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Sample records for hexarhopalus sculpticollis fairmaire

  1. Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Jian J. Duan; Juli R. Gould

    2014-01-01

    Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, 1888 (type locality: China) is considered the senior synonym to A. marcopoli Obenberger, 1930 (type locality: China), A. marcopoli ulmi Kurosawa, 1956 (type locality: Japan), and A. feretrius Obenberger, 1936 (type locality: Taiwan) by Jendek (1994) in a revision...

  2. Illustrated guide to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire and related species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 33 species of Agrilus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) hypothesized to be most closely related to Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (the emerald ash borer), are described and illustrated. Morphology (adults and immatures), biology, distribution, detailed taxonomic history and systematics are presented fo...

  3. Heat treatment of Firewood for Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire): Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Richard D. Bergman; Brian K. Brashaw; Scott W. Myers

    2014-01-01

    The movement of firewood within emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (EAB)-infested states and into adjoining areas has been a contributor to its spread throughout the United States and Canada. In an effort to prevent further human-aided spread of EAB and to facilitate interstate commerce, the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and cooperating...

  4. Rediscovery of Bothynus cribrarius (Fairmaire (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Dynastinae, Pentodontini: description of the male and precise location data

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    Paulo R.M. Duarte

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bothynus cribrarius (Fairmaire was rediscovered after studying the MNRJ and FIOC collections. The male is described and illustrated for the first time. Accurate location data is presented after 130 years since its species description.

  5. Influence of temperature and diet on the development of Ulomoides dermestoides (Fairmaire, 1893 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae, Diaperinae

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    Renato C. Marinoni

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Ulomoides dermestoides (Fairmaire, 1893 develops in stored food products (peanuts, maize, oats, rice, sorghum, etc. and breeds successfully in the laboratory. To determine the best conditions for development, experiments were set up in different temperatures and diets, similar to storage conditions of peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.. The higher viability of individuals and the shorter developmental time were observed in the diet composed of hulls and seeds of fruits at 21 and 24°C.Ulomoides dermestoides (Fairmaire, 1893 é um coleóptero que se desenvolve em produtos armazenados (amendoim, milho, aveia, arroz, sorgo, etc. e é facilmente criado em laboratório. Para avaliar as melhores condições de desenvolvimento foram estabelecidos experimentos em diferentes temperaturas e em dietas definidas por três diferentes condições de armazenamento de amendoim (Arachis hypogaea L.. A maior viabilidade de indivíduos e o menor tempo de desenvolvimento foram verificados na dieta constituída por frutos abertos (vagens e grãos e em temperaturas de 21 e 24°C. É discutida a possível influência da umidade relativa nos resultados.

  6. Microsatellite population genetics of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire): comparisons between Asian and North American populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson C. Keever; Christal Nieman; Larissa Ramsay; Carol E. Ritland; Leah S. Bauer; D. Barry Lyons; Jenny S. Cory

    2013-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera; Buprestidae), is an invasive wood-boring beetle native to northeast Asia. This species was first detected in Michigan USA in 2002, and is a significant threat to native and ornamental ash tree species (Fraxinus spp.) throughout North America. We...

  7. Attraction of agrilus planipennis fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) to a volatile pheromone: effects of release rate, host volatile and trap placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attraction of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, to a volatile pheromone was demonstrated in three field experiments using baited green sticky traps. A dose-response curve was generated for male A. planipennis to increasing release rates of (3Z)-dodecen-12-olide, (3Z)-lactone, in com...

  8. A contact sex pheromone component of the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Peter J.; Ryall, Krista; Barry Lyons, D.; Sweeney, Jon; Wu, Junping

    2009-05-01

    Analyses of the elytral hydrocarbons from male and female emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, that were freshly emerged vs. sexually mature (>10 days old) revealed a female-specific compound, 9-methyl-pentacosane (9-Me-C25), only present in sexually mature females. This material was synthesized by the Wittig reaction of 2-decanone with ( n-hexadecyl)-triphenylphosphonium bromide followed by catalytic reduction to yield racemic 9-Me C25, which matched the natural compound by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (retention time and EI mass spectrum). In field bioassays with freeze-killed sexually mature A. planipennis females, feral males spent significantly more time in contact and attempting copulation with unwashed females than with females that had been washed in n-hexane to remove the cuticular lipids. Hexane-washed females to which 9-Me-C25 had been reapplied elicited similar contact time and percentage of time attempting copulation as unwashed females, indicating that 9-methyl-pentacosane is a contact sex pheromone component of A. planipennis. This is the first contact sex pheromone identified in the Buprestidae.

  9. Biology and damage traits of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA WEI; YUN WU; RICHARD REARDON; TIE-HUAN SUN; MIN LU; JIANG-HUA SUN

    2007-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilusplanipennis Fairmaire)(Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is a major stem borer of ash (Fraxinus spp.). It is univoltine in Tianjin, while it is semivoltine in Heilongjiang Province, and both univoltine and semivoltine in Changchun, Jilin Province,where the majority is univoltine. The longevity of emerald ash borer adults is 17.2 ± 4.6 days (n = 45), eggs 9.0 ± 1.1 days (n = 103), univoltine larvae 308 days, semivoltine larvae 673 days, and pupae 61.2± 1.6 days (n = 45). It takes about 100 days from the time larvae bore into the phloem to when they complete the pupal cell. In a 10-year-old velvet ash (Fraxinus velutina Torr.) plantation in Tianjin, emerald ash borer preferred to oviposit on the regions of boles from 50-150 cm above ground, accounting for 76.7% of the total girdling.Girdling on the south side of the tree boles accounted for 43.40% of the total girdling. The emerald ash borer population density is higher at the edge of the plantation compared with the center.

  10. Preimaginal stages of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae: an invasive pest on ash trees (Fraxinus.

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    M Lourdes Chamorro

    Full Text Available This study provides the most detailed description of the immature stages of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire to date and illustrates suites of larval characters useful in distinguishing among Agrilus Curtis species and instars. Immature stages of eight species of Agrilus were examined and imaged using light and scanning electron microscopy. For A. planipennis all preimaginal stages (egg, instars I-IV, prepupa and pupa were described. A combination of 14 character states were identified that serve to identify larvae of A. planipennis. Our results support the segregation of Agrilus larvae into two informal assemblages based on characters of the mouthparts, prothorax, and abdomen: the A. viridis and A. ater assemblages, with A. planipennis being more similar to the former. Additional evidence is provided in favor of excluding A. planipennis from the subgenus Uragrilus.

  11. All European Ash Species are Susceptible to Emerald Ash Borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae – a Far Eastern Invader

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    Yu. N. Baranchikov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae – an example of a destructive invasive insect which abruptly enlarged its initially East-Asian area in 80–90s of the previous century. Nowadays this species is the main pest of ash (Fraxinus trees in USA and Canada and is quickly spreading over 11 administrative regions of Russia. It is very important to determine a list of possible host plants of A. planipennis for the pest risk assessment of invasion of this pest over the territory of Central and Western Europe. In its native area – North-Eastern Asia – this buprestid is a secondary consumer of dying trees of East-Asian ash species F. сhinensis and F. mandshurica. Healthy trees of these species are highly resistant to the pest. No examples of resistant ash species were found at North American continent. Documentary data are presented for the first time on infestation of three European ash species at the territory of the Main Botanical Garden of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, Russia by the emerald ash borer. At the first time this pest was registered at the garden in 2011. During the period of 2010–2014 EAB killed from 70 to 100 % of trees of European ash species: Fraxinus excelsior, F. angustifolia (= F. oxycarpa and F. ornus. At the same period from 81 to 90 % of specimens of North American ash species (F. pennsylvanica and F. americana were killed by this buprestid. Simultaneously dead trees of Asian species F. mandshurica and F. chinensis (= F. rhynchophyla did not carry any trace of EAB infestation. This case study is a good example of the «sentinel trees» concept’s usefulness. Arboretums with collections of non-native plants may serve as «ecological traps» for the local pests and pathogens – potential invasive organisms in the source regions of introduced plants.

  12. Relationships between the emergence and oviposition of ectoparasitoid Spathius agrili Vang and its host emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaoyi; YANG Zhongqi; LIU Guijun; LIU Enshan

    2007-01-01

    Emerald ash borer(EAB),Agrilus planipennisFairmaire(Coleoptera: Buprestidae),(=A.marcopoli Obenberger),is an important bark beetle attacking ash trees (Fraxinus spp.).It is very difficult to detect and control because of its highly concealed life history.This pest mainly distributed in partial Asian countries(China,Japan,Korea,Mongolia)and Far East Russia,while in China it presented in Heilongjiang,Jilin,Liaoning,Shandong,Inner Mongolia,Hebei,Taiwan Provinces and Tianjin City,etc.The important timber species F.mandshurica and gardening tree F.velutina were damaged severely in northern China.Spathius agrili Yang(Hymenoptera:Braconidae)is an important ectoparasitic wasp of the EAB larvae.This parasitoid has the potential to use as an excellent biological control agent for suppressing populations of EAB.The differences of emergence date between overwintered S.agrili and its host,parasitism rates at different periods,relations between parasitism rates and host densities,and relationships between ovipositions of braconid wasp and body sizes of host larvae were studied using methods of regular surveys in forests and observations in laboratory.Results revealed that the emergence of S.agrili was more than one month later than that of its host.It suggests good synchrony between parasitoid emergence and host availability.The overwintered S.agrili emerged from mid June to mid August with the peak in July in 2003,and it lasted from late May till late July with the peak during late June to early July in 2004.While the EAB emergence period ranged from mid May to late May in 2003,it ranged from mid April to mid May in 2004(in laboratory).The emergence date of parasitoid asynchronously inosculated with the optimum developmental instars of the earliest host larvae,which was the result of a long-term co-evolution between the two species.It was also suggested that the parasitoid S.agrili could be a specialized natural enemy for EAB.The natural parasitism rates on the whole gradually

  13. Six new species of Agrilus Curtis, 1825 (Coleoptera, Buprestidae, Agrilinae from the Oriental Region related to the emerald ash borer, A. planipennis Fairmaire, 1888 and synonymy of Sarawakita Obenberger, 1924

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    Eduard Jendek

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Six new species of Agrilus Curtis, 1825 with affinities to the emerald ash borer, A. planipennis Fairmaire, 1888, are described from the Oriental Region: A. crepuscularis sp. n. (Malaysia; A. pseudolubopetri sp.n. (Laos; A. sapphirinus sp. n. (Laos; A. seramensis sp. n. (Indonesia; A. spineus sp. n. (Malaysia; and A. tomentipennis sp. n. (Laos. The genus Sarawakita Obenberger, 1924 syn. nov. is considered a junior synonym of Agrilus.

  14. 人工光暗条件下花绒寄甲成虫活动行为节律%Circadian behaviors of the parasitic beetles, Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) under artificial light/dark conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕飞; 海小霞; 王志刚; 刘炳响; 阎爱华; 毕拥国

    2015-01-01

    [目的]花绒寄甲Dastarcus helophoroides(Fairmaire)是林木蛀干害虫重要的天敌昆虫,研究其行为活动昼夜节律,可以深入了解该虫的生物学特性、阐明其生活习性.[方法]采用室内(温度27 ±1℃、相对湿度65%±10%)条件下雌雄单头隔离饲养的方法,将该虫的行为活动分为移动、取食、饮水、木块处静息和木块外静息5种行为,每隔30 min记录一次,于2014年7月10-15日连续进行观察.[结果]移动和木块处静息行为存在明显的昼夜节律;移动行为主要发生在暗期,移动高峰发生在20:30-22:30和2:00-4:00之间,而在光期的6:00-16:30之间移动行为发生较少;木块处静息行为主要发生在光期的9:30-16:30和暗期的0:00-1:30之间,而在20:30-23:00的暗期中木块处静息行为发生较少.一天内,该虫发生取食和饮水行为均较少,两类行为主要发生在0:00-14:00之间.木块外静息行为主要发生在暗期的0:30-3:30和20:00-22:00之间.雌、雄成虫的各行为出现的时间和发生百分率无显著差异.[结论]花绒寄甲成虫活动行为受到光、暗条件的显著影响,移动行为主要发生在暗期,而各活动行为在雌、雄虫之间无显著性差异.

  15. 天牛科害虫重要天敌——花绒寄甲的研究进展%Research Progress in Dastarcus helophoroides Fairmaire (Bothrideridae), an Important Natural Enemy of the Longhorn Beetle Pests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕飞; 海小霞; 王志刚; 刘炳响; 阎爱华; 毕拥国

    2014-01-01

    天牛科的害虫以蛀食林木树干为害.充分利用自然控制因子的天牛类害虫治理技术体系,能避免过度使用农药给生态环境带来的危害.花绒寄甲是林木蛀干害虫天敌的优势种,对光肩星天牛、桑天牛、松褐天牛等大中型天牛有较好的防控效果.本文在对所有花绒寄甲研究文献进行检索分析的基础上,系统概述了花绒寄甲的地理分布情况、感觉器官及其行为学研究进展,并总结了近几年将花绒寄甲应用于天牛类害虫生物防治的研究成果,以期为合理制定林业蛀干害虫防控策略和深入研究寄主植物-天牛-花绒寄甲三级营养系统的互作机制提供科学借鉴.%Longicorn pests are wood-boring insects of trees.A technological system for controlling longicorn pests that fully makes use of natural biological control factors can avoid harm to the ecological environment from excessive use of pesticides.Dastarcus helophoroides Fairmaire is the dominant species among natural enemies against the wood-boring insects of trees.It has good controlling effect on both lager-and medium-body longicorn beetles including Anoplophora glabripennis,Apriona germari,and Monochamus alternatus.In this paper,based on searches and analyses to all literatures regarding Dastarcus helophoroides,we reviewed the research progress in distribution,sensory organ characteristics,and behaviors of Dastarcus helophoroides,and summarized the research achievements of using Dastarcus helophoroides in controlling longicorn pests in recent years.Our present work provides good references for establishing scientific prevention and control strategy against trunk borers of forests and for further studies on interactive mechanism of the host plant,longicorn beetle and Dastarcus helophoroides tri-trophic system.

  16. 金绒花天牛与金丝花天牛的鉴定及分布(鞘翅目,天牛科,花天牛亚科,花天牛族)%NOTES ON THE IDENTIFICATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF LEPTURA AURATOPILOSA ( MATSUSHITA, 1931 ) AND LEPTURA AUROSERICANS FAIRMAIRE (COLEOPTERA, CE AMBYCIDAE, LEPTURINAE, LEPTURINI)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨瑞刚; Eduard VIVES; 周善义; 黄建华

    2011-01-01

    金丝花天牛Leptura aurosericans Fairmaire,1895广泛分布在中国南方与东南亚地区,而金绒花天牛Leptura auratopilosa( Matsushita,1931)仅分布于台湾岛.最近10年,国内在金绒花天牛与金丝花天牛的鉴定及分布记录方面出现了一些不一致的报道.为了澄清这些问题,在核对模式标本及检视系列标本(包括许多正在自然交配的成对标本)的基础上,重新描述了这两个种的形态特征,给出了这两个种的鉴别特征并提供了彩色照片,认为金绒花天牛是台湾特有种,目前在大陆尚未发现.%Based on the examination of types and a series of specimens from Guangxi,including a lot of naturally mating pairs,we redescribed Leptura auratopilosa (Matsushita,1931 ) and Leptura aurosericans Fairmaire,1895; provided distinguishing characters and corrected the misidentification of the two species; and concluded that L.aurosericans is widely distributed in Southern China,Viemam,Laos and Thailand,but L.auratopilosa is endemic to Taiwan.

  17. 非嗜食植物汁液对旋心异跗莹叶甲取食及产卵的影响%Antifeedant and Oviposition Effects of Juice of Non-host Plants on Apophylia flavovirens (Fairmaire)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈川; 文耀东; 杨美霞; 李兴权; 石勇强; 郭小侠

    2011-01-01

    To search for safe and effective ways of control pest Apophylia flavovirens (Fairmaire) , the antifeedant and oviposition effects of five non-host plant juices were studied. The results showed that when the juices of Allium sativum L. (100% and 50%), Allium fistulosum L. (100% and 50%), Cirsium japokicum DC. (100%) and Bidens pilosa Linn. (100%) were utilized respectively, the unselective antifeedant rates were all over 70% after 48 hours. While after 7 days treatment with the juices of Allium sativum L. (100%), Allium fistulosum L. (100%), and Cirsium japokicumDC. (100%), respectively, the selective antifeedant rates -were all over 50%. When the juices of Plantago asiatica L. (100% and 50%), Allium sativum L. (100% and 50%), and Cirsium japokicum DC. (100%) were utilized respectively, the oviposition effect rates were all more than 50%. And the juice of Allium sativum L. (100%) showed the best antifeedant and oviposition deterrent, with 91. 4 % of unselective antifeedant rate after 48 hours, 97. 56% of selective antifeedant rate after 7 days and 95. 31% of oviposition effect rate. The results suggested that utilizing the secondary metabolites from non-host plants as insect pest behavior regulator was possible in integrated pest management.%为了探索安全、有效防治丹参新害虫旋心异跗莹叶甲的方法,研究5种非嗜食植物汁液对旋心异跗莹叶甲成虫取食和产卵的影响.结果表明,5种常见的非嗜食性植物次生物质(汁液)对旋心异跗莹叶甲成虫具有不同程度的拒食和产卵干扰作用,100%、50%大蒜汁液,100%、50%葱汁液,100%刺芥汁液及100%鬼针草汁液48 h的非选择性拒食率均在70%以上;100%大蒜、葱及刺芥汁液7 d的选择性拒食率均在50%以上;100%、50%车前汁液,100%、50%大蒜汁液,100%刺芥汁液的产卵抑制率均在50%以上;其中大蒜汁液的拒食作用和产卵干扰作用最明显,其48h非选择性拒食率、7d选择性拒食率、产卵

  18. 释放花绒寄甲和设置诱木防治松褐天牛对松材线虫病的控制作用研究%Control Effect of the Pine Wood Nematode Disease Transmitted by Monochamus alternatus through Releasing Parasitoid Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) and Using Bait-trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨忠岐; 王小艺; 张翌楠; 司徒春南; 王健; 付甫永

    2012-01-01

    The pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is an important invasive forest pest in China; and Japanese pine sawyer, Monochamus alternatus is the major vector insect. To explore sustainable management of the pine wilt disease, bait-trees were set in the forests to lure adults of M. alternatus for oviposition, which would be eradicated before adult emergence in the next year. Meanwhile, parasitoid Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) was released in sample stands. Then the spread chain of pine wood nematode would be cut off by the control measurements mentioned above. Results showed that the number of dead and weak trees decreased significantly in the plots with bait-trees and release of natural enemies compared with the control area. The control efficiency was 71.27% and 90.25% in bait-tree plot and natural enemy release plot, respectively. The trees infested with pine wood nematode and the population density of M. alternatus also reduced significantly in the two treatment plots. The parasitism rates of M. alternatus were 38.34% and 3.92% in the parasitoid release area and the control area, respectively. The indoor tests showed that parasitism rates were 12.5%-40% when the natural enemy was released at the ratio of 1 : 1-4: 1 (natural enemy to beetle), there were no significant differences in parasitism rates among different releasing proportions.. The parasitism rate increased significantly when a log was released with 10 D. helophoroides adults (19.45%) than with 4 adults (4.11%). These findings indicate that natural enemies play an important role against the population of M. alternatus in forests, thus preventing pine sawyer to spread the pine wood nematode disease.%松材线虫是我国林业重大外来有害生物,松褐天牛是传播松材线虫病的主要媒介昆虫。本研究通过在松材线虫病疫区布设诱木引诱松褐天牛成虫集中产卵,翌年在下一代松褐天牛成虫羽化出孔前清理林中诱木和枯死木,以

  19. Influence of separate rearing on adult longevity and fecundity of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)%隔离饲养对白蜡窄吉丁成虫寿命和繁殖力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路纪芳; 王小艺; 杨忠岐; 刘恩山; 包金梅; 王俊苹; 刘云程; 张显文

    2012-01-01

    白蜡窄吉丁Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire是近年来发生和危害严重的国际性检疫害虫.为了了解不同饲养条件和种内个体间相互感知对成虫生物学的影响,本研究采用群体饲养、单对饲养、无隔离单雌饲养、视觉隔离单雌饲养和嗅觉隔离单雌饲养等5种处理,在室内测定了白蜡窄吉丁成虫的寿命、取食量、产卵量和产卵历期等参数的变化.结果显示:隔离饲养降低了白蜡窄吉丁成虫的寿命和繁殖力,且不同处理下白蜡窄吉丁成虫的寿命和取食量均存在显著差异(P<0.05),但产卵量的差异不明显(P>0.05).其中无隔离单雌饲养时成虫的平均寿命最长,为32.40 d,群体饲养的寿命最短,为20.77 d,且单雌饲养的寿命均比单对饲养和群体饲养的长.单雌饲养的3种情况下,视觉隔离条件下的日均取食量最大,为156.16 mm2,嗅觉隔离的最小,为107.35 mm2;无隔离饲养条件下雌虫的产卵量最大,产卵历期也最长,分别为98.33 d和21.33 d.这些研究结果表明,白蜡窄吉丁种内个体间相互感知的阻断对成虫的取食、发育和繁殖活动存在明显影响,且嗅觉在其种群内的交流活动中作用最重要,其次是视觉.此外,个体之间的相互干扰或竞争对白蜡窄吉丁成虫的寿命和繁殖力也可能存在一定的影响.这为生产上采用隔离措施如营造混交林带防治该虫提供了理论基础.%The emerald ash borer (EAB) , Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera; Buprestidae) , is an important international quarantine insect pest. To understand the influence of different rearing conditions and intraspecific individual communications on biological parameters of the EAB adults, the adult longevity, food consumption, oviposition and oviposition duration were determined by group rearing, couple rearing, single female rearing without separation, single female rearing under visual separation and single female rearing under olfactory

  20. The overwintering physiology of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis fairmaire (coleoptera: buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosthwaite, Jill C; Sobek, Stephanie; Lyons, D Barry; Bernards, Mark A; Sinclair, Brent J

    2011-01-01

    Ability to survive cold is an important factor in determining northern range limits of insects. The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an invasive beetle introduced from Asia that is causing extensive damage to ash trees in North America, but little is known about its cold tolerance. Herein, the cold tolerance strategy and mechanisms involved in the cold tolerance of the emerald ash borer were investigated, and seasonal changes in these mechanisms monitored. The majority of emerald ash borers survive winter as freeze-intolerant prepupae. In winter, A. planipennis prepupae have low supercooling points (approximately -30°C), which they achieve by accumulating high concentrations of glycerol (approximately 4M) in their body fluids and by the synthesis of antifreeze agents. Cuticular waxes reduce inoculation from external ice. This is the first comprehensive study of seasonal changes in cold tolerance in a buprestid beetle.

  1. Review of Afraustraloderes rassei Bouyer, 2012: description of its female and a new species of Pixodarus Fairmaire, 1887 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Prioninae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnstad, Anders; Grobbelaar, Elizabeth; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2016-01-01

    The original description of Afraustraloderes rassei Bouyer, 2012 included a female that is now recognized as a separate species belonging to the genus Pixodarus and here described as Pixodarus spiniscapus sp. n. The true female of Afraustraloderes rassei has also been obtained recently and is, therefore, here described. The synonymy of Pixodarus exasperatus with Pixodarus nyassae, proposed earlier by Santos Ferreira (1980), is here supported. Conversely, the earlier inclusion of Afraustraloderes rassei in the tribe Hopliderini is rejected, on the basis of a key set of characters established by Quentin and Villiers (1972, 1975). Afraustraloderes rassei appears to be restricted to the Cape Floral Region, exhibiting larval development in trunks and roots of dead Proteaceae plants. Conversely, Pixodarus spiniscapus has so far only been recorded in the eastern part of South Africa and appears to be associated with bushveld vegetation.

  2. The role of olfactory cues in short-range mate finding by the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa S. Pureswaran; Therese M. Poland

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the relative importance of olfaction versus vision in the mate-finding behavior of Agrilus planipennis. When coupled in male-female, male-male and female-female pairs, attempts to mate occurred only in the male-female pairs, suggesting that beetles can identify the opposite sex before attempting to mate. In a set of sensory...

  3. Estimating of larval stadia of West Indian sweetpotato weevil Euscepes postfasciatus (Fairmaire) developed in the artificial larval diet by measuring larval head widths.

    OpenAIRE

    下地, 幸夫; Shimoji, Yukio; 琉球産経株式会社

    2003-01-01

    The survey conducted by measuring larval head widths of West Indian sweetpotato weevil Euscepes postfasciatus developed in the artificial larval diet revealed that there were five larval stadia in the developmental period. The result of this experiment can be used to estimate the larval stadia approximately in the artificial larval diet.

  4. Leluthia astigma (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Doryctinae) as a parasitoid of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae: Agrilinae), with an assessment of host associations for nearctic species of Leluthia Cameron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Kula; Kathleen S. Knight; Joanne Rebbeck; Leah S. Bauer; David L. Cappaert; Kamal J.K. Gandhi

    2010-01-01

    Published host associations are assessed for Leluthia astigma (Ashmead), Leluthia floridensis Marsh, and Leluthia mexicana Cameron, the three known species of Leluthia Cameron in the Nearctic Region. Leluthia astigma is reported as a parasitoid of Agrilus planipennis...

  5. Membracidos de Colombia - I. Revisión parcial de las especies del género Alchisme Kirkaldy (Homoptera: Membracidae: Hoplophorioninae Membracidos de Colombia - I. Revisión parcial de las especies del género Alchisme Kirkaldy (Homoptera: Membracidae: Hoplophorioninae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restrepo Mejía Ruben

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available Se revisó el género Alchisme Kirkaldy. De las diecinueve especies anotadas por Metcalf (1965 no se obtuvieron especímenes de A. apicalis (Walker, A. costaricensis Goding, A. elevata Goding, A. laticornis Funkhouser, A. pinguicornisFunkhouser, A. recurva (Stäl, A. spinosa Funkhouser y A. truncaticornis (Germar. Se incluyen las descripciones originales de estas especies y tentativamente se localizan en la clave presentada. Se redescriben: A. bos (Fairmaire, A. fastidiosa (Fairmaire, A. grossa (Fairmaire, A. inermis (Fairmaire, A. nigrocarinata (Fairmaire, A. rubrocostata (Spinola, A. turrita (Germar, A. ustulata (Fairmaire, A. virescens (Fairmaire y A. nigrocarinata var. tridentata (Fairmaire, para la cual se usa su combinación original A. tridentata (Fairmaire. Se sinonimizóa A. projecta Funkhouser en favor de A. bos (Fairmaire.Se ilustran las principales características del pronoto y de los genitales de los machos; se observaron y se obtuvieron fotografías de los edeagos en un microscopio electrónico "rastreador" (Scanning Electro Microscope, las cualesse incluyen como parte de las ilustraciones. Se analizó la distribución geográfica del género y se ilustró por medio de mapas.The genus Alchisme Kirkaldy was revised. From nineteen species listed by Metcalf (1965 not specimens were obtained of eight of them. Original descriptions of these species are included and tentatively are localized in the key.  A redescription is given for the species A. bos (Fairmaire, A. fastidiosa (Fairmaire, A. grossa (Fairmaire, A. inermis (Fairmaire, A. nigrocarinata (Fairmaire, A. rubrocostata (Spinola, A. turrita (Germar, A. ustulata (Fairmaire, A. virescens (Fairmaire y A. nigrocarinata var. tridentata (Fairmaire, for which was used the original combination A. tridentata (Fairmaire. A. projecta Funkhouser was synonymized in A. bos (Fairmaire. The main pronotum characters and male genitalia are illustred; Scanning Electro Microscope pictures of the

  6. Note on the genus Xanthogaleruca (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae) in Korea, with a newly recorded species

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this study, Xanthogaleruca aenescens Fairmaire is reported for the first time from Korea. An identification key for the genus Xanthogaleruca is provided. In addition, the photograph of adult habitus and illustration of male genitalia of X. aenescens Fairmaire are given.

  7. Note on the genus Xanthogaleruca (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae in Korea, with a newly recorded species

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    Jinyoung Park

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Xanthogaleruca aenescens Fairmaire is reported for the first time from Korea. An identification key for the genus Xanthogaleruca is provided. In addition, the photograph of adult habitus and illustration of male genitalia of X. aenescens Fairmaire are given.

  8. Reproductive and developmental biology of the emerald ash borer parasitoid Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) as affected by temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is an invasive pest of serious concern in North America. To complement ongoing biological control efforts, Spathius galinae Belokobylskij and Strazenac (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a recently-described specialist parasitoid of ...

  9. A cladistically based reinterpretation of the taxonomy of two Afrotropical tenebrionid genera Ectateus Koch, 1956 and Selinus Mulsant & Rey, 1853 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae, Platynotina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, Marcin Jan

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of a newly performed cladistic analysis a new classification of the representatives of two Afrotropical tenebrionid genera, Ectateus Koch, 1956 and Selinus Mulsant & Rey, 1853 sensu Iwan 2002a, is provided. Eleoselinus is described as a new genus. The genus Monodius, previously synonymized with Selinus by Iwan (2002), is redescribed and considered as a separate genus. Following new combinations are proposed: Ectateus calcaripes (Gebien, 1904), Monodius laevistriatus (Fairmaire, 1897), Monodius lamottei (Gridelli, 1954), Monodius plicicollis (Fairmaire, 1897), Eleoselinus villiersi (Ardoin, 1965) and Eleoselinus ursynowiensis (Kamiński, 2011). Neotype for Ectateus calcaripes and lectotypes for E. crenatus (Fairmaire, 1897), E. ghesquierei Koch, 1956 and Monodius malaisei malaisei Koch, 1956 are designated to fix the taxonomic status of these taxa. The following synonymies are proposed: Selinus monardi Kaszab, 1951 and Ectateus latipennis Koch, 1956 with E. crenatus (Fairmaire, 1897). Identification keys are provided to all known species of Ectateus sensu novum, Eleoselinus, Monodius and Selinus sensu novum.

  10. Comparison of emerald ash borer preference for ash of different species, sun exposure, age, and stress treatments in relation to foliar volatiles and nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deepa S. Pureswaran; Yigen Chen

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the host selection behavior and feeding preference of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on six different species of ash including Manchurian ash (F...

  11. Emerald ash borer dispersal in Maryland: go forth young pest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Sargent; Dick Bean; Michael Raupp; Alan J. Sawyer

    2009-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), an exotic invasive pest from Asia, was introduced into Maryland in April 2003 via infested nursery stock shipped from Michigan to a nursery in southern...

  12. A synopsis of the tribe Micrutalini Haupt (Homoptera, Membracidae, Smiliinae

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    Albino M. Sakakibara

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The tribe Micrutalini and its two genera, Trachytalis Fowler and Micrutalis Fowler, are redescribed. The following species are treated and, in some cases, nomenclatura! changes introduced: Trachytalis isabellina Fowler, 1895; T. distinguenda Fowler, 1895; T. retrofasciata (Lethierry, 1890, comb.n.; Micrutalis alrovena Goding, 1930; M. balteata (Fairmaire, 1846 = Aculalis lucidus Buckton, 1902, syn.n.; M. bella Goding, 1929; M. biguttula (Fairmaire, 1846, comb.n.; M. binaria (Fairmaire, 1846 = Acutalis flavivenlris Lethierry, 1890, syn.n.; M. callan-gensis Goding, 1930; M. calva (Say, 1830; M. discalis (Walker, 1858; M. dorsalis (Fitch, 1851; M. dubia Fowler, 1895 = M. zeteki Goding, 1928, syn.n.; M. flava Goding, 1929; M. flavozonala (Fairmaire, 1846, comb.n. = Acutalis geniculata Stál, 1862, syn.n. = Acutalis modesta Stál, 1862, syn.n.; M. godfreyi Sakakibara, 1976; M. incerla Sakakibara, 1976; M. lata Goding, 1930; M. litlerala (Fairmaire, 1846, comb.n.;M lugubrina(Stál, 1862;M malleiferaFovj]er, 1895 = M binariamutabilis Fowler, 1895, syn.n.; M. minutus Buckton, 1902; M. nigrolineata (Stál, 1864; M. nigromarginata Funkhouser, 1940; M. notalipennis Fowler, 1895; M. occidentalis (Goding, 1893; M. pollens Fowler, 1895; M. parva (Goding, 1893; M. plagíala (Stál, l&62 = AcutalisvariabiIisBerg, 1879,syn.n. =M. chapadensisGoding, 1930,syn.n.; M. punctifera (Walker, 1858; M. semialba (Stál, 1862; M. stipulipennis Buckton, 1902; M. tau Goding, 1930; M. trifurcala Goding, 1893; M. tripunctata (Fairmaire, 1846 = Acutalis moesta Stál, 1859, syn.n. = M. tartaredoides Goding, 1930, syn.n.. New species: Micrutalis diminuta sp.n. (Ecuador, Pichincha; Micrutalis divisa sp.n. (Brazil, Mato Grosso; Micrutalis henki sp.n. (Panama, Canal Zone; Micrutalis infúscala sp.n. (Venezuela, Portuguesa; Micrutalis margínala sp.n. (Brazil, Mato Grosso; Micrutalis meridana sp.n. (Venezuela, Mérida; Micrutalis mucuya sp.n. (Venezuela, Mérida; Micrutalis robustula

  13. Taxonomic and nomenclatural notes on the genera Themus Motschulsky and Lycocerus Gorham (Coleoptera, Cantharidae

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    Yuxia Yang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The following taxonomic or nomenclatural changes are proposed: Themus (s.str. regalis (Gorham, 1889 nom. rest.; T. (s.str. scutulatus Wittmer, 1983 = T. (s.str. hmong Kazantsev, 2007, syn. n.; T. (Telephorops coelestis (Gorham, 1889 = T. violetipennis Wang & Yang, 1992, syn. n.; T. (Telephorops uniformis Wittmer, 1983, stat. n. = T. (Telephorops cribripennis Wittmer, 1983, syn. n.; T. (Haplothemus licenti Pic, 1938, stat.rev., resurrected from synonymy with T. coriaceipennis (Fairmaire, 1889; Lycocerus aenescens (Fairmaire, 1889 = L. tcheonanus (Pic, 1922, syn. n.; L. asperipennis (Fairmaire, 1891 = L. wangi (Švihla,2004, syn. n.; L. borneoensis nom. n. for Athemellus atricolor (Wittmer, 1972; L. bilineatus (Wittmer, 1995 = L. amplus (Wittmer, 1995, syn. n.; L. fairmairei nom. n. et stat. rev. for Athemus dimidiaticrus (Fairmaire, 1889, originally in Telephorus, resurrected from synonymy with L. orientalis (Gorham,1889; L. confossicollis (Fairmaire, 1891, comb. n. hereby transferred from Cantharis = L. multiimpressus (Wittmer, 1997, syn. n.; L. inopaciceps (Pic, 1926 = Athemus (Athemellus bimaculicollis (Švihla, 2005, syn. n.; L. nigratus nom. n. for L. nigricolor (Wittmer, 1972, originally in Podabrinus; L. plebejus (Kiesenwetter, 1874 = L. brunneonotaticeps (Pic, 1922, syn. n. = Cantharis rufonotaticeps Pic, 1921, syn. n.; L. swampingatus (Pic, 1916, comb. n., hereby transferred from Cantharis. The neotypes of Themus violetipennis Wang & Yang, 1992 and Athemus (s.str. maculithorax Wang & Yang, 1992 are designated respectively.

  14. Two new species of Sundarion (Hemiptera: Membracidae: Darninae and taxonomic notes on two congeneric taxa

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    Antonio J. Creão-Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Two new species of Sundarion Kirkaldy, 1904 - Sundarion flavopiceum sp. nov. (from Brazil, state of Pará, Serra Norte and Sundarion marmoratum sp. nov. (from French Guiana, Montagne des Chevaux - are described. The first species differs from S. flavum (Fairmaire, 1846 in having smaller supra-humeral horns, and being dark brown with a large yellow spot on each side of the posterior process. In this aspect, it resembles Alcmeone picea (Fairmaire, 1846. The second species is similar to S. flavum except for being variegate yellowish-brown. Taxonomic comments are provided for S. notabile Souza & Rothéa, 2005, which was previously known only from males, and for S. compressicornis (Fairmaire, 1846 comb. nov., originally described in Hemiptycha Germar, 1833 and latter transferred to Hemikyptha Metcalf, 1927. New geographical distribution records are provided for both species.

  15. Four new Entiminae from the Mediterranean region (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae: Phyllobiini, Trachyphloeini), with additional data on the distribution of some poorly known species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germann, Christoph; Borovec, Roman; Braunert, Carlo

    2015-11-11

    Argoptochus sappho sp. n. and Pelletierellus bryophilus sp. n. from Lesbos island, Greece, Cathormiocerus kostali sp. n. from Morocco, and C. meyeri sp. n. from Portugal are described. New faunistic data are presented for Argoptochus moraveci Borovec, 2006, Cathormiocerus inflatiscapus Escalera, 1918, C. jeani (Borovec, 1989), C. longiscapus Pic, 1912, C. tenuiscapus Fairmaire, 1884, Pelletierellus bosnicus (Apfelbeck, 1898) and P. neglectus (Borovec, 1992). Males of Cathormiocerus inflatiscapus Escalera, 1918 and C. tenuiscapus Fairmaire, 1884 are described for the first time and the penises of these species are illustrated.

  16. 绿梣树吉丁虫

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周明华; 冉俊祥; 杜国兴; 韩晓敏; 汪利忠

    2004-01-01

    @@ 加拿大食品检验局(CFIA)发布的D-03-08号指令“防止绿梣树吉丁虫(Agrlus planipennis(Fairmaire))传入加拿大并在加拿大扩散的植物卫生要求(Phytosanitary Requirements to Prevent the Introduction into and Spread within Canada of the Emerald Ash Borer,Agrilus planipennis(Fairmaire),into Canada.)”于2003年6月3日生效。

  17. Revision of some Hybosorine Genera from the Indo-Malayan Subregion: Microphaeochroops, Microphaeolodes, Mimocoelodes, Pantolasius and Phaeochridius (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Hybosorinae)

    OpenAIRE

    Kuijten, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    A taxonomic revision of the Hybosorine genera Microphaeochroops Pic, Microphaeolodes Kuijten, Mimocoelodes Pic, Pantolasius Lansberge and Phaeochridius Lansberge is given. Microphaeochroops nigrosetosus, Microphaeochroops varius, Microphaeolodes mulumontis and Pantolasius bandaharae are proposed as new species, and Microphaeolodes as a new genus. Lectotypes are designated for Microphaeochroops peninsularis Arrow, Phaeochridius derasus (Harold) and Phaeochridius haroldi Fairmaire. Phaeochridiu...

  18. Spatial and temporal distribution of trunk-injected 14C-Imidacloprid in Fraxinus trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara R. Tanis; Bert M. Cregg; David Mota-Sanchez; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the discovery of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (emerald ash borer) in 2002, researchers have tested several methods of chemical control. Soil drench or trunk injection products containing imidacloprid are commonly used to control adults. However, efficacy can be highly variable andmay be due to uneven translocation of systemic...

  19. Quantifying change in riparian ash forests following the introduction of EAB in Michigan and Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Dacia M. Meneguzzo

    2012-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Buprestidae; EAB) is an introduced beetle that kills ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. While most EAB-related ash mortality has been documented in urban areas, the effects of EAB in forested settings, particularly in riparian forests, are not well known. This study utilizes...

  20. A new species of oobius trjapitzin (hymenoptera:encyrtidae) from the russian far east that parasitizes eggs of emerald ash borer (coleoptera:buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new egg parasitoid of the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) from the Russian Far East, Oobius primorskyensis Yao et Duan is described. Both morphological characters and analysis of DNA sequence divergence suggest that this species is different from the previ...

  1. Monitoring the establishment and abundance of introduced parasitoids of emerald ash borer larvae in Maryland, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical biological control can be an important tool for managing invasive species such as emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Emerald ash borer is now widespread throughout the United States, and was first detected in Maryland in 2003. The biological control program to manage emera...

  2. The mating and oviposition behavior of the invasive emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), with reference to the influence of host plant condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is an invasive wood-boring beetle accidentally introduced to North America from northeastern Asia. While our knowledge of EAB ecology has increased greatly over the past decade, we still know relatively little abou...

  3. Biology, life history, and laboratory rearing of Atanycolus cappaerti (Hymenoptera:Braconidae), a larval parasitoid of the invasive Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanycolus cappaerti Marsh and Strazanac is a native North American parasitoid that has been found to parasitize the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, which has killed millions of ash trees since it was first detected in Michigan. A native parasitoid like A. cappaerti...

  4. Hymenopteran Parasitoids Attacking the Invasive Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Western and Central Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted field surveys of the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, and associated larval parasitoids in western and central Pennsylvania (Cranberry and Granville Townships) in the spring and fall of 2009. The survey procedure involved destructively debarking sections of the m...

  5. Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an invasive beetle from Asia that has caused large scale ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in North America. This book chapter reviews the taxonomy, biology, life history of this invasive pest and its associated natural enemies in both its native ...

  6. Long-term monitoring of the introduced emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) egg parasitoid, oobius agrili (Hymenoptera: Encyridae), in Michigan, USA and evaluation of a newly developed monitoring technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious invasive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. The egg parasitoid Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) was introduced as a biological control agent of this pest in Michiga...

  7. Effects of the emerald ash borer invasion on the community composition of arthropods associated with ash tree boles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire is an invasive non-native wood-boring beetle that has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America, and threatens to extirpate the ecological services provided by the genus. Identifying the arthropod community assoc...

  8. Natural enemies implicated in the regulation of an invasive pest: a life table analysis of the population dynamics of the emerald ash Borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is a serious invasive forest pest that has killed tens of millions of ash (Fraxinus) trees in the United States and Canada. By caging EAB adults on trunks of healthy ash trees, we established three generations of experimental cohorts from ...

  9. A new species of genus Oobius (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) from the Russian Far East that parasitizes eggs of Emerald Ash Borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new egg parasitoid of the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is described from the Vladivostok, Russia, Oobius primorskyensis Yao & Duan n. sp. Both morphological characters and analysis of DNA sequence divergence suggest that this species is different from t...

  10. Natural enemies and their impacts on emerald ash borer populations in its native range, with new records of parasitism by two species of beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate the natural enemies of the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), and their role in regulating the pest population dynamics, we conducted field surveys at multiple forest sites with variable host densities in the pest’s native range (north an...

  11. An improved method for monitoring parasitism and establishment of Oobius agrili (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an egg parasitoid introduced for biological control of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian J. Duan; Leah S. Bauer; Jason A. Hansen; Kristopher J. Abell; Roy. Van Driesche

    2012-01-01

    Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) is a solitary egg parasitoid that has been released in the United States since 2007 for biocontrol of the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Field and laboratory trials with ash logs infested with EAB eggs were conducted...

  12. Evaluation of recovery and monitoring methods for parasitoids released against emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael S. Parisio; Juli R. Gould; John D. Vandenberg; Leah S. Bauer; Melissa K. Fierke

    2017-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, EAB) is an invasive forest pest and the target of an extensive biological control program designed to mitigate EAB-caused ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality. Since 2007, hymenopteran parasitoids of EAB from northeastern Asia have been released as biological control agents in North...

  13. Biology and Life History of Atanycolus cappaerti (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a North American Larval Parasitoid Attacking the Invasive Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanycolus cappaerti Marsh and Strazanac is a native North American parasitoid that has been found to parasitize the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, a serious invasive pests of North American ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). To facilitate the development of potential augmentative biocon...

  14. Biology of emerald ash borer parasitoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Jian J. Duan; Jonathan P. Lelito; Houping Liu; Juli R. Gould

    2015-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive beetle introduced from China (Bray et al., 2011), was identified as the cause of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in southeast Michigan and nearby Ontario in 2002 (Haack et al., 2002; Federal Register, 2003; Cappaert et al., 2005)....

  15. An assessment of the relationship between emerald ash borer presence and landscape pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Dacia M. Meneguzzo

    2009-01-01

    Six years after its 2002 detection near Detroit, MI, the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) has spread hundreds of miles across the Upper Midwest and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. Human-assisted transportation of infested ash materials is the primary mechanism of EAB dispersal over long distances. Natural spread...

  16. Behaviours of adult emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesar R. Rodriguez-Saona; James R. Miller; Therese M. Poland; Tina M. Kuhn; Gard W. Otis; Tonya Turk; Daniel L. Ward

    2007-01-01

    A 2-year study was conducted in Canada (2003) and the United States (2005) to better understand searching and mating behaviors of adult Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. In both field and laboratory, adults spent more time resting and walking than feeding or flying. The sex ratio in the field was biased towards males, which tended to hover around...

  17. EAB induced tree mortality impacts ecosystem respiration and tree water use in an experimental forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Flower; Douglas J. Lynch; Kathleen S. Knight; Miquel A. Gonzales-Meler

    2011-01-01

    The invasive emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, EAB) has been spreading across the forest landscape of the Midwest resulting in the rapid decline of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). Ash trees represent a dominant riparian species in temperate deciduous forests of the Eastern United States (USDA FIA Database). Prior...

  18. Suitability of immature emerald ash borers to Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since first detected in Michigan in 2002, the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), a buprestid native to Asia, has killed millions of ash trees in northeastern North America and continues to expand into new areas. Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a gregar...

  19. Biology and life history of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera:Eulophidae) is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid from China that is being released in North America in an effort to control the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), an exotic beetle responsible for widespread ash mortality. The developmental tim...

  20. Developing rearing methods for Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetrastichus planipennisi Yong, a gregarious koinobiont endoparasitoid, is one of three hymenopteran parasitoids being released in the U.S. for biological control of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmair, EAB), an invasive beetle from Asia causing mortality of the ash trees (Fraxinus s...

  1. Tetrastichus gallerucae(Fonscolombe)--A new record species i n China(Hymenoptera:Eulophidae)%榆毛萤叶甲啮小蜂--中国新记录种(膜翅目:姬小蜂科)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时振亚; 王高平; 司胜利; 尹新明; 符文俊

    2001-01-01

    本文在国内首次记述了采自河南郑州寄生榆绿毛萤叶甲Pyrrhaltaaenescens(Fairmaire)的一种啮小蜂--榆毛萤叶甲啮小蜂Tetrastichusgallerucae(Fonscolombe)的形态特征、寄主、分布等.

  2. Patterns among the ashes: Exploring the relationship between landscape pattern and the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Greg C. Liknes

    2010-01-01

    Landscape metrics, including host abundance and population density, were calculated using forest inventory and land cover data to assess the relationship between landscape pattern and the presence or absence of the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire). The Random Forests classification algorithm in the R statistical environment was...

  3. Evaluation of recovery and monitoring methods for parasitoids released against Emerald Ash Borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, EAB) is an invasive insect pest, and the target of an extensive biological control campaign designed to mitigate EAB driven ash tree (Fraxinus spp.) mortality. Since 2007, environmental releases of three species of hymenopteran parasitoids of EA...

  4. Can ash communities and their dependent species be partially protected through biological control of emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash trees were once relatively free of serious, major diseases and insect pests in North America until the arrival of the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, which was first detected in North America in Michigan in 2002 and has been detected in 32 U.S. states and two Canadian pro...

  5. A taxonomic review of the family Bothrideridae Erichson (Coleoptera: Coccinelloidea in Korea represented by ectoparasites of wood-boring insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Gyu Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A taxonomic study of Korean Bothrideridae is presented. Two species, Antibothrus morimotoi Sasaji and Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire, are recognized and the former is recorded for the first time in Korea. A comparison of morphological features between two Korean species, habitus photograph, and illustrations of diagnostic characters are provided.

  6. Evaluation of vacuum technology to kill larvae of the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhangjing Chen; Marshall S. White; Melody A. Keena; Therese M. Poland; Erin L. Clark

    2008-01-01

    The potential for using vacuum technology to kill larvae of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in solid-wood packing materials (SWPM) and other wood products was assessed. Current...

  7. Susceptibility of two hymenopteran parasitoids of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) to the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Ascomycota: Hypocreales)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberly M Dean; John D. Vandenberg; Michael H. Griggs; Leah S. Bauer; Melissa K. Fierke

    2012-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, native to Asia, is killing ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) across 15 states and southeastern Canada. Integrated pest management using biological control is the only viable long-term approach for controlling the spread of EAB outside of host resistance. Three hymenopteran parasitoids...

  8. Emerald Ash Borer Pest Alert, (English version)El barrenador del fresno, el barrenador verde esmeralda del fresno o (Spanish version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah McCullough; Steven Katovich

    2008-01-01

    A beetle from Asia, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), was identified in July 2002 as the cause of widespread ash (Fraxinus spp.) tree decline and mortality in southeastern Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Larval feeding in the tissue between the bark and sapwood disrupts transport of nutrients and...

  9. Monitoring the establishment and flight phenology of egg and larval parasitoids of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Michigan, USA using sentinel eggs and larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an important invasive pest of ash (Fraxinus) trees in North America. Two larval parasitoids, Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang and Spathius agrili Yang, and one egg parasitoid, Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang, were introduced into the United Sta...

  10. Population biology of emerald ash borer and its natural enemies in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer; Tonghai Zhao; Ruitong Gao

    2008-01-01

    Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), also known as emerald ash borer (EAB), was first discovered in Michigan and Ontario, Canada, in 2002 following investigations of declining and dying ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). Agrilus planipennis has also spread to Ohio, Indiana, Maryland, Virginia,...

  11. Emerald ash borer biology and invasion history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Yuri Baranchikov; Leah S. Bauer; Therese M. Poland

    2015-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is native to eastern Asia and is primarily a pest of ash (Fraxinus) trees (Fig. 1). Established populations of EAB were first detected in the United States and Canada in 2002 (Haack et al., 2002), and based on a dendrochronology study by Siegert...

  12. Oviposition and development of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on hosts and potential hosts in no-choice bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrea C. Anulewicz; Deborah G. McCullough; Deborah L. Miller

    2006-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is an invasive phloem-feeding pest native to Asia. It was first identified in North America in 2002 and has killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in southeast Michigan and Essex County, Ontario. Since then, additional populations have been discovered...

  13. Comparative Analysis of the Composition of Intestinal Bacterial Communities in Dastarcus helophoroides Fed Different Diets

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei-Wei; He, Cai; Cui, Jun; Wang, Hai-dong; Li, Meng-Lou

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of the intestinal bacterial communities in Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) larvae and adults was assayed by PCR-DGGE to determine whether different artificial diets could influence these bacterial communities. Two diets were used for feeding the larvae and four for the adults. Escherichia, Desemzia, Staphylococcus, Asticcacaulis, Cellvibrio, Aurantimonas, and Planomicrobium were isolated from the gut of the adults, with Escherichia and Staphylococ...

  14. New longhorn beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae from Serbia

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    Pil Nataša

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The most recent data (Ilić, 2005 indicate the presence of 245 longhorn beetle species (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae in Serbia. Not included in the mentioned publication, the following five species should be added to the list: Cortodera discolor Fairmaire, 1866; Stenopterus similatus Holzschuh 1979; Chlorophorus aegyptiacus (Fabricius, 1775; Agapanthia osmanlis (Reiche, 1858; Agapanthia maculicornis (Gyllenhal, 1817 (Pil and Stojanović in press. A total number of 250 species are presently known for the Serbian longhorn beetle fauna.

  15. イモゾウムシの卵接種が起因となる人工幼虫飼料汚染の防止

    OpenAIRE

    下地, 幸夫; Shimoji, Yukio; 琉球産経株式会社

    2003-01-01

    Prevention of the bacterial contamination on the artificial larval diet of West Indian sweetpotato weevil Eucepes postfasciatus (Fairmaire) was examined. Bacteria on the surface of eggs-inoculated on diet was considered as a source of diet contamination. The surface of eggs were rinsed with 70% ethanol solution several times as follows; a half, 1, 2, and 5 minutes. Surface-sterilized eggs for 30 seconds did not permit the emergence of bacteria, indicating the necessity of sterilization of egg...

  16. A new species of Pseudopyrochroa Pic, 1906 (Coleoptera: Pyrochroidae: Pyrochroinae) from the Mae Chaem District, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Daniel K

    2014-04-02

    A new species of the fire-colored beetle genus Pseudopyrochroa Pic, 1906, is described from the Mae Chaem District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. The new species, Pseudopyrochroa inthanonensis sp. nov., is superficially similar to Pseudopyrochroa basalis (Pic), Pseudopyrochroa cardoni (Fairmaire) and Pseudopyrochroa fainanensis (Pic) by virtue of body color, antennal form and prothoracic shape. It is the second species of the genus known from Thailand, the other being Pseudopyrochroa diversicornis (Blair).

  17. The Mediterranean Colaspidea (Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Eumolpinae

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    S. Zoia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean Colaspidea are reviewed with examination of type material. The following nomenclatural changes are provided: C. nitida Lucas, 1846 bona sp. resurrected from synonymy with C. globosa (Küster, 1848, Colaspidea proxima (Fairmaire, 1862 bona sp. resurrected from synonymy with C. oblonga (Fairmaire, 1862, C. juengeri Doguet, 1988 is raised to species, from subsp. of C. metallica (Rossi, 1790. The following synonymies are provided: C. oblonga (Fairmaire, 1862 n. syn. of C. nitida Lucas, 1846, C. oblonga albanica Schatzmayr, 1923 n. syn. of C. nitida Lucas, 1846. A Lectotype is designed for C. nitida Lucas, 1846, a Neotype is designed for Dia oblonga Fairmarie, 1862. The following new taxa are described: C. algarvensis n. sp. (Portugal: Algarve, C. incerta n. sp. (Algeria: Yakouren, C. dogueti n. sp. (Algeria: Massif du Djurdjura, C. pallidipes n. sp. (Morocco, C. confinis n. sp. (Algeria, C. maura n. sp. (Morocco, Algeria, C. maghrebina n. sp. (Algeria: Constantine. Morphological aspects are discussed, pointing out range of variability of aedeagic characters, here used in the discrimation of species. Distribution of each taxon is verified on the base of examined material and displayed on maps. A catalogue is provided.

  18. Morphometry and redescription of Parahelichus granulosus (Delève, 1974) with description of P. pseudogranulosus, a new cryptic species of Long-toed Water Beetles (Coleoptera: Dryopidae) from Indochinese peninsula, and proposal of a new synonym for Praehelichus sericatus (Waterhouse, 1881) from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lojková, Soňa; Degma, Peter; Kodada, Ján

    2014-08-18

    A new species of Parahelichus Löbl & Smetana, 2006 is described from Laos and Thailand: P. pseudogranulosus. A similar species, P. granulosus Delève, 1974, which was originally described only from a single specimen, is redescribed and morphometric data are provided from 442 specimens from Vietnam and Laos. Habitus views, illustrations of important characters as well as results of morphometric analyses are presented and discussed. Praehelichus sinensis (Fairmaire, 1888) is proposed as a new junior synonym of P. sericatus (Waterhouse, 1881). 

  19. Ground beetles from Sǎlaj county (Romania (coleoptera: carabidae

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    Kutasi Cs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During a faunistical exploration of Sǎlaj county carried out in 2014 and 2015, 207 ground beetle (Carabidae species were recorded from the area. Considering the earlier literature data the total number of carabid species known from the county is 246. Carabus variolosus Fabricius, 1787 is a Natura 2000 species, Pterostichus bielzii Fuss, 1878 is a species endemic to the Western Apuseni Mountains. Further rare species from the area: Dromius quadraticollis A. Morawitz, 1862, Elaphropus parvulus (Dejean, 1831, Lebia marginata (Geoffroy, 1785, Ophonus ardosiacus (Lučnik, 1922, Trechus amplicollis Fairmaire, 1859.

  20. Descrições, transferências e notas em Apomecynini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae Descriptions, transferences and notes on Apomecynini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

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    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The following new species are described from Brazil: Falsischnolea apicalis sp. n., Dorcasta singularis sp. n. and Paraesylacris candida sp. n. and from Venezuela: Amphicnaeia piriana sp. n. and A. zonula sp. n. New synonyms established: Acestrilla apicalis Breuning, 1942 and A. strandiella Breuning, 1943 = A. minima Bates, 1885. Bisaltes acutipennis Thomson, 1868 is transferred to the genus Ataxia Haldeman, 1847 (Pteropliini. Falsestola Breuning, 1940 is considered a synonym of Hesycha Fairmaire & Germain, 1859 and transferred to the tribe Onciderini. Hesycha ocellifera Martins & Galileo, 1990 is synonymized with Hesycha inermicollis (Breuning, 1940.

  1. A review of Drilini (Coleoptera: Elateridae: Agrypninae) of the Northern Levant, with description of a new species from Syria and a key to Levantine species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundrata, Robin; Kobieluszova, Lucie; Bocak, Ladislav

    2014-01-24

    The species of the elaterid soft-bodied tribe Drilini from the Levant are reviewed. All known species are redescribed and Drilus nemethi sp. nov. is described. Drilus adustus (Chevrolat, 1854), comb. nov. and D. akbesianus (Fairmaire, 1895), comb. nov. are transferred from Malacogaster Bassi, 1834 to Drilus Olivier, 1790. Drilus posticus Schaufuss, 1867, syn. nov. is a junior subjective synonym of Drilus adustus (Chevrolat, 1854). All Levantine species are keyed and diagnostic characters are illustrated. Their distribution, morphological diversity and the statuses of type specimens of Drilus reitteri Bourgeois, 1908 and Cydistus reitteri Bourgeois, 1885 are discussed.

  2. Onciderini Thomson, 1860 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) types of The Natural History Museum (BMNH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearns, Eugenio H; Barclay, Maxwell V L; Tavakilian, Gérard L

    2014-08-28

    The primary types of Onciderini Thomson, 1860 deposited at The Natural History Museum (BMNH), London, United Kingdom, are catalogued and illustrated. Data on the original combination, current name, and type locality are verified and presented. There are 39 primary types of Onciderini including 11 in Oncideres Lacordaire, 1830; and three each in Hesycha Fairmaire & Germain, 1859; Hypselomus Perty, 1832; Lamia Fabricius, 1775; and Tybalmia Thomson, 1868. Of the 39 primary types, 17 were described by H. W. Bates and seven by F. P. Pascoe. Five lectotypes are designated. Notes on additional Onciderini types once believed to be deposited at the BMNH are presented. 

  3. Taxonomy of Fissocantharis Pic (Coleoptera, Cantharidae) from Guangxi, China, with descriptions of six new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxia; Li, Limei; Guan, Kaile; Yang, Xingke

    2015-01-01

    A total of 17 species of Fissocantharis Pic is recorded from Guangxi, China. Six species are described new to science, Fissocantharissinensomima sp. n., Fissocantharissexcostata sp. n., Fissocantharisbasilaris sp. n., Fissocanthariseschara sp. n., Fissocantharislatipalpa sp. n. and Fissocantharisbiprojicientis sp. n., and two previously known species are redescribed, Fissocantharisgracilipes (Pic, 1927) and Fissocantharissinensis (Wittmer, 1988). These species are presented with habitus of males, abdominal sternites VIII of females and genitalia of both sexes. Fissocantharisflavofacialis (Pic, 1926) is synonymized with Fissocantharisangusta (Fairmaire, 1900); both were originally described in the genus Podabrus Westwood. Additionally, a key and a checklist of all the species of Fissocantharis from Guangxi are provided.

  4. Taxonomic notes on some Polyglyptini: descriptions of new genus and new species (Homoptera, Membracidae, Smiliinae

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    Albino M. Sakakibara

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic notes on some Polyglyptini; descriptions of new genus and new species (Homoptera, Membracidae, Smiliinae. The genera Hemiptycha Germar, Metheisa Fowler, Maturnaria Metcalf, Aphetea Fowler, Dioclophara Kirkaldy, and Phormophora Stål, are redescribed; Creonus, gen.n. (type species: Maturna lloydi Funkhouser, 1914, and Aphetea robustula, sp.n. (from Bolivia, are described. Some nomenclatural changes are introduced, as follow: - Hemiptycha Germar, 1833 = Polyrhyssa Stål, 1869, syn.n.: - Hemiptycha cultrata (Coquebert, 1801, comb.n., = Polyglyptodes flavocostatus Haviland, 1925, syn.n., = Polyrhyssa cultrata maculata Fonseca, 1942, syn.n. - Hemiptycha obtecta (Fabricius, 1803 = Hille herbicola Haviland, 1925, syn.n. - Maturnaria ephippigera (Fairmaire, 1846 = Publilia tumulata Buckton, 1903, syn.n., = Metheisa fowleri Funkhouser, 1927, syn.n. - Creonus lloydi (Funkhouser, 1914, comb.n. - Aphetea parvula (Fabricius, 1803, comb.n., = Aphetea affinis Haviland, 1925, syn.n. - Dioclophara Kirkaldy, 1904 = lncolea Goding, 1926, syn.n. - Dioclophara viridula (Fairmaire, 1846 = Maturna multilineata Fonseca, 1942, syn.n. - Dioclophara variegata (Goding, 1926, comb.n. = lncolea viridis Goding, 1926, syn.n. - Phormophora maura (Fabricius, 1803 = Darnis dorsata Fabricius, 1803, syn.n.

  5. The genus Hypheodana Metcalf and description of three new species (Hemiptera, Cicadomorpha, Membracidae O gênero Hypheodana Metcalf e descrição de três novas espécies (Hemiptera, Cicadomorpha, Membracidae

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    Albino M. Sakakibara

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Hypheodana Metcalf, 1952, previously considered of uncertain position, is classified in Darninae-Darnini. The following species are treated, together with a re-characterization of the genus: Hypheodana ursus (Fairmaire, 1846, H. cuneata (Fowler, 1894 comb. nov. (formerly in Aspona, H. intermedia (Fowler, 1894 comb. nov. (formerly in Aspona, and also H. proxima sp. nov. (from Costa Rica, H. costata sp. nov. and H. acuta sp. nov. (these two from Mato Grosso, Brazil. All the species are illustrated.O gênero Hypheodana Metcalf, 1952, antes considerado em posição incerta, é classificado em Darninae-Darnini. As seguintes espécies são tratadas, juntamente com uma re-caracterização do gênero: Hypheodana ursus (Fairmaire, 1846, H. cuneata (Fowler, 1894 comb. nov. (antes em Aspona, H. intermedia (Fowler, 1894 comb. nov. (antes em Aspona e, também, H. proxima sp. nov. (da Costa Rica, H. costata sp. nov. e H. costata sp. nov. e H. acuta sp. nov. (estas duas do Mato Grosso, Brasil. Todas as espécies são ilustradas.

  6. Una especie nueva de Tillus Olivier, 1790 (Coleoptera, Cleridae de la Península Ibérica

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    López-Colón, José Ignacio

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Tillus ibericus sp. nov. is described from the Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain and it is compared to the western Palaearctic species of the genus Tillus Olivier, 1790. Tillus ibericus is easily distinguished from all other species of the genus by the structure of the elytral sculpture and its characteristic coloration. This new species shares a general habitus and characters from the antennae, and general body stucture with T. flabellicornis Fairmaire, 1866, a species from northern Africa. All preexisting records of T. flabellicornis in the Iberian Peninsula correspond to T. ibericus sp. nov..Se describe Tillus ibericus sp. nov. de la Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid (España y se compara con las otras especies del género Tillus Olivier, 1790 de la región Paleártica occidental. Tillus ibericus se distingue con facilidad de las especies próximas por la estructura del punteado elitral y por su coloración característica. La especie nueva comparte un aspecto general y caracteres de la estructura del cuerpo y de las antenas con T. flabellicornis Fairmaire, 1866 del Norte de África. Todas las citas anteriores de T. flabellicornis de la Península Ibérica corresponden a T. ibericus sp. nov.

  7. Notas e novas espécies de Onciderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

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    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Novas espécies descritas do Brasil: Hypsioma carioca sp. nov. (Rio de Janeiro e Hesychotypa maraba sp. nov. (Pará; do Equador: Sternycha ecuatoriana sp. nov. (Pichincha; da Bolívia (Santa Cruz: Hesychotypa magnifica sp. nov., Tibiosioma maculosa sp. nov. e Alexera secunda sp. nov. Transfere-se Hesycha strandi (Breuning, 1943 para o gênero Cacostola Fairmaire & Germain, 1859. Hesychotypa archippa Dillon & Dillon, 1946 é considerada sinônima de H. miniata Thomson, 1868. Novo registro (Trinidad e figura são dados para Trachysomus surdus.Notes and new species of Onciderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. New species described from Brazil: Hypsioma carioca sp. nov. (Rio de Janeiro and Hesychotypa maraba sp. nov. (Pará; from Ecuador: Sternycha ecuatoriana sp. nov. (Pichincha; from Bolivia (Santa Cruz: Hesychotypa magnifica sp. nov., Tibiosioma maculosa sp. nov. and Alexera secunda sp. nov. Hesycha strandi (Breuning, 1943 is transferred to the genus Cacostola Fairmaire & Germain, 1859. Hesychotypa archippa Dillon & Dillon, 1946 is considered a synonym of H. miniata Thomson, 1868. New record (Trinidad and figure for Trachysomus surdus Dillon & Dillon, 1946 are given.

  8. The tribe Acutalini Fowler (Homoptera, Membracidae, Smiliinae: new genera, new species and some nomenclatural changes

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    Albino M Sakakibara

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available The tribe Acutalini Fowler is redescribed as well as the genera Acutalis Fairmaire, Euritea Stål, and Thrasymedes Kirkaldy. The following new taxa and nomenclatural changes are presented: Thrasymedes mexicana sp.n. (from Mexico, Oaxaca; Bordonia gen.n., with B. venezuelana sp.n. (type-species (from Venezuela, Portachuelo, B. clypeata sp.n. (from Colombia, Cuesta Boba, B. majuscula sp.n. (from Venezuela, Portachuelo, and Cornutalis gen.n., with C. cauca sp.n. (type-species (from Colombia, Cauca, and C. validu sp.n. (from Ecuador, Sto. Domingo. Acutalis fusconervosa Fairmaire, 1846 = Horiola venosa Walker, 1858, syn.n.; Euritea munda (Walker, 1858 = Stictolobus nitidus Funkhouser, 1940, syn.n.; Bordonia nigricosta (Goding, 1926, comb.n.; Bordonia virescens (Funkhouser, 1940, comb.n.. One species is transferred to Smiliinae-Ceresini: Tapinolobus curvispina (Walker, 1858, comb.n. (formerly in Thrasymedes = Tapinolobus fasciatus Sakakibara, 1969, syn.n.; another one is transferred to Darninae-Cymbomorphini: Eumela darnioides (Walker, 1858, comb.n. (formerly in Euritea.

  9. Definition and Revision of the Orthrius-group of genera (Coleoptera, Cleridae, Clerinae

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    Robert Gerstmeier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available An “Orthrius-group” of genera is proposed, and defined to include Aphelochroa Quedenfeldt, 1885; Caridopus Schenkling, 1908; Dozocolletus Chevrolat, 1842; Gyponyx Gorham, 1883; Languropilus Pic, 1940; Orthrius Gorham, 1876; Pieleus Pic, 1940; Xenorthrius Gorham, 1892; plus three new genera Neorthrius gen. n., Nonalatus gen. n. and Pseudoastigmus gen. n. A phylogeny of the 11 constituent Orthrius-group genera (analysis of 22 morphological characters using Clerus Geoffroy as the out-group taxon was performed with TNT v1.1 is proposed. Four genera are synonymised: Burgeonus Pic, 1950, syn. n. (with Aphelochroa Quedenfeldt, 1885; Brinckodes Winkler, 1960, syn. n. and Quasibrinckodes Winkler, 1960, syn. n. (both with Dozocolletus Chevrolat, 1842; and Dedana Fairmaire, 1888, syn. n. (with Orthrius Gorham, 1876. The genera Falsoorthrius Pic, 1940 and Mimorthrius Pic, 1940 are transferred from Clerinae to the subfamily Tillinae.

  10. Description and phylogenetic placement of Beauveria hoplocheli sp. nov. used in the biological control of the sugarcane white grub, Hoplochelus marginalis, on Reunion Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robène-Soustrade, Isabelle; Jouen, Emmanuel; Pastou, Didier; Payet-Hoarau, Magali; Goble, Tarryn; Linderme, Daphné; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Calmès, Cédric; Reynaud, Bernard; Nibouche, Samuel; Costet, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    On Reunion Island successful biological control of the sugarcane white grub Hoplochelus marginalis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae) has been conducted for decades with strains from the entomopathogenic fungal genus Beauveria (Ascomycota: Hypocreales). A study based on morphological characters combined with a multisequence phylogenetic analysis of genes that encode the translation elongation factor 1-alpha (TEF1), RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RPB1), RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2) and the Bloc nuc intergenic region was carried out on Beauveria strains isolated on Reunion and Madagascar from H. marginalis. This study revealed that these strains, previously identified as Beauveria brongniartii, did not match that species and are closely related to but still distinct from B. malawiensis strains. Therefore we describe the Reunion Island fungus as the new species B. hoplocheli.

  11. Influence of trap placement and design on capture of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francese, Joseph A; Oliver, Jason B; Fraser, Ivich; Lance, David R; Youssef, Nadeer; Sawyer, Alan J; Mastro, Victor C

    2008-12-01

    The key to an effective pest management program for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera Buprestidae), is a survey program equipped with tools for detecting and delimiting populations. We studied the effects of trap design, color, and placement on the efficacy of sticky traps for capturing the emerald ash borer. There were significant differences in trap catch along a transect gradient from wooded to open field conditions, with most beetles being caught along the edge, or in open fields, 15-25 m outside an ash (Fraxinus spp. L.) (Oleaceae) woodlot. Greater emerald ash borer catch occurred on purple traps than on red or white traps. Traps placed in the mid-canopy of ash trees (13 m) caught significantly more beetles than those placed at ground level. We also describe a new trap design, a three-sided prism trap, which is relatively easy to assemble and deploy.

  12. Emerald ash borer invasion of North America: history, biology, ecology, impacts, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herms, Daniel A; McCullough, Deborah G

    2014-01-01

    Since its accidental introduction from Asia, emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has killed millions of ash trees in North America. As it continues to spread, it could functionally extirpate ash with devastating economic and ecological impacts. Little was known about EAB when it was first discovered in North America in 2002, but substantial advances in understanding of EAB biology, ecology, and management have occurred since. Ash species indigenous to China are generally resistant to EAB and may eventually provide resistance genes for introgression into North American species. EAB is characterized by stratified dispersal resulting from natural and human-assisted spread, and substantial effort has been devoted to the development of survey methods. Early eradication efforts were abandoned largely because of the difficulty of detecting and delineating infestations. Current management is focused on biological control, insecticide protection of high-value trees, and integrated efforts to slow ash mortality.

  13. Elemental stoichiometry and compositions of weevil larvae and two acorn hosts under natural phosphorus variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Huawei; Du, Baoming; Liu, Chunjiang

    2017-04-05

    To understand how different trophic organisms in a parasite food chain adapt to the differences in soil nutrient conditions, we investigated stoichiometric variation and homeostasis of multiple elements in two acorn trees, Quercus variabilis and Quercus acutissima, and their parasite weevil larvae (Curculio davidi Fairmaire) at phosphorus (P)-deficient and P-rich sites in subtropical China where P-rich ores are scattered among dominant P-deficient soils. Results showed that elemental stoichiometry and compositions of both acorns and weevil larvae differed significantly between P-deficient and P-rich sites (p stoichiometry and compositions (p stoichiometry and composition and physiological regulations of nutritional needs in organisms and provide possible stoichiometric responses of both plants and animals to P loading, a worldwide issue from excess release of P into the environment.

  14. Taxonomic revision of the Lycocerus hanatanii species group (Coleoptera, Cantharidae, with the description of new species from Taiwan

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    Yun Hsiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lycocerus hanatanii species group is revised, with the addition of seven taxa: L. araticollis (Fairmaire, 1897, L. nigripennis (Pic, 1938, L. griseopubens (Pic, 1928, L. aurantiacus sp. nov., L. evangelium sp. nov., L. kintaroi sp. nov., and L. yitingi sp. nov. Supplementary descriptions of the males of L. araticollis and L. griseopubens are provided. Lycocerus nigripennis (Pic, 1938 and L. pictus (Wittmer, 1983 are redescribed in detail. Each species is provided with photos or illustrations of genitalia of both sexes and abdominal ventrite VII of the female if available. Distribution maps and a key to the species of the L. hanatanii species group are presented. In addition, the monophyly of the L. hanatanii species group is supported based on a morphological phylogenetic analysis.

  15. Review of the Madagascan Orphninae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) with a revision of the genus Triodontus Westwood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Andrey V; Montreuil, Olivier; Akhmetova, Lilia A

    2016-12-13

    The subfamily Orphninae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is reviewed from Madagascar. A total of four genera and 39 species were found, all being endemic to the island. The following five new species are described: Triodontus ankarafantsikae, Triodontus lemoulti, Triodontus viettei, Triodontus fairmairei, and Triodontus inexpectatus. The following new synonymies are proposed: Orphnus nigrita Brancsik, 1893 is synonym of Triodontus hova (Fairmaire, 1868); Triodontus occidentalis Paulian, 1977 and Orphnus obsoletus Brancsik, 1893 are synonyms of Triodontus nitidulus (Guérin-Méneville, 1844); Triodontus vadoni Paulian, 1977 and Triodontus perrotorum Paulian, 1977 are synonyms of Triodontus owas Westwood, 1852. Lectotypes are designated for the following names: Orphnus nitidulus Guérin-Méneville, 1844 and Orphnidius modestus Benderitter, 1914. Keys, descriptions, illustrations of habitus and male genitalia, and distributional records maps are given for all species.

  16. Elemental stoichiometry and compositions of weevil larvae and two acorn hosts under natural phosphorus variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Huawei; Du, Baoming; Liu, Chunjiang

    2017-04-01

    To understand how different trophic organisms in a parasite food chain adapt to the differences in soil nutrient conditions, we investigated stoichiometric variation and homeostasis of multiple elements in two acorn trees, Quercus variabilis and Quercus acutissima, and their parasite weevil larvae (Curculio davidi Fairmaire) at phosphorus (P)-deficient and P-rich sites in subtropical China where P-rich ores are scattered among dominant P-deficient soils. Results showed that elemental stoichiometry and compositions of both acorns and weevil larvae differed significantly between P-deficient and P-rich sites (p plants and animals to P loading, a worldwide issue from excess release of P into the environment.

  17. Feeding and Development of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on Cultivated Olive, Olea europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Don; Rigsby, Chad M; Peterson, Donnie L

    2017-08-01

    We examined the suitability of cultivated olive, Olea europaea L., as a host for emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. In a bioassay using cut stems from a field-grown olive tree (cv. 'Manzanilla') we found that 45% of larvae that had emerged from eggs used to inoculate stems, were recovered alive, many as larvae or prepupae, during periodic debarking of a subset of stems. Three intact stems that 19 larvae successfully entered were exposed to a simulated overwintering treatment. Four live adults emerged afterwards, and an additional pupa and several prepupae were discovered after debarking these stems. Cultivated olive joins white fringetree as one of the two species outside of the genus Fraxinus capable of supporting the development of emerald ash borer from neonate to adult. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The genus Bathysciola Jeannel, 1910 in the Iberian Peninsula and Pyrenees. Taxonomic revision of the Sections IV, VI and VII (Jeannel, 1924 (Coleoptera, Cholevide, Leptodirinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresneda, J.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomy of the Iberian and Pyrenean species of Bathysciola Jeannel, 1910 (sections IV, VI and VII of Jeannel, 1924 is revised. The proposed ordenation is based on the study of the genital structures of both sexes, in particular the sclerotised shield of the internal sac of the aedeagus. According to the different models of internal sac were identified the following species groups in the genus Bathysciola Jeannel, section IV: aubei group of Peyerimhoff (1 taxon: B. aubei (Kiesenwetter; madoni new group (2 taxa: B. madoni Jeannel and B. penicillata Jeannel; zariquieyi new group (2 taxa: B. zariquieyi zariquieyi Bolívar and B. zariquieyi serratensis Coiffait; section VII or ovata group of Perreau (8 taxa: B. asperula asperula (Fairmaire, B. asperula subasperata (Saulcy (= intermedia Jeannel, B. ovata ovata (Kiesenwetter, B. ovata aragonica Coiffait, B. ovata catalana Coiffait, B. ovata gabasensis Hustache, B. simonis (Abeille de Perrin and B. talpa (Normand; section VI: lapidicola new group (4 taxa: B. arcuatipes Jeannel, B. lapidicola lapidicola (Saulcy, B. lapidicola rectipes Coiffait and B. lapidicola simplex Coiffait; meridionalis new group (3 taxa: B. finismillennii sp. n., B. grenieri (Saulcy and B. meridionalis (J. Du Val (= nitidula Normand; larcennei new group (2 taxa: B. convena Jeannel new rank and B. larcennei (Abeille de Perrin; schiodtei group of Perreau (9 taxa: B. bigerrica Jeannel new rank (= convexa Coiffait n. syn., B. breuili Bolívar (= azuai Bolívar n. syn., B. diegoi Salgado & Fresneda, B. fauveli Jeannel, B. grandis (Fairmaire, B. obermaieri Bolívar, B. parallela (Jeannel, B. rugosa (Sharp and B. schiodtei (Kiesenwetter (= navarica Coiffait. Incertae sedis: Bathysciola aranensis Coiffait and Bathysciola minuscule (Abeille de Perrin.Se realiza una revisión taxonómica de las secciones IV, VI y VII (Jeannel, 1924 con las especies Ibéricas y de los Pirineos del género Bathysciola. Esta propuesta de ordenación tiene

  19. 湖北省罗田县板栗害虫种类调查%Investigation on the species of insect pests infesting on the chestnut plant (Castanea mollissima Blume)in Luotian County,Hubei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖云丽; 汪玉平; 孙康; 徐向阳; 晏绍良; 钟玉林

    2015-01-01

    The species of insect pests infesting on chestnut plant Castanea mollissima Blume were systematically in-vestigated from 2013 to 2014 in Luotian County,Hubei Province.One hundred and ninety-two chestnut pest spe-cies in 61 families under 5 orders were recorded from Luotian County,among them,62 branch and trunk pests species in 23 families,1 53 leaf,bud and flower pests species in 49 families,1 5 fruit pests species in 8 families. Eighty-one named species in 37 families under 4 orders were firstly reported feeding on chestnut plants,including 24 branch and trunk pests species in 13 families,60 leaf,bud and flower pests species in 28 families,and 7 fruit pests species in 4 families.Cyllorhynchites cumulatus (Voss),Curculio davidi Fairmaire,Niphades castanes Chao,Conogethes punctiferalis (Guenée),Synanthedon kunmingensis Yang & Wang,Synanthedon menglaensis Yang & Wang,Lachnus tropicalis (van der Goot),Phalera assimilis (Bremer & Grey),and Dryocosmus kuriphi-lus Yasumatsu caused serious damage in the chestnut production.%2013-2014年度系统调查了湖北省罗田县板栗害虫种类,经分类整理与鉴定,罗田县板栗害虫共计5目61科192种,其中枝干害虫23科62种,叶芽花序害虫49科153种、果实害虫8科15种;板栗新纪录害虫4目37科81种(已命名种),其中枝干害虫13科24种,叶芽花序害虫28科60种,果实害虫4科7种。对板栗生产造成严重危害的主要有:果实害虫板栗剪枝象[Cyllorhynchites cumulatus (Voss)]、栗实象(Curculio davidi Fairmaire)、栗雪片象(Niphades castanes Chao)和桃多斑野螟[Conogethes punctiferalis (Guenée)];枝干害虫昆明兴透翅蛾(Synanthedon kunmingensis Yang & Wang)、勐腊兴透翅蛾(Synanthedon menglaensis Yang & Wang)和板栗大蚜[Lachnus tropicalis (van der Goot)];叶芽害虫栎掌舟蛾[Phalera assimilis (Bremer & Grey)]和板栗瘿蜂(Dryo-cosmus kuriphilus Yasumatsu)。

  20. Contribution to the taxonomy of the family Membracidae Rafinesque (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha) in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez-V, Camilo; Wolff, Marta I; Cardona-Duque, Juliana

    2015-01-15

    The Membracidae are a relatively diverse group with nearly 400 genera and 3200 species. For Colombia 93 genera and 394 species were previously known. Study of the literature and 3744 specimens deposited in ten colections in Colombia, as well as non-systematic collections and field observations done in Colombia between 2011 and 2014, led us to record 116 genera and 474 species grouped in 9 subfamilies and 23 tribes, distributed in 24 departments. Thirteen genera were new country records. In addition, 1449 records of host plants and 262 records of associated Hymenoptera were obtained from literature, the examined collections and new, non-systematic field trips. For each genus a differential diagnosis is presented, as well as notes on biology, distribution and some taxonomic comments. Illustrated keys for the genera of Colombian Membracidae and known distributional maps are given. After examination of several Anobilia species, we propose the new combinations Stilbophora flava (Tode, 1966) n. comb., Stilbophora luteimaculata (Funkhouser, 1914) n. comb., Stilbophora sagitatta (Tode, 1966) n. comb., Stilbophora silvana (Tode, 1966) n. comb., Stilbophora tripartita (Fairmaire, 1846) n. comb., and Stilbophora variabilis (Tode, 1966) n. comb. The male of Sakakibarella sinuosa Creão-Duarte is described.

  1. Taxonomic review of the genera Micridium Motschulsky, 1869 and Micridina Johnson, 1969 (Coleoptera: Ptiliidae) with eleven new species including the first records from South America and Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, Michael

    2017-03-10

    The six recognised species of the genus Micridium Motschulsky, 1869: M. vittatum (Motschulsky, 1845) M. halidaii (Matthews, 1868), M. angulicolle (Fairmaire, 1858), M. lineatum (Le Conte, 1863). M. rhodeanum (Casey, 1924) and M. groehni Polilov & Perkovsky, 2004 are reviewed and eleven new species: M. attenboroughi sp.n., M. boliviense sp.n., M. elegans sp. n., M. foveatum sp.n., M. inornatum sp.n., M. johnsoni sp.n., M. newtoni sp.n., M. oweni sp.n., M. proprium sp.n., M. quadridens sp.n. and M. thayerae sp.n. are added. The new species are the first records of the genus from South America and Madagascar. The morphological characteristics separating Micridium from other genera in the tribe Ptiliini are discussed and the genus synonymised with the closely related monotypic genus Micridina Johnson, 1969 with its single species M. hilli Johnson, 1969. The synonymy of Dilinium Casey, 1924 with Micridium is confirmed and the type species D. rhodeanum Casey, 1924 re-described. Micridium groehni, described from a single specimen in Baltic amber, does not appear to belong to Micridium as defined here. A key to the new species is provided.

  2. Protection of individual ash trees from emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) with basal soil applications of imidacloprid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitley, D R; Rebek, E J; Royalty, R N; Davis, T W; Newhouse, K F

    2010-02-01

    We conducted field trials at five different locations over a period of 6 yr to investigate the efficacy of imidacloprid applied each spring as a basal soil drench for protection against emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Canopy thinning and emerald ash borer larval density were used to evaluate efficacy for 3-4 yr at each location while treatments continued. Test sites included small urban trees (5-15 cm diameter at breast height [dbh]), medium to large (15-65 cm dbh) trees at golf courses, and medium to large street trees. Annual basal drenches with imidacloprid gave complete protection of small ash trees for three years. At three sites where the size of trees ranged from 23 to 37 cm dbh, we successfully protected all ash trees beginning the test with tree size explains 46% of the variation in efficacy of imidacloprid drenches. The smallest trees (dbh) remained in excellent condition for 3 yr, whereas most of the largest trees (>38 cm dbh) declined to a weakened state and undesirable appearance. The five-fold increase in trunk and branch surface area of ash trees as the tree dbh doubles may account for reduced efficacy on larger trees, and suggests a need to increase treatment rates for larger trees.

  3. The History of Attack and Success of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on White Fringetree in Southwestern Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Danielle; Lopez, Vanessa; Ray, Ann M; Cipollini, Don

    2016-08-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an invasive insect that has caused widespread mortality of ash species in North America. The ability of emerald ash borer to utilize white fringetree as an alternate host was reported recently. We aimed to determine how long white fringetree has been under attack from emerald ash borer, the degree of attack, and the overall success of this beetle on this novel host. Stems from three of nine infested white fringetrees collected from the Dayton and Cincinnati, OH, areas in the winter of 2015 yielded four live adult emerald ash borers after being held in rearing containers, and numerous older exit holes were observed. Measurement and aging of feeding galleries on these stems indicated that emerald ash borer has been using this species since 2011, at least, with peak gallery densities reached in 2012 and 2013 on most of the harvested trees. On average, 32 galleries per square meter were found in these stems with about one-third of them being indicative of fourth-instar larvae. This supports the assertion that emerald ash borer has been using white fringetree as a host plant with moderate to good success for as long as ash species in these particular areas have been utilized.

  4. The biology and ecology of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yi; Yang, Zhong-Qi; Gould, Juli R; Zhang, Yi-Nan; Liu, Gui-Jun; Liu, En-shan

    2010-01-01

    The biology, ecology, and life cycle of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), were studied using regular inspection in the forest and observations in the laboratory. Results indicated that A. planipennis are mostly univoltine in Tianjin, China. They overwintered individually as mature larvae in shallow chambers excavated in the outer sapwood. In late July, some full-grown larvae began to build overwintering chambers, and all larvae entered the sapwood for dormancy by early November. A. planipennis pupated in the overwintering chamber from early April to mid May the following year, and the average pupal duration was about 20 days. In late April, some newly eclosed adults could be found in the pupal cells, but they had not yet emerged from the tree. Adults began to emerge in early May, with peak flight occurring in mid May. The average longevity of adults was about 21 days and the adult stage lasted through early July. The adults fed on ash foliage as a source of nutrition. Mating was usually conducted and completed on the leaf or trunk surfaces of ash trees. Oviposition began in mid May and eggs hatched on average in 15.7 days. The first instar larvae appeared in early June. The larval stage lasted about 300 days to complete an entire generation. The emerald ash borer had four larval instars on velvet ash, Fraxinus velutina (Scrophulariales: Oleaceae). The major natural control factors of A. planipennis were also investigated, and preliminary suggestions for its integrated management are proposed.

  5. Thermal constraints on the emerald ash borer invasion of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, R.; Moser, W. K.; Gormanson, D. D.; Bartlett, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire; EAB), a non-native invasive beetle, has caused substantial damage to green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.), white (Fraxinus americana L.), and black ash (Fraxinus nigra Marsh.), the major ash species of North America. In the absence of effective methods for controlling or eradicating the beetle, EAB continues to spread unimpeded across North America. Evidence indicates the mortality rate for EAB-infested trees near the epicenter of the infestation in southeast Michigan exceeds 99 percent for the major ash species. One possible climatic limitation on the spread of the infestation is suggested by recent work indicating that beetles cannot survive exposure to temperatures below -35.3 degrees Celsius. We considered whether this thermal constraint will limit the spread and distribution of EAB in North America. Historical climatic data for the United States and Canada were employed along with thermal models of the conditions beneath likely winter snowpack and beneath tree bark to predict the potential geographic distribution of the invasion. Results suggested the thermal mortality constraint will not lead to the protection of ash stands across most of North America. However, recent work indicates the majority of beetles cannot survive exposure to temperatures below -30 degrees Celsius. Along with our results, this suggests thermal constraints near the northern and western edges of the ranges of ash might limit EAB survival to some extent, thereby reducing the EAB population, the likelihood of EAB infestation, and subsequent ash mortality.

  6. Spectral analysis of white ash response to emerald ash borer infestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, Laura

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is an invasive insect that has killed over 50 million ash trees in the US. The goal of this research was to establish a method to identify ash trees infested with EAB using remote sensing techniques at the leaf-level and tree crown level. First, a field-based study at the leaf-level used the range of spectral bands from the WorldView-2 sensor to determine if there was a significant difference between EAB-infested white ash (Fraxinus americana) and healthy leaves. Binary logistic regression models were developed using individual and combinations of wavelengths; the most successful model included 545 and 950 nm bands. The second half of this research employed imagery to identify healthy and EAB-infested trees, comparing pixel- and object-based methods by applying an unsupervised classification approach and a tree crown delineation algorithm, respectively. The pixel-based models attained the highest overall accuracies.

  7. Economic analysis of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) management options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannatta, A R; Hauer, R H; Schuettpelz, N M

    2012-02-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), plays a significant role in the health and extent of management of native North American ash species in urban forests. An economic analysis of management options was performed to aid decision makers in preparing for likely future infestations. Separate ash tree population valuations were derived from the i-Tree Streets program and the Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers (CTLA) methodology. A relative economic analysis was used to compare a control option (do-nothing approach, only removing ash trees as they die) to three distinct management options: 1) preemptive removal of all ash trees over a 5 yr period, 2) preemptive removal of all ash trees and replacement with comparable nonash trees, or 3) treating the entire population of ash trees with insecticides to minimize mortality. For each valuation and management option, an annual analysis was performed for both the remaining ash tree population and those lost to emerald ash borer. Retention of ash trees using insecticide treatments typically retained greater urban forest value, followed by doing nothing (control), which was better than preemptive removal and replacement. Preemptive removal without tree replacement, which was the least expensive management option, also provided the lowest net urban forest value over the 20-yr simulation. A "no emerald ash borer" scenario was modeled to further serve as a benchmark for each management option and provide a level of economic justification for regulatory programs aimed at slowing the movement of emerald ash borer.

  8. Biotic and abiotic factors affect green ash volatile production and emerald ash borer adult feeding preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yigen; Poland, Therese M

    2009-12-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an exotic woodborer first detected in 2002 in Michigan and Ontario and is threatening the ash resource in North America. We examined the effects of light exposure and girdling on green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh) volatile production, and effects of light exposure, girdling, and leaf age on emerald ash borer adult feeding preferences and phototaxis. Green ash seedlings grown under higher light exposure had lower amounts of three individual volatile compounds, (Z)-3-hexenol, (E)-beta-ocimene, and (Z,E)-alpha-farnesene, as well as the total amount of six detected volatile compounds. Girdling did not affect the levels of these volatiles. Emerald ash borer females preferred mature leaves, leaves from girdled trees, and leaves grown in the sun over young leaves, leaves from nongirdled trees, and leaves grown in the shade, respectively. These emerald ash borer preferences were most likely because of physical, nutritional, or biochemical changes in leaves in response to the different treatments. Emerald ash borer females and males showed positive phototaxis in laboratory arenas, a response consistent with emerald ash borer preference for host trees growing in sunlight.

  9. Decreased emergence of emerald ash borer from ash treated with methyl jasmonate is associated with induction of general defense traits and the toxic phenolic compound verbascoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehill, Justin G A; Rigsby, Chad; Cipollini, Don; Herms, Daniel A; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2014-12-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is causing widespread mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. To date, no mechanisms of host resistance have been identified against this pest. Methyl jasmonate was applied to susceptible North American and resistant Asian ash species to determine if it can elicit induced responses in bark that enhance resistance to EAB. In particular, phenolic compounds, lignin, and defense-related proteins were quantified, and compounds associated with resistance were subsequently tested directly against EAB larvae in bioassays with artificial diet. MeJA application decreased adult emergence in susceptible ash species, comparable to levels achieved by insecticide application. Concentration of the phenolic compound verbascoside sharply increased after MeJA application to green and white ash. When incorporated in an artificial diet, verbascoside decreased survival and growth of EAB neonates in a dose-dependent fashion. Lignin and trypsin inhibitors were also induced by MeJA, and analogs of both compounds reduced growth of EAB larvae in artificial diets. We conclude that the application of MeJA prior to EAB attack has the ability to enhance resistance of susceptible ash trees by inducing endogenous plant defenses, and report evidence that induction of verbascoside is a mechanism of resistance to EAB.

  10. Improving detection tools for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): comparison of multifunnel traps, prism traps, and lure types at varying population densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Damon J; Francese, Joseph A; Rietz, Michael L; Lance, David R; Hull-Sanders, Helen M; Mastro, Victor C; Silk, Peter J; Ryall, Krista L

    2014-08-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious invasive pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) that has caused devastating mortality since it was first identified in North America in 2002. In 2012, we conducted field trapping assays that tested the efficacy of purple prism and fluon-coated green multifunnel (Lindgren funnel) traps. Traps were baited with combinations of several lures that were previously shown to be attractive to A. planipennis: manuka oil--a sesquiterpene-rich oil, (3Z)-hexenol--a green leaf volatile, or (3Z)-dodecen-12-olide [= (3Z)-lactone], a sex pheromone. Eighty-nine blocks (trap lines) were tested throughout nine states along the outer edges of the currently known A. planipennis infestation in North America. Trap catch was highest on fluon-coated green multifunnel traps, and trap detections at sites with low A. planipennis population density ranged from 72 to 76% for all trap and lure types tested. (3Z)-hexenol and (3Z)-lactone baited traps functioned as well as (3Z)-hexenol and manuka oil-baited traps. Independent of the lure used, detection rates on green fluon-coated multifunnel traps were comparable with glued purple prism traps in areas with low A. planipennis population densities.

  11. Interspecific variation in resistance to emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) among North American and Asian ash (Fraxinus spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebek, Eric J; Herms, Daniel A; Smitley, David R

    2008-02-01

    We conducted a 3-yr study to compare the susceptibility of selected North American ash and an Asian ash species to emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an invasive wood-boring beetle introduced to North America from Asia. Because of a coevolutionary relationship between Asian ashes and emerald ash borer, we hypothesized an Asian ash species, Manchurian ash, is more resistant to the beetle than its North American congeners. Consistent with our hypothesis, Manchurian ash experienced far less mortality and yielded far fewer adult beetles than several cultivars of North American green and white ash. Surprisingly, a black ash (North American) x Manchurian ash hybrid was highly susceptible to emerald ash borer, indicating this cultivar did not inherit emerald ash borer resistance from its Asian parent. A corollary study investigated the efficacy of soil-applied imidacloprid, a systemic, neonicotinoid insecticide, for controlling emerald ash borer in each of the five cultivars. Imidacloprid had no effect on emerald ash borer colonization of Manchurian ash, which was low in untreated and treated trees. In contrast, imidacloprid did enhance survival of the North American and hybrid cultivars and significantly reduced the number of emerald ash borer adults emerging from green and white ash cultivars. We identify a possible mechanism of resistance of Manchurian ash to emerald ash borer, which may prove useful for screening, selecting, and breeding emerald ash borer-resistant ash trees.

  12. Efficacy of multifunnel traps for capturing emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): effect of color, glue, and other trap coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francese, Joseph A; Fraser, Ivich; Lance, David R; Mastro, Victor C

    2011-06-01

    Tens of thousands of adhesive-coated purple prism traps are deployed annually in the United States to survey for the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). A reusable, more user-friendly trap is desired by program managers, surveyors, and researchers. Field assays were conducted in southeastern Michigan to ascertain the feasibility of using nonsticky traps as survey and detection tools for emerald ash borer. Three nonsticky trap designs, including multifunnel (Lindgren), modified intercept panel, and drainpipe (all painted purple) were compared with the standard purple prism trap; no statistical differences in capture of emerald ash borer adults were detected between the multifunnel design and the prism. In subsequent color comparison assays, both green- and purple-painted multifunnel traps (and later, plastic versions of these colors) performed as well or better than the prism traps. Multifunnel traps coated with spray-on adhesive caught more beetles than untreated traps. The increased catch, however, occurred in the traps' collection cups and not on the trap surface. In a separate assay, there was no significant difference detected between glue-coated traps and Rain-X (normally a glass treatment)-coated traps, but both caught significantly more A. planipennis adults than untreated traps.

  13. Variation in C:N:S stoichiometry and nutrient storage related to body size in a holometabolous insect (Curculio davidi) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Small, Gaston E; Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Donger; Li, Hongwang; Liu, Chunjiang

    2015-01-01

    Body size can be an important factor controlling consumer stoichiometry. In holometabolous insects, body size is typically associated with nutrient storage. Consumer stoichiometry is known to vary within species across a range of body sizes; however, the contribution of nutrient storage to this variation is not well understood. We used the fifth-instar larvae of the oak weevil (Coleoptera: Curculio davidi Fairmaire), which is characterized by a high capacity for nutrient storage, to investigate the effect of shifts in nutrient storage with body mass on variations in larva stoichiometry. Our results showed that weevil larvae with larger body mass had a lower carbon (C) content, reflecting decreases in the sequestration rate of C-rich lipids. Larger larvae had elevated concentrations of nitrogen (N), sulfur (S), and protein. The similar patterns of variation in elemental composition and macromolecule storage with body weight indicate that the shift in nutrient storage is the main factor causing the variation in larval stoichiometry with body weight. This finding was further supported by the low variation in residual larval biomass C, N, and S concentrations after lipid extraction. These results help decipher the physiological mechanism of stoichiometric regulation in growing organisms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  14. Sweet potato resistance to Euscepes postfasciatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): larval performance adversely effected by adult's preference to tuber for food and oviposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Y; Yasuda, K; Sakai, T; Ichinose, K

    2014-08-01

    The preferences of the West Indian sweet potato weevil, Euscepes postfasciatus (Fairmaire), to tubers of sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas (L.), for food and for oviposition were evaluated, and correlated to sweet potato's resistance to immatures. Adults (parent) were released in a plastic box containing tubers of sweet potato cultivars and maintained for 5 d, after which the adults on each tuber were counted. All adults were then removed and each tuber was maintained separately. New adults that emerged from the tubers were counted. Cultivars were grouped by cluster analyses using the number of parent adults on the tubers and the number of new adults emerging from the tubers, adjusted for the weight of each tuber. Cultivars were divided into five groups: average level of preference, preferred, preferred for oviposition but not for food, preferred for food but not for oviposition, and not preferred. New adults from the first two groups took less time to eclose than those from the other groups, and their body size was smaller. In a second experiment, one to five cultivars were selected from each group and inoculated each tuber with 10 weevil eggs on each cultivar. Although the proportion of eclosed adults was not significantly different between cultivars, the time to eclosion was shorter and body size was smaller on preferred cultivars. The selection of tubers by parent adults was not linearly related with larval development, and did not reduce the survival of the immatures.

  15. Biology and ecology of Alchisme grossa in a cloud forest of the Bolivian Yungas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrico-Bazoberry, Daniel; Caceres-Sanchez, Liliana; Saavedra-Ulloa, Daniela; Flores-Prado, Luis; Niemeyer, Hermann M; Pinto, Carlos F

    2014-01-01

    Treehoppers (Membracidae) exhibit different levels of sociality, from solitary to presocial. Although they are one of the best biological systems to study the evolution of maternal care in insects, information on the biology of species in this group is scarce. This work describes the biology and ecology of Alchisme grossa (Fairmaire) (Hemiptera: Membracidae) in a rain cloud forest of Bolivia. This subsocial membracid utilizes two host-plant species, Brugmansia suaveolens (Humb. & Bonpl. ex Wild) Bercht. & J.Presl and Solanum ursinum (Rusby) (both Solanaceae), the first one being used during the whole year and the second one almost exclusively during the wet season. The development of A. grossa from egg to adult occurred on the plant where eggs were laid. Maternal care was observed during the complete nymphal development, and involved behavioral traits such as food facilitation and antidepredatory defense. Life cycle was longer on B. suaveolens during the dry season and shorter on S. ursinum during the wet season. Mortality was similar on both host plants during the wet season but was lower on B. suaveolens during the dry season. The presence of a secondary female companion to the egg-guarding female individual and occasional iteropary is also reported. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  16. Sampling Buprestidae (Coleoptera in Washington state with Cerceris californica Cresson (Hymenoptera, Crabronidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Looney

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The beetle-hunting habits of ground nesting wasps in the genus Cerceris Latreille have been recently exploited as a survey technique for exotic and native Buprestidae, particularly Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (the emerald ash-borer. While such methods have been developed for the wide-ranging eastern Cerceris fumipennis Say, the survey potential of western buprestid-hunting Cerceris spp. has not been explored. Cerceris californica Cresson is the most well-studied of the western buprestid feeders, and the only one known to occur in Washington state. Here we report the results of surveys conducted in Washington in 2012–2013 for C. californica colonies, and numbers of buprestid beetles collected from monitored colonies. Eight C. californica colonies were found through visual search of 228 baseball fields and sandy clearings, but only four were large enough to monitor. Fifty-four beetles were recovered from the four colonies, comprising five native species. Four of these are new prey records for C. californica, and one (Chrysobothris quadriimpressa Gory & Laporte is newly recorded from Washington. Cerceris californica colonies do not appear to be large or common enough in Washington to be a significant exotic buprestid survey strategy. However, even the limited monitoring resulted in more buprestid captures than nearby purple sticky traps, and monitoring C. californica nests may be a locally useful supplement for general buprestid surveys.

  17. Incidence of bark- and wood-boring insects in firewood: a survey at Michigan's Mackinac Bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Robert A; Petrice, Toby R; Wiedenhoeft, Alex C

    2010-10-01

    Firewood is a major pathway for the inadvertent movement of bark- and wood-infesting insects. After discovery of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in southeastern Michigan in 2002, quarantines were enacted including prohibition of transporting firewood across the Mackinac Bridge between Michigan's Lower and Upper peninsulas. Drivers are required to surrender firewood before crossing the bridge. We surveyed recently surrendered firewood in April, July, and September 2008 and categorized it by genus, cross-sectional shape (whole, half, or quarter), approximate age (years since it was a live tree), presence of bark, and evidence of bark- and wood-boring insects. The 1045 pieces of firewood examined represented 21 tree genera: primarily Acer (30%), Quercus (18%), Fraxinus (15%), Ulmus (12%), Betula (5%), and Prunus (5%). Live borers (Bostrichoidea, Brentidae, Buprestidae, Cerambycidae, Cossidae, Curculionidae [Scolytinae and non-Scolytinae], and Siricidae) were found in 23% of the pieces and another 41% had evidence of previous borer infestation. Of the 152 Fraxinus firewood pieces, 13% had evidence of past A. planipennis infestation, but we found no live A. planipennis. We discuss national "don't move firewood" campaigns and U.S. imports of fuelwood. During 1996-2009, the United States imported fuelwood valued at > dollars U.S. 98 million from 34 countries.

  18. The genus Lycoderides Sakakibara, stat. nov., its composition and descriptions of new species (Hemiptera, Membracidae, Stegaspidinae

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    Albino M. Sakakibara

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The genus Lycoderides Sakakibara, stat. nov. , its composition and descriptions of new species (Hemiptera, Membracidae, Stegaspidinae.The subgenus Lycoderes (Lycoderides Sakakibara, 1972 is raised to the genus category - Lycoderides stat. nov.. - : and it now includes: Lycoderides amazonicus (Sakakibara, 1991, comb. nov. , Lycoderides brevilobus (Sakakibara, 1972, comb. nov. , Lycoderides burmeisteri (Fairmaire, 1846, comb. nov. , Lycoderides cultratus (Sakakibara, 1991, comb. nov. , Lycoderides fernandezi (Strümpel, 1988, comb. nov. , Lycoderides fuscus (Amyot & Serville, 1843, comb. nov. , Lycoderides gradatus (Sakakibara, 1972, comb. nov. , Lycoderides hippocampus (Fabricius, 1803, comb. nov. , Lycoderides luteus (Funkhouser, 1940, comb. nov. , Lycoderides marginalis (Walker, 1851, comb. nov. , Lycoderides nathanieli (Cryan, 1999, comb. nov. , Lycoderides obtusus (Sakakibara, 1991, comb. nov. , Lycoderides pennyi (Sakakibara, 1991, comb. nov. , Lycoderides phasianus (Fowler, 1896, comb. nov. (= Enchenopa minamen Buckton, 1901,SYN. NOV: , Lycoderides protensus (Sakakibara, 1991, comb. nov. , Lycoderides serraticornis (Fowler, 1896, comb. nov. , and Lycoderides strumpeli (Sakakibara, 1991, comb. nov. The following new species are described: Lycoderides abditus, sp. nov. , Lycoderides brulei,SP. NOV. (: both from French Guiana, Lycoderides capixaba, sp. nov. (from Brazil, Espírito Santo, Lycoderides cavichiolii, sp. nov. (from Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, Lycoderides meloi, sp. nov. (from Brazil, Bahia, and Lycoderides oliviae, sp. nov. (from Brazil, Minas Gerais. Other nomenclatural change: Stegaspis bracteata (Fabricius, 1787 = Lycoderes capitata Buckton, 1903, syn. nov. New records of geographical distribution and a key to the species are provided.

  19. Review of the genera Anelaphinis Kolbe, 1892 and Atrichelaphinis Kraatz, 1898 (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Cetoniinae

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    Sebastien Rojkoff

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available New material collected recently throughout the Afrotropical region has led to a major reassessment of taxa within the genera Anelaphinis Kolbe, 1892, Atrichelaphinis Kraatz, 1898 and other closely related genera. As a result, the name Megalleucosma Antoine, 1989 is here synonymised with Anelaphinis and a lectotype is designated for the type species, Cetonia dominula Harold, 1879. The genus Atrichelaphinis is redefined and a new subgenus, A. (Eugeaphinis, is proposed for Elaphinis simillima Ancey, 1883, Elaphinis vermiculata Fairmaire, 1894, Niphetophora rhodesiana Péringuey, 1907, Atrichelaphinis deplanata Moser, 1907 (with Anelaphinis kwangensis Burgeon, 1931 as junior synonym and Anelaphinis sternalis Moser, 1914. Additionally, three new species and one new subspecies are recognised and described in this new subgenus: A. (Eugeaphinis bomboesbergica sp. n. from South Africa; A. (Eugeaphinis bjornstadi sp. n. from Tanzania; A. (Eugeaphinis garnieri sp. n. from south–east Africa (Tanzania, Zimbabwe; and A. (Eugeaphinis deplanata minettii ssp. n. from central Africa (Malawi, Mozambique, Congo-Kinshasa, Congo-Brazzaville, South Africa, Rwanda, Zambia, Zimbabwe. The genus Atrichelaphinis is compared to its closest relatives and two separate keys are proposed, one for Atrichelaphinis and one for the sub-Saharan genera exhibiting completely or partially fused parameres.

  20. Growth of Larval Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and Fitness of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in Blue Ash (Fraxinus quadrangulata) and Green Ash (F. pennsylvanica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Donnie L; Duan, Jian J; Yaninek, J S; Ginzel, Matthew D; Sadof, Clifford S

    2015-12-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is an invasive primary pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. Blue ash (F. quadrangulata) is less susceptible to emerald ash borer infestations in the forest than other species of North American ash. Whereas other studies have examined adult host preferences, we compared the capacity of emerald ash borer larvae reared from emerald ash borer eggs in the field and in the laboratory to survive and grow in blue ash and the more susceptible green ash (F. pennsylvanica). Emerald ash borer larval survivorship was the same on both ash species. Mortality due to wound periderm formation was only observed in living field grown trees, but was low (<4%) in both green and blue ash. No difference in larval mortality in the absence of natural enemies suggests that both green and blue ash can support the development of emerald ash borer. Larvae reared from eggs on blue ash were smaller than on green ash growing in the field and also in bolts that were infested under laboratory conditions. In a laboratory study, parasitism rates of confined Tetrastichus planipennisi were similar on emerald ash borer larvae reared in blue and green ash bolts, as were fitness measures of the parasitoid including brood size, sex ratio, and adult female size. Thus, we postulate that emerald ash borer larvae infesting blue ash could support populations of T. planipennisi and serve as a potential reservoir for this introduced natural enemy after most of the other native ash trees have been killed.

  1. Factors affecting the flight capacity of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a classical biological control agent of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrner, Samuel J; Lelito, Jonathan P; Blaedow, Karen; Heimpel, George E; Aukema, Brian H

    2014-12-01

    The dispersal characteristics of a biological control agent can have direct implications on the ability of that agent to control populations of a target host. Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is a parasitic wasp native to eastern Asia that has been introduced into the United States as part of a classical biological control program against the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). We used computer-monitored flight mills to investigate the role of age, feeding status, mating status, and size on the flight capacity of female T. planipennisi over a 24-h period. We also compared flight capacity between sexes. Flight distance of female T. planipennisi representative of populations released in the biological control program averaged 1.26 km in 24 h with a maximum flight of just over 7 km. Median flight distance, however, was 422 m. The flight capacity of females fed a honey-water solution was 41× that of females provided only water, who flew very little. Larger females were capable of flying farther distances, but age did not affect the flight capacity of females up to 70 d posteclosion. Females dispersed 6× farther than did their smaller, male counterparts. The implications of our findings to host-parasitoid interactions and release protocols for distributing T. planipennisi are discussed.

  2. Comparative analysis of the composition of intestinal bacterial communities in Dastarcus helophoroides fed different diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Wei; He, Cai; Cui, Jun; Wang, Hai-Dong; Li, Meng-Lou

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of the intestinal bacterial communities in Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) larvae and adults was assayed by PCR-DGGE to determine whether different artificial diets could influence these bacterial communities. Two diets were used for feeding the larvae and four for the adults. Escherichia, Desemzia, Staphylococcus, Asticcacaulis, Cellvibrio, Aurantimonas, and Planomicrobium were isolated from the gut of the adults, with Escherichia and Staphylococcus being the main bacterial communities, and the quantities of intestinal bacterial were different in the adults fed different diets. Specifically, the amount of intestinal bacteria from the adults fed different diets had the following ranking according to the major component of the diet: ant powder > darkling beetle pupa powder > cricket powder > silkworm pupa powder. Escherichia, Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Kurthia, Planococcaceae, Ralstonia, Leptothrix, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas were isolated from the gut of the larvae. The quantity of intestinal bacteria from the larvae fed the darkling beetle pupae was greater than that from the larvae fed other artificial diets. This study, for the first time, investigated the effect of artificial diets on the bacterial community and the intestinal microbial diversity of D. helophoroides.

  3. Key to Holarctic species of Epitrix flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) with review of their distribution, host plants and history of invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieńkowski, Andrzej O; Orlova-Bienkowskaja, Marina J

    2016-10-17

    The genus Epitrix Foudras, 1860a has a worldwide distribution. Some species of Epitrix are major pests of potato, tomato, eggplant, tobacco and other plants in North America and Europe. Some pest species have been inadvertently introduced from North America to Europe, from Europe to North America and from both continents to some islands in Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Therefore, a key for the identification of all Holarctic species is necessary for plant quarantine and protection services. We have compiled the key for distinguishing Epitrix from genera that could be confused with it and a key for all Holarctic species of Epitrix with the figures of spermathecae and aedeagi and the checklist with a review of the geographical distribution, host plants and history of invasions. The following species are included: E. abeillei (Bauduer), E. allardii (Wollaston), E. atropae Foudras, E. brevis Schwarz, E. caucasica (Heikertinger), E. cucumeris (Harris), E. dieckmanni (Mohr), E. ermischi (Mohr), E. fasciata Blatchley, E. flavotestacea Horn, E. fuscula Crotch, E. hirtipennis (Melsheimer), E. humeralis Dury, E. intermedia Foudras, E. krali Döberl, E. lobata Crotch, E. muehlei Döberl, E. priesneri (Heikertinger), E. pubescens (Koch), E. ogloblini (Iablokov-Khnzorian), E. robusta Jacoby, E. setosella (Fairmaire), E. similaris Gentner, E. solani (Blatchley), E. subcrinita (LeConte), E. tuberis Gentner, E. warchalowskii (Mohr) and E. papa Orlova-Bienkowskaja.

  4. A new genus of the subfamily Cillaeinae (Coleoptera, Nitidulidae) from the Philippines and New Guinea with notes on the taxonomy and phylogeny of the subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirejtshuk, Alexander G; Kovalev, Alexey V

    2016-12-06

    Allenipeplus gen. nov. represented by A. philippinensis sp. nov., type species (Philippines, Luzon), A. alius sp. nov. (Philippines, Mindoro), A. harmonicus sp. nov. (Philippines, Mindanao) and A. vitellinus sp. nov. (Indonesian New Guinea), is described. This new genus combines characters with a mosaic spread among other cillaeine genera. We present a wide comparison of genera among the subfamily Cillaeinae, making it possible to elaborate a detailed diagnosis of the new genus and trace some order in character patterns and propose a hypothesis on the relationship of this genus to other groups known from the Indo-Malayan and Australian Regions. A detailed diagnosis of the new genus and key to the new species are given. The Adocimus-complex of the related genera including Allenipeplus gen. nov., Adocimus Murray, 1864, Ithyphenes Murray, 1864, Platynema Ritsema, 1885 and probably Brittonema Kirejtshuk, 2011 is defined. Some notes on the taxonomy of the genera Liparopeplus Murray, 1864 and Xanthopeplus Fairmaire, 1880, stat. nov. are given. Additionally, designation of a lectotype for Liparopeplus colastoides Murray, 1864 is made.

  5. Validation of reference genes for gene expression studies in the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Swapna Priya Rajarapu; Praveen Mamidala; Omprakash Mittapalli

    2012-01-01

    The Emerald ash borer (EAB,Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) an exotic invasive insect pest has killed millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) across North America and threatens billions more.We validated six A.planipennis reference genes (actin,ACT; beta tubulin,β- TUB; glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase,GAPDH; ribosomal protein,RPL7; translation elongation factor 1α,TEF-1α; and ubiquitin,UBQ) using geNorm,Normfinder and BestKeeper for accurate determination of target messenger RNA levels in gene expression studies.The stability of the six reference genes was evaluated in different larval tissues,developmental stages and two treatments ofA.planipennis using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.Although there was no consistent ranking observed among the reference genes across the samples,the overall analysis revealed TEF-1α as the most stable reference gene.GAPDH and ACT showed least stability for all the samples studied.We conclude that TEF-1α is the most appropriate reference gene for gene expression studies inA.planipennis.Results obtained can be applicable for transcript profiling in other invasive insect pests.Further,these validated reference genes could also serve as the basis for selection of candidate reference genes in any given insect system post-validation.

  6. New genus and species of broad-nosed weevils from Baltic amber and notes on fossils of the subfamily Entiminae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

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    Nikolai Yunakov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Arostropsis groehni gen. et sp. n. is described from Baltic amber and temporarily placed in the tribe Naupactini. It differs from all recent Naupactini genera with open corbels by very short and flattened scape, distinct lateral carina of the pronotum and elytra, and the rostrum distinctly narrower than the head capsule. The shape of head in the extinct genus is somewhat similar to that of the extant Naupactini genera with enclosed corbels (Platyomus Sahlberg, 1823 and Aptolemus Schoenherr, 1842, but differs in the slender body, open corbels, very short antennal scape and epifrons without a median sulcus (only a longitudinal depression is slightly visible. It is also similar to the Tanymecine genus Pandeleteius Schoenherr, 1834 in general appearance, but distinct by the straight anterior edge of the pronotum, lack of postocular spurs, lobes, and vibrissae, a slightly sloping elytral declivity, lateral ridges on the pronotum, subflattened antennal scape, elongate rostrum, and sparsely setose epistome. A new synonymy of the generic names Protonaupactus Zherikhin, 1971 and Sucinophyllobius Wanat & Borowiec, 1986, syn. n., is established. The Madagascan genus Corecaulus Fairmaire, 1903 is transferred from the tribe Naupactini to the Brachyderini because of its connate claws and the similarity in chaetotaxy of the epistomal area with African and Madagascar Brachyderini genera. A key to the identification of known Baltic amber genera of Entiminae is proposed. A checklist of the prepleistocene fossil Entiminae, based on V.V. Zherikhin’s data, with remarks and corrections, is presented.

  7. Systematics of the weevil genus Mecinus Germar, 1821 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). I. Taxonomic treatment of the species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldara, Roberto; Fogato, Valter

    2013-01-01

    Palaearctic species of the weevil genus Mecinus Germar, 1821 are revised. A total of 47 species are recognized, one of which, M. baridioides sp. n. is new to science. Mecinus dorsalis var. tavaresi Hoffmann, 1958 (stat. rev.) is considered as a distinct species, whereas M. alboscutellatus var. atratulus (Solari, 1933) is maintained as a subspecies of M. alboscutellatus (Hustache, 1913). The following new synonymies are proposed: Mecinus barbarus Gyllenhal, 1838 (= M. longiusculus var. subcylindricus Pic, 1896 syn. n.); M. caucasicus (Reitter, 1907) (= Gymnetron caucasicum var. rubricum Reitter, 1907 syn. n.); M. comosus Boheman, 1845 (= M. setosus Kiesenwetter, 1864 syn. n.; = M. hesteticus Vitale, 1906 syn. n.; = M. pici Reitter, 1907 syn. n.; = M. pici var. theresae Reitter, 1907 syn. n.); M. elongatus (H. Brisout de Barneville, 1862) (= G. pyrenaeum H. Brisout de Barneville, 1862 syn. n.); M. haemorrhoidalis (H. Brisout de Barneville, 1862) (= M. fairmairei Tournier, 1873 syn. n.; = G. variabile var. brevipenne Desbrochers des Loges, 1893 syn. n.; = G. variabile var. curtulum Reitter, 1907 syn. n.); M. humeralis Tournier, 1873 (= M. tournieri Fairmaire, 1876 syn. n.; = M. lineicollis Reitter, 1907 syn. n.); M. paratychioides (Hoffmann, 1965) (= G. longirostre Pic, 1921 syn. n.); M. longulus (Desbrochers des Loges, 1893) (= G. nigronotatum Pic, 1906 syn. n.; = G. nigronotatum var. vaulogeri Pic, 1930 syn. n.); M. pipistrellus (Marseul, 1871) (= G. concavirostre Stöcklein, 1950 syn. n.); M. plantaginis (Eppelsheim, 1875) (= G. zherichini Korotyaev, 1994 syn. n.); M. pyraster (Herbst, 1795) (= M. schneideri Kirsch, 1870 syn. n.; = M. hariolus Reitter, 1907 syn. n.; = M. pici var. favarcqui Pic, 1915 syn. n.); M. sanctus (Desbrochers des Loges, 1893) (= G. laterufum Pic, 1900 syn. n.); M. simus (Mulsant & Rey, 1859) (= G. mixtum Mulsant & Godart, 1873 syn. n.); M. tychioides (H. Brisout de Barneville, 1862) (= G. aestivum Hoffmann, 1956 syn. n.); M. vulpes (Lucas

  8. Azadirachtin: an effective systemic insecticide for control of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Nicole; Helson, Blair; Thompson, Dean; Otis, Gard; McFarlane, John; Buscarini, Teresa; Meating, Joe

    2010-06-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive pest discovered in North America in 2002, is now well established and threatens ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees throughout the continent. Experiments were conducted to 1) examine the efficacy of an alternative natural pesticide, azadirachtin, to control emerald ash borer, and 2) determine foliar uptake and dissipation patterns after systemic injections of azadirachtin into trunks of small (2.2 cm diameter at breast height [dbh]), uninfested green ash trees. We found no evidence of mortality of adult beetles. In contrast, fewer larvae completed their development at dose levels > or = 1.7 mg (AI)/cm dbh and development ceased beyond the second instar at dose levels > or = 13.6 mg (AI)/cm dbh. Substantial concentrations (11.2 microg/g dry mass [SD = 7.55]) of azadirachtin were present in leaves within 7 d of treatment. After rapid initial uptake, concentrations in leaves declined logarithmically during the 55 d after injection. A similar pattern was observed in a separate experiment that examined the uptake and translocation of azadirachtin in larger green ash trees (22 cm dbh) treated with 250 mg (AI) /cm dbh with the EcoJect injection system. In another experiment, recently infested plantation green ash trees treated with doses > or = 40 mg (AI)/cm dbh had significant reductions in adult emergence approximately 1 yr postinjection. Given the inhibition of larval development, reduction of adult emergence, and the occurrence of foliar residues at biologically active concentrations, we conclude that azadirachtin is effective in protecting ash trees from emerald ash borer.

  9. Interactive influence of leaf age, light intensity, and girdling on green ash foliar chemistry and emerald ash borer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yigen; Poland, Therese M

    2009-07-01

    Biotic and abiotic environmental factors affect plant nutritional quality and defensive compounds that confer plant resistance to herbivory. Influence of leaf age, light availability, and girdling on foliar nutrition and defense of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh) was examined in this study. Longevity of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), adults reared on green ash foliage subjected to these factors was assayed. Mature leaves generally were more nutritious with greater amino acids and a greater ratio of protein to non-structural carbohydrate (P:C) than young leaves, in particular when trees were grown in shade. On the other hand, mature leaves had lower amounts of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors, and total phenolics compared to young leaves. Lower defense of mature leaves alone, or along with higher nutritional quality may lead to increased survival and longevity of emerald ash borer feeding on mature leaves. Sunlight reduced amino acids and P:C ratio, irrespective of leaf age and girdling, and elevated total protein of young foliage, but not protein of mature leaves. Sunlight also dramatically increased all investigated defensive compounds of young, but not mature leaves. Girdling reduced green ash foliar nutrition, especially, of young leaves grown in shade and of mature leaves grown in sun. However emerald ash borer performance did not differ when fed leaves from trees grown in sun or shade, or from girdled or control trees. One explanation is that emerald ash borer reared on lower nutritional quality food may compensate for nutrient deficiency by increasing its consumption rate. The strong interactions among leaf age, light intensity, and girdling on nutrition and defense highlight the need for caution when interpreting data without considering possible interactions.

  10. Occurrence of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and biotic factors affecting its immature stages in the Russian Far East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Yurchenko, Galina; Fuester, Roger

    2012-04-01

    Field surveys were conducted from 2008 to 2011 in the Khabarovsk and Vladivostok regions of Russia to investigate the occurrence of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, and mortality factors affecting its immature stages. We found emerald ash borer infesting both introduced North American green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) and native oriental ashes (F. mandshurica Rupr. and F. rhynchophylla Hance) in both regions. Emerald ash borer densities (larvae/m(2) of phloem area) were markedly higher on green ash (11.3-76.7 in the Khabarovsk area and 77-245 in the Vladivostok area) than on artificially stressed Manchurian ash (2.2) or Oriental ash (10-59). Mortality of emerald ash borer larvae caused by different biotic factors (woodpecker predation, host plant resistance and/or undetermined diseases, and parasitism) varied with date, site, and ash species. In general, predation of emerald ash borer larvae by woodpeckers was low. While low rates (3-27%) of emerald ash borer larval mortality were caused by undetermined biotic factors on green ash between 2009 and 2011, higher rates (26-95%) of emerald ash borer larval mortality were caused by putative plant resistance in Oriental ash species in both regions. Little (emerald ash borer larvae was observed in Khabarovsk; however, three hymenopteran parasitoids (Spathius sp., Atanycolus nigriventris Vojnovskaja-Krieger, and Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang) were observed attacking third - fourth instars of emerald ash borer in the Vladivostok area, parasitizing 0-8.3% of emerald ash borer larvae infesting Oriental ash trees and 7.3-62.7% of those on green ash trees (primarily by Spathius sp.) in two of the three study sites. Relevance of these findings to the classical biological control of emerald ash borer in newly invaded regions is discussed.

  11. Detectability of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in asymptomatic urban trees by using branch samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryall, Krista L; Fidgen, Jeffrey G; Turgeon, Jean J

    2011-06-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an exotic invasive insect causing extensive mortality to ash trees, Fraxinus spp., in Canada and the United States. Detection of incipient populations of this pest is difficult because of its cryptic life stages and a multiyear time lag between initial attack and the appearance of signs or symptoms of infestation. We sampled branches from open-grown urban ash trees to develop a sample unit suitable for detecting low density A. planipennis infestation before any signs or symptoms are evident. The sample unit that maximized detection rates consisted of one 50-cm-long piece from the base of a branch ≥6 cm diameter in the midcrown. The optimal sample size was two such branches per tree. This sampling method detected ≈75% of asymptomatic trees known to be infested by using more intensive sampling and ≈3 times more trees than sampling one-fourth of the circumference of the trunk at breast height. The method is less conspicuous and esthetically damaging to a tree than the removal of bark from the main stem or the use of trap trees, and could be incorporated into routine sanitation or maintenance of city-owned trees to identify and delineate infested areas. This research indicates that branch sampling greatly reduces false negatives associated with visual surveys and window sampling at breast height. Detection of A. planipennis-infested asymptomatic trees through branch sampling in urban centers would provide landowners and urban foresters with more time to develop and implement management tactics.

  12. Optimization of multifunnel traps for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): influence of size, trap coating, and color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francese, Joseph A; Rietz, Michael L; Mastro, Victor C

    2013-12-01

    Field assays were conducted in southeastern and south-central Michigan in 2011 and 2012 to optimize green and purple multifunnel (Lindgren funnel) traps for use as a survey tool for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Larger sized (12- and 16-unit) multifunnel traps caught more beetles than their smaller-sized (4- and 8-unit) counterparts. Green traps coated with untinted (white) fluon caught almost four times as many adult A. planipennis as Rain-X and tinted (green) fluon-coated traps and almost 33 times more beetles than untreated control traps. Purple multifunnel traps generally caught much lower numbers of A. planipennis adults than green traps, and trap catch on them was not affected by differences in the type of coating applied. However, trap coating was necessary as untreated control purple traps caught significantly less beetles than traps treated with Rain-X and untinted or tinted (purple) fluon. Proportions of male beetles captured were generally much higher on green traps than on purple traps, but sex ratios were not affected by trap coating. In 2012, a new shade of purple plastic, based on a better color match to an attractive purple paint than the previously used purple, was used for trapping assays. When multifunnel traps were treated with fluon, green traps caught more A. planipennis adults than both shades of purple and a prism trap that was manufactured based on the same color match. Trap catch was not affected by diluting the fluon concentration applied to traps to 50% (1:1 mixture in water). At 10%, trap catch was significantly lowered.

  13. Effects of ambient temperature on egg and larval development of the invasive emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): implications for laboratory rearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Watt, Tim; Taylor, Phil; Larson, Kristi; Lelito, Jonathan P

    2013-10-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an invasive beetle from Asia causing large scale ash (Fraxinus) mortality in North America, has been extremely difficult to rear in the laboratory because of its long life cycle and cryptic nature of immature stages. This lack of effective laboratory-rearing methods has not only hindered research into its biology and ecology, but also mass production of natural enemies for biological control of this invasive pest. Using sticks from the alternate host plant, Fraxinus uhdei (Wenzig) Lingelsh, we characterized the stage-specific development time and growth rate of both emerald ash borer eggs and larvae at different constant temperatures (12-35 degrees C) for the purpose of developing effective laboratory-rearing methods. Results from our study showed that the median time for egg hatching decreased from 20 d at 20 degrees C to 7 d at 35 degrees C, while no emerald ash borer eggs hatched at 12 degrees C. The developmental time for 50% of emerald ash borer larvae advancing to third, fourth, and J-larval stages at 20 degrees C were 8.3, 9.1, and 12.3 wk, respectively, approximately two times longer than at 30 degrees C for the corresponding instars or stages. In contrast to 30 degrees C, however, the development times of emerald ash borer larvae advancing to later instars (from oviposition) were significantly increased at 35 degrees C, indicating adverse effects of this high temperature. The optimal range of ambient temperature to rear emerald ash borer larvae should be between 25-30 degrees C; however, faster rate of egg and larval development should be expected as temperature increases within this range.

  14. Effects of host plant and larval density on intraspecific competition in larvae of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Larson, Kristi; Watt, Tim; Gould, Juli; Lelito, Jonathan P

    2013-12-01

    Competition for food, mates, and space among different individuals of the same insect species can affect density-dependent regulation of insect abundance or population dynamics. The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious invasive pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees, with its larvae feeding in serpentine galleries between the interface of sapwood and phloem tissues of ash trees. Using artificial infestation of freshly cut logs of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) and tropical ash (Fraxinus uhdei [Wenzig] Lingelsh) with a series of egg densities, we evaluated the mechanism and outcome of intraspecific competition in larvae of A. planipennis in relation to larval density and host plant species. Results from our study showed that as the egg densities on each log (1.5-6.5 cm in diameter and 22-25 cm in length) increased from 200 to 1,600 eggs per square meter of surface area, larval survivorship declined from ≍68 to 10% for the green ash logs, and 86 to 55% for tropical ash logs. Accordingly, larval mortality resulting from cannibalism, starvation, or both, significantly increased as egg density increased, and the biomass of surviving larvae significantly decreased on both ash species. When larval density was adjusted to the same level, however, larval mortality from intraspecific competition was significantly higher and mean biomasses of surviving larvae was significantly lower in green ash than in tropical ash. The role of intraspecific competition of A. planipennis larvae in density-dependent regulation of its natural population dynamics is discussed.

  15. Indirect effects of emerald ash borer-induced ash mortality and canopy gap formation on epigaeic beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Kamal J K; Smith, Annemarie; Hartzler, Diane M; Herms, Daniel A

    2014-06-01

    Exotic herbivorous insects have drastically and irreversibly altered forest structure and composition of North American forests. For example, emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) from Asia has caused wide-scale mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in eastern United States and Canada. We studied the effects of forest changes resulting from emerald ash borer invasion on epigaeic or ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) along a gradient of ash dieback and gap sizes in southeastern Michigan. Ground beetles were sampled in hydric, mesic, and xeric habitats in which black (Fraxinus nigra Marshall), green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall), and white (Fraxinus americana L.) ash were the most common species, respectively. During 2006-2007, we trapped 2,545 adult ground beetles comprising 52 species. There was a negative correlation between percent ash tree mortality in 2006 and catches of all beetles. Catches of Agonum melanarium Dejean (in 2006) and Pterostichus mutus (Say) (in 2006-2007) were negatively correlated with tree mortality and gap size, respectively. However, catches of Pterostichus corvinus Dejean were positively correlated with gap size in 2006. As ash mortality and average gap size increased from 2006 to 2007, catches of all beetles as well as P. mutus and Pterostichus stygicus (Say) increased (1.3-3.9 times), while species diversity decreased, especially in mesic and xeric stands. Cluster analysis revealed that beetle assemblages in hydric and mesic stand diverged (25 and 40%, respectively) in their composition from 2006 to 2007, and that hydric stands had the most unique beetle assemblages. Overall, epigaeic beetle assemblages were altered in ash stands impacted by emerald ash borer; however, these impacts may dissipate as canopy gaps close.

  16. Influence of trap color and host volatiles on capture of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Damon J; Khrimian, Ashot; Cossé, Allard; Fraser, Ivich; Mastro, Victor C

    2012-04-01

    Field trapping assays were conducted in 2009 and 2010 throughout western Michigan, to evaluate lures for adult emerald ash borer, A. planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Several ash tree volatiles were tested on purple prism traps in 2009, and a dark green prism trap in 2010. In 2009, six bark oil distillate lure treatments were tested against manuka oil lures (used in 2008 by USDA APHIS PPQ emerald ash borer cooperative program). Purple traps baited with 80/20 (manuka/phoebe oil) significantly increased beetle catch compared with traps baited with manuka oil alone. In 2010 we monitored emerald ash borer attraction to dark green traps baited with six lure combinations of 80/20 (manuka/phoebe), manuka oil, and (3Z)-hexenol. Traps baited with manuka oil and (3Z)-hexenol caught significantly more male and total count insects than traps baited with manuka oil alone. Traps baited with manuka oil and (3Z)-hexenol did not catch more beetles when compared with traps baited with (3Z)-hexenol alone. When compared with unbaited green traps our results show that (3Z)-hexenol improved male catch significantly in only one of three field experiments using dark green traps. Dark green traps caught a high number of A. planipennis when unbaited while (3Z)-hexenol was seen to have a minimal (nonsignificant) trap catch effect at several different release rates. We hypothesize that the previously reported kairomonal attractancy of (3Z)-hexenol (for males) on light green traps is not as obvious here because of improved male attractancy to the darker green trap.

  17. Glutathione-S-transferase profiles in the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarapu, Swapna Priya; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2013-05-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire is a recently discovered invasive insect pest of ash, Fraxinus spp. in North America. Glutathione-S-transferases (GST) are a multifunctional superfamily of enzymes which function in conjugating toxic compounds to less toxic and excretable forms. In this study, we report the molecular characterization and expression patterns of different classes of GST genes in different tissues and developmental stages plus their specific activity. Multiple sequence alignment of all six A. planipennis GSTs (ApGST-E1, ApGST-E2, ApGST-E3, ApGST-O1, ApGST-S1 and ApGST-μ1) revealed conserved features of insect GSTs and a phylogenetic analysis grouped the GSTs within the epsilon, sigma, omega and microsomal classes of GSTs. Real time quantitative PCR was used to study field collected samples. In larval tissues high mRNA levels for ApGST-E1, ApGST-E3 and ApGST-O1 were obtained in the midgut and Malpighian tubules. On the other hand, ApGST-E2 and ApGST-S1 showed high mRNA levels in fat body and ApGST-μ1 showed constitutive levels in all the tissues assayed. During development, mRNA levels for ApGST-E2 were observed to be the highest in feeding instars, ApGST-S1 in prepupal instars; while the others showed constitutive patterns in all the developmental stages examined. At the enzyme level, total GST activity was similar in all the tissues and developmental stages assayed. Results obtained suggest that A. planipennis is potentially primed with GST-driven detoxification to metabolize ash allelochemicals. To our knowledge this study represents the first report of GSTs in A. planipennis and also in the family of wood boring beetles.

  18. Feeding by emerald ash borer larvae induces systemic changes in black ash foliar chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yigen; Whitehill, Justin G A; Bonello, Pierluigi; Poland, Therese M

    2011-11-01

    The exotic wood-boring pest, emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has been threatening North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) resources, this being recognized since its first detection in Michigan, USA and Ontario, Canada in 2002. Ash trees are killed by larval feeding in the cambial region, which results in disruption of photosynthate and nutrient translocation. In this study, changes in volatile and non-volatile foliar phytochemicals of potted 2-yr-old black ash, Fraxinus nigra Marshall, seedlings were observed in response to EAB larval feeding in the main stem. EAB larval feeding affected levels of six compounds [hexanal, (E)-2-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, (E)-β-ocimene, methyl salicylate, and (Z,E)-α-farnesene] with patterns of interaction depending upon compounds of interest and time of observation. Increased methyl salicylate emission suggests similarity in responses induced by EAB larval feeding and other phloem-feeding herbivores. Overall, EAB larval feeding suppressed (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate emission, elevated (E)-β-ocimene emission in the first 30days, but emissions leveled off thereafter, and generally increased the emission of (Z,E)-α-farnesene. Levels of carbohydrates and phenolics increased overall, while levels of proteins and most amino acids decreased in response to larval feeding. Twenty-three amino acids were consistently detected in the foliage of black ash. The three most abundant amino acids were aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glutamine, while the four least abundant were α-aminobutyric acid, β-aminoisobutyric acid, methionine, and sarcosine. Most (16) foliar free amino acids and 6 of the 9 detected essential amino acids decreased with EAB larval feeding. The ecological consequences of these dynamic phytochemical changes on herbivores harbored by ash trees and potential natural enemies of these herbivores are discussed.

  19. Comparison of trap types and colors for capturing emerald ash borer adults at different population densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Therese M; Mccullough, Deborah G

    2014-02-01

    Results of numerous trials to evaluate artificial trap designs and lures for detection of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, the emerald ash borer, have yielded inconsistent results, possibly because of different A. planipennis population densities in the field sites. In 2010 and 2011, we compared 1) green canopy traps, 2) purple canopy traps, 3) green double-decker traps, and 4) purple double-decker traps in sites representing a range of A. planipennis infestation levels. Traps were baited with cis-3-hexenol in both years, plus an 80:20 mixture of Manuka and Phoebe oil (2010) or Manuka oil alone (2011). Condition of trees bearing canopy traps, A. planipennis infestation level of trees in the vicinity of traps, and number of A. planipennis captured per trap differed among sites in both years. Overall in both years, more females, males, and beetles of both sexes were captured on double-decker traps than canopy traps, and more beetles of both sexes (2010) or females (2011) were captured on purple traps than green traps. In 2010, detection rates were higher for purple (100%) and green double-decker traps (100%) than for purple (82%) or green canopy traps (64%) at sites with very low to low A. planipennis infestation levels. Captures of A. planipennis on canopy traps consistently increased with the infestation level of the canopy trap-bearing trees. Differences among trap types were most pronounced at sites with low A. planipennis densities, where more beetles were captured on purple double-decker traps than on green canopy traps in both years.

  20. Antioxidant genes of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis): gene characterization and expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarapu, Swapna Priya; Mamidala, Praveen; Herms, Daniel A; Bonello, Pierluigi; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2011-06-01

    Phytophagous insects frequently encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS) from exogenous and endogenous sources. To overcome the effect of ROS, insects have evolved a suite of antioxidant defense genes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), an exotic invasive insect pest from Asia has killed millions of ash trees and continues to invade North America at a rapid pace. From an on-going expressed sequence tag (EST) project of A. planipennis larval tissues, we identified ESTs coding for a Cu-Zn SOD (ApSOD1), a CAT (ApCAT1) and a GPX (ApGPX1). A multiple sequence alignment of the derived A. planipennis sequences revealed high homology with other insect sequences at the amino acid level. Phylogenetic analysis of ApSOD1 grouped it with Cu-Zn SODs of other insect taxa. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis in different larval tissues (midgut, fat body, Malpighian tubule and cuticle) revealed high mRNA levels of ApCAT1 in the midgut. Interestingly, high mRNA levels for both ApSOD1 and ApGPX1 were observed in the Malpighian tubules. Assay of mRNA levels in developmental stages (larva, prepupa and adults) by qRT-PCR indicated high transcript levels of ApCAT1 and ApGPX1 in larval and prepupal stages with a decline in adults. On the other hand, the transcript levels of ApSOD1 were observed to be constitutive in all the developmental stages assayed. Results obtained reflect a plausible role of these A. planipennis antioxidant genes in quenching ROS from both diet (ash allelochemicals) as well as endogenous sources. These studies further help in understanding the adaptation/invasiveness of A. planipennis.

  1. The influence of satellite populations of emerald ash borer on projected economic costs in U.S. communities, 2010-2020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Kent F; Mercader, Rodrigo J; Haight, Robert G; Siegert, Nathan W; McCullough, Deborah G; Liebhold, Andrew M

    2011-09-01

    The invasion spread of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is characterized by the formation of satellite populations that expand and coalesce with the continuously invading population front. As of January 2010, satellite infestations have been detected in 13 states and two Canadian provinces. Understanding how newly established satellite populations may affect economic costs can help program managers to justify and design prevention and control strategies. We estimate the economic costs caused by EAB for the 10-yr period from 2010 to 2020 for scenarios of fewer EAB satellite populations than those found from 2005 to 2010 and slower expansion of satellite populations found in 2009. We measure the projected discounted cost of treatment, removal, and replacement of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) growing in managed landscapes in U.S. communities. Estimated costs for the base scenario with the full complement of satellites in 2005-2010 and no program to mitigate spread is $12.5 billion. Fewer EAB satellites from 2005 to 2010 delay economic costs of $1.0 to 7.4 billion. Slower expansion of 2009 satellite populations delays economic costs of $0.1 to 0.7 billion. Satellite populations that are both distant from the core EAB infestation and close to large urban areas caused more economic costs in our simulations than did other satellites. Our estimates of delayed economic costs suggest that spending on activities that prevent establishment of new satellite EAB populations or slow expansion of existing populations can be cost-effective and that continued research on the cost and effectiveness of prevention and control activities is warranted.

  2. Effectiveness of differing trap types for the detection of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jordan M; Storer, Andrew J; Fraser, Ivich; Beachy, Jessica A; Mastro, Victor C

    2009-08-01

    The early detection of populations of a forest pest is important to begin initial control efforts, minimizing the risk of further spread and impact. Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is an introduced pestiferous insect of ash (Fraxinus spp. L.) in North America. The effectiveness of trapping techniques, including girdled trap trees with sticky bands and purple prism traps, was tested in areas with low- and high-density populations of emerald ash borer. At both densities, large girdled trap trees (>30 cm diameter at breast height [dbh], 1.37 m in height) captured a higher rate of adult beetles per day than smaller trees. However, the odds of detecting emerald ash borer increased as the dbh of the tree increased by 1 cm for trap trees 15-25 cm dbh. Ash species used for the traps differed in the number of larvae per cubic centimeter of phloem. Emerald ash borer larvae were more likely to be detected below, compared with above, the crown base of the trap tree. While larval densities within a trap tree were related to the species of ash, adult capture rates were not. These results provide support for focusing state and regional detection programs on the detection of emerald ash borer adults. If bark peeling for larvae is incorporated into these programs, peeling efforts focused below the crown base may increase likelihood of identifying new infestations while reducing labor costs. Associating traps with larger trees ( approximately 25 cm dbh) may increase the odds of detecting low-density populations of emerald ash borer, possibly reducing the time between infestation establishment and implementing management strategies.

  3. Effects of trap type, placement and ash distribution on emerald ash borer captures in a low density site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Deborah G; Siegert, Nathan W; Poland, Therese M; Pierce, Steven J; Ahn, Su Zie

    2011-10-01

    Effective methods for early detection of newly established, low density emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) infestations are critically needed in North America. We assessed adult A. planipennis captures on four types of traps in a 16-ha site in central Michigan. The site was divided into 16 blocks, each comprised of four 50- by 50-m cells. Green ash trees (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) were inventoried by diameter class and ash phloem area was estimated for each cell. One trap type was randomly assigned to each cell in each block. Because initial sampling showed that A. planipennis density was extremely low, infested ash logs were introduced into the center of the site. In total, 87 beetles were captured during the summer. Purple double-decker traps baited with a blend of ash leaf volatiles, Manuka oil, and ethanol captured 65% of all A. planipennis beetles. Similarly baited, green double-decker traps captured 18% of the beetles, whereas sticky bands on girdled trees captured 11% of the beetles. Purple traps baited with Manuka oil and suspended in the canopies of live ash trees captured only 5% of the beetles. At least one beetle was captured on 81% of the purple double-decker traps, 56% of the green double-decker traps, 42% of sticky bands, and 25% of the canopy traps. Abundance of ash phloem near traps had no effect on captures and trap location and sun exposure had only weak effects on captures. Twelve girdled and 29 nongirdled trees were felled and sampled in winter. Current-year larvae were present in 100% of the girdled trees and 72% of the nongirdled trees, but larval density was five times higher on girdled than nongirdled trees.

  4. Failure to phytosanitize ash firewood infested with emerald ash borer in a small dry kiln using ISPM-15 standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, P Charles; Bumgardner, Matthew S; Herms, Daniel A; Sabula, Andrew

    2010-06-01

    Although current USDA-APHIS standards suggest that a core temperature of 71.1 degrees C (160 degrees F) for 75 min is needed to adequately sanitize emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire-infested firewood, it is unclear whether more moderate (and economical) treatment regimes will adequately eradicate emerald ash borer larvae and prepupae from ash firewood. We constructed a small dry kiln in an effort to emulate the type of technology a small- to medium-sized firewood producer might use to examine whether treatments with lower temperature and time regimes successfully eliminate emerald ash borer from both spilt and roundwood firewood. Using white ash (Fraxinus americana L.) firewood collected from a stand with a heavy infestation of emerald ash borer in Delaware, OH, we treated the firewood using the following temperature and time regime: 46 degrees C (114.8 degrees F) for 30 min, 46 degrees C (114.8 degrees F) for 60 min, 56 degrees C (132.8 degrees F) for 30 min, and 56 degrees C (132.8 degrees F) for 60 min. Temperatures were recorded for the outer 2.54-cm (1-in.) of firewood. After treatment, all firewood was placed under mesh netting and emerald ash borer were allowed to develop and emerge under natural conditions. No treatments seemed to be successful at eliminating emerald ash borer larvae and perpupae as all treatments (including two nontreated controls) experienced some emerald ash borer emergence. However, the 56 degrees C (132.8 degrees F) treatments did result in considerably less emerald ash borer emergence than the 46 degrees C (114.8 degrees F) treatments. Further investigation is needed to determine whether longer exposure to the higher temperature (56 degrees C) will successfully sanitize emerald ash borer-infested firewood.

  5. Nutritional attributes of ash (Fraxinus spp.) outer bark and phloem and their relationships to resistance against the emerald ash borer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Amy L; Whitehill, Justin G A; Opiyo, Stephen O; Phelan, P Larry; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2012-12-01

    The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, EAB) is an alien, invasive wood-boring insect that is responsible for killing millions of ash trees since its discovery in North America in 2002. All North American ash species (Fraxinus spp.) that EAB has encountered have shown various degrees of susceptibility, while Manchurian ash (Fraxinus mandshurica Ruprecht), which shares a co-evolutionary history with this insect, is resistant. Recent studies have looked into constitutive resistance mechanisms in Manchurian ash, concentrating on the secondary phloem, which is the feeding substrate for the insect. In addition to specialized metabolism and defense-related components, primary metabolites and nutritional summaries can also be important to understand the feeding behavior of insect herbivores. Here, we have compared the nutritional characteristics (water content, total protein, free amino acids, total soluble sugars and starch, percent carbon and nitrogen, and macro- and micronutrients) of outer bark and phloem from black, green, white and Manchurian ash to determine their relevance to resistance or susceptibility to EAB. Water content and concentrations of Al, Ba, Cu, Fe, K, Li, tryptophan and an unknown compound were found to separate black and Manchurian ash from green and white ash in a principal component analysis (PCA), confirming their phylogenetic placements into two distinct clades. The traits that distinguished Manchurian ash from black ash in the PCA were water content and concentrations of total soluble sugars, histidine, lysine, methionine, ornithine, proline, sarcosine, tyramine, tyrosol, Al, Fe, K, Na, V and an unknown compound. However, only proline, tyramine and tyrosol were significantly different, and higher, in Manchurian ash than in black ash.

  6. Laboratory Evaluation of the Toxicity of Systemic Insecticides to Emerald Ash Borer Larvae.

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    Poland, Therese M; Ciaramitaro, Tina M; McCullough, Deborah G

    2016-04-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive phloem-feeding insect native to Asia, threatens at least 16 North American ash (Fraxinus) species and has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees in landscapes and forests. We conducted laboratory bioassays to assess the relative efficacy of systemic insecticides to control emerald ash borer larvae in winter 2009 and 2010. Second- and third-instar larvae were reared on artificial diet treated with varying doses of emamectin benzoate (TREE-äge, Arborjet, Inc., Woburn, MA), imidacloprid (Imicide, J. J Mauget Co., Arcadia, CA), dinotefuran (Safari, Valent Professional Products, Walnut Creek, CA), and azadirachtin (TreeAzin, BioForest Technologies, Inc., Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, and Azasol, Arborjet, Inc., Woburn, MA). All of the insecticides were toxic to emerald ash borer larvae, but lethal concentrations needed to kill 50% of the larvae (LC50), standardized by larval weight, varied with insecticide and time. On the earliest date with a significant fit of the probit model, LC50 values were 0.024 ppm/g at day 29 for TREE-äge, 0.015 ppm/g at day 63 for Imicide, 0.030 ppm/g at day 46 for Safari, 0.025 ppm/g at day 24 for TreeAzin, and 0.027 ppm/g at day 27 for Azasol. The median lethal time to kill 50% (LT50) of the tested larvae also varied with insecticide product and dose, and was longer for Imicide and Safari than for TREE-äge or the azadirachtin products. Insecticide efficacy in the field will depend on adult and larval mortality as well as leaf and phloem insecticide residues.

  7. Influence of host age on critical fitness parameters of Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a new parasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Timothy J; Duan, Jian J

    2014-08-01

    Spathius galinae Belokobylskij and Strazenac (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a recently discovered gregarious idiobiont larval ectoparasitoid currently being evaluated for biological control against the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in the United States. To aid in the development of laboratory rearing protocols, we assessed the influence of various emerald ash borer stages on critical fitness parameters of S. galinae. We exposed gravid S. galinae females to emerald ash borer host larvae of various ages (3.5, 5, 7, and 10 wk post egg oviposition) that were reared naturally in tropical (evergreen) ash (Fraxinus uhdei (Wenzig) Lingelsh) logs, or to field-collected, late-stage emerald ash borers (nonfeeding J-shaped larvae termed "J-larvae," prepupae, and pupae) that were artificially inserted into green ash logs. When exposed to larvae in tropical ash logs, S. galinae attacked 5 and 7 wk hosts more frequently (68-76%) than 3.5 wk (23%) and 10 wk (12%) hosts. Subsample dissections of the these logs revealed that 3.5, 5, 7 and 10 wk host logs contained mostly second, third, fourth, and J-larvae, respectively, that had already bored into the sapwood for diapause. No J-larvae were attacked by S. galinae when naturally reared in tropical ash logs. When parasitized by S. galinae, 7 and 10 wk hosts produced the largest broods (approximately 6.7 offspring per parasitized host), and the progenies that emerged from these logs had larger anatomical measurements and more female-biased sex ratios. When exposed to emerald ash borer J-larvae, prepupae, or pupae artificially inserted into green ash logs, S. galinae attacked 53% ofJ-larvae, but did not attack any prepupae or pupae. We conclude that large (fourth instar) emerald ash borer larvae should be used to rear S. galinae.

  8. Evaluation of heat treatment schedules for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Scott W; Fraser, Ivich; Mastro, Victor C

    2009-12-01

    The thermotolerance of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), was evaluated by subjecting larvae and prepupae to a number of time-temperature regimes. Three independent experiments were conducted during 2006 and 2007 by heating emerald ash borer infested firewood in laboratory ovens. Heat treatments were established based on the internal wood temperature. Treatments ranged from 45 to 65 degrees C for 30 and 60 min, and the ability of larvae to pupate and emerge as adults was used to evaluate the success of each treatment. A fourth experiment was conducted to examine heat treatments on exposed prepupae removed from logs and subjected to ambient temperatures of 50, 55, and 60 degrees C for 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. Results from the firewood experiments were consistent in the first experiment. Emergence data showed emerald ash borer larvae were capable of surviving a temperatures-time combination up to 60 degrees C for 30 min in wood. The 65 degrees C for 30 min treatment was, however, effective in preventing emerald ash borer emergence on both dates. Conversely, in the second experiment using saturated steam heat, complete mortality was achieved at 50 and 55 degrees C for both 30 and 60 min. Results from the prepupae experiment showed emerald ash borer survivorship in temperature-time combinations up to 55 degrees C for 30 min, and at 50 degrees C for 60 min; 60 degrees C for 15 min and longer was effective in preventing pupation in exposed prepupae. Overall results suggest that emerald ash borer survival is variable depending on heating conditions, and an internal wood temperature of 60 degrees C for 60 min should be considered the minimum for safe treatment for firewood.

  9. Biology, life history, and laboratory rearing of Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a larval parasitoid of the invasive emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Watt, Timothy J; Larson, Kristi

    2014-06-01

    Spathius galinae Belokobylskij & Strazanac is a recently described parasitoid of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, in the Russian Far East, and is currently being considered for biocontrol introduction in the United States. Using A. planipennis larvae reared with freshly cut ash (Fraxinus spp.) sticks, we investigated the biology, life cycle, and rearing of S. galinae in the laboratory under normal rearing conditions (25 +/- 1 degrees C, 65 +/- 10% relative humidity, and a photoperiod of 16:8 [L:D] h). Our study showed that S. galinae took approximately 1 mo (29 d) to complete a single generation (from egg to adult) under the laboratory rearing conditions. After eclosion from eggs, larvae of S. galinae molted four times to reach the fifth instar, which then spun cocoons for pupation and development to adults. Adult female wasps had a median survival time of 7 wk with fecundity peaking 3 wk after emergence when reared in groups (of five females and five males) and 2 wk in single pairs. Throughout the life span, a single female S. galinae produced a mean (+/- SE) of 31 (+/- 3.0) progeny when reared in groups, and a mean (+/- SE) of 47 (+/- 5.3) progeny when reared in single pairs. Results from our study also showed that S. galinae could be effectively reared with A. planipennis larvae reared in both green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) and tropical [Fraxinus uhdei (Wenzig) Lingelsh] ash sticks. However, the abortion (unemergence) rate of S. galinae progeny was much higher (20%) when reared with host larvae in green ash sticks than that (2.1%) in tropical ash sticks.

  10. A new species of Synchroa Newman from China (Coleoptera: Synchroidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yun; Li, Yun; Liu, Zhenhua; Pang, Hong

    2016-03-24

    The family Synchroidae Lacordaire, 1859 is a small group of beetles with an elongate, tapered, and slightly flattened body and brownish to black coloration. Members exhibit morphological similarity to some genera of Melandryidae, but can be distinguished based on larval morphology and the unmodified apical maxillary palpomeres. They are widely distributed throughout the Oriental, Palaearctic and Nearctic regions and possess the highest species diversity in Eastern Asia (Nikitsky 1999; Hsiao 2015). Synchroa bark beetles had been viewed as members of the Melandryidae for a long time, but were treated as an independent family in Böving & Craighead (1931). Crowson (1966) followed Böving & Craighead's treatment and suggested close relatives among the members of Zopheridae and Stenotrachelidae based on both larval and adult characters. Currently, only 8 species distributed amongst three genera have been described in this family: Mallodrya Horn, 1888 is a monotypical genus from North America; Synchroa Newman, 1838, the nominal genus and the largest genus widely distributed in North America, east Palearctic region and the Oriental region, including 5 species; Synchroina Fairmaire, 1898 is from the Oriental region and includes two species. (Nikitsky 1999; Hsiao 2015).Recently, the first author had the opportunity to examine the collection of the Museum of Biology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China (SYSBM) discovering one remarkable species of Synchroa with dark coloration and a narrow prothorax, which are very different from previously described species of this genus. After careful examination and comparisons to other described species it is described here as new. In addition, an updated key to the world species of Synchroa is provided.

  11. Identification of odor-processing genes in the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis.

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    Praveen Mamidala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insects rely on olfaction to locate food, mates, and suitable oviposition sites for successful completion of their life cycle. Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (emerald ash borer is a serious invasive insect pest that has killed tens of millions of North American ash (Fraxinus spp trees and threatens the very existence of the genus Fraxinus. Adult A. planipennis are attracted to host volatiles and conspecifics; however, to date no molecular knowledge exists on olfaction in A. planipennis. Hence, we undertook an antennae-specific transcriptomic study to identify the repertoire of odor processing genes involved in A. planipennis olfaction. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We acquired 139,085 Roche/454 GS FLX transcriptomic reads that were assembled into 30,615 high quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs, including 3,249 isotigs and 27,366 non-isotigs (contigs and singletons. Intriguingly, the majority of the A. planipennis antennal transcripts (59.72% did not show similarity with sequences deposited in the non-redundant database of GenBank, potentially representing novel genes. Functional annotation and KEGG analysis revealed pathways associated with signaling and detoxification. Several odor processing genes (9 odorant binding proteins, 2 odorant receptors, 1 sensory neuron membrane protein and 134 odorant/xenobiotic degradation enzymes, including cytochrome P450s, glutathione-S-transferases; esterases, etc. putatively involved in olfaction processes were identified. Quantitative PCR of candidate genes in male and female A. planipennis in different developmental stages revealed developmental- and sex-biased expression patterns. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The antennal ESTs derived from A. planipennis constitute a rich molecular resource for the identification of genes potentially involved in the olfaction process of A. planipennis. These findings should help in understanding the processing of antennally-active compounds (e.g. 7-epi

  12. Comparison of male and female emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) responses to phoebe oil and (Z)-3-hexenol lures in light green prism traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gary G; Poland, Therese M; Ciaramitaro, Tina; Lyons, D Barry; Jones, Gene C

    2011-02-01

    We conducted trapping experiments for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Michigan, U.S.A., and Ontario, Canada, to compare unbaited light green sticky prism traps with traps baited with phoebe oil, (Z)-3-hexenol (Z3-6:OH), or blends of other green leaf volatiles (GLVs) with Z3-6:OH. Traps were placed in the lower canopy of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). Catches with Z3-6:OH-baited traps showed a significant male bias and these traps caught significantly more males than the unbaited controls at both sites. They were also superior to phoebe oil-baited traps and those baited with GLV blends. Catches with phoebe oil showed a significant female bias but there was no difference in the number of females captured between traps baited with phoebe oil or Z3-6:OH lures. Catches were analyzed at regular time intervals to examine the response of A. planipennis to the lures over the course of the flight season. Z3-6:OH-baited traps consistently caught more males than the controls at each interval throughout the flight season. Catches of females with Z3-6:OH and phoebe oil were significantly better than the controls early in the flight season but declined to control levels by midseason. Our results suggest that Z3-6:OH-baited green traps placed in the ash canopy would be a superior lure for detecting and monitoring A. planipennis throughout the flight season.

  13. Low-temperature methyl bromide fumigation of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in ash logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Alan V; Elder, Peggy; Fraser, Ivich

    2011-02-01

    Ash (Fraxinus spp.) logs, infested with fully developed, cold-acclimated larval and prepupal emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), were fumigated with methyl bromide (MeBr) at 4.4 and 10.0 degrees C for 24 h. Concentrations X time dosages of MeBr obtained were 1579 and 1273 g-h/m3 (24-h exposure) at 4.4 and 10.0 degrees C after applied doses of 112 and 96 g/m3, respectively. MeBr concentrations were simultaneously measured with a ContainIR infrared monitor and Fumiscope thermal conductivity meter calibrated for MeBr to measure the effect of CO2 on Fumiscope concentration readings compared with the infrared (IR) instrument. The presence of CO2 caused false high MeBr readings. With the thermal conductivity meter, CO2 measured 11.36 g/m3 MeBr per 1% CO2 in clean air, whereas the gas-specific infrared ContainIR instrument measured 9.55% CO2 as 4.2 g/m3 MeBr (0.44 g/m3 per 1% CO2). The IR instrument was 0.4% as sensitive to CO2 as the thermal conductivity meter. After aeration, fumigated and control logs were held for 8 wk to capture emerging beetles. No A. planipennis adults emerged from any of the fumigated logs, whereas 262 emerged from control logs (139 and 123/m2 at 4.4 and 10.0 degrees C, respectively). An effective fumigation dose and minimum periodic MeBr concentrations are proposed. The use of a CO2 scrubber in conjunction with nonspecific thermal conductivity instruments is necessary to more accurately measure MeBr concentrations.

  14. Laboratory and field response of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), to selected regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Damon J; Francese, Joseph A; Zylstra, Kelley E; Fraser, Ivich; Sawyer, Alan J; Bartels, David W; Lance, David R; Mastro, Victor C

    2009-12-01

    Retinal sensitivity of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) was examined with an aim to improve trap efficacy for the beetle. Electroretinogram (ERG) recordings from dark-adapted compound eyes of male and female were measured at different wavelengths across the spectrum ranging from 300 to 700 nm. The spectral sensitivity curves revealed peaks in the UV (340 nm), the violet/purple (420-430 nm), blue (460 nm), and green (540-560 nm) regions of the spectrum. Females were sensitive to red regions of the spectrum (640-670 nm), whereas males were not. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the wavelength and reflectance for ash foliage, purple corrugated plastic traps, as well as the elytra and abdomen of adult A. planipennis. Traps were painted using colors based on ERG and spectrophotometer measurements and compared with purple corrugated plastic traps currently used by the USDA-APHIS-PPQ-EAB National Survey. In a field assay conducted along the edges of several A. planipennis-infested ash stands, there were no significant differences in trap catch among green, red, or purple treatments. Dark blue traps caught significantly fewer A. planipennis than red, light green, or dark purple traps. In a second assay where purple and green treatments were placed in the mid canopy of ash trees (approximately 13 m in height), trap catch was significantly higher on green treatments. We hypothesize that when placed in the mid-canopy, green traps constitute a foliage-type stimulus that elicits food-seeking and/or host seeking behavior by A. planipennis.

  15. Taxonomic revision of Madagascan Rhantus (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Colymbetinae with an emphasis on Manjakatompo as a conservation priority

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    Anna Hjalmarsson

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the diving-beetle genus Rhantus Dejean of Madagascar (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Colymbetinae based on museum collection holdings and recently collected expedition material. Both morphology and DNA is used to test species boundaries, in particular whether newly collected material from the Tsaratanana mountains in the north represent a new species or are conspecific with Rhantus manjakatompo Pederzani and Rocchi 2009, described based on a single male specimen from the central Ankaratra mountains. DNA of the holotype of R. manjakatompo was successfully extracted in a non-destructive way and sequenced. The general mixed Yule coalescent model applied to an ultrametric tree constructed from mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI sequence data delimited three species. Morphological characters supported the same species unambiguously. We therefore recognise three species of Rhantus to occur in Madagascar: R. latus (Fairmaire, 1869, R. bouvieri Régimbart, 1900 and R. manjakatompo Pederzani and Rocchi, 2009. All three species are endemic to Madagascar and restricted to the highlands of the island. Rhantus stenonychus Régimbart, 1895, syn. n., is considered a junior synonym of R. latus. We designate lectotypes for R. bouvieri and R. goudoti Sharp, 1882, the latter a junior synonym of R. latus. We provide descriptions, a determination key, SEM-images of fine pronotal and elytral structures, distribution maps, habitus photos, and illustrations of male genitalia and pro- and mesotarsal claws. We discuss the role of the Manjakatompo forest as a refugium for Madagascan Rhantus diversity and other endemics of the montane central high plateau.

  16. Fecundity and egg hatchability of Dastarcus helophoroides adults fed on different types of artificial diets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-juan Li; Guang-ping Dong; Li Yang; Wan-lin Guo

    2015-01-01

    Both fecundities and egg hatchabilities were compared among three populations of Dastarcus helop-horoides Fairmaire adults (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) fed on three types of artificial diets (Diet of formula 1 com-posed of silkworm pupa powder, dried yeast powder, sucrose, peptone, egg yolk powder and poplar branch powder. Diet of formula 2 composed of silkworm pupa powder, dried yeast powder, sucrose, egg yolk powder, poplar branch powder, cricket powder, benzoic acid and distilled water. Diet of formula 3 composed of pine bark powder and Monochamus alternatus larva powder). for 90 days. The three diets showed no significant difference regarding the average number of eggs deposited by all D. helophoroides females (16622.3–23874.7);the average number of eggs per female (1278.6–1836.5); and the average number of eggs per female per day (14.2–20.4). The number of eggs one cluster contained mainly (82.06–82.66%) lied in 1–100 eggs, and the average number of eggs per cluster ranged from 61.7 to 63.1. In the first 10-day period, the number of eggs deposited by all females fed on formula 1 was significantly larger than that on formula 3. The eggs deposited in the last four 10-day periods were more than in the former five 10-day periods, on formula 3. There were no significant differences in hatchability of total eggs among the three artificial diets, and the average corrected egg hatchability ranged from 82.85 to 84.78%. No significant differences in the adult mortality and mean weight gain of D. helophoroides were found after feeding on three artificial diets. Our results suggest that D. helophoroides adults were not specialized on the diet, and the diet types might have little effect on fecundity and egg hatchability in D. helophoroides, as long as sufficient nutrition was supplied.

  17. A karyosystematic analysis of some water beetles related to Deronectes Sharp (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae

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    Robert Angus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An account is given of the karyotypes of five species and one additional subspecies of Deronectes Sharp, 1882, three species of Stictotarsus Zimmermann, 1919, one species of Trichonectes Guignot, 1941, four species of Scarodytes Gozis, 1914 and 17 species of Nebrioporus Régimbart, 1906. Deronectes species are characterised by a neo-Xy system of sex chromosomes and autosome numbers ranging from 60 (D. ferrugineus Fery et Brancucci, 1987 and D. wewalkai Fery et Fresneda, 1988 through 48 (D. latus (Stephens, 1829, D. angusi Fery et Brancucci, 1990 to 28 (D. costipennis Brancucci, 1983, D. costipennis gignouxi Fery et Brancucci, 1989 and D. platynotus (Germar, 1834. The three species of Stictotarsus, S. duodecimpustulatus (Fabricius, 1792, S. procerus (Aubé, 1838 and S. bertrandi (Legros, 1956, all belonging to the S. duodecimpustulatus group of species, have karyotypes comprising 54 autosomes and neo-Xy sex chromosomes. Trichonectes otini Guignot, 1941 has 48 autosomes and an X0 system of sex chromosomes, an arrangement shared with the 17 species of Nebrioporus Régimbart. The four Scarodytes species, S. halensis (Fabricius, 1787, S. nigriventris (Zimmermann, 1919, S. fuscitarsis (Aubé, 1838 and S. malickyi Wewalka, 1997, all have 54 autosomes and X0 sex chromosomes. The karyotypes of the various species are found to be distinctive and to support separation of these species from one another. In two cases (Nebrioporus martinii (Fairmaire, 1858 and N. sardus (Gemminger et Harold, 1868, and Scarodytes halensis and S. fuscitarsis the karyotypes require the recognition of the taxa as full species, not subspecies. The implications of these data for the generic classification are considered. The data are found to be compatible with the DNA-based phylogeny proposed by Ribera (2003, where the enlarged Stictotarsus proposed by Nilsson and Angus (1992 is found to be unsatisfactory.

  18. Evidence that Cerambycid Beetles Mimic Vespid Wasps in Odor as well as Appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Robert F; Curkovic, Tomislav; Mongold-Diers, Judith A; Neuteboom, Lara; Galbrecht, Hans-Martin; Tröger, Armin; Bergmann, Jan; Francke, Wittko; Hanks, Lawrence M

    2017-01-01

    We present evidence that cerambycid species that are supposed mimics of vespid wasps also mimic their model's odor by producing spiroacetals, common constituents of vespid alarm pheromones. Adults of the North American cerambycids Megacyllene caryae (Gahan) and Megacyllene robiniae (Forster) are conspicuously patterned yellow and black, and are believed to be mimics of aculeate Hymenoptera, such as species of Vespula and Polistes. Adult males of M. caryae produce an aggregation-sex pheromone, but both sexes produce a pungent odor when handled, which has been assumed to be a defensive response. Headspace aerations of agitated females of M. caryae contained 16 compounds with mass spectra characteristic of spiroacetals of eight distinct chemical structures, with the dominant compound being (7E,2E)-7-ethyl-2-methyl-1,6-dioxaspiro[4.5]decane. Headspace samples of agitated males of M. caryae contained five of the same components, with the same dominant compound. Females of M. robiniae produced six different spiroacetals, one of which was not produced by M. caryae, (2E,7E)-2-ethyl-7-methyl-1,6-dioxaspiro[4.5]decane, and five that were shared with M. caryae, including the dominant (2E,8E)-2,8-dimethyl-1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undecane. The latter compound is the sole spiroacetal produced by both males and females of a South American cerambycid species, Callisphyris apicicornis (Fairmaire & Germain), which is also thought to be a wasp mimic. Preliminary work also identified spiroacetals of similar or identical structure released by vespid wasps that co-occur with the Megacyllene species.

  19. Abundance of volatile organic compounds in white ash phloem and emerald ash borer larval frass does not attract Tetrastichus planipennisi in a Y-tube olfactometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yigen; Ulyshen, Michael D; Poland, Therese M

    2016-10-01

    Many natural enemies employ plant- and/or herbivore-derived signals for host/prey location. The larval parasitoid Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is 1 of 3 biocontrol agents currently being released in an effort to control the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coloeptera: Burprestidae) in North America. To enhance its efficiency, allelochemicals that attract it need to be assessed. In this study, ash phloem volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of black, green, and white ash, and EAB larval frass were compared. Foraging behavior of T. planipennisi females in response to VOCs of white ash or frass from EAB larvae feeding on white ash phloem was tested using a Y-tube olfactometer. Results indicated that the 3 ash species had similar VOC profiles. EAB larval frass generally contained greater levels of VOCs than phloem. Factor analysis indicated that the 11 VOCs could be broadly divided into 2 groups, with α-bisabolol, β-caryophyllene, (E)-2-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexenal, limonene, methyl benzoate, methyl indole-3-acetic acid, methyl jasmonate, methyl salicylate as the first group and the rest (i.e., methyl linoleate and methyl linolenate) as a second. Abundance of VOCs in white ash phloem tissue and frass, nevertheless, did not attract T. planipennisi females. The concealed feeding of EAB larvae might explain the selection for detectable and reliable virbrational signals, instead of undetectable and relatively unreliable VOC cues from phloem and frass, in short-range foraging by T. planipennisi. Alternatively, it is possible that T. planipennisi is not amenable to the Y-tube olfactometer assay employed.

  20. Establishment and abundance of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in Michigan: potential for success in classical biocontrol of the invasive emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Bauer, Leah S; Abell, Kristopher J; Lelito, Jonathan P; Van Driesche, Roy

    2013-06-01

    Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid native to China and has been introduced to the United States since 2007 for classical biological control of the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an exotic beetle responsible for widespread ash mortality. Between 2007-2010, T. planipennisi adults (3,311-4,597 females and approximately 1,500 males per site) were released into each of six forest sites in three counties (Ingham, Gratiot, and Shiawassee) of southern Michigan. By the fall of 2012, the proportion of sampled trees with one or more broods of T. planipennisi increased to 92 and 83% in the parasitoid-release and control plots, respectively, from 33 and 4% in the first year after parasitoid releases (2009 fall for Ingham county sites and 2010 for other sites). Similarly, the mean number of T. planipennisi broods observed from sampled trees increased from less than one brood per tree in the first year after parasitoid releases to 2.46 (at control plots) to 3.08 (at release plots) broods by the fall of 2012. The rates of emerald ash borer larval parasitism by T. planipennisi also increased from 1.2% in the first year after parasitoid releases to 21.2% in the parasitoid-release plots, and from 0.2 to 12.8% for the control plots by the fall of 2012. These results demonstrate that T. planipennisi is established in southern Michigan and that its populations are increasing and expanding. This suggests that T. planipennisi will likely play a critical role in suppressing emerald ash borer populations in Michigan.

  1. Critical rearing parameters of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) as affected by host plant substrate and host-parasitoid group structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Oppel, Craig

    2012-06-01

    In laboratory assays, we evaluated the potential impact of host plant substrate types, host-parasitoid group sizes (densities), and parasitoid-to-host ratios on select fitness parameters of the larval endoparasitoid Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), newly introduced for biological control of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in the United States. Results from our study showed that offspring production and critical fitness parameters (body size and sex ratio) of T. planipennisi from parasitized emerald ash borer larvae are significantly influenced by host plant substrate type, host-parasitoid group size, parasitoid-to-host ratio, or a combination in the primary exposure assay. The number of both female and male T. planipennisi progeny was significantly greater when emerald ash borer larvae were inserted into tropical ash [Fraxinus uhdei (Wenz.) Lingelsh.] logs rather than green ash (Fraxinus pensylvanica Marshall). When maintained at a constant 1:1 parasitoid-to-host ratio, assays with larger host-parasitoid group sizes (3:3-12:12) produced significantly greater numbers of both male and female offspring per parental wasp compared with those with the single host-parasitoid (1:1) group treatment. As the parasitoid-to-host ratio increased from 1:1 to 8:1 in the assay, the average brood size (number of offspring per parasitized emerald ash borer larva) increased significantly, whereas the average brood sex ratio (female to male) changed from being female-biased (6:1) to male-biased (1:2); body size of female offspring as measured by the length of ovipositor and left hind tibia also was reduced significantly. Based on these findings, we suggest that the current method of rearing T. planipennisi with artificially infested-emerald ash borer larvae use the tropical ash logs for emerald ash borer insertion, a larger (> or = 3:3) host-parasitoid group size and 1:1 parasitoid-to-host ratio in the primary

  2. Suitability and accessibility of immature Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) stages to Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyshen, Michael D; Duan, Jian J; Bauer, Leah S; Fraser, Ivich

    2010-08-01

    Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a gregarious larval endo-parasitoid, is one of three biocontrol agents from Asia currently being released in the United States to combat the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). The current protocol for rearing T. planipennisi involves presenting the wasps with artificially infested ash sticks made by placing field-collected larvae into shallow grooves beneath flaps of bark. Although third and fourth instars are readily accepted by T. planipennisi in these exposures, the suitability of younger or older developmental stages, which are often more readily available in the field, has not been tested. In this study, we used both artificially infested ash sticks and naturally infested ash logs to test which emerald ash borer developmental stages (second to fourth instars, J larvae [preprepupae], prepupae, and pupae) are most suitable for rearing T. planipennisi. T. planipennisi parasitized all stages except for pupae, but parasitized fewer J larvae and prepupae in naturally infested logs than in artificially infested ash sticks. This is probably because, in naturally infested ash logs, these stages were confined to pupal chambers excavated in the sapwood and may have been largely beyond the reach of ovipositing T. planipennisi. The number of T. planipennisi progeny produced was positively correlated (logarithmic) with host weight, but this relationship was stronger when J larvae and prepupae were excluded from the data set. Fourth instars yielded the most parasitoid progeny, followed by, in approximately equal numbers, J larvae, prepupae, and third instars. Second instars yielded too few parasitoid progeny to benefit rearing efforts.

  3. Role of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) larval vibrations in host-quality assessment by Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyshen, Michael D; Mankin, Richard W; Chen, Yigen; Duan, Jian J; Poland, Therese M; Bauer, Leah S

    2011-02-01

    The biological control agent Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive cambium-feeding species responsible for recent, widespread mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. T. planipennisi is known to prefer late-instar emerald ash borer, but the cues used to assess host size by this species and most other parasitoids of concealed hosts remain unknown. We sought to test whether vibrations produced by feeding emerald ash borer vary with larval size and whether there are any correlations between these cues and T. planipennisi progeny number (i.e., brood size) and sex ratio. The amplitudes and rates of 3-30-ms vibrational impulses produced by emerald ash borer larvae of various sizes were measured in the laboratory before presenting the larvae to T. planipennisi. Impulse-rate did not vary with emerald ash borer size, but vibration amplitude was significantly higher for large larvae than for small larvae. T. planipennisi produced a significantly higher proportion of female offspring from large hosts than small hosts and was shown in previous work to produce more offspring overall from large hosts. There were no significant correlations, however, between the T. planipennisi progeny data and the emerald ash borer sound data. Because vibration amplitude varied significantly with host size, however, we are unable to entirely reject the hypothesis that T. planipennisi and possibly other parasitoids of concealed hosts use vibrational cues to assess host quality, particularly given the low explanatory potential of other external cues. Internal chemical cues also may be important.

  4. Distribution, Predictors, and Impacts of Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) Infestation of White Fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Donnie L; Cipollini, Don

    2017-02-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire), is an invasive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America that was recently found infesting white fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus L.). Initial reports of the infestation of white fringetree by emerald ash borer occurred in southwestern Ohio and Chicago, IL. We examined white fringetrees at additional sites in Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania in Summer and Fall 2015 and Winter 2016 for emerald ash borer infestation. Our aim was to examine white fringetrees at a limited number of sites with emerald ash borer infestation and to relate tree size, crown dieback, epicormic sprouting, tree sex, and adjacency to ash or white fringetrees with the likelihood of beetle infestation. A higher proportion of infested trees exhibited epicormic sprouting and the likelihood that a tree was infested increased with increasing crown dieback, variables that may be both predictors and responses to attack. The proportion of trees infested with emerald ash borer increased with increasing tree size. Signs consistent with emerald ash borer infestation were found in 26% of 178 white fringetrees, with at least one host infested at each site in all states. Infestation rates of white fringetrees increased with the density of white fringetrees at each site. The Chicago Botanic Garden site had a significantly lower infestation (3.7%) than other sites, which may be due to proactive management of ash. Overall, these data indicate white fringetree has been utilized by emerald ash borer throughout their overlapping ranges in the United States in ornamental settings likely due to ecological fitting. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Larval Survival and Growth of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on White Ash and White Fringetree Saplings Under Well-Watered and Water-Deficit Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Claire E; Arango-Velez, Adriana

    2017-04-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) was recently found on a novel host in North America, white fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus L.) (Oleaceae). In this study, we artificially infested 4-yr-old, naïve white fringetree and white ash (Fraxinus americana L.) saplings under well-watered and water-deficit conditions with emerald ash borer eggs. We used physiological and phenotypical approaches to investigate both plant response to emerald ash borer and insect development at 21, 36, and 61 d postinfestation. Photosynthesis was reduced in both tree species by larval feeding, but not by water deficits. Emerald ash borer larvae established and survived successfully on white ash. Both establishment and survival were lower on white fringetree than on white ash. Larvae were larger, and had reached higher instars at all three time points on white ash than on white fringetrees. Larvae grew faster in white ash under water-deficit conditions; however, water-deficit conditions negatively impacted survival of larvae at 61 d postinfestation in white fringetrees, although head size did not differ among surviving larvae. White ash showed higher callus formation in well-watered trees, but no impact on larval survival was observed. In white fringetree, callus formation was not affected by water treatment, and was inversely related to larval survival. The higher rate of mortality and slow growth rate of larvae in white fringetree as compared to white ash suggest that populations of emerald ash borer may be sustained by white fringetree, but may grow more slowly than in white ash. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Identification of odor-processing genes in the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamidala, Praveen; Wijeratne, Asela J; Wijeratne, Saranga; Poland, Therese; Qazi, Sohail S; Doucet, Daniel; Cusson, Michel; Beliveau, Catherine; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2013-01-01

    Insects rely on olfaction to locate food, mates, and suitable oviposition sites for successful completion of their life cycle. Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (emerald ash borer) is a serious invasive insect pest that has killed tens of millions of North American ash (Fraxinus spp) trees and threatens the very existence of the genus Fraxinus. Adult A. planipennis are attracted to host volatiles and conspecifics; however, to date no molecular knowledge exists on olfaction in A. planipennis. Hence, we undertook an antennae-specific transcriptomic study to identify the repertoire of odor processing genes involved in A. planipennis olfaction. We acquired 139,085 Roche/454 GS FLX transcriptomic reads that were assembled into 30,615 high quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs), including 3,249 isotigs and 27,366 non-isotigs (contigs and singletons). Intriguingly, the majority of the A. planipennis antennal transcripts (59.72%) did not show similarity with sequences deposited in the non-redundant database of GenBank, potentially representing novel genes. Functional annotation and KEGG analysis revealed pathways associated with signaling and detoxification. Several odor processing genes (9 odorant binding proteins, 2 odorant receptors, 1 sensory neuron membrane protein and 134 odorant/xenobiotic degradation enzymes, including cytochrome P450s, glutathione-S-transferases; esterases, etc.) putatively involved in olfaction processes were identified. Quantitative PCR of candidate genes in male and female A. planipennis in different developmental stages revealed developmental- and sex-biased expression patterns. The antennal ESTs derived from A. planipennis constitute a rich molecular resource for the identification of genes potentially involved in the olfaction process of A. planipennis. These findings should help in understanding the processing of antennally-active compounds (e.g. 7-epi-sesquithujene) previously identified in this serious invasive pest.

  7. Optimizing Use of Girdled Ash Trees for Management of Low-Density Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Nathan W; McCullough, Deborah G; Poland, Therese M; Heyd, Robert L

    2017-06-01

    Effective survey methods to detect and monitor recently established, low-density infestations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), remain a high priority because they provide land managers and property owners with time to implement tactics to slow emerald ash borer population growth and the progression of ash mortality. We evaluated options for using girdled ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees for emerald ash borer detection and management in a low-density infestation in a forested area with abundant green ash (F. pennsylvanica). Across replicated 4-ha plots, we compared detection efficiency of 4 versus 16 evenly distributed girdled ash trees and between clusters of 3 versus 12 girdled trees. We also examined within-tree larval distribution in 208 girdled and nongirdled trees and assessed adult emerald ash borer emergence from detection trees felled 11 mo after girdling and left on site. Overall, current-year larvae were present in 85-97% of girdled trees and 57-72% of nongirdled trees, and larval density was 2-5 times greater on girdled than nongirdled trees. Low-density emerald ash borer infestations were readily detected with four girdled trees per 4-ha, and 3-tree clusters were as effective as 12-tree clusters. Larval densities were greatest 0.5 ± 0.4 m below the base of the canopy in girdled trees and 1.3 ± 0.7 m above the canopy base in nongirdled trees. Relatively few adult emerald ash borer emerged from trees felled 11 mo after girdling and left on site through the following summer, suggesting removal or destruction of girdled ash trees may be unnecessary. This could potentially reduce survey costs, particularly in forested areas with poor accessibility. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  8. Field-Cage Methodology for Evaluating Climatic Suitability for Introduced Wood-Borer Parasitoids: Preliminary Results from the Emerald Ash Borer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyshen, Michael D.; Duan, Jian J.; Bauer, Leah S.; Gould, Juli; Taylor, Phil; Bean, Dick; Holko, Carol; Driesche, Roy Van

    2011-01-01

    Field-cage methods were developed to evaluate the abilities of Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), biocontrol agents of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), to parasitize, develop and overwinter following three late-season releases at both a northern (Michigan) and a southern (Maryland) location within the current North American range of A. planipennis. In August, September and October of 2009, five young green ash trees were selected at each location. Tetrastichus planipennisi and S. agrili were each randomly assigned to one of two cages attached to each tree, surrounding separate sections of trunk in which late-instar A. planipennis had been inserted. The following April, the caged trunk sections were dissected to determine the fate of each A. planipennis larva and the developmental stages of all recovered parasitoid progeny. At both locations, T. planipennisi and S. agrili were able to parasitize hosts and successfully overwinter (i.e., reach adulthood the following spring). For T. planipennisi, successful parasitism (i.e., parasitoid progeny reached adulthood) occurred for all caged releases in Maryland, but only for the August and September releases in Michigan. At both locations, percent parasitism by T. planipennisi was higher in August and September than in October. For S. agrili, successful parasitism occurred for all caged releases in Maryland, but only for the August release in Michigan. In Maryland, percent parasitism by S. agrili in August and September was higher than in October. The caging method described here should be useful in determining the climatic suitability of other regions before proceeding with large-scale releases of either species and may have utility in other wood-borer parasitoid systems as well. PMID:22233133

  9. Physiological responses of emerald ash borer larvae to feeding on different ash species reveal putative resistance mechanisms and insect counter-adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigsby, C M; Showalter, D N; Herms, D A; Koch, J L; Bonello, P; Cipollini, D

    2015-07-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an Asian wood-boring beetle, has devastated ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North American forests and landscapes since its discovery there in 2002. In this study, we collected living larvae from EAB-resistant Manchurian ash (Fraxinus mandschurica), and susceptible white (Fraxinus americana) and green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) ash hosts, and quantified the activity and production of selected detoxification, digestive, and antioxidant enzymes. We hypothesized that differences in larval physiology could be used to infer resistance mechanisms of ash. We found no differences in cytochrome P450, glutathione-S-transferase, carboxylesterase, sulfotransferase, and tryptic BApNAase activities between larvae feeding on different hosts. Despite this, Manchurian ash-fed larvae produced a single isozyme of low electrophoretic mobility that was not produced in white or green ash-fed larvae. Additionally, larvae feeding on white and green ash produced two serine protease isozymes of high electrophoretic mobility that were not observed in Manchurian ash-fed larvae. We also found lower activity of β-glucosidase and higher activities of monoamine oxidase, ortho-quinone reductase, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase in Manchurian ash-fed larvae compared to larvae that had fed on susceptible ash. A single isozyme was detected for both catalase and superoxide dismutase in all larval groups. The activities of the quinone-protective and antioxidant enzymes are consistent with the resistance phenotype of the host species, with the highest activities measured in larvae feeding on resistant Manchurian ash. We conclude that larvae feeding on Manchurian ash could be under quinone and oxidative stress, suggesting these may be potential mechanisms of resistance of Manchurian ash to EAB larvae, and that quinone-protective and antioxidant enzymes are important counter-adaptations of larvae for dealing with these resistance

  10. 噻虫啉防治板栗主要害虫技术研究%Research on Technology of Using Thiacloprid MSP to Control the Main Insect Pests of Chinese Chestnut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐同冰

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,researches were made on using 2% thiacloprid MSP to control the five main Chinese chestnut pests,including Dryocosmus kuriphilus,Dichocrocis punctiferalis Guenee,Curculio davidi Fairmaire,Characoma ruficirra Hampson and Cryllorhynobites ursulus Roelots.They belonged to the three kinds of pests,which were leaf pests,seed pests and branch tip pests.Using the method of spraying MSP among the mountains could achieve a lot of advantages,such as a lasting efficacy,reducing pesticide times,preventing many kinds of insects,low cost,and good effect.In these tests,different doses of 1.5 kg,3.0 kg and 4.5 kg per hectare were adopted and their average control effect ranged between 60.69% and 94.71%.%2%噻虫啉微胶囊粉剂防治叶部害虫、种实害虫和枝梢害虫3个类群中的栗瘿蜂、桃蛀螟、栗实象、栗皮夜蛾和剪枝象甲等5种板栗主要害虫,采取山间雾化喷粉的施药方法,药效持续期长,减少施药次数,一药兼防多虫,成本低效果好。试验采用每公顷1.5 kg、3.0 kg和4.5 kg不同剂量配方施药,平均防治效果在60.69%~94.71%之间。

  11. Estimation of the population density of the sweetpotato weevils on the Mariana Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadi V.P. Reddy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The sweetpotato Ipomoea batatas L. (Convolvulaceae has been one of the most important foods for Pacific islanders for centuries. However, the yield levels have been declining in the recent past due to the presence of sweetpotato weevils Cylas formicarius (Fabricius (Coleoptera, Brentidae, Euscepes postfasciatus (Fairmaire and Daealus tuberosus (Zimmer man (Coleoptera, Curculionidae. Therefore, urgent management or eradication methods are sought in the Mariana Islands (Guam, Rota, Saipan, and Tinian. However, the management or eradication of these weevil pests requires accurate assessments of the target pest density. Currently, no advice is provided to growers on the best method for sampling sweetpotato for weevil pests, although pheromone-based traps or chemicals are being used. This study defines the results of field counts designed to adjust relative sampling techniques for three sweetpotato weevil pests by inspecting plants visually and at random in the field with an absolute measure of population density. Significant relationships were detected between the relative four sampling sites between the three weevil pests. In the dry and wet season, 90% and 35.5%, respectively, of population density of C. formicarius was noticed in Rota. This density of the population levels of this species is significantly lower in Saipan, Guam and Tinian. No incidence of E. postfasciatus and D. tuberosus was observed on Guam. However, E. postfasciatus is identified as the second most destructive pest in Rota, Tinian and Saipan in both the dry and wet seasons. Likewise, D. tuberosus is the third major pest as the recorded population density ranged from 12.5% to 2.5%. Also, it is evident from the sampling study that the population densities of all three weevils are significantly higher in the dry season than the wet season.

  12. Italian Dermestidae: notes on some species and an updated checklist (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Gianluca; Háva, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    An up-to-date checklist of the Italian Dermestidae is provided. The presence of 95 species in Italy is confirmed, while further 5 species (Dermestes (Dermestes) vorax Motschulsky, 1860, Thorictuspilosus Peyron, 1857, T. wasmanni Reitter, 1895, Attagenus (Attagenus) simonis Reitter, 1881 and Globicornis (G.) breviclavis (Reitter, 1878)) and 1 subspecies (A. (A.) tigrinus pulcher Faldermann, 1835) are excluded from the Italian fauna. Attagenus (Attagenus) calabricus Reitter, 1881 and A. (A.) lobatus Rosenhauer, 1856 are for the first time recorded from Abruzzi and Tuscany respectively; A. (A.) silvaticus Zhantiev, 1976 is recorded for the first time from mainland Italy (Apulia); Anthrenus (Anthrenus) angustefasciatus Ganglbauer, 1904 is new to northern Italy (Friuli-Venezia Giulia), central Italy (Tuscany), Apulia and Basilicata; A. (A.) munroi Hinton, 1943 is new to central Italy (Elba Island); A. (A.) delicatus Kiesenwetter, 1851 is for the first time recorded from Apulia; Globicornis (Globicornis) fasciata (Fairmaire & Brisout de Barneville, 1859) is new to southern Italy (Basilicata); G. (Hadrotoma) sulcata (C.N.F. Brisout de Barneville, 1866) is for the first time recorded from central Italy (Abruzzi), Campania and Sicily, whileTrogoderma inclusum LeConte, 1854 is new to Apulia. Seven species (Dermestes (Dermestes) peruvianus Laporte de Castelnau, 1840, D. (Dermestinus) carnivorus Fabricius, 1775, D. (Dermestinus) hankae Háva, 1999, D. (Dermestinus) intermedius intermedius Kalík, 1951, D. (Dermestinus) szekessyi Kalík, 1950, Anthrenus (Anthrenops) coloratus Reitter, 1881 and Trogodermaangustum (Solier, 1849)) recently recorded from Italy (without further details) are discussed. The lectotype and a paralectotype are designated forAttagenus (A.) calabricus Reitter, 1881 from Calabria. Attagenus pellio (Linnaeus, 1758) var. pilosissimus Roubal, 1932 is removed from synonymy with A. (A.) pellio and recognized as a valid species (stat. prom.); it is known from

  13. Italian Dermestidae: notes on some species and an updated checklist (Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Luca Nardi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An up-to-date checklist of the Italian Dermestidae is provided. The presence of 95 species in Italy is confirmed, while further 5 species (Dermestes (Dermestes vorax Motschulsky, 1860, Thorictus pilosus Peyron, 1857, T. wasmanni Reitter, 1895, Attagenus (Attagenus simonis Reitter, 1881 and Globicornis (G. breviclavis (Reitter, 1878 and 1 subspecies (A. (A. tigrinus pulcher Faldermann, 1835 are excluded from the Italian fauna.Attagenus (Attagenus calabricus Reitter, 1881 and A. (A. lobatus Rosenhauer, 1856 are for the first time recorded from Abruzzi and Tuscany respectively; A. (A. silvaticus Zhantiev, 1976 is recorded for the first time from mainland Italy (Apulia; Anthrenus (Anthrenus angustefasciatus Ganglbauer, 1904 is new to northern Italy (Friuli-Venezia Giulia, central Italy (Tuscany, Apulia and Basilicata; A. (A. munroi Hinton, 1943 is new to central Italy (Elba Island; A. (A. delicatus Kiesenwetter, 1851 is for the first time recorded from Apulia; Globicornis (Globicornis fasciata (Fairmaire & Brisout de Barneville, 1859 is new to southern Italy (Basilicata; G. (Hadrotoma sulcata (C.N.F. Brisout de Barneville, 1866 is for the first time recorded from central Italy (Abruzzi, Campania and Sicily, while Trogoderma inclusum LeConte, 1854 is new to Apulia.Seven species (Dermestes (Dermestes peruvianus Laporte de Castelnau, 1840, D. (Dermestinus carnivorus Fabricius, 1775, D. (Dermestinus hankae Háva, 1999, D. (Dermestinus intermedius intermedius Kalík, 1951, D. (Dermestinus szekessyi Kalík, 1950, Anthrenus (Anthrenops coloratus Reitter, 1881 and Trogoderma angustum (Solier, 1849 recently recorded from Italy (without further details are discussed.The lectotype and a paralectotype are designated for Attagenus (A. calabricus Reitter, 1881 from Calabria.Attagenus pellio (Linnaeus, 1758 var. pilosissimus Roubal, 1932 is removed from synonymy with A. (A. pellio and recognized as a valid species (stat. prom.; it is known from Lombardy, Apulia

  14. 广东地区花绒寄甲替代寄主的研究%Studies on the substitute host of Dastarcus helophoroides inGuangdong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊琳娜; 钱明惠; 范军祥; 黄焕华; 李奕震; 黄咏槐

    2011-01-01

    Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) is a parasitoid of the pine sawyer, Monochamus alternatus Hope, which is the primary vector of the most destructive pest pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Steiner and Buhrer).In this study, we investigated indoor mass - rearing methods for D.helophoroides.The average egg - adult survival rate of D.helophoroides reared on the substitute host mealworm Tenebrio moliter was above 20.0%.This parasitic beetle adults reared on T.moliter suecesfully laid eggs.The D.helophoroides larvae reared on of Buprestidae as host for raising,would kill each other, the average survival rate of adults was only 7.8%.The larvae of Zophobas morio can not raise out the D.helophoroides adults.%将花绒寄甲Dastarcus heloporoides Fairmaire幼虫接于替代寄主黄粉甲Tenebrio molitor、吉丁虫Buprestidaesp和大麦虫Zophobas morio,结果表明,黄粉甲幼虫、蛹和成虫均能繁育出花绒寄甲成虫,平均羽化率能达到20%以上,是较好的替代寄主.用黄粉甲繁育的花绒寄甲成虫存活情况良好,且能正常产卵;用吉丁虫幼虫繁育的花绒寄甲幼虫自相残杀的现象很严重,平均羽化率仅为7.8%;用大麦虫幼虫无法繁育出花绒寄甲成虫.

  15. Simulated Impacts of Emerald Ash Borer on Throughfall and Stemflow Inputs of Water and Nitrogen in Black Ash Wetlands in Northern Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pypker, T. G.; Davis, J.; Van Grinsven, M. J.; Bolton, N. W.; Shannon, J.; Kolka, R. K.; Nelson, J.; Wagenbrenner, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (EAB)) is an invasive insect that effectively kills ash trees (genus: Fraxinus) greater than 2.5 cm in diameter, resulting in near-complete stand mortality within 3-4 years. Black ash wetlands occupy approximately 270,000 ha in Michigan, and have 40 to 90% of the basal area occupied by black ash (F. nigra Marshall); hence the loss of black ash may result in dramatic changes in the canopy hydrology and nutrient deposition. We assessed the impact of a simulated EAB invasion on throughfall and stemflow quantity and nitrogen (N) content in 9 uninfected black ash wetlands located in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Within the 9 stands, 3 stands were left untreated ('Control'), 3 stands had all the black ash trees manually girdled ('Girdled') and 3 had all the black ash trees felled by chainsaw ('Clearcut'). We measured the quantity and inorganic-N content of throughfall using an array of randomly placed collectors (n = 16 per site). Stemflow was monitored at 2 sites (n = 12 trees) on the 3 most common tree species (black ash, yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis Britt.) and red maple (Acer rubra L.)). Preliminary results indicate that relative to the Control, average monthly throughfall was 25% and 1% greater in the Clearcut and Girdled sites, respectively. While the loss of the ash trees resulted in greater throughfall inputs in the Clearcut sites, water table heights did not significantly change as a result of the treatments. Stemflow from live black ash trees was lower than from the yellow birch and red maple trees. As a result, we predict stemflow will increase over time as species with smoother bark and less upright branching begin replacing the black ash. Hence, the change in tree species may result in a greater concentration of inorganic-N inputs to the base of the trees, thereby altering the distribution of inorganic-N inputs into the wetland. Our preliminary results show no significant change in the total

  16. Towards the development of an autocontamination trap system to manage populations of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) with the native entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, D Barry; Iavallée, Robert; Kyei-Poku, George; Van Frankenhuyzen, Kees; Johny, Shajahan; Guertin, Claude; Francese, Joseph A; Jones, Gene C; Blais, Martine

    2012-12-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is an invasive species from Asia that was discovered in North America Canada, in 2002. Herein, we describe studies to develop an autocontamination trapping system to disseminate Beauveria bassiana to control beetle populations. The standard trap for emerald ash borer in Canada is a light green prism trap covered in an insect adhesive and baited with (Z)-3-hexenol. We compared of green multifunnel traps, green intercept panel traps (both with and without fluon coating) and green prism traps for capturing emerald ash borer in a green ash plantation. The coated green multifunnel traps captured significantly more males and more females than any other trap design. We examined the efficacy of two native B. bassiana isolates, INRS-CFL and L49-1AA. In a field experiment the INRS-CFL isolate attached to multifunnel traps in autocontamination chambers retained its pathogenicity to emerald ash borer adults for up to 43 d of outdoor exposure. Conidia germination of the INRS-CFL isolate was >69% after outdoor exposure in the traps for up to 57 d. The L49-1AA isolate was not pathogenic in simulated trap exposures and the germination rate was extremely low (<5.3%). Mean (+/- SEM) conidia loads on ash borer adults after being autocontaminated in the laboratory using pouches that had been exposed in traps out of doors for 29 d were 579,200 (+/- 86,181) and 2,400 (+/- 681) for the INRS-CFL and the LA9-1AA isolates, respectively. We also examined the fungal dissemination process under field conditions using the L49-1AA isolate in a green ash plantation. Beetles were lured to baited green multifunnel traps with attached autocontamination chambers. Beetles acquired fungal conidia from cultures growing on pouches in the chambers and were recaptured on Pestick-coated traps. In total, 2,532 beetles were captured of which 165 (6.5%) had fungal growth that resembled B. bassiana. Of these 25 beetles were positive for

  17. Evaluation of double-decker traps for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Therese M; McCullough, Deborah G; Anulewicz, Andrea C

    2011-04-01

    Improved detection tools are needed for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive forest insect from Asia that has killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North America since its discovery in Michigan in 2002. We evaluated attraction of adult A. planipennis to artificial traps incorporating visual (e.g., height, color, silhouette) and olfactory cues (e.g., host volatiles) at field sites in Michigan. We developed a double-decker trap consisting of a 3-m-tall polyvinyl pipe with two purple prisms attached near the top. In 2006, we compared A. planipennis attraction to double-decker traps baited with various combinations of manuka oil (containing sesquiterpenes present in ash bark), a blend of four ash leaf volatiles (leaf blend), and a rough texture to simulate bark. Significantly more A. planipennis were captured per trap when traps without the rough texture were baited with the leaf blend and manuka oil lures than on traps with texture and manuka oil but no leaf blend. In 2007, we also tested single prism traps set 1.5 m above ground and tower traps, similar to double-decker traps but 6 m tall. Double-decker traps baited with the leaf blend and manuka oil, with or without the addition of ash leaf and bark extracts, captured significantly more A. planipennis than similarly baited single prism traps, tower traps, or unbaited double-decker traps. A baited double-decker trap captured A. planipennis at a field site that was not previously known to be infested, representing the first detection event using artificial traps and lures. In 2008, we compared purple or green double-decker traps, single prisms suspended 3-5 m above ground in the ash canopy (canopy traps), and large flat purple traps (billboard traps). Significantly more A. planipennis were captured in purple versus green traps, baited traps versus unbaited traps, and double-decker versus canopy traps, whereas billboard traps were intermediate. At sites

  18. Effects of rearing conditions on reproduction of Spathius agrili (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Juli R; Ayer, Tracy; Fraser, Ivich

    2011-04-01

    Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) can be successfully reared on emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), larvae feeding in chambers drilled in small ash twigs that are wrapped with floral tape. Females maintained in groups with males for one week can receive enough sperm for production of female progeny throughout their lives. Volatiles released by emerald ash borer adults feeding on ash foliage increased parasitoid fecundity over ash foliage alone or no stimulus. The temperature at which the parasitoids were reared ranged from 20 to 25 degrees C in a daily cycle; however, raising the daily maximum temperature to 28 degrees C did not affect parasitoid longevity or fecundity. Adult females lived between 12 and 127 d, with an average of 60.8 +/- 4.5 d. Males lived slightly longer, with an average of 66 +/- 4.5 d. The first clutch of eggs was laid when the female was between 2 and 42 d old, with the average preoviposition period lasting 11.4 +/- 1.4 or 19.5 +/- 2.0 d in 2007 and 2009 trials, respectively. A higher proportion of the emerald ash borer larvae were feeding and thus attractive to parasitoids in the 2009 trial, and female S. agrili laid an average of 9.5 +/- 1.0 clutches containing 5.4 +/- 0.2 eggs, for an average of 51.2 eggs per female. Approximately three quarters of the progeny were female. The number of eggs per clutch was significantly greater when deposited on larger emerald ash borer larvae, further highlighting the need for quality larvae in rearing. Chilling S. agrili pupae at 10 degrees C to stockpile them for summer release was not successful; chilling resulted in lower survival and lower fecundity of emerging progeny. Female S. agrili proved capable of attacking emerald ash borer larvae through even the thickest bark of an ash tree that was 30-cm diameter at breast height. Even emerald ash borer larvae that were creating overwintering chambers in the outer sapwood of the tree were successfully

  19. Measuring the impact of biotic factors on populations of immature emerald ash borers (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Ulyshen, Michael D; Bauer, Leah S; Gould, Juli; Van Driesche, Roy

    2010-10-01

    Cohorts of emerald ash borer larvae, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, were experimentally established in July of 2008 on healthy green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) trees in two wooded plots at each of three sites near Lansing, MI, by caging gravid emerald ash borer females or placing laboratory-reared eggs on trunks (0.5-2 m above the ground) of selected trees. One plot at each site was randomly chosen for release of two introduced larval parasitoids, Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), whereas the other served as the control. Stage-specific mortality factors and rates were measured for all experimentally established cohorts and for associated wild (i.e., naturally occurring) emerald ash borer immature stages via destructive sampling of 2.5 m (above the ground) trunk sections of cohort-bearing trees in the spring and fall of 2009. Host tree defense was the most important mortality factor, causing 32.0 to 41.1% mortality in the experimental cohorts and 17.5 to 21.5% in wild emerald ash borer stages by spring 2009, and 16.1 to 29% for the remaining experimental cohorts, and 9.9 to 11.8% for wild immature emerald ash borer stages by fall 2009. Woodpecker predation was the second most important factor, inflicting no mortality in the experimental cohorts but causing 5.0 to 5.6% mortality to associated wild emerald ash borer stages by spring 2009 and 9.2 to 12.8% and 3.2 to 17.7%, respectively, for experimental cohorts and wild emerald ash borer stages by fall 2009. Mortality from disease in both the experimental and wild cohorts was low (emerald ash borer stages were parasitized by T. planipennisi. While there were no significant differences in mortality rates because of parasitism between parasitoid-release and control plots, T. planipennisi was detected in each of the three release sites by the end of the study but was not detected in the experimental cohorts or associated wild larvae in any of the

  20. 不同人工饲料对花绒寄甲成虫肠道微生物群落组成的影响%Effect of Different Artificial Diets on Intestinal Microbial Community of Dastarcus helophoroides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟伟; 何彩; 李孟楼

    2013-01-01

    研究不同饲料对花绒寄甲Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire)]成虫肠道微生物区系的影响.人工配制4种花绒寄甲成虫饲料(Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ和Ⅳ),主要成分分别为蚕蛹粉、蟋蟀粉、替代寄主粉和蚂蚁粉,分别饲养花绒寄甲成虫.无菌取其肠道,进行肠道细菌16S rDNA全长PCR扩增和16S rDNA V3可变区的PCR扩增,扩增产物经16S rDNA作为分子标记的变性梯度凝胶电泳(DGGE)分离后再进行相似性分析.结果表明,从成虫肠道共得到11种细菌,分别属于德库菌属(Desemzia)、葡萄球菌属(Staphylococcus)、不粘柄菌属(Asticcacaulis)、纤维弧菌属(Cellvibrio)、动性杆菌属(Planomicrobium)、橙单胞菌属(Aurantimonas)和埃希氏菌属(Escherichia).经相似性分析后,饲喂饲料Ⅰ(蚕蛹粉)和饲料Ⅱ(蟋蟀粉)的成虫肠道细菌区系相似性为64%;饲喂饲料Ⅲ(替代寄主粉)和饲料Ⅳ(蚂蚁粉)的成虫肠道细菌区系的相似性为61%.饲料Ⅰ、Ⅱ喂养的成虫和饲料Ⅲ、Ⅳ喂养的成虫肠道菌群差异性较大,相似性为21%.可见,不同饲料对花绒寄甲成虫肠道微生物群落组成有很大的影响.

  1. A REVISION OF THE PACHNEPHORUS FROM THE AFROTROPICAL REGION (COLEOPTERA, CHRYSOMELIDAE

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    Stefano Zoia

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A revision of the genus Pachnephorus Chevrolat, 1837 from the Afrotropical Region is given and a key to the species is provided. Types of all the previously known taxa have been studied and redescribed; 40 new taxa are described and illustrated: P. achardi n. sp. (Mali, P. aequatorianus n. sp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. aethiopicus n. sp. (Etiopia, P. baehri n. sp. (Namibia, P. balyi n. sp. (Angola, P. beharui n. sp. (Etiopia, P. bertiae n. sp. (Madagascar, P. bezdeki n. sp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. bracarumvestitus n. sp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. bryanti n. sp. (Mali, P. burgeoni n. sp. (Natal, P. camerun­ensis n. sp. (Camerun, P. cristiani n. sp. (Namibia, P. crocodilinus n. sp. (Zambia, P. daccordii n. sp. (Yemen, P. danielssoni n. sp. (Sierra Leone, P. danielssoni congoanus n. ssp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. demeyeri n. sp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. episternalis n. sp. (Madagascar, P. fabianae n. sp. (Congo, P. fasciatus occidentalis n. ssp. (Nigeria, P. gardinii n. sp. (Etiopia, P. gerstaeckeri n. sp. (Namibia, P. grobbelaarae n. sp. (South Africa, P. hajeki n. sp. (Madagascar, P. lopatini n. sp. (Senegal, P. malicus n. sp. (Mali, P. maroantsetranus n. sp. (Madagascar, P. medvedevi n. sp. (Zambia, P. mo­seykoi n. sp. (Chad, P. pacificus n. sp. (Central Afr. Rep., P. parentorum n. sp. (Ghana, P. poggii n. sp. (Somalia, P. regalini n. sp. (Zambia, P. rigatoi n. sp. (Kenya, P. sas­sii n. sp. (Guinea Bissau, P. shuteae n. sp. (Rep. South Africa, P. sprecherae n. sp. (Madagascar, P. uhligi n. sp. (Namibia, P. willersi n. sp. (Namibia. The lectoypes of P. conspersus Gerstaecker, 1871, P. senegalensis Achard, 1914, P. latior Pic, 1921 and P. testaceipes Fairmaire, 1880 are designated. A new synonymy (P. costatus Achard, 1914 n. syn. of P. torridus Baly, 1878 and a nomenclatural change (Mecistes lineatus (Pic, 1921 n. comb. for Pachnephorus lineatus Pic, 1921 are proposed; the Lectotypes of M. lineatus and of M. flavipes (Gerstaecker, 1855 are designated.

  2. World reclassification of the Cardiophorinae (Coleoptera, Elateridae), based on phylogenetic analyses of morphological characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Hume B.

    2017-01-01

    Fleutiaux, 1892 (Physodactylinae) is syn. n. of Globothorax Fleutiaux, 1891. The following new genera are described: Austrocardiophorus (type species: Cardiophorus humeralis Fairmaire and Germain, 1860); Chileaphricus (type species: Aphricus chilensis Fleutiaux, 1940); Floridelater (type species: Coptostethus americanus Horn, 1871, transferred from Negastriinae to Cardiophorinae). Paradicronychus (nomen nudum), is syn. n. of Cardiophorus Eschscholtz, 1829. Generic reassignments to make Cardiodontulus, Cardiophorus, Cardiotarsus, Paracardiophorus consistent with phylogenetically revised genus concepts resulted in 84 new combinations. Lectotypes are designated for 29 type species to fix generic concepts: Anelastes femoralis Lucas, 1857; Aphricus chilensis Fleutiaux, 1940; Athous argentatus Abeille de Perrin, 1894; Cardiophorus adjutor Candèze, 1875; Cardiophorus florentini Fleutiaux, 1895; Cardiophorus inflatus Candèze, 1882; Cardiophorus luridipes Candèze, 1860; Cardiophorus mirabilis Candèze, 1860; Cardiophorus musculus Erichson, 1840; Cardiotarsus capensis Candèze, 1860; Cardiotarsus vitalisi Fleutiaux, 1918; Craspedostethus rufiventris Schwarz, 1898; Elater cinereus Herbst, 1784; Elater minutissimus Germar, 1817; Elater sputator Linnaeus, 1758; Elater thoracicus Fabricius, 1801; Eniconyx pullatus Horn, 1884; Esthesopus castaneus Eschscholtz, 1829; Gastrimargus schneideri Schwarz, 1902; Globothorax chevrolati Fleutiaux, 1891; Horistonotus flavidus Candèze, 1860; Horistonotus simplex LeConte, 1863; Lesnelater madagascariensis Fleutiaux, 1935; Oedostethus femoralis LeConte, 1853; Phorocardius solitarius Fleutiaux, 1931; Platynychus indicus Motschulsky, 1858; Platynychus mixtus Fleutiaux, 1931; Triplonychus acuminatus Candèze, 1860; Tropidiplus tellinii Fleutiaux, 1903. A key to genera and diagnoses are provided for all genera and subgenera. A bibliographic synonymy includes references for all taxonomic changes to genera and new species through 2015. PMID:28331397

  3. World reclassification of the Cardiophorinae (Coleoptera, Elateridae, based on phylogenetic analyses of morphological characters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hume B. Douglas

    2017-02-01

    ; Teslasena Fleutiaux, 1892 (Physodactylinae is syn. n. of Globothorax Fleutiaux, 1891. The following new genera are described: Austrocardiophorus (type species: Cardiophorus humeralis Fairmaire and Germain, 1860; Chileaphricus (type species: Aphricus chilensis Fleutiaux, 1940; Floridelater (type species: Coptostethus americanus Horn, 1871, transferred from Negastriinae to Cardiophorinae. Paradicronychus (nomen nudum, is syn. n. of Cardiophorus Eschscholtz, 1829. Generic reassignments to make Cardiodontulus, Cardiophorus, Cardiotarsus, Paracardiophorus consistent with phylogenetically revised genus concepts resulted in 84 new combinations. Lectotypes are designated for 29 type species to fix generic concepts: Anelastes femoralis Lucas, 1857; Aphricus chilensis Fleutiaux, 1940; Athous argentatus Abeille de Perrin, 1894; Cardiophorus adjutor Candèze, 1875; Cardiophorus florentini Fleutiaux, 1895; Cardiophorus inflatus Candèze, 1882; Cardiophorus luridipes Candèze, 1860; Cardiophorus mirabilis Candèze, 1860; Cardiophorus musculus Erichson, 1840; Cardiotarsus capensis Candèze, 1860; Cardiotarsus vitalisi Fleutiaux, 1918; Craspedostethus rufiventris Schwarz, 1898; Elater cinereus Herbst, 1784; Elater minutissimus Germar, 1817; Elater sputator Linnaeus, 1758; Elater thoracicus Fabricius, 1801; Eniconyx pullatus Horn, 1884; Esthesopus castaneus Eschscholtz, 1829; Gastrimargus schneideri Schwarz, 1902; Globothorax chevrolati Fleutiaux, 1891; Horistonotus flavidus Candèze, 1860; Horistonotus simplex LeConte, 1863; Lesnelater madagascariensis Fleutiaux, 1935; Oedostethus femoralis LeConte, 1853; Phorocardius solitarius Fleutiaux, 1931; Platynychus indicus Motschulsky, 1858; Platynychus mixtus Fleutiaux, 1931; Triplonychus acuminatus Candèze, 1860; Tropidiplus tellinii Fleutiaux, 1903. A key to genera and diagnoses are provided for all genera and subgenera. A bibliographic synonymy includes references for all taxonomic changes to genera and new species through 2015.

  4. 常见嗜尸性昆虫mtDNA提取方法的比较%Comparison of mtDNA Extracting Methods for Common Sarcosaphagous Insects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑶清; 郭亚东; 李茂枝; 熊枫; 李剑波; 蔡继峰

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较十六烷基三甲基溴化铵(cetyl triethyl ammonium bromide,CTAB)法、十二烷基硫酸钠-醋酸钾(sodium dodecyl sulfate-potassium acetate,SDS-KAc)法和十二烷基硫酸钠-蛋白酶K(sodium dodecyl sulfate-protein K,SDS-PK)法对法医学常见嗜尸性昆虫mtDNA的提取效果.方法 随机采集放置在长沙地区室外草地家兔尸体上的大头金蝇、双色葬甲、金龟科、墨胸胡蜂4种72只常见嗜尸性昆虫,分别采用CTAB、SDS-KAc、SDS-PK 3种方法提取总DNA.核酸蛋白测定仪检测DNA纯度及浓度,用mtDNA特异性引物进行PCR扩增,琼脂糖凝胶电泳检测PCR产物,对PCR产物进行序列测定,将测序结果上传到GenBank.结果 3种方法均能成功提取4种嗜尸性昆虫的mtDNA,SDS-PK法提取效果最好,CTAB法对陈旧性样本提取效果优于另两种方法,SDS-KAc法对各类样本的提取效果相近.结论 实验中应根据不同情况,选择最恰当的提取方法.制备高质量DNA推荐使用SDS-PK法,陈旧性样本推荐使用CTAB法,在各类预实验中可采取低成本的SDS-KAc法.%Objective To compare effects of three different methods for mtDNA extraction from common sarcosaphagous insects including cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method, sodium dodecyl sul-fate-potassium acetate (SDS-Kac) method and sodium dodecyl sulfate-proteinase K (SDS-PK) method. Methods Seventy-two insects from four species [Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius, 1784), Eusilpha bi-color (Fairmaire, 1896), Paraeutrichopus pecoudi (Mateu, 1954), Vespa velutina (Lepeletier, 1836)] were collected from the corpses of the rabbits in Changsha district. The total DNA of above samples was extracted by CTAB, SDS-Kac and SDS-PK methods. The purity and concentration of DNA were examined by protein-nucleic acid spectrophotometry, and mtDNA were amplified by specific primers and PCR products were detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Then PCR products were sequenced and subsequently uploaded to

  5. Are Iberian endemics Iberian? A case-study using water beetles of family Dytiscidae (Coleoptera

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    Ribera, Ignacio

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic relationships and the geographical origin of 27 of the 34 species and of 3 of the 9 subspecies of Iberian endemic Dytiscidae are studied, based on species level phylogenies constructed with two mitochondrial gene fragments (16S rRNA and Cytochrome Oxidase I. All Iberian endemic species for which more than one specimen was included were monophyletic with the exception of the complex Deronectes aubei sanfilippoi Fery & Brancucci, 1997-D. delarouzei (Jac. Du Val, 1857. The genus Stictotarsus as presently defined is polyphyletic, containing three different lineages: the S. duodecimpustulatus group —including the Iberian endemic S. bertrandi (Legros, 1956—, Trichonectes otini (Guignot, 1941 (new combination and the S. griseostriatus and S. roffii groups, which are in need of a new generic name. The genus Oreodytes is found to be paraphyletic, although with low bootstrap support. The species Nebrioporus (Nebrioporus martinii (Fairmaire, 1858 (new combination is transferred from the subgenus Zimmermannius to Nebrioporus. The Iberian populations of Stictotarsus griseostriatus (De Geer, 1774 and the endemic subspecies Oreodytes davisii rhianae Carr, 2001, O. sanmarkii alienus (Sharp, 1872 and Hydroporus normandi normandi Régimbart, 1903 do not form well characterised lineages, as measured with the mitochondrial markers used in this study. The Iberian endemic species of Dytiscidae are divided in three groups according to the type of vicariant origin: 1 within-Iberian species, when the sister species (or clade of the Iberian endemic is also and Iberian endemic; 2 Iberian/European, when the sister occurs in Europe north of the Pyrenees; and 3 Iberian/North African, when the sister occurs in North Africa. Within-Iberian endemics are found to be on average older than Iberian/European and Iberian/North African species, they have