M

    2017-09-01

    A cancer bioassay on hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in drinking water reported increased incidences of duodenal tumors in B6C3F1 mice at exposures of 30-180ppm, and oral cavity tumors in F344 rats at 180ppm. A subsequent transgenic rodent (TGR) in vivo mutation assay in Big Blue® TgF344 rats found that exposure to 180ppm Cr(VI) in drinking water for 28days did not increase cII transgene mutant frequency (MF) in the oral cavity (Thompson et al., 2015). Herein, we extend our analysis to the duodenum of these same TgF344 rats. At study termination, duodenum chromium levels were below either the limit of detection or quantification in control rats, but were 24.6±3.8μg/g in Cr(VI)-treated rats. The MF in control (23.2×10-6) and Cr(VI)-treated rats (22.7×10-6) were nearly identical. In contrast, the MF in the duodenum of rats exposed to 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea for six days (study days 1, 2, 3, 12, 19, 26) increased 24-fold to 557×10-6. These findings indicate that mutagenicity is unlikely an early initiating event in Cr(VI)-induced intestinal carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined abiotic and biotic in-situ reduction of hexavalent chromium in groundwater using nZVI and whey: A remedial pilot test

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němeček, J.; Pokorný, P.; Lacinová, L.; Černík, M.; Masopustová, Z.; Lhotský, O.; Filipová, Alena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 300, DEC 2015 (2015), s. 670-679 ISSN 0304-3894 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020218 Grant - others:Advanced Technologies and Innovation (CZ) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0005 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Hexavalent chromium * nZVI * Geofixation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.836, year: 2015

  2. Effect of available nitrogen on phytoavailability and bioaccumulation of hexavalent and trivalent chromium in hankow willows (Salix matsudana Koidz).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2008-06-01

    The effect of available nitrogen in nutrient solution on removal of two chemical forms of chromium (Cr) by plants was investigated. Pre-rooted hankow willows (Salix matsudana Koidz) were grown in a hydroponic solution system with or without nitrogen, and amended with hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)] or trivalent chromium [Cr (III)] at 25.0+/-0.5 degrees C for 192 h. The results revealed that higher removal of Cr by plants was achieved from the hydroponic solutions without any nitrogen than those containing nitrogen. Although faster removal of Cr (VI) than Cr (III) was observed, translocation of Cr (III) within plant materials was more efficient than Cr (VI). Substantial difference existed in the distribution of Cr in different parts of plant tissues due to the nitrogen in nutrient solutions (pnutrient solutions and more Cr was accumulated in the roots of plants in N-containing ones. No significant difference was found in the removal rate of Cr (VI) between willows grown in the N-free and N-containing solutions (p>0.05). Removal rates of Cr (III) decreased linearly with the strength of nutrient solutions with or without N addition (pnutrient solutions and decreased with the strength of N-free nutrient solutions. Results suggest that uptake and translocation mechanisms of Cr (VI) and Cr (III) are apparently different in hankow willows. The presence of easily available nitrogen and other nutrient elements in the nutrient solutions had a more pronounced influence on the uptake of Cr (III) than Cr (VI). Nitrogen availability and quantities in the ambient environment will affect the translocation of both Cr species and their distribution in willows in phytoremediation.

  3. Removal of chromium hexavalent of residual water from tannery using hydrotalcite; Remocion de cromo hexavalente de aguas residuales de teneria utilizando hidrotalcita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez G, S.; Martinez, V.; Bulbulian, S. [Instituto nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, C.P. 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    One of the main problems of leather tanned is the treatment that must be give to the waste water polluted with chrome which stays in trivalent form, but it is easily oxidated at chromium hexavalent. This work pretends to find an elimination media for chromium (VI) from water using the original synthetic hydrotalcite and calcined as sorbent by its anion exchange and memory effect properties. The tannery water was characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, specific surface and infrared spectroscopy. (Author)

  4. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium in a tannery industry wastewater using fungi species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sivakumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The isolated fungi species of different kinds from chromium contaminated soil sites located in Nagalkeni, Chennai were used for reducing chromium(VI in a tannery industry wastewater of Nagalkeni, Chennai.  The experiments were conducted to know biosorption potential of isolated fungi species for removing chromium(VI in a tannery industry wastewater against the different pH, fungi biomass and chromium(VI concentration (dilution ratio.  The results of this study indicated that the order of maximum removal of chromium(VI by an isolated fungi species at an optimum pH of 3, fungi biomass of 4g andan initial chromium(VI concentration of 18.125 mg/L (dilution ratio 4is A. niger > A. flavus > A. fumigatus > A. nidulans > A. heteromorphus > A. foetidus > A. viridinutans.  This study found that the maximum removal of chromium(VI was achieved by Aspergillus niger (96.3 % than other fungi species at chromium(VI concentration of 18.125 mg/Lin a tannery industry wastewater. The chromium removal from tannery industry wastewater was validated by checking chromium removal in an aqueous solution and by checking the removal efficiency of other parameters in a tannery industry wastewater using same isolated A. niger.  Biosorption model was proposed to simulate the experimental condition for removing chromium(VI in a tannery industry wastewater by all isolated fungi species. The R2 and  values of the proposed model predicted that the proposed biosorption model is very much useful for predicting the trend of reduction potential of chromium(VI in a tannery industry wastewater by all isolated fungi species.  This study suggested that one could select the type of fungi species, ion concentration level, selection of treatment period, quantity of biomass to be used, and pH level of the medium, to achieve the highest reduction of any toxic metals from any contaminated water, wastewater and soil environment.

  5. Characterization and recovery of hexavalent chromium salts of an environmental liability; Caracterizacion y recuperacion de sales de cromo hexavalente de un pasivo ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel C, A. A.; Isarain C, E. [Centro de Innovacion Aplicada en Tecnologias Competitivas, Omega 201, Fracc. Industrial Delta, 37545 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Maldonado V, M., E-mail: r.cordova.alexander@gmail.com [Hospital Regional de Alta Especialidad del Bajio, Bulevard Milenio No. 130, San Carlos la Roncha, 37660 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a diverse group of washing solutions for its use in the recovery of the industrial waste hexavalent chromium, in compliance with the Mexican regulation NOM-147-SEMARNAT/SSA1-2004. The recovery process consisted of a simple random sampling and a physical-chemical characterization with consideration to the high solubility of hexavalent chromium compounds. A test was performed which implemented five different washing solutions (water, sulfuric acid, citric acid, sodium hydroxide, calcium and hydroxide). This was followed by a factorial experimental design to optimize resources with a removal efficiency of 80% and hence a recovery of 33 g/kg as CaCrO{sub 4} (calcium chromate). Chromium hexavalent concentration in the leachate was quantified using UV-Vis spectrometry at a wavelength λ = 540 nm, while the salts recovered by evaporation were characterized using X-ray fluorescence analysis, leading to the conclusion that precipitate can be used as raw material, the main elements are Cr, Ca, Fe and Mg, and their concentration depends on the washing solution. (Author)

  6. Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron in continuous-flow system Part 1: effect of feed solution pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheju, M; Iovi, A; Balcu, I

    2008-05-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium by scrap iron was investigated in continuous system, using long-term column experiments, for aqueous Cr(VI) solutions having low buffering capacities, over the pH range of 2.00-7.30. The results showed that the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution significantly affects the reduction capacity of scrap iron. The highest reduction capacity was determined to be 19.2 mg Cr(VI)/g scrap iron, at pH 2.50, and decreased with increasing the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution. A considerable decrease in scrap iron reduction capacity (25%) was also observed at pH 2.00, as compared to pH 2.50, due to the increased contribution of H(+) ions to the corrosion of scrap iron, which leads to a rapid decrease in time of the scrap iron volume. Over the pH range of 2.50-7.30, hexavalent chromium concentration increases slowly in time after its breakthrough in column effluent, until a steady-state concentration was observed; similarly, over the same pH range, the amount of solubilized Cr(III) in treated column effluent decreases in time, until a steady-state concentration was observed. The steady-state concentration in column effluent decreased for Cr(VI) and increased for Cr(III) with decreasing the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution. No steady-state Cr(VI) or Cr(III) concentrations in column effluent were observed at pH 2.00. Over the entire studied pH range, the amount of Fe(total) in treated solution increases as the initial pH of column influent is decreased; the results show also a continuously decrease in time of Fe(total) concentration, for a constant initial pH, due to a decrease in time of iron corrosion rate. Cr(III) concentration in column effluent also continuously decreased in time, for a constant initial pH, over the pH range of 2.50-7.30. This represents an advantage, because the amount of precipitant agent used to remove Fe(total) and Cr(III) from the column effluent will also decrease in time. The optimum pH for Cr(VI) reduction with scrap iron in

  7. Hexavalent chromium reduction by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6: the influence of carbon source, iron minerals, and electron shuttling compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Erin K; Gerlach, Robin; Viamajala, Sridhar; Jennings, Laura K; Peyton, Brent M; Apel, William A

    2013-06-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), to trivalent chromium, Cr(III), can be an important aspect of remediation processes at contaminated sites. Cellulomonas species are found at several Cr(VI) contaminated and uncontaminated locations at the Department of Energy site in Hanford, Washington. Members of this genus have demonstrated the ability to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) fermentatively and therefore play a potential role in Cr(VI) remediation at this site. Batch studies were conducted with Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to assess the influence of various carbon sources, iron minerals, and electron shuttling compounds on Cr(VI) reduction rates as these chemical species are likely to be present in, or added to, the environment during in situ bioremediation. Results indicated that the type of carbon source as well as the type of electron shuttle present influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. Molasses stimulated Cr(VI) reduction more effectively than pure sucrose, presumably due to presence of more easily utilizable sugars, electron shuttling compounds or compounds with direct Cr(VI) reduction capabilities. Cr(VI) reduction rates increased with increasing concentration of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) regardless of the carbon source. The presence of iron minerals and their concentrations did not significantly influence Cr(VI) reduction rates. However, strain ES6 or AQDS could directly reduce surface-associated Fe(III) to Fe(II), which was capable of reducing Cr(VI) at a near instantaneous rate. These results suggest the rate limiting step in these systems was the transfer of electrons from strain ES6 to the intermediate or terminal electron acceptor whether that was Cr(VI), Fe(III), or AQDS.

  8. Eugenia dysenterica DC. (Myrtaceae) exerts chemopreventive effects against hexavalent chromium-induced damage in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Renato Ivan de; Mattos Alvarenga, Cátia Belo; Ávila, Paulo Henrique Marcelino de; Moreira, Roger Cardoso; Arruda, Andréa Fernandes; Fernandes, Thaís de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Bruna Dos Santos; Andrade, Wanessa Machado; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Paula, José Realino de; Valadares, Marize Campos

    2016-11-01

    Eugenia dysenterica DC. (Myrtaceae) has been widely used in the folk medicine and it presents phytochemicals constituents associated to antioxidant properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the protective effects of E. dysenterica leaf hydroalcoholic extract (EDE) in vitro and in vivo using AMJ2-C11 cells and Swiss mice exposed to hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], respectively. AMJ2-C11 cells were pretreated with EDE and exposed to Cr(VI) to evaluate cytotoxicity and the pathways involved in the chemopreventive effects of the extract. Mice were daily pretreated with EDE and then exposed to Cr(VI). Survival analysis, histopathological examination and determination of Cr levels in biological tissues were carried out. In vitro studies showed that pretreatment of the AMJ2-C11 cells with EDE protected against the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by Cr(VI). Consequently, the pretreatment with EDE reduced reactive oxygen species and apoptosis triggered by Cr(VI), probably by a marked antioxidant and chelating activities demonstrated by EDE. Regarding in vivo studies, pretreatment for 10 days with EDE increased survival of the mice exposed to Cr(VI). In addition, EDE prevented liver and kidney pathological damages, in parallel with reduction in chromium levels found in these organs and plasma. EDE also showed a marked antioxidant potential associated with the presence of polyphenols, especially flavonoids and tannins, as confirmed by HPLC-PDA. The study showed that EDE protects against Cr(VI)-induced damage in vitro and in vivo supporting further studies for the development of therapeutic products applied to prevent the damage induced by toxic metals, especially Cr(VI).

  9. Hexavalent chromium reduction by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria indigenous to chromite mine overburden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dey Satarupa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiological analysis of overburden samples collected from chromite mining areas of Orissa, India revealed that they are rich in microbial density as well as diversity and dominated by Gramnegative (58% bacteria. The phenotypically distinguishable bacterial isolates (130 showed wide degree of tolerance to chromium (2-8 mM when tested in peptone yeast extract glucose agar medium. Isolates (92 tolerating 2 mM chromium exhibited different degrees of Cr+6 reducing activity in chemically defined Vogel Bonner (VB broth and complex KSC medium. Three potent isolates, two belonging to Arthrobacter spp. and one to Pseudomonas sp. were able to reduce more than 50 and 80% of 2 mM chromium in defined and complex media respectively. Along with Cr+6 (MIC 8.6-17.8 mM, the isolates showed tolerance to Ni+2, Fe+3, Cu+2 and Co+2 but were extremely sensitive to Hg+2 followed by Cd+2, Mn+2 and Zn+2. In addition, they were resistant to antibiotics like penicillin, methicillin, ampicillin, neomycin and polymyxin B. During growth under shake-flask conditions, Arthrobacter SUK 1201 and SUK 1205 showed 100% reduction of 2 mM Cr+6 in KSC medium with simultaneous formation of insoluble precipitates of chromium salts. Both the isolates were also equally capable of completely reducing the Cr+6 present in mine seepage when grown in mine seepage supplemented with VB concentrate.

  10. 77 FR 39141 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium Policy to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... implement in the DFARS the DoD policy addressing the serious human health and environmental risks related to... 223.7306. * * * * * PART 244--SUBCONTRACTING POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 0 3. Revise section 244.403 to... Chromium (MAY 2011), if the subcontract is for supplies, maintenance and repair services, or construction...

  11. Effects of dentifrice containing hydroxyapatite on dentinal tubule occlusion and aqueous hexavalent chromium cations sorption: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiyan Yuan

    Full Text Available In order to endow environmental protection features to dentifrice, hydroxyapatite (HA was added to ordinary dentifrice. The effects on dentinal tubule occlusion and surface mineralization were compared after brushing dentine discs with dentifrice with or without HA. The two types of dentifrice were then added to 100 µg/ml of hexavalent chromium cation (Cr(6+ solution in order to evaluate their capacities of adsorbing Cr(6+ from water. Our results showed that the dentifrice containing HA was significantly better than the ordinary dentifrice in occluding the dentinal tubules with a plugging rate greater than 90%. Moreover, the effect of the HA dentifrice was persistent and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS revealed that the atomic percentages of calcium and phosphorus on the surface of dentine discs increased significantly. Adding HA to ordinary dentifrice significantly enhanced the ability of dentifrice to adsorb Cr(6+ from water with the removal rate up to 52.36%. In addition, the sorption was stable. Our study suggests that HA can be added to ordinary dentifrice to obtain dentifrice that has both relieving dentin hypersensitivity benefits and also helps to control environmental pollution.

  12. Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI]: a health survey and clinical examination of community inhabitants (Kanpur, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We assessed the health effects of hexavalent chromium groundwater contamination (from tanneries and chrome sulfate manufacturing in Kanpur, India. METHODS: The health status of residents living in areas with high Cr (VI groundwater contamination (N = 186 were compared to residents with similar social and demographic features living in communities having no elevated Cr (VI levels (N = 230. Subjects were recruited at health camps in both the areas. Health status was evaluated with health questionnaires, spirometry and blood hematology measures. Cr (VI was measured in groundwater samples by diphenylcarbazide reagent method. RESULTS: Residents from communities with known Cr (VI contamination had more self-reports of digestive and dermatological disorders and hematological abnormalities. GI distress was reported in 39.2% vs. 17.2% males (AOR = 3.1 and 39.3% vs. 21% females (AOR = 2.44; skin abnormalities in 24.5% vs. 9.2% males (AOR = 3.48 and 25% vs. 4.9% females (AOR = 6.57. Residents from affected communities had greater RBCs (among 30.7% males and 46.1% females, lower MCVs (among 62.8% males and less platelets (among 68% males and 72% females than matched controls. There were no differences in leucocytes count and spirometry parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Living in communities with Cr (VI groundwater is associated with gastrointestinal and dermatological complaints and abnormal hematological function. Limitations of this study include small sample size and the lack of long term follow-up.

  13. Elevated Frequencies of Micronuclei and other Nuclear Abnormalities of Chrome Plating Workers Occupationally Exposed to Hexavalent Chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudha, S; Kripa, S K; Shibily, P; Shyn, J

    2011-01-01

    Biomonitoring provides a useful tool to estimate the genetic risk from exposure to genotoxic agents. The aim of this study was to assess the potential cytogenetic damage associated with occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium by using micronuclei (MN) as a biomarker. This was a cross-sectional study and all participants were males. Both the exposed and control individuals were selected from Coimbatore, Southern India. Exfoliated buccal cells from 44 chrome plating workers and 40 age and sex matched control subjects were examined for MN frequency and nuclear abnormalities (NA) other than micronuclei, such as binucleates, broken eggs, karyorrhexis, karyolysis and pyknosis. Results showed statistically significant difference between chrome plating workers and control groups. MN and NA frequencies in chrome plating workers were significantly higher than those in control groups (p chrome plating workers are under risk of significant cytogenetic damage. Therefore, there is a need to educate those who work with heavy metals about the potential hazard of occupational exposure and the importance of using protective measures.

  14. DNA-protein cross-links in erythrocytes of freshwater fish exposed to hexavalent chromium or divalent nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuykendall, Jim R; Miller, Kyle L; Mellinger, Kristen M; Cain, Andrew J; Perry, Michael W; Bradley, Michael; Jarvi, Eric J; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2009-02-01

    DNA-protein cross-links (DPXs) in fish erythrocytes represent a potential biomarker for exposure to metal cations, such as hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) and divalent nickel (Ni[II]). Species-specific sensitivities to DPX formation were studied by coexposure of juvenile specimens of rainbow trout, hybrid bluegill, and channel catfish to waterborne metals, such as Cr(VI) and Ni(II). In a species comparison, 4 days of exposure to 2 ppm Cr(VI) induced highest DPXs in bluegill erythrocytes, followed by trout and catfish, at 186%, 97%, and 48% above controls, respectively. A similar pattern of species sensitivity was observed following co-exposure of the fish to 15 ppm Ni(II) for 4 days, with 237%, 124%, and 82% increased DPXs above control bluegill, trout, and catfish, respectively. Biological stability of Cr(VI)-induced DPXs was demonstrated in Cr(VI)-exposed bluegill, as DPX levels remained elevated for up to 20 days after discontinuation of exposure. Similar results were found following exposure of catfish to Ni(II), with detectable DPXs found 10 days after acute exposure. In both bluegill and catfish, a continued increase in DPX formation in erythrocytes was seen for 5-10 days after Cr(VI) was removed from tank water, suggesting that residual Cr(VI) may be involved in DPX formation following acute exposure of fish.

  15. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Green Tea Polyphenols and Green Tea Nano Zero-Valent Iron (GT-nZVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysochoou, M; Reeves, K

    2017-03-01

    This study reports on the direct reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] by green tea polyphenols, including a green tea solution and pure epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) solution. A linear trend was observed between the amount of reduced Cr(VI) and the amount of added polyphenols. The green tea solution showed a continued decrease in the observed stoichiometry with increasing pH, from a maximum of 1.4 mol per gallic acid equivalent (GAE) of green tea at pH 2.5, to 0.2 mol/GAE at pH 8.8. The EGCG solution exhibited different behavior, with a maximum stoichiometry of 2 at pH 7 and minimum of 1.6 at pH 4.4 and 8.9. When green tea was used to first react with Fe 3+ and form GT-nZVI, the amount of Cr(VI) reduced by a certain volume of GT-nZVI was double compared to green tea, and 6 times as high considering that GT-nZVI only contains 33 % green tea.

  16. Hexavalent Chromium Removal from Model Water and Car Shock Absorber Factory Effluent by Nanofiltration and Reverse Osmosis Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnif, Amine; Bejaoui, Imen; Mouelhi, Meral; Hamrouni, Béchir

    2017-01-01

    Nanofiltration and reverse osmosis are investigated as a possible alternative to the conventional methods of Cr(VI) removal from model water and industrial effluent. The influences of feed concentration, water recovery, pH, and the coexisting anions were studied. The results have shown that retention rates of hexavalent chromium can reach 99.7% using nanofiltration membrane (NF-HL) and vary from 85 to 99.9% using reverse osmosis membrane (RO-SG) depending upon the composition of the solution and operating conditions. This work was also extended to investigate the separation of Cr(VI) from car shock absorber factory effluent. The use of these membranes is very promising for Cr(VI) water treatment and desalting industry effluent. Spiegler-Kedem model was applied to experimental results in the aim to determine phenomenological parameters, the reflection coefficient of the membrane (σ), and the solute permeability coefficient (Ps ). The convective and diffusive parts of the mass transfer were quantified with predominance of the diffusive contribution.

  17. Antidotal impact of extra virgin olive oil against genotoxicity, cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity induced by hexavalent chromium in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samah Khalil

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An in vivo study was carried out to verify whether extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO has the potential to modulate alterations resulted from exposure to hexavalent chromium (CrVI as potassium dichromate in rats. For this purpose, CrVI was injected intraperitoneally (i.p. at a dose of 0.4 mg/kg bw/day, EVOO was given orally at a dose of 300 μl daily either a lone or co-treated with CrVI at the same doses, routes and duration (26 days. At the end of the experiment, blood and spleen samples were collected. Genotoxicity, cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity biomarkers induced by CrVI were evaluated. Also, histopathological and immunohistochemical investigations of spleen tissue were conducted. A significant increase in genotoxicity and cytotoxicity biomarkers (micronucleus frequency, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine level and lactate dehydrogenase activity were recorded in CrVI treated rats. In addition, the immunotoxicity biomarkers showed a significant decrease in phagocytic%, stimulated nitric oxide production and decrease in the serum lysozyme activity. Histopathological and immunohistochemical studies support the cytotoxicity study. Oral administration of EVOO can ameliorate those effects but not restored to control level. Thus, authors recommend that regular consumption of this oil in the diet provides a constant supply of potential antioxidants that could reduce these alterations.

  18. Precursor preparation for Ca-Al layered double hydroxide to remove hexavalent chromium coexisting with calcium and magnesium chlorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Lihua; He, Xiaoman; Qu, Jun; Li, Xuewei; Lei, Zhiwu; Zhang, Qiwu; Liu, Xinzhong

    2017-01-01

    Al(OH)3 and Ca(OH)2 powders are co-ground to prepare a precursor which hydrates into a layered double hydroxide (LDH) phase by agitation in aqueous solution with target hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) at room temperature, to achieve an obvious improvement in removal efficiency of Cr(VI) through an easy incorporation into the structure. Although the prepared precursor transforms into LDH phases also when agitated in the solutions of calcium and magnesium chlorides, it incorporates Cr(VI) preferentially to the chloride salts when they coexist. The adsorption isotherm and kinetic studies show that the phenomena occurring on the Al-Ca precursor fit a pseudo-second-order kinetics with a Langmuir adsorption capacity of 59.45 mg/g. Besides, characterizations of the prepared precursor and the samples after adsorption are also performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) to understand the reason of the preferential incorporation of Cr(VI) to the coexisting chloride salts during the LDH phase formation.

  19. Biological reduction of hexavalent chromium and mechanism analysis of detoxification by enterobacter sp. HT1 isolated from tannery effluents, Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Marjangul

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterobacter sp. HT1, Cr (VI resistant bacterial strain was isolated from the wastewater sample of the tannery in Mongolia. Batch experiments on hexavalent chromium removal was carried out at 10, 20, and 30 mg/L of Cr (VI added as potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7, at pH 7 and temperature of 30 °C using pure culture of Enterobacter sp. HT1 as inoculum.  The isolated HT1 is capable of reduction nearly 100% of Cr (VI resulting in the decrease of Cr (VI from 10 to 0.2 mg/L within 20 hours. When the concentration of Cr (VI increased to 20 and 30mg/L, almost complete reduction of Cr (VI could achieve after 72 and 96 hours, respectively.DOI: http://doi.dx.org/10.5564/mjc.v15i0.322 Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 15 (41, 2014, p47-52

  20. Hexavalent Chromium Removal from Model Water and Car Shock Absorber Factory Effluent by Nanofiltration and Reverse Osmosis Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Mnif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofiltration and reverse osmosis are investigated as a possible alternative to the conventional methods of Cr(VI removal from model water and industrial effluent. The influences of feed concentration, water recovery, pH, and the coexisting anions were studied. The results have shown that retention rates of hexavalent chromium can reach 99.7% using nanofiltration membrane (NF-HL and vary from 85 to 99.9% using reverse osmosis membrane (RO-SG depending upon the composition of the solution and operating conditions. This work was also extended to investigate the separation of Cr(VI from car shock absorber factory effluent. The use of these membranes is very promising for Cr(VI water treatment and desalting industry effluent. Spiegler-Kedem model was applied to experimental results in the aim to determine phenomenological parameters, the reflection coefficient of the membrane (σ, and the solute permeability coefficient (Ps. The convective and diffusive parts of the mass transfer were quantified with predominance of the diffusive contribution.

  1. Hexavalent Chromium Removal from Model Water and Car Shock Absorber Factory Effluent by Nanofiltration and Reverse Osmosis Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Imen; Mouelhi, Meral; Hamrouni, Béchir

    2017-01-01

    Nanofiltration and reverse osmosis are investigated as a possible alternative to the conventional methods of Cr(VI) removal from model water and industrial effluent. The influences of feed concentration, water recovery, pH, and the coexisting anions were studied. The results have shown that retention rates of hexavalent chromium can reach 99.7% using nanofiltration membrane (NF-HL) and vary from 85 to 99.9% using reverse osmosis membrane (RO-SG) depending upon the composition of the solution and operating conditions. This work was also extended to investigate the separation of Cr(VI) from car shock absorber factory effluent. The use of these membranes is very promising for Cr(VI) water treatment and desalting industry effluent. Spiegler-Kedem model was applied to experimental results in the aim to determine phenomenological parameters, the reflection coefficient of the membrane (σ), and the solute permeability coefficient (Ps). The convective and diffusive parts of the mass transfer were quantified with predominance of the diffusive contribution. PMID:28819360

  2. Utility of Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 in a Microbial Fuel Cell as an Early Warning Device for Hexavalent Chromium Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guey-Horng Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fast hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI determination is important for environmental risk and health-related considerations. We used a microbial fuel cell-based biosensor inoculated with a facultatively anaerobic, Cr(VI-reducing, and exoelectrogenic Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 to determine the Cr(VI concentration in water. The results indicated that O. anthropi YC152 exhibited high adaptability to pH, temperature, salinity, and water quality under anaerobic conditions. The stable performance of the microbial fuel cell (MFC-based biosensor indicated its potential as a reliable biosensor system. The MFC voltage decreased as the Cr(VI concentration in the MFC increased. Two satisfactory linear relationships were observed between the Cr(VI concentration and voltage output for various Cr(VI concentration ranges (0.0125–0.3 mg/L and 0.3–5 mg/L. The MFC biosensor is a simple device that can accurately measure Cr(VI concentrations in drinking water, groundwater, and electroplating wastewater in 45 min with low deviations (<10%. The use of the biosensor can help in preventing the violation of effluent regulations and the maximum allowable concentration of Cr(VI in water. Thus, the developed MFC biosensor has potential as an early warning detection device for Cr(VI determination even if O. anthropi YC152 is a possible opportunistic pathogen.

  3. Hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solution by algal bloom residue derived activated carbon: Equilibrium and kinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hong; Tang Yi; Cai Dongqing; Liu Xianan; Wang Xiangqin [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Huang Qing, E-mail: huangq@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Yu Zengliang, E-mail: zlyu@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2010-09-15

    A novel approach to prepare activated carbon from blue-green algal bloom residue has been tried for first time and its adsorption capability to remove hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) from aqueous solution has been examined. For this algal bloom residue derived activated carbon, the physical characters regarding adsorption capability were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Batch studies showed that initial pH, absorbent dosage, and initial concentration of Cr(VI) were important parameters for Cr(VI) absorption. It was found that initial pH of 1.0 was most favorable for Cr(VI) removal. The adsorption process followed the pseudo-second-order equation and Freundlich isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was 155.52 mg g{sup -1} in an acidic medium, which is comparable to best result from activated carbons derived from biomass. Therefore, this work put forward a nearly perfect solution which on one hand gets rid of environment-unfriendly algae residue while on the other hand produces high-quality activated carbon that is in return advantageous to environment protection.

  4. Hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solution by algal bloom residue derived activated carbon: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Tang, Yi; Cai, Dongqing; Liu, Xianan; Wang, Xiangqin; Huang, Qing; Yu, Zengliang

    2010-09-15

    A novel approach to prepare activated carbon from blue-green algal bloom residue has been tried for first time and its adsorption capability to remove hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) from aqueous solution has been examined. For this algal bloom residue derived activated carbon, the physical characters regarding adsorption capability were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Batch studies showed that initial pH, absorbent dosage, and initial concentration of Cr(VI) were important parameters for Cr(VI) absorption. It was found that initial pH of 1.0 was most favorable for Cr(VI) removal. The adsorption process followed the pseudo-second-order equation and Freundlich isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was 155.52 mg g(-1) in an acidic medium, which is comparable to best result from activated carbons derived from biomass. Therefore, this work put forward a nearly perfect solution which on one hand gets rid of environment-unfriendly algae residue while on the other hand produces high-quality activated carbon that is in return advantageous to environment protection. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. An Investigation on the Extraction and Quantitation of a Hexavalent Chromium in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Copolymer (ABS) and Printed Circuit Board (PCB) by Ion Chromatography Coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Sang Ho; Kim, Yu Na [Mokpo National University, Muan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    A hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) is one of the hazardous substances regulated by the RoHS. The determination of Cr (VI) in various polymers and printed circuit board (PCB) has been very important. In this study, the three different analytical methods were investigated for the determination of a hexavalent chromium in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene copolymer (ABS) and PCB. The results by three analytical methods were obtained and compared. An analytical method by UV-Visible spectrometer has been generally used for the determination of Cr (VI) in a sample, but a hexavalent chromium should complex with diphenylcarbazide for the detection in the method. The complexation did make an adverse effect on the quantitative analysis of Cr (VI) in ABS. The analytical method using diphenylcarbazide was also not applicable to printed circuit board (PCB) because PCB contained lots of irons. The irons interfered with the analysis of hexavalent chromium because those also could complex with diphenylcarbazide. In this study, hexavalent chromiums in PCB have been separated by ion chromatography (IC), then directly and selectively detected by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The quantity of Cr (VI) in PCB was 0.1 mg/kg

  6. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal by the electrochemical ion-exchange process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharnaik, Amit Shivputra; Ghosh, Pranab Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In the present investigation, the performance of a laboratory-scale plate and frame-type electrochemical ion-exchange (EIX) cell on removal ofhexavalent chromium from synthetic wastewater containing 5 mg/l of Cr(VI) was evaluated under varying applied voltages. Ruthenium dioxide-coated titanium plate (RuO2/Ti) was used as anode and stainless steel plates as cathode. The EIX cell was run at different hydraulic retention time (HRT). Before using in the electrochemical cell, the capacity of ion-exchange resin was evaluated through kinetic and isotherm equilibrium tests in batch mode. The batch kinetic study result showed that the equilibrium time for effective ion exchange with resin is 2 h. The isotherm equilibrium data fit well to both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Maximum capacity (qm) of resin calculated from Langmuir isotherm was 71.42 mg/g. Up to 99% of chromium removal was noticed in the EIX cell containing fresh resin at applied voltages of 10 V and higher. Migration of chromium ion to anode chamber was not noticed while performing the experiment with fresh resin. As high as 50% removal of chromium was observed from the middle chamber containing exhausted resin at an applied voltage of 25 V when the influent flow rate was maintained at 45 min of HRT. The performance of the reactor was increased to 72% when the influent flow rate was decreased to maintain at 90 min of HRT. Build-up of chromium in the anode chamber took place when exhausted resin was used in the process.

  7. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ferrous iron: A process of chromium isotope fractionation and its relevance to natural environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Dideriksen, Knud; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2011-01-01

    Stable chromium (Cr) isotopes can be used as a tracer for changing redox conditions in modern marine systems and in the geological record. We have investigated isotope fractionation during reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq. Reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq in batch experiments leads to significant...... composition of solids and solution displays Rayleigh distillation with a=0.9985. Chemical composition, electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Cr isotope composition agree with a model where Cr(VI)aq reduction occurs through two mechanisms: (a) homogeneous Cr(VI)aq reduction leads to the formation...... of unstable Cr(VI)-bearing green rust and results in Cr isotope fractionation of a magnitude similar to that observed during reduction by Fe(II)aq in our batch experiments, (b) intercalated Cr(VI) is reduced by the Fe(II) in the green rust, resulting in negligible isotope fractionation. The original Cr...

  8. Application of Nanomaterials for the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium and their Biological Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Burks, Terrance

    2016-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) stated that chromium in the form of Cr(VI) has been deemed to be a class-A human carcinogen. It has been a major contaminant associated with wastewater. Moreover, the existence of heavy metals in aquatic systems is a critical concern for the environment as well as industries that manufacture or consume these particular elements. In order to remove these particular toxic metals, several well-known conventional methods including ion-exchang...

  9. Differential uptake and transport of trivalent and hexavalent chromium by tumbleweed (Salsola kali).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardea-Torresdey, J L; de la Rosa, G; Peralta-Videa, J R; Montes, M; Cruz-Jimenez, G; Cano-Aguilera, I

    2005-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the differential absorption of Cr species by tumbleweed (Salsola kali) as well as the effect of this heavy metal on plant growth and nutrient uptake. Tumbleweed seeds were grown in an agar-based media containing different concentrations of either Cr(III) or Cr(VI). The results demonstrated that the uptake of Cr was influenced by the Cr concentration in the growth medium and the speciation of this heavy metal. When supplied in the hexavalent form, the concentration of Cr in the different plant parts (2900, 790, and 600 mg kg(-1) for roots, stems, and leaves, respectively) was between 10 and 20 times higher than the amounts found when Cr was supplied in the trivalent form. In addition, it was found that in most of the experiments, Cr(III) exhibited more toxic effects on tumbleweed plants than Cr(VI). The size of roots of plants grown in 20 mg L(-1) Cr(III) were significantly smaller (p Plants exposed to 20 mg L(-1) Cr(III) produced shoots significantly shorter (p plants and with those grown in 20 mg L(-1) Cr(VI). In addition, the absorption of macronutrients and microelements was in general lower when the plants were grown in the medium containing Cr(III). The amounts of Cr concentrated in the aerial plant parts under experimental conditions may indicate tumbleweed as a new option for the phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soil.

  10. Selecting Processes to Minimize Hexavalent Chromium from Stainless Steel Welding: Eight welding processes/shielding gas combinations were assessed for generation of hexavalent chromium in stainless steel welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, M; Siert, A; Stone, S; Chen, B; Slaven, J; Cumpston, A; Antonini, J

    2012-09-01

    Eight welding processes/shielding gas combinations were assessed for generation of hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) in stainless steel welding fumes. The processes examined were gas metal arc welding (GMAW) (axial spray, short circuit, and pulsed spray modes), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). The Cr(6+) fractions were measured in the fumes; fume generation rates, Cr(6+) generation rates, and Cr(6+) generation rates per unit mass of welding wire were determined. A limited controlled comparison study was done in a welding shop including SMAW, FCAW, and three GMAW methods. The processes studied were compared for costs, including relative labor costs. Results indicate the Cr(6+) in the fume varied widely, from a low of 2800 to a high of 34,000 ppm. Generation rates of Cr(6+) ranged from 69 to 7800 μg/min, and Cr(6+) generation rates per unit of wire ranged from 1 to 270 μg/g. The results of field study were similar to the findings in the laboratory. The Cr(6+) (ppm) in the fume did not necessarily correlate with the Cr(6+) generation rate. Physical properties were similar for the processes, with mass median aerodynamic diameters ranging from 250 to 336 nm, while the FCAW and SMAW fumes were larger (360 and 670 nm, respectively). The pulsed axial spray method was the best choice of the processes studied based on minimal fume generation, minimal Cr(6+) generation, and cost per weld. This method is usable in any position, has a high metal deposition rate, and is relatively simple to learn and use.

  11. Influence of the drying conditions of Sargassum sp. alga on the bioadsorption of hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, S C S; de Assis Cavalcante, J; da Silva, M G C; Gonçalves Pinho, C

    2006-09-01

    Industrial wastes containing synthetic organic compounds and heavy metals are among the most dangerous residues, whose growth has followed the increase in industrial activity. Heavy metals are readily assimilated into the food chain and therefore easily accumulated in the ecosystem. To remove heavy metals from aqueous solutions, marine algae may be used as adsorbents either in their natural form or after treatments by a cross-linking process to improve their mechanical resistance. Drying of biosorbents, such as marine algae, is mentioned in many previous works as a step preceding the adsorption/dessorption cycle. Concerning algae, drying of its fresh biomass allows for proper storage and enhances performance in the sorption of heavy metals. In this work, physical and morphological analyses of fresh and dried Sargassum sp. marine algae, harvested offshore São Sebastião, São Paulo state, Brazil, were performed in order to assess the influence of drying conditions on the biosorption process. Chromium concentrations were also determined in different parts of the algal structure before and after the biosorption process. The drying promoted structural changes in the algae, like shrinkage and porosity reduction. It was also observed that the chromium retention was dependent on the structural arrangement of the alga parts, in which the leaf was the major biosorbent.

  12. Efficient Catalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium With Pd-decorated Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Dang; Choi, Hyun Chul [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Heavy metal pollution is currently a serious environmental issue. Chromium (Cr) and chromium compounds are commonly found in wastewater discharged by various industries such as wood preservation, leather tanning, electroplating, metal finishing, and the production of chemicals. Pd nanoparticles can easily be introduced into CNTs by performing DCC-activated amidation. Our TEM and XRD results indicate that well-dispersed metallic Pd nanoparticles are anchored on the surface of the amidated CNTs. The XPS results suggest that the Pd content of the sample is approximately 9.8 atomic %. In comparison with the commercial Pd catalyst, the prepared Pd-CNTs were demonstrated to exhibit good catalytic activity in the reduction of 4-NP by NaBH4. Moreover, the Pd-CNT catalyst can easily be separated by performing a simple filtration and reused over at least 10 cycles. This Pd-CNT catalyst is therefore believed to have significant potential for use as a reusable catalyst in the reduction of Cr(Vi)

  13. Inhibition of CO poisoning on Pt catalyst coupled with the reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium in a dual-functional fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Hyoung-il; Chung, Young-Hoon; Lee, Myeong Jae; Yoo, Sung Jong; Bokare, Alok D; Choi, Wonyong; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2014-12-12

    We propose a method to enhance the fuel cell efficiency with the simultaneous removal of toxic heavy metal ions. Carbon monoxide (CO), an intermediate of methanol oxidation that is primarily responsible for Pt catalyst deactivation, can be used as an in-situ reducing agent for hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) with reactivating the CO-poisoned Pt catalyst. Using electro-oxidation measurements, the oxidation of adsorbed CO molecules coupled with the concurrent conversion of Cr (VI) to Cr (III) was confirmed. This concept was also successfully applied to a methanol fuel cell to enhance its performance efficiency and to remove toxic Cr (VI) at the same time.

  14. Simultaneously photocatalytic treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) using rotating reactor under solar irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngji [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Laboratory, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Hyunku [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Laboratory, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Her, Namguk [Korea Army Academy at Young-Cheon, Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, 135-1 Changhari, Kokyungmeon, Young-cheon, Gyeongbuk 770-849 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yeomin [University of South Carolina, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Sohn, Jinsik [Kookmin University, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 77 Jeongneung-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sungpyo [Korea University, Department of Environmental Engineering, Sejong 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jaekyung, E-mail: jyoon@kier.re.kr [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Laboratory, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Self-rotating reactor including TiO{sub 2} NTs is applied under solar irradiation. • Simultaneously photocatalysis of Cr(VI) and EDCs is observed to be up to 95%. • Photocatalytic reactions of Cr(VI) and EDCs are favorable under acidic pH. • Charge interaction and hole scavenge between TiO{sub 2} and pollutants are synergy factors. - Abstract: In this study, simultaneous treatments, reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and oxidation of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), such as bisphenol A (BPA), 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and 17β-estradiol (E2), were investigated with a rotating photocatalytic reactor including TiO{sub 2} nanotubes formed on titanium mesh substrates under solar UV irradiation. In the laboratory tests with a rotating type I reactor, synergy effects of the simultaneous photocatalytic reduction and oxidation of inorganic (Cr(VI)) and organic (BPA) pollutants were achieved. Particularly, the concurrent photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of BPA was higher under acidic conditions. The enhanced reaction efficiency of both pollutants was attributed to a stronger charge interaction between TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (positive charge) and the anionic form of Cr(VI) (negative charge), which are prevented recombination (electron–hole pair) by the hole scavenging effect of BPA. In the extended outdoor tests with a rotating type II reactor under solar irradiation, the experiment was extended to examine the simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) in the presence of additional EDCs, such as EE2 and E2 as well as BPA. The findings showed that synergic effect of both photocatalytic reduction and oxidation was confirmed with single-component (Cr(VI) only), two-components (Cr(VI)/BPA, Cr(VI)/EE2, and Cr(VI)/E2), and four-components (Cr(VI)/BPA/EE2/E2) under various solar irradiation conditions.

  15. Comparison of in vivo genotoxic and carcinogenic potency to augment mode of action analysis: Case study with hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chad M; Bichteler, Anne; Rager, Julia E; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M; Haws, Laurie C; Harris, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Recent analyses-highlighted by the International Workshops on Genotoxicity Testing Working Group on Quantitative Approaches to Genetic Toxicology Risk Assessment-have identified a correlation between (log) estimates of a carcinogen's in vivo genotoxic potency and in vivo carcinogenic potency in typical laboratory animal models, even when the underlying data have not been matched for tissue, species, or strain. Such a correlation could have important implications for risk assessment, including informing the mode of action (MOA) of specific carcinogens. When in vivo genotoxic potency is weak relative to carcinogenic potency, MOAs other than genotoxicity (e.g., endocrine disruption or regenerative hyperplasia) may be operational. Herein, we review recent in vivo genotoxicity and carcinogenicity data for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), following oral ingestion, in relevant tissues and species in the context of the aforementioned correlation. Potency estimates were generated using benchmark doses, or no-observable-adverse-effect-levels when data were not amenable to dose-response modeling. While the ratio between log values for carcinogenic and genotoxic potency was ≥1 for many compounds, the ratios for several Cr(VI) datasets (including in target tissue) were less than unity. In fact, the ratios for Cr(VI) clustered closely with ratios for chloroform and diethanolamine, two chemicals posited to have non-genotoxic MOAs. These findings suggest that genotoxicity may not play a major role in the cancers observed in rodents following exposure to high concentrations of Cr(VI) in drinking water-a finding consistent with recent MOA and adverse outcome pathway (AOP) analyses concerning Cr(VI). This semi-quantitative analysis, therefore, may be useful to augment traditional MOA and AOP analyses. More case examples will be needed to further explore the general applicability and validity of this approach for human health risk assessment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by

  16. Polyacrylonitrile/polypyrrole core/shell nanofiber mat for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianqiang [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Pan, Kai, E-mail: pankai@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); He, Qiwei [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Cao, Bing, E-mail: bcao@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► PAN nanofibers obtained by electrospinning. ► PAN/PPy core/shell nanofiber membrane was prepared. ► PAN/PPy core/shell nanofiber membrane used for Cr(VI) removal. ► Adsorption capacity remained up to 80% within 5 times cycles. -- Abstract: Polyacrylonitrile/polypyrrole (PAN/PPy) core–shell structure nanofibers were prepared via electrospinning followed by in situ polymerization of pyrrole monomer for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from aqueous solution. Attenuated total reflections Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results confirmed the presence of the polypyrrole (PPy) layer on the surface of PAN nanofibers. The morphology and structure of the core–shell PAN/PPy nanofibers were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), and the core–shell structure can be clearly proved from the SEM and TEM images. Adsorption results indicated that the adsorption capacity increased with the initial solution pH decreased. The adsorption equilibrium reached within 30 and 90 min as the initial solution concentration increased from 100 to 200 mg/L, and the process can be described using the pseudo-second-order model. Isotherm data fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm model. Thermodynamic study revealed that the adsorption process is endothermic and spontaneous in nature. Desorption results showed that the adsorption capacity can remain up to 80% after 5 times usage. The adsorption mechanism was also studied by XPS.

  17. Oxidized g-C3N4/polyaniline nanofiber composite for the selective removal of hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Barakat, M A; Alseroury, F A

    2017-10-09

    Nanomaterials with selective adsorption properties are in demand for environmental applications. Herein, acid etching and oxidative decomposition of melon units of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was performed to obtain the oxidized graphitic carbon nitride (Ox-g-C3N4) nanosheets. Ox- g-C3N4 nanosheets were further decorated on the polyaniline nanofiber (Ox-g-C3N4/Pani-NF). Ox-g-C3N4/Pani-NF was well characterized and further applied for a selective removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) form aqueous solution. The zeta potential analysis indicate that the surface of Ox-g-C3N4/Pani-NF was positively charged which could be beneficial to bind anionic Cr(VI) ions electrostatically. In addition, nitrogen and oxygen containing functional groups exist on the Ox-g-C3N4/Pani-NF were mainly responsible for adsorption of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solution. Moreover, the adsorption of Cr(VI) ions was also dependent on solution pH, reaction temperature and initial concentration of Cr(VI) ions. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of Ox-g-C3N4/Pani-NF for Cr(VI), calculated from Langmuir isotherm was 178.57 mg/g at pH = 2 and 30 °C. The activation energy (Ea = -20.66 kJ/mol) and the enthalpy change (ΔH° = -22.055 kJ/mol) validate the role of physical forces in adsorption of Cr(VI). These results demonstrate that Ox-g-C3N4/Pani-NF can be used as a potential adsorbent for environmental remediation applications.

  18. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld, and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr(6+). GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer, Regulated Metal Deposition, Cold Metal Transfer, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr(6+) ranged from 50-7800 µg/min, and Cr(6+) generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1-270 µg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13-330 µg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50-300 µg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4-140 µg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as five times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes in this

  19. Low temperature reduction of hexavalent chromium by a microbial enrichment consortium and a novel strain of Arthrobacter aurescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Vicki S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromium is a transition metal most commonly found in the environment in its trivalent [Cr(III] and hexavalent [Cr(VI] forms. The EPA maximum total chromium contaminant level for drinking water is 0.1 mg/l (0.1 ppm. Many water sources, especially underground sources, are at low temperatures (less than or equal to 15 Centigrade year round. It is important to evaluate the possibility of microbial remediation of Cr(VI contamination using microorganisms adapted to these low temperatures (psychrophiles. Results Core samples obtained from a Cr(VI contaminated aquifer at the Hanford facility in Washington were enriched in Vogel Bonner medium at 10 Centigrade with 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 1000 mg/l Cr(VI. The extent of Cr(VI reduction was evaluated using the diphenyl carbazide assay. Resistance to Cr(VI up to and including 1000 mg/l Cr(VI was observed in the consortium experiments. Reduction was slow or not observed at and above 100 mg/l Cr(VI using the enrichment consortium. Average time to complete reduction of Cr(VI in the 30 and 60 mg/l Cr(VI cultures of the consortium was 8 and 17 days, respectively at 10 Centigrade. Lyophilized consortium cells did not demonstrate adsorption of Cr(VI over a 24 hour period. Successful isolation of a Cr(VI reducing organism (designated P4 from the consortium was confirmed by 16S rDNA amplification and sequencing. Average time to complete reduction of Cr(VI at 10 Centigrade in the 25 and 50 mg/l Cr(VI cultures of the isolate P4 was 3 and 5 days, respectively. The 16S rDNA sequence from isolate P4 identified this organism as a strain of Arthrobacter aurescens, a species that has not previously been shown to be capable of low temperature Cr(VI reduction. Conclusion A. aurescens, indigenous to the subsurface, has the potential to be a predominant metal reducer in enhanced, in situ subsurface bioremediation efforts involving Cr(VI and possibly other heavy metals and radionuclides.

  20. Integration of mechanistic and pharmacokinetic information to derive oral reference dose and margin-of-exposure values for hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chad M; Kirman, Christopher R; Hays, Sean M; Suh, Mina; Harvey, Seneca E; Proctor, Deborah M; Rager, Julia E; Haws, Laurie C; Harris, Mark A

    2017-10-24

    The current US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reference dose (RfD) for oral exposure to chromium, 0.003 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) , is based on a no-observable-adverse-effect-level from a 1958 bioassay of rats exposed to ≤25 ppm hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water. EPA characterizes the confidence in this RfD as "low." A more recent cancer bioassay indicates that Cr(VI) in drinking water is carcinogenic to mice at ≥30 ppm. To assess whether the existing RfD is health protective, neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions from the 2 year cancer bioassay were modeled in a three-step process. First, a rodent physiological-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to estimate internal dose metrics relevant to each lesion. Second, benchmark dose modeling was conducted on each lesion using the internal dose metrics. Third, a human PBPK model was used to estimate the daily mg kg(-1) dose that would produce the same internal dose metric in both normal and susceptible humans. Mechanistic research into the mode of action for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal tumors in mice supports a threshold mechanism involving intestinal wounding and chronic regenerative hyperplasia. As such, an RfD was developed using incidence data for the precursor lesion diffuse epithelial hyperplasia. This RfD was compared to RfDs for other non-cancer endpoints; all RfD values ranged 0.003-0.02 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) . The lowest of these values is identical to EPA's existing RfD value. Although the RfD value remains 0.003 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) , the confidence is greatly improved due to the use of a 2-year bioassay, mechanistic data, PBPK models and benchmark dose modeling. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Isolation and characterization of hexavalent chromium-reducing rhizospheric bacteria from a wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauricio Gutiérrez, Amparo; Peña Cabriales, Juan José; Maldonado Vega, María

    2010-01-01

    Scirpus americanus Pers. occurs naturally in "San Germán," a pond that serves as a receptor of industrial wastewater in Guanajuato, México. This plant accumulates metals mainly in the root: concentrations (mg/kg) of Cr, As, Cd and Se were 970, 49, 41, and 85 respectively. Analysis of rhizosphere samples indicated bacterial population of 10(8) cfu g(-1) in media with 0.2 mM Cr(VI) and 10 mM sodium gluconate. Thirteen isolates were obtained and phylogenetic analyses (16S rRNA) indicated they corresponded to genera of Agrobacterium, Arthrobacter, Microbacterium, Curtobacterium, Rhodococcus, Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas. Cr(VI) reduction was evaluated using the diphenyl carbazide method. The isolates accomplished 5-40% (20 microM) of reduction in assays of resting cell and tolerated 0.5-5.0 mM Cr(VI). Eight strains used nitrate and thirteen used iron and chromium as electron acceptors to grow under anaerobic conditions. Cr(VI) reduction by five strains occurred at pH values (7-9) and NaCl concentrations (0.5-1.0 M) in basal medium. A mixed culture of strains (S17 and S28) reached a chromium removal of 100% at 0.2 mM Cr(VI) initial concentration. Aerobically, this consortium was capable of 93.8% Cr(VI) reduction of 81 microg L(-1) Cr(VI) of the industrial effluent, indicating their possible use in environmental cleanup.

  2. Bioreduction of hexavalent chromium by live and active phanerochaete chrysosporium: kinetics and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugavelh, Somasundaram; Mohanty, Kaustubha [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati, Assam (India)

    2012-07-15

    In this work the potential of live and active Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a white rot fungi, to remove lower Cr(VI) concentration from aqueous solutions was reported for the first time. A medium pH had significant effect on the growth of the fungus and bioremoval of Cr(VI). Substrate inhibition on the growth of Phanerochaete chrysosporium was evident beyond 20 g L{sup -1} of dextrose concentration. A maximum biomass concentration of 15.64 g L{sup -1} was obtained for an initial dextrose concentration of 20 g L{sup -1} in metal free medium at pH 6.0. An increase in Cr(VI) concentration beyond 10 mg L{sup -1} inhibited the growth of the fungi, thereby, reducing the chromium bioremoval efficiency. A maximum reduction efficiency of 98.92% was reported for an initial metal concentration of 10 mg L{sup -1}. A mathematical expression for the bioreduction of Cr(VI) considering the organic compounds in the cells was proposed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Hexavalent chromium reduction by Acinetobacter haemolyticus isolated from heavy-metal contaminated wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakaria, Zainul Akmar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Zakaria, Zainoha [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Surif, Salmijah [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Ahmad, Wan Azlina [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)]. E-mail: azlina@kimia.fs.utm.my

    2007-07-19

    Possible application of a locally isolated environmental isolate, Acinetobacter haemolyticus to remediate Cr(VI) contamination in water system was demonstrated. Cr(VI) reduction by A. haemolyticus seems to favour the lower concentrations (10-30 mg/L). However, incomplete Cr(VI) reduction occurred at 70-100 mg/L Cr(VI). Initial specific reduction rate increased with Cr(VI) concentrations. Cr(VI) reduction was not affected by 1 or 10 mM sodium azide (metabolic inhibitor), 10 mM of PO{sub 4} {sup 3-}, SO{sub 4} {sup 2-}, SO{sub 3} {sup 2-}, NO{sub 3} {sup -} or 30 mg/L of Pb(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) ions. However, heat treatment caused significant dropped in Cr(VI) reduction to less than 20% only. A. haemolyticus cells loses its shape and size after exposure to 10 and 50 mg Cr(VI)/L as revealed from TEM examination. The presence of electron-dense particles in the cytoplasmic region of the bacteria suggested deposition of chromium in the cells.

  4. IN-VITRO BIOREDUCTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM BY VIABLE WHOLE CELLS OF Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satarupa Dey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A chromium resistant and reducing bacterium Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201 was isolated from chromite mine overburden dumps of Orissa, India. Viable whole cells of this isolate was capable of completely reducing 100 µM Cr(VI in chemically defined MS medium within 28 h of incubation under batch cultivation. Reduction of chromate increased with increased cell density and was maximum at a density of 1010 cells/ml, but the reduction potential of the suspended cells decreased with increase in Cr(VI concentration in the medium. Chromate reducing efficiency was promoted when glycerol and glucose was used as electron donors, while the optimum pH and temperature of Cr(VI reduction was found to be 7.0 and 35°C respectively. The reduction process was inhibited by divalent cations Ni, Co and Cd, but not by Cu and Fe. Similarly, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP, N,N,-Di cyclohexyl carboiimide (DCC, sodium azide and sodium fluoride were inhibitory to chromate reduction, while in presence of 2,4 dinitrophenol (2,4 DNP chromate reduction by SUK 1201 cells remained unaffected.

  5. Determination of hexavalent chromium in exhaled breath condensate and environmental air among chrome plating workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldoni, Matteo [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention, Research Centre at University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Caglieri, Andrea [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Poli, Diana [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention, Research Centre at University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Vettori, Maria Vittoria [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention, Research Centre at University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Corradi, Massimo [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention, Research Centre at University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Apostoli, Pietro [Laboratory of Industrial Hygiene, Department of Experimental and Applied Medicine, University of Brescia (Italy); Mutti, Antonio [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy)]. E-mail: antonio.mutti@unipr.it

    2006-03-15

    Chromium speciation has attracted attention because of the different toxicity of Cr(III), which is considered relatively non-toxic, and Cr(VI), which can cross cell membranes mainly as a chromate anion and has been classified as a class I human carcinogen. The aims of the present study were to measure soluble Cr(VI) levels in environmental samples, to develop a simple method of quantifying Cr(VI) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), and to follow the kinetics of EBC Cr(VI) in chrome plating workers. Personal air samples were collected from 10 chrome platers; EBC was collected from the same workers immediately after the work shift on Tuesday and before the work shift on the following Wednesday. Environmental and EBC Cr(VI) levels were determined by means of colorimetry and electrothermal absorption atomic spectrometry, respectively. The method of detecting Cr(VI) in environmental air was based on the extraction of the Cr(VI)-diphenylcarbazide (Cr(VI)-DPC) complex in 1-butanol, whereas EBC Cr(VI) was determined using a solvent extraction of Cr(VI) as an ion pair with tetrabutylammonium ion, and subsequent direct determination of the complex (Cr(VI)-DPC) in EBC. Kinetic data showed that airborne Cr(VI) was reduced by 50% in airway lining fluid sampled at the end of exposure and that there was a further 50% reduction after about 15 h. The persistence of Cr(VI) in EBC supports the use of EBC in assessing target tissue levels of Cr(VI)

  6. Hexavalent chromium reduction potential of Cellulosimicrobium sp. isolated from common effluent treatment plant of tannery industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharagava, Ram Naresh; Mishra, Sandhya

    2018-01-01

    Present study deals with the isolation and characterization of a bacterium capable for the effective reduction of Cr(VI) from tannery wastewater. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, this bacterium was identified as Cellulosimicrobium sp. (KX710177). During the Cr(VI) reduction experiment performed at 50, 100, 200,and 300mg/L of Cr(VI) concentrations, the bacterium showed 99.33% and 96.98% reduction at 50 and 100mg/L at 24 and 96h, respectively. However, at 200 and 300mg/L concentration of Cr(VI), only 84.62% and 62.28% reduction was achieved after 96h, respectively. The SEM analysis revealed that bacterial cells exposed to Cr(VI) showed increased cell size in comparison to unexposed cells, which might be due to either the precipitation or adsorption of reduced Cr(III) on bacterial cells. Further, the Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis showed some chromium peaks for cells exposed to Cr(VI), which might be either due to the presence of precipitated reduced Cr(III) on cells or complexation of Cr(III) with cell surface molecules. The bacterium also showed resistance and sensitivity against the tested antibiotics with a wide range of MIC values ranging from 250 to 800mg/L for different heavy metals. Thus, this multi-drug and multi-metal resistant bacterium can be used as a potential agent for the effective bioremediation of metal contaminated sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. On-line dynamic extraction and automated determination of readily bioavailable hexavalent chromium in solid substrates using micro-sequential injection bead-injection lab-on-valve hyphenated with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Xiangbao; Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2006-01-01

    environments at the sub-low parts-per-million level. The flow system integrates dynamic leaching of hexavalent chromium using deionized water as recommended by the German Standard DIN 38414-S4 method; on-line pH adjustment of the extract by a 0.01 mol L-1 Tris-HNO3 buffer solution; isolation of the chromate...

  8. Insights into controls on hexavalent chromium in groundwater provided by environmental tracers, Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Andrew H.; Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Ball, Lyndsay B.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental tracers are useful for determining groundwater age and recharge source, yet their application in studies of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater has been limited. Environmental tracer data from 166 wells located in the Sacramento Valley, northern California, were interpreted and compared to Cr concentrations to determine the origin and age of groundwater with elevated Cr(VI), and better understand where Cr(VI) becomes mobilized and how it evolves along flowpaths. In addition to major ion and trace element concentrations, the dataset includes δ18O, δ2H, 3H concentration, 14C activity (of dissolved inorganic C), δ13C, 3He/4He ratio, and noble gas concentrations (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe). Noble gas recharge temperatures (NGTs) were computed, and age-related tracers were interpreted in combination to constrain the age distribution in samples and sort them into six different age categories spanning from 10,000 yr old. Nearly all measured Cr is in the form of Cr(IV). Concentrations range from 3 mg L−1), and commonly have δ18O values enriched relative to local precipitation. These samples likely contain irrigation water and are elevated due to accelerated mobilization of Cr(VI) in the unsaturated zone (UZ) in irrigated areas. Group 2 samples are from throughout the valley and typically contain water 1000–10,000 yr old, have δ18O values consistent with local precipitation, and have unexpectedly warm NGTs. Chromium(VI) concentrations in Group 2 samples may be elevated for multiple reasons, but the hypothesis most consistent with all available data (notably, the warm NGTs) is a relatively long UZ residence time due to recharge through a deep UZ near the margin of the basin. A possible explanation for why Cr(VI) may be primarily mobilized in the UZ rather than farther along flowpaths in the oxic portion of the saturated zone is more dynamic cycling of Mn in the UZ due to transient moisture and redox conditions.

  9. Natural occurrence of hexavalent chromium in serpentinite hosted spring waters from Western Tuscany (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarantini, Laura; Agostini, Samuele; Baneschi, Ilaria; Guidi, Massimo; Natali, Claudio; Tonarini, Sonia

    2013-04-01

    , able to rapid oxidise Cr(III) into Cr (VI ), implies that local presence of Cr (VI) in waters have to be ascribed to other processes. Some serpentinites contain significant amount of Fe-rich brucite and show evidences of its dissolution during surface weathering. This process could lead to the formation of both of hydrous magnesium carbonates and of Mg-rich members of "layered double hydroxide" group, which can contain high contents of Cr(III) that can be easily oxidized and mobilized during weathering reactions (Langone et al., in press). Cr isotopes analyses, able to record any occurrence of Cr redox reactions, are analysed in order to better understand which are the mineralogical, chemical and thermodynamic parameters responsible for Cr(III)-Cr(VI) oxidation during water-rock interactions. Langone A., Baneschi I., Boschi C., Dini A., Guidi M, and Cavallo A., (in press), Serpentinite-water interaction and chromium (VI) release in spring waters: examples from Tuscan ophiolites, Ofioliti.

  10. Pilot Scale Production of Activated Carbon Spheres Using Fluidized Bed Reactor and Its Evaluation for the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Nagesh Kumar; Sathe, Manisha

    2017-06-01

    Large scale production of activated carbon is need of ongoing research due to its excellent adsorption capacity for removal of heavy metals from contaminated solutions. In the present study, polymeric precursor polystyrene beads [Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) surface area, 46 m2/g; carbon content, 40.64%; crushing strength, 0.32 kg/sphere] were used to produce a new variant of activated carbon, Activated Carbon Spheres (ACS) in a pilot scale fluidized bed reactor. ACS were prepared by carbonization of polymeric precursor at 850 °C followed by activation of resultant material with steam. Prepared ACS were characterized using scanning electron microscope, CHNS analyzer, thermogravimetric analyzer, surface area analyzer and crushing strength tester. The produced ACS have 1009 m2/g BET surface area, 0.89 cm3/g total pore volume, 92.32% carbon content and 1.1 kg/sphere crushing strength with less than 1% of moisture and ash content. The ACS were also evaluated for its potential to remove hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated solutions. The chromium removal is observed to be 99.1% at initial concentration 50 mg/l, pH 2, ACS dose 1 g/l, contact time 2 h, agitation 120 rpm and temperature 30 °C. Thus ACS can be used as an adsorbent material for the removal of Cr(VI) from contaminated solutions.

  11. Application of ICP-MS and HPLC-ICP-MS for diagnosis and therapy of a severe intoxication with hexavalent chromium and inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitland, Peter; Blohm, Martin; Breuer, Christian; Brinkert, Florian; Achilles, Eike Gert; Pukite, Ieva; Köster, Helmut Dietrich

    2017-05-01

    ICP-MS and HPLC-ICP-MS were applied for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in a severe intoxication with a liquid containing hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and inorganic arsenic (iAs). In this rare case a liver transplantation of was considered as the only chance of survival. We developed and applied methods for the determination of Cr(VI) in erythrocytes and total chromium (Cr) and arsenic (As) in blood, plasma, urine and liver tissue by ICP-MS. Exposure to iAs was diagnosed by determination of iAs species and their metabolites in urine by anion exchange HPLC-ICP-MS. Three days after ingestion of the liquid the total Cr concentrations were 2180 and 1070μg/L in whole blood and plasma, respectively, and 4540μg/L Cr(VI) in erythrocytes. The arsenic concentration in blood was 206μg/L. The urinary As species concentrations were <0.5, 109, 115, 154 and 126μg/L for arsenobetaine, As(III), As(V), methylarsonate (V) and dimethylarsinate (V), respectively. Total Cr and As concentrations in the explanted liver were 11.7 and 0.9mg/kg, respectively. Further analytical results of this case study are tabulated and provide valuable data for physicians and toxicologists. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  12. Hexavalent and total chromium at low reporting concentrations in source-water aquifers and surface waters used for public supply in Illinois, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Patrick C.; Cobb, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of their recent review of the human health effects of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in public drinking water, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is considering the need for Federal regulation of Cr(VI). Presently, only total chromium is regulated, at a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 100 micrograms per liter (µg/L). The occurrence of Cr(VI) in groundwater and surface waters generally is attributed to industrial sources, but can be of natural origin. California’s recently established MCL for Cr(VI) of 10 µg/L illustrates the drinking-water concerns associated with Cr(VI). To improve understanding of the possible impact of a Cr(VI)-specific standard that approximates the California level on the management of Illinois’ public drinking water, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, assessed the occurrence and distribution of Cr(VI) in the State’s public-water supplies.

  13. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2011-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as high...

  14. Recovery and reuse of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by a hybrid technique of electrodialysis and ion exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gayathri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The chrome plating industry is one of the highly polluting industries whose effluent mainly consists of chromium(VI. This compound is highly toxic to aquatic life and human health. The rinse water constituents reflect the chrome plating bath characteristics; generally dead tank wash water contains about 1% of the plating bath concentration. Other metals and metal compounds usually considered as toxic can be precipitated out by suitably adjusting the pH of the wastewaters. However, Cr(VI is soluble in almost all pH ranges and therefore an efficient treatment is required for the removal and recovery of chromium, and also for the reuse of wastewaters. The present study aims to recover the chromium by a hybrid technique of electrodialysis and ion exchange for the removal and concentration of chromate ions from the effluent. The different modes of operation like batch recirculation process, batch recirculation process with continuous dipping and continuous process were carried out to remove and recover the chromium from the effluent and the percentage reductions of chromium were found to be 98.69%, 99.18% and 100%, respectively.

  15. Chemical and microbial remediation of hexavalent chromium from contaminated soil and mining/metallurgical solid waste: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhal, B; Thatoi, H N; Das, N N; Pandey, B D

    2013-04-15

    Chromium is a highly toxic non-essential metal for microorganisms and plants, and its occurrence is rare in nature. Lower to higher chromium containing effluents and solid wastes released by activities such as mining, metal plating, wood preservation, ink manufacture, dyes, pigments, glass and ceramics, tanning and textile industries, and corrosion inhibitors in cooling water, induce pollution and may cause major health hazards. Besides, natural processes (weathering and biochemical) also contribute to the mobility of chromium which enters in to the soil affecting the plant growth and metabolic functions of the living species. Generally, chemical processes are used for Cr- remediation. However, with the inference derived from the diverse Cr-resistance mechanism displayed by microorganisms and the plants including biosorption, diminished accumulation, precipitation, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), and chromate efflux, bioremediation is emerging as a potential tool to address the problem of Cr(VI) pollution. This review focuses on the chemistry of chromium, its use, and toxicity and mobility in soil, while assessing its concentration in effluents/wastes which becomes the source of pollution. In order to conserve the environment and resources, the chemical/biological remediation processes for Cr(VI) and their efficiency have been summarised in some detail. The interaction of chromium with various microbial/bacterial strains isolated and their reduction capacity towards Cr(VI) are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions Using Magnetic Nanoparticles Coated with Alumina and Modified by Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malakootian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The development of an effective method regarding chromium removal from the environment is of great importance. Therefore, the present study aimed to examiner magnetic nanoparticles coated with alumina modified by Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB in the removal of Cr6+ through magnetic solid phase extraction method. Materials & Methods: At first, iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized, coated with alumina, modified with CTAB and characterized with suitable instruments. The factors affecting the process of chromium removal were investigated, including the concentration of CTAB, the pH, the amount of nanoparticles, the sample volume, a proper eluent, the adsorption and desorption time, and the effect of interfering ions. Moreover, the chromium concentration was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS technique. The adsorption isotherm, adsorption capacity, and recoverability of the adsorbent were further examined. Results: The modified magnetic nanoparticles were demonstrated to be homogeneous, spherical, with a size lower than 20 nanometer having a magnetic property. The optimal conditions for chromium removal entailed 7*10-6 mol/L concentration of CTAB, pH range of 6-8, 0.1 g of the nanoparticles, 10 mL volume of the chromium sample (5 &mug mL-1, nitric acid 2 M as a suitable eluent, 15 minutes of adsorption and desorption, and no interference of interfering ions in the process of chromium separation. The process efficiency under optimal conditions was determined to be over 95%, which this process followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The adsorption capacity proved to be 23.8 mg/g. Reusing after four times of adsorbent recovering was effective in the chromium removal (80%. The method accuracy for five measurement times was 4.155% and the method’s LOD was 0.081 mg/L. Conclusion: The method enjoys the benefits of convenient preparation of the adsorbent, high selectivity, high accuracy, short process

  17. Escherichia coli NemA is an efficient chromate reductase that can be biologically immobilized to provide a cell free system for remediation of hexavalent chromium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J Robins

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium is a serious and widespread environmental pollutant. Although many bacteria have been identified that can transform highly water-soluble and toxic Cr(VI to insoluble and relatively non-toxic Cr(III, bacterial bioremediation of Cr(VI pollution is limited by a number of issues, in particular chromium toxicity to the remediating cells. To address this we sought to develop an immobilized enzymatic system for Cr(VI remediation. To identify novel Cr(VI reductase enzymes we first screened cell extracts from an Escherichia coli library of soluble oxidoreductases derived from a range of bacteria, but found that a number of these enzymes can reduce Cr(VI indirectly, via redox intermediates present in the crude extracts. Instead, activity assays for 15 candidate enzymes purified as His6-tagged proteins identified E. coli NemA as a highly efficient Cr(VI reductase (k(cat/K(M= 1.1×10(5 M(-1 s(-1 with NADH as cofactor. Fusion of nemA to the polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase gene phaC from Ralstonia eutropha enabled high-level biosynthesis of functionalized polyhydroxyalkanoate granules displaying stable and active NemA on their surface. When these granules were combined with either Bacillus subtilis glucose dehydrogenase or Candida boidinii formate dehydrogenase as a cofactor regenerating partner, high levels of chromate transformation were observed with only low initial concentrations of expensive NADH cofactor being required, the overall reaction being powered by consumption of the cheap sacrificial substrates glucose or formic acid, respectively. This system therefore offers promise as an economic solution for ex situ Cr(VI remediation.

  18. Nano-sized Fe2O3/Fe3O4 facilitate anaerobic transformation of hexavalent chromium in soil-water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaxian; Li, Hua; Gong, Libo; Dong, Guowen; Shen, Liang; Wang, Yuanpeng; Li, Qingbiao

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of nano-sized or submicro Fe2O3/Fe3O4 on the bioreduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and to evaluate the effects of nano-sized Fe2O3/Fe3O4 on the microbial communities from the anaerobic flooding soil. The results indicated that the net decreases upon Cr(VI) concentration from biotic soil samples amended with nano-sized Fe2O3 (317.1±2.1mg/L) and Fe3O4 (324.0±22.2mg/L) within 21days, which were approximately 2-fold of Cr(VI) concentration released from blank control assays (117.1±5.6mg/L). Furthermore, the results of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and high-throughput sequencing indicated a greater variety of microbes within the microbial community in amendments with nano-sized Fe2O3/Fe3O4 than the control assays. Especially, Proteobacteria occupied a predominant status on the phylum level within the indigenous microbial communities from chromium-contaminated soils. Besides, some partial decrease of soluble Cr(VI) in abiotic nano-sized Fe2O3/Fe3O4 amendments was responsible for the adsorption of nano-sized Fe2O3/Fe3O4 to soluble Cr(VI). Hence, the presence of nano-sized Fe2O3/Fe3O4 could largely facilitate the mobilization and biotransformation of Cr(VI) from flooding soils by adsorption and bio-mediated processes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Investigation of the Mode of Action Underlying the Tumorigenic Response Induced in B6C3F1 Mice Exposed Orally to Hexavalent Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chad M.; Proctor, Deborah M.; Haws, Laurie C.; Hébert, Charles D.; Grimes, Sheila D.; Shertzer, Howard G.; Kopec, Anna K.; Hixon, J.Gregory; Zacharewski, Timothy R.; Harris, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic ingestion of high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water induces intestinal tumors in mice. To investigate the mode of action (MOA) underlying these tumors, a 90-day drinking water study was conducted using similar exposure conditions as in a previous cancer bioassay, as well as lower (heretofore unexamined) drinking water concentrations. Tissue samples were collected in mice exposed for 7 or 90 days and subjected to histopathological, biochemical, toxicogenomic, and toxicokinetic analyses. Described herein are the results of toxicokinetic, biochemical, and pathological findings. Following 90 days of exposure to 0.3–520 mg/l of sodium dichromate dihydrate (SDD), total chromium concentrations in the duodenum were significantly elevated at ≥ 14 mg/l. At these concentrations, significant decreases in the reduced-to-oxidized glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG) were observed. Beginning at 60 mg/l, intestinal lesions were observed including villous cytoplasmic vacuolization. Atrophy, apoptosis, and crypt hyperplasia were evident at ≥ 170 mg/l. Protein carbonyls were elevated at concentrations ≥ 4 mg/l SDD, whereas oxidative DNA damage, as assessed by 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, was not increased in any treatment group. Significant decreases in the GSH/GSSG ratio and similar histopathological lesions as observed in the duodenum were also observed in the jejunum following 90 days of exposure. Cytokine levels (e.g., interleukin-1β) were generally depressed or unaltered at the termination of the study. Overall, the data suggest that Cr(VI) in drinking water can induce oxidative stress, villous cytotoxicity, and crypt hyperplasia in the mouse intestine and may underlie the MOA of intestinal carcinogenesis in mice. PMID:21712504

  20. The role of different functional groups in a novel adsorption-complexation-reduction multi-step kinetic model for hexavalent chromium retention by undissolved humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Yin, Huilin; Chen, Linpeng; Liu, Fei; Chen, Honghan

    2017-11-07

    Undissolved humic acid (HA) has a great retention effect on the migration of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in soil, and HA functional groups play a predominant role in this process. However, the coupled mode between Cr(VI) retention and HA functional groups reaction is still unclear. In this study, it was found that a fair amount of Cr on HA existed in the forms of ion exchangeable and binding Cr(VI) during the reaction resulting from the ion exchange adsorption and complexation of Cr(VI). According to the results of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopic analysis (2DCOS), HA functional groups participated in the reaction with Cr(VI) in the order of carboxyl ≈ chelated carboxyl > phenol > polysaccharide > methyl, and all the functional groups were more likely to be located at aromatic domains. Based on the results of XPS spectra, rather than to be oxidized by Cr(VI), carboxyl more tended to be complexed by chromium, which is regarded as the precondition for Cr(VI) reduction. Phenol, polysaccharide and methyl with distinct reaction activities successively acted as major electron donors for Cr(VI) reduction in different reaction stages. Consequently, it was determined that the retention of Cr(VI) by undissolved HA followed an adsorption-complexation-reduction mechanism, and based on this, a multi-step kinetic model with multiple types of complexation/reduction sites was developed to simulate the retention processes resulting in a much better fitting effect (R(2) > 0.99) compared with traditional first-order and second-order kinetic models (R(2) < 0.95). This demonstrated that the multi-step kinetic model is of great potential in accurately simulating the migration and transformation of Cr(VI) in soil environment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Optimization of fermentation conditions and properties of an exopolysaccharide from Klebsiella sp. H-207 and application in adsorption of hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Li; Yumei, Li; Sheng, Han; Yingzi, Liu; Dongxue, Song; Dake, Hao; Jiajia, Wang; Yanhong, Qu; Yuxia, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The novel exopolysaccharide HZ-7 is produced by Klebsiella sp. H-207, and its fermentation conditions were optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). In this study, the optimized medium consisted of sucrose 31.93 g/L, KNO(3) 2.17 g/L and K(2)HPO(4) 5.47 g/L; while the optimized culture conditions consisted of seed age 13 h, with an inoculum size of 10.6% and incubation temperature of 28.9°C. A maximum HZ-7 yield of about 15.05 g/L was achieved under the optimized conditions using RSM and single-factor experiments. Next the exopolysaccharide HZ-7 was partially purified and characterized. The resulting product showed good properties, such as high concentration of uronic acid (41.67%), low average molecular weight (about 1.94×10(5) Da) and porous surface structure, were very advantageous to biosorption. Therefore HZ-7 was applied to absorb hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). The maximum adsorption efficiency (99.2%) which was obtained at an initial pH of 1.0 along with an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 20 mg/L, was not affected by ordinary metal ions and temperature. These data suggest Klebsiella sp. H-207 exopolysaccharide will be promising potential for industrial application.

  2. Application of the U.S. EPA Mode of Action Framework for Purposes of Guiding Future Research: A Case Study Involving the Oral Carcinogenicity of Hexavalent Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chad M.; Haws, Laurie C.; Harris, Mark A.; Gatto, Nicole M.; Proctor, Deborah M.

    2011-01-01

    Mode of action (MOA) analysis provides a systematic description of key events leading to adverse health effects in animal bioassays for the purpose of informing human health risk assessment. Uncertainties and data gaps identified in the MOA analysis may also be used to guide future research to improve understanding of the MOAs underlying a specific toxic response and foster development of toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic models. An MOA analysis, consistent with approaches outlined in the MOA Framework as described in the Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment, was conducted to evaluate small intestinal tumors observed in mice chronically exposed to relatively high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in drinking water. Based on review of the literature, key events in the MOA are hypothesized to include saturation of the reductive capacity of the upper gastrointestinal tract, absorption of Cr(VI) into the intestinal epithelium, oxidative stress and inflammation, cell proliferation, direct and/or indirect DNA modification, and mutagenesis. Although available data generally support the plausibility of these key events, several unresolved questions and data gaps were identified, highlighting the need for obtaining critical toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic data in the target tissue and in the low-dose range. Experimental assays that can address these data gaps are discussed along with strategies for comparisons between responsive and nonresponsive tissues and species. This analysis provides a practical application of MOA Framework guidance and is instructive for the design of studies to improve upon the information available for quantitative risk assessment. PMID:20947717

  3. Development of a cancer-based chronic inhalation reference value for hexavalent chromium based on a nonlinear-threshold carcinogenic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Joseph T; Erraguntla, Neeraja; Sielken, Robert L; Valdez-Flores, Ciriaco

    2012-12-01

    The carcinogenicity of hexavalent chromium(CrVI) is of significant interest to regulatory agencies for the protection of public health and to industry. Additionally, the mode of action (MOA) and conditions under which CrVI may induce carcinogenicity (e.g., reductive capacity considerations) have recently been the subject of significant scientific debate. Epidemiological data supported by data relevant to the carcinogenic MOA support considering nonlinear-threshold carcinogenic assessments for comparison to default linear low-dose extrapolation approaches. This study reviews epidemiological studies available in the scientific literature and conducts additional statistical dose-response analyses to identify potential carcinogenic thresholds and points of departure (PODs) in the context of supportive MOA information for a nonlinear-threshold inhalation carcinogenic assessment. Dosimetric adjustments and application of appropriate uncertainty factors (total UF of 30) to the selected cumulative exposure POD results in a cancer-based chronic inhalation reference value (ReV) of 0.24 μgCrVI/m(3). This chronic ReV is 300 times higher than the 1 in 100,000 excess cancer risk air concentration of 8E-04 μg/m(3) based on USEPA's unit risk factor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of the mode of action underlying development of rodent small intestinal tumors following oral exposure to hexavalent chromium and relevance to humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Deborah M.; Suh, Mina; Haws, Laurie C.; Kirman, Christopher R.; Harris, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in drinking water causes intestinal adenomas and carcinomas in mice, but not in rats. Cr(VI) causes damage to intestinal villi and crypt hyperplasia in mice after only one week of exposure. After two years of exposure, intestinal damage and crypt hyperplasia are evident in mice (but not rats), as are intestinal tumors. Although Cr(VI) has genotoxic properties, these findings suggest that intestinal tumors in mice arise as a result of chronic mucosal injury. To better understand the mode of action (MOA) of Cr(VI) in the intestine, a 90-day drinking water study was conducted to collect histological, biochemical, toxicogenomic and pharmacokinetic data in intestinal tissues. Using MOA analyses and human relevance frameworks proposed by national and international regulatory agencies, the weight of evidence supports a cytotoxic MOA with the following key events: (a) absorption of Cr(VI) from the intestinal lumen, (b) toxicity to intestinal villi, (c) crypt regenerative hyperplasia and (d) clonal expansion of mutations within the crypt stem cells, resulting in late onset tumorigenesis. This article summarizes the data supporting each key event in the MOA, as well as data that argue against a mutagenic MOA for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal tumors. PMID:23445218

  5. Loss of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase induces glycolysis and promotes apoptosis resistance of cancer stem-like cells: an important role in hexavalent chromium-induced carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jin; Ji, Yanli; Wang, Wei; Kim, Donghern; Fai, Leonard Yenwong; Wang, Lei; Luo, Jia; Zhang, Zhuo

    2017-09-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) compounds are confirmed human carcinogens for lung cancer. Our previous studies has demonstrated that chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low dose of Cr(VI) causes malignant cell transformation. The acquisition of cancer stem cell-like properties is involved in the initiation of cancers. The present study has observed that a small population of cancer stem-like cells (BEAS-2B-Cr-CSC) exists in the Cr(VI)-transformed cells (BEAS-2B-Cr). Those BEAS-2B-Cr-CSC exhibit extremely reduced capability of generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis resistance. BEAS-2B-Cr-CSC are metabolic inactive as evidenced by reductions in oxygen consumption, glucose uptake, ATP production, and lactate production. Most importantly, BEAS-2B-Cr-CSC are more tumorigenic with high levels of cell self-renewal genes, Notch1 and p21. Further study has found that fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1), an rate-limiting enzyme driving glyconeogenesis, was lost in BEAS-2B-Cr-CSC. Forced expression of FBP1 in BEAS-2B-Cr-CSC restored ROS generation, resulting in increased apoptosis, leading to inhibition of tumorigenesis. In summary, the present study suggests that loss of FBP1 is a critical event in tumorigenesis of Cr(VI)-transformed cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effective bioreduction of hexavalent chromium–contaminated water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effective bioreduction of hexavalent chromium–contaminated water in fixed-film bioreactors. ... reduction was evident. This is the first up-scaled, effective demonstration of a biological chromium(VI) bioremediation system in South Africa. Keywords: Bioreduction, fixed-film reactor, hexavalent chromium, microbial diversity ...

  7. Supercritical CO2 Assisted Synthesis of EDTA-Fe3O4 Nanocomposite with High Adsorption Capacity for Hexavalent Chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Bisht

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of EDTA functionalized nanoparticles in adsorption of chromium (VI from water was investigated in this study. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs were synthesized by a simple chemical coprecipitation route and EDTA coating onto IONPs was attained via supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc CO2, a technology with green sustainable properties. The obtained nanoparticles were then characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and vibrating magnetometric analysis (VSM. The synthesized nanoparticle and its modified variant were evaluated as adsorbent for chromium (VI removal from water through batch adsorption technique and the effect of analytic concentration; contact time and adsorbent concentration were studied at pH 2. The results showed higher removal efficiency for modified magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONPs (i.e., 99.9% than their nonmodified variant IONPs, that is, 34.06% for the same concentration after 18 hours of incubation. Also maximum adsorption capacity (qe = 452.26 mg/g of MIONPs attained can be related to their preparation in Sc CO2 as qe calculated from IONPs, that is, 170.33 mg/g, is lower than that of MIONPs. The adsorption data fit well with Freundlich isotherm equation while kinetic adsorption studies of chromium (VI were modeled by pseudo-second-order model.

  8. Facile Synthesis of n-type (AgIn)(x)Zn(2(1-x))S2/p-type Ag2S Nanocomposite for Visible Light Photocatalytic Reduction To Detoxify Hexavalent Chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Hairus; Kuo, Dong-Hau

    2015-12-09

    n-type (AgIn)(x)Zn(2(1-x))S2/p-type Ag2S nanocomposites with 10%, 20%, and 30% Ag2S loading were successfully synthesized via the simple solvothermal and sol gel methods. The as-prepared nanocomposites were characterized, and their visible light photocatalytic reductions were tested for detoxification of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). The results showed only 20 mg of the as-prepared nanocomposites could reduce 100 mL of 20 ppm potassium dichromate by almost 100% in less than 90 min without adding any hole scavenger agents and pH adjustment (pH = 7). The good photocatalytic reduction was related to the narrower bandgap of (AgIn)(x)Zn(2(1-x))S2 solid solution because of the hybridized orbitals of Ag, In, Zn, and S and low recombination rate of photogenerated electron and hole pairs due to the effectiveness of p-type Ag2S and n-type (AgIn)(x)Zn(2(1-x))S2 nanoheterojunctions. This work not only gives a contribution to the creation of visible light photocatalysis for wide-bandgap semiconductors, but also extends our technological viewpoints in designing highly efficient metal sulfide photocatalyst. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first finding of a high photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium under visible light illumination by simultaneously using both concepts of p-n nanoheterojunction and solid solution in our photocatalyst design. In this present work, these concepts were used to replace the use of hole scavenger agents, which were commonly used by many other works to retard the recombination rate of photoinduced electron and hole pairs for photodegradation of hexavalent chromium.

  9. Electrodeposition of platinum-iridium coatings and nanowires for neurostimulating applications: Fabrication, characterization and in-vivo retinal stimulation/recording. EIS studies of hexavalent and trivalent chromium based military coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrossians, Artin

    properties of the coatings in which the primers with hexavalent chromium ions (Cr6+) provided better corrosion protection compared to primers with trivalent chromium ions (Cr3+). After 30 days of the exposure of the samples in 0.5 N NaCl, one sample from each set of samples was scribed and exposed to 0.5 N NaCl for 3 days. Analysis of the impedance spectra revealed that the samples with chromium conversion coating pretreatment and hexavalent chromium primer showed "self healing" characteristics and provided better corrosion protection on the scribed areas compared to the scribed samples with trivalent chromium pretreatment and non-hexavalent chromium primer.

  10. Determination of Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI Concentrations via Ion Chromatography and UV-Vis Spectrophotometry in Samples Collected from Nacogdoches Wastewater Treatment Plant, East Texas (USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kefa K. Onchoke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI, a toxic environmental pollutant and carcinogen, was determined in samples collected from Nacogdoches Wastewater Treatment Plant (NWWTP using ion chromatography and UV-visible spectrophotometry (IC, UV-Vis. On reaction with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (DPC Cr+6 forms a 1,5-diphenylcarbazide-Cr(VI complex, which is then analyzed at 530 nm and 540 nm, respectively. Via ion chromatography Cr(VI concentrations were in the range of 0.00190±0.0020 and 0.0010±0.0006 ppm at the influent and effluent, respectively. With the use of standard addition wastewater samples were spiked with a 0.5 ppm Cr(VI standard of various amounts and subsequently analyzed with UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The spiked concentrations gave Cr(VI concentrations in the range of 0.0090±0.0060 ppm and 0.0040±0.0061 ppm at the influent and influent wastewater, respectively. The determined Cr(VI concentrations through the ion chromatography and UV-Vis spectrophotometry are below the maximum USEPA contaminant concentration of 0.1 ppm. From the analysis, the NWWTP efficiently removes Cr(VI before discharge into the environment through La Nana Creek. The removal efficiency for Cr(VI was determined to be ≥92.8% along the wastewater treatment stages from the influent (aeration stage to the effluent stages prior to discharge into the La Nana Creek.

  11. Transient gestational exposure to drinking water containing excess hexavalent chromium modifies insulin signaling in liver and skeletal muscle of rat progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobana, Navaneethabalakrishnan; Aruldhas, Mariajoseph Michael; Tochhawng, Lalmuankimi; Loganathan, Ayyalu; Balaji, Sadhasivam; Kumar, Mani Kathiresh; Banu, Liaquat Alikhan Sheerin; Navin, Ajit Kumar; Mayilvanan, Chinnaiyan; Ilangovan, Ramachandran; Balasubramanian, Karundevi

    2017-11-01

    Chromium (Cr), an essential micronutrient potentiates insulin action, whereas excess hexavalent Cr (CrVI) acts as an endocrine disruptor. Pregnant mothers living in areas abutting industries using the metal and chromite ore dumps are exposed to ground water contaminated with Cr. Nevertheless, the impact of prenatal exposure to excess CrVI on insulin signaling in the progeny remains obscure. We tested the hypothesis "transient gestational exposure to drinking water containing excess CrVI may modify insulin signaling during postnatal life". Pregnant Wistar rats were given drinking water containing 50, 100 and 200 ppm CrVI (K2Cr2O7) from gestational day 9-14 encompassing the period of organogenesis; the male progenies were tested at postnatal day 60. Neither fasting blood glucose nor oral glucose tolerance was altered in CrVI treated progeny. Nevertheless, western blot detection pointed out attenuated expression level of insulin receptor (IR), its downstream signaling molecules (IRS-1, pIRS-1Tyr632, Akt and pAktSer473) and organ specific glucose transporters (GLUT2 in liver and GLUT4 in gastrocnemius muscle), along with a significant increase in serum insulin level in male progenies exposed to CrVI. While 14C-2-deoxy glucose uptake increased in the liver, the same decreased in the skeletal muscle whereas, 14C-glucose oxidation recorded a consistent decrease in both tissues of CrVI exposed rats. These findings support our hypothesis and suggest that transient gestational exposure to excess CrVI may affect insulin signaling and glucose oxidation in the progeny, predictably rendering them vulnerable to insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of hexavalent chromium concentration in industrial waste incinerator stack gas by using a modified ion chromatography with post-column derivatization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yuichi; Tokumura, Masahiro; Iwazaki, Yuta; Wang, Qi; Amagai, Takashi; Horii, Yuichi; Otsuka, Hideyuki; Tanikawa, Noboru; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Oguchi, Masahiro

    2017-06-16

    An ion chromatography with post-column derivatization with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (IC-DPC) analytical method was modified to enable measurement of trace-level hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in air. One of the difficulties in determining trace levels of Cr(VI) in air with conventional IC-DPC methods is co-elution of the solvent and ion peaks due to high concentrations of ionic compounds in the extract. However, by using gradient elution rather than isocratic elution we were able to fully resolve the Cr(VI) ion peak from the solvent peak without the need for diluting the extract, which would have reduced the minimum quantifiable level of the method. With this method, we were able to detect Cr(VI) in air at concentrations of 5.3ng/m3 (assuming a sampling volume of 1m3 and a final solution volume of 10mL). Recovery tests at three different concentrations of Cr(VI) (50, 250, 1000ng) were performed with or without fly ash; recovery rates at all the concentrations of Cr(VI), with or without fly ash, ranged from 68% to 110% (mean±relative standard deviation, 96%±11%), and there were no differences in recovery rates with respect to the presence or absence of fly ash. Finally, we used the developed method to determine the concentration of Cr(VI) in stack gases collected from eight industrial waste incinerators located in Japan. The concentration of Cr(VI) in the stack gases ranged from below the method quantification limit to 3100ng/m3. The highest concentrations of Cr(VI) detected in the stack gases were two to three orders of magnitude higher than that in ambient air in Japan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI Down-Regulates Acetylation of Histone H4 at Lysine 16 through Induction of Stressor Protein Nupr1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danqi Chen

    Full Text Available The environmental and occupational carcinogen Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI has been shown to cause lung cancer in humans when inhaled. In spite of a considerable research effort, the mechanisms of Cr(VI-induced carcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Nupr1 (nuclear protein 1 is a small, highly basic, and unfolded protein with molecular weight of 8,800 daltons and is induced by a variety of stressors. Studies in animal models have suggested that Nupr1 is a key factor in the development of lung and pancreatic cancers, with little known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we report that the level of Nupr1 is significantly increased in human bronchial epithelial BEAS2B cells following exposure to Cr(VI through epigenetic mechanisms. Interestingly, Cr(VI exposure also results in the loss of acetylation at histone H4K16, which is considered a 'hallmark' of human cancer. Cr(VI-induced reduction of H4K16 acetylation appears to be caused by the induction of Nupr1, since (a overexpression of Nupr1 decreased the levels of both H4K16 acetylation and the histone acetyltransferase MOF (male absent on the first; also known as Kat8, Myst 1, which specifically acetylates H4K16; (b the loss of acetylation of H4K16 upon Cr(VI exposure is greatly compromised by knockdown of Nupr1. Moreover, Nupr1-induced reduction of H4K16 acetylation correlates with the transcriptional down-regulation at several genomic loci. Notably, overexpression of Nupr1 induces anchorage-independent cell growth and knockdown of Nupr1 expression prevents Cr(VI-induced cell transformation. We propose that Cr(VI induces Nupr1 and rapidly perturbs gene expression by downregulating H4K16 acetylation, thereby contributing to Cr(VI-induced carcinogenesis.

  14. Carbothermal synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon-supported nano zero-valent iron with enhanced stability and activity for hexavalent chromium reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Hu, Yuchen; Jiang, Baojiang; Zou, Jinlong; Tian, Guohui; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-15

    Composites of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) are prepared by using simultaneous carbothermal reduction methods. The reactivity and stability of nZVI are expected to be enhanced by embedding it in the ordered pore channels. The structure characteristics of nZVI/OMC and the removal pathway for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) by nZVI/OMC are investigated. Results show that nZVI/OMC with a surface area of 715.16 m(2) g(-1) is obtained at 900 °C. nZVI with particle sizes of 20-30 nm is uniformly embedded in the OMC skeleton. The stability of nZVI is enhanced by surrounding it with a broad carbon layer and a little γ-Fe is derived from the passivation of α-Fe. Detection of ferric state (Fe 2p3/2, around 711.2eV) species confirms that part of the nZVI on the outer surface is inevitably oxidized by O2, even when unused. The removal efficiency of Cr(VI) (50 mg L(-1)) by nZVI/OMC is near 99% within 10 min through reduction (dominant mechanism) and adsorption. nZVI/OMC has the advantage in removal efficiency and reusability in comparison to nZVI/C, OMC and nZVI. This study suggests that nZVI/OMC has the potential for remediation of heavy metal pollution in water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of RSM modeling for optimizing decolorization of simulated textile wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZM130 capable of simultaneous removal of reactive dyes and hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Zahid; Hussain, Sabir; Ahmad, Tanvir; Nadeem, Habibullah; Imran, Muhammad; Khalid, Azeem; Abid, Muhammad; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-06-01

    Remediation of colored wastewater loaded with dyes and metal ions is a matter of interest nowadays. In this study, 220 bacteria isolated from textile wastewater were tested for their potential to decolorize each of the four reactive dyes (reactive red-120, reactive black-5, reactive yellow-2, and reactive orange-16) in the presence of a mixture of four different heavy metals (Cr, Zn, Pb, Cd) commonly found in textile effluents. Among the tested bacteria, the isolate ZM130 was found to be the most efficient in decolorizing reactive dyes in the presence of the mixture of heavy metals and was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZM130 by 16S rRNA gene analysis. The strain ZM130 was highly effective in simultaneously removing hexavalent chromium (25 mg L(-1)) and the azo dyes (100 mg L(-1)) from the simulated wastewater even in the presence of other three heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Cd). Simultaneous removal of chromium and azo dyes ranged as 76.6-98.7 % and 51.9-91.1 %, respectively, after 180 h incubation. On the basis of quadratic polynomial equation and response surfaces given by the response surface methodology (RSM), optimal salt content, pH, carbon co-substrate content, and level of multi-metal mixtures for decolorization of reactive red-120 in a simulated textile wastewater by the strain ZM130 were predicted to be 19.8, 7.8, and 6.33 g L(-1) and a multi-metal mixture (Cr 13.10 mg L(-1), Pb 26.21 mg L(-1), Cd 13.10 mg L(-1), Zn 26.21 mg L(-1)), respectively. Moreover, the strain ZM130 also exhibited laccase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced)-dichlorophenolindophenol reductase (NADH-DCIP reductase) activity during the decolorization of reactive red-120. However, the laccase activity was found to be maximum in the presence of 300 mg L(-1) of the dye as compared to other concentrations. Hence, the isolation of this strain might serve as a potential bio-resource required for developing the strategies aiming at bioremediation of the

  16. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intravenously showed signs of diabetes (including weight loss, neuropathy, and impaired glucose tolerance) until chromium was added to their feeding solution. The chromium, added at doses of 150 to 250 mcg/day for up to two weeks, corrected their diabetes ...

  17. Chromium removal capability and photosynthetic characteristics of Cyperus alternifolius and Coix lacryma-jobi L. in vertical flow constructed wetland treated with hexavalent chromium bearing domestic sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suli; Huang, Hailian; Li, Zhigang; Li, Zhengwen; He, Zhenli; Liang, He

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the chromium removal capability and photosynthetic capacity response of plants were investigated in vertical flow wetland microcosms (VFWM) treated with Cr(VI) bearing domestic sewage. Two plants, Cyperus alternifolius (C. alternifolius) and Coix lacryma-jobi L. (C. lacryma-jobi L.) grown in the VFWM enhanced the purification of Cr(VI) enriched domestic sewage. Cr concentration in the effluent fell below detection limit (<0.03 mg L-1), except for the C. alternifolius wetland treated with 40 mg L-1 Cr(VI). The biomasses of both plants species were increased at 10 and 20 mg L-1 Cr(VI) exposure but inhibited at 40 mg L-1 Cr(VI). The photosynthetic capacities of both plants were not affected at 10-40 mg L-1 Cr(VI) exposure during the days 20-60. However, they were inhibited significantly (P < 0.05) at 40 mg L-1 Cr(VI) exposure during days 80-100. These results demonstrated that a VFWM with C. alternifolius and/or C. lacryma-jobi L. was capable of maintaining its efficiency and recovering its vegetation. VFWM with C. alternifolius and/or C. lacryma-jobi L. was promising for purifying wastewater which contains low to medium concentrations of Cr(VI) (<20 mg L-1).

  18. Removal of chromium hexavalent ion from aqueous solutions using biopolymer chitosan coated with poly 3-methyl thiophene polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hena, Sufia, E-mail: sufiahena@yahoo.co.in [School of Industrial Technology, University Sains Malaysia, Sungai Dua, 11800, George Town, Penang, 11800, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2010-09-15

    Adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) onto chitosan coated with poly 3-methyl thiophene synthesized chemically was investigated in a batch system by considering the effects of various parameters like contact time, initial concentration, pH and temperature. Cr(VI) removal is pH dependent and found to be maximum at pH 2.0. Increases in adsorption capacity with increase in temperature indicate that the adsorption reaction is endothermic. Based on this study, the thermodynamic parameters like standard Gibb's free energy ({Delta}G{sup o}), standard enthalpy ({Delta}H{sup o}) and standard entropy ({Delta}S{sup o}) were evaluated. Adsorption kinetics of Cr(VI) ions onto chitosan coated with poly 3-methyl thiophene were analyzed by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms were used to describe the adsorption equilibrium studies of chitosan coated with poly 3-methyl thiophene at different temperatures. Langmuir isotherm shows better fit than Freundlich and Temkin isotherms in the temperature range studied. The results show that the chitosan coated with poly 3-methyl thiophene can be efficiently used for the treatment of wastewaters containing chromium as a low cost alternative compared to commercial activated carbon and other adsorbents reported. In order to find out the possibility of regeneration and reuse of exhausted adsorbent, desorption studies were also performed.

  19. Application of a heterogeneous adsorbent (HA for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions: Kinetic and equilibrium modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Srivastava

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a heterogeneous adsorbent material (HA was used as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solutions at laboratory scale. Cr(VI containing water was treated with heterogeneous adsorbent(HA.Chromium solutions of various initial concentrations were treated with adsorbent in batch mode experiments to investigate the adsorption characteristics of heterogeneous adsorbent (HA. Kinetics of adsorption of Cr(VI ions on adsorbent was investigated by using pseudo first order and second order kinetic models. Removal processes were found to be governed by pseudo second order model. Intraparticle diffusion model was also analyzed for this system. Removal was found to be increased by increasing the temperature from 298 to 318 K which indicates the endothermic nature of the process. Various two parameter isotherm models viz. Langmuir, Freundlich, Elovich, Tempkin, Dubnin–Raduskevich (D–R, Harkin–Jura and BET isotherm were applied on resultant data for equilibrium modeling. It was observed that heterogeneous adsorbent (HA particles were highly efficient for the removal of Cr(VI.

  20. Natural occurrence of hexavalent chromium in a sedimentary aquifer in Urânia, State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Bourotte

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous concentrations of hexavalent chromium have been detected in ground-water of the Adamantina Aquifer inat least 54 municipalities located in the northwestern region of the State of São Paulo, southeast Brazil, occasionallyexceeding the permitted limit for human consumption (0.05 mg.L-1. An investigation was conducted in the municipality of Urânia, where the highest concentrations of chromium were detected regionally. It was defined that the originof this contamination is natural, since high concentrations of chromium were detected in aquifer sandstones (averageof 221 ppm and also in pyroxenes (6000 ppm, one of the main heavy minerals found in the sediments. Besides, noother possible diffuse or point sources of contamination were observed in the study area. Stratification of ground-waterquality was observed and the highest concentrations of Cr6+ were detected at the base of the aquifer (0.12 mg.L-1,where ground-water shows elevated values for redox potential (472.5 mV and pH (8.61. The origin of Cr6+ in water may be associated with the weathering of pyroxene (augite, followed by the oxidation of Cr3+ by manganese oxides. The highest concentrations of Cr6+ are probably related to desorption reactions, due to the anomalous alkaline pHfound in ground-water at the base of the aquifer.Concentrações anômalas de cromo hexavalente foram detectadas em águas subterrâneas do Aqüífero Adamantina em pelo menos 54 municipalidades localizadas na região noroeste do Estado de São Paulo, sudeste do Brasil, algumas vezes ultrapassando o limite máximo permitido para consumo humano (0,05 mg.L-1. Um estudo foi realizado no município de Urânia, onde as mais elevadas concentrações de cromo da região foram detectadas. A origem da contaminação foi definida como natural, pois foram detectadas concentrações de cromonos arenitos do aqüífero (média 221 ppm e em piroxênios (6000 ppm, um dos principais minerais pesados encontrados nos sedimentos

  1. The effects of long duration chronic exposure to hexavalent chromium on single live cells interrogated by scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filice, Fraser P; Li, Michelle S M; Wong, Jonathan M; Ding, Zhifeng

    2018-02-10

    Chromium is a useful heavy metal which has been employed in numerous industry and house applications. However, there are several known health risks associated with its uses. Cr (VI) is a toxic heavy metal format which serves no essential biological role in humans. It has been associated with oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Contamination of groundwater or soil due to improper handling lead to long term environmental damage. This study explores the effects of long duration chronic exposure to Cr (VI) on live human cells. Herein, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) depth scan imaging was employed to monitor the membrane permeability of single live human bladder cancer (T24) cells following incubation with various Cr (VI) concentration stimuli. SECM was used to provide insights into the long duration effects on membrane homeostasis of individual cells exposed to constant levels of Cr (VI). Further investigation of total population viability was performed by MTT assay. Dependent on the exposure time, transition between three distinct trends was observed. At short incubation times (≤1-3 h) with low concentrations of Cr (VI) (0-10 μM), membrane permeability was largely unaffected. As time increased a decrease in membrane permeability coefficient was observed, reaching a minimum at 3-6 h. Following this a dramatic increase in membrane permeability was observed as cell viability decreased. Higher concentrations were also found to accelerate the timeframe at which these trends occurred. These findings further demonstrate the strength of SECM as a bioanalytical technique for monitoring cellular homeostasis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 78 FR 7456 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Hexavalent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... employers to monitor employee exposure to hexavalent chromium, to provide medical surveillance, and to... technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic...

  3. Titanium dioxide-gold nanocomposite materials embedded in silicate sol-gel film catalyst for simultaneous photodegradation of hexavalent chromium and methylene blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandikumar, Alagarsamy [Centre for Photoelectrochemistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India); Ramaraj, Ramasamy, E-mail: ramarajr@yahoo.com [Centre for Photoelectrochemistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India)

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Aminosilicate sol-gel supported TiO{sub 2}-Au nanocomposite material photocatalyst was prepared by deposition-precipitation method and used for the simultaneous oxidation and reduction of methyelene blue dye and Cr(VI) ions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} is used to design the solid-phase thin film photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Au promotes the interfacial electron transfer from TiO{sub 2} to Cr(VI) to form Cr(III). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The holes produced at the TiO{sub 2} oxidize the MB dye. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} film was used for the simultaneous oxidation and reduction of toxic molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photoinduced simultaneous redox process provides dual benefit for the environment remediation. - Abstract: Aminosilicate sol-gel supported titanium dioxide-gold (EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps}) nanocomposite materials were synthesized by simple deposition-precipitation method and characterized. The photocatalytic oxidation and reduction activity of the EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} film was evaluated using hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and methylene blue (MB) dye under irradiation. The photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) was studied in the presence of hole scavengers such as oxalic acid (OA) and methylene blue (MB). The photocatalytic degradation of MB was investigated in the presence and absence of Cr(VI). Presence of Au{sub nps} on the (TiO{sub 2}){sub nps} surface and its dispersion in the silicate sol-gel film (EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps}) improved the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of MB due to the effective interfacial electron transfer from the conduction band of the TiO{sub 2} to Au{sub nps} by minimizing the charge recombination process when compared to the TiO{sub 2} and (TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} in the absence of EDAS. The EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} nanocomposite materials provided

  4. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as highly toxic and carcinogenic with no nutritional value. Recent data indicate that it causes genomic instability and also has no role in promoting genomic stability. PMID:22192535

  5. Hexavalent chromium at low concentration alters Sertoli cell barrier and connexin 43 gap junction but not claudin-11 and N-cadherin in the rat seminiferous tubule culture model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carette, Diane [INSERM U 1065, Team 5 “Physiopathology of Germ Cell Control: Genomic and Non Genomic Mechanisms” C3M, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Perrard, Marie-Hélène, E-mail: marie-helene.durand@ens-lyon.fr [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Prisant, Nadia [University of Versailles/St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Gilleron, Jérome; Pointis, Georges [INSERM U 1065, Team 5 “Physiopathology of Germ Cell Control: Genomic and Non Genomic Mechanisms” C3M, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Segretain, Dominique [University of Versailles/St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Durand, Philippe [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Kallistem SAS Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to toxic metals, specifically those belonging to the nonessential group leads to human health defects and among them reprotoxic effects. The mechanisms by which these metals produce their negative effects on spermatogenesis have not been fully elucidated. By using the Durand's validated seminiferous tubule culture model, which mimics the in vivo situation, we recently reported that concentrations of hexavalent chromium, reported in the literature to be closed to that found in the blood circulation of men, increase the number of germ cell cytogenetic abnormalities. Since this metal is also known to affect cellular junctions, we investigated, in the present study, its potential influence on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins present at this level such as connexin 43, claudin-11 and N-cadherin. Cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers expressed the three junctional proteins and ZO-1 for at least 12 days. Exposure to low concentrations of chromium (10 μg/l) increased the trans-epithelial resistance without major changes of claudin-11 and N-cadherin expressions but strongly delocalized the gap junction protein connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells. The possibility that the hexavalent chromium-induced alteration of connexin 43 indirectly mediates the effect of the toxic metal on the blood–testis barrier dynamic is postulated. - Highlights: ► Influence of Cr(VI) on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins ► Use of cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers ► Low concentrations of Cr(VI) (10 μg/l) altered the trans-epithelial resistance. ► Cr(VI) did not alter claudin-11 and N-cadherin. ► Cr(VI) delocalized connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells.

  6. Chromium removal from aqueous media by superparamagnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the superparamagnetic starch functionalized maghemite nano-adsorbents is spontaneous and endothermic in nature. Keywords. Chromium removal; starch; maghemite nanoparticles; adsorption. 1. Introduction. Industrial wastewater often contains substantial amount of hexavalent chromium mainly from rinsing of electro-.

  7. Edaravone mitigates hexavalent chromium-induced oxidative stress and depletion of antioxidant enzymes while estrogen restores antioxidant enzymes in the rat ovary in F1 offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jone A; Sivakumar, Kirthiram K; Arosh, Joe A; Burghardt, Robert C; Banu, Sakhila K

    2014-07-01

    Environmental contamination of drinking water with chromium (Cr) has been increasing in more than 30 cities in the United States. Previous studies from our group have shown that Cr affects reproductive functions in female Sprague Dawley rats. Although it is impossible to completely remove Cr from the drinking water, it is imperative to develop effective intervention strategies to inhibit Cr-induced deleterious health effects. Edaravone (EDA), a potential inhibitor of free radicals, has been clinically used to treat cancer and cardiac ischemia. This study evaluated the efficacy of EDA against Cr-induced ovarian toxicity. Results showed that maternal exposure to CrVI in rats increased follicular atresia, decreased steroidogenesis, and delayed puberty in F1 offspring. CrVI increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant (AOX) enzyme levels in the ovary. CrVI increased follicle atresia by increased expression of cleaved caspase 3, and decreased expression of Bcl2 and Bcl2l1 in the ovary. EDA mitigated or inhibited the effects of CrVI on follicle atresia, pubertal onset, steroid hormone levels, and AOX enzyme activity, as well as the expression of Bcl2 and Bcl2l1 in the ovary. In a second study, CrVI treatment was withdrawn, and F1 rats were injected with estradiol (E₂) (10 μg in PBS/ethanol per 100 g body weight) for a period of 2 wk to evaluate whether E₂ treatment will restore Cr-induced depletion of AOX enzymes. E₂ restored CrVI-induced depletion of glutathione peroxidase 1, catalase, thioredoxin 2, and peroxiredoxin 3 in the ovary. This is the first study to demonstrate the protective effects of EDA against any toxicant in the ovary. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  8. Short-term toxicity of hexavalent-chromium to epipsammic diatoms of a microtidal estuary (Río de la Plata): Responses from the individual cell to the community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licursi, M., E-mail: malena@ilpla.edu.ar; Gómez, N.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: •Diatom's nuclear abnormalities were significantly higher as consequence of chromium exposure. •Diatoms and chlorophytes increased in treatment microcosms. •Nitzschia palea proportion increased significantly in the treatment microcosms. -- Abstract: Diatoms are an integral and often dominant component of the benthic microalgal assemblage in estuarine and shallow coastal environments. Different toxic substances discharged into these ecosystems persist in the water, sediments, and biota for long periods. Among these pernicious agents, the toxicity in diatoms by metal is linked to different steps in the transmembrane and internal movements of the toxicant, causing perturbations in the normal structural and functional cellular components. These changes constitute an early, nontaxonomic warning signal that could potentially serve as an indicator of this type of pollution. The aim of this work was to study the environment-reflecting short-term responses at different levels of organization of epipsammic diatoms from the Río de la Plata estuary, Argentina that had been exposed to hexavalent chromium within experimental microcosms. To this end we monitored: (i) changes in the proportion of the diatoms in relation to other algal groups at the biofilm community level; (ii) shifts in species composition at the diatom-assemblage level; (iii) projected changes in the densities of the most representative species at the population level through comparison of relative growth rates and generation times; and (iv) the cytological changes at the cellular and subcellular levels as indicated by the appearance of teratological effects on individuals and nuclear alterations. The epipsammic biofilms were exposed for 96 h to chromium at a concentration similar to that measured in highly impacted sites along the coast (80 μg L{sup −1}). Chromium pollution, at this concentration and short exposure time did not affect the algal biomass and density of these mature

  9. False-positive result when a diphenylcarbazide spot test is used on trivalent chromium-passivated zinc surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reveko, Valeriia; Lampert, Felix; Din, Rameez Ud

    2018-01-01

    A colorimetric 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (DPC)-based spot test can be used to identify hexavalent chromium on various metallic and leather surfaces. DPC testing on trivalent chromium-passivated zinc surfaces has unexpectedly given positive results in some cases, apparently indicating the presence...... of hexavalent chromium; however, the presence of hexavalent chromium has never been confirmed with more sensitive and accurate test methods. Objectives To examine the presence of hexavalent chromium on trivalent chromium-passivated zinc surfaces with a DPC-based spot test. Methods A colorimetric DPC spot test...... was used for the initial detection of hexavalent chromium on new and 1-year-aged trivalent chromium-passivated zinc surfaces. Then, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was performed for all samples. Results The DPC spot test indicated the presence of hexavalent chromium in aged, but not new, trivalent...

  10. Hexavalent chromium recovery by liquid–liquid extraction with 2-octylaminopyridine from acidic chloride media and its sequential separation from other heavy toxic metal ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Mane

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A systematic study of extraction of chromium(VI with 2-octylaminopyridine (2-OAP in xylene at room temperature has been conducted. Quantitative extraction of chromium(VI was observed in the 0.4–0.8 M concentration range of hydrochloric acid. From the extracted complex species in the organic phase, chromium(VI was back extracted with 7 N ammonia (3 × 10 mL, and was determined by spectrophotometric method. Various parameters such as 2-OAP concentration, equilibrium period, effect of various diluents, aqueous: organic volume ratio, acidity and diverse ions were studied. The extraction reaction proceeds with ion-pair formation and the stoichiometry of extracted species was found to be [(2OAPH+ CrO3Cl−](org. The separation and determination of chromium(VI from associated and toxic metals in binary, ternary and multicomponent mixture were carried out. The method permits the sequential separation of chromium(VI from other toxic metals and has been used to separate and determine chromium(VI from alloys, and effluent water samples from tannery industries.

  11. Genome-wide gene expression effects in B6C3F1 mouse intestinal epithelia following 7 and 90 days of exposure to hexavalent chromium in drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopec, Anna K.; Kim, Suntae; Forgacs, Agnes L.; Zacharewski, Timothy R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Proctor, Deborah M. [ToxStrategies, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, CA 92688 (United States); Harris, Mark A. [ToxStrategies, Inc., Katy, TX 77494 (United States); Haws, Laurie C. [ToxStrategies, Inc., Austin, TX 78759 (United States); Thompson, Chad M., E-mail: cthompson@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Inc., Katy, TX 77494 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Chronic administration of high doses of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] as sodium dichromate dihydrate (SDD) elicits alimentary cancers in mice. To further elucidate key events underlying tumor formation, a 90-day drinking water study was conducted in B6C3F1 mice. Differential gene expression was examined in duodenal and jejunal epithelial samples following 7 or 90 days of exposure to 0, 0.3, 4, 14, 60, 170 or 520 mg/L SDD in drinking water. Genome-wide microarray analyses identified 6562 duodenal and 4448 jejunal unique differentially expressed genes at day 8, and 4630 and 4845 unique changes, respectively, in the duodenum and jejunum at day 91. Comparative analysis identified significant overlap in duodenal and jejunal differential gene expression. Automated dose–response modeling identified > 80% of the differentially expressed genes exhibited sigmoidal dose–response curves with EC{sub 50} values ranging from 10 to 100 mg/L SDD. Only 16 genes satisfying the dose-dependent differential expression criteria had EC{sub 50} values < 10 mg/L SDD, 3 of which were regulated by Nrf2, suggesting oxidative stress in response to SDD at low concentrations. Analyses of differentially expressed genes identified over-represented functions associated with oxidative stress, cell cycle, lipid metabolism, and immune responses consistent with the reported effects on redox status and histopathology at corresponding SDD drinking water concentrations. Collectively, these data are consistent with a mode of action involving oxidative stress and cytotoxicity as early key events. This suggests that the tumorigenic effects of chronic Cr(VI) oral exposure likely require chronic tissue damage and compensatory epithelial cell proliferation. Highlights: ► Mouse small intestine gene expression is highly responsive to hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)]. ► Cr(VI) elicits more differential gene expression after 7 days of exposure than 90 days of exposure. ► Oral exposure to Cr(VI) leads to

  12. Effect of pH on hexavalent and total chromium removal from aqueous solutions by avocado shell using batch and continuous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda-García, Erick; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2017-09-29

    Solution pH appears to be the most important regulator of the biosorptive removal of chromium ions from aqueous solutions. This work presents a kinetic study of the effects of solution pH on Cr(VI) and total chromium removal from aqueous solution by Hass avocado shell (HAS) in batch and continuous packed bed column systems. Different Cr(VI) and total chromium removal performances of HAS were obtained in pH-shift batch, pH-controlled batch, and continuous systems. These results emphasize the great importance of determining the most appropriate pH for Cr(VI) and total chromium removal, considering the operational mode of the proposed large-scale treatment system. Total chromium biosorption batch kinetics was well described by the Elovich model, whereas in the continuous system, the fitness of the kinetic models to the experimental data was pH dependent. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and kinetic studies clearly indicated that the reaction mechanism of Cr(VI) with HAS was the reductive biotransformation of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), which was partially released to the aqueous solution and partially biosorbed onto HAS.

  13. Antigenotoxic and Apoptotic Activity of Green Tea Polyphenol Extracts on Hexavalent Chromium-Induced DNA Damage in Peripheral Blood of CD-1 Mice: Analysis with Differential Acridine Orange/Ethidium Bromide Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen García-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the modulating effects of green tea polyphenols on genotoxic damage and apoptotic activity induced by hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI] in CD-1 mice. Animals were divided into the following groups: (i injected with vehicle; (ii treated with green tea polyphenols (30 mg/kg via gavage; (iii injected with CrO3 (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally; (iv treated with green tea polyphenols in addition to CrO3. Genotoxic damage was evaluated by examining micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCEs obtained from peripheral blood at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment. Induction of apoptosis and cell viability were assessed by differential acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB staining. Treatment of green tea polyphenols led to no significant changes in the MN-PCEs. However, CrO3 treatment significantly increased MN-PCEs at 24 and 48 h after injection. Green tea polyphenols treatment prior to CrO3 injection led to a decrease in MN-PCEs compared to the group treated with CrO3 only. The average of apoptotic cells was increased at 48 h after treatment compared to control mice, suggesting that apoptosis could contribute to eliminate the DNA damaged cells induced by Cr (VI. Our findings support the proposed protective effects of green tea polyphenols against the genotoxic damage induced by Cr (VI.

  14. The carcinogenicity of chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Norseth, Tor

    1981-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of chromium compounds is reviewed with specific attention to the gaps in knowledge for risk estimation and research needs. The most important problems at present are whether trivalent chromium compounds cause cancer, and whether there is a difference in cancer causing effects between the soluble and the slightly soluble hexavalent compounds in the practical exposure situation. Dose estimates for risk estimation based on epidemiological investigations are also lacking. Pres...

  15. 75 FR 27188 - Revising the Notification Requirements in the Exposure Determination Provisions of the Hexavalent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... Notification Requirements in the Exposure Determination Provisions of the Hexavalent Chromium Standards AGENCY... employee notification requirements in the exposure determination provisions of the standards for Hexavalent... notification requirements in the exposure determination provisions of the Cr(VI) standards, 29 CFR 1910.1026...

  16. Development of analytical procedures for determination of total chromium by quadrupole ICP-MS and high-resolution ICP-MS, and hexavalent chromium by HPLC-ICP-MS, in different materials used in the automotive industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séby, F; Gagean, M; Garraud, H; Castetbon, A; Donard, O F X

    2003-10-01

    A European directive was recently adopted limiting the use of hazardous substances such as Pb, Hg, Cd, and Cr(VI) in vehicle manufacturing. From July 2003 a maximum of 2 g Cr(VI) will be authorised per vehicle in corrosion-preventing coatings of key components. As no standardised procedures are available to check if produced vehicles are in agreement with this directive, the objective of this work was to develop analytical procedures for total chromium and Cr(VI) determination in these materials. The first step of this study was to optimise digestion procedures for total chromium determination in plastic and metallic materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). High resolution (HR) ICP-MS was used to examine the influence of polyatomic interferences on the detection of the (52)Cr(+) and (53)Cr(+) isotopes. If there was strong interference with m/ z 52 for plastic materials, it was possible to use quadrupole ICP-MS for m/ z 53 if digestions were performed with HNO(3)+H(2)O(2). This mixture was also necessary for digestion of chromium from metallic materials. Extraction procedures in alkaline medium (NH(4)(+)/NH(3) buffer solution at pH 8.9) assisted by sonication were developed for determining Cr(VI) in four different corrosion-preventing coatings by HPLC-ICP-MS. After optimisation and validation with the only solid reference material certified for its Cr(VI) content (BCR 545; welding dusts), the efficiency of this extraction procedure for screw coatings was compared with that described in the EN ISO 3613 standard generally used in routine laboratories. For coatings comprising zinc and aluminium passivated in depth with chromium oxides the extraction procedure developed herein enabled determination of higher Cr(VI) concentrations. This was also observed for the screw covered with a chromium passivant layer on zinc-nickel. For coating comprising a chromium passivant layer on alkaline zinc the standardized extraction procedure was more efficient

  17. Size-separated particle fractions of stainless steel welding fume particles - A multi-analytical characterization focusing on surface oxide speciation and release of hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, N; Belleville, L; Cha, Y; Olofsson, U; Odnevall Wallinder, I; Persson, K-A; Hedberg, Y S

    2018-01-15

    Welding fume of stainless steels is potentially health hazardous. The aim of this study was to investigate the manganese (Mn) and chromium (Cr) speciation of welding fume particles and their extent of metal release relevant for an inhalation scenario, as a function of particle size, welding method (manual metal arc welding, metal arc welding using an active shielding gas), different electrodes (solid wires and flux-cored wires) and shielding gases, and base alloy (austenitic AISI 304L and duplex stainless steel LDX2101). Metal release investigations were performed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.3, 37°, 24h. The particles were characterized by means of microscopic, spectroscopic, and electroanalytical methods. Cr was predominantly released from particles of the welding fume when exposed in PBS [3-96% of the total amount of Cr, of which up to 70% as Cr(VI)], followed by Mn, nickel, and iron. Duplex stainless steel welded with a flux-cored wire generated a welding fume that released most Cr(VI). Nano-sized particles released a significantly higher amount of nickel compared with micron-sized particle fractions. The welding fume did not contain any solitary known chromate compounds, but multi-elemental highly oxidized oxide(s) (iron, Cr, and Mn, possibly bismuth and silicon). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hexavalent chromium stress enhances the uptake of nitrate but reduces the uptake of ammonium and glycine in pak choi (Brassica chinensis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingxu; Cao, Xiaochuang; Ma, Jinzhao; Tan, Xiaoli; Xie, Yinan; Xiao, Han; Wu, Lianghuan

    2017-05-01

    Chromium (Cr) pollution affects plant growth and biochemical processes, so, the relative uptake of glycine, nitrate, and ammonium by pak choi (Brassica chinensis) seedlings in treatments with 0mgL(-1) and 10mgL(-1) Cr (VI) were detected by substrate-specific (15)N-labelling in a sterile environment. The short-term uptake of (15)N-labelled sources and (15)N-enriched amino acids were detected by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to explore the mechanism by which Cr stress affects glycine uptake and metabolism, which showing that Cr stress hindered the uptake of ammonium and glycine but increased significantly the uptake of nitrate. Cr stress did not decrease the active or passive uptake of glycine, but it inhibited the conversion of glycine to serine in pak choi roots, indicating that the metabolism of glycine to serine in roots, rather than the root uptake, was the limiting step in glycine contribution to total N uptake in pak choi. Since Cr affects the relative uptake of different N sources, a feasible way to reduce Cr-induced stress is application of selective fertilization, in particular nitrate, in pak choi cultivation on Cr-polluted soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantification of the toxic hexavalent chromium content in an organic matrix by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-low-angle microtomy (ULAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greunz, Theresia, E-mail: theresia.greunz@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterisation (CDL-MS-MACH), Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics (ZONA), Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Duchaczek, Hubert; Sagl, Raffaela [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, voestalpine-Straße 3, 4031 Linz (Austria); Duchoslav, Jiri; Steinberger, Roland [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterisation (CDL-MS-MACH), Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics (ZONA), Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Strauß, Bernhard [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, voestalpine-Straße 3, 4031 Linz (Austria); Stifter, David [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterisation (CDL-MS-MACH), Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics (ZONA), Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Common methods are not suitable for a reliable determination of Cr(VI) in organic coatings on steel. • Our proposed method is a combination of XPS and ultra-low-angle microtomy (ULAM). • The results allow referring to legal regulations of the Cr(VI) concentration. • For this method no accurate sample parameters are required. - Abstract: Cr(VI) is known for its corrosion inhibitive properties and is, despite legal regulations, still a potential candidate to be added to thin (1–3 μm) protective coatings applied on, e.g., electrical steel as used for transformers, etc. However, Cr(VI) is harmful to the environment and to the human health. Hence, a reliable quantification of it is of decisive interest. Commonly, an alkaline extraction with a photometric endpoint detection of Cr(VI) is used for such material systems. However, this procedure requires an accurate knowledge on sample parameters such as dry film thickness and coating density that are occasionally associated with significant experimental errors. We present a comprehensive study of a coating system with a defined Cr(VI) pigment concentration applied on electrical steel. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to resolve the elemental chromium concentration and the chemical state. Turning to the fact that XPS is extremely surface sensitive (<10 nm) and that the lowest commonly achievable lateral resolution is a number of times higher than the coating thickness (∼2 μm), a bulk analysis was achieved with XPS line scans on extended wedge-shaped tapers through the coating. For that purpose a special sample preparation step performed on an ultra-microtome was required prior to analysis. Since a temperature increase leads to a reduction of Cr(VI) we extend our method on samples, which were subjected to different curing temperatures. We show that our proposed approach now allows to determine the elemental and Cr(VI) concentration and distribution inside the coating.

  20. A simple route to synthesize conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole nanocomposite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties and their performance for removal of hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Hasan, E-mail: samarhass@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Mohammad Mostafizar; Ali, Mohammad Azgar [Department of Chemistry, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh); Minami, Hideto [Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tauer, Klaus [Max Planck Institute of Colloid and Interfaces, Am Mühlenberg, 14476 Golm (Germany); Gafur, Mohammad Abdul [Pilot Plant and Process Development Centre, BCSIR, Dhaka 1205 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubor [Department of Chemistry, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh)

    2016-08-15

    A combination of maghemite polypyrrole (PPy/γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and stimuli-responsive properties in the same hydrogel microspheres is expected to enhance their application potential in various fields such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, biosensors, biomedical applications and removal of heavy metals from waste water, catalysis etc. In this investigation a simple two step process is used to prepare conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole (PPy) composite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties. Poly(styrene-methacrylic acid-N-isopropylacrylamide-polyethelene glycol methacrylate) or P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles are first prepared by soap-free precipitation copolymerization. The copolymer hydrogel particles exhibited both temperature- and pH-responsive volume phase transition. Conductive P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA)/PPy/γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite hydrogel particles are then prepared by seeded chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole in the presence of P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles using FeCl{sub 3} as a oxidant and p-toluene sulfonic acid ( p-TSA) as a dopant. In the reaction system FeCl{sub 3} functioned as a source of Fe(III) for the formation of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This reaction also requires the initial presence of Fe(II) provided by the addition of FeCl{sub 2}. The size and size distribution, surface structure, and morphology of the prepared conductive composite hydrogel particles are confirmed by FTIR, electron micrographs, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV–visible spectroscopy. The performance of nanocomposite hydrogel particles has been evaluated for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr) ions from water. - Highlights: • P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel particles were prepared. • P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA)/PPy/γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite hydrogel particles were prepared. • Oxidative polymerization of pyrrole and precipitation of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3

  1. Assessment of immunotoxicity in female Fischer 344/N and Sprague Dawley rats and female B6C3F1 mice exposed to hexavalent chromium via the drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipkowski, Kelly A; Sheth, Christopher M; Smith, Matthew J; Hooth, Michelle J; White, Kimber L; Germolec, Dori R

    2017-12-01

    Sodium dichromate dihydrate (SDD), an inorganic compound containing hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), is a common environmental contaminant of groundwater sources due to widespread industrial use. There are indications in the literature that Cr(VI) may induce immunotoxic effects following dermal exposure, including acting as both an irritant and a sensitizer; however, the potential immunomodulatory effects of Cr(VI) following oral exposure are relatively unknown. Following the detection of Cr(VI) in drinking water sources, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) conducted extensive evaluations of the toxicity and carcinogenicity of SDD following drinking water exposure, including studies to assess the potential for Cr(VI) to modulate immune function. For the immunotoxicity assessments, female Fischer 344/N (F344/N) and Sprague Dawley (SD) rats and female B6C3F1 mice were exposed to SDD in drinking water for 28 consecutive days and evaluated for alterations in cellular and humoral immune function as well as innate immunity. Rats were exposed to concentrations of 0, 14.3, 57.3, 172, or 516 ppm SDD while mice were exposed to concentrations of 0, 15.6, 31.3, 62.5, 125, or 250 ppm SDD. Final mean body weight and body weight gain were decreased relative to controls in 250 ppm B6C3F1 mice and 516 ppm SD rats. Water consumption was significantly decreased in F344/N and SD rats exposed to 172 and 516 ppm SDD; this was attributed to poor palatability of the SDD drinking water solutions. Several red blood cell-specific parameters were significantly (5-7%) decreased in 250 ppm mice; however, these parameters were unaffected in rats. Sporadic increases in the spleen IgM antibody response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) were observed, however, these increases were not dose-dependent and were not reproducible. No significant effects were observed in the other immunological parameters evaluated. Overall, exposure to Cr(VI) in drinking water had limited effects on the immune

  2. Assessment of the level of chromium species in the discharged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the level of chromium species in the discharged effluents of selected tanneries in the Amhara Region; Haik and Debre Berhan tanneries. The level of total chromium, and hexavalent chromium in the discharged effluent of the studied tanneries were determined using the ICP-OES, and ...

  3. Chromium-induced kidney disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Wedeen, R P; Qian, L F

    1991-01-01

    Kidney disease is often cited as one of the adverse effects of chromium, yet chronic renal disease due to occupational or environmental exposure to chromium has not yet been reported. Occasional cases of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) following massive absorption of chromate have been described. Chromate-induced ATN has been extensively studied in experimental animals following parenteral administration of large doses of potassium chromate (hexavalent) (15 mg/kg body weight). The chromate is se...

  4. Germination and sporophytic development of Regnellidium diphyllum Lindman (Marsileaceae in the presence of hexavalent chromium Germinação e desenvolvimento esporofítico de Regnellidium diphyllum Lindman (Marsileaceae na presença de cromo hexavalente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA. Kieling-Rubio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Regnellidium diphyllum Lindman is a heterosporous fern, growing in aquatic environments and surrounding wetlands, which is assumed to be threatened by increasing water pollution and disappearance of its natural habitats. Among contaminants, hexavalent chromium - Cr(VI - is known to be present in effluents from some leather tanning factories. Megaspore germination tests were performed using Meyer's solution, at concentrations 0 (control, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 50, and 80 mg.L-1, from a standard solution of Titrisol® 1000 mg.L-1. The primary development of apomictic sporophytes was studied using solutions containing 0.025 to 4.8 mg.L-1 of Cr(VI. The experiments were conducted in a growth chamber at 24 ± 1 ºC and for a 12-hour photoperiod under fluorescent lights, providing a nominal irradiance of 77 µmol.m-2/s. Significant differences in megaspore germination, with subsequent sporophytic development, were verified from 0.5 mg.L-1 Cr(VI concentration onwards. Growth of primary root and primary and secondary leaves was significantly reduced at 3.2 mg.L-1 Cr(VI concentration or higher. Considering the pollution from Cr(VI in some areas of R. diphyllum natural occurrence, these data indicate that low reproductive rates and disappearance of populations are likely to occur in these situations.Regnellidium diphyllum Lindman é uma filicínea heterosporada que se desenvolve em ambientes aquáticos e áreas úmidas circundantes, sendo considerada ameaçada pelo aumento da poluição e desaparecimento dos seus hábitats naturais. Entre os contaminantes, o cromo hexavalente - Cr(VI - é conhecido por estar presente nos efluentes de algumas indústrias de curtimento de couro. Testes de germinação foram realizados em meio líquido de Meyer, com concentrações de 0(controle; 0,1; 0,5; 1; 5; 10; 15; 20; 30; 50; e 80 mg.L-1 de Cr(VI, a partir de uma solução padrão de Titrisol® a 1000 mg.L-1. O desenvolvimento primário dos esporófitos apom

  5. Origin of hexavalent chromium in groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazakis, N.; Kantiranis, N.; Kalaitzidou, K.

    2017-01-01

    was paid to this particular study area due to the co-existence here of two important factors both expected to contribute to Cr(VI) presence and groundwater pollution; namely the area's exposed ophiolitic rocks and its substantial fly ash deposits originating from the local lignite burning power plant...... not be delineated. Therefore, the presence of Cr(VI) in the groundwater of this area is thought to originate from both the ophiolitic rock weathering products in the soils, and the local leaching of Cr(VI) from the diffused fly ash located in the area surrounding the lignite power plant. This conclusion...

  6. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Rhizopus Oryzae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    biomass growth was achieved at a pH of 7, temperature of 37°C, with an initial Cr6+ concentration of 400 ppm and incubation period of 72 h. ... on R. oryzae growth and chromate reduction were investigated with different temperature of medium ..... Saccharomyces Cerevisiae'- J. Bioresour. Technol., 70: 826-829. Volesky B ...

  7. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives - Pretreatments with Primers Screening Final Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J.; Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (hex chrome or Cr(VI)) is a widely used element within applied coating systems because of its self-healing and corrosion-resistant properties. The replacement of hex chrome in the processing of aluminum for aviation and aerospace applications remains a goal of great significance. Aluminum is the major manufacturing material of structures and components in the space flight arena. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) are engaged in a collaborative effort to test and evaluate alternatives to hexavalent chromium containing corrosion coating systems. NASA and ESA share common risks related to material obsolescence associated with hexavalent chromium used in corrosion-resistant coatings. In the United States, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) studies have concluded that hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic and poses significant risk to human health. On May 5, 2011, amendments to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) were issued in the Federal Register. Subpart 223.73 prohibits contracts from requiring hexavalent chromium in deliverables unless certain exceptions apply. Subpart 252.223-7008 provides the contract clause prohibiting contractors and subcontractors from using or delivering hexavalent chromium in a concentration greater than 0.1 percent by weight for all new contracts associated with supplies, maintenance and repair services, and construction materials. ESA faces its own increasingly stringent regulations within European directives such as Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical (REACH) substances and the Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive (RoHS) which have set a mid-2017 sunset date for hexavalent chromium. NASA and ESA continue to search for an alternative to hexavalent chromium in coatings applications that meet their performance requirements in corrosion protection, cost, operability, and health and

  8. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives: Pretreatments Only Final Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (hex chrome or CR(VI)) is a widely used element within applied coating systems because of its self-healing and corrosion-resistant properties. The replacement of hex chrome in the processing of aluminum for aviation and aerospace applications remains a goal of great significance. Aluminum is the major manufacturing material of structures and components in the space flight arena. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) are engaged in a collaborative effort to test and evaluate alternatives to hexavalent chromium containing corrosion coating systems. NASA and ESA share common risks related to material obsolescence associated with hexavalent chromium used in corrosion-resistant coatings.

  9. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium (chromium (VI) ion from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    taye

    2015-04-01

    jose tannery industry, stream and reference water samples from well (Yandoka), respectively, ... Author(s) agree that this article remain permanently open access under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0.

  10. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications: Joint Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Regardless of the corrosivity of the environment, all metals require periodic maintenance activity to guard against the insidious effects of corrosion and thus ensure that alloys meet or exceed design or performance life. The standard practice for protecting metallic substrates is the application of a coating system. Applied coating systems work via a variety of methods (barrier, galvanic, and/or inhibitor) and adhere to the substrate through a combination of chemical and physical bonds. For years hexavalent chromium has been a widely used element within applied coating systems because of its self healing and corrosion resistant properties. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) studies have concluded that hexavalent chromium (hex chrome) is carcinogenic and poses significant risk to human health. On May 5, 2011 amendments to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) were issued in the Federal Register. Subpart 223.73 prohibits contracts from requiring hexavalent chromium in deliverables unless certain exceptions apply. These exceptions include authorization from a general or flag officer and members of the Senior Executive Service from a Program Executive Office, and unmodified legacy systems. Otherwise, Subpart 252.223-7008 provides the contract clause prohibiting contractors from using or delivering hexavalent chromium in a concentration greater than 0.1 percent by weight for all new contracts and to be included down to subcontractors for supplies, maintenance and repair services, and construction materials. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Department of Defense (DoD), and industry stakeholders continue to search for alternatives to hex chrome in coatings applications that meet their performance requirements in corrosion protection, cost, operability, and health and safety, while typically specifying that performance must be equal to or greater than existing systems.

  11. Reproductive toxicological aspects of chromium in males

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, E.

    1994-12-31

    To expand our present understanding of the effects of chromium on male fertility a number of studies were designed to achieve this through the use of chromium intoxicated experimental animals and through investigation of sexual hormones and sperm quality in welders. Also in view of the lack of an experimental model for effects of noxious substance on the epididymal spermatozoa the main objectives of the series of studies reviewed here were: A. To establish a model for evaluation of epididymal sperm count and motility in the rat. B. To investigate and compare the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on epididymal spermatozoa. Further to describe the effects of low-dose long-time exposure of rats to the most toxicological interesting chromium oxidative state - hexavalent chromium. C. By the use of autoradiography and {gamma}-countinuing to expand the present knowledge on the distribution of chromium in the body with special reference to the male reproductive organs. D. To describe the effects of exposure to hexavalent chromium in welding fume on levels of sexual hormones and semen parameters in welders. (EG).

  12. remediation potential of Eichornia sp in conjunction with chromium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study Cr (VI) reduction increased gradually in mobilized state with increased time of contact. Removal of hexavalent chromium by Eichornia sp. was more effective in the presence of chromium resistant bacterial strains. Aquatic plants released minerals helping bacteria to survive and in return, bacteria supported plants.

  13. Monitoring of chromium species and 11 selected metals in emission and immission of airborne environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krystek, Petra; Ritsema, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring of chromium species as hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and the determination of the total chromium concentration as well as the concentration of 11 selected metals (Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Zn) in industrial emission of a foundry and immission studies of the nearby airborne

  14. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics: Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Effectiveness (SE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Determine the suitability of trivalent chromium conversion coatings that meet the requirements of MIL-DTL-5541, Type II, for use in applications where high-frequency electrical performance is important. Evaluate the ability of hexavalent chrome free pretreated aluminum to form adequate EMI seals, and maintain that seal while being subjected to harsh environmental conditions. Assess the performance of trivalent chromium pretreatments against a known control hexavalent chrome pretreatment before and after they have been exposed to a set of environmental conditions. It is known that environmental testing causes a decrease in shielding effectiveness when hexavalent chrome pretreatments are used (Alodine 1200s). Need to determine how shielding effectiveness will be affected with the use of hexavalent chrome free pretreatments. Performance will be assessed by evaluating shielding effectiveness (SE) test data from a variety of test samples comprised of different aluminum types and/or conversion coatings. The formation of corrosion will be evaluated between the mating surfaces and gasket to assess the corrosion resistant properties of the pretreatments, comparing the hexavalent control to the hexavalent chrome free pretreatments.

  15. 75 FR 27239 - Revising the Notification Requirements in the Exposure Determination Provisions of the Hexavalent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... Notification Requirements in the Exposure Determination Provisions of the Hexavalent Chromium Standards AGENCY... (DFR) amending the employee notification requirements in the exposure determination provisions of the... requirements in the exposure determination provisions of the Cr(VI) standards at 29 CFR 1910.1026, 29 CFR 1915...

  16. 75 FR 12681 - Revising the Notification Requirements in the Exposure Determination Provisions of the Hexavalent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... Notification Requirements in the Exposure Determination Provisions of the Hexavalent Chromium Standards AGENCY... determination results. This amendment to the standard will not alter any other substantive requirements of the exposure determination provisions, i.e., the amendment does not change any of the requirements for when or...

  17. A novel method for fast enrichment and monitoring of hexavalent and trivalent chromium at the ppt level with modified silica MCM-41 and its determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganjali Mohammad Reza

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium(III at the ng L-1 level was extracted using partially silylated MCM-41 modified by a tetraazamacrocyclic compound (TAMC and determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emision spectrometry (ICP OES. The extraction time and efficiency, pH and flow rate, type and minimum amount of stripping acid, and break- through volume were investigated. The method's enrichment factor and detection limit are 300 and 45.5 pg mL-1, respectively. The maximum capacity of the 10 mg of modified silylated MCM-41 was found to be 400.5?4.7 µg for Cr(III. The method was applied to the determination of Cr(III and Cr(VI in the wastewater of the chromium electroplating industry and in environmental and biological samples (black tea, hot and black pepper.

  18. Assessing the impact of geogenic chromium uptake by carrots (Daucus carota) grown in Asopos river basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilli, Maria A; Syranidou, Evdokia; Palliou, Andriana; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos P; Karatzas, George; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    A methodology was developed to assess the impact of geogenic origin hexavalent chromium uptake by carrots, and the risk of human consumption of carrots grown in Asopos River basin in Greece. A field scale experiment was conducted with carrots cultivated in treatment plots, with and without compost amendment, in order to assess the impact of carbon in the mobility and uptake of chromium by plants. The results suggested that there is a trend for chromium mobilization and uptake in the surface and the leaves of the carrots cultivated in the treatment plot with the higher carbon addition, but not in the core of the carrots. Limited mobility of hexavalent chromium in the soil-plant-water system is presented due to the affinity of chromium to be retained in the solid phase and be uptaken by plants. Hexavalent chromium tolerant bacterial strains were isolated from the carrots. These endophytic bacteria, present in all parts of the plant, were able to reduce hexavalent chromium to trivalent form to levels below the detection limit. Finally, a site-specific risk assessment analysis suggested no adverse effects to human health due to the consumption of carrots. These findings are of particular importance since they confirm that carrots grown in soils with geogenic origin chromium does not pose any adverse risk for human consumption, but could also have the beneficial effect of the micronutrient trivalent chromium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  20. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients...... with chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  1. Teaching the Properties of Chromium's Oxidation States with a Case Study Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdilek, Zehra

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how a mixed-method case study affects pre-service science teachers' awareness of hexavalent chromium pollution and content knowledge about the properties of chromium's different oxidation states. The study was conducted in Turkey with 55 sophomores during the fall semester of 2013-2014. The students…

  2. Uptake and Phytoaccumulation of Chromium at Seedling Stage in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to identify shoot and root uptake of chromium (Cr) for screening tree species and recommend the best Cr accumulator. Both trivalent and hexavalent Cr species at four concentration levels 0 (control), 10, 100 and 1000 ppm were used as treatments. The growing medium was prepared by ...

  3. Chromium Uptake Efficiency of Spinacea olaracea from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    Health 36:197-199. Singh, A.K. 2001. Effect of trivalent and hexavalent chromium on Spinach (Spinacea oleracea). Env. Eco. 19 (4): 807-810. Verma, V.K., Gupta, R.K. and Rai, J.P.N. 2005. Biosorption of Pb and Zn from pulp and paper industry effluent by water hyacinth (Eichornia crassipes). J. Sci. Ind. Res. 64: 778-781.

  4. Enhancing phytoremediation of chromium-stressed soils through plant-growth-promoting bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Ahemad, Munees

    2015-01-01

    Chromium, specifically hexavalent chromium is one of the most toxic pollutants that are released into soils by various anthropogenic activities. It has numerous adverse effects not only on plant system but also on beneficial soil microorganisms which are the indicators of soil fertility and health. Recent emergence of phytoremediation as an environmental friendly and economical approach to decontaminate the chromium stressed soils has received wider attention. But major drawback of this proce...

  5. Chromium-induced kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedeen, R.P. (VA Medical Center, East Orange, NJ (United States)); Qian, Lifen (New Jersey Medical School, Newark (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Kidney disease is often cited as one of the adverse effects of chromium, yet chronic renal disease due to occupational or environmental exposure to chromium has not been reported. Occasional cases of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) following massive absorption of chromate have been described. Chromate-induced ATN has been extensively studied in experimental animals following parenteral administration of large doses of potassium chromate (hexavalent). The chromate is selectively accumulated in the convoluted proximal tubule where necrosis occurs. An adverse long-term effect of low-dose chromium exposure on the kidneys is suggested by reports of low molecular weight (LMW) proteinuria in chromium workers. Excessive urinary excretion of {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, a specific proximal tubule brush border protein, and retinol-binding protein has been reported among chrome palters and welders. However, LMW proteinuria occurs after a variety of physiologic stresses, is usually reversible, and cannot by itself be considered evidence of chromic renal disease. Chromate-induced ATN and LMW proteinuria in chromium workers, nevertheless, raise the possibility that low-level, long-term exposure may produce persistent renal injury. The absence of evidence of chromate-induced chromic renal disease cannot be interpreted as evidence of the absence of such injury.

  6. Chromium III histidinate exposure modulates antioxidant gene expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    While the toxicity of hexavalent chromium is well established, trivalent Cr (Cr(III)) is an essential nutrient involved in insulin and glucose homeostasis. Recently, antioxidant effects of chromium (III) histidinate (Cr(III)His) were reported in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress...

  7. Thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yanping; Holappa, L.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals were reviewed based on the available information in the literature. It includes the analysing methods for oxidation state of chromium in slags, oxidation state of chromium and activities of chromium oxides in slags and minerals. The phase diagrams of chromium oxide systems and chromium distributions between slag and metal phases are also covered ill this review. Concerning the analysing methods, it was found that most of the available approaches are limited to iron free slag systems and the sample preparation is very sensitive to the analysing results. In silicate slags under reducing atmosphere, divalent and trivalent chromium co-exist in the slags. It is agreed that the fraction of divalent chromium to total chromium increases with higher temperature, lower slag basicity and oxygen potential. For the slags under oxidising atmosphere, trivalent, pentavalent and hexavalent states were reported to be stable. The activities of CrO and CrO{sub 1.5} were concluded to have positive deviation from ideal solution. Slag basicity has a positive effect and temperature has a negative effect on the activities of chromium oxides. The phase diagrams of the Cr-O, binary, and ternary chromium containing oxide systems have been examined systematically. The analysis shows that the data on the quaternary and quinary systems are insufficient, and require further investigation. The most important features of the chromium containing silicate slags are the large miscibility gaps and the stability of the chromite spinel. (orig.) (76 refs.)

  8. Evaluation and Optimization of Chromium Removal from Synthetic Aqueous Solutions by Powdered Spirogyra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafaii Gh.R.1 PhD,

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims Heavy metals are the main pollutants in nature. Chromium is a heavy metal which is widely used. Hexavalent chromium solubility and mobility in aqueous solutions is so high and it is easily reduced. Biosorption is a process in which heavy metals are uptake through passive binding by nonliving biomass from aqueous solutions. The present study aimed to determine the capability of powdered Spirogyra to remove chromium from synthetic aqueous solutions under the influence of process parameters includes pH, algal dosage, and metal initial concentration. Materials & Methods This study was empirically carried out in laboratory scale through a batch system in Kashan region, Iran, in September 2014. Hexavalent chromium stock solution (500mg/l was made by solving 1.417g of dichromate potassium in 1 liter of distilled water. The experiments were conducted with initial concentration of 10, 25, and 40mg/l of hexavalent chromium in pH levels equal to 3, 7 and 11 and algal dosages of 0.2, 0.5 and 1g/l. The repeated-measure test was applied for statistical analysis using SPSS 16 software. Findings Maximum value of chromium removal was observed at pH=3 (70%. Hexavalent chromium removal value increased with increasing algal dosage from 0.2g/l (45% to 1g/l (70% in 100ml samples with 40mg/l concentration of Cr(VI. The amount of Cr(VI bound by unit weight of biomass were increased from the initial concentration of 10 to 40mg/l about 27mg/g in all levels of pH. Conclusion Low dosages of powdered Spirogyra can remove hexavalent chromium from wastewater and aqueous solutions.

  9. Developed Fungal-Bacterial Biofilms as A Novel Tool for Bioremoval of Hexavelant Chromium from Wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herath, Lasantha; Rajapaksha, R. M. A. U.; Vithanage, M.

    2014-01-01

    Remediation measures for hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] are required for a safe environment. As a recent development in microbiology, bacterial biofilms are being studied as effective bioremediation agents. When bacteria are in fungal surface-attached biofilm mode, they are called fungal-bacterial ......Remediation measures for hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] are required for a safe environment. As a recent development in microbiology, bacterial biofilms are being studied as effective bioremediation agents. When bacteria are in fungal surface-attached biofilm mode, they are called fungal...

  10. Removal of hexavalent chromium using chitosan prepared from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, in this work, the main concern has been the preparation of chitin and chitosan from the raw materials of shrimp shells and the characterization of the prepared chitosan by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The work was then shifted to investigate ...

  11. Hexavalent chromium removal by chitosan modified-bioreduced nontronite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Li; Rengasamy, Karthikeyan

    2017-08-01

    Recent efforts have focused on structural Fe(II) in chemically or biologically reduced clay minerals to immobilize Cr(VI) from aqueous solution, but the coulombic repulsion between the negatively charged clay surface and the polyanionic form of Cr(VI), e.g., dichromate, can hinder the effectiveness of this process. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficiency and mechanism of Cr(VI) removal by a charge-reversed nontronite (NAu-2), an Fe-rich smectite. Chitosan, a linear polysaccharide derived from chitin found in soil and groundwater, was used to reverse the charge of NAu-2. Intercalation of chitosan into NAu-2 interlayer increased the basal d-spacing of NAu-2 from 1.23 nm to 1.83 nm and zeta potential from -27.17 to +34.13 mV, with the amount of increase depending on chitosan/NAu-2 ratio. Structural Fe(III) in chitosan-exchanged NAu-2 was then biologically reduced by an iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 in bicarbonate buffer with lactate as the sole electron donor, with and without electron shuttle, AQDS. Without AQDS, the extent of Fe(III) reduction increased from the lowest (∼9%) for the chitosan-free NAu-2 to the highest (∼12%) for the highest chitosan loaded NAu-2 (3:1 ratio). This enhancement of Fe(III) reduction was likely due to the attachment of negatively charged bacterial cells to charge-reversed (e.g., positively charged) NAu-2 surfaces, facilitating the electron transfer between cells and structural Fe(III). With AQDS, Fe(III) reduction extent doubled relative to those without AQDS, but the enhancement effect was similar across all chitosan loadings, suggesting that AQDS was more important than chitosan in enhancing Fe(III) bioreduction. Chitosan-exchanged, biologically reduced NAu-2 was then utilized for removing Cr(VI) in batch experiments with three consecutive spikes of 50 μM Cr. With the first Cr spike, the rate of Cr(VI) removal by charged-reversed NAu-2 that was bioreduced without and with AQDS was ∼1.5 and ∼6 μmol g-1 h-1, respectively. However, the capacity of these clays to remove Cr(VI) was progressively exhausted upon addition of subsequent Cr spikes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the reduction product of Cr(VI) by chitosan-exchanged-bioreduced NAu-2 was Cr(III), possibly in the form of Cr(OH)3. In summary, our results demonstrated that the combined effects of sorption and redox reactions by charge-reversed bioreduced nontronite may offer a feasible in-situ approach for remediating Cr(VI) polluted soil and groundwater.

  12. Removal of hexavalent chromium using chitosan prepared from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    Contamination of the aqueous environment by heavy metals and due to the discharge of metal containing effluents into the water bodies is one of the environmental issues of the century. Thus, in this work, the main concern has been the preparation of chitin and chitosan from the raw materials of shrimp shells and the ...

  13. Removal of trivalent and hexavalent chromium by seaweed biosorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochvil, D.; Volesky, B. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Pimentel, P. [CETEC, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    1998-09-15

    Protonated or Ca-form Sargassum seaweed biomass bound up to 40 mg/g of Cr(III) by ion exchange at pH 4. An ion-exchange model assuming that the only species taken up by the biomass was Cr(OH){sup 2+} successfully fitted the experimental biosorption data for Cr(III). The maximum uptake of Cr(VI) by protonated Sargassum biomass at pH 2 was explained by simultaneous anion exchange and Cr(VI) to Cr(III) reduction. At pH <2.0, the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) dominated the equilibrium behavior of the batch systems, which was explained by the dependence of the reduction potential of HCrO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} ions on the pH. At pH >2.0, the removal of Cr(VI) was linked to the depletion of protons in equilibrium batch systems via an anion-exchange reaction. The optimum pH for Cr(VI) removal by sorption lies in the region where the two mechanisms overlap, which for Sargassum biomass is in the vicinity of pH 2. The existence of the optimum pH for the removal of Cr(VI) may be explained by taking into account (a) the desorption of Cr(III) from biomass at low pH and (b) the effect of pH on the reduction potential of Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions. Seventy percent of Cr(VI) bound to the seaweed at pH 2 can be desorbed with 0.2 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} via reduction to Cr(III).

  14. Removal and transformation of hexavalent chromium in sequencing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-07

    Apr 7, 2011 ... vided during the FILL period by using an ejector. During each cycle, 7 ℓ of influent and treated effluent were introduced and drawn, respectively. The sludge age was controlled at around 10 days. The base mix for the reactor was of the following composi- tion (concentration in mg/ℓ): bactopeptone (188), ...

  15. Biosorption of Hexavalent Chromium Using Bark of Cassia spectabilis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dimensionless equilibrium parameter, RL, signifies a favorable adsorption of Cr(VI) on the adsorbent and is found to be 0.441 (0 < RL<1). Pseudo first-order and second order kinetic models were used to evaluate the mechanism of adsorption. Kinetic evaluation of the experimental data showed that the biosorption ...

  16. Hexavalent chromium induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in Pycnoporus sanguineus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mi; Yin, Hua; Peng, Hui; Liu, Zehua; Lu, Guining; Dang, Zhi

    2017-09-01

    White rot fungi have been proved to be a promising option for the removal of heavy metals, understanding their toxic response to heavy metals is conducive to developing and popularizing fungi-based remediation technologies so as to lessen the hazard of heavy metals. In this study, Cr(VI)-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in Pycnoporus sanguineus, a species of white rot fungi were investigated. The results suggested that high level of Cr(VI) promoted the formation of ROS, including H2O2, O2(•-) and ·OH. With the increment of Cr(VI) concentration, the SOD and CAT activity along with GSH content increased within the first 24 h, but decreased afterward, companied with a significant enhancement of MDA content. Cr(VI)-induced oxidative damage further caused and aggravated apoptosis in P. sanguineus, especially at Cr(VI) concentrations above 20 mg/L. Cr(VI)-induced apoptosis was involved with mitochondrial dysfunction including mitochondrial depolarization, the enhancement of mitochondrial permeability and release of cytochrome c. The early and late apoptosis hallmarks, such as metacaspase activation, phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, DNA fragmentation and the nuclear condensation and fragmentation were observed. Moreover, we also found disturbances of ion homeostasis, which was featured by K(+) effluxes and overload of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca(2+).Based on these results, we suggest that Cr(VI) induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in white rot fungi, P. sanguineus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A kinetic approach on hexavalent chromium removal with metallic iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheju, M; Balcu, I; Enache, A; Flueras, A

    2017-12-01

    This paper examines the mechanism of Cr(VI) removal with Fe(0), and the possible effect of various experimental parameters, from a kinetic perspective. The experimental data was analyzed using five different kinetic models: three for chemical reactions and two for adsorption processes. It was found that the process fitted well to the zero-order kinetic model for all investigated systems, excepting experiments conducted at 6 °C and those with nano-Fe(0), when the process followed the Ho's pseudo second-order model. Therefore, even though, under acidic conditions, chemical reduction can be generally considered as the main mechanism of Cr(VI) removal with Fe(0), under some experimental conditions (e.g. when working with nano-Fe(0) or at low temperatures), adsorption seems to be the dominant removal path. The enhanced Cr(VI) removal noticed in co-presence of SO4(2-) and Cl(-) anions reiterates the significance of the secondary reductant Fe(II) within the process of Cr(VI) removal with Fe(0). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Skin permeation and cutaneous hypersensitivity as a basis for making risk assessments of chromium as a soil contaminant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagdon, R.E. (UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States) Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway (United States)); Hazen, R.E. (New Jersey Dept. of Environmental Protection, Trenton (United States))

    1991-05-01

    A literature review of experimental and human exposure studies of skin permeation and cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions evoked by chromium was carried out to provide a basis for making a risk assessment of chromium as a soil contaminant. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that 1 to 4% of the applied dose of hexavalent and trivalent chromium to guinea pig skin penetrated skin within 5 to 24 hours after application. Ultrastructural investigations showed that hexavalent chromium localized intracellularly and extracellularly in the upper layers of guinea pig epidermis. The potential of hexavalent chromium to produce a skin sensitization reaction is readily demonstrated using animal models. The incidence and characteristics of chromium-induced skin hypersensitivity as a clinical entity are described. A health effects survey of populations exposed to chromium slag in soil in Tokyo, Japan extending over 8 years indicated a tendency toward symptoms characterized as headache, chromic fatigue, and gastrointestinal complaints, positive occult blood tests, minute hematuria and albuminuria suggestive of incipient renal disease, and a tendency toward an increase in contact dermatitis that was seasonally related. Based on these data, the cleanup level of total chromium in soil is designated as 75 mg/kg. It is proposed that levels of total chromium lower than 75 mg/kg in soil would avoid undue risk of contact dermatitis.

  19. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics; Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Effectiveness (SE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this testing is to determine the suitability of trivalent chromium conversion coatings that meet the requirements of MIL-DTL-5541, Type II, for use in applications where high-frequency electrical performance is important. This project will evaluate the ability of coated aluminum to form adequate EMI seals. Testing will assess performance of the trivalent chromium coatings against the known control hexavalent chromium MIL-DTL-5541 Type I Class 3 before and after they have been exposed to a set of environmental conditions. Performance will be assessed by evaluating shielding effectiveness (SE) test data from a variety of test samples comprised of different aluminum types and/or conversion coatings.

  20. Citric-acid preacidification enhanced electrokinetic remediation for removal of chromium from chromium-residue-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fansheng; Xue, Hao; Wang, Yeyao; Zheng, Binghui; Wang, Juling

    2018-02-01

    Electrokinetic experiments were conducted on chromium-residue-contaminated soils collected from a chemical plant in China. Acidification-electrokinetic remediation technology was proposed in order to solve the problem of removing inefficient with ordinary electrokinetic. The results showed that electrokinetic remediation removal efficiency of chromium from chromium-contaminated soil was significantly enhanced with acidizing pretreatment. The total chromium [Cr(T)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal rate of the group acidized by citric acid (0.9 mol/L) for 5 days was increased from 6.23% and 19.01% in the acid-free experiments to 26.97% and 77.66% in the acidification-treated experiments, respectively. In addition, part of chromium with the state of carbonate-combined will be converted into water-soluble state through acidification to improve the removal efficiency. Within the appropriate concentration range, the higher concentration of acid was, the more chromium was released. So the removal efficiency of chromium depended on the acid concentration. The citric acid is also a kind of complexing agent, which produced complexation with Cr that was released by the electrokinetic treatment and then enhanced the removal efficiency. The major speciation of chromium that was removed from soils by acidification-electrokinetics remediation was acid-soluble speciation, revivification speciation and oxidation speciation, which reduced biological availability of chromium.

  1. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives Pretreatments Only Interim Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA and ESA continue to search for an alternative to hexavalent chromium in coatings applications that meet their performance requirements in corrosion protection, cost, operability, and health and safety, while typically specifying that performance must be equal to or greater than existing systems. The overall objective of the collaborative effort between NASA TEERM and ESA is to test and evaluate coating systems (pretreatments, pretreatments with primer, and pretreatments with primer and topcoat) as replacements for hexavalent chrome coatings in aerospace applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing promising coatings identified from previous NASA, ESA, Department of Defense (DOD), and other project experience. Additionally, several new materials will be analyzed according to ESA-identified specifications.

  2. Chromium in leather footwear - risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2012-05-01

    Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact allergy and dermatitis. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr(VI) was 3 ppm. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0.001). Cr(VI) was extracted from 44% of 18 footwear products, and, in three items, more than 10 ppm was extracted. One shoe had 62 ppm Cr(VI) extracted. Sandals seemed to be over-represented among footwear with detectable Cr(VI). Cr(III) extraction reached a median value of 152 ppm. Most leather footwear contained chromium. Cr(VI) was extracted from a high proportion of leather footwear; this poses a risk of sensitization. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Hexavalent-Chrome Free Coatings Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The replacement of hexavalent chrome [Cr (VI)] in the processing of aluminum for high-reliability electronics applications in the aviation and aerospace sector...

  4. AQUIFER TESTING AND REBOUND STUDY IN SUPPORT OF THE 100-H DEEP CHROMIUM INVESTIGATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMOOT JL

    2010-11-05

    The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) second Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) 5-year review (DOEIRL-2006-20, The Second CERCLA Five-Year Review Report for the Hanford Site) set a milestone to conduct an investigation of deep hexavalent chromium contamination in the sediments of the Ringold upper mud (RUM) unit, which underlies the unconfined aquifer in the 100-H Area. The 5-year review noted that groundwater samples from one deep well extending below the aquitard (i.e., RUM) exceeded both the groundwater standard of 48 parts per billion (ppb) (Ecology Publication 94-06, Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Statute and Regulation) and the federal drinking water standard of 100 {mu}g/L for hexavalent chromium. The extent of hexavalent chromium contamination in this zone is not well understood. Action 12-1 from the 5-year review is to perform additional characterization of the aquifer below the initial aquitard. Field characterization and aquifer testing were performed in the Hanford Site's 100-H Area to address this milestone. The aquifer tests were conducted to gather data to answer several fundamental questions regarding the presence of the hexavalent chromium in the deep sediments of the RUM and to determine the extent and magnitude of deeper contamination. The pumping tests were performed in accordance with the Description of Work for Aquifer Testing in Support of the 100-H Deep Chromium Investigation (SGW-41302). The specific objectives for the series of tests were as follows: (1) Evaluate the sustainable production of the subject wells using step-drawdown and constant-rate pumping tests. (2) Collect water-level data to evaluate the degree of hydraulic connection between the RUM and the unconfined (upper) aquifer (natural or induced along the well casing). (3) Evaluate the hydraulic properties of a confined permeable layer within the RUM.; (4) Collect time-series groundwater samples during testing to

  5. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Trivalent and Hexavalent Chromium Based on Ingestion and Inhalation of Soluble Chromium Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    radicals and singlet oxygen are produced by the reaction of Cr(VI) with hydrogen peroxide (Kawanishi et al., 1986). Thioyl radicals may also be formed...peroxide. J. Biol. Chem. 261, 5952-5958. Korallus, U., Harzdorf, C., and Lewalter, J. (1984). Experimental bases for ascorbic acid therapy of poisoning...RAFX,’LO’=O.,’HI’=.O2 SET HVDPRN=.T. END SET HVDPRN=.T. SET CJVITG=.F. ,WESITG=.F. ,FTSPLT=.T. ,XINCPL=6. ,YINCPL=4. , CMD =O B2 2 APPENDIX C Tissue

  6. Effet des polyamines sur la réduction du chrome hexavalent par des souches bactériennes et leur résistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahri Joutey, N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of polyamines on the reduction of hexavalent chromium by bacterial strains and their resistance. Polyamines are involved in several functions in bacteria. In this study, we examined the role of polyamines in hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI] reduction by three bacterial strains isolated from sites contaminated by tannery effluents. The strains were identified as Serratia proteamaculans, Leucobacter chromiireducens and Brevibacterium frigoritolerans. The inhibition of polyamine synthesis by α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO caused a decrease in Cr(VI tolerance in the bacterial isolates, indicating the role of endogenous polyamines in resistance to Cr(VI. The exogenous application of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, cadaverine was found to stimulate growth and Cr(VI reduction by the bacterial strains in Luria-Bertani medium. The results show the importance of polyamines in response to heavy metal stresses, especially Cr(VI toxicity.

  7. Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Evaluation of Residual Chromium Contamination in the Subsurface Soil at 100-C-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. S. Thompson

    2007-02-15

    This sampling and analysis instruction (SAI) provides the requirements for sample collection and laboratory analysis to evaluate the extent of hexavalent chromium contamination present in the soil below the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 remedial action waste site excavations.

  8. THE ATM-SMC1 PATHWAY IS ESSENTIAL FOR ACTIVATION OF THE CHROMIUM[VI]-INDUCED S-PHASE CHECKPOINT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI] is a common industrial waste product, an environmental pollutant, and a recognized human carcinogen. Following cellular uptake, Cr[VI] can cause DNA damage, however, the mechanisims by which mammalian cells respond to Cr-induced DNA damage remain to b...

  9. Review of Chromium (VI) Apoptosis, Cell-Cycle-Arrest, and Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, A; Shi, J; Lee, WKP; Hill, R; Wakeman, TP; Katz, A; Xu, B; Dalal, NS; Robertson, JD; Chen, C; Chiu, N; Donehower, L

    2014-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium combines with glutathione in chloride intracellular channel carrier to form tetravalent and pentavelent chromium in plasma and organelle membranes. It also combines with NADH/NADPH to form pentavalent chromium in mitochondria. Tetravalent- and pentavalent- chromium (directly and indirectly) mediated DNA double strand breaks activate DNA damage signaling sensors: DNA-dependent-protein-kinase signals p53-dependent intrinsic mitochorndrial apoptosis, and ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated and ataxia-telangiectasia-Rad3-related signal cell-arrest for DNA repair. Tetravalent chromium may be the most potent species since it causes DNA breaks and somatic recombination, but not apoptosis. Upon further failure of apoptosis and senescence/DNA-repair, damaged cells may become immortal with loss-of-heterozygosity and genetic plasticity. PMID:20859824

  10. The effect of chromium on the hemoglobin concentration of Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri (Oligochaeta: Tubificidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Tena, F J; Martínez-Tabchet, L

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the toxic effects of polluted sediments, mainly chromium, the El Niagara reservoir (Aguascalientes, Mexico) on a benthic oligochaete species. Acute toxicity tests with hexavalent chromium in an artificial sediment-water system resulted in 24-, 48-, and 96-h LC50 values of 49.53, 22.81, and 5.11 mg available chromium/kg dry sediment, respectivley, in Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri. The uptake of chromium by tubificids from artificial and polluted reservoir sediments was found to increase with metal concentration in sediments and exposure time. The increase was higher in experiments with artificial sediment. Cr concentration in worms was related to hemoglobin content, which decreased significantly when Cr concentrations were above 1.0 microg/g dry weight. Bioavailable chromium in the El Niágara reservoir sediments may be an important factor limiting the benthic species in this ecosystem.

  11. Occupational exposure to chromium, copper and arsenic during work with impregnated wood in joinery shops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, O; Nilsson, C A; Lindahl, R

    1992-10-01

    CCA-impregnated timber contains copper, chromium and arsenic (CCA), and occupational exposure to wood dust as well as the CCA compounds may occur in work with such timber. Dust from commercially available impregnated wood has been found to contain hexavalent chromium, which is regarded as a carcinogen. Apart from determinations of the total amounts of the CCA compounds, specific determination of hexavalent chromium is therefore essential. Selective methods have been applied for control of the work environment in six joinery shops. The mean exposure to wood dust was found to be below 1 mg m-3. The mean airborne concentration of arsenic around various types of joinery machines was in the range from 0.54 to 3.1 micrograms m-3. No hexavalent chromium was detected in any samples and no increased concentrations of arsenic were found in urine from the workers. The presence of arsenic in the work-room air must be considered for appropriate assessment of the occupational environment in joinery shops.

  12. Maximum availability and mineralogical control of chromium released from AOD slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junguo; Liu, Bao; Zeng, Yanan; Wang, Ziming; Gao, Zhiyuan

    2017-03-01

    AOD (argon oxygen decarburization) slag is the by-product in the stainless steel refining process. Chromium existing in AOD slag can leach out and probably poses a serious threat to the environment. To assess the leaching toxicity of chromium released from AOD slag, the temperature-dependent maximum availability leaching test was performed. To determine the controlling mineralogical phases of chromium released from AOD slag, a Visual MINTEQ simulation was established based on Vminteq30 and the FactSage 7.0 database. The leaching tests indicated that the leaching availability of chromium was slight and mainly consisted of trivalent chromium. Aging of AOD slag under the atmosphere can oxidize trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium, which could be leached out by rainwater. According to the simulation, the chromium concentration in leachates was controlled by the freely soluble pseudo-binary phases in the pH = 7.0 leaching process and controlled by the Cr2O3 phase in the pH = 4.0 leaching process. Chromium concentrations were underestimated when the controlling phases were determined to be FeCr2O4 and MgCr2O4. Facilitating the generation of the insoluble spinel-like phases during the cooling and disposal process of the molten slag could be an effective approach to decreasing the leaching concentration of chromium and its environmental risk.

  13. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather: a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2014-12-01

    Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. To characterize patients with chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather exposure. They had a significantly lower quality of life (p leather articles. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. REACH Compliant Hexavalent Chrome Replacement for Corrosion Protection (HITEA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Trusted to deliver excellence REACH Compliant Hexavalent Chrome Replacement for Corrosion Protection (HITEA) Brad Wiley Rolls-Royce plc The...00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE REACH Compliant Hexavalent Chrome Replacement for Corrosion Protection (HITEA) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...and Restriction of Chemicals – legislation. • Hexavalent chrome compounds are classified as substances of very high concern (SVHC) because they are

  15. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  16. Laboratory scale studies on removal of chromium from industrial wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, M A; Mir, Mohsin; Murtaza, Shazad; Bhatti, Zafar I

    2003-05-01

    Chromium being one of the major toxic pollutants is discharged from electroplating and chrome tanning processes and is also found in the effluents of dyes, paint pigments, manufacturing units etc. Chromium exists in aqueous systems in both trivalent (Cr(3+)) and hexavalent (Cr(6+)) forms. The hexavalent form is carcinogenic and toxic to aquatic life, whereas Cr(3+) is however comparatively less toxic. This study was undertaken to investigate the total chromium removal from industrial effluents by chemical means in order to achieve the Pakistan NEQS level of 1 mg/L by the methods of reduction and precipitation. The study was conducted in four phases. In phase I, the optimum pH and cost effective reducing agent among the four popular commercial chemicals was selected. As a result, pH of 2 was found to be most suitable and sodium meta bisulfate was found to be the most cost effective reducing agent respectively. Phase II showed that lower dose of sodium meta bisulfate was sufficient to obtain 100% efficiency in reducing Cr(6+) to Cr(3+), and it was noted that reaction time had no significance in the whole process. A design curve for reduction process was established which can act as a tool for treatment of industrial effluents. Phase III studies indicated the best pH was 8.5 for precipitation of Cr(3+) to chromium hydroxide by using lime. An efficiency of 100% was achievable and a settling time of 30 minutes produced clear effluent. Finally in Phase IV actual waste samples from chrome tanning and electroplating industries, when precipitated at pH of 12 gave 100% efficiency at a settling time of 30 minutes and confined that chemical means of reduction and precipitation is a feasible and viable solution for treating chromium wastes from industries.

  17. Bioadsorption and bioaccumulation of chromium trivalent in Cr(III)-tolerant microalgae: a mechanisms for chromium resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M; Bartolomé, M C; Sánchez-Fortún, S

    2013-10-01

    Anthropogenic activity constantly releases heavy metals into the environment. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. While hexavalent chromium uptake in plant cells has been reported that an active process by carrying essential anions, the cation Cr(III) appears to be taken up inactively. Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides (Dc1M), an unicellular green alga is a well-studied cell biological model organism. The present study was carried out to investigate the toxic effect of chromium exposures on wild-type Cr(III)-sensitive (Dc1M(wt)) and Cr(III)-tolerant (Dc1M(Cr(III)R30)) strains of these green algae, and to determine the potential mechanism of chromium resistance. Using cell growth as endpoint to determine Cr(III)-sensitivity, the IC₅₀(₇₂) values obtained show significant differences of sensitivity between wild type and Cr(III)-tolerant cells. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed significant morphological differences between both strains, such as decrease in cell size or reducing the coefficient of form; and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization and cell wall thickening in the Cr(III)-tolerant strain with respect to the wild-type strain. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/XEDS) revealed that Cr(III)-tolerant D. chlorelloides cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium distributed in cell wall (bioadsorption) as well as in cytoplasm, vacuoles, and chloroplast (bio-accumulation). Morphological changes of Cr(III)-tolerant D. chlorelloides cells and the presence of these electron-dense bodies in their cell structures can be understood as a Cr(III) detoxification mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oral Chromium Exposure and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Brocato, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known carcinogen when inhaled. However, inhalational exposure to Cr(VI) affects only a small portion of the population, mainly by occupational exposures. In contrast, oral exposure to Cr(VI) is widespread and affects many people throughout the globe. In 2008, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) released a 2-year study demonstrating that ingested Cr(VI) was carcinogenic in rats and mice. The effects of Cr(VI) oral exposure is mitigated by reduction in the gut, however a portion evades the reductive detoxification and reaches target tissues. Once Cr(VI) enters the cell, it ultimately gets reduced to Cr(III), which mediates its toxicity via induction of oxidative stress during the reduction while Cr intermediates react with protein and DNA. Cr(III) can form adducts with DNA that may lead to mutations. This review will discuss the potential adverse effects of oral exposure to Cr(VI) by presenting up-to-date human and animal studies, examining the underlying mechanisms that mediate Cr(VI) toxicity, as well as highlighting opportunities for future research. PMID:26231506

  19. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-containing support, (c) activating the chromium-based silica-containing support, (d) chemically reducing the activated chromium-based silica-containing support to produce a precursor catalyst, (e) r...

  20. Effect of chromium on the fatty acid composition of two strains of Euglena gracilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocchetta, Iara [Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biologia Experimental, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: rocchetta@bg.fcen.uba.ar; Mazzuca, Marcia [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad de Patagonia, Comodoro Rivadavia, Chubut (Argentina); Conforti, Visitacion [Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biologia Experimental, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ruiz, Laura [Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biologia Experimental, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Balzaretti, Vilma [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad de Patagonia, Comodoro Rivadavia, Chubut (Argentina); Rios de Molina, Maria del Carmen [Departamento de Quimica Biologica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2006-05-15

    The effect of hexavalent chromium on fatty acid composition was studied in two strains of Euglena gracilis; UTEX 753 (from the Culture Collection of Algae of Texas University, USA) and MAT (isolated from a highly polluted River). Both were grown in photoauxotrophic and photoheterotrophic conditions and exposed to two metal concentrations, one below and one above IC{sub 5}. The high malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (3 to 7-fold) obtained with chromium concentration above IC{sub 5}, suggested the existence of metal-induced lipid peroxidation. Total lipid content increased only with concentration below IC{sub 5}, whereas it was inhibited by higher metal concentration. Photoheterotrophic control strains exhibited a significantly higher proportion of saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Polyunsaturated acids were most affected by chromium, especially those related to chloroplast structures. Ultra-structure studies showed clear thylakoid disorganization in all treated cells. The results indicate that hexavalent chromium affects levels of fatty acids, especially those related to photosynthetic activity. - Fatty acid evaluation in the presence of chromium in Euglena gracilis grown in different culture conditions.

  1. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications: Joint Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgeb, Matt; Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of the Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications project is to evaluate and test pretreatments not containing hexavalent chrome in avionics and electronics housing applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing strong performing coating systems from prior NASA and DoD testing or new coating systems as determined by the stakeholders.

  2. The effectiveness of Mendong plant (Fimbrystilis globulosa as a phytoremediator of soil contaminated with chromium of industrial waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pungky Ferina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The textile industry produces sideline output in the form of dangerous waste. The textile industrial waste containing heavy metal, one of which is Chromium (Cr.  Chromium is very dangerous metal for environment, especially chromium hexavalent that has properties of soluble, carcinogenic, and toxic. The pollution of chromium in soil is a problem that the action to be taken with the technology of bioremediation. Phytoremediation of soil contaminated with chromium using Mendong plant (Fimbrystilis globulosa, combined with association of microorganisms Agrobacterium sp I3 and compost. This study was conducted in field experiment plots using a completely randomized block design. Data were analyzed using Anova followed by Duncan and correlation tests. The results showed that the Mendong plant was an effective phytoremediator of soil contaminated with chromium and it can be used as a chromium accumulator plant. The highest decrease of soil chromium content of 58.39% was observed on the combined artificial fertilizer, Agrobacterium sp I3 and Mendong plant treatment (P1B1T1. Removal effectiveness of chromium at the treatments using Mendong plant was higher than without the Mendong plant. Chromium uptake in shoots was higher than in roots of Mendong plant. Bioremediation increased the total bacterial colonies, decreased soil pH, and increased cation exchange capacity of the soil. The growth of the Mendong plant was in a good condition during the process of bioremediation.

  3. Remediation of chromium-contaminated soil by electrokinetics and electrokinetics coupled with CaAl-LDH permeable reaction barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunfeng; Xia, Wei; Hou, Hetian; Zhang, Jia; Qian, Guangren

    2017-09-01

    The remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soil was investigated by electrokinetic (EK) and permeable-reactive-barrier assisted electrokinetic (EK-PRB). The medium of PRB was hydrocalumite (CaAl-LDH). The results showed that removal efficiency of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in EK-PRB and EK system was 96.49 and 85.50%, respectively. Simultaneously, the removal efficiency of total chromium (TCr) was 69.34 and 40.97% after 120-h treatment. The XRD, FTIR, and XPS analyses indicated that the reactive barrier media of CaAl-LDH successfully captured the chromium. Besides, the migration rate of chromium in EK-PRB was relatively faster than EK, since the media of PRB captured chromium in-time and reduced the influence of chromium accumulation on the migration of chromium. Moreover, the trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) was generated in EK/EK-PRB, and the chromium was stabilized in soil with the chemical speciations of oxidizable and residual fractions. Therefore, the treatment of EK-PRB and EK both increased the removal of chromium and decreased its environmental risks.

  4. Removal of chromium from synthetic plating waste by zero-valent iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Saumyen; Bhargava, Puja

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential of zero-valent iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) for reduction and removal of chromium from synthetic electroplating waste. The zero-valent iron shows promising results as a reductant of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) to trivalent chromium (Cr+3), capable of 100% reduction. The required iron concentration was a function of chromium concentration in the waste stream. Removal of Cr+3 by adsorption or precipitation on iron leads to complete removal of chromium from the waste and was a slower process than the reduction of Cr+6. Presence SRB in a completely mixed batch reactor inhibited the reduction of Cr+6. In a fixed-bed column reactor, SRB enhanced chromium removal and showed promising results for the treatment of wastes with low chromium concentrations. It is proposed that, for waste with high chromium concentration, zero-valent iron is an efficient reductant and can be used for reduction of Cr+6. For low chromium concentrations, a SRB augmented zero-valent iron and sand column is capable of removing chromium completely.

  5. Enhancing phytoremediation of chromium-stressed soils through plant-growth-promoting bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munees Ahemad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromium, specifically hexavalent chromium is one of the most toxic pollutants that are released into soils by various anthropogenic activities. It has numerous adverse effects not only on plant system but also on beneficial soil microorganisms which are the indicators of soil fertility and health. Recent emergence of phytoremediation as an environmental friendly and economical approach to decontaminate the chromium stressed soils has received wider attention. But major drawback of this process is that it takes long time. Application of multifunctional plant-growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB exhibiting chromium resistance and reducing traits when used as bioinoculants with phytoremediating plants, has resulted in a better plant growth and chromium remediating efficiency in a short time span. PGPB improve chromium uptake by modifying root architecture, secreting metal sequestering molecules in rhizosphere and alleviating chromium induced phytotoxicity. The purpose of this review is to highlight the plant-beneficial traits of PGPB to accelerate plant-growth and concurrently ameliorate phytoremediation of chromium contaminated soils.

  6. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dheeba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zea mays (maize and Vigna radiata (green gram are found to be the chromium (Cr tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and different fertilizer amendments and the yield of both plants were affected by Cr. We conclude that metal accumulation of seeds of green gram was higher than corn and the application of single fertilizer either farm yard manure (FYM or nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium (NPK enhances the growth and yield of both the tolerant and sensitive plants in the mixed crop cultivations.

  7. Nanocrystalline hard chromium electrodeposition from trivalent chromium bath containing carbamide and formic acid: Structure, composition, electrochemical corrosion behavior, hardness and wear characteristics of deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, F. I.; Protsenko, V. S.; Gordiienko, V. O.; Kwon, S. C.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, M.

    2011-07-01

    The paper is devoted to the structure, composition and properties investigations of coatings obtained from a sulfate trivalent chromium bath containing formic acid and carbamide as the complexing agents. The results indicate that the deposits have a nanocrystalline type of structure-there are regions with atomic ordered arrangement in bulk material with the average size of 3-5 nm. Carbon is present as chromium carbide within the coating and it is distributed uniformly inside of the deposit. The deposits under study exhibit particular electrochemical behavior (absence of the active dissolution range in acid solution). The hardness of these coatings does not differ noticeably from that typical of coatings obtained in Cr(VI)-based baths. The wear characteristics of the deposits from the proposed bath are somewhat better than in the case of a common hexavalent chromium bath.

  8. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based

  9. Chromium(VI) bioremediation by probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younan, Soraia; Sakita, Gabriel Z; Albuquerque, Talita R; Keller, Rogéria; Bremer-Neto, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    Chromium is a common mineral in the earth's crust and can be released into the environment from anthropogenic sources. Intake of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) through drinking water and food causes toxic effects, leading to serious diseases, and is a commonly reported environmental problem. Microorganisms can mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by heavy metals in addition to having effective resistance mechanisms to prevent cell damage and bind to these metals, sequestering them from the cell surface and removing them from the body. Species of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Bacillus and Bifidobacterium present in the human mouth and gut and in fermented foods have the ability to bind and detoxify some of these substances. This review address the primary topics related to Cr(VI) poisoning in animals and humans and the use of probiotics as a way to mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by Cr(VI). Further advances in the genetic knowledge of such microorganisms may lead to discoveries which will clarify the most active microorganisms that act as bioprotectants in bodies exposed to Cr(VI) and are an affordable option for people and animals intoxicated by the oral route. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Disturbance response indicators of Impatiens walleriana exposed to benzene and chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, V; Lessa, S S; Ramos, R L; Shinzato, M C; Medeiros, T A M

    2017-08-03

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the remediation potential and disturbance response indicators of Impatiens walleriana exposed to benzene and chromium. Numerous studies over the years have found abundant evidence of the carcinogenicity of benzene and chromium (VI) in humans. Benzene and chromium are two toxic industrial chemicals commonly found together at contaminated sites, and one of the most common management strategies employed in the recovery of sites contaminated by petroleum products and trace metals is in situ remediation. Given that increasing interest has focused on the use of plants as depollution agents, direct injection tests and benzene misting were performed on I. walleriana to evaluate the remediation potential of this species. I. walleriana accumulated hexavalent chromium, mainly in the root system (164.23 mg kg -1 ), to the detriment of the aerial part (39.72 mg kg -1 ), and presented visible damage only at the highest concentration (30 mg L -1 ). Unlike chromium (VI), chromium (III) was retained almost entirely by the soil, leaving it available for removal by phytotechnology. However, after the contamination stopped, I. walleriana responded positively to the detoxification process, recovering its stem stiffness and leaf color. I. walleriana showed visible changes such as leaf chlorosis during the ten days of benzene contamination. When benzene is absorbed by the roots, it is translocated to and accumulated in the plant's aerial part. This mechanism the plant uses ensures its tolerance to the organic compound, enabling the species to survive and reproduce after treatment with benzene. Although I. walleriana accumulates minor amounts of hexavalent chromium in the aerial part, this amount suffices to induce greater oxidative stress and to increase the amount of hydrogen peroxide when compared to that of benzene. It was therefore concluded that I. walleriana is a species that possesses desirable characteristics for phytotechnology.

  11. Emissions from sludge incinerators with venturi and tray scrubbers and wet electrostatic precipitators: Metals, chromium and nickel compounds, and organics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostian, H.E.; DeWees, W.G.; Crumpler, E.P.; Lewis, F.M.

    1993-01-01

    A comprehensive test program was developed to determine the ratios of hexavalent to total chromium and nickel subsulfide to total nickel for a typical municipal wastewater sludge incinerator under normal combustion conditions and improved combustion conditions. Emissions of metals, hexavalent chromium, nickel subsulfide, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and furans (PCDD/PCDFs), semi-volatile and volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide (CO), and total hydrocarbons (THCs) from two multiple hearth incinerators and a fluidized bed incinerator were measured. The emissions were controlled at each unit with venturi scrubbers and, on two of the units, emissions from wet electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) were determined. Flue gas sampling was conducted at the inlet and outlet of the air pollution control devices at three separate sites. Gas concentrations, mass emission rates, metals-to-particulate ratios, and emissions factors were reported. Analytical results for the process samples were reported.

  12. Biosorption of chromium from electroplating and galvanizing industrial effluents under extreme conditions using Chlorella vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sibi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI] is a toxic oxidized form and an important metal pollutant in the water bodies. Biosorption of chromium(VI offers a potential alternative to conventional metal removal methods. Dried biomass of Chlorella vulgaris was used as biosorbent for the removal of Cr(VI from electroplating and galvanizing industry effluents as a function of biosorbent dosage, contact time, pH, salinity and initial metal ion concentration. Batch experiments were conducted for biosorption and the optimum conditions were 1 g/L biomass, 4 h contact time, pH 2 and 2.893 mS/cm of electrical conductivity. The chromium biosorption was strictly pH dependent with a maximum Cr removal of 63.2 mg/L at pH 2. Highest Cr removal at a concentration of 81.3 mg/L was observed at Electrical conductivity (EC value of 2.893 mS/cm. A comparison of Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models revealed that Freundlich isotherm model fitted the experimental data based on R2, qmax and standard error values. The results suggest that C. vulgaris biomass could be considered a promising low-cost biosorbent for the removal of Cr(VI from electroplating and galvanizing industry effluents. Keywords: Biosorption, Chlorella vulgaris, Microalgae, Hexavalent chromium

  13. Influence of chromium salts on increased lipid peroxidation and differential pattern in antioxidant metabolism in Pistia stratiotes L

    OpenAIRE

    RishiKesh Upadhyay; Sanjib Kumar Panda

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the changing effect of different concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10mM) of hexavalent and trivalent chromium on different biochemical parameters along with antioxidant enzymes was investigated on water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L.) in order to know the possible involvement of this metal in oxidative injury, besides the activities of antioxidant enzymes leading to biochemical and oxidative aberration induced by elevated concentrations. Both in roots and shoots, Cr produced a sig...

  14. SUMMARY CONCLUSIONS FOR THE PILOT IN-SITU CHROMIUM REDUCTION TEST AT RIVERBANK ARMY AMMUNITIONS PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridley, M

    2007-04-25

    A treatability study was conducted at Riverbank Army Ammunition Plant's (RBAAP) Site 17, to evaluate the effectiveness of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for the treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup 6+}). The chromium contamination at Site 17 is hydrologically isolated and unsuitable for standard extraction and treatment (pump and treat). The majority of the chromium contamination at Site 17 is trapped within the fine grain sediments of a clay/slit zone (45 to 63). The PRB was established above and adjacent to the contaminated zone at Site 17 to reduce the hexavalent chromium as it leaches out of the contaminated clay/silt zone separating the A zone from the A zone. Site 17 and the monitoring network are described in the In-Situ Chromium Reduction Treatability Study Work Plan (CH2MHILL, January 2004). The PRB was created by reducing naturally occurring Fe{sup 3+} to Fe{sup 2+} with the injection of a buffered sodium dithionite solution into subsurface chromium source area. The Cr{sup 6+} leaching out of the contaminated clay/silt zone and migrating through the PRB is reduced by Fe{sup 2+} to Cr{sup 3+} and immobilized (Amonette, et al., 1994). The sodium dithionite will also reduce accessible Cr{sup 6+}, however the long-term reductant is the Fe{sup 2+}. Bench scale tests (Appendix A) were conducted to assess the quantity and availability of the naturally occurring iron at Site 17, the ability of the sodium dithionite to reduce the hexavalent chromium and Fe within the sediments, and the by-products produced during the treatment. Appendix A, provides a detailed description of the laboratory treatability tests, and provides background information on the technologies considered as possible treatment options for Site 17. Following the sodium dithionite treatment, groundwater/treatment solution was extracted to remove treatment by-products (sulfate, manganese, and iron). The following sections briefly discuss the current treatment status, future

  15. Chromium genotoxicity: a double-edged sword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickens, Kristen P.; Patierno, Steven R.; Ceryak, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Certain forms of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] are known respiratory carcinogens that induce a broad spectrum of DNA damage. Cr(VI)-carcinogenesis may be initiated or promoted through several mechanistic processes including, the intracellular metabolic reduction of Cr(VI) producing chromium species capable of interacting with DNA to yield genotoxic and mutagenic effects, Cr(VI)-induced inflammatory/immunological responses, and alteration of survival signaling pathways. Cr(VI) enters the cell through nonspecific anion channels, and is metabolically reduced by agents including ascorbate, glutathione, and cysteine to Cr(V), Cr(IV), and Cr(III). Cr(III) has a weak membrane permeability capacity and is unable to cross the cell membrane, thereby trapping it within the cell where it can bind to DNA and produce genetic damage leading to genomic instability. Structural genetic lesions produced by the intracellular reduction of Cr(VI) include DNA adducts, DNA strand breaks, DNA-protein crosslinks, oxidized bases, abasic sites, and DNA inter- and intrastrand crosslinks. The damage induced by Cr(VI) can lead to dysfunctional DNA replication and transcription, aberrant cell cycle checkpoints, dysregulated DNA repair mechanisms, microsatelite instability, inflammatory responses, and the disruption of key regulatory gene networks responsible for the balance of cell survival and cell death, which may all play an important role in Cr(VI) carcinogenesis. Several lines of evidence have indicated that neoplastic progression is a result of consecutive genetic/epigenetic changes that provide cellular survival advantages, and ultimately lead to the conversion of normal human cells to malignant cancer cells. This review is based on studies that provide a glimpse into Cr(VI) carcinogenicity via mechanisms including Cr(VI)-induced death-resistance, the involvement of DNA repair mechanisms in survival after chromium exposure, and the activation of survival signaling cascades in response to Cr

  16. Chromium Is Elevated in Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus) Skin Tissue and Is Genotoxic to Fin Whale Skin Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Catherine F.; Wise, Sandra S.; Thompson, W Douglas; Perkins, Christopher; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is present in the marine environment and is a known carcinogen and reproductive toxicant. Cr(VI) is the form of chromium that is well absorbed through the cell membrane. It is also the most prevalent form in seawater. We measured the total Cr levels in skin biopsies obtained from healthy free-ranging fin whales from the Gulf of Maine and found elevated levels relative to marine mammals in other parts of the world. The levels in fin whale biopsies ranged from 1.71 ...

  17. Predictive approach for simultaneous biosorption of hexavalent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium and pentachlorophenol are the major environmental pollutants emanating from tannery effluent. Indigenous Bacillus cereus isolate was employed for biosorption and PCP degradation studies under varied environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, contact time, presence of other heavy metals, initial ...

  18. Cadmium tolerance, cysteine and thiol peptide levels in wild type and chromium-tolerant strains of Scenedesmus acutus (Chlorophyceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torricelli, Elena; Gorbi, Gessica; Pawlik-Skowronska, Barbara; Di Toppi, Luigi Sanita; Corradi, Maria Grazia

    2004-07-14

    Two strains of the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus acutus with different sensitivity to hexavalent chromium were compared for their tolerance of cadmium, by means of growth and recovery tests, and determination of cysteine, reduced glutathione and phytochelatin content, after short-term exposure to various cadmium concentrations (from 1.125 to 27 {mu}M). Growth experiments showed that, after 7-day treatments with cadmium, the chromium-tolerant strain reached a significantly higher cell density and, after 24-h exposure to Cd, was able to resume growth significantly better than the wild type. Constitutive level of cysteine was higher in the chromium-tolerant strain, while glutathione levels were similar in the two strains. The higher content of cysteine and the maintenance of both reduced glutathione and phytochelatin high levels in the presence of cadmium, support the higher cadmium co-tolerance of the chromium-tolerant strain in comparison with the wild type one.

  19. Removal of toxic chromium from wastewater using green alga Ulva lactuca and its activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sikaily, Amany [Environmental Division, National Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Kayet Bey, Alexandria (Egypt); Nemr, Ahmed El [Environmental Division, National Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Kayet Bey, Alexandria (Egypt)], E-mail: ahmedmoustafaelnemr@yahoo.com; Khaled, Azza; Abdelwehab, Ola [Environmental Division, National Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Kayet Bey, Alexandria (Egypt)

    2007-09-05

    Biosorption of heavy metals can be an effective process for the removal of toxic chromium ions from wastewater. In this study, the batch removal of toxic hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solution, saline water and wastewater using marine dried green alga Ulva lactuca was investigated. Activated carbon prepared from U. lactuca by acid decomposition was also used for the removal of chromium from aqueous solution, saline water and wastewater. The chromium uptake was dependent on the initial pH and the initial chromium concentration, with pH {approx}1.0, being the optimum pH value. Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Koble-Corrigan isotherm models were fitted well the equilibrium data for both sorbents. The maximum efficiencies of chromium removal were 92 and 98% for U. lactuca and its activated carbon, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 10.61 and 112.36 mg g{sup -1} for dried green alga and activated carbon developed from it, respectively. The adsorption capacities of U. lactuca and its activated carbon were independent on the type of solution containing toxic chromium and the efficiency of removal was not affected by the replacing of aqueous solution by saline water or wastewater containing the same chromium concentration. Two hours were necessary to reach the sorption equilibrium. The chromium uptake by U. lactuca and its activated carbon form were best described by pseudo second-order rate model. This study verifies the possibility of using inactivated marine green alga U. lactuca and its activated carbon as valuable material for the removal of chromium from aqueous solutions, saline water or wastewater.

  20. NASA TEERM Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.; Rothgeb, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The overall objective of the Hex Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics project is to evaluate and test pretreatment coating systems not containing hexavalent chrome in avionics and electronics housing applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing strong performing coating systems from prior NASA and DoD testing or new coating systems as determined by the stakeholders. The technical stakeholders have agreed that this protocol will focus specifically on Class 3 coatings. Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), depots, and support contractors have to be prepared to deal with an electronics supply chain that increasingly provides parts with lead-free finishes, some labeled no differently and intermingled with their SnPb counterparts. Allowance of lead-free components presents one of the greatest risks to the reliability of military and aerospace electronics. The introduction of components with lead-free terminations, termination finishes, or circuit boards presents a host of concerns to customers, suppliers, and maintainers of aerospace and military electronic systems such as: 1. Electrical shorting due to tin whiskers 2. Incompatibility of lead-free processes and parameters (including higher melting points of lead-free alloys) with other materials in the system 3. Unknown material properties and incompatibilities that could reduce solder joint reliability

  1. Sodium sulfur container with chromium/chromium oxide coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Frank A.; Higley, Lin R.

    1981-01-01

    A coating of chromium/chromium oxide is disclosed for coating the surfaces of electrically conducting components of a sodium sulfur battery. This chromium/chromium oxide coating is placed on the surfaces of the electrically conducting components of the battery which are in contact with molten polysulfide and sulfur reactants during battery operation.

  2. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Presentation on the NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings project. Project is in response to a Memorandum of Understanding between NASA and ESA Concerning Cooperation in the Field of Space Transportation - signed September 11, 2009. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) have expressed mutual interest in pursuing cooperation in the areas of evaluating hexavalent chrome-free coatings, environmentally-preferable coatings for maintenance of launch facilities and ground support equipment, citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys.

  3. GSDO Program Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives: Final Pretreatments Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chrome free pretreatments should be considered for use on Ground Support Equipment (OSE) and Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EOSE). Both of the hexavalent chrome free pretreatments (Metalast TCP HF and SurTec 650C) evaluated by this project met, and in some instances exceeded, the requirements ofMIL-DTL-5541 "Chemical Conversion Coatings on Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys". For DC resistance measurements, both Metalast TCP HF and SurTec (!50C met initial requirements following assembly and in many cases continued to maintain passing readings for the duration of testing.

  4. Total control of chromium in tanneries - thermal decomposition of filtration cake from enzymatic hydrolysis of chrome shavings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocurek, P; Kolomazník, K; Bařinová, M; Hendrych, J

    2017-04-01

    This paper deals with the problem of chromium recovery from chrome-tanned waste and thus with reducing the environmental impact of the leather industry. Chrome-tanned waste was transformed by alkaline enzymatic hydrolysis promoted by magnesium oxide into practically chromium-free, commercially applicable collagen hydrolysate and filtration cake containing a high portion of chromium. The crude and magnesium-deprived chromium cakes were subjected to a process of thermal decomposition at 650°C under oxygen-free conditions to reduce the amount of this waste and to study the effect of magnesium removal on the resulting products. Oxygen-free conditions were applied in order to prevent the oxidation of trivalent chromium into the hazardous hexavalent form. Thermal decomposition products from both crude and magnesium-deprived chrome cakes were characterized by high chromium content over 50%, which occurred as eskolaite (Cr2O3) and magnesiochromite (MgCr2O4) crystal phases, respectively. Thermal decomposition decreased the amount of chrome cake dry feed by 90%. Based on the performed experiments, a scheme for the total control of chromium in the leather industry was designed.

  5. Gum karaya (Sterculia urens) stabilized zero-valent iron nanoparticles: characterization and applications for the removal of chromium and volatile organic pollutants from water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinod, V.T.P.; Waclawek, S.; Senan, Ch.; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Pešková, K.; Černík, M.; Somashekarappa, H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 23 (2017), s. 13997-14009 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015073 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : nanoscale zerovalent iron * ray photoelectron-spectroscopy * groundwater remediation * hexavalent chromium * xanthan gum * guar gum * waste - water Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  6. Assisted green remediation of chromium pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheju, M; Balcu, I

    2017-12-01

    The effects of application of two anions commonly found in subsurface environments, phosphate (PO4(3-)) and sulfate (SO4(2-)), on hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) uptake and translocation by Zea mays, were investigated using pot-culture experiments. The two anions were tested as potential agents to mobilize Cr(VI) from polluted soil (50, 75 and 100 mg kg(-1) dw) at a dose of 16.7 mmol kg(-1). Metal uptake from soil to roots and subsequent transfer to shoots was discussed in terms of bioconcentration factor (BCF) and translocation factor (TF). The overall order of BCFs and TFs which resulted from this study was: PO4(3-) > H2O > SO4(2-); in the same time, metal concentration in plants tissues decreased in the order: root > stem > leaf. The present study suggests that PO4(3-) may be used as an environmentally compatible alternative to non-biodegradable synthetic chelants, to enhance the efficiency of Cr(VI) phytoextraction with Z. mays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Microstructural characterisation of chromium slags

    OpenAIRE

    J. Burja; F. Tehovnik; Vode, F.; B. Arh

    2015-01-01

    In this chromium slags that form during melting of chromium alloyed steels are examined. During melting and oxidation of these steel grades a considerable amount of chromium is lost, and gained back with slag reduction. Laboratory experiments were performed to study the mechanism of chromium oxide reduction by silicon. Slags chemistry and phase composition have a strong effect on the steelmaking process. Phase analysis revealed two types of chromium oxides, calcium chromites and chromite spin...

  8. Sequential Leaching of Chromium Contaminated Sediments - A Study Characterizing Natural Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, D.; Ding, M.; Beroff, S.; Rearick, M.; Perkins, G.; WoldeGabriel, G. W.; Ware, D.; Harris, R.; Kluk, E.; Katzman, D.; Reimus, P. W.; Heikoop, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Natural attenuation is an important process in slowing down the transport of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), an anthropogenic environmental contaminant, either by adsorption of Cr(VI) to sediments, or by reduction to nontoxic trivalent chromium, Cr(III). The capacity and mechanism of attenuation is explored in this sequential leaching study of different particle size fractions of chromium contaminated sediments and similar uncontaminated sediments from the regional aquifer near Los Alamos, New Mexico. Using this leaching protocol each sediment sample is split in two: one half is leached three times using a 0.1 M sodium bicarbonate/carbonate solution, while the second half is leached three times using a 0.01 M nitric acid, followed by two consecutively increasing magnitudes of nitric acid concentrations. Based on the amphoteric nature of chromium, alkaline leaching is used to establish the amount of Cr(VI) sorbed on the sediment, whereas acid leaching is used to establish the amount of Cr(III). The weak acid is predicted to release the attenuated anthropogenic Cr(III), without affecting Cr-bearing minerals. The sequential, stronger, acid is anticipated to leach Cr(III)-incorporated in the minerals. The efficiency and validation of the sequential leaching method is assessed by comparing the leaching behavior of bentonite and biotite samples, with and without loaded Cr(VI). A 97% chromium mass balance of leached Cr(VI)-loaded bentonite and biotite proves the viability of this method for further use on leaching contaminated sediments. By comparing contaminated and uncontaminated sediment leachate results, of chromium and other major and trace elements, the signature of anthropogenic chromium is determined. Further mineralogical characterization of the sediments provides a quantitative measure of the natural attenuation capacity for chromium. Understanding these results is pertinent in delineating the optimal procedure for the remediation of Cr(VI) in the regional aquifer

  9. Bioremediation of hexavalent chromate using permeabilized Brevibacterium sp. and Stenotrophomonas sp. cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shimei; Ge, Shichao; Zhou, Maohong; Dong, Xinjiao

    2015-07-01

    Bioremediation has been found to be a useful method for removing hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), which is very toxic, from wastewater. Two strains of bacteria that were able to reduce Cr(VI) effectively were isolated from Cr(VI) contaminated soil samples and identified as Brevibacterium sp. K1 and Stenotrophomonas sp. D6, respectively, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. Brevibacterium sp. K1 and Stenotrophomonas sp. D6 could grow in Luria-Broth medium containing K2Cr2O7 at 1000 and 1600 mg/L, respectively, and they completely reduced the Cr(VI) in LB medium containing K2Cr2O7 at 200 mg/L within 72 h. Further analyses revealed that permeabilized K1 and D6 cells reduced Cr(VI) more effectively than did the resting cells. Triton X-100 was the best permeabilizing agent that was tested. The permeabilized cells of both strains could completely reduce Cr(VI) in industrial wastewater twice before needing to be replenished. The results suggested that these chromate-reducing bacteria are potential candidates for practical use biotreating industrial effluents containing Cr(VI) with Stenotrophomonas sp. D6 being the more effective bacterium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cytogenomics of hexavalent chromium (Cr6+ exposed cells: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Nigam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The altered cellular gene expression profile is being hypothesized as the possible molecular basis navigating the onset or progress of various morbidities. This hypothesis has been evaluated here in respect of Cr 6+ induced toxicity. Several studies using gene microarray show selective and strategic dysregulations of cellular genes and pathways induced by Cr 6+ . Relevant literature has been reviewed to unravel these changes in different test systems after exposure to Cr 6+ and also to elucidate association if any, of the altered cytogenomics with Cr 6+ induced toxicity or carcinogenicity. The aim was to verify the hypothesis for critical role of altered cytogenomics in onset of Cr 6+ induced biological / clinical effects by identifying genes modulated commonly by the toxicant irrespective of test system or test concentrations / doses, and by scrutinizing their importance in regulation of the flow of mechanistically linked events crucial for resultant morbidities. Their probability as biomarkers to monitor the toxicant induced biological changes is speculative. The modulated genes have been found to cluster under the pathways that manage onset of oxidative stress, DNA damage, apoptosis, cell-cycle regulation, cytoskeleton, morphological changes, energy metabolism, biosynthesis, oncogenes, bioenergetics, and immune system critical for toxicity. In these studies, the identity of genes has been found to differ remarkably; albeit the trend of pathways′ dysregulation has been found to remain similar. We conclude that the intensity of dysregulation of genes or pathways involved in mechanistic events forms a sub-threshold or threshold level depending upon the dose and type (including speciation of the toxicant, duration of exposure, type of target cells, and niche microenvironment of cells, and the intensity of sub-threshold or threshold level of the altered cytogenomics paves way in toxicant exposed cells eventually either to opt for reversal to differentiation and growth, or to result in toxicity like dedifferentiation and apoptosis, respectively.

  11. Alleviation of toxic hexavalent chromium using indigenous aerobic bacteria isolated from contaminated tannery industry sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Siddhartha; Singh, Nitin Kumar; Bansal, Ankur Kumar; Arutchelvan, V; Sarkar, Sudipta

    2016-07-03

    In the last decade, much attention has been paid to bioremediation of Cr(VI) using various bacterial species. Cr(VI) remediation by indegeneous bacteria isolated from contaminated sites of a tannery industry located in Tamil Nadu, India, was investigated in this study. Three Cr(VI) resistant bacterial strains (TES-1, TEf-1, and TES-2) were isolated and selected based on their Cr(VI) reduction ability in minimal salt medium. Among these three bacterial strains, TES-1 was found to be most efficient in bioreduction, while TES-2 was only found to be Cr(VI) resistant and showed negligible bioreduction, whereas TEf-1 was observed to be most Cr(VI) tolerant. Potential for bioremediation of TES-1 and TEf-1 was further investigated at different concentrations of Cr(VI) in the range of 50 to 350 mg L(-1). TEf-1 showed prominent synchronous growth throughout the experiment, whereas TES-1 took a longer acclimatization time. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of Cr(VI) for TES-1 and TEf-1 were approximated as 600 mg L(-1) and 750 mg L(-1), respectively. The kinetic behavior of Cr(VI) reduction by TES-1 and TEf-1 exhibited zero- and first-order removal kinetics for Cr(VI), respectively. The most efficient strain TES-1 was identified as Streptomyces sp. by gene sequencing of 16S rRNA.

  12. Hexavalent chromium removal in a tannery industry wastewater using rice husk silica

    OpenAIRE

    Sivakumar, D

    2015-01-01

    Present study dealt the removal of Cr(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater using rice husk silica powder as an adsorbent.The experimental investigations have been carried out by using rice husk silica powder for different adsorption dosage, different contact time and different pH against the initial Cr(VI) concentration of 292 mg/L. The maximum percentage removal of Cr(VI) in the tannery industrial wastewater (88.3 %) was found at an optimum adsorbent dosage of 15 g, contact time of 150 min.,...

  13. Effective Management of Hexavalent Chromium (Cr+6) in DoD Organic and Inorganic Coatings Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-19

    and composites ( Graphite -Epoxy, Fiberglass-Epoxy, and Kevlar)  Validation of Performance and Material Compatibility − External Tests: OSHA Method ID...200 12100 98.35% SET 1 Fiber Glass 0.1 0.033 0.33 12100 100.00% SET 1 Graphite Epoxy 0.1 6 59 12100 99.51% SET 1 Kevlar 0.1 3 29 12100 99.76...compatibility • All panel ATR spectra are dominated by epoxy resin • All panel residue spectra are very weak indicating very little to no HCR

  14. Influence of plants on the reduction of hexavalent chromium in wetland sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zazo, Juan A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, 28049 (Spain)], E-mail: juan.zazo@uam.es; Paull, Jeffery S.; Jaffe, Peter R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    This work addresses the effect that plants (Typha latifolia and Carex lurida) have on the reduction of Cr(VI) in wetland sediments. Experiments were carried out using tubular microcosms, where chemical species were monitored along the longitudinal flow axis. Cr(VI) removal was enhanced by the presence of plants. This is explained by a decrease in the redox potential promoted by organic root exudates released by plants. Under these conditions sulfate reduction is enhanced, increasing the concentration of sulfide species in the sediment pore water, which reduce Cr(VI). Evapotranspiration induced by plants also contributed to enhance the reduction of Cr(VI) by concentrating all chemical species in the sediment pore water. Both exudates release and evapotranspiration have a diurnal component that affects Cr(VI) reduction. Concentration profiles were fitted to a kinetic model linking sulfide and Cr(VI) concentrations corrected for evapotranspiration. This expression captures both the longitudinal as well as the diurnal Cr(VI) concentration profiles. - The presence of plants enhances the reduction of Cr(VI) in wetland sediments by modifying the governing biogeochemical cycle.

  15. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution using polypyrrole-polyaniline nanofibers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bhaumik, M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available -emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) respectively. Adsorption experiments were carried out in batch sorption mode to investigate the effect of pH, dose of adsorbent, contact time, concentration...

  16. Dissociation of Hexavalent Chromium from Sanded Paint Particles into a Simulated Lung Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    50 Ppm N.E. 50 ppm N.C. 4.4 OF 9F .PETROLEUM NAPHTHA LT. AROMATIC 64742-95-6 6.640 100 ppm N.E. N.E. N.E. 3 0 68F 1,2,4 TRINETHYLBENZENE 95-63-6 6.870...25 ppm N.E. .9 9 77F PETROLEUM NAPHTHA LT. AROMATIC 64742-95-6 4.790 100 ppm N.E. N.E. N.E. 3, 6 60 1,2,4 TRIMETHYLBENZENE 95-63-6 4.950 25 ppm 35...Samples and Extracts for Total Metals for Analysis by FLAA or ICP Spectroscopy (Vol. Method 3010A). Friedman, G., AB, S., & CC, S. (1973). Cigarette

  17. Effect of Set Potential on Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Electricity Generation from Biocathode Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Liping

    2011-06-01

    Setting a biocathode potential at ?300 mV improved the subsequent performance of an MFC for Cr(VI) reduction compared to a control (no set potential). With this set potential, the startup time was reduced to 19 days, the reduction of Cr(VI) was improved to 19.7 mg/L d, and the maximum power density was increased to 6.4 W/m3 compared to the control (26 days, 14.0 mg/L d and 4.1 W/m3). Set potentials of ?150 mV and ?300 mV also improved system performance and led to similarly higher utilization of metabolic energy gained (PMEG) than set potentials of +200 mV and ?450 mV. We observed putative pili at ?150 and ?300 mV potentials, and aggregated precipitates on bacterial surfaces in both poised and nonpoised controls. These tests show that there are optimal potentials that can be set for developing a Cr(VI) biocathode. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Kinetic and isotherm study of hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions using calcium alginate beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ghodratollah Shams Khorramabadi

    2011-08-01

    Conclusion: It can be stated that biosorption of Cr (VI onto calcium alginate occurs through a chemical mechanism. Also, according to maximum biosorption capacity, it can be stated that calcium alginate is an effective and efficient biosorbent.

  19. Kinetics of the reduction of hexavalent chromium with the brown seaweed Ecklonia biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donghee; Yun, Yeoung-Sang; Ahn, Chi Kyu; Park, Jong Moon

    2007-01-01

    The dead biomass of the brown seaweed, Ecklonia sp., is capable of reducing toxic Cr(VI) into less toxic or nontoxic Cr(III). However, little is known about the mechanism of Cr(VI) reduction by the biomass. The objective of this work was to develop a kinetic model for Cr(VI) biosorption, for supporting our mechanism. The reduction rate of Cr(VI) increased with increasing total chromate concentration, [Cr(VI)], and equivalent concentration of organic compounds, [OCs], and decreasing solution pH. It was found that the reduction rate of Cr(VI) was proportional to [Cr(VI)] and [OCs], suggesting the simple kinetic equation -d[Cr(VI)]/dt=k[Cr(VI)][OCs]. When considering the consumption of organic compounds due to the oxidation by Cr(VI), an average rate coefficient of 9.33 (+/-0.65)microM(-1)h(-1) was determined, at pH 2. Although the function of the pH could not be expressed in a mechanistic manner, an empirical model able to describe the pH dependence was obtained. It is expected that the developed rate equation could likely be used for design and performance predictions of biosorption processes for treating chromate wastewaters.

  20. Orange peel + nanostructured zero-valent-iron composite for the removal of hexavalent chromium in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea-Mejía, O.; Cabral-Prieto, A.; Salcedo-Castillo, U.; López-Tellez, G.; Olea-Cardoso, O.; López-Castañares, R.

    2017-11-01

    In this work we used the Pulsed Plasma in Liquid technique to synthesize zero-valent iron nanostructures. We used a DC Power Source to produce such plasma on water and methanol. The obtained particles were characterized by TEM to determine their shape and size and Mossbauer Spectroscopy to investigate the chemical state of the iron present. We found that 80% of the particles produced in water are composed of metallic iron and when methanol is used 97% of the particles are metallic iron. Once the Fe colloid was formed, orange skin was impregnated with these nanostructures for the removal of in water solution. The Cr(VI) removal experiments were done in a batch system in the presence of the composites at an inicial concentration of 50 ppm of Cr(VI). When using the iron nanostructures supported on the orange peel, the percentage of removal is 100% in the case of nanostructures formed in water and 96% when obtained in methanol.

  1. Zeolite Coating System for Corrosion Control to Eliminate Hexavalent Chromium from DoD Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    18): p. 8652-8658. 16) McDonnell, A.M.P., et al., Hydrophilic and antimicrobial zeolite coatings for gravity- independent water separation. Advanced...Functional Materials, 2005. 15(2): p. 336-340. 17) Munoz, R.A., D. Beving, and Y.S. Yan, Hydrophilic zeolite coatings for improved heat transfer...et al., Durability of hydrophilic and antimicrobial zeolite coatings under water immersion. Aiche Journal, 2006. 52(3): p. 1157-1161. 24) Johnson, M

  2. Nanocrystalline celluloses-assisted preparation of hierarchical carbon monoliths for hexavalent chromium removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Haiping; Chong, Yanping; Wang, Jitong; Long, Donghui; Qiao, Wenming; Ling, Licheng

    2018-01-15

    Hierarchical porous carbon monoliths with a 3D framework were synthesized through a facile sol-gel process using resorcinol-melamine-formaldehyde (RMF) as carbon precursors, and nanocrystalline celluloses (NCCs) as the structural inducing agent, followed by ambient pressure drying and carbonization. Polymerization of the RMF resin occurs around the nanorod-like NCCs dispersed homogeneously in water, which is quite beneficial for the formation of an interconnected network and supports the rigid macroporous structure. A hierarchical porous carbon monolith with modest micropores and well-developed macropores was prepared after CO2 activation at 950°C. The microporous structure was generated from the network of RMF polymer chains, while the macroporous structure was formed from the interconnection of polymer networks induced by NCCs. The obtained carbon monolith has a large specific surface area of 1808m2g-1 and shows a high adsorption capacity of 463mgg-1 for toxic Cr(VI) ions. Moreover, the activated carbon monolith exhibits a high selectivity for Cr(VI) in the coexistence of several other metal ions. These outstanding advantages of carbon monoliths, including their micro/macroporous structures, rich functional groups, low cost and easy synthesis, endow them with potential for use in a wide range of applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hexavalent chromium removal in a tannery industry wastewater using rice husk silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sivakumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study dealt the removal of Cr(VI in a tannery industry wastewater using rice husk silica powder as an adsorbent.The experimental investigations have been carried out by using rice husk silica powder for different adsorption dosage, different contact time and different pH against the initial Cr(VI concentration of 292 mg/L. The maximum percentage removal of Cr(VI in the tannery industrial wastewater (88.3 % was found at an optimum adsorbent dosage of 15 g, contact time of 150 min., and pH of 4.  Further, the experimental data on removal of Cr(VI from tannery industry wastewater was validated with the Cr(VI aqueous solution of same initial concentration of tannery industry waster against the optimum process parameters. The results of the validation experiment showed that the experiments conducted for the removal of Cr(VI in a tannery industry wastewater may be reproducing capability for analyzing various parameters along with Cr(VI based water and industry wastewater.  The experimental data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models.  Isotherm models result indicated that the equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm than Freundlich isotherm, because of higher correlation created between dependent and independent variables. Thus, the adsorption method using rice husk silica powder was used effectively for removing Cr(VI in the tannery industrial wastewater, seems to be an economical and worthwhile alternative over other conventional methods, because of their abundant source, low price, multi-purposes and antimicrobial properties.

  4. Evaluation of sustained release polylactate electron donors for removal of hexavalent chromium from contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, E.L.; Joyner, D. C.; Faybishenko, B.; Conrad, M. E.; Rios-Velazquez, C.; Mork, B.; Willet, A.; Koenigsberg, S.; Herman, D.; Firestone, M. K.; Hazen, T. C.; Malave, Josue; Martinez, Ramon

    2011-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater at the Department of Energy Hanford site, we conducted a series of microcosm experiments using a range of commercial electron donors with varying degrees of lactate polymerization (polylactate). These experiments were conducted using Hanford Formation sediments (coarse sand and gravel) immersed in Hanford groundwater, which were amended with Cr(VI) and several types of lactate-based electron donors (Hydrogen Release Compound, HRC; primer-HRC, pHRC; extended release HRC) and the polylactate-cysteine form (Metal Remediation Compound, MRC). The results showed that polylactate compounds stimulated an increase in bacterial biomass and activity to a greater extent than sodium lactate when applied at equivalent carbon concentrations. At the same time, concentrations of headspace hydrogen and methane increased and correlated with changes in the microbial community structure. Enrichment of Pseudomonas spp. occurred with all lactate additions, and enrichment of sulfate-reducing Desulfosporosinus spp. occurred with almost complete sulfate reduction. The results of these experiments demonstrate that amendment with the pHRC and MRC forms result in effective removal of Cr(VI) from solution most likely by both direct (enzymatic) and indirect (microbially generated reductant) mechanisms.

  5. 76 FR 20349 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... the draft assessment under review. Space is limited, and reservations will be accepted on a first... held at Hilton Crystal City Hotel; 2399 Jefferson Davis Highway; Arlington, VA 22202. To attend the... wish to make comments during the workshop. Information on Services for Individuals with Disabilities...

  6. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium on modified corn stalk using different cross-linking agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Suhong; Zhu, Yi; Han, Zhijun; Feng, Gao; Jia, Yuling; Fu, Kaifang; Yue, Qinyan

    2017-12-01

    In this study, four different types of adsorbents modified from corn stalk were synthesized after the reaction with epichlorohydrin, N,N-dimethylformamide, triethylamine and different cross-linking agents. The surface functional groups and thermal stability of modified corn stalk (MCSs) were characterized using FTIR and TG analysis, respectively. The feasibility of using MCSs to remove Cr(VI) were evaluated. Adsorption isotherms were determined and modeled with Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin equations. The experimental results showed that MCS modified using diethylenetriamine (DETA) had the best modification effect, and the adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) reached as high as 227.27 mg/g at 323 K. Thermodynamic study showed that the Cr(VI) adsorption onto MCSs was endothermic processes. As a result, MCS by using DETA as cross-linking agent has good potential for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions.

  7. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium on cationic cross-linked starches of different botanic origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimaviciute, Rima; Bendoraitiene, Joana; Rutkaite, Ramune; Zemaitaitis, Algirdas

    2010-09-15

    The influence of origin of native starch used to obtain cationic cross-linked starch (CCS) on the adsorption of Cr(VI) onto CCS has been investigated. CCS granule size is influenced by the botanic source of native starch. The equilibrium adsorption of Cr(VI) onto CCS was described by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich and Temkin models. The more equal the adsorption energy of the quaternary ammonium groups in CCS granule as indicated by low value of change of Temkin adsorption energy DeltaE(T) the greater amount of Cr(VI) was adsorbed onto CCS. The value of DeltaE(T) decreased and sorption capacity of CCS increased with the decrease of CCS granule size and with the increase of number of amorphous regions in CCS granules. The affinity of dichromate anions increases and adsorption proceeds more spontaneously when Cr(VI) is adsorbed onto more amorphous CCS. Adsorption process of Cr(VI) onto such CCS is more exothermic and order of system undergoes major changes during adsorption. After the adsorption on CCS Cr(VI) could be regenerated by incineration at temperature of 800 degrees C. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of non-dissolved redox mediators on a hexavalent chromium bioreduction process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of six non-dissolved redox mediators (RM immobilized in cellulose acetate beads on enhancing Cr(VI reduction by Mangrovibacter plantisponsor CR1 were investigated. In addition, the voltammetric behaviours and electron transfer capacities of the redox mediators were examined using electrochemical methods. Compared to the control beads, the Cr(VI bioreduction rate with 1-chloroanthraquinone cellulose acetate beads (1-CAQ/CA beads was increased up to 4.5-fold, which was mainly attributed to enhanced electron transfer by 1-CAQ. The redox mediators also improved the oxidation–reduction potential values of the Cr(VI bioreduction processes, which might assist in Cr(VI bioreduction. The role of the redox mediators was discussed based on the cyclic voltammetric characteristics (E0' of the redox mediators and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy characteristics (Rct of the RM/CA beads. A linear correlation was found for the reaction constant k and the 1-CAQ concentration (C1-CAQ, which was k = 1.5674 C1-CAQ + 4.8506 (R2 = 0.9683. The Cr(VI bioreduction was affected by temperature, and the optimum pH for the Cr(VI bioreduction was 6.5. The results of repeated-batch operations showed that 1-CAQ/CA beads exhibited good stability and persistence. This study contributes to a better understanding of the effects of the redox mediator on Cr(VI bioreduction process and demonstrates its promising potential for environmental bioremediation applications.

  9. Evaluation and Demonstration of Non-Hexavalent Chromium Pretreatments and Sealers for Steel Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    public release; distribution unlimited. Common Steel Pretreatments • Zinc and Manganese - phosphate with chromate rinse • Sacrificial coatings (cad...Alternative Coatings Zinc Phosphate Sealers Gardolbond 24S Spray Gardolbond 24T Immersion Abrasive Blast PPG Cheminhib 420 MIL-P-15328 (Wash Primer... zinc , zinc alloys, Al) with chromate post treatment • Chromated wash primer DOD-P-15328 • Direct to metal (waiver process) – State of art/best practice

  10. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium Part 2: Human, Toxicokinetic, and Mechanistic Studies (Preliminary Assessment Materials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In August 2014, EPA released the second part of draft literature searches and associated search strategies, evidence tables, and exposure response arrays for Cr(VI) to obtain input from stakeholders and the public prior to developing the draft IRIS assessment. Specifically, EPA w...

  11. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium Part 1: Experimental Animal Studies (Preliminary Assessment Materials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In April 2014, EPA released the draft literature searches and associated search strategies, evidence tables, and exposure response arrays for Cr(VI) to obtain input from stakeholders and the public prior to developing the draft IRIS assessment. Specifically, EPA was interested in...

  12. Hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solution by adsorption on aluminum magnesium mixed hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujiang; Gao, Baoyu; Wu, Tao; Sun, Dejun; Li, Xia; Wang, Biao; Lu, Fengjuan

    2009-07-01

    A series of sols consisting of aluminum magnesium mixed hydroxide (AMH) nanoparticles with various Mg/Al molar ratios were prepared by coprecipitation. The use of AMH as adsorbent to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solution was investigated. Adsorption experiments were carried out as a function of the Mg/Al molar ratio, pH, contact time, concentration of Cr(VI) and temperature. It was found that AMH with Mg/Al molar ratio 3 has the largest adsorption efficiency due to the smallest average particle diameter and the highest zeta potential; AMH was particularly effective for the Cr(VI) removal in a pH range from acid to slightly alkaline, even though the most effective pH range was between 2.5 and 5.0. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on AMH reached equilibrium within 150 min. The saturated adsorption capacities of AMH for Cr(VI) were 105.3-112.0mg/g at 20-40 degrees C. The interaction between the surface sites of AMH and the Cr(VI) ions may be a combination of both anion exchange and surface complexation. The pseudo-second-order model best described the adsorption kinetics of Cr(VI) onto AMH. The results showed that AMH can be used as a new adsorbent for Cr(VI) removal which has higher adsorption capacity and faster adsorption rate at pH values close to that at which pollutants are usually found in the environment.

  13. Isolation and process parameter optimization of Brevibacterium casei for simultaneous bioremediation of hexavalent chromium and pentachlorophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Tuhina; Singh, Neha

    2013-03-01

    Chromate and pentachlorophenol are major pollutants discharged through tanneries. Three bacteria resistant to high Cr(6+) and PCP concentrations simultaneously were isolated. The TVS-3 strain was tolerant to highest 850 mg l(-1) Cr(6+) and 1000 mg l(-1) PCP concentration and concomitantly reduced 69% Cr(6+) and degraded 72% PCP within 168 h at pH 7.5, 35 ± 1°C temperature, was selected and identified as Brevibacterium casei. At 168 h of growth, bacterium showed maximum PCP utilization of 720 mg l(-1) and released 900 mg l(-1) chloride ion. The bacterium exhibited remarkable ability to significantly reduce Cr(6+) and degrade PCP in presence of other metals, between 100-120 rpm aeration and over broad pH (6.5-10.0) and temperature (30-40°C) range. Maximum 78% Cr(6+) reduction and 82% PCP degradation was observed at pH 8.0, 35 ± 1°C within 168 h of incubation, 120 rpm and initial concentration of 850 mg l(-1) Cr(6+) and 1000 mg l(-1) PCP. This is the first study reporting 78% Cr(6+) reduction and 82% PCP degradation simultaneously by single native bacteria under wide growth conditions utilizing PCP as sole carbon source. This bacterium may potentially be useful for simultaneous bioremediation of Cr(6+) and PCP containing wastes in the environment. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Formation of hexavalent chromium by reaction between slag and magnesite-chrome refractory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.; Nassaralla, C.L. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    1998-04-01

    Magnesite-chrome refractories have been used in steel, copper, and glass industries. The service life of magnesite-chrome refractory varies with the process and serverity of conditions to which it is exposed. Under normal industrial temperatures and oxidizing conditions, Cr{sup 3+}, which is present in the refractory, can oxidize to Cr{sup 6+}. Spent magnesite-chrome refractory is classified as a solid hazardous waste when it has over 5 ppm Cr{sup 6+}, because Cr{sup 6+} is solube in water and is known to be carcinogenic. Iron and steel industries are increasingly conscious of this problem due to more stringent environmental regulations. Therefore, bigger efforts have been made to recycle and reduce solid wastes. The goal of this work was to understand how Cr{sup 6+} formation is affected by the interaction between chromite phases present in magnesite-chrome refractory and different slag compositions. In addition, the formation of Cr{sup 6+} as a function of chromite particle size and cooling rate due to the chromite phase/slag interaction was investigated. The following slag compositions were studied: calcium aluminate, calcium aluminum silicate, and calcium silicate. It was found that the presence of uncombined CaO in the calcium aluminate slags is responsible for a higher yield of Cr{sup 6+}. However, the replacement of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by SiO{sub 2} in calcium aluminate slags decreases the formation of Cr{sup 6+}. SiO{sub 2} reacts with CaO to form stable 2CaO {center_dot} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {center_dot} SiO{sub 2} and CaO {center_dot} SiO{sub 2} phases, consequently decreasing the amount of uncombined CaO available to react with the chromite phase to form Cr{sup 6+}. Moreover, the content of Cr{sup 6+} is decreased by increasing chromite particle size and increasing the cooling rate of magnesite-chrome refractory.

  15. Effective Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions Using Ionic Liquid Modified Graphene Oxide Sorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nasrollahpour

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquid modified reduced graphene oxide (IL-rGO was prepared and examined for chromate removal. The sorbent was characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption measurement (BET, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis. The sorption behavior of chromate on the ionic liquid modified reduced graphene oxide sorbent from an aqueous medium was studied by varying the parameters such as contact time, initial chromate concentration, pH, and agitation speed. The results showed that sorption kinetics of chromate by IL-rGO follows the pseudo second order, which indicates that the sorption mechanism is both chemical and physical interaction. The sorption isotherm studies revealed that Langmuir model provided the best fit to all the experimental data with an adsorption capacity of 232.55 mg g–1 for IL-rGO. Thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy (–2.85 kJ mol–1 at 298 K, enthalpy (55.41 kJ mol–1, and entropy (11.64 J mol–1 K–1 of sorption of the chromate on ionic liquid modified reduced graphene oxide was evaluated, and it was found that the reaction was spontaneous and endothermic in nature.

  16. Synthesis, Characterization and Hexavalent Chromium Adsorption Characteristics of Aluminum- and Sucrose-Incorporated Tobermorite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguang Zhao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tobermorites were synthesized from the lime-quartz slurries with incorporations of aluminum and sucrose under hydrothermal conditions, and then used for adsorption of Cr(VI. The chemical components, and structural and morphological properties of tobermorite were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS and N2 adsorption–desorption measurements. The formation and crystallinity of tobermorite could be largely enhanced by adding 2.3 wt.% aluminum hydroxide or 13.3 wt.% sucrose. Sucrose also played a significantly positive role in increasing the surface area. The adsorption performances for Cr(VI were tested using a batch method taking into account the effects of pH, the adsorption kinetics, and the adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacities of the aluminum- and sucrose-incorporated tobermorites reached up to 31.65 mg/g and 28.92 mg/g, respectively. Thus, the synthesized tobermorites showed good adsorption properties for removal of Cr(VI, making this material a promising candidate for efficient bulk wastewater treatment.

  17. Effects of hexavalent chromium on development of crabs, Rhithropanopeus harrisii and Callinectes sapidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bookhout, C.G.; Monroe, R.J.; Forward, R.B. Jr.; Costlow, J.D. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Survival of Rhithropanopeus harrisii larvae from hatching to first crab stage occurred in Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ concentrations from 1.1 to 29.1 ppm. Estimated LC50 for complete zoeal development was 17.8 ppm Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ and it was 13.7 ppm for development to first crab stage. A concentration of 1.1 ppm Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ was nontoxic, while Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ concentrations of 7.2 and 14.5 ppm were sublethal and concentrations of 29.1 to 58.1 ppm were acutely toxic. Low concentrations of Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ concentrations of Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ caused an increase in swimming speed and high concentrations caused a decline. Survival of Callinectes sapidus larvae occurred in Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ concentrations from 1.1 to 4.7 ppm. The LC50 for complete zoeal development was estimated to be 2.9 ppm Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ and the LC50 for development to first crab stage was estimated to be 1.0 ppm Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/. The total Cr in sodium chromate is 32% by weight, hence, the total Cr concentrations tested were 32% of the Cr salts given above. Statistical analyses of the data on survival, duration and mortality of larvae are presented.

  18. Fleet Readiness Center - Southeast Technology Development Program (Cadmium & Hexavalent Chromium Reduction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    repair, overhaul or modification processes…”  COMFRCINST 7500.1  FRC Responsibilities  Reduced Exposure  Revision Requested Requested...Revision per 2014JX00417 Site Locations 4  FRC East  FRC Southeast  FRC Southwest  NAWC-AD HM Cleaning Requirement(s) 5  Approximately $1M...year labor/materials for HM daily cleaning at FRC Daily Break Room Cleaning Task 1: Active Usage by NSN Cr+6 6 fl) -ro ·-11..... d) ....... ro

  19. Hexavalent chromium reduction by immobilized cells of Bacillus sphaericus AND 303

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arundhati Pal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus sphaericus AND 303, a Cr(VI-resistant and reducing bacterium reported from serpentine outcrops of Andaman was evaluated for Cr(VI reduction using immobilized cells under batch culture. Screening of inert matrices for entrapment of whole cells indicated that polyvinyl alchohol-alginate was the most effective one reducing 87.5% of 20 µM Cr(VI in 24 h. The rate of chromate reduction was dependent on initial Cr(VI and biomass concentrations. The PVA cell beads were recycled three times without cell leakage and disintegration. The reduction efficiency was improved in the presence of glucose and glycerol as electron donors leading to complete reduction. However, the presence of additional metal ions was inhibitory to Cr(VI reduction. It could be emphasized that PVA-alginate immobilized cells of B. sphaericus AND 303 could be used as a continuous bioprocess in treating Cr(VI contaminated effluents.

  20. Influence of hexavalent chromium on lactate-enriched Hanford groundwater microbial communities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somenahally, Anil C [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Yuan, Tong [University of Oklahoma; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Hazen, Terry C [ORNL; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction and immobilization of chromate (Cr(VI)) is a plausible bioremediation strategy. However, higher Cr(VI) concentrations may impose stress on native Cr-reducing communities. We sought to determine if Cr(VI) would influence the lactate enriched native microbial community structure and function in groundwater from the Cr contaminated site at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were amended with lactate and Cr(VI) (0.0, 0.1 and 3.0 mg/L). Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI) concentrations, 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition in bioreactors were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and some differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) was reduced in the bioreactors. With lactate enrichment, the native communities did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. Native bacterial communities were diverse, whereas after lactate enrichment, Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., were the most predominant groups in all bioreactors. Similarly, the Archaea diversity significantly decreased from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%), Halobacteriales (12%), Methanoregula (8%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%) after lactate enrichment. Composition of several key functional genes was distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant probes (chrA), Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result the 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not appear to give chromate reducing strains a competitive advantage for proliferation or for increasing Cr-reduction.

  1. Effects of citrate on hexavalent chromium reduction by structural Fe(II) in nontronite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolei; Dong, Hailiang; Yang, Xuewei; Kovarik, Libor; Chen, Yu; Zeng, Qiang

    2018-02-05

    Previous studies have shown that organic ligands could influence Cr(VI) reduction by aqueous Fe(2+) and pyrite. In this study, the effects of citrate on Cr(VI) reduction by structural Fe(II) in nontronite (NAu-2) were investigated at pH 6. Our results showed that the presence of citrate decreased the rate but increased the amount of Cr(VI) reduction. The decreased rate was likely due to competitive sorption of citrate and anionic dichromate (Cr2O7(-)) to NAu-2 surface sites, because sorption of dichromate appeared to be the first step for subsequent Cr(VI) reduction. The increased amount of Cr(VI) reduction was likely because citrate served as an additional electron donor to reduce Cr(VI) through ligand-metal electron transfer in the presence of soluble Fe(3+), which was possibly derived from dissolution of reduced NAu-2. Soluble Cr(III)-citrate complex was a possible form of reduced Cr(VI) when citrate was present. Without citrate, nanometer-sized Cr2O3 particles were the product of Cr(VI) reduction. Our study highlights the importance of citrate on Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization when iron-rich smectite is applied to treat Cr(VI) contaminant in organic carbon rich environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Wetland Plants on the Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium in Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazo, J. A.; Paull, J.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    The effect of wetland plants (Typha latifolia and Carex lurida) on the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at relatively low initial Cr(VI) concentrations (Cr(VI) reduction was enhanced significantly by the presence of plants. This is explained by a decrease of the redox potential promoted by the root exudates released by the roots of the plants. Using these root exudates as their carbon source, and in the absence of nitrates, sulfate-reducing bacteria are able to reduce sulfate, building up the concentration of acid volatile sulfide (AVS), which in turn reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Moreover, evapotranspiration induced by plants also contributes to enhance the removal of Cr(VI) by concentrating the species in the sediment porewater and therefore affecting the reaction kinetics. The effect of diurnal cycles on the Cr(VI) reduction rate has also been also studied. The diurnal cycle influences both root exudates released by plants as well as evapotranspiration. Higher levels of dissolved organic carbon in the pore water and evapotranspiration, occurring from around noon to 3 pm, correspond to a higher sulphate reduction rate and a lower redox potential in the sediments. This promotes a higher Cr(VI) removal during the day hours. Finally the Cr(VI) reduction dynamics were fitted to a kinetic equation that depends on the AVS and Cr(VI) concentration.

  3. Influence of plants on the reduction of hexavalent chromium in wetland sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazo, Juan A; Paull, Jeffery S; Jaffe, Peter R

    2008-11-01

    This work addresses the effect that plants (Typha latifolia and Carex lurida) have on the reduction of Cr(VI) in wetland sediments. Experiments were carried out using tubular microcosms, where chemical species were monitored along the longitudinal flow axis. Cr(VI) removal was enhanced by the presence of plants. This is explained by a decrease in the redox potential promoted by organic root exudates released by plants. Under these conditions sulfate reduction is enhanced, increasing the concentration of sulfide species in the sediment pore water, which reduce Cr(VI). Evapotranspiration induced by plants also contributed to enhance the reduction of Cr(VI) by concentrating all chemical species in the sediment pore water. Both exudates release and evapotranspiration have a diurnal component that affects Cr(VI) reduction. Concentration profiles were fitted to a kinetic model linking sulfide and Cr(VI) concentrations corrected for evapotranspiration. This expression captures both the longitudinal as well as the diurnal Cr(VI) concentration profiles.

  4. Equilibrium and kinetics study on hexavalent chromium adsorption onto diethylene triamine grafted glycidyl methacrylate based copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksin, Danijela D; Nastasović, Aleksandra B; Milutinović-Nikolić, Aleksandra D; Suručić, Ljiljana T; Sandić, Zvjezdana P; Hercigonja, Radmila V; Onjia, Antonije E

    2012-03-30

    Two porous and one non-porous crosslinked poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) [abbreviated PGME] were prepared by suspension copolymerization and functionalized with diethylene triamine [abbreviated PGME-deta]. Samples were characterized by elemental analysis, mercury porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption by PGME-deta were investigated in batch static experiments, in the temperature range 25-70°C. Sorption was rapid, with the uptake capacity higher than 80% after 30 min. Sorption behavior and rate-controlling mechanisms were analyzed using five kinetic models (pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich, intraparticle diffusion and Bangham model). Kinetic studies showed that Cr(VI) adsorption adhered to the pseudo-second-order model, with definite influence of pore diffusion. Equilibrium data was tested with Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin adsorption isotherm models. Langmuir model was the most suitable indicating homogeneous distribution of active sites on PGME-deta and monolayer sorption. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir model, Q(max), at pH 1.8 and 25°C was 143 mg g(-1) for PGME2-deta (sample with the highest amino group concentration) while at 70°C Q(max) reached the high value of 198 mg g(-1). Thermodynamic parameters revealed spontaneous and endothermic nature of Cr(VI) adsorption onto PGME-deta. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Differential physiological responses of two Salvinia species to hexavalent chromium at a glance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Carolina; Chocobar Ponce, Silvana; Pagano, Eduardo; Prado, Fernando E; Rosa, Mariana

    2016-06-01

    In plants of Salvinia rotundifolia and Salvinia minima the effect of two Cr(VI) concentrations (5 and 20mgL(-1)) applied for 7days was assessed by measuring changes in biomass, photosynthetic pigments, Cr accumulation, malondialdehyde (MDA), membrane stability index (MSI), thiols (TT, NPT and PBT), and phenolics (SP and IP). Biomass in S. minima was decreased at highest Cr(VI) concentration, but there were no changes in S. rotundifolia. Metal accumulation was different in both species. S. minima accumulates more metal in fronds, but S. rotundifolia accumulates more metal in lacinias. Results also showed that S. minima translocates more Cr to fronds than S. rotundifolia, but at the whole plant level higher accumulation occurred in this last. Tolerance index (Ti) was higher in S. rotundifolia. Chl b and carotenoids were decreased only upon exposure to high Cr(VI) concentration in both species. Cr(VI) treatment did not enhance MDA accumulation. Cr exposure had no impact on MSI values when comparing with Cr-untreated values. Thiols in fronds and lacinias showed different distribution patterns between species. IP and NPT were higher in S. rotundifolia lacinias that accumulate more Cr than S. minima lacinias. Whilst SP and NPT were higher in S. minima fronds compared with S. rotundifolia ones. This may indicate that these species can cope with Cr(VI) toxicity, either through metal complexation and/or metal reduction or by the scavenging of ROS derived from Cr-induced oxidative stress. Based on Cr accumulation and biomass production, S. rotundifolia seems more suitable to remove Cr(VI) from polluted waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Chromium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is important in the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates . It stimulates fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis, which are important for brain function and other body processes. Chromium also aids in insulin action and glucose metabolism.

  7. Integrated Criteria Document Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Slooff W; Cleven RFMJ; Janus JA; van der Poel P; van Beelen P; Boumans LJM; Canton JH; Eerens HC; Krajnc EI; de Leeuw FAAM; Matthijsen AJCM; van de Meent D; van der Meulen A; Mohn GR; Wijland GC

    1990-01-01

    Betreft de engelse versie van rapport 758701001
    Bij dit rapport behoort een appendix onder hetzelfde nummer getiteld: "Integrated Criteria Document Chromium: Effects" Auteurs: Janus JA; Krajnc EI
    (appendix: see 710401002A)

  8. Occupational Exposure to Chromium of Assembly Workers in Aviation Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, G; Castiglia, L; Pieri, M; Novi, C; d'Angelo, R; Sannolo, N; Lamberti, M; Miraglia, N

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft are constructed by modules that are covered by a "primer" layer, which can often contain hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], known carcinogen to humans. While the occupational exposure to Cr(VI) during aircraft painting is ascertained, the exposure assessment of assembly workers (assemblers) requires investigations. Three biological monitoring campaigns (BM-I,II,III) were performed in an aviation industry, on homogeneous groups of assemblers (N = 43) and controls (N = 23), by measuring chromium concentrations in end-shift urine collected at the end of the working week and the chromium concentration difference between end- and before-shift urines. BM-I was conducted on full-time workers, BM-II was performed on workers after a 3-4 day absence from work, BM-III on workers using ecoprimers with lower Cr(VI) content. Samples were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy and mean values were compared by T-test. Even if Cr concentrations measured during BM-I were lower than Biological Exposure Indices by ACGIH, statistically significant differences were found between urinary Cr concentrations of workers and controls. Despite 3-4 days of absence from work, urinary chromium concentrations measured during BM-II were still higher than references from nonoccupationally exposed populations. In the BM-III campaign, the obtained preliminary results suggested the efficacy of using ecoprimers. The healthcare of workers exposed to carcinogenic agents follows the principle of limiting the exposure to "the minimum technically possible". The obtained results evidence that assemblers of aviation industries, whose task does not involve the direct use of primers containing Cr(VI), show an albeit slight occupational exposure to Cr(VI), that must be carefully taken into consideration in planning suitable prevention measures during risk assessment and management processes.

  9. Study on the DNA-protein crosslinks induced by chromium (VI) in SPC-A1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanqun; Ding, Jianjun; Lu, Xiongbing; You, Hao

    2018-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effect of chromium (VI) on DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) of SPC-A1 cells. Methods: We exposed SPC-A1 cells were cultured in 1640 medium and treated with the SPC-A1 cells in vitro to different concentrations of Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) for 2h, the KC1-SDS precipitation assay were used to measure the DNA-protein cross-linking effect. Results: All the different concentrations of Cr(VI) could cause the increase of DPC coefficient in SPC-A1 cells. But this effect was not significant (P>0.05) at low concentrations; while in high concentration Cr(VI) induced SPC-A1 cells could produce DNA-protein cross-linking effect significantly (PDNA-protein crosslink.

  10. PIXE analysis of chromium phytoaccumulation by the aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza-Quinones, F.R. [Department of Chemical Engineering - Postgraduate Program - NBQ, West Parana State University, Rua da Faculdade, 645, Jardim Santa Maria, 85903-000 Toledo, Parana (Brazil)], E-mail: f.espinoza@terra.com.br; Rizzutto, M.A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M.H. [Physics Institute, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao s/n, Travessa R 187, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Modenes, A.N.; Palacio, S.M.; Silva, E.A.; Rossi, F.L.; Martin, N.; Szymanski, N. [Department of Chemical Engineering - Postgraduate Program - NBQ, West Parana State University, Rua da Faculdade, 645, Jardim Santa Maria, 85903-000 Toledo, Parana (Brazil)

    2009-04-15

    The uptake of hexavalent chromium in free living floating aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes cultivated in non-toxic chromium-doped hydroponic solutions is presented. A Cr-uptake bioaccumulation experiment was carried out using healthy macrophytes grown in a temperature controlled greenhouse. Six samples of nutrient media and plants were collected during the 23 day experiment. Roots and leaves were acid digested with the addition of an internal Gallium standard, for thin film sample preparation and quantitative Cr analysis by PIXE method. The Cr{sup 6+} mass uptake by the macrophytes reached up to 70% of the initial concentration, comparable to former results and literature data. The Cr-uptake data were described using a non-structural first order kinetic model. Due to low cost and high removal efficiency, living aquatic macrophytes E. crassipes are a viable biosorbent in an artificial wetland of a water effluent treatment plant.

  11. PIXE analysis of chromium phytoaccumulation by the aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Quiñones, F. R.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.; Módenes, A. N.; Palácio, S. M.; Silva, E. A.; Rossi, F. L.; Martin, N.; Szymanski, N.

    2009-04-01

    The uptake of hexavalent chromium in free living floating aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes cultivated in non-toxic chromium-doped hydroponic solutions is presented. A Cr-uptake bioaccumulation experiment was carried out using healthy macrophytes grown in a temperature controlled greenhouse. Six samples of nutrient media and plants were collected during the 23 day experiment. Roots and leaves were acid digested with the addition of an internal Gallium standard, for thin film sample preparation and quantitative Cr analysis by PIXE method. The Cr 6+ mass uptake by the macrophytes reached up to 70% of the initial concentration, comparable to former results and literature data. The Cr-uptake data were described using a non-structural first order kinetic model. Due to low cost and high removal efficiency, living aquatic macrophytes E. crassipes are a viable biosorbent in an artificial wetland of a water effluent treatment plant.

  12. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Stefanie; Lütz, Cornelius; Michalke, Bernhard; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 μM Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron–oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  13. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volland, Stefanie, E-mail: Stefanie.Volland@stud.sbg.ac.at [Plant Physiology Division, Cell Biology Department, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Luetz, Cornelius, E-mail: cornelius.luetz@uibk.ac.at [Institute of Botany, University of Innsbruck, Sternwartestrasse 15, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Michalke, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.michalke@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Luetz-Meindl, Ursula, E-mail: ursula.luetz-meindl@sbg.ac.at [Plant Physiology Division, Cell Biology Department, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-03-15

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 {mu}M Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron-oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  14. Microstructural characterisation of chromium slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Burja

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this chromium slags that form during melting of chromium alloyed steels are examined. During melting and oxidation of these steel grades a considerable amount of chromium is lost, and gained back with slag reduction. Laboratory experiments were performed to study the mechanism of chromium oxide reduction by silicon. Slags chemistry and phase composition have a strong effect on the steelmaking process. Phase analysis revealed two types of chromium oxides, calcium chromites and chromite spinels dependent on chemistry and basicity of the slag.

  15. Biosorption of chromium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kathiresan

    metal accumulation in the biomass was determined by using an inductively coupled plasma system. (ICP- Optical ... processing time with 30 batch experimental plan derived from the centre composite design (CCD) of .... Central composite design matrix for the experimental design and predicted responses for chromium.

  16. Chromium and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is associated with increased blood glucose, insulin, blood lipids, and fat mass, and decreased lean body mass leading to increased incidences of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Improved chromium nutrition is associated with improvements in all of these variables. Insulin sensitivity de...

  17. Adhesion and differentiation of Saos-2 osteoblast-like cells on chromium-doped diamond-like carbon coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filová, Elena; Vandrovcová, Marta; Jelínek, Miroslav; Zemek, Josef; Houdková, Jana; Remsa, Jan; Kocourek, Tomáš; Staňková, Ľubica; Bačáková, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 17. ISSN 0957-4530 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-05864S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-04790S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : osteocalcin * osteogenic differentiation * hexavalent chromium * focal adhesion contact * cell spreading area Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.325, year: 2016

  18. Assessment of biological chromium among stainless steel and mild steel welders in relation to welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmé, J L; Shirali, P; Mereau, M; Sobaszek, A; Boulenguez, C; Diebold, F; Haguenoer, J M

    1997-01-01

    Air and biological monitoring were used for assessing external and internal chromium exposure among 116 stainless steel welders (SS welders) using manual metal arc (MMA), metal inert gas (MIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes (MMA: n = 57; MIG: n = 37; TIG: n = 22) and 30 mild steel welders (MS welders) using MMA and MIG welding processes (MMA: n = 14; MIG: n = 16). The levels of atmospheric total chromium were evaluated after personal air monitoring. The mean values for the different groups of SS welders were 201 micrograms/m3 (MMA) and 185 micrograms/m3 (MIG), 52 micrograms/m3 (TIG) and for MS welders 8.1 micrograms/m3 (MMA) and 7.3 micrograms/m3 (MIG). The curve of cumulative frequency distribution from biological monitoring among SS welders showed chromium geometric mean concentrations in whole blood of 3.6 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 19.9), in plasma of 3.3 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 21.0) and in urine samples of 6.2 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 58.0). Among MS welders, mean values in whole blood and plasma were rather more scattered (1.8 micrograms/l, 95th percentile = 9.3 and 1.3 micrograms/l, 95th percentile = 8.4, respectively) and in urine the value was 2.4 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 13.3). The analysis of variance of chromium concentrations in plasma previously showed a metal effect (F = 29.7, P welding process. MMA-SS is definitely different from other processes because the biological values are clearly higher. These higher levels are due to the very significant concentrations of total soluble chromium, mainly hexavalent chromium, in welding fumes.

  19. Allergy-Inducing Chromium Compounds Trigger Potent Innate Immune Stimulation Via ROS-Dependent Inflammasome Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Christian; Wohlfarth, Jonas; Haußmann, Maike; Sennefelder, Helga; Rodin, Annette; Maler, Mareike; Martin, Stefan F; Goebeler, Matthias; Schmidt, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Chromium allergy is a common occupational skin disease mediated by chromium (VI)-specific T cells that induce delayed-type hypersensitivity in sensitized individuals. Additionally, chromium (VI) can act as an irritant. Both responses critically require innate immune activation, but if and how chromium (VI) elicits this signal is currently unclear. Using human monocytes, primary human keratinocytes, and murine dendritic cells we show that chromium (VI) compounds fail to trigger direct proinflammatory activation but potently induce processing and secretion of IL-1β. IL-1β release required priming by phorbol-ester or toll-like receptor stimulation and was prevented by inhibition of K+ efflux, NLRP3 depletion or caspase-1 inhibition, identifying chromium (VI) as a hapten activator of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Inflammasome activation was initiated by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production triggered by chromium (VI), as indicated by sensitivity to treatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine and a coinciding failure of K+ efflux, caspase-1, or NLRP3 inhibition to prevent mitochondrial reactive oxygen species accumulation. IL-1β release further correlated with cytotoxicity that was secondary to reactive oxygen species, K+ efflux, and NLRP3 activation. Trivalent chromium was unable to induce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, inflammasome activation, and cytotoxicity, suggesting that oxidation state-specific differences in mitochondrial reactivity may determine inflammasome activation and allergic/irritant capacity of different chromium compounds. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Interaction of chromium(III) or chromium(VI) with catalase and its effect on the structure and function of catalase: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linfeng; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Yaxian; Zhang, Yong

    2018-04-01

    Heavy metal chromium (Cr) poses a severe health risk to humans via food chain contamination. In this study, the interactions of either trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) or hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) with catalase (CAT) were investigated via multi-spectroscopic studies and computational simulations. The fluorescence analysis showed that Cr(III) and Cr(VI) quenched the fluorescence of CAT through a dynamic and a static quenching mechanism, respectively. The binding constant of Cr(VI) with CAT was 3.44×10(4)lmol(-1) at 298K. Other detailed binding characterizations of the Cr(VI)-CAT complex were also obtained using spectra analysis and molecular docking. Synchronous fluorescence, UV-vis and circular dichroism (CD) spectral studies showed that either Cr(III) or Cr(VI) induced conformational changes of CAT, but the degree of influence was different. The response of CAT activity to Cr(III) or Cr(VI) was found to be variable depending on their valence states and concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hair chromium concentration and chromium excretion in tannery workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saner, G; Yüzbasiyan, V; Cigdem, S

    1984-01-01

    Hair and urine samples were collected from 34 male tannery workers and from 12 normal adults. Eighteen of the workers dealt directly with chromium and the remaining 16 (controls) worked in the offices and kitchen of the same factory. All were found to be clinically healthy. Chromium was determined by flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy. When compared with normal adult values, urinary chromium concentration, Cr/Creatinine ratio, daily chromium excretion, and hair chromium, concentrations were significantly higher and urinary beta 2-microglobulin/Cre ratios significantly lower in both tannery workers and in controls. A significant negative correlation was found between urinary beta 2-microglobulin/Cre and Cr/Cre ratios of tannery workers and controls. A significant positive correlation was shown between hair chromium and urinary Cr/Cre values in all workers. No correlations between the duration of exposure to chromium and hair and urinary chromium values were found. Nevertheless, high values observed in workers with short exposures show that chromium is readily absorbed through the respiratory system. PMID:6372853

  2. Chromium uptake by Fenugreek

    OpenAIRE

    Xanthate D S; Murthy Ch V R; Rajan S C S; Sekhar D M R

    2012-01-01

    Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum- graecum) is both herb (leaves) and a spice (seed) belonging to the family Fabaceae. Fenugreek leaves and seeds are used in the cuisine of India. Fenugreek also has medicinal value. Fenugreek seeds are known to reduce serum glucose and improve glucose tolerance and hence are prescribed to diabetic patients. In the recent past supplemental Chromium is being prescribed to diabetic patients to activate (increased- insulin binding, insulin receptor number, insulin rec...

  3. Removal of toxic chromium from aqueous solution, wastewater and saline water by marine red alga Pterocladia capillacea and its activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed El Nemr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pterocladia capillacea, a red marine macroalgae, was tested for its ability to remove toxic hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. A new activated carbon obtained from P. capillacea via acid dehydration was also investigated as an adsorbent for toxic chromium. The experiments were conducted to study the effect of important parameters such as pH, chromium concentration and adsorbent weight. Batch equilibrium tests at different pH conditions showed that at pH 1.0, a maximum chromium uptake was observed for both inactivated dried red alga P. capillacea and its activated carbon. The maximum sorption capacities for dried red alga and its activated carbon were about 12 and 66 mgg−1, respectively, as calculated by Langmuir model. The ability of inactivated red alga P. capillacea and developed activated carbon to remove chromium from synthetic sea water, natural sea water and wastewater was investigated as well. Different isotherm models were used to analyze the experimental data and the models parameters were evaluated. This study showed that the activated carbon developed from red alga P. capillacea is a promising activated carbon for removal of toxic chromium.

  4. Chromium mobility in freshwater wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattuck, Rosemary; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos P.

    1996-07-01

    A wetland at a chromium-contaminated electroplating site was studied to determine its ability to immobilize subsurface chromium contamination. First, a site characterization was conducted to determine the lateral and vertical extent of chromium contamination in the sediment and pore water. The wetland was found to be highly contaminated, with sediment concentrations of up to 50,000 μg g -1. Chromium was partitioned largely on the sediment, with Kd's up to 317,000 mL g -1. No Cr(VI) was detected in the pore water. Sequential chemical extractions performed on the sediment found 60-90% of the chromium bound in the {Fe}/{Mn}- oxide and residual fractions of the soil, with very little exchangeable or organic-bound chromium present. These results indicate that the chromium is very tightly bound to the sediment. XPS determined a very low {Cr}/{Si} ratio on the solid surface. Batch leaching experiments using the contaminated sediment were conducted at pH 3, 4, and 5. Leaching of chromium from the sediment increased with lower pH, ranging from 0.02% to 0.34% of the total, and appeared to be solubility controlled. Results indicate that the wetland has been highly effective in immobilizing Cr, by reducing the Cr(VI) and precipitating it as a relatively insoluble Cr(III)-hydroxide.

  5. THE CONSEQUENCES ON BLOOD GSH DYNAMICS ON WISTAR FEMALE RATS AT AD LIBITUM CHROMIUM (VI ADMINISTRATION DURING THE GESTATION AFTER THE WEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CORINA GRĂVILĂ

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromium (VI is a widely used industrial chemical, extensively used in paints, metal finishes, steel including stainless steel manufacturing, alloy cast irons, chrome, and wood treatment. In nature chromium occurs in divalent, trivalent and hexavalent forms. Hexavalent chromium predominates over the trivalent form in natural waters. We have studied the influence of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7 on blood GSH values in rats. This study was carried out on 28 Wistar adult female rats, divided in 3 experimental groups (E and one control group (C. The rats were feed with 25ppm (LOAEL, 50ppm and 75ppm potassium dichromate, ad libitum, in drinking water, during the gestation. The control batch received tap water. Reduced glutathione (GSH was measured quantitatively after the wean using a Perkin-Elmer spectrophotometer, through Beutler et al. method, at 412nm. This study reports that potassium dichromate exposure induced the depletion of blood GSH because Cr(VI can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS. It can induce oxidative stress and toxicity.

  6. Attenuation of Chromium toxicity in mine waste water using water hyacinth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanty M.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The mine waste water at South Kaliapani chromite mining area of Orissa (India showed high levels of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr+6. Cr+6 contaminated mine waste water poses potential threats for biotic community in the vicinity. The current field based phytoremediation study is an in situ approach for attenuation of Cr+6 from mine waste water using water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes weeds by rhizofiltration method. The weeds significantly reduced (up to 54% toxic concentrations of Cr+6 from contaminated mine waste water when passed through succeeding water hyacinth ponds. The reduction of toxic chromium level varied with the plant age and passage distance of waste water. Chromium phytoaccumulation and Bio-Concentration Factor (BCF was maximum at growing stage of plant i.e. 75 days old plant. High BCF (10,924 and Transportation Index (32.09 for water hyacinth indicated that the weeds can be used as a tool of phytoremediation to combat the problem of in situ Cr contamination in mining areas.

  7. Determination of chromium (VI) in primary and secondary fertilizer and their respective precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Oliver; Fiedler, Francesca; Adam, Christian; Vogel, Christian; Senz, Rainer

    2017-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium species (Cr(VI)) are often carcinogenic, of high acute toxicity, highly mobile, and thus pose a severe risk to health and environment. Fertilizers usually contain significant amounts of chromium. Therefore, a reliable analysis of chromium and the fraction of Cr(VI) are crucial for safe use of fertilizers. This problem is expected to increase in the future, since more and more recycled fertilizers emerge due to increasing fertilizer demand and respective supply risks. However, existing analytical methods have been developed for conventional fertilizers and have to be tested whether they are suitable for the new materials. Thus, we performed a wet-chemical extraction for Cr(VI) on several matrices as well as respective quality control experiments including spiking with Cr(III) and Cr(VI) compounds. We found the Cr(VI) amounts to be below 2 mg/kg except for a thermally post-treated sewage sludge ash (SSA) that showed 12.3 mg/kg. The presence of organic matter e.g. in sludge or precipitated struvite caused a reduction of spiked Cr(VI) and thus no satisfying recovery for quality control. Cr(VI) reduction was also observed for SSA, presumably due to the presence of Fe(II) compounds. Even though the tested procedure can be hampered in some recycled fertilizer matrices, it might be adapted to be applicable also for these complex samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biosorption of chromium (VI) onto NaOH activated Codium tomentosum biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Suresh Babu; Balaiah, Anandaraj

    2015-11-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to examine the efficacy of NaOH activated Codium tomentosum biomass on the sorption of hexavalent chromium. Several influencing parameters like pH, contact time, dosage and initial chromium(VI) concentration was experimented at 20°C. The monolayer sorption capacity was found to be 5.504 ± 0.360 mg g(-1). Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm implied favorable condition of chromium(VI) biosorption, based on R2 values. Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm showed the best fit linearity and infered that adsorption energy as 4.888 ± 0.129 kJ mol(-1). Pseudo-second order kinetics showed good compliance for the entire data and the rate constant (k2) was found to be 0.0398 ± 0.007 g mg(-1) min. Elovich kinetics exhibited that adsorption occurs on heterogeneous surface. Intraparticle diffusion model specified multi-linearity in adsorption process. Hence, the employed biosorbent was sensible and sorption efficiency was remarkable.

  9. Measuring cytotoxicity by bioluminescence imaging outperforms the standard chromium-51 release assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mobin A; Lee, Eric; Bachmann, Michael H; Salicioni, Ana Maria; Behrens, Edward M; Kambayashi, Taku; Baldwin, Cynthia L

    2014-01-01

    The chromium-release assay developed in 1968 is still the most commonly used method to measure cytotoxicity by T cells and by natural killer cells. Target cells are loaded in vitro with radioactive chromium and lysis is determined by measuring chromium in the supernatant released by dying cells. Since then, alternative methods have been developed using different markers of target cell viability that do not involve radioactivity. Here, we compared and contrasted a bioluminescence (BLI)-based cytotoxicity assay to the standard radioactive chromium-release assay using an identical set of effector cells and tumor target cells. For this, we stably transduced several human and murine tumor cell lines to express luciferase. When co-cultured with cytotoxic effector cells, highly reproducible decreases in BLI were seen in an effector to target cell dose-dependent manner. When compared to results obtained from the chromium release assay, the performance of the BLI-based assay was superior, because of its robustness, increased signal-to-noise ratio, and faster kinetics. The reduced/delayed detection of cytotoxicity by the chromium release method was attributable to the association of chromium with structural components of the cell, which are released quickly by detergent solubilization but not by hypotonic lysis. We conclude that the (BLI)-based measurement of cytotoxicity offers a superior non-radioactive alternative to the chromium-release assay that is more robust and quicker to perform.

  10. Role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, M

    1994-01-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are known to be potent toxic and carcinogenic agents. Because chromium(VI) is easily taken up by cells and is subsequently reduced to chromium(III), the formation of paramagnetic chromium such as chromium(V) and chromium(III) is believed to play a role in the adverse biological effects of chromium(VI) compounds. The present report, uses electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy; the importance of the role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in intac...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1926.1126 Section 1926.1126 Labor... Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI) in all forms... objective data demonstrating that a material containing chromium or a specific process, operation, or...

  12. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1915.1026 Section 1915.1026 Labor... § 1915.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI... cement; or (4) Where the employer has objective data demonstrating that a material containing chromium or...

  13. Chitosan supramolecularly cross linked with trimesic acid - Facile synthesis, characterization and evaluation of adsorption potential for chromium(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ronak; Sreedhar, B; Padmaja, P

    2017-11-01

    A facile synthesis of Chitosan Supramolecularly cross-linked with Trimesic Acid (CTMA) is reported in this work. The adsorption potential of CTMA for removal of hexavalent chromium was evaluated and the influence of pH, temperature, contact time and adsorbent dose on the adsorption process was investigated. The experimental results showed that CTMA could efficiently adsorb Cr(6+) and partially reduce it to the less toxic Cr(3+) state. The maximum adsorption capacity of CTMA for Cr(6+) was found to be 129.53mg/g at pH 2.0. CTMA and chromium loaded CTMA were characterised by FT-IR, Raman, TGA-DSC, SEM-EDX, XRD, ESR and XPS spectroscopic techniques. Chitosan was observed to be cross- linked with TMA via ionic, hydrogen bonding and pi-pi supramolecular interactions while adsorption of chromium onto CTMA was by electrostatic forces and hydrogen bonding. From the observed results it was evident that CTMA was successfully applied for simultaneous removal of chromium, lead and iron from chrome plating effluent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Study of reduction of chromium (VI by calcium polysulfide using spectrophotometric method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batukhan Tatykaev

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents  the results of the study on reduction  of  Cr2O72-   to   Cr3 +  by aqueous solution of calcium polysulfide  using spectrophotometric method. Concentrations  of Cr (VI were determined on the basis of the absorption spectrum at the wavelength range 350 - 372 nm. The change of the concentration of Cr (VI during on reduction by calcium polysulfide has been shown.  The influence of pH on the rate of reducing of Cr (VI to Cr (III was considered: the rate of reducing of hexavalent chromium decreases with increasing pH. The data obtained show that recycling Cr (VI in industrial scale potentially effective at  the pH = 5.

  15. Release of Chromium from Orthopaedic Arthroplasties

    OpenAIRE

    Afolaranmi, G.A.; Tettey, J; Meek, R. M. D; Grant, M. H.

    2008-01-01

    Many orthopaedic implants are composed of alloys containing chromium. Of particular relevance is the increasing number of Cobalt Chromium bearing arthroplasies being inserted into young patients with osteoarthritis. Such implants will release chromium ions. These patients will be exposed to the released chromium for over 50 years in some cases. The subsequent chromium ion metabolism and redistribution in fluid and tissue compartments is complex. In addition, the potential biological effects o...

  16. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes are a useful tracer of changes in redox conditions because changes in its oxidation state are accompanied by an isotopic fractionation. For this reason the Cr isotope system is being developed as a potential tool for paleo-redox reconstruction. Dissolved Cr in seawater...... is incorporated into carbonates. Hence, ancient carbonates can potentially record the Cr isotopic composition (δ53Cr ‰) of seawater in the geological past. Reliable application and interpretation of this proxy requires a detailed knowledge about processes that fractionate Cr on the Earth’s surface......, and the quantification the Cr isotope composition of major Cr fluxes into and out of ocean. This thesis adds to the current knowledge of the Cr isotope system and is divided into two studies. The focus of the first study was to determine what processes control the Cr isotopic compositionof river water and to quantify...

  17. Hexavalent Americium Recovery Using Copper(III) Periodate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Kevin; Brigham, Derek M; Morrison, Samuel; Braley, Jenifer C

    2016-11-21

    Separation of americium from the lanthanides is considered one of the most difficult separation steps in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. One approach to this separation could involve oxidizing americium to the hexavalent state to form a linear dioxo cation while the lanthanides remain as trivalent ions. This work considers aqueous soluble Cu 3+ periodate as an oxidant under molar nitric acid conditions to separate hexavalent Am with diamyl amylphosphonate (DAAP) in n-dodecane. Initial studies assessed the kinetics of Cu 3+ periodate autoreduction in acidic media to aid in development of the solvent extraction system. Following characterization of the Cu 3+ periodate oxidant, solvent extraction studies optimized the recovery of Am from varied nitric acid media and in the presence of other fission product, or fission product surrogate, species. Short aqueous/organic contact times encouraged successful recovery of Am (distribution values as high as 2) from nitric acid media in the absence of redox active fission products. In the presence of a post-plutonium uranium redox extraction (post-PUREX) simulant aqueous feed, precipitation of tetravalent species (Ce, Ru, Zr) occurred and the distribution values of 241 Am were suppressed, suggesting some oxidizing capacity of the Cu 3+ periodate is significantly consumed by other redox active metals in the simulant. The manuscript demonstrates Cu 3+ periodate as a potentially viable oxidant for Am oxidation and recovery and notes the consumption of oxidizing capacity observed in the presence of the post-PUREX simulant feed will need to be addressed for any approach seeking to oxidize Am for separations relevant to the nuclear fuel cycle.

  18. TREATABILITY TEST REPORT FOR THE REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM GROUNDWATER AT 100-D AREA USING ELECTROCOAGULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-09-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to accelerate cleanup of contaminated groundwater along the Columbia River. The current treatment approach was driven by a series of Interim Action Records of Decision (IAROD) issued in the mid-1990s. Part of the approach for acceleration involves increasing the rate of groundwater extraction for the chromium plume north of the 100-D Reactor and injecting the treated water in strategic locations to hydraulically direct contaminated groundwater toward the extraction wells. The current treatment system uses ion exchange for Cr(VI) removal, with off-site regeneration of the ion exchange resins. Higher flow rates will increase the cost and frequency of ion exchange resin regeneration; therefore, alternative technologies are being considered for treatment at high flow rates. One of these technologies, electrocoagulation (EC), was evaluated through a pilot-scale treatability test. The primary purpose of the treatability study was to determine the effectiveness of Cr(VI) removal and the robustness/implementability of an EC system. Secondary purposes of the study were to gather information about derivative wastes and to obtain data applicable to scaling the process from the treatability scale to full-scale. The treatability study work plan identified a performance objective and four operational objectives. The performance objective for the treatability study was to determine the efficiency (effectiveness) of hexavalent chromium removal from the groundwater, with a desired concentration of {le} 20 micrograms per liter ({micro}g/L) Cr(VI) in the effluent prior to re-injection. Influent and effluent total chromium and hexavalent chromium data were collected using a field test kit for multiple samples per week, and from off-site laboratory analysis of samples collected approximately monthly. These data met all data quality requirements. Two of three effluent chromium samples analyzed in the off-site (that is, fixed) laboratory

  19. Hexavalent IPV-based combination vaccines for public-sector markets of low-resource countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Kutub; Pelkowski, Sonia; Atherly, Deborah; Sitrin, Robert D; Donnelly, John J

    2013-09-01

    In anticipation of the successful eradication of wild polio virus, alternative vaccination strategies for public-sector markets of low-resource countries are extremely important, but are still under development. Following polio eradication, inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) would be the only polio vaccine available, and would be needed for early childhood immunization for several years, as maintenance of herd immunity will be important for sustaining polio eradication. Low-cost combination vaccines containing IPV could provide reliable and continuous immunization in the post-polio eradication period. Combination vaccines can potentially simplify complex pediatric routine immunization schedules, improve compliance, and reduce costs. Hexavalent vaccines containing Diphtheria (D), Tetanus (T), whole cell pertussis (wP), Hepatitis B (HBV), Haemophilus b (Hib) and the three IPV serotype antigens have been considered as the ultimate combination vaccine for routine immunization. This product review evaluates potential hexavalent vaccine candidates by composition, probable time to market, expected cost of goods, presentation, and technical feasibility and offers suggestions for development of low-cost hexavalent combination vaccines. Because there are significant technical challenges facing wP-based hexavalent vaccine development, this review also discusses other alternative approaches to hexavalent that could also ensure a timely and reliable supply of low-cost IPV based combination vaccines.

  20. Branch bark of holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) for reconstructing the temporal variations of atmospheric deposition of hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drava, Giuliana; Anselmo, Marco; Brignole, Daniele; Giordani, Paolo; Minganti, Vincenzo

    2017-03-01

    The bark from the annual segments of the branches of holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) is exposed to trace element deposition for a known period of time and thus it is a possible candidate as a bioindicator for reconstructing historical changes in pollution. A series of samples were analysed for Cr(VI) concentration by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) after selective extraction in a sodium carbonate solution. In this way the atmospheric deposition of Cr(VI) was reconstructed from 2001 to 2010 in an area where an industrial plant produced Cr(VI) compounds until 2003. The present study shows the potential of this type of sample as a natural archive for persistent pollutants, useful for monitoring changes that occur before a monitoring programme is established, with the advantage of being easy to collect almost everywhere. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Soil retention of hexavalent chromium released from construction and demolition waste in a road-base-application scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Stefania; Trapp, Stefan; Astrup, Thomas F; Christensen, Thomas H

    2015-11-15

    We investigated the retention of Cr(VI) in three subsoils with low organic matter content in laboratory experiments at concentration levels relevant to represent leachates from construction and demolition waste (C&DW) reused as unbound material in road construction. The retention mechanism appeared to be reduction and subsequent precipitation as Cr(III) on the soil. The reduction process was slow and in several experiments it was still proceeding at the end of the six-month experimental period. The overall retention reaction fit well with a second-order reaction governed by actual Cr(VI) concentration and reduction capacity of the soil. The experimentally determined reduction capacities and second-order kinetic parameters were used to model, for a 100-year period, the one-dimensional migration of Cr(VI) in the subsoil under a layer of C&DW. The resulting Cr(VI) concentration would be negligible below 7-70 cm depth. However, in rigid climates and with high water infiltration through the road pavement, the reduction reaction could be so slow that Cr(VI) might migrate as deep as 200 cm under the road. The reaction parameters and the model can form the basis for systematically assessing under which scenarios Cr(VI) from C&DW could lead to an environmental issue for ground- and receiving surface waters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Hexavalent chromium bioreduction and chemical precipitation of sulphate as a treatment of site-specific fly ash leachates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Errol D; Williams, Peter J; Ojo, Elizabeth; Castillo, Julio; DeFlaun, Mary F; van Heerden, Esta

    2017-05-01

    Most of the power generation globally is by coal-fired power plants resulting in large stockpiles of fly ash. The trace elements associated with the ash particles are subjected to the leaching effects of precipitation which may lead to the subsequent contamination of surface and groundwater systems. In this study, we successfully demonstrate an efficient and sustainable dual treatment remediation strategy for the removal of high levels of Cr 6+ and SO 4 2- introduced by fly ash leachate generated by a power station situation in Mpumalanga, South Africa. The treatment consisted of a primary fixed-bed bioreactor kept at a reduction potential for Cr 6+ reduction. Metagenome sequencing clearly indicated a diverse bacterial community containing various bacteria, predominantly of the phylum Proteobacteria which includes numerous species known for their ability to detoxify metals such as Cr 6+ . This was followed by a secondary BaCO 3 /dispersed alkaline substrate column for SO 4 2- removal. The combination of these two systems resulted in the removal of 99% Cr 6+ and 90% SO 4 2- . This is the first effective demonstration of an integrated system combining a biological and chemical strategy for the remediation of multi-contaminants present in fly ash leachate in South Africa.

  3. Development of analytical procedures for the determination of hexavalent chromium in corrosion prevention coatings used in the automotive industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séby, F; Castetbon, A; Ortega, R; Guimon, C; Niveau, F; Barrois-Oudin, N; Garraud, H; Donard, O F X

    2008-05-01

    The European directive 2000/53/EC limits the use of Cr(VI) in vehicle manufacturing. Although a maximum of 2 g of Cr(VI) was authorised per vehicle for corrosion prevention coatings of key components, since July 2007 its use has been prohibited except for some particular applications. Therefore, the objective of this work was to develop direct analytical procedures for Cr(VI) determination in the different steel coatings used for screws. Instead of working directly with screws, the optimisation of the procedures was carried out with metallic plates homogeneously coated to improve the data comparability. Extraction of Cr(VI) from the metallic parts was performed by sonication. Two extraction solutions were tested: a direct water extraction solution used in standard protocols and an ammonium/ammonia buffer solution at pH 8.9. The extracts were further analysed for Cr speciation by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic emission spectrometry or HPLC ICP mass spectrometry depending on the concentration level. When possible, the coatings were also directly analysed by solid speciation techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure, XANES) for validation of the results. Very good results between the different analytical approaches were obtained for the sample of coating made up of a heated paint containing Zn, Al and Cr when using the extracting buffer solution at pH 8.9. After a repeated four-step extraction procedure on the same portion test, taking into account the depth of the surface layer reached, good agreement with XPS and XANES results was obtained. In contrast, for the coatings composed of an alkaline Zn layer where Cr(VI) and Cr(III) are deposited, only the extraction procedure using water allowed the detection of Cr(VI). To elucidate the Cr(VI) reduction during extraction at pH 8.9, the reactivity of Cr(VI) towards different species of Zn generally present in the coatings (metallic Zn and zinc oxide) was studied. The results showed that metallic Zn rapidly reduces Cr(VI), whereas this reaction is less evident in the presence of zinc oxide. Water was then retained for coatings containing metallic Zn.

  4. LONG-TERM GEOCHEMICAL BEHAVIOR OF A ZEROVALENT IRON PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN GROUNDWATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passive, in-situ reactive barriers have proven to be viable, cost-effective systems for the remediation of Cr-contaminated groundwater at some sites. Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are installed in the flow-path of groundwater, most typically as vertical treatment walls. Re...

  5. Rapid and efficient photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium by using “water dispersible” TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei; Kang, Shi-Zhao, E-mail: kangsz@sit.edu.cn; Li, Xiangqing; Qin, Lixia; Yan, Hao; Mu, Jin, E-mail: mujin@sit.edu.cn

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, “water dispersible” TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were prepared, and meanwhile, their photocatalytic activity was systematically tested for the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) ions. It is found that the as-prepared “water dispersible” TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are a highly efficient photocatalyst for the reduction of Cr(VI) ions in water under UV irradiation, and suitable for the remediation of Cr(VI) ions wastewater with low concentration. Compared with commercial TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (P25), the “water dispersible” TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibit 3.8-fold higher photocatalytic activity. 100% Cr (VI) ions can be reduced into Cr(III) ions within 10 min when the Cr (VI) ions initial concentration is 10 mg L{sup −1}. Moreover, the electrical energy consumption can be obviously decreased using the “water dispersible” TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. These results suggest that the “water dispersible” TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are a promising photocatalyst for rapid removal of Cr (VI) in environmental therapy. - Highlights: • “Water dispersible” TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with high photocatalytic activity. • 100% Cr (VI) (10 mg L{sup −1}) can be reduced within 10 min. • Obvious decrease of electrical energy consumption.

  6. Electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotube on reticulated vitreous carbon for hexavalent chromium removal in a biocathode microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Kangqing; Song, Tian-shun; Wang, Haoqi; Zhang, Dalu; Tao, Ran; Xie, Jingjing

    2017-10-01

    For Cr(VI)-removal microbial fuel cell (MFC), a more efficient biocathode in MFCs is required to improve the Cr(VI) removal and electricity generation. RVC-CNT electrode was prepared through the electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotube (CNT) on reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC). The power density of MFC with an RVC-CNT electrode increased to 132.1 ± 2.8 mW m-2, and 80.9% removal of Cr(VI) was achieved within 48 h; compared to only 44.5% removal of Cr(VI) in unmodified RVC. Cyclic voltammetry, energy-dispersive spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry showed that the RVC-CNT electrode enhanced the electrical conductivity and the electron transfer rate; and provided more reaction sites for Cr(VI) reduction. This approach provides process simplicity and a thickness control method for fabricating three-dimensional biocathodes to improve the performance of MFCs for Cr(VI) removal.

  7. Hexavalent chromium in ambient air in the Netherlands. Results of measurements near wood preservation plants and at a regional site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mennen MG; Koot W; van Putten EM; Ritsema R; Piso S; Knol-de Vos T; Fortezza F; Kliest JJG; LLO; LAC; IEM

    1998-01-01

    Concentraties van Cr(VI) in buitenlucht zijn gemeten door lucht te bemonsteren met vier parallelle impinger-denuder systemen. De impingers bevatten een alkalische bufferoplossing om Cr(VI) af te vangen. Na monstername werd Cr(VI) in de oplossingen bepaald met grafietoven atoom absorptie

  8. Modulation of hexavalent chromium toxicity on Οriganum vulgare in an acidic soil amended with peat, lime, and zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, Vasileios; Zanni, Anna A; Levizou, Efi; Shaheen, Sabry M; Dimirkou, Anthoula; Bolan, Nanthi; Rinklebe, Jörg

    2017-12-19

    Dynamics of chromate (Cr(VI)) in contaminated soils may be modulated by decreasing its phytoavailability via the addition of organic matter-rich amendments, which might accelerate Cr(VI) reduction to inert chromite (Cr(III)) or high-cation exchange capacity amendments. We studied Cr(VI) phytoavailability of oregano in a Cr(VI)-spiked acidic soil non-treated (S) and treated with peat (SP), lime (SL), and zeolite (SZ). The addition of Cr(VI) increased the concentrations of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in soils and plants, especially in the lime-amended soil. The plant biomass decreased in the lime-amended soil compared to the un-spiked soil (control) due to decreased plant phosphorus concentrations and high Cr(VI) concentrations in root at that treatment. Oregano in the peat-amended soil exhibited significantly less toxic effects, due to the role of organic matter in reducing toxic Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and boosted plant vigour in this treatment. In the lime-amended soil, the parameters of soil Cr(VI), soil Cr(III), and root Cr(III) increased significantly compared to the non-amended soil, indicating that Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) was accelerated at high pH. Added zeolite failed to decreased Cr(VI) level to soil and plant. Oregano achieved a total uptake of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) of 0.275 mg in plant kg-1 soil in a pot in the non-amended soil. We conclude that peat as soil amendment might be considered as a suitable option for decreasing Cr(VI) toxicity in soil and plant, and that oregano as tolerant plant species has a certain potential to be used as a Cr accumulator. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Soil retention of hexavalent chromium released from construction and demolition waste in a road-base-application scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butera, Stefania; Trapp, Stefan; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    depth. However, in rigid climates and with high water infiltration through the road pavement, the reduction reaction could be so slow that Cr(VI) might migrate as deep as 200 cm under the road. The reaction parameters and the model can form the basis for systematically assessing under which scenarios Cr...

  10. Removal combined with reduction of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by Fe-ethylene glycol complex microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong-Xing [School of Physics and Electronic Information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000 (China); Jia, Yong, E-mail: yjiaahedu@163.com [School of Pharmacy, Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Fe-EG complex microspheres were synthesized by a hydrothermal method. • The removal properties towards Cr(VI) ions were investigated. • The adsorption and reduction mechanism was revealed by FTIR and XPS. - Abstract: Three-dimensional Fe-ethylene glycol (Fe-EG) complex microspheres were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method, and were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The adsorption as well as reduction properties of the obtained Fe-EG complex microspheres towards Cr(VI) ions were studied. The experiment data of adsorption kinetic and isotherm were fitted by nonlinear regression approach. In neutral condition, the maximum adsorption capacity was 49.78 mg g{sup −1} at room temperature, and was increased with the increasing of temperature. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy, standard enthalpy and standard entropy revealed that adsorption of Cr(VI) was a feasible, spontaneous and endothermic process. Spectroscopic analysis revealed the adsorption of Cr(VI) was a physical adsorption process. The adsorbed CrO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ions were partly reduced to Cr(OH){sub 3} by Fe(II) ions and the organic groups in the Fe-EG complex.

  11. U.S. Army Toxic Metal Reduction Program: Demonstrating Alternatives to Hexavalent Chromium and Cadmium in Surface Finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-18

    Aluminum conversion coatings* Hard chrome plating* Magnesium anodizing* Sealers and rinses * Stripping of anodizing and platings* Passivation of stainless...steel* Cad Plating Nickel Plating Electroless Nickel Etching *Contains Cr6+ The Long and Winding Road Process Specification Hazardous Chemicals...Cadmium-Free Connectors and Fasteners Cadmium-Free Plating for Components Dichromate-Free Sealers / Primers Cr(VI)-Free Sealants and Adhesives

  12. Electrochemically enhanced reduction of hexavalent chromium in contaminated clay: Kinetics, energy consumption, and application of pulse current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tian Ran; Pamukcu, Sibel; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemically enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in clay medium is a technique based on inputting extra energy into the clay to drive the favorable redox reaction. In this study, the reducing reagent Fe(II) was transported into Cr(VI) spiked kaolinite clay by direct current to investigate...... 0.002min-1 at current density of 0mA/cm2 to 0.016min-1 at current density of 0.6mA/cm2, and the corresponding reduction efficiency after 60min experimental time was increased from 8.5% to 57.5%. Mass transport process of Fe(II) in clay pore fluid was determined as the rate controlling step......,Fe)(OH)3] precipitates. XRD analysis suggested that the [(Cr,Fe)(OH)3] formed at the clay surface and grew into the pore fluid. SEM-EDX results indicated that the overall Fe(III):Cr(III) ratio of the precipitates was approximately 1.26:1. Application of pulse current decreased the non-productive energy...

  13. Comparison of potentiality of Zinc oxide nanoparticles and hydrogen peroxide in removal of hexavalent chromium from polluted water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anvar Asadi

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that H2O2 as a cheap and available agent and also UV/ZnO, as a friendly and without residual environmental treatment process, can be used for effective reduction of Cr(VI to yield Cr(III.

  14. Biosynthesized iron nanoparticles in aqueous extracts of Eichhornia crassipes and its mechanism in the hexavalent chromium removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yufen; Fang, Zhanqiang; Zheng, Liuchun; Tsang, Eric Pokeung

    2017-03-01

    Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth), a species of invasive weeds has caused serious ecological damage due to its extraordinary fertility and growth rate. However, it has not yet been exploited for use as a resource. This paper reported the synthesis and characterization of amorphous iron nanoparticles (Ec-Fe-NPs) from Fe(III) salts in aqueous extracts of Eichhornia crassipes. The nanoparticles were characterized by SEM, EDS, TEM, XPS, FTIR, DLS and the zeta potential methods. The characterization results confirmed the successful synthesis of amorphous iron nanoparticles with diameters of 20-80 nm. Moreover, the nanoparticles were mainly composed of zero valent iron nanoparticles which were coated with various organic matters in the extracts as a capping or stabilizing agents. Batch experiments showed that 89.9% of Cr(VI) was removed by the Ec-Fe-NPs much higher than by the extracts alone (20.4%) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (47.3%). Based on the kinetics study and the XPS analysis, a removal mechanism dominated by adsorption and reduction with subsequently co-precipitation was proposed.

  15. Assessment of heavy metal tolerance and hexavalent chromium reducing potential of Corynebacterium paurometabolum SKPD 1204 isolated from chromite mine seepage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Kanti Paul

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium paurometabolum SKPD 1204 (MTCC 8730, a heavy metal tolerant and chromate reducing bacterium isolated from chromite mine seepage of Odisha, India has been evaluated for chromate reduction under batch culture. The isolate was found to tolerate metals like Co(II, Cu(II, Ni(II, Mn(II, Zn(II, Fe(III and Hg(II along with Cr(VI and was resistant to different antibiotics as evaluated by disc-diffusion method. The isolate, SKPD 1204 was found to reduce 62.5% of 2 mM Cr(VI in Vogel Bonner broth within 8 days of incubation. Chromate reduction capability of SKPD 1204 decreased with increase in Cr(VI concentration, but increased with increase in cell density and attained its maximum at 1010 cells/mL. Chromate reducing efficiency of SKPD 1204 was promoted in the presence of glycerol and glucose, while the highest reduction was recorded at pH 7.0 and 35 °C. The reduction process was inhibited by divalent cations Zn(II, Cd(II, Cu(II, and Ni(II, but not by Mn(II. Anions like nitrate, phosphate, sulphate and sulphite was found to be inhibitory to the process of Cr(VI reduction. Similarly, sodium fluoride, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, sodium azide and N, N,-Di cyclohexyl carboiimide were inhibitory to chromate reduction, while 2,4-dinitrophenol appeared to be neither promotive nor inhibitory to the process.

  16. Control of exposure to hexavalent chromium concentration in shielded metal arc welding fumes by nano-coating of electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapirakasam, S P; Mohan, Sreejith; Santhosh Kumar, M C; Thomas Paul, Ashley; Surianarayanan, M

    2018-02-20

    Background Cr(VI) is a suspected human carcinogen formed as a by-product of stainless steel welding. Nano-alumina and nano-titania coating of electrodes reduced the welding fume levels. Objective To investigate the effect of nano-coating of welding electrodes on Cr(VI) formation rate (Cr(VI) FR) from a shielded metal arc welding process. Methods The core welding wires were coated with nano-alumina and nano-titania using the sol-gel dip coating technique. Bead-on plate welds were deposited on SS 316 LN plates kept inside a fume test chamber. Cr(VI) analysis was done using an atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS). Results A reduction of 40% and 76%, respectively, in the Cr(VI) FR was observed from nano-alumina and nano-titania coated electrodes. Increase in the fume level decreased the Cr(VI) FR. Discussion Increase in fume levels blocked the UV radiation responsible for the formation of ozone thereby preventing the formation of Cr(VI).

  17. Nitrification inhibition by hexavalent chromium Cr(VI)--Microbial ecology, gene expression and off-gas emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Mo; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the responses in the physiology, microbial ecology and gene expression of nitrifying bacteria to imposition of and recovery from Cr(VI) loading in a lab-scale nitrification bioreactor. Exposure to Cr(VI) in the reactor strongly inhibited nitrification performance resulting in a parallel decrease in nitrate production and ammonia consumption. Cr(VI) exposure also led to an overall decrease in total bacterial concentrations in the reactor. However, the fraction of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) decreased to a greater extent than the fraction of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In terms of functional gene expression, a rapid decrease in the transcript concentrations of amoA gene coding for ammonia oxidation in AOB was observed in response to the Cr(VI) shock. In contrast, transcript concentrations of the nxrA gene coding for nitrite oxidation in NOB were relatively unchanged compared to Cr(VI) pre-exposure levels. Therefore, Cr(VI) exposure selectively and directly inhibited activity of AOB, which indirectly resulted in substrate (nitrite) limitation to NOB. Significantly, trends in amoA expression preceded performance trends both during imposition of and recovery from inhibition. During recovery from the Cr(VI) shock, the high ammonia concentrations in the bioreactor resulted in an irreversible shift towards AOB populations, which are expected to be more competitive in high ammonia environments. An inadvertent impact during recovery was increased emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO), consistent with recent findings linking AOB activity and the production of these gases. Therefore, Cr(VI) exposure elicited multiple responses on the microbial ecology, gene expression and both aqueous and gaseous nitrogenous conversion in a nitrification process. A complementary interrogation of these multiple responses facilitated an understanding of both direct and indirect inhibitory impacts on nitrification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Polyacrylonitrile/polyaniline core/shell nanofiber mat for removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution: mechanism and applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jianqiang

    2013-01-01

    Polyacrylonitrile/polyaniline core/shell nanofibers were prepared via electrospinning followed by in situ polymerization of aniline. Nanofibers with different morphology were obtained by changing the polymerization temperature. When used as absorbent for Cr(vi) ions, the core/shell nanofiber mats exhibit excellent adsorption capability. The equilibrium capacity is 24.96, 37.24, and 52.00 mg g-1 for 105, 156, and 207 mg L-1 initial Cr(vi) solution, respectively, and the adsorption capacity increases with temperature. The adsorption follows a pseudo second order kinetics model and is best fit using the Langmuir isotherm model. The mats show excellent selectivity towards Cr(vi) ions in the presence of competing ions albeit a small decrease in adsorption is observed. The mats can be regenerated and reused after treatment with NaOH making them promising candidates as practical adsorbents for Cr(vi) removal. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  19. Carbothermal synthesis of carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron particles for the remediation of hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Laura B; Mack, Elizabeth J; Hydutsky, Bianca W; Hershman, Jessica M; Skluzacek, Joanna M; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2008-04-01

    Nanoscale, zero-valent iron is a promising reagent for in situ reduction of a variety of subsurface contaminants, but its utility in full-scale remediation projects is limited by material costs. Iron nanoparticles (20-100 nm diameter) supported on carbon (C-Fe0) were synthesized by reacting iron salts, adsorbed or impregnated from aqueous solutions onto 80 m2/g carbon black, at 600-800 degrees C under Ar. Similar products were obtained by heating the reactants under air in a covered alumina crucible. X-ray powder diffraction patterns show that Fe3O4 particles are formed at 300-500 degrees C in the initial stage of the reaction and that these particles are reduced to a mixture of alpha- and gamma-Fe nanoparticles above 600 degrees C. When C-Fe0 was combined with carboxymethylcellulose in a 5:1 weight ratio in water, the resulting material had similar transport properties to previously optimized nanoiron/polyanion suspensions in water-saturated sand columns. At a 10:3 Fe/Cr mole ratio, C-Fe0 reduced a 10 ppm Cr(VI) solution to approximately 1 ppm within three days. The surface area normalized first-order Cr removal rate was 1.2 h(-1) m(-2) under these conditions. These results demonstrate that reactive nanoiron with good transport properties in water-saturated porous media can be made in a scalable process from inexpensive starting materials by carbothermal reduction.

  20. Determination of hexavalent chromium reduction using Cr stable isotopes: isotopic fractionation factors for permeable reactive barrier materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Johnson, Thomas M

    2012-05-15

    Cr stable isotope measurements can provide improved estimates of the extent of Cr(VI) reduction to less toxic Cr(III). The relationship between observed (53)Cr/(52)Cr ratio shifts and the extent of reduction can be calibrated by determining the isotopic fractionation factor for relevant reactions. Permeable reactive barriers (PRB) made of Fe(0) and in situ redox manipulation (ISRM) zones effectively remediate Cr-contaminated aquifers. Here, we determine the isotopic fractionations for dominant reductants in reactive barriers and reduced sediments obtained from an ISRM zone at the US DOE's Hanford site. In all cases, significant isotopic fractionation was observed; fractionation (expressed as ε) was -3.91‰ for Fe(II)-doped goethite, -2.11‰ for FeS, -2.65‰ for green rust, -2.67‰ for FeCO(3), and -3.18‰ for ISRM zone sediments. These results provide a better calibration of the relationship between Cr isotope ratios and the extent of Cr(VI) reduction and aid in interpretation of Cr isotope data from systems with reactive barriers.

  1. Hexavalent chromium removal by titanium dioxide photocatalytic reduction and the effect of phenol and humic acid on its removal efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malakootian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study is Cr (VI removal by titanium dioxide (TiO2 photocatalytic reduction and the effect of phenol and humic acid (HA on its removal efficiency are investigated. Materials and Methods: The experiments were performed on both simulated synthetic wastewater and real wastewater. Various parameters such as pH, contact time, Cr (VI and TiO 2 concentrations, and a constant concentration of phenol and HA were considered to perform the experiments. Results: The removal value of Cr (VI alone is 81% and in combination with HA and phenol is 89.7% and 96.2%, respectively. Cr (VI removal efficiency was enhanced by decreasing pH and contact time. With increasing TiO 2 dosage, the removal of Cr (VI increased, up to 0.5 g/L and then decreased at 1 g/L. Cr (VI removal efficiency decreases with the increase of Cr (VI initial concentration. Removal efficiency, in 10 mg/L initial concentration of phenol and HA, was enhanced as contact time increased. Equilibrium data and adsorption process kinetics obey Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo second-order kinetic model, respectively. Conclusions: Heavy metal ions and organic pollutants are often present in real wastewater. This research suggests that the photocatalytic reaction TiO 2 could be applied to more effectively treat wastewaters containing both Cr (VI and organic compounds.

  2. Graphene/biofilm composites for enhancement of hexavalent chromium reduction and electricity production in a biocathode microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tian-shun [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Jiangsu Branch of China Academy of Science & Technology Development, Nanjing (China); Jin, Yuejuan; Bao, Jingjing [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Kang, Dongzhou, E-mail: kangdz@ybu.edu.cn [College of Pharmacy, Yanbian University, Yanji 133002 (China); Xie, Jingjing, E-mail: xiej@njtech.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Jiangsu Branch of China Academy of Science & Technology Development, Nanjing (China); College of Pharmacy, Yanbian University, Yanji 133002 (China); Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing 211816 (China)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Graphene/biofilm was microbially fabricated to cathode of a Cr(VI)-reducing MFC. • High Cr(VI) reduction rate was generated by self-assembled graphene biocathode MFC. • Graphene biocathode improves the electricity production of Cr(VI)-reducing MFC. • High surface area of the graphene provides more adsorption sites for Cr(VI). • Graphene biocathode improves the electron transfer rate in the MFC. - Abstract: In this study, a simple method of biocathode fabrication in a Cr(VI)-reducing microbial fuel cell (MFC) is demonstrated. A self-assembling graphene was decorated onto the biocathode microbially, constructing a graphene/biofilm, in situ. The maximum power density of the MFC with a graphene biocathode is 5.7 times that of the MFC with a graphite felt biocathode. Cr(VI) reduction was also enhanced, resulting in 100% removal of Cr(VI) within 48 h, at 40 mg/L Cr(VI), compared with only 58.3% removal of Cr(VI) in the MFC with a graphite felt biocathode. Cyclic voltammogram analyses showed that the graphene biocathode had faster electron transfer kinetics than the graphite felt version. Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) analysis revealed a possible adsorption-reduction mechanism for Cr(VI) reduction via the graphene biocathode. This study attempts to improve the efficiency of the biocathode in the Cr(VI)-reducing MFC, and provides a useful candidate method for the treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated wastewater, under neutral conditions.

  3. 77 FR 58219 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks... Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; and Steel... air pollutants (NESHAP): hard and decorative chromium electroplating and chromium anodizing tanks, and...

  4. Isolation and characterization of a chromium-resistant bacterium Serratia sp. Cr-10 from a chromate-contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kundi; Li, Fuli [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao (China). Qingdao Inst. of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology

    2011-05-15

    A novel bacterium, Cr-10, was isolated from a chromium-contaminated site and capable of removing toxic chromium species from solution by reducing hexavalent chromium to an insoluble precipitate. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene of strain Cr-10 showed that it was most closely related to Serratia rubidaea JCM 1240{sup T} (97.68%). Physiological and chemotaxonomic data also supported that strain Cr-10 was identified as Serratia sp., a genus which was never specially reported chromate-resistant before. Serratia sp., Cr-10 was tolerant to a concentration of 1,500 mg Cr(VI) L{sup -1}, which was the highest level reported until now. The optimum pH and temperature for reduction of Cr(VI) by Serratia sp. Cr-10 were found to be 7.0 and 37 C, respectively. The Cr(VI) reduction was significantly influenced by additional carbon sources, and among them fructose and lactose offered maximum reduction, with a rate of 0.28 and 0.25 mg Cr(VI) L{sup -1} h{sup -1}, respectively. The cell-free extracts and filtrate of the culture were able to reduce Cr(VI) while concentration of total chromium remained stable in the process, indicating that the enzyme-catalyzed mechanism was applied in Cr(VI) reduction by the isolate. Additionally, it was found that there was hardly any chromium on the cell surface of the strain, further supporting that reduction, rather than bioadsorption, plays a major role in the Cr(VI) removal. (orig.)

  5. Chromium Uptake Efficiency of Spinacea olaracea from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the uptake of chromium by Spinacea olaracea and its accumulation in roots and shoots of plants grown in pots at various concentrations of chromium (30, 60, 90,120,150 mg/l). The results revealed that the levels of chromium accumulation in roots and shoots were higher at minimum ...

  6. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been e...

  7. Application of the Rietveld method to assess chromium(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysochoou, Maria; Dermatas, Dimitris

    2007-03-15

    The Rietveld method allows the quantification of crystalline phases and amorphous material identified by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and other diffraction methods. The method assists in determining the speciation of contaminants in solid matrices both qualitatively and quantitatively in a statistically defensible approach, as it does not focus on a microscale. Rietveld was applied to chromite ore processing residue (COPR), a cementitious waste containing hexavalent chromium. Calcium aluminum chromium oxide hydrates (CACs) were the crystalline phases identified by XRPD that bind Cr(6+) in COPR according to their chemical formula. Rietveld quantification, combined with mass balances on Cr(6+), showed that CACs may bind Cr(6+) in variable percentages, ranging from 25% to 85%. Analysis of duplicate samples showed that material variability is the predominant factor of uncertainty in evaluating the role of CACs in Cr(6+) speciation, provided that a consistent quantification strategy is pursued. The choice of strategy was performed on the basis of the pertinent literature, preliminary analyses of the equipment and the software settings, and mass balances. The correlation between the average CAC-bound Cr(6+) concentration and the total Cr(6+) for five samples (R(2)=0.94), extracted from different zones and soil borings, suggests that CACs are a primary sink for Cr(6+) in COPR.

  8. Μetal Uptake by Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Irrigated with Water Polluted with Chromium and Nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoikou, Vasiliki; Andrianos, Vangelis; Stasinos, Sotiris; Kostakis, Marios G; Attiti, Sofia; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S; Zabetakis, Ioannis

    2017-07-17

    The water aquifers of the regions of Asopos River in Viotia and Messapia in Evia (Greece) have been contaminated with hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) and bivalent nickel (Ni (II)). Given that these areas are the two biggest tuber producing regions of Greece, in our previous work, the cross-contamination of the food chain with these two heavy metals was quantified. In the present study, the potential of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) cultivation in these regions is evaluated. The scope of our study was to investigate the uptake of chromium and nickel by sunflower, in a greenhouse experiment. The study included two cultivation periods of plants in six irrigation lines with different levels of Cr (VI) and Ni (II) ranging from 0 μg/L (control) to 10,000 μg/L. In all plant parts, statistically significant increased levels of Cr (VI) and Ni (II) were found when compared to control ones. Also, a positive correlation, both for Cr and Ni, between levels of heavy metals in irrigation water and plants was observed. Following European Food Safety Authority recommendations, the obtained oil was evaluated as safe for consumption, therefore, sunflower cultivation could be a valid bioremediation solution for the Asopos and Messapia regions.

  9. Variations in chromium tolerance and accumulation among canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, Hakan; Yıldız, Mustafa

    2014-07-01

    Phytoremediation is a green technology for the remediation of contaminated ecosystems by using plants. In the present study, a hydroponic experiment was conducted to investigate the phytoremediation potential of eight canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars for hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)]. Chromium significantly affected dry weight, lipid peroxidation, chlorophylls, non-protein thiol and antioxidant enzymes. Based on the dry weight, the tolerance index was found maximum in cultivar (cv.) NK Petrol and minimum in cv. Sary. The cv. Sary accumulated the maximum amount of Cr (705.8 μg g(-1) DW), which was correlated with the lowest levels of chlorophyll content and highest levels of lipid peroxidation. However, Cr accumulation was lowest (255.0 μg g(-1) DW) in NK Petrol. Although cv. NK Petrol may be a Cr(VI) excluder relative to cv. Sary, it may have the potential for the phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated sites as it possesses higher resistance to Cr(VI) by producing higher biomasses.

  10. Influence of chromium salts on increased lipid peroxidation and differential pattern in antioxidant metabolism in Pistia stratiotes L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RishiKesh Upadhyay

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the changing effect of different concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10mM of hexavalent and trivalent chromium on different biochemical parameters along with antioxidant enzymes was investigated on water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L. in order to know the possible involvement of this metal in oxidative injury, besides the activities of antioxidant enzymes leading to biochemical and oxidative aberration induced by elevated concentrations. Both in roots and shoots, Cr produced a significant increase in enzymic and non-enzymic antioxidants, except in catalase (CAT activity where a strong accumulation of hydrogen peroxide was indicated, suggesting an imposition of oxidative stress. The observation showed an uptake of chromium by P. stratiotes L. as well as increase in activity of antioxidants, as the concentrations and their duration of treatment increased. The activity of antioxidative enzymes determined the steady-state levels of ROS in the cell. The augmentation of antioxidative defense plays a key role in regulating the oxidative stress. This pointed to the possibility in induction of oxidative stress, with the increasing lipid peroxidation, followed by a differential pattern in antioxidant metabolisms by chromium ions in P. stratiotes L.

  11. Removal of chromium (VI) by acid-washed zero-valent iron under various groundwater geochemistry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Keith C K; Lo, Irene M C

    2008-02-15

    The hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) removal capacity of acid-washed zerovalent iron (AW-Fe0) was evaluated under different groundwater geochemistry conditions through column experiments. It was found that each gram of the AW-Fe0 could remove 0.65-1.76 mg of Cr(VI) from synthetic groundwater in the absence of bicarbonate (HCO3-), magnesium and/or calcium ions. Groundwater geochemistry was found to exert various degrees of impact on Cr(VI) removal by the AW-Fe0, in which HCO3- alone gave the mildest impact whereas the copresence of calcium and HCO3- exerted the greatest impact In comparison with the unwashed Fe0, the AW-Fe0 showed a poorer Cr(VI) removal capacity and was also more susceptible to the influence of the dissolved groundwater constituents on Cr(VI) removal,thereby indicating the unsuitability of using AW-Fe0 in permeable reactive barriers for remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater. On the AW-Fe0 surface, where the indigenous iron precipitates were almost erased, trivalent chromium including chromium (III) oxides, hydroxides, and oxyhydroxides in irregular strip, chick footmark-liked or boulder-liked forms as well as Cr(III)-Cr(VI) mixed oxides were detected.

  12. Chromium(III) -- chromium(VI) interconversions in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijden, C.H. van der; Reith, M.

    1982-01-01

    The stable form of dissolved chromium in oxygenated seawater is Cr(VI). But Cr(III)-species are also present at an analytically significant level. It is shown that Cr(III) is oxidized only slowly by dissolved oxygen, and that manganese oxide is a strong catalyst for such oxidation. However, the low

  13. Improved Electrodeposited Low Contraction Chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    and during testing, special fix- tures were devised to grip the brittle chromium tubes. PVC end caps were 2 ~7 . -~Z machined to accommodate the...LC 1 REDSTONE ARSENAL, AL 35898 - LCA (PLASTICS TECH 1 EVAL CEN) COMMANDER -LCE 1 REDSTONE ARSENAL -LCM I ATTN: DRSMI-RRS I -LCS 1 -RSM 1 -LCW 1

  14. Chromium Salen Mediated Alkene Epoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Norrby, Per-Ola; Daly, Adrian M.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of alkene epoxidation by chromium(v) oxo salen complexes has been studied by DFT and experimental methods. The reaction is compared to the closely related Mn-catalyzed process in an attempt to understand the dramatic difference in selectivity between the two systems. Overall, the st...

  15. Delayed Puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolby, Nanna; Busch, Alexander Siegfried; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Delayed puberty can be a source of great concern and anxiety, although it usually is caused by a self-limiting variant of the normal physiological timing named constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP). Delayed puberty can, however, also be the first presentation of a permanent condition...... of diagnostic evaluation today remain in distinguishing the benign CDGP from underlying pathological causes such as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Several techniques have been investigated for this purpose and are reviewed in this chapter; however, no single test is yet...

  16. Equilibrium and kinetic study on chromium (VI removal from simulated waste water using gooseberry seeds as a novel biosorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Aravind

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gooseberry seed (Phyllanthus acidus was used as an adsorbent to determine its feasibility for the removal of Cr(VI. Various parameters such as pH, temperature, contact time, initial metal concentration and adsorbent dosage were investigated to determine the biosorption performance. Equilibrium was attained within 60 minutes and maximum removal of 96% was achieved under the optimum conditions at pH 2. The adsorption phenomenon demonstrated here was monolayer represented by Langmuir isotherm with R2 value of 0.992 and the Langmuir constants k and q0 was found to be 0.0061 (L/mg and 19.23 (mg/g. The adsorption system obeyed Pseudo second order kinetics with R2 value of 0.999. The results of the present study indicated that gooseberry seed powder can be employed as adsorbent for the effective removal of hexavalent chromium economically.

  17. Adsorption Isotherm of Chromium (Vi) into Zncl2 Impregnated Activated Carbon Derived by Jatropha Curcas Seed Hull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, M.; Yakub, I.; Yaakob, Z.; Asim, N.; Sopian, K.

    2017-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic and should be removed from industrial wastewater before discharged into water resources. Adsorption by using activated carbon from biomass is an economic and conventional way on removing the heavy metal ions from wastewater. In this research, activated carbon is synthesized from Jatropha curcas L. seed hull through chemical activation with ZnCl2 and carbonized at 800 °C (JAC/ZnCl2). The activated carbon has been characterized using FTIR, SEM-EDX, BET and CHNS-O analyzer. Adsorption isotherms have been analysed using Langmuir and Freundlich models to determine its removal mechanism. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cr (VI) metal ions onto JAC/ZnCl2 activated carbon is 25.189 mg/g and following Langmuir isotherm model which is monolayer adsorption.

  18. Chromium in drinking water: sources, metabolism, and cancer risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2011-10-17

    Drinking water supplies in many geographic areas contain chromium in the +3 and +6 oxidation states. Public health concerns are centered on the presence of hexavalent Cr that is classified as a known human carcinogen via inhalation. Cr(VI) has high environmental mobility and can originate from anthropogenic and natural sources. Acidic environments with high organic content promote the reduction of Cr(VI) to nontoxic Cr(III). The opposite process of Cr(VI) formation from Cr(III) also occurs, particularly in the presence of common minerals containing Mn(IV) oxides. Limited epidemiological evidence for Cr(VI) ingestion is suggestive of elevated risks for stomach cancers. Exposure of animals to Cr(VI) in drinking water induced tumors in the alimentary tract, with linear and supralinear responses in the mouse small intestine. Chromate, the predominant form of Cr(VI) at neutral pH, is taken up by all cells through sulfate channels and is activated nonenzymatically by ubiquitously present ascorbate and small thiols. The most abundant form of DNA damage induced by Cr(VI) is Cr-DNA adducts, which cause mutations and chromosomal breaks. Emerging evidence points to two-way interactions between DNA damage and epigenetic changes that collectively determine the spectrum of genomic rearrangements and profiles of gene expression in tumors. Extensive formation of DNA adducts, clear positivity in genotoxicity assays with high predictive values for carcinogenicity, the shape of tumor-dose responses in mice, and a biological signature of mutagenic carcinogens (multispecies, multisite, and trans-sex tumorigenic potency) strongly support the importance of the DNA-reactive mutagenic mechanisms in carcinogenic effects of Cr(VI). Bioavailability results and kinetic considerations suggest that 10-20% of ingested low-dose Cr(VI) escapes human gastric inactivation. The directly mutagenic mode of action and the incompleteness of gastric detoxification argue against a threshold in low

  19. Chromium in Drinking Water: Sources, Metabolism, and Cancer Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Drinking water supplies in many geographic areas contain chromium in the +3 and +6 oxidation states. Public health concerns are centered on the presence of hexavalent Cr that is classified as a known human carcinogen via inhalation. Cr(VI) has high environmental mobility and can originate from anthropogenic and natural sources. Acidic environments with high organic content promote the reduction of Cr(VI) to nontoxic Cr(III). The opposite process of Cr(VI) formation from Cr(III) also occurs, particularly in the presence of common minerals containing Mn(IV) oxides. Limited epidemiological evidence for Cr(VI) ingestion is suggestive of elevated risks for stomach cancers. Exposure of animals to Cr(VI) in drinking water induced tumors in the alimentary tract, with linear and supralinear responses in the mouse small intestine. Chromate, the predominant form of Cr(VI) at neutral pH, is taken up by all cells through sulfate channels and is activated nonenzymatically by ubiquitously present ascorbate and small thiols. The most abundant form of DNA damage induced by Cr(VI) is Cr-DNA adducts, which cause mutations and chromosomal breaks. Emerging evidence points to two-way interactions between DNA damage and epigenetic changes that collectively determine the spectrum of genomic rearrangements and profiles of gene expression in tumors. Extensive formation of DNA adducts, clear positivity in genotoxicity assays with high predictive values for carcinogenicity, the shape of tumor–dose responses in mice, and a biological signature of mutagenic carcinogens (multispecies, multisite, and trans-sex tumorigenic potency) strongly support the importance of the DNA-reactive mutagenic mechanisms in carcinogenic effects of Cr(VI). Bioavailability results and kinetic considerations suggest that 10–20% of ingested low-dose Cr(VI) escapes human gastric inactivation. The directly mutagenic mode of action and the incompleteness of gastric detoxification argue against a threshold in low

  20. Mechanism of DNA-protein cross-linking by chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfie, Andrea; Hagan, Elizabeth; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2010-02-15

    Hexavalent chromium is a known inducer of DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs) that contribute to repression of inducible genes and genotoxicity of this metal. Lymphocytic DPCs have also shown potential utility as biomarkers of human exposure to Cr(VI). Here, we examined the mechanism of DPC formation by Cr(VI) and the impact of its main cellular reducers. In vitro reactions of Cr(VI) with one-electron reducing thiols (glutathione and cysteine) or two-electron donating ascorbate were all efficient at DPC production, indicating a dispensable role of Cr(V). No Cr(VI) reducer was able to generate DPC in the presence of Cr(III)-chelating EDTA or phosphate. A critical role of Cr(III) in DNA-protein linkages was further confirmed by dissociation of Cr(VI)-induced DPC by phosphate. EDTA was very inefficient in DPC dissociation, indicating its poor suitability for testing of Cr(III)-mediated bridging and reversal of complex DPC. Reactions containing only one Cr-modified component (protein or DNA) showed that Cr(III)-DNA adduction was the initial step in DPC formation. Cross-linking proceeded slowly after the rapid formation of Cr-DNA adducts, indicating that protein conjugation was the rate-limiting step in DPC generation. Experiments with depletion of glutathione and restoration of ascorbate levels in human lung A549 cells showed that high cellular reducing capacity promotes DPC yield. Overall, our data provide evidence for a three-step cross-linking mechanism involving (i) reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), (ii) Cr(III)-DNA binding, and (iii) protein capture by DNA-bound Cr(III) generating protein-Cr(III)-DNA cross-links.

  1. Remediation of soils contaminated with chromium using citric and hydrochloric acids: the role of chromium fractionation in chromium leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shu-Fen; Huang, Chin-Yuan; Tu, Yao-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Acid washing is a common method for soil remediation, but is not always efficient for chromium-contaminated soil. Both soil particle size and the forms of chromium existing in the soil affect the efficiency of soil washing. Laboratory batch and column dissolution experiments were conducted to determine the efficiencies of citric and hydrochloric acids as agents to extract chromium from soils contaminated with chromium. The effects of soil particle size and chromium fractionation on Cr leaching were also investigated. About 90% of chromium in the studied soil existed either in residual form or bound to iron and manganese oxides, and Cr fraction distributions were similar for all soil particle sizes. Almost all exchangeable and carbonate-bound chromium was removed by washing once with 0.5 M HCl, whereas organic chromium was more effectively removed by washing with citric acid rather than with HCl solution of the same concentration. For chromium fractions that were either bound to Fe-Mn oxides or existed as residual forms, the efficiencies of acid washing were usually 20% or less, except for 0.5 M HCl solution, which had much higher efficiencies. Separation of the soil sample by particle size before the separate washing of the soil fractions had little improvement on the chromium removal.

  2. Delayed growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4 years Developmental milestones record - 5 years Causes Constitutional growth delay refers to children who are small ... nutrition expert who can help you choose the right foods to offer your child. What to Expect ...

  3. Delayed Ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bladder rather than out of the penis Psychological causes of delayed ejaculation include: Depression, anxiety or other mental health conditions Relationship problems due to stress, poor communication or other concerns ...

  4. Delayed Ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of stress Delayed ejaculation Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  5. Over-accumulation of putrescine induced by cyclohexylamine interferes with chromium accumulation and partially restores pollen tube growth in Actinidia deliciosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoccianti, Valeria; Iacobucci, Marta; Speranza, Anna; Antognoni, Fabiana

    2013-09-01

    Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium, i.e., Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively, were previously demonstrated to affect in vitro germination and ultrastructure of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) pollen. In the present work, the response to chromium in germinating pollen was evaluated in terms of changes in the polyamine profile. Slight, though significant, increases in free spermidine and spermine occurred after exposure to Cr(III), while the levels remained almost unchanged after Cr(VI) treatment. The spermidine synthase inhibitor cyclohexylamine (CHA) caused a dramatic increase in free putrescine in both chromium-treated and untreated samples, while spermidine content was not affected. Interestingly, CHA positively affected the performance of chromium-treated pollen by partially, though significantly, restoring pollen tube growth. The major growth recovery was registered with 1 mM CHA in the presence of Cr(VI), concomitant with a considerable reduction in uptake of the metal. Conversely, endogenous calcium levels were more heavily affected in Cr(III)-treated pollen. The effect of CHA on production of reactive oxygen species also varied depending on the chromium species. The response of pollen to the CHA-induced putrescine excess was compared with that exerted by an exogenous supply of the same diamine. Results show that in Cr(III)-treated pollen, putrescine over-accumulation induced by CHA exerted similar effects as exogenous putrescine, while this was not true in the Cr(VI) treatment. It appears that the diamine was able to improve pollen tolerance to metal stress through different mechanisms, mostly depending upon the chromium species, namely via reduced metal uptake or by substituting for calcium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Responses of endogenous proline in rice seedlings under chromium exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.Z. Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroponic experiments were performed to exam the dynamic change of endogenous proline in rice seedlings exposed to potassium chromate chromium (VI or chromium nitrate chromium (III. Although accumulation of both chromium species in rice seedlings was obvious, more chromium was detected in plant tissues of rice seedlings exposed to chromium (III than those in chromium (VI, majority being in roots rather than shoots. Results also showed that the accumulation capacity of chromium by rice seedlings was positively correlated to chromium concentrations supplied in both chromium variants and the accumulation curve depicted an exponential trend in both chromium treatments over the entire period of exposure. Proline assays showed that both chromium variants induced the change of endogenous proline in shoots and roots of rice seedlings. Chromium (VI of 12.8 mg/L increased proline content significantly (p

  7. ChromiSense: A colourimetric lab-on-a-disc sensor for chromium speciation in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, G; Maguire, I; Heery, Brendan; Gers, Pauline; Ducrée, J; Regan, F

    2018-02-01

    The development of a centrifugal device for quantitative analysis of both chromium (III) and (VI) species in water is reported. ChromiSense is a colourimetric sensor system that has been applied to the measurement of chromium in spiked river water samples. For analysis, the sample is loaded into a reservoir on the disposable microfluidic disc, along with reagents. A centrifugal force is created by spinning the disc to pump liquids through microchannels, causing them to mix and react to form a coloured product. The coloured product is then presented to a low-cost optical detection system, where absorbance measurements can be recorded. The optical detection system consists of a light emitting diode (LED) and photodiode (PD) couple. Chromium (III) was measured using 2,6-pyridine dicarboxylic acid as a ligand, forming a complex that was measured at 535nm and at 335nm. While measuring at 535nm allowed for the use of a low cost LED, the sensitivity was improved 2.5 times by measuring at 335nm. However, 335nm also yielded a diminished linear range with little improvement in limit of deteciton (LOD), and required a lengthier manufacturing process due to the need for a UV-transparent material. Chromium (VI) was detected using 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPC). This standard analysis method was simplified for automation on-disc, and optimised to achieve a low LOD. The LOD for trivalent and hexavalent chromium using this device were 21mgL(-1) and 4μgL(-1), respectively. The linear range for quantitative analysis was found to be 69-1000mgL(-1) for Cr(III) and 14-1000μgL(-1) for Cr (VI). While this range is high for Cr(III), incorporation of an off-disc pre-concentration method would make this technology suitable for environmental sample analysis. The device is simple to use, low in cost, and could provide rapid on-site measurements, with results comparable to those obtained using a benchtop spectrophotometer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. SEPARATION OF FISSION PRODUCT VALUES FROM THE HEXAVALENT PLUTONIUM BY CARRIER PRECIPITATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, T.H.

    1959-12-15

    An improved precipitation of fission products on bismuth phosphate from an aqueous mineral acid solution also containing hexavalent plutonium by incorporating, prior to bismuth phosphate precipitation, from 0.05 to 2.5 grams/ liter of zirconium phosphate, niobium oxide. and/or lanthanum fluoride is described. The plutonium remains in solution.

  9. Lung delayed-type hypersensitivity in stressed mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Blecha, F; Topliff, D

    1984-01-01

    The influence of an immobilization stressor on lung cellular immune responses was studied. Delayed-type hypersensitivity to sheep erythrocytes was used to evaluate in vivo lung cellular immunity. Mice were sensitized intravenously and challenged intratracheally with sheep erythrocytes. Three hours prior to challenge all mice were injected intravenously with chromium-51 labeled mononuclear cells from syngeneic mice. The delayed-type hypersensitivity response was measured by counting the radioa...

  10. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both...

  11. The Identity of "Chromium Malate".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Megan; Brown, Silas; Tannehill, Haley; Lockart, Molly; Bowman, Michael K; Vincent, John B

    2017-05-18

    Recently, several studies on the effects of a compound named "chromium malate," with the proposed formula "Cr2malate3·xH2O" where x = 3.5 or 5, on the health of healthy and diabetic rats have appeared. However, the compound is poorly characterized, and knowing the identity of this material could be important in the interpretation of the previous and of future studies on the effects of this compound in animals. Consequently, the synthesis, characterization, and identity of this material were explored. A combination of spectroscopic, magnetic, and elemental analyses and mass spectral studies reveal that the compound is probably a polymer, not a discrete molecule, and does not have the composition previously reported. The repeating unit of the polymer possesses an antiferromagnetically coupled trinuclear Cr(III) core. The current study suggests that previous reports on chromium malate and its effects in animals must be viewed with caution.

  12. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  13. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  14. Speciation of arsenic, selenium, and chromium in wildfire impacted soils and ashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Hageman, Philip L.; Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    In 2007-09, California experienced several large wildfires that damaged large areas of forest and destroyed many homes and buildings. The U.S. Geological Survey collected samples from the Harris, Witch, Grass Valley, Ammo, Santiago, Canyon, Jesusita, and Station fires for testing to identify any possible characteristics of the ashes and soils from burned areas that may be of concern for their impact on water quality, human health, and endangered species. The samples were subjected to analysis for bulk chemical composition for 44 elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after acid digestion and de-ionized water leach tests for pH, alkalinity, conductivity, and anions. Water leach tests generated solutions ranging from pH 10-12, suggesting that ashes can generate caustic alkalinity in contact with rainwater or body fluids (for example, sweat and fluids in the respiratory tract). Samples from burned residential areas in the 2007 fires had elevated levels for several metals, including: As, Pb, Sb, Cu, Zn, and Cr. In some cases, the levels found were above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) preliminary remediation goals (PRG) for soils. Speciation analyses were conducted on de-ionized water and simulated lung fluid leachates for As(III), As(V), Se(IV), Se(VI), Cr(III), and Cr(VI). All species were determined in the same analytical run using an ion-pairing HPLC-ICP-MS method. For leachates containing high levels of total Cr, the majority of the chromium was present in the hexavalent, Cr(VI), form. Higher total and hexavalent chromium levels were observed for samples collected from burned residential areas. Arsenic was also generally present in the more oxidized, As(V), form. Selenium (IV) and (VI) were present, but typically at levels below 2 ppb for most samples. Stability studies of leachate solutions under different storage conditions were performed and the suitability of different sample preservation methods for speciation

  15. Isolating, screening and applying chromium reducing bacteria to promote growth and yield of okra (Hibiscus esculentus L.) in chromium contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Zahid; Asghar, Hafiz Naeem; Shahzad, Tanvir; Hussain, Sabir; Riaz, Muhammad; Ali, Shafaqat; Arif, Muhammad Saleem; Maqsood, Marium

    2015-04-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)], extensively used in different industries, is one of the most toxic heavy metals. The Cr (VI) reducing bacteria could be helpful in decreasing its toxic effects. The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of Cr (VI) reducing bacteria to improve growth and yield of okra (Hibiscus esculentus L.) in Cr-contaminated soils. Most of the selected bacterial isolates significantly increased the growth and yield of okra. Maximum response was observed in the plants inoculated with the isolate K12 where plant height, root length, fruit weight and number of fruits per plant increased up to 77.5 percent, 72.6 percent, 1.4 fold and 2.9 fold, respectively. Moreover, inoculation with bacteria caused significant decrease in Cr (VI) concentration in soil and plant parts across all treatments. The maximum decrease of 69.6, 56.1 and 40.0 percent in Cr (VI) concentrations in soil, plant vegetative parts and plant reproductive parts, respectively, was observed in the treatment inoculated with the strain K12. Based on amplification, sequencing and analysis of 16S rDNA sequence, the strain K12 was found belonging to genus Brucella and was designated as Brucella sp. K12. These findings suggest that the strain K12 may serve as a potential bioresource to improve crop production in Cr-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C

    1992-01-01

    of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...... barrier function of the skin. The amount of chromium found in all skin layers after application of chromium chloride decreased with increasing pH due to lower solubility of the salt. The % of chromium found in the recipient phase as chromium(VI) increased with increasing total chromium concentration...

  17. Development of a chromium-free consumable for joining stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowards, Jeffrey William

    Government regulations in the United States (OSHA Standards: 1910; 1915; 1917; 1918; 1926) and abroad are decreasing allowable exposure levels of hexavalent chromium to welding related personnel. The latest OSHA ruling in 2006 reduced the permissible exposure limit of airborne hexavalent chromium from 52 to 5 mug m-3. Achieving the new level may not be practical from an engineering controls standpoint during the fabrication of tightly enclosed stainless steel components such as the inside of ship hulls and boiler vessels. One method of addressing this problem is to implement a chromium-free welding consumable that provides equivalent mechanical performance and corrosion characteristics to current stainless steel welding consumables. This project was aimed at developing such a consumable and evaluating its suitability for replacement of current stainless steel consumables such as E308L-16. A new shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) consumable based on the Ni-Cu-Ru system was developed for austenitic stainless steel welding. The focus of this work was evaluating the mechanical properties, weldability, and fume formation characteristics of the various iterations of consumables developed. Welds deposited on Type 304 stainless steel were evaluated with weldability tests including: mechanical testing, hot ductility testing, Strain-to-fracture testing, Transverse Varestraint testing, and button melting. Mechanical properties of weld deposits of each consumable were found to exceed minimum values of Type 304 stainless steel based on tensile testing. Guide bend testing showed that weld deposits met minimum weld ductility requirements for stainless steel consumables, such as E308-16. Hot ductility testing revealed a narrow crack susceptible region (33 to 54°C) indicating a low susceptibility to weld metal liquation cracking. GTA welds exhibited superior ductility when compared to SMA welds. This was attributed to a lack of slag inclusions in the weld deposit, which are

  18. Delayed Puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolby, Nanna; Busch, Alexander Siegfried; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    or a symptom of an underlying disease. The diagnosis delayed puberty is made if there are no signs of puberty at an age corresponding to 2 SD above the population mean age at pubertal onset, often translated into 14 years in boys. Delayed puberty among boys is a frequent presentation in pediatrics....... The underlying reasons for the large variation in the age at pubertal onset are not fully established; however, nutritional status and socioeconomic and environmental factors are known to be influencing, and a significant amount of influencing genetic factors have also been identified. The challenges...... of diagnostic evaluation today remain in distinguishing the benign CDGP from underlying pathological causes such as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Several techniques have been investigated for this purpose and are reviewed in this chapter; however, no single test is yet...

  19. Analysis of the bioavailability of Cr(III and Cr(VI based on the determination of chromium in Mentha piperita by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SVETLANA ĐOGO

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mentha piperita L. (Lamiaceae was cultivated under the controlled laboratory conditions in the presence of varying levels of trivalent and hexavalent chromium in order to determine its capacity to control chromium uptake and its tolerance limit. The plants were grown in pots at 25 °C with controlled soil moisture (about 80 % of the water retention capacity. The soil was treated with increasing concentrations of Cr(NO33 (40, 80, 120, and 200 mg kg-1 and K2Cr2O7 (2.5, 5, 10, and 15 mg kg-1. A control group of plants was grown without the addition of chromium to the soil. For each concentration, three acidity levels were tested: natural, one pH unit below and one above the natural acidity of the soil (pH2 6, pH1 5 and pH3 7. The plant samples were digested according to the standard procedure and chromium content was determined by GFAAS. For all plants, the transportation index was calculated and the results (expressed in mg kg-1 at pH1, pH2 and pH3, respectively, were: 0.21–0.80, 0.06–1.06 and 0.04–0.52. The recoveries were good (72.73–115.3 % as evidenced by the analysis of certified reference materials (NIST SRM 8433 – Corn Bran and NIST SRM 1547 – Peach Leaves. The mobility of chromium through the plants tissues is discussed in regard to its competition with iron and manganese for transport binding sites; hence Mn and Fe were also determined.

  20. Performances of local chitosan and its nanocomposite 5%Bentonite/Chitosan in the removal of chromium ions (Cr(VI)) from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussout, Hamou; Ahlafi, Hammou; Aazza, Mustapha; El Akili, Charaf

    2017-11-06

    The present work focuses on the study of the application of abundant and less expensive materials such as chitosan (CS) and bentonite/chitosan nanobiocomposite (nano 5%Bt/CS) in the removal of hexavalent chromium. The adsorption behavior of the prepared materials (CS and nano 5%Bt/CS) was tested for the removal of chromium (VI) ions in a synthetic solution and wastewater from a tanning industry. Spectroscopic analysis like techniques FTIR, XRD and SEM/EDX have been used to characterise the adsorbents before and after their contact with chromium ions. The experimental data indicate that the adsorption of chromium proceeds kinetically according to a pseudo-second order model on both adsorbents and the apparent activation energy (Ea) have been measured to be 4.11kJmol(-1) and 15.98kJmol(-1) for chitosan and nano 5%Bt/CS, respectively. It was found that the non-linear modelling of experimental isotherms was well adapted to the Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson models. Thermodynamic parameters (i.e., change in the free energy (ΔG°), the enthalpy (ΔH°), and the entropy (ΔS°)) have been also, evaluated and the results revealed that the removal of chromium ions on both solids was done via physical adsorption. The adsorption test on a real rejection of the tanning industry shows that the CS and nano 5%Bt/CS can substitute other more expensive adsorbents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Chromium tolerance and reduction potential of Staphylococci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to study the microbiology of chromium tolerance and reduction at a fly ash dumping site in South Africa, 15 core samples were investigated. It was shown that the 30 year old dumping site exhibited high concentrations of Cr (VI) ranging from 1.6 to 9.6 mg/g. From this contaminated fly ash dumping site, 67 chromium ...

  2. Chromium Is Elevated in Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus) Skin Tissue and Is Genotoxic to Fin Whale Skin Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Catherine F; Wise, Sandra S; Thompson, W Douglas; Perkins, Christopher; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-07-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is present in the marine environment and is a known carcinogen and reproductive toxicant. Cr(VI) is the form of chromium that is well absorbed through the cell membrane. It is also the most prevalent form in seawater. We measured the total Cr levels in skin biopsies obtained from healthy free-ranging fin whales from the Gulf of Maine and found elevated levels relative to marine mammals in other parts of the world. The levels in fin whale biopsies ranged from 1.71 to 19.6 μg/g with an average level of 10.07 μg/g. We also measured the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Cr(VI) in fin whale skin cells. We found that particulate and soluble Cr(VI) are both cytotoxic and genotoxic to fin whale skin cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The concentration range used in our cell culture studies used environmentally relevant concentrations based on the biopsy measurements. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for whales in the Gulf of Maine.

  3. Removal of chromium (VI) from water using nanoscale zerovalent iron particles supported on herb-residue biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jingge; Zong, Mingzhu; Yu, Ying; Kong, Xiangrui; Du, Qiong; Liao, Qianjiahua

    2017-07-15

    A composite material consisting of nanoscale zerovalent iron particles supported on herb-residue biochar (nZVI/BC) was synthesized and used for treatment of Cr(VI)-contaminated water. The effects of initial pH, chromium concentration, contact time, and competition with coexisting anions and natural organic matter (NOM) were also investigated. nZVI/BC was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy analysis (SEM), and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area was measured. TEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis before and after reaction with Cr(VI) showed that reduction and coprecipitation occurred during hexavalent chromium adsorption. The removal of Cr(VI) was highly pH-dependent and the adsorption kinetics data agreed well with the pseudo-second-order model. The presence of SO42- and humic acid promoted Cr(VI) removal at both low and high concentrations, while the HCO3- inhibited the reaction. These results prove that nZVI/BC can be an effective reagent for removal of Cr(VI) from solutions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chromium Is Elevated in Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus) Skin Tissue and Is Genotoxic to Fin Whale Skin Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Catherine F.; Wise, Sandra S.; Thompson, W. Douglas; Perkins, Christopher; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is present in the marine environment and is a known carcinogen and reproductive toxicant. Cr(VI) is the form of chromium that is well absorbed through the cell membrane. It is also the most prevalent form in seawater. We measured the total Cr levels in skin biopsies obtained from healthy free-ranging fin whales from the Gulf of Maine and found elevated levels relative to marine mammals in other parts of the world. The levels in fin whale biopsies ranged from 1.71 ug/g to 19.6 ug/g with an average level of 10.07 ug/g. We also measured the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Cr(VI) in fin whale skin cells. We found that particulate and soluble Cr(VI) are both cytotoxic and genotoxic to fin whale skin cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The concentration range used in our cell culture studies used environmentally relevant concentrations based on the biopsy measurements. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for whales in the Gulf of Maine. PMID:25805270

  5. The influence of Chromium supplied by tanning and wet finishing processes on the formation of cr(vi in leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Fuck

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromium used in leather manufacturing can be oxidized from the trivalent to the hexavalent state, causing environmental concerns. In this study, the influence of Cr(III from tanning, deacidification pH, fatliquors, chrome retanning and vegetable retanning on the formation of Cr(VI in leather was analyzed by comparing natural and aged samples. In wet-blue leather, even after aging and in fatliquored leathers that did not suffer the aging process, the presence of Cr(VI was always below the detection limit of 3 mg/kg. Considering the presence of Cr(VI, the supply of chromium during the retanning step had a more significant effect than during the tanning. In the fatliquoring process with sulfites, fish and synthetic fatliquor leather samples contained Cr(VI when aged, and the highest concentration detected was 26.7 mg/kg. The evaluation of Cr(VI formation led to recommendations for regulation in the leather industry.

  6. Highly integrated flow assembly for automated dynamic extraction and determination of readily bioaccessible chromium(VI) in soils exploiting carbon nanoparticle-based solid-phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosende, Maria; Miro, Manuel; Cerda, Victor [University of the Balearic Islands, Department of Chemistry, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Segundo, Marcela A.; Lima, Jose L.F.C. [University of Porto, REQUIMTE, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Porto (Portugal)

    2011-06-15

    An automated dynamic leaching test integrated in a portable flow-based setup is herein proposed for reliable determination of readily bioaccessible Cr(VI) under worst-case scenarios in soils containing varying levels of contamination. The manifold is devised to accommodate bi-directional flow extraction followed by processing of extracts via either in-line clean-up/preconcentration using multi-walled carbon nanotubes or automatic dilution at will, along with Cr(VI) derivatization and flow-through spectrophotometric detection. The magnitude of readily mobilizable Cr(VI) pools was ascertained by resorting to water extraction as promulgated by current standard leaching tests. The role of carbon nanomaterials for the uptake of Cr(VI) in soil leachates and the configuration of the packed column integrated in the flow manifold were investigated in detail. The analytical performance of the proposed system for in vitro bioaccessibility tests was evaluated in chromium-enriched soils at environmentally relevant levels and in a standard reference soil material (SRM 2701) with a certified value of total hexavalent chromium. The automated method was proven to afford unbiased assessment of water-soluble Cr(VI) in soils as a result of the minimization of the chromium species transformation. By combination of the kinetic leaching profile and a first-order leaching model, the water-soluble Cr(VI) fraction in soils was determined in merely 6 h against >24 h taken in batchwise steady-state standard methods. (orig.)

  7. Magnetochemistry of chromium (III) (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, K. E.; Burriel, R.; Carlin, Richard L.

    1988-04-01

    There are relatively few superexchange-coupled antiferromagnets of chromium (III), largely because the exchange interactions are so weak. We have begun a program to study these materials and present magnetic susceptibility measurements on several new systems. We find that a polycrystalline sample of [Cr(NH3)5Cl]Cl2 behaves as a magnetic linear chain, and orders antiferromagnetically at about 600 mK, and that single crystals of [Cr(en)3]X3ṡ3H2O order at 130 mK when X is chloride. The analogous bromide orders at 112 mK. The chloride exhibits an easy axis, parallel to the longitudinal axis, while the bromide exhibits an easy plane. The data have been successfully fitted by several different procedures which result in much the same parameters. In addition to the exchange, it is necessary to include in the analysis the zero-field splitting of the chromium ions. The zero-field splitting in paramagnetic NaMg[Cr(oxalate)3]ṡ9H2O has also been measured.

  8. Chromium-Induced Ultrastructural Changes and Oxidative Stress in Roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftherios P. Eleftheriou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromium (Cr is an abundant heavy metal in nature, toxic to living organisms. As it is widely used in industry and leather tanning, it may accumulate locally at high concentrations, raising concerns for human health hazards. Though Cr effects have extensively been investigated in animals and mammals, in plants they are poorly understood. The present study was then undertaken to determine the ultrastructural malformations induced by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI], the most toxic form provided as 100 μM potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7, in the root tip cells of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. A concentration-dependent decrease of root growth and a time-dependent increase of dead cells, callose deposition, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production and peroxidase activity were found in Cr(VI-treated seedlings, mostly at the transition root zone. In the same zone, nuclei remained ultrastructurally unaffected, but in the meristematic zone some nuclei displayed bulbous outgrowths or contained tubular structures. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER was less affected under Cr(VI stress, but Golgi bodies appeared severely disintegrated. Moreover, mitochondria and plastids became spherical and displayed translucent stroma with diminished internal membranes, but noteworthy is that their double-membrane envelopes remained structurally intact. Starch grains and electron dense deposits occurred in the plastids. Amorphous material was also deposited in the cell walls, the middle lamella and the vacuoles. Some vacuoles were collapsed, but the tonoplast appeared integral. The plasma membrane was structurally unaffected and the cytoplasm contained opaque lipid droplets and dense electron deposits. All electron dense deposits presumably consisted of Cr that is sequestered from sensitive sites, thus contributing to metal tolerance. It is concluded that the ultrastructural changes are reactive oxygen species (ROS-correlated and the malformations observed are organelle specific.

  9. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10 chro...

  10. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  11. Improved physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for oral exposures to chromium in mice, rats, and humans to address temporal variation and sensitive populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirman, C R; Suh, M; Proctor, D M; Hays, S M

    2017-06-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in mice, rats, and humans developed previously (Kirman et al., 2012, 2013), was updated to reflect an improved understanding of the toxicokinetics of the gastrointestinal tract following oral exposures. Improvements were made to: (1) the reduction model, which describes the pH-dependent reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in the gastrointestinal tract under both fasted and fed states; (2) drinking water pattern simulations, to better describe dosimetry in rodents under the conditions of the NTP cancer bioassay; and (3) parameterize the model to characterize potentially sensitive human populations. Important species differences, sources of non-linear toxicokinetics, and human variation are identified and discussed within the context of human health risk assessment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. PNIPAm grafted amino-functionalized mesoporous silica for thermo-responsive chromium elimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Jinwon; Lee, Hyesun

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the effective elimination of Cr(VI) was achieved by thermo-responsive polymer-grafted amino-functionalized mesoporous silica (MS@APTES@PNIPAm) in aqueous solution. The MS@APTES@PNIPAm was successfully synthesized by the coupling of 3-MOP and N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAm) in 3-aminoproyltriethoxysilane (APTES) grafted mesoporous silica surface. The thermo-responsive elimination of Cr(VI) was demonstrated at various pH levels and at room temperature and 40 °C, respectively. The characterization of the synthesized materials was achieved by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and nitrogen (N2) adsorption-desorption. The maximum adsorption of hexavalent chromium on MS@APTES@PNIPAm in aqueous solution was 123.8 mg g-1 at 40 °C in pH 2.5. Furthermore, the results of isotherm and kinetic experiments demonstrated that the adsorption behavior of Cr(VI) on MS@APTES@PNIPAm was well fitted to a Langmuir plot with a pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion model.

  13. Kinetics and Products of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Iron(II/III)-Bearing Clay Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe-Wong, Claresta; Brown, Gordon E; Maher, Kate

    2017-09-05

    Hexavalent chromium is a water-soluble pollutant, the mobility of which can be controlled by reduction of Cr(VI) to less soluble, environmentally benign Cr(III). Iron(II/III)-bearing clay minerals are widespread potential reductants of Cr(VI), but the kinetics and pathways of Cr(VI) reduction by such clay minerals are poorly understood. We reacted aqueous Cr(VI) with two abiotically reduced clay minerals: an Fe-poor montmorillonite and an Fe-rich nontronite. The effects of ionic strength, pH, total Fe content, and the fraction of reduced structural Fe(II) [Fe(II)/Fe(total)] were examined. The last variable had the largest effect on Cr(VI) reduction kinetics: for both clay minerals, the rate constant of Cr(VI) reduction varies by more than 3 orders of magnitude with Fe(II)/Fe(total) and is described by a linear free energy relationship. Under all conditions examined, Cr and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra show that the main Cr-bearing product is a Cr(III)-hydroxide and that Fe remains in the clay structure after reacting with Cr(VI). This study helps to quantify our understanding of the kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction by Fe(II/III)-bearing clay minerals and may improve predictions of Cr(VI) behavior in subsurface environments.

  14. The Applicability of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Assessing Chromium Induced Toxicity in the Fish Labeo rohita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ankur; Dange, Swati

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of metal's toxicity in freshwater is one of the imperative areas of research and there is an emergent concern on the development of techniques for detecting toxic effects in aquatic animals. Oxidative stress biomarkers are very useful in assessing the health of aquatic life and more in depth studies are necessary to establish an exact cause effect relationship. Therefore, to study the effectiveness of this approach, a laboratory study was conducted in the fish Labeo rohita as a function of hexavalent chromium and the toxicity indices using a battery of oxidative stress biomarkers such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione reductase (GR) in the liver, muscle, gills, and brain have been studied along with biometric parameters, behavioral changes, and Cr bioaccumulation. A significant increased HSI was observed in contrast to CF which reduced significantly. SOD, CAT, and GR activity increased significantly in all the tissues of treated fishes. The bioaccumulation of Cr was highest in liver followed by gills, muscle, and brain. This study highlights the significance of using a set of integrated biomarker and advocate to include these parameters in National Water Quality Monitoring Program in areas potentially polluted with metals to assess the health of the ecosystem. PMID:25302308

  15. Carcinogenic risk of chromium, copper and arsenic in CCA-treated wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Nobutaka; Yamanoshita, Osamu; Thang, Nguyen Dinh; Yajima, Ichiro; Nakano, Chihiro; Wenting, Wu; Ohnuma, Shoko; Kato, Masashi

    2015-11-01

    We showed that 2.1% of 233 pieces of lumber debris after the Great East Japan Earthquake was chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. Since hexavalent chromium (Cr), copper (Cu) and pentavalent arsenic (As) in the debris may be diffused in the air via incineration, we exposed human lung normal (BEAS-2B) and carcinoma (A549) cells to Cr, Cu and As at the molar ratio in a representative CCA-treated wood. Co-exposure to 0.10 μM Cr and 0.06 μM As, which solely had no effect on colony formation, synergistically promoted colony formation in BEAS-2B cells, but not A549 cells, with activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway. Sole exposure and co-exposure to Cu showed limited effects. Since previous reports showed Cr and As concentrations to which human lungs might be exposed, our results suggest the importance to avoid diffusion of Cr and As in the air via incineration of debris including CCA-treated wood after the disaster. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Leaching of chromium from chromium contaminated soil: Speciation study and geochemical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Darko H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of chromium between soil and leachate was monitored. A natural process of percolating rainwater through the soil was simulated in the laboratory conditions and studied with column leaching extraction. Migration of chromium in the soil is conditioned by the level of chromium soil contamination, the soil organic matter content, and rainwater acidity. Chromium (III and chromium(VI were determined by spectrophotometric method with diphenilcarbazide in acidic media. Comparing the results of chromium speciation in leachate obtained by experimental model systems and geochemical modelling calculations using Visual MINTEQ model, a correlation was observed regarding the influence of the tested parameters. Leachate solutions showed that the concentration of Cr depended on the organic matter content. The influence of pH and soil organic matter content is in compliance after its definition through experimental and theoretical way. The computer model - Stockholm Humic Model used to evaluate the leaching results corresponded rather well with the measured values.

  17. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    retain an isotopically light Cr signature. Cr(VI) enriched in heavy Cr isotopes is then transported via river waters to the oceans and sequestered into marine sediments. Marine chemical sediments such asbanded iron formations and modern marine carbonates have proven useful in recording the Cr isotope...... with calcium carbonate in order to test the reliability of the Cr carbonate compositions. Several experimental approaches have been employed to elucidate the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopes when Cr(VI) is incorporated into calcium carbonate phases. These results indicate that at lower Cr concentrations......Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past...

  18. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metalceramic samples were made from nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C, according to the manufactures manuals and instructions from ISO 9693: 1996. Three-point bending test was performed up to the ceramic fracture. The fracture load was measured on an universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464, with cross-head speed of 0,05mm/min. Results. The results of this study confirmed the significant differences between the metal-ceramic bond strength (p < 0.01 and elastic modulus (p < 0.001 of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys, where cobalt-chromium alloys showed higher values for both tested parameters. Conclusion. Cobalt-chromium metal-ceramic alloys can successfully replace nickel-chromium alloys, especially for fabrication of long-span metal-ceramic bridges due to the great flexural strength.

  19. [Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirković, Nemanja

    2007-04-01

    Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strenght and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metal-ceramic samples were made from nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99) and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C), according to the manufactures manuals and instructions from ISO 9693: 1996. Three-point bending test was performed up to the ceramic fracture. The fracture load was measured on an universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464), with cross-head speed of 0,05mm/min. The results of this study confirmed the significant differences between the metal-ceramic bond strength (p chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys, where cobalt-chromium alloys showed higher values for both tested parameters. Cobalt-chromium metal-ceramic alloys can successfully replace nickel-chromium alloys, especially for fabrication of long-span metal-ceramic bridges due to the great flexural strength.

  20. Localized Corrosion of Chromium Coated Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Beentjes, P.; Mol, A.; Terryn, H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the studies of the local corrosion behaviour of chromium-coated ultra low carbon steel in NaCl solution using polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and SVET.

  1. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  2. Contribution to the study of the biological properties of compounds labeled with radio-chromium {sup 51}Cr; Contribution a l'etude des proprietes biologiques des composes marques au radiochrome {sup 51}Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingrand, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-15

    Among the radioisotopes commonly used in biology and medicine which are controlled Individually in the Radioelement Departement of the Saclay Nuclear Research Centre before being sent to the users, the author has chosen chromium 51 incorporated in inorganic salts or in organic substrates for a study of the biological properties of the compounds. In the first part, he has compared the pathways followed by the radioactive sodium chromate and chromic chloride mixed with blood or given to the whole animal, the object being to determine whether a reduction of hexavalent chromium occurs, both in vitro and in vivo. In the second part, the author has tried to show the validity of using, various substrates labeled with chromium 51, red cells, haemoglobin, plasma proteins and cytochrome c. The results obtained have contributed to underline the interest of using such compounds for biological applications. (author) [French] Parmi les radioisotopes d'utilisation courants en biologie et en medecine qui sont l'objet d'un controle particulier dans le Departement des Radioelements du Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay avant leur diffusion aux utilisateurs, l'auteur a choisi le chrome 51 incorpore a des sels mineraux ou a des substrats organiques, afin d'en etudier les proprietes biologiques. Dans la premiere partie, il a compare le sort du chromate de sodium et du chlorure chromique radioactifs melanges a du sang ou administres a l'animal entier en s'efforcant de mettre en evidence une reduction du chrome hexavalent aussi bien in vitro qu'in vivo. Dans la deuxieme partie, il a cherche a etablir la validite de l'emploi de differents substrats marques au chrome 51, l'hematie, l'hemoglobine, les proteines plasmatiques et le cytochrome c. Les resultats obtenus ont permis de souligner le reel interet des applications biologiques des composes marques par le radioisotope. (auteur)

  3. Chromium in human nutrition: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, W

    1993-04-01

    This review summarizes the results of 15 controlled studies supplementing defined Cr(III) compounds to subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. Three of these (3-4 mumol Cr/d for > 2 mo) produced no beneficial effects: serum glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations remained unchanged. The remaining 12 interventions improved the efficiency of insulin or the blood lipid profile of subjects (ranging from malnourished children and healthy middle-aged individuals to insulin-requiring diabetics). In addition, three cases of impaired glucose tolerance after long-term total parenteral alimentation responding to Cr supplementation have been reported. Chromium potentiates the action of insulin in vitro and in vivo; maximal in vitro activity requires a special chemical form, termed Glucose Tolerance Factor and tentatively identified as a Cr-nicotinic acid complex. Its complete structural identification is a major challenge to chromium research. The development and validation of a procedure to diagnose chromium status is the second challenge. Such a test would allow the assessment of incidence and severity of deficiency in the population and the selection of deficiency in the population and the selection of chromium-responsive individuals. The third challenge is the definition of chromium's mode of action on parameters of lipid metabolism that have been reported from some studies but not others. Future research along these lines might establish whether chromium deficiency is a factor in the much discussed "Syndrome X" of insulin resistance.

  4. Kinetics of the Autoreduction of Hexavalent Americium in Aqueous Nitric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Travis S; Horne, Gregory P; Dares, Christopher J; Pimblott, Simon M; Mezyk, Stephen P; Mincher, Bruce J

    2017-07-17

    The rate of reduction of hexavalent 243 Am due to self-radiolysis was measured across a range of total americium and nitric acid concentrations. These so-called autoreduction rates exhibited zero-order kinetics with respect to the concentration of hexavalent americium, and pseudo-first-order kinetics with respect to the total concentration of americium. However, the rate constants did vary with nitric acid concentration, resulting in values of 0.0048 ± 0.0003, 0.0075 ± 0.0005, and 0.0054 ± 0.0003 h -1 for 1.0, 3.0, and 6.5 M HNO 3 , respectively. This indicates that reduction is due to reaction of hexavalent americium with the radiolysis products of total americium decay. The concentration changes of Am(III), Am(V), and Am(VI) were determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. The Am(III) molar extinction coefficients are known; however, the unknown values for the Am(V) and Am(VI) absorbances across the studied range of nitric acid concentrations were determined by sensitivity analysis in which a mass balance with the known total americium concentration was obtained. The new extinction coefficients and reduction rate constants have been tabulated here. Multiscale radiation chemical modeling using a reaction set with both known and optimized rate coefficients was employed to achieve excellent agreement with the experimental results, and indicates that radiolytically produced nitrous acid from nitric acid radiolysis and hydrogen peroxide from water radiolysis are the important reducing agents. Since these species also react with each other, modeling indicated that the highest concentrations of these species available for Am(VI) reduction occurred at 3.0 M HNO 3 . This is in agreement with the empirical finding that the highest rate constant for autoreduction occurred at the intermediate acid concentration.

  5. Chromium-induced skin damage among Taiwanese cement workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Wang, Po-Chih; Wu, Jyun-De; Sheu, Shiann-Cherng

    2016-10-01

    Little research has been done on the relationships between chromium exposure, skin barrier function, and other hygienic habits in cement workers. Our purpose was to investigate chromium-induced skin barrier disruption due to cement exposure among cement workers. One hundred and eight cement workers were recruited in this study. Urinary chromium concentration was used to characterize exposure levels. The biological exposure index was used to separate high and low chromium exposure. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was used to assess the skin barrier function. TEWL was significantly increased in workers with high chromium exposure levels than those with low chromium exposure levels (p = 0.048). A positive correlation was also found between urinary chromium concentration and TEWL (R = 0.28, p = 0.004). After adjusting for smoking status and glove use, a significant correlation between urinary chromium concentrations and TEWL remained. Moreover, workers who smoked and had a high chromium exposure had significantly increased TEWL compared to nonsmokers with low chromium exposure (p = 0.01). Skin barrier function of cement workers may have been disrupted by chromium in cement, and smoking might significantly enhance such skin barrier perturbation with chromium exposure. Decreased chromium skin exposure and smoking cessation should be encouraged at work. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Serum chromium levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Sundararaman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure serum chromium level in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM from Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with gestational diabetes, 60 age matched controls. Inclusion criteria: Gestational age 22-28 weeks, age group 20-35 years. Exclusion Criteria: Gestational age beyond 28 weeks, malnutrition or presence of infection. Serum chromium was measured using inductive couple plasma emission spectrometer. Results: Serum chromium levels of women with GDM, 1.59+/-0.02 ng/ml (range: 0.16-4.0 ng/ml were lower than in controls (4.58+/-0.62 ng/ml; range 0.82-5.33 ng/ml (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences among cases and controls when subdivided by parity. Conclusions: Women with GDM from a South Indian city had lower levels of serum chromium compared to pregnant women without GDM. Studies may be done whether chromium supplementation is useful in this group of women.

  7. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration.

  8. Surface Chemistry and Spectroscopy of Chromium in Inorganic Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the surface chemistry and spectroscopy of chromium in inorganic oxides. Characterization of the molecular structures of chromium; Mechanics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions; Mobility and reactivity on oxidic surfaces.

  9. Mössbauer and magnetization studies of nanosize chromium ferrite

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    In spite of this much magnetization in the chromium ferrite nanoparticles, no hyperfine ... Iron, chromium and oxygen form a stable oxide FeCr2O4 known as iron chromite. ... Nanosize chromium ferrites in the size range of 6 to 35 nm were synthesized by .... As we know in zinc ferrite the magnetization appears due to cationic ...

  10. Levels of Lead, Cadmium and Chromium in Oreochromis Niloticus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lead (Pb), Cadmium (Cd) and Chromium (Cr) levels in Oreochromis niloticus, aquatic plants, water and sawdust were collected and analyzed for Lead, Cadmium and Chromium using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Results obtained showed that sawdust had the highest Lead and Chromium contents of 32.0 + 0.99 μg/g ...

  11. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.2326 Section 73.2326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and specifications.The color additive chromium hydroxide green shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  12. 21 CFR 73.1327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.1327 Section 73.1327... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium oxide greens is principally chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3). (2) Color additive...

  13. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.1326 Section 73.1326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3·XH2O...

  14. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.2327 Section 73.2327... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens shall conform in identify and specifications to the...

  15. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens (chromic oxide) (CAS Reg. No. 1308-38-9...

  16. 75 FR 67100 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... COMMISSION Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... chromium from Japan. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it has instituted a review pursuant... revocation of the antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan would be likely to lead...

  17. Native Chromium Resistant Staphylococci Species from a Fly Ash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty-six chromium-resistant Staphylococci species belonging to S. epidermidis, S. aureus, S. saprophyticus and S. arlettae were previously isolated from a chromium-polluted Fly ash (FA) dumping site in South Africa. However the genetic mechanisms responsible for chromium resistance were not known. Polymerase chain ...

  18. ELECTROSLAG CАSTING OF CHROMIUM BASED ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Hoon Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the electroslag remelting (ESR process schemes was carried out. For heat-resistant material on the basis of chromium chosen scheme crucible ESR with nonconsumable bifilar electrodes. Developed and manufactured laboratory plant for studying the processes of electroslag remelting crucible chromium-based alloys. Samples from chromium based alloy were obtained.

  19. Leaching of chromium from chromium contaminated soil: Speciation study and geochemical modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anđelković Darko H; Anđelković Tatjana D; Nikolić Ružica S; Purenović Milovan M; Blagojević Srđan D; Bojić Aleksandar Lj; Ristić Milica M

    2012-01-01

    Distribution of chromium between soil and leachate was monitored. A natural process of percolating rainwater through the soil was simulated in the laboratory conditions and studied with column leaching extraction...

  20. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mirković, Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strenght and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most...

  1. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mirkovic, Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most...

  2. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includesan interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes inthe epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium...... allergy, emphasizing that the investigation of chromium allergy is still far from complete. Our review article on chromium focuses on the allergen’s chemical properties, its potential exposure sources, and the allergen’s interaction with the skin, and also provides an overview of the regulations...

  3. Mechanistic insight into chromium(VI) reduction by oxalic acid in the presence of manganese(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrobel, Katarzyna; Corrales Escobosa, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez Ibarra, Alan Alexander; Mendez Garcia, Manuel; Yanez Barrientos, Eunice; Wrobel, Kazimierz, E-mail: kazimier@ugto.mx

    2015-12-30

    Over the past few decades, reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) has been studied in many physicochemical contexts. In this research, we reveal the mechanism underlying the favorable effect of Mn(II) observed during Cr(VI) reduction by oxalic acid using liquid chromatography with spectrophotometric diode array detector (HPLC–DAD), nitrogen microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometry (HPLC–MP-AES), and high resolution mass spectrometry (ESI–QTOFMS). Both reaction mixtures contained potassium dichromate (0.67 mM Cr(VI)) and oxalic acid (13.3 mM), pH 3, one reaction mixture contained manganese sulfate (0.33 mM Mn(II)). In the absence of Mn(II) only trace amounts of reaction intermediates were generated, most likely in the following pathways: (1) Cr(VI) → Cr(IV) and (2) Cr(VI) + Cr(IV) → 2Cr(V). In the presence of Mn(II), the active reducing species appeared to be Mn(II) bis-oxalato complex (J); the proposed reaction mechanism involves a one-electron transfer from J to any chromium compound containing Cr=O bond, which is reduced to Cr−OH, and the generation of Mn(III) bis-oxalato complex (K). Conversion of K to J was observed, confirming the catalytic role of Mn(II). Since no additional acidification was required, the results obtained in this study may be helpful in designing a new, environmentally friendly strategy for the remediation of environments contaminated with Cr(VI).

  4. XRCC1 Arg399Gln was associated with repair capacity for DNA damage induced by occupational chromium exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Occupational chromium exposure may induce DNA damage and lead to lung cancer and other work-related diseases. DNA repair gene polymorphisms, which may alter the efficiency of DNA repair, thus may contribute to genetic susceptibility of DNA damage. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the genetic variations of 9 major DNA repair genes could modulate the hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI))-induced DNA damage. Findings The median (P25-P75) of Olive tail moment was 0.93 (0.58–1.79) for individuals carrying GG genotype of XRCC1 Arg399Gln (G/A), 0.73 (0.46–1.35) for GA heterozygote and 0.50 (0.43–0.93) for AA genotype. Significant difference was found among the subjects with three different genotypes (P = 0.048) after adjusting the confounding factors. The median of Olive tail moment of the subjects carrying A allele (the genotypes of AA and GA) was 0.66 (0.44–1.31), which was significantly lower than that of subjects with GG genotype (P = 0.043). The A allele conferred a significantly reduced risk of DNA damage with the OR of 0.39 (95% CI: 0.15–0.99, P = 0.048). No significant association was found between the XRCC1Arg194Trp, ERCC1 C8092A, ERCC5 His1104Asp, ERCC6 Gly399Asp, GSTP1 Ile105Val, OGG1 Ser326Cys, XPC Lys939Gln, XPD Lys751Gln and DNA damage. Conclusion The polymorphism of Arg399Gln in XRCC1 was associated with the Cr (VI)- induced DNA damage. XRCC1 Arg399Gln may serve as a genetic biomarker of susceptibility for Cr (VI)- induced DNA damage. PMID:22642904

  5. Antibacterial and cytotoxic efficacy of extracellular silver nanoparticles biofabricated from chromium reducing novel OS4 strain of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Oves

    Full Text Available Biofabricated metal nanoparticles are generally biocompatible, inexpensive, and ecofriendly, therefore, are used preferably in industries, medical and material science research. Considering the importance of biofabricated materials, we isolated, characterized and identified a novel bacterial strain OS4 of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (GenBank: JN247637.1. At neutral pH, this Gram negative bacterial strain significantly reduced hexavalent chromium, an important heavy metal contaminant found in the tannery effluents and minings. Subsequently, even at room temperature the supernatant of log phase grown culture of strain OS4 also reduced silver nitrate (AgNO3 to generate nanoparticles (AgNPs. These AgNPs were further characterized by UV-visible, Nanophox particle size analyzer, XRD, SEM and FTIR. As evident from the FTIR data, plausibly the protein components of supernatant caused the reduction of AgNO3. The cuboid and homogenous AgNPs showed a characteristic UV-visible peak at 428 nm with average size of ~93 nm. The XRD spectra exhibited the characteristic Bragg peaks of 111, 200, 220 and 311 facets of the face centred cubic symmetry of nanoparticles suggesting that these nanoparticles were crystalline in nature. From the nanoparticle release kinetics data, the rapid release of AgNPs was correlated with the particle size and increasing surface area of the nanoparticles. A highly significant antimicrobial activity against medically important bacteria by the biofabricated AgNPs was also revealed as decline in growth of Staphylococcus aureus (91%, Escherichia coli (69% and Serratia marcescens (66% substantially. Additionally, different cytotoxic assays showed no toxicity of AgNPs to liver function, RBCs, splenocytes and HeLa cells, hence these particles were safe to use. Therefore, this novel bacterial strain OS4 is likely to provide broad spectrum benefits for curing chromium polluted sites, for biofabrication of AgNPs and ultimately in the

  6. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim. Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. Methods. The research was performed as an experimenta...

  7. Characterization of chromium species in urban runoff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederkvist, Karin; Jensen, Marina Bergen; Holm, Peter Engelund

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the presence of the element Cr in its toxic hexavalent form Cr(VI) in stormwater runoff from urban areas. Most studies report only total Cr concentration, i.e., including also the nontoxic Cr(III) molecular form. The objective of this study was to evaluate a field method based...... on cation-exchange for characterization of Cr species in urban stormwater runoff and soil leachate. We used a 0.05 mol L-1 Na and Ca solution and a soil leachate as matrices and spiked these with Cr(III), Cr(VI), or both in the concentration range of 1 to 100 mu g L-1. We then filtered the test samples...... that can be applied to urban runoff in the field. Furthermore, cartridge speciation methods should ideally be tested before being applied on solutions containing organic matter....

  8. Extraction Of Chromium From Leather Chrome Shaving Dust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashiqur Rahaman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Leather processing involves transformation of putrescible animal hides and skin into non putrescible leather. Leather industry generates a huge amount of solid waste containing chromium. These solid wastes were disposed of through land filling which causes leaching out of in soil and water. Now a day increasing environmental legislations have encouraged tannery industry to develop a new technology. In this study we incinerated chrome shaving dust at 500oC to 7000C for chromium extraction. Various oxidizing acids with different concentration were used for chromium extraction. Extracted chromium was measured by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Recovery of chromium was in the range of 297 mgL to 222 mgL. Nitric acid extracted maximum amount of chromium while sulfuric acid extracted minimum amount of chromium.

  9. BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM (VI) USING IMMOBILIZED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-05-20

    May 20, 2016 ... water and air. It affects the growth of flora and fauna which in turn affect human health negatively. Chromium could also bio-accumulate in plants and animals and this becomes ... The sorption kinetic models of Cr (VI) onto the biosorbents were examined with ... bulk density, moisture and ash contents.

  10. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  11. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al...

  12. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    CERN Document Server

    Marek, T; Vertes, A; El-Sharif, M; McDougall, J; Chisolm, C U

    2000-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  13. Thermodynamic Properties of Chromium Adsorption by Sediments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2013-06-19

    Jun 19, 2013 ... Department of Pure and Industrial Chemistry, Bayero University, PMB 3011, Kano, Nigeria. Email: ladanmagaji@yahoo.com ... quantify the processes governing the interactions of various solutes with soils (Amacher et. ... industrial effluent using removal of chromium from electroplating industry effluents by.

  14. Chromium Tolerance and Bioremoval by Cyanobacteria Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cyanobacterial species Nostoc calcicola HH-12 and Chroococcus minutus HH-11 isolated from a textile mill oxidation pond were examined individually and as consortium for their chromium(VI) tolerance and bioremoval from aqueous solutions. Both species were tolerant to the metal and showed significant increase ...

  15. Removal of chromium (VI from aqueous medium using chemically modified banana peels as efficient low-cost adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The adsorptive removal of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI from aqueous solutions was investigated by acrylonitrile grafted banana peels (GBPs. Banana peels were treated with 10% HCl, followed by alkaline hydrolysis with 10% NaOH, and washed thoroughly. The bleaching of alkali hydrolyzed peels was carried out with sodium chlorate (NaClO3 in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and glacial acetic acid. The grafting co-polymerization of acrylonitrile onto the bleached pulp was initiated by Fenton’s reagent (Fe+2/H2O2. The optimum conditions for adsorption of Cr(VI were found to be the following: pH 3, adsorbent dose 4 g/L, concentration 400 mg/L and contact time of 120 min. The surface morphology of adsorbent was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM before and after the adsorption. The adsorption of Cr(VI onto grafted banana peels (GBPs was recorded to be 96%. The adsorption data were fully fitted with the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm model and followed a pseudo-second order kinetic model. Thermodynamic study showed that the adsorption is exothermic and spontaneous. Owing to high efficiency and low cost, grafted banana peels (GBPs can be used as effective adsorbent for Cr(VI removal from wastewater.

  16. Cleaning-induced arsenic mobilization and chromium oxidation from CCA-wood deck: Potential risk to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, J; de Oliveira, L M; da Silva, E B; Lessl, J M; Wilson, P C; Townsend, T; Ma, L Q

    2015-09-01

    Concern about children's exposure to arsenic (As) from wood treated with chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA) led to its withdrawal from residential use in 2004. However, due to its effectiveness, millions of American homes still have CCA-wood decks on which children play. This study evaluated the effects of three deck-cleaning methods on formation of dislodgeable As and hexavalent chromium (CrVI) on CCA-wood surfaces and in leachate. Initial wipes from CCA-wood wetted with water showed 3-4 times more dislodgeable As than on dry wood. After cleaning with a bleach solution, 9.8-40.3μg/100cm(2) of CrVI was found on the wood surface, with up to 170μg/L CrVI in the leachate. Depending on the cleaning method, 699-2473mg of As would be released into the environment from cleaning a 18.6-m(2)-deck. Estimated As doses in children aged 1-6 after 1h of playing on a wet CCA-wood deck were 0.25-0.41μg/kg. This is the first study to identify increased dislodgeable As on wet CCA-wood and to evaluate dislodgeable CrVI after bleach application. Our data suggest that As and CrVI in 25-year old CCA-wood still show exposure risks for children and potential for soil contamination. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. The effects of chromium(VI) on the thioredoxin system: Implications for redox regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are highly redox active and have long been recognized as potent cytotoxins and carcinogens. The intracellular reduction of Cr(VI) generates reactive Cr intermediates, which are themselves strong oxidants, as well as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical. These probably contribute to the oxidative damage and effects on redox-sensitive transcription factors that have been reported. However, the identification of events that initiate these signaling changes has been elusive. More recent studies show that Cr(VI) causes irreversible inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and oxidation of thioredoxin (Trx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx). Mitochondrial Trx2/Prx3 are more sensitive to Cr(VI) treatment than cytosolic Trx1/Prx1, although both compartments show thiol oxidation with higher doses or longer treatments. Thiol redox proteomics demonstrate that Trx2, Prx3, and Trx1 are among the most sensitive proteins in cells to Cr(VI) treatment. Their oxidation could therefore represent initiating events that have widespread implications for protein thiol redox control and for multiple aspects of redox signaling. This review summarizes the effects of Cr(VI) on the TrxR/Trx system and how these events could influence a number of downstream redox signaling systems that are influenced by Cr(VI) exposure. Some of the signaling events discussed include the activation of apoptosis signal regulating kinase and MAP kinases (p38 and JNK) and the modulation of a number of redox-sensitive transcription factors including AP-1, NF-κB, p53, and Nrf2. PMID:22542445

  18. Accumulation and detoxification dynamics of Chromium and antioxidant responses in juvenile rare minnow, Gobiocypris rarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cong; Li, Meng; Zheng, Yao; Zhou, Ying; Wu, Feili; Wang, Zaizhao

    2017-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) compounds are hazardous via all exposure routes. To explore the dynamics of Cr accumulation and elimination and to reveal the mechanisms underlying detoxification and antioxidation in juvenile Gobiocypris rarus, one-month old G. rarus larvae were exposed to 0.1mgL-1 Cr6+ for four weeks for accumulation and subsequently placed to clean water for another week for depuration. The contents of Cr were measured weekly in the whole body of G. rarus juveniles. The activities of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR), and contents of glutathione (GSH) and malonaldehyde (MDA), and transcripts of cat, Cu/Zn-sod, Mn-sod, gpx1, gstpi, gr, mt1, nrf2 and uba52 were determined. The results indicated that G. rarus juveniles had a strong ability to resist the Cr accumulation by Cr6+ exposure and to remove Cr from the body in clean water. In addition, GST and MT proteins may be involved in the detoxification of Cr6+. Moreover, Cr6+-induced GST detoxification in G. rarus juveniles might be accomplished through the Nrf2-mediated regulation of gene expressions. The antioxidant enzyme systems exhibited a response mechanism of the protective enzymes in organisms when they are subjected to external environmental stress. Two weeks of Cr6+ treatments could have led to the damage and consecutive degradation of antioxidant enzymes via ubiquitination, and MT proteins could be involved in protecting the activity of these enzymes. The capability of antioxidant enzyme systems to recover from the Cr6+-induced damage was strong in G. rarus juveniles after Cr6+ was removed from the water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sexually Dimorphic Impact of Chromium Accumulation on Human Placental Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, Sakhila K; Stanley, Jone A; Taylor, Robert J; Sivakumar, Kirthiram K; Arosh, Joe A; Zeng, Lixia; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2017-10-23

    Environmental contamination with CrVI is a growing problem both in the U.S and developing countries. CrVI is widely used in numerous industries. Environmental exposure to hexavalent chromium (CrVI) adversely affects pregnancy outcomes and subsequent health of two generations, resulting in higher pregnancy loss, spontaneous abortion and low birth rate. Pregnant women exposed to CrVI through occupational settings experience increased risk of spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, preterm birth, and neonatal death. Children of the CrVI exposed women experience respiratory problems, perinatal jaundice, and increased birth defects. Since placental dysfunction may have a role in such adverse pregnancy outcome, we tested the hypothesis that environmental Cr exposure in pregnant women results in Cr accumulation in the human placenta, which could increase placental oxidative stress by disrupting antioxidant machinery and inducing apoptosis . Studies using frozen, deidentified human term placenta samples indicated that: (i) Cr accumulates in human term placenta tissues and (ii) increase in Cr accumulation is positively correlated with oxidative stress and apoptotic markers, and altered antioxidants levels. Interestingly, there was a sexual dimorphism in the correlation between Cr accumulation and oxidative stress, and expression of apoptotic and antioxidant markers. Mechanistic in vitro studies using human trophoblast cells BeWo confirmed the detrimental effects of Cr in altering antioxidant genes. For the first time, the current study provides evidence in support of a positive correlation between Cr accumulation in the human placenta and accelerated oxidative stress, with a gender bias towards the male sex. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Design and performance of chromium mist generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirgar Aram

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium mist generator is an essential tool for conducting researches and making science-based recommendations to evaluate air pollution and its control systems. The purpose of this research was to design and construct a homogenous chromium mist generator and the study of some effective factors including sampling height and distances between samplers in side-by-side sampling on chromium mist sampling method. A mist generator was constructed, using a chromium electroplating bath in pilot scale. Concentration of CrO3 and sulfuric acid in plating solution was 125 g L-1 and 1.25 g L-1, respectively. In order to create permanent air sampling locations, a Plexiglas cylindrical chamber (75 cm height, 55 cm i.d was installed the bath overhead. Sixty holes were produced on the chamber in 3 rows (each 20. The distance between rows and holes was 15 and 7.5 cm, respectively. Homogeneity and effective factors were studied via side-by-side air sampling method. So, 48 clusters of samples were collected on polyvinyl chloride (PVC filters housed in sampling cassettes. Cassettes were located in 35, 50, and 65 cm above the solution surface with less than 7.5 and/or 7.5-15 cm distance between heads. All samples were analyzed according to the NIOSH method 7600. According to the ANOVA test, no significant differences were observed between different sampling locations in side-by-side sampling (P=0.82 and between sampling heights and different samplers distances (P=0.86 and 0.86, respectively. However, there were notable differences between means of coefficient of variations (CV in various heights and distances. It is concluded that the most chromium mist homogeneity could be obtained at height 50 cm from the bath solution surface and samplers distance of < 7.5 cm.