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Sample records for hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin

  1. Combinatorics of giant hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanin, L G; Vinogradov, S N

    2000-01-01

    The paper discusses combinatorial and probabilistic models allowing to characterize various aspects of spacial symmetry and structural heterogeneity of the giant hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins (HBL Hb). Linker-dodecamer configurations of HBL are described for two and four linker types (occurring in the two most studied HBL Hb of Arenicola and Lumbricus, respectively), and the most probable configurations are found. It is shown that, for HBL with marked dodecamers, the number of 'normal-marked' pairs of dodecamers in homological position follows a binomial distribution. The group of symmetries of the dodecamer substructure of HBL is identified with the dihedral group D6. Under natural symmetry assumptions, the total dipole moment of the dodecamer substructure of HBL is shown to be zero. Biological implications of the mathematical findings are discussed.

  2. Structural characterization of hemoglobins from Monilifera and Frenulata tubeworms (Siboglinids): first discovery of giant hexagonal-bilayer hemoglobin in the former "Pogonophora" group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Cédric; Andersen, Ann C; Bruneaux, Matthieu; Le Guen, Dominique; Terrier, Peran; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle; Zal, Franck

    2010-01-01

    Siboglinids are symbiotic polychete annelids having hemoglobins as essential oxygen- and sulfide-carriers for their endosymbiotic bacteria. We analyzed the structure of the hemoglobins from two species of siboglinids: the monilifera Sclerolinum contortum and the frenulata Oligobrachia webbi (i.e. haakonmosbiensis) from Norwegian cold seeps. Measured by Multi-Angle Laser Light Scattering (MALLS), Sclerolinum shows a 3190+/-50 kDa hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (HBL-Hb) and a 461+/-46 kDa ring-Hb, just as vestimentifera, whereas Oligobrachia has a 409+/-3.7 kDa ring-Hb only. Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS) showed Sclerolinum HBL-Hb composed of seven monomeric globins (15-16 kDa), three disulfide-bonded globin heterodimers and three linkers. The heterodimers always contain globin-b (15814.4+/-1.5 Da). Sclerolinum ring-Hb is composed of globins and dimers with identical masses as its HBL-Hb, but lacks linkers. Oligobrachia ring-Hb has three globin monomers (14-15 kDa) only, with no disulfide-bonded dimers. Comparison of Sclerolinum hemoglobins between Storegga and Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, using the normalized height of deconvoluted ESI-MS peaks, shows differences in globin monomers abundances that could reflect genetic differences or differential gene expression between distinct seep populations. The discovery of HBL-Hb in Sclerolinum is a new element supporting the hypothesis of monilifera being phylogenetically more closely related to vestimentifera, than to frenulata.

  3. Topological states in two-dimensional hexagon lattice bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Ming; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the topological states of the two-dimensional hexagon lattice bilayer. The system exhibits a quantum valley Hall (QVH) state when the interlayer interaction t⊥ is smaller than the nearest neighbor hopping energy t, and then translates to a trivial band insulator state when t⊥ / t > 1. Interestingly, the system is found to be a single-edge QVH state with t⊥ / t = 1. The topological phase transition also can be presented via changing bias voltage and sublattice potential in the system. The QVH states have different edge modes carrying valley current but no net charge current. The bias voltage and external electric field can be tuned easily in experiments, so the present results will provide potential application in valleytronics based on the two-dimensional hexagon lattice.

  4. Hexagonal-shaped monolayer-bilayer quantum disks in graphene: A tight-binding approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, D. R.; Zarenia, M.; Chaves, Andrey; Pereira, J. M.; Farias, G. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2016-07-01

    Using the tight-binding approach, we investigate confined states in two different hybrid monolayer-bilayer systems: (i) a hexagonal monolayer area surrounded by bilayer graphene in the presence of a perpendicularly applied electric field and (ii) a hexagonal bilayer graphene dot surrounded by monolayer graphene. The dependence of the energy levels on dot size and external magnetic field is calculated. We find that the energy spectrum for quantum dots with zigzag edges consists of states inside the gap which range from dot-localized states, edge states, to mixed states coexisting together, whereas for dots with armchair edges, only dot-localized states are observed.

  5. Topological phase transition in hexagonal boron-nitride bilayers modulated by gate voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guojun; Zhai, Xuechao

    2013-03-01

    We study the gate-voltage modulated electronic properties of hexagonal boron-nitride bilayers with two different stacking structures in the presence of intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit interactions. Our analytical results show that there are striking cooperation effects arising from the spin-orbit interactions and the interlayer bias voltage. For realizing topological phase transition, in contrast to a gated graphene bilayer for increasing its energy gap, the energy gap of a boron-nitride bilayer is significantly reduced by an applied gate voltage. For the AA stacking-bilayer which has the inversion symmetry, a strong topological phase is found, and there is an interesting reentrant behavior from a normal phase to a topological phase and then to a normal phase again, characterized by the topological index. Therefore, the gate voltage modulated AA-boron nitride bilayer can be taken as a newcomer of the topological insulator family. For the AB stacking-bilayer which is lack of the inversion symmetry, it is always topologically trivial, but exhibits an unusual quantum Hall phase with four degenerate low-energy states localized at a single edge. It is suggested that these theoretical findings could be verified experimentally in the transport properties of boron-nitride bylayers. This research was supported by the NSFC (Nos. 60876065, 11074108), PAPD, and NBRPC (Nos. 2009CB929504, 2011CB922102).

  6. Decoupled electron and phonon transports in hexagonal boron nitride-silicene bilayer heterostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yongqing; Pei, Qing-Xiang, E-mail: peiqx@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg, E-mail: zhangg@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg; Zhang, Gang, E-mail: peiqx@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg, E-mail: zhangg@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg; Zhang, Yong-Wei [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, Singapore 138632 (Singapore)

    2016-02-14

    Calculations based on the density functional theory and empirical molecular dynamics are performed to investigate interlayer interaction, electronic structure and thermal transport of a bilayer heterostructure consisting of silicene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In this heterostructure, the two layers are found to interact weakly via a non-covalent binding. As a result, the Dirac cone of silicene is preserved with the Dirac cone point being located exactly at the Fermi level, and only a small amount of electrons are transferred from h-BN to silicene, suggesting that silicene dominates the electronic transport. Molecular dynamics calculation results demonstrate that the heat current along h-BN is six times of that along silicene, suggesting that h-BN dominates the thermal transport. This decoupled role of h-BN and silicene in thermal and electronic transport suggests that the BN-silicene bilayer heterostructure is promising for thermoelectric applications.

  7. Transport properties of monolayer and bilayer graphene supported by hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zou, Ke; Seiwell, Donald; Zhu, Jun

    2013-03-01

    We present transport studies on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) supported monolayer and bilayer graphene. Following the method introduced by Dean et al, we first exfoliate thin sheets of h-BN (15-20 nm) to SiO2/Si substrate then align and transfer exfoliated graphene flakes onto the h-BN sheets. E-beam lithography is used to process the samples into Hall bar devices. We find that current annealing at low temperature can increase the mobility of as-fabricated devices but often introduces large density inhomogeneity at the same time. AFM images of annealed devices reveal the limitations of this technique. In comparison, thermal annealing is much more reliable in improving the sample quality. Bilayer devices annealed in a flow of Ar/H2 at 450C for 5 hours show high mobility of 30,000 cm2/Vs at low temperature. We observe high-quality Shubnikov-de Hass (SdH) oscillations and degeneracy-lifted Landau levels in these samples. We extend existing measurements of the electron and hole effective mass in bilayer graphene to lower carrier density regimes and discuss the implications of the results. Department of Applied Physics, Yale University

  8. Static density functional study of graphene-hexagonal bilayer ice interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anick, David J

    2014-09-04

    Periodic static ab initio studies are conducted of hexagonal bilayer ice (HBL) and basal layers of ice-1h adsorbed on graphene using the model BLYP-D in CRYSTAL09. Eight high-symmetry periodic forms of HBL are optimized, of which four have lower energy; their electronic binding energy to graphene is ∼1.6 kcal/mol per abutting H2O. Optimized geometries have the property of maximizing the occurrence of a certain O-H-C alignment motif. One lattice is selected for more detailed study. Its 2-D shear translation potential energy surface is found to have barrier heights in two zigzag directions of ∼140 cal/mol per abutting H2O. A second hexagonal bilayer can be added and the electronic binding energy drops from ∼1.7 to ∼1.0 kcal/mol per abutting H2O. For ice-1h monolayer adsorbed on graphene, a proton-ordered form in which half of the O's nearest the graphene carry a proton pointing toward graphene is preferred over proton-ordered forms in which either all or none of those O's have H's pointing toward graphene. Cohesive energy for two-layer ice-1h on graphene is 0.66 kcal/mol of H2O higher than for HBL, supporting experimental evidence that the graphene+HBL isomer is more stable. However, the HBL and two-HBL structures are unstable or at best metastable with respect to four layers of ice-1h.

  9. Hemoglobin derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003371.htm Hemoglobin derivatives To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hemoglobin derivatives are altered forms of hemoglobin . Hemoglobin is ...

  10. Hemoglobin (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemoglobin is the most important component of red blood cells. It is composed of a protein called ... exchanged for carbon dioxide. Abnormalities of an individual's hemoglobin value can indicate defects in the normal balance ...

  11. Hemoglobin electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 12. Read More A1C test Anemia Hemoglobin Hemolytic anemia Sickle cell anemia Thalassemia Review Date 1/31/2016 Updated by: ... Anemia Blood Count Tests Blood Disorders Newborn Screening Sickle Cell Anemia Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  12. Fish hemoglobins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. de Souza

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate hemoglobin, contained in erythrocytes, is a globular protein with a quaternary structure composed of 4 globin chains (2 alpha and 2 beta and a prosthetic group named heme bound to each one. Having myoglobin as an ancestor, hemoglobin acquired the capacity to respond to chemical stimuli that modulate its function according to tissue requirements for oxygen. Fish are generally submitted to spatial and temporal O2 variations and have developed anatomical, physiological and biochemical strategies to adapt to the changing environmental gas availability. Structurally, most fish hemoglobins are tetrameric; however, those from some species such as lamprey and hagfish dissociate, being monomeric when oxygenated and oligomeric when deoxygenated. Fish blood frequently possesses several hemoglobins; the primary origin of this finding lies in the polymorphism that occurs in the globin loci, an aspect that may occasionally confer advantages to its carriers or even be a harmless evolutionary remnant. On the other hand, the functional properties exhibit different behaviors, ranging from a total absence of responses to allosteric regulation to drastic ones, such as the Root effect.

  13. Hemoglobin C disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical hemoglobin C ... Hemoglobin C is an abnormal type of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. It is ... Americans. You are more likely to have hemoglobin C disease if someone in your family has had ...

  14. Electro-absorption of silicene and bilayer graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsalam, Hazem; Talaat, Mohamed H.; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Portnoi, M. E.; Saroka, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    We study numerically the optical properties of low-buckled silicene and AB-stacked bilayer graphene quantum dots subjected to an external electric field, which is normal to their surface. Within the tight-binding model, the optical absorption is calculated for quantum dots, of triangular and hexagonal shapes, with zigzag and armchair edge terminations. We show that in triangular silicene clusters with zigzag edges a rich and widely tunable infrared absorption peak structure originates from transitions involving zero energy states. The edge of absorption in silicene quantum dots undergoes red shift in the external electric field for triangular clusters, whereas blue shift takes place for hexagonal ones. In small clusters of bilayer graphene with zigzag edges the edge of absorption undergoes blue/red shift for triangular/hexagonal geometry. In armchair clusters of silicene blue shift of the absorption edge takes place for both cluster shapes, while red shift is inherent for both shapes of the bilayer graphene quantum dots.

  15. Molecular dynamics modelling of EGCG clusters on ceramide bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Jingjie; Cheng, Yuan; Li, Weifeng; Zhang, Yong-Wei [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, 138632 (Singapore)

    2015-12-31

    A novel method of atomistic modelling and characterization of both pure ceramide and mixed lipid bilayers is being developed, using only the General Amber ForceField. Lipid bilayers modelled as pure ceramides adopt hexagonal packing after equilibration, and the area per lipid and bilayer thickness are consistent with previously reported theoretical results. Mixed lipid bilayers are modelled as a combination of ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. This model is shown to be stable after equilibration. Green tea extract, also known as epigallocatechin-3-gallate, is introduced as a spherical cluster on the surface of the mixed lipid bilayer. It is demonstrated that the cluster is able to bind to the bilayers as a cluster without diffusing into the surrounding water.

  16. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-09

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition.

  17. Matchings in hexagonal cacti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Farrell

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Explicit recurrences are derived for the matching polynomials of the basic types of hexagonal cacti, the linear cactus and the star cactus and also for an associated graph, called the hexagonal crown. Tables of the polynomials are given for each type of graph. Explicit formulae are then obtained for the number of defect-d matchings in the graphs, for various values of d. In particular, formulae are derived for the number of perfect matchings in all three types of graphs. Finally, results are given for the total number of matchings in the graphs.

  18. Thermotropic and barotropic phase transitions on diacylphosphatidylethanolamine bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, Hitoshi; Endo, Shigeru; Sueyoshi, Ryosuke; Goto, Masaki; Tamai, Nobutake; Kaneshina, Shoji

    2017-07-01

    The bilayer phase transitions of four diacylphosphatidylethanolamines (PEs) with matched saturated acyl chains (Cn=12, 14, 16 and 18) and two PEs with matched unsaturated acyl chains containing a different kind of double bonds were observed by differential scanning calorimetry under atmospheric pressure and light-transmittance measurements under high pressure. The temperature-pressure phase diagrams for these PE bilayer membranes were constructed from the obtained phase-transition data. The saturated PE bilayer membranes underwent two different phase transitions related to the liquid crystalline (Lα) phase, the transition from the hydrated crystalline (Lc) phase and the chain melting (gel (Lβ) to Lα) transition, depending on the thermal history. Pressure altered the gel-phase stability of the bilayer membranes of PEs with longer chains at a low pressure. Comparing the thermodynamic quantities of the saturated PE bilayer membranes with those of diacylphosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayer membranes, the PE bilayer membranes showed higher phase-transition temperatures and formed more stable Lc phase, which originates from the strong interaction between polar head groups of PE molecules. On the other hand, the unsaturated PE bilayer membranes underwent the transition from the Lα phase to the inverted hexagonal (HII) phase at a high temperature and this transition showed a small transition enthalpy but high pressure-responsivity. It turned out that the kind of double bonds markedly affects both bilayer-bilayer and bilayer-nonbilayer transitions and the Lα/HII transition is a volume driven transition for the reconstruction of molecular packing. Further, the phase-transition behavior was explained by chemical potential curves of bilayer phases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Human hemoglobin genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honig, G.R.; Adams, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: Introduction; The Human Hemoglobins; The Human Globin Genes; Hemoglobin Synthesis and Globin Gene Expression; The Globin Gene Mutations - A. Mechanisms and Classification; The Globin Gene Mutations - B. Their Phenotypes and Clinical Expression; The Genetics of the Human Globin Gene Loci: Formal Genetics and Gene Linkage; The Geographic Distribution of Globin Gene Variation; Labortory Identification, Screening, Education, and Counseling for Abnormal Hemoglobins and Thalassemias; and Approaches to the Treatment of the Hemoglobin Disorders.

  20. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively .+-.60.degree. away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency.

  1. Hexagonalization of Correlation Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Fleury, Thiago

    2016-01-01

    We propose a nonperturbative framework to study general correlation functions of single-trace operators in $\\mathcal{N}=4$ supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at large $N$. The basic strategy is to decompose them into fundamental building blocks called the hexagon form factors, which were introduced earlier to study structure constants using integrability. The decomposition is akin to a triangulation of a Riemann surface, and we thus call it hexagonalization. We propose a set of rules to glue the hexagons together based on symmetry, which naturally incorporate the dependence on the conformal and the R-symmetry cross ratios. Our method is conceptually different from the conventional operator product expansion and automatically takes into account multi-trace operators exchanged in OPE channels. To illustrate the idea in simple set-ups, we compute four-point functions of BPS operators of arbitrary lengths and correlation functions of one Konishi operator and three short BPS operators, all at one loop. In all cases,...

  2. Hemoglobin Variants in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, Raymond A.

    1965-04-22

    Variability among mammalian hemoglobins was observed many years ago (35). The chemical basis for differences among hemoglobins from different species of mammals has been studied by several investigators (5, 11, 18, 48). As well as interspecies differences, hemoglobin variants are frequently found within a species of mammals (2, 3, 7, 16) The inheritance of these intraspecies variants can be studied, and pedigrees indicate that the type of hemoglobin synthesized in an individual is genetically controlled (20). Several of the variant human hemoglobins are f'unctionally deficient (7, 16). Such hemoglobin anomalies are of basic interest to man because of the vital role of hemoglobin for transporting oxygen to all tissues of the body.

  3. A transfer technique for high mobility graphene devices on commercially available hexagonal boron nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, P. J.; Dash, S. P.; Tombros, N.; van Wees, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present electronic transport measurements of single and bilayer graphene on commercially available hexagonal boron nitride. We extract mobilities as high as 125 000 cm(2) V-1 s(-1) at room temperature and 275 000 cm(2) V-1 s(-1) at 4.2 K. The excellent quality is supported by the early developmen

  4. Lipid bilayers and interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kik, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    In biological systems lipid bilayers are subject to many different interactions with other entities. These can range from proteins that are attached to the hydrophilic region of the bilayer or transmembrane proteins that interact with the hydrophobic region of the lipid bilayer. Interaction between

  5. Hexagonal graphene quantum dots

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, S.

    2016-12-05

    We study hexagonal graphene quantum dots, using density functional theory, to obtain a quantitative description of the electronic properties and their size dependence, considering disk and ring geometries with both armchair and zigzag edges. We show that the electronic properties of quantum dots with armchair edges are more sensitive to structural details than those with zigzag edges. As functions of the inner and outer radii, we find in the case of armchair edges that the size of the band gap follows distinct branches, while in the case of zigzag edges it changes monotonically. This behaviour is further analyzed by studying the ground state wave function and explained in terms of its localisation.

  6. The Hemoglobin E Thalassemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucharoen, Suthat; Weatherall, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobin E (HbE) is an extremely common structural hemoglobin variant that occurs at high frequencies throughout many Asian countries. It is a β-hemoglobin variant, which is produced at a slightly reduced rate and hence has the phenotype of a mild form of β thalassemia. Its interactions with different forms of α thalassemia result in a wide variety of clinical disorders, whereas its coinheritance with β thalassemia, a condition called hemoglobin E β thalassemia, is by far the most common severe form of β thalassemia in Asia and, globally, comprises approximately 50% of the clinically severe β-thalassemia disorders. PMID:22908199

  7. Hemoglobin E disease and glycosylated hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Niharika Yedla; Mohammad Shafi Kuchay; Ambrish Mithal

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) is a routinely measured parameter to monitor long-term glycemic control in people with diabetes mellitus. The presence of hemoglobin (Hb) variants can affect the accuracy of HbA1C methods. Hb E variant is the most common Hb variant in South-east Asia and North-east India. In the presence of Hb E, HbA1C may not be detectable by ion-exchange chromatography (high-pressure liquid chromatography), but may be estimated by immunoassay technique and boronate affinity c...

  8. Electronic structure of superlattices of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-11-14

    We study the electronic structure of superlattices consisting of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride slabs, using ab initio density functional theory. We find that the system favors a short C–B bond length at the interface between the two component materials. A sizeable band gap at the Dirac point is opened for superlattices with single graphene layers but not for superlattices with graphene bilayers. The system is promising for applications in electronic devices such as field effect transistors and metal-oxide semiconductors.

  9. Quantum transport in bilayer graphene. Fabry-Perot interferences and proximity-induced superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Renjun

    2015-10-30

    Bilayer graphene (BLG) p-n junctions made of hBN-BLG-hBN (hexagonal boron nitride) heterostructures enable ballistic transport over long distances. We investigate Fabry-Perot interferences, and detect that the bilayer-like anti-Klein tunneling transits into single-layer-like Klein tunneling when tuning the Fermi level towards the band edges. Furthermore, the proximity-induced superconductivity has been studied in these devices with Al leads.

  10. Hemoglobin E disease and glycosylated hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niharika Yedla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C is a routinely measured parameter to monitor long-term glycemic control in people with diabetes mellitus. The presence of hemoglobin (Hb variants can affect the accuracy of HbA1C methods. Hb E variant is the most common Hb variant in South-east Asia and North-east India. In the presence of Hb E, HbA1C may not be detectable by ion-exchange chromatography (high-pressure liquid chromatography, but may be estimated by immunoassay technique and boronate affinity chromatography. However, the result may be underestimated when correlated with plasma glucose and serum fructosamine levels. Clinicians should be aware of this limitation of HbA1C estimation in patients with Hb E and other Hb variants.

  11. Phylogeny of Echinoderm Hemoglobins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B Christensen

    Full Text Available Recent genomic information has revealed that neuroglobin and cytoglobin are the two principal lineages of vertebrate hemoglobins, with the latter encompassing the familiar myoglobin and α-globin/β-globin tetramer hemoglobin, and several minor groups. In contrast, very little is known about hemoglobins in echinoderms, a phylum of exclusively marine organisms closely related to vertebrates, beyond the presence of coelomic hemoglobins in sea cucumbers and brittle stars. We identified about 50 hemoglobins in sea urchin, starfish and sea cucumber genomes and transcriptomes, and used Bayesian inference to carry out a molecular phylogenetic analysis of their relationship to vertebrate sequences, specifically, to assess the hypothesis that the neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages are also present in echinoderms.The genome of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus encodes several hemoglobins, including a unique chimeric 14-domain globin, 2 androglobin isoforms and a unique single androglobin domain protein. Other strongylocentrotid genomes appear to have similar repertoires of globin genes. We carried out molecular phylogenetic analyses of 52 hemoglobins identified in sea urchin, brittle star and sea cucumber genomes and transcriptomes, using different multiple sequence alignment methods coupled with Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches. The results demonstrate that there are two major globin lineages in echinoderms, which are related to the vertebrate neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages. Furthermore, the brittle star and sea cucumber coelomic hemoglobins appear to have evolved independently from the cytoglobin lineage, similar to the evolution of erythroid oxygen binding globins in cyclostomes and vertebrates.The presence of echinoderm globins related to the vertebrate neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages suggests that the split between neuroglobins and cytoglobins occurred in the deuterostome ancestor shared by echinoderms and vertebrates.

  12. A combination of dynamic light scattering and polarized resonance Raman scattering applied in the study of Arenicola Marina extracellular hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernshøj, K D; Hassing, S; Olsen, L F

    2013-08-14

    Arenicola Marina extracellular hemoglobin (Hbl Hb) is considered to be a promising candidate as a blood substitute. To entangle some of the properties of extracellular giant hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (Hbl Hb) of Arenicola Marina, we combined polarized resonance Raman scattering (532 nm excitation) with dynamic light scattering (DLS) (632.8 nm). An analysis of the depolarization ratio of selected a(2g) skeletal modes of the heme in native Hbl Hb and porcine Hb, shows that the distortion of the heme group away from its ideal fourfold symmetry is much smaller for heme groups bound in the Hbl Hb than for heme groups bound in porcine Hb. Using DLS, the average hydrodynamic diameter () of Hbl Hb was measured at pH = 5, 7, 8, 9, and 10. At pH = 5 to 7, the Hbl Hb was found in its native form with equal to 24.2 nm, while at pH = 8 and 9, a dissociation process starts to take place resulting in = 9 nm. At pH = 10, only large aggregates of fragmented Hbl Hb with larger than 1000 nm was detected, however, a comparison of the DLS results with the polarized resonance Raman scattering (RRS) revealed that the coupling between the fragments did not involve direct interaction between the heme groups, but also that the local heme environment seems to be comparable in the aggregates and in the native Hbl Hb. By comparing the unpolarized RRS results obtained for erythrocytes (RBC) with those for Hbl Hb, led us to the important conclusion that Hbl Hb is much easier photolyzed than porcine RBC.

  13. An Explanation for Saturn's Hexagon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    For over three decades, weve been gathering observations of the mysterious hexagonal cloud pattern encircling Saturns north pole. Now, researchers believe they have a model that can better explain its formation.Fascinating GeometrySaturns northern Hexagon is a cloud band circling Saturns north pole at 78 N, first observed by the Voyager flybys in 198081. This remarkable pattern has now persisted for more than a Saturn year (29.5 Earth years).Eight frames demonstrating the motion within Saturns Hexagon. Click to watch the animation! The view is from a reference frame rotating with Saturn. [NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI/Hampton University]Observations by Voyager and, more recently, Cassini have helped to identify many key characteristics of this bizarre structure. Two interesting things weve learned are:The Hexagon is associated with an eastward zonal jet moving at more than 200 mph.The cause of the Hexagon is believed to be a jet stream, similar to the ones that we experience on Earth. The path of the jet itself appears to follow the hexagons outline.The Hexagon rotates at roughly the same rate as Saturns overall rotation.While we observe individual storms and cloud patterns moving at different speeds within the Hexagon, the vertices of the Hexagon move at almost exactly the same rotational speed as that of Saturn itself.Attempts to model the formation of the Hexagon with a jet stream have yet to fully reproduce all of the observed features and behavior. But now, a team led by Ral Morales-Juberas of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology believes they have created a model that better matches what we see.Simulating a Meandering JetThe team ran a series of simulations of an eastward, Gaussian-profile jet around Saturns pole. They introduced small perturbations to the jet and demonstrated that, as a result of the perturbations, the jet can meander into a hexagonal shape. With the initial conditions of the teams model, the meandering jet is able to settle into a

  14. THE RENAL HANDLING OF HEMOGLOBIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, H. Franklin; Esham, William T.; Bull, Robert W.

    1969-01-01

    The glomerular filtration of hemoglobin (α2β2) was studied under conditions in which its dissociation into αβ dimers was experimentally altered. Rats receiving hemoglobin treated with the sulfhydryl reagent bis(N-maleimidomethyl) ether (BME) showed a much lower renal excretion and prolonged plasma survival as compared with animals injected with untreated hemoglobin. Plasma disappearance was also prolonged in dogs receiving BME hemoglobin. Gel filtration data indicated that under physiological conditions, BME hemoglobin had impaired subunit dissociation. In addition, BME hemoglobin showed a very high oxygen affinity and a decreased rate of auto-oxidation. Glomerular filtration was enhanced under conditions which favor the dissociation of hemoglobin into dimers. Cat hemoglobin, which forms subunits much more extensively than canine hemoglobin, was excreted more readily by the rat kidney. The renal uptake of 59Fe hemoglobin injected intra-arterially into rabbits varied inversely with the concentration of the injected dose. PMID:5778789

  15. Amyloid Fibrils from Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadishka Jayawardena

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils are a class of insoluble protein nanofibers that are formed via the self-assembly of a wide range of peptides and proteins. They are increasingly exploited for a broad range of applications in bionanotechnology, such as biosensing and drug delivery, as nanowires, hydrogels, and thin films. Amyloid fibrils have been prepared from many proteins, but there has been no definitive characterization of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin to date. Here, nanofiber formation was carried out under denaturing conditions using solutions of apo-hemoglobin extracted from bovine waste blood. A characteristic amyloid fibril morphology was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM, with mean fibril dimensions of approximately 5 nm diameter and up to several microns in length. The thioflavin T assay confirmed the presence of β-sheet structures in apo-hemoglobin fibrils, and X-ray fiber diffraction showed the characteristic amyloid cross-β quaternary structure. Apo-hemoglobin nanofibers demonstrated high stability over a range of temperatures (−20 to 80 °C and pHs (2–10, and were stable in the presence of organic solvents and trypsin, confirming their potential as nanomaterials with versatile applications. This study conclusively demonstrates the formation of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin for the first time, and also introduces a cost-effective method for amyloid fibril manufacture using meat industry by-products.

  16. Hexagonal tessellations in image algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberly, David H.; Wenzel, Dennis J.; Longbotham, Harold G.

    1990-11-01

    In image algebra '' the concept of a coordinate set X is general in that such a set is simply a subset of ndimensional Euclidean space . The standard applications in 2-dimensional image processing use coordinate sets which are rectangular arrays X 72 x ZZm. However some applications may require other geometries for the coordinate set. We look at three such related applications in the context of image algebra. The first application is the modeling of photoreceptors in primate retinas. These receptors are inhomogeneously distributed on the retina. The largest receptor density occurs in the center of the fovea and decreases radially outwards. One can construct a hexagonal tessellation of the retina such that each hexagon contains approximately the same number of receptors. The resulting tessellation called a sunflower heart2 consists of concentric rings of hexagons whose sizes increase as the radius of the ring increases. The second application is the modeling of the primary visual . The neurons are assumed to be uniformly distributed as a regular hexagonal lattice. Cortical neural image coding is modeled by a recursive convolution of the retinal neural image using a special set of filters. The third application involves analysis of a hexagonally-tessellated image where the pixel resolution is variable .

  17. Rice (Oryza) hemoglobins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice (Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a sin...

  18. Triggering the atomic layers control of hexagonal boron nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yangxi [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhang, Changrui, E-mail: crzhang12@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Li, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Jiang, Da; Ding, Guqiao; Wang, Haomin [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Xie, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmxie@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Thickness of h-BN films can be controlled from double atomic layers to over ten atomic layers by adjusting the CVD parameters, quite different from the reported thickness control of up to tens of nanometers. (The interlayer distance of h-BN is 0.333 nm.) • Growth mechanisms of h-BN are discussed, especially for bilayer h-BN films. • Both epitaxial growth and diffusion-segregation process are involved in the synthesis of bilayer h-BN films. - Abstract: In this work, we report the successful synthesis of large scale hexagonal boron nitride films with controllable atomic layers. The films are grown on thin nickel foils via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition with borazine as the precursor. The atomic layers of h-BN films can be controlled in a narrow range by adjusting growth time and the cooling rates. Transmission electron microscope results shows the h-BN films exhibit high uniformity and good crystalline. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows the B/N elemental ratio is about 1.01. The h-BN films exhibit a pronounced deep ultraviolet absorption at 203.0 nm with a large optical band gap of 6.02 ± 0.03 eV. The results suggest potential applications of h-BN films in deep ultraviolet and dielectric materials. Growth mechanisms of h-BN films with thickness control are discussed, especially when the synthesized h-BN films after a higher cooling rate show an in-plane rotation angle between bilayers. Both epitaxial growth and diffusion-segregation process are involved in the synthesis of bilayer h-BN films.

  19. On Processing Hexagonally Sampled Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Definition Addition Negation Subtraction Scalar Multiplication                  2121 2121 21 2 aacc aarr aa pp1...coordinate system for addressing a hexagonal grid that provides support for efficient image processing • Efficient ASA methods were shown for gradient

  20. Hemoglobin interacting proteins and implications of spectrin hemoglobin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Avik; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2015-10-14

    In this report we have analyzed interacting partners of hemoglobin inside erythrocyte and sought possible implications of hemoglobin-spectrin interaction. Our list of identified cytosolic hemoglobin interacting proteins includes redox regulators like peroxiredoxin-2, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, aldehyde dehydrogenase-1, flavin reductase and chaperones like HSP70, α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein. Others include metabolic enzymes like carbonic anhydrase-1, selenium binding protein-1, purine nucleoside phosphorylase and nucleoside diphosphate kinase. Additionally, various membrane proteins like α and β spectrin, ankyrin, band3, protein4.1, actin and glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase have been shown to interact with hemoglobin. Our result indicates that major membrane skeleton protein spectrin, that also has a chaperone like activity, helps to fold the unstable alpha-globin chains in vitro. Taken together our results could provide insight into a protein network evolved around hemoglobin molecule inside erythrocyte that may add a new perspective in understanding the hemoglobin function and homeostasis.

  1. Antimicrobial properties of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshadri, Preethi; Abraham, Jayanthi

    2012-12-01

    Hemoglobin consists of a heme containing component and a globin unit. It exists as a tetramer with 2 α subunits and 2 β subunits in adults and with 2 α subunits and 2 γ chains in infants. On proteolytic cleavage, hemoglobin breaks down to produce many biologically active compounds, among which are hemocidins, those which exhibit antimicrobial property. The generation of these peptides does not depend on the blood group, Rhesus factor, age and sex of the healthy donors. The microbicidal activity has been observed against a variety of gram positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and against filamentous fungi, yeast and even certain parasites. The discovery of hemocidins opens a new field for research into the details of the peptides acting as second line of defence in boosting the innate immune system of the organisms.

  2. Hemoglobin oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croci, S.; Ortalli, I.; Pedrazzi, G. [University of Parma, Istituto di Scienze Fisiche, INFM-Udr Parma (Italy); Passeri, G. [University of Parma, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna e Scienze Biomediche (Italy); Piccolo, P. [University of Parma, Istituto di Clinica chirurgica Generale, Toracica e Vascolare (Italy)

    2000-07-15

    Venous blood obtained from healthy donors and from patients suffering from breast cancer have been treated with acetylphenylhydrazine (APH) for different time. Moessbauer spectra of the packed red cells have been recorded and compared. The largest difference occurs after 50 min of treatment with APH where the patient samples show a broad spectral pattern indicating an advanced hemoglobin oxidation. These results may have some relevance in early cancer diagnosis.

  3. Thermal conductance of graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2017-03-01

    The lattice-based scattering boundary method is applied to compute the phonon mode-resolved transmission coefficients and thermal conductances of in-plane heterostructures built from graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). The thermal conductance of all structures is dominated by acoustic phonon modes near the Brillouin zone center that have high group velocity, population, and transmission coefficient. Out-of-plane modes make their most significant contributions at low frequencies, whereas in-plane modes contribute across the frequency spectrum. Finite-length superlattice junctions between graphene and hBN leads have a lower thermal conductance than comparable junctions between two graphene leads due to lack of transmission in the hBN phonon bandgap. The thermal conductances of bilayer systems differ by less than 10% from their single-layer counterparts on a per area basis, in contrast to the strong thermal conductivity reduction when moving from single- to multi-layer graphene.

  4. EDGE-ORIENTED HEXAGONAL ELEMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Yang; Jiachang Sun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, two new nonconforming hexagonal elements are presented, which are based on the trilinear function space Q(3)1 and are edge-oriented, analogical to the case of the rotated Q1 quadrilateral element. A priori error estimates are given to show that the new elements achieve first-order accuracy in the energy norm and second-order accuracy in the L2 norm. This theoretical result is confirmed by the numerical tests.

  5. Hemoglobin Drift after Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Timothy J.; Beaty, Claude A.; Kilic, Arman; Haggerty, Kara A.; Frank, Steven M.; Savage, William J.; Whitman, Glenn J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Recent literature suggests that a restrictive approach to red blood cell transfusions is associated with improved outcomes in cardiac surgery (CS) patients. Even in the absence of bleeding, intravascular fluid shifts cause hemoglobin levels to drift postoperatively, possibly confounding the decision to transfuse. We undertook this study to define the natural progression of hemoglobin levels in postoperative CS patients. Methods We included all CS patients from 10/10-03/11 who did not receive a postoperative transfusion. Primary stratification was by intraoperative transfusion status. Change in hemoglobin was evaluated relative to the initial postoperative hemoglobin. Maximal drift was defined as the maximum minus the minimum hemoglobin for a given hospitalization. Final drift was defined as the difference between initial and discharge hemoglobin. Results Our final cohort included 199 patients, 71(36%) received an intraoperative transfusion while 128(64%) did not. The average initial and final hemoglobin for all patients were 11.0±1.4g/dL and 9.9±1.3g/dL, respectively, an final drift of 1.1±1.4g/dL. The maximal drift was 1.8±1.1g/dL and was similar regardless of intraoperative transfusion status(p=0.9). Although all patients’ hemoglobin initially dropped, 79% of patients reached a nadir and experienced a mean recovery of 0.7±0.7g/dL by discharge. On multivariable analysis, increasing CPB time was significantly associated with total hemoglobin drift(Coefficient/hour: 0.3[0.1–0.5]g/dL, p=0.02). Conclusions In this first report of hemoglobin drift following CS, although all postoperative patients experienced downward hemoglobin drift, 79% of patients exhibited hemoglobin recovery prior to discharge. Physicians should consider the eventual upward hemoglobin drift prior to administering red cell transfusions. PMID:22609121

  6. Carbon-assisted chemical vapor deposition of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismach, Ariel; Chou, Harry; Mende, Patrick; Dolocan, Andrei; Addou, Rafik; Aloni, Shaul; Wallace, Robert; Feenstra, Randall; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Colombo, Luigi

    2017-06-01

    We show that in a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system, the residual oxygen and/or air play a crucial role in the mechanism of the growth of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) films on Ni foil ‘enclosures’. Hexagonal-BN films grow on the Ni foil surface via the formation of an intermediate boric-oxide (BO x ) phase followed by a thermal reduction of the BO x by a carbon source (either amorphous carbon powder or methane), leading to the formation of single- and bi-layer h-BN. Low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and diffraction (LEED) were used to map the number of layers over large areas; Raman spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) were used to characterize the structure and physical quality of the ultra-thin h-BN film. The growth procedure reported here leads to a better understanding and control of the synthesis of ultra-thin h-BN films.

  7. Giant Frictional Drag in Double Bilayer Graphene Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kayoung; Xue, Jiamin; Dillen, David C.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2016-07-01

    We study the frictional drag between carriers in two bilayer graphene flakes separated by a 2-5 nm thick hexagonal boron nitride dielectric. At temperatures (T ) lower than ˜10 K , we observe a large anomalous negative drag emerging predominantly near the drag layer charge neutrality. The anomalous drag resistivity increases dramatically with reducing T , and becomes comparable to the layer resistivity at the lowest T =1.5 K . At low T the drag resistivity exhibits a breakdown of layer reciprocity. A comparison of the drag resistivity and the drag layer Peltier coefficient suggests a thermoelectric origin of this anomalous drag.

  8. Studying the lateral chain packing in a ceramide bilayer with molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, N. I.; Karozis, S. N.; Kainourgiakis, M. E.; Charalambopoulou, G. Ch

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a novel technique, based on molecular dynamics simulations, that allows the study of the lateral chain packing in a lipid bilayer. It utilizes the radial distribution function of the alkyl chains to determine the arrangement of the chains along the bilayer plane. The positions of the mass centres of the chains are projected onto the bilayer plane and a 2D radial distribution function is calculated for these projections. The proposed technique can be particularly useful for lipid bilayers in the gel (solid) phase where the chains present a limited degree of mobility. As a case study, we have examined a bilayer that consists of ceramide NS 24:0. Ceramide bilayers can be found in the lipid domain of the skin where they have a significant role in its barrier function. The specific bilayer was found (at 300 K) to adopt a strictly hexagonal chain packing with a separation distance between the chains of 0.466 nm, in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  9. Lepromatous leprosy patients produce antibodies that recognise non-bilayer lipid arrangements containing mycolic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Baeza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements are three-dimensional structures that form when anionic phospholipids with an intermediate structure of the tubular hexagonal phase II are present in a bilayer of lipids. Antibodies that recognise these arrangements have been described in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome and/or systemic lupus erythematosus and in those with preeclampsia; these antibodies have also been documented in an experimental murine model of lupus, in which they are associated with immunopathology. Here, we demonstrate the presence of antibodies against non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements containing mycolic acids in the sera of lepromatous leprosy (LL patients, but not those of healthy volunteers. The presence of antibodies that recognise these non-bilayer lipid arrangements may contribute to the hypergammaglobulinaemia observed in LL patients. We also found IgM and IgG anti-cardiolipin antibodies in 77% of the patients. This positive correlation between the anti-mycolic-non-bilayer arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies suggests that both types of antibodies are produced by a common mechanism, as was demonstrated in the experimental murine model of lupus, in which there was a correlation between the anti-non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Antibodies to non-bilayer lipid arrangements may represent a previously unrecognised pathogenic mechanism in LL and the detection of these antibodies may be a tool for the early diagnosis of LL patients.

  10. Experimental and theoretical evidence for bilayer-by-bilayer surface melting of crystalline ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, M. Alejandra; Kling, Tanja; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; van Zadel, Marc-Jan; Mezger, Markus; Jochum, Mara N.; Cyran, Jenée D.; Smit, Wilbert J.; Bakker, Huib J.; Shultz, Mary Jane; Morita, Akihiro; Donadio, Davide; Nagata, Yuki; Bonn, Mischa; Backus, Ellen H. G.

    2017-01-01

    On the surface of water ice, a quasi-liquid layer (QLL) has been extensively reported at temperatures below its bulk melting point at 273 K. Approaching the bulk melting temperature from below, the thickness of the QLL is known to increase. To elucidate the precise temperature variation of the QLL, and its nature, we investigate the surface melting of hexagonal ice by combining noncontact, surface-specific vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and spectra calculated from molecular dynamics simulations. Using SFG, we probe the outermost water layers of distinct single crystalline ice faces at different temperatures. For the basal face, a stepwise, sudden weakening of the hydrogen-bonded structure of the outermost water layers occurs at 257 K. The spectral calculations from the molecular dynamics simulations reproduce the experimental findings; this allows us to interpret our experimental findings in terms of a stepwise change from one to two molten bilayers at the transition temperature. PMID:27956637

  11. Hexagonal boron nitride intercalated multi-layer graphene: a possible ultimate solution to ultra-scaled interconnect technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Jun Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We proposed intercalation of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN in multilayer graphene to improve its performance in ultra-scaled interconnects for integrated circuit. The effect of intercalated hBN layer in bilayer graphene is investigated using non-equilibrium Green's functions. We find the hBN intercalated bilayer graphene exhibit enhanced transport properties compared with pristine bilayer ones, and the improvement is attributed to suppression of interlayer scattering and good planar bonding condition of inbetween hBN layer. Based on these results, we proposed a via structure that not only benefits from suppressed interlayer scattering between multilayer graphene, but also sustains the unique electrical properties of graphene when many graphene layers are stacking together. The ideal current density across the structure can be as high as 4.6×109 A/cm2 at 1V, which is very promising for the future high-performance interconnect.

  12. Pivotal surfaces in inverse hexagonal and cubic phases of phospholipids and glycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Derek

    2011-03-01

    Data on the location and dimensions of the pivotal surfaces in inverse hexagonal (H(II)) and inverse cubic (Q(II)) phases of phospholipids and glycolipids are reviewed. This includes the H(II) phases of dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, 2:1 mol/mol mixtures of saturated fatty acids with the corresponding diacyl phosphatidylcholine, and glucosyl didodecylglycerol, and also the Q(II)(230/G) gyroid inverse cubic phases of monooleoylglycerol and glucosyl didodecylglycerol. Data from the inverse cubic phases are largely compatible with those from inverse hexagonal H(II)-phases. The pivotal plane is located in the hydrophobic region, relatively close to the polar-apolar interface. The area per lipid at the pivotal plane is similar in size to lipid cross-sectional areas found in the fluid lamellar phase (L(α)) of lipid bilayers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nanoparticle-lipid bilayer interactions studied with lipid bilayer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Smith, Tyler; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2015-04-01

    The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which can provide insight into the nature of the particle-membrane interaction through variation of membrane and solution properties not possible with cell-based assays. However, the scope of these studies can be limited because of the low throughput characteristic of lipid bilayer platforms. We have recently described an easy to use, parallel lipid bilayer platform which we have used to electrically investigate the activity of 60 nm diameter amine and carboxyl modified polystyrene nanoparticles (NH2-NP and COOH-NP) with over 1000 lipid bilayers while varying lipid composition, bilayer charge, ionic strength, pH, voltage, serum, particle concentration, and particle charge. Our results confirm recent studies finding activity of NH2-NP but not COOH-NP. Detailed analysis shows that NH2-NP formed pores 0.3-2.3 nm in radius, dependent on bilayer and solution composition. These interactions appear to be electrostatic, as they are regulated by NH2-NP surface charge, solution ionic strength, and bilayer charge. The ability to rapidly measure a large number of nanoparticle and membrane parameters indicates strong potential of this bilayer array platform for additional nanoparticle bilayer studies.The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which

  14. Extremal hexagonal chains concerning largest eigenvalue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we define a roll-attaching operation of a hexagonal chain, and prove Gutman's conjecture affirmatively by using the operation. The idea of the proof is also applicable to the results concerning extremal hexagonal chains for the Hosoya index and Merrifield-Simmons index.

  15. Phase transition and magnetization of a hexagonal prismatic nanoisland with a ferrimagnetic spin configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Ya-Ning

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic properties of a nanoisland with a ferrimagnetic spin configuration, described by the transverse Ising model, are studied by the effective-field theory with correlations. The hexagonal prismatic nanoisland consists of the bilayer with core-shell structure. The phase transition, the magnetization, the susceptibility and the internal energy of the system have been calculated for different values. A lot of novel features, such as the reentrant phenomenon, have been found in the phase transition diagrams of the nanoisland. They are heavily dependent on the exchange coupling, the single-ion anisotropy and the transverse field. These theoretical results may have guiding significance for preparing nanoisland experimentally.

  16. Non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Haider, Ansab; Rhee, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Technology has transformed the practice of medicine and surgery in particular over the last several decades. This change in practice has allowed diagnostic and therapeutic tests to be performed less invasively. Hemoglobin monitoring remains one of the most commonly performed diagnostic tests in the United States. Recently, non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring technology has gained popularity. The aim of this article is to review the principles of how this technology works, pros and cons, and the implications of non-invasive hemoglobin technology particularly in trauma surgery.

  17. Molecular Dynamics of Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-09

    The aim of this work is to study, by molecular dynamics simulations, the properties of lipid bilayers. We have applied the vectorizable, order-N...fast angle-dependent force/potential algorithms to treat angle bending and torsion. Keywords: Molecular dynamics , Lipid bilayers.

  18. Self-assembly of Asymmetric Dimer Particles in Supported Copolymer Bilayer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-chun Qin; Chun-lai Ren

    2011-01-01

    Using self-consistent field and density functional theories, we investigate the self-assembly behavior of asymmetric dimer particles in a supported AB block copolymer bilayer. Asymmetric dimer particles are amphiphilic molecules composed by two different spheres. One prefers to A block of copolymers and the other likes B block when they are introduced into the copolymer bilayer. The two layer structure of the dimer particles is formed within the bilayer.Due to the presence of the substrate surface, the symmetry of the two leaflets of the bilayer is broken, which may lead to two different layer structures of dimer particles within each leaflet of the bilayer. With the increasing concentration of the asymmetric dimer particles,in-plane structure of the dimer particles undergoes sparse square, hexagonal, dense square, and cylindrical structures. In a further condensed packing, a bending cylindrical structure comes into being. Here we verify that the entropic effect of copolymers, the enthalpy of the system and the steric repulsion of the dimer particles are three important factors determing the self-assembly of dimer particles within the supported copolymer bilayer.

  19. More Refined Experiments with Hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Phillippe

    1985-01-01

    Discusses materials needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained for experiments designed to make a numerical stepwise study of the oxygenation of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other oxygen carriers. (JN)

  20. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V., E-mail: LHWANG@WUSTL.EDU [Optical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography.

  1. The Molecular Structure of the Liquid Ordered Phase of Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodt, Alexander J.; Sandar, Michael Logan; Gawrisch, Klaus; Pastor, Richard W.; Lyman, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations reveal substructures within the liquid-ordered phase of lipid bilayers. These substructures, identified in a 10 μsec all-atom trajectory of liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered coexistence (Lo/Ld), are composed of saturated hydrocarbon chains packed with local hexagonal order, and separated by interstitial regions enriched in cholesterol and unsaturated chains. Lipid hydrocarbon chain order parameters calculated from the Lo phase are in excellent agreement with 2H NMR measurements; the local hexagonal packing is also consistent with 1H-MAS NMR spectra of the Lo phase, NMR diffusion experiments, and small angle X-ray- and neutron scattering. The balance of cholesterol-rich to local hexagonal order is proposed to control the partitioning of membrane components into the Lo regions. The latter have been frequently associated with formation of so-called rafts, platforms in the plasma membranes of cells that facilitate interaction between components of signaling pathways. PMID:24345334

  2. Localised IR spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    CERN Document Server

    Yarrow, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    IR absorption spectroscopy of hemoglobin was performed using an IR optical parametric oscillator laser and a commercial atomic force microscope in a novel experimental arrangement based on the use of a bottom-up excitation alignment. This experimental approach enables detection of protein samples with a resolution that is much higher than that of standard IR spectroscopy. Presented here are AFM based IR absorption spectra of micron sized hemoglobin features

  3. Bursting Bubbles and Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven P. Wrenn, Stephen M. Dicker, Eleanor F. Small, Nily R. Dan, Michał Mleczko, Georg Schmitz, Peter A. Lewin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses various interactions between ultrasound, phospholipid monolayer-coated gas bubbles, phospholipid bilayer vesicles, and cells. The paper begins with a review of microbubble physics models, developed to describe microbubble dynamic behavior in the presence of ultrasound, and follows this with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict inertial cavitation profiles. Predicted sensitivities of inertial cavitation to changes in the values of membrane properties, including surface tension, surface dilatational viscosity, and area expansion modulus, indicate that area expansion modulus exerts the greatest relative influence on inertial cavitation. Accordingly, the theoretical dependence of area expansion modulus on chemical composition - in particular, poly (ethylene glyclol (PEG - is reviewed, and predictions of inertial cavitation for different PEG molecular weights and compositions are compared with experiment. Noteworthy is the predicted dependence, or lack thereof, of inertial cavitation on PEG molecular weight and mole fraction. Specifically, inertial cavitation is predicted to be independent of PEG molecular weight and mole fraction in the so-called mushroom regime. In the “brush” regime, however, inertial cavitation is predicted to increase with PEG mole fraction but to decrease (to the inverse 3/5 power with PEG molecular weight. While excellent agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved, it is shown that the calculated inertial cavitation profiles depend strongly on the criterion used to predict inertial cavitation. This is followed by a discussion of nesting microbubbles inside the aqueous core of microcapsules and how this significantly increases the inertial cavitation threshold. Nesting thus offers a means for avoiding unwanted inertial cavitation and cell death during imaging and other applications such as sonoporation. A review of putative sonoporation mechanisms is then presented

  4. Hexagonal image processing a practical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Middleton, Lee

    2006-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the processing of hexagonally sampled images, includes a survey of the work done in the field, and presents a novel framework for hexagonal image processing (HIP) based on hierarchical aggregates. The strengths offered by hexagonal lattices over square lattices to define digital images are considerable: higher packing density; uniform connectivity of points (pixels) in the lattice; better angular resolution by virtue of having more nearest neighbours; and superlative representation of curves. The utility of the HIP framework is shown by implementing severa

  5. Lipid bilayers on nano-templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Aleksandr; Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Bakajin, Olgica; Stoeve, Pieter

    2009-08-04

    A lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising a nanotube or nanowire and a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire. One embodiment provides a method of fabricating a lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising the steps of providing a nanotube or nanowire and forming a lipid bilayer around the polymer cushion. One embodiment provides a protein pore in the lipid bilayer. In one embodiment the protein pore is sensitive to specific agents

  6. FRACTURE OF AMORPHOUS BILAYER RIBBON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, Vaclav; DUHAJ, P; CSACH, K; MISKUF, J; BENGUS, VZ

    On the basis of measuring the mechanical properties and observing the fracture surface of an amorphous bilayer ribbon some partial conclusions on the mechanical quality of the bimetal boundary were drawn.

  7. New hexagonal structure for silicon atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, S.; Belhaj, A.; Labrim, H.; Benyoussef, A.; El Kenz, A.

    2012-11-01

    Motivated by recent experimental and theoretical works on silicene and its derived materials and based on the exceptional Lie algebra G2 we propose a new hexagonal symmetry producing the (√3 × √3)R30° superstructure for silicon atoms. The principal hexagonal unit cell contains twelve atoms instead of the usual structure involving only six ones and it is associated with the G2 root system. In this silicon atom configuration appears two hexagons of unequal side length at angle 30°. This atomic structure can be tessellated to exhibit two superstructures (1 × 1) and (√3 × √3)R30° on the same atomic sheet. To test this double hexagonal structure, we perform a numerical study using Ab-initio calculations based on FPLO9.00-34 code. We observe that the usual silicon electronic properties and the lattice parameters of planar geometry are modified. In particular, the corresponding material becomes a conductor rather than zero gaped semi-conductor arising in single hexagonal structure. Although the calculation is done for silicon atoms, we expect that this structure could be adapted to all two dimensional materials having a single hexagonal flat geometry.

  8. Reactions of arsine with hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatlelid, K.M.; Brailsford, C.; Carter, D.E. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-02-09

    The mechanism of arsine (AsH{sub 3}) induced hemolysis was studied in vitro using isolated red blood cells (RBCs) from the rat or dog. AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis of dog red blood cells was completely blocked by carbon monoxide (CO) preincubation and was reduced by pure oxygen (O{sub 2}) compared to incubations in air. Since CO and O{sub 2} bind to heme and also reduced hemolysis, these results suggested a reaction between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin in the hemeligand binding pocket or with the heme iron. Further, sodium nitrite induction of methemoglobin (metHb) to 85% and 34% of total Hb in otherwise intact RBCs resulted in 56% and 16% decreases in hemolysis, respectively, after incubation for 4 h. This provided additional evidence for the involvement of hemoglobin in the AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis mechanism. Reactions between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin were studied in solutions of purified dog hemoglobin. Spectrophotometric studies of the reaction of AsH{sub 3} with various purified hemoglobin species revealed that AsH{sub 3} reacted with HbO{sub 2} to produce metHb and, eventually, degraded Hb characterized by gross precipitation of the protein. AsH{sub 3} did not alter the spectrum of deoxyHb and did not cause degradation of metHb in oxygen, but bound to and reduced metHb in the absence of oxygen. These data indicate that a reaction of AsH{sub 3} with oxygenated hemoglobin, HbO{sub 2}, may lead to hemolysis, but there are reactions between AsH{sub 3} and metHb that may not be directly involved in the hemolytic process. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Electronic and transmission properties of magnetotunnel junctions of cobalt/iron intercalated bilayer two dimensional sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, N.; Xie, M.D. [Department of Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105, Hunan (China); Zhou, P. [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Sun, L.Z., E-mail: lzsun@xtu.edu.cn [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China)

    2015-10-23

    Highlights: • The TMR ratio reaches 169% for Co intercalated Ni|bi-GBN|Ni MTJs. • The TMR ratio reaches 173% for Fe intercalated Ni|bi-GBN|Ni MTJs. • Intercalated Co/Fe effectively modulates the spin filtering of bilayer systems. - Abstract: Density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function method are used to study the electronic properties and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of magnetotunnel junctions (MTJs) based on Co/Fe intercalated bilayer graphene (bi-Gr), bilayer hexagonal boron nitride (bi-h-BN), and bilayer Gr-h-BN (bi-GBN). The spin-polarized bands around the Fermi energy of the two dimensional bilayer sheets are modulated by the intercalated cobalt. The TMR ratio reaches 169.94% and 173.00% for cobalt and iron intercalated Ni|bi-GBN|Ni MTJs, respectively. We observe that the Co/Fe intercalated bi-GBN is a promising candidate as a spacer in MTJs for spintronics.

  10. Experimental Observation of Travelling Hexagon Patterns in Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董丽芳; 贺亚峰; 尹增谦; 柴志方

    2003-01-01

    Travelling hexagon patterns have been observed in dielectric barrier discharge in an air-argon mixture. The phase diagram of hexagon pattern appearance as functions of applied voltage and air concentration is given. The spatial frequency of hexagon pattern increases with increasing applied voltage and air concentration. The current waveforms of hexagon pattern also vary with the air concentration. The drift velocity of travelling hexagon pattern changes from 4mm/s to 18mm/s.

  11. Comparison between triangular and hexagonal modeling of a hexagonal-structured reactor core using box method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmir, Hessam, E-mail: malmir@energy.sharif.edu [Department of Energy Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moghaddam, Nader Maleki [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amir Kabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnique), Hafez Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zahedinejad, Ehsan [Department of Energy Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    A hexagonal-structured reactor core (e.g. VVER-type) is mostly modeled by structured triangular and hexagonal mesh zones. Although both the triangular and hexagonal models give good approximations over the neutronic calculation of the core, there are some differences between them that seem necessary to be clarified. For this purpose, the neutronic calculations of a hexagonal-structured reactor core have to be performed using the structured triangular and hexagonal meshes based on box method of discretisation and then the results of two models should be benchmarked in different cases. In this paper, the box method of discretisation is derived for triangular and hexagonal meshes. Then, two 2-D 2-group static simulators for triangular and hexagonal geometries (called TRIDIF-2 and HEXDIF-2, respectively) are developed using the box method. The results are benchmarked against the well-known CITATION computer code in case of a VVER-1000 reactor core. Furthermore, the relative powers calculated by the TRIDIF-2 and HEXDIF-2 along with the ones obtained by the CITATION code are compared with the verified results which have been presented in the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) of the aforementioned reactor. Different benchmark cases revealed the reliability of the box method in contrast with the CITATION code. Furthermore, it is shown that the triangular modeling of the core is more acceptable compared with the hexagonal one.

  12. Stacking transition in bilayer graphene caused by thermally activated rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mengjian; Ghazaryan, Davit; Son, Seok-Kyun; Woods, Colin R.; Misra, Abhishek; He, Lin; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Cao, Yang; Mishchenko, Artem

    2017-03-01

    Crystallographic alignment between two-dimensional crystals in van der Waals heterostructures brought a number of profound physical phenomena, including observation of Hofstadter butterfly and topological currents, and promising novel applications, such as resonant tunnelling transistors. Here, by probing the electronic density of states in graphene using graphene-hexagonal boron nitride-graphene tunnelling transistors, we demonstrate a structural transition of bilayer graphene from incommensurate twisted stacking state into a commensurate AB stacking due to a macroscopic graphene self-rotation. This structural transition is accompanied by a topological transition in the reciprocal space and by pseudospin texturing. The stacking transition is driven by van der Waals interaction energy of the two graphene layers and is thermally activated by unpinning the microscopic chemical adsorbents which are then removed by the self-cleaning of graphene.

  13. Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014 previous 1 • 2 • 3 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Diabetes Control: Why It's Important Monitoring Blood Sugar Helping Kids Deal With Injections and Blood Tests Blood Test: Hemoglobin ... Center Word! Glycosylated Hemoglobin Test (Hemoglobin A1c) Medical ...

  14. Basic Functionalization of Hexagonal Mesoporous Silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    3-Aminopropyltricthoxysilanc (AM), 3-cthyldiaminopropyltrimcthoxysilane (ED) and 3-piperazinylpropyltriethoxysilanc (PZ), were used to chemically couple with the silanol groups of calcined hexagonal and hexagonal-like mesoporous silica SBA-3 and HMS, respectively, to produce functionalised alkaline mesoporous materials. The inerease in the dosage of organosilanes, or in reaction temperature, or in the humidity (i.e., water content) of support, is favorable to the grafting of functional molecules on the surface. When functionalization conditions are the same, the order of loadings on SBA-3 and DDA-HMS is ED>AM>PZ. However, on ODA-HMS, the loading of AM is similar to that of ED.

  15. Hexagonal Structure of Baby Skyrmion Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Hen, Itay

    2007-01-01

    We study the zero-temperature crystalline structure of baby Skyrmions by applying a full-field numerical minimization algorithm to baby Skyrmions placed inside different parallelogramic unit-cells and imposing periodic boundary conditions. We find that within this setup, the minimal energy is obtained for the hexagonal lattice, and that in the resulting configuration the Skyrmion splits into quarter-Skyrmions. In particular, we find that the energy in the hexagonal case is lower than the one obtained on the well-known rectangular lattice, in which splitting into half-Skyrmions is observed.

  16. Thermally induced microstrain broadening in hexagonal zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, Andrew C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roberts, Joyce A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leineweber, Andreas [STUTTGART, GERMANY; Mittemeijer, E J [STUTTGART, GERMANY; Kreher, W [DRESDEN UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Neutron powder-diffraction experiments on polycrystalline hexagonal zinc show considerable temperature-dependent line broadening. Whereas as-received zinc at 300 K exhibits narrow reflections, during cooling to a minimum temperature of 10K considerable line-broadening appears, which largely disappears again during reheating. The line broadening may be ascribed to microstrains induced by thermal microstresses due to the anisotropy of the thermal expansion (shrinkage) of hexagonal zinc. Differences between the thermal microstrains and theoretical predictions considering elastic deformation of the grains can be explained by plastic deformation and surface effects.

  17. Electromechanical oscillations in bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benameur, Muhammed M.; Gargiulo, Fernando; Manzeli, Sajedeh; Autès, Gabriel; Tosun, Mahmut; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2015-10-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems constitute a class of devices lying at the interface between fundamental research and technological applications. Realizing nanoelectromechanical devices based on novel materials such as graphene allows studying their mechanical and electromechanical characteristics at the nanoscale and addressing fundamental questions such as electron-phonon interaction and bandgap engineering. In this work, we realize electromechanical devices using single and bilayer graphene and probe the interplay between their mechanical and electrical properties. We show that the deflection of monolayer graphene nanoribbons results in a linear increase in their electrical resistance. Surprisingly, we observe oscillations in the electromechanical response of bilayer graphene. The proposed theoretical model suggests that these oscillations arise from quantum mechanical interference in the transition region induced by sliding of individual graphene layers with respect to each other. Our work shows that bilayer graphene conceals unexpectedly rich and novel physics with promising potential in applications based on nanoelectromechanical systems.

  18. Unexpected bilayer formation in Langmuir films of nucleolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbat, Bernard; Arazam, Nessim; Khiati, Salim; Tonelli, Giovanni; Neri, Wilfrid; Barthélémy, Philippe; Navailles, Laurence

    2012-05-01

    Langmuir monolayers have been extensively investigated by various experimental techniques. These studies allowed an in-depth understanding of the molecular conformation in the layer, phase transitions, and the structure of the multilayer. As the monolayer is compressed and the surface pressure is increased beyond a critical value, usually occurring in the minimal closely packed molecular area, the monolayer fractures and/or folds, forming multilayers in a process referred to as collapse. Various mechanisms for monolayer collapse and the resulting reorganization of the film have been proposed, and only a few studies have demonstrated the formation of a bilayer after collapse and with the use of a Ca(2+) solution. In this work, Langmuir isotherms coupled with imaging ellipsometry and polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy were recorded to investigate the air-water interface properties of Langmuir films of anionic nucleolipids. We report for these new molecules the formation of a quasi-hexagonal packing of bilayer domains at a low compression rate, a singular behavior for lipids at the air-water interface that has not yet been documented.

  19. HEXAGONAL CLOSE-PACKED C-60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jan; van Smaalen, Sander; Petricek, Vaclav; Dusek, Michal P.; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Meijer, G.

    1994-01-01

    C60 crystals were grown from purified powder material with a multiple sublimation technique. In addition to crystals wit a cubic close-packed (ccp) arrangement, crystals were found with a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure. Detailed crystallographic evidence is given, including complete refineme

  20. Hexagonal LuMnO3 revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aken, Bas B. van; Meetsma, Auke; Palstra, Thomas T.M.

    2001-01-01

    The crystal structure of hexagonal LuMnO3 at room temperature is isomorphous with YMnO3 and deviates in important details from early work. Mn is near the centre of its oxygen coordination environment. On the threefold axes, the apical O-Lu bonds have alternating long and short bond lengths, leading

  1. Powdered Hexagonal Boron Nitride Reducing Nanoscale Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chkhartishvili, L.; Matcharashvili, T.; Esiava, R.; Tsagareishvili, O.; Gabunia, D.; Margiev, B.; Gachechiladze, A.

    2013-05-01

    A morphology model is suggested for nano-powdered hexagonal boron nitride that can serve as an effective solid additive to liquid lubricants. It allows to estimate the specific surface, that is a hard-to-measure parameter, based on average size of powder particles. The model can be used also to control nanoscale wear processes.

  2. Lyotropic hexagonal columnar liquid crystals of large colloidal gibbsite platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, M.C.D.; Petukhov, A.V.; Vroege, G.J.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.

    2010-01-01

    We report the formation of hexagonal columnar liquid crystal phases in suspensions of large (570 nm diameter), sterically stabilized, colloidal gibbsite platelets in organic solvent. In thin cells these systems display strong iridescence originating from hexagonally arranged columns that are

  3. Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Failure of the right side of the heart ( cor pulmonale ) Severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Scarring or ... chronic disease Aplastic anemia Bleeding CBC blood test Cor pulmonale Diabetes Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia Erythropoietin test ...

  4. Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities ...

  5. Phase changes in supported planar bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picas, Laura; Montero, M Teresa; Morros, Antoni; Oncins, Gerard; Hernández-Borrell, Jordi

    2008-08-21

    We studied the thermal response of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) by comparing the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data of liposomes with atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations on supported planar bilayers. Planar bilayers were obtained by using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique: the first leaflet transferred at 30 mN m(-1) and the second at 25 mN m(-1). The topographic evaluation of supported POPE bilayers above room temperature showed changes between 43.8 and 59.8 degrees C. These observations are discussed in relation to the main roughness (Ra) variations and are interpreted as the result of the lamellar liquid crystalline (Lalpha) to inverted hexagonal (HII) phase transition. High-magnification images obtained at 45 degrees C revealed intermediate structures in the transformation. Force spectroscopy (FS) was subsequently applied to gain further structural and nanomechanical insight into the POPE planar bilayers as a function of temperature. These measurements show that the threshold force (Fy), which is the maximum force, that the sample can withstand before breaking, increases from 1.91+/-0.11 nN at 21 degrees C up to 3.08+/-0.17 nN at 43.8 degrees C. This behavior is interpreted as a consequence of the formation of intermediate structures or stalks in the transition from the L alpha to H II phase.

  6. Chain hexagonal cacti with the extremal eccentric distance sum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hui; Yu, Guihai

    2014-01-01

    Eccentric distance sum (EDS), which can predict biological and physical properties, is a topological index based on the eccentricity of a graph. In this paper we characterize the chain hexagonal cactus with the minimal and the maximal eccentric distance sum among all chain hexagonal cacti of length n, respectively. Moreover, we present exact formulas for EDS of two types of hexagonal cacti.

  7. Hemoglobin variant (hemoglobin Aalborg) mimicking interstitial pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panou, Vasiliki; Jensen, Peter-Diedrich Mathias; Pedersen, Jan Freddy; Thomsen, Lars Pilegaard; Weinreich, Ulla Møller

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobin Aalborg is a moderately unstable hemoglobin variant with no affiliation to serious hematological abnormality or major clinical symptoms under normal circumstances. Our index person was a healthy woman of 58, not previously diagnosed with hemoglobinopathy Aalborg, who developed acute respiratory failure after a routine cholecystectomy. Initially she was suspected of idiopathic interstitial lung disease, yet a series of tests uncovered various abnormal physiological parameters and set the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathy Aalborg. This led us to examine a group of the index person's relatives known with hemoglobinopathy Aalborg in order to study whether the same physiological abnormalities would be reencountered. They were all subjected to spirometry and body plethysmography, six-minute walking test, pulse oximetry, and arterial blood gas samples before and after the walking test. The entire study population presented the same physiological anomalies: reduction in diffusion capacity, and abnormalities in P(a)O2 and p50 values; the latter could not be presented by the arterial blood gas analyzer; furthermore there was concordance between pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas samples regarding saturation. These data suggest that, based upon the above mentioned anomalies in physiological parameters, the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathy Aalborg should be considered.

  8. Hemoglobin Variant (Hemoglobin Aalborg Mimicking Interstitial Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Panou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin Aalborg is a moderately unstable hemoglobin variant with no affiliation to serious hematological abnormality or major clinical symptoms under normal circumstances. Our index person was a healthy woman of 58, not previously diagnosed with hemoglobinopathy Aalborg, who developed acute respiratory failure after a routine cholecystectomy. Initially she was suspected of idiopathic interstitial lung disease, yet a series of tests uncovered various abnormal physiological parameters and set the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathy Aalborg. This led us to examine a group of the index person’s relatives known with hemoglobinopathy Aalborg in order to study whether the same physiological abnormalities would be reencountered. They were all subjected to spirometry and body plethysmography, six-minute walking test, pulse oximetry, and arterial blood gas samples before and after the walking test. The entire study population presented the same physiological anomalies: reduction in diffusion capacity, and abnormalities in PaO2 and p50 values; the latter could not be presented by the arterial blood gas analyzer; furthermore there was concordance between pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas samples regarding saturation. These data suggest that, based upon the above mentioned anomalies in physiological parameters, the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathy Aalborg should be considered.

  9. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  10. Synthesis of silicon carbide hexagonal nanoprisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, R. B.; Yang, G. Y.; Pan, Y.; Chen, J. J.

    2007-02-01

    SiC hexagonal nanoprisms have been prepared by a reaction of multiwall carbon nanotubes and Si vapor in an Astro furnace at 1450 °C for 3 h. The polytype, morphology, crystal structure of the nanoprisms were studied by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, showing their hexagonal nanoprism shapes with a 3C-SiC single crystal structure with a diameter of about 100 nm and 2 μm in length. The photoluminescence spectrum of the nanoprisms exhibits a significant blue-shift relative to bulk 3C-SiC and other nanostructured SiC. The possible growth mechanism that controls the nanostructure formation is also analysed.

  11. Discrete breathers in hexagonal dusty plasma lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukouloyannis, V; Kourakis, I

    2009-08-01

    The occurrence of single-site or multisite localized vibrational modes, also called discrete breathers, in two-dimensional hexagonal dusty plasma lattices is investigated. The system is described by a Klein-Gordon hexagonal lattice characterized by a negative coupling parameter epsilon in account of its inverse dispersive behavior. A theoretical analysis is performed in order to establish the possibility of existence of single as well as three-site discrete breathers in such systems. The study is complemented by a numerical investigation based on experimentally provided potential forms. This investigation shows that a dusty plasma lattice can support single-site discrete breathers, while three-site in phase breathers could exist if specific conditions, about the intergrain interaction strength, would hold. On the other hand, out of phase and vortex three-site breathers cannot be supported since they are highly unstable.

  12. Hemoglobin variants: biochemical properties and clinical correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Christopher S; Dickson, Claire F; Gell, David A; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2013-03-01

    Diseases affecting hemoglobin synthesis and function are extremely common worldwide. More than 1000 naturally occurring human hemoglobin variants with single amino acid substitutions throughout the molecule have been discovered, mainly through their clinical and/or laboratory manifestations. These variants alter hemoglobin structure and biochemical properties with physiological effects ranging from insignificant to severe. Studies of these mutations in patients and in the laboratory have produced a wealth of information on hemoglobin biochemistry and biology with significant implications for hematology practice. More generally, landmark studies of hemoglobin performed over the past 60 years have established important paradigms for the disciplines of structural biology, genetics, biochemistry, and medicine. Here we review the major classes of hemoglobin variants, emphasizing general concepts and illustrative examples.

  13. Spin Seebeck effect in Y-type hexagonal ferrite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschner, J.; Maryško, M.; Hejtmánek, J.; Uhrecký, R.; Soroka, M.; Buršík, J.; Anadón, A.; Aguirre, M. H.; Knížek, K.

    2017-08-01

    The longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (SSE) has been investigated using Pt/ferrite bilayers employing two Y-hexagonal ferrites Ba2Zn2Fe12O22 (Zn2Y) and Ba2Co2Fe12O22 (Co2Y) deposited by a spin-coating method on SrTiO3(111 ) substrates. The prepared hexagonal ferrites are highly oriented with c axes perpendicular to the substrate plane. The room-temperature magnetic moments of both ferrimagnetic ferrites amount to similar values and, most importantly, both have easy magnetization normal to the c axis. Despite their similar magnetic response the notable SSE signal is only observed for Zn2Y whereas the SSE signal of Co2Y is below the experimental noise level. A plausible explanation for this surprising discrepancy is magnetic disorder induced by cobalt cations, the random distribution of which in the Co2Y ferrite structure might critically limit the spin-wave propagation. This results in suppression of the SSE signal in Co2Y, while the Zn2Y with nonmagnetic substituent exhibits significant SSE signal. The temperature dependence of SSE for Zn2Y was measured over the 30 -300 -K range and quantitatively analyzed considering the heat flow through the Pt/Zn2Y bilayer and thermal gradient across the Zn2Y thin layer as the most relevant parameters. Using this approach the normalized SSE smoothly increases with lowering temperature, which correlates to increasing magnon propagation length and magnetization with decreasing temperature.

  14. Experimental investigations of hexagonal crimping die failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veera kumar M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the hexagonal crimping die failure of high carbon high chromium steel material. The failure modes were initially revealed and identified by the visual examination. Then the chemical analysis and metallographic examination havebeen carried at different positions of the failure die surface using scanning electron microscope (SEM. The microstructure evaluation reveals that failure occurs due to undissolved austenitic structure resulting in improper transition duringheat treatment.

  15. Layered graphene structure of a hexagonal carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bin, E-mail: beenchang@nuaa.edu.cn

    2013-06-01

    Experiments show that there is a novel hexagonal carbon polymorph restricted to the space group of P-62c, but the detailed atomic structure is not determined. Here we set carbon atoms occupying P-62c 4f or P-62c 2c and 2d Wyckoff positions, and calculate the total energy of the different cell structures changing the internal parameter by first-principles calculations, which demonstrates that the stable structures in energy (at local minima) are hexagonal carbon (P-62c 2c and 2d) and hexagonal diamond (P-62c 4f, z=1/16). The calculated bulk modulus 437±16 GPa and interlayer distance 2.062 Å of the layered graphene structure P-62c 2c and 2d are in good agreement with those of the proposed new carbon, which indicates that P-62c 2c and 2d is a possible precursor or intermediate hard phase during the structural transformation of carbon.

  16. Polydopamine-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souryvanh Nirasay

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the formation of lipid membranes supported by a soft polymeric cushion of polydopamine. First, 20 nm thick polydopamine films were formed on mica substrates. Atomic force microscopy imaging indicated that these films were also soft with a surface roughness of 2 nm under hydrated conditions. A zwitterionic phospholipid bilayer was then deposited on the polydopamine cushion by fusion of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC vesicles. Polydopamine films preserved the lateral mobility of the phospholipids as shown by fluorescence microscopy recovery after photobleaching (FRAP experiments. Diffusion coefficients of ~5.9 and 7.2 µm2 s−1 were respectively determined for DMPC and DOPC at room temperature, values which are characteristic of lipids in a free standing bilayer system.

  17. Polydopamine-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirasay, Souryvanh; Badia, Antonella; Leclair, Grégoire; Claverie, Jerome P.; Marcotte, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    We report the formation of lipid membranes supported by a soft polymeric cushion of polydopamine. First, 20 nm thick polydopamine films were formed on mica substrates. Atomic force microscopy imaging indicated that these films were also soft with a surface roughness of 2 nm under hydrated conditions. A zwitterionic phospholipid bilayer was then deposited on the polydopamine cushion by fusion of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) vesicles. Polydopamine films preserved the lateral mobility of the phospholipids as shown by fluorescence microscopy recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments. Diffusion coefficients of ~5.9 and 7.2 µm2 s−1 were respectively determined for DMPC and DOPC at room temperature, values which are characteristic of lipids in a free standing bilayer system.

  18. Bilayer Effects of Antimalarial Compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole B Ramsey

    Full Text Available Because of the perpetual development of resistance to current therapies for malaria, the Medicines for Malaria Venture developed the Malaria Box to facilitate the drug development process. We tested the 80 most potent compounds from the box for bilayer-mediated effects on membrane protein conformational changes (a measure of likely toxicity in a gramicidin-based stopped flow fluorescence assay. Among the Malaria Box compounds tested, four compounds altered membrane properties (p< 0.05; MMV007384 stood out as a potent bilayer-perturbing compound that is toxic in many cell-based assays, suggesting that testing for membrane perturbation could help identify toxic compounds. In any case, MMV007384 should be approached with caution, if at all.

  19. Computer Simulations of Lipid Bilayers and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    , Pressure profile calculations in lipid bilayers: A lipid bilayer is merely $\\sim$5~nm thick, but the lateral pressure (parallel to the bilayer plane) varies several hundred bar on this short distance (normal to the bilayer). These variations in the lateral pressure are commonly referred to as the pressure...... of neglecting pressure contributions from long range electrostatic interactions. The first issue is addressed by comparing two methods for calculating pressure profiles, and judged by the similar results obtained by these two methods the pressure profile appears to be well-defined for fluid phase lipid bilayers......The importance of computer simulations in lipid bilayer research has become more prominent for the last couple of decades and as computers get even faster, simulations will play an increasingly important part of understanding the processes that take place in and across cell membranes. This thesis...

  20. Horizontal Bilayer for Electrical and Optical Recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alf Honigmann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Artificial bilayer containing reconstituted ion channels, transporters and pumps serve as a well-defined model system for electrophysiological investigations of membrane protein structure–function relationship. Appropriately constructed microchips containing horizontally oriented bilayers with easy solution access to both sides provide, in addition, the possibility to investigate these model bilayer membranes and the membrane proteins therein with high resolution fluorescence techniques up to the single-molecule level. Here, we describe a bilayer microchip system in which long-term stable horizontal free-standing and hydrogel-supported bilayers can be formed and demonstrate its prospects particularly for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and high resolution fluorescence microscopy in probing the physicochemical properties like phase behavior of the bilayer-forming lipids, as well as in functional studies of membrane proteins.

  1. Determination of Human Hemoglobin Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Atef M M; Ibrahim, Fatma A A; Abd El-Latif, Noha A; Aziz, Samir W; Abdelmottaleb Moussa, Sherif A; Elalfy, Mohsen S

    2015-01-01

    The levels of the inactive hemoglobin (Hb) pigments [such as methemoglobin (metHb), carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) and sulfohemoglobin (SHb)] and the active Hb [in the oxyhemoglobin (oxyHb) form] as well as the blood Hb concentration in healthy non pregnant female volunteers were determined using a newly developed multi-component spectrophotometric method. The results of this method revealed values of SHb% in the range (0.0727-0.370%), metHb% (0.43-1.0%), HbCO% (0.4-1.52%) and oxyHb% (97.06-98.62%). Furthermore, the results of this method revealed values of blood Hb concentration in the range (12.608-15.777 g/dL). The method is highly sensitive, accurate and reproducible.

  2. THE BIOCHEMISTRY OF VITREOSCILLA HEMOGLOBIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C. Stark

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The hemoglobin (VHb from Vitreoscilla was the first bacterial hemoglobin discovered. Its structure and function have been extensively investigated, and engineering of a wide variety of heterologous organisms to express VHb has been performed to increase their growth and productivity. This strategy has shown promise in applications as far-ranging as the production of antibiotics and petrochemical replacements by microorganisms to increasing stress tolerance in plants. These applications of “VHb technology” have generally been of the “black box” variety, wherein the endpoint studied is an increase in the levels of a certain product or improved growth and survival. Their eventual optimization, however, will require a thorough understanding of the various functions and activities of VHb, and how VHb expression ripples to affect metabolism more generally. Here we review the current knowledge of these topics. VHb's functions all involve oxygen binding (and often delivery in one way or another. Several biochemical and structure-function studies have provided an insight into the molecular details of this binding and delivery. VHb activities are varied. They include supply of oxygen to oxygenases and the respiratory chain, particularly under low oxygen conditions; oxygen sensing and modulation of transcription factor activity; and detoxification of NO, and seem to require interactions of VHb with “partner proteins”. VHb expression affects the levels of ATP and NADH, although not enormously. VHb expression may affect the level of many compounds of intermediary metabolism, and, apparently, alters the levels of expression of many genes. Thus, the metabolic changes in organisms engineered to express VHb are likely to be numerous and complicated.

  3. Led Astray by Hemoglobin A1c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Chen MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin A1c (A1c is used frequently to diagnose and treat diabetes mellitus. Therefore, it is important be aware of factors that may interfere with the accuracy of A1c measurements. This is a case of a rare hemoglobin variant that falsely elevated a nondiabetic patient’s A1c level and led to a misdiagnosis of diabetes. A 67-year-old male presented to endocrine clinic for further management after he was diagnosed with diabetes based on an elevated A1c of 10.7%, which is approximately equivalent to an average blood glucose of 260 mg/dL. Multiple repeat A1c levels remained >10%, but his home fasting and random glucose monitoring ranged from 92 to 130 mg/dL. Hemoglobin electrophoresis and subsequent genetic analysis diagnosed the patient with hemoglobin Wayne, a rare hemoglobin variant. This variant falsely elevates A1c levels when A1c is measured using cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. When the boronate affinity method was applied instead, the patient’s A1c level was actually 4.7%. Though hemoglobin Wayne is clinically silent, this patient was erroneously diagnosed with diabetes and started on an antiglycemic medication. Due to this misdiagnosis, the patient was at risk of escalation in his “diabetes management” and hypoglycemia. Therefore, it is important that providers are aware of factors that may result in hemoglobin A1c inaccuracy including hemoglobin variants.

  4. Method for exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A new method is disclosed for the exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride into mono- and few-layered nanosheets (or nanoplatelets, nanomesh, nanoribbons). The method does not necessarily require high temperature or vacuum, but uses commercially available h-BN powders (or those derived from these materials, bulk crystals) and only requires wet chemical processing. The method is facile, cost efficient, and scalable. The resultant exfoliated h-BN is dispersible in an organic solvent or water thus amenable for solution processing for unique microelectronic or composite applications.

  5. Diagonal form factors and hexagon form factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yunfeng [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zürich,Honggerberg, Zürich, 8093 (Switzerland); Petrovskii, Andrei [Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA, URA 2306 CNRS Saclay,Gif-sur-Yvette, F91191 (France)

    2016-07-25

    We study the heavy-heavy-light (HHL) three-point functions in the planar N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory using the recently proposed hexagon bootstrap program http://arxiv.org/abs/1505.06745. We prove the conjecture of Bajnok, Janik and Wereszczynski http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP09(2014)050 on the polynomial L-dependence of HHL structure constant up to the leading finite-size corrections, where L is the length of the heavy operators. The proof is presented for a specific set-up but the method can be applied to more general situations.

  6. Nadir Hemoglobin Levels after Discontinuation of Epoetin in Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo, Jose A.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Meyer, Klemens B.; Weiner, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: In hemodialysis patients, both hemoglobin variability and targeting normalization of hemoglobin may have adverse consequences. There are few data on epoetin management in patients achieving high hemoglobin levels.

  7. Superdiffusion in supported lipid bilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Campagnola, Grace; Schroder, Bryce W; Peersen, Olve B; Krapf, Diego

    2015-01-01

    We study the diffusion of membrane-targeting C2 domains using single-molecule tracking in supported lipid bilayers. The ensemble-averaged mean square displacement (MSD) exhibits superdiffusive behavior. However, the time-averaged MSD of individual trajectories is found to be linear with respect to lag time, as in Brownian diffusion. These observations are explained in terms of bulk excursions that introduce jumps with a heavy-tail distribution. Our experimental results are shown to agree with analytical models of bulk-mediated diffusion and with numerical simulations.

  8. Nylon flocked swab severely reduces Hexagon Obti sensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frippiat, Christophe; De Roy, Gilbert; Fontaine, Louis-Marie; Dognaux, Sophie; Noel, Fabrice; Heudt, Laeticia; Lepot, Laurent

    2015-02-01

    Hexagon Obti immunological blood test and flocked swab are widely used in forensic laboratories. Nevertheless, up to now, no compatibility tests have been published between sampling with the ethylene oxide treated flocked swab and the Hexagon Obti blood detection strip. In this study, we investigated this compatibility. Our work shows that sampling with ethylene oxide treated flocked swab reduces by a factor of at least 100 the detection threshold of blood using the Hexagon Obti immunological test.

  9. DNA nanotechnology: Bringing lipid bilayers into shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Lipid bilayers form the thin and floppy membranes that define the boundary of compartments such as cells. Now, a method to control the shape and size of bilayers using DNA nanoscaffolds has been developed. Such designer materials advance synthetic biology and could find use in membrane research.

  10. Fragmented state of lipid bilayers in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helfrich, W.; Thimmel, J.; Klösgen, Beate Maria

    1999-01-01

    The bilayers of some typical biological membrane lipids such as PC and DGDG disintegrate in a large excess of water to form an optically invisible dispersive bilayer phase. `Dark bodies' can be reversibly precipitated from it by raising the temperature. The dispersive phase probably consists...

  11. Pseudocritical Behavior and Unbinding of Phospholipid Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemmich, Jesper; Mortensen, Kell; Ipsen, John Hjorth;

    1995-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the small-angle neutron scattering from fully hydrated multilamellar phospholipid bilayers near the main phase transition is analyzed by means of a simple geometric model which yields both the lamellar repeat distance as well as the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer...

  12. Alcohol's Effects on Lipid Bilayer Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I.; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2011-01-01

    Alcohols are known modulators of lipid bilayer properties. Their biological effects have long been attributed to their bilayer-modifying effects, but alcohols can also alter protein function through direct protein interactions. This raises the question: Do alcohol's biological actions result predominantly from direct protein-alcohol interactions or from general changes in the membrane properties? The efficacy of alcohols of various chain lengths tends to exhibit a so-called cutoff effect (i.e., increasing potency with increased chain length, which that eventually levels off). The cutoff varies depending on the assay, and numerous mechanisms have been proposed such as: limited size of the alcohol-protein interaction site, limited alcohol solubility, and a chain-length-dependent lipid bilayer-alcohol interaction. To address these issues, we determined the bilayer-modifying potency of 27 aliphatic alcohols using a gramicidin-based fluorescence assay. All of the alcohols tested (with chain lengths of 1–16 carbons) alter the bilayer properties, as sensed by a bilayer-spanning channel. The bilayer-modifying potency of the short-chain alcohols scales linearly with their bilayer partitioning; the potency tapers off at higher chain lengths, and eventually changes sign for the longest-chain alcohols, demonstrating an alcohol cutoff effect in a system that has no alcohol-binding pocket. PMID:21843475

  13. Two-dimensional hexagonal semiconductors beyond graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-12-01

    The rapid and successful development of the research on graphene and graphene-based nanostructures has been substantially enlarged to include many other two-dimensional hexagonal semiconductors (THS): phosphorene, silicene, germanene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2 as well as the van der Waals heterostructures of various THSs (including graphene). The present article is a review of recent works on THSs beyond graphene and van der Waals heterostructures composed of different pairs of all THSs. One among the priorities of new THSs compared to graphene is the presence of a non-vanishing energy bandgap which opened up the ability to fabricate a large number of electronic, optoelectronic and photonic devices on the basis of these new materials and their van der Waals heterostructures. Moreover, a significant progress in the research on TMDCs was the discovery of valley degree of freedom. The results of research on valley degree of freedom and the development of a new technology based on valley degree of freedom-valleytronics are also presented. Thus the scientific contents of the basic research and practical applications os THSs are very rich and extremely promising.

  14. Study on the enhanced and stable field emission behavior of a novel electrosprayed Al-doped ZnO bilayer film

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    A novel electrosprayed bilayer film composed of an over-layer (L 2) of aluminium-doped ZnO (AZO) nanoflakes (NF-AZO) and a under-layer (L1) of AZO nanocrystallites structure (NC-AZO) named BL:NF/NC-AZO is studied as an excellent field-emitter. The XRD pattern demonstrated that the doped bilayer film has preferential growth along the c-axis with hexagonal wurtzite structure and the (0 0 2) peak shifted toward the larger angle side after doping. The lowest turn-on field of ∼2.8 V μm-1, highest emission current density of 1.95 mA cm-2 is obtained for BL:NF/NC-AZO under the field of 6.8 V μm-1 and as well as the highest field enhancement factor (β) is estimated to be 4370 ± 3, compared to pure ZnO bilayer film (BL:NF/NC-ZnO) and also better than NC-AZO film and possesses the excellent long term stability of emission current. The PL intensity of doped ZnO bilayer film is very much stronger than pure ZnO bilayer structure. The superior field emission properties are attributed to the better morphologies, Al-doping and better crystallinity of bilayer AZO films. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Planar bilayer membranes from photoactivable phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borle, F; Sänger, M; Sigrist, H

    1991-07-22

    Planar bilayer membranes formed from photoactivable phospholipids have been characterized by low frequency voltametry. Cyclic voltametric measurements were applied for simultaneous registration of planar membrane conductivity and capacitance. The procedure has been utilized to characterize the formation and stability of planar bilayer membranes. Bilayer membranes were formed from N'-(1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethyl)-N-((m-3- trifluoromethyldiazirine)phenyl)thiourea (C14-PED), a head-group photosensitive phospholipid. In situ photoactivation of C14-PED at wavelengths greater than or equal to 320 nm altered neither the mean conductivity nor the capacitance of the bilayer. Ionophore (valinomycin) and ion channel (gramicidin) activities were not impaired upon photoactivation. In contrast, bilayer membranes formed from 1,2-bis(hexadeca-2,4-dienoyl)-sn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (C16-DENPC) revealed short life times. In situ photopolymerization of the diene fatty acids significantly increased the membrane conductivity or led to membrane rupture.

  16. Photon correlation spectroscopy of bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crilly, J F; Earnshaw, J C

    1983-02-01

    Light scattering by thermal fluctuations on simple monoglyceride bilayer membranes has been used to investigate the viscoelastic properties of these structures. Spectroscopic analysis of these fluctuations (capillary waves) permits the nonperturbative measurement of the interfacial tension and a shear interfacial viscosity acting normal to the membrane plane. The methods were established by studies of solvent and nonsolvent bilayers of glycerol monooleate (GMO). Changes in the tension of GMO/n-decane membranes induced by altering the composition of the parent solution were detected and quantified. In a test of the reliability of the technique controlled variations of the viscosity of the aqueous bathing solution were accurately monitored. The technique was applied to solvent-free bilayers formed from dispersions of GMO in squalane. The lower tensions observed attested to the comparative absence of solvent in such bilayers. In contrast to the solvent case, the solvent-free membranes exhibited a significant transverse shear viscosity, indicative of the enhanced intermolecular interactions within the bilayer.

  17. Mutational analysis of hemoglobin binding and heme utilization by a bacterial hemoglobin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, W G; Choudhary, N R; Council, S E; Collins, E J; Leduc, I

    2013-07-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most living organisms. To acquire iron from their environment, Gram-negative bacteria use TonB-dependent transporters that bind host proteins at the bacterial surface and transport iron or heme to the periplasm via the Ton machinery. TonB-dependent transporters are barrel-shaped outer membrane proteins with 22 transmembrane domains, 11 surface-exposed loops, and a plug domain that occludes the pore. To identify key residues of TonB-dependent transporters involved in hemoglobin binding and heme transport and thereby locate putative protective epitopes, the hemoglobin receptor of Haemophilus ducreyi HgbA was used as a model of iron/heme acquisition from hemoglobin. Although all extracellular loops of HgbA are required by H. ducreyi to use hemoglobin as a source of iron/heme, we previously demonstrated that hemoglobin binding by HgbA only involves loops 5 and 7. Using deletion, substitution, and site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to differentiate hemoglobin binding and heme acquisition by HgbA. Deletion or substitution of the GYEAYNRQWWA region of loop 5 and alanine replacement of selected histidines affected hemoglobin binding by HgbA. Conversely, mutation of the phenylalanine in the loop 7 FRAP domain or substitution of the NRQWWA motif of loop 5 significantly abrogated utilization of heme from hemoglobin. Our findings show that hemoglobin binding and heme utilization by a bacterial hemoglobin receptor involve specific motifs of HgbA.

  18. Hemoglobin Philly (β35 tyrosine→phenylalanine): studies in the molecular pathology of hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Ronald F.; Oski, Frank A.; Clegg, J. B.

    1969-01-01

    An abnormal unstable hemoglobin, hemoglobin Philly, was found in three members of a family, each of whom had evidence of a chronic hemolytic state. The presence of the mutant protein was suggested by the rapid appearance of inclusion bodies upon incubation of erythrocytes with brilliant cresyl blue and by the increased heat precipitability of the hemoglobin. However, no abnormal hemoglobin could be demonstrated by electrophoresis or column chromatography. Sulfhydryl titration of the hemolysates with p-mercuribenzoate indicated that there was an average of four reactive sulfhydryl groups per hemoglobin molecule instead of the usual two. The total number of hemoglobin sulfhydryl groups was normal; six groups were measured when denatured globin was reacted with 5,5′-dithiobis[2-nitrobenzoic acid]. This indicated that the increased sulfhydryl reactivity was due to an increased availability to p-mercuribenzoate of the usually unreactive hemoglobin cysteines at β112 and α104. After treatment for ½ hr with 4-5 moles of p-mercuribenzoate per mole of hemoglobin, electrophoresis revealed that 30-35% of the hemoglobin had been dissociated into α- and β-chains. Normal hemolysates revealed negligible splitting after 72 hr of similar treatment. The α- and β-chains of hemoglobin Philly were separated from the unsplit hemoglobin A by carboxymethyl cellulose chromatography. Fingerprint and amino acid analyses revealed that tyrosine β35 was replaced by phenylalanine. In hemoglobin Philly there is loss of the normal hydrogen bond between the tyrosine hydroxyl group and the carboxyl group of aspartic acid α126 at the α1β1 contact. This shifts the equilibrium from hemoglobin tetramers toward monomers, exposing the β112 and α104 cysteines. In the cell, precipitation of the unstable monomers may contribute to erythrocyte destruction. Images PMID:5822575

  19. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  20. Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Somorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-05-01

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO(2)-Pt and Pt-SiO(2), can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO(2)-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H(2), which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO(2) interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts.

  1. Multiscale Modeling of supported bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Roland; Xing, Chenyue; Hoopes, Matthew I.

    2009-03-01

    Supported Lipid Bilayers are an abundant research platform for understanding the behavior of real cell membranes as they allow for additional mechanical stability. We studied systematically the changes that a support induces on a phospholipid bilayer using coarse-grained molecular modeling on different levels. We characterize the density and pressure profiles as well as the density imbalance inflicted on the membrane by the support. We also determine the diffusion coefficients and characterize the influence of different corrugations of the support. We then determine the free energy of transfer of phospholipids between the proximal and distal leaflet of a supported membrane using the coarse-grained Martini model. It turns out that there is at equilibrium about a 2-3% higher density in the proximal leaflet. These results are in favorable agreement with recent data obtained by very large scale modeling using a water free model where flip-flop can be observed directly. We compare results of the free energy of transfer obtained by pulling the lipid across the membrane in different ways. There are small quantitative differences but the overall picture is consistent. We are additionally characterizing the intermediate states which determine the barrier height and therefore the rate of translocation.

  2. Observation of even denominator fractional quantum Hall effect in suspended bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Dong-Keun; Fal'ko, Vladimir I; Abanin, Dmitry A; Morpurgo, Alberto F

    2014-01-01

    We investigate low-temperature magneto-transport in recently developed, high-quality multiterminal suspended bilayer graphene devices, enabling the independent measurement of the longitudinal and transverse resistance. We observe clear signatures of the fractional quantum Hall effect with different states that are either fully developed, and exhibit a clear plateau in the transverse resistance with a concomitant dip in longitudinal resistance or incipient, and exhibit only a longitudinal resistance minimum. All observed states scale as a function of filling factor ν, as expected. An unprecedented even-denominator fractional state is observed at ν = -1/2 on the hole side, exhibiting a clear plateau in Rxy quantized at the expected value of 2h/e(2) with a precision of ∼0.5%. Many of our observations, together with a recent electronic compressibility measurement performed in graphene bilayers on hexagonal boron-nitride (hBN) substrates, are consistent with a recent theory that accounts for the effect of the degeneracy between the N = 0 and N = 1 Landau levels in the fractional quantum Hall effect and predicts the occurrence of a Moore-Read type ν = -1/2 state. Owing to the experimental flexibility of bilayer graphene, which has a gate-dependent band structure, can be easily accessed by scanning probes, and can be contacted with materials such as superconductors, our findings offer new possibilities to explore the microscopic nature of even-denominator fractional quantum Hall effect.

  3. Characterization of Drosophila hemoglobin. Evidence for hemoglobin-mediated respiration in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankeln, Thomas; Jaenicke, Viviane; Kiger, Laurent; Dewilde, Sylvia; Ungerechts, Guy; Schmidt, Marc; Urban, Joachim; Marden, Michael C; Moens, Luc; Burmester, Thorsten

    2002-08-09

    In contrast to previous assumptions, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster possesses hemoglobin. This respiratory protein forms a monomer of about 17 kDa that is not exported into the hemolymph. Recombinant Drosophila hemoglobin displays a typical hexacoordinated deoxy spectrum and binds oxygen with an affinity of 0.12 torr. Four different hemoglobin transcripts have been identified, which are generated by two distinct promoters of the hemoglobin (glob1) gene but are identical in their coding regions. Putative binding sites for hypoxia-regulated transcription factors have been identified in the gene. Hemoglobin synthesis in Drosophila is mainly associated with the tracheal system and the fat body. This suggests that oxygen supply in insects may be more complex than thought previously and may depend on hemoglobin-mediated oxygen transport and storage in addition to simple diffusion.

  4. Nanobiotechnology for hemoglobin-based blood substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T M S

    2009-04-01

    Nanobiotechnology is the assembling of biological molecules into nanodimension complexes. This has been used for the preparation of polyhemoglobin formed by the assembling of hemoglobin molecules into a soluble nanodimension complex. New generations of this approach include the nanobiotechnological assembly of hemoglobin, catalase, and superoxide dismutase into a soluble nanodimension complex. This acts as an oxygen carrier and an antioxidant for those conditions with potential for ischemiareperfusion injuries. Another recent novel approach is the assembling of hemoglobin and fibrinogen into a soluble nanodimension polyhemoglobin-fibrinogen complex that acts as an oxygen carrier with platelet-like activity. This is potentially useful in cases of extensive blood loss requiring massive replacement using blood substitutes, resulting in the need for the replacement of platelets and clotting factors. A further step is the preparation of nanodimension artificial red blood cells that contain hemoglobin and all the enzymes present in red blood cells.

  5. Undetectable Glycosylated Hemoglobin in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitani, Noriyuki; Taguchi, Akihiko; Sakuragi, Shizu; Matsui, Kumiko; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Shinohara, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    We encountered two cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) with undetectable glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) level at diagnosis. Hemolytic anemia improved by administration of prednisolone (PSL) and HbA1C became measurable after response.

  6. Optical Marking of Alcohol Induced Hemoglobin Modification

    CERN Document Server

    Vlokh, R; Moroz, O; Nastishin, Yu; Dudok, K; Dudok, T; Grinchishin, N; Nechiporenko, I; Hul, A

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that conformational modifications of Hb induced by ethanol consumption can be visualized in optical spectra studying oxygenation kinetics of hemoglobin or mixing hemoglobin with Cibacron blue dye. Better dye affinity of blood proteins extracted from alcoholised rats with respect to those from non-alcoholised ones confirms that ethanol and its metabolites induce structural pathologies in blood protein molecules. The detected changes for the case of the posterity of intoxicated animals may be explained as a post-translation modification, as well as a disturbance of the structure and function of tissue cellular gene mechanism for the blood creation. It is established that alcohol intake during first four months leads to the decrease of fractional weight of oxyhemoglobin and to the increase of methemoglobin amount in blood. Further alcohol consumption is accompanied by recovering of the normal level of hemoglobin derivatives in blood. Normalization of the fractional weight of hemoglobin derivati...

  7. Elliptically distributed lozenge tilings of a hexagon

    CERN Document Server

    Betea, Dan

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed study of a 4 parameter family of elliptic weights on tilings of a hexagon introduced by Borodin, Gorin and Rains, and generalize some of their results. In the process, we connect the combinatorics of the model with the theory of elliptic special functions. We first analyze some properties of the measure and introduce canonical coordinates that are useful for combinatorially interpreting results. We then show how the computed $n$-point function (called the elliptic Selberg density) and transitional probabilities connect to the theory of $BC_n$-symmetric multivariate elliptic special functions and difference operators discovered by Rains. In particular, the difference operators intrinsically capture the combinatorial model under study, while the elliptic Selberg density is a generalization (deformation) of probability distributions pervasive in the theory of random matrices and interacting particle systems. Based on quasi-commutation relations between elliptic difference operators, we cons...

  8. Quantum emission from hexagonal boron nitride monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Bray, Kerem; Ford, Michael J.; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Artificial atomic systems in solids are widely considered the leading physical system for a variety of quantum technologies, including quantum communications, computing and metrology. To date, however, room-temperature quantum emitters have only been observed in wide-bandgap semiconductors such as diamond and silicon carbide, nanocrystal quantum dots, and most recently in carbon nanotubes. Single-photon emission from two-dimensional materials has been reported, but only at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature, polarized and ultrabright single-photon emission from a colour centre in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. Density functional theory calculations indicate that vacancy-related defects are a probable source of the emission. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented potential of van der Waals crystals for large-scale nanophotonics and quantum information processing.

  9. The hexagon hypothesis: Six disruptive scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtles, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to bring a simple but effective and comprehensive approach to the development, delivery and monitoring of business continuity solutions. To ensure that the arguments and principles apply across the board, the paper sticks to basic underlying concepts rather than sophisticated interpretations. First, the paper explores what exactly people are defending themselves against. Secondly, the paper looks at how defences should be set up. Disruptive events tend to unfold in phases, each of which invites a particular style of protection, ranging from risk management through to business continuity to insurance cover. Their impact upon any business operation will fall into one of six basic scenarios. The hexagon hypothesis suggests that everyone should be prepared to deal with each of these six disruptive scenarios and it provides them with a useful benchmark for business continuity.

  10. Mechanical Hysteresis of Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Aiguo; LI Haoran

    2011-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an important structural material with layered microstructure.Because of the plastic anisotropy,this material shows obvious mechanical hysteresis (nonlinear elastic deformation).There are hysteretic loops at the cyclical load-unload stress-strain curves of h-BN.Consequently,two hot-pressed h-BN cylinders with different textures were studied.The mechanical hysteresis is heavily texture-dependent.The area of hysteretic loop is linearly related with the square of loading stresslevel.Two minor loops attached on the hysteretic loops with the same extreme stresses have congruent shapes.It can be concluded that the mechanical hysteresis of h-BN can he explained by a Kink Nonlinear Elastic model developed from the study of a ternary carbide Ti3SiC2.

  11. Permeation of Light Gases through Hexagonal Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gales

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gas separation using porous solids have attracted great attention due to their energetic applications. There is an enormous economic and environmental interest in the development of improved technologies for relevant processes, such as H2 production, CO2 separation or O2 and N2 purification from air. New materials are needed for achieving major improvements. Crystalline materials, displaying unidirectional and single-sized pores, preferentially with low pore tortuosity and high pore density, are promising candidates for membrane synthesis. Herein, we study hexagonal ice crystals as an example of this class of materials. By slowly growing ice crystals inside capillary tubes we were able to measure the permeation of several gas species through ice crystals and investigate its relation with both the size of the guest molecules and temperature of the crystal.

  12. Dancoff Correction in Square and Hexagonal Lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlvik, I.

    1966-11-15

    This report presents the results of a series of calculations of Dancoff corrections for square and hexagonal rod lattices. The tables cover a wide range of volume ratios and moderator cross sections. The results were utilized for checking the approximative formula of Sauer and also the modification of Bonalumi to Sauer's formula. The modified formula calculates the Dancoff correction with an accuracy of 0.01 - 0.02 in cases of practical interest. Calculations have also been performed on square lattices with an empty gap surrounding the rods. The results demonstrate the error involved in treating this kind of geometry by means of homogenizing the gap and the moderator. The calculations were made on the Ferranti Mercury computer of AB Atomenergi before it was closed down. Since then FORTRAN routines for Dancoff corrections have been written, and a subroutine DASQHE is included in the report.

  13. Structure of grain boundaries in hexagonal materials

    CERN Document Server

    Sarrazit, F

    1998-01-01

    which allows the behaviour of line-defects to be studied in complex interfacial processes. The work presented in this thesis describes experimental and theoretical aspects associated with the structure of grain boundaries in hexagonal materials. It has been found useful to classify grain boundaries as low-angle, special or general on the basis of their structure. High-angle grain boundaries were investigated in tungsten carbide (WC) using conventional electron microscopy techniques, and three examples characteristic of the interfaces observed in this material were studied extensively. Three-dimensionally periodic patterns are proposed as plausible reference configurations, and the Burgers vectors of observed interfacial dislocations were predicted using a theory developed recently. The comparison of experimental observations with theoretical predictions proved to be difficult as contrast simulation techniques require further development for analysis to be completed confidently. Another part of this work invol...

  14. Hemoglobins, programmed cell death and somatic embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert D; Huang, Shuanglong; Stasolla, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a universal process in all multicellular organisms. It is a critical component in a diverse number of processes ranging from growth and differentiation to response to stress. Somatic embryogenesis is one such process where PCD is significantly involved. Nitric oxide is increasingly being recognized as playing a significant role in regulating PCD in both mammalian and plant systems. Plant hemoglobins scavenge NO, and evidence is accumulating that events that modify NO levels in plants also affect hemoglobin expression. Here, we review the process of PCD, describing the involvement of NO and plant hemoglobins in the process. NO is an effector of cell death in both plants and vertebrates, triggering the cascade of events leading to targeted cell death that is a part of an organism's response to stress or to tissue differentiation and development. Expression of specific hemoglobins can alter this response in plants by scavenging the NO, thus, interrupting the death process. Somatic embryogenesis is used as a model system to demonstrate how cell-specific expression of different classes of hemoglobins can alter the embryogenic process, affecting hormone synthesis, cell metabolite levels and genes associated with PCD and embryogenic competence. We propose that plant hemoglobins influence somatic embryogenesis and PCD through cell-specific expression of a distinct plant hemoglobin. It is based on the premise that both embryogenic competence and PCD are strongly influenced by cellular NO levels. Increases in cellular NO levels result in elevated Zn(2+) and reactive-oxygen species associated with PCD, but they also result in decreased expression of MYC2, a transcription factor that is a negative effector of indoleacetic acid synthesis, a hormone that positively influences embryogenic competence. Cell-specific hemoglobin expression reduces NO levels as a result of NO scavenging, resulting in cell survival.

  15. Role of Noninvasive Hemoglobin Monitoring in Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-25

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2015-0002 Role of Noninvasive Hemoglobin Monitoring in Trauma Betty J. Tsuei, MD; Dennis J. Hanseman, PhD...W. Gerlach, USAF, MC U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Center for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills March 2015...August 2012 – August 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Role of Noninvasive Hemoglobin Monitoring in Trauma 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-12-2-6B14 5b

  16. Tangential flow filtration of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Andre F; Sun, Guoyong; Harris, David R

    2009-01-01

    Bovine and human hemoglobin (bHb and hHb, respectively) was purified from bovine and human red blood cells via tangential flow filtration (TFF) in four successive stages. TFF is a fast and simple method to purify Hb from RBCs using filtration through hollow fiber (HF) membranes. Most of the Hb was retained in stage III (100 kDa HF membrane) and displayed methemoglobin levels less than 1%, yielding final concentrations of 318 and 300 mg/mL for bHb and hHb, respectively. Purified Hb exhibited much lower endotoxin levels than their respective RBCs. The purity of Hb was initially assessed via SDS-PAGE, and showed tiny impurity bands for the stage III retentate. The oxygen affinity (P(50)) and cooperativity coefficient (n) were regressed from the measured oxygen-RBC/Hb equilibrium curves of RBCs and purified Hb. These results suggest that TFF yielded oxygen affinities of bHb and hHb that are comparable to values in the literature. LC-MS was used to measure the molecular weight of the alpha (alpha) and beta (beta) globin chains of purified Hb. No impurity peaks were present in the HPLC chromatograms of purified Hb. The mass of the molecular ions corresponding to the alpha and beta globin chains agreed well with the calculated theoretical mass of the alpha- and beta- globin chains. Taken together, our results demonstrate that HPLC-grade Hb can be generated via TFF. In general, this method can be more broadly applied to purify Hb from any source of RBCs. This work is significant, since it outlines a simple method for generating Hb for synthesis and/or formulation of Hb-based oxygen carriers.

  17. Biotechnology Applications of Tethered Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A. Jackman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of cell membranes in biological systems has prompted the development of model membrane platforms that recapitulate fundamental aspects of membrane biology, especially the lipid bilayer environment. Tethered lipid bilayers represent one of the most promising classes of model membranes and are based on the immobilization of a planar lipid bilayer on a solid support that enables characterization by a wide range of surface-sensitive analytical techniques. Moreover, as the result of molecular engineering inspired by biology, tethered bilayers are increasingly able to mimic fundamental properties of natural cell membranes, including fluidity, electrical sealing and hosting transmembrane proteins. At the same time, new methods have been employed to improve the durability of tethered bilayers, with shelf-lives now reaching the order of weeks and months. Taken together, the capabilities of tethered lipid bilayers have opened the door to biotechnology applications in healthcare, environmental monitoring and energy storage. In this review, several examples of such applications are presented. Beyond the particulars of each example, the focus of this review is on the emerging design and characterization strategies that made these applications possible. By drawing connections between these strategies and promising research results, future opportunities for tethered lipid bilayers within the biotechnology field are discussed.

  18. Hemoglobin levels in normal Filipino pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuizon, M D; Natera, M G; Ancheta, L P; Platon, T P; Reyes, G D; Macapinlac, M P

    1981-09-01

    The hemoglobin concentrations during pregnancy in Filipinos belonging to the upper income group, who were prescribed 105 mg elemental iron daily, and who had acceptable levels of transferrin saturation, were examined in an attempt to define normal levels. The hemoglobin concentrations for each trimester followed a Gaussian distribution. The hemoglobin values equal to the mean minus one standard deviation were 11.4 gm/dl for the first trimester and 10.4 gm/dl for the second and third trimesters. Using these values as the lower limits of normal, in one group of pregnant women the prevalence of anemia during the last two trimesters was found lower than that obtained when WHO levels for normal were used. Groups of women with hemoglobin of 10.4 to 10.9 gm/dl (classified anemic by WHO criteria but normal in the present study) and those with 11.0 gm/dl and above could not be distinguished on the basis of their serum ferritin levels nor on the degree of decrease in their hemoglobin concentration during pregnancy. Many subjects in both groups, however, had serum ferritin levels less than 12 ng/ml which indicate poor iron stores. It might be desirable in future studies to determine the hemoglobin cut-off point that will delineate subjects who are both non-anemic and adequate in iron stores using serum ferritin levels as criterion for the latter.

  19. Noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring: how accurate is enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Mark J; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Morey, Timothy E

    2013-10-01

    Evaluating the accuracy of medical devices has traditionally been a blend of statistical analyses, at times without contextualizing the clinical application. There have been a number of recent publications on the accuracy of a continuous noninvasive hemoglobin measurement device, the Masimo Radical-7 Pulse Co-oximeter, focusing on the traditional statistical metrics of bias and precision. In this review, which contains material presented at the Innovations and Applications of Monitoring Perfusion, Oxygenation, and Ventilation (IAMPOV) Symposium at Yale University in 2012, we critically investigated these metrics as applied to the new technology, exploring what is required of a noninvasive hemoglobin monitor and whether the conventional statistics adequately answer our questions about clinical accuracy. We discuss the glucose error grid, well known in the glucose monitoring literature, and describe an analogous version for hemoglobin monitoring. This hemoglobin error grid can be used to evaluate the required clinical accuracy (±g/dL) of a hemoglobin measurement device to provide more conclusive evidence on whether to transfuse an individual patient. The important decision to transfuse a patient usually requires both an accurate hemoglobin measurement and a physiologic reason to elect transfusion. It is our opinion that the published accuracy data of the Masimo Radical-7 is not good enough to make the transfusion decision.

  20. Thermal response of domains in cardiolipin content bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech, Oscar [Departament de Quimica-Fisica, Facultat de Quimica, U.B. 08028 (Spain); Morros, Antoni [Unitat de Biofisica, Departament de Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Facultat de Medicina (Spain); Servei de Ressonancia Magnetica Nuclear (SeRMN), U.A.B., 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Cabanas, Miquel E. [Servei de Ressonancia Magnetica Nuclear (SeRMN), U.A.B., 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Montero, M. Teresa [Departament de Fisicoquimica, Facultat de Farmacia, U.B. 08028 (Spain); Hernandez-Borrell, Jordi [Departament de Fisicoquimica, Facultat de Farmacia, U.B. 08028 (Spain)], E-mail: jordihernandezborrell@ub.edu

    2007-10-15

    In the study described here, supported planar bilayers (SPBs) of 1-palmitoy-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE):cardiolipin (CL) (0.8:0.2, mol/mol) were examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). SPBs were formed from suspensions of POPE:CL (0.8:0.2, mol/mol) in inverted hexagonal (H{sub II}) phases (buffer containing Ca{sup 2+}). Three laterally segregated domains which differ in height were observed at 24 degC. Based on the area accounted for each domain and the nominal composition of the mixture, we interpret that the higher domain is formed by CL, while the intermediate and lower domains (LDs) are formed by POPE. The three domains respond to temperature increase with relative changes in their area. At 37 degC, we observed that the increase in the area of the intermediate domain occurs at the expense of the LD. {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 31}P-NMR) and Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used in combination with AFM to characterize the phase behavior of the suspensions and to elucidate the nature of the structures observed.

  1. Direct Nanoimprint of Metal Bilayer for Tunnable Metal Photonic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Sangkeun; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Choi, Dae-Geun; Lee, Jihye; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Eung-Sug

    2013-10-01

    Tunable metal optical properties were realized by directly nanoimprinting metal onto silver-coated poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bilayer glass substrates. Imprinting at elevated temperatures enabled the molding of a stamp pattern consisting of a hexagonal pillar array with a 265 nm diameter and 530 nm pitch size, which produced a corrugated-metal nanohole array. The transmittance of the sample imprinted at 200 °C and 50 bar was uniquely improved from below 20% to more than 30% in the visible-infrared region, and its reflectance was reduced by more than 65% compared to a reference sample. The optical properties of the investigated metal depended significantly on the imprint temperature and relatively less on the imprint pressure and deposited silver film thickness. The improved transmittance was obtained only for the direct-imprinted silver-PMMA and not when the silver was simply deposited onto the predefined PMMA pattern. The presented fabrication strategy enables the provision of accessible optical tunability as well as improved cost-labor effectiveness for metal nanostructuring.

  2. Spin dynamics of bilayer manganites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapan Chatterji

    2004-07-01

    The results of inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering investigations on the 40% hole-doped quasi-2D bilayer manganites La1.2Sr1.8Mn2O7 have been reviewed. The complete set of exchange interactions have been determined on the basis of a localized Heisenberg model. However, the spin wave dispersion in La1.2Sr1.8Mn2O7 shows softening close to the zone boundary and are also heavily damped especially close to the zone boundary and deviate from that expected for a simple Heisenberg model. A minimal double exchange model including quantum corrections can reproduce these effects qualitatively but falls short of quantitative agreement.

  3. Texture of lipid bilayer domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Uffe Bernchou; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Midtiby, Henrik Skov

    2009-01-01

    chains. By imaging the intensity variations as a function of the polarization angle, we map the lateral variations of the lipid tilt within domains. Results reveal that gel domains are composed of subdomains with different lipid tilt directions. We have applied a Fourier decomposition method......We investigate the texture of gel (g) domains in binary lipid membranes composed of the phospholipids DPPC and DOPC. Lateral organization of lipid bilayer membranes is a topic of fundamental and biological importance. Whereas questions related to size and composition of fluid membrane domain...... are well studied, the possibility of texture in gel domains has so far not been examined. When using polarized light for two-photon excitation of the fluorescent lipid probe Laurdan, the emission intensity is highly sensitive to the angle between the polarization and the tilt orientation of lipid acyl...

  4. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology al...

  5. Fragmented state of lipid bilayers in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helfrich, W.; Thimmel, J.; Klösgen, Beate Maria

    1999-01-01

    The bilayers of some typical biological membrane lipids such as PC and DGDG disintegrate in a large excess of water to form an optically invisible dispersive bilayer phase. `Dark bodies' can be reversibly precipitated from it by raising the temperature. The dispersive phase probably consists...... of `knotted sticks', i.e. very thin nodular tubes of bilayer. After reviewing pertinent experimental and theoretical work we report on the discovery of a lower consolute point near room temperature in DGDG/water systems. Its existence shows that the dispersive phase and the dark bodies belong to the same...

  6. Berry phase transition in twisted bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Johannes C.; Smirnov, Dmitri; Schmidt, Hennrik; Haug, Rolf J.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic dispersion of a graphene bilayer is highly dependent on rotational mismatch between layers and can be further manipulated by electrical gating. This allows for an unprecedented control over electronic properties and opens up the possibility of flexible band structure engineering. Here we present novel magnetotransport data in a twisted bilayer, crossing the energetic border between decoupled monolayers and coupled bilayer. In addition a transition in Berry phase between π and 2π is observed at intermediate magnetic fields. Analysis of Fermi velocities and gate induced charge carrier densities suggests an important role of strong layer asymmetry for the observed phenomena.

  7. Microstructures and Recording Mechanism of Mo/Si Bilayer Applied for Write-Once Blue Laser Optical Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin-Liang Ou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mo/Si bilayer thin films were grown by magnetron sputtering and applied to write-once blu-ray disc (BD-R. The microstructures and optical storage properties of Mo/Si bilayer were investigated. From the temperature dependence of reflectivity measurement, it was revealed that a phase change occurred in the range of 255–425°C. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the as-deposited film possessed Mo polycrystalline phase. The hexagonal MoSi2 and cubic Mo3Si phases appeared after annealing at 300 and 450°C, respectively. By measuring the optical reflectivity at a wavelength of 405 nm, the optical contrast of Mo/Si bilayer between as-deposited and 450°C-annealed states was evaluated to 25.8%. The optimum jitter value of 6.8% was obtained at 10.65 mW for 4× recording speed. The dynamic tests show that the Mo/Si bilayer has high potential in BD-R applications.

  8. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. 864.7470 Section... Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. A glycosylated hemoglobin assay is a device used to measure the glycosylated hemoglobins (A1a, A1b, and A1c) in a patient's blood by a column...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7400 - Hemoglobin A2 assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin A2 assay. 864.7400 Section 864.7400...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7400 Hemoglobin A2 assay. (a) Identification. A hemoglobin A2 assay is a device used to determine the hemoglobin A2...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  11. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  12. 21 CFR 864.5620 - Automated hemoglobin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated hemoglobin system. 864.5620 Section 864....5620 Automated hemoglobin system. (a) Identification. An automated hemoglobin system is a fully... hemoglobin content of human blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  13. 21 CFR 864.7415 - Abnormal hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abnormal hemoglobin assay. 864.7415 Section 864... hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. An abnormal hemoglobin assay is a device consisting of the reagents... hemoglobin types. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  14. 21 CFR 866.5470 - Hemoglobin immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin immunological test system. 866.5470... Hemoglobin immunological test system. (a) Indentification. A hemoglobin immunological test system is a device... hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying pigment in red blood cells) in blood, urine, plasma, or other body...

  15. Hydrophobic silver nanoparticles trapped in lipid bilayers: Size distribution, bilayer phase behavior, and optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bothun Geoffrey D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid-based dispersion of nanoparticles provides a biologically inspired route to designing therapeutic agents and a means of reducing nanoparticle toxicity. Little is currently known on how the presence of nanoparticles influences lipid vesicle stability and bilayer phase behavior. In this work, the formation of aqueous lipid/nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs consisting of hydrophobic silver-decanethiol particles (5.7 ± 1.8 nm embedded within 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC bilayers is demonstrated as a function of the DPPC/Ag nanoparticle (AgNP ratio. The effect of nanoparticle loading on the size distribution, bilayer phase behavior, and bilayer fluidity is determined. Concomitantly, the effect of bilayer incorporation on the optical properties of the AgNPs is also examined. Results The dispersions were stable at 50°C where the bilayers existed in a liquid crystalline state, but phase separated at 25°C where the bilayers were in a gel state, consistent with vesicle aggregation below the lipid melting temperature. Formation of bilayer-embedded nanoparticles was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence anisotropy, where increasing nanoparticle concentration suppressed the lipid pretransition temperature, reduced the melting temperature, and disrupted gel phase bilayers. The characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR wavelength of the embedded nanoparticles was independent of the bilayer phase; however, the SPR absorbance was dependent on vesicle aggregation. Conclusion These results suggest that lipid bilayers can distort to accommodate large hydrophobic nanoparticles, relative to the thickness of the bilayer, and may provide insight into nanoparticle/biomembrane interactions and the design of multifunctional liposomal carriers.

  16. The renal handling of hemoglobin. I. Glomerular filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, H F; Esham, W T; Bull, R W

    1969-05-01

    The glomerular filtration of hemoglobin (alpha(2)beta(2)) was studied under conditions in which its dissociation into alphabeta dimers was experimentally altered. Rats receiving hemoglobin treated with the sulfhydryl reagent bis(N-maleimidomethyl) ether (BME) showed a much lower renal excretion and prolonged plasma survival as compared with animals injected with untreated hemoglobin. Plasma disappearance was also prolonged in dogs receiving BME hemoglobin. Gel filtration data indicated that under physiological conditions, BME hemoglobin had impaired subunit dissociation. In addition, BME hemoglobin showed a very high oxygen affinity and a decreased rate of auto-oxidation. Glomerular filtration was enhanced under conditions which favor the dissociation of hemoglobin into dimers. Cat hemoglobin, which forms subunits much more extensively than canine hemoglobin, was excreted more readily by the rat kidney. The renal uptake of (59)Fe hemoglobin injected intra-arterially into rabbits varied inversely with the concentration of the injected dose.

  17. Polyethylene Glycol Camouflaged Earthworm Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moges, Selamawit; Nacharaju, Parimala; Roche, Camille; Dantsker, David; Palmer, Andre; Friedman, Joel M.

    2017-01-01

    Nearly 21 million components of blood and whole blood and transfused annually in the United States, while on average only 13.6 million units of blood are donated. As the demand for Red Blood Cells (RBCs) continues to increase due to the aging population, this deficit will be more significant. Despite decades of research to develop hemoglobin (Hb) based oxygen (O2) carriers (HBOCs) as RBC substitutes, there are no products approved for clinical use. Lumbricus terrestris erythrocruorin (LtEc) is the large acellular O2 carrying protein complex found in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris. LtEc is an extremely stable protein complex, resistant to autoxidation, and capable of transporting O2 to tissue when transfused into mammals. These characteristics render LtEc a promising candidate for the development of the next generation HBOCs. LtEc has a short half-life in circulation, limiting its application as a bridge over days, until blood became available. Conjugation with polyethylene glycol (PEG-LtEc) can extend LtEc circulation time. This study explores PEG-LtEc pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. To study PEG-LtEc pharmacokinetics, hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber were subjected to a 40% exchange transfusion with 10 g/dL PEG-LtEc or LtEc and followed for 48 hours. To study the vascular response of PEG-LtEc, hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber received multiple infusions of 10 g/dL PEG-LtEc or LtEc solution to increase plasma LtEc concentration to 0.5, then 1.0, and 1.5 g/dL, while monitoring the animals’ systemic and microcirculatory parameters. Results confirm that PEGylation of LtEc increases its circulation time, extending the half-life to 70 hours, 4 times longer than that of unPEGylated LtEc. However, PEGylation increased the rate of LtEc oxidation in vivo. Vascular analysis verified that PEG-LtEc showed the absence of microvascular vasoconstriction or systemic hypertension. The molecular size of PEG-LtEc did not change the

  18. Microcrystalline hexagonal tungsten bronze. 2. Dehydration dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Vittorio; Griffith, Christopher S; Hanna, John V

    2009-07-06

    Low-temperature (25-600 degrees C) thermal transformations have been studied for hydrothermally prepared, microcrystalline hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) phases A(x)WO(3+x/2).zH(2)O as a function of temperature, where A is an exchangeable cation (in this case Na(+) or Cs(+)) located in hexagonal structural tunnels. Thermal treatment of the as-prepared sodium- and cesium-exchanged phases in air were monitored using a conventional laboratory-based X-ray diffractometer, while thermal transformations in vacuum were studied using synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction. Concurrent thermogravimetric, diffuse reflectance infrared (DRIFT), and (23)Na and (133)Cs magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopic studies have also been undertaken. For the cesium variant, cell volume contraction occurred from room temperature to about 350 degrees C, the regime in which water was "squeezed" out of tunnel sites. This was followed by a lattice expansion in the 350-600 degrees C temperature range. Over the entire temperature range, a net thermal contraction was observed, and this was the result of an anisotropic change in the cell dimensions which included a shortening of the A-O2 bond length. These changes explain why Cs(+) ions are locked into tunnel positions at temperatures as low as 400 degrees C, subsequently inducing a significant reduction in Cs(+) extractability under low pH (nitric acid) conditions. The changing Cs(+) speciation as detected by (133)Cs MAS NMR showed a condensation from multiple Cs sites, presumably associated with differing modes of Cs(+) hydration in the tunnels, to a single Cs(+) environment upon thermal transformation and water removal. While similar lattice contraction was observed for the as-prepared sodium variant, the smaller radius of Na(+) caused it to be relatively easily removed with acid in comparison to the Cs(+) variant. From (23)Na MAS NMR studies of the parent material, complex Na(+) speciation was observed with dehydrated and various

  19. A new hemoglobin gene from soybean: a role for hemoglobin in all plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, C R; Jensen, E O; LLewellyn, D J

    1996-01-01

    indicate that this new gene is a nonsymbiotic legume hemoglobin. The finding of this gene in legumes and similar genes in other species strengthens our previous suggestion that genomes of all plants contain hemoglobin genes. The specialized leghemoglobin gene family may have arisen from a preexisting...

  20. Convergent evolution of hemoglobin switching in jawed and jawless vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfing, Kim; Stuhlmann, Friederike; Docker, Margaret F; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-02-01

    During development, humans and other jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata) express distinct hemoglobin genes, resulting in different hemoglobin tetramers. Embryonic and fetal hemoglobin have higher oxygen affinities than the adult hemoglobin, sustaining the oxygen demand of the developing organism. Little is known about the expression of hemoglobins during development of jawless vertebrates (Agnatha). We identified three hemoglobin switches in the life cycle of the sea lamprey. Three hemoglobin genes are specifically expressed in the embryo, four genes in the filter feeding larva (ammocoete), and nine genes correspond to the adult hemoglobin chains. During the development from the parasitic to the reproductive adult, the composition of hemoglobin changes again, with a massive increase of chain aHb1. A single hemoglobin chain is expressed constitutively in all stages. We further showed the differential expression of other globin genes: Myoglobin 1 is most highly expressed in the reproductive adult, myoglobin 2 expression peaks in the larva. Globin X1 is restricted to the embryo; globin X2 was only found in the reproductive adult. Cytoglobin is expressed at low levels throughout the life cycle. Because the hemoglobins of jawed and jawless vertebrates evolved independently from a common globin ancestor, hemoglobin switching must also have evolved convergently in these taxa. Notably, the ontogeny of sea lamprey hemoglobins essentially recapitulates their phylogeny, with the embryonic hemoglobins emerging first, followed by the evolution of larval and adult hemoglobins.

  1. Dynamic Morphologies of Microscale Droplet Interface Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya [ORNL; Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Sarles, Stephen A [ORNL; Venkatesan, Guru [The University of Tennessee; Hayes, Douglas G [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) are a powerful platform for studying the dynamics of synthetic cellular membranes; however, very little has been done to exploit the unique dynamical features of DIBs. Here, we generate microscale droplet interface bilayers ( DIBs) by bringing together femtoliter-volume water droplets in a microfluidic oil channel, and characterize morphological changes of the DIBs as the droplets shrink due to evaporation. By varying the initial conditions of the system, we identify three distinct classes of dynamic morphology. (1) Buckling and Fission: When forming DIBs using the lipid-out method (lipids in oil phase), lipids in the shrinking monolayers continually pair together and slide into the bilayer to conserve their mass. As the bilayer continues to grow, it becomes confined, buckles, and eventually fissions one or more vesicles. (2) Uniform Shrinking: When using the lipid-in method (lipids in water phase) to form DIBs, lipids uniformly transfer from the monolayers and bilayer into vesicles contained inside the water droplets. (3) Stretching and Unzipping: Finally, when the droplets are pinned to the wall(s) of the microfluidic channel, the droplets become stretched during evaporation, culminating in the unzipping of the bilayer and droplet separation. These findings offer a better understanding of the dynamics of coupled lipid interfaces.

  2. Bootstrapping the Three-Loop Hexagon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Lance J.; /CERN /SLAC; Drummond, James M.; /CERN /Annecy, LAPTH; Henn, Johannes M.; /Humboldt U., Berlin /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2011-11-08

    We consider the hexagonal Wilson loop dual to the six-point MHV amplitude in planar N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory. We apply constraints from the operator product expansion in the near-collinear limit to the symbol of the remainder function at three loops. Using these constraints, and assuming a natural ansatz for the symbol's entries, we determine the symbol up to just two undetermined constants. In the multi-Regge limit, both constants drop out from the symbol, enabling us to make a non-trivial confirmation of the BFKL prediction for the leading-log approximation. This result provides a strong consistency check of both our ansatz for the symbol and the duality between Wilson loops and MHV amplitudes. Furthermore, we predict the form of the full three-loop remainder function in the multi-Regge limit, beyond the leading-log approximation, up to a few constants representing terms not detected by the symbol. Our results confirm an all-loop prediction for the real part of the remainder function in multi-Regge 3 {yields} 3 scattering. In the multi-Regge limit, our result for the remainder function can be expressed entirely in terms of classical polylogarithms. For generic six-point kinematics other functions are required.

  3. Hexagonal boron-nitride nanomesh magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, C.; Tagami, R.; Nakanishi, Y.; Iwaki, R.; Nomura, K.; Haruyama, J.

    2016-09-01

    The formation of magnetic and spintronic devices using two-dimensional (2D) atom-thin layers has attracted attention. Ferromagnetisms (FMs) arising from zigzag-type atomic structure of edges of 2D atom-thin materials have been experimentally observed in graphene nanoribbons, hydrogen (H)-terminated graphene nanomeshes (NMs), and few-layer oxygen (O)-terminated black phosphorus NMs. Herein, we report room-temperature edge FM in few-layer hexagonal boron-nitride (hBN) NMs. O-terminated hBNNMs annealed at 500 °C show the largest FM, while it completely disappears in H-terminated hBNNMs. When hBNNMs are annealed at other temperatures, amplitude of the FM significantly decreases. These are highly in contrast to the case of graphene NMs but similar to the cases of black phosphorus NM and suggest that the hybridization of the O atoms with B(N) dangling bonds of zigzag pore edges, formed at the 500 °C annealing, strongly contribute to this edge FM. Room-temperature FM realizable only by exposing hBNNMs into air opens the way for high-efficiency 2D flexible magnetic and spintronic devices without the use of rare magnetic elements.

  4. Hyperbolic phonon polaritons in hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Siyuan

    2015-03-01

    Uniaxial materials whose axial and tangential permittivities have opposite signs are referred to as indefinite or hyperbolic media. While hyperbolic responses are normally achieved with metamaterials, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) naturally possesses this property due to the anisotropic phonons in the mid-infrared. Using scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy, we studied polaritonic phenomena in hBN. We performed infrared nano-imaging of highly confined and low-loss hyperbolic phonon polaritons in hBN. The polariton wavelength was shown to be governed by the hBN thickness according to a linear law persisting down to few atomic layers [Science, 343, 1125-1129 (2014)]. Additionally, we carried out the modification of hyperbolic response in heterostructures comprised of a mononlayer graphene deposited on hBN. Electrostatic gating of the top graphene layer allows for the modification of wavelength and intensity of hyperbolic phonon polaritons in bulk hBN. The physics of the modification originates from the plasmon-phonon coupling in the hyperbolic medium. Furthermore, we demonstrated the ``hyperlens'' for subdiffractional imaging and focusing using a slab of hBN.

  5. Instability of vibrational modes in hexagonal lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korznikova, Elena A.; Bachurin, Dmitry V.; Fomin, Sergey Yu.; Chetverikov, Alexander P.; Dmitriev, Sergey V.

    2017-02-01

    The phenomenon of modulational instability is investigated for all four delocalized short-wave vibrational modes recently found for the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice with the help of a group-theoretic approach. The polynomial pair potential with hard-type quartic nonlinearity ( β-FPU potential with β > 0) is used to describe interactions between atoms. As expected for the hard-type anharmonic interactions, for all four modes the frequency is found to increase with the amplitude. Frequency of the modes I and III bifurcates from the upper edge of the phonon spectrum, while that of the modes II and IV increases from inside the spectrum. It is also shown that the considered model supports spatially localized vibrational mode called discrete breather (DB) or intrinsic localized mode. DB frequency increases with the amplitude above the phonon spectrum. Two different scenarios of the mode decay were revealed. In the first scenario (for modes I and III), development of the modulational instability leads to a formation of long-lived DBs that radiate their energy slowly until thermal equilibrium is reached. In the second scenario (for modes II and IV) a transition to thermal oscillations of atoms is observed with no formation of DBs.

  6. Performance of the ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array

    CERN Document Server

    Barwick, S W; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Binns, W R; Boersma, D; Bose, R G; Braun, D L; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Buitink, S; Dookayka, K; Dowkontt, P F; Duffin, T; Euler, S; Gerhardt, L; Gustafsson, L; Hallgren, A; Hanson, J C; Israel, M H; Kiryluk, J; Klein, S; Kleinfelder, S; Nelles, A; Niederhausen, H; Olevitch, M A; Persichelli, C; Ratzlaff, K; Rauch, B F; Reed, C; Roumi, M; Samanta, A; Simburger, G E; Stezelberger, T; Tatar, J; Uggerhoj, U; Walker, J; Young, R

    2015-01-01

    Installation of the ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array (HRA) on the Ross Ice Shelf of Antarctica has been completed. This detector serves as a pilot program to the ARIANNA neutrino telescope, which aims to measure the diffuse flux of very high energy neutrinos by observing the radio pulse generated by neutrino-induced charged particle showers in the ice. All HRA stations ran reliably and took data during the entire 2014-2015 austral summer season. A new radio signal direction reconstruction procedure is described, and is observed to have a resolution better than a degree. The reconstruction is used in a preliminary search for potential neutrino candidate events in the data from one of the newly installed detector stations. Three cuts are used to separate radio backgrounds from neutrino signals. The cuts are found to filter out all data recorded by the station during the season while preserving 85.4% of simulated neutrino events that trigger the station. This efficiency is similar to that found in analyses of previ...

  7. Study the Postbuckling of Hexagonal Piezoelectric Nanowires with Surface Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Rahmani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric nanobeams having circular, rectangular and hexagonal cross-sections are synthesized and used in various Nano structures; however, piezoelectric nanobeams with hexagonal cross-sections have not been studied in detail. In particular, the physical mechanisms of the surface effect and the role of surface stress, surface elasticity and surface piezoelectricity have not been discussed thoroughly. The present study investigated post-buckling behavior of piezoelectric nanobeams by examining surface effects. The energy method was applied to post-buckling of hexagonal nanobeams and the critical buckling voltage and amplitude are derived analytically from bulk and surface material properties and geometric factors.

  8. Whole Core Transport Calculation Methodology for a Hexagonal Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, J. Y.; Kim, K. S.; Lee, C. C.; Zee, S. Q.; Joo, H. G

    2007-07-15

    This report discusses the hexagonal module implemented to the DeCART code and the performance of them. The implemented hexagonal module includes the hexagonal ray tracing and the CMFD acceleration modules. The performance of the implemented hexagonal module is examined for 4 tests of: (1) CMFD acceleration test, (2) the accuracy test of the hexagonal module, (3) the performance test for 2-D NGNP problem and (4) the applicability test for 3-D NGNP problem. The features of the implemented hexagonal modules are: (1) The Modular ray tracing scheme based on a hexagonal assembly and a path linking scheme between the modular rays. (2) Segment generation based on the structure unit. (3) Cell ray approximation: This feature is developed to reduce the memory required to store the segment information. (4) Modified cycle ray scheme that begins the ray tracing at a given surface and finishes if the reflected ray meets the starting surface. This feature is developed to reduce the memory required for the angular flux at the core boundary. (5) Fixed assembly geometry. The pin geometry of the single pin per assembly problem is different from that of the multi-pin problem. The core geometry of a single assembly problem is also different from that of the multi-assembly problem. (6) CMFD module based on unstructured cell. This feature is to deal with the irregular gap cells that are positioned at the assembly boundaries. The examination results of the 4 tests can be summarized as: (1) The CMFD acceleration test shows that the CMFD module speedups about greater than 200 for the core problem. (2) The accuracy test shows that the hexagonal MOC module produces an accurate solution of less than 60 pcm of eigenvalue and less than 2 % of local pin power errors. (3) The performance test for 2-D NGNP problem shows that the implemented hexagonal module works soundly and produces a reasonable solution by cooperating with the existing DeCART library and the other modules. (4) The applicability

  9. RKKY interaction in bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Yawar; Moradian, Rostam

    2015-12-01

    We study the RKKY interaction between two magnetic impurities located on the same layer (intralayer case) or on different layers (interlayer case) in undoped bilayer graphene (BLG) in the four-bands model, by directly calculating the Green functions in the eigenvalues and eigenvectors representation. Our results show that both intra- and interlayer RKKY interactions between two magnetic impurities located on the same (opposite) sublattice are always ferromagnetic (antiferromagnetic). Furthermore we find unusual long-distance decay of the RKKY interaction in BLG. The intralyer RKKY interactions between two magnetic impurities located on the same sublattice, J AnAn(R) and J BnBn(R), decay closely as 1 /R6 and 1 /R2 at large impurity distances respectively, but when they are located on opposite sublattices the RKKY interactions exhibit 1 /R4 decays approximately. In the interlayer case, the RKKY interactions between two magnetic impurities located on the same sublattice show a decay close to 1 /R4 at large impurity distances, but if two magnetic impurities be on opposite sublattices the RKKY interactions, J A1B2(R) and J B1A2(R), decay closely as 1 /R6 and 1 /R2 respectively. Both intra- and interlayer RKKY interactions have anisotropic oscillatory factors which for intralayer case is equal to that for single layer graphene (SLG). Our results at weak and strong interlayer coupling limits reduce to the RKKY interaction of SLG and that of BLG in the two-bands approximation respectively.

  10. Nitrosyl hemoglobins: EPR above 80 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wajnberg, E.; Bemski, G.; El-Jaick, L.J.; Alves, O.C.

    1995-03-01

    The EPR spectra of nitrosyl hemoglobin and myoglobin in different conditions (native, denatured and lyophilized), as well as of hematin-NO were obtained in the temperature range of 80 K-280 K. There is a substantial and reversible.decrease of the areas of the EPR spectra of all the hemoglobin samples above 150 K. The interpretation of the results implies the existence of two conformational states in thermal equilibrium only one of which is EPR detectable. Thermodynamical parameters are determined for the hexa and penta-coordinated cases. (author). 25 refs, 3 figs.

  11. Bifurcation theory for hexagonal agglomeration in economic geography

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, Kiyohiro

    2014-01-01

    This book contributes to an understanding of how bifurcation theory adapts to the analysis of economic geography. It is easily accessible not only to mathematicians and economists, but also to upper-level undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in nonlinear mathematics. The self-organization of hexagonal agglomeration patterns of industrial regions was first predicted by the central place theory in economic geography based on investigations of southern Germany. The emergence of hexagonal agglomeration in economic geography models was envisaged by Krugman. In this book, after a brief introduction of central place theory and new economic geography, the missing link between them is discovered by elucidating the mechanism of the evolution of bifurcating hexagonal patterns. Pattern formation by such bifurcation is a well-studied topic in nonlinear mathematics, and group-theoretic bifurcation analysis is a well-developed theoretical tool. A finite hexagonal lattice is used to express uniformly distri...

  12. Preparation and characterization of hexagonal close-packed Ni nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hexagonal close-packed Ni nanoparticles were synthesized using a heat-treating technique with the precursors prepared by the sol-gel method.The synthesis condition,structure,and morphology of the samples were characterized and analysed by thermogravimetric analysis (TG),differential thermal analysis (DTA),X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Results indicate that the hexagonal close packed Ni nanoparticles were synthesized at a heat-treating temperature of 300℃.The cell constants are calculated at a=0.2652 nm and c=0.4334 nm.The average grain size of the hexagonal close-packed Ni particles evaluated by Scherrer equation is about 12 nm.The phase transformation from a hexagonal close-packed Ni to a face-centered cubic Ni structure occurred when the heat-treating temperature was increased.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Hexagonal Boron Nitride (h- BN) Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-09

    Synthesis 1. Diborane- ammonia (B2H6-NH3- gases): Early results with these precursors were published in 2012. 5 Briefly, LPCVD growth of h-BN in a hot-wall...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Synthesis and Characterization of Hexagonal Boron Nitride (h- BN) Films. The views, opinions and...1 ABSTRACT Number of Papers published in peer-reviewed journals: Synthesis and Characterization of Hexagonal Boron Nitride (h-BN) Films. Report Title

  14. Bounds for the connective constant of the hexagonal lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, S E; Parviainen, R [Department of Mathematics, Uppsala University, Box 480, 75106 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-01-23

    We give improved bounds for the connective constant of the hexagonal lattice. The lower bound is found by using Kesten's method of irreducible bridges and by determining generating functions for bridges on one-dimensional lattices. The upper bound is obtained as the largest eigenvalue of a certain transfer matrix. Using a relation between the hexagonal and the (3.12{sup 2}) lattices, we also give bounds for the connective constant of the latter lattice.

  15. Critical point for the canted antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition at charge neutrality in bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzini, S.; Cobaleda, C.; Piot, B. A.; Bellani, V.; Diez, E.

    2014-09-01

    We report on magnetotransport measurements up to 30 T performed on a bilayer graphene Hall bar, enclosed by two thin hexagonal boron nitride flakes. In the quantum Hall regime, our high-mobility sample exhibits an insulating state at the neutrality point which evolves into a metallic phase when a strong in-plane field is applied, as expected for a transition from a canted antiferromagnetic to a ferromagnetic spin-ordered phase. We individuate a temperature-independent crossing in the four-terminal resistance as a function of the total magnetic field, corresponding to the critical point of the transition. We show that the critical field scales linearly with the perpendicular component of the field, as expected from the underlying competition between the Zeeman energy and interaction-induced anisotropies. A clear scaling of the resistance is also found and a universal behavior is proposed in the vicinity of the transition.

  16. Piezoelectricity in asymmetrically strained bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Donck, M.; De Beule, C.; Partoens, B.; Peeters, F. M.; Van Duppen, B.

    2016-09-01

    We study the electronic properties of commensurate faulted bilayer graphene by diagonalizing the one-particle Hamiltonian of the bilayer system in a complete basis of Bloch states of the individual graphene layers. Our novel approach is very general and can be easily extended to any commensurate graphene-based heterostructure. Here, we consider three cases: (i) twisted bilayer graphene, (ii) bilayer graphene where triaxial stress is applied to one layer and (iii) bilayer graphene where uniaxial stress is applied to one layer. We show that the resulting superstructures can be divided into distinct classes, depending on the twist angle or the magnitude of the induced strain. The different classes are distinguished from each other by the interlayer coupling mechanism, resulting in fundamentally different low-energy physics. For the cases of triaxial and uniaxial stress, the individual graphene layers tend to decouple and we find significant charge transfer between the layers. In addition, this piezoelectric effect can be tuned by applying a perpendicular electric field. Finally, we show how our approach can be generalized to multilayer systems.

  17. Residual stresses in bilayer dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskonak, Burak; Mecholsky, John J; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2005-06-01

    It is clinically observed that lithia-disilicate-based all-ceramic fixed partial dentures (FPD) can fail because of the fragmentation of the veneering material. The hypothesis of this study is that the global residual stresses within the surface of those veneered FPDs may be responsible for partial fragmentation of the veneering ceramic. Bilayer and monolithic ceramic composites were prepared using a lithia disilicate based (Li2OSiO2) glass-ceramic core and a glass veneer. A four-step fracture mechanics approach was used to analyze residual stress in bilayered all-ceramic FPDs. We found a statistically significant increase in the mean flexural strengths of bilayer specimens compared with monolithic glass specimens (p < or = 0.05). There was a statistically significant difference between the mean longitudinal and transverse indentation-induced crack sizes in bilayer specimens (p < or = 0.05), which indicates the existence of residual stress. Global residual stresses in the veneer layer, calculated using a fracture mechanics equation, were determined to be responsible for the increased strength and observed chipping, i.e., spallation in bilayer ceramic composites.

  18. Viscoelastic deformation of lipid bilayer vesicles†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Sankhagowit, Shalene; Biswas, Roshni; Wu, Shuyang; Povinelli, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid bilayers form the boundaries of the cell and its organelles. Many physiological processes, such as cell movement and division, involve bending and folding of the bilayer at high curvatures. Currently, bending of the bilayer is treated as an elastic deformation, such that its stress-strain response is independent of the rate at which bending strain is applied. We present here the first direct measurement of viscoelastic response in a lipid bilayer vesicle. We used a dual-beam optical trap (DBOT) to stretch 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Upon application of a step optical force, the vesicle membrane deforms in two regimes: a fast, instantaneous area increase, followed by a much slower stretching to an eventual plateau deformation. From measurements of dozens of GUVs, the average time constant of the slower stretching response was 0.225 ± 0.033 s (standard deviation, SD). Increasing the fluid viscosity did not affect the observed time constant. We performed a set of experiments to rule out heating by laser absorption as a cause of the transient behavior. Thus, we demonstrate here that the bending deformation of lipid bilayer membranes should be treated as viscoelastic. PMID:26268612

  19. Viscoelastic deformation of lipid bilayer vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Sankhagowit, Shalene; Biswas, Roshni; Wu, Shuyang; Povinelli, Michelle L; Malmstadt, Noah

    2015-10-07

    Lipid bilayers form the boundaries of the cell and its organelles. Many physiological processes, such as cell movement and division, involve bending and folding of the bilayer at high curvatures. Currently, bending of the bilayer is treated as an elastic deformation, such that its stress-strain response is independent of the rate at which bending strain is applied. We present here the first direct measurement of viscoelastic response in a lipid bilayer vesicle. We used a dual-beam optical trap (DBOT) to stretch 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Upon application of a step optical force, the vesicle membrane deforms in two regimes: a fast, instantaneous area increase, followed by a much slower stretching to an eventual plateau deformation. From measurements of dozens of GUVs, the average time constant of the slower stretching response was 0.225 ± 0.033 s (standard deviation, SD). Increasing the fluid viscosity did not affect the observed time constant. We performed a set of experiments to rule out heating by laser absorption as a cause of the transient behavior. Thus, we demonstrate here that the bending deformation of lipid bilayer membranes should be treated as viscoelastic.

  20. Faster heme loss from hemoglobin E than HbS, in acidic pH: Effect of aminophospholipids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mousumi Banerjee; Malini Pramanik; Dipankar Bhattacharya; Mohini Lahiry; Samita Basu; Abhjit Chakrabarti

    2011-12-01

    We report studies on loss of heme at or below pH 3.0 from two clinically important hemoglobin variants, HbE and HbS, in the presence and absence of phopholipid membranes. The kinetics of heme loss has been studied at pH 3.0 to simulate the same at a faster rate than at physiological pH, for spectroscopic investigation. Results obtained from the study clearly establish the probable fate of the lost heme to partition into the phospholipid bilayer independent of the pH range. This is also of particular importance to membranes containing the aminophospholipid and cholesterol which are predominantly localized in the inner leaflet of erythrocytes. Absorption measurements indicated such loss of heme when the Soret peak at 415 nm blue-shifted to 380 nm at pH 3.0. The extent of this blue shift decreased from 35 nm to ∼15 nm in the presence of small unilammelar vesicles of both dimyristoyl- and dioleoyl-based phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, indicating partitioning of the released heme in the membrane bilayer. The kinetics of heme loss was faster from HbE than HbA and HbS, obeying first-order reaction kinetics. Released heme could be involved in the premature destruction of erythrocytes in hemoglobin disorders.

  1. Magnetoacoustic resonance in magnetoelectric bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, D. A.; Bichurin, M. I.; Petrov, V. M.; Srinivasan, G.

    2004-03-01

    Layered composites of ferrite and ferroelectric single crystal thin films are of interest for studies on magnetoelectric interactions [1,2]. Such interactions result in unique and novel effects that are absent in single phase materials. For example, in a single crystal composite it is possible to control the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) parameters for the ferrite by means of hypersonic oscillations induced in the ferroelectric phase. The absorption of acoustic oscillations by the ferrite results in variation in FMR line shape and power absorbed. One anticipates resonance absorption of elastic waves when the frequency of elastic waves coincides with the precession frequency of magnetization vector. This work is concerned with the nature of FMR under the influence of acoustic oscillations with the same frequency as FMR. Bilayers of ferrite and piezoelectric single crystals are considered. Hypersonic waves induced in the piezoelectric phase transmit acoustic power into ferrite due to mechanical connectivity between the phases. That transmission depends strongly on interface coupling [3]. We estimate the resulting variations in ferromagnetic resonance line shape. Estimates of magnetoelectric effect at magnetoacoustic resonance are also given. In addition, dependence of absorption of acoustic power on sample dimensions and compliances, electric and magnetic susceptibilities, piezoelectric and magnetostriction coefficients is discussed. The theory provided here is important for an understanding of interface coupling and the nature of magnetoelastic interactions in the composites. 1. M. I. Bichurin and V. M. Petrov, Zh. Tekh. Fiz. 58, 2277 (1988) [Sov. Phys. Tech. Phys. 33, 1389 (1988)]. 2. M.I. Bichurin, I. A. Kornev, V. M. Petrov, A. S. Tatarenko, Yu. V. Kiliba, and G. Srinivasan. Phys. Rev. B 64, 094409 (2001). 3. M. I. Bichurin, V. M. Petrov, and G. Srinivasan, J. Appl. Phys. 92, 7681 (2002). This work was supported by grants from the Russian Ministry of Education (

  2. High-altitude adaptations in vertebrate hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    Vertebrates at high altitude are subjected to hypoxic conditions that challenge aerobic metabolism. O2 transport from the respiratory surfaces to tissues requires matching between the O2 loading and unloading tensions and theO2-affinity of blood, which is an integrated function of hemoglobin......, birds and ectothermic vertebrates at high altitude....

  3. Hemoglobin: A Nitric-Oxide Dioxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Gardner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the hemoglobin superfamily efficiently catalyze nitric-oxide dioxygenation, and when paired with native electron donors, function as NO dioxygenases (NODs. Indeed, the NOD function has emerged as a more common and ancient function than the well-known role in O2 transport-storage. Novel hemoglobins possessing a NOD function continue to be discovered in diverse life forms. Unique hemoglobin structures evolved, in part, for catalysis with different electron donors. The mechanism of NOD catalysis by representative single domain hemoglobins and multidomain flavohemoglobin occurs through a multistep mechanism involving O2 migration to the heme pocket, O2 binding-reduction, NO migration, radical-radical coupling, O-atom rearrangement, nitrate release, and heme iron re-reduction. Unraveling the physiological functions of multiple NODs with varying expression in organisms and the complexity of NO as both a poison and signaling molecule remain grand challenges for the NO field. NOD knockout organisms and cells expressing recombinant NODs are helping to advance our understanding of NO actions in microbial infection, plant senescence, cancer, mitochondrial function, iron metabolism, and tissue O2 homeostasis. NOD inhibitors are being pursued for therapeutic applications as antibiotics and antitumor agents. Transgenic NOD-expressing plants, fish, algae, and microbes are being developed for agriculture, aquaculture, and industry.

  4. Insulin-induced lipid binding to hemoglobin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomasevic, N; Klappe, K; Hoekstra, D; Niketic, [No Value; Nikolic, M.

    2003-01-01

    Under hypoglycemic conditions, concomitant hyperinsulinism causes an apparent modification of hemoglobin (Hb) which is manifested by its a aggregation (Niketic et al.. Clin. Chim. Acia 197 (1991) 47). In the present work the causes and mechanisms underlying this Hb modification were Studied. Hemoglo

  5. High-altitude adaptations in vertebrate hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    Vertebrates at high altitude are subjected to hypoxic conditions that challenge aerobic metabolism. O2 transport from the respiratory surfaces to tissues requires matching between the O2 loading and unloading tensions and theO2-affinity of blood, which is an integrated function of hemoglobin......, birds and ectothermic vertebrates at high altitude....

  6. Kadar Hemoglobin dan Kecerdasan Intelektual Anak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuni Kusmiyati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Kualitas sumber daya manusia dipengaruhi oleh inteligensi anak. Skor kecerdasan intelektual yang tidak menetap pada usia tertentu dapat berubah karena faktor genetik, gizi, dan lingkungan. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui hubungan kadar hemoglobin dengan kecerdasan intelektual anak. Penelitian observasional dengan desain potong lintang ini dilakukan pada populasi siswa kelas VI Sekolah Dasar Negeri Giwangan Yogyakarta, tahun 2013. Penarikan sampel dilakukan dengan metode simple random sampling terhadap 37 sampel siswa. Instrumen untuk mengukur kecerdasan intelektual dengan Cultural Fair Intelligence Quotient Test yang dirancang untuk meminimalkan pengaruh kultural dengan memperhatikan prosedur evaluasi, instruksi, konten isi, dan respons peserta. Tes dilakukan oleh Biro Psikologi Universitas Ahmad Dahlan Yogyakarta, kadar hemoglobin diukur menggunakan Portable Hemoglobin Digital Analyzer Easy Touch secara digital.Variabel luar indeks massa tubuh diukur langsung menggunakan parameter tinggi badan dan berat badan. Analisis menggunakan uji regresi linier. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan indeks massa tubuh tidak berhubungan dengan kecerdasan intelektual (nilai p = 0,052. Anemia berhubungan cukup dengan kecerdasan anak (r = 0,491 dan berpola positif, semakin tinggi kadar hemoglobin semakin tinggi kecerdasan intelektual anak. Nilai koefisien determinasi 0,241 menerangkan bahwa 24,1% variasi anemia cukup baik untuk menjelaskan variabel kecerdasan intelektual. Ada hubungan antara kadar hemoglobin dengan kecerdasan intelektual (nilai p = 0,002. Quality of human resources is influenced by the child’s intelligent. Intelligence Quotient (IQ score will not settle at a certain age and can change due to genetic factors, nutrition, and the environment. The objective is known relationship of anemia with IQ to child. Method of observational study with cross sectional design. Population are students of class VI elementary school of Giwangan Yogyakarta in

  7. Possible mechanism of adhesion in a mica supported phospholipid bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertsin, Alexander, E-mail: ig3@ix.urz.uni-heidelberg.de [Angewandte Physikalische Chemie, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 253, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Organo-Element Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Str. 28, 117991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Grunze, Michael [Angewandte Physikalische Chemie, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 253, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute for Functional Interfaces, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von- Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-05-14

    Phospholipid bilayers supported on hydrophilic solids like silica and mica play a substantial role in fundamental studies and technological applications of phospholipid membranes. In both cases the molecular mechanism of adhesion between the bilayer and the support is of primary interest. Since the possibilities of experimental methods in this specific area are rather limited, the methods of computer simulation acquire great importance. In this paper we use the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and an atomistic force field to simulate the behavior of a mica supported phospholipid bilayer in pure water as a function of the distance between the bilayer and the support. The simulation reveals a possible adhesion mechanism, where the adhesion is due to individual lipid molecules that protrude from the bilayer and form widely spaced links with the support. Simultaneously, the bilayer remains separated from the bilayer by a thin water interlayer which maintains the bilayer fluidity.

  8. Ionic motion in PEDOT and PPy conducting polymer bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zainudeen, Umer L.; Skaarup, Steen

    2006-01-01

    Conducting polymer bilayers with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and polypyrrole (PPy), each containing dodecyl benzenesulfonate (DBS) as immobile dopant species, were synthesized galvanostatically. The electrochemical behaviour of the bilayers was investigated using cyclic voltammetry...

  9. Ionic motion in PEDOT and PPy conducting polymer bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zainudeen, Umer L.; Skaarup, Steen

    2006-01-01

    Conducting polymer bilayers with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and polypyrrole (PPy), each containing dodecyl benzenesulfonate (DBS) as immobile dopant species, were synthesized galvanostatically. The electrochemical behaviour of the bilayers was investigated using cyclic voltammetry...

  10. Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin C, S- ... Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin C, S- ...

  11. The influence of socioeconomic status on the hemoglobin level and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of socioeconomic status on the hemoglobin level and ... using anthropometric measurements and steady-state hemoglobin, of children with ... Social class was assessed using educational attainment and occupation of parents.

  12. Alpha chain hemoglobins with electrophoretic mobility similar to that of hemoglobin S in a newborn screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcilene Rezende Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize alpha-chain variant hemoglobins with electric mobility similar to that of hemoglobin S in a newborn screening program. METHODS: βS allele and alpha-thalassemia deletions were investigated in 14 children who had undefined hemoglobin at birth and an electrophoretic profile similar to that of hemoglobin S when they were six months old. Gene sequencing and restriction enzymes (DdeI, BsaJI, NlaIV, Bsu36I and TaqI were used to identify hemoglobins. Clinical and hematological data were obtained from children who attended scheduled medical visits. RESULTS: The following alpha chain variants were found: seven children with hemoglobin Hasharon [alpha2 47(CE5 Asp>His, HbA2:c.142G>C], all associated with alpha-thalassemia, five with hemoglobin Ottawa [alpha1 15(A13 Gly>Arg, HBA1:c.46G>C], one with hemoglobin St Luke's [alpha1 95(G2 Pro>Arg, HBA1:c.287C>G] and another one with hemoglobin Etobicoke [alpha212 84(F5 Ser>Arg, HBA212:c.255C>G]. Two associations with hemoglobin S were found: one with hemoglobin Ottawa and one with hemoglobin St Luke's. The mutation underlying hemoglobin Etobicoke was located in a hybrid α212 allele in one child. There was no evidence of clinically relevant hemoglobins detected in this study. CONCLUSION: Apparently these are the first cases of hemoglobin Ottawa, St Luke's, Etobicoke and the α212 gene described in Brazil. The hemoglobins detected in this study may lead to false diagnosis of sickle cell trait or sickle cell disease when only isoelectric focusing is used in neonatal screening. Additional tests are necessary for the correct identification of hemoglobin variants.

  13. Design of Asymmetric Peptide Bilayer Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Mehta, Anil K; Sidorov, Anton N; Orlando, Thomas M; Jiang, Zhigang; Anthony, Neil R; Lynn, David G

    2016-03-16

    Energetic insights emerging from the structural characterization of peptide cross-β assemblies have enabled the design and construction of robust asymmetric bilayer peptide membranes. Two peptides differing only in their N-terminal residue, phosphotyrosine vs lysine, coassemble as stacks of antiparallel β-sheets with precisely patterned charged lattices stabilizing the bilayer leaflet interface. Either homogeneous or mixed leaflet composition is possible, and both create nanotubes with dense negative external and positive internal solvent exposed surfaces. Cross-seeding peptide solutions with a preassembled peptide nanotube seed leads to domains of different leaflet architecture within single nanotubes. Architectural control over these cross-β assemblies, both across the bilayer membrane and along the nanotube length, provides access to highly ordered asymmetric membranes for the further construction of functional mesoscale assemblies.

  14. A bilayer Double Semion model with symmetry-enriched topological order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, L.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    We construct a new model of two-dimensional quantum spin systems that combines intrinsic topological orders and a global symmetry called flavour symmetry. It is referred as the bilayer Doubled Semion model (bDS) and is an instance of symmetry-enriched topological order. A honeycomb bilayer lattice is introduced to combine a Double Semion Topological Order with a global spin-flavour symmetry to get the fractionalization of its quasiparticles. The bDS model exhibits non-trivial braiding self-statistics of excitations and its dual model constitutes a Symmetry-Protected Topological Order with novel edge states. This dual model gives rise to a bilayer Non-Trivial Paramagnet that is invariant under the flavour symmetry and the well-known spin flip symmetry. On the one hand, the Hermele model is constructed with a square lattice in a multilayer structure that forms a quasi-three-dimensional model, but the square lattice cannot support a DS model. (see Appendix C and [39]). On the other hand, the Levin-Gu method is realized on a single hexagonal layer, but we would need a multilayer realization of that construction. This is problematic since the necessary coordination condition (3) is incompatible with a multilayer structure of honeycomb layers. Interestingly enough, we can rephrase this compatibility problem between these two fractionalization methods as a compatibility condition between global symmetries. The key point is to realize that the Levin-Gu method deals with a spin-flip symmetry, e.g. G = Z2fs, explicitly shown in the spin model introduced in Section 4, while the Hermele method is about a spin-flavour symmetry among lattice layers, e.g. G = Z2fv. This spin-favour symmetry is present explicitly in the string model presented in Eq. (26).We hereby summarize briefly some of our main results:i/ We have constructed a bilayer Doubled Semion (bDS) model that has intrinsic topological orders of type G =Z2 and is invariant under the global symmetry group G = Z2fv

  15. Capacitance Variation of Electrolyte-Gated Bilayer Graphene Based Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Hediyeh Karimi; Rubiyah Yusof; Mohammad Taghi Ahmadi; Mehdi Saeidmanesh; Meisam Rahmani; Elnaz Akbari; Wong King Kiat

    2013-01-01

    Quantum capacitance of electrolyte-gated bilayer graphene field-effect transistors is investigated in this paper. Bilayer graphene has received huge attention due to the fact that an energy gap could be opened by chemical doping or by applying external perpendicular electric field. So, this extraordinary property can be exploited to use bilayer graphene as a channel in electrolyte-gated field-effect transistors. The quantum capacitance of bi-layer graphene with an equivalent circuit is presen...

  16. Gate-controlled topological conducting channels in bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wang, Ke; McFaul, Kenton J.; Zern, Zachary; Ren, Yafei; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Qiao, Zhenhua; Zhu, Jun

    2016-12-01

    The existence of inequivalent valleys K and K‧ in the momentum space of 2D hexagonal lattices provides a new electronic degree of freedom, the manipulation of which can potentially lead to new types of electronics, analogous to the role played by electron spin. In materials with broken inversion symmetry, such as an electrically gated bilayer graphene (BLG), the momentum-space Berry curvature Ω carries opposite sign in the K and K‧ valleys. A sign reversal of Ω along an internal boundary of the sheet gives rise to counterpropagating 1D conducting modes encoded with opposite-valley indices. These metallic states are topologically protected against backscattering in the absence of valley-mixing scattering, and thus can carry current ballistically. In BLG, the reversal of Ω can occur at the domain wall of AB- and BA-stacked domains, or at the line junction of two oppositely gated regions. The latter approach can provide a scalable platform to implement valleytronic operations, such as valves and waveguides, but it is technically challenging to realize. Here, we fabricate a dual-split-gate structure in BLG and present evidence of the predicted metallic states in electrical transport. The metallic states possess a mean free path (MFP) of up to a few hundred nanometres in the absence of a magnetic field. The application of a perpendicular magnetic field suppresses the backscattering significantly and enables a junction 400 nm in length to exhibit conductance close to the ballistic limit of 4e2/h at 8 T. Our experiment paves the way to the realization of gate-controlled ballistic valley transport and the development of valleytronic applications in atomically thin materials.

  17. Bilayer graphene quantum dot defined by topgates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, André; Kaestner, Bernd; Hohls, Frank; Weimann, Thomas; Pierz, Klaus; Schumacher, Hans W., E-mail: hans.w.schumacher@ptb.de [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2014-06-21

    We investigate the application of nanoscale topgates on exfoliated bilayer graphene to define quantum dot devices. At temperatures below 500 mK, the conductance underneath the grounded gates is suppressed, which we attribute to nearest neighbour hopping and strain-induced piezoelectric fields. The gate-layout can thus be used to define resistive regions by tuning into the corresponding temperature range. We use this method to define a quantum dot structure in bilayer graphene showing Coulomb blockade oscillations consistent with the gate layout.

  18. Temperature effect on plasmons in bilayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Digish K., E-mail: jdiggish@gmail.com; Sharma, A. C. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, The M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002, Gujarat (India); Ashraf, S. S. Z. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002, Uttar Pradesh (India); Ambavale, S. K. [Vishwakarma Government Engineering College Chandkheda, Ahmedabad-382424, Gujarat (India)

    2015-06-24

    We have theoretically investigated the plasmon dispersion and damping rate of doped bilayer graphene (BLG) at finite temperatures within the random phase approximation. Our computed results on plasmon dispersion show that plasmon frequency enhances with increasing temperatures in contrast to single layer graphene where it is suppressed. This can be attributed to the fact that the dynamic response of the electron gas or screening in bilayer graphene is different from that of single layer graphene. Further the temperature effect on damping rate is also discussed.

  19. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  20. Truncated hemoglobins in actinorhizal nodules of Datisca glomerata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlowski, K.; Jacobsen, K.R.; Alloisio, N.; Denison, R.F.; Klein, M.; Tjepkema, J.D.; Winzer, T.; Sirrenberg, A.; Guan, C.; Berry, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Three types of hemoglobins exist in higher plants, symbiotic, non-symbiotic, and truncated hemoglobins. Symbiotic (class II) hemoglobins play a role in oxygen supply to intracellular nitrogen-fixing symbionts in legume root nodules, and in one case ( Parasponia Sp.), a non-symbiotic (class I) hemogl

  1. Truncated hemoglobins in actinorhizal nodules of Datisca glomerata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlowski, K.; Jacobsen, K.R.; Alloisio, N.; Denison, R.F.; Klein, M.; Tjepkema, J.D.; Winzer, T.; Sirrenberg, A.; Guan, C.; Berry, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Three types of hemoglobins exist in higher plants, symbiotic, non-symbiotic, and truncated hemoglobins. Symbiotic (class II) hemoglobins play a role in oxygen supply to intracellular nitrogen-fixing symbionts in legume root nodules, and in one case ( Parasponia Sp.), a non-symbiotic (class I)

  2. Bioimaging techniques for subcellular localization of plant hemoglobins and measurement of hemoglobin-dependent nitric oxide scavenging in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebelstrup, Kim H; Østergaard-Jensen, Erik; Hill, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    Plant hemoglobins are ubiquitous in all plant families. They are expressed at low levels in specific tissues. Several studies have established that plant hemoglobins are scavengers of nitric oxide (NO) and that varying the endogenous level of hemoglobin in plant cells negatively modulates bioactivity of NO generated under hypoxic conditions or during cellular signaling. Earlier methods for determination of hemoglobin-dependent scavenging in planta were based on measuring activity in whole plants or organs. Plant hemoglobins do not contain specific organelle localization signals; however, earlier reports on plant hemoglobin have demonstrated either cytosolic or nuclear localization, depending on the method or cell type investigated. We have developed two bioimaging techniques: one for visualization of hemoglobin-catalyzed scavenging of NO in specific cells and another for visualization of subcellular localization of green fluorescent protein-tagged plant hemoglobins in transformed Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

  3. Lyophilized bovine hemoglobin as a possible reference material for the determination of hemoglobin derivatives in human blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, BHA; Buursma, A; Ernst, RAJ; Maas, AHJ; Zijlstra, WG

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the suitability of a lyophilized bovine hemoglobin (LBH) preparation containing various fractions of oxyhemoglobin (O(2)Hb), carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), and methemoglobin (MetHb) for quality assessment in multicomponent analysis (MCA) of hemoglobin derivatives. It was demonstrated that

  4. Physical properties and stability mechanisms of poly(ethylene glycol) conjugated liposome encapsulated hemoglobin dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, Dian R; Palmer, Andre F

    2005-01-01

    Liposomes encapsulating hemoglobin (LEHs) surface-conjugated with 2000 and 550 Da poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were produced via extrusion through 400, 200 and 100 nm pore diameter membranes in two types of phosphate buffer with different ionic strengths. The lipid bilayers were composed of dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), cholesterol, dimyristoyl-phosphoethanolamine-PEG (DMPE-PEG), dimyristoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG), and alpha-tocopherol (in a 43:40:10:5:2 mole ratio). N-acetyl-L-cysteine was coencapsulated in order to suppress hemoglobin (Hb) oxidation. Various physical properties of PEG-LEH dispersions were determined: size distribution, encapsulation efficiency, P50 (partial pressure of O2 where half of the oxygen binding sites are saturated with O2), cooperativity coefficient, and encapsulated methemoglobin (MetHb) level. In order to study the stabilization mechanism of these dispersions, the effective bending constant (KB) and the spontaneous radius of curvature (R0) of PEG-LEHs were extracted by fitting a mathematical model describing the size distribution of a liposome dispersion to the experimentally measured size distributions. We observed that liposome dispersions extruded in phosphate buffer (PB) were more monodisperse than liposomes extruded in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and higher molecular weight PEG promoted the formation of narrower size distributions. Moreover, extrusion in PB and lipid conjugation with higher molecular weight PEG imparted higher bilayer rigidity (high KB), and stabilized the liposome dispersions by the spontaneous curvature mechanism, whereas the other liposome dispersions were stabilized by thermal undulations (low KB). The P50 and cooperativity coefficient of PEG-LEHs extruded in PBS and PB was comparable to that of human blood, and the encapsulated MetHb levels were less than 5%. The highest encapsulation efficiencies obtained were 27%-36% (82-109 mg Hb/mL) for LEH dispersions extruded in PBS and grafted with

  5. Magnetic and electronic properties of La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/h-YMnO{sub 3} bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Manish; Choudhary, R. J.; Phase, D. M., E-mail: dmphase@csr.res.in [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Indore 452001 (India)

    2016-03-15

    La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/h-YMnO{sub 3} (h ∼ hexagonal) bilayer thin films are grown using pulsed laser deposition technique and magnetic/band-offset measurements are performed to explore the magnetic/electronic properties. The bilayer displays the signatures of the ferromagnetic (FM) La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} layer and antiferromagnetic (AFM) h-YMnO{sub 3} layer. The uncompensated spins at the interface of FM/AFM layers caused exchange bias effect. The vertical and horizontal shift in field cooled isothermal magnetization curves below the AFM transition temperature shows dependence on the sign of the cooling magnetic field. Type-II band alignment at the interface of bilayer is realized through valence band offset and conduction band offset values estimated from the photoemission results.

  6. Inserting Stress Analysis of Combined Hexagonal Aluminum Honeycombs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangcheng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of hexagonal aluminum honeycombs are tested to study their out-of-plane crushing behavior. In the tests, honeycomb samples, including single hexagonal aluminum honeycomb (SHAH samples and two stack-up combined hexagonal aluminum honeycombs (CHAH samples, are compressed at a fixed quasistatic loading rate. The results show that the inserting process of CHAH can erase the initial peak stress that occurred in SHAH. Meanwhile, energy-absorbing property of combined honeycomb samples is more beneficial than the one of single honeycomb sample with the same thickness if the two types of honeycomb samples are completely crushed. Then, the applicability of the existing theoretical model for single hexagonal honeycomb is discussed, and an area equivalent method is proposed to calculate the crushing stress for nearly regular hexagonal honeycombs. Furthermore, a semiempirical formula is proposed to calculate the inserting plateau stress of two stack-up CHAH, in which structural parameters and mechanics properties of base material are concerned. The results show that the predicted stresses of three kinds of two stack-up combined honeycombs are in good agreement with the experimental data. Based on this study, stress-displacement curve of aluminum honeycombs can be designed in detail, which is very beneficial to optimize the energy-absorbing structures in engineering fields.

  7. Hemoglobin expression in rat experimental granulation tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miretta Tommila; Christoffer Stark; Anne Jokilammi; Ville Peltonen; Risto Penttinen; Erika Ekholm

    2011-01-01

    The general opinion that hemoglobin is only a carrier protein for oxygen and carbon dioxide has been challenged by several recent studies showing hemoglobin expression in other cells than those of the erythroid series, for example, in macrophages. We discovered β-globin expression in rat experimental granulation tissue induced by subcutaneously implanted cellulose sponges. Closer investigation revealed also α-globin expression. The first peak of the biphasic globin expression noticed during granulation tissue formation correlated with the invasion of monocytes/macrophages, whereas the second one seemed to be connected to the appearance of hematopoietic progenitors. Data presented in this study indicate globin expression both in macrophages and in immature erythroid cells as validated by erythroid-specific markers.

  8. Insulin-induced lipid binding to hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VESNA NIKETIC

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Under hypoglycemic conditions, concomitant hyperinsulinism causes an apparent modification of hemoglobin (Hb which is manifested by its aggregation (Niketi} et al., Clin. Chim. Acta 197 (1991 47. In the present work the causes and mechanisms underlying this Hb modification were studied. Hemoglobin isolated from normal erythrocytes incubated with insulin was analyzed by applying 31P-spectrometry and lipid extraction and analysis. To study the dynamics of the plasma membrane during hyperinsulinism, a fluorescent lipid-analog was applied. In the presence of insulin, phosphatidylserine (PS, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE and cholesterol were found to bind to Hb. Lipid binding resulted in Hb aggregation, a condition that can be reproduced when phospholipids are incubated with Hb in vitro. Using a fluorescent lipid-analog, it was also shown that exposing erythrocytes to supraphysiological concentrations of insulin in vitro resulted in the internalization of lipids. The results presented in this work may have relevance to cases of diabetes mellitus and hypoglycemia.

  9. [Abnormal hemoglobins in Negroid Ecuadorian populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, N O; Guevara Espinoza, A; Guderian, R H

    1989-02-01

    The prevalence of hemoglobinopathies was determined in the black race located in two distinct geographical areas in Ecuador; in the coastal province of Esmeraldas, particularly the Santiago basin (Rio Cayapas and Rio Onzoles) and in the province of Imbabura, particularly in the intermoutain valley, Valle de Chota. A total of 2038 blood samples were analyzed, 1734 in Esmeraldas and 304 in Inbabura, of which 23.2% (473 individuals) were found to be carriers of abnormal hemoglobins, 25.4% (441) in Esmeraldas and 10.5% (32) in Imbabura. The abnormal hemoglobins found in Esmeraldas were Hb AS (19.2%), Hb AC (5.0%), Hb SS (0.6%) and Hb SC (0.5%) while in Imbabura only Hb AS (9.5%) and Hb AC (0.9%) were found. The factors that could influence the difference in prevalence found in the two geographical areas are discussed.

  10. Induction of nano pore in Agrobacterial hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Mojtaba Tousheh; Giti Emtiazi; Peyman Derikvand

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A variety of oxygen-transport and -binding proteins exist in organisms including bacteria, protozoans, and fungi all have hemoglobin-like proteins. In addition to dealing with transport and sensing of oxygen, they may also deal with NO2, CO2, sulfide compounds, and even O2 scavenging in environments. Also they detoxified chlorinated materials like P450 enzymes and peroxidases and use as a detector of nitrate and hydrogen peroxide. Pore-forming bacterial globins are interested fo...

  11. Facile Interfacial Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhai Fan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We herein describe a method of depositing hemoglobin (Hb and sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN on GC electrodes that facilitate interfacial protein electron transfer. Well-defined, reproducible, chemically reversible peaks of Hb and SPAN can be obtained in our experiments. We also observed enhanced peroxidase activity of Hb in SPAN films. These results clearly showed that SPAN worked as molecular wires and effectively exchanged electrons between Hb and electrodes.Mediated by Conjugated Polymers

  12. Free heme and sickle hemoglobin polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunova, Veselina V.

    This work investigates further the mechanism of one of the most interesting of the protein self-assembly systems---the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin and the role of free heme in it. Polymerization of sickle hemoglobin is the primary event in the pathology of a chronic hemolytic condition called sickle cell anemia with complex pathogenesis, unexplained variability and symptomatic treatment. Auto-oxidation develops in hemoglobin solutions exposed to room temperature and causes release of ferriheme. The composition of such solutions is investigated by mass spectrometry. Heme dimers whose amount corresponds to the initial amounts of heme released from the protein are followed. Differences in the dimer peak height are established for hemoglobin variants A, S and C and depending on the exposure duration. The effects of free heme on polymerization kinetics are studied. Growth rates and two characteristic parameters of nucleation are measured for stored Hb S. After dialysis of polymerizing solutions, no spherulites are detected at moderately high supersaturation and prolonged exposure times. The addition of 0.16-0.26 mM amounts of heme to dialyzed solutions leads to restoration of polymerization. The measured kinetic parameters have higher values compared to the ones before dialysis. The amount of heme in non-dialyzed aged solution is characterized using spectrophotometry. Three methods are used: difference in absorbance of dialyzed and non-dialyzed solutions, characteristic absorbance of heme-albumin complex and absorbance of non-dialyzed solutions with added potassium cyanide. The various approaches suggest the presence of 0.12 to 0.18 mM of free ferriheme in such solutions. Open questions are whether the same amounts of free heme are present in vivo and whether the same mechanism operates intracellulary. If the answer to those questions is positive, then removal of free heme from erythrocytes can influence their readiness to sickle.

  13. Serum ferritin levels in hemoglobin H disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanello, R; Melis, M A; Paglietti, E; Cornacchia, G; de Virgiliis, S; Cao, A

    1983-01-01

    This study shows that hemoglobin H disease patients aged between 0.5 and 44 years, usually (27 out of 30) have normal serum ferritin levels according to age. This reconfirms that in this disease there are usually normal iron stores. However, in a few patients (3 out of 30) increased levels were found. This may be due to inappropriate iron medication, transfusions or associated idiopathic hereditary hemocromatosis gene.

  14. In situ atomic force microscope imaging of supported lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Leidy, Chad; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    2001-01-01

    In situ AFM images of phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/) hydrolysis of mica-supported one- and two-component lipid bilayers are presented. For one-component DPPC bilayers an enhanced enzymatic activity is observed towards preexisting defects in the bilayer. Phase separation is observed in two......-component DMPC-DSPC bilayers and a remarkable enhanced hydrolytic activity of the PLA/sub 2/-enzyme for the DMPC-rich phase is seen. Furthermore, in a supported double bilayer system a characteristic ripple structure, most likely related to the formation of the P/sub beta /-ripple phase is observed....

  15. Electronic properties of graphene-based bilayer systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhkov, A.V., E-mail: arozhkov@gmail.com [CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Sboychakov, A.O. [CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Rakhmanov, A.L. [CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region, 141700 (Russian Federation); All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow, 127055 (Russian Federation); Nori, Franco, E-mail: fnori@riken.jp [CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2016-08-23

    This article reviews the theoretical and experimental work related to the electronic properties of bilayer graphene systems. Three types of bilayer stackings are discussed: the AA, AB, and twisted bilayer graphene. This review covers single-electron properties, effects of static electric and magnetic fields, bilayer-based mesoscopic systems, spin–orbit coupling, dc transport and optical response, as well as spontaneous symmetry violation and other interaction effects. The selection of the material aims to introduce the reader to the most commonly studied topics of theoretical and experimental research in bilayer graphene.

  16. Electronic properties of graphene-based bilayer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkov, A. V.; Sboychakov, A. O.; Rakhmanov, A. L.; Nori, Franco

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews the theoretical and experimental work related to the electronic properties of bilayer graphene systems. Three types of bilayer stackings are discussed: the AA, AB, and twisted bilayer graphene. This review covers single-electron properties, effects of static electric and magnetic fields, bilayer-based mesoscopic systems, spin-orbit coupling, dc transport and optical response, as well as spontaneous symmetry violation and other interaction effects. The selection of the material aims to introduce the reader to the most commonly studied topics of theoretical and experimental research in bilayer graphene.

  17. Electronic properties of a biased graphene bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Eduardo V; Lopes dos Santos, J M B [CFP and Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias Universidade do Porto, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Novoselov, K S; Morozov, S V; Geim, A K [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Peres, N M R [Centre of Physics and Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, P-4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Nilsson, Johan; Castro Neto, A H [Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Guinea, F [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-05

    We study, within the tight-binding approximation, the electronic properties of a graphene bilayer in the presence of an external electric field applied perpendicular to the system-a biased bilayer. The effect of the perpendicular electric field is included through a parallel plate capacitor model, with screening correction at the Hartree level. The full tight-binding description is compared with its four-band and two-band continuum approximations, and the four-band model is shown to always be a suitable approximation for the conditions realized in experiments. The model is applied to real biased bilayer devices, made out of either SiC or exfoliated graphene, and good agreement with experimental results is found, indicating that the model is capturing the key ingredients, and that a finite gap is effectively being controlled externally. Analysis of experimental results regarding the electrical noise and cyclotron resonance further suggests that the model can be seen as a good starting point for understanding the electronic properties of graphene bilayer. Also, we study the effect of electron-hole asymmetry terms, such as the second-nearest-neighbour hopping energies t' (in-plane) and {gamma}{sub 4} (inter-layer), and the on-site energy {Delta}.

  18. Electronic properties of a biased graphene bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Eduardo V; Novoselov, K S; Morozov, S V; Peres, N M R; Lopes dos Santos, J M B; Nilsson, Johan; Guinea, F; Geim, A K; Castro Neto, A H

    2010-05-01

    We study, within the tight-binding approximation, the electronic properties of a graphene bilayer in the presence of an external electric field applied perpendicular to the system-a biased bilayer. The effect of the perpendicular electric field is included through a parallel plate capacitor model, with screening correction at the Hartree level. The full tight-binding description is compared with its four-band and two-band continuum approximations, and the four-band model is shown to always be a suitable approximation for the conditions realized in experiments. The model is applied to real biased bilayer devices, made out of either SiC or exfoliated graphene, and good agreement with experimental results is found, indicating that the model is capturing the key ingredients, and that a finite gap is effectively being controlled externally. Analysis of experimental results regarding the electrical noise and cyclotron resonance further suggests that the model can be seen as a good starting point for understanding the electronic properties of graphene bilayer. Also, we study the effect of electron-hole asymmetry terms, such as the second-nearest-neighbour hopping energies t' (in-plane) and γ(4) (inter-layer), and the on-site energy Δ.

  19. Lipid bilayer composition influences small multidrug transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curnow Paul

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane proteins are influenced by their surrounding lipids. We investigate the effect of bilayer composition on the membrane transport activity of two members of the small multidrug resistance family; the Escherichia coli transporter, EmrE and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis, TBsmr. In particular we address the influence of phosphatidylethanolamine and anionic lipids on the activity of these multidrug transporters. Phosphatidylethanolamine lipids are native to the membranes of both transporters and also alter the lateral pressure profile of a lipid bilayer. Lipid bilayer lateral pressures affect membrane protein insertion, folding and activity and have been shown to influence reconstitution, topology and activity of membrane transport proteins. Results Both EmrE and TBsmr are found to exhibit a similar dependence on lipid composition, with phosphatidylethanolamine increasing methyl viologen transport. Anionic lipids also increase transport for both EmrE and TBsmr, with the proteins showing a preference for their most prevalent native anionic lipid headgroup; phosphatidylglycerol for EmrE and phosphatidylinositol for TBsmr. Conclusion These findings show that the physical state of the membrane modifies drug transport and that substrate translocation is dependent on in vitro lipid composition. Multidrug transport activity seems to respond to alterations in the lateral forces exerted upon the transport proteins by the bilayer.

  20. Localized plasmons in bilayer graphene nanodisks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Weihua; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-01-01

    We study localized plasmonic excitations in bilayer graphene (BLG) nanodisks, comparing AA-stacked and AB-stacked BLG and contrasting the results to the case of two monolayers without electronic hybridization. The electrodynamic response of the BLG electron gas is described in terms of a spatially...

  1. Capillary wrinkling of thin bilayer polymeric sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jooyoung; Menon, Narayanan; Russell, Thomas

    We have investigated capillary force induced wrinkling on a floated polymeric bilayer thin sheet. The origin of the wrinkle pattern is compressional hoop stress caused by the capillary force of a water droplet placed on the floated polymeric thin sheet afore investigated. Herein, we study the effect of the differences of surface energy arising from the hydrophobicity of Polystyrene (PS Mw: 97 K, Contact Angle: 88 º) and the hydrophilicity of Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA Mw: 99K, Contact Angle: 68 º) on two sides of a bilayer film. We measure the number and the length of the wrinkles by broadly varying the range of thicknesses of top (9 nm to 550 nm) and bottom layer (25 nm to 330 nm). At the same, there is only a small contrast in mechanical properties of the two layers (PS E = 3.4 GPa, and PMMA E = 3 GPa). The number of the wrinkles is not strongly affected by the composition (PS(Top)/PMMA(Bottom) or PMMA(Top)/PS(Bottom)) and the thickness of each and overall bilayer system. However, the length of the wrinkle is governed by the contact angle of the drop on the top layer of bilayer system. We also compare this to the wrinkle pattern obtained in monolayer systems over a wide range of thickness from PS and PMMA (7 nm to 1 μm). W.M. Keck Foundation.

  2. Bilayer Tablet via Microsphere: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyushkumar Vinubhai Gundaraniya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to develop bilayer tablets containing sustained release microspheres as one layer and immediate release as another layer. The proposed dosage form is intended to decrease the dosing frequency and the combined administration of an anti-diabetic agent. Several pharmaceutical companies are currently developing bi-layer tablets, for a variety of reasons: patent extension, therapeutic, marketing to name a few. To reduce capital investment, quite often existing but modified tablet presses are used to develop and produce such tablets. One such approach is using microspheres as carriers for drugs also known as micro particles. It is the reliable means to deliver the drug to the target site with specificity, if modified, and to maintain the desired concentration at the site of interest. Microspheres received much attention not only for prolonged release, but also for targeting of anti-diabetic drugs. Bilayer tablet via microsphere is new era for the successful development of controlled release formulation along with various features to provide a way of successful drug delivery system. Especially when in addition high production output is required. An attempt has been made in this review article to introduce the society to the current technological developments in bilayer and floating drug delivery system.

  3. Nanostructured antireflective bilayers: Optical design and preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detrich, Ádám [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, Centre for Colloid Chemistry, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Nagy, Norbert [Research Centre for Natural Sciences (MTA TTK), Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science (MFA), P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Nyári, Mária; Albert, Emőke; Zámbó, Dániel [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, Centre for Colloid Chemistry, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Hórvölgyi, Zoltán, E-mail: zhorvolgyi@mail.bme.hu [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, Centre for Colloid Chemistry, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-05-01

    We show different methods for tailoring and fabrication of various cost-effective antireflective nanocoatings on transparent and non-transparent substrates. The main purpose was to prepare coatings with decreased reflectance in the full visible wavelength range using simple wet layer deposition techniques. Structure of coatings was designed by optical simulations applying simplified calculations. The refractive index of substrates was also considered for the calculations. The advantageous optical properties were achieved by bilayered structures combining compact and porous sol–gel derived oxide layers and nanoparticulate films. The bilayered structures enhance the flexibility of design by not only the selection of the layer thicknesses but also by different ways of adjusting the effective refractive index of the layers. Furthermore, chemical stability of the coatings was also investigated. The optical and structural properties of prepared films and bilayered coatings were studied by UV–vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The transmittance of coated glass substrates was above 97.5%, while the reflectance of coated silicon substrates was below 4% between 450 nm and 900 nm. - Highlights: • Designed antireflective bilayered coatings on glass and silicon. • Simple, colloid chemical approaches to preparation. • Favorable optical properties by combining compact and porous oxide layers. • Different ways for adjusting the effective refractive index. • Strong chemical resistance against acidic effects.

  4. Confinement of charge carriers in bilayer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the fundamental properties of electronic transport in bilayer graphene. We do this by confining electrons to narrow constrictions and small islands. Our key result is the fabrication and measurement of nanoscale devices that permit confinement with electric fields in b

  5. Confinement of charge carriers in bilayer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the fundamental properties of electronic transport in bilayer graphene. We do this by confining electrons to narrow constrictions and small islands. Our key result is the fabrication and measurement of nanoscale devices that permit confinement with electric fields in b

  6. Quantum pumping in a ballistic graphene bilayer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, G.M.M.; Blaauboer, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate quantum pumping of massless Dirac fermions in an ideal (impurity free) double layer of graphene. The pumped current is generated by adiabatic variation in two gate voltages in the contact regions to a weakly doped double graphene sheet. At the Dirac point and for a wide bilayer with

  7. Bright Ion Channels and Lipid Bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szymanski, Wiktor; Yilmaz, Duygu; Kocer, Armagan; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-01-01

    If we look at a simple organism such as a zebrafish under a microscope, we would see many cells working in harmony. If we zoomed in, we would observe each unit performing its own tasks in a special aqueous environment isolated from the other units by a lipid bilayer approximately 5 nm thick. These

  8. Bifurcation of self-folded polygonal bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Arif M.; Braun, Paul V.; Hsia, K. Jimmy

    2017-09-01

    Motivated by the self-assembly of natural systems, researchers have investigated the stimulus-responsive curving of thin-shell structures, which is also known as self-folding. Self-folding strategies not only offer possibilities to realize complicated shapes but also promise actuation at small length scales. Biaxial mismatch strain driven self-folding bilayers demonstrate bifurcation of equilibrium shapes (from quasi-axisymmetric doubly curved to approximately singly curved) during their stimulus-responsive morphing behavior. Being a structurally instable, bifurcation could be used to tune the self-folding behavior, and hence, a detailed understanding of this phenomenon is appealing from both fundamental and practical perspectives. In this work, we investigated the bifurcation behavior of self-folding bilayer polygons. For the mechanistic understanding, we developed finite element models of planar bilayers (consisting of a stimulus-responsive and a passive layer of material) that transform into 3D curved configurations. Our experiments with cross-linked Polydimethylsiloxane samples that change shapes in organic solvents confirmed our model predictions. Finally, we explored a design scheme to generate gripper-like architectures by avoiding the bifurcation of stimulus-responsive bilayers. Our research contributes to the broad field of self-assembly as the findings could motivate functional devices across multiple disciplines such as robotics, artificial muscles, therapeutic cargos, and reconfigurable biomedical devices.

  9. Topological transformation of a surfactant bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, T.D.; Olsson, U.; Mortensen, K.

    2000-01-01

    Surfactant lamellar phases are often complicated by the formation of multilamellar (onions) under shear, which can originate simply by shaking the sample. A systematic study has been performed on the C10E3-D2O system in which different bilayer structures under a steady shear flow were investigated...

  10. Induction of nano pore in Agrobacterial hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Tousheh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A variety of oxygen-transport and -binding proteins exist in organisms including bacteria, protozoans, and fungi all have hemoglobin-like proteins. In addition to dealing with transport and sensing of oxygen, they may also deal with NO2, CO2, sulfide compounds, and even O2 scavenging in environments. Also they detoxified chlorinated materials like P450 enzymes and peroxidases and use as a detector of nitrate and hydrogen peroxide. Pore-forming bacterial globins are interested for filtration. Materials and methods: Although there are data for bacterial toxin as a filter, here we used Agrobacterial hem to induce nano pore in the heme structure using point mutation. Results: Investigations showed that three amino acids leucine 76, alanine 83 and histidine 80 are important for pore formation in Agrobacterium hemoglobin. A point mutation on leucine 76 to glycine, histidine 80 to asparagine and alanine 83 to lysine step by step led to create the nano pore 0.7- 0.8 nm in the globin. Discussion and conclusion: These mutations in bacterial hemoglobin increase the stability when mutation is with it’s at pH7. This mutation decreases the aliphatic index however increase the stability index.

  11. Hemoglobin profiles of siblings of thalassemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Riza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies are the most common inherited disorders in many areas of the world, including South East Asia. The siblings of thalassemia major is a group of high risk to carry the gene of thalassemia. Determining the carrier is useful for early treatment planning and prevention to the next child. Objective To determine carrier status among siblings of thalassemia patients using a capillary electrophoresis system. Methods A cross-sectional study on the siblings of thalassemia major patients was performed from January 2011 to February 2012 at Dr. Moewardi Hospital. Complete blood counts were performed in the siblings. Subjects with mean corpuscular volume (MCV <80 fl and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH <27 pg were subjected to analize hemoglobin fraction by capillary electrophoresis. Results Of the 26 subjects, there were 12 males and 14 females. The mean age was 9.38 (SD 6.8 years (range 1 to 29 years. From the siblings, 10 were identified as normal, 5 were identified as ß thalassemia carriers and 5 were hemoglobin E (HbE carriers. Six siblings were diagnosed with ß thalassemia/ HbE. Conclusion There are high occurrence of the two common types of thalassemia carriers (ß and HbE in our small group of subjects who had a family history of thalassemia. Most of the siblings of thalassemia had low MCV and MCH. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:70-3.].

  12. Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsheye, Idowu; Alsultan, Abdulrahman; Solovieff, Nadia; Ngo, Duyen; Baldwin, Clinton T; Sebastiani, Paola; Chui, David H K; Steinberg, Martin H

    2011-07-07

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is the major genetic modulator of the hematologic and clinical features of sickle cell disease, an effect mediated by its exclusion from the sickle hemoglobin polymer. Fetal hemoglobin genes are genetically regulated, and the level of HbF and its distribution among sickle erythrocytes is highly variable. Some patients with sickle cell disease have exceptionally high levels of HbF that are associated with the Senegal and Saudi-Indian haplotype of the HBB-like gene cluster; some patients with different haplotypes can have similarly high HbF. In these patients, high HbF is associated with generally milder but not asymptomatic disease. Studying these persons might provide additional insights into HbF gene regulation. HbF appears to benefit some complications of disease more than others. This might be related to the premature destruction of erythrocytes that do not contain HbF, even though the total HbF concentration is high. Recent insights into HbF regulation have spurred new efforts to induce high HbF levels in sickle cell disease beyond those achievable with the current limited repertory of HbF inducers.

  13. Additive Manufacturing of Dense Hexagonal Boron Nitride Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez Rossy, Andres E [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Elliott, Amy M [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2017-05-12

    The feasibility of manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via additive manufacturing techniques was investigated. It was demonstrated that it is possible to hot-extrude thermoplastic filaments containing uniformly distributed boron nitride particles with a volume concentration as high as 60% and that these thermoplastic filaments can be used as feedstock for 3D-printing objects using a fused deposition system. Objects 3D-printed by fused deposition were subsequently sintered at high temperature to obtain dense ceramic products. In a parallel study the behavior of hexagonal boron nitride in aqueous solutions was investigated. It was shown that the addition of a cationic dispersant to an azeotrope enabled the formulation of slurries with a volume concentration of boron nitride as high as 33%. Although these slurries exhibited complex rheological behavior, the results from this study are encouraging and provide a pathway for manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via robocasting.

  14. Kinematic dynamo action in square and hexagonal patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, B; Proctor, M R E

    2013-11-01

    We consider kinematic dynamo action in rapidly rotating Boussinesq convection just above onset. The velocity is constrained to have either a square or a hexagonal pattern. For the square pattern, large-scale dynamo action is observed at onset, with most of the magnetic energy being contained in the horizontally averaged component. As the magnetic Reynolds number increases, small-scale dynamo action becomes possible, reducing the overall growth rate of the dynamo. For the hexagonal pattern, the breaking of symmetry between up and down flows results in an effective pumping velocity. For intermediate rotation rates, this additional effect can prevent the growth of any mean-field dynamo, so that only a small-scale dynamo is eventually possible at large enough magnetic Reynolds number. For very large rotation rates, this pumping term becomes negligible, and the dynamo properties of square and hexagonal patterns are qualitatively similar. These results hold for both perfectly conducting and infinite magnetic permeability boundary conditions.

  15. Multilayer DNA Origami Packed on Hexagonal and Hybrid Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yonggang; Voigt, Niels V.; Gothelf, Kurt V.; Shih, William M.

    2012-01-01

    “Scaffolded DNA origami” has been proven to be a powerful and efficient approach to construct two-dimensional or three-dimensional objects with great complexity. Multilayer DNA origami has been demonstrated with helices packing along either honeycomb-lattice geometry or square-lattice geometry. Here we report successful folding of multilayer DNA origami with helices arranged on a close-packed hexagonal lattice. This arrangement yields a higher density of helical packing and therefore higher resolution of spatial addressing than has been shown previously. We also demonstrate hybrid multilayer DNA origami with honeycomb-lattice, square-lattice, and hexagonal lattice packing of helices all in one design. The availability of hexagonal close packing of helices extends our ability to build complex structures using DNA nanotechnology. PMID:22187940

  16. Nanosecond absorption study of kinetics associated with carbon monoxide rebinding to hemoglobin S and hemoglobin C following ligand photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, D B; Paquette, S J; Esquerra, R M; Che, D; Goldbeck, R A; Hirsch, R E; Mohandas, N; Kliger, D S

    1994-11-30

    The absorption spectra of photolysis intermediates of the CO complex of hemoglobin S and hemoglobin C, in the tetramer form, have been measured between 10 ns and 200 ms after excitation. These data were analyzed using singular value decomposition (SVD) and global analysis to determine kinetic lifetimes associated with various processes involved in CO recombination. The results of this analysis show that, in the tetramer (non-aggregated) form, hemoglobin S and hemoglobin C exhibit the same kinetics associated with CO recombination as hemoglobin A.

  17. New results for loop integrals. AMBRE, CSectors, hexagon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluza, Janusz; Kajda, Krzysztof [Silesia Univ., Katowice (Poland). Dept. of Field Theory and Particle Physics, Inst. of Physics; Riemann, Tord; Yundin, Valery [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    We report on the three Mathematica packages hexagon, CSectors, AMBRE. They are useful for the evaluation of one- and two-loop Feynman integrals with a dependence on several kinematical scales. These integrals are typically needed for LHC and ILC applications, but also for higher order corrections at meson factories. hexagon is a new package for the tensor reduction of one-loop 5-point and 6-point functions with rank R=3 and R=4, respectively; AMBRE is a tool for derivations of Mellin-Barnes representations; CSectors is an interface for the package sectordecomposition and allows a convenient, direct evaluation of tensor Feynman integrals. (orig.)

  18. Hexagonal Pixels and Indexing Scheme for Binary Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gordon G.

    2004-01-01

    A scheme for resampling binaryimage data from a rectangular grid to a regular hexagonal grid and an associated tree-structured pixel-indexing scheme keyed to the level of resolution have been devised. This scheme could be utilized in conjunction with appropriate image-data-processing algorithms to enable automated retrieval and/or recognition of images. For some purposes, this scheme is superior to a prior scheme that relies on rectangular pixels: one example of such a purpose is recognition of fingerprints, which can be approximated more closely by use of line segments along hexagonal axes than by line segments along rectangular axes. This scheme could also be combined with algorithms for query-image-based retrieval of images via the Internet. A binary image on a rectangular grid is generated by raster scanning or by sampling on a stationary grid of rectangular pixels. In either case, each pixel (each cell in the rectangular grid) is denoted as either bright or dark, depending on whether the light level in the pixel is above or below a prescribed threshold. The binary data on such an image are stored in a matrix form that lends itself readily to searches of line segments aligned with either or both of the perpendicular coordinate axes. The first step in resampling onto a regular hexagonal grid is to make the resolution of the hexagonal grid fine enough to capture all the binaryimage detail from the rectangular grid. In practice, this amounts to choosing a hexagonal-cell width equal to or less than a third of the rectangular- cell width. Once the data have been resampled onto the hexagonal grid, the image can readily be checked for line segments aligned with the hexagonal coordinate axes, which typically lie at angles of 30deg, 90deg, and 150deg with respect to say, the horizontal rectangular coordinate axis. Optionally, one can then rotate the rectangular image by 90deg, then again sample onto the hexagonal grid and check for line segments at angles of 0deg, 60deg

  19. Communication: Water on hexagonal boron nitride from diffusion Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hamdani, Yasmine S.; Ma, Ming; Michaelides, Angelos, E-mail: angelos.michaelides@ucl.ac.uk [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Alfè, Dario [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Sciences, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von [Institute of Physical Chemistry and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials, Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratories, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Despite a recent flurry of experimental and simulation studies, an accurate estimate of the interaction strength of water molecules with hexagonal boron nitride is lacking. Here, we report quantum Monte Carlo results for the adsorption of a water monomer on a periodic hexagonal boron nitride sheet, which yield a water monomer interaction energy of −84 ± 5 meV. We use the results to evaluate the performance of several widely used density functional theory (DFT) exchange correlation functionals and find that they all deviate substantially. Differences in interaction energies between different adsorption sites are however better reproduced by DFT.

  20. The Discrete Fourier Transform on hexagonal remote sensing image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yalu; Ben, Jin; Wang, Rui; Du, Lingyu

    2016-11-01

    Global discrete grid system will subdivide the earth recursively to form a multi-resolution grid hierarchy with no Overlap and seamless which help build global uniform spatial reference datum and multi-source data processing mode which takes the position as the object and in the aspect of data structure supports the organization, process and analysis of the remote sensing big data. This paper adopts the base transform to realize the mutual transformation of square pixel and hexagonal pixel. This paper designs the corresponding discrete Fourier transform algorithm for any lattice. Finally, the paper show the result of the DFT of the remote sensing image of the hexagonal pixel.

  1. Fabrication of hexagonal gallium nitride films on silicon (111) substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li; XUE Chengshan; WANG Cuimei; LI Huaixiang; REN Yuwen

    2003-01-01

    Hexagonal gallium nitride films were successfully fabricated through ammoniating Ga2O3 films deposited on silicon (111 ) substrates by electrophoresis. The structure, composition, and surface morphology of the formed films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM),and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The measurement results reveal that the polycrystalline GaN films with hexagonal wurtzite structure were successfully grown on the silicon (111) substrates. Preliminary results suggest that varying the ammoniating temperature has obvious effect on the quality of the GaN films formed with this method.

  2. New results for loop integrals: AMBRE, CSectors, hexagon

    CERN Document Server

    Gluza, Janusz; Riemann, Tord; Yundin, Valery

    2009-01-01

    We report on the three Mathematica packages hexagon, CSectors, AMBRE. They are useful for the evaluation of one- and two-loop Feynman integrals with a dependence on several kinematical scales. These integrals are typically needed for LHC and ILC applications, but also for higher order corrections at meson factories. hexagon is a new package for the tensor reduction of one-loop 5-point and 6-point functions with rank R=3 and R=4, respectively; AMBRE is a tool for derivations of Mellin-Barnes representations; CSectors is an interface for the package sector_decomposition and allows a convenient, direct evaluation of tensor Feynman integrals.

  3. Multiscale Modeling of Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, Matthew I.; Xing, Chenyue; Faller, Roland

    Cell membranes consist of a multitude of lipid molecules that serve as a framework for the even greater variety of membrane associated proteins [1-4]. As this highly complex (nonequilibrium) system cannot easily be understood and studied in a controlled way, a wide variety of model systems have been devised to understand the dynamics, structure, and thermodynamics in biological membranes. One such model system is a supported lipid bilayer (SLB), a two-dimensional membrane suspended on a surface. SLBs have been realized to be manageable experimentally while reproducing many of the key features of real biological membranes [5,6]. One of the main advantages of supported bilayers is the physical stability due to the solid support that enables a wide range of surface characterization techniques not available to free or unsupported membranes. As SLBs maintain some of the crucial structural and dynamic properties of biological membranes, they provide an important bridge to natural systems. In order to mimic cell membranes reliably, certain structural and dynamic features have to be reliably reproduced in the artificially constructed lipid bilayers. SLBs should display lateral mobility as in living cells, because many membrane activities involve transport, recruitment, or assembly of specific components. It is also critical for membranes to exhibit the correct thermodynamic phase, namely, a fluid lipid bilayer, to respond to environmental stress such as temperature and pressure changes [7]. There are several ways to fabricate supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) on planar substrates. One can use vesicle fusion on solid substrates [5,8-10] as well as Langmuir-Blodgett deposition [11,12]. Proteoliposome adsorption and subsequent membrane formation on a mica surface was first demonstrated by Brian and McConnell [13]. Because of its simplicity and reproducibility, this is one of the most common approaches to prepare supported membranes. A diverse range of different solid substrates

  4. Lattice-Polarity-Driven Epitaxy of Hexagonal Semiconductor Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Yuan, Ying; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Xinqiang; Zheng, Xiantong; Rong, Xin; Wang, Tao; Sheng, Bowen; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhang, Yongqiang; Bian, Lifeng; Yang, Xuelin; Xu, Fujun; Qin, Zhixin; Li, Xinzheng; Zhang, Xixiang; Shen, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Lattice-polarity-driven epitaxy of hexagonal semiconductor nanowires (NWs) is demonstrated on InN NWs. In-polarity InN NWs form typical hexagonal structure with pyramidal growth front, whereas N-polarity InN NWs slowly turn to the shape of hexagonal pyramid and then convert to an inverted pyramid growth, forming diagonal pyramids with flat surfaces and finally coalescence with each other. This contrary growth behavior driven by lattice-polarity is most likely due to the relatively lower growth rate of the (0001̅) plane, which results from the fact that the diffusion barriers of In and N adatoms on the (0001) plane (0.18 and 1.0 eV, respectively) are about 2-fold larger in magnitude than those on the (0001̅) plane (0.07 and 0.52 eV), as calculated by first-principles density functional theory (DFT). The formation of diagonal pyramids for the N-polarity hexagonal NWs affords a novel way to locate quantum dot in the kink position, suggesting a new recipe for the fabrication of dot-based devices.

  5. Synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride graphene-like few layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, S.; Toury, B.; Journet, C.; Brioude, A.

    2014-06-01

    Self-standing highly crystallized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) mono-, bi- and few-layers have been obtained for the first time via the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route by adding lithium nitride (Li3N) micropowders to liquid-state polyborazylene (PBN). Incorporation of Li3N as a crystallization promoter allows the onset of crystallization of h-BN at a lower temperature (1200 °C) than under classical conditions (1800 °C). The hexagonal structure was confirmed by both electron and X-ray diffraction.Self-standing highly crystallized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) mono-, bi- and few-layers have been obtained for the first time via the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route by adding lithium nitride (Li3N) micropowders to liquid-state polyborazylene (PBN). Incorporation of Li3N as a crystallization promoter allows the onset of crystallization of h-BN at a lower temperature (1200 °C) than under classical conditions (1800 °C). The hexagonal structure was confirmed by both electron and X-ray diffraction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01017e

  6. Hexagonal Boron Nitride Self-Launches Hyperbolic Phonon Polaritons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilburd, Leonid; Kim, Kris S.; Ho, Kevin; Trajanoski, Daniel; Maiti, Aniket; Halverson, Duncan; de Beer, Sissi; Walker, Gilbert C.

    2017-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a 2D material that supports traveling waves composed of material vibrations and light, and is attractive for nanoscale optical devices that function in the infrared. However, the only current method of launching these traveling waves requires the use of a metal

  7. Solitary plane waves in an isotropic hexagonal lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav; Savin, A.V.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1998-01-01

    Solitary plane-wave solutions in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice which can propagate in different directions on the plane are found by using the pseudospectral method. The main point of our studies is that the lattice model is isotropic and we show that the sound velocity is the same for diff...

  8. Epitaxial hexagonal materials on IBAD-textured substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matias, Vladimir; Yung, Christopher

    2017-08-15

    A multilayer structure including a hexagonal epitaxial layer, such as GaN or other group III-nitride (III-N) semiconductors, a <111> oriented textured layer, and a non-single crystal substrate, and methods for making the same. The textured layer has a crystalline alignment preferably formed by the ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD) texturing process and can be biaxially aligned. The in-plane crystalline texture of the textured layer is sufficiently low to allow growth of high quality hexagonal material, but can still be significantly greater than the required in-plane crystalline texture of the hexagonal material. The IBAD process enables low-cost, large-area, flexible metal foil substrates to be used as potential alternatives to single-crystal sapphire and silicon for manufacture of electronic devices, enabling scaled-up roll-to-roll, sheet-to-sheet, or similar fabrication processes to be used. The user is able to choose a substrate for its mechanical and thermal properties, such as how well its coefficient of thermal expansion matches that of the hexagonal epitaxial layer, while choosing a textured layer that more closely lattice matches that layer.

  9. Hexagons and Interfaces in a Vibrated Granular Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Aranson, I S; Vinokur, V M

    1998-01-01

    The order parameter model based on parametric Ginzburg-Landau equation is used to describe high acceleration patterns in vibrated layer of granular material. At large amplitude of driving both hexagons and interfaces emerge. Transverse instability leading to formation of ``decorated'' interfaces and labyrinthine patterns, is found. Additional sub-harmonic forcing leads to controlled interface motion.

  10. A low cost route to hexagonal mesostructured carbon molecular sieves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S S; Pinnavaia, T J

    2001-12-07

    A mesoporous carbon molecular sieve with a hexagonal framework structure (denoted C-MSU-H) has been prepared using a MSU-H silica template that can be assembled from a low cost soluble silicate precursor at near-neutral pH conditions.

  11. Lattice-polarity-driven epitaxy of hexagonal semiconductor nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Ping

    2015-12-22

    Lattice-polarity-driven epitaxy of hexagonal semiconductor nanowires (NWs) is demonstrated on InN NWs. In-polarity InN NWs form typical hexagonal structure with pyramidal growth front, whereas N-polarity InN NWs slowly turn to the shape of hexagonal pyramid and then convert to an inverted pyramid growth, forming diagonal pyramids with flat surfaces and finally coalescence with each other. This contrary growth behavior driven by lattice-polarity is most likely due to the relatively lower growth rate of the (0001 ̅) plane, which results from the fact that the diffusion barriers of In and N adatoms on the (0001) plane (0.18 and 1.0 eV, respectively) are about two-fold larger in magnitude than those on the (0001 ̅) plane (0.07 and 0.52 eV), as calculated by first-principles density functional theory (DFT). The formation of diagonal pyramids for the N-polarity hexagonal NWs affords a novel way to locate quantum dot in the kink position, suggesting a new recipe for the fabrication of dot-based devices.

  12. Crystal structure of hexagonal RE(CO{sub 3})OH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michiba, Kiyonori; Tahara, Takeshi; Nakai, Izumi [Tokyo Univ. of Science, Shinjuku (Japan). Faculty of Science; Miyawaki, Ritsuro; Matsubara, Satoshi [National Museum of Nature and Science, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Geology and Paleontology

    2011-07-01

    Hexagonal rare earth carbonate hydroxides, RE(CO{sub 3})OH, where RE = La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er, were hydrothermally synthesized from formic acid and hydroxide gels of rare earth elements. The crystals exhibited bicephalous hexagonal prisms with lengths of several tens of micrometers. The crystal structures of a series of hexagonal RE(CO{sub 3})OH were solved using the single crystal CCD-XRD intensity data sets. The space groups of the synthetic hexagonal RE(CO{sub 3})OH crystals are all P- anti 6. The present study has cast doubt upon the space group P- anti 62c previously reported for the natural Ce(CO{sub 3})OH, hydroxylbastnaesite-(Ce). The cell parameters decreased linearly with decreases in the ionic radii of the rare earth elements. La(CO{sub 3})OH showed the largest unit cell (a = 12.6752(6), c = 10.0806(10) A), while Er(CO{sub 3})OH showed the smallest (a = 11.8977(4), c = 9.6978(8) A). The rare earth atoms are in ninefold coordination with oxygen atoms to form a tricapped trigonal prism. The structure consists of layers of {sup 2}{infinity}[(OH)RE{sub 3/3}]{sup 2+} ions linked by carbonate ions. Raman spectra indicate the presence of carbonate and hydroxide groups. An evolutionary shift was observed from La to Er towards higher frequency, which was associated with a decreasing RE-O bond length. (orig.)

  13. Characterization of the secondary flow in hexagonal ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, O.; Vinuesa, R.; Obabko, A. V.; Schlatter, P.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we report the results of DNSs and LESs of the turbulent flow through hexagonal ducts at friction Reynolds numbers based on centerplane wall shear and duct half-height Reτ,c ≃ 180, 360, and 550. The evolution of the Fanning friction factor f with Re is in very good agreement with experimental measurements. A significant disagreement between the DNS and previous RANS simulations was found in the prediction of the in-plane velocity, and is explained through the inability of the RANS model to properly reproduce the secondary flow present in the hexagon. The kinetic energy of the secondary flow integrated over the cross-sectional area yz decreases with Re in the hexagon, whereas it remains constant with Re in square ducts at comparable Reynolds numbers. Close connection between the values of Reynolds stress u w ¯ on the horizontal wall close to the corner and the interaction of bursting events between the horizontal and inclined walls is found. This interaction leads to the formation of the secondary flow, and is less frequent in the hexagon as Re increases due to the 120∘ aperture of its vertex, whereas in the square duct the 90∘ corner leads to the same level of interaction with increasing Re. Analysis of turbulence statistics at the centerplane and the azimuthal variance of the mean flow and the fluctuations shows a close connection between hexagonal ducts and pipe flows, since the hexagon exhibits near-axisymmetric conditions up to a distance of around 0.15DH measured from its center. Spanwise distributions of wall-shear stress show that in square ducts the 90∘ corner sets the location of a high-speed streak at a distance zv+≃50 from it, whereas in hexagons the 120∘ aperture leads to a shorter distance of zv+≃38 . At these locations the root mean square of the wall-shear stresses exhibits an inflection point, which further shows the connections between the near-wall structures and the large-scale motions in the outer flow.

  14. Hemoglobin allostery: new views on old players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miele, Adriana Erica; Bellelli, Andrea; Brunori, Maurizio

    2013-05-13

    Proteins are dynamic molecular machines whose structure and function are modulated by environmental perturbations and natural selection. Allosteric regulation, discovered in 1963 as a novel molecular mechanism of enzymatic adaptation [Monod, Changeux & Jacob (1963). J. Mol. Biol.6, 306-329], seems to be the leit motiv of enzymes and metabolic pathways, enabling fine and quick responses toward external perturbations. Hemoglobin (Hb), the oxygen transporter of all vertebrates, has been for decades the paradigmatic system to test the validity of the conformational selection mechanism, the conceptual innovation introduced by Monod, Wyman and Changeux. We present hereby the results of a comparative analysis of structure, function and thermodynamics of two extensively investigated hemoglobins: human HbA and trout HbI. They represent a unique and challenging comparison to test the general validity of the stereochemical model proposed by Perutz. Indeed both proteins are ideal for the purpose being very similar yet very different. In fact, T-HbI is a low-ligand-affinity cooperative tetrameric Hb, insensitive to all allosteric effectors. This remarkable feature, besides being physiologically sound, supports the stereochemical model, given that the six residues identified in HbA as responsible for the Bohr and the 2,3-di-phosphoglycerate effects are all mutated. Comparison of the three-dimensional structures of HbA and T-HbI allows unveiling the molecular mechanism whereby the latter has a lower O2 affinity. Moreover, the energetic balance sheet shows that the salt bridges breaking upon allosteric quaternary transition are important yet insufficient to account for the free energy of heme-heme interactions in both hemoglobins.

  15. Mini-hemoglobins from nemertean worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergon, Thomas L; Riggs, Austen F

    2008-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) found in members of the phylum Nemertea are smaller than any other known Hb molecules. These mini-Hbs have been of great interest because of their unique three-dimensional structure and their stable ligand-binding properties. Also of interest is the expression of mini-Hb in neural tissue, body wall muscle tissue, and red blood cells. This chapter outlines methods that may be used to isolate and purify functional mini-Hbs from all three tissue types in nemertean worms.

  16. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M., E-mail: Frans.leermakers@wur.nl [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 6, 6307 HB Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2014-02-14

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k{sub c} and k{sup ¯} and the preferred monolayer curvature J{sub 0}{sup m}, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of k{sub c} and the area compression modulus k{sub A} are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k{sup ¯}<0, membranes can form stable cubic phases when the Gaussian bending modulus becomes positive, which occurs with membranes composed of PC lipids with long tails. Similarly, negative monolayer curvatures appear when a small head group such as PE is combined with long lipid tails, which hints towards the stability of inverse hexagonal phases at the cost of the bilayer topology. To prevent the destabilisation of bilayers, PG lipids can be mixed into these PC or PE lipid membranes. Progressive loading of bilayers with PG lipids lead to highly charged membranes, resulting in J{sub 0}{sup m}≫0, especially at low ionic

  17. Interaction of thyroid hormone and hemoglobin: nature of the interaction and effect of hemoglobin on thyroid hormone radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P.J.; Yoshida, K.; Schoenl, M.

    1980-05-01

    Gel filtration of human erythrocyte (RBC) lysate incubated with labeled thyroxine (Tu) or triiodothyronine (Tt) revealed co-elution of a major iodothyronine-binding fraction (R-2) and hemoglobin. Solutions of purified human hemoglobin and Tt also showed co-elution of hormone and hemoglobin. Because hematin and protoporphyrin were shown to bind labeled Tt, the oxygen-binding site on hemoglobin was excluded as the site of iodothyronine-hemoglobin interaction. Analysis of hormone binding by heme and globin moieties showed Tt binding to be limited to the heme fraction. Addition of excess unlabeled Tt to hemoglobin or heme incubated with labeled Tt indicated 75% to 90% of hormone binding was poorly dissociable. These observations suggested that the presence of hemoglobin in RBC lysate or in serum could influence the measurement of Tu and Tt by specific radioimmunoassay (RIA). Subsequent studies of the addition to serum of human hemoglobin revealed a significant reduction in Tt and Tu detectable by RIA in the presence of this protein. The effect was influenced by the concentration of hemoglobin and by duration and temperature of incubations of hemoglobin and serum prior to RIA.

  18. Relationship of Baseline Hemoglobin Level with Serum Ferritin, Postphlebotomy Hemoglobin Changes, and Phlebotomy Requirements among HFE C282Y Homozygotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Mousavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We aimed to examine whether baseline hemoglobin levels in C282Y-homozygous patients are related to the degree of serum ferritin (SF elevation and whether patients with different baseline hemoglobin have different phlebotomy requirements. Methods. A total of 196 patients (124 males and 72 females who had undergone therapeutic phlebotomy and had SF and both pre- and posttreatment hemoglobin values were included in the study. Results. Bivariate correlation analysis suggested that baseline SF explains approximately 6 to 7% of the variation in baseline hemoglobin. The results also showed that males who had higher (≥150 g/L baseline hemoglobin levels had a significantly greater reduction in their posttreatment hemoglobin despite requiring fewer phlebotomies to achieve iron depletion than those who had lower (<150 g/L baseline hemoglobin, regardless of whether baseline SF was below or above 1000 µg/L. There were no significant differences between hemoglobin subgroups regarding baseline and treatment characteristics, except for transferrin saturation between male subgroups with SF above 1000 µg/L. Similar differences were observed when females with higher (≥138 g/L baseline hemoglobin were compared with those with lower (<138 g/L baseline hemoglobin. Conclusion. Dividing C282Y-homozygous patients into just two subgroups according to the degree of baseline SF elevation may obscure important subgroup variations.

  19. Fluctuations in lipid bilayers: Are they understood?

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Friederike

    2013-01-01

    We review recent computer simulation studies of undulating lipid bilayers. Theoretical interpretations of such fluctuating membranes are most commonly based on generalized Helfrich-type elastic models, with additional contributions of local "protrusions" and/or density fluctuations. Such models provide an excellent basis for describing the fluctuations of tensionless bilayers in the fluid phase at a quantitative level. However, this description is found to fail for membranes in the gel phase and for membranes subject to high tensions. The fluctuations of tilted gel membranes show a signature of the modulated ripple structure, which is a nearby phase observed in the pretransition regime between the fluid and tilted gel state. This complicates a quantitative analysis on mesoscopic length scales. In the case of fluid membranes under tension, the large-wavelength fluctuation modes are found to be significantly softer than predicted by theory. In the latter context, we also address the general problem of the relat...

  20. Stokesian jellyfish: Viscous locomotion of bilayer vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Arthur A; Lauga, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by recent advances in vesicle engineering, we consider theoretically the locomotion of shape-changing bilayer vesicles at low Reynolds number. By modulating their volume and membrane composition, the vesicles can be made to change shape quasi-statically in thermal equilibrium. When the control parameters are tuned appropriately to yield periodic shape changes which are not time-reversible, the result is a net swimming motion over one cycle of shape deformation. For two classical vesicle models (spontaneous curvature and bilayer coupling), we determine numerically the sequence of vesicle shapes through an enthalpy minimization, as well as the fluid-body interactions by solving a boundary integral formulation of the Stokes equations. For both models, net locomotion can be obtained either by continuously modulating fore-aft asymmetric vesicle shapes, or by crossing a continuous shape-transition region and alternating between fore-aft asymmetric and fore-aft symmetric shapes. The obtained hydrodynamic e...

  1. Electric Octupole Order in Bilayer Rashba System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitomi, Takanori; Yanase, Youichi

    2016-12-01

    The odd-parity multipole is an emergent degree of freedom, leading to spontaneous inversion symmetry breaking. The odd-parity multipole order may occur by forming staggered even-parity multipoles in a unit cell. We focus on a locally noncentrosymmetric bilayer Rashba system, and study an odd-parity electric octupole order caused by the antiferro stacking of local electric quadrupoles. Analyzing the forward scattering model, we show that the electric octupole order is stabilized by a layer-dependent Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The roles of the spin-orbit coupling are clarified on the basis of the analytic formula of multipole susceptibility. The spin texture allowed in the D2d point group symmetry and its magnetic response are revealed. Furthermore, we show that the parity-breaking quantum critical point appears in the magnetic field. The possible realization of the electric octupole order in bilayer high-Tc cuprate superconductors is discussed.

  2. Specificity for human hemoglobin enhances Staphylococcus aureus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishchany, Gleb; McCoy, Amanda L.; Torres, Victor J.; Krause, Jens C.; Crowe, James E.; Fabry, Mary E.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Iron is required for bacterial proliferation and Staphylococcus aureus steals this metal from host hemoglobin during invasive infections. This process involves hemoglobin binding to the cell wall of S. aureus, heme extraction, passage through the cell envelope, and degradation to release free iron. Herein we demonstrate an enhanced ability of S. aureus to bind hemoglobin derived from humans as compared to other mammals. Increased specificity for human hemoglobin (hHb) translates into an improved ability to acquire iron and is entirely dependent on the staphylococcal hemoglobin receptor IsdB. This feature affects host-pathogen interaction as demonstrated by the increased susceptibility of hHb expressing mice to systemic staphylococcal infection. Interestingly, enhanced utilization of human hemoglobin is not a uniform property of all bacterial pathogens. These results suggest a step in the evolution of S. aureus to better colonize the human host and establish hHb expressing mice as a model of S. aureus pathogenesis. PMID:21147468

  3. Blood clotting reactions on nanoscale phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, James H; Pureza, Vincent; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Sligar, Stephen G; Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2008-01-01

    Blood clotting reactions, such as those catalyzed by the tissue factor:factor VIIa complex (TF:FVIIa), assemble on membrane surfaces containing anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine (PS). In fact, membrane binding is critical for the function of most of the steps in the blood clotting cascade. In spite of this, our understanding of how the membrane contributes to catalysis, or even how these proteins interact with phospholipids, is incomplete. Making matters more complicated, membranes containing mixtures of PS and neutral phospholipids are known to spontaneously form PS-rich membrane microdomains in the presence of plasma concentrations of calcium ions, and it is likely that blood-clotting proteases such as TF:FVIIa partition into these PS-rich microdomains. Unfortunately, little is known about how membrane microdomain composition influences the activity of blood-clotting proteases, which is typically not under experimental control even in "simple" model membranes. Our laboratories have developed and applied new technologies for studying membrane proteins to gain insights into how blood-clotting protease-cofactor pairs assemble and function on membrane surfaces. This includes using a novel, nanoscale bilayer system (Nanodiscs) that permits assembling blood-clotting protease-cofactor pairs on stable bilayers containing from 65 to 250 phospholipid molecules per leaflet. We have used this system to investigate how local (nanometer-scale) changes in phospholipid bilayer composition modulate TF:FVIIa activity. We have also used detailed molecular-dynamics simulations of nanoscale bilayers to provide atomic-scale predictions of how the membrane-binding domain of factor VIIa interacts with PS in membranes.

  4. Systematical shape evolution of hexagonal NiSe crystals caused by mixed solvents and ammonium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuguang; Zeng, Kai; Song, Yande; Li, Haibin; Liu, Peng; Li, Fujin

    2012-11-01

    Systematic shape evolution of hexagonal NiSe crystals is realized via a simple solvothermal route in a mixture of NiCl2·6H2O, elemental selenium, hydrazine hydrate and ethylenediamine. By introducing ammonium chloride as electrolyte and varying the volume ratios of hydrazine hydrate to ethylenediamine, shape evolution of hexagonal NiSe crystals from small hexagonal microdisks to hexagonal microdisks in larger width, microspheres, hexagonal prisms and hexagonal bitowers is successfully achieved. X-ray powder diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction are performed for the analyses of the products. The ionization and hydrolysis of ammonium chloride decrease the nucleation rate of hexagonal NiSe and the diffusion rate of growth resources, while the adsorption of ethylenediamine at {001} facets of hexagonal NiSe crystals inhibits the crystal growth in directions, thus leading to various novel architectures.

  5. Hemoglobin Moabit: alpha 86 (F7) Leu leads to Arg: a new unstable abnormal hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, A; Pribilla, W; Marti, H R; Winterhalter, K H

    1979-01-01

    A new alpha chain abnormal hemoglobin variant was found in a Turkish patient with a mild Heinz body hemolytic anemia and splenomegaly. The substitution alpha 86 Leu leads to Arg, which is next to the heme binding proximal histidine, is responsible for a marked instability of the molecule. The oxygen affinity of the erythrocytes was found to be slightly decreased.

  6. Self-folding graphene-polymer bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Tao [Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Yoon, ChangKyu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Jin, Qianru [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Li, Mingen [Department of Physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Liu, Zewen [Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gracias, David H., E-mail: dgracias@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    In order to incorporate the extraordinary intrinsic thermal, electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of graphene with three dimensional (3D) flexible substrates, we introduce a solvent-driven self-folding approach using graphene-polymer bilayers. A polymer (SU-8) film was spin coated atop chemically vapor deposited graphene films on wafer substrates and graphene-polymer bilayers were patterned with or without metal electrodes using photolithography, thin film deposition, and etching. After patterning, the bilayers were released from the substrates and they self-folded to form fully integrated, curved, and folded structures. In contrast to planar graphene sensors on rigid substrates, we assembled curved and folded sensors that are flexible and they feature smaller form factors due to their 3D geometry and large surface areas due to their multiple rolled architectures. We believe that this approach could be used to assemble a range of high performance 3D electronic and optical devices of relevance to sensing, diagnostics, wearables, and energy harvesting.

  7. Self-folding graphene-polymer bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tao; Yoon, ChangKyu; Jin, Qianru; Li, Mingen; Liu, Zewen; Gracias, David H.

    2015-05-01

    In order to incorporate the extraordinary intrinsic thermal, electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of graphene with three dimensional (3D) flexible substrates, we introduce a solvent-driven self-folding approach using graphene-polymer bilayers. A polymer (SU-8) film was spin coated atop chemically vapor deposited graphene films on wafer substrates and graphene-polymer bilayers were patterned with or without metal electrodes using photolithography, thin film deposition, and etching. After patterning, the bilayers were released from the substrates and they self-folded to form fully integrated, curved, and folded structures. In contrast to planar graphene sensors on rigid substrates, we assembled curved and folded sensors that are flexible and they feature smaller form factors due to their 3D geometry and large surface areas due to their multiple rolled architectures. We believe that this approach could be used to assemble a range of high performance 3D electronic and optical devices of relevance to sensing, diagnostics, wearables, and energy harvesting.

  8. Structure of twisted and buckled bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sandeep K.; Juričić, Vladimir; Barkema, Gerard T.

    2017-03-01

    We study the atomic structure of twisted bilayer graphene, with very small mismatch angles (θ ∼ {0.28}0), a topic of intense recent interest. We use simulations, in which we combine a recently presented semi-empirical potential for single-layer graphene, with a new term for out-of-plane deformations, (Jain et al 2015 J. Phys. Chem. C 119 9646) and an often-used interlayer potential (Kolmogorov et al 2005 Phys. Rev. B 71 235415). This combination of potentials is computationally cheap but accurate and precise at the same time, allowing us to study very large samples, which is necessary to reach very small mismatch angles in periodic samples. By performing large scale atomistic simulations, we show that the vortices appearing in the Moiré pattern in the twisted bilayer graphene samples converge to a constant size in the thermodynamic limit. Furthermore, the well known sinusoidal behavior of energy no longer persists once the misorientation angle becomes very small (θ \\lt {1}0). We also show that there is a significant buckling after the relaxation in the samples, with the buckling height proportional to the system size. These structural properties have direct consequences on the electronic and optical properties of bilayer graphene.

  9. Ion beam mixing isotopic metal bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fell, C.J. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics; Kenny, M.J. [CSIRO, Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1993-12-31

    In order to obtain an insight into the mechanisms of ion-solid interactions, bilayer targets can be prepared from two different isotopes. A mixing study SIMS is to be carried out using specially grown monocrystalline bilayers of {sup 58}Ni / {sup 60}Ni. An important aspect of the work is the preparation of high quality single-crystal thin films. The Ni layers will be grown on the (110) surface of pure Ni and verified for crystallinity using Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction and Rutherford Backscattering channelling analysis. The Pd bilayers will be grown on a Pd (100) surface. RHEED will be used to confirm the two-dimensional crystallinity of the surface before and after deposition of each layer, and channelling used to confirm bulk film crystallinity. Single crystal substrates are currently being prepared. Analysis of the Ni (110) surface using RHEED at 9 kV shows a streak spacing which corresponds to a lattice spacing of 2.47 {+-} 0.09 Angstroms. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Method of fabricating lipid bilayer membranes on solid supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam-Joon (Inventor); Frank, Curtis W. (Inventor); Glenn, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Cheong, Kwang Ho (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of producing a planar lipid bilayer on a solid support. With this method, a solution of lipid vesicles is first deposited on the solid support. Next, the lipid vesicles are destabilized by adding an amphipathic peptide solution to the lipid vesicle solution. This destabilization leads to production of a planar lipid bilayer on the solid support. The present invention also provides a supported planar lipid bilayer, where the planar lipid bilayer is made of naturally occurring lipids and the solid support is made of unmodified gold or titanium oxide. Preferably, the supported planar lipid bilayer is continuous. The planar lipid bilayer may be made of any naturally occurring lipid or mixture of lipids, including, but not limited to phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinsitol, cardiolipin, cholesterol, and sphingomyelin.

  11. Stability of Blood Samples for Hemoglobin Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadira Valdés Fraser

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: the National Medical Genetics Center has conducted the prenatal screening for hemoglobinopathies in the province of Artemisa and the quality control of this program nationwide; reliability of the results is determined by the quality of the samples used. Objective: to describe the stability of whole blood samples using EDTAK2 and heparin as anticoagulants. Methods: a descriptive study of 100 samples of whole blood from pregnant women and their husbands was conducted at the National Medical Genetics Center. Hemoglobin electrophoresis with Hydrasis technology was performed using 10 % EDTAK2, 2.2 % and 5 % heparin, temperature at 4-8 0C and shelf-life of 7.15 and 30 days. Results: samples with EDTAK2 showed stability for a month with accuracy and repeatability in the electrophoresis runs. By using 5 % and 2.2 % heparin, problems were found in all periods analyzed. Conclusions: 10 % EDTAK2 anticoagulant is appropriate to ensure the reliability of the results in the screening for hemoglobinopathies. The results obtained in this study can be applied in all clinical, hematological and hemoglobin electrophoresis laboratories.

  12. A review of variant hemoglobins interfering with hemoglobin A1c measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Randie R; Roberts, William L

    2009-05-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is used routinely to monitor long-term glycemic control in people with diabetes mellitus, as HbA1c is related directly to risks for diabetic complications. The accuracy of HbA1c methods can be affected adversely by the presence of hemoglobin (Hb) variants or elevated levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF). The effect of each variant or elevated HbF must be examined with each specific method. The most common Hb variants worldwide are HbS, HbE, HbC, and HbD. All of these Hb variants have single amino acid substitutions in the Hb beta chain. HbF is the major hemoglobin during intrauterine life; by the end of the first year, HbF falls to values close to adult levels of approximately 1%. However, elevated HbF levels can occur in certain pathologic conditions or with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin. In a series of publications over the past several years, the effects of these four most common Hb variants and elevated HbF have been described. There are clinically significant interferences with some methods for each of these variants. A summary is given showing which methods are affected by the presence of the heterozygous variants S, E, C, and D and elevated HbF. Methods are divided by type (immunoassay, ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, boronate affinity, other) with an indication of whether the result is artificially increased or decreased by the presence of a Hb variant. Laboratorians should be aware of the limitations of their method with respect to these interferences.

  13. Properties of Hemoglobin Decolorized with a Histidine-Specific Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; de Roos, Andre; Schouten, Olaf; Zheng, Chaoya; Vink, Collin; Vonk, Brenda; Kliphuis, Annette; Schaap, Albert; Edens, Luppo

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the application of Aspergilloglutamic peptidase (AGP) on porcine hemoglobin decolorization. AGP from fungus Aspergillus niger is identified to possess a high preference towards the histidine residues. As histidine residues in hemoglobin are known to coordinate the heme group within the globin molecule, we therefore hypothesized that incubating hemoglobin with a histidine-specific protease would efficiently separate the non-heme peptides from the heme-enriched peptides with a minimum degree of hydrolysis. AGP-decolored porcine hemoglobin hydrolysates were assessed on their functional (for example, color, emulsification, foaming, and water binding) and sensory properties. The results were compared with commercially available blood-derived proteins (subtilisin-decolored hemoglobin hydrolysates and plasma protein). It was observed that AGP is able to effectively decolor hemoglobin. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) increased less than 3% using AGP to achieve 90% color reduction of hemoglobin, whereas a DH increase of more than 20% is needed using subtilisin. The AGP-decolored hemoglobin hydrolysates (AGP-Hb) possess good emulsification, foaming, and water binding properties, which are better or comparable with the plasma protein, and much better than the subtilisin-decolored hemoglobin hydrolysates (subtilisin-Hb). The model canned meat with addition of AGP-Hb showed the highest value in hardness, springiness, and chewiness from the texture analysis. Furthermore, the canned meat with AGP-Hb was found to have a better sensory profile than the ones with addition of subtilisin-Hb and plasma protein.

  14. Hemoglobin screening: response of a Brazilian community to optional programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Sérgio Ramalho

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency and the viability of three hemoglobin screening programs were investigated. They were offered on a voluntary basis to a Brazilian population and started with the analysis of blood donors, pregnant women and students. The hemoglobin screening was done through optional exams which included electrophoresis of hemoglobin and complementary hematological tests. A total of 13,670 people were tested over a period of 39 months and a total of 644 individuals with hereditary hemoglobin disorders were detected - 4.7% of the samples examined. The programs showed satisfactory indicators of viability and efficiency, expressed by the significative proportion of exams performed among the probands and their relatives.

  15. Equilibrium insertion of nanoscale objects into phospholipid bilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Pogodin, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Certain membrane proteins, peptides, nanoparticles and nanotubes have rigid structure and fixed shape. They are often viewed as spheres and cylinders with certain surface properties. Single Chain Mean Field theory is used to model the equilibrium insertion of nanoscale spheres and rods into the phospholipid bilayer. The equilibrium structures and the resulting free energies of the nano-objects in the bilayer allow to distinguish different orientations in the bilayer and estimate the energy barrier of insertion.

  16. High Activity of Hexagonal Ag/Pt Nanoshell Catalyst for Oxygen Electroreduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Chien-Liang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hexagonal Ag/Pt nanoshells were prepared by using a hexagonal Ag nanoplate as the displacement template and by introducing Pt ions. The prepared Ag/Pt nanoshells played the role of an electrocatalyst in an oxygen reduction process. Compared to spherical Pt and Ag/Pt nanoparticles, the hexagonal Ag/Pt nanoshells showed higher activity for oxygen electroreduction.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, shape evolution, and optical properties of copper sulfide hexagonal bifrustum nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Baorui; Qin Mingli, E-mail: qinml@mater.ustb.edu.cn [University of Science and Technology Beijing, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China); Jiang Xuezhi [North Heavy Industry Group, Special Steel Works (China); Zhang Zili; Zhang Lin; Liu Ye; Qu Xuanhui [University of Science and Technology Beijing, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2013-03-15

    The hexagonal bifrustum-shaped copper sulfide (CuS) nanocrystals were selectively and facilely synthesized by a hydrothermal method for the first time at 120 Degree-Sign C. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The results showed that the CuS hexagonal bifrustum nanocrystal was bounded by two top hexagons with edge length of about 50-70 nm and twelve lateral trapezoids with a base of about 100 nm and that the length of each hexagonal bifrustum was about 250 nm. Tetradecylamine (TDA), as an effective capping agent, was found to be critical for this special shape. Using different amounts of TDA, two kinds of CuS hexagonal bifrustum nanocrystals were obtained: 'lender hexagonal bifrustum' and 'pancake hexagonal bifrustum.' Furthermore, we studied the formation mechanism of hexagonal bifrustum, which is related to the intrinsic crystalline structure of CuS and Ostwald ripening. And, the results revealed that the CuS nanocrystal evolved from hexagonal plate to hexagonal bifrustum and finally to hexagonal bipyramid as the heating time increased. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum showed that these CuS hexagonal bifrustum nanocrystals exhibited strong absorption in the near-infrared region and had a potential application for photothermal therapy and photocatalysis.

  18. Intercalation of small hydrophobic molecules in lipid bilayers containing cholesterol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worcester, D.L.; Hamacher, K.; Kaiser, H.; Kulasekere, R.; Torbet, J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Partitioning of small hydrophobic molecules into lipid bilayers containing cholesterol has been studied using the 2XC diffractometer at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. Locations of the compounds were determined by Fourier difference methods with data from both deuterated and undeuterated compounds introduced into the bilayers from the vapor phase. Data fitting procedures were developed for determining how well the compounds were localized. The compounds were found to be localized in a narrow region at the center of the hydrophobic layer, between the two halves of the bilayer. The structures are therefore intercalated structures with the long axis of the molecules in the plane of the bilayer.

  19. Pair interaction of bilayer-coated nanoscopic particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qi-Yi

    2009-01-01

    The pair interaction between bilayer membrane-coated nanosized particles has been explored by using the self-consistent field (SCF) theory. The bilayer membranes are composed of amphiphilic polymers. For different system parameters, the pair-interaction free energies are obtained. Particular emphasis is placcd on the analysis of a sequence of structural transformations of bilayers on spherical particles, which occur during their approaching processes. For different head fractions of amphiphilcs, the asymmetrical morphologies between bilayers on two particles and the inverted micellar intermediates have been found in the membrane fusion pathway. These results can benefit the fabrication of vesicles as encapsulation vectors for drug and gene delivery.

  20. Faraday rotation in bilayer graphene-based integrated microcavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Hai-Xia; Yan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Bernal-stacked bilayer graphene has rich ground states with various broken symmetries, allowing the existence of magneto-optical (MO) effects even in the absence of an external magnetic field. Here we report controllable Faraday rotation (FR) of bilayer graphene induced by electrostatic gate voltage, whose value is 10 times smaller than the case of single layer graphene with a magnetic field. A proposed bilayer graphene-based microcavity configuration enables the enhanced FR angle due to the large localized electromagnetic field. Our results offer unique opportunities to apply bilayer graphene for MO devices.

  1. Chemical and Bandgap Engineering in Monolayer Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Kun; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Jingxin; Bao, Jingxian; Xuan, Ningning; Sun, Yangye; Liu, Bing; Xie, Aozhen; Wu, Shiwei; Sun, Zhengzong

    2017-04-01

    Monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses a wide bandgap of ~6 eV. Trimming down the bandgap is technically attractive, yet poses remarkable challenges in chemistry. One strategy is to topological reform the h-BN’s hexagonal structure, which involves defects or grain boundaries (GBs) engineering in the basal plane. The other way is to invite foreign atoms, such as carbon, to forge bizarre hybrid structures like hetero-junctions or semiconducting h-BNC materials. Here we successfully developed a general chemical method to synthesize these different h-BN derivatives, showcasing how the chemical structure can be manipulated with or without a graphene precursor, and the bandgap be tuned to ~2 eV, only one third of the pristine one’s.

  2. Pedestrian simulations in hexagonal cell local field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Biao; Wang, Jianyuan; Xiong, Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Pedestrian dynamics have caused wide concern over the recent years. This paper presents a local field (LF) model based on regular hexagonal cells to simulate pedestrian dynamics in scenarios such as corridors and bottlenecks. In this model, the simulation scenarios are discretized into regular hexagonal cells. The local field is a small region around pedestrian. Each pedestrian will choose his/her target cell according to the situation in his/her local field. Different walking strategies are considered in the simulation in corridor scenario and the fundamental graphs are used to verify this model. Different shapes of exit are also discussed in the bottleneck scenario. The statistics of push effect show that the smooth bottleneck exit may be more safe.

  3. Utility based Power Control with FEC in Hexagonally deployed WSN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran Valli

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental component of resource management in Wireless Sensor Network (WSN is transmitter power control since they are miniature battery powered devices. An efficient power control technique is essential to maintain reliable communication links in WSN and to maintain the battery life of the sensor node and in turn the sensor network. Error control coding (ECC schemes can improve the system performance and has an impact on energy consumption. This paper analyses a game theoretic model with pricing for power control in a sensor network considering ECC for random, square, triangular and hexagonal deployment schemes. The performance of the proposed power control scheme with RS and MIDRS code for WSN is evaluated in terms of utility, and energy consumption. Simulation results show that, for hexagonal deployment scheme, with the inclusion of ECC, the transmitting power of the nodes is reduced thereby saving energy and increasing the network lifetime

  4. Calculation of Accurate Hexagonal Discontinuity Factors for PARCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pounders. J., Bandini, B. R. , Xu, Y, and Downar, T. J.

    2007-11-01

    In this study we derive a methodology for calculating discontinuity factors consistent with the Triangle-based Polynomial Expansion Nodal (TPEN) method implemented in PARCS for hexagonal reactor geometries. The accuracy of coarse-mesh nodal methods is greatly enhanced by permitting flux discontinuities at node boundaries, but the practice of calculating discontinuity factors from infinite-medium (zero-current) single bundle calculations may not be sufficiently accurate for more challenging problems in which there is a large amount of internodal neutron streaming. The authors therefore derive a TPEN-based method for calculating discontinuity factors that are exact with respect to generalized equivalence theory. The method is validated by reproducing the reference solution for a small hexagonal core.

  5. Direct in situ measurement of specific capacitance, monolayer tension, and bilayer tension in a droplet interface bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Graham J; Venkatesan, Guru A; Collier, C Patrick; Sarles, Stephen A

    2015-10-14

    Thickness and tension are important physical parameters of model cell membranes. However, traditional methods to measure these quantities require multiple experiments using separate equipment. This work introduces a new multi-step procedure for directly accessing in situ multiple physical properties of droplet interface bilayers (DIB), including specific capacitance (related to thickness), lipid monolayer tension in the Plateau-Gibbs border, and bilayer tension. The procedure employs a combination of mechanical manipulation of bilayer area followed by electrowetting of the capacitive interface to examine the sensitivities of bilayer capacitance to area and contact angle to voltage, respectively. These data allow for determining the specific capacitance of the membrane and surface tension of the lipid monolayer, which are then used to compute bilayer thickness and tension, respectively. The use of DIBs affords accurate optical imaging of the connected droplets in addition to electrical measurements of bilayer capacitance, and it allows for reversibly varying bilayer area. After validating the accuracy of the technique with diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) DIBs in hexadecane, the method is applied herein to quantify separately the effects on membrane thickness and tension caused by varying the solvent in which the DIB is formed and introducing cholesterol into the bilayer. Because the technique relies only on capacitance measurements and optical images to determine both thickness and tension, this approach is specifically well-suited for studying the effects of peptides, biomolecules, natural and synthetic nanoparticles, and other species that accumulate within membranes without altering bilayer conductance.

  6. Raman study of magnetic phase transitions of hexagonal manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ji-Yeon; Hien, Nguyen T. M.; Huyen, Nguyen T.; Han, Kiok; Chen, Xiang-Bai; Cheong, S. W.; Lee, D.; Noh, T. W.; Sung, N. H.; Cho, B. K.; Yang, In-Sang

    2014-03-01

    Results of Raman studies of magnetic phase transitions of hexagonal LuMnO3 single crystal and HoMnO3 thin films are compared directly with the results of magnetic measurements. Our results show that the temperature dependent Raman study of magnon scattering provides a simple and accurate method for investigating magnetic phase transitions, especially in HoMnO3 thin films. In single crystal, our optical method provides results as good as magnetization measurements.

  7. Electronic structure of spontaneously strained graphene on hexagonal Boron Nitride

    OpenAIRE

    San-Jose, Pablo; Gutiérrez, Ángel; Sturla, Mauricio; Guinea, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Hexagonal Boron Nitride substrates have been shown to dramatically improve the electric properties of graphene. Recently, it has been observed that when the two honeycomb crystals are close to perfect alignment, strong lattice distortions develop in graphene due to the moir\\'e adhesion landscape. Simultaneously a gap opens at the Dirac point. Here we derive a simple low energy model for graphene carriers close to alignment with the substrate, taking into account spontaneous strains at equilib...

  8. Competing structures in two dimensions: Square-to-hexagonal transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gränz, Barbara; Korshunov, Sergey E.; Geshkenbein, Vadim B.; Blatter, Gianni

    2016-08-01

    We study a system of particles in two dimensions interacting via a dipolar long-range potential D /r3 and subject to a square-lattice substrate potential V (r ) with amplitude V and lattice constant b . The isotropic interaction favors a hexagonal arrangement of the particles with lattice constant a , which competes against the square symmetry of the underlying substrate lattice. We determine the minimal-energy states at fixed external pressure p generating the commensurate density n =1 /b2=(4/3 ) 1 /2/a2 in the absence of thermal and quantum fluctuations, using both analytical techniques based on the harmonic and continuum elastic approximations as well as numerical relaxation of particle configurations. At large substrate amplitude V >0.2 eD, with eD=D /b3 the dipolar energy scale, the particles reside in the substrate minima and hence arrange in a square lattice. Upon decreasing V , the square lattice turns unstable with respect to a zone-boundary shear mode and deforms into a period-doubled zigzag lattice. Analytic and numerical results show that this period-doubled phase in turn becomes unstable at V ≈0.074 eD towards a nonuniform phase developing an array of domain walls or solitons; as the density of solitons increases, the particle arrangement approaches that of a rhombic (or isosceles triangular) lattice. At a yet smaller substrate value estimated as V ≈0.046 eD, a further solitonic transition establishes a second nonuniform phase which smoothly approaches the hexagonal (or equilateral triangular) lattice phase with vanishing amplitude V . At small but finite amplitude V , the hexagonal phase is distorted and hexatically locked at an angle of φ ≈3 .8∘ with respect to the substrate lattice. The square-to-hexagonal transformation in this two-dimensional commensurate-incommensurate system thus involves a complex pathway with various nontrivial lattice- and modulated phases.

  9. sd(2) Graphene: Kagome band in a hexagonal lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Miao; Liu, Zheng; Ming, Wenmei; Wang, Zhengfei; Liu, Feng

    2014-12-05

    Graphene, made of sp^{2} hybridized carbon, is characterized with a Dirac band, representative of its underlying 2D hexagonal lattice. The fundamental understanding of graphene has recently spurred a surge in the search for 2D topological quantum phases in solid-state materials. Here, we propose a new form of 2D material, consisting of sd^{2} hybridized transition metal atoms in hexagonal lattice, called sd^{2} "graphene." The sd^{2} graphene is characterized by bond-centered electronic hopping, which transforms the apparent atomic hexagonal lattice into the physics of a kagome lattice that may exhibit a wide range of topological quantum phases. Based on first-principles calculations, room-temperature quantum anomalous Hall states with an energy gap of ∼0.1  eV are demonstrated for one such lattice made of W, which can be epitaxially grown on a semiconductor surface of 1/3 monolayer Cl-covered Si(111), with high thermodynamic and kinetic stability.

  10. The Veldkamp Space of the Smallest Slim Dense Near Hexagon

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Richard M

    2009-01-01

    We give a detailed description of the Veldkamp space of the smallest slim dense near hexagon. This space is isomorphic to PG(7, 2) and its 2^8 - 1 = 255 Veldkamp points (that is, geometric hyperplanes of the near hexagon) fall into five distinct classes, each of which is uniquely characterized by the number of points/lines as well as by a sequence of the cardinalities of points of given orders and/or that of (grid-)quads of given types. For each type we also give its weight, stabilizer group within the full automorphism group of the near hexagon and the total number of copies. The totality of (255 choose 2)/3 = 10795 Veldkamp lines split into 41 different types. We give a complete classification of them in terms of the properties of their cores (i. e., subconfigurations of points and lines common to all the three hyperplanes comprising a given Veldkamp line) and the types of the hyperplanes they are composed of. These findings may lend themselves into important physical applications, especially in view of rec...

  11. Femtosecond laser direct writing of monocrystalline hexagonal silver prisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vora, Kevin; Kang, SeungYeon; Moebius, Michael [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Mazur, Eric [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, Harvard University, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-06

    Bottom-up growth methods and top-down patterning techniques are both used to fabricate metal nanostructures, each with a distinct advantage: One creates crystalline structures and the other offers precise positioning. Here, we present a technique that localizes the growth of metal crystals to the focal volume of a laser beam, combining advantages from both approaches. We report the fabrication of silver nanoprisms—hexagonal nanoscale silver crystals—through irradiation with focused femtosecond laser pulses. The growth of these nanoprisms is due to a nonlinear optical interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and a polyvinylpyrrolidone film doped with silver nitrate. The hexagonal nanoprisms have bases hundreds of nanometers in size and the crystal growth occurs over exposure times of less than 1 ms (8 orders of magnitude faster than traditional chemical techniques). Electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows that the hexagonal nanoprisms are monocrystalline. The fabrication method combines advantages from both wet chemistry and femtosecond laser direct-writing to grow silver crystals in targeted locations. The results presented in this letter offer an approach to directly positioning and growing silver crystals on a substrate, which can be used for plasmonic devices.

  12. Femtosecond laser direct writing of monocrystalline hexagonal silver prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Kevin; Kang, SeungYeon; Moebius, Michael; Mazur, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Bottom-up growth methods and top-down patterning techniques are both used to fabricate metal nanostructures, each with a distinct advantage: One creates crystalline structures and the other offers precise positioning. Here, we present a technique that localizes the growth of metal crystals to the focal volume of a laser beam, combining advantages from both approaches. We report the fabrication of silver nanoprisms—hexagonal nanoscale silver crystals—through irradiation with focused femtosecond laser pulses. The growth of these nanoprisms is due to a nonlinear optical interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and a polyvinylpyrrolidone film doped with silver nitrate. The hexagonal nanoprisms have bases hundreds of nanometers in size and the crystal growth occurs over exposure times of less than 1 ms (8 orders of magnitude faster than traditional chemical techniques). Electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows that the hexagonal nanoprisms are monocrystalline. The fabrication method combines advantages from both wet chemistry and femtosecond laser direct-writing to grow silver crystals in targeted locations. The results presented in this letter offer an approach to directly positioning and growing silver crystals on a substrate, which can be used for plasmonic devices.

  13. Design of a solar concentrator with hexagonal facets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Vázquez, Joel; Vázquez y Montiel, Sergio

    2007-09-01

    In this work we present the optical design of a solar concentrator for an High-Flux solar furnace of a solar laboratory, these concentrator is compound for an aspheric mirror surface sectioned in 121 hexagonal facets to simplify the construction process, its total diameter is 6.6 m and a focal length is 3.68 m, also was developed the corresponding algorithm to determine the correct position and orientation of each hexagonal section that compound the arrangement. We present the results of the focused energy of this configuration and we propose a modification on the original position of the mirrors for optimizing the focusing of energy by the sun furnace. These modifications produces an increment on the energy focused on a small area in a remarkable way similar to used a parabolic mirror. The algorithm before mentioned was programmed in MathCAD and it calculates the modification of the original position of each hexagonal mirror giving us a file that ZEMAX can read. This file contains the information of each 121 mirrors from the arrangement and also the correct form, position and direction, simplifying the traditional input process one by one.

  14. Exploring Simple Triangular and Hexagonal Grid Polygons Online

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, Daniel; Langetepe, Elmar

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the online exploration problem (aka covering) of a short-sighted mobile robot moving in an unknown cellular environment with hexagons and triangles as types of cells. To explore a cell, the robot must enter it. Once inside, the robot knows which of the 3 or 6 adjacent cells exist and which are boundary edges. The robot's task is to visit every cell in the given environment and to return to the start. Our interest is in a short exploration tour; that is, in keeping the number of multiple cell visits small. For arbitrary environments containing no obstacles we provide a strategy producing tours of length S <= C + 1/4 E - 2.5 for hexagonal grids, and S <= C + E - 4 for triangular grids. C denotes the number of cells-the area-, E denotes the number of boundary edges-the perimeter-of the given environment. Further, we show that our strategy is 4/3-competitive in both types of grids, and we provide lower bounds of 14/13 for hexagonal grids and 7/6 for triangular grids.

  15. Discovery of Superconductivity in Hard Hexagonal ε-NbN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yongtao; Qi, Xintong; Zhang, Cheng; Ma, Shuailing; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ying; Chen, Ting; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Zhiqiang; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Li, Qiang; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2016-02-29

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond with a critical temperature (TC) near 4 K, great interest has been attracted in hard superconductors such as transition-metal nitrides and carbides. Here we report the new discovery of superconductivity in polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Direct magnetization and electrical resistivity measurements demonstrate that the superconductivity in bulk polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN is below ∼11.6 K, which is significantly higher than that for boron-doped diamond. The nature of superconductivity in hexagonal ε-NbN and the physical mechanism for the relatively lower TC have been addressed by the weaker bonding in the Nb-N network, the co-planarity of Nb-N layer as well as its relatively weaker electron-phonon coupling, as compared with the cubic δ-NbN counterpart. Moreover, the newly discovered ε-NbN superconductor remains stable at pressures up to ∼20 GPa and is significantly harder than cubic δ-NbN; it is as hard as sapphire, ultra-incompressible and has a high shear rigidity of 201 GPa to rival hard/superhard material γ-B (∼227 GPa). This exploration opens a new class of highly desirable materials combining the outstanding mechanical/elastic properties with superconductivity, which may be particularly attractive for its technological and engineering applications in extreme environments.

  16. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  17. Molecular evolution of hemoglobins of Antarctic fishes (Notothenioidei)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, W.T.; Beintema, J.J; D Avino, R.; Tamburrini, M.; di Prisco, G.

    1997-01-01

    Amino acid sequences of alpha- and beta-chains of human hemoglobin and of hemoglobins of coelacanth and 24 teleost fish species, including 11 antarctic and two temperate Notothenioidei, were analyzed using maximum parsimony. Trees were derived for the alpha- and beta-chains separately and for tandem

  18. Conformational changes in hemoglobin triggered by changing the iron charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croci, S., E-mail: simo@unipr.it [University of Parma, Departments of Public Health, INBB Parma (Italy); Achterhold, K. [Physik-Department E17 (Germany); Ortalli, I. [University of Parma, Departments of Public Health, INBB Parma (Italy); Parak, F. G. [Physik-Department E17 (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    In this work the hemoglobin conformational changes induced by changing the iron charge have been studied and compared with Myoglobin. Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to follow the change of the iron conformation. In order to compare the conformational relaxation of hemoglobin and myoglobin, and to study a possible influence of the quaternary structure, an intermediate metastable state of hemoglobin has been created by low temperature X-ray irradiation of methemoglobin. The irradiation reduces the Fe(III) of the heme groups to Fe(II) Low Spin, where the water is still bound on the sixth coordination. Heating cycles performed at temperatures from 140 K to 200 K allow the molecules to overcome an activation energy barrier and to relax into a stable conformation such as deoxy-hemoglobin or carboxy-hemoglobin, if CO is present. Slightly different structures (conformational substates) reveal themselves as a distribution of energy barriers ({Delta}G). The distribution of the activation energy, for the decay of the Fe(II) Low Spin intermediate, has been fitted with a Gaussian. For comparison, published myoglobin data were re-analysed in the same way. The average energy value at characteristic temperature is very similar in case of myoglobin and hemoglobin. The larger Gaussian energy distribution for myoglobin with respect to hemoglobin shows that more conformational substates are available. This may be caused by a larger area exposed to water. In hemoglobin, part of the surface of the chains is not water accessible due to the quaternary structure.

  19. The influence of socioeconomic status on the hemoglobin level and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and hemoglobin concentration were observed from social class 1 to 4; this was statistically significant in controls ... Key words: Hemoglobin level, sickle cell anemia, socioeconomic class ..... This study was designed to determine the relationship .... sickle cell anaemia: studies of serum gonadotropin concentration, height,.

  20. 21 CFR 864.7455 - Fetal hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... hemoglobin present. The assay may be used to detect fetal red cells in the maternal circulation or to detect... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fetal hemoglobin assay. 864.7455 Section 864.7455...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7455 Fetal...

  1. Receptor targeting of hemoglobin mediated by the haptoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2009-01-01

    Haptoglobin, the haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor CD163, and the heme oxygenase-1 are proteins with a well-established function in the clearance and metabolism of "free" hemoglobin released during intravascular hemolysis. This scavenging system counteracts the potentially harmful oxidative and NO-...

  2. Symbiotic and nonsymbiotic hemoglobin genes of Casuarina glauca

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen-Lyon, K; Jensen, Erik Østergaard; Jørgensen, Jan-Elo

    1995-01-01

    Casuarina glauca has a gene encoding hemoglobin (cashb-nonsym). This gene is expressed in a number of plant tissues. Casuarina also has a second family of hemoglobin genes (cashb-sym) expressed at a high level in the nodules that Casuarina forms in a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with the actinomycete...

  3. Hexagonal sampling in the infrared domain: an introduction to array set addressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummelt, Nicholas I.; Barrows, Geoffrey L.; Massie, Mark A.

    2011-06-01

    It has been known since the early 1960s that hexagonal sampling is the optimal sampling approach for isotropically band-limited images, providing a 13.4% improvement in sampling efficiency over rectangular sampling. Despite this fact and other significant advantages of hexagonal sampling, rectangular sampling is still used for virtually all modern digital image processing systems. This is arguably due to the lack of an efficient addressing system for hexagonal grids. Array set addressing (ASA) is a recent advance in addressing hexagonal grids that allows image processing techniques to be performed efficiently on hexagonally sampled images. This paper will describe ASA and discuss its advantages. With ASA, a renewed interest in sensors that sample hexagonally is occurring. We will describe a new visible imager that simultaneously samples both hexagonally and rectangularly. This novel research tool has the ability to provide real imagery that can be used to quantitatively compare the performance of an image processing operation on both hexagonally sampled and rectangularly sampled images. We will also describe current efforts and plans for future visible sensors that sample hexagonally. The advantages of hexagonal sampling are not limited to the visible domain and should be equally realizable in the infrared domain. This paper will discuss considerations for developing infrared sensors that sample hexagonally. On-focal plane array (FPA) processing, readout architectures, detector materials, and bump-bonding are among the topics to be discussed.

  4. GLYCATED HEMOGLOBIN AND FRUCTOSAMINE IN DOGS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olair Carlos Beltrame

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM commonly occurs in dogs, and the laboratorial confirmation is carried out by glycemia test. The diagnosis and monitoring in humans is made by glycated hemoglobin and fructosamine concentrations. The objective of this study was to diagnose DM in 19 dogs, by evaluating seric glucose, glycated hemoglobin and fructosamine concentrations. Six dogs with DM and treated with insulin were assisted during a twelve-month period, by means of the same blood analysis, until the death (three dogs or glycemic control (three dogs. Glucose, glycated hemoglobin and fructosamine increased in all dogs with DM, and dogs that did not survive presented higher glycated hemoglobin and seric glucose values than those that survived at the last evaluation. The results showed the importance of evaluating glycated hemoglobin and fructosamine in dogs with DM to diagnose and control treatment effectiveness.

  5. Enhanced magnetic response and metallicity in AB stacked bilayer graphene via Cr-doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Jyoti [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119, Haryana (India); Kashyap, Manish K., E-mail: manishdft@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119, Haryana (India); Saini, Hardev S. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Reshak, Ali H. [New Technologies – Research Centre, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2015-11-15

    First-principles study for the electronic and magnetic properties of Cr atom doping in lower layer of AB bernal stacked bilayer graphene (BLG) is presented. This doping is analysed in three different configurations; (i) Hollow type (above the centre of C hexagon), (ii) Top-type (directly on the top of any C atom) and (iii) Bridge type (mid point of any C–C bond). It has been observed that the doping of Cr atom enlarges the interlayer spacing in BLG as compared to pure one. The Top-type (T-type) doping is found to be most stable energetically. The doping of Cr atom in all configurations generates the large spin polarization and induces the appreciable magnetic moment. Half metallicity has been obtained in Hollow type (H-type) doping with a suitable band gap of 0.28 eV in minority spin channel. The origin of magnetism has been identified via interactions of 3d-states of doped Cr atom with p-states of inequivalent C atoms present in the vicinity of doping site. The electron densities plots also confirm the metallic nature of Cr-doped BLG. Our results reveal that the resultant BLG has potential for futuristic applications such as high frequency transistors, spintronics, photodetectors and energy resources. - Highlights: • Cr-doping in bilayer graphene induces magnetic channel. • Half metallicity is observed only in H-type Cr-doping in graphene. • T-type doping is most energetically stable among all types (H-type, B-type and T-type). • The strong hybridization of Cr-3d states with C-p states governs the magnetism in BLG.

  6. Giant magnetoresistance in bilayer graphene nanoflakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farghadan, Rouhollah; Farekiyan, Marzieh

    2016-09-01

    Coherent spin transport through bilayer graphene (BLG) nanoflakes sandwiched between two electrodes made of single-layer zigzag graphene nanoribbon was investigated by means of Landauer-Buttiker formalism. Application of a magnetic field only on BLG structure as a channel produces a perfect spin polarization in a large energy region. Moreover, the conductance could be strongly modulated by magnetization of the zigzag edge of AB-stacked BLG, and the junction, entirely made of carbon, produces a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) up to 100%. Intestinally, GMR and spin polarization could be tuned by varying BLG width and length. Generally, MR in a AB-stacked BLG strongly increases (decreases) with length (width).

  7. Twisted CFT and bilayer Quantum Hall systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cristofano, G; Naddeo, A

    2003-01-01

    We identify the impurity interactions of the recently proposed CFT description of a bilayer Quantum Hall system at filling nu =m/(pm+2) in Mod. Phys. Lett. A 15 (2000) 1679. Such a CFT is obtained by m-reduction on the one layer system, with a resulting pairing symmetry and presence of quasi-holes. For the m=2 case boundary terms are shown to describe an impurity interaction which allows for a localized tunnel of the Kondo problem type. The presence of an anomalous fixed point is evidenced at finite coupling which is unstable with respect to unbalance and flows to a vacuum state with no quasi-holes.

  8. Vortex dynamics in ferromagnetic/superconducting bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplak, M.Z.; Adamus, Z. [Polish Acad Sci, Inst Phys, PL-02668 Warsaw, (Poland); Konczykowski, M. [CEA, DSM, DRECAM, Lab Solides Irradies, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS-UMR 7642, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Zhu, L.Y.; Chien, C.L. [Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Phys and Astron, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The dependence of vortex dynamics on the geometry of magnetic domain pattern is studied in the superconducting/ferromagnetic bilayers, in which niobium is a superconductor, and Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy serves as a ferromagnetic layer. Magnetic domain patterns with different density of domains per surface area and different domain size, w, are obtained for Co/Pt with different thickness of Pt. The dense patterns of domains with the size comparable to the magnetic penetration depth (w {>=} {lambda}) produce large vortex pinning and smooth vortex penetration, while less dense patterns with larger domains (w {>=}{>=} {lambda}) enhance pinning less effectively and result in flux jumps during flux motion. (authors)

  9. Interaction of neurotransmitters with a phospholipid bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Werge, Mikkel; Elf-Lind, Maria Northved

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations to study the interactions between the neurotransmitters (NTs) γ-aminobutyrate (GABA), glycine (GLY), acetylcholine (ACH) and glutamate (GLU) as well as the amidated/acetylated γ-aminobutyrate (GABAneu) and the osmolyte molecule glycerol...... umbrella sampling simulations, which were conducted for the four naturally occurring NTs. Free energy profiles for ACH and GLU show a minimum of ∼2–3 kJ/mol close to the bilayer interface, while for GABA and GLY, a minimum of respectively ∼2 kJ/mol and ∼5 kJ/mol is observed when these NTs are located...

  10. Bilayer avalanche spin-diode logic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Joseph S., E-mail: joseph.friedman@u-psud.fr; Querlioz, Damien [Institut d’Electronique Fondamentale, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, 91405 Orsay (France); Fadel, Eric R. [Department of Materials Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wessels, Bruce W. [Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Sahakian, Alan V. [Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A novel spintronic computing paradigm is proposed and analyzed in which InSb p-n bilayer avalanche spin-diodes are cascaded to efficiently perform complex logic operations. This spin-diode logic family uses control wires to generate magnetic fields that modulate the resistance of the spin-diodes, and currents through these devices control the resistance of cascaded devices. Electromagnetic simulations are performed to demonstrate the cascading mechanism, and guidelines are provided for the development of this innovative computing technology. This cascading scheme permits compact logic circuits with switching speeds determined by electromagnetic wave propagation rather than electron motion, enabling high-performance spintronic computing.

  11. Rich Polymorphic Behavior of Wigner Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antlanger, Moritz; Kahl, Gerhard; Mazars, Martial; Šamaj, Ladislav; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2016-09-01

    Self-assembly into target structures is an efficient material design strategy. Combining analytical calculations and computational techniques of evolutionary and Monte Carlo types, we report about a remarkable structural variability of Wigner bilayer ground states, when charges are confined between parallel charged plates. Changing the interlayer separation, or the plate charge asymmetry, a cascade of ordered patterns emerges. At variance with the symmetric case phenomenology, the competition between commensurability features and charge neutralization leads to long range attraction, appearance of macroscopic charges, exotic phases, and nonconventional phase transitions with distinct critical indices, offering the possibility of a subtle, but precise and convenient control over patterns.

  12. Interference of the Hope Hemoglobin With Hemoglobin A1c Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sutirtha; Chanda, Dalia; Gain, Mithun; Krishnan, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is now considered to be the marker of choice in diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus, based on the results of certain landmark clinical trials. Herein, we report the case of a 52-year-old ethnic Southeast Asian Indian man with impaired glucose tolerance whose glycated hemoglobin (ie, HbA1c) levels, as measured via Bio-Rad D10 high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Roche Tina-quant immunoassay were 47.8% and 44.0%, respectively. No variant hemoglobin (Hb) peak was observed via the D10 chromatogram. We assayed the patient specimen on the Sebia MINICAP capillary electrophoresis platform; the HbA1c level was 6.8%, with a large variant Hb peak of 42.0%. This finding suggested the possible presence of the heterozygous Hb Hope, which can result in spuriously elevated HbA1c results on HPLC and turbidimetric immunoassays. Although the capillary electrophoresis system was able to identify the variant, the A1c results should not be considered accurate due to overlapping of the variant and adult Hb peaks on the electrophoretogram reading. Hb Hope is usually clinically silent but can present such analytical challenges. Through this case study, we critically discuss the limitations of various HbA1c assay methods, highlighting the fact that laboratory professionals need to be aware of occurrences of Hb Hope, to help ensure patient safety.

  13. Insights into Hemoglobin Assembly through in Vivo Mutagenesis of α-Hemoglobin Stabilizing Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandros, Eugene; Mollan, Todd L.; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yao, Yu; D'Souza, Janine; Gell, David A.; Olson, John S.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2012-01-01

    α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is believed to facilitate adult Hemoglobin A assembly and protect against toxic free α-globin subunits. Recombinant AHSP binds multiple forms of free α-globin to stabilize their structures and inhibit precipitation. However, AHSP also stimulates autooxidation of αO2 subunit and its rapid conversion to a partially unfolded bishistidyl hemichrome structure. To investigate these biochemical properties, we altered the evolutionarily conserved AHSP proline 30 in recombinantly expressed proteins and introduced identical mutations into the endogenous murine Ahsp gene. In vitro, the P30W AHSP variant bound oxygenated α chains with 30-fold increased affinity. Both P30W and P30A mutant proteins also caused decreased rates of αO2 autooxidation as compared with wild-type AHSP. Despite these abnormalities, mice harboring P30A or P30W Ahsp mutations exhibited no detectable defects in erythropoiesis at steady state or during induced stresses. Further biochemical studies revealed that the AHSP P30A and P30W substitutions had minimal effects on AHSP interactions with ferric α subunits. Together, our findings indicate that the ability of AHSP to stabilize nascent α chain folding intermediates prior to hemin reduction and incorporation into adult Hemoglobin A is physiologically more important than AHSP interactions with ferrous αO2 subunits. PMID:22287545

  14. Insights into hemoglobin assembly through in vivo mutagenesis of α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandros, Eugene; Mollan, Todd L; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yao, Yu; D'Souza, Janine; Gell, David A; Olson, John S; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2012-03-30

    α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is believed to facilitate adult Hemoglobin A assembly and protect against toxic free α-globin subunits. Recombinant AHSP binds multiple forms of free α-globin to stabilize their structures and inhibit precipitation. However, AHSP also stimulates autooxidation of αO(2) subunit and its rapid conversion to a partially unfolded bishistidyl hemichrome structure. To investigate these biochemical properties, we altered the evolutionarily conserved AHSP proline 30 in recombinantly expressed proteins and introduced identical mutations into the endogenous murine Ahsp gene. In vitro, the P30W AHSP variant bound oxygenated α chains with 30-fold increased affinity. Both P30W and P30A mutant proteins also caused decreased rates of αO(2) autooxidation as compared with wild-type AHSP. Despite these abnormalities, mice harboring P30A or P30W Ahsp mutations exhibited no detectable defects in erythropoiesis at steady state or during induced stresses. Further biochemical studies revealed that the AHSP P30A and P30W substitutions had minimal effects on AHSP interactions with ferric α subunits. Together, our findings indicate that the ability of AHSP to stabilize nascent α chain folding intermediates prior to hemin reduction and incorporation into adult Hemoglobin A is physiologically more important than AHSP interactions with ferrous αO(2) subunits.

  15. Bohr effect of hemoglobins: Accounting for differences in magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonjo, Kehinde O

    2015-09-01

    The basis of the difference in the Bohr effect of various hemoglobins has remained enigmatic for decades. Fourteen amino acid residues, identical in pairs and located at specific 'Bohr group positions' in human hemoglobin, are implicated in the Bohr effect. All 14 are present in mouse, 11 in dog, eight in pigeon and 13 in guinea pig hemoglobin. The Bohr data for human and mouse hemoglobin are identical: the 14 Bohr groups appear at identical positions in both molecules. The dog data are different from the human because three Bohr group positions are occupied by non-ionizable groups in dog hemoglobin; the pigeon data are vastly different from the human because six Bohr group positions are occupied by non-ionizable groups in pigeon hemoglobin. The guinea pig data are quite complex. Quantitative analyses showed that only the pigeon data could be fitted with the Wyman equation for the Bohr effect. We demonstrate that, apart from guinea pig hemoglobin, the difference between the Bohr effect of each of the other hemoglobins and of pigeon hemoglobin can be accounted for quantitatively on the basis of the occupation of some of their Bohr group positions by non-ionizable groups in pigeon hemoglobin. We attribute the anomalous guinea pig result to a new salt-bridge formed in its R2 quaternary structure between the terminal NH3(+) group of one β-chain and the COO(-) terminal group of the partner β-chain in the same molecule. The pKas of this NH3(+) group are 6.33 in the R2 and 4.59 in the T state.

  16. Effect of Multiple Mutations in the Hemoglobin- and Hemoglobin-Haptoglobin-Binding Proteins, HgpA, HgpB, and HgpC, of Haemophilus influenzae Type b

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, Daniel J; Whitby, Paul W.; Jin, Hongfan; Ren, Zhen; Stull, Terrence L.

    1999-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae requires heme for growth and can utilize hemoglobin and hemoglobin-haptoglobin as heme sources. We previously identified two hemoglobin- and hemoglobin-haptoglobin-binding proteins, HgpA and HgpB, in H. influenzae HI689. Insertional mutation of hgpA and hgpB, either singly or together, did not abrogate the ability to utilize or bind either hemoglobin or the hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex. A hemoglobin affinity purification method was used to isolate a protein of approxi...

  17. Cholesterol orientation and tilt modulus in DMPC bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Khelashvili, George; Pabst, Georg; Harries, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of hydrated bilayers containing mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and Cholesterol at various ratios, to study the effect of cholesterol concentration on its orientation, and to characterize the link between cholesterol tilt and overall phospholipid membrane organization. The simulations show a substantial probability for cholesterol molecules to transiently orient perpendicular to the bilayer normal, and suggest that cholesterol...

  18. Effect of Undulations on Surface Tension in Simulated Bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, S.J.; Mark, A.E.

    2001-01-01

    To understand the effect of the finite size of simulation cells on the equilibrium properties of bilayers, an extensive series of glycerolmonoolein bilayer molecular dynamics simulations in which the surface area and system size were systematically changed have been conducted. Systems ranging from

  19. Fluid lipid bilayers: Intermonolayer coupling and its thermodynamic manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Lyngs; Miao, Ling; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1998-01-01

    A fluid membrane of lipid bilayer consists of two individual molecular monolayers physically opposed to each other. This unique molecular architecture naturally necessitates the need to treat a lipid-bilayer membrane as one entity of two coupled two-dimensional systems (monolayers), each of which...

  20. Alpha-tocopherol inhibits pore formation in the oxidized bilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Boonnoy, Phansiri; Wong-ekkabut, Jirasak

    2016-01-01

    In biological membranes, alpha-tocopherols ({\\alpha}-toc; vitamin E) protect polyunsaturated lipids from free radicals. Although the interactions of {\\alpha}-toc with non-oxidized lipid bilayers have been studied, their on oxidized bilayers remain unknown. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of oxidized lipid bilayers were performed with varying concentrations of {\\alpha}-toc. Bilayers with 1-palmitoyl-2-lauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PLPC) lipids and its aldehyde derivatives at 1:1 ratio were studied. Our simulations show that oxidized lipids self-assemble into aggregates with a water pore rapidly developing across the lipid bilayer. The free energy of transporting an {\\alpha}-toc molecule in a lipid bilayer suggests that {\\alpha}-tocs can passively adsorb into the bilayer. When {\\alpha}-toc molecules were present at low concentrations in bilayers containing oxidized lipids, the formation of water pores was slowed down. At high {\\alpha}-toc concentra-tions, no pores were observ...

  1. Regulation of sodium channel function by bilayer elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbaek, Jens A; Birn, Pia; Hansen, Anker J

    2004-01-01

    be a general mechanism regulating membrane protein function, we examined whether voltage-dependent skeletal-muscle sodium channels, expressed in HEK293 cells, are regulated by bilayer elasticity, as monitored using gramicidin A (gA) channels. Nonphysiological amphiphiles (beta-octyl-glucoside, Genapol X-100......, Triton X-100, and reduced Triton X-100) that make lipid bilayers less "stiff", as measured using gA channels, shift the voltage dependence of sodium channel inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials. At low amphiphile concentration, the magnitude of the shift is linearly correlated to the change...... in gA channel lifetime. Cholesterol-depletion, which also reduces bilayer stiffness, causes a similar shift in sodium channel inactivation. These results provide strong support for the notion that bilayer-protein hydrophobic coupling allows the bilayer elastic properties to regulate membrane protein...

  2. Asymmetric heat transfer from nanoparticles in lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potdar, Dipti; Sammalkorpi, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the heat transfer properties of lipid bilayer - gold nanoparticle systems in which the nanoparticle acts as a heat source. The focus is on dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid bilayers and thiolated alcohol and alkyl functionalized nanoparticles as prototype hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanoparticles. We find hydrophilic nanoparticles which are partly in contact with the surrounding water environment are more efficient in transferring heat to the system than hydrophobic ones which reside surrounded by the membrane. This is because of the hydrogen bonding capability of the hydroxy pentanethiol and the more efficient heat conductivity through water than the lipid bilayer. Additionally, we find the heat conductance is strongly asymmetric and has a discontinuity between the bilayer leaflets. In total, the findings provide understanding on heat transport from localized heat sources in lipid bilayers and could bear significance, e.g., in engineering and controlling photoactivated triggering of liposomal systems.

  3. Thermotropic and Barotropic Phase Behavior of Phosphatidylcholine Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutake Tamai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilayers formed by phospholipids are frequently used as model biological membranes in various life science studies. A characteristic feature of phospholipid bilayers is to undergo a structural change called a phase transition in response to environmental changes of their surroundings. In this review, we focus our attention on phase transitions of some major phospholipids contained in biological membranes, phosphatidylcholines (PCs, depending on temperature and pressure. Bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, which is the most representative lipid in model membrane studies, will first be explained. Then, the bilayer phase behavior of various kinds of PCs with different molecular structures is revealed from the temperature–pressure phase diagrams, and the difference in phase stability among these PC bilayers is discussed in connection with the molecular structure of the PC molecules. Furthermore, the solvent effect on the phase behavior is also described briefly.

  4. Genomic organization and evolution of the Atlantic salmon hemoglobin repertoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Ruth B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomes of salmonids are considered pseudo-tetraploid undergoing reversion to a stable diploid state. Given the genome duplication and extensive biological data available for salmonids, they are excellent model organisms for studying comparative genomics, evolutionary processes, fates of duplicated genes and the genetic and physiological processes associated with complex behavioral phenotypes. The evolution of the tetrapod hemoglobin genes is well studied; however, little is known about the genomic organization and evolution of teleost hemoglobin genes, particularly those of salmonids. The Atlantic salmon serves as a representative salmonid species for genomics studies. Given the well documented role of hemoglobin in adaptation to varied environmental conditions as well as its use as a model protein for evolutionary analyses, an understanding of the genomic structure and organization of the Atlantic salmon α and β hemoglobin genes is of great interest. Results We identified four bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs comprising two hemoglobin gene clusters spanning the entire α and β hemoglobin gene repertoire of the Atlantic salmon genome. Their chromosomal locations were established using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis and linkage mapping, demonstrating that the two clusters are located on separate chromosomes. The BACs were sequenced and assembled into scaffolds, which were annotated for putatively functional and pseudogenized hemoglobin-like genes. This revealed that the tail-to-tail organization and alternating pattern of the α and β hemoglobin genes are well conserved in both clusters, as well as that the Atlantic salmon genome houses substantially more hemoglobin genes, including non-Bohr β globin genes, than the genomes of other teleosts that have been sequenced. Conclusions We suggest that the most parsimonious evolutionary path leading to the present organization of the Atlantic salmon

  5. Engineering Lipid Bilayer Membranes for Protein Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shuja Khan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipid membranes regulate the flow of nutrients and communication signaling between cells and protect the sub-cellular structures. Recent attempts to fabricate artificial systems using nanostructures that mimic the physiological properties of natural lipid bilayer membranes (LBM fused with transmembrane proteins have helped demonstrate the importance of temperature, pH, ionic strength, adsorption behavior, conformational reorientation and surface density in cellular membranes which all affect the incorporation of proteins on solid surfaces. Much of this work is performed on artificial templates made of polymer sponges or porous materials based on alumina, mica, and porous silicon (PSi surfaces. For example, porous silicon materials have high biocompatibility, biodegradability, and photoluminescence, which allow them to be used both as a support structure for lipid bilayers or a template to measure the electrochemical functionality of living cells grown over the surface as in vivo. The variety of these media, coupled with the complex physiological conditions present in living systems, warrant a summary and prospectus detailing which artificial systems provide the most promise for different biological conditions. This study summarizes the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS data on artificial biological membranes that are closely matched with previously published biological systems using both black lipid membrane and patch clamp techniques.

  6. Reversible Polarization Rotation in Epitaxial Ferroelectric Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Guangqing; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Hsin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Polarization rotation engineering is a promising path to giant dielectric and electromechanical responses in ferroelectric materials and devices. This work demonstrates robust and reversible in- to out-of-plane polarization rotation in ultrathin (nanoscale) epitaxial (001) tetragonal PbZr0.3Ti0.7O3...... (PZT-T)/rhombohedral PbZr0.55Ti0.45O3 (PZT-R) ferroelectric bilayers. An underlying 20 nm thick PZT-R layer reduces the symmetry in a 5 nm thick PZT-T layer by imposing an in-plane tensile strain while simultaneously decoupling the PZT-T layer from the substrate. This prevents clamping and facilitates...... large-scale polarization rotation switching (≈60 μC cm−2) and an effective d 33 response 500% (≈250 pm V−1) larger than the PZT-R layer alone. Furthermore, this enhancement is stable for more than 107 electrical switching cycles. These bilayers present a simple and highly controllable means to design...

  7. Theoretical study on stability of hybrid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thiago S.; de Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio; Azevedo, Sèrgio

    2015-04-01

    Motivated by the recent experimental realization of the hybrid nanostructure of graphene and boron nitride (h-BN) sheet, and studies of gap modulation by strain, we use first principles calculations based on density functional theory to investigate the effects of strain in hybrid bilayers composed of two monolayers of graphene with a nanodomain of {{B}3}{{N}3}. The calculations were made with two different approximations for the functional exchange-correlation, GGA and VDW-DF. We investigate the modification in the electronic structure and structural properties of various configurations of the hybrid bilayers. Among the configurations, those with Bernal stacking are found to be more stable when compared to the others. Studies of the compressive strain influence were made only in the structure that has been shown to be the most stable. We have found that the two approximations used in the calculations exhibit the same results for the electronic properties of all structures. The opening of the energy gap due to strain was possible in the calculations by using the GGA approximation, but the same does not happen in the calculations using the VDW-DF approximation. Our analysis shows that the VDW-DF approximation is better suited for studies involving surfaces.

  8. On distance variation effects on graphene bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, S.; Bhihi, M.; Labrim, H.; Belhaj, A.; Benyoussef, A.; El Kenz, A.; Loulidi, M.

    2014-06-01

    The opening of the energy gap and the total energy of the graphene-like bilayers are investigated using ab initio calculations. The studied model consists of a static single layer of graphene interacting with an extra dynamic one placed at a varying vertical distance d in the (AB) stacking arrangement. The effects of the vertical distance variation on the energy gap and the total energy of the system are discussed first. Starting from a distance around the van der Waals length, the energy gap does not depend on the vertical distance variation and the system exhibits graphene-like properties with minor deformations in the lattice size parameter and the energy dispersion behaviour around K points. However, it has been shown that the diagonal distance variation of the graphene-like bilayer modifies the electronic structure properties. This modification depends on an intermediate stacking arrangement between the (AA) and the (AB) configurations. It has been shown that the diagonal distance variation has an influence on the states of pz electrons in the (AB) arrangement and it can be explored to open the energy gap.

  9. Measuring Interlayer Shear Stress in Bilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guorui; Dai, Zhaohe; Wang, Yanlei; Tan, PingHeng; Liu, Luqi; Xu, Zhiping; Wei, Yueguang; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Zhong

    2017-07-01

    Monolayer two-dimensional (2D) crystals exhibit a host of intriguing properties, but the most exciting applications may come from stacking them into multilayer structures. Interlayer and interfacial shear interactions could play a crucial role in the performance and reliability of these applications, but little is known about the key parameters controlling shear deformation across the layers and interfaces between 2D materials. Herein, we report the first measurement of the interlayer shear stress of bilayer graphene based on pressurized microscale bubble loading devices. We demonstrate continuous growth of an interlayer shear zone outside the bubble edge and extract an interlayer shear stress of 40 kPa based on a membrane analysis for bilayer graphene bubbles. Meanwhile, a much higher interfacial shear stress of 1.64 MPa was determined for monolayer graphene on a silicon oxide substrate. Our results not only provide insights into the interfacial shear responses of the thinnest structures possible, but also establish an experimental method for characterizing the fundamental interlayer shear properties of the emerging 2D materials for potential applications in multilayer systems.

  10. Theory of skyrmions in bilayer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshibae, Wataru; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2017-02-01

    Skyrmion is an emergent particle consisting of many spins in magnets, and has many nontrivial features such as (i) nano-scale size, (ii) topological stability, (iii) gyrodynamics, and (iv) highly efficient spin transfer torque, which make skyrmions the promising candidate for the magnetic devices. Earlier works were focusing on the bulk or thin film of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) magnets, while recent advances are focusing on the skyrmions induced by the interfaces. Therefore, the superstructures naturally leads to the interacting skyrmions on different interfaces, which has unique dynamics compared with those on the same interface. Here we theoretically study the two skyrmions on bilayer systems employing micromagnetic simulations as well as the analysis based on Thiele equation, revealing the reaction between them such as the collision and bound state formation. The dynamics depends sensitively on the sign of DM interactions, i.e., helicities, and skyrmion numbers of two skyrmions, which can be well described by Thiele equation. Furthermore, we have found the colossal spin-transfer-torque effect of bound skyrmion pair on antiferromagnetically coupled bilayer systems.

  11. Relation between interfacial structure and mechanical properties in AlN/TiN bilayers investigated by EXAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersen, O. [Equipe de Recherche Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, 61, rue Albert Camus, F-68093 Mulhouse (France)]. E-mail: ovidiu.ersen@ipcms.u-strasbg.fr; Tuilier, M.-H. [Equipe de Recherche Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, 61, rue Albert Camus, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Thobor-Keck, A. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ecoulements les Surfaces et les Transferts (UMR CNRS 6000), ITSFC, 4, place Tharradin, BP 71427, F-25211 Montbeliard (France); Rousselot, C. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ecoulements les Surfaces et les Transferts (UMR CNRS 6000), ITSFC, 4, place Tharradin, BP 71427, F-25211 Montbeliard (France); Cortes, R. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee (UMR CNRS 7643), Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau cedex (France)

    2005-06-01

    The relation between the mechanical properties and the structure of AlN/TiN bilayers prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering in the 600 nm range is investigated. Al and Ti K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure is used in order to determine the local order around Al and Ti by comparison with 300 nm thick AlN and TiN single layers. The use of this powerful local probe allows the evidence of intermixing between AlN and TiN deposited layers, which is suggested by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy experiments. The effect of ionic bombardment applied at various steps of the deposition process is studied. The ionic bombardment applied during the deposit induces substantial changes in the absorption spectra that are assigned to a decrease of intermixing and an improvement of local order. Simulations of (Al, Ti)N ternary alloys Al and Ti K-edge absorption spectra for increasing mean occupation factors C {sub Ti} (C {sub Al}) of Ti(Al) substituting Al(Ti) in hexagonal AlN (cubic TiN) lattice are performed in order to determine the initial parameters for the fit of the experimental data. The refinements performed by using FEFFIT software demonstrate that an ionic bombardment applied during the deposition phase results in a significant reduction of the number of Al-Ti pairs within the bilayer and an improvement of the local order around Ti and Al, which is quantified by a decrease of the Debye-Waller parameters. This structural evolution is tentatively correlated with the improvement of mechanical properties of the bilayers.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations on deformation and fracture of bi-layer graphene with different stacking pattern under tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, M.D.; Wang, L. [College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Wang, C.Y. [Faculty of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Zhang, Q., E-mail: lxzhangqing@hhu.edu.cn [College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Ye, S.Y.; Wang, F.Y. [College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)

    2016-02-05

    Based on AIREBO (Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order) potential, molecular dynamics simulations (MDs) are performed to study the mechanical behavior of AB- and AA-stacked bi-layer graphene films (BGFs) under tension. Stress–strain relationship is established and deformation mechanism is investigated via morphology analysis. It is found that AA-stacked BGFs show wavy folds, i.e. the structural instability, and the local structure of AB-stacked BGFs transforms into AA-stacked ones during free relaxation. The values of the Young's modulus obtained for AA-stacked zigzag and armchair BGFs are 797.2 GPa and 727.4 GPa, and those of their AB-stacked counterparts are 646.7 GPa and 603.5 GPa, respectively. In comparison with single-layer graphene, low anisotropy is observed for BGFs, especially AB-stacked ones. During the tensile deformation, hexagonal cells at the edge of BGFs are found to transform into pentagonal rings and the number of such defects increases with the rise of tensile strain. - Highlights: • Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the mechanical behavior of AB- and AA-stacked bi-layer graphene films under tension. • Stress–strain relationship is established and deformation mechanism is investigated via morphology analysis. • AA-stacked graphene shows structural instability and the local structure of AB-stacked films transforms into AA-stacked in free relaxation. • Low anisotropy is observed for bi-layer graphene films, especially for AB-stacked ones.

  13. Hexagon functions and the three-loop remainder function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Lance J.; Drummond, James M.; von Hippel, Matt; Pennington, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    We present the three-loop remainder function, which describes the scattering of six gluons in the maximally-helicity-violating configuration in planar NN = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory, as a function of the three dual conformal cross ratios. The result can be expressed in terms of multiple Goncharov polylogarithms. We also employ a more restricted class of hexagon functions which have the correct branch cuts and certain other restrictions on their symbols. We classify all the hexagon functions through transcendental weight five, using the coproduct for their Hopf algebra iteratively, which amounts to a set of first-order differential equations. The three-loop remainder function is a particular weight-six hexagon function, whose symbol was determined previously. The differential equations can be integrated numerically for generic values of the cross ratios, or analytically in certain kinematic limits, including the near-collinear and multi-Regge limits. These limits allow us to impose constraints from the operator product expansion and multi-Regge factorization directly at the function level, and thereby to fix uniquely a set of Riemann ζ valued constants that could not be fixed at the level of the symbol. The near-collinear limits agree precisely with recent predictions by Basso, Sever and Vieira based on integrability. The multi-Regge limits agree with the factorization formula of Fadin and Lipatov, and determine three constants entering the impact factor at this order. We plot the three-loop remainder function for various slices of the Euclidean region of positive cross ratios, and compare it to the two-loop one. For large ranges of the cross ratios, the ratio of the three-loop to the two-loop remainder function is relatively constant, and close to -7.

  14. Hexagonal organization of Moloney murine leukemia virus capsid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Keith; McDermott, Jason; Barklis, Eric

    2002-06-20

    To help elucidate the mechanisms by which retrovirus structural proteins associate to form virus particles, we have examined membrane-bound assemblies of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) capsid (CA) proteins. Electron microscopy and image reconstruction techniques showed that CA dimers appear to function as organizational subunits of the cage-like, membrane-bound protein arrays. However, new three-dimensional (3D) data also were consistent with hexagonal (p6) assembly models. The p6 3D reconstructions of membrane-bound M-MuLV CA proteins gave unit cells of a = b = 80.3 A, c = 110 A, gamma = 120 degrees, in which six dimer units formed a cage lattice. Neighbor cage hole-to-hole distances were 45 A, while distances between hexagonal cage holes corresponded to unit cell lengths (80.3 A). The hexagonal model predicts two types of cage holes (trimer and hexamer holes), uses symmetric head-to-head dimer building blocks, and permits the introduction of lattice curvature by conversion of hexamer to pentamer units. The M-MuLV CA lattice is similar to those formed in helical tubes by HIV CA in that hexamer units surround cage holes of 25-30 A, but differs in that M-MuLV hexamer units appear to be CA dimers, whereas HIV CA units appear to be monomers. These results suggest that while general assembly principles apply to different retroviruses, clear assembly distinctions exist between these virus types. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  15. Preparation of porcine hemoglobin microcapsules of chitosan-sodium alginate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; ZHANG Jijuan; ZHAO Xinjuan; YU Yan

    2007-01-01

    Using an emulsification-gelation method,chitosansodium alginate-porcine hemoglobin microcapsules were prepared.Results show that these microcapsules have better forms and small granules with 1 μm size of the mean particle size.They possess a relatively narrow and normal Gaussian distribution.The loading efficiency of porcine hemoglobin (pHb) in microcapsules is more than 90%.The pHb released from microcapsules is extended for more than one month.Chitosan-sodium alginate-hemoglobin microcapsules are expected to become an artificial oxygen-carrying therapeutic agent with sustained release for intravenous injection.

  16. Hyperspectral imaging for dermal hemoglobin spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Peter J.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    1999-10-01

    It has been shown previously that images collected at selected wavelengths in a sufficiently narrow bandwidth can be used to produce maps of the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in the dermis. A four-wavelength algorithm has been developed based on a two-layer model of the skin, in which the blood is contained in the lower layer (dermis), while the upper layer attenuates some of the reflection and adds a clutter term. In the present work, the algorithm is compared analytically to simpler algorithms using three wavelengths and based on a single-layer model. It is shown through Monte-Carlo models that, for typical skin, the single-layer model is adequate to analyze data from fiber-optical reflectance spectroscopy, but the two-layer model produces better results for imaging systems. Although the model does not address the full complexity of reflectance of a two-layer skin, it has proven to be sufficient to recover the oxygen saturation, and perhaps other medically relevant information. The algorithm is demonstrated on a suction blister, where the epidermis is removed to reveal the underlying dermis. Applications for this imaging modality exist in dermatology, in surgery, and in developing treatment plans for various diseases.

  17. Glycosylated hemoglobin and hyperbaric oxygen coverage denials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, A D; Worth, E R; Weaver, L K

    2015-01-01

    Some Medicaid and Medicare fiscal intermediaries are denying hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients if the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) > 7.0%. We performed multiple PubMed searches for any diabetic wound healing clinical trial that documented HbA1c and had a wound healing endpoint. We scrutinized 30 peer-reviewed clinical trials, representing more than 4,400 patients. The average HbA1c from the intervention side of the studies was 8.6% (7.2% - 9.9%) and the control/sham side was 8.3% (6.0% - 10.6%). Twelve studies made a direct attempt to link HbA1c and wound healing. Four retrospective studies and one prospective cohort study assert that lower HbA1c favors wound healing, but review of the studies reveal design flaws that invalidate these conclusions. In total, 25 studies showed no direct correlation between HbA1c levels and wound healing. There was no randomized controlled trial (RCT) data demonstrating that HbA1c 7.0% is unfounded.

  18. PARALLEL ASSAY OF OXYGEN EQUILIBRIA OF HEMOGLOBIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Laura E.; Blinebry, Sara K.; Viscardi, Chelsea M.; Perez, Luis; Bonaventura, Joe; McMahon, Tim J.

    2013-01-01

    Methods to systematically analyze in parallel the function of multiple protein or cell samples in vivo or ex vivo (i.e. functional proteomics) in a controlled gaseous environment have thus far been limited. Here we describe an apparatus and procedure that enables, for the first time, parallel assay of oxygen equilibria in multiple samples. Using this apparatus, numerous simultaneous oxygen equilibrium curves (OECs) can be obtained under truly identical conditions from blood cell samples or purified hemoglobins (Hbs). We suggest that the ability to obtain these parallel datasets under identical conditions can be of immense value, both to biomedical researchers and clinicians who wish to monitor blood health, and to physiologists studying non-human organisms and the effects of climate change on these organisms. Parallel monitoring techniques are essential in order to better understand the functions of critical cellular proteins. The procedure can be applied to human studies, wherein an OEC can be analyzed in light of an individual’s entire genome. Here, we analyzed intraerythrocytic Hb, a protein that operates at the organism’s environmental interface and then comes into close contact with virtually all of the organism’s cells. The apparatus is theoretically scalable, and establishes a functional proteomic screen that can be correlated with genomic information on the same individuals. This new method is expected to accelerate our general understanding of protein function, an increasingly challenging objective as advances in proteomic and genomic throughput outpace the ability to study proteins’ functional properties. PMID:23827235

  19. Polychelated cryogels: hemoglobin adsorption from human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Kadir

    2017-02-01

    The separation and purification methods are extremely important for the hemoglobin (Hb) which is a crucial biomolecule. The adsorption technique is popular among these methods and the cryogels have been used quite much due to their macropores and interconnected flow channels. In this study, the Hb adsorption onto the Cu(II) immobilized poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-glycidyl methacrylate), poly(HEMA-GMA)-Cu(II), cryogels was investigated under different conditions (pH, interaction time, initial Hb concentration, temperature and ionic strength) to optimize adsorption conditions. The swelling test, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), surface area (BET), elemental and ICP-OES analysis were performed for the characterization of cryogels. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) molecule was used as a Cu(II)-chelating ligand. The Hb adsorption capacity of cryogels was determined as 193.8 mg Hb/g cryogel. The isolation of Hb from human blood was also studied under optimum adsorption conditions determined and the Hb (124.5 mg/g cryogel) was isolated. The adsorption model was investigated in the light of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models and it was determined to be more appropriate to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model.

  20. Corrosion resistance of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahvash, F.; Eissa, S.; Bordjiba, T.; Tavares, A. C.; Szkopek, T.; Siaj, M.

    2017-02-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a layered material with high thermal and chemical stability ideal for ultrathin corrosion resistant coatings. Here, we report the corrosion resistance of Cu with hBN grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that hBN layers inhibit Cu corrosion and oxygen reduction. We find that CVD grown hBN reduces the Cu corrosion rate by one order of magnitude compared to bare Cu, suggesting that this ultrathin layer can be employed as an atomically thin corrosion-inhibition coating.

  1. Crossover between tetrahedral and hexagonal structures in liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chara, Osvaldo [Instituto de Fisica de Liquidos y Sistemas Biologicos (IFLYSIB), CONICET - Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); McCarthy, Andres N., E-mail: amccarthy@iflysib.unlp.edu.a [Instituto de Fisica de Liquidos y Sistemas Biologicos (IFLYSIB), CONICET - Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); Grigera, J. Raul [Instituto de Fisica de Liquidos y Sistemas Biologicos (IFLYSIB), CONICET - Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina)

    2011-01-17

    It is widely accepted that liquid water structure is comprised of two closely interweaved components; i.e. tetrahedral (low density) and hexagonal (high density) structures. The relative amount of these components is temperature and pressure dependent. We propose an order parameter, based on the radial distribution function, that quantifies the relative structural composition at any defined temperature and pressure, thus establishing the crossover point in structural dominance. At 300 K this point lies close to 2 kbar, pressure at which water looses most of its 'anomalous' properties.

  2. Polyanionic Hexagons: X6n– (X = Si, Ge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masae Takahashi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the polyanionic hexagons of silicon and germanium, focusing on aromaticity. The chair-like structures of hexasila- and hexagermabenzene are similar to a nonaromatic cyclohexane (CH26 and dissimilar to aromatic D6h-symmetric benzene (CH6, although silicon and germanium are in the same group of the periodic table as carbon. Recently, six-membered silicon and germanium rings with extra electrons instead of conventional substituents, such as alkyl, aryl, etc., were calculated by us to have D6h symmetry and to be aromatic. We summarize here our main findings and the background needed to reach them, and propose a synthetically accessible molecule.

  3. Exciton optical transitions in a hexagonal boron nitride single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Museur, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers - LPL, CNRS UMR 7538, Institut Galilee, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Brasse, G.; Maine, S.; Ducastelle, F.; Loiseau, A. [ONERA - Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures - LEM, ONERA-CNRS, UMR 104, BP 72, 92322 Chatillon Cedex (France); Pierret, A. [ONERA - Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures - LEM, ONERA-CNRS, UMR 104, BP 72, 92322 Chatillon Cedex (France); CEA-CNRS, Institut Neel/CNRS, Universite J. Fourier, CEA/INAC/SP2M, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38 054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Attal-Tretout, B. [ONERA - Departement Mesures Physiques - DMPh, 27 Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Barjon, J. [GEMaC, Universite de Versailles St Quentin, CNRS Bellevue, 1 Place Aristide Briand, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Kanaev, A. [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procedes et des Materiaux - LSPM, CNRS UPR 3407, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2011-06-15

    Near band gap photoluminescence (PL) of a hexagonal boron nitride single crystal has been studied at cryogenic temperatures with synchrotron radiation excitation. The PL signal is dominated by trapped-exciton optical transitions, while the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra show features assigned to free excitons. Complementary photoconductivity and PLE measurements set the band gap transition energy to 6.4 eV and the Frenkel exciton binding energy larger than 380 meV. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Stable Tetrahedral Aluminum Sites in Hexagonal Mesoporous Aluminosilicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩宇; 刘宪春; 等

    2002-01-01

    A unique templating approach for the synthesis of hexagonal mesoporous aluminosilicates via self-assembly of pre-formed aluminosilcate nacoclusters with the templating micella formed by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) is described ,The obtained materials of MAS-5 are hydrothermally stable,which is shown by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis,Further-more,as charaacterized by NMR technique ,MAS-5 has taable tetrahedral aluminum sites that is the major contributions to the acidity of aluminosilicate molecular sieve ,and on non-frame-work aluminium species in the saples was observed.

  5. Inter-layer potential for hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leven, Itai; Hod, Oded, E-mail: odedhod@tau.ac.il [Department of Chemical Physics, School of Chemistry, The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Azuri, Ido; Kronik, Leeor [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovoth 76100 (Israel)

    2014-03-14

    A new interlayer force-field for layered hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) based structures is presented. The force-field contains three terms representing the interlayer attraction due to dispersive interactions, repulsion due to anisotropic overlaps of electron clouds, and monopolar electrostatic interactions. With appropriate parameterization, the potential is able to simultaneously capture well the binding and lateral sliding energies of planar h-BN based dimer systems as well as the interlayer telescoping and rotation of double walled boron-nitride nanotubes of different crystallographic orientations. The new potential thus allows for the accurate and efficient modeling and simulation of large-scale h-BN based layered structures.

  6. Chromatic Dispersion Compensation Using Photonic Crystal Fibers with Hexagonal Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick E. Reyes-Vera

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we show various configurations of photonic crystal fiber with hexagonal holes distribution for compensation of chromatic dispersion in optical communications links. The vectorial finite element method with scattering boundary condition was used for the analysis of the fibers. From these results it was estimated variation of the dispersion and the dispersion slope with respect to change in the diameter of the holes in the microstructure. With the above was possible to obtain values of dispersion in the C and L bands of telecommunications close to -850 ps / nm * km, with confinement losses 10-3 dB / km

  7. Hexagon POPE: effective particles and tree level resummation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova, Lucía

    2017-01-01

    We present the resummation of the full Pentagon Operator Product Expansion series of the hexagon Wilson loop in planar N=4 SYM at tree level. We do so by considering the one effective particle states formed by a fundamental flux tube excitation and an arbitrary number of the so called small fermions which are then integrated out. We derive the one effective particle measures at finite coupling. By evaluating these measures at tree level and summing over all one effective particle states we reproduce the full 6 point tree level amplitude.

  8. Hexagon POPE: effective particles and tree level resummation

    CERN Document Server

    Córdova, Lucía

    2016-01-01

    We present the resummation of the full Pentagon Operator Product Expansion series of the hexagon Wilson loop in planar $\\mathcal N=4$ SYM at tree level. We do so by considering the one effective particle states formed by a fundamental flux tube excitation and an arbitrary number of the so called "small fermions" which are then integrated out. We present our proposals for the one effective particle measures at finite coupling. By evaluating these measures at tree level and summing over all one effective particle states we reproduce the full 6 point tree level amplitude.

  9. Colorings of odd or even chirality on hexagonal lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cépas, O.

    2017-02-01

    We define two classes of colorings that have odd or even chirality on hexagonal lattices. This parity is an invariant in the dynamics of all loops, and explains why standard Monte Carlo algorithms are nonergodic. We argue that adding the motion of "stranded" loops allows for parity changes. By implementing this algorithm, we show that the even and odd classes have the same entropy. In general, they do not have the same number of states, except for the special geometry of long strips, where a Z2 symmetry between even and odd states occurs in the thermodynamic limit.

  10. Triangular Wavelets: An Isotropic Image Representation with Hexagonal Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensuke Fujinoki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces triangular wavelets, which are two-dimensional nonseparable biorthogonal wavelets defined on the regular triangular lattice. The construction that we propose is a simple nonseparable extension of one-dimensional interpolating wavelets followed by a straightforward generalization. The resulting three oriented high-pass filters are symmetrically arranged on the lattice, while low-pass filters have hexagonal symmetry, thereby allowing an isotropic image processing in the sense that three detail components are distributed uniformly. Applying the triangular filter to images, we explore applications that truly benefit from the triangular wavelets in comparison with the conventional tensor product transforms.

  11. Triangular Wavelets: An Isotropic Image Representation with Hexagonal Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujinoki Kensuke

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper introduces triangular wavelets, which are two-dimensional nonseparable biorthogonal wavelets defined on the regular triangular lattice. The construction that we propose is a simple nonseparable extension of one-dimensional interpolating wavelets followed by a straightforward generalization. The resulting three oriented high-pass filters are symmetrically arranged on the lattice, while low-pass filters have hexagonal symmetry, thereby allowing an isotropic image processing in the sense that three detail components are distributed uniformly. Applying the triangular filter to images, we explore applications that truly benefit from the triangular wavelets in comparison with the conventional tensor product transforms.

  12. Stable Tetrahedral Aluminum Sites in Hexagonal Mesoporous Aluminosilicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN,Yu(韩宇); YU,Yi(于沂); XU,Xian-Zhu(许宪祝); XIAO,Feng-Shou(肖丰收); LIU,Xian-Chun(刘宪春); HAN,Xiu-Wen(韩秀文); BAO,Xin-He(包信和)

    2002-01-01

    A unique templating approach for the synthesis of hexagonal mesoporous aluminosilicates via self-assembly of pre-formed aluminosilcate nanoclusters with the templating micella formed by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) is described.The obtained materials of MAS-5 are hydrothermally stable,which is shown by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Furthermore, as characterized by NMR technique, MAS-5 has stable tetrahedral aluminum sites that is the major contributions to the acidity of aluminosilicate molecular sieve, and on non-framework aluminium species in the samples was observed.

  13. Spin lattice coupling in multiferroic hexagonal YMnO3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sylvain Petit; Stéphane Pailhès; Xavier Fabrèges; Martine Hennion; Fernande Moussa; Loreynne Pinsard; Louis-Pierre Regnault; Alexander Ivanov

    2008-10-01

    Aiming to shed light on the possible existence of hybrid phonon—magnon excitations in multiferroic manganites, neutron scattering measurements have been un-dertaken at LLB and ILL on the particular case of hexagonal YMnO3. Our experiments focused on a transverse acoustic phonon mode polarized along the ferroelectric axis. The neutron data show that below the magnetic transition, this particular phonon mode splits in two different branches. The upper branch is found to coincide with a spin wave mode. This manifestation of a strong spin-lattice coupling is discussed in terms of a possible hybridization between the two types of elementary excitations, the phonon and magnons.

  14. Inter-layer potential for hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leven, Itai; Azuri, Ido; Kronik, Leeor; Hod, Oded

    2014-03-01

    A new interlayer force-field for layered hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) based structures is presented. The force-field contains three terms representing the interlayer attraction due to dispersive interactions, repulsion due to anisotropic overlaps of electron clouds, and monopolar electrostatic interactions. With appropriate parameterization, the potential is able to simultaneously capture well the binding and lateral sliding energies of planar h-BN based dimer systems as well as the interlayer telescoping and rotation of double walled boron-nitride nanotubes of different crystallographic orientations. The new potential thus allows for the accurate and efficient modeling and simulation of large-scale h-BN based layered structures.

  15. Molecular dynamics of halogenated graphene - hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemnes, G. A.; Visan, Camelia; Anghel, D. V.; Manolescu, A.

    2016-08-01

    The hybrid graphene - hexagonal boron nitride (G-hBN) systems offer new routes in the design of nanoscale electronic devices. Using ab initio density functional theory calculations we investigate the dynamics of zig-zag nanoribbons a few interatomic distances wide. Several structures are analyzed, namely pristine graphene, hBN and G-hBN systems. By passivating the nanoribbon edges with hydrogen and different halogen atoms, one may tune the electronic and mechanical properties, like the band gap energies and the natural frequencies of vibration.

  16. Different Effects of Long- and Short-Chain Ceramides on the Gel-Fluid and Lamellar-Hexagonal Transitions of Phospholipids: A Calorimetric, NMR, and X-Ray Diffraction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sot, Jesús; Aranda, Francisco J.; Collado, M.-Isabel; Goñi, Félix M.; Alonso, Alicia

    2005-01-01

    The effects on dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DEPE) bilayers of ceramides containing different N-acyl chains have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry small angle x-ray diffraction and 31P-NMR spectroscopy. N-palmitoyl (Cer16), N-hexanoyl (Cer6), and N-acetyl (Cer2) sphingosines have been used. Both the gel-fluid and the lamellar-inverted hexagonal transitions of DEPE have been examined in the presence of the various ceramides in the 0-25 mol % concentration range. Pure hydrated ceramides exhibit cooperative endothermic order-disorder transitions at 93°C (Cer16), 60°C (Cer6), and 54°C (Cer2). In DEPE bilayers, Cer16 does not mix with the phospholipid in the gel phase, giving rise to high-melting ceramide-rich domains. Cer16 favors the lamellar-hexagonal transition of DEPE, decreasing the transition temperature. Cer2, on the other hand, is soluble in the gel phase of DEPE, decreasing the gel-fluid and increasing the lamellar-hexagonal transition temperatures, thus effectively stabilizing the lamellar fluid phase. In addition, Cer2 was peculiar in that no equilibrium could be reached for the Cer2-DEPE mixture above 60°C, the lamellar-hexagonal transition shifting with time to temperatures beyond the instrumental range. The properties of Cer6 are intermediate between those of the other two, this ceramide decreasing both the gel-fluid and lamellar-hexagonal transition temperatures. Temperature-composition diagrams have been constructed for the mixtures of DEPE with each of the three ceramides. The different behavior of the long- and short-chain ceramides can be rationalized in terms of their different molecular geometries, Cer16 favoring negative curvature in the monolayers, thus inverted phases, and the opposite being true of the micelle-forming Cer2. These differences may be at the origin of the different physiological effects that are sometimes observed for the long- and short-chain ceramides. PMID:15695626

  17. Substrate temperature influence on W/WCN{sub x} bilayers grown by pulsed vacuum arc discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ospina, R.; Escobar, D. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Arango, P.J.; Jurado, J.F. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia)

    2012-04-01

    W/WCN{sub x} coatings were produced by using a repetitive pulsed vacuum arc discharge on stainless-steel 304 substrates, varying the substrate temperature from room temperature to 200 Degree-Sign C. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used for determining W, C and N concentrations dependence on the substrate temperature. A competition between C and N can be observed. Atomic force microscopy was employed for obtaining the thickness and grain size that present similar tendencies as a function of the temperature. X-ray diffraction characterization showed phases of W and {alpha}-WCN (hexagonal). Raman spectra for all substrate temperatures were obtained, presenting two peaks corresponding to D (disorder) and G (graphite) bands in the region of 1100-1700 cm{sup -1} due to the amorphous carbon. As an important conclusion, it was stated that substrate temperature has strong influence on the structure, chemical composition and morphology of W/WCN{sub x} bilayers, caused by the competition between carbon and nitrogen.

  18. Effects of Dimethyl Sulfoxide on Surface Water near Phospholipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuno; Pincus, Philip A; Hyeon, Changbong

    2016-12-06

    Despite much effort to probe the properties of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution, the effects of DMSO on water, especially near plasma membrane surfaces, still remain elusive. By performing molecular dynamics simulations at varying DMSO concentrations (XDMSO), we study how DMSO affects structural and dynamical properties of water in the vicinity of phospholipid bilayers. As proposed by a number of experiments, our simulations confirm that DMSO induces dehydration from bilayer surfaces and disrupts the H-bond structure of water. However, DMSO-enhanced water diffusivity at solvent-bilayer interfaces, an intriguing discovery reported by a spin-label measurement, is not confirmed in our simulations. To resolve this discrepancy, we examine the location of the spin label (Tempo) relative to the solvent-bilayer interface. In accord with the evidence in the literature, our simulations, which explicitly model Tempo-phosphatidylcholine, find that the Tempo moiety is equilibrated at ∼8-10 Å below the bilayer surface. Furthermore, the DMSO-enhanced surface-water diffusion is confirmed only when water diffusion is analyzed around the Tempo moiety that is immersed below the bilayer surface, which implies that the experimentally detected signal of water using Tempo stems from the interior of bilayers, not from the interface. Our analysis finds that the increase of water diffusion below the bilayer surface is coupled to the increase of area per lipid with an increasing XDMSO(≲10mol%). Underscoring the hydrophobic nature of the Tempo moiety, our study calls for careful re-evaluation of the use of Tempo in measurements on lipid bilayer surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental demonstration of a bilayer thermal cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tiancheng; Bai, Xue; Gao, Dongliang; Thong, John T L; Li, Baowen; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2014-02-07

    Invisibility has attracted intensive research in various communities, e.g., optics, electromagnetics, acoustics, thermodynamics, dc, etc. However, many experimental demonstrations have only been achieved by virtue of simplified approaches due to the inhomogeneous and extreme parameters imposed by the transformation-optic method, and usually require a challenging realization with metamaterials. In this Letter, we demonstrate a bilayer thermal cloak made of bulk isotropic materials, and it has been validated as an exact cloak. We experimentally verified its ability to maintain the heat front and its heat protection capabilities in a 2D proof-of-concept experiment. The robustness of this scheme is validated in both 2D (including oblique heat front incidence) and 3D configurations. The proposed scheme may open a new avenue to control the diffusive heat flow in ways inconceivable with phonons, and also inspire new alternatives to the functionalities promised by transformation optics.

  20. Space charge and screening in bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeisky, Eugene B.; Straley, Joseph P.; Abrams, Daniel L.

    2016-11-01

    Undoped bilayer graphene is a two-dimensional semimetal with a low-energy excitation spectrum that is parabolic in the momentum. As a result, the screening of an arbitrary external charge Ze is accompanied by a reconstruction of the ground state: valence band electrons (for Z  >  0) are promoted to form a space charge around the charge while the holes leave the physical picture. The outcome is a flat neutral object resembling the regular atom except that for Z\\gg 1 it is described by a strictly linear Thomas-Fermi theory. This theory also predicts that the bilayer’s static dielectric constant is the same as that of a two-dimensional electron gas in the long-wavelength limit.

  1. Oxygen diffusion in bilayer polymer films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars; Zebger, Ingo; Tofte, Jannik Pentti;

    2004-01-01

    Experiments to quantify oxygen diffusion have been performed on polymer samples in which a film of poly(ethylene-co-norbornene) was cast onto a film of polystyrene which, in turn, was cast onto an oxygen-impermeable substrate. In the technique employed, the time evolution of oxygen transport...... through the film of poly(ethylene-co-norbornene) and into the polystyrene film was monitored using the phosphorescence of singlet oxygen as a spectroscopic probe. To analyze the data, it was necessary to solve Fick's second law of diffusion for both polymer films. Tractable analytical and numerical...... solutions were obtained for the problem. Moreover, the numerical solution is sufficiently general that it can be used to simulate oxygen concentration profiles in films consisting of more than two layers. Data obtained from the bilayer films yield a diffusion coefficient for oxygen in poly...

  2. Astyanax scabripinnis (Pisces: Characidae hemoglobins: structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. LANDINI

    Full Text Available Electrophoretic patterns of hemoglobins, Root effect, Bohr effect in blood and stripped hemoglobin, Hb-O2 affinity GTP modulation of Astyanax scabripinnis (lambari, caught at three different altitudes in Ribeirão Grande, near Campos do Jordão (São Paulo, are described. All populations showed the same electrophoretic patterns: two cathodal components in starch gel. Normal Bohr effect values were found in these three populations both in blood (phi = -0,11 and stripped hemoglobin (phi = -0,12. Different blood O2 affinities collected in fish of these 3 populations were detected. GTP has a large influence on Hb-O2 binding properties in A. scabripinnis. Stripped hemoglobin shows small Root effect. The addition of triphosphated nucleotides increases this effect. GTP is more effective than ATP on enhancing Root effect. Oxygen availability in water can be the factor responsible for differences found in blood O2 affinity.

  3. Postpartum hemorrhage is related to the hemoglobin levels at labor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kaima A. Frass

    2015-01-06

    Jan 6, 2015 ... tion (Hb < 10) during emergency cesarean delivery and to assess the Hb level at which .... hemoglobin and oxygen to uterus causing tissue enzymes and ... loon tamponade and systemic pelvic devascularization were.

  4. MECHANISM OF THE OXIDATION OF HEMOGLOBIN BY COPPER (II COMPLXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. BAYATI

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available An outer sphere electron transfer mechanism by which human hemoglobin reduces the complexes of copper(II and, in turn, is oxidized to methemoglobin has been characterized. We have found that the rate of oxidation of hemoglobin is a function of pH, temperature, concentration of copper(II, and the environment of the hemoglobin. Prior to oxidation, copper(II complex binds to specific sites on the surface of the protein by losing one or more of its ligands, forming a ternary complex. This process is followed by electron transfer between the Cu(II and Fe(H with the Cu(II-deoxyhemoglobin being the active intermediate. The dominant factors which govern the rate of oxidation of hemoglobin by coppcr(I I complexes seem to be the stability constant of the Cu(II complexes and the overall redox potential of the ternary complex.

  5. Lower versus Higher Hemoglobin Threshold for Transfusion in Septic Shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusions are frequently given to patients with septic shock. However, the benefits and harms of different hemoglobin thresholds for transfusion have not been established. METHODS: In this multicenter, parallel-group trial, we randomly assigned patients in the intensive care...... unit (ICU) who had septic shock and a hemoglobin concentration of 9 g per deciliter or less to receive 1 unit of leukoreduced red cells when the hemoglobin level was 7 g per deciliter or less (lower threshold) or when the level was 9 g per deciliter or less (higher threshold) during the ICU stay...... were similar in the two intervention groups. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with septic shock, mortality at 90 days and rates of ischemic events and use of life support were similar among those assigned to blood transfusion at a higher hemoglobin threshold and those assigned to blood transfusion...

  6. Comparison of Hemoglobins from Various Subjects Living in Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RINI PUSPITANINGRUM

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to obtain the different characteristics of haemoglobin molecules in subjects under hypoxic condition, namely eel, catfish, suckermouth fish, green sea turtle using an electrophoresis technique. We used human umbilical cord blood and thalassemia patient blood, as well as a normal adult-human blood as controls. The proteins obtained after electrophoresis process were stained with two different colouring techniques, each based on different principles. Both staining techniques gave practically identical results. Subject that live in hypoxic condition has a different haemoglobin in comparison to the one found in adult human live in normal oxygen condition (normoxia. These hypoxia-adapted or -needed hemoglobin migrate slower than adult human hemoglobin from normoxia. This observation suggests that hemoglobin which is needed to live in hypoxic condition or environment is a different molecule. Whether this hemoglobin from hypoxic condition has a higher affinity to oxygen is not yet known.

  7. The effects of globotriaosylceramide tail saturation level on bilayer phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pezeshkian, Weria; Chaban, Vitaly V; Johannes, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    of the Gb3 concentration and its acyl chain saturation on the phase behaviour of a mixed bilayer of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine and Gb3. The simulation results show that: (1) the Gb3 acyl chains (longer tails) from one leaflet interdigitate into the opposing leaflet and lead to significant bilayer...... rigidification and immobilisation of the lipid tails. S-Gb3 can form a highly ordered, relatively immobile phase which is resistant to bending while these changes for U-Gb3 are not significant. (2) At low concentrations of Gb3, U-Gb3 and S-Gb3 have a similar impact on the bilayer reminiscent of the effect...

  8. Multiscale molecular modeling of tertiary supported lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranz, Holden T.; Faller, Roland

    2015-08-01

    Ternary lipid bilayer systems assembled from mixtures of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and cholesterol have been studied using coarse-grained molecular dynamics at biologically relevant temperatures (280 K to 310 K), which are between the chain melting temperatures of the pure lipid component. Free lipid bilayers were simulated using the MARTINI model (Stage I) and a variant with water-water interactions reduced to 76% (Stage II). The latter was subsequently used for preparing supported lipid bilayer simulations (Stage III). Clustering of like lipids was observed, but the simulation timescale did not yield larger phaseseparated domains.

  9. Modeling liquid crystal bilayer structures with minimal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enlow, J D; Enlow, R L; McGrath, K M; Tate, M W

    2004-01-22

    This paper describes a new convenient and accurate method of calculating x-ray diffraction integrated intensities from detailed cubic bilayer structures. The method is employed to investigate the structure of a particular surfactant system (didodecyldimethylammonium bromide in a solution of oil and heavy water), for which single-crystal experimental data have recently been collected. The diffracted peak intensities correlate well with theoretical structures based on mathematical minimal surfaces. Optimized electron density profiles of the bilayer are presented, providing new insight into key features of the bilayer structure.

  10. Charge detection in a bilayer graphene quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fringes, Stefan; Norda, Caroline; Dauber, Jan; Engels, Stephan [JARA-FIT and II, Institute of Physics B, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Volk, Christian; Terres, Bernat; Stampfer, Christoph [JARA-FIT and II, Institute of Physics B, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-8/9), Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Trellenkamp, Stefan [Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-8/9), Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    We show measurements on a bilayer graphene quantum dot (QD) with an integrated charge detector. The focus lies on enabling charge detection with a 30 nm wide bilayer graphene nanoribbon located approximately 35 nm next to a bilayer graphene QD with an island diameter of about 100 nm. Local resonances in the nanoribbon can be successfully used to detect individual charging events in the dot even in regimes where the QD Coulomb peaks cannot be measured by conventional techniques. False color atomic force microscope image of the investigated device. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Spin Hall magnetoresistance in antiferromagnet/normal metal bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the emergence of spin Hall magnetoresistance in a magnetic bilayer composed of a normal metal adjacent to an antiferromagnet. Based on a recently derived drift diffusion equation, we show that the resistance of the bilayer depends on the relative angle between the direction transverse to the current flow and the Néel order parameter. While this effect presents striking similarities with the spin Hall magnetoresistance recently reported in ferromagnetic bilayers, its physical origin is attributed to the anisotropic spin relaxation of itinerant spins in the antiferromagnet.

  12. Application of genetic algorithm to hexagon-based motion estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Chih-Ming; Cheng, Wan-Shu; Jeng, Jyh-Horng

    2014-01-01

    With the improvement of science and technology, the development of the network, and the exploitation of the HDTV, the demands of audio and video become more and more important. Depending on the video coding technology would be the solution for achieving these requirements. Motion estimation, which removes the redundancy in video frames, plays an important role in the video coding. Therefore, many experts devote themselves to the issues. The existing fast algorithms rely on the assumption that the matching error decreases monotonically as the searched point moves closer to the global optimum. However, genetic algorithm is not fundamentally limited to this restriction. The character would help the proposed scheme to search the mean square error closer to the algorithm of full search than those fast algorithms. The aim of this paper is to propose a new technique which focuses on combing the hexagon-based search algorithm, which is faster than diamond search, and genetic algorithm. Experiments are performed to demonstrate the encoding speed and accuracy of hexagon-based search pattern method and proposed method.

  13. Vortex solitons at the interface separating square and hexagonal lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jović Savić, Dragana, E-mail: jovic@ipb.ac.rs; Piper, Aleksandra; Žikić, Radomir; Timotijević, Dejan

    2015-06-19

    Vortex solitons at the interface separating two different photonic lattices – square and hexagonal – are demonstrated numerically. We consider the conditions for the existence of discrete vortex states at such interfaces and develop a concise picture of different scenarios of the vortex solutions behavior. Various vortices with different size and topological charges are considered, as well as various lattice interfaces. A novel type of discrete vortex surface solitons in a form of five-lobe solution is observed. Besides stable three-lobe and six-lobe discrete surface modes propagating for long distances, we observe various oscillatory vortex surface solitons, as well as dynamical instabilities of different kinds of solutions and study their angular momentum. Dynamical instabilities occur for higher values of the propagation constant, or at higher beam powers. - Highlights: • We demonstrate vortex solitons at the square–hexagonal photonic lattice interface. • A novel type of five-lobe surface vortex solitons is observed. • Different phase structures of surface solutions are studied. • Orbital angular momentum transfer of such solutions is investigated.

  14. Experimental investigation of the coolability of blocked hexagonal bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hózer, Zoltán, E-mail: zoltan.hozer@energia.mta.hu; Nagy, Imre; Kunstár, Mihály; Szabó, Péter; Vér, Nóra; Farkas, Róbert; Trosztel, István; Vimi, András

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Experiments were performed with electrically heated hexagonal fuel bundles. • Coolability of ballooned VVER-440 type bundle was confirmed up to high blockage rate. • Pellet relocation effect causes delay in the cool-down of the bundle. • The bypass line does not prevent the reflood of ballooned fuel rods. - Abstract: The CODEX-COOL experimental series was carried out in order to evaluate the effect of ballooning and pellet relocation in hexagonal bundles on the coolability of fuel rods after a LOCA event. The effects of blockage geometry, coolant flowrate, initial temperature and axial profile were investigated. The experimental results confirmed that a VVER bundle up to 80% blockage rate remains coolable after a LOCA event under design basis conditions. The ballooned section creates some obstacles for the cooling water during reflood of the bundle, but this effect causes only a short delay in the cooling down of the hot fuel rods. The accumulation of fuel pellet debris in the ballooned volume results in a local power peak, which leads to further slowing down of quench front.

  15. FAINT LUMINESCENT RING OVER SATURN’S POLAR HEXAGON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriani, Alberto; D’Aversa, Emiliano; Oliva, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico [Institute of Space Astrophysics and Planetology of INAF, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Moriconi, Maria Luisa, E-mail: alberto.adriani@iaps.inaf.it [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate of CNR, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy)

    2015-07-20

    Springtime insolation is presently advancing across Saturn's north polar region. Early solar radiation scattered through the gaseous giant's atmosphere gives a unique opportunity to sound the atmospheric structure at its upper troposphere/lower stratosphere at high latitudes. Here, we report the detection of a tenuous bright structure in Saturn's northern polar cap corresponding to the hexagon equatorward boundary, observed by Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on 2013 June. The structure is spectrally characterized by an anomalously enhanced intensity in the 3610–3730 nm wavelength range and near 2500 nm, pertaining to relatively low opacity windows between strong methane absorption bands. Our first results suggest that a strong forward scattering by tropospheric clouds, higher in respect to the surrounding cloud deck, can be responsible for the enhanced intensity of the feature. This can be consistent with the atmospheric dynamics associated with the jet stream embedded in the polar hexagon. Further investigations at higher spectral resolution are needed to better assess the vertical distribution and microphysics of the clouds in this interesting region.

  16. Spin-orbit coupling in a hexagonal ring of pendula

    CERN Document Server

    Salerno, Grazia; Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M; Taxis, Ludovic; Pugno, Nicola M; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-01-01

    We consider the mechanical motion of a system of six macroscopic pendula which are connected with springs and arranged in a hexagonal geometry. When the springs are pre-tensioned, the coupling between neighbouring pendula along the longitudinal (L) and the transverse (T) directions are different: identifying the motion along the L and T directions as a spin-like degree of freedom, we theoretically and experimentally verify that the pre-tensioned springs result in a tunable spin-orbit coupling. We elucidate the structure of such a spin-orbit coupling in the extended two-dimensional honeycomb lattice, making connections to physics of graphene. The experimental frequencies and the oscillation patterns of the eigenmodes for the hexagonal ring of pendula are extracted from a spectral analysis of the motion of the pendula in response to an external excitation and are found to be in good agreement with our theoretical predictions. We anticipate that extending this classical analogue of quantum mechanical spin-orbit ...

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis and chromic properties of hexagonal WO3 nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Hua-Jun; Chen Ya-Qi; Yu Fang; Peng Yue-Hua; He Xiong-Wu; Zhao Ding; Tang Dong-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports that highly purified hexagonal WO3 nanowires are synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. The as-synthesized WO3 nanowires are investigated in detail by ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectroscopy and electrical transport measurements under different conditions. It finds that the optical band gap and the diffuse reflection coefficient in the wavelength region above 450 nm of WO3 nanowires decrease observably upon exposure to ultraviolet light or NH3 gas. It is also found that there are electrons being trapped or released in individual WO3 nanowires when scanning bias voltage in different directions upon exposure to ultraviolet and NH3 gas. The experimental results suggest that the chromic properties might be attributed to the injection/extraction of hydrogen ions induced by ultraviolet light irradiation in air or creation/annihilation of oxygen vacancies induced by NH3 gas exposure, which serve as colour centres and trap electrons as polarons. The experimental results also suggest that the hexagonal WO3 nanowires will be a good candidate for sensing reduced gas such as NH3.

  18. OUT-OF-PLANE COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES OF HEXAGONAL PAPER HONEYCOMBS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dongmei; WANG Zhiwei

    2007-01-01

    The compressive behaviour of paper honeycombs is studied by means of an experimental analysis. Experiment results show how geometry aspects of hexagonal paper honeycombs, e.g. the height of paper honeycomb, the thickness and length of honeycomb cell-wall, the drawing ratio of hexagonal honeycomb, affect the compressive properties of the paper honeycombs. It is in good agreement with the theory model. The constraint factor K of the critical buckling stress is mainly determined by the length of honeycomb cell-wall. It can be described as K=1.54 for B type paper honeycombs and K=3.32 for D type paper honeycombs. The plateau stress is the power exponent function of the thickness to length ratio of honeycomb cell-wall, and the experiment results show that the constant is 13.2 and the power exponent is 1.77. The research results can be used to characterize and improve efficiently the compressive properties of paper honeycombs.

  19. Band gap effects of hexagonal boron nitride using oxygen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevak Singh, Ram; Leong Chow, Wai [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Yingjie Tay, Roland [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Temasek Laboratories-NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Hon Tsang, Siu [Temasek Laboratories-NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Mallick, Govind [Temasek Laboratories-NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States); Tong Teo, Edwin Hang, E-mail: htteo@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-04-21

    Tuning of band gap of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been a challenging problem due to its inherent chemical stability and inertness. In this work, we report the changes in band gaps in a few layers of chemical vapor deposition processed as-grown h-BN using a simple oxygen plasma treatment. Optical absorption spectra show a trend of band gap narrowing monotonically from 6 eV of pristine h-BN to 4.31 eV when exposed to oxygen plasma for 12 s. The narrowing of band gap causes the reduction in electrical resistance by ∼100 fold. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results of plasma treated hexagonal boron nitride surface show the predominant doping of oxygen for the nitrogen vacancy. Energy sub-band formations inside the band gap of h-BN, due to the incorporation of oxygen dopants, cause a red shift in absorption edge corresponding to the band gap narrowing.

  20. Thermally induced fluid reversed hexagonal (H(II)) mesophase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar-Yuli, Idit; Wachtel, Ellen; Shalev, Deborah E; Moshe, Hagai; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2007-12-06

    In the present study we characterized the microstructures of the Lc and HII phases in a glycerol monooleate (GMO)/tricaprylin (TAG)/water mixture as a function of temperature. We studied the factors that govern the formation of a low-viscosity HII phase at relatively elevated temperatures (>35 degrees C). This phase has very valuable physical characteristics and properties. The techniques used were differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS and SAXS, respectively), NMR (self-diffusion and (2)H NMR), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies. The reverse hexagonal phase exhibited relatively rapid flow of water in the inner channels within the densely packed cylindrical aggregates of GMO with TAG molecules located in the interstices. The existence of two water diffusion peaks reflects the existence of both mobile water and hydration water at the GMO-water interface (hydrogen exchange between the GMO hydroxyls and water molecules). Above 35 degrees C, the sample became fluid yet hexagonal symmetry was maintained. The fluidity of the HII phase is explained by a significant reduction in the domain size and also perhaps cylinder length. This phenomenon was characterized by higher mobility of the GMO, lower mobility of the water, and a significant dehydration process.

  1. Asymptotic Analysis of Fiber-Reinforced Composites of Hexagonal Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Andrianov, Igor V.; Pacheco, Pedro M. C. L.; Savi, Marcelo A.; Starushenko, Galina A.

    2016-08-01

    The fiber-reinforced composite materials with periodic cylindrical inclusions of a circular cross-section arranged in a hexagonal array are analyzed. The governing analytical relations of the thermal conductivity problem for such composites are obtained using the asymptotic homogenization method. The lubrication theory is applied for the asymptotic solution of the unit cell problems in the cases of inclusions of large and close to limit diameters, and for inclusions with high conductivity. The lubrication method is further generalized to the cases of finite values of the physical properties of inclusions, as well as for the cases of medium-sized inclusions. The analytical formulas for the effective coefficient of thermal conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composite materials of a hexagonal structure are derived in the cases of small conductivity of inclusions, as well as in the cases of extremely low conductivity of inclusions. The three-phase composite model (TPhM) is applied for solving the unit cell problems in the cases of the inclusions with small diameters, and the asymptotic analysis of the obtained solutions is performed for inclusions of small sizes. The obtained results are analyzed and illustrated graphically, and the limits of their applicability are evaluated. They are compared with the known numerical and asymptotic data in some particular cases, and very good agreement is demonstrated.

  2. Estimation of contact angle for hydrophobic silica nanoparticles in their hexagonally ordered layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detrich, Ádám; Nyári, Mária; Volentiru, Emőke; Hórvölgyi, Zoltán, E-mail: zhorvolgyi@mail.bme.hu

    2013-07-15

    Wetting properties of bilayered nanostructured coatings were studied in this work. Coatings were prepared by stratifying a compact silica sol–gel (SG) film and a Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) layer of differently sized (84, 131 and 227 nm) Stöber silica particles onto glass substrates. Joint high temperature annealing of the layers increased the mechanical stability of the particulate film facilitating its further investigations. Regular structure of LB layers allowed us to carry out wetting model investigations. Close-packed arrangement of particles was reinforced by optical measurements. Transmittance spectra of LB films were taken and evaluated by a theoretical model. Resulting effective refractive index and film thickness values indicated a good agreement between the real and the supposed (hexagonally close packed, monodisperse spherical particles) layer structure. It was confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images, too. Advancing and receding water contact angles (CA) on differently (with mono- and bifunctional chlorosilanes) hydrophobized SG and combined films were measured applying the sessile drop method. SG films showed approximately the same CA-s after different silylation processes without considerable contact angle hysteresis (CAH). In case of combined films ca. 30° higher advancing CA-s were measured at stronger silylation and only the milder silylation resulted in significant CAH. It was explained by the surface heterogeneity of constituent particles. Layers of differently sized particles showed the same wetting properties in all cases in agreement to the Cassie–Baxter equation which was used for the estimation of CA values for the individual silica particles (88–90° and 105–106° depending on the silylation conditions). - Highlights: • Wetting of silica sol–gel films and LB layers of Stöber silica particles was studied. • Close-packed structure of LB layers was justified by optical and FESEM studies. • Only

  3. The use of virtual ground to control transmembrane voltages and measure bilayer currents in serial arrays of droplet interface bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarles, Stephen A.

    2013-09-01

    The droplet interface bilayer (DIB) is a simple technique for constructing a stable lipid bilayer at the interface of two lipid-encased water droplets submerged in oil. Networks of DIBs formed by connecting more than two droplets constitute a new form of modular biomolecular smart material, where the transduction properties of a single lipid bilayer can affect the actions performed at other interface bilayers in the network via diffusion through the aqueous environments of shared droplet connections. The passive electrical properties of a lipid bilayer and the arrangement of droplets that determine the paths for transport in the network require specific electrical control to stimulate and interrogate each bilayer. Here, we explore the use of virtual ground for electrodes inserted into specific droplets in the network and employ a multichannel patch clamp amplifier to characterize bilayer formation and ion-channel activity in a serial DIB array. Analysis of serial connections of DIBs is discussed to understand how assigning electrode connections to the measurement device can be used to measure activity across all lipid membranes within a network. Serial arrays of DIBs are assembled using the regulated attachment method within a multi-compartment flexible substrate, and wire-type electrodes inserted into each droplet compartment of the substrate enable the application of voltage and measurement of current in each droplet in the array.

  4. Thalassemia and Hemoglobin E in Southern Thai Blood Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Manit Nuinoon; Kwanta Kruachan; Warachaya Sengking; Dararat Horpet; Ubol Sungyuan

    2014-01-01

    Thalassemia and hemoglobin E (Hb E) are common in Thailand. Individuals with thalassemia trait usually have a normal hemoglobin concentration or mild anemia. Therefore, thalassemic individuals who have minimum acceptable Hb level may be accepted as blood donors. This study was aimed at determining the frequency of α-thalassemia 1 trait, β-thalassemia trait, and Hb E-related syndromes in Southern Thai blood donors. One hundred and sixteen voluntary blood donors, Southern Thailand origin, were ...

  5. Effects of thyroid status on glycated hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Bhattacharjee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c can be altered in different conditions. We hypothesize that HbA1c levels may change due to altered thyroid status, possibly due to changes in red blood cell (RBC turnover. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of altered thyroid status on HbA1c levels in individuals without diabetes, with overt hyper- and hypo-thyroidism, and if present, whether such changes in HbA1c are reversed after achieving euthyroid state. Methods: Euglycemic individuals with overt hypo- or hyper-thyroidism were selected. Age- and sex-matched controls were recruited. Baseline HbA1c and reticulocyte counts (for estimation of RBC turnover were estimated in all the patients and compared. Thereafter, stable euthyroidism was achieved in a randomly selected subgroup and HbA1c and reticulocyte count was reassessed. HbA1c values and reticulocyte counts were compared with baseline in both the groups. Results: Hb A1c in patients initially selected was found to be significantly higher in hypothyroid group. HbA1c values in hyperthyroid patients were not significantly different from controls. HbA1c reduction and rise in reticulocyte count were significant in hypothyroid group following treatment without significant change in glucose level. Hb A1c did not change significantly following treatment in hyperthyroid group. The reticulocyte count, however, decreased significantly. Conclusion: Baseline HbA1c levels were found to be significantly higher in hypothyroid patients, which reduced significantly after achievement of euthyroidism without any change in glucose levels. Significant baseline or posttreatment change was not observed in hyperthyroid patients. Our study suggests that we should be cautious while interpreting HbA1c data in patients with hypothyroidism.

  6. Oxygen binding to partially nitrosylated hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fago, Angela; Crumbliss, Alvin L; Hendrich, Michael P; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim; Henkens, Robert; Bonaventura, Celia

    2013-09-01

    Reactions of nitric oxide (NO) with hemoglobin (Hb) are important elements in protection against nitrosative damage. NO in the vasculature is depleted by the oxidative reaction with oxy Hb or by binding to deoxy Hb to generate partially nitrosylated Hb (Hb-NO). Many aspects of the formation and persistence of Hb-NO are yet to be clarified. In this study, we used a combination of EPR and visible absorption spectroscopy to investigate the interactions of partially nitrosylated Hb with O2. Partially nitrosylated Hb samples had predominantly hexacoordinate NO-heme geometry and resisted oxidation when exposed to O2 in the absence of anionic allosteric effectors. Faster oxidation occurred in the presence of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) or inositol hexaphosphate (IHP), where the NO-heme derivatives had higher levels of pentacoordinate heme geometry. The anion-dependence of the NO-heme geometry also affected O2 binding equilibria. O2-binding curves of partially nitrosylated Hb in the absence of anions were left-shifted at low saturations, indicating destabilization of the low O2 affinity T-state of the Hb by increasing percentages of NO-heme, much as occurs with increasing levels of CO-heme. Samples containing IHP showed small decreases in O2 affinity, indicating shifts toward the low-affinity T-state and formation of inert α-NO/β-met tetramers. Most remarkably, O2-equilibria in the presence of the physiological effector DPG were essentially unchanged by up to 30% NO-heme in the samples. As will be discussed, under physiological conditions the interactions of Hb with NO provide protection against nitrosative damage without impairing O2 transport by Hb's unoccupied heme sites. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Anisotropic Hexagonal Boron Nitride Nanomaterials - Synthesis and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han,W.Q.

    2008-08-01

    Boron nitride (BN) is a synthetic binary compound located between III and V group elements in the Periodic Table. However, its properties, in terms of polymorphism and mechanical characteristics, are rather close to those of carbon compared with other III-V compounds, such as gallium nitride. BN crystallizes into a layered or a tetrahedrally linked structure, like those of graphite and diamond, respectively, depending on the conditions of its preparation, especially the pressure applied. Such correspondence between BN and carbon readily can be understood from their isoelectronic structures [1, 2]. On the other hand, in contrast to graphite, layered BN is transparent and is an insulator. This material has attracted great interest because, similar to carbon, it exists in various polymorphic forms exhibiting very different properties; however, these forms do not correspond strictly to those of carbon. Crystallographically, BN is classified into four polymorphic forms: Hexagonal BN (h-BN) (Figure 1(b)); rhombohedral BN (r-BN); cubic BN (c-BN); and wurtzite BN (w-BN). BN does not occur in nature. In 1842, Balmain [3] obtained BN as a reaction product between molten boric oxide and potassium cyanide under atmospheric pressure. Thereafter, many methods for its synthesis were reported. h-BN and r-BN are formed under ambient pressure. c-BN is synthesized from h-BN under high pressure at high temperature while w-BN is prepared from h-BN under high pressure at room temperature [1]. Each BN layer consists of stacks of hexagonal plate-like units of boron and nitrogen atoms linked by SP{sup 2} hybridized orbits and held together mainly by Van der Waals force (Fig 1(b)). The hexagonal polymorph has two-layered repeating units: AA'AA'... that differ from those in graphite: ABAB... (Figure 1(a)). Within the layers of h-BN there is coincidence between the same phases of the hexagons, although the boron atoms and nitrogen atoms are alternatively located along the c

  8. Mechanism of the body-centered cubic--hexagonal close-packed phase transition in iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, W A; Huang, E

    1987-11-06

    The transition from body-centered cubic to hexagonal close-packed phase in iron has been studied in a diamond anvil cell with synchrotron radiation. The hexagonal close-packed phase, when it first appears, has a ratio of lattice parameters that is significantly larger than normal. This is attributed to a displacive mechanism that causes a distortion of the hexagonal close-packed structure in a body-centered cubic matrix. The hexagonal close-packed phase adjacent to a boundary with the body-centered cubic phase is stretched in the c direction and compressed in the a direction when it first forms.

  9. Relative phase of oscillations of cerebral oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations during sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierro, Michele L.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Bergethon, Peter R.; Fantini, Sergio

    2012-02-01

    We present a near-infrared spectroscopy study of the instantaneous phase difference between spontaneous oscillations of cerebral deoxy-hemoglobin and oxy-hemoglobin concentrations ([Hb] and [HbO], respectively) in the low-frequency range, namely 0.04-0.12 Hz. We report phase measurements during the transitions between different sleep stages in a whole-night study of a human subject. We have found that the phase difference between [Hb] and [HbO] low-frequency oscillations tends to be greater in deep sleep (by ~96° on average) and REM sleep (by ~77° on average) compared to the awake state. In particular, we have observed progressive phase increases as the subject transitions from awake conditions into non-REM sleep stages N1, N2, and N3. Corresponding phase decreases were recorded in the reversed transitions from sleep stages N3 to N2, and N2 to awake. These results illustrate the physiological information content of phase measurements of [Hb] and [HbO] oscillations that reflect the different cerebral hemodynamic conditions of the different sleep stages, and that can find broader applicability in a wide range of near-infrared spectroscopy brain studies.

  10. Hemoglobin Screening Independently Predicts All-Cause Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulks, Michael; Dolan, Vera F; Stout, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Objective .- Determine if the addition of hemoglobin testing improves risk prediction for life insurance applicants. Method .- Hemoglobin results for insurance applicants tested from 1993 to 2007, with vital status determined by Social Security Death Master File follow-up in 2011, were analyzed by age and sex with and without accounting for the contribution of other test results. Results .- Hemoglobin values ≤12.0 g/dL (and possibly ≤13.0 g/dL) in females age 50+ (but not age 15.0 g/dL (and possibly >14.0 g/dL) for all females and for hemoglobin values >16.0 g/dL for males. Conclusion .- Hemoglobin testing can add additional independent risk assessment to that obtained from other laboratory testing, BP and build in this relatively healthy insurance applicant population. Multiple studies support this finding at older ages, but data (and the prevalence of diseases impacting hemoglobin levels) are limited at younger ages.

  11. IPR and technological issues regarding a biopharmaceutical formulation hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honrao, Chandrashekhar; Banerjee, Uttam C; Bansal, Parikshit

    2008-01-01

    Hemoglobin, the protein responsible for the red color of blood plays a very important part in 'life'- it transports oxygen, without which humans cannot survive. The idea of using purified Hemoglobin as a possible universal substitute for red blood cells has been around for almost a century. Hemoglobin formulations have important therapeutic applications, especially in case of trauma and war when requirements for blood may be very large. Manufacture of hemoglobin for use as a biopharmaceutical poses practical challenges, owing to dependence on human expired blood and fragility of the protein molecule. Biotechnology can play a critical role in breaking these barriers, by not only ensuring recombinant production of hemoglobin, but also enhancing stability of the molecule. The present article, based on a review of patents and available literature gives an insight into the IPR and technological issues involved in the commercial production of this 'life-saving' protein. There are more than 250 patents worldwide related to hemoglobin formulation, cross-linking and determination.

  12. The primary structure of the hemoglobin of Malayan sun bear (Helarctos malayanus, Carnivora) and structural comparison to other hemoglobin sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, O; Braunitzer, G; Göltenboth, R

    1987-05-01

    The complete primary structure of the alpha- and beta-chains of the hemoglobin of Malayan Sun Bear (Helarctos malayanus) is presented. After cleavage of the heme-protein link and chain separation by RP-HPLC, amino-acid sequences were determined by Edman degradation in liquid- and gas-phase sequenators. An interesting result of this work is the demonstration that the hemoglobin of Malayan Sun Bear is identical to the hemoglobins of Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) and Asiatic Black Bear (Ursus tibetanus). The paper gives an updated table of identical hemoglobin chains from different species. This paper may be considered as a compilation of work on the genetic relationship of Pandas.

  13. Sub-wavelength antenna enhanced bilayer graphene tunable photodetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beechem, III, Thomas Edwin; Howell, Stephen W.; Peters, David W.; Davids, Paul; Ohta, Taisuke

    2016-03-22

    The integration of bilayer graphene with an absorption enhancing sub-wavelength antenna provides an infrared photodetector capable of real-time spectral tuning without filters at nanosecond timescales.

  14. Capacitance Variation of Electrolyte-Gated Bilayer Graphene Based Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hediyeh Karimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum capacitance of electrolyte-gated bilayer graphene field-effect transistors is investigated in this paper. Bilayer graphene has received huge attention due to the fact that an energy gap could be opened by chemical doping or by applying external perpendicular electric field. So, this extraordinary property can be exploited to use bilayer graphene as a channel in electrolyte-gated field-effect transistors. The quantum capacitance of bi-layer graphene with an equivalent circuit is presented, and also based on the analytical model a numerical solution is reported. We begin by modeling the DOS, followed by carrier concentration as a function V in degenerate and nondegenerate regimes. To further confirm this viewpoint, the presented analytical model is compared with experimental data, and acceptable agreement is reported.

  15. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Andersson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties.

  16. Electronic properties of asymmetrically doped twisted graphene bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trambly de Laissardière, Guy; Namarvar, Omid Faizy; Mayou, Didier; Magaud, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    Rotated graphene bilayers form an exotic class of nanomaterials with fascinating electronic properties governed by the rotation angle θ . For large rotation angles, the electron eigenstates are restricted to one layer and the bilayer behaves like two decoupled graphene layers. At intermediate angles, Dirac cones are preserved but with a lower velocity and van Hove singularities are induced at energies where the two Dirac cones intersect. At very small angles, eigenstates become localized in peculiar moiré zones. We analyze here the effect of an asymmetric doping for a series of commensurate rotated bilayers on the basis of tight-binding calculations of their band dispersions, density of states, participation ratio, and diffusive properties. While a small doping level preserves the θ dependence of the rotated bilayer electronic structure, larger doping induces a further reduction of the band velocity in the same way as a further reduction of the rotation angle.

  17. Pairing of cholesterol with oxidized phospholipid species in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Loubet, Bastien; Olzynska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    We claim that (1) cholesterol protects bilayers from disruption caused by lipid oxidation by sequestering conical shaped oxidized lipid species such as 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PZPC) away from phospholipid, because cholesterol and the oxidized lipid have complementary...... shapes and (2) mixtures of cholesterol and oxidized lipids can self-assemble into bilayers much like lysolipid–cholesterol mixtures. The evidence for bilayer protection comes from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. Unimodal size distributions of extruded...... vesicles (LUVETs) made up of a mixture of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and PZPC containing high amounts of PZPC are only obtained when cholesterol is present in high concentrations. In simulations, bilayers containing high amounts of PZPC become porous, unless cholesterol is also present...

  18. Structure and fluctuations of a single floating lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daillant, J; Bellet-Amalric, E; Braslau, A; Charitat, T; Fragneto, G; Graner, F; Mora, S; Rieutord, F; Stidder, B

    2005-08-16

    A single lipid molecular bilayer of 17 or 18 carbon chain phosphocholines, floating in water near a flat wall, is prepared in the bilayer gel phase and then heated to the fluid phase. Its structure (electron density profile) and height fluctuations are determined by using x-ray reflectivity and non-specular scattering. By fitting the off-specular signal to that calculated for a two-dimensional membrane using a Helfrich Hamiltonian, we determine the three main physical quantities that govern the bilayer height fluctuations: The wall attraction potential is unexpectedly low; the surface tension, roughly independent on chain length and temperature, is moderate (approximately 5 x 10(-4) J.m(-2)) but large enough to dominate the intermediate range of the fluctuation spectrum; and the bending modulus abruptly decreases by an order-of-magnitude from 10(-18) J to 10(-19) J at the bilayer gel-to-fluid transition.

  19. Ion dynamics in cationic lipid bilayer systems in saline solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miettinen, Markus S; Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    mixture of cationic dimyristoyltrimethylammoniumpropane (DMTAP) and zwitterionic (neutral) dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipids. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we address the effects of bilayer composition (cationic to zwitterionic lipid fraction) and of NaCl electrolyte...

  20. Bilayer properties of hydroxytyrosol- and tyrosol-phosphatidylcholine lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol are the phytochemicals abundantly found in olive oil. Transphosphatidylation of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol with dioleoylphosphocholine resulted in phospholipids with antioxidant properties. The ability of these phyto-phospholipids to form liposomes and supported bilayers w...

  1. Molecular Dynamics of a Water-Lipid Bilayer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of a glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer in water. The total length of analyzed trajectories is 5ns. The calculated width of the bilayer agrees well with the experimentally measured value. The interior of the membrane is in a highly disordered fluid state. Atomic density profile, orientational and conformational distribution functions, and order parameters indicate that disorder increases toward the center of the bilayer. Analysis of out-of-plane thermal fluctuations of the bilayer surfaces occurring at the time scale of the present calculations reveals that the distribution of modes agrees with predictions of the capillary wave model. Fluctuations of both bilayer surfaces are uncorrelated, yielding Gaussian distribution of instantaneous widths of the membrane. Fluctuations of the width produce transient thinning defects in the bilayer which occasionally span almost half of the membrane. The leading mechanism of these fluctuations is the orientational and conformational motion of head groups rather than vertical motion of the whole molecules. Water considerably penetrates the head group region of the bilayer but not its hydrocarbon core. The total net excess dipole moment of the interfacial water points toward the aqueous phase, but the water polarization profile is non-monotonic. Both water and head groups significantly contribute to the surface potential across the interface. The calculated sign of the surface potential is in agreement with that from experimental measurements, but the value is markedly overestimated. The structural and electrical properties of the water-bilayer system are discussed in relation to membrane functions, in particular transport of ions and nonelectrolytes across membranes.

  2. Molecular doping and band-gap opening of bilayer graphene.

    OpenAIRE

    Samuels, AJ; Carey, JD

    2013-01-01

    The ability to induce an energy band gap in bilayer graphene is an important development in graphene science and opens up potential applications in electronics and photonics. Here we report the emergence of permanent electronic and optical band gaps in bilayer graphene upon adsorption of π electron containing molecules. Adsorption of n- or p-type dopant molecules on one layer results in an asymmetric charge distribution between the top and bottom layers and in the formation of an energy gap. ...

  3. A generic model for lipid monolayers, bilayers, and membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, F; Lenz, O; West, B

    2007-01-01

    We describe a simple coarse-grained model which is suited to study lipid layers and their phase transitions. Lipids are modeled by short semiflexible chains of beads with a solvophilic head and a solvophobic tail component. They are forced to self-assemble into bilayers by a computationally cheap `phantom solvent' environment. The model reproduces the most important phases and phase transitions of monolayers and bilayers. Technical issues such as Monte Carlo parallelization schemes are briefly discussed.

  4. Tunable Fermi surface topology and Lifshitz transition in bilayer graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Varlet, Anastasia; Mucha-Kruczyński, Marcin; Bischoff, Dominik; Simonet, Pauline; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Fal'ko, Vladimir; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Bilayer graphene is a highly tunable material: not only can one tune the Fermi energy using standard gates, as in single-layer graphene, but the band structure can also be modified by external perturbations such as transverse electric fields or strain. We review the theoretical basics of the band structure of bilayer graphene and study the evolution of the band structure under the influence of these two external parameters. We highlight their key role concerning the ease to experimentally pro...

  5. Gates controlled parallel-coupled bilayer graphene double quantum dot

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lin-Jun; Wei, Da; Cao, Gang; Tu, Tao; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Chang, A M

    2011-01-01

    Here we report the fabrication and quantum transport measurements of gates controlled parallel-coupled bilayer graphene double quantum dot. It is shown that the interdot coupling strength of the parallel double dots can be effectively tuned from weak to strong regime by both the in-plane plunger gates and back gate. All the relevant energy scales and parameters of the bilayer graphene parallel-coupled double dot can be extracted from the honeycomb charge stability diagrams revealed through the transport measurements.

  6. Molecular Dynamics of a Water-Lipid Bilayer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of a glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer in water. The total length of analyzed trajectories is 5ns. The calculated width of the bilayer agrees well with the experimentally measured value. The interior of the membrane is in a highly disordered fluid state. Atomic density profile, orientational and conformational distribution functions, and order parameters indicate that disorder increases toward the center of the bilayer. Analysis of out-of-plane thermal fluctuations of the bilayer surfaces occurring at the time scale of the present calculations reveals that the distribution of modes agrees with predictions of the capillary wave model. Fluctuations of both bilayer surfaces are uncorrelated, yielding Gaussian distribution of instantaneous widths of the membrane. Fluctuations of the width produce transient thinning defects in the bilayer which occasionally span almost half of the membrane. The leading mechanism of these fluctuations is the orientational and conformational motion of head groups rather than vertical motion of the whole molecules. Water considerably penetrates the head group region of the bilayer but not its hydrocarbon core. The total net excess dipole moment of the interfacial water points toward the aqueous phase, but the water polarization profile is non-monotonic. Both water and head groups significantly contribute to the surface potential across the interface. The calculated sign of the surface potential is in agreement with that from experimental measurements, but the value is markedly overestimated. The structural and electrical properties of the water-bilayer system are discussed in relation to membrane functions, in particular transport of ions and nonelectrolytes across membranes.

  7. Identification of a haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex in the Alaskan Least Cisco (Coregonus sardinella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, S M; Boger, J K; Michael, V; Duffy, L K

    1992-01-01

    The hemoglobin and a hemoglobin binding protein have been characterized in the Arctic fish (Coregonus sardinella). The evolutionary significance of the hemoglobin and plasma protein differences between fish and mammals is still unresolved. Blood samples from the Alaskan Least Cisco were separated into plasma and hemoglobin fractions and the proteins in these fractions were analyzed both by alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis, by isolelectric focusing, and by capillary electrophoresis. Staining the plasma proteins gels with o-dianisidine revealed hemoglobin containing protein complexes. A hemoglobin-containing band was observed in hemolyzed plasma which did not migrate with free hemoglobin, and is believed to be hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex. Size exclusion chromatography further characterized the hemoglobin as disassociating freely into dimers, and hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex having a molecular weight greater then 200,000 daltons.

  8. Thermodynamic study of benzocaine insertion into different lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascales, J. J. López; Costa, S. D. Oliveira; Porasso, R. D.

    2011-10-01

    Despite the general consensus concerning the role played by sodium channels in the molecular mechanism of local anesthetics, the potency of anaesthetic drugs also seems to be related with their solubility in lipid bilayers. In this respect, this work represents a thermodynamic study of benzocaine insertion into lipid bilayers of different compositions by means of molecular dynamics simulation. Thus, the free energy profiles associated with benzocaine insertion into symmetric lipid bilayers composed of different proportions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine were studied. From the simulation results, a maximum in the free energy (ΔG) profile was measured in the region of the lipid/solution interface. This free energy barrier appears to be very much dependent on the lipid composition of the membrane. On the other hand, the minimum free energy (ΔG) within the bilayer remained almost independent of the lipid composition of the bilayer. By repeating the study at different temperatures, it was seen how the spontaneity of benzocaine insertion into the lipid bilayer is due to an increase in the entropy associated with the process.

  9. Microporous device for local electric recordings on model lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufeld, Theresa; Steinem, Claudia; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    A powerful approach for characterizing lipid membranes and embedded proteins is the reconstitution of model lipid bilayers. The extreme fragility of 5 nm thick bilayers is a challenge for device design and requires a trade off of stability against accessibility. We here present a microporous lab-on-chip device that allows us to form stable, solvent-free lipid bilayers from giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) in a geometry that provides a unique set of access possibilities. The device is constructed around a micro-fabricated silicon chip with clusters of 1 µm-diameter pores and provides optical access to the lipid bilayers for high-NA epifluorescence imaging. At the same time, solvent exchange is possible on both sides of the lipid bilayer. Complete coverage can be achieved with GUVs, so that voltages can be applied across the lipid bilayer and single-channel currents can be measured using external or integrated silver/silver chloride electrodes. We describe the micro-fabrication by standard cleanroom techniques and the characterization of the device by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and impedance spectroscopy. In proof-of-concept experiments we demonstrate that the device is capable of low-noise, single-ion-channel recordings. Electronic Supplementary Information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/b000000x/

  10. Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Brian H.; Shen, Jana K. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States); Eike, David M.; Murch, Bruce P.; Koenig, Peter H. [Computational Chemistry, Modeling and Simulation GCO, Procter and Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio 45201 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    Knowledge of the protonation behavior of pH-sensitive molecules in micelles and bilayers has significant implications in consumer product development and biomedical applications. However, the calculation of pK{sub a}’s in such environments proves challenging using traditional structure-based calculations. Here we apply all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics with explicit ions and titratable water to calculate the pK{sub a} of a fatty acid molecule in a micelle of dodecyl trimethylammonium chloride and liquid as well as gel-phase bilayers of diethyl ester dimethylammonium chloride. Interestingly, the pK{sub a} of the fatty acid in the gel bilayer is 5.4, 0.4 units lower than that in the analogous liquid bilayer or micelle, despite the fact that the protonated carboxylic group is significantly more desolvated in the gel bilayer. This work illustrates the capability of all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics in capturing the delicate balance in the free energies of desolvation and Coulombic interactions. It also shows the importance of the explicit treatment of ions in sampling the protonation states. The ability to model dynamics of pH-responsive substrates in a bilayer environment is useful for improving fabric care products as well as our understanding of the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  11. Robustly Engineering Thermal Conductivity of Bilayer Graphene by Interlayer Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yufei; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-02-25

    Graphene and its bilayer structure are the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. Their realistic applications in emerging nanoelectronics usually call for thermal transport manipulation in a controllable and precise manner. In this paper we systematically studied the effect of interlayer covalent bonding, in particular different interlay bonding arrangement, on the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is revealed that, the thermal conductivity of randomly bonded bilayer graphene decreases monotonically with the increase of interlayer bonding density, however, for the regularly bonded bilayer graphene structure the thermal conductivity possesses unexpectedly non-monotonic dependence on the interlayer bonding density. The results suggest that the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene depends not only on the interlayer bonding density, but also on the detailed topological configuration of the interlayer bonding. The underlying mechanism for this abnormal phenomenon is identified by means of phonon spectral energy density, participation ratio and mode weight factor analysis. The large tunability of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene through rational interlayer bonding arrangement paves the way to achieve other desired properties for potential nanoelectronics applications involving graphene layers.

  12. PI3 kinase enzymology on fluid lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Debjit; Pulsipher, Abigail; Luo, Wei; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2014-10-21

    We report the use of fluid lipid bilayer membrane as a model platform to study the influence of the bilayer microenvironment and composition on the enzymology in membrane. As a model system we determined the enzyme kinetics on membranes for the transformation of bilayers containing phosphoinositol(4,5)-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) to phosphoinositol(3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3) by the enzyme phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) using radiolabeled ATP. The activity of the enzyme was monitored as a function of the radioactivity incorporated within the bilayer. The transformation of PI(4,5)P2 to PI(3,4,5)P3 was determined using a mass strip assay. The fluidity of the bilayer was confirmed by Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) experiments. Kinetic simulations were performed based on Langmuir adsorption and Michaelis-Menton kinetics equations to generate the rate constants for the enzymatic reaction. The effect of cholesterol on the enzyme kinetics was studied by doping the bilayer with 1% cholesterol. This leads to significant reduction in reaction rate due to change in membrane microenvironment. This strategy provides a method to study the enzymology of various kinases and phosphatases occurring at the membrane and also how these reactions are affected by the membrane composition and surface microenvironment.

  13. Different oxidized phospholipid molecules unequally affect bilayer packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megli, Francesco M; Russo, Luciana

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more detailed knowledge about the effect of the presence of defined oxidized phospholipid molecules in phospholipid bilayers. After chromatographic and mass spectrometry analysis, the previously used product of the Fenton reaction with unsaturated lecithins proved to consist of a plethora of oxidatively modified lecithins, useless either for the detailed study of the effects brought about in the bilayer or as the source of defined oxidized phospholipid molecules. The latter, particularly 2-(omega-carboxyacyl)- and 2-(n-hydroperoxyacyl)-lecithins, can be more conveniently prepared by chemical or enzymatic synthesis rather than by chemical or physical oxidation. The effect of those molecules and of commercially available 12-hydroxy-stearic and dodecanedioic acid was studied in planar supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) by use of EPR spectrometry. The SPBs also contained 2-(5-doxylstearoyl)-lecithin as the spin probe, and the EPR spectral anisotropy loss, indicative of bilayer disordering, was measured as a function of the molar percentage of oxidized lipid. Most oxidized lipid molecules examined in this study were able to induce bilayer disordering, while hydroperoxyl group-bearing acyl chains appeared to be much less effective. It is concluded that the effects of different oxidized phospholipids on phospholipid bilayer structure cannot be generalized, as happens with batch-oxidized phospholipids, and that the use of defined oxidized phospholipid molecular species for membrane oxidative stress guarantees a more reliable and detailed response.

  14. Mechanism of unassisted ion transport across membrane bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1996-01-01

    To establish how charged species move from water to the nonpolar membrane interior and to determine the energetic and structural effects accompanying this process, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the transport of Na+ and Cl- across a lipid bilayer located between two water lamellae. The total length of molecular dynamics trajectories generated for each ion was 10 ns. Our simulations demonstrate that permeation of ions into the membrane is accompanied by the formation of deep, asymmetric thinning defects in the bilayer, whereby polar lipid head groups and water penetrate the nonpolar membrane interior. Once the ion crosses the midplane of the bilayer the deformation "switches sides"; the initial defect slowly relaxes, and a defect forms in the outgoing side of the bilayer. As a result, the ion remains well solvated during the process; the total number of oxygen atoms from water and lipid head groups in the first solvation shell remains constant. A similar membrane deformation is formed when the ion is instantaneously inserted into the interior of the bilayer. The formation of defects considerably lowers the free energy barrier to transfer of the ion across the bilayer and, consequently, increases the permeabilities of the membrane to ions, compared to the rigid, planar structure, by approximately 14 orders of magnitude. Our results have implications for drug delivery using liposomes and peptide insertion into membranes.

  15. Comparison of Hemoglobin Transmition Spectrums of Healthy Persons and Patients with Schizophrenia Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Vlokh R.; Marsel L.; Vlokh I.; Moroz O.; Dudok K.

    2002-01-01

    The present paper is devoted to the study of human hemoglobin transmission spectrums that were divided into four groups: hemoglobin of healthy persons, patients with schizophrenia, persons and people with and without the prodrome of schizophrenia that are in genetic susceptibility with patients. The change of absorption spectrums of hemoglobin of these groups was determined. The shifting of transmission minimums of the hemoglobin that correspond to electronic transitions in the hemoglobin mol...

  16. Plant hemoglobins: Important players at the crossroads between oxygen and nitric oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Kapuganti J; Hebelstrup, Kim; Mur, Luis A J

    2011-01-01

    Plant hemoglobins constitute a diverse group of hemeproteins and evolutionarily belong to three different classes. Class 1 hemoglobins possess an extremely high affinity to oxygen and their main function consists in scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) at very low oxygen levels. Class 2 hemoglobins have...... at high O2 concentrations. Depending on their physical properties, hemoglobins belong either to hexacoordinate non-symbiotic or pentacoordinate symbiotic groups. Plant hemoglobins are plausible targets for improving resistance to multiple stresses....

  17. Feasibility of Electrospinning the Globular Proteins Hemoglobin and Myoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine P. Barnes

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Various concentrations of the globular protein hemoglobin were successfully electrospun to create micro-fibrous mats of varying physical and mechanical characteristics. The electrospinning parameters are reported. One concentration of myoglobin was electrospun into a mat for comparison to the hemoglobin mats. Scanning electron microscopy revealed ribbon-like morphologies for the hemoglobin and myoglobin structures. Mean fiber width and thickness for each mat electrospun from a different hemoglobin concentration increased from 2.68 ± 0.83 to 3.55 ± 1.49 μm and from 0.49 ± 0.08 to 0.99 ± 0.41 μm, respectively, for increasing hemoglobin solution concentrations (from 150 to 225 mg/mL. For calculations of surface area to volume ratio for the four different electrospun hemoglobin concentrations, there was a negative correlation (r = -0.84 with concentration; the surface area to volume ratio ranged between 0.50 ± 0.16 and 1.53 ± 0.24 m2/cm3. Also, there appears to be a positive correlation between electrospun hemoglobin concentration and porosity, which increased with increasing concentration from 69.5 to 83.3 %. Following cross-linking with glutaraldehyde, the mechanical properties of two constructs were evaluated via uniaxial tensile testing to demonstrate handling capability. Results indicated that increased cross-linking time produced stiffer structures, as peak stress and modulus increased while strain at break decreased when the mats were cross-linked for 30 minutes with glutaraldehyde versus the 20 minute cross-linking time.

  18. Quantum Nucleation of Antiferromagnetic Bubbles with Tetragonal and Hexagonal Symmetries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Hui; ZHU Jia-Lin; L(U) Rong

    2004-01-01

    We study the quantum nucleation in a nanometer-scale antiferromagnet placed in a magnetic field at an arbitrary angle. We consider the magnetocrystalline anisotropy with tetragonal symmetry and that with hexagonal symmetry, respectively. Different structures of the tunneling barriers can be generated by the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic field. We use the instanton method in the spin-coherent-state path-integral representation to calculate the dependence of the rate of quantum nucleation and the crossover temperature on the orientation and strength of the field for bulk solids and two-dimensional films of antiferromagnets, respectively. We find that the rate of quantum nucleation and the crossover temperature from thermal-to-quantum transitions depend on the orientation and strength of the external magnetic field distinctly, which can be tested by use of existing experimental techniques.

  19. Embedding defect sites into hexagonal nondiffracting wave fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kelberer, Andreas; Rose, Patrick; Denz, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    We present a highly purposive technique to optically induce periodic photonic lattices enriched with a negative defect site by using a properly designed nondiffracting beam. As the interference of two or more nondiffracting beams with adequate mutual spatial frequency relations in turn reproduces a nondiffracting beam, we adeptly superpose a hexagonal and a Bessel beam to create the nondiffracting defect beam of demand. The presented wavelength-independent technique is of utmost universality in terms of structural scalability and does not make any specific requirements to the photosensitive medium. In addition, the technique is easily transferable to all pattern-forming holographic methods in general and its application is highly appropriate e.g. in the fields of particle as well as atom trapping.

  20. Hexagon Wilson loop = six-gluon MHV amplitude

    CERN Document Server

    Drummond, J M; Korchemsky, G P; Sokatchev, E

    2008-01-01

    We compare the two-loop corrections to the finite part of the light-like hexagon Wilson loop with the recent numerical results for the finite part of the MHV six-gluon amplitude in N=4 SYM theory by Bern, Dixon, Kosower, Roiban, Spradlin, Vergu and Volovich (arXiv:0803.1465 [hep-th]) and demonstrate that they coincide within the error bars and, at the same time, they differ from the BDS ansatz by a non-trivial function of (dual) conformal kinematical invariants. This provides strong evidence that the Wilson loop/scattering amplitude duality holds in planar N=4 SYM theory to all loops for an arbitrary number of external particles.

  1. Classical Heisenberg spins on a hexagonal lattice with Kitaev couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Samarth; Ramola, Kabir; Dhar, Deepak

    2010-09-01

    We analyze the low temperature properties of a system of classical Heisenberg spins on a hexagonal lattice with Kitaev couplings. For a lattice of 2N sites with periodic boundary conditions, the ground states form an (N+1) dimensional manifold. We show that the ensemble of ground states is equivalent to that of a solid-on-solid model with continuously variable heights and nearest neighbor interactions, at a finite temperature. For temperature T tending to zero, all ground states have equal weight, and there is no order by disorder in this model. We argue that the bond-energy bond-energy correlations at distance R decay as 1/R2 at zero temperature. This is verified by Monte Carlo simulations. We also discuss the relation to the quantum spin- S Kitaev model for large S, and obtain lower and upper bounds on the ground-state energy of the quantum model.

  2. Atomic scale modelling of hexagonal structured metallic fission product alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleburgh, S C; King, D M; Lumpkin, G R

    2015-04-01

    Noble metal particles in the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc system have been simulated on the atomic scale using density functional theory techniques for the first time. The composition and behaviour of the epsilon phases are consistent with high-entropy alloys (or multi-principal component alloys)-making the epsilon phase the only hexagonally close packed high-entropy alloy currently described. Configurational entropy effects were considered to predict the stability of the alloys with increasing temperatures. The variation of Mo content was modelled to understand the change in alloy structure and behaviour with fuel burnup (Mo molar content decreases in these alloys as burnup increases). The predicted structures compare extremely well with experimentally ascertained values. Vacancy formation energies and the behaviour of extrinsic defects (including iodine and xenon) in the epsilon phase were also investigated to further understand the impact that the metallic precipitates have on fuel performance.

  3. Synthesis of hexagonal close-packed gold nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao; Li, Shaozhou; Huang, Yizhong; Wu, Shixin; Zhou, Xiaozhu; Li, Shuzhou; Gan, Chee Lip; Boey, Freddy; Mirkin, Chad A; Zhang, Hua

    2011-01-01

    Solid gold is usually most stable as a face-centred cubic (fcc) structure. To date, no one has synthesized a colloidal form of Au that is exclusively hexagonal close-packed (hcp) and stable under ambient conditions. Here we report the first in situ synthesis of dispersible hcp Au square sheets on graphene oxide sheets, which exhibit an edge length of 200-500 nm and a thickness of ~ 2.4 nm (~ 16 Au atomic layers). Interestingly, the Au square sheet transforms from hcp to a fcc structure on exposure to an electron beam during transmission electron microscopy analysis. In addition, as the square sheet grows thicker (from ~ 2.4 to 6 nm), fcc segments begin to appear. A detailed experimental analysis of these structures shows that for structures with ultrasmall dimensions (for example, <~ 6 nm thickness for the square sheets), the previously unobserved pure hcp structure becomes stable and isolable.

  4. High-Entropy Alloys in Hexagonal Close-Packed Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, M. C.; Zhang, B.; Guo, S. M.; Qiao, J. W.; Hawk, J. A.

    2016-07-01

    The microstructures and properties of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) based on the face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic structures have been studied extensively in the literature, but reports on HEAs in the hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structure are very limited. Using an efficient strategy in combining phase diagram inspection, CALPHAD modeling, and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, a variety of new compositions are suggested that may hold great potentials in forming single-phase HCP HEAs that comprise rare earth elements and transition metals, respectively. Experimental verification was carried out on CoFeReRu and CoReRuV using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersion spectroscopy.

  5. Electronic structure of spontaneously strained graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Jose, Pablo; Gutiérrez-Rubio, A.; Sturla, Mauricio; Guinea, Francisco

    2014-09-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride substrates have been shown to dramatically improve the electric properties of graphene. Recently, it has been observed that when the two honeycomb crystals are close to perfect alignment, strong lattice distortions develop in graphene due to the moiré adhesion landscape. Simultaneously, a gap opens at the Dirac point. Here, we derive a simple low-energy electronic model for graphene aligned with the substrate, taking into account spontaneous strains at equilibrium and pseudogauge fields. We carry out a detailed characterization of the modified band structure, gap, local and global density of states, and band topology in terms of physical parameters. We show that the overall electronic structure is strongly modified by the spontaneous strains.

  6. Indirect interband transition in hexagonal GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancry, O; Pichonat, E [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman (LASIR), UMR CNRS 8516, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, bat C5, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Farvacque, J-L [Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), UMR CNRS 8207, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, bat C6, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Gaquiere, C, E-mail: emmanuelle.pichonat@univ-lille1.fr [Institut d' Electronique de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, Cite Scientifique, Avenue Poincare, BP 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France)

    2011-02-23

    In this paper, we report on optical investigations with Raman experiment to underline a new ultraviolet (UV) luminescence band in hexagonal gallium nitride (GaN) at 4.56 eV. GaN is a direct band gap semiconductor, the photoluminescence peak corresponding to the energy gap at 3.43 eV dominates the spectrum. Nevertheless, other electronic interband transitions can appear on the spectrum: the electronic indirect interband transitions. We attribute one of them to the observed new photoluminescence band at 4.56 eV. This interpretation is supported by photoluminescence spectra obtained on three different samples at room temperature and at -50 deg. C with UV excitation source: mbd-266 nm solid laser (4.66 eV) and by the study of three criteria: the partly opposite parities of initial and final wave function, the implication of acoustic phonons and temperature control.

  7. Pattern Coarsening in a Two Dimensional Hexagonal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikin, Paul

    2008-03-01

    We have been studying the ordering, annealing, coarsening and alignment of two dimensional periodically ordered structures in thin films of diblock copolymers*. Coarsening by dislocation and disclination annihilation is clearly observed in AFM studies of monolayer films of cylindrical patterns with a time dependence given by t^α, with α about 1/4. However in hexagonal structures the mechanism is less well defined and appears to involve the collapse of small grains entrained in the grain boundaries of larger domains. Remarkably the exponent of α about 1/4 remains. We also report on shear aligned samples and samples quenched in a gradient after alignment. * Harrison C, Angelescu DE, Trawick M, Cheng ZD, Huse DA, Chaikin PM, Vega DA, Sebastian JM, Register RA, Adamson DH, EUROPHYSICS LETTERS 67 800-806 (2004)

  8. Fabrication of hexagonal boron nitride based ceramics by combustion synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Pure h-BN (hexagonal boron nitride) and h-BN based ceramic parts were fabricated by combustion synthesis technique, i.e. self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS). Components were manufactured by the combustion reaction of 80  MPa nitrogen and the compact made by cool isostatic pressing. In h-BN based ceramic parts, h-BN powder was used as diluent and SiO2 powder as reinforcing phase. The density of pure h-BN and h-BN-based ceramic parts were 58% and 78% of theoretical density, respectively. With XRD and SEM, phases and microstructures of ceramic parts were analyzed. Mechanical properties were also tested.

  9. Magnetic tunnel junctions with monolayer hexagonal boron nitride tunnel barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piquemal-Banci, M.; Galceran, R.; Bouzehouane, K.; Anane, A.; Petroff, F.; Fert, A.; Dlubak, B.; Seneor, P. [Unité Mixte de Physique, CNRS, Thales, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Palaiseau 91767 (France); Caneva, S.; Martin, M.-B.; Weatherup, R. S.; Kidambi, P. R.; Robertson, J.; Hofmann, S. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB21PZ (United Kingdom); Xavier, S. [Thales Research and Technology, 1 avenue Augustin Fresnel, Palaiseau 91767 (France)

    2016-03-07

    We report on the integration of atomically thin 2D insulating hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) tunnel barriers into Co/h-BN/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The h-BN monolayer is directly grown by chemical vapor deposition on Fe. The Conductive Tip Atomic Force Microscopy (CT-AFM) measurements reveal the homogeneity of the tunnel behavior of our h-BN layers. As expected for tunneling, the resistance depends exponentially on the number of h-BN layers. The h-BN monolayer properties are also characterized through integration into complete MTJ devices. A Tunnel Magnetoresistance of up to 6% is observed for a MTJ based on a single atomically thin h-BN layer.

  10. Livetime and sensitivity of the ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array

    CERN Document Server

    Barwick, S W; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Binns, W R; Boersma, D; Bose, R G; Braun, D L; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Buitink, S; Dookayka, K; Dowkontt, P F; Duffin, T; Euler, S; Gerhardt, L; Gustafsson, L; Hallgren, A; Hanson, J C; Israel, M H; Kiryluk, J; Klein, S; Kleinfelder, S; Nelles, A; Niederhausen, H; Olevitch, M A; Persichelli, C; Ratzlaff, K; Rauch, B F; Reed, C; Roumi, M; Samanta, A; Simburger, G E; Stezelberger, T; Tatar, J; Uggerhoj, U; Walker, J; Young, R

    2015-01-01

    The ARIANNA collaboration completed the installation of the hexagonal radio array (HRA) in December 2014, serving as a pilot program for a planned high energy neutrino telescope located about 110 km south of McMurdo Station on the Ross Ice Shelf near the coast of Antarctica. The goal of ARIANNA is to measure both diffuse and point fluxes of astrophysical neutrinos at energies in excess of 1016 eV. Upgraded hardware has been installed during the 2014 deployment season and stations show a livetime of better than 90% between commissioning and austral sunset. Though designed to observe radio pulses from neutrino interactions originating within the ice below each detector, one station was modified to study the low-frequency environment and signals from above. We provide evidence that the HRA observed both continuous emission from the Galaxy and a transient solar burst. Preliminary work on modeling the (weak) Galactic signal confirm the absolute sensitivity of the HRA detector system.

  11. Functionalized hexagonal boron nitride nanomaterials: emerging properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Qunhong; Wang, Xuebin; Wang, Xi; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2016-07-11

    Functionalization is an important way to breed new properties and applications for a material. This review presents an overview of the progresses in functionalized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanomaterials. It begins with an introduction of h-BN structural features, physical and chemical properties, followed by an emphasis on the developments of BN functionalization strategies and its emerging properties/applications, and ends with the research perspectives. Different functionalization methods, including physical and chemical routes, are comprehensively described toward fabrication of various BN derivatives, hetero- and porous structures, etc. Novel properties of functionalized BN materials, such as high water solubility, excellent biocompatibility, tunable surface affinities, good processibility, adjustable band gaps, etc., have guaranteed wide applications in biomedical, electronic, composite, environmental and "green" energy-related fields.

  12. Hexagonal microlasers based on organic dyes in nanoporous crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, I; Laeri, F; Nöckel, J U; Schulz-Ekloff, G; Schueth, F; Vietze, U; Weiss, O; Woehrle, D; Braun, Ingo; Ihlein, Guido; Laeri, Franco; Noeckel, Jens U.; Schulz-Ekloff, Guenter; Schueth, Ferdi; Vietze, Uwe; Weiss, Ozlem; Woehrle, Dieter

    2000-01-01

    Molecular sieves, such as nanoporous AlPO_4-5, can host a wide variety of laser active dyes. We embedded pyridine 2 molecules as a representative of a commercially available dye which fits into the channel pores of the host matrix. Many efficient dye molecules, such as rhodamines, do not fit into the pores. But the amount of encapsulated dyes can be increased by modifying the structure of the dyes such that they match the host templates. The resulting microlasers have properties that depend on size and shape of the microresonators, and we discuss a model for microscopic hexagonal ring resonators. In terms of pump needed to reach lasing threshold molecular sieve microlasers are comparable to VCSELs. For dyes which fit into the pores we observed a partial regeneration of photo-induced damage.

  13. Importance of the hexagonal lipid phase in biological membrane organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette eJouhet

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Domains are present in every natural membrane. They are characterised by a distinctive protein and/or lipid composition. Their size is highly variable from the nano- to the micrometer scale. The domains confer specific properties to the membrane leading to original structure and function. The determinants leading to domain organisation are therefore important but remain obscure. This review presents how the ability of lipids to organize into hexagonal II or lamellar phases can promote particular local structures within membranes. Since biological membranes are composed of a mixture of lipids, each with distinctive biophysical properties, lateral and transversal sorting of lipids can promote creation of domains inside the membrane through local modulation of the lipid phase. Lipid biophysical properties have been characterized for long based on in vitro analyses using non-natural lipid molecules; their re-examinations using natural lipids might open interesting perspectives on membrane architecture occurring in vivo in various cellular and physiological contexts.

  14. Critical points and dynamic systems with planar hexagonal symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ning [Faculty of Information and Control Engineering, Shenyang Jianzhu University, Shenyang 110168 (China)]. E-mail: n_chen@126.com; Meng Fan Yu [Faculty of Information and Control Engineering, Shenyang Jianzhu University, Shenyang 110168 (China)

    2007-05-15

    In this investigation, we detect and utilize critical points of functions with hexagonal symmetry in order to study their dynamics. The asymmetric unit in a parallelogram lattice is chosen as the initial searching region for a critical point set in a dynamic plane. The accelerated direct search algorithm is used within the parallelogram lattice to search for the critical points. Parameter space is separated into regions (chaotic, periodic or mixed) by the Ljapunov exponents of the critical points. Then the generalized Mandelbrot set (M-set), which is a cross-section of the parameter space, is constructed. Many chaotic attractors and filled-in Julia sets can be generated by using parameters from this kind of M-sets.

  15. Taylor–Socolar Hexagonal Tilings as Model Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Yup Lee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Taylor–Socolar tilings are regular hexagonal tilings of the plane but are distinguished in being comprised of hexagons of two colors in an aperiodic way. We place the Taylor–Socolar tilings into an algebraic setting, which allows one to see them directly as model sets and to understand the corresponding tiling hull along with its generic and singular parts. Although the tilings were originally obtained by matching rules and by substitution, our approach sets the tilings into the framework of a cut and project scheme and studies how the tilings relate to the corresponding internal space. The centers of the entire set of tiles of one tiling form a lattice Q in the plane. If XQ denotes the set of all Taylor–Socolar tilings with centers on Q, then XQ forms a natural hull under the standard local topology of hulls and is a dynamical system for the action of Q.The Q-adic completion Q of Q is a natural factor of XQ and the natural mapping XQ → Q is bijective except at a dense set of points of measure 0 in /Q. We show that XQ consists of three LI classes under translation. Two of these LI classes are very small, namely countable Q-orbits in XQ. The other is a minimal dynamical system, which maps surjectively to /Q and which is variously 2 : 1, 6 : 1, and 12 : 1 at the singular points. We further develop the formula of what determines the parity of the tiles of a tiling in terms of the coordinates of its tile centers. Finally we show that the hull of the parity tilings can be identified with the hull XQ; more precisely the two hulls are mutually locally derivable.

  16. Compact triplexer in two-dimensional hexagonal lattice photonic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Ren; Jianping Ma; Hao Wen; Yali Qin; Zhefu Wu; Weisheng Hu; Chun Jiang; Yaohui Jin

    2011-01-01

    We design a contpact triplexer based on two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal lattice photonic crystals (PCs). A folded directional coupler (FDC) is introduced in the triplexer beside the point-defect micro-cavities and line-defect waveguides. Because of the reflection feedback of the FDC, high channel drop efficiency can be realized and a compact size with the order of micrometers can be maintained. The proposed device is analyzed using the plane wave expansion method, and its transmission characteristics are calculated using the finites-difference time-domain method. The footprint of the triplexer is about 12× 9 μm, and its extinction ratios are less than -20 dB for 1310 nm, approximately -20 dB for 1490 nm, and under -4O dB for 1550 nm, making it a potentially essential device ii future fiber-to-the-home networks.%@@ We design a compact triplexer based on two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal lattice photonic crystals (PCs).A folded directional coupler (FDC) is introduced in the triplexer beside the point-defect micro-cavities and line-defect waveguides.Because of the reflection feedback of the FDC, high channel drop efficiency can be realized and a compact size with the order of micrometers can be maintained.The proposed device is analyzed using the plane wave expansion method, and its transmission characteristics are calculated using the finite-difference time-domain method.The footprint of the triplexer is about 12×9 μm, and its extinction ratios are less than -20 dB for 1310 nm, approximately -20 dB for 1490 nm, and under -40 dB for 1550 nm, making it a potentially essential device in future fiber-to-the-home networks.

  17. Hemoglobin Wood beta97(FG4) His replaced by Leu. A new high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin associated with familial erythrocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketa, F; Huang, Y P; Libnoch, J A; Dessel, B H

    1975-08-19

    The characterization of hemoglobin Wood (beta97(FG4) His replaced by Leu), a high oxygen affinity hemoglobin with reduced Hill constant is described. The amino acid substitution occurs at the alpha1beta2 interface, in the same position as in hemoglobin Malmö (beta97(FG4) His replaced by Gln) and in an homologous position when compared with hemoglobins Chesapeake (alpha92(FG4) Arg replaced by Leu) and J. Capetown (alpha92(fg4) arg replaced by Gln).

  18. Selection of aptamers specific for glycated hemoglobin and total hemoglobin using on-chip SELEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-I; Wu, Ching-Chu; Yang, Ching-Hsuan; Chang, Ko-Wei; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Shiesh, Shu-Chu

    2015-01-21

    Blood glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels reflecting average glucose concentrations over the past three months are fundamental for the diagnosis, monitoring, and risk assessment of diabetes. It has been hypothesized that aptamers, which are single-stranded DNAs or RNAs that demonstrate high affinity to a large variety of molecules ranging from small drugs, metabolites, or proteins, could be used for the measurement of HbA1c. Aptamers are selected through an in vitro process called systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), and they can be chemically synthesized with high reproducibility at relatively low costs. This study therefore aimed to select HbA1c- and hemoglobin (Hb)-specific single-stranded DNA aptamers using an on-chip SELEX protocol. A microfluidic SELEX chip was developed to continuously and automatically carry out multiple rounds of SELEX to screen specific aptamers for HbA1c and Hb. HbA1c and Hb were first coated onto magnetic beads. Following several rounds of selection and enrichment with a randomized 40-mer DNA library, specific oligonucleotides were selected. The binding specificity and affinity were assessed by competitive and binding assays. Using the developed microfluidic system, the incubation and partitioning times were greatly decreased, and the entire process was shortened dramatically. Both HbA1c- and Hb-specific aptamers selected by the microfluidic system showed high specificity and affinity (dissociation constant, Kd = 7.6 ± 3.0 nM and 7.3 ± 2.2 nM for HbA1c and Hb, respectively). With further refinements in the assay, these aptamers may replace the conventional antibodies for in vitro diagnostics applications in the near future.

  19. Amphiphile regulation of ion channel function by changes in the bilayer spring constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August; Koeppe, R.E.; Andersen, Oluf Sten

    2010-01-01

    be predicted from measurements of isolated changes in such properties. Thus, the bilayer contribution to the promiscuous regulation of membrane proteins by drugs and other amphiphiles remains unknown. To overcome this problem, we use gramicidin A (gA) channels as molecular force probes to measure the net......Many drugs are amphiphiles that, in addition to binding to a particular target protein, adsorb to cell membrane lipid bilayers and alter intrinsic bilayer physical properties (e. g., bilayer thickness, monolayer curvature, and elastic moduli). Such changes can modulate membrane protein function...... by altering the energetic cost (Delta G(bilayer)) of bilayer deformations associated with protein conformational changes that involve the protein-bilayer interface. But amphiphiles have complex effects on the physical properties of lipid bilayers, meaning that the net change in Delta G(bilayer) cannot...

  20. High-pressure Al-rich hexagonal phases-What are their kin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makovicky, Emil; Olsen, Lars Arnskov

    2008-01-01

    The hexagonal Al-rich high-pressure phases are members of a structural family with the same type of framework composed of double-ribbons of edge-sharing octahedra, but variably occupied trigonal and hexagonal channels. This family includes jaffeite, fluoborite, yeremeyevite, painite, and synthetic...

  1. Phase boundary of the hexagonal-prism superconducting network in a magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金绍维; 李伟; 易佑民; 甄胜来; 缪胜清

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we systematically study the phase boundary Tc(H ) of a hexagonal-prism superconducting network inan external magnetic field H of arbitrary magnitude and direction. The result indicates that the phase boundary of thehexagonal-prism superconducting circuit varies more sharply than that of the cubic circuit. The potential applicationsof the hexagonal-prism superconducting circuit are also discussed.

  2. A Unified Understanding of the Thickness-Dependent Bandgap Transition in Hexagonal Two-Dimensional Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joongoo; Zhang, Lijun; Wei, Su-Huai

    2016-02-18

    Many important layered semiconductors, such as hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), are derived from a hexagonal lattice. A single layer of such hexagonal semiconductors generally has a direct bandgap at the high-symmetry point K, whereas it becomes an indirect, optically inactive semiconductor as the number of layers increases to two or more. Here, taking hBN and MoS2 as examples, we reveal the microscopic origin of the direct-to-indirect bandgap transition of hexagonal layered materials. Our symmetry analysis and first-principles calculations show that the bandgap transition arises from the lack of the interlayer orbital couplings for the band-edge states at K, which are inherently weak because of the crystal symmetries of hexagonal layered materials. Therefore, it is necessary to judiciously break the underlying crystal symmetries to design more optically active, multilayered semiconductors from hBN or TMDs.

  3. Condensation energy of the superconducting bilayer cuprates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Govind; Ajay; S K Joshi

    2002-05-01

    In the present work, we report the interplay of single particle and Cooper pair tunnelings on the superconducting state of layered high-c cuprate superconductors. For this we have considered a model Hamiltonian incorporating the intra-planar interactions and the contributions arising due to the coupling between the planes. The interplanar interactions include the single particle tunneling as well as the Josephson tunneling of Cooper pairs between the two layers. The expression of the out-of-plane correlation parameter which describes the hopping of a particle from one layer to another layer in the superconducting state is obtained within a Bardeen–Cooper–Schriefer (BCS) formalism using the Green’s function technique. This correlation is found to be sensitive to the various parameter of the model Hamiltonian. We have calculated the out-of-plane contribution to the superconducting condensation energy. The calculated values of condensation energy are in agreement with those obtained from the specific heat and the -axis penetration depth measurements on bilayer cuprates.

  4. Titration force microscopy on supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Gorostiza, Pau; Sanz, Fausto

    2006-01-01

    The use of chemically modified atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes allows us to measure the surface charges of supported planar lipid bilayers with high sensitivity through the force spectroscopy operation mode. By controlling the chemistry of the tip, we can perform a classical analytical chemistry titration where the titration agent is a weak acid (attached to the AFM tip) with the particularity of being performed in surface rather than in solution and, especially, at the nanometric scale. Thus, the AFM tip acts as a real "nanosensor". The approaching curves of the force plots reveal that electrostatic interactions between the tip and the supported membrane play a key role. Besides, the plot of the adhesion force (measured from the retracting curve of the force plots) versus pH displays a nonsigmoidal shape with a peak in the adhesion force attributed to high-energy hydrogen bonds. One of these peaks corresponds to the pKa of the surface under study and the other to the pKa of the titrating probe attached to the tip.

  5. Exceptional Optoelectronic Properties of Hydrogenated Bilayer Silicene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Huang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Silicon is arguably the best electronic material, but it is not a good optoelectronic material. By employing first-principles calculations and the cluster-expansion approach, we discover that hydrogenated bilayer silicene (BS shows promising potential as a new kind of optoelectronic material. Most significantly, hydrogenation converts the intrinsic BS, a strongly indirect semiconductor, into a direct-gap semiconductor with a widely tunable band gap. At low hydrogen concentrations, four ground states of single- and double-sided hydrogenated BS are characterized by dipole-allowed direct (or quasidirect band gaps in the desirable range from 1 to 1.5 eV, suitable for solar applications. At high hydrogen concentrations, three well-ordered double-sided hydrogenated BS structures exhibit direct (or quasidirect band gaps in the color range of red, green, and blue, affording white light-emitting diodes. Our findings open opportunities to search for new silicon-based light-absorption and light-emitting materials for earth-abundant, high-efficiency, optoelectronic applications.

  6. Properties of bilayer contacts to porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallach, D.; Torres-Costa, V.; Garcia-Pelayo, L.; Climent-Font, A.; Martin-Palma, R.J.; Manso, M. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Madrid (Spain); Barreiros-das-Santos, M.; Sporer, C.; Samitier, J. [Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Nanobioengineering Group, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-05-15

    The aim of the present work is the growth by PVD techniques and ulterior characterization of electrical contacts to columnar porous silicon (PSi) as an approach to reliable PSi sensor devices. Contacts consist of a NiCr (40:60) and Au bilayer on the PSi surface deposited by magnetron sputtering. These structures show a good adhesion to the rough surface of columnar PSi. The morphology of these electrical contacts is characterized by electron microscopy and their crystalline structure by X-ray diffraction. Compositional profiles are determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which demonstrate that the infiltration of NiCr into the PSi is at the origin of the metallic thin film adhesion improvement. I-V characteristics and impedance spectroscopy measurements show that this configuration provides rectifying electrical contacts to PSi, for which a simple equivalent circuit based on one resistor and two capacitors can be modeled. These results further support the use of PSi electrical structures for sensing purposes. (orig.)

  7. Raman modes in transferred bilayer CVD graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niilisk Ahti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic experimental Raman spectroscopic study of twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG domains localized inside wide-area single layer graphene (SLG produced by low-pressure CVD on Cu foil and transferred onto SiO2/Si substrate has been performed. According to the Raman characterization the tBLG domains had a great variety of twisting angles θ between the bottom and top graphene layers (6° < θ < 25°. The twisting angle θ was estimated from the spectral position of the rotating R and R' modes in the Raman spectrum.Under G band resonance conditions the breathing mode ZO' with a frequency of 95- 97 cm−1 was detected, and a breathing mode ZO was found in the spectra between 804 cm−1 and 836 cm−1, its position depending on the twisting angle θ. An almost linear relationship was found between the frequencies ωZO and ωR. Also a few other spectral peculiarities were found, e.g. a high-energy excitation of the G band resonance, the 2G overtone appearing at 3170-3180 cm−1 by the G band resonance, revealing a linear dispersion of 80 cm−1/eV of the 2D band in tBLG

  8. Assembly processes in oligomers containing structurally distinct subunits. [Hemoglobin, Hemocyanin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaventura, C. (Duke Univ. Marine Laboratory, Beaufort, NC); Bonaventura, J.; Brouwer, M.

    1980-10-01

    There are two major classes of oxygen carrying proteins: the hemoglobins and the hemocyanins. Thetrameric hemoglobin is an oxygen carrier that has long served as a model in the analysis of allostery in proteins. In assembly processes as well, the oxygen carrying proteins appear to be good model systems which illustrate the distinct roles played by structurally diverse subunits. Thetrameric human hemoglobin shows definite differences in assembly and tetrameric stability depending on alpha-beta, alpha-alpha, beta-beta, alpha-gamma, etc., interactions. The blue-colored hemocyanins are found in the hemolymph of many molluscs and arthropods. In these molecules, oxygen binds at dimeric copper centers. Te reactivity toward oxygen is typically modulated by external factors such as pH and sodium chloride. Because of their extremely large size and subunit diversity, the hemocyanins may be particularly useful as assembly models.

  9. Hemoglobin values for pregnant women residing at middle altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Jatziri Gaitán-González

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine maternal hemoglobin behavior during pregnancy for middle altitude residents and to compare it with that reported in other populations with or without iron supplementation. Materials and methods. Hematological values from 227 pregnant women residing at 2 240 m altitude (Mexico City, with low obstetric and perinatal risk, and receiving supplementary iron, were compared with reference values obtained from other populations of pregnant women residing at different altitudes, after correcting for altitude. Results. While the hemoglobin values for the first and second trimester of pregnancy in our studied population were similar to those reported for iron-supplemented populations (p mayor que 0.05, the third trimester values were similar to those reported for a population without this supplement (p mayor que 0.05. Conclusions. Despite receiving supplementary iron, hemoglobin values during pregnancy from women residing at middle altitude show similar behavior to that reported for pregnant women without iron supplementation.

  10. Hemoglobin is essential for normal growth of Arabidopsis organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim Henrik; Hunt, Peter; Dennis, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    lines are viable but show a mutant phenotype affecting the regions where AHb1 is expressed. Arabidopsis lines with an insertional knockout or overexpression of AHb2, a class II 3-on-3 hemoglobin, were generated. Seedlings overexpressing AHb2 show enhanced survival of hypoxic stress. The AHb2 knockout......In Arabidopsis thaliana, the class I hemoglobin AHb1 is transiently expressed in the hydathodes of leaves and in floral buds from young inflorescences. Nitric oxide (NO) accumulates to high levels in these organs when AHb1 is silenced, indicating an important role in metabolizing NO. AHb1-silenced...... suggests that 3-on-3 hemoglobins apart from a role in hypoxic stress play a general role under non-stressed conditions where they are essential for normal development by controlling the level of NO which tends to accumulate in floral buds and leaf hydathodes of plants...

  11. Membrane-associated sickle hemoglobin: a major determinant of sickle erythrocyte rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, E A; Mohandas, N

    1987-11-01

    Micropipette aspiration tests on single erythrocytes have previously shown that the static rigidity (membrane shear modulus) of oxygenated sickle cells increased with increasing hemoglobin concentration, whereas the rigidity of normal cells was independent of hemoglobin concentration. Moreover, it was observed that after mechanical extension, sickle cells exhibited persistent deformation more frequently and to a greater extent than normal cells. To ascertain if differences in association of normal and sickle hemoglobin with the membrane could account for these observations, we measured rheologic properties of normal membranes reconstituted with sickle hemoglobin and sickle membranes reconstituted with normal hemoglobin. The static rigidity of normal ghosts reloaded with sickle hemoglobin was higher than those of either normal ghosts reloaded with normal hemoglobin or native normal cells. On the other hand, the increased rigidity of native sickle cells decreased to near-normal values following reconstitution with normal hemoglobin. Furthermore, we observed that normal ghosts reconstituted with sickle hemoglobin exhibited persistent bumps after mechanical extension, but no bumps formed on normal ghosts reconstituted with normal hemoglobin. Moreover residual bumps were not produced on sickle cells reloaded with normal hemoglobin. Since mechanical characteristics peculiar to sickle cells could be induced in normal cells by incorporation of sickle hemoglobin, and since normal characteristics could be restored to sickle cells by incorporation of normal hemoglobin, we suggest that the interaction of sickle hemoglobin with the cell membrane is responsible for augmented static rigidity of oxygenated sickle erythrocytes.

  12. Nitric oxide in plants: the roles of ascorbate and hemoglobin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguang Wang

    Full Text Available Ascorbic acid and hemoglobins have been linked to nitric oxide metabolism in plants. It has been hypothesized that ascorbic acid directly reduces plant hemoglobin in support of NO scavenging, producing nitrate and monodehydroascorbate. In this scenario, monodehydroascorbate reductase uses NADH to reduce monodehydroascorbate back to ascorbate to sustain the cycle. To test this hypothesis, rates of rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin reduction by ascorbate were measured directly, in the presence and absence of purified rice monodehydroascorbate reductase and NADH. Solution NO scavenging was also measured methodically in the presence and absence of rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin and monodehydroascorbate reductase, under hypoxic and normoxic conditions, in an effort to gauge the likelihood of these proteins affecting NO metabolism in plant tissues. Our results indicate that ascorbic acid slowly reduces rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin at a rate identical to myoglobin reduction. The product of the reaction is monodehydroascorbate, which can be efficiently reduced back to ascorbate in the presence of monodehydroascorbate reductase and NADH. However, our NO scavenging results suggest that the direct reduction of plant hemoglobin by ascorbic acid is unlikely to serve as a significant factor in NO metabolism, even in the presence of monodehydroascorbate reductase. Finally, the possibility that the direct reaction of nitrite/nitrous acid and ascorbic acid produces NO was measured at various pH values mimicking hypoxic plant cells. Our results suggest that this reaction is a likely source of NO as the plant cell pH drops below 7, and as nitrite concentrations rise to mM levels during hypoxia.

  13. Effects of exposure of blood hemoglobin to nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiodi, H.; Mohler, J.G.

    1985-08-01

    The effect of oxygen exposure on nitrosythemoglobin of whole human blood or its buffered solution has been determined. The amount of methemoglobin formed was determined by anaerobic modification of the Evelyn-Malloy method: 59% of the total hemoglobin of whole blood was oxidized to methemoglobin in the first 15 min of the oxygen exposure and 78% of the total hemoglobin was oxidized after 120 min of oxygen exposure. Similar results were obtained when nitrosylhemoglobin buffered solutions were exposed to the oxygen of the air. A comparison of the present in vitro results with these obtained by injecting nitric oxide into the rat peritoneal cavity and its implications are discussed.

  14. Glycosylation of hemoglobin and plasma proteins in petrochemical plant workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrug, A.; Tomaszewski, L.

    1985-01-01

    The concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin and (plasma) proteins has been measured in 111 workers of 6 MZRiP departments in Plock and in 54 healthy people. In all subjects the mean concentrations of glycosylated hemoglobin and glycosylated plasma proteins have been in so called wide range of normal values. Significant shifts of glycosylated Hb concentrations have been found in two departments--those of ethylenederivatives and distillation. The concentration of glycosylated plasma proteins has been elevated only in workers of the Catalytic Processes Department.

  15. Correlation of serum leptin with levels of hemoglobin in hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafieian-Kopaei Mahmoud

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available To examine the association of serum leptin level with anemia in hemodialysis, we investigated 36 patients (males: 21, diabetics: 11 under regular hemodialysis. For patients, complete blood counts, iron profile, serum leptin, and adequacy of hemodialysis were assessed. In this study a significant correlation of serum leptin with level of hemoglobin and body mass index was detected. An association between serum leptin and total iron binding capacity was observed. No correlation of serum ferritin with leptin level was seen. Our findings attest previous findings showing that greater serum leptin levels are associated with greater hemoglobin levels.

  16. A metastable HCP intermetallic phase in Cu-Al bilayer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Limei

    2006-07-01

    For the present study, three kinds of layered Cu/Al films have been fabricated. The first kind of samples were multilayered Cu/Al films deposited by sputtering on (001)Si. The individual layer thicknesses were 100 nm, 200 nm and 400 nm, while the total film thickness of 800 nm was kept constant, thus leading to multilayer systems with 8, 4 and 2 layers, respectively. The second type of samples were Cu/Al bilayer films grown on (0001) sapphire by sputtering, with individual layer thicknesses of 400 nm. The third type of samples were bilayer films (100 nm Cu and 100 nm Al) deposited on (0001)sapphire by MBE at room temperature. Applying conventional transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, different epitaxial growth behaviors were found in these films. All multilayer films from the first type were polycrystalline. The second type of films show a (111) FCC texture and possess intermetallic phases at the interfaces. HRTEM investigations displayed that along [111]FCC, the atomic structure of the interlayer has an ABAB stacking sequence, which is identical with a hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structure in [0001] direction, but not with the ABCABC stacking sequence of Cu and Al in [111]FCC. The lattice parameters of the HCP structure at the interlayer were determined from a model which gave the best agreement between the experimental and simulated images. The parameters are: a=b=0.256 nm, c=0.419 nm, ?=120 , with the space group of P6m2. Furthermore, lattice distortion analysis revealed that the lattice parameters of the HCP phase are increasing from the near-Cu-side to the near-Al-side. The chemical composition of the interlayer was investigated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). EDS linescans were performed from pure Al to pure Cu layers. In order to examine the stability of this HCP phase, in-situ heating experiments were performed in the HRTEM at {proportional_to}600 C. Ex-situ heating experiments were performed at different temperatures to

  17. Surface complexation of Pb(II) by hexagonal birnessite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, K.; Refson, K.; Sposito, G.

    2010-10-15

    Natural hexagonal birnessite is a poorly-crystalline layer type Mn(IV) oxide precipitated by bacteria and fungi which has a particularly high adsorption affinity for Pb(II). X-ray spectroscopic studies have shown that Pb(II) forms strong inner-sphere surface complexes mainly at two sites on hexagonal birnessite nanoparticles: triple corner-sharing (TCS) complexes on Mn(IV) vacancies in the interlayers and double edge-sharing (DES) complexes on lateral edge surfaces. Although the TCS surface complex has been well characterized by spectroscopy, some important questions remain about the structure and stability of the complexes occurring on the edge surfaces. First-principles simulation techniques such as density functional theory (DFT) offer a useful way to address these questions by providing complementary information that is difficult to obtain by spectroscopy. Following this computational approach, we used spin-polarized DFT to perform total-energy-minimization geometry optimizations of several possible Pb(II) surface complexes on model birnessite nanoparticles similar to those that have been studied experimentally. We first validated our DFT calculations by geometry optimizations of (1) the Pb-Mn oxyhydroxide mineral, quenselite (PbMnO{sub 2}OH), and (2) the TCS surface complex, finding good agreement with experimental structural data while uncovering new information about bonding and stability. Our geometry optimizations of several protonated variants of the DES surface complex led us to conclude that the observed edge-surface species is very likely to be this complex if the singly-coordinated terminal O that binds to Pb(II) is protonated. Our geometry optimizations also revealed that an unhydrated double corner-sharing (DCS) species that has been proposed as an alternative to the DES complex is intrinsically unstable on nanoparticle edge surfaces, but could become stabilized if the local coordination environment is well-hydrated. A significant similarity exists

  18. Pattern Formation in Dewetting Nanoparticle/Polymer Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esker, Alan; Paul, Rituparna; Karabiyik, Ufuk; Swift, Michael; Hottle, John

    2008-03-01

    Comprised of inorganic cores and flexible organic coronae with 1 -- 2 nm diameter monodisperse sizes, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) are ideal model nanofillers. Our discovery that one POSS derivative, trisilanolphenyl-POSS (TPP), can form Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films on hydrophobic substrates, allows us to create thin film bilayers of precisely controlled thickness and architecture. Work with poly(t-butylacrylate) (PtBA)/TPP bilayers reveals a two-step dewetting mechanism in which the upper TPP layer dewets first, followed by the formation of isolated holes with intricate, fractal, nanofiller aggregates. Like the PtBA/TPP bilayers, polystyrene (PS)/TPP bilayers also undergo a two-step dewetting mechanism. However, the upper TPP layer initially forms cracks that may arise from mismatches in thermal expansion coefficients. These cracks then serve as nucleation sites for complete dewetting of the entire bilayer. Understanding the rich diversity of surface patterns that can be formed from relatively simple processes is a key feature of this work.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of bi-layered ceramic dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Zhou, Shiwei; Li, Qing; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael V

    2012-02-01

    The reliability and longevity of ceramic prostheses have become a major concern. The existing studies have focused on some critical issues from clinical perspectives, but more researches are needed to address fundamental sciences and fabrication issues to ensure the longevity and durability of ceramic prostheses. The aim of this paper was to explore how "sensitive" the thermal and mechanical responses, in terms of changes in temperature and thermal residual stress of the bi-layered ceramic systems and crown models will be with respect to the perturbation of the design variables chosen (e.g. layer thickness and heat transfer coefficient) in a quantitative way. In this study, three bi-layered ceramic models with different geometries are considered: (i) a simple bi-layered plate, (ii) a simple bi-layer triangle, and (iii) an axisymmetric bi-layered crown. The layer thickness and convective heat transfer coefficient (or cooling rate) seem to be more sensitive for the porcelain fused on zirconia substrate models. The resultant sensitivities indicate a critical importance of the heat transfer coefficient and thickness ratio of core to veneer on the temperature distributions and residual stresses in each model. The findings provide a quantitative basis for assessing the effects of fabrication uncertainties and optimizing the design of ceramic prostheses. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermal Response Analysis of Phospholipid Bilayers Using Ellipsometric Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Henríquez, Carmen M; Villegas-Opazo, Vanessa A; Sagredo-Oyarce, Dallits H; Sarabia-Vallejos, Mauricio A; Terraza, Claudio A

    2017-08-18

    Biomimetic planar artificial membranes have been widely studied due to their multiple applications in several research fields. Their humectation and thermal response are crucial for reaching stability; these characteristics are related to the molecular organization inside the bilayer, which is affected by the aliphatic chain length, saturations, and molecule polarity, among others. Bilayer stability becomes a fundamental factor when technological devices are developed-like biosensors-based on those systems. Thermal studies were performed for different types of phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules: two pure PC bilayers and four binary PC mixtures. These analyses were carried out through the detection of slight changes in their optical and structural parameters via Ellipsometry and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) techniques. Phospholipid bilayers were prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett technique and deposited over a hydrophilic silicon wafer. Their molecular inclination degree, mobility, and stability of the different phases were detected and analyzed through bilayer thickness changes and their optical phase-amplitude response. Results show that certain binary lipid mixtures-with differences in its aliphatic chain length-present a co-existence of two thermal responses due to non-ideal mixing.

  1. [Hemoglobins, XLVIII: the primary structure of hemoglobin of the Indian elephant (Elephas maximus, Proboscidea): beta 2 = Asn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunitzer, G; Jelkmann, W; Stangl, A; Schrank, B; Krombach, C

    1982-07-01

    The primary structure of the hemoglobin of the Indian Elephant (Elephas maximus) is given. The sequence was determined automatically in a sequenator. By homologous comparison with adult human HbA, the alpha-chains differ by 24 exchanges and the beta-chains by 27 exchanges. Furthermore, we report p(O2)50 values with regard to altered contact sites with 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate in Indian elephant hemoglobin. Our findings explain the low p(O2)50 and the reduced interaction with 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate. Elephant hemoglobin has, like that of the Llama, only five phosphate binding sites. In addition, we have made an attempt to relate these results to aspects of respiratory physiology. Some implications of these biochemical and physiological results, concerning the Second Punic War and Hannibal's Alp transition, are given.

  2. Survival and failure modes: platform-switching for internal and external hexagon cemented fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchieta, Rodolfo B; Machado, Lucas S; Hirata, Ronaldo; Coelho, Paulo G; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the probability of survival (reliability) of platform-switched fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) cemented on different implant-abutment connection designs. Eighty-four-three-unit FDPs (molar pontic) were cemented on abutments connected to two implants of external or internal hexagon connection. Four groups (n = 21 each) were established: external hexagon connection and regular platform (ERC); external hexagon connection and switched platform (ESC); internal hexagon and regular platform (IRC); and internal hexagon and switched platform (ISC). Prostheses were subjected to step-stress accelerated life testing in water. Weibull curves and probability of survival for a mission of 100,000 cycles at 400 N (two-sided 90% CI) were calculated. The beta values of 0.22, 0.48, 0.50, and 1.25 for groups ERC, ESC, IRC, and ISC, respectively, indicated a limited role of fatigue in damage accumulation, except for group ISC. Survival decreased for both platform-switched groups (ESC: 74%, and ISC: 59%) compared with the regular matching platform counterparts (ERC: 95%, and IRC: 98%). Characteristic strength was higher only for ERC compared with ESC, but not different between internal connections. Failures chiefly involved the abutment screw. Platform switching decreased the probability of survival of FDPs on both external and internal connections. The absence in loss of characteristic strength observed in internal hexagon connections favor their use compared with platform-switched external hexagon connections. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  3. Electronic Structure of Graphene and Germanene Based on Double Hexagonal Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, S.; Belhaj, A.; Labrim, H.; Benyoussef, A.; El Kenz, A.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we study the electronic structure of monolayer materials based on a double hexagonal geometry with (1×1) and (√ 3 × √ 3)R30o superstructures. Inspired from the two-dimensional root system of an exceptional Lie algebra called G2, this hexagonal atomic configuration involves two hexagons of unequal side length at angle 30°. The principal unit hexagonal cell contains twelve atoms instead of the usual configuration involving only six ones relying only on the (1×1) superstructure. Using ab initio calculations based on FPLO9.00-34 code, we investigate numerically the graphene and the germanene with the double hexagonal geometry. In particular, we find that the usual electronic properties and the lattice parameters of such materials are modified. More precisely, the lattice parameters are increased. It has been shown that, in the single hexagonal geometry, the grapheme and the germanene behave as a gapless semiconductor and a semi-metallic, respectively. In double hexagonal geometry however, both materials becomes metallic.

  4. Controllable synthesis of hexagonal ZnO–carbon core–shell microrods and the removal of ZnO to form hexagonal carbon microtubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Yong, E-mail: xy91007@163.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); He, Wenqi; Gao, Chuang [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Nanochemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zheng, Mingtao; Lie, Bingfu; Liu, Xiaotang [Department of Applied Chemistry, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Liu, Yingliang, E-mail: tliuyl@163.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China)

    2013-06-15

    A simple and efficient approach was developed to produce regular and uniform shaped hexagonal ZnO–C core–shell micro-rods and carbon micro-tubes. A single-source raw material, zinc acetate dihydrate, has been used for the in situ generation of the hexagonal ZnO–C micro-rods in a sealed autoclave system at 500 °C for 12 h without a catalyst. The resulting products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and room-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The partial or complete carbon coating on the ZnO surfaces plays an important role in modifying the PL properties. Impacting factors including thermolysis temperature, time and dose of the reactant on the evolution of the hexagonal shape were investigated. A possible formation diagram for the materials has been proposed and discussed based on the features of the reaction system. - Highlights: • Hexagonal ZnO–C core–shell microrods were synthesized by the lower temperature decomposition of zinc acetate. • The novel hexagonal carbon microtubes can gain by simply handling with dilute acid. • The partial or complete carbon coating on the ZnO surfaces plays an important role in modifying the PL properties. • A possible formation diagram for the materials has been proposed.

  5. A hemoglobin A1C immunoassay method not affected by carbamylated hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, A M; Tongate, C; Valdes, R

    1995-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) methods based on charge separation of Hb species are subject to interference from carbamylated Hb (carb Hb). Carb Hb adducts are formed via interaction of terminal amino groups of HbA with isocyanic acid, after the spontaneous dissociation of urea to cyanate. It is hypothesized that a new immunoassay method, using a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the N-terminus of the Hb beta-chain and its sugar moiety, should be refractory to cross-reactive interference from carb Hb. To test this hypothesis, Hb was carbamylated in vitro and co-migration of carb Hb assessed with HbA1C using an electrophoretic method. Densitometric scans - post sodium cyanate incubation and electrophoretic separation - showed a 5 to 7 fold elevation of the HbA1C peak only, while HbA1C values obtained using immunoassay were unaffected. Also assessed was carbamylation interference in vivo, and a positive proportional bias with the electrophoretic system (Y) was observed compared to the immunoassay system (X) (y = 1.2x - 0.21 percent). Others have shown that carb Hb may cause a clinically significant false elevation in patient HbA1C values, when methods based on charge separation of Hb species are used. It is our conclusion, however, that while carb Hb may play a role, the differences observed in this study are largely due to calibration.

  6. Modulation of oxygen binding to insect hemoglobins: the structure of hemoglobin from the botfly Gasterophilus intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Dewilde, Sylvia; Hoogewijs, David; Ascenzi, Paolo; Moens, Luc; Bolognesi, Martino

    2005-12-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) reversibly bind gaseous diatomic ligands (e.g., O2) as the sixth heme axial ligand of the penta-coordinate deoxygenated form. Selected members of the Hb superfamily, however, display a functionally relevant hexa-coordinate heme Fe atom in their deoxygenated state. Endogenous heme hexa-coordination is generally provided in these Hbs by the E7 residue (often His), which thus modulates accessibility to the heme distal pocket and reactivity of the heme toward exogenous ligands. Such a pivotal role of the E7 residue is prominently shown by analysis of the functional and structural properties of insect Hbs. Here, we report the 2.6 A crystal structure of oxygenated Gasterophilus intestinalis Hb1, a Hb known to display a penta-coordinate heme in the deoxygenated form. The structure is analyzed in comparison with those of Drosophila melanogaster Hb, exhibiting a hexa-coordinate heme in its deoxygenated derivative, and of Chironomus thummi thummi HbIII, which displays a penta-coordinate heme in the deoxygenated form. Despite evident structural differences in the heme distal pockets, the distinct molecular mechanisms regulating O2 binding to the three insect Hbs result in similar O(2 affinities (P50 values ranging between 0.12 torr and 0.46 torr).

  7. Understanding Multiferroic Hexagonal Manganites by Static and Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ting Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiferroic hexagonal manganites ReMnO3 studied by optics are reviewed. Their electronic structures were revealed by static linear and nonlinear spectra. Two transitions located at ~1.7 eV and ~2.3 eV have been observed and attributed to the interband transitions from the lower-lying Mn3+dxy/dx2-y2 and dxz/dyz states to the Mn3+d3z2-r2 state, respectively. These so-called d-d transitions exhibit a blueshift as decreasing temperatures and an extra blueshift near TN. This dramatic change indicates that the magnetic ordering seriously influences the electronic structure. On the other hand, the ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy has provided the important information on spin-charge coupling and spin-lattice coupling. Because of the strongly correlation between electronic structure and magnetic ordering, the amplitude of the initial rising component in ΔR/R shows striking changes at the vicinity of TN. Moreover, the coherent optical and acoustic phonons were observed on optical pump-probe spectroscopy. Both the amplitude and dephasing time of coherent phonons also exhibit significant changes at TN, which provide the evidence for spin-lattice interaction in these intriguing materials.

  8. Thermal transport across graphene and single layer hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingchao, E-mail: zhang@unl.edu, E-mail: yyue@whu.edu.cn [Holland Computing Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Hong, Yang [Department of Chemistry, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Yue, Yanan, E-mail: zhang@unl.edu, E-mail: yyue@whu.edu.cn [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China)

    2015-04-07

    As the dimensions of nanocircuits and nanoelectronics shrink, thermal energies are being generated in more confined spaces, making it extremely important and urgent to explore for efficient heat dissipation pathways. In this work, the phonon energy transport across graphene and hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) interface is studied using classic molecular dynamics simulations. Effects of temperature, interatomic bond strength, heat flux direction, and functionalization on interfacial thermal transport are investigated. It is found out that by hydrogenating graphene in the hybrid structure, the interfacial thermal resistance (R) between graphene and h-BN can be reduced by 76.3%, indicating an effective approach to manipulate the interfacial thermal transport. Improved in-plane/out-of-plane phonon couplings and broadened phonon channels are observed in the hydrogenated graphene system by analyzing its phonon power spectra. The reported R results monotonically decrease with temperature and interatomic bond strengths. No thermal rectification phenomenon is observed in this interfacial thermal transport. Results reported in this work give the fundamental knowledge on graphene and h-BN thermal transport and provide rational guidelines for next generation thermal interface material designs.

  9. Exfoliation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Ferric Chloride Intercalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana; Rogers, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) was used as an activation agent to successfully intercalate ferric chloride (FeCl3) into hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). This reaction caused the hBN mass to increase by approx.100 percent, the lattice parameter c to decrease from 6.6585 to between 6.6565 and 6.6569 ?, the x-ray diffraction (XRD) (002) peak to widen from 0.01deg to 0.05deg of the full width half maximum value, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum's broad band (1277/cm peak) to change shape, and new FTIR bands to emerge at 3700 to 2700 and 1600/cm. This indicates hBN's structural and chemical properties are significantly changed. The intercalated product was hygroscopic and interacted with moisture in the air to cause further structural and chemical changes (from XRD and FTIR). During a 24-h hold at room temperature in air with 100 percent relative humidity, the mass increased another 141 percent. The intercalated product, hydrated or not, can be heated to 750 C in air to cause exfoliation. Exfoliation becomes significant after two intercalation-air heating cycles, when 20-nm nanosheets are commonly found. Structural and chemical changes indicated by XRD and FTIR data were nearly reversed after the product was placed in hydrochloric acid (HCl), resulting in purified, exfoliated, thin hBN products.

  10. Transport properties of ultrathin black phosphorus on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doganov, Rostislav A.; Özyilmaz, Barbaros [Centre for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, 6 Science Drive 2, 117546 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering (NGS), National University of Singapore, 28 Medical Drive, 117456 Singapore (Singapore); Koenig, Steven P.; Yeo, Yuting [Centre for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, 6 Science Drive 2, 117546 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-02-23

    Ultrathin black phosphorus, or phosphorene, is a two-dimensional material that allows both high carrier mobility and large on/off ratios. Similar to other atomic crystals, like graphene or layered transition metal dichalcogenides, the transport behavior of few-layer black phosphorus is expected to be affected by the underlying substrate. The properties of black phosphorus have so far been studied on the widely utilized SiO{sub 2} substrate. Here, we characterize few-layer black phosphorus field effect transistors on hexagonal boron nitride—an atomically smooth and charge trap-free substrate. We measure the temperature dependence of the field effect mobility for both holes and electrons and explain the observed behavior in terms of charged impurity limited transport. We find that in-situ vacuum annealing at 400 K removes the p-doping of few-layer black phosphorus on both boron nitride and SiO{sub 2} substrates and reduces the hysteresis at room temperature.

  11. The Hexagon-Spindle Model for educational ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedyk, Rachel; Woodcock, Andrée; Harder, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Ergonomics has traditionally considered work done, in a workplace. More recently, this scope has broadened, and the concept of 'work' may now be applied to the satisfactory completion of any task. Thus, learning, being the transformation and extension of the learner's knowledge or skills, can be viewed as work, with its workplace being the educational environment in which learning tasks take place. In accomplishing the learning, the learner interacts with the teachers, other students, equipment, materials, study plans and the educational organisation; the effectiveness of these learning interactions is influenced by many factors both inside and external to the organisation. To optimize such a multi-factorial process requires the application of an ergonomic approach. This paper proposes an adaptation of the concentric rings model of ergonomics, informed by Kao's earlier model, to produce a new model for educational ergonomics, known as the Hexagon-Spindle Model. In comparison to other published models of educational ergonomics, it is holistic, multi-dimensional, task-related and transferable across a range of educational settings. It extends to characterise a time base for serial and simultaneous tasks, and space shared by multiple learners, and highlights areas where learner/system conflicts may arise. The paper illustrates analysis tools for the application of the model in evaluation and design.

  12. Hexagonal tungsten oxide nanoflowers as enzymatic mimetics and electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Yeong; Seo, Ji Min; Jo, Hongil; Park, Juhyun; Ok, Kang Min; Park, Tae Jung

    2017-01-01

    Tungsten oxide (WOx) has been widely studied for versatile applications based on its photocatalytic, intrinsic catalytic, and electrocatalytic properties. Among the several nanostructures, we focused on the flower-like structures to increase the catalytic efficiency on the interface with both increased substrate interaction capacities due to their large surface area and efficient electron transportation. Therefore, improved WOx nanoflowers (WONFs) with large surface areas were developed through a simple hydrothermal method using sodium tungstate and hydrogen chloride solution at low temperature, without any additional surfactant, capping agent, or reducing agent. Structural determination and electrochemical analyses revealed that the WONFs have hexagonal Na0.17WO3.085·0.17H2O structure and exhibit peroxidase-like activity, turning from colorless to blue by catalyzing the oxidation of a peroxidase substrate, such as 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine, in the presence of H2O2. Additionally, a WONF-modified glassy carbon electrode was adopted to monitor the electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2. To verify the catalytic efficiency enhancement by the unique shape and structure of the WONFs, they were compared with calcinated WONFs, cesium WOx nanoparticles, and other peroxidase-like nanomaterials. The results indicated that the WONFs showed a low Michaelis-Menten constant (km), high maximal reaction velocity (vmax), and large surface area. PMID:28128306

  13. Hyperbolic phonon polaritons in hexagonal boron nitride (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Siyuan; Ma, Qiong; Fei, Zhe; Liu, Mengkun; Goldflam, Michael D.; Andersen, Trond; Garnett, William; Regan, Will; Wagner, Martin; McLeod, Alexander S.; Rodin, Alexandr; Zhu, Shou-En; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, T.; Dominguez, Gerado; Thiemens, Mark; Castro Neto, Antonio H.; Janssen, Guido C. A. M.; Zettl, Alex; Keilmann, Fritz; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Fogler, Michael M.; Basov, Dmitri N.

    2016-09-01

    Uniaxial materials whose axial and tangential permittivities have opposite signs are referred to as indefinite or hyperbolic media. While hyperbolic responses are normally achieved with metamaterials, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) naturally possesses this property due to the anisotropic phonons in the mid-infrared. Using scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy, we studied polaritonic phenomena in hBN. We performed infrared nano-imaging of highly confined and low-loss hyperbolic phonon polaritons in hBN. The polariton wavelength was shown to be governed by the hBN thickness according to a linear law persisting down to few atomic layers [1]. Additionally, we carried out the modification of hyperbolic response in meta-structures comprised of a mononlayer graphene deposited on hBN [2]. Electrostatic gating of the top graphene layer allows for the modification of wavelength and intensity of hyperbolic phonon polaritons in bulk hBN. The physics of the modification originates from the plasmon-phonon coupling in the hyperbolic medium. Furthermore, we demonstrated the "hyperlens" for subdiffractional focusing and imaging using a slab of hBN [3]. References [1] S. Dai et al., Science, 343, 1125 (2014). [2] S. Dai et al., Nature Nanotechnology, 10, 682 (2015). [3] S. Dai et al., Nature Communications, 6, 6963 (2015).

  14. A challenging interpretation of a hexagonally layered protein structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Michael C.; Yeates, Todd O., E-mail: yeates@mbi.ucla.edu [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe the structure determination of a hexagonally layered protein structure that suffered from a complicated combination of translational non-crystallographic symmetry and hemihedral twinning. This case serves as a reminder that broken crystallographic symmetry resulting from doubling of a unit-cell axis often requires a new choice of origin. The carboxysome is a giant protein complex that acts as a metabolic organelle in cyanobacteria and some chemoautotrophs. Its outer structure is formed by the assembly of thousands of copies of hexameric shell protein subunits into a molecular layer. The structure determination of a CcmK1 shell protein mutant (L11K) from the β-carboxysome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 led to challenges in structure determination. Twinning, noncrystallographic symmetry and packing of hexameric units in a special arrangement led to initial difficulties in space-group assignment. The correct space group was clarified after initial model refinement revealed additional symmetry. This study provides an instructive example in which broken symmetry requires a new choice of unit-cell origin in order to identify the highest symmetry space group. An additional observation related to the packing arrangement of molecules in this crystal suggests that these hexameric shell proteins might have lower internal symmetry than previously believed.

  15. Optical Signatures of Quantum Emitters in Suspended Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarhos, Annemarie L; Hopper, David A; Grote, Richard R; Alkauskas, Audrius; Bassett, Lee C

    2017-03-28

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is rapidly emerging as an attractive material for solid-state quantum engineering. Analogously to three-dimensional wide-band-gap semiconductors such as diamond, h-BN hosts isolated defects exhibiting visible fluorescence at room temperature, and the ability to position such quantum emitters within a two-dimensional material promises breakthrough advances in quantum sensing, photonics, and other quantum technologies. Critical to such applications is an understanding of the physics underlying h-BN's quantum emission. We report the creation and characterization of visible single-photon sources in suspended, single-crystal, h-BN films. With substrate interactions eliminated, we study the spectral, temporal, and spatial characteristics of the defects' optical emission. Theoretical analysis of the defects' spectra reveals similarities in vibronic coupling to h-BN phonon modes despite widely varying fluorescence wavelengths, and a statistical analysis of the polarized emission from many emitters throughout the same single-crystal flake uncovers a weak correlation between the optical dipole orientations of some defects and h-BN's primitive crystallographic axes, despite a clear misalignment for other dipoles. These measurements constrain possible defect models and, moreover, suggest that several classes of emitters can exist simultaneously throughout free-standing h-BN, whether they be different defects, different charge states of the same defect, or the result of strong local perturbations.

  16. Hexagonal tungsten oxide nanoflowers as enzymatic mimetics and electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Yeong; Seo, Ji Min; Jo, Hongil; Park, Juhyun; Ok, Kang Min; Park, Tae Jung

    2017-01-01

    Tungsten oxide (WOx) has been widely studied for versatile applications based on its photocatalytic, intrinsic catalytic, and electrocatalytic properties. Among the several nanostructures, we focused on the flower-like structures to increase the catalytic efficiency on the interface with both increased substrate interaction capacities due to their large surface area and efficient electron transportation. Therefore, improved WOx nanoflowers (WONFs) with large surface areas were developed through a simple hydrothermal method using sodium tungstate and hydrogen chloride solution at low temperature, without any additional surfactant, capping agent, or reducing agent. Structural determination and electrochemical analyses revealed that the WONFs have hexagonal Na0.17WO3.085·0.17H2O structure and exhibit peroxidase-like activity, turning from colorless to blue by catalyzing the oxidation of a peroxidase substrate, such as 3,3‧,5,5‧-tetramethylbenzidine, in the presence of H2O2. Additionally, a WONF-modified glassy carbon electrode was adopted to monitor the electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2. To verify the catalytic efficiency enhancement by the unique shape and structure of the WONFs, they were compared with calcinated WONFs, cesium WOx nanoparticles, and other peroxidase-like nanomaterials. The results indicated that the WONFs showed a low Michaelis-Menten constant (km), high maximal reaction velocity (vmax), and large surface area.

  17. Tilted hexagonal post arrays: DNA electrophoresis in anisotropic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Dorfman, Kevin D

    2014-02-01

    Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we show that DNA electrophoresis in a hexagonal array of micron-sized posts changes qualitatively when the applied electric field vector is not coincident with the lattice vectors of the array. DNA electrophoresis in such "tilted" post arrays is superior to the standard "un-tilted" approach; while the time required to achieve a resolution of unity in a tilted post array is similar to an un-tilted array at a low-electric field strengths, this time (i) decreases exponentially with electric field strength in a tilted array and (ii) increases exponentially with electric field strength in an un-tilted array. Although the DNA dynamics in a post array are complicated, the electrophoretic mobility results indicate that the "free path," i.e. the average distance of ballistic trajectories of point-sized particles launched from random positions in the unit cell until they intersect the next post, is a useful proxy for the detailed DNA trajectories. The analysis of the free path reveals a fundamental connection between anisotropy of the medium and DNA transport therein that goes beyond simply improving the separation device.

  18. The ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array - performance and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Allan

    2016-04-01

    The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays at ˜1020 eV is still unknown. Ultra-high energy neutrinos from the GZK process should provide information on the sources and their properties. A promising and cost effective method for observing GZK-neutrinos is based on detection of Askaryan radio pulses with antennas installed in ice. The ARIANNA project aims at instrumenting a 36*36 km2 large area on the Ross Ice Shelf with an array of radio detection stations. The deployment of a test system for ARIANNA, the Hexagonal Radio Array (HRA), was completed in December 2014. The three first stations were installed in 2012. Solar panels are used to drive the < 10 W stations. The system hibernated at sunset in April and all stations returned to operation in September. The site is essentially free of anthropogenic noise. Simple cuts eliminate background and provides for efficient selection of neutrino events. Prospects for the sensitivity of the full ARIANNA array to the flux of GZK neutrinos are shown.

  19. Design and Performance of the ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Barwick, S W; Besson, D Z; Cheim, E; Duffin, T; Hanson, J C; Klein, S R; Kleinfelder, S A; Prakash, T; Piasecki, M; Ratzlaff, K; Reed, C; Roumi, M; Samanta, A; Stezelberger, T; Tatar, J; Walker, J; Young, R; Zou, L

    2014-01-01

    We report on the development, installation and operation of the first three of seven stations deployed at the ARIANNA site's pilot Hexagonal Radio Array in Antarctica. The primary goal of the ARIANNA project is to observe ultra-high energy (>100 PeV) cosmogenic neutrino signatures using a large array of autonomous stations each dispersed 1 km apart on the surface of the Ross Ice Shelf. Sensing radio emissions of 100 MHz to 1 GHz, each station in the array contains RF antennas, amplifiers, 1.92 G-sample/s, 850 MHz bandwidth signal acquisition circuitry, pattern-matching trigger capabilities, an embedded CPU, 32 GB of solid-state data storage, and long-distance wireless and satellite communications. Power is provided by the sun and LiFePO4 storage batteries, and the stations consume an average of 7W of power. Operation on solar power has resulted in >=58% per calendar-year live-time. The station's pattern-trigger capabilities reduce the trigger rates to a few milli-Hertz with 4-sigma thresholds while retaining ...

  20. Whispering Gallery Modes in Hexagonal Zinc Oxide Micro- and Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobis, Thomas; Kaidashev, Evgeni M.; Rahm, Andreas; Lorenz, Michael; Grundmann, Marius

    The resonator properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) micro- and nanocrystals grown by a novel high pressure pulsed laser deposition process have been investigated at room temperature by cathodoluminescence (CL), spatially resolved CL-imaging and polarization resolved micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) within the visible spectral range. The spectra exhibit a series of comparatively sharp and almost equidistant resonance lines. Using a simple plane wave interference model and taking into account the spectral characteristic n(ω) of the refractive index of ZnO, we can unambiguously attribute those lines to whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of a two dimensional hexagonal resonator. The predicted resonator diameters agree well with the measured crystal sizes. Tapered, high aspect ratio ZnO nanoneedles furthermore allow systematic investigations of the WGMs as a function of cavity diameter D down to zero. Hence, the transition from a multi-mode to a single mode cavity is directly observed. μ-PL experiments demonstrate that the WGMs are mainly TM polarized.

  1. Strontium adsorption on tantalum-doped hexagonal tungsten oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingliang; Mu, Wanjun; Xie, Xiang; Liu, Bijun; Tang, Hui; Zhou, Guanhong; Wei, Hongyuan; Jian, Yuan; Luo, Shunzhong

    2014-01-15

    Hexagonal tungsten oxide (hex-WO3) has the potential to separate (137)Cs and (90)Sr from nuclear power plant or fission (99)Mo production waste. This study aims to increase the capacity of hex-WO3 to adsorb Sr(2+). Ta-doped hex-WO3 was synthesized by the hydrothermal treatment of sodium tungstate dihydrate and tantalum chloride in concentrated HCl, in the presence of ammonium sulfate. Incorporating Ta into the WO3 framework caused the interlayer spacing to expand, and the band gap to shift to higher energy. The Sr(2+) adsorption capacity of Ta-doped hex-WO3 was significantly higher than that of hex-WO3. Sr(2+) adsorption reached equilibrium within 2h in acidic solution. Maximum Sr(2+) removal occurred at pH 4. Sr(2+) uptake by hex-WO3 was described better by the Freundlich model than by the Langmuir model. Sr(2+) adsorption on hex-WO3 was spontaneous under the studied conditions.

  2. The ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array – performance and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallgren Allan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays at ∼1020 eV is still unknown. Ultra-high energy neutrinos from the GZK process should provide information on the sources and their properties. A promising and cost effective method for observing GZK-neutrinos is based on detection of Askaryan radio pulses with antennas installed in ice. The ARIANNA project aims at instrumenting a 36*36 km2 large area on the Ross Ice Shelf with an array of radio detection stations. The deployment of a test system for ARIANNA, the Hexagonal Radio Array (HRA, was completed in December 2014. The three first stations were installed in 2012. Solar panels are used to drive the < 10 W stations. The system hibernated at sunset in April and all stations returned to operation in September. The site is essentially free of anthropogenic noise. Simple cuts eliminate background and provides for efficient selection of neutrino events. Prospects for the sensitivity of the full ARIANNA array to the flux of GZK neutrinos are shown.

  3. On plastic flow in notched hexagonal close packed single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvarajou, Balaji; Kondori, Babak; Benzerga, A. Amine; Joshi, Shailendra P.

    2016-09-01

    The micromechanics of anisotropic plastic flow by combined slip and twinning is investigated computationally in single crystal notched specimens. Constitutive relations for hexagonal close packed materials are used which take into account elastic anisotropy, thirty potential deformation systems, various hardening mechanisms and rate-sensitivity. The specimens are loaded perpendicular to the c-axis but the presence of a notch generates three-dimensional triaxial stress states. The study is motivated by recent experiments on a polycrystalline magnesium alloy. To enable comparisons with these where appropriate, three sets of activation thresholds for the various deformation systems are used. For the conditions that most closely mimic the alloy material, attention is focused on the relative roles of pyramidal and prismatic slip, as well as on the emergence of {1012bar}[101bar1] extension twinning at sufficiently high triaxiality. In all cases, the spatial variations of stress triaxiality and plastic strain, inclusive of various system activities, are quantified along with their evolution upon straining. The implications of these findings in fundamental understanding of ductile failure of HCP alloys in general and Mg alloys in particular are discussed.

  4. Non-abelian representations of the slim dense near hexagons on 81 and 243 points

    CERN Document Server

    De Bruyn, B; Sastry, N S N

    2010-01-01

    We prove that the near hexagon $Q(5,2) \\times \\mathbb{L}_3$ has a non-abelian representation in the extra-special 2-group $2^{1+12}_+$ and that the near hexagon $Q(5,2) \\otimes Q(5,2)$ has a non-abelian representation in the extra-special 2-group $2^{1+18}_-$. The description of the non-abelian representation of $Q(5,2) \\otimes Q(5,2)$ makes use of a new combinatorial construction of this near hexagon.

  5. Epitaxial stabilization of artificial hexagonal GdMnO3 thin films and their magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Lee, J.-H.; Murugavel, P.; Jang, S. Y.; Noh, T. W.; Jo, Y.; Jung, M.-H.; Ko, Y.-D.; Chung, J.-S.

    2007-04-01

    The authors investigated the role of oxygen partial pressure on the epitaxial growth of an artificial hexagonal GdMnO3 phase, which should exist in an orthorhombic structure in bulk. The hexagonal GdMnO3 film showed diverse, but obvious, magnetic phase transitions with highly enhanced ferromagnetic properties. Its remnant magnetization at 4.2K is higher than those of other hexagonal RMnO3 (R =Ho, Er, and Yb) compounds, and the Curie temperature increases by around 25K. The results demonstrate that the epitaxial stabilization technique is a promising method for fabricating an artificial material with enhanced magnetic properties.

  6. Pressure Dependence of Structure Stability of Multiferroic Hexagonal-RMnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Gao, Peng; Tyson, Trevor. A.; Liu, Zhenxian; Hu, Jinzhu; Zhang, Chenglin; Kim, Sung-Baek; Cheong, Sang-Wook

    2009-03-01

    We present high pressure IR and X-ray diffraction measurements of the hexagonal multiferroic systems HoMnO3, YMnO3 and LuMnO3. Measurements were conducted over the pressure range ambient to ˜20 GPa. No phase changes were observed over this broad range of hydrostatic pressures. These suggest that the hexagonal structure is stable at higher pressures. The thermal treatment is necessary to overcome the barrier (breaking and reconnection of bonds) to achieve the hexagonal to orthorhombic phase change. A discussion of the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the ferroelectric properties of these systems will be given based on comparisons with density functional calculations.

  7. Molecular-dynamics simulation of a ceramide bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Sagar A.; Scott, H. Larry

    2006-01-01

    Ceramide is the simplest lipid in the biologically important class of glycosphingolipids. Ceramide is an important signaling molecule and a major component of the strateum corneum layer in the skin. In order to begin to understand the biophysical properties of ceramide, we have carried out a molecular-dynamics simulation of a hydrated 16:0 ceramide lipid bilayer at 368K (5° above the main phase transition). In this paper we describe the simulation and present the resulting properties of the bilayer. We compare the properties of the simulated ceramide bilayer to an earlier simulation of 18:0 sphingomyelin, and we discuss the results as they relate to experimental data for ceramide and other sphingolipids. The most significant differences arise at the lipid/water interface, where the lack of a large ceramide polar group leads to a different electron density and a different electrostatic potential but, surprisingly, not a different overall "dipole potential," when ceramide is compared to sphingomyelin.

  8. Meron-Pair Excitations in Bilayer Quantum Hall System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyungsun

    Bilayer two-dimensional electron gas systems can form unusual broken symmetry states with spontaneous inter-layer phase coherence at certain filling factors. At total filling factor νT = 1, the lowest energy charged excitation of the system is theoretically suggested to be a linearly-confined meron-pair, which is topologically identical to a single skyrmion. We will review how this remarkable excitation arises and can help unravel various experimental results demonstrated in bilayer quantum Hall system. In order to detect the linearly-confined meron-pair excitation directly, we propose a gated bilayer Hall bar experiment, where the magnitude and orientation of magnetic field B‖ applied parallel to the 2D plane can be controlled. We demonstrate a strong angle-dependent transport due to the anisotropic nature of linearly-confined meron-pairs and discuss how it would be manifested in experiment.

  9. Methodological problems in pressure profile calculations for lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Jacob; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2005-01-01

    From molecular dynamics simulations of a dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) lipid bilayer in the liquid crystalline phase, pressure profiles through the bilayer are calculated by different methods. These profiles allow us to address two central and unresolved problems in pressure profile...... calculations: The first problem is that the pressure profile is not uniquely defined since the expression for the local pressure involves an arbitrary choice of an integration contour. We have investigated two different choices leading to the Irving-Kirkwood (IK) and Harasima (H) expressions for the local...... pressure tensor. For these choices we find that the pressure profile is almost independent of the contour used, which indicates that the local pressure is well defined for a DPPC bilayer in the liquid crystalline phase. This may not be the case for other systems and we therefore suggest that both the IK...

  10. Equilibrium Configurations of Lipid Bilayer Membranes and Carbon Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iva(i)lo M.Mladenov; Peter A.Djondjorov; Mariana Ts.Hadzhilazova; Vassil M.Vassilev

    2013-01-01

    The present article concerns the continuum modelling of the mechanical behaviour and equilibrium shapes of two types of nano-scale objects:fluid lipid bilayer membranes and carbon nanostructures.A unified continuum model is used to handle four different case studies.Two of them consist in representing in analytic form cylindrical and axisymmetric equilibrium configurations of single-wall carbon nanotubes and fluid lipid bilayer membranes subjected to uniform hydrostatic pressure.The third one is concerned with determination of possible shapes of junctions between a single-wall carbon nanotube and a fiat graphene sheet or another single-wall carbon nanotube.The last one deals with the mechanical behaviour of closed fluid lipid bilayer membranes (vesicles) adhering onto a fiat homogeneous rigid substrate subjected to micro-injection and uniform hydrostatic pressure.

  11. Curvatronics with bilayer graphene in an effective $4D$ spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Cariglia, M; Perali, A

    2016-01-01

    We show that in AB stacked bilayer graphene low energy excitations around the semimetallic points are described by massless, four dimensional Dirac fermions. There is an effective reconstruction of the 4 dimensional spacetime, including in particular the dimension perpendicular to the sheet, that arises dynamically from the physical graphene sheet and the interactions experienced by the carriers. The effective spacetime is the Eisenhart-Duval lift of the dynamics experienced by Galilei invariant L\\'evy-Leblond spin $\\frac{1}{2}$ particles near the Dirac points. We find that changing the intrinsic curvature of the bilayer sheet induces a change in the energy level of the electronic bands, switching from a conducting regime for negative curvature to an insulating one when curvature is positive. In particular, curving graphene bilayers allows opening or closing the energy gap between conduction and valence bands, a key effect for electronic devices. Thus using curvature as a tunable parameter opens the way for t...

  12. Exchange bias training effect in coupled all ferromagnetic bilayer structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Ch; Polisetty, S; He, Xi; Berger, A

    2006-02-17

    Exchange coupled bilayers of soft and hard ferromagnetic thin films show remarkable analogies to conventional antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic exchange bias heterostructures. Not only do all these ferromagnetic bilayers exhibit a tunable exchange bias effect, they also show a distinct training behavior upon cycling the soft layer through consecutive hysteresis loops. In contrast with conventional exchange bias systems, such all ferromagnetic bilayer structures allow the observation of training induced changes in the bias-setting hardmagnetic layer by means of simple magnetometry. Our experiments show unambiguously that the exchange bias training effect is driven by deviations from equilibrium in the pinning layer. A comparison of our experimental data with predictions from a theory based upon triggered relaxation phenomena shows excellent agreement.

  13. Laurdan fluorescence senses mechanical strain in the lipid bilayer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Liang; Frangos, John A; Chachisvilis, Mirianas

    2006-09-01

    The precise molecular mechanisms by which cells transduce a mechanical stimulus into an intracellular biochemical response have not yet been established. Here, we show for the first time that the fluorescence emission of an environment-sensitive membrane probe Laurdan is modulated by mechanical strain of the lipid bilayer membrane. We have measured fluorescence emission of Laurdan in phospholipid vesicles of 30, 50, and 100 nm diameter to show that osmotically induced membrane tension leads to an increase in polarity (hydration depth) of the phospholipid bilayer interior. Our data indicate that the general polarization of Laurdan emission is linearly dependent on membrane tension. We also show that higher membrane curvature leads to higher hydration levels. We anticipate that the proposed method will facilitate future studies of mechanically induced changes in physical properties of lipid bilayer environment both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Duff, K.C. [Univ. of Edinburgh Medical School (United Kingdom); Saxena, A.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein.

  15. Bilayer Deformation, Pores, and Micellation Induced by Oxidized Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonnoy, Phansiri; Jarerattanachat, Viwan; Karttunen, Mikko; Wong-Ekkabut, Jirasak

    2015-12-17

    The influence of different oxidized lipids on lipid bilayers was investigated with 16 individual 1 μs atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Binary mixtures of lipid bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PLPC) and its peroxide and aldehyde products were performed at different concentrations. In addition, an asymmetrical short chain lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PDPC), was used to compare the effects of polar/apolar groups in the lipid tail on lipid bilayer. Although water defects occurred with both aldehyde and peroxide lipids, full pore formation was observed only for aldehyde lipids. At medium concentrations the pores were stable. At higher concentrations, however, the pores became unstable and micellation occurred. Data analysis shows that aldehyde lipids' propensity for pore formation is due to their shorter and highly mobile tail. The highly polar peroxide lipids are stabilized by strong hydrogen bonds with interfacial water.

  16. Magnetically Assisted Bilayer Composites for Soft Bending Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Hwan Jang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a soft pneumatic bending actuator using a magnetically assisted bilayer composite composed of silicone polymer and ferromagnetic particles. Bilayer composites were fabricated by mixing ferromagnetic particles to a prepolymer state of silicone in a mold and asymmetrically distributed them by applying a strong non-uniform magnetic field to one side of the mold during the curing process. The biased magnetic field induces sedimentation of the ferromagnetic particles toward one side of the structure. The nonhomogeneous distribution of the particles induces bending of the structure when inflated, as a result of asymmetric stiffness of the composite. The bilayer composites were then characterized with a scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The bending performance and the axial expansion of the actuator were discussed for manipulation applications in soft robotics and bioengineering. The magnetically assisted manufacturing process for the soft bending actuator is a promising technique for various applications in soft robotics.

  17. Manipulating interface states in monolayer-bilayer graphene planar junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Jun

    2016-05-01

    We report on transport properties of monolayer-bilayer graphene planar junctions in a magnetic field. Due to its unique geometry, the edge and interface states can be independently manipulated by either interlayer potential or Zeeman field, and the conductance exhibits interesting quantized behaviors. In the hybrid graphene junction, the quantum Hall (QH) conductance is no longer antisymmetric with respect to the charge neutrality point. When the Zeeman field is considered, a quantum spin Hall (QSH) phase is found in the monolayer region while the weak-QSH phase stays in the bilayer region. In the presence of both interlayer potential and Zeeman field, the bilayer region hosts a QSH phase, whereas the monolayer region is still in a QH phase, leading to a spin-polarized current in the interface. In particular, the QSH phase remains robust against the disorder.

  18. Light-Patterned Current Generation in a Droplet Bilayer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo Schild, Vanessa; Booth, Michael J.; Box, Stuart J.; Olof, Sam N.; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R.; Bayley, Hagan

    2017-04-01

    We have created a 4 × 4 droplet bilayer array comprising light-activatable aqueous droplet bio-pixels. Aqueous droplets containing bacteriorhodopsin (bR), a light-driven proton pump, were arranged on a common hydrogel surface in lipid-containing oil. A separate lipid bilayer formed at the interface between each droplet and the hydrogel; each bilayer then incorporated bR. Electrodes in each droplet simultaneously measured the light-driven proton-pumping activities of each bio-pixel. The 4 × 4 array derived by this bottom-up synthetic biology approach can detect grey-scale images and patterns of light moving across the device, which are transduced as electrical current generated in each bio-pixel. We propose that synthetic biological light-activatable arrays, produced with soft materials, might be interfaced with living tissues to stimulate neuronal pathways.

  19. Lipid bilayer microarray for parallel recording of transmembrane ion currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pioufle, Bruno; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Tabata, Kazuhito V; Noji, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a multiwell biochip for simultaneous parallel recording of ion current through transmembrane pores reconstituted in planar lipid bilayer arrays. Use of a thin poly(p-xylylene) (parylene) film having micrometer-sized apertures (phi=15-50 microm, t=20 microm) led to formation of highly stable bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) for incorporation of transmembrane pores; thus, a large number of BLMs could be arrayed without any skillful technique. We optically confirmed the simultaneous formation of BLMs in a 5x5 matrix, and in our durability test, the BLM lasted more than 15 h. Simultaneous parallel recording of alamethicin and gramicidin transmembrane pores in multiple contiguous recording sites demonstrated the feasibility of high-throughput screening of transmembrane ion currents in artificial lipid bilayers.

  20. Relationship between maternal hemoglobin concentration and neonatal birth weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhavat, Leila; Davar, Robab; Hosseinidezoki, Somaiasadat

    2011-11-01

    Pregnancy considerably increases iron needs in a mother and her fetus. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between maternal hemoglobin concentration in labor with neonatal birth weight. A population-based study in Shahid Sadughi Hospital in Yazd, Iran, was performed by comparing 1842 singleton term pregnancies of patients with and without anemia and their newborns. Maternal characteristics, including hemoglobin values, were recorded at the labor visit. Maternal anemia was defined as hemoglobin concentration lower than 10 g/dl during pregnancy. Main outcome measures included birth weight and Apgar score. Linear and logistic regression models were used to analyze data. Anemia (Hb 13 g/dl) increased the risk of low birth weight but it was not significant. The risk of a low Apgar score was significantly increased in women with anemia. The minimum incidence of low birth weight occurs in association with a hemoglobin concentration of 10-13 g/dl. Maternal anemia was significantly associated with effect on birth weight. Also Hb > 13 g/dl was also associated with an increased risk of low birth weight.