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Sample records for heteroleptic ruthenium sensitizer

  1. Synthesis and characterization of novel heteroleptic ruthenium sensitizer for nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sivakumar, R.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Anandan, S.

    2009-01-01

    A novel heteroleptic ruthenium complex of the type [Ru(bpin)(dcbpyH2)Cl]Cl (where bpin is 2,6-bis(pyrazol-1-yl)isonicotinic acid and dcbpyH2 is 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridine) was synthesized and characterized for tuning the LUMO level of the ruthenium sensitizer to achieve greater stabilization in

  2. A High Molar Extinction Coefficient Mono-Anthracenyl Bipyridyl Heteroleptic Ruthenium(II Complex: Synthesis, Photophysical and Electrochemical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Ajibade

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In our quest to develop good materials as photosensitizers for photovoltaic dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs, cis-dithiocyanato-4-(2,3-dimethylacrylic acid-2,2'-bipyridyl-4-(9-anthracenyl-(2,3-dimethylacrylic-2,2'-bipyridyl ruthenium(II complex, a high molar extinction coefficient charge transfer sensitizer, was designed, synthesized and characterized by spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. Earlier studies on heteroleptic ruthenium(II complex analogues containing functionalized oligo-anthracenyl phenanthroline ligands have been reported and documented. Based on a general linear correlation between increase in the length of π-conjugation bond and the molar extinction coefficients, herein, we report the photophysical and electrochemical properties of a Ru(II bipyridyl complex analogue with a single functionalized anthracenyl unit. Interestingly, the complex shows better broad and intense metal-to ligand charge transfer (MLCT band absorption with higher molar extinction coefficient (λmax = 518 nm, e = 44900 M−1cm−1, and appreciable photoluminescence spanning the visible region than those containing higher anthracenyl units. It was shown that molar absorption coefficient of the complexes may not be solely depended on the extended π-conjugation but are reduced by molecular aggregation in the molecules.

  3. Electronic optimization of heteroleptic Ru(II) bipyridine complexes by remote substituents: synthesis, characterization, and application to dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Won-Sik; Han, Jung-Kyu; Kim, Hyun-Young; Choi, Mi Jin; Kang, Yong-Soo; Pac, Chyongjin; Kang, Sang Ook

    2011-04-18

    We prepared a series of new heteroleptic ruthenium(II) complexes, Ru(NCS)(2)LL' (3a-3e), where L is 4,4'-di(hydroxycarbonyl)-2,2'-bipyridine and L' is 4,4'-di(p-X-phenyl)-2,2'-pyridine (X = CN (a), F (b), H (c), OMe (d), and NMe(2) (e)), in an attempt to explore the structure-activity relationships in their photophysical and electrochemical behavior and in their performance in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). When substituent X is changed from electron-donating NMe(2) to electron-withdrawing CN, the absorption and emission maxima reveal systematic bathochromic shifts. The redox potentials of these dyes are also significantly influenced by X. The electronic properties of the dyes were theoretically analyzed using density functional theory calculations; the results show good correlations with the experimental results. The solar-cell performance of DSSCs based on dye-grafted nanocrystalline TiO(2) using 3a-3e and standard N3 (bis[(4,4'-carboxy-2,2'-bipyridine)(thiocyanato)]ruthenium(II)) were compared, revealing substantial dependences on the dye structures, particularly on the remote substituent X. The 3d-based device showed the best performance: η = 8.30%, J(SC) = 16.0 mA·cm(-2), V(OC) = 717 mV, and ff = 0.72. These values are better than N3-based device.

  4. Ruthenium Sensitizers and Their Applications in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuancheng Qin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs have attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the possibility of low-cost conversion of photovoltaic energy. The DSSCs-based ruthenium complexes as sensitizers show high efficiency and excellent stability, implying potential practical applications. This review focuses on recent advances in design and preparation of efficient ruthenium sensitizers and their applications in DSSCs, including thiocyanate ruthenium sensitizers and thiocyanate-free ruthenium sensitizers.

  5. Theoretical insight into electronic structure and optoelectronic properties of heteroleptic Cu(I)-based complexes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Shuxian; Li, Ke; Lu, Xiaoqing, E-mail: luxq@upc.edu.cn; Zhao, Zigang; Shao, Yang; Dang, Yong; Li, Shaoren; Guo, Wenyue, E-mail: wyguo@upc.edu.cn

    2016-04-15

    A series of heteroleptic Cu(I)-based dyes were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT). Results showed that Cu(I)-based dyes were inclined to form distorted pseudo-trigonal pyramidal configurations with four-coordinated geometry index τ{sub 4} ranging from 0.905 to 0.914. The absorption spectra of Cu(I)-based dyes covered ∼300.0–600.0 nm region, and the lowest excitation states were crucial for efficient electron excitation and separation. Suitable energy levels of Cu(I)-based dyes rendered them thermodynamically favorable for efficient electron injection into semiconductor and regeneration from electrolyte. Relative to π-conjugation, heteroaromatic groups introduced into ancillary ligands could significantly improve the property of Cu(I)-based dyes by decreasing HOMO-LUMO gaps, red-shifting spectral range, strengthening absorption intensity, boosting light-harvesting efficiency, and promoting interfacial electron injection. Specifically, Cu(I)-based dye with dithiole-functionalized group exhibited outstanding optoelectronic property. - Highlights: • Assessment of heteroleptic Cu(I) dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells. • Suitable energy levels render Cu(I) dyes ideal candidates for electron injection. • Heteroaromatic groups efficiently improve Cu(I) dyes light-harvesting properties. • Dye with dithiole group exhibits ideal photoelectronic property.

  6. The Versatile SALSAC Approach to Heteroleptic Copper(I Dye Assembly in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik J. Malzner

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Surface-bound heteroleptic copper(I dyes [Cu(Lanchor(Lancillary]+ are assembled using the “surfaces-as-ligands, surfaces as complexes” (SALSAC approach by three different procedures. The anchoring and ancillary ligands chosen are ((6,6′-dimethyl-[2,2′-bipyridine]-4,4′-diyl-bis(4,1-phenylenebis(phosphonic acid (3 and 4,4′-bis(4-iodophenyl-6,6′-diphenyl-2,2′-bipyridine (4, respectively. In the first SALSAC procedure, the FTO/TiO2 electrode is functionalized with 3 in the first dye bath, and then undergoes ligand exchange with the homoleptic complex [Cu(42][PF6] to give surface-bound [Cu(3(4]+. In the second method, the FTO/TiO2 electrode functionalized with 3 is immersed in a solution containing a 1:1 mixture of [Cu(MeCN4][PF6] and 4 to give surface-anchored [Cu(3(4]+. In the third procedure, the anchor 3, copper(I ion and ancillary ligand 4 are introduced in a sequential manner. The performances of the DSSCs show a dependence on the dye assembly procedure. The sequential method leads to the best-performing DSSCs with the highest values of JSC (7.85 and 7.73 mA cm−2 for fully masked cells and overall efficiencies (η = 2.81 and 2.71%, representing 41.1 and 39.6% relative to an N719 reference DSSC. Use of the 1:1 mixture of [Cu(MeCN4][PF6] and 4 yields DSSCs with higher VOC values but lower JSC values compared to those assembled using the sequential approach; values of η are 2.27 and 2.29% versus 6.84% for the N719 reference DSSC. The ligand exchange procedure leads to DSSCs that perform relatively poorly. The investigation demonstrates the versatile and powerful nature of SALSAC in preparing dyes for copper-based DSSCs, allowing the photoconversion efficiency of dye to be optimized for a given dye. The SALSAC strategy provides alternative hierarchical strategies where the isolation of the homoleptic [Cu(Lancillary2]+ is difficult or time-consuming; stepwise strategies are more atom-economic than ligand exchange involving the

  7. Ruthenium oxide resistors as sensitive elements of composite bolometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benassai, M.; Gallinaro, G.; Gatti, F.; Siri, S.; Vitale, S.

    1988-01-01

    Bolometers for particle detection made with Ruthenium oxide thermistors could be produced by means of a simple technique on a variety of different materials as substrata. Preliminary results on alpha particle detection with devices realized using commercial RuO 2 thick film resistor (Tfr) are considered positive for devices operating between. 3 and .1 k and determined us to pursue further the idea. Ruthenium oxide resistors on sapphire at the moment are being prepared. The behaviour of these devices st temperatures lower than .1 k has to be investigated in more detail

  8. Highly efficient and stable cyclometalated ruthenium(II) complexes as sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jian-Feng; Liu, Jun-Min; Su, Pei-Yang; Chen, Yi-Fan; Shen, Yong; Xiao, Li-Min; Kuang, Dai-Bin; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Four novel thiocyanate-free cyclometalated ruthenium sensitizer were conveniently synthesized. • The D-CF 3 -sensitized DSSCs show higher efficiency compared to N719 based cells. • The DSSCs based on D-CF 3 and D-bisCF 3 sensitizers exhibit excellent long-term stability. • The diverse cyclometalated Ru complexes can be developed as high-performance sensitizers for use in DSSC. - Abstract: Four novel thiocyanate-free cyclometallted Ru(II) complexes, D-bisCF 3 , D-CF 3 , D-OMe, and D-DPA, with two 4,4′-dicarboxylic acid-2,2′-bipyridine together with a functionalized phenylpyridine ancillary ligand, have been designed and synthesized. The effect of different substituents (R = bisCF 3 , CF 3 , OMe, and DPA) on the ancillary C^N ligand on the photophysical properties and photovoltaic performance is investigated. Under standard global AM 1.5 solar conditions, the device based on D-CF 3 sensitizer gives a higher conversion efficiency of 8.74% than those based on D-bisCF 3 , D-OMe, and D-DPA, which can be ascribed to its broad range of visible light absorption, appropriate localization of the frontier orbitals, weak hydrogen bonds between -CF 3 and -OH groups at the TiO 2 surface, moderate dye loading on TiO 2 , and high charge collection efficiency. Moreover, the D-bisCF 3 and D-CF 3 based DSSCs exhibit good stability under 100 mW cm −2 light soaking at 60 °C for 400 h

  9. Spectral sensitization of SrTiO3 photoanodes with binuclear 1,10-phenanthroline bis(2,2'-bipyridine) complexes of ruthenium(II) and tris(2,2'-bipyridine) ruthenium(II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinnemans, A.H.A.; Mackor, A.

    1981-01-01

    A single crystal of strontium titanate, used as a photoanode for the photoelectrolysis of water, has been sensitized by mono‐ and binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes in acidic solution for visible light. The dependence of the photocurrent density on light intensity, dye concentration, wavelength and

  10. Dye sensitized photovoltaic cells: Attaching conjugated polymers to zwitterionic ruthenium dyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Biancardo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis of a zwitterionic ruthenium dye that binds to anatase surfaces and has a built-in functionality that allows for the attachment of a conjugated polymer chain is presented. The system was found to adsorb on the surface of anatase anchored by the ruthenium dye. Two types of devices were...... prepared: standard photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells and polymer solar cells. The PEC solar cells employed a sandwich geometry between TiO2 nanoporous photoanodes and Pt counter electrodes using LiI/I-2 in CH3CN as an electrolyte. The polymer solar cells employed planar anatase electrodes...

  11. Fundamental Factors Impacting the Stability of Phosphonate-Derivatized Ruthenium Polypyridyl Sensitizers Adsorbed on Metal Oxide Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raber, McKenzie; Brady, Matthew David; Troian-Gautier, Ludovic; Dickenson, John; Marquard, Seth L; Hyde, Jacob; Lopez, Santiago; Meyer, Gerald J; Meyer, Thomas J; Harrison, Daniel P

    2018-06-08

    A series of 18 ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes were synthesized and evaluated under electrochemically oxidative conditions, which generates the Ru(III) oxidation state and mimics the harsh conditions experienced during the kinetically-limited regime that can occur in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells (DSPECs), to further develop fundamental insights into the factors governing molecular sensitizer surface stability in aqueous 0.1 M HClO4 (aq). Both desorption and oxidatively induced ligand substitution were observed on planar fluorine doped tin oxide, FTO, electrodes, with a dependence on the E1/2 Ru(III/II) redox potential dictating the comparative ratios of the processes. Complexes such as RuP4OMe (E1/2 = 0.91 vs Ag/AgCl) displayed virtually only desorption, while complexes such as RuPbpz (E1/2 > 1.62 V vs Ag/AgCl) displayed only chemical decomposition. Comparing isomers of 4,4'- and 5,5-disubstituted-2,2'-bipyridine ancillary polypyridyl ligands, a dramatic increase in the rate of desorption of the Ru(III) complexes was observed for the 5,5'-ligands. Nanoscopic indium doped tin oxide thin films, nanoITO, were also sensitized and analyzed with cyclic voltammetry, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, and XPS, allowing for further distinction of desorption versus ligand substitution processes. Desorption loss to bulk solution associated with the planar surface of FTO is essentially non-existent on nanoITO, where both desorption and ligand substitution are shut down with RuP4OMe. These results revealed that minimizing time spent in the oxidized form, incorporating electron donating groups, maximizing hydrophobicity, and minimizing molecular bulk near the adsorbed ligand are critical to optimizing the performance of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes in dye-sensitized solar cell devices.

  12. Effect of composition of chlorophyll and ruthenium dyes mixture (hybrid) on the dye-sensitized solar cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiwi, D. D.; Nurosyid, F.; Kusumandari; Supriyanto, A.; Suryana, R.

    2018-03-01

    The fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) has been conducted by varying the composition of natural dye from moss chlorophyll (Bryophyte) and synthesis dye from ruthenium complex N719. The sandwich structure of DSSC consists of the working electrode using TiO2, dye, electrolyte, and counter electrode using carbon. The composition of chlorophyll and synthesis dyes mixture were 100% and 0%, 80% and 20%, 60% and 40%, 40% and 60%, and 20% and 80%. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of moss chlorophyll showed the first peak in the wavelength range of 450-500 nm and the second peak at wavelength of 650-700 nm. The peak value of absorbance at wavelengths of 450-500 nm was 6.1004 and at wavelengths of 650-700 nm was 3.5835. The IPCE characteristic curves showed the absorption peak of photon for DSSCs occurred at wavelength of 550-650 nm. It considered that photon in this wavelength can contribute dominantly to produce the optimum electrons. The I-V characteristics of DSSCs with composition of chlorophyll and synthesis dyes mixture of 100% and 0%, 80% and 20%, 60% and 40%, 40% and 60%, and 20% and 80% resulted the efficiency of 0.0022; 0.0194; 0.0239; 0.0342; and 0.0414, respectively. It suggested that the addition of a little composition of the ruthenium complex dye into moss chlorophyll dye can increase the efficiency significantly.

  13. Thermal stability of the DSC ruthenium dye C106 in robust electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Torben; Phuong, Nguyen Tuyet; Pechy, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the thermal stability of the heteroleptic ruthenium complex C106 employed as a sensitizer in dye-sensitized solar cells. The C106 was adsorbed on TiO2 particles and exposed to 2 different iodide/triidode based redox electrolytes A and B at 80 °C for up to 1500 h in sealed glass......) substitution products 3 and 4 formed by replacement of the thiocyanate ligand by NBB after 1500 h of heating at 80 °C. Samples prepared under ambient conditions gave a steady state C106 concentration of 60% of the initial value and 40% substitution products. The C106 degradation was found to be independent...... of the degree of dye loading of the TiO2 particles and the ratio between the amount of dyed TiO2 particles and electrolyte volume. Assuming that this substitution is the predominant loss mechanism in a DSC during thermal stress, we estimate the reduction in the DSC efficiency after long term heat to be 12...

  14. Caprolactone-based bipyridine macroligands for novel ruthenium polypyridyl complexes for applications in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin, V.N.; Holder, E.; Hoogenboom, R.; Schubert, U.S.

    2004-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce electrolyte loss in solar cells, the use of sold or quasi-solid state electrolytes is advantageous. The authors synthesized a metal contg. polymer via two synthetic pathways. In the first, a bipyridine-bisphenanthroline ruthenium metal complex with a hydroxy functionality was

  15. High efficiency solid-state sensitized heterojunction photovoltaic device

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Mingkui

    2010-06-01

    The high molar extinction coefficient heteroleptic ruthenium dye, NaRu(4,4′-bis(5-(hexylthio)thiophen-2-yl)-2,2′-bipyridine) (4-carboxylic acid-4′-carboxylate-2,2′-bipyridine) (NCS) 2, exhibits certified 5% electric power conversion efficiency at AM 1.5 solar irradiation (100 mW cm-2) in a solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell using 2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis-(N,N-di-pmethoxyphenylamine)-9, 9′-spirobifluorene (spiro-MeOTAD) as the organic hole-transporting material. This demonstration elucidates a class of photovoltaic devices with potential for low-cost power generation. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. High efficiency solid-state sensitized heterojunction photovoltaic device

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Mingkui; Liu, Jingyuan; Cevey-Ha, Ngoc-Le; Moon, Soo-Jin; Liska, Paul; Humphry-Baker, Robin; Moser, Jacques-E.; Grä tzel, Carole; Wang, Peng; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M.

    2010-01-01

    The high molar extinction coefficient heteroleptic ruthenium dye, NaRu(4,4′-bis(5-(hexylthio)thiophen-2-yl)-2,2′-bipyridine) (4-carboxylic acid-4′-carboxylate-2,2′-bipyridine) (NCS) 2, exhibits certified 5% electric power conversion efficiency at AM 1.5 solar irradiation (100 mW cm-2) in a solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell using 2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis-(N,N-di-pmethoxyphenylamine)-9, 9′-spirobifluorene (spiro-MeOTAD) as the organic hole-transporting material. This demonstration elucidates a class of photovoltaic devices with potential for low-cost power generation. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Photoanode Thickness Optimization and Impedance Spectroscopic Analysis of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells based on a Carbazole-Containing Ruthenium Dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jongwan; Kim, Felix Sunjoo

    2018-03-01

    We studied the influence of photoanode thickness on the photovoltaic characteristics and impedance responses of the dye-sensitized solar cells based on a ruthenium dye containing a hexyloxyl-substituted carbazole unit (Ru-HCz). As the thickness of photoanode increases from 4.2 μm to 14.8 μm, the dye-loading amount and the efficiency increase. The device with thicker photoanode shows a decrease in the efficiency due to the higher probability of recombination of electron-hole pairs before charge extraction. We also analyzed the electron-transfer and recombination characteristics as a function of photoanode thickness through detailed electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis.

  18. Substitution of Ethynyl-Thiophene Chromophores on Ruthenium Sensitizers: Influence on Thermal and Photovoltaic Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malapaka Chandrasekharam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new high molar extinction coefficient ruthenium(II bipyridyl complex, “Ru(2,2-bipyridine-4,4′-dicarboxylic acid(4,4′-bis((3-hexylthiophen-2-ylethynyl-2,2′-bipyridine(NCS2 (N(C4H94, MC101” was synthesized and fully characterized by 1H-NMR, ESI-MASS, FT-IR, UV-Vis., and fluorescence spectroscopes. The dye showed relatively high molar extinction coefficient of 25.0 × 103 M-1 cm-1 at λ maximum of 544 nm, while the reference C101 has shown 15.8 × 103 M-1cm-1 at λ maximum 528 nm. The monochromatic incident photon-to-collected electron conversion efficiency of 44.1% was obtained for MC101 over the entire visible range, while the C101 sensitized solar cell fabricated and evaluated under identical conditions exhibited 40.1%. The DSSCs fabricated with 0.54 cm2 active area TiO2 electrodes and high efficient electrolyte (E01, from the sensitizers MC101 and C101 exhibited energy conversion efficiencies of 3.25% (short-circuit current density (JSC = 7.32 mA/cm2, VOC = 610 mV, ff = 0.725 and 2.94% (JSC = 6.60 mA/cm2; VOC = 630 mV; ff = 0.709, respectively, under air mass of 1.5 sunlight.

  19. Radiochemistry of ruthenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W W; Metcalf, S G; Barney, G S

    1984-06-01

    Information on ruthenium is presented. Topics include the following; isotopes and nuclear properties of ruthenium; review of the chemistry of ruthenium including metal and alloys, compounds of ruthenium, and solution chemistry; separation methods including volatilization of RuO{sub 4}, precipitation and coprecipitation, solvent extraction, chromatographic techniques, and analysis for radioruthenium. 445 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs.

  20. Radiochemistry of ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.W.; Metcalf, S.G.; Barney, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    Information on ruthenium is presented. Topics include the following; isotopes and nuclear properties of ruthenium; review of the chemistry of ruthenium including metal and alloys, compounds of ruthenium, and solution chemistry; separation methods including volatilization of RuO 4 , precipitation and coprecipitation, solvent extraction, chromatographic techniques, and analysis for radioruthenium. 445 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs

  1. Electronic structure of the indium tin oxide/nanocrystalline anatase (TiO2)/ruthenium-dye interfaces in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, J. E.; Rayan, M. K.; Beerbom, M. M.; Schlaf, R.

    2008-10-01

    The electronic structure of two interfaces commonly found in dye-sensitized photovoltaic cells based on nanocrystalline anatase TiO2 ("Grätzel cells") was investigated using photoemission spectroscopy (PES). X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) measurements were carried out on the indium tin oxide (ITO)/TiO2 and the TiO2/cis-bis(isothiocyanato)bis(2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylato)-ruthenium(II)bis-tetrabutylammonium dye ("N719" or "Ruthenium 535-bisTBA") interfaces. Both contacts were investigated using a multistep deposition procedure where the entire structure was prepared in vacuum using electrospray deposition. In between deposition steps the surface was characterized with XPS and UPS resulting in a series of spectra, allowing the determination of the orbital and band lineup at the interfaces. The results of these efforts confirm previous PES measurements on TiO2/dye contacts prepared under ambient conditions, suggesting that ambient contamination might not have significant influence on the electronic structure at the dye/TiO2 interface. The results also demonstrate that there may be a significant barrier for electron injection at the sputtered ITO/TiO2 interface and that this interface should be viewed as a semiconductor heterojunction rather than as metal-semiconductor (Schottky) contact.

  2. Thermal degradation chemistry of ruthenium complexes in the dye-sensitized solar cell and strategies for reducing the dark current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Torben

    on the surface of a semiconductor anode (TiO2). In my lecture, I will present and overview of our degradation investigations of the ruthenium dyes N719, Z907 and C106 with the general structure RuLL´(NCS)2 and show how detailed degradation mechanistic knowledge is important in the developing of DSC cells...... transfer from the photo anode to the mediator R+ and the oxidized dye S+ we have applied electrochemical grafting strategies to attach an electrical isolation layer of mono and multilayers of organic molecules on the TiO2 photo anode [3]....

  3. Influence of the UV radiation on the screen-printed pH-sensitive layers based on graphene and ruthenium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepłowski, A.; Grudziński, D.; Raczyński, T.; Wróblewski, G.; Janczak, D.; Jakubowska, M.

    2017-08-01

    Electrodes for measuring pH of the solution were fabricated by the means of screen-printing technology. Potentiometric sensors' layers comprised of composite with polymer matrix and graphene nanoplatelets/ruthenium (IV) oxide nanopowder as functional phase. Transceivers were printed on the elastic PMMA foil. Regarding potential application of the sensors in the wearable devices, dynamic response of the electrodes to changing ultraviolet radiation levels was assessed, since RuO2 is reported to be UV-sensitive. Observed changes of the electrodes' potential were of sub-millivolt magnitude, being comparable to simultaneously observed signal drift. Given this stability under varying UV conditions and previously verified good flexibility, fabricated sensors meet the requirements for wearable applications.

  4. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High spectral response heteroleptic ruthenium (II) complexes as sensitizers for dye sensitized solar cells · M Chandrasekharam Ch Srinivasarao T Suresh M Anil Reddy M Raghavender G Rajkumar M Srinivasu P Yella Reddy · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Heteroleptic ruthenium(II) bipyridyl complex, cis-Ru(II)(4 ...

  5. Kinetics and Photochemistry of Ruthenium Bisbipyridine Diacetonitrile Complexes: An Interdisciplinary Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Teresa L.; Phillips, Susan R.; Dmochowski, Ivan J.

    2016-01-01

    The study of ruthenium polypyridyl complexes can be widely applied across disciplines in the undergraduate curriculum. Ruthenium photochemistry has advanced many fields including dye-sensitized solar cells, photoredox catalysis, lightdriven water oxidation, and biological electron transfer. Equally promising are ruthenium polypyridyl complexes…

  6. Background-free, high sensitivity staining of proteins in one- and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels using a luminescent ruthenium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, K; Chernokalskaya, E; Steinberg, T H; Kemper, C; Lopez, M F; Diwu, Z; Haugland, R P; Patton, W F

    2000-07-01

    SYPRO Ruby dye is a permanent stain comprised of ruthenium as part of an organic complex that interacts noncovalently with proteins. SYPRO Ruby Protein Gel Stain provides a sensitive, gentle, fluorescence-based method for detecting proteins in one-dimensional and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Proteins are fixed, stained from 3h to overnight and then rinsed in deionized water or dilute methanol/acetic acid solution for 30 min. The stain can be visualized using a wide range of excitation sources commonly used in image analysis systems including a 302 nm UV-B transilluminator, 473 nm second harmonic generation (SHG) laser, 488 nm argon-ion laser, 532 nm yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser, xenon arc lamp, blue fluorescent light bulb or blue light-emitting diode (LED). The sensitivity of SYPRO Ruby Protein Gel Stain is superior to colloidal Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB) stain or monobromobimane labeling and comparable with the highest sensitivity silver or zinc-imidazole staining procedures available. The linear dynamic range of SYPRO Ruby Protein Gel stain extends over three orders of magnitude, which is vastly superior to silver, zinc-imidazole, monobromobimane and CBB stain. The fluorescent stain does not contain superfluous chemicals (formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, Tween-20) that frequently interfere with peptide identification in mass spectrometry. While peptide mass profiles are severely altered in protein samples prelabeled with monobromobimane, successful identification of proteins by peptide mass profiling using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry was easily performed after protein detection with SYPRO Ruby Protein Gel stain.

  7. Cosensitization Properties of Glutathione-Protected Au25 Cluster on Ruthenium Dye-Sensitized TiO2 Photoelectrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Nakata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosensitization by glutathione-protected Au25 clusters on Ru complex, N719-sensitized TiO2 photoelectrodes is demonstrated. Glutathione-protected Au25 clusters showed no significant changes in properties after adsorption onto TiO2 particles, as confirmed by optical absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Adsorption property of the glutathione-protected Au25 clusters depends on the pH, which affects the incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE of the TiO2 photoelectrode containing Au25 clusters. When pH 7. The IPCE of a TiO2 photoelectrode sensitized by both glutathione-protected Au25 clusters and N719 was increased compared with photoelectrodes containing either glutathione-protected Au25 clusters or N719, which suggests that glutathione-protected Au25 clusters act as a coadsorbent for N719 on TiO2 photoelectrodes. This is also supported by the results that the IPCE of N719-sensitized TiO2 photoelectrodes increased upon addition of glutathione. Furthermore, cosensitization by glutathione-protected Au25 clusters on N719-sensitized TiO2 photoelectrodes allows that wavelength of photoelectric conversion was extended to the near infrared (NIR region. These results suggest that glutathione-protected Au25 clusters act not only as a coadsorbent to increase IPCE but also as an NIR-active sensitizer.

  8. Polarographic determination of ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jifu; Duan Shirong; Wu Xi

    1989-01-01

    It is suggested to use 0.5 mol/l HClO 4 -0.5 mol/l NaNO 3 -0.1 mol/l NaClO 4 as supporting electrolyte for determining ruthenium. In the supporting electrolyte there is a clear polarographic wave of ruthenium (IV) at -0.8 V vs. SCE. The wave height of ruthenium(IV) is linear in the range from 0.1 to 0.4 μg. ml -1 . The effect of the component of supporting electroylte and the other ion in the samples on the measurement of ruthenium are studied. The analysis methods for measuring ruthenium in both acidic or basic imitative radioactive waste solutions which is used in study of glass solidification are worked out. Imitative samples are analysised

  9. Synthesis of ruthenium phosphides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernogorenko, V.B.; Lynchak, K.A.; Kulik, L.Ya.; Shkaravskij, Yu.F.; Klochkov, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method of ampoule synthesis of ruthenium phosphides, Ru 2 P, RuP, and RuP 2 , with stepwise heating of stoichimetric charges in a single-zone furnace is developed. A method for synthesizing ruthenium diphosphide by phosphidization of a ruthenium powder with phosphine at 1150 deg C is worked out. The optimum conditions of its manufacture are found by planning an extremal experiment. Interaction of PH 3 with ruthenium proceeds by the diffusion mechanism and obeys the parabolic law. An extraction-photometric method for determining phosphorus in phosphides is elaborated. Ruthenium phosphides are extremely corrosion-resistant in acids and alkalis. Ru 2 P and RuP exhibit metallic conductivity

  10. Ruthenium(ii)-polypyridyl zirconium(iv) metal-organic frameworks as a new class of sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza, W A; Haring, A J; Ahrenholtz, S R; Epley, C C; Lin, S Y; Morris, A J

    2016-01-01

    A series of Ru(ii)L 2 L' (L = 2,2'-bipyridyl, L' = 2,2'-bipyridine-5,5'-dicarboxylic acid), RuDCBPY, -containing zirconium(iv) coordination polymer thin films have been prepared as sensitizing materials for solar cell applications. These metal-organic framework (MOF) sensitized solar cells, MOFSCs, each are shown to generate photocurrent in response to simulated 1 sun illumination. Emission lifetime measurements indicate the excited state quenching of RuDCBPY at the MOF-TiO 2 interface is extremely efficient (>90%), presumably due to electron injection into TiO 2 . A mechanism is proposed in which RuDCBPY-centers photo-excited within the MOF-bulk undergo isotropic energy migration up to 25 nm from the point of origin. This work represents the first example in which a MOFSC is directly compared to the constituent dye adsorbed on TiO 2 (DSC). Importantly, the MOFSCs outperformed their RuDCBPY-TiO 2 DSC counterpart under the conditions used here and, thus, are solidified as promising solar cell platforms.

  11. Acid-base properties of the N3 ruthenium(II) solar cell sensitizer: a combined experimental and computational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzoli, Giuliano; Lobello, Maria Grazia; Carlotti, Benedetta; Elisei, Fausto; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad K; Vitillaro, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Filippo

    2012-10-14

    We report a combined spectro-photometric and computational investigation of the acid-base equilibria of the N3 solar cell sensitizer [Ru(dcbpyH(2))(2)(NCS)(2)] (dcbpyH(2) = 4,4'-dicarboxyl-2,2' bipyridine) in aqueous/ethanol solutions. The absorption spectra of N3 recorded at various pH values were analyzed by Single Value Decomposition techniques, followed by Global Fitting procedures, allowing us to identify four separate acid-base equilibria and their corresponding ground state pK(a) values. DFT/TDDFT calculations were performed for the N3 dye in solution, investigating the possible relevant species obtained by sequential deprotonation of the four dye carboxylic groups. TDDFT excited state calculations provided UV-vis absorption spectra which nicely agree with the experimental spectral shapes at various pH values. The calculated pK(a) values are also in good agreement with experimental data, within <1 pK(a) unit. Based on the calculated energy differences a tentative assignment of the N3 deprotonation pathway is reported.

  12. Versatile ruthenium(II) dye towards blue-light emitter and dye-sensitizer for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, Kassio P. S.; Amaral, Ronaldo C.; Murakami Iha, Neyde Y.; Abreu, Felipe D.; de Carvalho, Idalina M. M.

    2018-06-01

    A versatile Ru(II) complex bearing an anthracene moiety was synthesized in our search for suitable compounds towards efficient molecular devices. The new engineered dye, cis‑[Ru(dcbH2)(NCS)2(mbpy‑anth)] (dcbH2 = 2,2‧‑bipyridyl‑4,4‧‑dicarboxylic acid, mbpy‑anth = 4‑[N‑(2‑anthryl)carbamoyl]‑4‧‑methyl‑2,2‧‑bipyridine), exhibits a blueish emission in a vibronically structured spectrum ascribed to the fluorescence of a 1LCAnth (ligand centered) excited state in the anthracene and has a potential to be exploited in the fields of smart lighting and displays. This complex was also employed in dye-sensitized solar cells with fairly efficient solar energy conversion with the use of self-assembled TiO2 compact layers beneath the TiO2 mesoporous film to prevent meso‑TiO2/dye back reactions. Further photoelectrochemical investigations through incident photon-to-current efficiency and electrochemical impedance spectra showed that the all-nano-TiO2 compact layer acts as contact layers that increase the electron harvesting in the external circuit, enhancing efficiencies up to 50%.

  13. Ruthenium removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Masafumi; Shirado, Katsuyuki.

    1990-01-01

    A processing gas supply system and a NO x supply system for supplying NO x to be mixed with processed gases are connected to the gas plenum in the lower portion of reaction vessel. Further, a cleaning station is disposed above the gas plenum for introducing a mixed gas stream from the gas plenum into a liquid detergent thereby trapping NO x and ruthenium reduction products into the liquid detergent. Volatile ruthenium contained in the processed gases is reduced into ruthenium reduction products and formed as mists. They are trapped in the cleaning liquid and the remaining gases are discharged out of the liquid detergent to the outside of the reaction vessel. Accordingly, solid radioactive wastes are not formed and the decontaminating efficiency for volatile ruthenium can be improved. (T.M.)

  14. Optimization of screen-printed ruthenium dioxide electrodes for pH measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyzkiewicz, I.

    2002-01-01

    Optimization of disposable, screen-printed pH-sensors based on ruthenium dioxide is described in this paper. The electrodes were prepared with the use of thick-film technology. The pH-sensitive layers were deposited onto polyester foil. Polymer graphite paste containing ruthenium dioxide from 0% to 90% has been investigated. The dependence of the pH-sensitive layers related to ruthenium dioxide content is presented. The investigation proved that the electrodes containing 40-60% ruthenium dioxide exhibit linear high sensitivity (∼ 50 mV/pH) in the wide range of pH (2 - 11) as well as very good reproducibility. (author)

  15. Synthesis, Photophysical and Electrochemical Properties of a Mixed Bipyridyl-Phenanthrolyl Ligand Ru(II Heteroleptic Complex Having trans-2-Methyl-2-butenoic Acid Functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale O. Adeloye

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, two ligands: 4-(trans-2-Methyl-2-butenoic acid-2,2'-bipyridine (L1 and 5-(trans-2-methyl-2-butenoic acid-1,10-phenanthroline (L2, with the corresponding mixed-ligand heteroleptic Ru(II complex were synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, 1H-, 13C-NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The influence of the mixed functionalized polypyridyl ruthenium(II complex on the photophysical and electrochemical properties were investigated and compared to individual single-ligand homoleptic complexes. Interestingly, the mixed-ligand complex formulated as [RuL1L2(NCS2] exhibits broad and intense metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT absorption with a high molar extinction coefficient (λmax = 514 nm, ε = 69,700 M−1 cm−1, better than those of individual single-ligand complexes, [Ru(L12(NCS2] and [Ru(L22(NCS2], and a strong photoluminescence intensity ratio in the red region at λem = 686 nm. The electrochemical properties of the complex indicated that the redox processes are ligand-based.

  16. Analysis of radioactive ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This manual explains the procedures of analysis of radioactive ruthenium in the drain water from atomic energy plants. The most important radioactive ruthenium is 106 Ru, and the method of measurement described in this manual is to measure the beta ray of the daughter nuclide 106 Rh. The samples to be measured are collected from seawater, marine living things, and sediment of sea bottom near atomic energy plants. In case of sea water, the ruthenium is separated by the co-precipitation with magnesium hydroxide and distillation or the extraction with carbon tetrachloride, reduction and precipitation. The beta ray of the obtained sample is measured by a gas-flow type low background β counting system. Alkali dissolution-distillation or nitric acid extraction-distillation, reduction and precipitation are applied for marine living things. The sediment of sea bottom is treated with nitric acid or strong phosphoric acid, and distilled then the ruthenium is reduced and precipitated, and the beta-counting of the precipitation is made. The method to fix radioactive ruthenium on polyethylene films after the co-precipitation is also described for reference. The detectable levels by the present methods are 0.05 pCi/l for sea water, 0.1 pCi/g for marine living things, and 20 pCi/kg for the sediment of sea bottom. (Kato, T.)

  17. Terpyridine and Quaterpyridine Complexes as Sensitizers for Photovoltaic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Saccone

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Terpyridine and quaterpyridine-based complexes allow wide light harvesting of the solar spectrum. Terpyridines, with respect to bipyridines, allow for achieving metal-complexes with lower band gaps in the metal-to-ligand transition (MLCT, thus providing a better absorption at lower energy wavelengths resulting in an enhancement of the solar light-harvesting ability. Despite the wider absorption of the first tricarboxylate terpyridyl ligand-based complex, Black Dye (BD, dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC performances are lower if compared with N719 or other optimized bipyridine-based complexes. To further improve BD performances several modifications have been carried out in recent years affecting each component of the complexes: terpyridines have been replaced by quaterpyridines; other metals were used instead of ruthenium, and thiocyanates have been replaced by different pinchers in order to achieve cyclometalated or heteroleptic complexes. The review provides a summary on design strategies, main synthetic routes, optical and photovoltaic properties of terpyridine and quaterpyridine ligands applied to photovoltaic, and focuses on n-type DSCs.

  18. Syntheses and Characterization of Some Tetradentate Schiff-Base Complexes and Their Heteroleptic Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Osowole

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available VO(IV, Ni(II and Cu(II complexes of the asymmetric Schiff base [(HOC6H3(OCH3C(C6H5:N(CH2CH2N:C(CH3CH:C(C6H5OH], and their heteroleptic analogues with triphenyl phosphine and 2,2’-bipyridine have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, conductance, magnetic, infrared and electronic spectral measurements. The ligand is tetradentate coordinating via the imine N and enolic O atoms. The Ni(II and Cu(II complexes adopt a four coordinate square planar geometry, the VO(IV complex is five coordinate square-pyramidal and the heteroleptic complexes are 6-coordinate, octahedral. The assignment of geometry is collaborated by magnetic moments and electronic spectra measurements. The compounds are non-electrolyte in nitromethane and are magnetically dilute.

  19. Titrimetric determination of ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichko, V.V.; Belyaeva, T.I.; Kudinova, V.K.; Usatenko, Yu.I.

    1978-01-01

    Titration of ruthenium(4) hydrochloric-acid solutions with Mohr's salt, hydroquinone, and thiourea has been studied with the use of biampero- and potentiometric indication of the titration end point (t.e.p.) Potentiometric and amperometric indication of the t.e.p. is applicable when Ru(4) concentration is from 20 to 6000 mkg in 20 ml of the titrated solution; biamperometric indication can be used at a concentration of 5-1000 mkg in the same volume. It has been established that titration of Ru(4) (in the form of the Na 2 RuCl 6 solution) with Mohr's salt is not hindered by the presence of 1000-fold excess of alkaline and alkali-earth metals, Al, Ti(4), Mn(2), Cr(3), Fe(3), Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge(4), As, Se, Mo(6), Cd, In, and Te; 100-fold excess of Rh, Pd, W, Bi, and Sn; 10-fold excess of Ag, Au, Pt, Hg, Os. Along with Ru(4) titrated are Ir(4), Te(3), V(5), and Ce(4). Selectivity of hydroquinone and thiourea is lower. Titrimetric procedure of determining ruthenium has been tested for ruthenium alloy containing cobalt tungsten. It cannot be recommended for analysis of the samples which dissolve in aqua regia

  20. Ruthenium separation device from radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayabe, Osao.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently oxidize ruthenium in radioactive wastes and evaporize ruthenium tetraoxide after oxidization thereof, thereby improve the separation and recovery rate. Constitution: The device comprises an oxidization vessel for supplying an oxidizing agent into radioactive wastes to oxidize ruthenium in the wastes into ruthenium tetraoxide, and a distillation vessel for introducing radioactive wastes after oxidization, distillating under heating ruthenium tetraoxide leached into the wastes and evaporizing ruthenium tetraoxide. By dividing the device into the oxidizing vessel and the distillation vessel, the oxidizing treatment and the distilling treatment can individually be operated optimally to improve the separation and recovery rate of ruthenium. (Takahashi, M.)

  1. Self-assembly of heteroleptic dinuclear metallosupramolecular kites from multivalent ligands via social self-sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Benkhäuser

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A Tröger's base-derived racemic bis(1,10-phenanthroline ligand (rac-1 and a bis(2,2'-bipyridine ligand with a central 1,3-diethynylbenzene unit 2 were synthesized. Each of these ligands acts as a multivalent entity for the binding of two copper(I ions. Upon coordination to the metal ions these two ligands undergo selective self-assembly into heteroleptic dinuclear metallosupramolecular kites in a high-fidelity social self-sorting manner as evidenced by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

  2. Method of dissolving metal ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuno, Masao; Soda, Yasuhiko; Kuroda, Sadaomi; Koga, Tadaaki.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To dissolve and clean metal ruthenium deposited to the inner surface of a dissolving vessel for spent fuel rods. Method: Metal ruthenium is dissolved in a solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to which potassium permanganate is added. As the alkali metal hydroxide used herein there can be mentioned potassium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide and lithium hydroxide can be mentioned, which is used as an aqueous solution from 5 to 20 % concentration in view of the solubility of metal ruthenium and economical merit. Further, potassium permanganate is used by adding to the solution of alkali metal hydroxide at a concentration of 1 to 5 %. (Yoshihara, H.)

  3. Interfacial charge separation and photovoltaic efficiency in Fe(ii)-carbene sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Mariachiara; Duchanois, Thibaut; Liu, Li; Monari, Antonio; Assfeld, Xavier; Haacke, Stefan; Gros, Philippe C

    2016-10-12

    The first combined theoretical and photovoltaic characterization of both homoleptic and heteroleptic Fe(ii)-carbene sensitized photoanodes in working dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) has been performed. Three new heteroleptic Fe(ii)-NHC dye sensitizers have been synthesized, characterized and tested. Despite an improved interfacial charge separation in comparison to the homoleptic compounds, the heteroleptic complexes did not show boosted photovoltaic performances. The ab initio quantitative analysis of the interfacial electron and hole transfers and the measured photovoltaic data clearly evidenced fast recombination reactions for heteroleptics, even associated with un unfavorable directional electron flow, and hence slower injection rates, in the case of homoleptics. Notably, quantum mechanics calculations revealed that deprotonation of the not anchored carboxylic function in the homoleptic complex can effectively accelerate the electron injection rate and completely suppress the electron recombination to the oxidized dye. This result suggests that introduction of strong electron-donating substituents on the not-anchored carbene ligand in heteroleptic complexes, in such a way of mimicking the electronic effects of the carboxylate functionality, should yield markedly improved interfacial charge generation properties. The present results, providing for the first time a detailed understanding of the interfacial electron transfers and photovoltaic characterization in Fe(ii)-carbene sensitized solar cells, open the way to a rational molecular engineering of efficient iron-based dyes for photoelectrochemical applications.

  4. Hybrid structures formed by homo- and heteroleptic aliphatic dicarboxylates of lead with 2-D inorganic connectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirumurugan, A.; Rao, C.N.R.

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional homoleptic (single type of ligand) lead dicarboxylates with hybrid structures involving Pb-O-Pb linkages of the compositions, Pb(C 5 H 6 O 4 ), I, and Pb(C 6 H 8 O 4 ), II and III, have been synthesized and characterized. Three-dimensional heteroleptic (mixed ligands) lead dicarboxylates of the formulae, Pb 2 (C 2 O 4 )(C 4 H 4 O 4 ), IV and Pb 2 (C 2 O 4 )(C 6 H 8 O 4 ), V, with hybrid structures involving Pb-O-Pb linkages have also been prepared and characterized along with a novel two-dimensional lead nitrate-oxalate of the composition, (OPb 2 ) 2 (C 2 O 4 )(NO 3 ) 2 , VI. In all these dicarboxylates, there is two-dimensional inorganic connectivity and the lead (II) cation has hemi- or holo-directed coordination geometry. Depending upon the torsional angle and the coordination mode of the dicarboxylate anions as well as the geometry of the lead (II) cations, these hybrid compounds exhibit two types of two-dimensional inorganic connectivities. - Graphical abstract: Three homoleptic and two heteroleptic three-dimensional lead aliphatic dicarboxylates along with a novel two-dimensional lead nitrate-oxalate with hybrid structures involving Pb-O-Pb linkages have been synthesized and charecterized. In all these dicarboxylates, there is two-dimensional inorganic connectivity. The lead (II) cation has hemi- or holo-directed coordination geometry

  5. Heteroleptic metallosupramolecular racks, rectangles, and trigonal prisms: stoichiometry-controlled reversible interconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Subhadip; Lorenz, Yvonne; Engeser, Marianne; Samanta, Debabrata; Schmittel, Michael

    2013-06-17

    A simple approach toward preparation of heteroleptic two-dimensional (2D) rectangles and three-dimensional (3D) triangular prisms is described utilizing the HETPYP (HETeroleptic PYridyl and Phenanthroline metal complexes) concept. By mixing metal-loaded linear bisphenanthrolines of varying lengths with diverse (multi)pyridine (py) ligands in a proper ratio, six different self-assembled architectures arise cleanly and spontaneously in the absence of any template. They are characterized by (1)H and DOSY NMR, ESI-FT-ICR mass spectrometry as well as by Job plots and UV-vis titrations. Density functional theory (DFT) computations provide information about each structure. A stoichiometry-controlled supramolecule-to-supramolecule interconversion based on the relative amounts of metal bisphenanthroline and bipyridine forces the rectangular assembly to reorganize to a rack architecture and back to the rectangle, as clearly supported by variable temperature and DOSY NMR as well as dynamic light scattering data. The highly dynamic nature of the assemblies represents a promising starting point for constitutional dynamic materials.

  6. Modeling Ruthenium-Dye-Sensitized TiO2 Surfaces Exposing the (001) or (101) Faces: A First-Principles Investigation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Angelis, F.; Vitillaro, G.; Kavan, Ladislav; Nazeeruddin, M. K.; Grätzel, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 34 (2012), s. 18124-18131 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR KAN200100801 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Dye-sensitized solar cells * density-functional theory * anatase TiO2 surfaces Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.814, year: 2012

  7. Heteroleptic Palladium(II) dithiocarbamates: Synthesis, characterization and in vitro biological screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahan Zeb; Zia-ur-Rehman; Amir, Muhammad Kashif; Ullah, Imdad; Akhter, M. S.; Bélanger-Gariepy, Francine

    2018-03-01

    Two new heteroleptic Pd(II) complexes of sodium 4-(2-pyrimidyl)piperazine-1-carbodithioate with tris-p-flourophenylphosphine (1) and tris-p-chlorophenylphosphine (2) were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, multinuclear NMR {1H, 13C and 31P} and single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurement. In both complexes, Pd exhibit pseudo square planner geometry mediated by SS chelate, P and Cl. In vitro cytotoxicity against five different cancer cell lines using staurosporine as a standard revealed 1 to be more cytotoxic than 2, though both complexes are more active than cisplatin. Subsequent DNA binding studies revealed that non-covalent complex-DNA interaction may be the reason for arresting cancer cell growth. Furthermore, 1 and 2 are potent antioxidant agents.

  8. Thermodynamic behaviour of ruthenium at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, F.

    1988-01-01

    Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations are used to determine the chemical speciation of ruthenium under postulated reactor accident conditions. The speciation of ruthenium is determined for various values of temperature, pressure, oxygen partial pressure and ruthenium concentration. The importance of these variables, in particular the oxygen partial pressure, in determining the volatility of ruthenium is clearly demonstrated in this report. Reliable thermodynamic data are required to determine the behaviour of ruthenium using equilibrium calculations. Therefore, it was necessary to compile a thermodynamic database for the ruthenium species that can be formed under reactor accident conditions. The origin of the thermodynamic data for the ruthenium species included in our calculations is discussed in detail in Appendix A. 23 refs

  9. Kinetic method of ruthenium ion traces determination, basing on the reaction of oxidation of direct blue 6B, by means of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwinska, T.; Gregorowicz, A.; Matysek-Majewska, D.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitive and selective method of determination of ruthenium ion traces (1.10 - 3 μg/cm 3 ) has been worked out. The method is based on oxidation of direct blue 6B by hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions at pH = 0,8 - 1,2 in the presence of ruthenium ions as catalyst. The method has been applied for determination of ruthenium traces in Pt, PdCl 2 , PtCl 4 and RhCl 3 .n H 2 O. In these materials ruthenium has been determined within the range of 1,10 - 2 % - 5,10 - 4 %. (author)

  10. Electrochemical studies of ruthenium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar Ghosh, B.; Chakravorty, A.

    1989-01-01

    In many ways the chemistry of transition metals is the chemistry of multiple oxidation states and the associated redox phenomena. If a particular element were to be singeld out to illustrate this viewpoint, a model choice would be ruthenium - an element that is directly or indirectly the active centre of a plethora of redox phenomena encompassing ten different oxidation states and a breathtaking diversity of structure and bonding. In the present review the authors are primarily concerned with the oxidation states of certain ligands coordinated to ruthenium. This choice is deliberate since this is one area where the unique power of electrochemical methods is splendidly revealed. Without these methods, development in this area would have been greatly hampered. A brief summary of metal oxidation states is also included as a prelude to the main subject of this review. The authors have generally emphasize the information derived which is of chemical interest leaving the details of formal electrochemical arguments in the background. The authors have reviewed the pattern and systematics of ligand redox in ruthenium complexes. The synergistic combination of electrochemical and spectroscopic methods have vastly increased our understanding of ligand phenomena during the last 15 years or so. This in turn has led to better understanding and new developments in other fields. Photophysics and photochemistry could be cited as examples. (author). 176 refs.; 10 figs.; 10 tabs

  11. Solventless synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Peña, Nidia G. [Departmento de Tecnociencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cd. Universitaria A.P. 70-186, C.P. 04510 Coyoacán, México D.F. (Mexico); Redón, Rocío, E-mail: rredon@unam.mx [Departmento de Tecnociencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cd. Universitaria A.P. 70-186, C.P. 04510 Coyoacán, México D.F. (Mexico); Herrera-Gomez, Alberto [Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Campus Juriquilla, Querétaro (Mexico); Fernández-Osorio, Ana Leticia [FES-Cuautitlán, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Bravo-Sanchez, Mariela; Gomez-Sosa, Gustavo [Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Campus Juriquilla, Querétaro (Mexico)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Successful synthesis of Ru nanoparticles by a cheap, fast and solventless approach was achieved. • The zero-valent state as well as the by-product/impurity free of the mechanochemical obtained Ru nanoparticles was proven by XPS, TEM and XRD. • Compared to two other synthesis strategies, the above-mentioned synthesis was more suitable to obtain smaller particles with fewer impurities in shorter time. - Abstract: This paper presents a novel solventless method for the synthesis of zero-valent ruthenium nanoparticles Ru(0). The proposed method, although not entirely new in the nanomaterials world, was used for the first time to synthesize zero-valent ruthenium nanoparticles. This new approach has proved to be an environmentally friendly, clean, cheap, fast, and reproducible technique which employs low amounts of solvent. It was optimized through varying amounts of reducing salt on a determined quantity of precursor and measuring the effect of this variation on the average particle size obtained. The resulting products were fully characterized by powder XRD, TEM, HR-TEM, and XPS studies, all of which corroborated the purity of the nanoparticles achieved. In order to verify the advantages of our method over other techniques, we compared our nanoparticles with two common colloidal-synthesized ruthenium nanoparticles.

  12. A Heteroleptic Ferrous Complex with Mesoionic Bis(1,2,3-triazol-5-ylidene) Ligands: Taming the MLCT Excited State of Iron(II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yizhu; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Fredin, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    based on sequentially furnishing the Fe-II center with the benchmark 2,2-bipyridine (bpy) ligand and the more strongly sigma-donating mesoionic ligand, 4,4-bis(1,2,3-triazol-5-ylidene) (btz). Complex1 was comprehensively characterized by electrochemistry, static and ultrafast spectroscopy, and quantum...... chemical calculations and compared to [Fe(bpy)(3)](PF6)(2) and (TBA)(2)[Fe(bpy)(CN)(4)]. Heteroleptic complex1 extends the absorption spectrum towards longer wavelengths compared to a previously synthesized homoleptic Fe-II NHC complex. The combination of the mesoionic nature of btz and the heteroleptic...

  13. Spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium (III) and rhodium (III) with 9,10-phenanthrenequinone monoxime after extraction into molten naphthalene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasey, A.; Bansal, R.K.; Puri, B.K.; Satake, Masatada.

    1983-01-01

    9,10-Phenanthrenequinone monoxime has been used as a reagent for the spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium(III) and rhodium(III) after extraction into molten naphthalene. The extracted mixture of the metal complex and naphthalene was dissolved in chloroform and ruthenium and rhodium were determined spectrophotometrically. Beer's law holds in the concentration range of 0.2-4.1 μg/cm 3 for ruthenium and 0.3-5.3 μg/cm 3 for rhodium in 10 cm 3 of the final solution. The molar absorptivities and Sandell sensitivities are calculated to be 9.70 x 10 3 l mol -1 cm -1 and 0.01 μg/cmsup(2 ) (660 nm) for ruthenium and 1.13 x 10 4 l mol -1 cm -1 and 0.009 μg/cm 2 (410 nm) for rhodium respectively. Aliquots containing 2.0 μg of ruthenium and 4.1 μg of rhodium give mean absorbances of 0.192 and 0.451 with standard deviations of 0.0017 and 0.0039, respectively. Interference of various ions has been studied and the method has been applied to the determination of ruthenium and rhodium in various synthetic mixtures. This procedure is also applied to the simultaneous determination of ruthenium and rhodium present together in a solution. (author)

  14. IR-doped ruthenium oxide catalyst for oxygen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for preparing a metal-doped ruthenium oxide material by heating a mixture of a doping metal and a source of ruthenium under an inert atmosphere. In some embodiments, the doping metal is in the form of iridium black or lead powder, and the source of ruthenium is a powdered ruthenium oxide. An iridium-doped or lead-doped ruthenium oxide material can perform as an oxygen evolution catalyst and can be fabricated into electrodes for electrolysis cells.

  15. Utilization of ruthenium volatilization at heating of residue containing phosphates and nitrates for ruthenium separation and for its qualitative proof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holgye, Z.

    1979-01-01

    The volatility of ruthenium during the heating of a residue after evaporation of a solution containing ruthenium, phosphates and nitrates may be utilized for the separation of ruthenium from various substances. Sup(103,106) Ru may be rapidly, selectively, and quantitatively separated from fission products mixture. Ruthenium may be also separated in this way from various inorganic salts or from biological material. The volatility of ruthenium may be used also for its qualitative proof. (author)

  16. Bis(morpholine) hydrogen bond pincer - a novel series of heteroleptic Cu(II) coordination compounds as receptors for electron rich guests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stilinovic, Vladimir; Uzarevic, Krunoslav; Cvrtila, Ivica; Kaitner, Branko

    2012-01-01

    Crystallisation from morpholine (morph) solutions of copper(II) salts with monovalent anions (A) and 1,3-diketones (Hdkt) yielded nine heteroleptic coordination compounds [Cu(dkt)(morph)(2)A]. The coordination polyhedron of the copper ion in these compounds is a square pyramid with a monovalent

  17. Probing the mer- to fac-isomerization of tris-cyclometallated homo- and heteroleptic (C,N)3 Iridium(III) complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDonald, A.R.; Lutz, M.; von Chrzanowski, L.S.; van Klink, G.P.M.; Spek, A.L.; van Koten, G.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed techniques which allow for covalent tethering, via a “hetero” cyclometallating ligand, of heteroleptic tris-cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes to polymeric supports (for application in light-emitting diode technologies). This involved the selective synthesis and thorough

  18. Red phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs) based on a heteroleptic cyclometalated Iridium (III) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepeltier, Marc [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR 8180 CNRS, Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelines, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Dumur, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.dumur@univ-amu.fr [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, ICR, UMR 7273, F-13397 Marseille (France); Wantz, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.wantz@ims-bordeaux.fr [University of Bordeaux, IMS, UMR 5218, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, IMS, UMR 5218, F-33400 Talence (France); Vila, Neus; Mbomekallé, Israel [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR 8180 CNRS, Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelines, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Bertin, Denis; Gigmes, Didier [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, ICR, UMR 7273, F-13397 Marseille (France); Mayer, Cédric R., E-mail: cmayer@lisv.uvsq.fr [Laboratoire d’Ingénierie des Systèmes de Versailles LISV – EA 4048, Université de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, 10/12 avenue de l’Europe, 78140 Vélizy (France)

    2013-11-15

    Highly efficient red-emitting Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (PhOLEDs) based on a neutral vacuum-sublimatable heteroleptic iridium (III) complex have been designed and studied. Heteroleptic complex Ir(piq){sub 2}(acac) was prepared in one step with acetylacetone (acac) as the ancillary ligand. Electronic and spectroscopic properties of Ir(piq){sub 2}(acac) were investigated by UV–visible absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Electrophosphorescent devices comprising Ir(piq){sub 2}(acac) as dopant of TCTA exhibited outstanding electroluminescence performance with a current efficiency of 10.0 cd A{sup −1}, a maximum power efficiency of 7.2 lm W{sup −1} and a maximal brightness of 3540 cd m{sup −2} was reached at 8.0 V. CIE coordinates close to the standard red of the national television system committee were obtained (0.67, 0.33). -- Highlights: • A saturated red OLED has been prepared. • High power efficiency and brightness were obtained. • Thickness of the device was determined as a parameter determining the overall performance. • CIE coordinates close to the standard red of the national television system committee were obtained.

  19. Estimation of very low concentrations of Ruthenium by spectrophotometric method using barbituric acid as complexing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishna Reddy, S.; Srinivasan, R.; Mallika, C.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Natarajan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrophotometric method employing numerous chromogenic reagents like thiourea, 1,10-phenanthroline, thiocyanate and tropolone is reported in the literature for the estimation of very low concentrations of Ru. A sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of ruthenium in the concentration range 1.5 to 6.5 ppm in the present work. This method is based on the reaction of ruthenium with barbituric acid to produce ruthenium(ll)tris-violurate, (Ru(H 2 Va) 3 ) -1 complex which gives a stable deep-red coloured solution. The maximum absorption of the complex is at 491 nm due to the inverted t 2g → Π(L-L ligand) electron - transfer transition. The molar absorptivity of the coloured species is 9,851 dm 3 mol -1 cm -1

  20. Ruthenium(II)- bipyridyl with extended π-system: Improved thermo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    aInorganic and Physical Chemistry Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Uppal Road, Tarnaka, ... A new extended thermo-stable high molar extinction coefficient bipyridyl ruthenium(II) complex ... cyanines and metal free organic sensitizers have been ..... Iodide-based ionic liquids are more viscous than.

  1. Interface behaviour and electrical performance of ruthenium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry; Raman spectroscopy; oxidation; silicide; Schottky barrier diodes; ruthenium ... water and then dried with nitrogen gas before being loaded into the vacuum ... laser of wavelength 514.6 nm. Full I–V and ...

  2. Ruthenium (4) and ruthenium (3) state in hydrochloric acid solutions under microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashilov, A.V.; Kuz'min, N.M.; Nesterov, A.A.; Runov, V.K.

    2000-01-01

    Reactions of hydration, poly- and depolymerization, oxidation-reduction processes with ruthenium (4) and ruthenium (3) participation are investigated in hydrochloric acid solutions under microwave irradiation by the methods of molecular absorption spectroscopy in UV visible region taking K 4 [Ru 2 OCl 10 ] as an example. Content of state forms of ruthenium (4) and ruthenium (3), absorption characteristics of forming complexes are calculated. Variation of microwave irradiation parameters and HCl concentration permits to prepare solutions containing [RuCl 6 ] 2+ (95 %) and [(RuOH) 2 (H 2 O) 6 (OH) 2 ] 4+ (98 %) preeminently predominant forms. The role of microwave effect directly is established taking as an example the process of ruthenium (4) hydration [ru

  3. Insight into regulation of emission color and photodeactivation process from heteroleptic to homoleptic Ir(III) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Zheng, Danning; Feng, Songyan; Wang, Li, E-mail: chemwangl@henu.edu.cn; Li, Junfeng, E-mail: jfli@theochem.kth.se; Zhang, Jinglai, E-mail: zhangjinglai@henu.edu.cn

    2017-03-15

    The phosphorescent process of two heteroleptic ((DMDPI){sub 2}Ir(tftap) and (tftap){sub 2}Ir(DMDPI)) and one homoleptic (Ir(DMDPI){sub 3}) Ir(III) complexes (See ) is theoretically investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and quadratic response (QR) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Two or three triplet excited states are confirmed for three complexes, respectively. On the basis of the respective optimized triplet geometry, the emissive wavelength is determined by the ΔSCF-DFT method. Furthermore, the radiative rate constant (k{sub r}) is also calculated corresponding to each triplet state. Combination of k{sub r} and emissive energy, the emission rule is determined. It is found that complex (DMDPI){sub 2}Ir(tftap) follows the dual emission scenarios, while complexes (tftap){sub 2}Ir(DMDPI) and Ir(DMDPI){sub 3} obey the Kasha rule. The nonradiative rate constant (k{sub nr}) is qualitatively evaluated by the construction of triplet potential surface via metal centered ({sup 3}MC d-d) state. Finally, the sequence of quantum yield is compared by both k{sub r} and k{sub nr}. The quantum yield of homoleptic Ir(III) complex Ir(DMDPI){sub 3} is higher than that of heteroleptic Ir(III) complexes (DMDPI){sub 2}Ir(tftap) and (tftap){sub 2}Ir(DMDPI). However, the emissive wavelength of Ir(DMDPI){sub 3} is in the red color region rather than blue color.

  4. Cyclotron production of ruthenium-97 for radiopharmaceutical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Gessner, M.

    1980-01-01

    Ruthenium-97 is of interest for clinical practice in nuclear medicine. The combination of the excellent physical and chemical properties of Ruthenium-97 make this isotope worth evaluating. Ruthenium-97 has been prepared by irradiation of a sheet of molybdenum with the internal alpha-beam of the Ruthenium-97 as a function of the alpha particle energy has been measured. The radiochemical separation and its possible clinical applications have been discussed. (author)

  5. A panchromatic anthracene-fused porphyrin sensitizer for dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ball, James M.; Davis, Nicola K. S.; Wilkinson, James D.; Kirkpatrick, James; Teuscher, Joë l; Gunning, Robert; Anderson, Harry L.; Snaith, Henry J.

    2012-01-01

    The development of ruthenium-free sensitizers which absorb light over a broad range of the solar spectrum is important for improving the power conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells. Here we study three chemically tailored porphyrin

  6. Analysis of uranium and its compounds. Ruthenium spectrographic determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Ruthenium determination in uranium and its compounds, suitable for content greater than 0.1 ppm with respect to uranium, by dissolution in sulfuric acid and addition of palladium as an internal standard, separation of the precipitated ruthenium, in the presence of gold, by reduction with zinc, the precipitate is calcined and ruthenium is determined by spectrography [fr

  7. Method of suppressing evaporation loss of ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muromura, Tadazumi; Sato, Tadashi.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent evaporation loss of ruthenium from liquid wastes by adding an aluminum compound upon applying evaporating and drying to solid treatment to reprocessing liquid wastes for spent fuels. Method: An aluminum compound such as aluminum nitrate or aluminum hydroxide to reprocessing liquid wastes of spent fuels such that aluminum/ruthenium mixing ratio corresponds to 1.3 - 70.0 by g/atom ratio (0.34 - 187 by weight ratio), and the liquid mixture is heated to a temperature of about 130 deg C to be evaporated and dried to solidness. This enables to recover ruthenium without settling and depositing insoluble matters in the liquid wastes and without decomposing nitric acid. (Yoshino, Y.)

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of a Heteroleptic Ru(II Complex of Phenanthroline Containing Oligo-Anthracenyl Carboxylic Acid Moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Ajibade

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to develop new ruthenium(II complexes, this work describes the design, synthesis and characterization of a ruthenium(II functionalized phenanthroline complex with extended π-conjugation. The ligand were L1 (4,7-bis(2,3-dimethylacrylic acid-1,10-phenanthroline, synthesized by a direct aromatic substitution reaction, and L2 (4,7-bis(trianthracenyl-2,3-dimethylacrylic acid-1,10-phenanthroline, which was synthesized by the dehalogenation of halogenated aromatic compounds using a zero-valent palladium cross-catalyzed reaction in the absence of magnesium-diene complexes and/or cyclooctadienyl nickel (0 catalysts to generate a new carbon-carbon bond (C-C bond polymerized hydrocarbon units. The ruthenium complex [RuL1L2(NCS2] showed improved photophysical properties (red-shifted metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transition absorptions and enhanced molar extinction coefficients, luminescence and interesting electrochemical properties. Cyclic and square wave voltammetry revealed five major redox processes. The number of electron(s transferred by the ruthenium complex was determined by chronocoulometry in each case. The results show that processes I, II and III are multi-electron transfer reactions while processes IV and V involved one-electron transfer reaction. The photophysical property of the complex makes it a promising candidate in the design of chemosensors and photosensitizers, while its redox-active nature makes the complex a potential mediator of electron transfer in photochemical processes.

  9. Adsorption of aliphatic alcohols on ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapovalova, L.B.; Zakumbaeva, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The adsorption is studied of allyl-, propyl- and propargyl alcohols on a ruthenium catalyst-electrode at 20, 30 and 40 deg C in H 2 SO 4 in helium. Above adsorption has been found to grow with increased concentration of the alcohols in the solution. In solutions with the same concentration, propargyl alcohol has been noted to show highest sorptive capacity, followed by that of allyl- and propyl alcohols. With variations in the ruthenium electrode potential, alcohol adsorption occurs via maximum at potential = 0.18

  10. Processing of radioactive ruthenium with aluminosilicate gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Takuji; Ichinose, Yasuhiro; Ito, Katsuo

    1979-01-01

    Coprecipitation of radioactive Ru with hydroxides has been studied for the purpose of the management of the high level waste from the nuclear fuel reprocessing. Aluminosilicate gel used as coprecipitant was prepared by addition of aqueous sodium hydroxide to sodium aluminate-sodium silicate solution containing ruthenium nitrate. Ruthenium quantitatively precipitates under the conditions, aluminate > 4 x 10 -2 M, Al/Si 0 C. However, volatilization rate of Ru is suppressed by coating with mullite phase into which aluminosilicate gel transformes above 900 0 C. The amount of Ru volatilized in Ar-flow was reduced to about 10% of that in air-flow. (author)

  11. Ruthenium nanocatalysis on redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Ramdass, Arumugam; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles have generated intense interest over the past 20 years due to their high potential applications in different areas such as catalysis, sensors, nanoscale electronics, fuel and solar cells and optoelectronics. As the large fractions of metal atoms are exposed to the surface, the use of metal nanoparticles as nanocatalysts allows mild reaction conditions and high catalytic efficiency in a large number of chemical transformations. They have emerged as sustainable heterogeneous catalysts and catalyst supports alternative to conventional materials. This review focuses on the synthesis, characterization and catalytic role of ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) on the redox reactions of heteroatom containing organic compounds with the green reagent H2O2, a field that has attracted immense interest among the chemical, materials and industrial communities. We intend to present a broad overview of Ru nanocatalysts for redox reactions with an emphasis on their performance, stability and reusability. The growth in the chemistry of organic sulfoxides and N-oxides during last decade was due to their importance as synthetic intermediates for the production of a wide range of chemically and biologically active molecules. Thus design of efficient methods for the synthesis of sulfoxides and N-oxides becomes important. This review concentrates on the catalysis of RuNPs on the H2O2 oxidation of organic sulfides to sulfoxides and amines to N-oxides. The deoxygenation reactions of sulfoxides to sulfides and reduction of nitro compounds to amines are fundamental reactions in both chemistry and biology. Here, we also highlight the catalysis of metal nanoparticles on the deoxygenation of sulfoxides and sulfones and reduction of nitro compounds with particular emphasis on the mechanistic aspects.

  12. Structure and reactivity of Ruthenium nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    We present a method for obtaining detailed structural information of ruthenium nanoparticles in at least the diameter range from 1.5 to 5 nm. The method is based on an ensemble approach where a large number of low-energy structures are collected in an ensemble, from which average properties can...

  13. Thermodynamic properties of gaseous ruthenium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miradji, Faoulat; Souvi, Sidi; Cantrel, Laurent; Louis, Florent; Vallet, Valérie

    2015-05-21

    The review of thermodynamic data of ruthenium oxides reveals large uncertainties in some of the standard enthalpies of formation, motivating the use of high-level relativistic correlated quantum chemical methods to reduce the level of discrepancies. The reaction energies leading to the formation of ruthenium oxides RuO, RuO2, RuO3, and RuO4 have been calculated for a series of reactions. The combination of different quantum chemical methods has been investigated [DFT, CASSCF, MRCI, CASPT2, CCSD(T)] in order to predict the geometrical parameters, the energetics including electronic correlation and spin-orbit coupling. The most suitable method for ruthenium compounds is the use of TPSSh-5%HF for geometry optimization, followed by CCSD(T) with complete basis set (CBS) extrapolations for the calculation of the total electronic energies. SO-CASSCF seems to be accurate enough to estimate spin-orbit coupling contributions to the ground-state electronic energies. This methodology yields very accurate standard enthalpies of formations of all species, which are either in excellent agreement with the most reliable experimental data or provide an improved estimate for the others. These new data will be implemented in the thermodynamical databases that are used by the ASTEC code (accident source term evaluation code) to build models of ruthenium chemistry behavior in severe nuclear accident conditions. The paper also discusses the nature of the chemical bonds both from molecular orbital and topological view points.

  14. Enyne Metathesis Catalyzed by Ruthenium Carbene Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Carina Storm; Madsen, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Enyne metathesis combines an alkene and an alkyne into a 1,3-diene. The first enyne metathesis reaction catalyzed by a ruthenium carbene complex was reported in 1994. This review covers the advances in this transformation during the last eight years with particular emphasis on methodology...

  15. Support Effect in Hydrodesulfurization over Ruthenium Sulfide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gulková, Daniela; Kaluža, Luděk; Vít, Zdeněk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2009), s. 146-149 ISSN 1337-7027 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/06/0705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : ruthenium sulfide * hydrodesulfurization * support effect Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  16. Ruthenium transport experiments in air ingress accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teemu, Karkele; Ulrika, Backman; Ari, Auvinen; Unto, Tapper; Jorma, Jokiniemi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Fine Particles (Finland); Riitta, Zilliacus; Maija, Lipponen; Tommi, Kekki [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Accident Management (Finland); Jorma, Jokiniemi [Kuopio Univ., Dept. of Environmental Sciences, Fine Particle and Aerosol Technology Lab. (Finland)

    2007-07-01

    In this study the release, transport and speciation of ruthenium in conditions simulating an air ingress accident was studied. Ruthenium dioxide was exposed to oxidising environment at high temperature (1100-1700 K) in a tubular flow furnace. At these conditions volatile ruthenium species were formed. A large fraction of the released ruthenium was deposited in the tube as RuO{sub 2}. Depending on the experimental conditions 1-26 wt% of the released ruthenium was trapped in the outlet filter as RuO{sub 2} particles. In stainless steel tube 0-8.8 wt% of the released ruthenium reached the trapping bottle as gaseous RuO{sub 4}. A few experiments were carried out, in which revaporization of ruthenium deposited on the tube walls was studied. In these experiments, oxidation of RuO{sub 2} took place at a lower temperature. During revaporization experiments 35-65 % of ruthenium was transported as gaseous RuO{sub 4}. In order to close mass balance and achieve better time resolution 4 experiments were carried out using a radioactive tracer. In these experiments ruthenium profiles were measured. These experiments showed that the most important retention mechanism was decomposition of gaseous RuO{sub 3} into RuO{sub 2} as the temperature of the furnace was decreasing. In these experiments the transport rate of gaseous ruthenium was decreasing while the release rate was constant.

  17. Determination of gold osmium and ruthenium through iodine-azide reaction in presence of 2- or 6- mercaptopurine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Kurzawa, Z.

    1978-01-01

    The composition of osmium and ruthenium complexes with 6-mercaptopurine has been determined. The sensitivity of the method was enhanced due to a proper choice of the optimal time of the formation of these complexes and the time of equilibrium attainment in the presence of excess of azide. Also the gold complex with 2-mercaptopurine was investigated. (author)

  18. Synthesis of a red electrophosphorescent heteroleptic iridium complex and its application in efficient polymer light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiuju; Xu Yunhua; Sun Yiheng; Shi Huahong; Zhu Xuhui; Cao Yong

    2007-01-01

    The preparation and characterization of a heteroleptic iridium complex [2-(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)pyridine]Ir(III)[2-(4H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl) pyridine] [(Btp) 2 Ir(PZ)] were reported (2-(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)pyridine = Btp; 2-(4H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)pyridine = PZ). Electrophosphorescence was investigated in the device structure [indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/poly(ethlenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)/poly(vinylcarbazole)(PVK)/Poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) end capped with dimethylphenyl (PFO): (Btp) 2 Ir(PZ)/Ba/Al] by using this iridium complex as guest and PFO as host. The red electrophosphorescent devices showed a peak emission at approximately 604 nm and shoulder at 654 nm with the Commission International de'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.64, 0.35) and external quantum efficiency of 7.7% at a doping concentration of 8 wt.% without an electron-transporting material in the emitting layer

  19. ct-DNA Binding and Antibacterial Activity of Octahedral Titanium (IV Heteroleptic (Benzoylacetone and Hydroxamic Acids Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kaushal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Five structurally related titanium (IV heteroleptic complexes, [TiCl2(bzac(L1–4] and [TiCl3(bzac(HL5]; bzac = benzoylacetonate; L1–5 = benzohydroximate (L1, salicylhydroximate (L2, acetohydroximate (L3, hydroxyurea (L4, and N-benzoyl-N-phenyl hydroxylamine (L5, were used for the assessment of their antibacterial activities against ten pathogenic bacterial strains. The titanium (IV complexes (1–5 demonstrated significant level of antibacterial properties as measured using agar well diffusion method. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopic technique was applied, to get a better insight into the nature of binding between titanium (IV complexes with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA. On the basis of the results of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, the interaction between ct-DNA and the titanium (IV complexes is likely to occur through the same mode. Results indicated that titanium (IV complex can bind to calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA via an intercalative mode. The intrinsic binding constant (Kb was calculated by absorption spectra by using Benesi-Hildebrand equation. Further, Gibbs free energy was also calculated for all the complexes.

  20. Increased electrochemical properties of ruthenium oxide and graphene/ruthenium oxide hybrid dispersed by polyvinylpyrrolidone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yao; Zhang, Xiong; Zhang, Dacheng; Ma, Yanwei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A good dispersion of RuO 2 and graphene/RuO 2 is obtained by polyvinylpyrrolidone. ► PVP as a dispersant also can prevent the formation of metal Ru in graphene/RuO 2 . ► The max capacitances of the hybrid and RuO 2 reach 435 and 597 F g −1 at 0.2 A g −1 . ► The hybrid shows the best rate capability of 39% at 50 A g −1 . - Abstract: Ruthenium oxide has been prepared by a sol–gel method. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as an excellent polymeric dispersant is adopted to prevent aggregation of ruthenium oxide. In order to enhance the rate capability of ruthenium oxide, graphene with residual oxygen functional groups as a 2D support has been merged into ruthenium oxide. These oxygen functional groups not only favor to form stable few layers of graphene colloids, but also offer the sites to anchor ruthenium oxide nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction infers that PVP can also hinder the partial formation of Ru by blocking the direct contact between the Ru 3+ and the graphene in the sol–gel synthesis of the hybrids. The ruthenium oxide and the graphene/ruthenium oxide hybrids dispersed by PVP have superior electrochemical properties due to good dispersing and protecting ability of PVP. Especially, the hybrids using PVP exhibit the best rate capability, indicating that the composites possess an advanced structure of combining sheets and particles in nano-scale.

  1. Evidence for Dynamic Chemical Kinetics at Individual Molecular Ruthenium Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, Quinn T; Blum, Suzanne A

    2018-02-05

    Catalytic cycles are typically depicted as possessing time-invariant steps with fixed rates. Yet the true behavior of individual catalysts with respect to time is unknown, hidden by the ensemble averaging inherent to bulk measurements. Evidence is presented for variable chemical kinetics at individual catalysts, with a focus on ring-opening metathesis polymerization catalyzed by the second-generation Grubbs' ruthenium catalyst. Fluorescence microscopy is used to probe the chemical kinetics of the reaction because the technique possesses sufficient sensitivity for the detection of single chemical reactions. Insertion reactions in submicron regions likely occur at groups of many (not single) catalysts, yet not so many that their unique kinetic behavior is ensemble averaged. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Contribution to the study of ruthenium fluorides, oxyfluorides and oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbin, Odile.

    1982-08-01

    Studies on the dry processing of spent fuels reveal a poor ruthenium decontamination of plutonium. For a better understanding of this result a study of ruthenium fluorides, oxyfluorides and oxides is carried out here as follows: - bibliographical review; - thermochromatographic identification of the number and nature of compounds formed by fluorination of microquantities of ruthenium; - confirmation of the thermochromatographic results by two other analytical methods: thermogravimetry and infrared spectroscopy [fr

  3. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidation of Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ritwika; Hazari, Arijit Singha; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar; Maiti, Debabrata

    2018-01-18

    Amine oxidation is one of the fundamental reactions in organic synthesis as it leads to a variety of value-added products such as oximes, nitriles, imines, and amides among many others. These products comprise the key N-containing building blocks in the modern chemical industry, and such transformations, when achieved in the presence of molecular oxygen without using stoichiometric oxidants, are much preferred as they circumvent the production of unwanted wastes. In parallel, the versatility of ruthenium catalysts in various oxidative transformations is well-documented. Herein, this review focuses on aerobic oxidation of amines specifically by using ruthenium catalysts and highlights the major achievements in this direction and challenges that still need to be addressed. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Characterization of self-assembled monolayers on a ruthenium surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaheen, Amrozia; Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Ricciardi, R.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    We have modified and stabilized the ruthenium surface by depositing a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 1-hexadecanethiol on a polycrystalline ruthenium thin film. The growth mechanism, dynamics, and stability of these monolayers were studied. SAMs, deposited under ambient conditions, on

  5. Application of the chemical properties of ruthenium to decontamination processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, A.; Berger, D.

    1965-01-01

    The chemical properties of ruthenium in the form of an aqueous solution of the nitrate and of organic tributylphosphate solution are reviewed. From this data, some known examples are given: they demonstrate the processes of separation or of elimination of ruthenium from radioactive waste. (authors) [fr

  6. Volatilization and trapping of ruthenium in high temperature processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Weyers, C.; Goossens, W.R.A.

    1983-01-01

    This experimental study has indicated the importance of moisture and NO/sub x/ vapors on the volatility and trapping conditions of ruthenium in high temperature processes. Also the process operating conditions have a great influence on the ruthenium behavior in the off-gas purification units. Of particular interest is the observation that the ruthenium release during direct vitrification of simulated high-level liquid waste is a factor of about 5 smaller than the ruthenium release during calcination of this type of waste. Moreover, in the direct vitrification case the ruthenium escapes mostly in the form of an aerosol whereas in the calcination case a volatile ruthenium compound is dominating. Consequently, a specific ruthenium filter is not needed in the off-gas line of a direct vitrifier simplifying in this way the number of units in this off-gas line and avoiding the handling and controlling problems of such a ruthenium filter. In the future, a similar program will be started on the volatility of cesium and antimony in a liquid fed melter and on the technical reliability of the liquid fed melter and its associated gas purification units on a semi-pilote scale under simulated conditions

  7. The biokinetics of ruthenium in the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The biokinetics of ruthenium (Ru) in the human body is of interest due mainly to the potential for occupational or environmental exposure to 106Ru (T1/2 = 373.6 d) and 103Ru (T1/2 = 39.3 d), which typically represent a significant portion of the fission products in a reactor inventory. During reactor operations or nuclear fuel reprocessing these ruthenium isotopes may be present as ruthenium tetroxide (RuO4) vapor, a highly mobile form of ruthenium that has been involved in a number of cases of accidental exposure to 106Ru or 103Ru. This paper summarizes the biokinetic database for ruthenium and proposes a new respiratory model for inhaled RuO4 vapor, a new biokinetic for systemic (absorbed) ruthenium, and material-specific gastrointestinal absorption fractions for ruthenium. The proposed respiratory model for RuO4 differs from the current ICRP model mainly in that it depicts slower clearance of deposited activity from the respiratory tract and lower absorption to blood than depicted in the current ICRP model. The proposed systemic biokinetic model depicts more realistic paths of movement of absorbed ruthenium in the body than the current ICRP model and, in contrast to the present model, a less uniform distribution of systemic activity. Implications of the proposed models with regard to inhalation and ingestion dose coefficients for 106Ru are examined.

  8. Metal Complex Dyes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Recent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    interests are in coding theory, error-correction in networks and wireless communication.“ Ruthenium ..... Calculate power conversion efficiency by using the formula: 100 ... Molar Extinction Coefficient Charge-Transfer Sensitizers for Solar Cell.

  9. Electrodeposited nano-scale islands of ruthenium oxide as a bifunctional electrocatalyst for simultaneous catalytic oxidation of hydrazine and hydroxylamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, Hamid R., E-mail: hrzare@yazduni.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, P.O. Box 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanotechnology Research Center, Yazd University, P.O. Box 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, S. Hossein; Benvidi, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, P.O. Box 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-06-04

    For the first time, an electrodeposited nano-scale islands of ruthenium oxide (ruthenium oxide nanoparticles), as an excellent bifunctional electrocatalyst, was successfully used for hydrazine and hydroxylamine electrocatalytic oxidation. The results show that, at the present bifunctional modified electrode, two different redox couples of ruthenium oxides serve as electrocatalysts for simultaneous electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrazine and hydroxylamine. At the modified electrode surface, the peaks of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) for hydrazine and hydroxylamine oxidation were clearly separated from each other when they co-exited in solution. Thus, it was possible to simultaneously determine hydrazine and hydroxylamine in the samples at a ruthenium oxide nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode (RuON-GCE). Linear calibration curves were obtained for 2.0-268.3 {mu}M and 268.3-417.3 {mu}M of hydrazine and for 4.0-33.8 {mu}M and 33.8-78.3 {mu}M of hydroxylamine at the modified electrode surface using an amperometric method. The amperometric method also exhibited the detection limits of 0.15 {mu}M and 0.45 {mu}M for hydrazine and hydroxylamine respectively. RuON-GCE was satisfactorily used for determination of spiked hydrazine in two water samples. Moreover, the studied bifunctional modified electrode exhibited high sensitivity, good repeatability, wide linear range and long-term stability.

  10. Flotation-spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium in the Ru(IV)-chloride-rhodamine 6G-toluene system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcerzak, M.

    1985-01-01

    The reduction of RuO 4 in hydrochloric acid has been examined. A sensitive flotation-spectrophotometric method of the determination of ruthenium based on the ion associate formed by the anionic chlorid complex of ruthenium RuCl 2- 6 with the basic dye Rhodamine 6G (R6G) has been developed. The solution of the ion associate obeys Beer's law up to the concentration of 0.25 μg Ru/ml. The ion associate precipitates when the aqueous solution is shaken with toluene. The separated compound is dissolved in acetone. The molar absorptivity (epsilon) at 530 nm is 5.1 x 10 5 l x mole -1 x cm -1 . The relative standard deviation is 3-7%. The mole ratio of Ru:R6G in the complex is 1:5. Osmium reacts similarly. The determination of ruthenium can be selective after the preliminary separation of osmium as OsO 4 . The method was applied to the determination of microgram amounts of ruthenium in crucible platinum. (Author)

  11. Experiments on the behaviour of ruthenium in air ingress accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Backman, Ul; Auvinen, A.; Zilliacus, R.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2007-03-01

    During routine nuclear reactor operation, ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel in relatively high concentrations. In a severe accident in a nuclear power plant it is possible that air gets into contact with the reactor core. In this case ruthenium may oxidise and form volatile ruthenium species, RuO3 and RuO4, which can be transported into the containment. In order to estimate the amount of gaseous ruthenium species, it is of interest to know, how they are formed and how they behave. In our experiments the formation and transport of volatile ruthenium oxides was studied by exposing RuO2 powder to diverse oxidising atmospheres at a relatively high temperature. Transport of gaseous RuO4 was further investigated by injecting it into the facility in similar conditions. Upon cooling of the gas flow RuO2 aerosol particles were formed in the system. They were removed from the gas stream with plane filters. Gaseous ruthenium species were trapped in 1M NaOH-water solution, which is capable of trapping RuO4 totally. Ruthenium in the solution was filtered for analysis. The determination of ruthenium both in aerosol and in liquid filters was made using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). In order to close the mass balance and to achieve better time resolution seven experiment were carried out using radioactive tracer. In this report, the facility for the ruthenium behaviour study and results from experiments are presented. Preliminary conclusions from the experiments are reported as well. Final conclusions will be made after modelling of the facility is completed in a continuation work of this study. (au)

  12. Experiments on the behaviour of ruthenium in air ingress accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Backman, Ul; Auvinen, A.; Zilliacus, R.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J. [Technical Research Centre of Finland VTT (Finland)

    2007-03-15

    During routine nuclear reactor operation, ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel in relatively high concentrations. In a severe accident in a nuclear power plant it is possible that air gets into contact with the reactor core. In this case ruthenium may oxidise and form volatile ruthenium species, RuO3 and RuO4, which can be transported into the containment. In order to estimate the amount of gaseous ruthenium species, it is of interest to know, how they are formed and how they behave. In our experiments the formation and transport of volatile ruthenium oxides was studied by exposing RuO2 powder to diverse oxidising atmospheres at a relatively high temperature. Transport of gaseous RuO4 was further investigated by injecting it into the facility in similar conditions. Upon cooling of the gas flow RuO2 aerosol particles were formed in the system. They were removed from the gas stream with plane filters. Gaseous ruthenium species were trapped in 1M NaOH-water solution, which is capable of trapping RuO4 totally. Ruthenium in the solution was filtered for analysis. The determination of ruthenium both in aerosol and in liquid filters was made using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). In order to close the mass balance and to achieve better time resolution seven experiment were carried out using radioactive tracer. In this report, the facility for the ruthenium behaviour study and results from experiments are presented. Preliminary conclusions from the experiments are reported as well. Final conclusions will be made after modelling of the facility is completed in a continuation work of this study. (au)

  13. Characterization of ultrasonic spray pyrolysed ruthenium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, P.S.; Ennaoui, E.A.; Lokhande, C.D.; Mueller, M.; Giersig, M.; Diesner, K.; Tributsch, H. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany). Bereich Physikalische Chemie

    1997-11-21

    The ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) technique was employed to deposit ruthenium oxide thin films. The films were prepared at 190 C substrate temperature and further annealed at 350 C for 30 min in air. The films were 0.22 {mu} thick and black grey in color. The structural, compositional and optical properties of ruthenium oxide thin films are reported. Contactless transient photoconductivity measurement was carried out to calculate the decay time of excess charge carriers in ruthenium oxide thin films. (orig.) 28 refs.

  14. Hazards and control of ruthenium in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichholz, G.G.

    1978-01-01

    A review is presented of present information on the possible hazards of radioruthenium in the nuclear fuel cycle and its behaviour in nuclear operations and in the environment. The subject is dealt with under the following headings: basic chemical and nuclear properties of ruthenium; chemistry (including the ruthenium-nitric acid system, electrochemistry, extraction processes); ruthenium toxicity; generation of radioruthenium (fallout sources, reactor sources, fuel reprocessing operations); waste treatment (cementation and bitumenization, calcining processes, vitrification); movement in the environment (movement of airborne effluents, liquid effluents and the freshwater environment, marine environment, bottom sediments, marine organisms, terrestrial environments, uptake in vegetation and animals); conclusion. (U.K.)

  15. Scaling-resistance of ruthenium- and ruthenium phosphides powders in argon and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernogorebko, V.B.; Semenov-Kobzar', A.A.; Kulik, L.Ya.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal stability of ruthenium phosphides in air diminishes as the content of phosphorus in the compound increases. The temperatures at which active oxidation of the powders starts are as follows: Ru-600, Ru 2 P-590, RuP-390, and RuP 2 -270 0 C. The oxidation of phosphorus in the phosphides proceeds in steps. The atoms of phosphorus which are most accessible to oxygen are first oxidated. Phosphorus atoms in the octahedral spaces are oxidated less easily, simultaneously with the oxidation of the ruthenium atoms. When heated in argon, Ru 2 P and RuP fuse congruently at 1,500 and 1,555 0 C respectively, while RuP 2 dissociates at 950 0 C. (author)

  16. The effect of 4-tert-butylpyridine and Li+ on the thermal degradation of TiO2 - bound ruthenium dye N719

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Phuong Tuyet; Hansen, Poul Erik; Lund, Torben

    2013-01-01

    Thermal stability experiments were performed at 100 °C of the dye-sensitized solar cell ruthenium dye N719. The experiments were performed as simple test-tube experiments carried out with colloidal solutions of N719-loaded TiO2 particles. The dye degradation was followed by the use of HPLC-couple...

  17. Ruthenium, osmium and rhodium complexes of polypyridyl ligands ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Discipline of Silicates and Catalysis, Central Salt and Marine Chemicals ... However, synthetic methods have also been developed to prepare complexes with ... 3.2 Synthesis and characterisation of ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) complexes18, ...

  18. Unsaturated carbone and allenylidene ruthenium complexes from alkynes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, Yu.L.; Diznev, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    The author's studies aimed at activation of terminal alkynes by metal complexes, reactivity patterns and selective preparations of unsaturated carbene, allenylidene and cumulenylidene derivatives of (arene)ruthenium complexes are reviewed. 48 refs

  19. Synthesis of ruthenium (III) complexes with benzimidazole derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, P.C.; Chahar, Yogesh K.; Garg, Yajula; Seth, Gita

    2003-01-01

    Complexes of ruthenium with biologically important benzimidazole derivatives, viz. 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl) benzimidazole (HOPBI), 2-2'- mercaptophenyl) benzimidazole (HSPBI), 2- (2'-hydroxynaphthyl) benzimidazole (HONBI) have been synthesized and characterized. (author)

  20. Supercapacitive performance of hydrous ruthenium oxide (RuO2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gel method have been employed to prepare ruthenium oxide thin films. Recently ... the potentiostat (263A EG&G, Princeton Applied Research. Potentiostat). .... is a mixed conductor that conducts protons and electrons in acidic solution (as ...

  1. Origin of a counterintuitive yellow light-emitting electrochemical cell based on a blue-emitting heteroleptic copper(i) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michael D; Garino, Claudio; Volpi, Giorgio; Casamassa, Enrico; Milanesio, Marco; Barolo, Claudia; Costa, Rubén D

    2016-06-07

    This work provides the synthesis, structural characterization, electrochemical and photophysical features, as well as the application in light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) of a novel heteroleptic copper(i) complex - [Cu(impy)(POP)][PF6], where impy is 3-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-(pyridine-2-yl)imidazo[1,5-a]pyridine and POP is bis{2-(diphenylphosphanyl)phenyl}ether. This compound shows blue photoluminescence (PL, λ = 450 nm) in solution and solid-state and excellent redox stability. Despite these excellent features, the electroluminescence (EL) response is located at ∼550 nm. Although the EL spectrum of LECs is typically red-shifted compared to the PL of the electroluminescent material, a shift of ca. 100 nm represents the largest one reported in LECs. To date, the large shift phenomena have been attributed to (i) a change in the nature of the lowest emitting state due to a concentration effect of the films, (ii) a reversible substitution of the ligands due to the weak coordination to the Cu(i), and (iii) a change in the distribution of the excited states due to polarization effects. After having discarded these along with others like the irreversible degradation of the emitter during device fabrication and/or under operation conditions, driving conditions, active layer composition, and changes in the excited states under different external electrical stimuli, we attribute the origin of this unexpected shift to a lack of a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) process due to the solely ligand-centered character of the excited states. As such, the lack of a charge transfer character in the excited states leads to a blue-fluorescence and yellow-phosphorescence photo- and electro-responses, respectively. This corroborates recent studies focused on the design of TADF for heteroleptic copper(i) complexes. Overall, this work is a clear insight into the design of new copper(i) complexes towards the preparation of blue LECs, which are still unexplored.

  2. Rare earth-ruthenium-magnesium intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Sebastian; Kersting, Marcel; Heletta, Lukas; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie

    2017-07-01

    Eight new intermetallic rare earth-ruthenium-magnesium compounds have been synthesized from the elements in sealed niobium ampoules using different annealing sequences in muffle furnaces. The compounds have been characterized by powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Sm{sub 9.2}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 17.8} (a=939.6(2), c=1779(1) pm), Gd{sub 11}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 16} (a=951.9(2), c=1756.8(8) pm), and Tb{sub 10.5}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 16.5} (a=942.5(1), c=1758.3(4) pm) crystallize with the tetragonal Nd{sub 9.34}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 17.66} type structure, space group I4/mmm. This structure exhibits a complex condensation pattern of square-prisms and square-antiprisms around the magnesium and ruthenium atoms, respectively. Y{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} (a=344.0(1), c=2019(1) pm) and Tb{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} (a=341.43(6), c=2054.2(7) pm) adopt the Er{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} structure and Tm{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg (a=337.72(9), c=1129.8(4) pm) is isotypic with Sc{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg. Tm{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} (a=337.35(9), c=2671(1) pm) and Lu{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} (a=335.83(5), c=2652.2(5) pm) are the first ternary ordered variants of the Ti{sub 3}Cu{sub 4} type, space group I4/mmm. These five compounds belong to a large family of intermetallics which are completely ordered superstructures of the bcc subcell. The group-subgroup scheme for Lu{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} is presented. The common structural motif of all three structure types are ruthenium-centered rare earth cubes reminicent of the CsCl type. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of Y{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} and Lu{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} samples revealed Pauli paramagnetism of the conduction electrons.

  3. p-chloro- and p-bromo-benzoylacetoneoxime as the spectrophotometric reagents for palladium and ruthenium(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeole, V.V.; Langade, A.D.; Shinde, V.M.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure is described for the extractive spectrophotometric determination of palladium or ruthenium(III) using p-chloro or p-bromobenzoylacetoneoxime as the reagent. The yellow palladium complexes which are extracted into chloroform from an aqueous solution of pH 3.5, absorb as 400 nm and conform to Beer's law in the range of 10 to 100 μg of Pd/10 ml of organic phase. The orange-red ruthenium complexes which are extracted into ethylacetate from an aqueous solution of pH 5.0, absorbs at 475 nm and conforms to Beer's law in the range of 20 to 200 μg of Ru/10 ml of organic phase. The molar absorptivities, Sandell's sensitivities and instability constants are reported. (author)

  4. Towards PSII analogs driven by ruthenium photophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Jerry

    2002-01-01

    A number of model complexes have been prepared in an attempt to develop models for photosystem II (PSII) in green plants. As replacement for the chlorophyll photosensitizer, we have used Ru(ll) tris-2,2-bipyridyl or Ru(ll) bis-2,2';6',2 - terpyridyl complexes linked to a pendant 2,2'-bipyridyl or 2,2';6',2''-terpyridyl moieties via spacers of varying lengths. Manganese (ll) has been covalently linked to the pendant 2,2'-bipyridyl /2,2';6',2''-terpyridyl moieties. The use of different ruthenium centres and spacers has made it possible to make assumptions about the way and how easily manganese is coordinated through self-assembly to the pendant 2,2'-bipyridyl or 2,2';6',2''-terpyridyl groups. Several polynuclear complexes containing a photoactive centre (Ru(ll) tris-2,2'-bipyridine or Ru(ll) bis-2,2';6',2''-terpyridine) or other metal ions (Co 2+ , Fe 2+ , Mn 2= ) have been prepared and characterised. The main work has been focused on organic synthesis and characterisation of polypyridine ligands and coordinated to different metal centres. The complexes have been investigated electrochemically and photophysically. Several new phenol-based ligands have been prepared by organic synthetic methods and characterised by various different methods. (author)

  5. Reactions of dihydridotetrakis(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium(II) with olefins and isolation of new ruthenium-olefin complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiya, Sanshiro; Yamamoto, Akio

    1976-01-01

    Dihydridotetrakis(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium (II), RuH 2 (PPh 3 ) 4 , reacts with olefins (ethylene, propylene, stylene and butadiene) to give olefin-coordinated complexes of the type, Ru(olefin)(PPh 3 ) 3 and equimolar amounts of their hydrogenation products per mol of the dihydride complex. The olefin coordinated with ruthenium can be exchanged with other olefins. Olefin-coordinated complexes easily react with molecular hydrogen to afford tetrahydridotris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium, RuH 4 (PPh 3 ) 3 , releasing alkane at room temperature, Under hydrogen atmosphere catalytic hydrogenation of the olefins smoothly takes place with RuH 2 (PPh 3 ) 4 . (Ethylene)tris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium(0) reacts with methyl iodide to give propylene and a trace of butadiene along with methane, ethylene, and small amounts of ethane and butenes. The formation of propylene suggests that oxidative addition involving cleavage of the C-H bond of ethylene to ruthenium giving a hydridovinyl complex may be taking place. Reactions of Ru(C 2 H 4 )(PPh 3 ) 3 with methyl-d 3 iodide and ethyl iodide, and of Ru(C 3 H 6 )(PPh 3 ) 3 with methyl iodide were examined to test the generality of this type of reaction. The reaction of Ru(C 2 H 4 )(PPh 3 ) 3 with CD 3 I released CD 4 and CD 2 H 2 together with CD 3 H suggesting the involvement of α-hydrogen abstraction. (auth.)

  6. Ruthenium Dioxide Catalysts for the Selective Oxidation of Benzylamine to Benzonitrile: Investigating the Effect of Ruthenium Loading on Physical and Catalytic Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvang, Emily Catherine; Schill, Leonhard; Riisager, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation of benzylamine to benzonitrile was studied in batch and continuous flow processes using ruthenium dioxide catalysts with varying ruthenium loadings. Increased conversions were observed in the continuous flow process compared with the batch process (up to 100% in the ......The oxidative dehydrogenation of benzylamine to benzonitrile was studied in batch and continuous flow processes using ruthenium dioxide catalysts with varying ruthenium loadings. Increased conversions were observed in the continuous flow process compared with the batch process (up to 100......% in the flow process compared with up to 92% in the batch process), with increased selectivity to benzonitrile (82 and 65%, respectively) and benzonitrile yields (84 and 58%, respectively). The major by-product was N-benzylidenebenzylamine. The ruthenium loading in the catalyst was successfully optimised...... and the most active catalyst had a ruthenium loading of 2.5-3.5 wt%....

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis and physicochemical properties of ruthenium(0) nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dikhtiarenko, A., E-mail: dikhtiarenkoalla@uniovi.es [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo - CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Khainakov, S.A.; Garcia, J.R.; Gimeno, J. [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo - CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Pedro, I. de; Fernandez, J. Rodriguez [CITIMAC, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, 39005 Santander (Spain); Blanco, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ruthenium nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average size of the nanoparticles are depend on the reducing agent used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic response seems to be dominated by a paramagnetic contribution characteristic of the band electronic magnetism of the ruthenium(0) nanoparticles. - Abstract: The synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles in hydrothermal conditions using mild reducing agents (succinic acid, ascorbic acid and sodium citrate) is reported. The shape of the nanoparticles depends on the type of the reducing agent, while the size is more influenced by the pH of the medium. The magnetic response seems to be dominated by a paramagnetic contribution characteristic of the band electronic magnetism of the nanoparticles.

  8. Confinement of ruthenium oxides volatilized during nuclear fuels reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maas, E.T. Jr.; Longo, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    While many materials have been suggested and employed as trapping agents for gaseous oxides of fission product ruthenium volatilized during nuclear fuels reprocessing, none that is known to form thermodynamically stable compounds with rutheniunm has been utilized. We have employed alkaline earth metal compounds for this purpose because of their ability to form stable mixed metal oxide phases with ruthenium. Results of experiments in which RuO 4 was volatilized from either a solid source (RuO 2 .xH 2 O) or from solution [Ru(NO)(NO 3 ) 3 ] in HNO 3 and passed through beds of alkaline earth metal carbonates and calcium oxide held at 600 to 750 0 C have demonstrated that compounds of formulation MRuO 3 (M = calcium, strontium, barium) are formed. Under oxidizing conditions, these materials exist as stable ceramic phases, whereas under reducing conditions, they are transformed into intimate mixtures of the alkaline earth metal oxide and nonvolatile ruthenium metal

  9. Device for separating ruthenium ion from spent fuel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumida, Tatsuo; Sasahira, Akira; Ozawa, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Fumio.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To separate plutonium ions efficiently and selectively from organic solvent containing tributyl phosphate used in the main step of reprocessing process. Constitution: The device comprises, as the main constituent factor, a liquid-liquid contact device for bringing not water soluble organic solvent into contact with a nitric acid solution of spent fuel substances and a liquid-liquid contact-separation device for bringing an organic solvent solution containing spent fuel substances separated with nitric acid into contact again with nitric acid. Then, a device is disposed between two liquid-liquid contact devices for staying ruthenium ions and organic solvent for a sufficient time. In this way, ruthenium ions in the organic solvent containing butyl phosphate are gradually converted into complex compounds combined with tributyl phosphate thereby enabling to separate ruthenium ions efficiently and remarkably reduce the corrosion of equipments. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. Thermodynamic data bases for multivalent elements: An example for ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rard, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    A careful consideration and understanding of fundamental chemistry, thermodynamics, and kinetics is absolutely essential when modeling predominance regions and solubility behavior of elements that exhibit a wide range of valence states. Examples of this are given using the ruthenium-water system at 298.15 K, for which a critically assessed thermochemical data base is available. Ruthenium exhibits the widest range of known aqueous solution valence states. Known solid anhydrous binary oxides of ruthenium are crystalline RuO 2 , RuO 4 , and possibly RuO 3 (thin film), and known hydroxides/hydrated oxides (all amorphous) are Ru(OH) 3 . H 2 O, RuO 2 . 2H 2 O, RuO 2 . H 2 O, and a poorly characterized Ru(V) hydrous oxide. Although the other oxides, hydroxides, and hydrous oxides are generally obtained as precipitates from aqueous solutions, they are thermodynamically unstable with regard to RuO 2 (cr) formation. Characterized aqueous species of ruthenium include RuO 4 (which slowly oxidizes water and which dissociates as a weak acid), RuO 4 - and RuO 4 2- (which probably contain lesser amounts of RuO 3 (OH) 2 - and RuO 3 (OH) 2 2- , respectively, and other species), Ru(OH) 2 2+ , Ru 4 (OH) 12 4+ , Ru(OH) 4 , Ru 3+ , Ru(OH) 2+ , Ru(OH) 2 + , Ru 2+ , and some hydroxytetramers with formal ruthenium valences of 3.75 ≥ Z ≥ 2.0. Potential pH diagrams of the predominance regions change significantly with concentration due to polymerization/depolymerization reactions. Failure to consider the known chemistry of ruthenium can yield large differences in predicted solubilities

  11. Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium(II)-bisoprolol-based electrochemiluminescence coupled with capillary zone electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jingwu [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China)], E-mail: wangjingwu@ncu.edu.cn; Zhang Xiaojun; Pi Fangfang [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wang Xiaoxia [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Yang Nianjun [Diamond Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2-13, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)], E-mail: nianjun.yang@iaf.fraunhofer.de

    2009-03-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) coupled with tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium(II)-based end-column electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) has been utilized to detect bisoprolol in drugs and tablets after its separation from metoprolol. Tetrahydrofuran was used as an additive in the running buffer to obtain the absolute ECL peak of bisoprolol. Bisoprolol reacts as a co-reactant in tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium(II) ECL system. Under the optimized experimental conditions, bisoprolol was separated successfully and efficiently from metoprolol and other co-existed materials in tablets and urine samples. The ECL intensity of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium(II)-bisoprolol-based system is linear with the concentration of bisoprolol from 1.5 {mu}M to 0.3 mM with a detection limit of 0.3 {mu}M. Relative standard derivations of the ECL intensity are 2.58% for the detection of 15 {mu}M bisoprolol. This method is a simple, rapid, selective, and sensitive. It was applied successfully for the monitoring of bisoprolol in market available tablets and human urine samples.

  12. Electrochemical behavior of ruthenium-hexacyanoferrate modified glassy carbon electrode and catalytic activity towards ethanol electro oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Wendell M.; Marques, Aldalea L.B., E-mail: aldalea.ufma@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica Tecnologica; Cardoso, William S.; Marques, Edmar P.; Bezerra, Cicero W.B. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Departamento de Qumica; Ferreira, Antonio Ap. P. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Song, Chaojie; Zhang, Jiujun [Energy, Mining and Environment Portfolio, National Research Council of Canada, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    Ruthenium-based hexacyanoferrate (RuHCF) thin film modified glassy carbon electrode was prepared by drop evaporation method. The RuHCF modified electrode exhibited four redox couples in strong acidic solution (pH 1.5) attributed to Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-} ion and three ruthenium forms (Ru(II), Ru(III) and Ru(IV)), characteristic of ruthenium oxide compounds. The modified electrode displayed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards ethanol oxidation in the potential region where electrochemical processes Ru(III)-O-Ru(IV) and Ru(IV)-O-Ru(VI) occur. Impedance spectroscopy data indicated that the charge transfer resistance decreased with the increase of the applied potential and ethanol concentration, indicating the use of the RuHCF modified electrode as an ethanol sensor. Under optimized conditions, the sensor responded linearly and rapidly to ethanol concentration between 0.03 and 0.4 mol L{sup -1} with a limit of detection of 0.76 mmol L{sup -1}, suggesting an adequate sensitivity in ethanol analyses. (author)

  13. A simple and selective spectrophotometric flow injection determination of trace amounts of ruthenium by catalytic oxidation of safranin-O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei, Behzad [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-84111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: rezaei@cc.iut.ac.ir; Keyvanfard, Mohsen [Faculty of Science, Majlesi Campus, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-03-01

    In this work, a simple, selective and rapid flow injection method has been developed for determination of ruthenium. The method is based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of safranin-O by metaperiodate. The reaction was monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring safranin-O absorbance at {lambda}{sub max} = 521. The reagents and manifold variables, which have influences on the sensitivity, were investigated and the optimum conditions were established. The optimized conditions made it possible to determine ruthenium in the ranges of 0.4-20.0 ng/mL ({delta}A = 0.2819C{sub Ru} + 1.1840) and 20.0-100.0 ng/mL ({delta}A = 0.0984C{sub Ru} + 7.9391) with a detection limit of 0.095 ng/mL and a sample rate of 30 {+-} 5 samples/h. Relative standard deviation for the five replicate measurements was less than 1.84%. The proposed method has been successfully applied for analysis of ultra trace amounts of ruthenium in real samples.

  14. A simple and selective spectrophotometric flow injection determination of trace amounts of ruthenium by catalytic oxidation of safranin-O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezaei, Behzad; Keyvanfard, Mohsen

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a simple, selective and rapid flow injection method has been developed for determination of ruthenium. The method is based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of safranin-O by metaperiodate. The reaction was monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring safranin-O absorbance at λ max = 521. The reagents and manifold variables, which have influences on the sensitivity, were investigated and the optimum conditions were established. The optimized conditions made it possible to determine ruthenium in the ranges of 0.4-20.0 ng/mL (ΔA = 0.2819C Ru + 1.1840) and 20.0-100.0 ng/mL (ΔA = 0.0984C Ru + 7.9391) with a detection limit of 0.095 ng/mL and a sample rate of 30 ± 5 samples/h. Relative standard deviation for the five replicate measurements was less than 1.84%. The proposed method has been successfully applied for analysis of ultra trace amounts of ruthenium in real samples

  15. Ruthenium porphyrin-induced photodamage in bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoeva, Vanya; Siksjø, Monica; Sæterbø, Kristin G; Melø, Thor Bernt; Bjørkøy, Astrid; Lindgren, Mikael; Gederaas, Odrun A

    2016-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive treatment for solid malignant and flat tumors. Light activated sensitizers catalyze photochemical reactions that produce reactive oxygen species which can cause cancer cell death. In this work we investigated the photophysical properties of the photosensitizer ruthenium(II) porphyrin (RuP), along with its PDT efficiency onto rat bladder cancer cells (AY27). Optical spectroscopy verified that RuP is capable to activate singlet oxygen via blue and red absorption bands and inter system crossing (ISC) to the triplet state. In vitro experiments on AY27 indicated increased photo-toxicity of RuP (20μM, 18h incubation) after cell illumination (at 435nm), as a function of blue light exposure. Cell survival fraction was significantly reduced to 14% after illumination of 20μM RuP with 15.6J/cm(2), whereas the "dark toxicity" of 20μM RuP was 17%. Structural and morphological changes of cells were observed, due to RuP accumulation, as well as light-dependent cell death was recorded by confocal microscopy. Flow cytometry verified that PDT-RuP (50μM) triggered significant photo-induced cellular destruction with a photoxicity of (93%±0.9%). Interestingly, the present investigation of RuP-PDT showed that the dominating mode of cell death is necrosis. RuP "dark toxicity" compared to the conventional chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin was higher, both evaluated by the MTT assay (24h). In conclusion, the present investigation shows that RuP with or without photoactivation induces cell death of bladder cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Method of removing clogging materials due to ruthenium precipitates and sealing them in device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshikawa, Tadahiro; Sasahira, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    In a facility, such as a reprocessing facility, for processing a solution containing a great amount of ruthenium, precipitates due to evaporated ruthenium and cooled NO x are brought into contact with each other to decompose the precipitates due to the evaporated ruthenium. Precipitates due to ruthenium evaporated from the solution are reacted with cooled NO x , and the precipitates of ruthenium are decomposed and returned to the solution in the form of extremely fine particles together with recycling flow from the inner wall of the device. Since the precipitates of ruthenium returned to the solution are stable, they are no more evaporated and precipitated on the inner wall of the device. In the solution processing device having a possibility of clogging, clogging can be prevented and the precipitates of ruthenium can be sealed by decomposing them. (T.M.)

  17. Cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by metallo-intercalator ruthenium(II) complexes containing chloro-substituted phenylazopyridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nhukeaw, Tidarat; Temboot, Pornvichai; Hansongnern, Kanidtha; Ratanaphan, Adisorn

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined by the absence of expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Breast cancers with a BRCA1 mutation are also frequently triple-negative. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapies and known specific molecular targets for this aggressive breast cancer subtype. To address this concern, we have explored the cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells, and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by the ruthenium(II) complexes containing the bidentate ligand, 5-chloro-2-(phenylazo)pyridine. Triple-negative MDA-MB-231, BRCA1-defective HCC1937 and BRCA1-competent MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were treated with ruthenium(II) complexes. The cytoxoxicity of ruthenium-induced breast cancer cells was evaluated by a real time cellular analyzer (RTCA). Cellular uptake of ruthenium complexes was determined by ICP-MS. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed using propidium iodide and Annexin V flow cytometry. The N-terminal BRCA1 RING protein was used for conformational and functional studies using circular dichroism and in vitro ubiquitination. HCC1937 cells were significantly more sensitive to the ruthenium complexes than the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. Treatment demonstrated a higher degree of cytotoxicity than cisplatin against all three cell lines. Most ruthenium atoms were retained in the nuclear compartment, particularly in HCC1937 cells, after 24 h of incubation, and produced a significant block at the G2/M phase. An increased induction of apoptotic cells as well as an upregulation of p53 mRNA was observed in all tested breast cancer cells. It was of interest that BRCA1 mRNA and replication of BRCA1-defective cells were downregulated. Changes in the conformation and binding constants of ruthenium-BRCA1 adducts were observed, causing inactivation of the RING heterodimer BRCA1/BARD1-mediated E3 ubiquitin ligase activity

  18. Determination of oxygen diffusion kinetics during thin film ruthenium oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma Ribera, R., E-mail: r.colomaribera@utwente.nl; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F. [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2015-08-07

    In situ X-ray reflectivity was used to reveal oxygen diffusion kinetics for thermal oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium thin films and accurate determination of activation energies for this process. Diffusion rates in nanometer thin RuO{sub 2} films were found to show Arrhenius behaviour. However, a gradual decrease in diffusion rates was observed with oxide growth, with the activation energy increasing from about 2.1 to 2.4 eV. Further exploration of the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor for diffusion process revealed that oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium joins the class of materials that obey the Meyer-Neldel rule.

  19. Development of a method for analyzing traces of ruthenium in plant materials and determination of the transfer factors soil/plant for ruthenium compounds from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasius, E.; Huth, R.; Neumann, W.

    1988-01-01

    In an artificial humous and sandy soil spiked with 106 Ru as RuO 2 and RuCl 3 , pasture grass was grown under artificial illumination in our laboratory. The amounts of ruthenium taken up by the plants were determined by γ-spectrometry. For open-air investigations with pasture grass, wheat and potatoes inactive ruthenium(III) chloride and ruthenium nitrosylchloride were used. Ruthenium was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after destroying the organic material and concentrating the solution. The concentration and chemical form of the ruthenium exert an unimportant influence on the transfer factor. For the pasture-grass, the stems of wheat and the weed of potatoes it amounts to 0.00005 to 0.0015, for the ear of wheat to about 0.00005. In peeled potatoes there was no ruthenium detectable, therefore the limit of detection leads to a transfer factor ≤ 0.00001. So it is evident that ruthenium is little available for the roots of the plants. In the event of an accident in a nuclear plant the uptake of radioactive ruthenium by roots has only negligible radioecological consequences. This applies even if 50 years of ruthenium enrichment in the soil are assumed. (orig./RB)

  20. Application of the chemical properties of ruthenium to decontamination processes; L'application des proprietes chimiques du ruthenium a des procedes de decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, A.; Berger, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Production de Plutonium, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The chemical properties of ruthenium in the form of an aqueous solution of the nitrate and of organic tributylphosphate solution are reviewed. From this data, some known examples are given: they demonstrate the processes of separation or of elimination of ruthenium from radioactive waste. (authors) [French] Les proprietes chimiques du ruthenium en solutions aqueuses nitriques et en solutions organiques de tributylphosphate, sont passees en revue. A partir de ces donnees, quelques exemples connus sont cites: ils exposent des procedes de separation ou d'elimination du ruthenium de dechets radioactifs. (auteurs)

  1. Application of the chemical properties of ruthenium to decontamination processes; L'application des proprietes chimiques du ruthenium a des procedes de decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, A; Berger, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Production de Plutonium, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The chemical properties of ruthenium in the form of an aqueous solution of the nitrate and of organic tributylphosphate solution are reviewed. From this data, some known examples are given: they demonstrate the processes of separation or of elimination of ruthenium from radioactive waste. (authors) [French] Les proprietes chimiques du ruthenium en solutions aqueuses nitriques et en solutions organiques de tributylphosphate, sont passees en revue. A partir de ces donnees, quelques exemples connus sont cites: ils exposent des procedes de separation ou d'elimination du ruthenium de dechets radioactifs. (auteurs)

  2. Determination of microgramme amounts of osmium and ruthenium based on inhibition of the iodine-azide reaction by their complexes with 6-mercaptopurine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Kurzawa, Z.

    1976-01-01

    A new kinetic method of the determination of microamounts of osmium and ruthenium has been developed. The reaction between sodum azide and iodine induced by 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) was used for this purpose. Under suitable experimental conditions the induction coefficient of 6-MP amounts to 1750+-40. The formed complexes of the metals are stable in the medium containing an excess of azide ions and do not induce the iodine-azide reaction. The method consists in the determination of the 6-MP not bound to the metal. The amount of osmium or ruthenium is then determined from linear relations. Before the determination osmium and ruthenium must be separated from other cations and from each other by distillation as volatile tetroxides. The iodine-azide method is simple, sensitive and does not require any apparatus. The range of the determination is 0.1-5.0 μg in 5 cm 3 of the solution of Os(8) and 0.5-5.0 μg for Ru(8). The error of the determination is +-6.4% and +- 6.1% for osmium and ruthenium, respectively. The time of the determination is 30 minutes not taking into account 2-hour waiting time necessary for the formation of the complexes. (author)

  3. Electro-volatilization of ruthenium in nitric medium: influences of ruthenium species nature and models solutions composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousset, F.

    2004-12-01

    Ruthenium is one of the fission products in the reprocessing of irradiated fuels that requires a specific processing management. Its elimination, upstream by the PUREX process, has been considered. A process, called electro-volatilization, which take advantage of the RuO 4 volatility, has been optimised in the present study. It consists in a continuous electrolysis of ruthenium solutions in order to generate RuO 4 species that is volatilized and easily trapped. This process goes to satisfying ruthenium elimination yields with RuNO(NO 3 ) 3 (H 2 O) 2 synthetic solutions but not with fuel dissolution solutions. Consequently, this work consisted in the speciation studies of dissolved ruthenium species were carried out by simulating fuel solutions produced by hot acid attack of several ruthenium compounds (Ru(0), RuO 2 ,xH 2 O, polymetallic alloy). In parallel with dissolution kinetic studies, the determination of dissolved species was performed using voltammetry, spectrometry and spectro-electrochemistry. The results showed the co-existence of Ru(IV) and RuNO(NO 2 ) 2 (H 2 O) 3 . Although these species are different from synthetic RuNO(NO 3 ) 3 (H 2 O) 2 , their electro-oxidation behaviour are similar. The electro-volatilization tests of these dissolution solutions yielded to comparable results as the synthetic RuNO(NO 3 ) 3 (H 2 O) 2 solutions. Then, complexity increase of models solutions was performed by in-situ generation of nitrous acid during ruthenium dissolution. Nitrous acid showed a catalytic effect on ruthenium dissolution. Its presence goes to quasi exclusively RuNO(NO 2 ) 2 (H 2 O) 3 species. It is also responsible of the strong n-bond formation between Ru 2+ and NO + . In addition, it has been shown that its reducing action on RuO 4 hinders the electro-volatilization process. Mn 2+ and Ce 3+ cations also reveal, but to a lesser extent, an electro-eater behaviour as well as Pu 4+ and Cr 3+ according to the thermodynamics data. These results allow one to

  4. Design of a Free-Ruthenium In2S3 Crystalline Photosensitized Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong Sub Kwak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new type of sulfide-based, solid-state dye material that is sensitive to visible radiation was assessed as a potential replacement for commercial ruthenium complex dyes in a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC assembly. The In2S3 crystals on the surface of the TiO2 bottom blocking layer were grown as a solid-state dye material. Scanning electron microscopy of In2S3 revealed a microsized, 3D-connected sheet-like shape, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction to be a beta-structure. The efficiency of the dye-sensitized solar cells assembled with a layer grown with In2S3 increased with increasing In2S3 mole concentrations to 0.05 M (1.02% but decreased at concentrations greater than 0.6~0.8%. This suggests that crystalline In2S3 acts as a dye sensitized to visible radiation, but the short-circuit current density is too low compared to the commercially available ruthenium dye. This suggests that In2S3 crystals did not grow densely but were bulk-grown with large pores, resulting in a smaller amount of In2S3 per unit area. Two IPCE curves were observed, which were assigned to TiO2 and In2S3, meaning that the TiO2 surfaces were covered completely with In2S3 crystals. The exposure of TiO2 eventually leads to a reaction with the electrolytes, resulting in lower quantum efficiency.

  5. The trans influence in mer-trichloronitridobis(triphenylarsine)ruthenium(VI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Magnus; Bendix, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    The title compound, mer-[RuCl(3)N(C(18)H(15)As)(2)], is the first structurally characterized example of a nitride complex in which ruthenium is six-coordinated to monodentate ligands only. The Ru[triple-bond]N bond length [1.6161 (15) A] is relatively long, and the trans influence of the nitride...

  6. Polystyrene with pendant mixed functional ruthenium(II)-terpyridine complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heller, M.; Schubert, U.S.

    2002-01-01

    A vinyl substituted 2,2:6,2-terpyridine and a mixed, bifunctional ruthenium(II)-terpyridine complex bearing a vinyl and a hydroxymethyl group are utilized as comonomers for radical copolymerization with styrene. The resulting polymers are characterized by means of UV-vis spectroscopy and gel

  7. Electroerosion method for preparation of saturated solutions of ruthenium hydroxochloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhalev, V.A.; Andrianov, G.A.; Zhadanov, B.V.; Ryazanov, A.I.

    1987-01-01

    A pilot plant for carrying out electroerosion processes using pulse current of high unit power is developed. The solution process of metallic Ru in concentrated HCl is investigated. The possibility of preparation of ruthenium hydroxochloride solutions of 300 g/l concentration is established; it gives the possibility of Ru solution under conditions similar to the process of salting out

  8. A new approach to synthesize supported ruthenium phosphides for hydrodesulfurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qingfang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Yin, Xiaoqian; Zhou, Linxi; Zhang, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We bring out a new method to synthesize noble metal phosphides at low temperature. • Both RuP and Ru_2P were synthesized using triphenylphosphine as phosphorus sources. • Ru_2P was the better active phase for HDS than RuP and metal Ru. • RuP/SiO_2 prepared by new method had better HDS activity to that by TPR method. - Abstract: Supported noble metal ruthenium phosphides were synthesized by one-step H_2-thermal treatment method using triphenylphosphine (TPP) as phosphorus sources at low temperatures. Two phosphides RuP and Ru_2P can be prepared by this method via varying the molar ratio of metal salt and TPP. The as-prepared phosphides were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), low-temperature N_2 adsorption, CO chemisorption and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). The supported ruthenium phosphides prepared by new method and conventional method together with contradistinctive metallic ruthenium were evaluated in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT). The catalytic results showed that metal-rich Ru_2P was the better active phase for HDS than RuP and metal Ru. Besides this, ruthenium phosphide catalyst prepared by new method exhibited superior HDS activity to that prepared by conventional method.

  9. A new approach to synthesize supported ruthenium phosphides for hydrodesulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qingfang [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Water Environment and Resources, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wang, Zhiqiang [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Water Environment and Resources, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Yin, Xiaoqian; Zhou, Linxi [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhang, Minghui, E-mail: zhangmh@nankai.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Kashgar University, Kashgar 844006 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • We bring out a new method to synthesize noble metal phosphides at low temperature. • Both RuP and Ru{sub 2}P were synthesized using triphenylphosphine as phosphorus sources. • Ru{sub 2}P was the better active phase for HDS than RuP and metal Ru. • RuP/SiO{sub 2} prepared by new method had better HDS activity to that by TPR method. - Abstract: Supported noble metal ruthenium phosphides were synthesized by one-step H{sub 2}-thermal treatment method using triphenylphosphine (TPP) as phosphorus sources at low temperatures. Two phosphides RuP and Ru{sub 2}P can be prepared by this method via varying the molar ratio of metal salt and TPP. The as-prepared phosphides were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), low-temperature N{sub 2} adsorption, CO chemisorption and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). The supported ruthenium phosphides prepared by new method and conventional method together with contradistinctive metallic ruthenium were evaluated in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT). The catalytic results showed that metal-rich Ru{sub 2}P was the better active phase for HDS than RuP and metal Ru. Besides this, ruthenium phosphide catalyst prepared by new method exhibited superior HDS activity to that prepared by conventional method.

  10. Determination of oxygen diffusion kinetics during thin film ruthenium oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coloma Ribera, R.; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Yakshin, Andrey; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    In situ X-ray reflectivity was used to reveal oxygen diffusion kinetics for thermal oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium thin films and accurate determination of activation energies for this process. Diffusion rates in nanometer thin RuO2 films were found to show Arrhenius behaviour. However, a

  11. An XPS study on ruthenium compounds and catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, C.L.; Ragaini, V.; Cattania, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    The binding energy (BE) of the relevant peaks of several ruthenium compounds have been measured with a monochromatic small spot XPS. The BE of the 3d 5/2 level of ruthenium is in the range 279.91-282.88 eV. The variation of BE is due either to the variation of the oxidation state or to the different counter-ion. A series of catalysts with varying amounts of ruthenium supported on alumina and prepared using different precursors was also analyzed. The presence of more ruthenium species other than the metal was observed. On the basis of the values previously obtained on unsupported compounds, the species with higher BE were assigned to oxides. On all the samples prepared from RuCl 3 , an additional peak at a very high BE (283.79 eV) has been observed. This peak is related to the presence of chlorine on the surface: it is suggested that it is related to a charge transfer interaction. The influence of this species on the CO reactivity in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction is discussed. (orig.)

  12. Oxidation of ruthenium thin films using atomic oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, A.P.; Bogan, J.; Brady, A.; Hughes, G.

    2015-12-31

    In this study, the use of atomic oxygen to oxidise ruthenium thin films is assessed. Atomic layer deposited (ALD) ruthenium thin films (~ 3 nm) were exposed to varying amounts of atomic oxygen and the results were compared to the impact of exposures to molecular oxygen. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal substantial oxidation of metallic ruthenium films to RuO{sub 2} at exposures as low as ~ 10{sup 2} L at 575 K when atomic oxygen was used. Higher exposures of molecular oxygen resulted in no metal oxidation highlighting the benefits of using atomic oxygen to form RuO{sub 2}. Additionally, the partial oxidation of these ruthenium films occurred at temperatures as low as 293 K (room temperature) in an atomic oxygen environment. - Highlights: • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the oxidation of Ru thin films • Oxidation of Ru thin films using atomic oxygen • Comparison between atomic oxygen and molecular oxygen treatments on Ru thin films • Fully oxidised RuO{sub 2} thin films formed with low exposures to atomic oxygen.

  13. The use of ruthenium in various fields of industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinitsin, N.M.

    1990-03-01

    Metallic ruthenium, its alloys, and compounds with other metals have a number of valuable and specific properties which allow the usage of ruthenium in various fields of modern technology, which is described here. In the atomic technology, Ru can be used in the building of reactors as a material of construction since its isotopes don't possess a high neutron capture cross section. Ruthenium is used for the preparation of γ- and β-ray emission sources. Isotopes Ru-103 and Ru-106 are widely used as tracers. They are successfully used for the monitoring of production, for the development of new technological and analytical methods of the extraction of Ru, for the cleansing of other valuable metals from Ru, for the monitoring of the thickness of Ru microfilm on the substrate, and for the monitoring of Ru losses in various processes. In the nuclear reactor, during the process of uranium and plutonium decay, large amounts of stable Ru isotopes are formed together with radioactive isotopes. In such a manner, a nuclear reactor can supply Ru. Special attention must be paid to the usage of direct coordination Ru compounds. Ru and its compounds possess a large number of very valuable properties, many of the secrets of Ru must still be discovered. It can be presumed that the demand for ruthenium will grow in the forthcoming years and the range and volume of its applications will increase

  14. Ruthenium based redox flow battery for solar energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, Mohammed Harun; Roberts, Edward Pelham Lindfield; Bae, Chulheung; Saleem, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Undivided redox flow battery employing porous graphite felt electrodes was used. → Ruthenium acetylacetonate dissolved in acetonitrile was the electrolyte. → Charge/discharge conditions were determined for both 0.02 M and 0.1 M electrolytes. → Optimum power output of 0.180 W was also determined for 0.1 M electrolyte. → 55% voltage efficiency was obtained when battery was full of electrolytes. -- Abstract: The technical performance for the operation of a stand alone redox flow battery system for solar energy storage is presented. An undivided reactor configuration has been employed along with porous graphite felt electrodes and ruthenium acetylacetonate as electrolyte in acetonitrile solvent. Limiting current densities are determined for concentrations of 0.02 M and 0.1 M ruthenium acetylacetonate. Based on these, operating conditions for 0.02 M ruthenium acetylacetonate are determined as charging current density of 7 mA/cm 2 , charge electrolyte superficial velocity of 0.0072 cm/s (through the porous electrodes), discharge current density of 2 mA/cm 2 and discharge electrolyte superficial velocity of 0.0045 cm/s. An optimum power output of 35 mW is also obtained upon discharge at 2.1 mA/cm 2 . With an increase in the concentration of ruthenium species from 0.02 M to 0.1 M, the current densities and power output are higher by a factor of five approximately (at same superficial velocities) due to higher mass transport phenomenon. Moreover at 0.02 M concentration the voltage efficiency is better for battery full of electrolytes prior to charging (52.1%) in comparison to an empty battery (40.5%) due to better mass transport phenomenon. Voltage efficiencies are higher as expected at concentrations of 0.1 M ruthenium acetylacetonate (55% when battery is full of electrolytes and 48% when empty) showing that the all-ruthenium redox flow battery has some promise for future applications in solar energy storage. Some improvements for the

  15. Recommendation of ruthenium source for sludge batch flowsheet studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodham, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-13

    Included herein is a preliminary analysis of previously-generated data from sludge batches 7a, 7b, 8, and 9 sludge simulant and real-waste testing, performed to recommend a form of ruthenium for future sludge batch simulant testing under the nitric-formic flowsheet. Focus is given to reactions present in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank cycle, given that this cycle historically produces the most changes in chemical composition during Chemical Process Cell processing. Data is presented and analyzed for several runs performed under the nitric-formic flowsheet, with consideration given to effects on the production of hydrogen gas, nitrous oxide gas, consumption of formate, conversion of nitrite to nitrate, and the removal and recovery of mercury during processing. Additionally, a brief discussion is given to the effect of ruthenium source selection under the nitric-glycolic flowsheet. An analysis of data generated from scaled demonstration testing, sludge batch 9 qualification testing, and antifoam degradation testing under the nitric-glycolic flowsheet is presented. Experimental parameters of interest under the nitric-glycolic flowsheet include N2O production, glycolate destruction, conversion of glycolate to formate and oxalate, and the conversion of nitrite to nitrate. To date, the number of real-waste experiments that have been performed under the nitric-glycolic flowsheet is insufficient to provide a complete understanding of the effects of ruthenium source selection in simulant experiments with regard to fidelity to real-waste testing. Therefore, a determination of comparability between the two ruthenium sources as employed under the nitric-glycolic flowsheet is made based on available data in order to inform ruthenium source selection for future testing under the nitric-glycolic flowsheet.

  16. Dye Sensitized Solar Cell, DSSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongsatorn Amornpitoksuk

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available A dye sensitized solar cell is a new type of solar cell. The operating system of this solar cell type is similar to plant’s photosynthesis process. The sensitizer is available for absorption light and transfer electrons to nanocrystalline metal oxide semiconductor. The ruthenium(II complexes with polypyridyl ligands are usually used as the sensitizers in solar cell. At the present time, the complex of [Ru(2,2',2'’-(COOH3- terpy(NCS3] is the most efficient sensitizer. The total photon to current conversion efficiency was approximately 10% at AM = 1.5.

  17. Synthesis of phosphonic acid derivatized bipyridine ligands and their ruthenium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Michael R; Concepcion, Javier J; Glasson, Christopher R K; Fang, Zhen; Lapides, Alexander M; Ashford, Dennis L; Templeton, Joseph L; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-11-04

    Water-stable, surface-bound chromophores, catalysts, and assemblies are an essential element in dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells for the generation of solar fuels by water splitting and CO2 reduction to CO, other oxygenates, or hydrocarbons. Phosphonic acid derivatives provide a basis for stable chemical binding on metal oxide surfaces. We report here the efficient synthesis of 4,4'-bis(diethylphosphonomethyl)-2,2'-bipyridine and 4,4'-bis(diethylphosphonate)-2,2'-bipyridine, as well as the mono-, bis-, and tris-substituted ruthenium complexes, [Ru(bpy)2(Pbpy)](2+), [Ru(bpy)(Pbpy)2](2+), [Ru(Pbpy)3](2+), [Ru(bpy)2(CPbpy)](2+), [Ru(bpy)(CPbpy)2](2+), and [Ru(CPbpy)3](2+) [bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; Pbpy = 4,4'-bis(phosphonic acid)-2,2'-bipyridine; CPbpy = 4,4'-bis(methylphosphonic acid)-2,2'-bipyridine].

  18. Nonlinear optical properties of systems based on ruthenium(II) tetra-15-crown-5-phthalocyaninate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishina, A.D.; Gorbunova, Yu.G.; Enakieva, Yu.Yu.; Krivenko, T.V.; Savel'ev, V.V.; Vannikov, A.V.; Tsivadze, A.Yu.

    2008-01-01

    The third-order nonlinear optical properties of the ruthenium (II) complex with tetra-15-crown-5-phthalocyanine and axially coordinated triethylenediamine molecules (R 4 Pc)Ru(TED) 2 were analyzed by means of the z-scanning technique. A solution of (R 4 Pc)Ru(TED) 2 in tetrachloroethane was exposed to nanosecond laser pulses at a wavelength of 1064 nm. It was found that the third-order molecular polarizability of the Ru(II) complex is 4.5 x 10 -32 cm 4 /C (esu). The polarizability per molecule increases by a factor of 3.6 when the single molecule occurs in a supramolecular assembly of (R 4 Pc)Ru(TED) 2 complexes. The photoelectric and photorefractive properties at 1064 nm of polymer composites, determined by the supramolecular assemblies that exhibits optical absorption and photoelectric sensitivity in the near IR region, are reported [ru

  19. Study on volatilization mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide from nitrosyl ruthenium nitrate by using mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Tetsuya, E-mail: tkato@criepi.denken.or.jp [Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Usami, Tsuyoshi; Tsukada, Takeshi [Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Shibata, Yuki; Kodama, Takashi [Safety Technology Division, Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    In a cooling malfunction accident of a high-level liquid waste (HLLW) tank, behavior of ruthenium (Ru) attracts much attention, since Ru could be oxidized to a volatile chemical form in the boiling and drying of HLLW, and part of radioactive Ru can potentially be released to the environment. In this study, nitrosyl Ru nitrate (Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}) dissolved in nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), which is commonly contained in a simulated HLLW, was dried and heated up to 723 K, and the evolved gas was introduced into a mass spectrometer. The well-known volatile species, ruthenium tetroxide (RuO{sub 4}) was detected in a temperature range between 390 K and 500 K with the peak top around 440 K. Various gases such as HNO{sub 3}, nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitrogen monoxide (NO) also evolved due to evaporation of the nitric acid and decomposition of the nitrate ions. The ion current of RuO{sub 4} seems to increase with the increasing decomposition of nitrate, while the evaporation of HNO{sub 3} decreases. More volatilization of RuO{sub 4} was observed from the HNO{sub 3} solution containing not only Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} but also cerium nitrate (Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}·6H{sub 2}O) which was added for extra supply of nitrate ion, compared with that from the HNO{sub 3} solution containing only Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. These experimental results suggest that Ru could be oxidized to form RuO{sub 4} by the nitrate ion as well as HNO{sub 3}. - Graphical abstract: Ion current intensities of the mass numbers corresponding to O, NO, O{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3}, and RuO{sub 4} obtained in mass spectrometry for dried nitric acid solution containing Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. Heating rate: 5 K min{sup −1}, sample solution weight: 6.61 mg, contained Ru weight: 0.56 mg. The ion current of RuO{sub 4} increases with the increasing decomposition of nitrate, while the evaporation of HNO{sub 3} decreases. - Highlights: • Nitrosyl Ru nitrate (Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}) dissolved in

  20. C-N bond cleavage of anilines by a (salen)ruthenium(VI) nitrido complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wai-Lun; Xie, Jianhui; Pan, Yi; Lam, William W Y; Kwong, Hoi-Ki; Ip, Kwok-Wa; Yiu, Shek-Man; Lau, Kai-Chung; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2013-04-17

    We report experimental and computational studies of the facile oxidative C-N bond cleavage of anilines by a (salen)ruthenium(VI) nitrido complex. We provide evidence that the initial step involves nucleophilic attack of aniline at the nitrido ligand of the ruthenium complex, which is followed by proton and electron transfer to afford a (salen)ruthenium(II) diazonium intermediate. This intermediate then undergoes unimolecular decomposition to generate benzene and N2.

  1. Ruthenium(III Chloride Catalyzed Acylation of Alcohols, Phenols, and Thiols in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhong Cai

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Ruthenium(III chloride-catalyzed acylation of a variety of alcohols, phenols, and thiols was achieved in high yields under mild conditions (room temperature in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]. The ionic liquid and ruthenium catalyst can be recycled at least 10 times. Our system not only solves the basic problem of ruthenium catalyst reuse, but also avoids the use of volatile acetonitrile as solvent.

  2. Synthesis of PVP-stabilized ruthenium colloids with low boiling point alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqing; Yu, Jiulong; Niu, Haijun; Liu, Hanfan

    2007-09-15

    A route to the preparation of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP)-stabilized ruthenium colloids by refluxing ruthenium(III) chloride in low boiling point alcohols was developed. Deep purple colloids with shuttle-like ruthenium particles were also synthesized. XPS measurement verified the nanoparticles were in the metallic state. The morphology of metal nanoparticles was characterized by UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, TEM and XRD.

  3. Heteroleptic and Homoleptic Iron(III Spin-Crossover Complexes; Effects of Ligand Substituents and Intermolecular Interactions between Co-Cation/Anion and the Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasinee Phonsri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The structural and magnetic properties of a range of new iron(III bis-tridentate Schiff base complexes are described with emphasis on how intermolecular structural interactions influence spin states and spin crossover (SCO in these d5 materials. Three pairs of complexes were investigated. The first pair are the neutral, heteroleptic complexes [Fe(3-OMe-SalEen(thsa] 1 and [Fe(3-MeOSalEen(3-EtOthsa] 2, where 3-R-HSalEen = (E-2-(((2-(ethylaminoethyliminomethyl-6-R-phenol and 3-R-H2thsa = thiosemicarbazone-3-R-salicylaldimine. They display spin transitions above room temperature. However, 2 shows incomplete and gradual change, while SCO in 1 is complete and more abrupt. Lower cooperativity in 2 is ascribed to the lack of π–π interactions, compared to 1. The second pair, cationic species [Fe(3-EtOSalEen2]NO3 3 and [Fe(3-EtOSalEen2]Cl 4 differ only in the counter-anion. They show partial SCO above room temperature with 3 displaying a sharp transition at 343 K. Weak hydrogen bonds from cation to Cl− probably lead to weaker cooperativity in 4. The last pair, CsH2O[Fe(3-MeO-thsa2] 5 and Cs(H2O2[Fe(5-NO2-thsa2] 6, are anionic homoleptic chelates that have different substituents on the salicylaldiminate rings of thsa2−. The Cs cations bond to O atoms of water and the ligands, in unusual ways thus forming attractive 1D and 3D networks in 5 and 6, respectively, and 5 remains HS (high spin at all temperatures while 6 remains LS (low spin. Comparisons are made to other literature examples of Cs salts of [Fe(5-R-thsa2]− (R = H and Br.

  4. Nonenzymatic amperometric sensor for ascorbic acid based on hollow gold/ruthenium nanoshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Ara; Kang, Minkyung; Cha, Areum; Jang, Hye Su [Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jun Ho [Department of Chemistry, Daegu University, Gyeongsan 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Nam-Suk [National Center for Nanomaterials Technology (NCNT), Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung Hwa [Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Youngmi, E-mail: youngmilee@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chongmok, E-mail: cmlee@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • We synthesized hollow gold/ruthenium (hAu–Ru) nanoshells for ascorbic acid sensing. • The hAu–Ru nanoshells showed sensitivity of 426 μA mM⁻¹ cm⁻² for ascorbic acid. • Good selectivity against glucose, uric acid, dopamine, 4-acetamidophenol, and NADH. • The linear dynamic range appeared from zero to 2.0 mM (R = 0.9995). • Response time (1.6 s) and low detection limit (2.2 μM) were obtained at pH 7.40. Abstract: We report a new nonenzymatic amperometric detection of ascorbic acid (AA) using a glassy carbon (GC) disk electrode modified with hollow gold/ruthenium (hAu–Ru) nanoshells, which exhibited decent sensing characteristics. The hAu–Ru nanoshells were prepared by the incorporation of Ru on hollow gold (hAu) nanoshells from Co nanoparticle templates, which enabled AA selectivity against glucose without aid of enzyme or membrane. The structure and electrocatalytic activities of the hAu–Ru catalysts were characterized by spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. The hAu–Ru loaded on GC electrode (hAu–Ru/GC) showed sensitivity of 426 μA mM⁻¹ cm⁻² (normalized to the GC disk area) for the linear dynamic range of <5 μM to 2 mM AA at physiological pH. The response time and detection limit were 1.6 s and 2.2 μM, respectively. Furthermore, the hAu–Ru/GC electrode displayed remarkable selectivity for ascorbic acid over all potential biological interferents, including glucose, uric acid (UA), dopamine (DA), 4-acetamidophenol (AP), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which could be especially good for biological sensing.

  5. Nonenzymatic amperometric sensor for ascorbic acid based on hollow gold/ruthenium nanoshells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Ara; Kang, Minkyung; Cha, Areum; Jang, Hye Su; Shim, Jun Ho; Lee, Nam-Suk; Kim, Myung Hwa; Lee, Youngmi; Lee, Chongmok

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We synthesized hollow gold/ruthenium (hAu–Ru) nanoshells for ascorbic acid sensing. • The hAu–Ru nanoshells showed sensitivity of 426 μA mM −1 cm −2 for ascorbic acid. • Good selectivity against glucose, uric acid, dopamine, 4-acetamidophenol, and NADH. • The linear dynamic range appeared from zero to 2.0 mM (R = 0.9995). • Response time (1.6 s) and low detection limit (2.2 μM) were obtained at pH 7.40. - Abstract: We report a new nonenzymatic amperometric detection of ascorbic acid (AA) using a glassy carbon (GC) disk electrode modified with hollow gold/ruthenium (hAu–Ru) nanoshells, which exhibited decent sensing characteristics. The hAu–Ru nanoshells were prepared by the incorporation of Ru on hollow gold (hAu) nanoshells from Co nanoparticle templates, which enabled AA selectivity against glucose without aid of enzyme or membrane. The structure and electrocatalytic activities of the hAu–Ru catalysts were characterized by spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. The hAu–Ru loaded on GC electrode (hAu–Ru/GC) showed sensitivity of 426 μA mM −1 cm −2 (normalized to the GC disk area) for the linear dynamic range of <5 μM to 2 mM AA at physiological pH. The response time and detection limit were 1.6 s and 2.2 μM, respectively. Furthermore, the hAu–Ru/GC electrode displayed remarkable selectivity for ascorbic acid over all potential biological interferents, including glucose, uric acid (UA), dopamine (DA), 4-acetamidophenol (AP), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which could be especially good for biological sensing

  6. Experiments on the behaviour of ruthenium in air ingress accidents - Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Backman, U.; Auvinen, A.; Ziliacus, R.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2006-02-01

    During routine nuclear reactor operation, ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel in relatively high concentrations. In an accident in a nuclear power plant it is possible that air gets into contact with the reactor core. In this case ruthenium can oxidise and form volatile ruthenium species, RuO3 and RuO4, which can be transported into the containment. In order to estimate the amount of gaseous ruthenium species it is of interest to know, how it is formed and how it behaves. In our experiments RuO2 is exposed to diverse oxidising atmospheres at a relatively high temperature. In this report, the experimental system for the ruthenium behaviour study is presented. Also preliminary results from experiments carried out during year 2005 are reported. In the experiments gaseous ruthenium oxides were produced in a furnace. Upon cooling RuO2 aerosol particles were formed in the system. They were removed with plane filters from the gas stream. Gaseous ruthenium species were trapped in 1M NaOH-water solution, which is capable of trapping RuO4 totally. Ruthenium in the solution was filtered for analysis. The determination of ruthenium both in aerosol and in liquid filters was made using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). In order to close mass balance and achieve better time resolution three experiment using radioactive tracer were carried out. (au)

  7. Ruthenium determination in new composite materials by coulometric titration with generated iron(2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butakova, N.A.; Oganesyan, L.B.

    1983-01-01

    A coulometric technique is developed for ruthenium (4) titration with generated iron (2) in a mixture of hydrochloric-, sulfuric- and phosphoric acids with potentiometric and biammetric indication of the final titration point. Bi (3), Pd (2), Nb (5), Pt (4) Pb (2), Rh (3) do not interfere with the titration. Together with Ru (4) titrated are Ir (4), V (5), Au (3). The method is applied to analyze commercial samples of ruthenium dioxides, lead- and bismuth ruthenites, ruthenium pentafluorides containing 30-80% of ruthenium. The Ssub(r) values do not exceed 0.002

  8. Surface and sub-surface thermal oxidation of thin ruthenium films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma Ribera, R.; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F. [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Kokke, S.; Zoethout, E. [FOM Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER), P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2014-09-29

    A mixed 2D (film) and 3D (nano-column) growth of ruthenium oxide has been experimentally observed for thermally oxidized polycrystalline ruthenium thin films. Furthermore, in situ x-ray reflectivity upon annealing allowed the detection of 2D film growth as two separate layers consisting of low density and high density oxides. Nano-columns grow at the surface of the low density oxide layer, with the growth rate being limited by diffusion of ruthenium through the formed oxide film. Simultaneously, with the growth of the columns, sub-surface high density oxide continues to grow limited by diffusion of oxygen or ruthenium through the oxide film.

  9. Experiments on the behaviour of ruthenium in air ingress accidents - Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Backman, U.; Auvinen, A.; Ziliacus, R.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland)

    2006-02-15

    During routine nuclear reactor operation, ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel in relatively high concentrations. In an accident in a nuclear power plant it is possible that air gets into contact with the reactor core. In this case ruthenium can oxidise and form volatile ruthenium species, RuO3 and RuO4, which can be transported into the containment. In order to estimate the amount of gaseous ruthenium species it is of interest to know, how it is formed and how it behaves. In our experiments RuO2 is exposed to diverse oxidising atmospheres at a relatively high temperature. In this report, the experimental system for the ruthenium behaviour study is presented. Also preliminary results from experiments carried out during year 2005 are reported. In the experiments gaseous ruthenium oxides were produced in a furnace. Upon cooling RuO2 aerosol particles were formed in the system. They were removed with plane filters from the gas stream. Gaseous ruthenium species were trapped in 1M NaOH-water solution, which is capable of trapping RuO4 totally. Ruthenium in the solution was filtered for analysis. The determination of ruthenium both in aerosol and in liquid filters was made using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). In order to close mass balance and achieve better time resolution three experiment using radioactive tracer were carried out. (au)

  10. Evaluation of radiolabeled ruthenium compounds as tumor-localizing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Richards, P.; Meinken, G.E.; Som, P.; Atkins, H.L.; Larson, S.M.; Grunbaum, Z.; Rasey, J.S.; Clarke, M.H.; Dowling, M.

    1979-01-01

    This work introduces a new class of radiopharmaceuticals based on ruthenium-97. The excellent physical properties of Ru-97, the high chemical reactivity of Ru, the potential antitumor activity of several Ru coordination compounds, and BLIP production of Ru-97, provide a unique combination for the application of this isotope in nuclear oncology. A systematic study was undertaken on the synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of a number of ruthenium-labeled compounds. In a variety of animal tumor models, several compounds show considerable promise as tumor-localizing agents when compared to gallium-67 citrate. The compounds studied (with Ru in different oxidation states) include ionic Ru, a number of hydrophilic and lipophilic chelates, and various ammine derivatives

  11. Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloy films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin Jinhong; Waheed, Abdul; Winkenwerder, Wyatt A.; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Agapiou, Kyriacos; Jones, Richard A.; Hwang, Gyeong S.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition growth of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus films on SiO 2 containing ∼ 15% phosphorus is reported. cis-Ruthenium(II)dihydridotetrakis-(trimethylphosphine), cis-RuH 2 (PMe 3 ) 4 (Me = CH 3 ) was used at growth temperatures ranging from 525 to 575 K. Both Ru and P are zero-valent. The films are metastable, becoming increasingly more polycrystalline upon annealing to 775 and 975 K. Surface studies illustrate that demethylation is quite efficient near 560 K. Precursor adsorption at 135 K or 210 K and heating reveal the precursor undergoes a complex decomposition process in which the hydride and trimethylphosphine ligands are lost at temperatures as low at 280 K. Phosphorus and its manner of incorporation appear responsible for the amorphous-like character. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented to suggest the local structure in the films and the causes for phosphorus stabilizing the amorphous phase

  12. Ruthenium Complexes as NO Donors for Vascular Relaxation Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Galvão de Lima

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO donors are substances that can release NO. Vascular relaxation induction is among the several functions of NO, and the administration of NO donors is a pharmacological alternative to treat hypertension. This review will focus on the physicochemical description of ruthenium-derived NO donor complexes that release NO via reduction and light stimulation. In particular, we will discuss the complexes synthesized by our research group over the last ten years, and we will focus on the vasodilation and arterial pressure control elicited by these complexes. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC and potassium channels are the main targets of the NO species released from the inorganic compounds. We will consider the importance of the chemical structure of the ruthenium complexes and their vascular effects.

  13. Committee's report on ruthenium fall-out incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, C.J.; Crawford, J.H.; Livingston, R.; Ritchie, R.H.; Rupp, A.F.; Taylor, E.H.

    1983-07-01

    Investigations of the fall-out incident of November 11 and 12, 1959, by responsible parties (Health Physics Division and Operations Division personnel) established beyond reasonable doubt that the incident had its origin in the expulsion of particles, heavily contaminated with ruthenium, which had been detached from the walls of the electric fan housing and ducts in the off-gas system associated with the brick stack. All available evidence indicates that the particles were loosened during maintenance work on the exhaust damper and the bearings of the electric fan and were carried up the stack in two bursts as particulate fall-out when this fan was put back into service. Radiographic and chemical analysis showed the activity to be almost entirely ruthenium (Ru 106 ) and its daughter rhodium (Rh 106 ) with very little, if any, strontium being present. This report summarizes the findings and sets forth the conclusions and recommendations of the Committee asked to investigate the incident

  14. The Biological Side of Water-Soluble Arene Ruthenium Assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Therrien, Bruno; Furrer, Julien

    2014-01-01

    This review article covers the synthetic strategies, structural aspects, and host-guest properties of ruthenium metalla-assemblies, with a special focus on their use as drug delivery vectors. The two-dimensional metalla-rectangles show interesting host-guest possibilities but seem less appropriate for being used as drug carriers. On the other hand, metalla-prisms allow encapsulation and possible targeted release of bioactive molecules and consequently show some potential as drug delivery vect...

  15. THE SYNTHESIS AND THE REACTIVITY OF ARENE RUTHENIUM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    [RuCl(η6-p-cymene)(η2-dppm)][PF6] ruthenium complexes with C2O4(Me4N)2 in the ... the Service de Microanalyse du CNRS (Vernaison/France). .... Once bonded to the Ru(II), the characterization of the oxalato ligand by infrared .... The 1H NMR spectrum shows signals of the aromatic proton resonances at 5.45 and 5.15,.

  16. Allenylidene Complexes of Ruthenium: Synthesis, Spectroscopy and Electron Transfer Properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Winter, R. F.; Záliš, Stanislav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 248, 15/16 (2004), s. 1565-1583 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/0821; GA MŠk OC D14.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : spectroscopy * allenylidine complexes of ruthenium * electron transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.446, year: 2004

  17. Behaviour of ruthenium (3) bromocomplexes in nonaqueous solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnitskaya, O.V.; Miroshnichenko, I.V.; Pichkov, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    Behaviour of K 3 [RuBr 6 ] · H 2 O and K 3 [Ru 2 Br 9 ] in solutions of dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide is investigated by absorption and ESR spectroscopy. Complexes are shown to be labile in solutions, interact easily with solvents. Formation of ruthenium (3) and (2) bromide-dimethylsulfoxide complexes occurs gradually in DMSO, final product is trans-[Ru(DMSO) 4 Br 2

  18. Role of ligands in controlling the regioselectivity in ruthenium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of Hay and Wadt (LANL2DZ)11 for ruthenium atom and 6-31G(d)12 for other .... C2 atom in 3x/3′ x. To understand the wider role of lig- ands in modulating the regio-selectivity of product for- mation, we have studied the benzoic acid addition to the selected .... at C1 and the localization of electron density in the. M=C double ...

  19. Mechanism of ruthenium dioxide crystallization during high level waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucetta, H.

    2012-01-01

    Ruthenium, arising from the reprocessing of spent uranium oxide fuel, has a low solubility in glass melt. It crystallizes in the form of particles of RuO 2 of acicular or polyhedral morphology dispersed in fission product and actinides waste containment glass. Since the morphology of these particles strongly influences the physico-chemical properties, the knowledge and the control of their mechanism of formation are of major importance. The goal of this work is to determine the chemical reactions responsible for the formation of RuO 2 particles of acicular or polyhedral shape during glass synthesis. Using a simplification approach, the reactions between RuO 2 -NaNO 3 , and more complex calcine RuO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -Na 2 O and a sodium borosilicate glass are studied. In situ scanning electron microscopy and XANES at increasing temperatures are used to follow changes in composition, speciation and morphology of the ruthenium intermediate species. Those compounds are thoroughly characterised by SEM, XRD, HRTEM, and ruthenium K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. This combined approach allows us to show that the ruthenium speciation modification during vitrification is the key of control of the morphology of RuO 2 particles in the glass. In particular, the formation of a specific intermediate compound (Na 3 RuO 4 ) is one of the main steps that lead to the precipitation of needle-shaped RuO 2 particles in the melt. The formation of polyhedral particles, on the contrary, results from the direct incorporation of RuO 2 crystals in the melt followed by an Ostwald ripening mechanism. (author) [fr

  20. Behaviour of ruthenium dioxide particles in borosilicate glasses and melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflieger, Rachel [DEN/DTCD-SCDV/CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR5257, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)], E-mail: rachel_pflieger@yahoo.fr; Lefebvre, Leila [DEN/DTCD-SCDV/CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Malki, Mohammed [CNRS/CEMHTI-1D Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45701 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Polytech Orleans, Universite d' Orleans, 8 rue Leonard de Vinci, 45072 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Allix, Mathieu [CNRS/CEMHTI-1D Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45701 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Grandjean, Agnes [DEN/DTCD-SCDV/CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR5257, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

    2009-06-01

    Ruthenium-glass systems are formed during the vitrification of nuclear waste. They are also widely used in micro-electronics because of their unique electrical properties. However, the interaction of this element with the glass matrix remains poorly understood. This work focuses on a RuO{sub 2} particles-nuclear alumino-borosilicate glass system in which the electrical conductivity is known to vary considerably with the RuO{sub 2} content and to become electronic above about 0.5-0.7 vol.% RuO{sub 2} [R. Pflieger, M. Malki, Y. Guari, J. Larionova, A. Grandjean, J. Am. Ceram. Soc., accepted for publication]. Some RuO{sub 2} segregation was observed in SEM/TEM investigations but no continuous chain of RuO{sub 2} particles could be seen. Electron relays between the particles are then necessary for a low-rate percolation, such as the nanoclusters suggested by Adachi et al. [K. Adachi, S. Iida, K. Hayashi, J. Mater. Res. 9 (7) (1994) 1866; K. Adachi, H. Kuno, J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 83 (10) (2000) 2441], which could consist in dissolved ruthenium. Indeed, several observations made here clearly indicate the presence of dissolved ruthenium in the glass matrix, like the modification of the glass density in presence of RuO{sub 2} particles or the diffusion-limited growth of RuO{sub 2} particles in the melt.

  1. Atomic Layer Deposition of Ruthenium with TiN Interface for Sub-10 nm Advanced Interconnects beyond Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Liang Gong; Roussel, Philippe; Pedreira, Olalla Varela

    2016-01-01

    . These extremely scaled ruthenium lines show excellent electromigration behavior. Time-dependent dielectric breakdown measurements reveal negligible ruthenium ion drift into low-kappa dielectrics up to 200 degrees C, demonstrating that ruthenium can be used as a barrierless metallization in interconnects...

  2. Iodide Ion Pairing with Highly Charged Ruthenium Polypyridyl Cations in CH3CN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Wesley B; Li, Guocan; Meyer, Gerald J

    2015-05-04

    A series of three highly charged cationic ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes of the general formula [Ru(deeb)3-x(tmam)x](PF6)2x+2, where deeb is 4,4'-diethyl ester-2,2'-bipyridine and tmam is 4,4'-bis[(trimethylamino)methyl]-2,2'-bipyridine, were synthesized and characterized and are referred to as 1, 2, or 3 based on the number of tmam ligands. Crystals suitable for X-ray crystallography were obtained for the homoleptic complex 3, which was found to possess D3 symmetry over the entire ruthenium complex. The complexes displayed visible absorption spectra typical of metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) transitions. In acetonitrile, quasi-reversible waves were assigned to Ru(III/II) electron transfer, with formal reduction potentials that shifted negative as the number of tmam ligands was increased. Room temperature photoluminescence was observed in acetonitrile with quantum yields of ϕ ∼ 0.1 and lifetimes of τ ∼ 2 μs. The spectroscopic and electrochemical data were most consistent with excited-state localization on the deeb ligand for 1 and 2 and on the tmam ligand for 3. The addition of tetrabutylammonium iodide to the complexes dissolved in a CH3CN solution led to changes in the UV-vis absorption spectra consistent with ion pairing. A Benesi-Hildebrand-type analysis of these data revealed equilibrium constants that increased with the cationic charge 1 10(8) s(-1). The possible relevance of this work to solar energy conversion and dye-sensitized solar cells is discussed.

  3. Ruthenium release from thermally overheated nitric acid solution containing ruthenium nitrosyl nitrate and sodium nitrate to solidify

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Kayo; Ueda, Yasuyuki; Enokida, Youichi [Nuclear Chemical Engineering Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 4648603 (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Radioactive ruthenium (Ru) is one of the dominant elemental species released into the environment from a fuel reprocessing plant in a hypothetical design accident due to its relatively higher fission yield and longer half-life. After the hypothetical accident assuming the loss of all electric power and cooling functions, high-level liquid waste (HLLW) may be overheated by the energetic decays of many fission products in it, and Ru may be oxidized to the volatile tetroxide, RuO{sub 4}, which is released through the off-gas pathway. At a reprocessing plant in Japan, alkaline solution from the solvent scrubbing stream is sometimes mixed with the HLLW followed by vitrification, which can be influenced by the addition of sodium nitrate to a simulated HLLW containing ruthenium nitrosyl nitrate that was experimentally evaluated on a small scale using the overheated nitric acid solution of 2 mol/dm{sup 3}, which was kept at 180 Celsius degrees in a glass evaporator placed in a thermostatic bath. The release fraction of Ru increased by approximately 30% by the addition of sodium nitrate. This may be partially explained by the existence of relatively highly concentrated nitrate ions in the liquid phase that oxidize the ruthenium species to RuO{sub 4} during the drying process. (authors)

  4. Catalytic Ammonia Decomposition Over Ruthenium Nanoparticles Supported on Nano-Titanates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klerke, Asbjørn; Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    Nanosized Na2Ti3O7, K2Ti6O13 and Cs2Ti6O13 materials were prepared and used as supports of ruthenium nanoparticles for catalytic ammonia decomposition. It is shown that these catalysts exhibit higher catalytic activity than ruthenium supported on TiO2 nanoparticles promoted with cesium. The diffe...

  5. Surface and sub-surface thermal oxidation of thin ruthenium films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coloma Ribera, R.; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Kokke, S.; Zoethout, E.; Yakshin, Andrey; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    A mixed 2D (film) and 3D (nano-column) growth of ruthenium oxide has been experimentally observed for thermally oxidized polycrystalline ruthenium thin films. Furthermore, in situ x-ray reflectivity upon annealing allowed the detection of 2D film growth as two separate layers consisting of low

  6. Ruthenium on chitosan: A recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for aqueous hydration of nitriles to amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthenium has been immobilized over chitosan by simply stirring an aqueous suspension of chitosan in water with ruthenium chloride and has been utilized for the oxidation of nitriles to amides; the hydration of nitriles occurs in high yield and excellent selectivity, which procee...

  7. Design, synthesis, characterization, and OFET properties of amphiphilic heteroleptic tris(phthalocyaninato) europium(III) complexes. The effect of crown ether hydrophilic substituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yingning; Ma, Pan; Chen, Yanli; Zhang, Ying; Bian, Yongzhong; Li, Xiyou; Jiang, Jianzhuang; Ma, Changqin

    2009-01-05

    Two amphiphilic heteroleptic tris(phthalocyaninato) europium complexes with hydrophilic crown ether heads and hydrophobic octyloxy tails [Pc(mCn)(4)]Eu[Pc(mCn)(4)]Eu[Pc(OC(8)H(17))(8)] [m = 12, n = 4, H(2)Pc(12C4)(4) = 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-tetrakis(12-crown-4)phthalocyanine; m = 18, n = 6, H(2)Pc(18C6)(4) = 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-tetrakis(18-crown-6)phthalocyanine; H(2)Pc(OC(8)H(17))(8) = 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis(octyloxy)phthalocyanine] (1, 2) were designed and prepared from the reaction between homoleptic bis(phthalocyaninato) europium compound [Pc(mCn)(4)]Eu[Pc(mCn)(4)] (m = 12, n = 4; m = 18, n = 6) and metal-free H(2)Pc(OC(8)H(17))(8) in the presence of Eu(acac)(3).H(2)O (Hacac = acetylacetone) in boiling 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene. These novel sandwich triple-decker complexes were characterized by a wide range of spectroscopic methods and electrochemically studied. With the help of the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, these typical amphiphilic triple-decker complexes were fabricated into organic field effect transistors (OFET) with top contact configuration on bare SiO(2)/Si substrate, hexamethyldisilazane-treated SiO(2)/Si substrate, and octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-treated SiO(2)/Si substrate, respectively. The device performance is revealed to be dependent on the species of crown ether substituents and substrate surface treatment. OFETs fabricated from the triple decker with 12-crown-4 hydrophilic substituents, 1, allow the hole transfer in the direction parallel to the aromatic phthalocyanine rings. In contrast, the devices of a triple-decker compound containing 18-crown-6 as hydrophilic heads, 2, transfer holes in a direction along the long axis of the assembly composed of face-to-face aggregated triple-decker molecules, revealing the effect of molecular structure, specifically the crown ether substituents on the film structure and OFET functional properties. The carrier mobility for hole as high as 0.33 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and current modulation of 7.91 x 10

  8. Method of improving the decontaminating efficiency of ruthenium in evaporating treatment of nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kanya; Yamana, Hajime; Takeda, Seiichiro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To significantly improve the ruthenium removing efficiency in a nitric acid solution in an acid recovery system for the recovery of nitric acid from nitric acid liquid wastes through evaporating condensation. Method: Upon evaporating treatment of nitric acid solution containing ruthenium by supplying and heating the solution to a nitric acid evaporating device, hydrazine is previously added to the nitric acid solution. Hydrazine and intermediate reaction product of hydrazine such as azide causes a reduction reaction with intermediate reaction product of ruthenium tetraoxide to suppress the oxidation of ruthenium and thereby improve the decontaminating efficiency of ruthenium. The amount of hydrazine to be added is preferably between 20 - 500 mg/l and most suitably between 200 - 2000 mg/l per one liter of the liquid in the evaporating device. (Seki, T.)

  9. Late side effects of Ruthenium 106 therapy for uveal melanomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langmann, G.; Faulborn, J.; Poier, E.

    1994-01-01

    When effectiveness is evaluated in brachytherapy with Ruthenium 106 special emphasis has to be put on tumor destruction and late side effects responsible for the definite functional results. We evaluated the late side effects of 22 uveal melanomas, which had been treated with 106 Ruthenium plaques. The tumor prominences ranged from 3 to 10 mm, the diameter from 4 to 9 disc diameters. In 4 patients the tumor involved the posterior pole, 14 melanomas were located in the midperiphery of the fundus, 4 tumors were ciliary body melanomas. The total radiation dose of the apex ranged from 100 to 240 Gy with a corresponding dose to the sclera between 540 to 1000 Gy. Because of the short half life of the plaque we have been using different dose rates (1.6-11 Gy/h). In 17/22 eyes adequate regression could be achieved by Ruthenium therapy alone. In one case additional laser treatment of the macular part of the melanoma had to be performed, Gamma Knife therapy was necessary in another melanoma with 10 mm tumor prominence. 3 recurrences led to enucleation. The mean follow up was 4.8 years ranging from 1 to 7 years. In 2/22 patients opticopathy caused severe visual impairment, in another 2 patients radiation maculopathy and opticopathy was observed. 7/22 developed vasculopathy with neovascularization treated by photocoagulation. In one case of focal radiation maculopathy laser treatment could prevent further visual impairment. The following factors are responsible for a higher incidence of late side effects: 1. High dose rate of the plaques in combination with a high radiation dose to the sclera 2. Location of the tumor within a minimum distance of 2 disc diameters to the optic nerve or macula 3. Tumor location at the ciliary body Laser treatment in case of neovascularization and focal radiation maculopathy is the only effective treatment with regard to late side effects. Ischemic maculopathy and radiation opticopathy are responsible for late visual impairment. (authors)

  10. Electrochemical detection of uric acid using ruthenium-dioxide-coated carbon nanotube directly grown onto Si wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yi-Ting; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Lin, Chung-Kuang

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) directly grown onto a Si substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition were used in uric acid (UA) detection. The process is simple and formation is easy without the need for additional chemical treatments. However, CNTs lack selectivity and sensitivity to UA. To enhance the electrochemical analysis, ruthenium oxide was used as a catalytic mediator in the modification of electrodes. The electrochemical results show that RuO2 nanostructures coated onto CNTs can strengthen the UA signal. The peak currents of RuO2 nanostructures coated onto CNTs linearly increase with increasing UA concentration, meaning that they can work as electrodes for UA detection. The lowest detection limit and highest sensitivity were 55 nM and 4.36 µA/µM, respectively. Moreover, the characteristics of RuO2 nanostructures coated onto CNTs were examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy.

  11. Radiation related complications after ruthenium plaque radiotherapy of uveal melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summanen, P.; Immonen, I.; Kivela, T.; Tommila, P.; Tarkkanen, A. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Meilahti Clinic; Heikkonen, J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept of Radiotherapy and Oncology

    1996-08-01

    The aims were to analyse radiation related complications and secondary enucleation after irradiation of malignant uveal melanoma with ruthenium-106 plaques. A series of 100 consecutive eyes irradiated in 1981-91 was analysed using the life table method and the Cox proportional hazards model. The 3 and 5 year probabilities of being without radiation cataract were 73% and 63%, without neovascular glaucoma 91% and 81%, without vitreous haemorrhage 83% and 74%, without radiation maculopathy 85% and 70%, and without radiation optic neuropathy 90% and 88%, respectively. (Author).

  12. Radiation related complications after ruthenium plaque radiotherapy of uveal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summanen, P.; Immonen, I.; Kivela, T.; Tommila, P.; Tarkkanen, A.; Heikkonen, J.

    1996-01-01

    The aims were to analyse radiation related complications and secondary enucleation after irradiation of malignant uveal melanoma with ruthenium-106 plaques. A series of 100 consecutive eyes irradiated in 1981-91 was analysed using the life table method and the Cox proportional hazards model. The 3 and 5 year probabilities of being without radiation cataract were 73% and 63%, without neovascular glaucoma 91% and 81%, without vitreous haemorrhage 83% and 74%, without radiation maculopathy 85% and 70%, and without radiation optic neuropathy 90% and 88%, respectively. (Author)

  13. Progress in doping of ruthenium silicide (Ru2Si3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vining, C.B.; Allevato, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that ruthenium silicide (Ru 2 Si 3 ) is currently under development as a promising thermoelectric material suitable for space power applications. Key to realizing the potentially high figure of merit values of this material is the development of appropriate doping techniques. In this study, manganese and iridium have been identified as useful p- and n-type dopants, respectively. Resistivity values have been reduced by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Anomalous Hall effect results, however, complicate interpretation of some of the results and further effort is required to achieve optimum doping levels

  14. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Decarbonylation of Primary Alcohols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazziotta, Andrea; Madsen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Dehydrogenative decarbonylation of a primary alcohol involves the release of both dihydrogen and carbon monoxide to afford the one-carbon shorter product. The transformation has now been achieved with a ruthenium-catalyzed protocol by using the complex Ru(COD)Cl2 and the hindered monodentate ligand...... P(o-tolyl)3 in refluxing p-cymene. The reaction can be applied to both benzylic and long chain linear aliphatic alcohols. The intermediate aldehyde can be observed during the transformation, which is therefore believed to proceed through two separate catalytic cycles involving first dehydrogenation...... of the alcohol and then decarbonylation of the resulting aldehyde....

  15. A nanoporous ruthenium oxide framework for amperometric sensing of glucose and potentiometric sensing of pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, J.H.; Kang, M.; Lee, Y.; Lee, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoporous ruthenium oxide frameworks (L 2 -eRuO) were electrodeposited on gold substrates by repetitive potential cycling in solutions of ruthenium(III) ions in the presence of reverse neutral micelles. The L 2 -eRuO was characterized in terms of direct oxidation of glucose and potentiometric response to pH values. The surface structures and morphologies of the L 2 -eRuO were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Their surface area was estimated via underpotential deposition of copper. L 2-eRuO-modified electrodes showed a 17-fold higher sensitivity (40 μA mM -1 cm -2 towards glucose in 0-4 mM concentration in solution of pH 7.4) than a RuO electrode prepared in the absence of reverse micelles. Potential interferents such as ascorbic acid, 4-acetamidophenol, uric acid and dopamine displayed no effect. The new electrode also revealed improved potentiometric response to pH changes compared to a platinum electrode of the same type. (author)

  16. Immobilization of ruthenium phthalocyanine on silica-coated multi-wall partially oriented carbon nanotubes: Electrochemical detection of fenitrothion pesticide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canevari, Thiago C., E-mail: tccanevari@gmail.com [Engineering School, Mackenzie Presbyterian University, 01302-907 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Prado, Thiago M.; Cincotto, Fernando H.; Machado, Sergio A.S. [Institute of Chemistry, State University of São Paulo, P.O. Box 780, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Hybrid material, SiO{sub 2}/MWCNTs containing ruthenium phthalocyanine (RuPc) synthesized in situ. • Silica containing multi-walled carbon nanotube partially oriented. • Determination of pesticide fenitrothion in orange juice. - Abstract: This paper reports on the determination of the pesticide fenitrothion using a glassy carbon electrode modified with silica-coated, multi-walled, partially oriented carbon nanotubes, SiO{sub 2}/MWCNTs, containing ruthenium phthalocyanine (RuPc) synthesized in situ. The hybrid SiO{sub 2}/MWCNTs/RuPc material was characterized by UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and differential pulse voltammetry. The modified electrode showed well-defined peaks in the presence of fenitrothion in acetate buffer, pH 4.5, with a sensitivity of 0.0822 μA μM{sup −1} mm{sup −2} and a detection limit of 0.45 ppm. Notably, the modified SiO{sub 2}/MWCNTs/RuPc electrodes with did not suffer from significant influences in the presence of other organophosphorus pesticides during the determination of the fenitrothion pesticide. Moreover, this modified electrode showed excellent performance in the determination of fenitrothion in orange juice.

  17. Removal of fission product ruthenium from purex process solutions: thiourea as complexing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floh, B.; Abrao, A.

    1980-01-01

    A new method for the treatment of spent uranium fuel is presented. It is based on the Purex Process using thiourea to increase the ruthenium decontamination factor. Thiourea exhibits a strong tendency for the formation of coordination compounds in acidic media. This tendency serves as a basis to transform nitrosyl-ruthenium species into Ru /SC(NH)(NH 2 )/ 2+ and Ru /SC(NH)(NH 2 )/ 3 complexes which are unextractable by TBP-varsol. The best conditions for the ruthenium-thiourea complex formation were found to be: thiourea-ruthenium ratio (mass/mass) close to 42, at 75 0 C, 30 minutes reaction time and aging period of 60 minutes. The ruthenium decontamination factor for a single uranium extraction are ca. 80-100, not interfering with extraction of actinides. These values are rather high in comparison to those obtained using the conventional Purex Process (e.g. F.D. sub(Ru)=10). By this reason the method developed here is suitable for the treatment of spent uranium fuels. Thiourea (100g/l) scrubbing experiments of ruthenium, partially co-extracted with actinides, confirmed the possibility of its removal from the extract. A decontamination greater than 83,5% for ruthenium as fission product is obtained in two stages with this procedure. (Author) [pt

  18. A thermodynamic/mass-transport model for the release of ruthenium from irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, F.; Iglesias, F.C.; Hunt, C.E.L.

    1990-01-01

    Some postulated nuclear reactor accidents lead to fuel failures and hence release of fission products into the primary heat transport system (PHTS). To determine the consequences of such accidents, it is important to understand the behavior of fission products both in the PHTS and in the reactor containment building. Ruthenium metal has a high boiling point and is nonvolatile under reducing conditions. However, under oxidizing conditions ruthenium can form volatile oxides at relatively low temperatures and, hence, could escape from failed fuel and enter the containment building. The ruthenium radioisotope Ru-106 presents a potentially significant health risk if it is released outside the reactor containment building. Consequently, it is important to understand the behavior of ruthenium during a nuclear reactor accident. The authors review the thermodynamic behavior of ruthenium at high temperatures. The qualitative behavior of ruthenium, predicted using thermodynamic calculations, is then compared with experimental results from the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL). Finally, a simple thermodynamic/mass-transport model is proposed to explain the release behavior of ruthenium in a steam atmosphere

  19. Dynamics of the contact between a ruthenium surface with a single nanoasperity and a flat ruthenium surface: Molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros de Oliveira, Alan; Fortini, Andrea; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Srolovitz, David

    2011-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the contact between a pair of surfaces (with properties designed to mimic ruthenium) via molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the contact between a ruthenium surface with a single nanoasperity and a flat ruthenium surface. The results of such simulations suggest that contact behavior is highly variable. The goal of this study is to investigate the source and degree of this variability. We find that during compression, the behavior of the contact force displacement curves is reproducible, while during contact separation, the behavior is highly variable. Examination of the contact surfaces suggests that two separation mechanisms are in operation and give rise to this variability. One mechanism corresponds to the formation of a bridge between the two surfaces that plastically stretches as the surfaces are drawn apart and eventually separate in shear. This leads to a morphology after separation in which there are opposing asperities on the two surfaces. This plastic separation/bridge formation mechanism leads to a large work of separation. The other mechanism is a more brittle-like mode in which a crack propagates across the base of the asperity (slightly below the asperity/substrate junction) leading to most of the asperity on one surface or the other after separation and a slight depression facing this asperity on the opposing surface. This failure mode corresponds to a smaller work of separation. This failure mode corresponds to a smaller work of separation. Furthermore, contacts made from materials that exhibit predominantly brittle-like behavior will tend to require lower work of separation than those made from ductile-like contact materials.

  20. Quantum chemical studies on electronic structure and photodynamics of ruthenium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitag, L.

    2015-01-01

    Ruthenium complexes have found their way into many applications in the last decades. Among those, ruthenium polypyridyl compounds have been employed as light harvesting devices and photosensitisers in artificial photosynthesis and molecular photocatalysis. Ruthenium nitrosyl complexes are rapidly emerging as NO delivery agents to biological tissues with promising applications in anticancer photodynamic therapy, thanks to their ability to photorelease nitric oxide (NO). This thesis encompasses computational studies on reactivity, electronic structure, excited states and photodynamics of several ruthenium nitrosyl and polypyridyl complexes. The first part of the thesis deals with ruthenium nitrosyls. The cis-trans isomerisation mechanism of RuHIndNO, a ruthenium nitrosyl derivate of the prominent anti-cancer drug candidate KP1019, is investigated with density functional theory calculations. Next, the electronic structure of the ground and the first excited triplet state of RuHIndNO is studied with multiconfigurational methods including the density-matrix renormalisation group (DMRG). The obtained multiconfigurational wavefunctions and DMRG-based orbital entanglement analysis provides theoretical insight into the non-innocence of the NO ligand in nitrosyl complexes by describing the electron correlation in the Ru--NO bond and assigning oxidation states to the metal and the NO ligand. Another study is performed on excited states of ruthenium nitrosyl complexes with quantum chemical calculations and surface-hopping dynamics to obtain insights into the photodissociation mechanism of NO. The second part of this thesis is devoted to the excited states and photophysics of ruthenium polypyridyl complexes. Accurate excitation energies of tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium (II), the prototype ruthenium polypyridyl are obtained with multiconfigurational calculations assisted by an orbital entanglement analysis. Subsequently, the effect of the ligand substitution on the photophysics

  1. Ruthenium determination by the method of inversion voltammetry on graphite electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominova, I G; Kolpakova, N A; Stromberg, A G [Tomskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR)

    1978-12-01

    Optimal conditions for determining ruthenium by inversion voltammetry on a graphite electrode are 0.1 M KCl or KNO/sub 3/, pH 2-3, electrolysis potential - 1.0 V. A linear dependence of ruthenium electrodissolution current on its concentration in the solution makes it possible to use inversion voltammetry for determining 5x10/sup -7/ - 1x10/sup -4/ g-ion Ru/l. Ruthenium can be determined in the presence of a large excess of nickel and copper but commensurable amounts of mercury adn platinum metals interfere.

  2. Ruthenium behaviour in severe nuclear accident conditions - Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backman, U.; Lipponen, M.; Zilliacus, R.; Auvinen, A.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2004-03-01

    In order to prevent the radioactive ruthenium from spreading in gaseous form in case of an accident in a nuclear power plant it is of interest to know how it is formed and how it behaves. In the experiments the behaviour of ruthenium in oxidising atmosphere at high temperatures is studied. The methods for trapping and analysing RuO4 has been studied. It was found that 1M NaOH is capable of trapping RuO4 totally. The determination of Ru from the solution can be made using ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) and from the reduced precipitates on filters by INAA (instrumental neutron activation analysis). The results of the experiments carried out so far is reported. A significant difference in the decomposition rate of gaseous RuO4 depending on the tube material was found. In all experiments only a minor fraction of Ru remained in gaseous form until the bubbler. In order to achieve a better mass balance an experiment using radioactive tracer was carried out. In the decomposition of gaseous Ru needle-shaped RuO2 crystallites were formed. (au)

  3. Near-infrared-emitting heteroleptic cationic iridium complexes derived from 2,3-diphenylbenzo[g]quinoxaline as in vitro theranostic photodynamic therapy agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li; Yin, Huimin; Cui, Peng; Hetu, Marc; Wang, Chengzhe; Monro, Susan; Schaller, Richard D.; Cameron, Colin G.; Liu, Bingqing; Kilina, Svetlana; McFarland, Sherri A.; Sun, Wenfang

    2017-05-19

    Five heteroleptic cationic iridium complexes with a π-expansive cyclometalating 2,3-diphenylbenzo[g] quinoxaline (dpbq) ligand (C^N ligand) and different diimine ligands (N^N ligands) (i.e. 2,2’-bipyridine (bpy, 1), phenanthroline (phen, 2), 2-(2-pyridinyl)quinoline (pqu, 3), 2,2’-bisquinoline (bqu, 4), and 2-(quinolin-2-yl)quinoxaline (quqo, 5)) were synthesized and characterized. The lowest-energy singlet electronic transitions (S1 states) were mainly dpbq ligand-centred 1ILCT (intraligand charge transfer)/1MLCT (metal to ligand charge transfer) transitions mixed with some 1π,π* transitions for complexes 1–4 with increased contributions from 1LLCT (ligand to ligand charge transfer) in 3 and 4. For complex 5, the S1 state was switched to the 1LLCT/1MLCT transitions. All five complexes displayed weak near-infrared (NIR) phosphorescence, with maximal emission output spanning 700–1400 nm and quantum yields being on the order of 10-3. The triplet state absorptions of 1–4 all resembled that of the [Ir(dpbq)2Cl]2 dimer with lifetimes of ca. 400 ns, while the TA spectrum of 5 possessed the characteristics of both the quqo ligand and the [Ir(dpbq)2Cl]2 dimer with a bi-exponential decay of ca. 5 μs and 400 ns. While the photophysics of these complexes differ slightly, their theranostic photodynamic therapy (PDT) effects varied drastically. All of the complexes were biologically active toward melanoma cells. Complexes 2 and 3 were the most cytotoxic, with 230–340 nM activity and selectivity factors for melanoma cells over normal skin fibroblasts of 34 to 40 fold. Complexes 2, 3, and 5 became very potent cytotoxins with light activation, with EC50 values as low as 12–18 nM. This potent nanomolar light-triggered activity combined with a lower dark toxicity resulted in 5 having a phototherapeutic index (PI) margin of almost 275. The bpy coligand led to the least amount of dark toxicity of 1, while phen and pqu produced cytotoxic but selective complexes 2 and

  4. Characteristics of dye-sensitized solar cells using natural dye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Shoji, E-mail: furukawa@cse.kyutech.ac.j [Graduate School of Computer Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, 680-4 Kawazu, Iizuka-shi, Fukuoka-ken 820-8502 (Japan); Iino, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Tomohisa; Kukita, Koudai; Yamauchi, Shoji [Graduate School of Computer Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, 680-4 Kawazu, Iizuka-shi, Fukuoka-ken 820-8502 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    Dye-sensitized solar cells are expected to be used for future clean energy. Recently, most of the researchers in this field use Ruthenium complex as dye in the dye-sensitized solar cells. However, Ruthenium is a rare metal, so the cost of the Ruthenium complex is very high. In this paper, various dye-sensitized solar cells have been fabricated using natural dye, such as the dye of red-cabbage, curcumin, and red-perilla. As a result, it was found that the conversion efficiency of the solar cell fabricated using the mixture of red-cabbage and curcumin was about 0.6% (light source: halogen lamp), which was larger than that of the solar cells using one kind of dye. It was also found that the conversion efficiency was about 1.0% for the solar cell with the oxide semiconductor film fabricated using polyethylene glycol (PEG) whose molecular weight was 2,000,000 and red-cabbage dye. This indicates that the cost performance (defined by [conversion efficiency]/[cost of dye]) of the latter solar cell (dye: red-cabbage) is larger by more than 50 times than that of the solar cell using Ruthenium complex, even if the effect of the difference between the halogen lamp and the standard light source is taken into account.

  5. Ruthenium nitrosyl complexes in radioactive waste solutions in reprocessing plants. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasius, E.; Mueller, K.

    1984-01-01

    With capillary isotachophoresis and free-flow isotachophoresis it is possible to separate and isolate preparatively the mononuclear cationic ruthenium nitrosyl nitrato complexes. The behaviour of these complexes during storage, concentration and calcination is studied: The conversion of six ruthenium nitrosyl nitrato complexes as a function of time is studied at -36 0 C, 0 0 C, +3 0 C and 100 0 C. The percentage of ruthenium nitrosyl complexes with NO 3 - as ligand increased markedly during concentration experiments. Above 250 0 C NOsub(x) is liberated and the colour of the residue changes from brown to brownish-grey. At 400 0 C ruthenium complexes are no longer detected and the inner walls of the apparatus are covered with RuO 2 . (orig.)

  6. Synthesis and catalytic activity of ruthenium complexes modified with chiral racemic per- and polyfluorooxaalkanoates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lipovská, P.; Rathouská, L.; Šimůnek, O.; Hošek, J.; Kolaříková, V.; Rybáčková, M.; Cvačka, Josef; Svoboda, Martin; Kvíčala, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 191, Nov (2016), s. 14-22 ISSN 0022-1139 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : racemic * chiral * ruthenium complex * perfluorooxaalkanoate * polyfluorooxaalkanoate Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.101, year: 2016

  7. Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Lithium-O2 Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Kovarik, Libor; Bowden, Mark E.; Li, Shari; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-12-01

    Dendrimer-encapsulated ruthenium nanoparticles (DEN-Ru) have been used as catalysts in lithium-O2 batteries for the first time. Results obtained from UV-vis spectroscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the nanoparticles synthesized by the dendrimer template method are ruthenium oxide instead of metallic ruthenium reported earlier by other groups. The DEN-Ru significantly improve the cycling stability of lithium (Li)-O2 batteries with carbon black electrodes and decrease the charging potential even at low catalyst loading. The monodispersity, porosity and large number of surface functionalities of the dendrimer template prevent the aggregation of the ruthenium nanoparticles making their entire surface area available for catalysis. The potential of using DEN-Ru as stand-alone cathode materials for Li-O2 batteries is also explored.

  8. Extraction of ruthenium thiocyanate and its separation from rhodium by polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Bazi, S.J.; Chow, A.

    1984-01-01

    Conditions for the formation and extraction of the thiocyanate complex of ruthenium are reported. Distribution coefficients of more than 10 4 and a capacity of about 0.24 mole per kg of foam were obtained. The effect of the chloride salts of various univalent cations on the extraction of Ru(SCN) 6 3- indicated that the efficiency of ruthenium extraction depends on how well the cation fits into the polyether segment of the polyurethane foam, which agrees with the 'cation-chelation' mechanism. The separation of ruthenium and rhodium indicated that more than 95% of the rhodium remained in the aqueous phase and about 95% of the ruthenium was retained by the polyurethane foam and could be easily recovered. (author)

  9. Some thermophysical properties of ruthenium in the neighbourhood of the melting point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheindlin, A.E.; Kats, S.A.; Berezin, B.Ya.; Chekhovskoy, V.Ya.; Kenisarin, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    The technique of levitation calorimetry has been used to study for the first time thermophysical properties of ruthenium in the neighbourhood of the melting point. To measure enthalpy a copper block calorimeter with an istohermal jacket has been used. Basing on the values measured the equations for enthalpy of solid and liquid ruthenium within the temperature ranges of 2,270-2,607 K and 2,607-2,760 K respectively have been obtained by the least squares method. In addition the melting temperature of ruthenium and its brightness temperature at the melting point, the wavelength being 0.65 micron, have been measured. The results of the measurements have been used to calculate the heat and entropy of fusion, the specific heat of solid and that of liquid ruthenium and its normal spectral emissivity at the melting point

  10. Flameless atomic absorption determination of ruthenium using a ''Saturn-1'' spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichkov, V.N.; Sinitsyn, N.M.; Sadikova, F.G.; Govorova, M.I.; Yakshinskij, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    A flameless atomic absorption method is suggested for determining ruthenium in samples of complicated composition using a ''Saturn-1'' spectrophotometer with a L'vov graphite cuvette. The method was used for determining ruthenium in a copper-based sample (10 -3 % Ru) and in electrolyte slurries (10 -3 -10 -2 %). The limit of detection Csub(min, 0.95) = 3.0x10 -3 μg Ru/ml. Other platinum metals do not interfere [ru

  11. Identification of short-lived neutron-rich ruthenium and rhodium isotopes in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, G.; Herrmann, G.

    1975-01-01

    Short-lived ruthenium and rhodium isotopes ( 107 Ru, 108 Ru, 108 Rh, 109 Ru, 109 Rh, 110 Ru, 110 Rh, 111 Ru, 111 Rh, 112 Ru, 112 Rh, 113 Ru) have been separated from fission products by a rapid chemical procedure and identified by means of γ-ray spectroscopy. Nuclides with half-lives down to 3 sec were accessible. Ruthenium isotopes up to mass number 113 have been identified. (author)

  12. Photorefractive IR-spectrum composites prepared from polyimide and ruthenium(II) tetra-15-crown-5-phthalocyaninate with axially coordinated triethylenediamine molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannikov, A.V.; Grishina, A.D.; Gorbunova, Yu.G.; Enakieva, Yu.Yu.; Krivenko, T.V.; Savel'ev, V.V.; Tsivadze, A.Yu.

    2006-01-01

    Photoelectric, non-linear optical, and photorefractive properties of aromatic polyimine doped with ruthenium(II) complex with tetra-15-crown-5-phthalocyanine and axially coordinated triethylenediamine molecules, (R 4 Pc)Ru(TED) 2 , where R 4 Pc 2- and TED denote 4,5,4',5',4'',5'',4''',5'''-tetrakis-(1,4,7,10,13- pentaoxatridecamethylene)phthalocyaninate ion and triethylenediamine molecule, respectively, were studied. It is established that supramolecular ensembles on the basis of the complex make an aromatic polyimide layer photoelectrically sensitive to 1064-nm Nd : YAG laser radiation, exhibit third-order susceptibility, and, consequently, impart photorefractive properties to the polymer layer at this wavelength [ru

  13. A New Homogeneous Catalyst for the Dehydrogenation of Dimethylamine Borane Starting with Ruthenium(III Acetylacetonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Ünel Barın

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic activity of ruthenium(III acetylacetonate was investigated for the first time in the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine borane. During catalytic reaction, a new ruthenium(II species is formed in situ from the reduction of ruthenium(III and characterized using UV-Visible, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, 1H NMR, and mass spectroscopy. The most likely structure suggested for the ruthenium(II species is mer-[Ru(N2Me43(acacH]. Mercury poisoning experiment indicates that the catalytic dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane is homogeneous catalysis. The kinetics of the catalytic dehydrogenation of dimethylamine borane starting with Ru(acac3 were studied depending on the catalyst concentration, substrate concentration and temperature. The hydrogen generation was found to be first-order with respect to catalyst concentration and zero-order regarding the substrate concentration. Evaluation of the kinetic data provides the activation parameters for the dehydrogenation reaction: the activation energy Ea = 85 ± 2 kJ·mol−1, the enthalpy of activation ∆H# = 82 ± 2 kJ·mol−1 and the entropy of activation; ∆S# = −85 ± 5 J·mol−1·K−1. The ruthenium(II catalyst formed from the reduction of ruthenium(III acetylacetonate provides 1700 turnovers over 100 hours in hydrogen generation from the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine borane before deactivation at 60 °C.

  14. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy on laser-engineered ruthenium dye-functionalized nanoporous gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Lina; Franzka, Steffen; Biener, Monika; Biener, Jürgen; Hartmann, Nils

    2016-06-01

    Photothermal processing of nanoporous gold with a microfocused continuous-wave laser at λ = 532 nm provides a facile means in order engineer the pore and ligament size of nanoporous gold. In this report we take advantage of this approach in order to investigate the size-dependence of enhancement effects in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Surface structures with laterally varying pore sizes from 25 nm to ≥200 nm are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and then functionalized with N719, a commercial ruthenium complex, which is widely used in dye-sensitized solar cells. Raman spectroscopy reveals the characteristic spectral features of N719. Peak intensities strongly depend on the pore size. Highest intensities are observed on the native support, i.e. on nanoporous gold with pore sizes around 25 nm. These results demonstrate the particular perspectives of laser-fabricated nanoporous gold structures in fundamental SERS studies. In particular, it is emphasized that laser-engineered porous gold substrates represent a very well defined platform in order to study size-dependent effects with high reproducibility and precision and resolve conflicting results in previous studies.

  15. The Biological Side of Water-Soluble Arene Ruthenium Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Therrien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review article covers the synthetic strategies, structural aspects, and host-guest properties of ruthenium metalla-assemblies, with a special focus on their use as drug delivery vectors. The two-dimensional metalla-rectangles show interesting host-guest possibilities but seem less appropriate for being used as drug carriers. On the other hand, metalla-prisms allow encapsulation and possible targeted release of bioactive molecules and consequently show some potential as drug delivery vectors. The reactivity of these metalla-prisms can be fine-tuned to allow a fine control of the guest’s release. The larger metalla-cubes can be used to stabilize the formation of G-quadruplex DNA and can be used to encapsulate and release photoactive molecules such as porphins. These metalla-assemblies demonstrate great prospective in photodynamic therapy.

  16. Raman spectra of ruthenium and tantalum trimers in argon matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Li; Shen, Xiaole; Chen, Xiaoyu; Lombardi, John R.

    2000-12-01

    The resonance Raman spectra of ruthenium trimers (Ru 3) in argon matrices have been obtained. Three resonance Raman transitions were observed between 570 and 590 nm. Two of them (303.4 and 603.7 cm -1) are assigned to the totally symmetric vibrational progression, giving k e=1.86 mdyne/ Å. The line at 581.5 cm-1 is assigned as the origin of a low-lying electronic state. We also report on the observation of a resonance Raman spectrum of tantalum trimers (Ta 3). Observed lines include 251.2 and 501.9 cm-1 which we assign to the fundamental and the first overtone of the symmetric stretch in Ta 3. This gives k e=2.25 mdyne/ Å.

  17. Cathodic processes during ruthenium electrodeposition from a chloride melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokol'skij, D.V.

    1985-01-01

    Cathodic processes occurring during the electrolysis of chloride melts in the presence of oxygen-containing impurities were studied. The experiments were carried out at 500, 550 600 and 680 deg C, ruthenium ions concentration in KCl-NaCl-CsCl eutectic melt being 0.4-1.5 mol% and BaO additions 4.8x10 -2 mol%. Temperature dependence of Ru(3) ion diffusion coefficient in the chloride melt (lg D=3.25-1508/T+-0.02) and activation energy of the diffusion process (6.9 k cal/mol) were determined. It is shown that changes of the shape of E, t-curve and the deviation of values determined in the cause of chronopotentiometric investigations from the corresponding values of reversable processes are related in many respects to the participation of oxygen-containing compounds in the cathodic process. Irreversibility of the cathodic process is also connected with metal crystallization during electrodeposition

  18. Ruthenium(II) arene complexes with chelating chloroquine analogue ligands: Synthesis, characterization and in vitro antimalarial activity†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glans, Lotta; Ehnbom, Andreas; de Kock, Carmen; Martínez, Alberto; Estrada, Jesús; Smith, Peter J.; Haukka, Matti; Sánchez-Delgado, Roberto A.; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2012-01-01

    Three new ruthenium complexes with bidentate chloroquine analogue ligands, [Ru(η6-cym)(L1)Cl]Cl (1, cym = p-cymene, L1 = N-(2-((pyridin-2-yl)methylamino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine), [Ru(η6-cym)(L2)Cl]Cl (2, L2 = N-(2-((1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methylamino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine) and [Ru(η6-cym)(L3)Cl] (3, L3 = N-(2-((2-hydroxyphenyl)methylimino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine) have been synthesized and characterized. In addition, the X-ray crystal structure of 2 is reported. The antimalarial activity of complexes 1–3 and ligands L1, L2 and L3, as well as the compound N-(2-(bis((pyridin-2-yl)methyl)amino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine (L4), against chloroquine sensitive and chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria strains was evaluated. While 1 and 2 are less active than the corresponding ligands, 3 exhibits high antimalarial activity. The chloroquine analogue L2 also shows good activity against both the choloroquine sensitive and the chloroquine resistant strains. Heme aggregation inhibition activity (HAIA) at an aqueous buffer/n-octanol interface (HAIR50) and lipophilicity (D, as measured by water/n-octanol distribution coefficients) have been measured for all ligands and metal complexes. A direct correlation between the D and HAIR50 properties cannot be made because of the relative structural diversity of the complexes, but it may be noted that these properties are enhanced upon complexation of the inactive ligand L3 to ruthenium, to give a metal complex (3) with promising antimalarial activity. PMID:22249579

  19. Separation of carrier-free rhodium isotopes from ruthenium cyclotron targets by the extraction of nitrosylruthenium from hydrochloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haasbroek, F.J.; Strelow, F.W.E.; Van der Walt, T.N.

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for the separation of rhodium isotopes from ruthenium cyclotron targets. After bombardment with deuterons and dissolution of the target material, the ruthenium is converted into a nitrosyl complex by treatment with hydroxylammonium chloride. Aluminium and other elements which have been introduced in the dissolution step, are separated by cation exchange. Ruthenium is then separated by extraction with a mixture of tri-n-butyl phosphate and hexane (4:1), leaving the rhodium in the aqueous phase. No ruthenium is found in the rhodium fraction and the recovery of rhodium is better than 90 per cent [af

  20. Perylene anhydride fused porphyrins as near-infrared sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Jiao, Chongjun

    2011-07-15

    Two perylene anhydride fused porphyrins 1 and 2 have been synthesized and employed successfully in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Both compounds showed broad incident monochromatic photon-to-current conversion efficiency spectra covering the entire visible spectral region and even extending into the near-infrared (NIR) region up to 1000 nm, which is impressive for ruthenium-free dyes in DSCs. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H F; Zhou, F Y; Li, L; Zheng, Y F

    2016-04-19

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)-1.29 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1) for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti-6Al-4V, ~3.5 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1), CP Ti and Ti-6Al-7Nb, ~3.0 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)), and one-sixth that of Co-Cr alloys (Co-Cr-Mo, ~7.7 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)). Among the Zr-Ru alloy series, Zr-1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr-Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments.

  2. Behavior of ruthenium in the case of shutdown of the cooling system of HLLW storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, M.; Mercier, J.P.; Gue, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    The consequences of the failure of the cooling system of fission product storage tanks over a variable period were investigated as part of the safety analysis of the La Hague spent fuel reprocessing plant. Due to the considerable heat release, induced by the fission products, a prolonged shutdown of the tank cooling system could cause the progressive evaporation of the solutions to dryness, and culminate in the formation of volatile species of ruthenium and their release in the tank venting circuit. To determine the fraction of ruthenium likely to be transferred from the storage tanks in volatile or aerosol form during the failure, evaporation tests were conducted by evaporating samples of actual nitric acid solutions of fission products, obtained on the laboratory scale after the reprocessing of several kilograms of MOX fuels irradiated to 30,000 MWday.t -1 . A distillation apparatus was designed to operate with small volume solution samples, reproducing the heating conditions existing in the reprocessing plant within a storage tank for fission products. The main conclusions drawn from these experiments are as follows: - ruthenium is only volatilized in the final phase of evaporation, just before desiccation, - for a final temperature limited to 160 0 C, the total fraction of volatilized ruthenium reaches 12%, in the presence of H 2 0, HN0 3 , N0 x and 0 2 , the volatilized ruthenium recombines mainly in the form of ruthenium nitrosyl nitrates, or decomposes into ruthenium oxide on the walls of the apparatus. Assuming a heating power density of 10 W/liter of concentrate, and a perfectly adiabatic storage system, the minimum time required to reach dryness can be estimated at 90 h, allowing substantial time to take action to restore a cooling source

  3. Behavior of ruthenium in the case of shutdown of the cooling system of HLLW storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, M.; Mercier, J.P.; Gue, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The consequences of the failure of the cooling system of fission product storage tanks over a variable period were investigated as part of the safety analysis of the La Hague spent fuel reprocessing plant. Due to the considerable heat release, induced by the fission products, a prolonged shutdown of the tank cooling system could cause the progressive evaporation of the solutions to dryness, and culminate in the formation of volatile species of ruthenium and their release in the tank venting circuit. To determine the fraction of ruthenium likely to be transferred from the storage tanks in volatile or aerosol form during the failure, evaporation tests were conducted by evaporating samples of actual nitric acid solutions of fission products, obtained on the laboratory scale after the reprocessing of several kilograms of MOX fuels irradiated to 30,000 MW day·t -1 . A distillation apparatus was designed to operate with small-volume solution samples, reproducing the heating conditions existing in the reprocessing plant within a storage tank for fission products. The main conclusions drawn from these experiments are as follows: ruthenium is only volatilized in the final phase of evaporation, just before desiccation; for a final temperature limited to 160 degree C, the total fraction of volatilized ruthenium reaches 12%; in the presence of H 2 O, HNO 3 , NO x and O 2 , the volatilized ruthenium recombines mainly in the form of ruthenium nitrosyl nitrates, or decomposes into ruthenium oxide (probably RuO 2 ) on the walls of the apparatus. Assuming a heating power density of 10 W/liter of concentrate, and a perfectly adiabatic storage system, the minimum time required to reach dryness can be estimated at 90 h, allowing substantial time to take action to restore a cooling source

  4. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.F.; Zhou, F.Y.; Li, L.; Zheng, Y.F.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are alloys and Ti-based alloys, the magnetic susceptibilities of the zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10−6 cm3·g−1–1.29 × 10−6 cm3·g−1 for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti–6Al–4V, ~3.5 × 10−6 cm3·g−1, CP Ti and Ti–6Al–7Nb, ~3.0 × 10−6 cm3·g−1), and one-sixth that of Co–Cr alloys (Co–Cr–Mo, ~7.7 × 10−6 cm3·g−1). Among the Zr–Ru alloy series, Zr–1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr–Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. PMID:27090955

  5. Electrochemiluminescent determination of nicotine based on tri(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (II) complex through flow injection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Mengshan [Department of Chemistry, Tamkang University, Tamsui 25137, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: mslin@mail.tku.edu.tw; Wang Junsheng; Lai Chienhung [Department of Chemistry, Tamkang University, Tamsui 25137, Taiwan (China)

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes the electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) processes of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}/nicotine system at ITO working electrode. An ECL-based method for rapid and sensitive detection of nicotine in phosphate buffer solution at pH 8.0 is established. Strong ECL emission was observed at a positive potential of 1.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl. A possible ECL mechanism is proposed for the Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}/nicotine system, the oxidation product of nicotine at the electrode surface reacts with the 3+ state of ruthenium bipyridyl (2+) complex and form ruthenium complex exited state ions and thus releases photons. Effect of pH (medium/electrolyte), working potential, buffer composition, buffer concentration, reactant and co-reactant (nicotine) concentration, flow rate and loop size on the ECL spectrum of the Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}/nicotine were studied. At the optimized experimental conditions, lower detection limit for nicotine was observed as 1.2 nmol L{sup -1} (S/N = 3). Linear relationship between ECL current and concentration of nicotine was observed (up to 100 {mu}mol L{sup -1}) with R-value of 0.997. The relative standard deviation with 5 {mu}mol L{sup -1} concentration of nicotine for 20 analyses was only 1.4%. A 94% recovery rate was observed in a real sample analysis without any complications/disturbance in measurement. Interferences of humid acid, camphor and SDS were not observed in their presence in the sample solution. The established procedure for nicotine quantification manifests fascinating results and can be suggested for further applications.

  6. Electrochemiluminescent determination of nicotine based on tri(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (II) complex through flow injection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Meng Shan; Wang, Jun Sheng; Lai, Chien Hung [Department of Chemistry, Tamkang University, Tamsui 25137 (China)

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes the electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) processes of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}/nicotine system at ITO working electrode. An ECL-based method for rapid and sensitive detection of nicotine in phosphate buffer solution at pH 8.0 is established. Strong ECL emission was observed at a positive potential of 1.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl. A possible ECL mechanism is proposed for the Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}/nicotine system, the oxidation product of nicotine at the electrode surface reacts with the 3+ state of ruthenium bipyridyl (2+) complex and form ruthenium complex exited state ions and thus releases photons. Effect of pH (medium/electrolyte), working potential, buffer composition, buffer concentration, reactant and co-reactant (nicotine) concentration, flow rate and loop size on the ECL spectrum of the Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}/nicotine were studied. At the optimized experimental conditions, lower detection limit for nicotine was observed as 1.2 nmol L{sup -1} (S/N = 3). Linear relationship between ECL current and concentration of nicotine was observed (up to 100 {mu}mol L{sup -1}) with R-value of 0.997. The relative standard deviation with 5 {mu}mol L{sup -1} concentration of nicotine for 20 analyses was only 1.4%. A 94% recovery rate was observed in a real sample analysis without any complications/disturbance in measurement. Interferences of humid acid, camphor and SDS were not observed in their presence in the sample solution. The established procedure for nicotine quantification manifests fascinating results and can be suggested for further applications. (author)

  7. Electrochemiluminescent determination of nicotine based on tri(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (II) complex through flow injection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Mengshan; Wang Junsheng; Lai Chienhung

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) processes of Ru(bpy) 3 2+ /nicotine system at ITO working electrode. An ECL-based method for rapid and sensitive detection of nicotine in phosphate buffer solution at pH 8.0 is established. Strong ECL emission was observed at a positive potential of 1.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl. A possible ECL mechanism is proposed for the Ru(bpy) 3 2+ /nicotine system, the oxidation product of nicotine at the electrode surface reacts with the 3+ state of ruthenium bipyridyl (2+) complex and form ruthenium complex exited state ions and thus releases photons. Effect of pH (medium/electrolyte), working potential, buffer composition, buffer concentration, reactant and co-reactant (nicotine) concentration, flow rate and loop size on the ECL spectrum of the Ru(bpy) 3 2+ /nicotine were studied. At the optimized experimental conditions, lower detection limit for nicotine was observed as 1.2 nmol L -1 (S/N = 3). Linear relationship between ECL current and concentration of nicotine was observed (up to 100 μmol L -1 ) with R-value of 0.997. The relative standard deviation with 5 μmol L -1 concentration of nicotine for 20 analyses was only 1.4%. A 94% recovery rate was observed in a real sample analysis without any complications/disturbance in measurement. Interferences of humid acid, camphor and SDS were not observed in their presence in the sample solution. The established procedure for nicotine quantification manifests fascinating results and can be suggested for further applications

  8. Change of Dye Bath for Sensitisation of Nanocrystalline TiO Films: Enhances Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malapaka Chandrasekharam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The photovoltaic performance of the heteroleptic H102 and HRD2 sensitizers was measured in DSSC and compared with that of reference N719 under similar fabrication and evaluation conditions. The Dye-Sensitised TiO2 electrodes were prepared by staining the electrodes in ethanol bath and 1/1 v/v acetonitrile/tert-butanol (binary liquid mixture bath separately and the DSSCs based on these sensitizers show that the change of dye bath from ethanol to the binary liquid mixture enhances the photocurrent action spectrum and solar-to-electricity conversion efficiencies, (η. Using ethanol for sensitisation of TiO2 electrodes, the efficiencies obtained for H102, HRD2 and N719 are 4.31%, 4.62%, and 5.46%, respectively, while in binary liquid mixture bath, the corresponding values are enhanced to 5.89%, 4.87%, and 7.23%, respectively, under comparable conditions.

  9. Electrochemical behavior of ruthenium (III), rhodium (III) and palladium (II) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, M.; Venkatesan, K.A. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Srinivasan, T.G. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)], E-mail: tgs@igcar.gov.in; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2009-11-01

    Electrochemical behavior of ruthenium (III), rhodium (III) and palladium (II) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (bmimCl) and their ternary and binary solutions in bmimCl was studied at various working electrodes at 373 K by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Ruthenium (III) chloride forms a stable solution with bmimCl and the cyclic voltammogram of ruthenium (III) in bmimCl recorded at glassy carbon electrode consisted of several redox waves due to the complex nature of ruthenium to exist in several oxidation states. Electrolysis of ruthenium (III) chloride in bmimCl at the cathodic limit of bmimCl (-1.8 V (vs. Pd)) did not result in ruthenium metal deposition. However, it was deposited from bmimPF{sub 6} and bmimNTf{sub 2} room temperature ionic liquids at -0.8 V (vs. Pd). The electrochemical behavior of ruthenium (III) in bmimCl in the presence of palladium (II) and rhodium (III) was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The presence of palladium (II) in bmimCl favors underpotential deposition of ruthenium metal. The nuclear loop at -0.5 V (vs. Pd) was observed in all solutions when palladium (II) co-existed with other two metal ions. Nucleation and growth of the metal on glassy carbon working electrode was investigated by chronoamperometry. The growth and decay of chronocurrents has been found to follow the instantaneous nucleation model with three-dimensional growth of nuclei.

  10. Ground vs. excited state interaction in ruthenium-thienyl dyads : implications for through bond interactions in multicomponent systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henry, William; Browne, Wesley R.; Ronayne, Kate L.; O’Boyle, Noel M.; Vos, Johannes G.; McGarvey, John J.

    2005-01-01

    The vibrational and photophysical properties of mononuclear ruthenium(II) and ruthenium(III) polypyridyl complexes based on the, ligands 2-(5-(pyridin-2"-yl)-1'H-1',2',4'-triaz-3'-yl)-thiophene, 2-(5-(pyrazin-2"-yl)-1'H-1',2,4-triaz-3'-yl)-thiophene, are reported. The effect of the introduction of

  11. Dehydrogenative Coupling of Primary Alcohols To Form Esters Catalyzed by a Ruthenium N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølvhøj, Amanda Birgitte; Madsen, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The ruthenium complex [RuCl2(IiPr)(p-cymene)] catalyzes the direct condensation of primary alcohols into esters and lactones with the release of hydrogen gas. The reaction is most effective with linear aliphatic alcohols and 1,4-diols and is believed to proceed with a ruthenium dihydride...

  12. A facile one-pot synthesis of ruthenium hydroxide nanoparticles on magnetic silica: Aqueous hydration of nitriles to amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium hydroxide nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium hydroxide immobilization; the hydration of nitriles occurs in high yield and excellent selectivity using this...

  13. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of ruthenium oxide nanodots on reduced graphene oxide sheets for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yao [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang Xiong [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang Dacheng [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ma Yanwei, E-mail: ywma@mail.iee.ac.cn [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: > Graphite oxide instead of graphene as precursor has been used to synthesize reduced graphene oxide/ruthenium oxide composites by a hydrothermal treatment. > Using NaOH solution to adjust pH of GO colloids leads to homogeneous ruthenium oxide deposited on reduced graphene oxide sheets. > A maximum capacitance of 471 F g{sup -1} is obtained at 0.5 A g{sup -1} for the composites when loading 40% of RuO{sub 2} and its life retention reaches 92% after 3000 cycles. - Abstract: Ruthenium oxide nanodots have been deposited on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets homogeneously by hydrothermal and annealing methods. Adding NaOH solution in GO colloids prevents the restack and agglomeration of GO sheets when mixed with ruthenium chloride solution. Local crystallization of RuO{sub 2} in the composites is revealed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The element mapping image demonstrates the uniform distribution of Ru on RGO sheets. Unlike the pure crystalline RuO{sub 2} exhibiting poor electrochemical performance, the composites present superior capacitive properties. The hydrothermal time is optimized and a maximum of 471 F g{sup -1} is measured in the composites at 0.5 A g{sup -1} when loaded with 45 wt% of RuO{sub 2}. After 3000 cycles, its specific capacitance remains 92% of the maximum capacitance. Our results suggest potential application of the reduced graphene oxide/ruthenium oxide composites to supercapacitors.

  14. Activity and selectivity regulation of synthesis gas reaction over supported ruthenium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, K; Nobusawa, T; Fukushima, T; Tominaga, H

    1985-01-01

    The catalytic activities of supported ruthenium for synthesis-gas conversion to hydrocarbons was found to be in the following order: TiOS > Nb2O3 > ZrO2 > SiO2 > Ta2O5 > Al2O3 > V2O5 > MoO3 > WO3 > MnO2 > ZnO. Turnover frequencies of the supported ruthenium increased with decrease in dispersion of the metal particles for every carrier material. Even the activities per unit weight of metals were higher for low-dispersion ruthenium of Al2O3, TiO2, and ZrO2. The chain-growth probability of a hydrocarbon product, which is characterized by the Schulz-Flory distribution, increased markedly with decrease in the metal dispersion irrespective of the carrier material. The catalytic activity of ruthenium particles with a dispersed ruthenium increased almost linearly with an increase in reaction pressure (up to at least 2.0 MPa). 23 references, 10 figures, 3 tables.

  15. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of ruthenium oxide nanodots on reduced graphene oxide sheets for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yao; Zhang Xiong; Zhang Dacheng; Ma Yanwei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Graphite oxide instead of graphene as precursor has been used to synthesize reduced graphene oxide/ruthenium oxide composites by a hydrothermal treatment. → Using NaOH solution to adjust pH of GO colloids leads to homogeneous ruthenium oxide deposited on reduced graphene oxide sheets. → A maximum capacitance of 471 F g -1 is obtained at 0.5 A g -1 for the composites when loading 40% of RuO 2 and its life retention reaches 92% after 3000 cycles. - Abstract: Ruthenium oxide nanodots have been deposited on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets homogeneously by hydrothermal and annealing methods. Adding NaOH solution in GO colloids prevents the restack and agglomeration of GO sheets when mixed with ruthenium chloride solution. Local crystallization of RuO 2 in the composites is revealed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The element mapping image demonstrates the uniform distribution of Ru on RGO sheets. Unlike the pure crystalline RuO 2 exhibiting poor electrochemical performance, the composites present superior capacitive properties. The hydrothermal time is optimized and a maximum of 471 F g -1 is measured in the composites at 0.5 A g -1 when loaded with 45 wt% of RuO 2 . After 3000 cycles, its specific capacitance remains 92% of the maximum capacitance. Our results suggest potential application of the reduced graphene oxide/ruthenium oxide composites to supercapacitors.

  16. Mitigation of strontium and ruthenium release in the CANDU primary heat transport system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, J

    1998-03-01

    In certain severe accident scenarios, low-volatility fission products can appear to contribute significantly to dose, if treated with undue conservatism. Hence a survey was performed, to see if factors that may mitigate release of strontium and ruthenium could be incorporated into safety analyses, to cover parameters such as location in the fuel matrix under normal operating conditions, release from fuel, transport and deposition in the primary heat transport system and chemistry. In addition chemical equilibrium calculations were performed to investigate the volatility of strontium and ruthenium in the presence of uranium and important fission products. Strontium is very soluble in the U0{sub 2} fuel, up to 12 atom %, and hence release is improbable, particularly under oxidizing conditions until volatilization of the fuel matrix itself occurs. Ruthenium, however, can be released at low temperatures, but only under oxidizing conditions. These may occur during a fuel-handling accident or as a result of an end-fitting failure. Under these conditions, the primary heat transport system cannot be credited for retention. The volatile form of ruthenium, RuO{sub 4}(g), is thermally unstable above 381 K and decomposes to RuO{sub 2}(s) and O{sub 2}(g) upon contact with surfaces, a factor that is likely to minimize the release of ruthenium into the environment. (author)

  17. Mitigation of strontium and ruthenium release in the CANDU primary heat transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, J.

    1998-03-01

    In certain severe accident scenarios, low-volatility fission products can appear to contribute significantly to dose, if treated with undue conservatism. Hence a survey was performed, to see if factors that may mitigate release of strontium and ruthenium could be incorporated into safety analyses, to cover parameters such as location in the fuel matrix under normal operating conditions, release from fuel, transport and deposition in the primary heat transport system and chemistry. In addition chemical equilibrium calculations were performed to investigate the volatility of strontium and ruthenium in the presence of uranium and important fission products. Strontium is very soluble in the U0 2 fuel, up to 12 atom %, and hence release is improbable, particularly under oxidizing conditions until volatilization of the fuel matrix itself occurs. Ruthenium, however, can be released at low temperatures, but only under oxidizing conditions. These may occur during a fuel-handling accident or as a result of an end-fitting failure. Under these conditions, the primary heat transport system cannot be credited for retention. The volatile form of ruthenium, RuO 4 (g), is thermally unstable above 381 K and decomposes to RuO 2 (s) and O 2 (g) upon contact with surfaces, a factor that is likely to minimize the release of ruthenium into the environment. (author)

  18. Controlling Second Coordination Sphere Effects in Luminescent Ruthenium Complexes by Means of External Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannwitz, Andrea; Poirier, Stéphanie; Bélanger-Desmarais, Nicolas; Prescimone, Alessandro; Wenger, Oliver S; Reber, Christian

    2018-06-04

    Two luminescent heteroleptic Ru II complexes with a 2,2'-biimidazole (biimH 2 ) ligand form doubly hydrogen-bonded salt bridges to 4-sulfobenzoate anions in single crystals. The structure of one of these cation-anion adducts shows that the biimH 2 ligand is deprotonated. Its 3 MLCT luminescence band does not shift significantly under the influence of an external hydrostatic pressure, a behavior typical for these electronic transitions. In contrast, hydrostatic pressure on the other crystalline cation-anion adduct induces a shift of proton density from the peripheral N-H groups of biimH 2 towards benzoate, leading to a pronounced redshift of the 3 MLCT luminescence band. Such a significant and pressure-tunable influence from an interaction in the second coordination sphere is unprecedented in artificial small-molecule-based systems. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Interaction of ruthenium (4) and osmium (4) with 2-mercaptobenzimidazole, 2-mercaptobenzoxazole and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole in the presence of edta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busev, A.I.; Ignat'eva, T.I.; Lomakina, L.N.

    1975-01-01

    Interaction of ruthenium (4) and osmium (4) with 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2MBI), 2-mercaptobenzoxazole (2MBO) and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (2MBT) in the presence of EDTA was studied. The interaction of ruthenium (4) and osmium (4) with EDTA was constidered. Ruthenium complex is formed with constant output at 2-4.5 pH after 30 min.heating. In the lowacid solution (pH 2-4) osmium reacts with EDTA forming soluble compound. Characteristics of ruthenium (4) compound with 2MBI, 2MBO and 2MBT produced in the presence of EDTA are presented. Osmium (4) in the presence of EDTA and above mentioned organic reagents and when heating forms lowsoluble compounds. Possibility of joint determination of ruthenium and osmium with help of 2MBI in the presence of EDTA under conditions of minimum complexing osmium with EDTA was investigated

  20. Interaction of ruthenium (4) and osmium (4) with 2-mercaptobenzimidazole, 2-mercaptobenzoxazole and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole in the presence of EDTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busev, A I; Ignat' eva, T I; Lomakina, L N [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Kafedra Analiticheskoj Khimii

    1975-05-01

    Interaction of ruthenium (4) and osmium (4) with 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2MBI), 2-mercaptobenzoxazole (2MBO) and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (2MBT) in the presence of EDTA was studied. The interaction of ruthenium (4) and osmium (4) with EDTA was considered. Ruthenium complex is formed with constant output at 2-4.5 pH after 30 min. heating. In the low acid solution (pH 2-4) osmium reacts with EDTA forming soluble compound. Characteristics of ruthenium (4) compound with 2MBI, 2MBO and 2MBT produced in the presence of EDTA are presented. Osmium (4) in the presence of EDTA and above mentioned organic reagents and when heating forms low soluble compounds. Possibility of joint determination of ruthenium and osmium with help of 2MBI in the presence of EDTA under conditions of minimum complexing osmium with EDTA was investigated.

  1. Ruthenium sulfoxides structure and reactivity with nitrogen heterocyclic bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Denise de.

    1990-01-01

    Ruthenium (II) sulfoxides are compounds of great interest in oxidative catalysis and in chemotherapy. In order to contribute for the understanding of the chemistry and electronic structure of this class of compounds, it has been studied a series of [Ru Cl 2 (S-DMSO) 2 L x ] complexes, where x = 1 (polymeric compounds) or 2 (monomers) and L N-heterocyclic ligands (pyridine, pyrazine and imidazole derivatives). The nature of N-heterocyclic ligand and their coordination are of great relevance to the stability, spectroscopic and electrochemical characteristics of the complexes. The trans-interactions are extremely important in this series, influencing the strength of the Ru(II)-> S-DMSO and Ru(II)-> L π-back donation. The DMSO and L ligands are π-acceptors. The metal-> ligand π-back donation is strengthened when the ligand is trans to chloride, which is π-donor, due to trans-cooperative interactions of the type: π-donor -> Ru(II) π-acceptor. Another interesting aspect in the series of [Ru Cl 2 (S-DMSO) 2 L 2 ] complexes is the occurrence of dissociative equilibria in the solution, due to the existence of three types of ligands. It was observed that the trans-N isomer of 2,6-dimethyl pyrazine derivative undergoes thermal substitution, with preferential liabilization of the N-heterocyclic ligand. Chloride ion is the most inert ligand in this complex. (author). 145 refs., 76 figs., 21 tabs

  2. Coordinatively unsaturated ruthenium complexes as efficient alkyneazide cycloaddition catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Lamberti, Marina; Fortman, George C.; Poater, Albert; Broggi, Julie; Slawin, Alexandra M. Z.; Cavallo, Luigi; Nolan, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of 16-electron ruthenium complexes with the general formula Cp*Ru(L)X (in which L = phosphine or N-heterocyclic carbene ligand; X = Cl or OCH2CF3) was explored in azidealkyne cycloaddition reactions that afford the 1,2,3- triazole products. The scope of the Cp*Ru(PiPr 3)Cl precatalyst was investigated for terminal alkynes leading to new 1,5-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles in high yields. Mechanistic studies were conducted and revealed a number of proposed intermediates. Cp*Ru- (PiPr3)(2-HCCPh)Cl was observed and characterized by 1H, 13C, and 31P NMR at temperatures between 273 and 213 K. A rare example of N,N-κ2-phosphazide complex, Cp*Ru(κ2- iPr3PN3Bn)Cl, was fully characterized, and a single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure was obtained. DFT calculations describe a complete map of the catalytic reactivity with phenylacetylene and/or benzylazide. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Graphene Oxide/ Ruthenium Oxide Composites for Supercapacitors Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Fatima

    Supercapacitors are electrical energy storage devices with high power density, high rate capability, low maintenance cost, and long life cycle. They complement or replace batteries in harvesting applications when high power delivery is needed. An important improvement in performance of supercapacitors has been achieved through recent advances in the development of new nanostructured materials. Here we will discuss the fabrication of graphene oxide/ ruthenium oxide supercacitors electrodes including electrophoretic deposition. The morphology and structure of the fabricated electrodes were investigated and will be discussed. The electrochemical properties were determined using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge techniques and the experiments that demonstrate the excellent capacitive properties of the obtained supercapacitors will also be discussed. The fabrication and characterization of the samples were performed at the Center of Functional Nanomaterials at Brookhaven National Lab. The developed approaches in our study represent an exciting direction for designing the next generation of energy storage devices. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Visiting Faculty Program and the research used resources of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  4. Visual acuity after Ruthenium106 brachytherapy of choroidal melanomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damato, Bertil; Patel, Imran M.; Campbell, Ian R.; Mayles, Helen M.; Errington, R. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To report on conservation of visual acuity after Ruthenium 106 (Ru-106) brachytherapy of choroidal melanoma. Methods and materials: This study was a noncomparative interventional case series of 458 patients with choroidal melanoma treated at a single center between January 1993 and December 2001. The intervention consisted of Ru-106 brachytherapy delivering minimum scleral and apex doses of 300 Gy and 80 Gy, respectively, using a 15-mm or 20-mm plaque. For discrete, posterior tumors, the plaque was positioned eccentrically with its posterior edge aligned with the posterior tumor margin. To ensure correct plaque positioning, any overlying extraocular muscles were dis-inserted, and the locations of both tumor and plaque edges were confirmed by transillumination and indentation. The main outcome measures were conservation of vision of 20/40 or better, 20/200 or better, and Counting Fingers or better, according to baseline variables. Results: The actuarial rate of conservation of 20/40 or better was 55% at 9 years, loss of such vision correlating with posterior tumor extension (p 106 brachytherapy of posterior choroidal melanoma achieves good conservation of vision if the tumor does not extend close to the optic nerve or fovea

  5. Coordinatively unsaturated ruthenium complexes as efficient alkyneazide cycloaddition catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Lamberti, Marina

    2012-01-23

    The performance of 16-electron ruthenium complexes with the general formula Cp*Ru(L)X (in which L = phosphine or N-heterocyclic carbene ligand; X = Cl or OCH2CF3) was explored in azidealkyne cycloaddition reactions that afford the 1,2,3- triazole products. The scope of the Cp*Ru(PiPr 3)Cl precatalyst was investigated for terminal alkynes leading to new 1,5-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles in high yields. Mechanistic studies were conducted and revealed a number of proposed intermediates. Cp*Ru- (PiPr3)(2-HCCPh)Cl was observed and characterized by 1H, 13C, and 31P NMR at temperatures between 273 and 213 K. A rare example of N,N-κ2-phosphazide complex, Cp*Ru(κ2- iPr3PN3Bn)Cl, was fully characterized, and a single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure was obtained. DFT calculations describe a complete map of the catalytic reactivity with phenylacetylene and/or benzylazide. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Rapid visual and spectrophotometric nitrite detection by cyclometalated ruthenium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hoi-Shing; Lo, Ka-Wai; Yeung, Chi-Fung; Wong, Chun-Yuen

    2017-10-16

    Quantitative determination of nitrite ion (NO 2 - ) is of great importance in environmental and clinical investigations. A rapid visual and spectrophotometric assay for NO 2 - detection was developed based on a newly designed ruthenium complex, [Ru(npy)([9]aneS3)(CO)](ClO 4 ) (denoted as RuNPY; npy = 2-(1-naphthyl)pyridine, [9]aneS3 = 1,4,7-trithiacyclononane). This complex traps NO + produced in acidified NO 2 - solution, and yields observable color change within 1 min at room temperature. The assay features excellent dynamic range (1-840 μmol L -1 ) and high selectivity, and its limit of detection (0.39 μmol L -1 ) is also well below the guideline values for drinking water recommended by WHO and U.S. EPA. Practical use of this assay in tap water and human urine was successfully demonstrated. Overall, the rapidity and selectivity of this assay overcome the problems suffered by the commonly used modified Griess assays for nitrite determination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ruthenium(V) oxides from low-temperature hydrothermal synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiley, Craig I.; Walton, Richard I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Lees, Martin R. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Fisher, Janet M.; Thompsett, David [Johnson Matthey Technology Centre, Reading (United Kingdom); Agrestini, Stefano [Max-Planck Institut, CPfS, Dresden (Germany); Smith, Ronald I. [ISIS Neutron and Muon Source, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-22

    Low-temperature (200 C) hydrothermal synthesis of the ruthenium oxides Ca{sub 1.5}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}, SrRu{sub 2}O{sub 6}, and Ba{sub 2}Ru{sub 3}O{sub 9}(OH) is reported. Ca{sub 1.5}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7} is a defective pyrochlore containing Ru{sup V/VI}; SrRu{sub 2}O{sub 6} is a layered Ru{sup V} oxide with a PbSb{sub 2}O{sub 6} structure, whilst Ba{sub 2}Ru{sub 3}O{sub 9}(OH) has a previously unreported structure type with orthorhombic symmetry solved from synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction. SrRu{sub 2}O{sub 6} exhibits unusually high-temperature magnetic order, with antiferromagnetism persisting to at least 500 K, and refinement using room temperature neutron powder diffraction data provides the magnetic structure. All three ruthenates are metastable and readily collapse to mixtures of other oxides upon heating in air at temperatures around 300-500 C, suggesting they would be difficult, if not impossible, to isolate under conventional high-temperature solid-state synthesis conditions. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Placental transfer of ruthenium in rat and guinea-pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levack, V.M.; Pottinger, H.; Harrison, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Ruthenium-106 in citrate solution was administered intravenously to rat at different stages of pregnancy and to guinea-pig either before conception or in late pregnancy. The results for rat showed that retention in the embryo/foetus measured at 3-5 days after administration increased from about 0.0002% of injected activity per embryo/foetus on day 12 of gestation to about 0.05% at birth. The relative concentrations of 106 Ru in embryo/foetus and mother (C f /C m ratio) were about 0.1 in each case. Concentrations in the yolk sac on day 12 were about 1% g -1 compared with 0.01% g -1 kin the foetus/ Retention in the guinea-pig foetus in late gestation at 7 days after administration (days 50-57) was about 0.2% injected activity per foetus, corresponding to a C f /C m = 0.2. Retention in each foetoplacental unit was 2% of injected 106 Ru with 50% in the yolk sac, 35% in the placenta and 10% in the foetus. For administration 4 weeks prior to conception, the level of 106 Ru retained in the foetus on day 57 of gestation was two orders of magnitude lower than after short-term administration, with a C f /C m about 0.004. (author)

  9. Sweetening ruthenium and osmium: organometallic arene complexes containing aspartame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jennifer C; Habtemariam, Abraha; Winnig, Marcel; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Sadler, Peter J

    2008-09-01

    The novel organometallic sandwich complexes [(eta(6)-p-cymene)Ru(eta(6)-aspartame)](OTf)(2) (1) (OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate) and [(eta(6)-p-cymene)Os(eta(6)-aspartame)](OTf)(2) (2) incorporating the artificial sweetener aspartame have been synthesised and characterised. A number of properties of aspartame were found to be altered on binding to either metal. The pK(a) values of both the carboxyl and the amino groups of aspartame are lowered by between 0.35 and 0.57 pH units, causing partial deprotonation of the amino group at pH 7.4 (physiological pH). The rate of degradation of aspartame to 3,6-dioxo-5-phenylmethylpiperazine acetic acid (diketopiperazine) increased over threefold from 0.12 to 0.36 h(-1) for 1, and to 0.43 h(-1) for 2. Furthermore, the reduction potential of the ligand shifted from -1.133 to -0.619 V for 2. For the ruthenium complex 1 the process occurred in two steps, the first (at -0.38 V) within a biologically accessible range. This facilitates reactions with biological reductants such as ascorbate. Binding to and activation of the sweet taste receptor was not observed for these metal complexes up to concentrations of 1 mM. The factors which affect the ability of metal-bound aspartame to interact with the receptor site are discussed.

  10. Electron transfer reactions of ruthenium(II) complexes with polyphenolic acids in micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Department of Chemistry, Fatima College, Madurai 625 018 (India); Ramdass, Arumugam [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Research Department of Chemistry, Aditanar College of Arts and Science, Tiruchendur 628 216 (India); Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Department of Industrial Chemistry, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003 (India); Rajagopal, Seenivasan, E-mail: rajagopalseenivasan@yahoo.com [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India)

    2016-02-15

    The electron transfer in a microhetrogeneous system is a perfect mimic of biological electron transfer. The electron transfer between biologically important phenolic acids and ruthenium (II) complexes is systematically studied in the presence of anionic and cationic micelles. The photophysical properties of these ruthenium (II) complexes with anionic and cationic micelles and their binding abilities with these two type of micelles are also studies using absorption, emission and excited state lifetime spectral techniques. Pseudophase Ion Exchange (PIE) Model is applied to derive mechanism of electron transfer in two types of micelles. - Highlights: • Effect of microhetrogeneous system is studied using ruthenium (II) complexes and gallic acid is studied. • Pseudophase Ion exchange model is applied to derive the mechanism. • Binding constants are in the range of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} M{sup −1}.

  11. Stable tracer investigations in humans for assessing the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronese, I.; Cantone, M.C.; Giussani, A.; Maggioni, T.; Birattari, C.; Bondardi, M.; Groppi, F.; Garlaschelli, I.; Werner, E.; Roth, P.; Hoellriegl, V.; Louvat, P.; Felgenhauer, N.; Zilker, Th.

    2003-01-01

    The interest in the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium in humans is justified by the potential radiological risk represented by their radionuclides. Only a few data related to the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium in humans are available and, accordingly, the biokinetic models currently recommended by the ICRP for these elements are mainly based on data from animal experiments. The use of stable isotopes as tracers, coupled with a proper analytical technique (nuclear activation analysis with protons) for their determination in biological samples, represents an ethically acceptable methodology for biokinetic investigations, being free from any radiation risk for the volunteer subjects. In this work, the results obtained in eight biokinetic investigations for ruthenium, conducted on a total of three healthy volunteers, and six for zirconium, performed on a total of three subjects, are presented and compared to the predictions of the ICRP models. (author)

  12. Amorphous carbon nanofibres inducing high specific capacitance of deposited hydrous ruthenium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, V.; Pico, F.; Ibanez, J.; Lillo-Rodenas, M.A.; Linares-Solano, A.; Kimura, M.; Oya, A.; Rojas, R.M.; Amarilla, J.M.; Rojo, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Composites consisting of ruthenium oxide particles deposited on amorphous carbon nanofibres are prepared by a repetitive impregnation procedure. The choice of amorphous carbon nanofibres as support of amorphous ruthenium oxide leads to composites in which the deposited oxide consists of aggregates of extremely small primary particles (1-1.5 nm-size) and showing high porosity (specific surface area of 450 m 2 g -1 ). This special deposition of the oxide seems to favour: (i) high oxide capacitance (1000 Fg -1 ) at high oxide loadings (up to 20 wt%) and (ii) high capacitance retention (ca. 80% from the initial oxide capacitance) at high current densities (200 mA cm -2 ). Amorphous carbon nanofibres are suitable supports for amorphous ruthenium oxide and perhaps for other amorphous oxides acting as active electrode materials.

  13. Alkyl Chain Barriers for Kinetic Optimization in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, J.E.; Hirata, N.; Koops, S.; Nazeeruddin, M.K.; Schmidt-Mende, L.; Grätzel, M.; Durrant, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    The optimization of interfacial charge transfer is crucial to the design of dye-sensitized solar cells. In this paper we address the dynamics of the charge separation and recombination in liquid-electrolyte and solid-state cells employing a series of amphiphilic ruthenium dyes with varying

  14. Highly efficient quenching of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) electrochemiluminescence by ozone using formaldehyde, methylglyoxal, and glyoxalate as co-reactants and its application to ozone sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Liu, Xiaoyun; Qi, Wenjing; Gao, Wenyue; Li, Yunhui; Xu, Guobao

    2015-06-21

    Most electrochemiluminescence (ECL) systems require high concentrations of quencher to totally quench ECL. In this study, we found that ozone can quench tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) ECL using formaldehyde, methylglyoxal, or glyoxalate as co-reactants at a glassy carbon electrode with remarkable efficiencies even when the concentration of ozone is merely 0.25% of that of the co-reactant. The strongest quenching is observed with the tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II)/formaldehyde ECL system. The tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II)/formaldehyde ECL intensities decrease linearly with the ozone concentration over the range of 0.025-25 μM (r = 0.9947) with a limit of detection of 8 nM. The method is more sensitive and faster than most methods. It shows high selectivity in the presence of other ROS or oxidants and some metal ions, such as H2O2, ClO(-), Mg(2+), Ni(2+), etc. The method exhibits high recoveries for the detection of ozone in a ventilated photocopy room.

  15. Ruthenium phosphine complexes as catalysts for alternating co-polymerization of ethylene and CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, O.V.; Kal'sin, A.M.; Peganov, T.A.; Petrovskij, P.V.; Belov, G.P.; Novikova, E.V.

    2000-01-01

    Ruthenium (2) complexes, [Ru(dppe) 2 (OTs) 2 ] and [Ru(PhP(CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 PPh 2 ) 2 )(OTs) 2 ], where dppe (diphenylphosphino)ethane; OTs = tosylate, were synthesized with the yield of 67 and 76%, respectively, and characterized by 31 P NMR. The properties of the above complexes as catalysts of alternating co-polymerization of ethylene and carbon monoxide were studied. A considerable increase in catalytic activity of the complexes was established in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid and 1,4-benzoquinone. These compounds are the first example of ruthenium complexes that catalyse co-polymerization of ethylene and CO [ru

  16. Behaviour of ruthenium in the case of shutdown of the cooling system of HLLW storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, M.; Gue, J.P.; Mercier, J.P.

    1990-12-01

    The consequences of the failure of the cooling system of fission product storage tanks over a variable period were investigated as part of the safety analysis of the La Hague spent fuel reprocessing plant. Due to the considerable heat release, induced by the fission products, a prolonged shutdown of the tank cooling system could cause the progressive evaporation of the solutions to dryness, and culminate in the formation of volatile species of ruthenium and their release in the tank venting circuit. To determine the fraction of ruthenium likely to be transferred from the storage tanks in volatile or aerosol form during the failure, evaporation tests were conducted by evaporating samples of actual nitric acid solutions of fission products, obtained on the laboratory scale after the reprocessing of several kilograms of MOX fuels irradiated to 30.000 MW day ·t -1 . A distillation apparatus was designed to operate with small-volume solution samples, reproducing the heating conditions existing in the reprocessing plant within a storage tank for fission products. The main conclusions drawn from these experiments are as follows: - ruthenium is only volatilized in the final phase of evaporation, just before desiccation, - for a final temperature limited to 160 deg. C, the total fraction of volatilized ruthenium reaches 12%, - in the presence of H 2 O, HNO 3 , NO x and O 2 , the volatilized ruthenium recombines mainly in the form of ruthenium nitrosyl nitrates, or decomposes into ruthenium oxide (probably RuO 2 ) on the walls of the apparatus. Assuming a heating power density of 10 W/liter of concentrate, and a perfectly adiabatic storage system, the minimum time required to reach dryness can be estimated at 90 h, allowing substantial time to take action to restore a cooling source. It is probable that, in an industrial storage tank, the heat losses from the tank and the offgas discharge ducts will cause recondensation and internal reflux, which will commensurately delay

  17. General synthesis of (salen)ruthenium(III) complexes via N...N coupling of (salen)ruthenium(VI) nitrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wai-Lun; Kwong, Hoi-Ki; Lam, William W Y; Xiang, Jing; Wong, Tsz-Wing; Lam, Wing-Hong; Wong, Wing-Tak; Peng, Shie-Ming; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2008-07-07

    Reaction of [Ru (VI)(N)(L (1))(MeOH)] (+) (L (1) = N, N'-bis(salicylidene)- o-cyclohexylenediamine dianion) with excess pyridine in CH 3CN produces [Ru (III)(L (1))(py) 2] (+) and N 2. The proposed mechanism involves initial equilibrium formation of [Ru (VI)(N)(L (1))(py)] (+), which undergoes rapid N...N coupling to produce [(py)(L (1))Ru (III) N N-Ru (III)(L (1))(py)] (2+); this is followed by pyridine substituion to give the final product. This ligand-induced N...N coupling of Ru (VI)N is utilized in the preparation of a series of new ruthenium(III) salen complexes, [Ru (III)(L)(X) 2] (+/-) (L = salen ligand; X = H 2O, 1-MeIm, py, Me 2SO, PhNH 2, ( t )BuNH 2, Cl (-) or CN (-)). The structures of [Ru (III)(L (1))(NH 2Ph) 2](PF 6) ( 6), K[Ru (III)(L (1))(CN) 2] ( 9), [Ru (III)(L (2))(NCCH 3) 2][Au (I)(CN) 2] ( 11) (L (2) = N, N'-bis(salicylidene)- o-phenylenediamine dianion) and [N ( n )Bu 4][Ru (III)(L (3))Cl 2] ( 12) (L (3) = N, N'-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine dianion) have been determined by X-ray crystallography.

  18. Spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium(III) and rhodium(III) after extraction of their cyclohexylthioglycolate complexes into chloroform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, A.L.J.; Gupta, Usha; Puri, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Cyclohexylthioglycolate has been used as a reagent for the spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium(III) and rhodium(III) after the extraction of their complexes into chloroform. Various parameters involved in the extraction have been studied and the composition of the extracted complex has been established in each instance. Ruthenium and rhodium complexes are extracted into chloroform in the pH ranges 5.0-9.0 and 9.0-12.5, respectively. The ruthenium complex absorbs strongly at 365 nm, whereas the rhodium complex shows a maximum absorption at 345 nm. Beer's law is obeyed over the concentration range 6-96 μg for ruthenium and 2-41 μg for rhodium in 10 ml of the chloroform solution. The molar absorptivities are 5.02 x 10 3 l mol -1 cm -1 for ruthenium and 1.60 x 10 4 l mol -1 cm -1 for rhodium. Ten replicate determinations on a sample solution containing 60.3 μg of ruthenium or 20.6 μg of rhodium gave mean absorbances of 0.300 and 0.320 with standard deviations of 0.0021 and 0.0025 and relative standard deviations of 0.70% and 0.78%, respectively. The interference of various ions has been studied and the method has been applied to the determination of the metals in various synthetic samples. Conditions have also been developed for the simultaneous determination of ruthenium and rhodium. (author)

  19. A ruthenium anticancer compound interacts with histones and impacts differently on epigenetic and death pathways compared to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona, Cynthia; Spaety, Marie-Elodie; Capuozzo, Antonelle; Ali, Moussa; Santamaria, Rita; Armant, Olivier; Delalande, Francois; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Cianferani, Sarah; Spencer, John; Pfeffer, Michel; Mellitzer, Georg; Gaiddon, Christian

    2017-01-10

    Ruthenium complexes are considered as potential replacements for platinum compounds in oncotherapy. Their clinical development is handicapped by a lack of consensus on their mode of action. In this study, we identify three histones (H3.1, H2A, H2B) as possible targets for an anticancer redox organoruthenium compound (RDC11). Using purified histones, we confirmed an interaction between the ruthenium complex and histones that impacted on histone complex formation. A comparative study of the ruthenium complex versus cisplatin showed differential epigenetic modifications on histone H3 that correlated with differential expression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) genes. We then characterized the impact of these epigenetic modifications on signaling pathways employing a transcriptomic approach. Clustering analyses showed gene expression signatures specific for cisplatin (42%) and for the ruthenium complex (30%). Signaling pathway analyses pointed to specificities distinguishing the ruthenium complex from cisplatin. For instance, cisplatin triggered preferentially p53 and folate biosynthesis while the ruthenium complex induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and trans-sulfuration pathways. To further understand the role of HDACs in these regulations, we used suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) and showed that it synergized with cisplatin cytotoxicity while antagonizing the ruthenium complex activity. This study provides critical information for the characterization of signaling pathways differentiating both compounds, in particular, by the identification of a non-DNA direct target for an organoruthenium complex.

  20. In vitro evaluation of ruthenium complexes for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenna; Xie, Qiang; Lai, Linglin; Mo, Zhentao; Peng, Xiaofang; Leng, Ennian; Zhang, Dandan; Sun, Hongxia; Li, Yiqi; Mei, Wenjie; Gao, Shuying

    2017-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising anti-tumor treatment strategy. Photosensitizer is one of the most important components of PDT. In this work, the anticancer activities of PDT mediated by six new ruthenium porphyrin complexes were screened. The mechanisms of the most efficacious candidate were investigated. Photocytotoxicity of the six porphyrins was tested. The most promising complex, Rup-03, was further investigated using Geimsa staining, which indirectly detects reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subcellular localization. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cell apoptosis, DNA fragmentation, c-Myc gene expression, and telomerase activities were also assayed. Rup-03 and Rup-04 had the lowest IC 50 values. Rup-03 had an IC 50 value of 29.5±2.3μM in HepG2 cells and 59.0±6.1μM in RAW264.7 cells, while Rup-04 had an IC 50 value of 40.0±3.8μM in SGC-7901 cells. The complexes also induced cellular morphological changes and impaired cellular ability to scavenge ROS, and accumulated preferentially in mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Rup-03 reduced MMP levels, induced apoptosis, and repressed both c-Myc mRNA expression and telomerase activity in HepG2 cells. Among six candidates, Rup-03-mediated PDT is most effective against HepG2 and RAW264.7, with a similar efficacy as that of Rup-04-mediated PDT against SGC-7901 cells. Repression of ROS scavenging activities and c-Myc expression, which mediated DNA damage-induced cell apoptosis and repression of telomerase activity, respectively, were found to be involved in the anticancer mechanisms of Rup-03. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dealloyed Ruthenium Film Catalysts for Hydrogen Generation from Chemical Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramis B. Serin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Thin-film ruthenium (Ru and copper (Cu binary alloys have been prepared on a Teflon™ backing layer by cosputtering of the precious and nonprecious metals, respectively. Alloys were then selectively dealloyed by sulfuric acid as an etchant, and their hydrogen generation catalysts performances were evaluated. Sputtering time and power of Cu atoms have been varied in order to tailor the hydrogen generation performances. Similarly, dealloying time and the sulfuric acid concentration have also been altered to tune the morphologies of the resulted films. A maximum hydrogen generation rate of 35 mL min−1 was achieved when Cu sputtering power and time were 200 W and 60 min and while acid concentration and dealloying time were 18 M and 90 min, respectively. It has also been demonstrated that the Ru content in the alloy after dealloying gradually increased with the increasing the sputtering power of Cu. After 90 min dealloying, the Ru to Cu ratio increased to about 190 times that of bare alloy. This is the key issue for observing higher catalytic activity. Interestingly, we have also presented template-free nanoforest-like structure formation within the context of one-step alloying and dealloying used in this study. Last but not least, the long-time hydrogen generation performances of the catalysts system have also been evaluated along 3600 min. During the first 600 min, the catalytic activity was quite stable, while about 24% of the catalytic activity decayed after 3000 min, which still makes these systems available for the development of robust catalyst systems in the area of hydrogen generation.

  2. {sup 106}Ruthenium Plaque Therapy (RPT) for Retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Naoya, E-mail: namuraka@ncc.go.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Shigenobu [Department of Ophthalmic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshimura, Ryoichi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Oncology, Head and Neck Reconstruction Division, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Inaba, Koji; Kuroda, Yuki; Morota, Madoka; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Sakudo, Mototake; Wakita, Akihisa; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Sumi, Minako; Kagami, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ohtomo, Kuni [Department of Radiology, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Itami, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of episcleral {sup 106}ruthenium plaque therapy (RPT) in the management of retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: One hundred one RPTs were retrospectively analyzed that were performed in 90 eyes of 85 patients with retinoblastoma at National Cancer Center Hospital between 1998 and 2008. Each RPT had a corresponding tumor and 101 tumors were considered in the analysis of local control. Median follow-up length was 72.8 months. Median patient age at the RPT was 28 months. Median prescribed doses at reference depth and outer surface of the sclera were 47.4 Gy and 162.3 Gy, respectively. Results: Local control rate (LCR) and ocular retention rate (ORR) at 2 years were 33.7% and 58.7%, respectively. Unilateral disease, International Classification of Retinoblastoma group C or more advanced at the first presentation or at the time of RPT, vitreous and/or subretinal seeding, tumor size greater than 5 disc diameter (DD), reference depth greater than 5 mm, dose rate at reference depth lower than 0.7 Gy/hour, dose at the reference depth lower than 35 Gy, and (biologically effective dose with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 10 Gy) at the reference depth lower than 40 Gy{sub 10} were associated with unfavorable LCR. Two patients died of metastatic disease. Radiation complications included retinal detachment in 12 eyes (13.3%), proliferative retinopathy in 6 (6.7%), rubeosis iris in 2 (2.2%), and posterior subcapsular cataract in 23 (25.6%). Conclusion: RPT is an effective eye-preserving treatment for retinoblastoma.

  3. Behavior of ruthenium, cesium and antimony during simulated HLLW vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Weyers, C.; Goossens, W.R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of ruthenium, cesium, and antimony during the vitrification of simulated high-level radioactive liquid wastes (HLLW) in a liquid fed melter was studied on a laboratory scale and on a semi-pilot scale. In the laboratory melter of a 2.5 kg capacity, a series of tests with the simulate traced with 103 Ru, 134 Cs and 124 Sb, has shown that the Ru and Cs losses to the melter effluent are generally higher than 10% whereas the antimony losses remain lower than 0.4%. A wet purification system comprising in series, a dust scrubber, a condenser, an ejector venturi and an NOx washing column retains most of the activity present in the off-gas so that the release fractions for Ru at the absolute filter inlet ranges between 5.10 -3 to 5.10 -5 % of the Ru fed, for Cs the corresponding release fraction ranges between 3.10 -3 to 10 -4 % and for Sb the release fraction ranges between 1.7 10 -4 to 1.7 10 -5 %. The same experiments were performed at a throughput of 1 to 2 1 h -1 of simulated solution in the semi-pilot scale unit RUFUS. The RUFUS unit comprises a glass melter with a 50 kg molten glass capacity and the wet purification train comprises in series a dust scrubber, a condenser, an ejector venturi and an NOx washing column. The tracer tests were restricted to 103 Ru and 134 Cs since the laboratory tests had shown that the antimony losses were very low. The results of the tests are presented

  4. Reaction mechanisms of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehaug, Astrid Elisabeth

    1995-12-31

    This thesis reports a study of the mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of saturated hydrocarbons, ethers, alkenes and alcohols. Several methods were used. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidations of adamantane and cis-decalin were studied in CCl{sub 4}-CH{sub 3}CN-H{sub 2}O and in acetone-water. The rate of reaction was found to be moderately influenced by the polarity of the solvent. Solvent properties other than the polarity were also found to influence the reaction rates. From the oxidations of adamantane and adamantane-1,3,5,7-d{sub 4} two primary kinetic deuterium isotope effects were found. These were comparable with the deuterium isotope effects found for the analogous oxidations of cis-decalin and cis-decalin-d{sub 18}. The results seem to exclude both a one step hydride abstraction reaction mechanism and a one step concerted mechanism, as well as a scheme where two such mechanisms compete. The observations may be explained by a two step reaction mechanism consisting of a pre-equilibrium with formation of a substrate-RuO{sub 4} complex followed by a concerted rate determining reaction. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidation of ethers was of kinetic second order with a small enthalpy of activation and a large negative entropy of activation. Oxidation of cyclopropylmethyl methyl ether gave methyl cyclopropanecarboxylate, no rearranged products were observed. On RuO{sub 4} oxidations in CCl{sub 4} with NaIO{sub 4} as stoichiometric oxidant, no chlorinated products were observed. Several observations not in agreement with a hydride or a hydrogen abstraction mechanism may be explained by assuming that the reaction proceeds by either a concerted reaction or by a reversible oxidative addition of the ether to RuO{sub 4} followed by a slow concerted step. 228 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  5. Catalytic water oxidation by ruthenium(II) quaterpyridine (qpy) complexes: evidence for ruthenium(III) qpy-N,N'''-dioxide as the real catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingying; Ng, Siu-Mui; Yiu, Shek-Man; Lam, William W Y; Wei, Xi-Guang; Lau, Kai-Chung; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2014-12-22

    Polypyridyl and related ligands have been widely used for the development of water oxidation catalysts. Supposedly these ligands are oxidation-resistant and can stabilize high-oxidation-state intermediates. In this work a series of ruthenium(II) complexes [Ru(qpy)(L)2 ](2+) (qpy=2,2':6',2'':6'',2'''-quaterpyridine; L=substituted pyridine) have been synthesized and found to catalyze Ce(IV) -driven water oxidation, with turnover numbers of up to 2100. However, these ruthenium complexes are found to function only as precatalysts; first, they have to be oxidized to the qpy-N,N'''-dioxide (ONNO) complexes [Ru(ONNO)(L)2 ](3+) which are the real catalysts for water oxidation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Liquid-liquid extraction of ruthenium(III) thiocyanate with hexamethylphosphoramide: direct spectrophotometric determination in the organic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, B.K.; Pal, B.K.; Chowdhury, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    Ru(III) thiocyanate has been extracted with hexamethylphosphoramide(HMPA) in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Thus the extractability, sensitivity and selectivity are improved over the simple binary Ru(III) thiocyanate system in spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium in the organic phase. The maximum colour develops on the steam bath, at the acidity range of 1.5 - 2.5 M with HCl and ammonium thiocyanate concentration range of 0.25 - O.5 M. The colour is completely extractable in MIBK when 1.5 - 3.0 ml HMPA is used and show maximum absorbance at 570 nm. The colour system obeys Beer's law for 0.7 - 13 μg Ru/ml and the optimum concentration range is 2 - 13 μg/ml. The molar absorptivity and sensitivity are 6940 l . mole -1 cm -1 and 0.0145 μg/cm 2 respectively. The percent relative error is 2.72%. The method is very simple and does not require oxidation and subsequent distillation. The method can be applied in the presence of osmium. (Author)

  7. Biological properties of novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles

    KAUST Repository

    Novak, Maria S.; Bü chel, Gabriel E.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Jakupec, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery that nitric oxide (NO) is a physiologically relevant molecule, there has been great interest in the use of metal nitrosyl compounds as antitumor pharmaceuticals. Particularly interesting are those complexes which can deliver NO to biological targets. Ruthenium- and osmium-based compounds offer lower toxicity compared to other metals and show different mechanisms of action as well as different spectra of activity compared to platinum-based drugs. Novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles were studied to elucidate their cytotoxicity and possible interactions with DNA. Apoptosis induction, changes of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and possible formation of reactive oxygen species were investigated as indicators of NO-mediated damage by flow cytometry. Results suggest that ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with the general formula (indazolium)[cis/trans-MCl4(NO)(1H-indazole)] have pronounced cytotoxic potency in cancer cell lines. Especially the more potent ruthenium complexes strongly induce apoptosis associated with depolarization of mitochondrial membranes, and elevated reactive oxygen species levels. Furthermore, a slight yet not unequivocal trend to accumulation of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate attributable to NO-mediated effects was observed.

  8. Surface and sub-surface thermal oxidation of ruthenium thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coloma Ribera, R.; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Zoethout, E.; Yakshin, Andrey; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    For next generation Extreme UV photolithography, multilayer coatings may require protective capping layers against surface contamination. Ruthenium, as a low-oxidation metal, is often used as a reference material. The oxidation behaviour of Ru thin films has been studied using X-ray reflectometry

  9. Fabrication of ruthenium metal nanosheets via topotactic metallization of exfoliated ruthenate nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Sato, Jun; Saida, Takahiro; Sugimoto, Wataru; Ebina, Yasuo; Shibata, Tatsuo; Osada, Minoru; Sasaki, Takayoshi

    2013-03-04

    The metallization behavior of molecularly thin RuO2 nanosheets obtained from complete delamination of layered ruthenates was studied. Interestingly, the RuO2 nanosheets in a monolayer state topotactically transformed into a single layer of Ru atoms, i.e., ruthenium metal nanosheets, which can be regarded as a new family of nanosized metals.

  10. Acetic Acid Formation by Selective Aerobic Oxidation of Aqueous Ethanol over Heterogeneous Ruthenium Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbanev, Yury; Kegnæs, Søren; Hanning, Christopher William

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalyst systems comprising ruthenium hydroxide supported on different carrier materials, titania, alumina, ceria, and spinel (MgAl2O4), were applied in selective aerobic oxidation ethanol to form acetic acid, an important bulk chemical and food ingredient. The catalysts were...

  11. Activity of iridium-ruthenium and iridium-rhodium adsorption catalysts in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubovich, I A; Mikhaylov, V A; Migulina, N N [Yaroslavskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR)

    1976-06-01

    Experimental data for the activities of iridium-ruthenium and iridium-rhodium adsorption catalysts in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide are considered and the results of magnetic susceptibility measurements are presented. It is concluded that surface structures (complexes) may be formed and that micro-electronic feaures play a role in heterogeneous catalysis.

  12. Elimination of ionic interference effects in the atomic absorption spectrometric determination of ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Defrawy, M.M.M.; Posta, J.; Beck, M.T.

    1978-01-01

    In connection with work on the catalytic effect of ruthenium complexes, new compounds were prepared. Atomic absorption spectrometry (a.a.s.) was to be used for their analysis. The standard methods could not be applied to the complexes studied, therefore the effect of cyanide ions for elimination of interfering effects has been studied, because of the great stability of cyanide complexes. (Auth.)

  13. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: Sample Analysis of Zirconium and Ruthenium in Metal Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    linear regression fits for the calibration curves. The goodness of the linear fits are summarized in Table 3 and Figure 1. Table 3. Concentration...and ruthenium at each calibration level. 11 REFERENCES 1. General Requirements for the Competence of Testing and Calibration Laboratories

  14. Hydrogenation of esters catalyzed by ruthenium PN3-Pincer complexes containing an aminophosphine arm

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2014-08-11

    Hydrogenation of esters under mild conditions was achieved using air-stable ruthenium PN3-pincer complexes containing an aminophosphine arm. High efficiency was achieved even in the presence of water. DFT studies suggest a bimolecular proton shuttle mechanism which allows H2 to be activated by the relatively stable catalyst with a reasonably low transition state barrier. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  15. Biological properties of novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles

    KAUST Repository

    Novak, Maria S.

    2016-03-09

    Since the discovery that nitric oxide (NO) is a physiologically relevant molecule, there has been great interest in the use of metal nitrosyl compounds as antitumor pharmaceuticals. Particularly interesting are those complexes which can deliver NO to biological targets. Ruthenium- and osmium-based compounds offer lower toxicity compared to other metals and show different mechanisms of action as well as different spectra of activity compared to platinum-based drugs. Novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles were studied to elucidate their cytotoxicity and possible interactions with DNA. Apoptosis induction, changes of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and possible formation of reactive oxygen species were investigated as indicators of NO-mediated damage by flow cytometry. Results suggest that ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with the general formula (indazolium)[cis/trans-MCl4(NO)(1H-indazole)] have pronounced cytotoxic potency in cancer cell lines. Especially the more potent ruthenium complexes strongly induce apoptosis associated with depolarization of mitochondrial membranes, and elevated reactive oxygen species levels. Furthermore, a slight yet not unequivocal trend to accumulation of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate attributable to NO-mediated effects was observed.

  16. Design and synthesis of ruthenium(II) OCO pincer type NHC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The tridentate nature of the tBu(OCO)2− ligand as well as some level of steric protection ... our previous results of ruthenium(II) o-hydroxyaryl sub- stituted bidentate NHC ...... (a) Ribelin T, Katz C E, English D G, Smith S,. Manukyan A K, Day ...

  17. Preliminary assessment of modified borosilicate glasses for chromium and ruthenium immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, Osama M. [Reactors Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority of Egypt, P.O. 13759, Inshas, Cairo (Egypt); Centre of Nuclear Engineering (CNE), Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Abdel Rahman, R.O., E-mail: alaarehab@yahoo.com [Hot Laboratory Center, Atomic Energy Authority of Egypt, P.O. 13759, Inshas, Cairo (Egypt)

    2017-01-15

    The feasibility of using modified alkali borosilicate glasses for ruthenium and chromium immobilization is preliminary assessed by investigating the immobilization system structure under normal conditions. Within this context, reference alkali borosilicate, and simulated Magnox-modified glasses were prepared and studied. The results indicate that ruthenium is immobilized in the vitreous structure as encapsulated RuO{sub 2} crystallites that act as seeds for heterogeneous nucleation of other crystalline phases. The presence of Zn, as modifier, has contributed to chromium immobilization in zincochromite spinel structure, whereas Ca is accommodated in the vitreous structure. Immobilization performance was evaluated by conducting conservative static leach test and studying the leached glass. Leached glass morphology was altered, where near surface reference glass is leached over 400 nm and simulated Magnox-modified sample is altered over 300 nm. Normalized release rates are within normal range for borosilicate material. For simulated Magnox-modified sample, Ca and alkali structural element, i.e. Na and Li, are leached via ion-exchange reaction. The ion-exchanged fraction equals 1.06 × 10{sup −8} mol/m{sup 2} s and chromium has slightly lower normalized release rate value than ruthenium. - Highlights: • The presence of modifiers and waste oxides led to localized de-vitrification. • Ruthenium is encapsulated within the vitreous glass network as RuO{sub 2} crystals. • Chromium is immobilized within the zincochromite spinel structure. • Pitting and cracks induced by leaching did not affect the immobilization performance.

  18. Dinuclear ruthenium sawhorse-type complexes containing carboxylato bridges and ferrocenyl substituents: Synthesis and electrochemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Auzias, M.; Süss-Fink, G.; Štěpnička, P.; Ludvík, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 360, č. 6 (2007), s. 2023-2028 ISSN 0020-1693 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : carboxylato bridges * dinuclear complexes * ruthenium * electrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.713, year: 2007

  19. Contribution to the study of the fluorination of ruthenium and its dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtois, Charles.

    1977-12-01

    Compounds formed during fluorination of ruthenium and its dioxide are studied. By chemical analysis the constitution of these compounds is cleared up. RuF 5 is the main compound formed, but a secondary product is obtained which is RuF 8 . The vapor pressure of this product is given between 178 and 221 0 K, and its infrared spectrum is drawn [fr

  20. Highly dispersed supported ruthenium oxide as an aerobic catalyst for acetic acid synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anders Bo; Gorbanev, Yury; Cavalca, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    The increasing need for shifting to renewable feedstocks in the chemical industry has driven research toward using green aerobic, selective oxidation reactions to produce bulk chemicals. Here, we report the use of a ruthenium mixed oxide/hydroxide (RuOx) on different support materials for the sel...

  1. A technique for studying digestion by grasshoppers using a 103Ruthenium-labelled marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandar, M.V.

    1981-01-01

    103 Ru-labelled tris (I,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium (II) chloride has proved to be a convenient marker in investigating digestion in grasshoppers. Assimilation efficiencies and the retension time of the food in the gut were measured. It is surmised that the technique described in this paper will be applicable to studies of a variety of chewing herbivorous insects. (author)

  2. Structural, spectral, DFT and biological studies on macrocyclic mononuclear ruthenium (II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukkumar, M.; Kamal, C.; Venkatesh, G.; Kaya, C.; Kaya, S.; Enoch, Israel V. M. V.; Vennila, P.; Rajavel, R.

    2017-11-01

    Macrocyclic mononuclear ruthenium (II) complexes have been synthesized by condensation method [Ru (L1, L2, L3) Cl2] L1 = (C36 H31 N9), L2= (C42H36N8), L3= (C32H32 N8)]. These ruthenium complexes have been established by elemental analyses and spectroscopic techniques (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), 1H- nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 13C- NMR and Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS)). The coordination mode of the ligand has been confirmed and the octahedral geometry around the ruthenium ion has been revealed. Binding affinity and binding mode of ruthenium (II) complexes with Bovine serum Albumin (BSA) have been characterized by Emission spectra analysis. UV-Visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques have also been utilized to examine the interaction between ligand and its complexes L1, L2, & L3 with BSA. Chemical parameters and molecular structure of Ru (II) complexes L1H, L2H, & L3H have been determined by DFT coupled with B3LYP/6-311G** functional in both the gaseous and aqueous phases.

  3. Ion implantation to improve mechanical and electrical properties of resistive materials based on ruthenium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byeli, A.V.; Shykh, S.K.; Beresina, V.P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of ion implantation, using different chemical species, on the surface micromorphology, wear resistance, coefficient of friction and electrical resistivity, and its variation during friction for resistive materials based on ruthenium dioxide. It is demonstrated that nitrogen and hydrogen ions are the most effective for modifying surface properties. (Author)

  4. A study of ruthenium complexes of some biologically relevant a-N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 112; Issue 3. A study of ruthenium complexes of some biologically relevant ∙ -N-heterocyclic ... Author Affiliations. P Sengupta1 S Ghosh1. Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Calcutta 700 032, India ...

  5. New soluble functional polymers by free-radical copolymerization of methacrylates and bipyridine ruthenium complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holder, E.; Meier, M.A.R.; Marin, V.N.; Schubert, U.S.

    2003-01-01

    The luminescent complex [4-(3-hydroxypropyl)-4-methyl-2,2-bipyridine]-bis(2,2-bipyridine)-ruthenium(II)-bis(hexafluoroantimonate) and its methacrylate derivative were successfully synthesized and fully characterized by two-dimensional 1H and 13C{1H} NMR techniques [correlation spectroscopy (COSY)

  6. Electronic Interplay between TTF and Extended-TCNQ Electrophores along a Ruthenium Bis(acetylide) Linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, Antoine; Auffray, Morgan; Barrière, Frédéric; Roisnel, Thierry; Lorcy, Dominique

    2017-11-17

    A bis(TTF-butadiynyl) ruthenium D-D'-D complex, with intramolecular electronic interplay between the three electron-donating electrophores, was easily converted through a cycloaddition-retroelectrocyclization with TCNQ into a D-A-D'-A-D pentad complex, which exhibits an intense intramolecular charge transfer together with an electronic interplay between the two acceptors along the conjugated organometallic bridge.

  7. Graphene/Ruthenium Active Species Aerogel as Electrode for Supercapacitor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigot, Arnaud; Fontana, Marco; Pirri, Candido Fabrizio; Rivolo, Paola

    2017-12-30

    Ruthenium active species containing Ruthenium Sulphide (RuS₂) is synthesized together with a self-assembled reduced graphene oxide (RGO) aerogel by a one-pot hydrothermal synthesis. Ruthenium Chloride and L-Cysteine are used as reactants. The hydrothermal synthesis of the innovative hybrid material occurs at 180 °C for 12 h, by using water as solvent. The structure and morphology of the hybrid material are fully characterized by Raman, XRD, XPS, FESEM and TEM. The XRD and diffraction pattern obtained by TEM display an amorphous nanostructure of RuS₂ on RGO crystallized flakes. The specific capacitance measured in planar configuration in 1 M NaCl electrolyte at 5 mV s -1 is 238 F g -1 . This supercapacitor electrode also exhibits perfect cyclic stability without loss of the specific capacitance after 15,000 cycles. In summary, the RGO/Ruthenium active species hybrid material demonstrates remarkable properties for use as active material for supercapacitor applications.

  8. Reactions of ruthenium and osmium cluster carbonyls with heteroatom-substituted and functionalized alkynes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koridze, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The results of studies of the reactions of ruthenium and osmium cluster carbonyls with metal (M = Re, Mn, Fe) alkynes, silylalkynes, propargyl alcohols and their derivatives, diynes, enynes, and ferrocenylacetylene are summarized. Intramolecular rearrangements in the cluster complexes including migrations of carbonyl, hydride, and hydrocarbon ligands and the metal core reorganization are considered [ru

  9. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  10. Ruthenium-catalyzed cyclization of N-carbamoyl indolines with alkynes: an efficient route to pyrroloquinolinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Ramasamy; Jeganmohan, Masilamani

    2015-09-21

    A regioselective synthesis of substituted pyrroloquinolinones via a ruthenium-catalyzed oxidative cyclization of substituted N-carbamoyl indolines with alkynes is described. The cyclization reaction was compatible with various symmetrical and unsymmetrical alkynes including substituted propiolates. Later, we performed the aromatization of pyrroloquinolinones into indole derivatives in the presence of 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ).

  11. Studies On An Aerobic Oxidation Of Dibenzothiophene And Related Compounds Using Ruthenium Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morishita Y.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An aerobic oxidation of dibenzothiophene and related compounds using a catalytic amount of ruthenium chloride in hydrocarbon solvents at 80°C for 20 h gave the corresponding sulfones in almost quantitative yields. The reaction might proceed via autoxidation of solvents to hydroperoxides and the reaction of sulfur compounds with the resulting hydroperoxides.

  12. Photo-induced DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity of a ruthenium(II) arene anticancer complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Viktor; Prachařová, J.; Štěpánková, Jana; Sadler, P. J.; Kašpárková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 160, JUL2016 (2016), s. 149-155 ISSN 0162-0134 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-21053S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14019 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Ruthenium anticancer complex * DNA cleavage * Phototoxicity Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.348, year: 2016

  13. Mixed-ligand complexes of ruthenium(II) incorporating a diazo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Dedicated to the memory of the late Professor Bhaskar G Maiya. *For correspondence. Mixed-ligand complexes of ruthenium(II) incorporating a diazo ligand: Synthesis .... water (1 : 1) for 5 h to give a dark red solution. The solution was cooled to room temperature. After eva- poration of the solvent, the solid was collected,.

  14. Correlations between electrochemical and spectrochemical parameters of ruthenium sulfoxides series with N-heterocyclic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D. de; Toma, H.E.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic study of Ru Cl sub(2) (DMSO) sub(2) L sub(2) derivates, where L = N-heterocyclic base is described, contributing for a best understanding of chemical behaviour and electronic structure of the ruthenium sulfoxides. The correlations between the electrochemical and the spectroscopical parameters of the serie are presented with more emphasis. (author)

  15. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell Stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    Dissolution of ruthenium was observed in the 80-cell stack. Duration testing was performed in single cell MEAs to determine the pathway of cell degradation. EDAX analysis on each of the single cell MEAs has shown that the Johnson Matthey commercial catalyst is stable in DMFC operation for 250 hours, no ruthenium dissolution was observed. Changes in the hydrophobicity of the cathode backing papers was minimum. Electrode polarization analysis revealed that the MEA performance loss is attributed to changes in the cathode catalyst layer. Ruthenium migration does not seem to occur during cell operation but can occur when methanol is absent from the anode compartment, the cathode compartment has access to air, and the cells in the stack are electrically connected to a load (Shunt Currents). The open-to-air cathode stack design allowed for: a) The MEAs to have continual access to oxygen; and b) The stack to sustain shunt currents. Ruthenium dissolution in a DMFC stack can be prevented by: a) Developing an internally manifolded stacks that seal reactant compartments when not in operation; b) Bringing the cell voltages to zero quickly when not in operation; and c) Limiting the total number of cells to 25 in an effort to limit shunt currents.

  16. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cells Stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a detailed review of the Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell (DMFC) stack and investigates the Ruthenium that was found at the exit of the stack. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) Pathways for Cell Degradation; 3) Cell Duration Testing; 4) Duration Testing, MEA Analysis; and 5) Stack Degradation Analysis.

  17. Aerobic Oxidation of 5-(Hydroxymethyl)furfural in Ionic Liquids with Solid Ruthenium Hydroxide Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ståhlberg, Tim Johannes Bjarki; Eyjolfsdottir, Ester; Gorbanev, Yury

    2012-01-01

    The aerobic oxidation of 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural was investigated over solid ruthenium hydroxide catalysts in ionic liquids at elevated temperatures and pressures. Several different catalyst supports were tested in combination with various ionic liquids. The best result was obtained in [EMIm...

  18. Tailoring the Selectivity for Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution on Ruthenium Oxides by Zinc Substitution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrykin, Valery; Macounová, Kateřina; Shlyakhtin, O. A.; Krtil, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 28 (2010), s. 4813-4815 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400906 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : electrocatalysis * ruthenium oxides * zinc substitution Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 12.730, year: 2010

  19. Efficient oxygen reduction reaction using ruthenium tetrakis(diaquaplatinum)octacarboxyphthalocyanine catalyst supported on MWCNT platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maxakato, NW

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available -1 Electroanalysis 2011, 23, No. 2, 325 ? 329 Efficient Oxygen Reduction Reaction Using Ruthenium Tetrakis(diaquaplatinum)Octacarboxyphthalocyanine Catalyst Supported on MWCNT Platform Nobanathi W. Maxakato,a Solomon A. Mamuru,a Kenneth I. Ozoemena*a, b a...

  20. Room temperature aerobic oxidation of amines by a nanocrystalline ruthenium oxide pyrochlore nafion composite catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Shanmuganathan; Kumar, Annamalai Senthil; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Chan, Ting-Shan; Zen, Jyh-Myng

    2012-05-14

    The aerobic oxidation of primary amines to their respective nitriles has been carried out at room temperature using a highly reusable nanocrystalline ruthenium oxide pyrochlore Nafion composite catalyst (see figure). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Study of the emission oxidative reactions of ruthenium (II) complex by cationic compounds in anionic micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonilha, J.B.S.

    1985-01-01

    The oxidative quenching of the emission of the tetraanionic complex tris (4,4' dicarboxylate - 2,2' - bipyridine ruthenium (II) in aqueous solution, by both organic and inorganic compounds in presence of anionic detergents, above and below the critical micelle concentration is studied. The organic cations, the inorganic ion and detergents used are shown. (M.J.C.) [pt

  2. Low temperature X-ray structure analyses combined with NBO studies of a new heteroleptic octa-coordinated Holmium(III) complex with N,N,N-tridentate hydrazono-phthalazine-type ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Saied M.; El-Faham, Ayman

    2018-04-01

    The new heteroleptic [HoL(H2O)5]Br3 complex, L is hydrazono-phthalazine ligand, is synthesized and its molecular structure aspects were analyzed using single crystal X-ray structure (SCXRD), Hirshfeld (HF) analysis, quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and natural bond orbital (NBO) method. The SCXRD showed that the Ho is octa-coordinated with one N,N,N-tridentate ligand L and five water molecules. The HF analysis is used to analyze the molecular packing in the [HoL(H2O)5]Br3crystal structure. The complex cations are connected via strong Osbnd H⋯Br and Nsbnd H⋯Br H-bonding interactions which have greater importance than the Csbnd H⋯Br contacts. Also, all the Hosbnd N and Hosbnd O bonds have the characteristics of closed shell interactions using QTAIM. The natural orbitals included in these interactions were analyzed using NBO method. The alpha LP*(8)Ho and beta LP*(4)Ho which have mainly s-orbital characters are the most important anti-bonding natural orbitals included in all Ho-N and Hosbnd O bonds. The rest of the Ho anti-bonding orbitals which have either p or d-orbital characters shared partially in the Ho-ligands interactions. Natural charges analysis revealed the presence of significant amount of electron density (0.9225-0.9300 e) transferred from the ligands to Ho (2.0700-2.0775 e). Spherical spin density with ∼4.0 e is predicted over the Ho atom.

  3. Extraction and atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of iron and ruthenium by using potassium xanthates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihara, M; Kiboku, M [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan)

    1981-06-01

    Potassium xanthates (potassium o-alkyl dithiocarbonate; KRX) react with many metal ions, and so the complex formation with iron (II, III) ion and the extraction of their complexes has been studied to some extent, but those of ruthenium (III) have not been. Iron-xanthate and ruthenium-xanthate complexes can be extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) from weakly acidic solution to weakly alkaline solution. For quantitative extraction of iron (20 ..mu..g/40 ml), KRX concentration should be above 2.0 x 10/sup -2/ mol dm/sup -3/ of KEtX, 1.0 x 10/sup -2/ mol dm/sup -3/ of KPrX, and 5.0 x 10/sup -3/ mol dm/sup -3/ of KBtX and KPeX, and for that of ruthenium (202 ..mu..g/40 ml), it should be above 2.0 x 10/sup -1/ mol dm/sup -3/ of KEtX and KPrX. Formation constant of ruthenium-xanthate complexes is presumed to be small. A 100-fold excess of Ni(II), Co(II), Cu(II), WO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/, CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7//sup 2 -/ interfered with the determination of iron, however, the interferences are eliminated by adding 5 ml of 0.1 mol dm/sup -3/ ascorbic acid solution. For the determination of ruthenium, a 50-fold excess of Ag(I), Hg(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Mn(II), Cr(III), and Pt(II), or a 100-fold excess of NO/sub 2//sup -/, S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/, CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7//sup 2 -/, respectively, interfered. The coefficient of variation after each ten runs, ranges from 0.9% to 3.2% in the determination of 10 ..mu..g, 20 ..mu..g, and 30 ..mu..g of iron, and from 1.4% to 4.3% in the determination of 100 ..mu..g, 200 ..mu..g, and 300 ..mu..g of ruthenium. The determination limit in aqueous samples is 0.02 ppm for iron and 0.2 ppm for ruthenium, when the volume ratio of aqueous phase to organic phase (MIBK) is 10:1.

  4. Analysis of flow fields, temperatures and ruthenium transport in the test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Pyykoenen, J.; Auvinen, A.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2008-03-01

    Ruthenium transport experiments were conducted at VTT during years 2002- 2006. Experiments gave information about ruthenium behaviour in air ingress accident conditions. This study complements those experiments with an analysis of the flows and thermal fields in the test system. Temperature profiles were measured at the walls of the experimental facility. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations used the measured profiles and provided predictions of flows and temperatures inside the furnace. Ruthenium transport was also modelled with CFD. Thermal characterisation of the reactor demonstrated that buoyancy has a significant role during the cooling after the furnace. A hypothesis of the dominant role of RuO2 and RuO3 condensation on reactor walls gave simulation results that are in accordance with radiotracer measurements of deposition in experiments conducted with furnace at 1500K. Actually, RuO3 does not condensate, but it thermal decomposes to RuO2. This does not seem to have effect on result. Particle formation around the furnace exit could be detected from the comparison of modelling results with the measured profiles. In several other experiments ruthenium behaviour is dominated by other issues. These are related to the complex ruthenium chemistry that includes various surface reactions. Thermal equilibrium indicates significant gaseous RuO4 concentration around 1300 K. It seems that seed particles decreased the catalytic decomposition activity of RuO4 to RuO2 around this temperature pushing the gas concentration towards the equilibrium, and further give rise to gaseous RuO4 transport to low temperatures. At higher temperature increasing mass flow rate of RuO2 particles is likely to catalyse (decomposition) reaction of RuO4 to RuO2. (au)

  5. Synthesis and reactivity of compounds containing ruthenium-carbon, -nitrogen, and -oxygen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwig, J.F.

    1990-12-01

    The products and mechanisms of the thermal reactions of several complexes of the general structure (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(X)(Y) and (DMPM) 2 Ru(X)(Y) where X and Y are hydride, aryl, and benzyl groups, have been investigated. The mechanism of decomposition depends critically on the structure of the complex and the medium in which the thermolysis is carried out. The alkyl hydride complexes are do not react with alkane solvent, but undergo C-H activation processes with aromatic solvents by several different mechanisms. Thermolysis of (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(Ph)(Me) or (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(Ph) 2 leads to the ruthenium benzyne complex (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(η 2 -C 6 H 4 ) (1) by a mechanism which involves reversible dissociation of phosphine. In many ways its chemistry is analogous to that of early rather than late organo transition metal complexes. The synthesis, structure, variable temperature NMR spectroscopy and reactivity of ruthenium complexes containing aryloxide or arylamide ligands are reported. These complexes undergo cleavage of a P-C bond in coordinated trimethylphosphine, insertion of CO and CO 2 and hydrogenolysis. Mechanistic studies on these reactions are described. The generation of a series of reactive ruthenium complexes of the general formula (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(R)(enolate) is reported. Most of these enolates have been shown to bind to the ruthenium center through the oxygen atom. Two of the enolate complexes 8 and 9 exist in equilibrium between the O- and C-bound forms. The reactions of these compounds are reported, including reactions to form oxygen-containing metallacycles. The structure and reactivity of these ruthenium metallacycles is reported, including their thermal chemistry and reactivity toward protic acids, electrophiles, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and trimethylsilane. 243 refs., 10 tabs

  6. Analysis of flow fields, temperatures and ruthenium transport in the test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Pyykoenen, J.; Auvinen, A.; Jokiniemi, J. [Technical Research Centre of Finland VTT (Finland)

    2008-03-15

    Ruthenium transport experiments were conducted at VTT during years 2002- 2006. Experiments gave information about ruthenium behaviour in air ingress accident conditions. This study complements those experiments with an analysis of the flows and thermal fields in the test system. Temperature profiles were measured at the walls of the experimental facility. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations used the measured profiles and provided predictions of flows and temperatures inside the furnace. Ruthenium transport was also modelled with CFD. Thermal characterisation of the reactor demonstrated that buoyancy has a significant role during the cooling after the furnace. A hypothesis of the dominant role of RuO2 and RuO3 condensation on reactor walls gave simulation results that are in accordance with radiotracer measurements of deposition in experiments conducted with furnace at 1500K. Actually, RuO3 does not condensate, but it thermal decomposes to RuO2. This does not seem to have effect on result. Particle formation around the furnace exit could be detected from the comparison of modelling results with the measured profiles. In several other experiments ruthenium behaviour is dominated by other issues. These are related to the complex ruthenium chemistry that includes various surface reactions. Thermal equilibrium indicates significant gaseous RuO4 concentration around 1300 K. It seems that seed particles decreased the catalytic decomposition activity of RuO4 to RuO2 around this temperature pushing the gas concentration towards the equilibrium, and further give rise to gaseous RuO4 transport to low temperatures. At higher temperature increasing mass flow rate of RuO2 particles is likely to catalyse (decomposition) reaction of RuO4 to RuO2. (au)

  7. Synthesis and reactivity of compounds containing ruthenium-carbon, -nitrogen, and -oxygen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, J.F.

    1990-12-01

    The products and mechanisms of the thermal reactions of several complexes of the general structure (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(X)(Y) and (DMPM){sub 2}Ru(X)(Y) where X and Y are hydride, aryl, and benzyl groups, have been investigated. The mechanism of decomposition depends critically on the structure of the complex and the medium in which the thermolysis is carried out. The alkyl hydride complexes are do not react with alkane solvent, but undergo C-H activation processes with aromatic solvents by several different mechanisms. Thermolysis of (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph)(Me) or (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph){sub 2} leads to the ruthenium benzyne complex (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}) (1) by a mechanism which involves reversible dissociation of phosphine. In many ways its chemistry is analogous to that of early rather than late organo transition metal complexes. The synthesis, structure, variable temperature NMR spectroscopy and reactivity of ruthenium complexes containing aryloxide or arylamide ligands are reported. These complexes undergo cleavage of a P-C bond in coordinated trimethylphosphine, insertion of CO and CO{sub 2} and hydrogenolysis. Mechanistic studies on these reactions are described. The generation of a series of reactive ruthenium complexes of the general formula (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(R)(enolate) is reported. Most of these enolates have been shown to bind to the ruthenium center through the oxygen atom. Two of the enolate complexes 8 and 9 exist in equilibrium between the O- and C-bound forms. The reactions of these compounds are reported, including reactions to form oxygen-containing metallacycles. The structure and reactivity of these ruthenium metallacycles is reported, including their thermal chemistry and reactivity toward protic acids, electrophiles, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and trimethylsilane. 243 refs., 10 tabs.

  8. A High Molar Extinction Coefficient Ru(II Complex Functionalized with cis-Dithiocyanato-bis-(9-anthracenyl-10-(2-methyl-2-butenoic acid-1,10-phenanthroline: Potential Sensitizer for Stable Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale O. Adeloye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New heteroleptic ruthenium(II complex was formulated as [Ru(L12(NCS2], where L1 = 9-anthracenyl-10-(2-methyl-2-butenoic acid-1,10-phenanthroline was synthesized and its photophysical properties were studied and compared to previously reported analogue complex containing no anthracene moiety [Ru(L22(NCS2], L2 = (2-methyl-2-butenoic acid-1,10-phenanthroline. The two complexes though exhibit very strong molar extinction coefficient values; however, [Ru(L12(NCS2] shows better characteristic broad and intense metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT absorption band and higher molar absorptivity coefficient at (λmax=522 nm, ε=6.60×104 M−1 cm−1 than that of [Ru(L22(NCS2] complex, (λmax=446 nm, ε=4.82×104 M−1 cm−1. At room temperature, long wavelength emissions with strong intensity ratio centered at 660 nm were recorded for [Ru(L12(NCS2] complex with a bathochromic shift (λem=700 nm for [Ru(L22(NCS2] complex. It was shown that the luminescence wavelength characteristic of the complexes may be a function relating to the increasing length of π-conjugation and/or molecular weight. A preliminary cyclic voltammetry of [Ru(L12(NCS2] complex also exhibits good electroredox activity with oxidation potential of about 1.04 V, significantly better than other Ru(II polypyridine complexes containing bidentate ligands.

  9. Selective deposition of nanostructured ruthenium oxide using Tobacco mosaic virus for micro-supercapacitors in solid Nafion electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnerlich, Markus; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Culver, James N.; Ketchum, Douglas R.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional micro-supercapacitor has been developed using a novel bottom-up assembly method combining genetically modified Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV-1Cys), photolithographically defined micropillars and selective deposition of ruthenium oxide on multi-metallic microelectrodes. The three-dimensional microelectrodes consist of a titanium nitride current collector with two functionalized areas: (1) gold coating on the active electrode area promotes TMV-1Cys adhesion, and (2) sacrificial nickel pads dissolve in ruthenium tetroxide plating solution to produce ruthenium oxide on all electrically connected areas. The microfabricated electrodes are arranged in an interdigitated pattern, and the capacitance per electrode has been measured as high as 203 mF cm-2 with solid Nafion electrolyte. The process integration of bio-templated ruthenium oxide with microfabricated electrodes and solid electrolyte is an important advance towards the energy storage needs of mass produced self-sufficient micro-devices.

  10. Nanoengineering of Ruthenium and Platinum-based Nanocatalysts by Continuous-Flow Chemistry for Renewable Energy Applications

    KAUST Repository

    AlYami, Noktan Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents an integrated study of nanocatalysts for heterogenous catalytic and electrochemical processes using pure ruthenium (Ru) with mixed-phase and platinum-based nanomaterials synthesized by continuous-flow chemistry. There are three

  11. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a palladium and rhodium or ruthenium catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly [Orlando, FL; Rossin, Joseph A [Columbus, OH; Knapke, Michael J [Columbus, OH

    2011-07-12

    A process for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in a gas stream (29) in the presence of H.sub.2 is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system (38) comprising zirconia-silica washcoat particles (41), a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a catalyst combination (40) comprising palladium and at least one of rhodium, ruthenium, or a mixture of ruthenium and rhodium.

  12. Study of some properties of the ruthenium (II) trans-tetra-ammines with nitrogened aromatic heterocyclic ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bento, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The ruthenium (II) complexes trans [Ru(NH 3 ) 4 LL'] (BF 4 ) 2 , where L and L' are 4-picoline, pyridine, isonicatinamide, pyrazine or 4-acetylpyridine are studied. The U.V-visible range spectra, bands in the U.V. and in the visible range is analysed. The spectra and the bands by comparison with other ruthenium (II) ammines are discussed, and a qualitative molecular orbital model is used. (M.J.C.) [pt

  13. Determination of biogenic amines from electrocatalytic responses of graphite electrodes modified with metallic osmium or an osmium oxide-ruthenium cyanide film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shajdarova, L.G.; Gedmina, A.V.; Chelnokova, I.A.; Budnikov, G.K.

    2008-01-01

    Particles of osmium or an inorganic polymeric film of osmium oxide-ruthenium cyanide (OsO-RuCN) electrodeposited on glassy carbon (GC) electrocatalyze the oxidation of dopamine (DA), adrenaline (AD), and noradrenaline (NAD). It is found that these biogenic amines are determined with a high sensitivity by oxidation at an electrode with an OsO-RuCN film. Procedures for the voltammetric determination of DA, AD, or NAD at a composite film electrode are developed. The currents of the substrate oxidation are linear functions of the concentrations in the ranges from 5x10 -7 to 1x10 -3 M for DA and from 1x10 -6 to 1x10 -3 M for AD and NAD [ru

  14. Ruthenium complexing during sorption by graft copolymer of polyacrylonitrile fibre with poly-2-methyl-5-vnylpyridine (PAN-MVP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanova, S.A.; Kolmakova, A.I.; Konovalov, L.V.; Kukushkin, Yu.N.; Lysenko, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The sorption of ruthenium chlorocomplexes is studied on graft copolymer of polyacrylonitrile fibre with poly-2-methyl-5-vinylpyridine (PAN-MVP). The sorption has been performed under static conditions in the course of mixing at 20 and 98 deg from 0.1-2 OM HCl, 0.1-1 m NaCl solutions. The volume of the investigated solutions constituted 25 ml, fibre weight -0.1-0.3 g. Ruthenium concentration in solutions has been changed in the limits of 5x10 3 -2x10 -2 mol/l. The fibre has been preliminarily moistened by a solution containing no ruthenium. In all cases fresh-prepared ruthenium chlorocomplex solutions have been used. It has been found that with temperature increase the PAN-MVP sorption capacitance relative to ruthenium increases (at 20 deg-1.15 mmol/g, at 98 deg-1.70 mmol/g. The ruthenium chlorocomplex sorption by pyridine fibrous sorbent from salt-acid solutions occurs by anionoexchange mechanism and is related to the formation in the sorbent phase of onium chlorocomplexes - (RPyH) 2 [RuCl 6 ]. In the course of sorbents heating pyridine compounds are subject to Anderson regroupping with formation of compounds of diamine type-[Ru(RPy) 2 Cl 4

  15. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence: An oxidative-reductive mechanism between quinolone antibiotics and tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhead, Matthew S.; Wang, Heeyoung; Fallet, Marcel [Department of Chemistry, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Gross, Erin M. [Department of Chemistry, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States)], E-mail: eringross@creighton.edu

    2008-04-21

    The cyclic voltammetry and electrogenerated chemiluminescent (ECL) reactions of a series of quinolone and fluoroquinolone antibiotics were investigated in a flow injection analysis (FIA) system. 7-Piperazinyl fluoroquinolone antibiotics were found to participate as a coreactant in an oxidative-reductive ECL mechanism with tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}) as the luminescent reagent. The reaction mechanism was investigated in order to understand and optimize the processes leading to light emission. The optimal conditions included a solution pH {approx}7 at a flow rate of 3.0 mL min{sup -1} with no added organic modifier and application of 1.2 V vs. a Pt quasi-reference electrode (QRE). Fluoroquinolones containing a tertiary distal nitrogen on the piperazine ring, such as enrofloxacin and ofloxacin, reacted to produce more intense ECL than those with a secondary nitrogen, such as ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin. The method linear range, precision, detection limits, and sensitivity for the detection of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were compared to that of tripropylamine. The method was applied to the determination of the ciprofloxacin content in a pharmaceutical preparation. The assay is discussed in terms of its analytical figures of merit, ease of use, speed, accuracy and application to pharmaceutical samples.

  16. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence: An oxidative-reductive mechanism between quinolone antibiotics and tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhead, Matthew S.; Wang, Heeyoung; Fallet, Marcel; Gross, Erin M.

    2008-01-01

    The cyclic voltammetry and electrogenerated chemiluminescent (ECL) reactions of a series of quinolone and fluoroquinolone antibiotics were investigated in a flow injection analysis (FIA) system. 7-Piperazinyl fluoroquinolone antibiotics were found to participate as a coreactant in an oxidative-reductive ECL mechanism with tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy) 3 2+ ) as the luminescent reagent. The reaction mechanism was investigated in order to understand and optimize the processes leading to light emission. The optimal conditions included a solution pH ∼7 at a flow rate of 3.0 mL min -1 with no added organic modifier and application of 1.2 V vs. a Pt quasi-reference electrode (QRE). Fluoroquinolones containing a tertiary distal nitrogen on the piperazine ring, such as enrofloxacin and ofloxacin, reacted to produce more intense ECL than those with a secondary nitrogen, such as ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin. The method linear range, precision, detection limits, and sensitivity for the detection of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were compared to that of tripropylamine. The method was applied to the determination of the ciprofloxacin content in a pharmaceutical preparation. The assay is discussed in terms of its analytical figures of merit, ease of use, speed, accuracy and application to pharmaceutical samples

  17. Electrochemical oxidation of chlorpheniramine at polytyramine film doped with ruthenium (II) complex: Measurement, kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khudaish, Emad A.; Al-Hinaai, Mohammed; Al-Harthy, Salim; Laxman, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • XPS data confirm doping of ruthenium onto the polytyramine moiety. • Doping of Ru decreases the Pty resistivity and increases the electron transfer kinetics. • The resulting sensor is stable for a large range of CPM concentration. • Estimated values of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were comparable. • Application to commercial dosage forms was excellent and satisfactory. - Abstract: A solid-state sensor based on polytyramine film deposited at glassy carbon electrode doped with tris(2,2′-bipyridyl)Ru(II) complex (Ru/Pty/GCE) was constructed electrochemically. A redox property represented by [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 3+/2+ couple immobilized at the Pty moiety was characterized using typical voltammetric techniques. The XPS data and AFM images confirm the grafting of Ru species on the top of Pty while the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data supports the immobilization of both surface modifiers onto the GCE. The constructed sensor exhibits a substantial reactivity, stability and high sensitivity to chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM) oxidation. The detection limit (S/N = 3) was brought down to 338 nM using differential pulse voltammetry method. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were evaluated using hydrodynamic method. The apparent diffusion coefficient and the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant for the CPM oxidation were 2.67 × 10 −5 cm 2 s −1 and 3.21 × 10 −3 cm s −1 , respectively. Interference studies and real sample analysis were conducted with excellent performance and satisfactory results

  18. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence biosensing for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells incorporating antibody as capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as signal probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haiying [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Department of Chemistry, Yuncheng University, Yuncheng 044300 (China); Li, Zhejian; Shan, Meng; Li, Congcong; Qi, Honglan; Gao, Qiang [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Wang, Jinyi [College of Science and College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Zhang, Chengxiao, E-mail: cxzhang@snnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China)

    2015-03-10

    Highlights: • A novel biosensor was developed for the detection of prostate cancer cells. • The selectivity of the biosensor was improved using antibody as capture probe. • The biosensor showed the low extremely detection limit of 2.6 × 10{sup 2} cells mL{sup −1}. • The ruthenium complex-labelled WGA can be transported in the cell vesicles. - Abstract: A highly selective and sensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells was designed using a prostate specific antibody as a capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as a signal probe. The ECL biosensor was fabricated by covalently immobilising the capture probe on a graphene oxide-coated glassy carbon electrode. Target PC-3 cells were selectively captured on the surface of the biosensor, and then, the signal probe was bound with the captured PC-3 cells to form a sandwich. In the presence of tripropylamine, the ECL intensity of the sandwich biosensor was logarithmically directly proportion to the concentration of PC-3 cells over a range from 7.0 × 10{sup 2} to 3.0 × 10{sup 4} cells mL{sup −1}, with a detection limit of 2.6 × 10{sup 2} cells mL{sup −1}. The ECL biosensor was also applied to detect prostate specific antigen with a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL{sup −1}. The high selectivity of the biosensor was demonstrated in comparison with that of a lectin-based biosensor. The strategy developed in this study may be a promising approach and could be extended to the design of ECL biosensors for highly sensitive and selective detection of other cancer-related cells or cancer biomarkers using different probes.

  19. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence biosensing for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells incorporating antibody as capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as signal probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Haiying; Li, Zhejian; Shan, Meng; Li, Congcong; Qi, Honglan; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Jinyi; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel biosensor was developed for the detection of prostate cancer cells. • The selectivity of the biosensor was improved using antibody as capture probe. • The biosensor showed the low extremely detection limit of 2.6 × 10 2 cells mL −1 . • The ruthenium complex-labelled WGA can be transported in the cell vesicles. - Abstract: A highly selective and sensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells was designed using a prostate specific antibody as a capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as a signal probe. The ECL biosensor was fabricated by covalently immobilising the capture probe on a graphene oxide-coated glassy carbon electrode. Target PC-3 cells were selectively captured on the surface of the biosensor, and then, the signal probe was bound with the captured PC-3 cells to form a sandwich. In the presence of tripropylamine, the ECL intensity of the sandwich biosensor was logarithmically directly proportion to the concentration of PC-3 cells over a range from 7.0 × 10 2 to 3.0 × 10 4 cells mL −1 , with a detection limit of 2.6 × 10 2 cells mL −1 . The ECL biosensor was also applied to detect prostate specific antigen with a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL −1 . The high selectivity of the biosensor was demonstrated in comparison with that of a lectin-based biosensor. The strategy developed in this study may be a promising approach and could be extended to the design of ECL biosensors for highly sensitive and selective detection of other cancer-related cells or cancer biomarkers using different probes

  20. Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Ruthenium, Cobalt, and Black Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peethala, Brown Cornelius

    Ta/TaN bilayer serves as the diffusion barrier as well as the adhesion promoter between Cu and the dielectric in 32 nm technology devices. A key concern of future technology devices (layer (vs. a bilayer of Ta/TaN) to act as a barrier. During patterning, they need to be planarized using conventional chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) to achieve a planar surface. However, CMP of these new barrier materials requires novel slurry compositions that provide adequate selectivity towards Cu and dielectric films, and minimize galvanic corrosion. Apart from the application as a barrier, Ru also has been proposed as a lower electrode material in metal-insulator-metal capacitors where high (> 50 nm/min) Ru removal rates (RRs) are required and as a stop layer in magnetic recording head fabrication where low (hydroxide (KOH). It was also determined that increased the ionic strength is not responsible for the observed increase in Ru removal rate. Benzotirazole (BTA) and ascorbic acid were added to the slurry to reduce the open circuit potential (Eoc) difference between Cu and Ru to ˜20 mV from about 550 mV in the absence of additives. A removal mechanism with KIO4 as the oxidizing agent is proposed based on the formation of several ruthenium oxides, some of which formed residues on the polishing pad below a pH of ˜7. Next, a colloidal silica-based slurry with hydrogen peroxide (H 2O2) as the oxidizer (1 wt%), and arginine (0.5 wt%) as the complexing agent was developed to polish Co at pH 10. The Eoc between Cu and Co at the above conditions was reduced to ˜20 mV compared to ˜250 mV in the absence of additives, suggestive of reduced galvanic corrosion during the Co polishing. The slurry also has the advantages of good post-polish surface quality at pH 10, and no dissolution rate. BTA at a concentration of 5mM in this slurry inhibited Cu dissolution rates and yielded a Cu/Co RR ratio of ˜0.8:1 while the open potential difference between Cu and Co was further reduced to ˜10

  1. Reaction of a (Salen)ruthenium(VI) nitrido complex with thiols. C-H bond activation by (Salen)ruthenium(IV) sulfilamido species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wai-Lun; Lam, William W Y; Kwong, Hoi-Ki; Peng, Shie-Ming; Wong, Wing-Tak; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2010-01-04

    The reaction of [Ru(VI)(N)(L)(MeOH)](PF(6)) [1; L = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-o-cyclohexyldiamine dianion] with a stoichiometric amount of RSH in CH(3)CN gives the corresponding (salen)ruthenium(IV) sulfilamido species [Ru(IV){N(H)SR}(L)(NCCH(3))](PF(6)) (2a, R = (t)Bu; 2b, R = Ph). Metathesis of 2a with NaN(3) in methanol affords [Ru(IV){N(H)S(t)Bu}(L)(N(3))] (2c). 2a undergoes further reaction with 1 equiv of RSH to afford a (salen)ruthenium(III) sulfilamine species, [Ru(III){N(H)(2)S(t)Bu}(L)(NCCH(3))](PF(6)) (3). On the other hand, 2b reacts with 2 equiv of PhSH to give a (salen)ruthenium(III) ammine species [Ru(III)(NH(3))(L)(NCCH(3))](PF(6)) (4); this species can also be prepared by treatment of 1 with 3 equiv of PhSH. The X-ray structures of 2c and 4 have been determined. Kinetic studies of the reaction of 1 with excess RSH indicate the following schemes: 1 --> 2a --> 3 (R = (t)Bu), 1 --> 2b --> 4 (R = Ph). The conversion of 1 to 2 probably involves nucleophilic attack of RSH at the nitrido ligand, followed by a proton shift. The conversions of 2a to 3 and 2b to 4 are proposed to involve rate-limiting H-atom abstraction from RSH by 2a or 2b. 2a and 2b are also able to abstract H atoms from hydrocarbons with weak C-H bonds. These reactions occur with large deuterium isotope effects; the kinetic isotope effect values for the oxidation of 9,10-dihydroanthracene, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, and fluorene by 2a are 51, 56, and 11, respectively.

  2. Mechanistic studies of the oxidation of soluble species of ruthenium in nitric acid solutions. Application to the removal of ruthenium from nuclear fuel dissolution solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carron, V.

    2001-01-01

    Ruthenium is one of the most troublesome fission products during nuclear fuel reprocessing. His removal from nitric acid fuel dissolution solutions, above the PUREX process, is under consideration. Electro-volatilization could be a possible way to eliminate this element. It consists in the oxidation of soluble ruthenium species coupled with the volatilization of formed RuO 4 . Soluble species are nitrate and nitro complexes of nitrosyl ruthenium RuNO 3+ . The first part of this work deals with the direct oxidation of RuNO 3+ at a golden or a platinum anode. It has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry and infrared and UV-visible reflectance spectroscopy. The oxidation of RuNO 3+ begins with an adsorption step, which precedes the formation of RuO 4 . Then a reaction between RuO 4 and RuNO 3+ occurs to produce a Ru IV compound, which is also electro-oxidized to RuO 4 . The second part concerns potentiostatic electro-volatilization experiences. The rate of electro-volatilization decreases with increasing HNO 3 concentration. At low concentrations, kinetic is controlled by the volatilization of RuO 4 . The rate-determining step is the oxidation of RuNO 3+ at concentrations higher than 1 M. In HNO 3 4 M, the addition of AgNO 3 is required to accelerate the oxidation of RuNO 3+ . The last part is devoted to the study of the indirect oxidation of RuNO 3+ . The electrocatalytic power of electro-generated Ag II is illustrated by voltammetric techniques and potentiostatic electrolysis. The existence of a limit concentration of AgNO 3 is shown (which value depends on experimental conditions) beyond which kinetic is controlled by the RuO 4 volatilization step. These results indicate that the electro-volatilization kinetic could be increased by optimizing the volatilization conditions. (author)

  3. Antioxidant, DNA interaction, VEGFR2 kinase, topoisomerase I and in vitro cytotoxic activities of heteroleptic copper(II) complexes of tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines and diimines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haleel, A.; Mahendiran, D. [Post-Graduate and Research Department of Chemistry, The New College (Autonomous), Chennai 600 014 (India); Veena, V.; Sakthivel, N. [Department of Biotechnology, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry 605 014 (India); Rahiman, A. Kalilur, E-mail: akrahmanjkr@gmail.com [Post-Graduate and Research Department of Chemistry, The New College (Autonomous), Chennai 600 014 (India)

    2016-11-01

    A series of heteroleptic mononuclear copper(II) complexes of the type [Cu(L{sup 1–3})(diimine)]ClO{sub 4} (1–6) containing three tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core ligands, ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL{sup 1}), ethyl 5-methyl-7-(4-diethylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL{sup 2}) or ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL{sup 3}), and two diimine coligands, 2,2′-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) have been synthesized and characterized by spectral methods. The geometry of complexes have been determined with the help of electronic absorption and EPR splitting patterns, which suggest four coordinated square planar geometry around copper(II) ion. The lowering of HOMO–LUMO band gap value of complex 4 implies its higher biological activity compared to other complexes. Antioxidant studies revealed that the complexes possess considerable radical scavenging potency against DPPH. The binding studies of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT–DNA) revealed groove mode of binding, which was further supported by docking simulation. The complexes 3 and 4 strongly inhibit the topoisomerase I, and also strongly interact with VEGFR2 kinase receptor via π–π, σ–π and hydrogen bonding interaction. Gel electrophoresis experiments demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave plasmid DNA in the absence of activators. In vitro cytotoxic activities of the complexes were examined on three cancerous cell lines such as human lung (A549), cervical (HeLa) and colon (HCT-15), and two normal cells such as human embryonic kidney (HEK) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The live cell and fluorescent imaging of cancer cells were observed with acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining assay. All encouraging chemical and biological findings indicate that the complex 4 is a suitable candidate

  4. Electrooxidative Ruthenium-Catalyzed C-H/O-H Annulation by Weak O-Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Youai; Tian, Cong; Massignan, Leonardo; Rogge, Torben; Ackermann, Lutz

    2018-05-14

    Electrocatalysis has been identified as a powerful strategy for organometallic catalysis, and yet electrocatalytic C-H activation is restricted to strongly N-coordinating directing groups. The first example of electrocatalytic C-H activation by weak O-coordination is presented, in which a versatile ruthenium(II) carboxylate catalyst enables electrooxidative C-H/O-H functionalization for alkyne annulations in the absence of metal oxidants; thereby exploiting sustainable electricity as the sole oxidant. Mechanistic insights provide strong support for a facile organometallic C-H ruthenation and an effective electrochemical reoxidation of the key ruthenium(0) intermediate. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Study of methods for removing strontium, plutonium, and ruthenium from Savannah River Plant waste supernate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.R.

    1976-06-01

    As a part of long-term waste management studies at the Savannah River Laboratory, tests were made to study removal of strontium, plutonium, and ruthenium from simulated and actual waste supernates. Plutonium was sorbed by Duolite ARC-359 ion exchange resin, the same resin that is used to remove cesium from waste supernate. Strontium was removed from supernate by sorption on a chelating resin Chelex 100, or by precipitation as Sr 3 (PO 4 ) 2 . Activities of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and 238-241 Pu remaining in processed waste supernate should be 1-10 nanocuries of each element per gram of salt. Of the methods that were tested, none was adequate for plant-scale removal of ruthenium

  6. Ruthenium complexing in sorption by granulated sorbents with ethylene diamine and diethyl amine groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanova, S.A.; Kolmakova, A.I.; Konovalov, L.V.; Kukushkin, Yu.N.; Kalalova, E.

    1986-01-01

    The sorption process of ruthenium (4) chlorocomplexes - K 2 (RuCl 6 ) macroporous granulated copolymers of glycidylmethacrylate ethylene dimethacrylate with ethylene diamine and diethyl amine has been studied. Sorption has been carried out under the static conditions (at 20 and 98 deg C) from 0.1-2.0 MxHCl and 1.0 M NaCl solutions. It is established that the sorption from acidic solutions proceeds according to anion exchange mechanism with formation of onium chlorocomplexes in the sorbent phase, subjecting to Anderson regrouping during the heating. During the sorption from neutral solutions the second-sphere coordination of polymer amino groups accirs near ruthenium atom and amino-chloride complexes are formed in the sorbent phase

  7. In Situ FTIR and NMR Spectroscopic Investigations on Ruthenium-Based Catalysts for Alkene Hydroformylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Christoph; Profir, Irina; Fleischer, Ivana; Baumann, Wolfgang; Selent, Detlef; Fischer, Christine; Spannenberg, Anke; Ludwig, Ralf; Hess, Dieter; Franke, Robert; Börner, Armin

    2016-02-18

    Homogeneous ruthenium complexes modified by imidazole-substituted monophosphines as catalysts for various highly efficient hydroformylation reactions were characterized by in situ IR spectroscopy under reaction conditions and NMR spectroscopy. A proper protocol for the preformation reaction from [Ru3 (CO)12] is decisive to prevent the formation of inactive ligand-modified polynuclear complexes. During catalysis, ligand-modified mononuclear ruthenium(0) carbonyls were detected as resting states. Changes in the ligand structure have a crucial impact on the coordination behavior of the ligand and consequently on the catalytic performance. The substitution of CO by a nitrogen atom of the imidazolyl moiety in the ligand is not a general feature, but it takes place when structural prerequisites of the ligand are fulfilled. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Large-scale ruthenium- and enzyme-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution of (rac-1-phenylethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bäckvall Jan-E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The scale-up of the ruthenium- and enzyme-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR of (rac-1-phenylethanol (2 is addressed. The immobilized lipase Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB was employed for the resolution, which shows high enantioselectivity in the transesterification. The ruthenium catalyst used, (η 5-C5Ph5RuCl(CO2 1, was shown to possess very high reactivity in the "in situ" redox racemization of 1-phenylethanol (2 in the presence of the immobilized enzyme, and could be used in 0.05 mol% with high efficiency. Commercially available isopropenyl acetate was employed as acylating agent in the lipase-catalyzed transesterifications, which makes the purification of the product very easy. In a successful large-scale DKR of 2, with 0.05 mol% of 1, (R-1-phenylethanol acetate (3 was obtained in 159 g (97% yield in excellent enantiomeric excess (99.8% ee.

  9. Recent advances in the ruthenium-catalyzed hydroarylation of alkynes with aromatics: synthesis of trisubstituted alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Rajendran; Jeganmohan, Masilamani

    2015-11-14

    The hydroarylation of alkynes with substituted aromatics in the presence of a metal catalyst via chelation-assisted C-H bond activation is a powerful method to synthesize trisubstituted alkenes. Chelation-assisted C-H bond activation can be done by two ways: (a) an oxidative addition pathway and (b) a deprotonation pathway. Generally, a mixture of cis and trans stereoisomeric as well as regioisomeric trisubstituted alkenes was observed in an oxidative addition pathway. In the deprotonation pathway, the hydroarylation reaction can be done in a highly regio- and stereoselective manner, and enables preparation of the expected trisubstituted alkenes in a highly selective manner. Generally, ruthenium, rhodium and cobalt complexes are used as catalysts in the reaction. In this review, a ruthenium-catalyzed hydroarylation of alkynes with substituted aromatics is covered completely. The hydroarylation reaction of alkynes with amide, azole, carbamate, phosphine oxide, amine, acetyl, sulfoxide and sulphur directed aromatics is discussed.

  10. Electro-volatilization of ruthenium in nitric medium: influences of ruthenium species nature and models solutions composition; Electro-volatilisation du ruthenium en milieu nitrique: influence de la nature des formes chimiques du ruthenium et de la composition des solutions modeles de dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousset, F

    2004-12-15

    Ruthenium is one of the fission products in the reprocessing of irradiated fuels that requires a specific processing management. Its elimination, upstream by the PUREX process, has been considered. A process, called electro-volatilization, which take advantage of the RuO{sub 4} volatility, has been optimised in the present study. It consists in a continuous electrolysis of ruthenium solutions in order to generate RuO{sub 4} species that is volatilized and easily trapped. This process goes to satisfying ruthenium elimination yields with RuNO(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} synthetic solutions but not with fuel dissolution solutions. Consequently, this work consisted in the speciation studies of dissolved ruthenium species were carried out by simulating fuel solutions produced by hot acid attack of several ruthenium compounds (Ru(0), RuO{sub 2},xH{sub 2}O, polymetallic alloy). In parallel with dissolution kinetic studies, the determination of dissolved species was performed using voltammetry, spectrometry and spectro-electrochemistry. The results showed the co-existence of Ru(IV) and RuNO(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}. Although these species are different from synthetic RuNO(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, their electro-oxidation behaviour are similar. The electro-volatilization tests of these dissolution solutions yielded to comparable results as the synthetic RuNO(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} solutions. Then, complexity increase of models solutions was performed by in-situ generation of nitrous acid during ruthenium dissolution. Nitrous acid showed a catalytic effect on ruthenium dissolution. Its presence goes to quasi exclusively RuNO(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} species. It is also responsible of the strong n-bond formation between Ru{sup 2+} and NO{sup +}. In addition, it has been shown that its reducing action on RuO{sub 4} hinders the electro-volatilization process. Mn{sup 2+} and Ce{sup 3+} cations also reveal, but to a lesser

  11. Investigation of the process for ruthenium fixation on stainless steel in concentrated nitric environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massit, Hubert

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis reports the development of a process and the determination of the conditions for the fixation of insoluble ruthenium compounds on a Z2CN180 stainless steel in a concentrated nitric environment. The original characteristics and results of this research work are the use of a rotating disk to control the hydrodynamic conditions of suspension particle transport towards the collector surface, and the application of X ray spectrometry of solid deposits of ruthenium compounds fixed on this surface. Characterization techniques (granulometry, Auger electron spectroscopy or AES, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis or ESCA) allowed the assessment of the influence of various parameters (size, surface chemical composition) on the studied process. Electrochemical techniques are used to show the role of particle-substrate Coulomb interactions, on the quantity of fixed particles and on fixation kinetics. The author evokes possible developments and applications, notably decontamination processes [fr

  12. Studies of dissolution solutions of ruthenium metal, oxide and mixed compounds in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousset, F.; Eysseric, C.; Bedioui, F.

    2004-01-01

    Ruthenium is one of the fission products generated by irradiated nuclear fuel. It is present throughout all the steps of nuclear fuel reprocessing-particularly during extraction-and requires special attention due to its complex chemistry and high βγ activity. An innovative electro-volatilization process is now being developed to take advantage of the volatility of RuO 4 in order to eliminate it at the head end of the Purex process and thus reduce the number of extraction cycles. Although the process operates successfully with synthetic nitrato-RuNO 3+ solutions, difficulties have been encountered in extrapolating it to real-like dissolution solutions. In order to better approximate the chemical forms of ruthenium found in fuel dissolution solutions, kinetic and speciation studies on dissolved species were undertaken with RuO 2 ,xH 2 O and Ru 0 in nitric acid media. (authors)

  13. Effect of solvent on Se-modified ruthenium/carbon catalyst for oxygen reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanxiang Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Se-modified ruthenium supporting on carbon (Sex–Ru/C electrocatalyst was prepared by solvothermal one-step synthesis method. The reaction mechanism was revealed after discussing impact of different solvents (i-propanol and EG in solvotermal reaction. The result showed that the grain size of Se-modified ruthenium electrocatalyst was as small as 1 to 3 nm and highly dispersed on carbon surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS presented that selenium mainly existed in the catalyst in the form of elemental selenium and selenium oxides when the solvent was EG and i-propanol, respectively. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR performance was improved by appearance of selenium oxides.

  14. Forefront of PUREX system engineering. Chemistry and engineering of ruthenium, technetium and neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    The paper reports the activity of the research committee organized by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan on 'Ruthenium and Technetium Chemistry in the PUREX System', with focusing on basic behaviors of ruthenium, technetium and neptunium in the PUREX process, the principles of plant design, and behaviors during the final waste treatment. The scope of the work includes the following major topics: (1) basic solution and solid-state chemistry; (2) basic solution and solid-state chemistry of minor actinides in particular, Np; (3) partitioning chemistry in the PUREX system and environmental behavior of the components; (4) processes of recovery, purification, and utilization of rare metal fission products; (5) field data on plant design, operation, decontamination, and decommissioning; (6) numerical process simulations and process control technologies; (7) compilation of a data base for process chemistry and plant engineering. (S. Ohno)

  15. A mixed ruthenium polypyridyl complex containing a PEG-bipyridine macroligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, Veronica; Holder, Elisabeth; Meier, Michael A.R.; Hoogenboom, Richard; Schubert, Ulrich S. [Laboratory of Macromolecular Chemistry and Nanoscience, Eindhoven University of Technology and Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI), P. O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2004-04-06

    An amino-functionalized bipyridine ligand was prepared in order to serve as a bridging unit to an activated low-molecular-weight monomethyl ether of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Coordination of a ruthenium(II) phenantroline precursor onto the formed PEG-containing bipyridine ligand yielded a metal-containing polymer which shows interesting properties for solar cell applications. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Ruthenium(II) pincer complexes with oxazoline arms for efficient transfer hydrogenation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2012-08-01

    Well-defined P NN CN pincer ruthenium complexes bearing both strong phosphine and weak oxazoline donors were developed. These easily accessible complexes exhibit significantly better catalytic activity in transfer hydrogenation of ketones compared to their PN 3P analogs. These reactions proceed under mild and base-free conditions via protonation- deprotonation of the \\'NH\\' group in the aromatization-dearomatization process. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Preparation and characterization of nickel-caffeine and ruthenium-arborine complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusmidah Ali

    1998-01-01

    In this study, two types of complexes were synthesised, namely, nickel-cafeine and ruthenium-arborine by using NiCl 2 6H 2 O and RuCl 3 3H 2 O as starting materials. The complexes were characterised using far- and near infrared and CHN analysis. The proposed complexes were (Ni(kaf)Cl 2 ) 4 and (RuCl 3 Ab)EtOH

  18. Cytogenotoxic effects of two potential anticancer Ruthenium(III Schiff Bases complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izet Eminovic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treatment of cancer has been subject of great interest. Researchers are continuously searching for new medicines. In this sense, ruthenium complexes have big potential. Some evidences suggest that ruthenium compounds possess anticancer activities. We synthesized two recently published ruthenium(III complexes with bidentate O,N and tridentate O,O,N Schiff bases derived from 5-substituted salicylaldehyde and aminophenol or anilineare. These compounds showed affinity for binding to the DNA molecule, however, insufficient data are available regarding their possible toxic effects on biological systems.Methods: In the present study we evaluated genotoxic, cytotoxic, and cytostatic effects of Na[RuCl2(L12] and Na[Ru(L22], using the Allium cepa assay.Results: Different toxic effects were observed depending on the substance, tested concentration, and endpoint measured. In general, the tested compounds significantly lowered the root growth and mitotic index values as compared to the control group. Additionally, a wide range of abnormal mitotic stages, both clastogenic and non-clastogenic were observed in the treated cells. Na[RuCl2(L12] significantly increased the frequency of sticky metaphases, chromosome bridges, micronuclei, impaired chromosome segregation, as well as number of apoptotic and necrotic cells over the controls. In contrast, Na[Ru(L22] did not show significant evidence of genotoxicity with regard to chromosome aberrations and micronuclei, however, significant differences were detected in the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells when the highest concentration was applied.Conclusions: In this study we demonstrated antiproliferative effects of Na[RuCl2(L12] and Na[Ru(L22]. At clinical level, these results could be interesting for further studies on anticancer potential of the ruthenium(III complexes using animal models.

  19. Ruthenium-catalysed decomposition of formic acid: Fuel cell and catalytic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Piola, Lorenzo

    2017-08-08

    The decomposition of formic acid into H2 and CO2 was successfully performed using a ruthenium hydride catalyst, without any concomitant CO evolution. The reaction mechanism is investigated by means of density functional theory calculations (DFT). The generated H2 was further exploited in a fuel cell to produce electricity. The catalytic hydrogenation of conjugated olefins, using this dihydrogen generation procedure, is also reported.

  20. Synergistic Interaction within Bifunctional Ruthenium Nanoparticle/SILP Catalysts for the Selective Hydrodeoxygenation of Phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luska, Kylie L; Migowski, Pedro; El Sayed, Sami; Leitner, Walter

    2015-12-21

    Ruthenium nanoparticles immobilized on acid-functionalized supported ionic liquid phases (Ru NPs@SILPs) act as efficient bifunctional catalysts in the hydrodeoxygenation of phenolic substrates under batch and continuous flow conditions. A synergistic interaction between the metal sites and acid groups within the bifunctional catalyst leads to enhanced catalytic activities for the overall transformation as compared to the individual steps catalyzed by the separate catalytic functionalities. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Ruthenium-catalyzed direct C3 alkylation of indoles with α,β-unsaturated ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai-Shuai; Lin, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Dong, Lin

    2015-01-28

    In this paper, a simple and highly efficient ruthenium-catalyzed direct C3 alkylation of indoles with various α,β-unsaturated ketones without chelation assistance has been developed. This novel C-H activation methodology exhibits a broad substrate scope such as different substituted indoles, pyrroles, and other azoles. Further synthetic applications of the alkylation products can lead to more attractive 3,4-fused tricyclic indoles.

  2. Modification of Ammonia Decomposition Activity of Ruthenium Nanoparticles by N-Doping of CNT Supports

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Tamsin; Zhan, G; Wu, Kejun; Torrente Murciano, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The use of ammonia as a hydrogen vector has the potential to unlock the hydrogen economy. In this context, this paper presents novel insights into improving the ammonia decomposition activity of ruthenium nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes (CNT) by nitrogen doping. Our results can be applied to develop more active systems capable of delivering hydrogen on demand, with a view to move towards the low temperature target of less than 150 °C. Herein we demonstrate that nitrogen doping of ...

  3. Ruthenium(II)-catalyzed direct addition of indole/pyrrole C2-H bonds to alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Libo; Fu, Shaomin; Lin, Dongen; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Deng, Yuanfu; Jiang, Huanfeng; Zeng, Wei

    2014-10-17

    A ruthenium-catalyzed C2-hydroindolation of alkynes has been achieved. This protocol provides a rapid and concise access to kinds of 2-alkenyl-substituted N-(2-pyridyl)indoles in which the pyridyl moiety can be easily removed to afford free (N-H) indoles under mild conditions. Various arenes and alkynes, including electron-deficient and electron-rich internal alkynes and terminal alkynes, allow for this transformation.

  4. Ruthenium-catalysed decomposition of formic acid: Fuel cell and catalytic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Piola, Lorenzo; Ferná ndez-Salas, José A.; Nahra, Fady; Poater, Albert; Cavallo, Luigi; Nolan, Steven P.

    2017-01-01

    The decomposition of formic acid into H2 and CO2 was successfully performed using a ruthenium hydride catalyst, without any concomitant CO evolution. The reaction mechanism is investigated by means of density functional theory calculations (DFT). The generated H2 was further exploited in a fuel cell to produce electricity. The catalytic hydrogenation of conjugated olefins, using this dihydrogen generation procedure, is also reported.

  5. Improvements in iodine and ruthenium removal from advanced liquid processing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skibo, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-27

    SRNL has considerable experience in designing, engineering, and operating systems for removing iodine-129 (I-129) and ruthenium-106 (Ru-106) from waste streams that are directly analogous to the Advanced Liquid Processing System (ALPS) waste streams. SRNL proposes to provide the technical background and design and engineering support for an improved I-129 and Ru-106 removal system for application to ALPS on the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS).

  6. Ammonia synthesis in the presence of rhodium-ruthenium-iridium carbonyl clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoseev, I.V.; Solov'ev, N.V.

    2007-01-01

    Researches in the field of platinum metal coordination compounds, where nitrogen enters as a ligand in coordination sphere of metal, are discussed. Results of experiments on the ammonia synthesis during the CO+N 2 mixture passing through alkali solution containing mixture of carbonyl clusters of rhodium, ruthenium and iridium at atmospheric pressure are given. Technique of the experiment and steps of assumed reactions of nitrogen fixation by Rh, Ir and Ru carbonyl clusters are demonstrated [ru

  7. Sequential Electrodeposition of Platinum-Ruthenium at Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes for Methanol Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana González-González

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequential electrodeposition of Pt and Ru on boron-doped diamond (BDD films, in 0.5 M H2SO4 by cyclic voltammetry, has been prepared. The potential cycling, in the aqueous solutions of the respective metals, was between 0.00 and 1.00 V versus Ag/AgCl. The catalyst composites, Pt and PtRu, deposited on BDD film substrates, were tested for methanol oxidation. The modified diamond surfaces were also characterized by scanning electron microscopy-X-ray fluorescence-energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy. The scanning Auger electron spectroscopy mapping showed the ruthenium signal only in areas where platinum was electrodeposited. Ruthenium does not deposit on the oxidized diamond surface of the boron-doped diamond. Particles with 5–10% of ruthenium with respect to platinum exhibited better performance for methanol oxidation in terms of methanol oxidation peak current and chronoamperometric current stability. The electrogenerated •OH radicals on BDD may interact with Pt surface, participating in the methanol oxidation as shown in oxidation current and the shift in the peak position. The conductive diamond surface is a good candidate as the support for the platinum electrocatalyst, because it ensures catalytic activity, which compares with the used carbon, and higher stability under severe anodic and cathodic conditions.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meublat, L.

    1989-10-01

    The synthesis of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states was attempted from dioxide RuO 2 and tetroxide RuO 4 . Three fluorinating agents were used: fluorine, chlorine trifluoride and krypton difluoride. The reactions were achieved in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride at room temperature. Thus, the reaction of RuO 4 with CIF 3 enabled us to prepare chloryl hexafluororuthenate (V), CIO 2 + RuF 6 - , a new compound well identified by vibrational spectroscopy (infra-red and Raman), the structure of which was determined. The reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 4 gave the oxide tetrafluoride RuOF 4 , the previously published syntheses and properties of which were not in agreement with each other. This compound was definitely characterized here by chemical analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The product of thermal decomposition (70 0 C) of RuOF 4 is presumably RuF 4 since only oxygen is liberated during this decomposition. At last, the reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 2 probably leads to the formation of the new oxide fluoride RuO 2 F 4 . Indeed, no oxygen is given off during this reaction, the chemical analysis of the red-orange coloured solid residue is almost in agreement with the one proposed and its infra-red absorption spectrum indicates the presence of ruthenium-oxygen and ruthenium-terminal and bridging fluorine bonds [fr

  9. Synthesis and characterization of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meublat, L.

    1989-01-01

    The synthesis of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states was attempted from dioxide RuO 2 and tetroxide RuO 4 . Three fluorinating agents were used: fluorine, chlorine trifluoride and krypton difluoride. The reactions were achieved in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride at room temperature. Thus, the reaction of RuO 4 with CIF 3 enabled us to prepare chloryl hexafluororuthenate (V), ClO 2 + RuF 6 - , a new compound well idendified by vibrational spectroscopy (infra-red and Raman), the structure of which was determined. The reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 4 gave the oxide tetrafluoride RuOF 4 , the previously published syntheses and properties of which were not in agreement with each other. This compound was definitely characterized here by chemical analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The product of thermal decomposition (70 0 C) of RuOF 4 is presumably RuF 4 since only oxygen is liberated during this decomposition. At last, the reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 2 probably leads to the formation of the new oxide fluoride RuO 2 F 4 . Indeed, no oxygen is given off during this reaction, the chemical analysis of the red-orange coloured solid residue is almost in agreement with the one proposed and its infra-red absorption spectrum indicates the presence of ruthenium-oxygen and ruthenium-terminal and bridging fluorine bonds [fr

  10. Tracking the Oxygen Status in the Cell Nucleus with a Hoechst-Tagged Phosphorescent Ruthenium Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Daiki; Umehara, Yui; Son, Aoi; Asahi, Wataru; Misu, Sotaro; Kurihara, Ryohsuke; Kondo, Teruyuki; Tanabe, Kazuhito

    2018-05-04

    Molecular oxygen in living cells is distributed and consumed inhomogeneously, depending on the activity of each organelle. Therefore, tractable methods that can be used to monitor the oxygen status in each organelle are needed to understand cellular function. Here we report the design of a new oxygen-sensing probe for use in the cell nucleus. We prepared "Ru-Hoechsts", each consisting of a phosphorescent ruthenium complex linked to a Hoechst 33258 moiety, and characterized their properties as oxygen sensors. The Hoechst unit shows strong DNA-binding properties in the nucleus, and the ruthenium complex shows oxygen-dependent phosphorescence. Thus, Ru-Hoechsts accumulated in the cell nucleus and showed oxygen-dependent signals that could be monitored. Of the Ru-Hoechsts prepared in this study, Ru-Hoechst b, in which the ruthenium complex and the Hoechst unit were linked through a hexyl chain, showed the most suitable properties for monitoring the oxygen status. Ru-Hoechsts are probes with high potential for visualizing oxygen fluctuations in the nucleus. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Antipyrilquinoneimine dye formation by coupling aniline derivatives with 4-aminoantipyrine in the presence of ruthenium nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasthuri, J.; Santhanalakshmi, J.; Rajendiran, N.

    2008-01-01

    The coupling of 4-aminoantipyrine with aniline derivatives catalyzed by ruthenium nanoparticles has been studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy in aqueous medium. The rate constant for antipyrilquinoneimine dye formation depends on the nature of the aniline substituent and the p H, ionic strength and temperature of the reaction medium. The maximum rate constant of the dye formation reaction is observed at p H 3.6. Aniline derivatives with electron donating substituents show higher rate constant values than those with electron withdrawing substituents, with increasing rate constant values in the order: N,N-dimethyl aniline> a-toluidine> o-chloroaniline > m-chloroaniline. With pseudo first order kinetics, the total order is 1.0 + 1.0 + 1.0 = 3.0, which includes the orders with respect to amine, 4-aminoantipyrine and ruthenium nanoparticles. Studies on these effects help to complete the kinetic analysis as well as propose the reaction pathway. Furthermore, TEM measurement confirms that the nano scalar size of the ruthenium nanoparticles is 7 nm

  12. Ruthenium-modified cytochrome c: temperature dependence of the rate of intramolecular electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isied, S.S.; Kuehn, C.; Worosila, G.

    1984-01-01

    The ruthenium-modified horse heart cytochrome c, Ru(III)-cyt c(III), where the ruthenium is bound to the histidines-33 residue has been synthesized and characterized by ruthenium analysis, UV-vis and CD spectra, and differential pulse polarography and cyclic voltammetry. The intermediate Ru(III)-cyt c(III) has been generated by pulse-radioanalysis with use of four different radicals, CO 2 -., (CH 3 )COH., (CH 2 OH) 3 CCHOH, and -OCCH(OH)C(OH)CO 2 -. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer within the Ru(III)-cyt c(III) complex and its temperature dependence were determined over a 40 0 C temperature range with the CO 2 -. radical. At 25 0 C, these values are k/sub u/=53 +/- s/sup -1/ (pH 7.01 M phosphate buffer, 0.1 M NaHCO 2 ), ΔH/sup +/=3.5 +/- 0.2 kcal mol/sup -1/, and ΔS/sup +/=-39 +/- 1 eu

  13. About the value of Ruthenium 106 brachytherapy in the treatment of uveal melanomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langmann, G.; Mosboeck, G.; Stuecklschwaiger, G.; Muellner, K.; Lechner, H.; Faulborn, J.

    2002-01-01

    Background: to investigate the clinical course, sequelae and visual function of uveal melanomas treated with Ruthenium 106 brachytherapy. Patients and method: 47 patients who underwent Ruthenium 106 brachytherapy between 1985 and 2000 were evaluated using Kaplan Meier statistical method. Mean follow up interval was 22 month (range 8 - 152 months). Results: Local tumor control rate was 85 %, 5 years possibility to avoid enucleation was 75 %. The most important sequelae were radiation optic neuropathy (29 %), maculopathy (37 %) and radiation retinopathy (32 %). After terminating the study the 34 % of the patients achieved a visual acuity of 20/40 and more, another 34 % had a visual function of 20/200 and lower. Conclusion: Ruthenium 106 brachytherapy is our method of choice in small medium sized uveal melanomas and a maximum tumor prominence of 6 mm. Tumors have to be located in the midperiphery and outer periphery of the fundus including the ciliary body. In addition to the indications introduced by Lommatzsch we treated ciliary body melanomas with a tumor base more than 3 clock hours (by shifting the plaque) as an alternative therapy to enucleation. (author)

  14. High-pressure catalytic chemical vapor deposition of ferromagnetic ruthenium-containing carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khavrus, Vyacheslav O., E-mail: V.Khavrus@ifw-dresden.de; Ibrahim, E. M. M.; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Ruemmeli, Mark H.; Wolter, A. U. B.; Hampel, Silke; Leonhardt, Albrecht [IFW Dresden (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    We report on the high-pressure catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of ruthenium nanoparticles (NPs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by means of gas-phase decomposition of acetonitrile and ruthenocene in a tubular quartz flow reactor at 950 Degree-Sign C and at elevated pressures (between 2 and 8 bar). The deposited material consists of Ru metal cores with sizes ranging between 1 and 3 nm surrounded by a carbon matrix. The high-pressure CCVD seems to be an effective route to obtain composite materials containing metallic NPs, Ru in this work, inside a nanostructured carbon matrix protecting them from oxidation in ambient air. We find that in contradiction to the weak paramagnetic properties characterizing bulk ruthenium, the synthesized samples are ferromagnetic as predicted for nanosized particles of nonmagnetic materials. At low pressure, the very small ruthenium catalyst particles are able to catalyze growth of SWCNTs. Their yield decreases with increasing reaction pressure. Transmission electron microscopy, selected area energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements were used to analyze and confirm properties of the synthesized NPs and nanotubes. A discussion on the growth mechanism of the Ru-containing nanostructures is presented.

  15. Ruthenium(II) carbonyl compounds with the 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatikonda, Rajendhraprasad; Haukka, Matti

    2017-04-01

    Two ruthenium carbonyl complexes with the 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine ligand (tpy-Cl, C 15 H 10 ClN 3 ), i.e. [RuCl(tpy-Cl)(CO) 2 ][RuCl 3 (CO) 3 ] (I) [systematic name: cis -di-carbonyl-chlorido(4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine-κ 3 N )ruthenium(II) fac -tricarbonyltri-chlorido-ruthenate(II)], and [RuCl 2 (tpy-Cl)(CO) 2 ] (II) [ cis -dicarbonyl- trans -di-chlorido(4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine-κ 2 N 1 , N 1' )ruthenium(II)], were synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The Ru II atoms in both centrosymmetric structures (I) and (II) display similar, slightly distorted octa-hedral coordination spheres. The coordination sphere in the complex cation in compound (I) is defined by three N atoms of the tridentate tpy-Cl ligand, two carbonyl carbon atoms and one chlorido ligand; the charge is balanced by an octa-hedral [Ru(CO) 3 Cl 3 ] - counter-anion. In the neutral compound (II), the tpy-Cl ligand coordinates to the metal only through two of its N atoms. The coordination sphere of the Ru II atom is completed by two carbonyl and two chlorido ligands. In the crystal structures of both (I) and (II), weak C-H⋯Cl inter-actions are observed.

  16. Oxidative dissolution of ruthenium deposits onto stainless steel by permanganate ions in alkaline medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floquet, S.; Eysseric, C.; Maurel, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/Valrho), Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    During spent nuclear fuel reprocessing ruthenium is liable to form black ruthenium deposits on the stainless steel walls of process equipments. These deposits promote corrosion and can eventually obstruct the off-gas lines. The results of decontamination of 304L stainless steel test specimens covered with RuO(OH){sub 2} . xH{sub 2}O deposits by permanganate ions in alkaline medium are described. The ruthenium deposits were dissolved by oxidation of RuO(OH){sub 2} to RuO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ions, while the permanganate ions were reduced to MnO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ions and then to manganese dioxide MnO{sub 2}. The parameters affecting the kinetics of oxidative dissolution of these deposits were examined. The results indicate that the oxidative dissolution kinetics depends on the instantaneous surface area of the deposit, and that the dissolution rate increases with the concentrations of MnO{sub 4}{sup -} and OH{sup -} ions. (orig.)

  17. Surface heterogeneity and ionization of Cs promoter in carbon-based ruthenium catalyst for ammonia synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotarba, Andrzej; Dmytrzyk, Jaromir; Rarog-Pilecka, Wioletta; Kowalczyk, Zbigniew

    2003-01-01

    Second-generation ammonia synthesis cesium-doped ruthenium catalyst supported on turbostratic carbon was investigated by the species resolved thermal alkali desorption method (SR-TAD). Energetic barriers for cesium ions (2.86 eV), ground state (1.96 eV) and electronically excited atoms (5.76 eV) desorbing from the Cs-Ru/C catalyst were determined. In the case of ruthenium-free Cs/C system, cesium desorbs as ground state atoms only, with an energy barrier of 2.87 eV. The work functions determined by the thermionic emission of electrons from Cs/C and Cs-Ru/C were of the same value (2.9 eV). It was concluded that ruthenium induces heterogeneous distribution of cesium on the catalyst surface. The promoter stability is reduced on low work function areas and its surface ionization on high work function areas opens the ionic desorption channel. The Cs desorption from the catalyst is discussed in terms of the literature data for the cesium/graphite system

  18. Application of the ruthenium and technetium thermodynamic data bases used in the EQ3/6 geochemical codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.

    1985-04-01

    Based on a critical review of the available thermodynamic data, computerized data bases for technetium and ruthenium were created for use with the EQ3/6 geochemical computer codes. The technetium data base contains thermodynamic data for 8 aqueous species and 15 solids; 26 aqueous species and 9 solids were included in the ruthenium data base. The EQ3NR code was used to calculate solubility limits for ruthenium (8 x 10 -16 M) in ground water from Yucca Mountain, a potential nuclear waste repository site near the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The code confirmed the essentially unlimited solubility of technetium in oxidizing conditions, such as those that are believed to exist in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain and the Cambric Nuclear event site at the NTS. Ruthenium migration observed from the Cambric site was evaluated. The solubility limit for ruthenium (as the aqueous species RuO 4 - ) when constrained by RuO 2 is approximately equal to the concentration of ruthenium found in the cavity ground water (i.e., 2.1 x 10 -11 vs 4.5 x 10 -11 M). Differences in ruthenium solubility limits between Yucca Mountain and Cambric are primarily due to differences in ground-water pH. Technetium solubility (3 x 10 -8 M) for moderately reducing conditions (Eh = -0.1 V) using the metastable oxide, TcO 2 .2H 2 O, as the solubility constraint is within the range of experimental values recently published in a study of technetium sorption on basalt. Previously published technetium solubilities of 10 -12 to 10 -16 M were apparently based on a technetium data base that did not include aqueous species other than TcO 4 - . When TcO(OH) 2 0 is included in the data base, the calculated values are much closer to the experimental results. Eh-pH diagrams were also generated for a variety of conditions using the SOLUPLOT code

  19. Tailoring Ruthenium Exposure to Enhance the Performance of fcc Platinum@Ruthenium Core-Shell Electrocatalysts in the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    AlYami, Noktan

    2016-05-17

    The catalytic properties of noble metal nanocrystals are a function of their size, structure, and surface composition. In particular, achieving high activity without sacrificing stability is essential for designing commercially viable catalysts. A major challenge in designing state-of-the-art Ru-based catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), which is a key step in water splitting, is the poor stability and surface tailorability of these catalysts. In this study, we designed rapidly synthesizable size-controlled, morphology-selective, and surface-tailored platinum-ruthenium core-shell (Pt@Ru) and alloy (PtRu) nanocatalysts in a scalable continuous-flow reactor. These core-shell nanoparticles with atomically precise shells were produced in a single synthetic step with carbon monoxide as the reducing agent. By varying the metal precursor concentration, a dendritic or layer-by-layer ruthenium shell can be grown. The catalytic activities of the synthesized Pt@Ru and PtRu nanoparticles exhibit noticeably higher electrocatalytic activity in the OER compared to that of pure Pt and Ru nanoparticles. Promisingly, Pt@Ru nanocrystals with a ~2-3 atomic layer Ru cuboctahedral shell surpass conventional Ru nanoparticles in terms of both durability and activity.

  20. Tailoring Ruthenium Exposure to Enhance the Performance of fcc Platinum@Ruthenium Core-Shell Electrocatalysts in the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    AlYami, Noktan; LaGrow, Alec P.; Joya, khurram; Hwang, Jinyeon; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Sinatra, Lutfan; Kim, Jin Young; Bakr, Osman

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic properties of noble metal nanocrystals are a function of their size, structure, and surface composition. In particular, achieving high activity without sacrificing stability is essential for designing commercially viable catalysts. A major challenge in designing state-of-the-art Ru-based catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), which is a key step in water splitting, is the poor stability and surface tailorability of these catalysts. In this study, we designed rapidly synthesizable size-controlled, morphology-selective, and surface-tailored platinum-ruthenium core-shell (Pt@Ru) and alloy (PtRu) nanocatalysts in a scalable continuous-flow reactor. These core-shell nanoparticles with atomically precise shells were produced in a single synthetic step with carbon monoxide as the reducing agent. By varying the metal precursor concentration, a dendritic or layer-by-layer ruthenium shell can be grown. The catalytic activities of the synthesized Pt@Ru and PtRu nanoparticles exhibit noticeably higher electrocatalytic activity in the OER compared to that of pure Pt and Ru nanoparticles. Promisingly, Pt@Ru nanocrystals with a ~2-3 atomic layer Ru cuboctahedral shell surpass conventional Ru nanoparticles in terms of both durability and activity.

  1. Deposition and properties of cobalt- and ruthenium-based ultra-thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Lucas Benjamin

    Future copper interconnect systems will require replacement of the materials that currently comprise both the liner layer(s) and the capping layer. Ruthenium has previously been considered as a material that could function as a single material liner, however its poor ability to prevent copper diffusion makes it incompatible with liner requirements. A recently described chemical vapor deposition route to amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloy films could correct this problem by eliminating the grain boundaries found in pure ruthenium films. Bias-temperature stressing of capacitor structures using 5 nm ruthenium-phosphorus film as a barrier to copper diffusion and analysis of the times-to-failure at accelerated temperature and field conditions implies that ruthenium-phosphorus performs acceptably as a diffusion barrier for temperatures above 165°C. The future problems associated with the copper capping layer are primarily due to the poor adhesion between copper and the current Si-based capping layers. Cobalt, which adheres well to copper, has been widely proposed to replace the Si-based materials, but its ability to prevent copper diffusion must be improved if it is to be successfully implemented in the interconnect. Using a dual-source chemistry of dicobaltoctacarbonyl and trimethylphosphine at temperatures from 250-350°C, amorphous cobalt-phosphorus can be deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The films contain elemental cobalt and phosphorus, plus some carbon impurity, which is incorporated in the film as both graphitic and carbidic (bonded to cobalt) carbon. When deposited on copper, the adhesion between the two materials remains strong despite the presence of phosphorus and carbon at the interface, but the selectivity for growth on copper compared to silicon dioxide is poor and must be improved prior to consideration for application in interconnect systems. A single molecule precursor containing both cobalt and phosphorus atoms, tetrakis

  2. Mathematical modelling of brittle phase precipitation in complex ruthenium containing nickel-based superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettig, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    A new model has been developed in this work which is capable of simulating the precipitation kinetics of brittle phases, especially TCP-phases (topologically close packed phases) in ruthenium containing superalloys. The model simultaneously simulates the nucleation and the growth stage of precipitation for any number of precipitating phases. The CALPHAD method (Calculation of Phase Diagrams) is employed to calculate thermodynamic properties, such as the driving force or phase compositions in equilibrium. For calculation of diffusion coefficients, kinetic mobility databases which are also based on the CALPHAD-method are used. The model is fully capable of handling multicomponent effects, which are common in complex superalloys. Metastable phases can be treated and will automatically be dissolved if they get unstable. As the model is based on the general CALPHAD method, it can be applied to a broad range of precipitation processes in different alloys as long as the relevant thermodynamic and kinetic databases are available. The developed model proves that the TCP-phases precipitate in a sequence of phases. The first phase that is often formed is the metastable σ-phase because it has the lowest interface energy due to low-energy planes at the interface between matrix and precipitate. After several hundred hours the stable μ- and P-phases start to precipitate by nucleating at the σ-phase which is energetically favourable. During the growth of these stable phases the sigma-phase is continuously dissolved. It can be shown by thermodynamic CALPHAD calculations that the sigma-phase has a lower Gibbs free enthalpy than the μ- and P-phase. All required parameters of the model, such as interface energy and nucleate densities, have been estimated. The mechanisms of suppression of TCP-phase precipitation in the presence of ruthenium in superalloys were investigated with the newly developed model. It is shown by the simulations that ruthenium mostly affects the nucleation

  3. Variation of the Sterical Properties of the N-Heterocyclic Carbene Coligand in Thermally Triggerable Ruthenium-Based Olefin Metathesis Precatalysts/Initiators

    KAUST Repository

    Pump, Eva; Leitgeb, Anita; Kozłowska, Anna; Torvisco, Ana; Falivene, Laura; Cavallo, Luigi; Grela, Karol; Slugovc, Christian

    2015-01-01

    A series of ruthenium complexes based on the κ(C,N)-(2-(benzo[h]quinolin-10-yl)methylidene ruthenium dichloride fragment featuring different neutral coligands L (L = 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazol-2-ylidene (SIPr), 1,3-bis(2

  4. 3-Methylindole-Based Tripodal Tetraphosphine Ruthenium Complexes in N2 Coordination and Reduction and Formic Acid Dehydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenna F. van de Watering

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The ruthenium(II complexes RuCl2L1H, RuCl2L1CF3, RuCl2L1OMe and RuCl2L2H were synthesized from [Ru(η6-benzeneCl(μ-Cl]2 and the corresponding tripodal tris-3-methylindolephosphine-based ligands L1H, L1CF3, L1OMe, and L2H. Stoichiometric reduction of these complexes with KC8 yielded the corresponding ruthenium(0 dinitrogen complexes. The latter complexes were studied in the N2 reduction with chlorosilanes and KC8, yielding stoichiometric amounts of the silylamines. The synthesized ruthenium(II complexes are also active catalysts for the formic acid dehydrogenation reaction.

  5. Amidines for versatile ruthenium(II)-catalyzed oxidative C-H activations with internal alkynes and acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; John, Michael; Ackermann, Lutz

    2014-04-25

    Cationic ruthenium complexes derived from KPF6 or AgOAc enabled efficient oxidative CH functionalizations on aryl and heteroaryl amidines. Thus, oxidative annulations of diversely decorated internal alkynes provided expedient access to 1-aminoisoquinolines, while catalyzed C-H activations with substituted acrylates gave rise to structurally novel 1-iminoisoindolines. The powerful ruthenium(II) catalysts displayed a remarkably high site-, regio- and, chemoselectivity. Therefore, the catalytic system proved tolerant of a variety of important electrophilic functional groups. Detailed mechanistic studies provided strong support for the cationic ruthenium(II) catalysts to operate by a facile, reversible C-H activation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. In-situ XPS analysis of oxidized and reduced plasma deposited ruthenium-based thin catalytic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerzak, Jacek; Redzynia, Wiktor; Tyczkowski, Jacek

    2017-12-01

    A novel in-situ study of the surface molecular structure of catalytically active ruthenium-based films subjected to the oxidation (in oxygen) and reduction (in hydrogen) was performed in a Cat-Cell reactor combined with a XPS spectrometer. The films were produced by the plasma deposition method (PEMOCVD). It was found that the films contained ruthenium at different oxidation states: metallic (Ru0), RuO2 (Ru+4), and other RuOx (Ru+x), of which content could be changed by the oxidation or reduction, depending on the process temperature. These results allow to predict the behavior of the Ru-based catalysts in different redox environments.

  7. Dehydrogenative Synthesis of Imines from Alcohols and Amines Catalyzed by a Ruthenium N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggi, Agnese; Madsen, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A new method for the direct synthesis of imines from alcohols and amines is described where hydrogen gas is liberated. The reaction is catalyzed by the ruthenium N-heterocyclic carbene complex [RuCl2(IiPr)(p-cymene)] in the presence of the ligand DABCO and molecular sieves. The imination can...... be applied to a variety of primary alcohols and amines and can be combined with a subsequent addition reaction. A deuterium labeling experiment indicates that the catalytically active species is a ruthenium dihydride. The reaction is believed to proceed by initial dehydrogenation of the alcohol...

  8. Thermodynamic assessment of the rhodium-ruthenium-oxygen (Rh-Ru-O) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossé, S.; Bordier, S.; Guéneau, C.; Brackx, E.; Domenger, R.; Rogez, J.

    2018-03-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) and rhodium (Rh) are abundant platinum-group metals formed during burn-up of nuclear fuels. Under normal operating conditions, Rh and Ru accumulate and predominantly form metallic precipitates with other fission products like Mo, Pd and Tc. In the framework of vitrification of high-level nuclear waste, these fission products are poorly soluble in molten glasses. They precipitate as metallic particles and oxide phases. Moreover, these Ru and Rh rich phases strongly depend on temperature and the oxygen fugacity of the glass melt. In case of severe accidental conditions with air ingress, oxidation of the Ru and Rh is possible. At low temperatures (T 1422 K for rhodium sesquioxide and T > 1815 K for ruthenium dioxide), they may decompose into (Rh)-FCC or (Ru)-HCP metallic phases and radiotoxic volatile gaseous species. A thermodynamic assessment of the Rh-Ru-O system will enable the prediction of: (1) the metallic and oxide phases that form during the vitrification of high-level nuclear wastes and (2) the release of volatile gaseous species during a severe accident. The Calphad method developed herein employs a thermodynamic approach in the investigation of the thermochemistry of rhodium and ruthenium at high temperatures. Current literature on the thermodynamic properties and phase diagram data enables preliminary thermodynamic assessments of the Rh-O and Ru-O systems. Additionally, select compositions in the ternary Rh-Ru-O system underwent experimental tests to complement data found in literature and to establish the phase equilibria in the ternary system.

  9. The effect of annealing temperature on the optical properties of a ruthenium complex thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocakoglu, Kasim, E-mail: kasim.ocakoglu@mersin.edu.tr [Advanced Technology Research & Application Center, Mersin University, TR-33343, Yenisehir, Mersin (Turkey); Department of Energy Systems Engineering, Faculty of Technology, Mersin University, TR-33480 Mersin (Turkey); Okur, Salih, E-mail: salih.okur@ikc.edu.tr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Izmir Katip Celebi University, Izmir (Turkey); Aydin, Hasan [Izmir Institute of Technology, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Gulbahce Campus, 35430, Urla, Izmir (Turkey); Emen, Fatih Mehmet [Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Mehmet Akif Ersoy University, TR-15030 Burdur (Turkey)

    2016-08-01

    The stability of the optical parameters of a ruthenium polypyridyl complex (Ru-PC K314) film under varying annealing temperatures between 278 K and 673 K was investigated. The ruthenium polypyridyl complex thin film was prepared on a quartz substrate by drop casting technique. The transmission of the film was recorded by using Ultraviolet/Visible/Near Infrared spectrophotometer and the optical band gap energy of the as-deposited film was determined around 2.20 eV. The optical parameters such as refractive index, extinction coefficient, and dielectric constant of the film were determined and the annealing effect on these parameters was investigated. The results show that Ru PC K314 film is quite stable up to 595 K, and the rate of the optical band gap energy change was found to be 5.23 × 10{sup −5} eV/K. Furthermore, the thermal analysis studies were carried out in the range 298–673 K. The Differential Thermal Analysis/Thermal Gravimmetry/Differantial Thermal Gravimmetry curves show that the decomposition is incomplete in the temperature range 298–673 K. Ru-PC K314 is thermally stable up to 387 K. The decomposition starts at 387 K with elimination of functional groups such as CO{sub 2}, CO molecules and SO{sub 3}H group was eliminated between 614 K and 666 K. - Highlights: • Optical parameters of a ruthenium polypyridyl complex film under varying annealing temperatures • The film is quite stable up to 573 K. • The rate of change of optical energy gap was obtained as 5.23 × 10{sup −5} eV/K.

  10. Nano-scale islands of ruthenium oxide as an electrochemical sensor for iodate and periodate determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatraei, Fatemeh; Zare, Hamid R.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a promising electrochemical sensor was fabricated by the electrodeposition of nano-scale islands of ruthenium oxide (ruthenium oxide nanoparticles, RuON) on a glassy carbon electrode (RuON–GCE). Then, the electrocatalytic oxidation of iodate and periodate was investigated on it, using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and amperometry as diagnostic techniques. The charge transfer coefficient, α, and the charge transfer rate constant, k s , for electron transfer between RuON and GCE were calculated as 0.5 ± 0.03 and 9.0 ± 0.7 s −1 respectively. A comparison of the data obtained from the electrocatalytic reduction of iodate and periodate at a bare GCE (BGCE) and RuON–GCE clearly shows that the unique electronic properties of nanoparticles definitely improve the characteristics of iodate and periodate electrocatalytic reduction. The kinetic parameters such as the electron transfer coefficient, α, and the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant, k′, for the reduction of iodate and periodate at RuON–GCE surface were determined using cyclic voltammetry. Amperometry revealed a good linear relationship between the peak current and the concentration of iodate and periodate. The detection limits of 0.9 and 0.2 μM were calculated for iodate and periodate respectively. Highlights: ► Ruthenium oxide nanoparticles, RuON, were used for electrocatalytic reduction iodate and periodate. ► Formal potential, E 0 ′, of the surface redox couple of RuON is pH-dependent. ► The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant values between both analytes and RuON were calculated.

  11. Preparations and characterization of some carbonyl-(1-cyanoethyl)ruthenium(II) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, Katsuma; Ochi, Naoyuki; Kitamura, Tsuneyuki; Sasada, Yoko [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan); Shinoda, Sumio

    1982-08-01

    A hydridoruthenium(II) complex (RuClH(CO)(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 3/) reacted easily with acrylonitrile and fumaronitrile to give chloro-bridged binuclear (1-cyanoethyl)ruthenium(II) complexes, ((Ru(MeCHCN)Cl(CO)(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 2/)/sub 2/) (2) and ((Ru(NCCH/sub 2/CHCN)Cl(CO)(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 2/)/sub 2/), respectively. Complex 2 reacted with 4-picoline (pic), Na(BHPz/sub 3/) (Pz = 1-pyrazolyl), Na(BPz/sub 4/), and Na(Et/sub 2/NCS/sub 2/).3H/sub 2/O to afford the corresponding (1-cyanoethyl)ruthenium(II) complexes, ((Ru(MeCHCN)Cl(CO)(pic)(PPh/sub 3/))/sub 2/) (3), (Ru(MeCHCN)(BHPz/sub 3/)(CO)(PPh/sub 3/)) (accompanied by a small amount of (Ru/sub 2/(MeCHCN)/sub 2/Cl(BHPz/sub 3/)(CO)/sub 2/(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 4/)), (Ru/sub 2/(MeCHCN)/sub 2/Cl(BPz/sub 4/)(CO)/sub 2/(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 2/), and Na(Ru(MeCHCN)Cl(Et/sub 2/NCS/sub 2/)(CO)(PPh/sub 3/)), respectively. Complex 3 reacted with thallium (I) acetylacetonate (Tl(acac)), resulting in the formation of ((Ru(MeCHCN)(acac)(CO)(PPh/sub 3/))/sub 2/) and (Ru(MeCHCN)(acad)(CO)(pic)(PPh/sub 3/)). These new complexes were characterized by means of elemental analysis and spectroscopic data. The diastereoisomerism was also discussed as regards these (1-cyanoethyl)ruthenium(II) complexes.

  12. Bioimaging of isosteric osmium and ruthenium anticancer agents by LA-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Matthias H M; Theiner, Sarah; Kornauth, Christoph; Meier-Menches, Samuel M; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Koellensperger, Gunda; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2018-03-01

    Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to study the spatial distribution of two metallodrugs with anticancer activities in vivo, namely the organoruthenium plecstatin-1 (1) and its isosteric osmium analogue (2), in liver, kidneys, muscles and tumours of treated mice bearing a CT-26 tumour after single-dose i.p. administration. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the spatial distribution of an osmium drug candidate has been investigated using LA-ICP-MS in tissues. Independent measurements of the average ruthenium and osmium concentration via microwave digestion and ICP-MS in organs and tumours were in good agreement with the LA-ICP-MS results. Matrix-matched standards (MMS) ranging from 1 to 30 μg g -1 were prepared to quantify the spatial distributions of the metals and the average metal content of the MMS samples was additionally quantified by ICP-MS after microwave digestion. The recoveries for osmium and ruthenium in the MMS were 105% and 101% on average, respectively, validating the sample preparation procedure of the MMS. Preparation of MMS was carried out under an argon atmosphere to prevent oxidation of osmium-species to the volatile OsO 4 . The highest metal concentrations were found in the liver, followed by kidney, lung and tumour tissues, while muscles displayed only very low quantities of the respective metal. Both metallodrugs accumulated in the cortex of the kidneys more strongly compared to the medulla. Interestingly, osmium from 2 was largely located at the periphery and tissue edges, whereas ruthenium from 1 was observed to penetrate deeper into the organs and tumours.

  13. Rolling cycle amplification based single-color quantum dots–ruthenium complex assembling dyads for homogeneous and highly selective detection of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chen; Liu, Yufei; Ye, Tai; Xiang, Xia; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike, E-mail: zhkhe@whu.edu.cn

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A universal, label-free, homogeneous, highly sensitive, and selective fluorescent biosensor for DNA detection is developed by using rolling-circle amplification (RCA) based single-color quantum dots–ruthenium complex (QDs–Ru) assembling dyads. - Highlights: • The single-color QDs–Ru assembling dyads were applied in homogeneous DNA assay. • This biosensor exhibited high selectivity against base mismatched sequences. • This biosensor could be severed as universal platform for the detection of ssDNA. • This sensor could be used to detect the target in human serum samples. • This DNA sensor had a good selectivity under the interference of other dsDNA. - Abstract: In this work, a new, label-free, homogeneous, highly sensitive, and selective fluorescent biosensor for DNA detection is developed by using rolling-circle amplification (RCA) based single-color quantum dots–ruthenium complex (QDs–Ru) assembling dyads. This strategy includes three steps: (1) the target DNA initiates RCA reaction and generates linear RCA products; (2) the complementary DNA hybridizes with the RCA products to form long double-strand DNA (dsDNA); (3) [Ru(phen){sub 2}(dppx)]{sup 2+} (dppx = 7,8-dimethyldipyrido [3,2-a:2′,3′-c] phenanthroline) intercalates into the long dsDNA with strong fluorescence emission. Due to its strong binding propensity with the long dsDNA, [Ru(phen){sub 2}(dppx)]{sup 2+} is removed from the surface of the QDs, resulting in restoring the fluorescence of the QDs, which has been quenched by [Ru(phen){sub 2}(dppx)]{sup 2+} through a photoinduced electron transfer process and is overlaid with the fluorescence of dsDNA bonded Ru(II) polypyridyl complex (Ru-dsDNA). Thus, high fluorescence intensity is observed, and is related to the concentration of target. This sensor exhibits not only high sensitivity for hepatitis B virus (HBV) ssDNA with a low detection limit (0.5 pM), but also excellent selectivity in the complex matrix. Moreover

  14. A feasible kinetic model for the hydrogen oxidation on ruthenium electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, M.S.; Gennero de Chialvo, M.R.; Chialvo, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen oxidation reaction (hor) was studied on a polycrystalline ruthenium electrode in H 2 SO 4 solution at different rotation rates (ω). The experimental polarization curves recorded on steady state show the existence of a maximum current with a non-linear dependence of the current density on ω 1/2 . On the basis of the Tafel-Heyrovsky-Volmer kinetic mechanism, coupled with a process of inhibition of active sites by the reversible electroadsorption of hydroxyl species, it was possible to appropriately describe the origin of the maximum current. The corresponding set of kinetic parameters was also calculated from the correlation of the experimental results with the proposed kinetic model.

  15. Dynamic modeling of the cesium, strontium, and ruthenium transfer to grass and vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, P.; Real, J.; Maubert, H.; Roussel-Debet, S.

    1999-01-01

    From 1988 to 1993, the Nuclear Safety and Protection Institute (Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire -- IPSN) conducted experimental programs focused on transfers to vegetation following accidental localized deposits of radioactive aerosols. In relation to vegetable crops (fruit, leaves, and root vegetables) and meadow grass these experiments have enabled a determination of the factors involved in the transfer of cesium, strontium, and ruthenium at successive harvests, or cuttings, in respect of various time lags after contamination. The dynamic modeling given by these results allows an evaluation of changes in the mass activity of vegetables and grass during the months following deposit. It constitutes part of the ASTRAL post-accident radioecology model

  16. Electrochemical capacitance of nanocomposite films formed by loading carbon nanotubes with ruthenium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Kyung [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Seoul, 90 Chonnong-dong, Tongdaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pathan, Habib M.; Jung, Kwang-Deog; Joo, Oh-Shim [Eco-Nano Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-22

    This work reports the supercapacitive properties of composite films of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) and ruthenium oxide (RuO{sub 2}). Transmission and scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical studies revealed that the nanoporous three-dimensional arrangement of RuO{sub 2}-coated MWNT in these films facilitated the improvement of electron and ion transfer relative to MWNT films. The capacitance was measured for films of different RuO{sub 2} loading, revealing specific capacitances per mass as high as 628Fg{sup -1}. The energy storage density of the electrode has increased about three times as compared to MWNT treated with piranha solution. (author)

  17. Ruthenium Grubbs’ catalyst nanostructures grown by UV-excimer-laser ablation for self-healing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aïssa, B.; Nechache, R.; Haddad, E.; Jamroz, W.; Merle, P.G.; Rosei, F.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Successful preparation of 5-Ethylidene-2-Norbornene (5E2N) monomer reacted with Ruthenium Grubbs’ Catalyst (RGC) composite. ► The kinetics of the 5E2N ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) is effective in a large temperature range (−20 to 45 °C). ► The kinetics of the 5E2N ROMP is occurring at very short time scales ( −4 Vol.%, occurring at very short time reaction. This approach opens new prospects for using healing agent nanocomposite materials for self-repair functionality, thereby obtaining a higher catalytic efficiency per unit mass.

  18. Half -sand wish ruthenium complexes of heterocyclic-dithio carboxylato ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-khateeb, M.; Al-Noaimi, M.; Harb, M.; Gorls, H.; Weigand, W.

    2008-01-01

    The heterocyclic-dithio carboxylato complexes Cp Ru(PPh 3 )(κ 2 S,S-S 2 C-h et) [h et= 2-C 4 H 3 O (1), 2-C 4 H 3 S (2), 1-C 4 H 8 N (3)] are obtained by the reaction of the ruthenium chloride, Cp Ru(PPh 3 ) 2 CI, with the anions, h et-CS 2 . The X-ray structure of Cp Ru(PPh 3 )(κ 2 S, S-S 2 C-1- C 4 H 8 N) (3) is determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction.

  19. The contrasting chemistry and cancer cell cytotoxicity of bipyridine and bipyridinediol ruthenium(II) arene complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bugarcic, T.; Habtemariam, A.; Štěpánková, Jana; Heringová, Pavla; Kašpárková, Jana; Deeth, R.J.; Johnstone, R.D.L.; Prescimone, A.; Parkin, A.; Parsons, S.; Brabec, Viktor; Sadler, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 24 (2008), s. 11470-11486 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06030; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08017; GA MŠk(CZ) OC08003; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040581; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200200651; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040803; GA MZd(CZ) NR8562 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA * ruthenium * cancer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.147, year: 2008

  20. Volatilization and trapping of ruthenium during calcination of nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Weyers, C.; Goossens, W.R.A.; Smet, M. de; Trine, J.

    1983-01-01

    Solid radioactive aerosols and semi-volatile fission products e.g. Ru, Cs, Sb are generated during high level liquid waste calcination and vitrification processes. The retention of Ruthenium was studied because of its strong tendency to form volatile compounds in oxidative media. Since RuO 4 was the suspected form for high temperature processes, the study was carried out on the behaviour of RuO 4 and its retention on adsorbants and catalysts for various gas compositions. The behaviour of volatilized Ru species obtained by calcination of nitrosyl Ru compounds was then compared with the RuO 4 case

  1. An alternative pathway for production of acetonitrile: ruthenium catalysed aerobic dehydrogenation of ethylamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corker, Emily; Mentzel, Uffe Vie; Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative synthesis of acetonitrile from ethylamine was studied using a supported ruthenium catalyst. The reaction was conducted in both batch and flow processes and high conversions (over 85%) were achieved in both cases. Selectivity of both reactions was improved by optimisation of reaction...... conditions, achieving over 90% selectivity in the batch process and 80% selectivity in the continuous flow process. The use of a selective solid catalyst that utilises a feedstock that can be derived from biomass, dioxygen as the oxidant and water as the solvent represents a new, green route...

  2. Ruthenium(ii)-catalyzed olefination via carbonyl reductive cross-coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Dai, Xi-Jie; Wang, Haining; Li, Chenchen; Yang, Xiaobo; Li, Chao-Jun

    2017-12-01

    Natural availability of carbonyl groups offers reductive carbonyl coupling tremendous synthetic potential for efficient olefin synthesis, yet the catalytic carbonyl cross-coupling remains largely elusive. We report herein such a reaction, mediated by hydrazine under ruthenium(ii) catalysis. This method enables facile and selective cross-couplings of two unsymmetrical carbonyl compounds in either an intermolecular or intramolecular fashion. Moreover, this chemistry accommodates a variety of substrates, proceeds under mild reaction conditions with good functional group tolerance, and generates stoichiometric benign byproducts. Importantly, the coexistence of KO t Bu and bidentate phosphine dmpe is vital to this transformation.

  3. Synthesis and characterisation of ruthenium(III) complexes with benzimidazole derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, P.C.; Kaur, N.; Goel, A.K.; Vyas, S.

    1995-01-01

    Complexes of ruthenium trichloride with biologically important benzimidazole derivatives, viz., 2-(hydroxy methyl) benzimidazole, 2-(l-hydroxy ethyl) benzimidazole, 2-(mercapto methyl) benzimidazole, 2-(l-mercapto ethyl) benzimidazole, and 2,2'-bis-benzimidazole have been synthesized by reacting the above metal chloride and ligands respectively in 1:3 molar ratio. These complexes are characterised on the basis of elemental analysis, molar conductance data, room temperature, magnetic moment values, electronic spectral and IR spectral studies. (author). 17 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Evaluation of Ruthenium Capture Methods for Tritium Pretreatment Off-Gas Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, Stephanie H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Strachan, Denis M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    In the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel, radioactive elements are released into various plant off-gas streams. While much research and development has focused on the abatement of the volatile nuclides 3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I, the potential release of semivolatile isotopes that could also report to the off-gas streams in a reprocessing facility has been examined. Ruthenium (as 106Ru) has been identified as one of the semivolatile nuclides requiring the greatest degree of abatement prior to discharging the plant off-gas to the environment.

  5. Bifunctional amine-tethered ruthenium(II) arene complexes form monofunctional adducts on DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melchart, M.; Habtemariam, A.; Nováková, Olga; Moggach, S.A.; Fabbiani, F.P.A.; Parsons, S.; Brabec, Viktor; Sadler, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 21 (2007), s. 8950-8962 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/2030; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/06/1239; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040581; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA * ruthenium * cancer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2007

  6. Ruthenium-catalyzed reactions--a treasure trove of atom-economic transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Barry M; Frederiksen, Mathias U; Rudd, Michael T

    2005-10-21

    The demand for new chemicals spanning the fields of health care to materials science combined with the pressure to produce these substances in an environmentally benign fashion pose great challenges to the synthetic chemical community. The maximization of synthetic efficiency by the conversion of simple building blocks into complex targets remains a fundamental goal. In this context, ruthenium complexes catalyze a number of non-metathesis conversions and allow the rapid assembly of complex molecules with high selectivity and atom economy. These complexes often exhibit unusual reactivity. Careful consideration of the mechanistic underpinnings of the transformations can lead to the design of new reactions and the discovery of new reactivity.

  7. Oxidation of Bromide to Bromine by Ruthenium(II) Bipyridine-Type Complexes Using the Flash-Quench Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kelvin Yun-Da; Chang, I-Jy

    2017-07-17

    Six ruthenium complexes, [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ (1), [Ru(bpy) 2 (deeb)] 2+ (2), [Ru(deeb) 2 (dmbpy)] 2+ (3), [Ru(deeb) 2 (bpy)] 2+ (4), [Ru(deeb) 3 ] 2+ (5), and [Ru(deeb) 2 (bpz)] 2+ (6) (bpy: 2,2'-bipyridine; deeb: 4,4'-diethylester-2,2'-bipyridine; dmbpy: 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine, bpz: 2,2'-bipyrazine), have been employed to sensitize photochemical oxidation of bromide to bromine. The oxidation potential for complexes 1-6 are 1.26, 1.36, 1.42, 1.46, 1.56, and 1.66 V vs SCE, respectively. The bimolecular rate constants for the quenching of complexes 1-6 by ArN 2 + (bromobenzenediazonium) are determined as 1.1 × 10 9 , 1.6 × 10 8 , 1.4 × 10 8 , 1.2 × 10 8 , 6.4 × 10 7 , and 8.9 × 10 6 M -1 s -1 , respectively. Transient kinetics indicated that Br - reacted with photogenerated Ru(III) species at different rates. Bimolecular rate constants for the oxidation of Br - by the Ru(III) species derived from complexes 1-5 are observed as 1.2 × 10 8 , 1.3 × 10 9 , 4.0 × 10 9 , 4.8 × 10 9 , and 1.1 × 10 10 , M -1 s -1 , respectively. The last reaction kinetics observed in the three-component system consisting of a Ru sensitizer, quencher, and bromide is shown to be independent of the Ru sensitizer. The final product was identified as bromine by its reaction with hexene. The last reaction kinetics is assigned to the disproportionation reaction of Br 2 -• ions, for which the rate constant is determined as 5 × 10 9 M -1 s -1 . Though complex 6 has the highest oxidation potential in the Ru(II)/Ru(III) couple, its excited state fails to react with ArN 2 + sufficiently for subsequent reactions. The Ru(III) species derived from complex 1 reacts with Br - at the slowest rate. Complexes 2-5 are excellent photosensitizers to drive photooxidation of bromide to bromine.

  8. Influence of different ruthenium(II) bipyridyl complex on the photocatalytic H{sub 2} evolution over TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with mesostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Tianyou [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory for Catalysis and Material Science, College of Chemistry and Material Science, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan 430074 (China); Ke, Dingning; Cai, Ping; Dai, Ke; Ma, Liang; Zan, Ling [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2008-05-15

    H{sub 2} production over dye-sensitized Pt/TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with mesostructures (m-TiO{sub 2}) under visible light ({lambda} > 420 nm) was investigated by using methanol as electron donors. Experimental results indicate that three types of ruthenium(II) bipyridyl complex dyes (one binuclear Ru, two mononuclear Ru), which can be attached to Pt/m-TiO{sub 2} with different linkage modes, show different photosensitization effects due to their different coordination circumstances and physicochemical properties. The dye tightly linked with m-TiO{sub 2} has better durability but the lowest H{sub 2} evolution efficiency, whereas the loosely attached dyes possess higher H{sub 2} evolution efficiency and preferable durability. It seems that the dynamic equilibrium between the linkage of the ground state dye with TiO{sub 2} and the divorce of the oxidization state dye from the surfaces plays a crucial role in the photochemical behavior during the photocatalyst sensitization process. It is helpful to improve the H{sub 2} evolution efficiency by enhancing the electron injection and hindering the backward transfer. The binuclear Ru(II) dye shows a better photosensitization in comparison with mononuclear Ru(II) dyes due to its large molecular area, conjugation system, and ''antenna effect'', which, in turn, improve the visible light harvesting and electron transfer between the dye molecules and TiO{sub 2}. (author)

  9. TBP 20% diluent/H N O3/H2 O liquid-liquid extraction system: equilibrium data normalization of nitric acid, ruthenium and zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.A.L.G. de; Araujo, B.F. de.

    1991-11-01

    The extraction behavior of nitric acid, nitrosyl ruthenium nitrate and zirconium hydroxide nitrate in the system tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) 20% -diluent was studied. The main purpose was to obtain enough data to elaborate process flowsheets for the treatment of irradiated uranium fuels. During the runs, the equilibrium diagrams of nitric acid, ruthenium and zirconium were settled. From the achieved data, the influence of nitric acid, ruthenium, zirconium and nitrate ions concentration in the aqueous phase was checked. Furthermore, the density and the surface tension of the aqueous and organic phases were determined, gathering the interfacial tension after the contact between the phases. (author)

  10. Pretreatment with U(IV) solution for improving the decontamination of ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Haoxin; Qi Zhanshun; Zhu Guohui

    1993-01-01

    The ruthenium decontamination factor in Purex process falls quickly in successive TBP cycles. So, it is necessary to change the chemical states of RuNO complexes in order to improve DF Ru in the uranium purification cycle. Hydrazine nitrate is being used to transform RuNO complexes into in-extractable Ru(III)and Ru(IV). However, hydrazine nitrate may be inverted into hydrazoic acid which is dangerous and can bring an unstable factor. Pretreatment using U(IV) solution provides another method to improve the decontamination of ruthenium in Purex process. 0.02 mol/lU(IV) solution can transform RuNO complexes into inextricable species by heating in water bath. The D Ru can be decreased by a factor of 10-20. U(IV) pretreatment does not bring any harmful chemical in process. The acidity has a very large influence on the effect of pretreatment. The higher the acidity is, the worse the effect will be

  11. Production of ruthenium aluminide by reaction sintering of Ru and Al powder mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povarova, K.B.; Kazanskaya, N.K.; Drozdov, A.A.; Skachkov, O.A.; Levin, V.P.

    2002-01-01

    The physicochemical processes, taking place by the RuAl alloy formation from the ruthenium and aluminium powder mixture within the temperature range of 250-1400 deg C in the vacuum from 10 -2 up to 10 -5 mm mercury column are studied on the alloys of the Ru 50 Al 50 stoichiometric and Ru 52 Al 48 hyperstoichiometric composition. The Ru + Al → RuAl interaction with the exothermal effect begins in the solid phase at the temperatures below the aluminium t melt . The Ru 2 Al 3 , RuAl 2 and RuAl traces rich in aluminium are formed already at 600 deg C; at 1000-1400 deg C the RuAl becomes the basic phase; the precipitates of the ruthenium-based solid solution are additionally present in the hyperstoichiometric Ru 52 Al 48 alloy. The Ru 52 Al 48 crystalline lattice period increases with the growth of the caking temperature from 0.29906 (660 deg C) up to 0.22955 nm (1400 deg C). The Al 2 O 3 inclusions up to 1 μm in diameter are identified in the caked alloys in vacuum after the reaction caking [ru

  12. Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of hydrous ruthenium oxides with PTFE and their supercapacitor performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jong H.; Machida, Kenji; Kim, Yuri; Naoi, Katsuhiko

    2006-01-01

    The effect of PTFE addition was investigated for the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of hydrous ruthenium oxide electrodes. Mechanical stability of electrode layers, together with deposition yield, was enhanced by using hydrous ruthenium oxide/PTFE dispersions. High supercapacitor performance was obtained for the electrodes prepared with 2% PTFE and 10% water. When PTFE content was higher, the rate capability became poor with low electronic conductivity; higher water content than 10% resulted in non-uniform depositions with poor cycleability and power capability. When electrodes were heat treated at 200 deg. C for 10 h, the specific energy was as high as 17.6 Wh/kg based on single electrode (at 200 W/kg); while utilizable energy was lower with heat treatment time of 1 and 50 h, due to the high resistance and gradual crystallization, respectively. With PTFE addition and heat treatment at 200 deg. C for 10 h, the specific capacitance was increased by 31% (460 → 599 F/g at ca. 0.6 mg/cm 2 ) at 10 mV/s, and the deposition weight was increased up to 1.7 mg/cm 2 with initial capacitance of 350 F/g

  13. Synthesis and electrochemistry of tri- and tetranuclear polypyridine derivations of ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The synthesis of clusters of ruthenium is the focus of this work. The electrochemistry of metal cluster derivatives of ruthenium, iron and osmium are reviewed. The ability of these compounds to undergo more than one electron transfer reaction and to act as electron reservoirs is evident. The synthesis and characterisation of a range of polypyridine derivatives of [Ru 3 (CO) 12 ]; [Ru 3 (CO) 10 (napy)]; [Ru 3 (CO) 10 (bipy)]; [Ru 4 H 4 (CO) 12 ]; [Ru 4 H 4 (CO) 8 (bipy) 2 ] and [Ru 4 H 4 (CO) 10 (bipy)] were dealt with. The crystal structures of [Ru 3 (CO) 10 (napy)] and [Ru 4 H 4 (CO) 10 (bipy)] were also determined. The six compounds were fully investigated and a mechanism for their electrochemical reduction was postulated based on their observed experimental data, and that of the relevant compounds. The techniques used are also described and a brief introduction to the actual theory and practise of these techniques is discussed. 132 refs., 33 figs., 22 tabs

  14. Tunability of photoswitchable ruthenium sulfoxide compounds on the basis of ligand substitution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eicke, Sebastian; Dieckmann, Volker; Springfeld, Kristin; Imlau, Mirco [Deparment of Physics, University of Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Photoswitchable ruthenium sulfoxide compounds provide a light-induced linkage isomerization in combination with pronounced changes in characteristic optical properties. As representative of the ruthenium sulfoxide group the molecular compound [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(R-OSO)]{sup +} (OSO: 2-methylsulfinylbenzoate) can be tuned in its optical properties by the substitution of the photoswitchable ligands (R=Bn, BnCl, BnMe). These modified sulfoxides were studied in respect to their photochromic properties and kinetics of the generation and relaxation of the light-induced isomers. The kinetics were determined by pump-probe technique and show in each case two reversible thermal decay processes following Arrhenius law. The two photo-excited states offer lifetimes in the magnitude of {tau}{sub 1}{approx}10{sup 3} s and {tau}{sub 2}{approx}10{sup 4} s at room temperature with activation energies about E{sub A,I}=0.72 eV to 0.92 eV and E{sub A,II}=0.8 eV to 1.00 eV. Another respresentative of the photoswitchable sulfoxides is the [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(pySO)]{sup 2+} compound. This molecule is the first sulfoxide which allows for reversible switching between the ground and metastable states by light exposure. With this compound the sulfoxides are highly qualified for optical data storage on a molecular scale.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and dielectric properties of polynorbornadiene–clay nanocomposites by ROMP using intercalated Ruthenium catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalçınkaya, Esra Evrim; Balcan, Mehmet; Güler, Çetin

    2013-01-01

    Polynorbornadiene clay nanocomposites were prepared for the first time by the ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) using modified montmorillonite and polynorbornadiene the latter of which is used commonly in electric–electronic industry. The Na–MMT clay was modified by a quaternary ammonium salt containing Ruthenium complex as a suitable catalyst and intercalant as well. The norbornadiene monomers were polymerized within the modified montmorillonite layers by in-situ polymerization method in different clay loading degrees. Intercalation ability of the Ru catalyst and partially exfoliated nanocomposite structure were proved by powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD) Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) methods. The nanocomposite materials with high thermal degradation temperature and low dielectric constant compared to the pure polynorbornadiene were obtained. The dielectric constants decreased with the increase of the clay content. - Highlights: • Polynorbornadiene–clay nanocomposites were prepared for the first time. • Ruthenium complex was assigned as both suitable catalyst and intercalant. • The norbornadiene was polymerized by in-situ polymerization method. • Exfoliation/intercalation structures were found to be related with loading degree. • PNBD–MMT nanocomposites had a higher thermal degradation temperature and lower dielectric constant

  16. Ruthenium nanoparticles decorated curl-like porous carbons for high performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Bih-Show; Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Chen, Shen-Ming; Veeramani, Vediyappan; Madhu, Rajesh; Liu, Shang-Bin

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of highly dispersed and stable ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs; ca. 2-3 nm) on porous activated carbons derived from Moringa Oleifera fruit shells (MOC) is reported and were exploited for supercapacitor applications. The Ru/MOC composites so fabricated using the biowaste carbon source and ruthenium acetylacetonate as the co-feeding metal precursors were activated at elevated temperatures (600-900 oC) in the presence of ZnCl2 as the pore generating and chemical activating agent. The as-prepared MOC carbonized at 900 oC was found to possess a high specific surface area (2522 m2 g-1) and co-existing micro- and mesoporosities. Upon incorporating RuNPs, the Ru/MOC nanocomposites loaded with modest amount of metallic Ru (1.0-1.5 wt%) exhibit remarkable electrochemical and capacitive properties, achiving a maximum capacitance of 291 F g-1 at a current density of 1 A g-1 in 1.0 M H2SO4 electrolyte. These highly stable and durable Ru/MOC electrodes, which can be facily fabricated by the eco-friendly and cost-effective route, should have great potentials for practical applications in energy storage, biosensing, and catalysis.

  17. The influence of a new fabrication procedure on the catalytic activity of ruthenium-selenium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.; Yuan, W.; Scott, K.

    2006-01-01

    A new procedure has been introduced to enhance catalytic activity of ruthenium-selenium electro-catalysts for oxygen reduction, in which materials are treated under hydrogen atmosphere at elevated temperatures. The characterisation using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy or energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy exhibited that the treatment at 400 deg. C made catalysts denser while their porous nature remained, led to a good degree of crystallinity and an optimum Se:Ru ratio. The half cell test confirms feasibility of the new procedure; the catalyst treated at 400 deg. C gave the highest reduction current (55.9 mA cm -2 at -0.4 V) and a low methanol oxidation effect coefficient (3.8%). The direct methanol fuel cell with the RuSe 400 deg. C cathode catalyst (2 mg RuSe cm -2 ) generated a power density of 33.8 mW cm -2 using 2 M methanol and 2 bar oxygen at 90 deg. C. The new procedure produced the catalysts with low decay rates. The best sample was compared to the Pt and to the reported ruthenium-selenium catalyst. Possible reasons for the observations are discussed

  18. The effect of NO2 on spectroscopic and structural properties of evaporated ruthenium phthalocyanine dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alagna, Lucilla; Capobianchi, Aldo; Paoletti, Anna Maria; Pennesi, Giovanna; Rossi, Gentilina; Casaletto, Maria Pia; Generosi, Amanda; Paci, Barbara; Albertini, Valerio Rossi

    2006-01-01

    The chemical interaction between NO 2 gas and dimeric ruthenium phthalocyanine (RuPc) 2 (Pc = phthalocyanine ligand) films has been investigated by different techniques: UV-Visible spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The optical spectra in the Q band region (700-500 nm) registered 'in situ' enabled to follow the evolution of the process in real time indicating that a two steps reaction, showing two clear isosbestic points, occurs. The first phase was essentially characterised by: (a) the rapid disappearance of the 608 and 420 nm shoulders; (b) the intensity decrease of the main absorption peak and (c) the appearance of a new adsorption band centred around 510 nm. In the second step the remarkable feature is a further lowering of the main peak with the simultaneous decrease of the new 510 nm absorption. These spectral changes suggested that a chemical reaction occurred between NO 2 and ruthenium phthalocyanine with the formation of a radical species due to the macrocycle oxidation. The kinetics indicates that the adsorption of gas by the evaporated (RuPc) 2 film is a complex process involving more than one independent mechanism. XPS and EXAFS spectra collected before and after gas exposure showed that the central metals (Ru) were also involved in the oxidation process. The reversibility of the process has been also tested by treating the films at different temperatures, the original optical spectrum being not completely recovered

  19. Synthesis and Catalytic Applications of Ruthenium(0) Nanoparticles in Click Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Avvaru Praveen; Baek, Minwook; Sridhar, Chirumarry; Kumar, Begari Prem; Lee, Yongill [Changwon National Univ., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Here we report a facile synthesis of ruthenium (Ru) Nanoparticles (NPs) by chemical co-precipitation method. The calcination of ruthenium hydroxide samples at 500 .deg. C under hydrogen atmosphere lead to the formation of Ru{sup 0} NPs. The size and aggregation of Ru NPs depends on the pH of the medium, and type of surfactant and its concentration. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope image (TEM) analyses of particles indicated the formation of Ru{sup 0} NPs, and have 10 to 20 nm sizes. As-synthesized Ru{sup 0} NPs are characterized and investigated their catalytic ability in click chemistry (azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions), showing good results in terms of reactivity. Interestingly, small structural differences in triazines influence the catalytic activity of Ru{sup 0} nanocatalysts. Click chemistry has recently emerged to become one of the most powerful tools in drug discovery, chemical biology, proteomics, medical sciences and nanotechnology/nanomedicine. In addition, preliminary tests of recycling showed good results with neither loss of activity or significant precipitation.

  20. Behavior of ruthenium, cesium and antimony in high temperature processes for waste conditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Weyers, C.; Goossens, W.R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The fission products and the actinides of high level radioactive liquid wastes can be immobilized by incorporation into a glass matrix prior to disposal. The behaviour of so-called semi-volatile products during the vitrification process has been studied by the C.E.N./S.C.K. in Mol since 1979 in the framework of a contract with DWK of Germany in support to the HAW technological program PAMELA. The experiments were performed on laboratory and semi-pilot scale using simulated LEWC solutions tagged with radioisotopes of three suspected volatile fission products, namely ruthenium, cesium and antimony. The releases of these semi-volatile compounds to the off-gases have been investigated for a liquid fed melter as a function of the operational conditions. The study of a wet purification system, comprising in series of a dust scrubber, a condensor, an ejector venturi and an NOsub(x) column, has shown that cesium appears to be the reference isotope for the volatile elements released from the melter. Ruthenium seems not to be a problem from the point of view of gas purification although local radiation problems caused by deposits on metal surfaces cannot be excluded. (Auth.)

  1. Effect of Support in Heterogeneous Ruthenium Catalysts Used for the Selective Aerobic Oxidation of HMF in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbanev, Yury; Kegnæs, Søren; Riisager, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous ruthenium-based catalysts were applied in the selective, aerobic oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, a versatile biomass-derived chemical, to form 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid. The oxidation reactions were performed in water with dioxygen as the oxidant at different pressures without...

  2. Selective Aerobic Oxidation of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in Water Over Solid Ruthenium Hydroxide Catalysts with Magnesium-Based Supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbanev, Yury; Kegnæs, Søren; Riisager, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Solid catalyst systems comprised of ruthenium hydroxide supported on magnesium-based carrier materials (spinel, magnesium oxide and hydrotalcite) were investigated for the selective, aqueous aerobic oxidation of the biomass-derived chemical 5-hydroxymethylfurfural into 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid...

  3. Characterisation and application of new carboxylic acid-functionalised ruthenium complexes as dye-sensitisers for solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duprez, Virginie; Biancardo, Matteo; Krebs, Frederik C

    2007-01-01

    A series of ruthenium complexes with and without TiO2, anchoring carboxylic acid groups have been synthesised and characterised using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), UV-vis and luminescence. These complexes were adsorbed on thin films of the wide band-gap semiconductor anatase and were tested a...

  4. Determination of ruthenium in photographic emulsions - Development and comparison of different sample treatments and mass spectrometric methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krystek, Petra; Heumann, Klaus G.

    1999-01-01

    Different sample treatment procedures were combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and negative thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (NTI-MS) for the determination of ruthenium traces in photographic emulsions. Dissolution of the samples in concentrated ammonia solution

  5. The thermodynamic effects of ligand structure on the molecular recognition of mononuclear ruthenium polypyridyl complexes with B-DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes (RPCs), [(phen)2Ru(tatpp)]Cl2 (3Cl2) and [(phen)2Ru (tatpp)Ru(phen)2]Cl4 (4Cl4), containing the large planar and redox-active tetraazatetrapyrido- pentacene (tatpp) ligand, cleave DNA in the presence of reducing agents in cell-free assays and show significant...

  6. Catalytic hydroprocessing of lignin β-O-4 ether bond model compound phenethyl phenyl ether over ruthenium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez-Monedero, B.; Faria, J.; Bimbela, F.; Ruiz, M.P.

    2017-01-01

    The catalytic hydroprocessing of phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE), a model compound of one of the most significant ether linkages within lignin structure, β-O-4, has been studied. Reactions were carried out using two ruthenium-based catalysts, supported on different materials: 3.8 wt.% Ru/C and 3.9 wt.%

  7. Reactivity studies of eta sup (6)-p-cymene ruthenium(II) carboxylato complexes towards azide some neutral ligands

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, K.S.; Kollipara, M.R.

    sub (2)O sub (4)(7) or C sub (2)CH sub (2)O sub (4)(10)] have been prepared by the reaction of [(p-cymene)RuCl sub (2)]sub (2) with the corresponding sodium salts of the carboxylic acids. Treatment of (eta sup (6)-p-cymene) ruthenium(II) carboxylato...

  8. Ruthenium-modified MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieve and Y zeolite catalysts for selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájek, J.; Kumar, N.; Mäki-Arvela, P.; Salmi, T.; Murzin, D. Z.; Paseka, Ivo; Heikkilä, T.; Laine, E.; Laukkanen, P.; Väyrynen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 251, č. 2 (2003), s. 385-396 ISSN 0926-860X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/03/0409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : mesoporous molecular sieve * zeolites * ruthenium Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.825, year: 2003

  9. Ruthenium supported on magnetic nanoparticles: An efficient and recoverable catalyst for hydrogenation of alkynes and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthenium supported on surface modified magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and applied for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The ...

  10. New carboxy-functionalized terpyridines as precursors for zwitterionic ruthenium complexes for polymer-based solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duprez, V.; Krebs, Frederik C

    2006-01-01

    New carboxy-terpyridines selectively functionalized at the 4-, 4'- and 4"-positions were prepared in a three-step procedure with good yields using, the Krohnke reaction followed by saponification. Their complexation with ruthenium led to symmetric and unsymmetric terpyridinyl zwitterionic complexes...

  11. Synthesis, photo-, and electrochemistry of ruthenium bis(bipyridine) complexes comprising a N-heterocyclic carbene ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Vivienne; Ghattas, Wadih; Lalrempuia, Ralte; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Pryce, Mary T; Albrecht, Martin

    2013-05-06

    Analogues of [Ru(bpy)3](2+) were prepared in which one pyridine ligand site is substituted by a N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand, that is, either by an imidazolylidene with a variable wingtip group R (R = Me, 3a; R = Et, 3b; R = iPr, 3c), or by a benzimidazolylidene (Me wingtip group, 3d), or by a 1,2,3-triazolylidene (Me wingtip group, 3e). All complexes were characterized spectroscopically, photophysically, and electrochemically. An increase of the size of the wingtip groups from Me to Et or iPr groups distorts the octahedral geometry (NMR spectroscopy) and curtails the reversibility of the ruthenium oxidation. NHC ligands with methyl wingtip groups display reversible ruthenium oxidation at a potential that reflects the donor properties of the NHC ligand (triazolylidene > imidazolylidene > benzimidazolylidene). The most attractive properties were measured for the triazolylidene ruthenium complex 3e, featuring the smallest gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) in the series (2.41 eV), a slightly red-shifted absorption profile, and reasonable excited-state lifetime (188 ns) when compared to [Ru(bpy)3](2+). These features demonstrate the potential utility of triazolylidene ruthenium complexes as photosensitizers for solar energy conversion.

  12. Plasma-assisted synthesis of monodispersed and robust Ruthenium ultrafine nanocatalysts for organosilane oxidation and oxygen evolution reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gnanakumar, E.S.; Ng, W.; Filiz, B.C.; Rothenberg, G.; Wang, S.; Xu, H.; Pastor-Pérez, L.; Pastor-Blas, M.M.; Sepúlveda-Escribano, A.; Yan, N.; Shiju, N.R.

    2017-01-01

    We report a facile and general approach for preparing ultrafine ruthenium nanocatalysts by using a plasma-assisted synthesis at <100 °C. The resulting Ru nanoparticles are monodispersed (typical size 2 nm) and remain that way upon loading onto carbon and TiO2 supports. This gives robust catalysts

  13. Mono and dinuclear iridium, rhodium and ruthenium complexes containing chelating carboxylato pyrazine ligands: Synthesis, molecular structure and electrochemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Govindaswamy, P.; Therrien, B.; Süss-Fink, G.; Štěpnička, P.; Ludvík, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 692, č. 8 (2007), s. 1661-1671 ISSN 0022-328X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : dinuclear complexes * iridium * rhodium * ruthenium * electrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2007

  14. A nanogravimmetric investigation of the charging processes on ruthenium oxide thin films and their effect on methanol oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, M.C.; Cogo, L.; Tanimoto, S.T.; Calegaro, M.L.; Bulhoes, L.O.S

    2006-01-01

    The charging processes and methanol oxidation that occur during the oxidation-reduction cycles in a ruthenium oxide thin film electrode (deposited by the sol-gel method on Pt covered quartz crystals) were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance techniques. The ruthenium oxide rutile phase structure was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The results obtained during the charging of rutile ruthenium oxide films indicate that in the anodic sweep the transition from Ru(II) to Ru(VI) occurs followed by proton de-intercalation. In the cathodic sweep, electron injection occurs followed by proton intercalation, leading to Ru(II). The proton intercalation/de-intercalation processes can be inferred from the mass/charge relationship which gives a slope close to 1 g mol -1 (multiplied by the Faraday constant) corresponding to the molar mass of hydrogen. From the chronoamperometric measurements, charge and mass saturation of the RuO 2 thin films was observed (440 ng cm -2 ) during the charging processes, which is related to the total number of active sites in these films. Using the electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance technique to study the methanol oxidation reaction at these films was possible to demonstrate that bulk oxidation occurs without the formation of strongly adsorbed intermediates such as CO ads , demonstrating that Pt electrodes modified by ruthenium oxide particles can be promising catalysts for the methanol oxidation as already shown in the literature

  15. Study of the ruthenium fission-product behavior in the containment, in the case of a nuclear reactor severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, Ch.

    2007-03-01

    Ruthenium tetroxide is an extremely volatile and highly radio-toxic species. During a severe accident with air ingress in the reactor vessel, ruthenium oxides may reach the reactor containment building in significant quantities. Therefore, a better understanding of the RuO 4 (g) behaviour in the containment atmosphere is of primary importance for the assessment of radiological consequences, in the case of potential releases of this species into the environment. A RuO 4 (g) decomposition kinetic law was determined. Steam seems to play a catalytic role, as well as the presence of ruthenium dioxide deposits. The temperature is also a key parameter. The nature of the substrate, stainless steel or paint, did not exhibit any chemical affinities with RuO 4 (g). This absence of reactivity was confirmed by XPS analyses, which indicate the presence of the same species in the Ru deposits surface layer whatever the substrates considered. It has been concluded that RuO 4 (g) decomposition corresponds to a bulk gas phase decomposition. The ruthenium re-volatilization phenomenon under irradiation from Ru deposits was also highlighted. An oxidation kinetic law was determined. The increase of the temperature and the steam concentration promote significantly the oxidation reaction. The establishment of Ru behavioural laws allowed making a modelling of the Ru source term. The results of the reactor calculations indicate that the values obtained for 106 Ru source term are closed to the reference value considered currently by the IRSN, for 900 MWe PWR safety analysis. (author)

  16. Hydrogenation of fast pyrolyis oil and model compounds in a two-phase aqueous organic system using homogeneous ruthenium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfud, F. H.; Ghijsen, F.; Heeres, H. J.

    2007-01-01

    The use of homogeneous ruthenium catalysts to hydrogenate the water-soluble fraction of pyrolysis oil is reported. Pyrolysis oil, which is obtained by fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass at 450-600 degrees C, contains significant amounts of aldehydes and ketones (e.g. 1-hydroxy-2-propanone (1)

  17. Through-Space Paramagnetic NMR Effects in Host-Guest Complexes: Potential Ruthenium(III) Metallodrugs with Macrocyclic Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyba, Jan; Novák, Martin; Munzarová, Petra; Novotný, Jan; Marek, Radek

    2018-04-05

    The potential of paramagnetic ruthenium(III) compounds for use as anticancer metallodrugs has been investigated extensively during the past several decades. However, the means by which these ruthenium compounds are transported and distributed in living bodies remain relatively unexplored. In this work, we prepared several novel ruthenium(III) compounds with the general structure Na + [ trans-Ru III Cl 4 (DMSO)(L)] - (DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide), where L stands for pyridine or imidazole linked with adamantane, a hydrophobic chemophore. The supramolecular interactions of these compounds with macrocyclic carriers of the cyclodextrin (CD) and cucurbit[ n]uril (CB) families were investigated by NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and relativistic DFT methods. The long-range hyperfine NMR effects of the paramagnetic guest on the host macrocycle are related to the distance between them and their relative orientation in the host-guest complex. The CD and CB macrocyclic carriers being studied in this account can be attached to a vector that attracts the drug-carrier system to a specific biological target and our investigation thus introduces a new possibility in the field of targeted delivery of anticancer metallodrugs based on ruthenium(III) compounds.

  18. Spectroscopic and electrochemical study of polynuclear clusters from ruthenium acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipriano, C.

    1989-01-01

    The chemistry of the trinuclear clusters [Ru sub(3) O (CH sub(3) CO sub(2)) sub(4) L sub(3)] where L = imidazole, pyridine or pyrazine type of ligands, was investigated based on spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. These complexes are of great interest from the point of view of their electronic and redox properties, providing multisite species for electron transfer processes. They were isolated in solid state, and characterized by means of elementary analyses and infrared spectra. The electrochemical behaviour in acetonitrile solution was typically reversible; the cyclic voltammograms exhibited a series of four or five mono electronic waves ascribed to the sucessive Ru sup(IV) Ru sup(III) Ru sup(III) / Ru sup(III) Ru sup(III) Ru sup(III)/ --- Ru sup(II) Ru sup(II) Ru sup(II) redox couples. The differences between the successive redox potentials were about 1 V, indicating strong metal-metal interaction in the trinuclear Ru sub(3) centre. The E values were strongly sensitive to the nature of the N-heterocyclic ligand, increasing with the pi-acceptor properties of the pyridine and pyrazine derivatives, but in a much less pronounced way in the case of the imidazole derivatives. Resonance Raman studies for the pyrazine cluster showed selective intensification of the vibrational modes of the Ru-pyrazine chromophore, and the trinuclear centre, using excitation wavelengths coinciding with the metal-to-pyrazine and metal-metal bands, respectively. (author)

  19. Application of the ruthenium and technetium thermodynamic data bases used in the EQ3/6 geochemical codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isherwood, D.

    1985-04-01

    Based on a critical review of the available thermodynamic data, computerized data bases for technetium and ruthenium were created for use with the EQ3/6 geochemical computer codes. The technetium data base contains thermodynamic data for 8 aqueous species and 15 solids; 26 aqueous species and 9 solids were included in the ruthenium data base. The EQ3NR code was used to calculate solubility limits for ruthenium (8 x 10{sup -16} M) in ground water from Yucca Mountain, a potential nuclear waste repository site near the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The code confirmed the essentially unlimited solubility of technetium in oxidizing conditions, such as those that are believed to exist in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain and the Cambric Nuclear event site at the NTS. Ruthenium migration observed from the Cambric site was evaluated. The solubility limit for ruthenium (as the aqueous species RuO{sub 4}{sup -}) when constrained by RuO{sub 2} is approximately equal to the concentration of ruthenium found in the cavity ground water (i.e., 2.1 x 10{sup -11} vs 4.5 x 10{sup -11} M). Differences in ruthenium solubility limits between Yucca Mountain and Cambric are primarily due to differences in ground-water pH. Technetium solubility (3 x 10{sup -8} M) for moderately reducing conditions (Eh = -0.1 V) using the metastable oxide, TcO{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O, as the solubility constraint is within the range of experimental values recently published in a study of technetium sorption on basalt. Previously published technetium solubilities of 10{sup -12} to 10{sup -16} M were apparently based on a technetium data base that did not include aqueous species other than TcO{sub 4}{sup -}. When TcO(OH){sub 2}{sup 0} is included in the data base, the calculated values are much closer to the experimental results. Eh-pH diagrams were also generated for a variety of conditions using the SOLUPLOT code.

  20. Ruthenium release modelling in air and steam atmospheres under severe accident conditions using the MAAP4 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuzet, Emilie; Lamy, Jean-Sylvestre; Perron, Hadrien; Simoni, Eric; Ducros, Gérard

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We developed a new modelling of fuel oxidation and ruthenium release in the EDF version of the MAAP4 code. ► We validated this model against some VERCORS experiments. ► Ruthenium release prediction quantitatively and qualitatively well reproduced under air and steam atmospheres. - Abstract: In a nuclear power plant (NPP), a severe accident is a low probability sequence that can lead to core fusion and fission product (FP) release to the environment (source term). For instance during a loss-of-coolant accident, water vaporization and core uncovery can occur due to decay heat. These phenomena enhance core degradation and, subsequently, molten materials can relocate to the lower head of the vessel. Heat exchange between the debris and the vessel may cause its rupture and air ingress. After lower head failure, steam and air entering in the vessel can lead to degradation and oxidation of materials that are still intact in the core. Indeed, Zircaloy-4 cladding oxidation is very exothermic and fuel interaction with the cladding material can decrease its melting temperature by several hundred of Kelvin. FP release can thus be increased, noticeably that of ruthenium under oxidizing conditions. Ruthenium is of particular interest because of its high radio-toxicity due to 103 Ru and 106 Ru isotopes and its ability to form highly volatile compounds, even at room temperature, such as gaseous ruthenium tetra-oxide (RuO 4 ). It is consequently of great need to understand phenomena governing steam and air oxidation of the fuel and ruthenium release as prerequisites for the source term issues. A review of existing data on these phenomena shows relatively good understanding. In terms of oxygen affinity, the fuel is oxidized before ruthenium, from UO 2 to UO 2+x . Its oxidation is a rate-controlling surface exchange reaction with the atmosphere, so that the stoichiometric deviation and oxygen partial pressure increase. High temperatures combined with the presence

  1. Magnetic field effects in dye-sensitized solar cells controlled by different cell architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M; Pankiewicz, R; Zalas, M; Stampor, W

    2016-07-21

    The charge recombination and exciton dissociation are generally recognized as the basic electronic processes limiting the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. In this work, we propose a detailed mechanism of photocurrent generation in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) examined by magnetic field effect (MFE) technique. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of the MFE on photocurrent in DSSCs can be controlled by the radius and spin coherence time of electron-hole (e-h) pairs which are experimentally modified by the photoanode morphology (TiO2 nanoparticles or nanotubes) and the electronic orbital structure of various dye molecules (ruthenium N719, dinuclear ruthenium B1 and fully organic squaraine SQ2 dyes). The observed MFE is attributed to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of (e-h) pairs according to the Δg mechanism.

  2. Design of Ru(II) sensitizers endowed by three anchoring units for adsorption mode and light harvesting optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobello, Maria Grazia; Fantacci, Simona; Manfredi, Norberto; Coluccini, Carmine; Abbotto, Alessandro; Nazeeruddin, Mohammed K.; De Angelis, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    We report the design, synthesis and computational investigation of a class of Ru(II)-dyes based on mixed bipyridine ligands for use in dye-sensitized solar cells. These dyes are designed to preserve the optimal anchoring mode of the prototypical N719 sensitizer by three carboxylic groups, yet allowing for tunable optimization of their electronic and optical properties by selective substitution at one of the 4-4′ positions of a single bipyridine ligand with π-excessive heteroaromatic groups. We used Density Functional Theory/Time Dependent Density Functional Theory calculations to analyze the electronic structure and optical properties of the dye and to investigate the dye adsorption mode on a TiO 2 nanoparticle model. Our results show that we are effectively able to introduce three carboxylic anchoring units into the dye and achieve at the same time an enhanced dye light harvesting, demonstrating the design concept. As a drawback of this type of dyes, the synthesis leads to a mixture of dye isomers, which are rather tedious to separate. - Highlights: • We designed heteroleptic Ru(II) sensitizers with three carboxylic anchoring groups. • The three carboxylic anchoring groups are essential for high open circuit potentials. • Introduction of the mixed bipyridine ligand increases the dye light absorption. • Computational simulations confirm the three anchoring sites on TiO 2

  3. Design of Ru(II) sensitizers endowed by three anchoring units for adsorption mode and light harvesting optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobello, Maria Grazia; Fantacci, Simona [Computational Laboratory for Hybrid/Organic Photovoltaics (CLHYO), Istituto CNR di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Via elce di Sotto 8, I-06213 Perugia (Italy); Manfredi, Norberto; Coluccini, Carmine [Department of Materials Science and Milano-Bicocca Solar Energy Research Center-MIB-Solar, University of Milano-Bicocca and INSTM, Via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Abbotto, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.abbotto@unimib.it [Department of Materials Science and Milano-Bicocca Solar Energy Research Center-MIB-Solar, University of Milano-Bicocca and INSTM, Via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Nazeeruddin, Mohammed K., E-mail: mdkhaja.nazeeruddin@epfl.ch [Laboratory for Photonics and Interfaces, Station 6, Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); De Angelis, Filippo, E-mail: filippo@thch.unipg.it [Computational Laboratory for Hybrid/Organic Photovoltaics (CLHYO), Istituto CNR di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Via elce di Sotto 8, I-06213 Perugia (Italy)

    2014-06-02

    We report the design, synthesis and computational investigation of a class of Ru(II)-dyes based on mixed bipyridine ligands for use in dye-sensitized solar cells. These dyes are designed to preserve the optimal anchoring mode of the prototypical N719 sensitizer by three carboxylic groups, yet allowing for tunable optimization of their electronic and optical properties by selective substitution at one of the 4-4′ positions of a single bipyridine ligand with π-excessive heteroaromatic groups. We used Density Functional Theory/Time Dependent Density Functional Theory calculations to analyze the electronic structure and optical properties of the dye and to investigate the dye adsorption mode on a TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle model. Our results show that we are effectively able to introduce three carboxylic anchoring units into the dye and achieve at the same time an enhanced dye light harvesting, demonstrating the design concept. As a drawback of this type of dyes, the synthesis leads to a mixture of dye isomers, which are rather tedious to separate. - Highlights: • We designed heteroleptic Ru(II) sensitizers with three carboxylic anchoring groups. • The three carboxylic anchoring groups are essential for high open circuit potentials. • Introduction of the mixed bipyridine ligand increases the dye light absorption. • Computational simulations confirm the three anchoring sites on TiO{sub 2}.

  4. Ruthenium(II)-tris-bipyridine and titaniumdioxide - photocatalysts for solar induced water remediation; Ruthenium(II)-tris-bipyridin und Titandioxid - Photokatalysatoren zum solarinduzierten Abbau von Schadstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossmann, S [Lehrstuhl fuer Umweltmesstechnik, Engler-Bunte-Inst., Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany)

    1997-01-01

    The photophysical and photochemical properties of photocatalysts capable of working under solar-light-irradiation are of great interest. An especially promising application is the development of low-cost `Advanced Oxidation Procedures` (AOP). The aim of this endeavor is the detoxification of hazardous chemicals in wastewaters, which cannot be treated by conventional techniques. The mineralization of the most (highly) toxic chemicals to CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and simple inorganic compounds is favored by thermodynamics, however various difficulties such as kinetic barriers and hindered diffusion exist in systems for heterogeneous photocatalysis. In that respect, Ruthenium(II)-tris-bipyridine ([Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+}) and TiO{sub 2} - codoped photocatalysts offer several advantages. The photoreactive centers consist of supramolecular units of [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} and TiO{sub 2} - nanocrystals. Pollutants, such as our model compound 2,4-Dimethylaniline, diffuse through the framework of zeolite Y and undergo oxidative degradation at the reactive centers of the photocatalysts in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Under the aspect of application, the size of the zeolite Y-particles (diameter: 1x10{sup -6} m in average) permits their easy handling in filtration and recyling operations. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die photophysikalischen und -chemischen Eigenschaften von Katalysatoren, die das Licht der Sonne als kostenguenstige Energiequelle ausnutzen, treten immer staerker in den Vordergrund des Interesses. Dies gilt vor allem fuer ihren Einsatz in `Advanced Oxidation Technologies` (AOT`s) zur Entgiftung toxischer Substanzen im Abwasser. Die Mineralisation der meisten (hoch)giftigen Chemikalien zu CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O und einfachen anorganischen Verbindungen ist zwar thermodynamisch beguenstigt, es treten jedoch sowohl kinetische Hemmschwellen als auch Diffusionshindernisse in der heterogenen Photokatalyse auf. Ruthenium(II)-tris-bipyridin ([Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+}) und TiO{sub 2

  5. Studying the effect of Ruthenium on High Temperature Mechanical Properties of Nickel Based Superalloys and Determining the Universal Behavior of Ruthenium at Atomic Scale with respect to alloying elements, Stress and Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriswaroop Dasari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Any property of a material is a function of its microstructure and microstructure is a function of material composition. So, to maximize the desired properties of a material, one has to understand the evolution of microstructure which in turn is nothing but the reflection of the role of alloying elements. Research has not been done to understand the universal behavior of a certain base/alloying element. Let’s take the example of Cl- ion in HCl, we all know that in general, chloride ion can only be replaced by Fluoride or oxygen ion and that no other ion can replace it. But when you consider a metal like Ni, Co, Cr, Fe etc. there is no establishment that it behaves only in a certain way. Though I concord to the fact that discovery of universal behavior of Ni is lot complex than chloride ion, I think that future research should be focused in this direction also. Superalloys are the candidate materials required to improve thermal efficiency of a gas turbine by allowing higher turbine inlet gas temperatures. Gas turbines are the heart of local power systems, next generation jet engines and high performance space rockets. Recent research in superalloys showed that addition of some alloying elements in minor quantities can result in drastic change in properties. Such an alloying element is Ruthenium (Ru. Addition of Ruthenium to superalloys has shown improvement in mechanical properties by an order of magnitude. However reasons for such improvement are not known yet. Hence, there is a need to identify its role and discover the universal behavior of ruthenium to utilize it efficiently. In this proposal, we study materials with different compositions that are derived based on one ruthenium containing superalloy, and different thermomechanical history. Based on the evolution of microstructures and results of mechanical testing, we plan to determine the exact role of Ruthenium and prediction of its behavior with respect to other elements in the material

  6. Determination of molybdenum, ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium in radioinactive simulated waste of the nuclear fuel cycle by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmiedel, G.; Mainka, E.; Ache, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    In relation with insoluble particles in the nuclear fuel cycle waste, the solid sampling GFAAS was used to determine molybdenum, ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium in such waste. Two methods for the direct determination of these elements are described. The samples must be handled in glove boxes or moreover in hot cells with a robot. The determination of the elements by the cup-in-tube technique needs a very sensitive balance (microbalance) for weighing in μg-range and the handling of this method is not practical in glove boxes and hot cells. An alternative technique of solid sampling GFAAS, which can be used without great problems in glove boxes and hot cells is the slurry technique. In this case two methods have been used. One method uses graphite powder as a diluter, the other is the direct suspension of the sample in a matrix modifier solution. In the case of slurry technique with predilution of the sample with graphite powder, recoveries between 91 and 102% and RSD between 4 and 8% were obtained, whereas in the case of slurry technique with direct suspension of the waste sample recoveries between 91 and 103% and RSD between 14 and 20% for the above mentioned elements were obtained. (orig.)

  7. Sol-gel-immobilized Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) electrogenerated chemiluminescence sensor for high-performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Han Nim; Cho, Sung-Hee; Park, Yu-Jin; Lee, Dai Woon; Lee, Won-Yong

    2005-01-01

    The sol-gel-immobilized Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) [Ru(bpy) 3 2+ ] electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) sensor was applied to the reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) determination of phenothiazine derivatives (promazine, chlorpromazine, triflupromazine, thioridazine, and trifluoperazine) and erythromycin in human urine samples. In this method, Ru(bpy) 3 2+ was immobilized in sol-gel-derived titania (TiO 2 )-Nafion nanocomposite films coated on a dual platinum electrode. This method eliminates an extra pump needed for the delivery of Ru(bpy) 3 2+ reagent into a reaction/observation zone in front of photomultiplier tube because the immobilized-Ru(bpy) 3 2+ is recycled on the electrode surface by an applied potential at +1.3 V versus Ag/AgCl (3 M NaCl) reference electrode. The resulting analytical performances such as detection limit, working range, sensitivity, and measurement precision were slightly worse than those obtained with the conventional post-column Ru(bpy) 3 2+ addition approach. The lack of significant interferences and the low detection limits for phenothiazine derivatives and erythromycin indicate that the proposed HPLC-Ru(bpy) 3 2+ ECL detection method is suitable for the determination of those compounds in biological fluids

  8. Electrochemiluminescent determination of methamphetamine based on tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) ion-association in organically modified silicate films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Changqing; Tao Yin; Wang Bo; Chen Xi

    2005-01-01

    Tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) and dimethyldimethoxysilane (DiMe-DiMOS) were used as co-precursor to immobilize poly(p-styrenesulfonate) (PSS), then tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy) 3 2+ ) was successfully immobilized on a glass carbon electrode via ion-association. The immobilized Ru(bpy) 3 2+ shows good electrochemical and photochemical activities. Electrochemical and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) characterizations of the organically modified silicates (ORMOSILs) modified film electrodes were made by means of cyclic voltammetry and chronocoulometry. The ORMOSIL films were investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electrochemical microscope, tunnelling electrochemical microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. XPS in-depth profiles revealed a homogeneous distribution of Ru(bpy) 3 2+ inside the silica thin layers. The modified electrode was used for the ECL determination of methamphetamine (METH) and showed high sensitivity. Detection limit was 2.0 x 10 -7 mol l -1 for METH (S/N = 3) with a linear range from 5.0 x 10 -7 to 1.0 x 10 -3 mol l -1 (R = 0.986). The relative standard deviation (n = 6) was 1.1% for the determination of 1.0 x 10 -5 mol l -1 METH. Furthermore, the Ru(bpy) 3 2+ immobilized modified electrode was applied in the ECL determination of methamphetamine (METH) in scout cases

  9. Electrochemiluminescent determination of methamphetamine based on tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) ion-association in organically modified silicate films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Changqing [Key Laboratory of Analytical Sciences of Ministry of Education, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Tao Yin [Key Laboratory of Analytical Sciences of Ministry of Education, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wang Bo [Institute of Criminal Science and Technology of Xiamen, Xiamen 361005 (China); Chen Xi [Key Laboratory of Analytical Sciences of Ministry of Education, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)]. E-mail: xichen@xmu.edu.cn

    2005-06-13

    Tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) and dimethyldimethoxysilane (DiMe-DiMOS) were used as co-precursor to immobilize poly(p-styrenesulfonate) (PSS), then tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy){sub 3} {sup 2+}) was successfully immobilized on a glass carbon electrode via ion-association. The immobilized Ru(bpy){sub 3} {sup 2+} shows good electrochemical and photochemical activities. Electrochemical and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) characterizations of the organically modified silicates (ORMOSILs) modified film electrodes were made by means of cyclic voltammetry and chronocoulometry. The ORMOSIL films were investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electrochemical microscope, tunnelling electrochemical microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. XPS in-depth profiles revealed a homogeneous distribution of Ru(bpy){sub 3} {sup 2+} inside the silica thin layers. The modified electrode was used for the ECL determination of methamphetamine (METH) and showed high sensitivity. Detection limit was 2.0 x 10{sup -7} mol l{sup -1} for METH (S/N = 3) with a linear range from 5.0 x 10{sup -7} to 1.0 x 10{sup -3} mol l{sup -1} (R = 0.986). The relative standard deviation (n = 6) was 1.1% for the determination of 1.0 x 10{sup -5} mol l{sup -1} METH. Furthermore, the Ru(bpy){sub 3} {sup 2+} immobilized modified electrode was applied in the ECL determination of methamphetamine (METH) in scout cases.

  10. A ruthenium(II) complex as turn-on Cu(II) luminescent sensor based on oxidative cyclization mechanism and its application in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunfei; Liu, Zonglun; Yang, Kui; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Yongqian; Li, Hongjuan; Wang, Chaoxia; Lu, Aiping; Sun, Shiguo

    2015-02-01

    Copper ions play a vital role in a variety of fundamental physiological processes not only in human beings and plants, but also for extensive insects and microorganisms. In this paper, a novel water-soluble ruthenium(II) complex as a turn-on copper(II) ions luminescent sensor based on o-(phenylazo)aniline was designed and synthesized. The azo group would undergo a specific oxidative cyclization reaction with copper(II) ions and turn into high luminescent benzotriazole, triggering significant luminescent increasements which were linear to the concentrations of copper(II) ions. The sensor distinguished by its high sensitivity (over 80-fold luminescent switch-on response), good selectivity (the changes of the emission intensity in the presence of other metal ions or amino acids were negligible) and low detection limit (4.42 nM) in water. Moreover, the copper(II) luminescent sensor exhibited good photostability under light irradiation. Furthermore, the applicability of the proposed sensor in biological samples assay was also studied and imaged copper(II) ions in living pea aphids successfully.

  11. Consequences of the electronic tuning of latent ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts on their reactivity

    KAUST Repository

    Żukowska, Karolina

    2015-08-20

    Two ruthenium olefin metathesis initiators featuring electronically modified quinoline-based chelating carbene ligands are introduced. Their reactivity in RCM and ROMP reactions was tested and the results were compared to those obtained with the parent unsubstituted compound. The studied complexes are very stable at high temperatures up to 140 °C. The placement of an electron-withdrawing functionality translates into an enhanced activity in RCM. While electronically modified precatalysts, which exist predominantly in the trans-dichloro configuration, gave mostly the RCM and a minor amount of the cycloisomerization product, the unmodified congener, which preferentially exists as its cis-dichloro isomer, shows a switched reactivity. The position of the equilibrium between the cis- and the trans-dichloro species was found to be the crucial factor governing the reactivity of the complexes.

  12. Magnetic anisotropy of graphene quantum dots decorated with a ruthenium adatom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Beljakov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The creation of magnetic storage devices by decoration of a graphene sheet by magnetic transition-metal adatoms, utilizing the high in-plane versus out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE, has recently been proposed. This concept is extended in our density-functional-based modeling study by incorporating the influence of the graphene edge on the MAE. We consider triangular graphene flakes with both armchair and zigzag edges in which a single ruthenium adatom is placed at symmetrically inequivalent positions. Depending on the edge-type, the graphene edge was found to influence the MAE in opposite ways: for the armchair flake the MAE increases close to the edge, while the opposite is true for the zigzag edge. Additionally, in-plane pinning of the magnetization direction perpendicular to the edge itself is observed for the first time.

  13. X-Ray structure and cytotoxic activity of a picolinate ruthenium(II–arene complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANKA IVANOVIĆ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A ruthenium(II–arene complex with picolinic acid, [(η6-p-cymeneRuCl(pico]∙H2O, was prepared by the reaction of [(η6-p-cymeneRuCl2]2 with picolinic acid in a 1:2 molar ratio in 2-propanol. The compound was characterized by elemental analysis, and IR and NMR spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the molecule adopts a “three-leg piano-stool” geometry, which is common for this type of complexes. The cytotoxic activity of the complex was tested in two human cancer cell lines HeLa (cervix and FemX (melanoma by MTT assay. The IC50 values were at 82.0 and 36.2 µmol dm-3 for HeLa and FemX cells, respectively.

  14. Dehydrogenation of Formic Acid Catalyzed by a Ruthenium Complex with an N,N′-Diimine Ligand

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Chao

    2016-12-17

    We report a ruthenium complex containing an N,N′-diimine ligand for the selective decomposition of formic acid to H and CO in water in the absence of any organic additives. A turnover frequency of 12000 h and a turnover number of 350 000 at 90 °C were achieved in the HCOOH/HCOONa aqueous solution. Efficient production of high-pressure H and CO (24.0 MPa (3480 psi)) was achieved through the decomposition of formic acid with no formation of CO. Mechanistic studies by NMR and DFT calculations indicate that there may be two competitive pathways for the key hydride transfer rate-determining step in the catalytic process.

  15. Crystal structures of bromo- and iododerivatives of ruthenium nitroso complexes K2[RuNOX5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, Yu.N.; Kanishcheva, A.S.; Svetlov, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Method of X-ray diffraction analysis was used to interpret crystal structure of ruthenium pentahalogenonitroso complexes: K 2 [RuNOBr 5 ] (1) and K 2 [RuOI 5 ] (2). Crystals belong to rhombic syngony, sp.gr. Pcmn. Lattice parameters: (1) - a 7.236(2), b = 10.791(2), c = 13.949(3) A, V = 1089.14(1) A 3 , Z = 4; (2) - a = 7.755(1), b = 11.506(6), c = 14.951(5) A, V 133.97(8) A 3 , Z = 4. It was revealed that lengths of Ru-Br equatorial bonds in (1) exceeded the axial ones, and in the compound (2) the reverse relation was observed. The obtained results were correlated with the structural data for K 2 [RuNOF 5 ]H 2 O and K 2 [RuNOCl 5 ] complexes and similar osmium compounds

  16. Kinetic investigation of the chlorine reduction reaction on electrochemically oxidised ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, M.; Karlsen, C.; Borresen, B.; Tunold, R.

    2006-01-01

    The rate and mechanism of the electroreduction of chlorine on electrooxidised ruthenium has been investigated with focus on the effect of solution pH. Current/potential curves for the reduction process in solutions with constant chloride concentration of 1.0 mol dm -3 and varying H + concentration have been obtained with the use of the rotating disk electrode technique (RDE). It was found that the chlorine reduction rate is highly inhibited in solutions with high H + concentrations and that it can be satisfactorily described by the Erenburg mechanism, previously suggested for the chlorine evolution on RuO 2 and RTO. The expression of the kinetic current as a function of chlorine and H + concentration was obtained by solving the elementary rate equations of the kinetic mechanism. The kinetic constants obtained from the correlation of the kinetic current expression to the experimental data were used to simulate the dependence of the surface coverages and elementary reaction rates on overpotential

  17. Transmutation of technetium into stable ruthenium in high flux conceptual research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amrani, N.; Boucenna, A.

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of transmutation for the long lived fission product technetium-99 in high flux research reactor, considering its large capture cross section in thermal and epithermal region is evaluated. The calculation of Ruthenium concentration evolution under irradiation was performed using Chain Solver 2.20 code. The approximation used for the transmutation calculation is the assumption that the influence of change in irradiated materials structures on the reactor operator mode characteristics is insignificant. The results on Technetium transmutation in high flux research reactor suggested an effective use of this kind of research reactors. The evaluation brings a new concept of multi-recycle Technetium transmutation using HFR T RAN (High Flux Research Reactor for Transmutation)

  18. Ruthenium Tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine as an Effective Photocaging Group for Nitriles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Ruthenium(II) tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA) is an effective caging group for nitriles that provides high levels of control over the enzyme activity with light. Two caged nitriles were prepared, [Ru(TPA)(MeCN)2](PF6)2 (1) and [Ru(TPA)(3)2](PF6)2 (2), where 3 is the cathepsin K inhibitor Cbz-Leu-NHCH2CN, and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques and mass spectrometry. Both 1 and 2 show the release of a single nitrile within 20 min of irradiation with 365 nm light. Complex 2 acts as a potent, photoactivated inhibitor of human cathepsin K. IC50 values were determined for 2 and 3. Enzyme inhibition for 2 was enhanced by a factor of 89 upon exposure to light, with IC50 values of 63 nM (light) and 5.6 μM (dark). PMID:24661182

  19. Consequences of the electronic tuning of latent ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts on their reactivity

    KAUST Repository

    Żukowska, Karolina; Pump, Eva; Pazio, Aleksandra E; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Cavallo, Luigi; Slugovc, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Two ruthenium olefin metathesis initiators featuring electronically modified quinoline-based chelating carbene ligands are introduced. Their reactivity in RCM and ROMP reactions was tested and the results were compared to those obtained with the parent unsubstituted compound. The studied complexes are very stable at high temperatures up to 140 °C. The placement of an electron-withdrawing functionality translates into an enhanced activity in RCM. While electronically modified precatalysts, which exist predominantly in the trans-dichloro configuration, gave mostly the RCM and a minor amount of the cycloisomerization product, the unmodified congener, which preferentially exists as its cis-dichloro isomer, shows a switched reactivity. The position of the equilibrium between the cis- and the trans-dichloro species was found to be the crucial factor governing the reactivity of the complexes.

  20. Effect of annealing temperature on electrochemical characteristics of ruthenium oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Min-Kang [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Saouab, Abdelghani [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Le Havre, Place Robert Schuman, BP 4006, 76610 Le Havre (France); Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.k [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-25

    The preparation and characterization of high-surface-area ruthenium oxide (RuO{sub 2})/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composite electrodes for use in supercapacitors is reported in this work. The RuO{sub 2}/MWCNTs composites were prepared by the polyol process of RuO{sub 2} into MWCNTs and by Ru annealing in air before mixed with MWCNTs. The chemically oxidized and annealed Ru nanoparticles contribute a pseudocapacitance to the electrodes and dramatically improve the energy storage characteristics of the MWCNTs. These composites annealed at 200 deg. C demonstrate specific capacitances in excess of 130 F/g in comparison to 80 F/g for pristine MWCNTs. The annealing temperature is found to play an important role, as it affects the electrochemical performance of annealed RuO{sub 2}/MWCNTs composites critically due to its influence on the diffusion of protons into the structure.

  1. Hydroformylation and kinetics of 1-hexene over ruthenium, cobalt and rhodium zerolite catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.; Wei, W.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, six kinds of catalysts were prepared by cation exchange with rhodium, ruthenium and cobalt chloropentaamino dichoride and zeolites. Effects such as support materials, PPH 3 to metal ratio, reaction temperature, total pressure, H 2 /CO ratio, reaction time and solvents have been investigated in an autoclave. The most favorable results of 1-hexene hydroformylation were obtained in the temperature range 100-150 degrees C at a pressure of 5.0MPa (H 2 /CO=1:1) and the addition of free PPh 3 . The bimetallic catalysts showed high catalytic activing for hydroformylation because of the synergistic effect of bimetallic systems. This paper reports the results of experiments and catalysts characterization by means of IR and XRD spectroscopy

  2. Theoretical characterization of the surface composition of ruthenium nanoparticles in equilibrium with syngas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusinato, Lucy; Martínez-Prieto, Luis M.; Chaudret, Bruno; Del Rosal, Iker; Poteau, Romuald

    2016-05-01

    A deeper understanding of the relationship between experimental reaction conditions and the surface composition of nanoparticles is crucial in order to elucidate mechanisms involved in nanocatalysis. In the framework of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, a resolution of this complex puzzle requires a detailed understanding of the interaction of CO and H with the surface of the catalyst. In this context, the single- and co-adsorption of CO and H to the surface of a 1 nm ruthenium nanoparticle has been investigated with density functional theory. Using several indexes (d-band center, crystal overlap Hamilton population, density of states), a systematic analysis of the bond properties and of the electronic states has also been done, in order to bring an understanding of structure/property relationships at the nanoscale. The H : CO surface composition of this ruthenium nanoparticle exposed to syngas has been evaluated according to a thermodynamic model fed with DFT energies. Such ab initio thermodynamic calculations give access to the optimal H : CO coverage values under a wide range of experimental conditions, through the construction of free energy phase diagrams. Surprisingly, under the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis experimental conditions, and in agreement with new experiments, only CO species are adsorbed at the surface of the nanoparticle. These findings shed new light on the possible reaction pathways underlying the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, and specifically the initiation of the reaction. It is finally shown that the joint knowledge of the surface composition and energy descriptors can help to identify possible reaction intermediates.A deeper understanding of the relationship between experimental reaction conditions and the surface composition of nanoparticles is crucial in order to elucidate mechanisms involved in nanocatalysis. In the framework of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, a resolution of this complex puzzle requires a detailed understanding of the interaction

  3. Photoluminescence quenching of chemically functionalized porous silicon by a ruthenium cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukherroub, R.; Wayner, D.D.M. [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Lockwood, D.J. [Institute for Microstructural Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Zargarian, D. [Chemistry Department, University of Montreal, C.P. 6128, succursale, Centre-ville, Montreal QC (Canada)

    2003-05-01

    This paper describes photoluminescence (PL) quenching of hydrogen-terminated and chemically derivatized porous silicon (PSi) nanostructures by a green ruthenium cluster (I). Chemisorption of freshly prepared PSi surfaces in a hexane solution of the Ru cluster for several days at room temperature led to a complete quenching of the PSi PL. The only visible PL was due to the original PL of the cluster. When the PSi surface functionalized with undecylenic acid was immersed in the same hexane solution of (I), the PSi PL was completely quenched and accompanied with a shift to a lower energy of the cluster PL. This shift was assigned to the formation of an ester linkage resulting from the nucleophilic attack of the PO anion of the cluster on the terminal acid functional group. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Photoluminescence quenching of chemically functionalized porous silicon by a ruthenium cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukherroub, R.; Wayner, D. D. M.; Lockwood, D. J.; Zargarian, D.

    2003-05-01

    This paper describes photoluminescence (PL) quenching of hydrogen-terminated and chemically derivatized porous silicon (PSi) nanostructures by a green ruthenium cluster (I). Chemisorption of freshly prepared PSi surfaces in a hexane solution of the Ru cluster for several days at room temperature led to a complete quenching of the PSi PL. The only visible PL was due to the original PL of the cluster. When the PSi surface functionalized with undecylenic acid was immersed in the same hexane solution of (I), the PSi PL was completely quenched and accompanied with a shift to a lower energy of the cluster PL. This shift was assigned to the formation of an ester linkage resulting from the nucleophilic attack of the PO anion of the cluster on the terminal acid functional group.

  5. Catalytic behaviors of ruthenium dioxide films deposited on ferroelectrics substrates, by spin coating process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khachane, M.; Nowakowski, P.; Villain, S.; Gavarri, J.R.; Muller, Ch.; Elaatmani, M.; Outzourhite, A.; Luk'yanchuk, I.; Zegzouti, A.; Daoud, M.

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic ruthenium dioxide films were deposited by spin-coating process on ferroelectric films mainly constituted of SrBi 2 Ta 2 O 9 (SBT) and Ba 2 NaNb 5 O 15 (BNN) phases. After thermal treatment under air, these ferroelectric-catalytic systems were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM images showed that RuO 2 film morphology depended on substrate nature. A study of CH 4 conversion into CO 2 and H 2 O was carried out using these catalytic-ferroelectric multilayers: the conversion was analyzed from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, at various temperatures. Improved catalytic properties were observed for RuO 2 films deposited on BNN oxide layer

  6. Dry reforming of methane in the presence of ruthenium-based catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safariamin, M.; Tidahy, L.H.; Abi-Aad, E.; Siffert, St.; Aboukais, A.

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic activities of ruthenium-based catalysts (5 wt% Ru) supported on alumina, ceria and ceria/alumina with different proportions of ceria (nCe 10 Al, n = 1, 3, 5; n = atomic ratio) were studied for the methane reforming reaction with CO 2 (CH 4 / CO 2 = 1) in the temperature range of 400-800 C. Evaluation of coke deposited after the reaction showed carbon deposition on Ru catalysts supported on CeO 2 , 1Ce 10 Al and 3Ce 10 Al, but not on Ru/Al 2 O 3 and Ru/5Ce 10 Al. Moreover, the sample Ru/5Ce 10 Al exhibited a higher activity than the other catalysts. (authors)

  7. Photolabile ruthenium complexes to cage and release a highly cytotoxic anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianhua; Renfrew, Anna K

    2018-02-01

    CHS-828 (N-(6-(4-chlorophenoxy)hexyl)-N'-cyano-N″-4-pyridyl guanidine) is an anticancer agent with low bioavailability and high systemic toxicity. Here we present an approach to improve the therapeutic profile of the drug using photolabile ruthenium complexes to generate light-activated prodrugs of CHS-828. Both prodrug complexes are stable in the dark but release CHS-828 when irradiated with visible light. The complexes are water-soluble and accumulate in tumour cells in very high concentrations, predominantly in the mitochondria. Both prodrug complexes are significantly less cyototoxic than free CHS-828 in the dark but their toxicity increases up to 10-fold in combination with visible light. The cellular responses to light treatment are consistent with release of the cytotoxic CHS-828 ligand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Light olefins from synthesis gas using ruthenium on rare earth oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, L.; Hardin, S.; Hoang, M.; Turney, T.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of ruthenium carbonyl, Ru/sub 3/(CO)/sub 12/ with rare earth oxides of high surface area, >50m/sup 2/g/sup -1/, has been studied. [Ru/sub 3/(μ H)(CO)/sub 10/(μ-OM=)] is formed on holmia, but on lanthana only [Ru(CO)/sub 2/]/sub n/ species are observed. Reduction of the carbonyl ligands takes place at <573K to give catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide with activity and selectivity dependent on the particular rare earth oxide and pretreatment. Over ceria, the product is up to 55 wt% C2-5 olefins. A similar selectivity is obtained over lanthana only after redispersion through a reduction-oxidation-reduction cycle

  9. Elaboration of strontium ruthenium oxide thin films on metal substrates by chemical solution deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seveno, R. [Universite de Nantes, Institut de Recherche en Electrotechnique et Electronique de Nantes Atlantique (IREENA), 2, rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)]. E-mail: raynald.seveno@univ-nantes.fr; Braud, A. [Universite de Nantes, Institut de Recherche en Electrotechnique et Electronique de Nantes Atlantique (IREENA), 2, rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Gundel, H.W. [Universite de Nantes, Institut de Recherche en Electrotechnique et Electronique de Nantes Atlantique (IREENA), 2, rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2005-12-22

    In order to improve the structural interface between a metal substrate and a lead zirconate titanate (Pb(ZrTi)O{sub 3}, PZT) ferroelectric thin film, the elaboration of strontium ruthenium oxide (SrRuO{sub 3}) by chemical solution deposition is studied. The SrRuO{sub 3} thin films were realized by multiple spin-coating technique and the temperature of the rapid thermal annealing process was optimized. The crystallization behavior was examined by X-ray diffraction; surface analyses using scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope techniques showed the influence of the SrRuO{sub 3} layer at the interface PZT/metal on the morphology of the ferroelectric thin film. From the electrical measurements, a coercive electric field around 25 kV/cm and a remanent polarization of approximately 30 {mu}C/cm were found.

  10. Amide Synthesis from Alcohols and Amines Catalyzed by Ruthenium N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Johan Hygum; Osztrovszky, Gyorgyi; Nordstrøm, Lars Ulrik Rubæk

    2010-01-01

    The direct synthesis of amides from alcohols and amines is described with the simultaneous liberation of dihydrogen. The reaction does not require any stoichiometric additives or hydrogen acceptors and is catalyzed by ruthenium N-heterocyclic carbene complexes. Three different catalyst systems...... are presented that all employ 1,3-diisopropylimidazol-2-ylidene (IiPr) as the carbene ligand. In addition, potassium tert-butoxide and a tricycloalkylphosphine are required for the amidation to proceed. In the first system, the active catalyst is generated in situ from [RuCl2(cod)] (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene), 1...... chloride and base. A range of different primary alcohols and amines have been coupled in the presence of the three catalyst systems to afford the corresponding amides in moderate to excellent yields. The best results are obtained with sterically unhindered alcohols and amines. The three catalyst systems do...

  11. Synthesis and spectroscopic properties of Tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) in zeolite Y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWilde, W.; Peeters, G.; Lunsford, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complexes have been synthesized within the large cavities of dehydrated Y-type zeolites by allowing bipyridine to react with a Ru(NH 3 ) 6 -Y form of the zeolite. The resulting Ru(bpy) 3 2+ complexes are characterized by absorption and emission bands similar to those found in aqueous solutions. The relatively high concentration of the Ru(bpy) 3 2+ complexes resulted in concentration quenching. As the addition of water to the samples approached saturation, the luminescence was quenched; however, small amounts of water increased the luminescence in a sample which contained 2.8 complexes per unit cell. Emission was also quenched upon addition of O 2 to the zeolite, with the effect being more pronounced in samples having a smaller concentration of complexes. 30 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  12. Multifaceted catalytic hydrogenation of amides via diverse activation of a sterically confined bipyridine-ruthenium framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takashi; Naruto, Masayuki; Toda, Katsuaki; Shimomura, Taiki; Saito, Susumu

    2017-05-16

    Amides are ubiquitous and abundant in nature and our society, but are very stable and reluctant to salt-free, catalytic chemical transformations. Through the activation of a "sterically confined bipyridine-ruthenium (Ru) framework (molecularly well-designed site to confine adsorbed H 2 in)" of a precatalyst, catalytic hydrogenation of formamides through polyamide is achieved under a wide range of reaction conditions. Both C=O bond and C-N bond cleavage of a lactam became also possible using a single precatalyst. That is, catalyst diversity is induced by activation and stepwise multiple hydrogenation of a single precatalyst when the conditions are varied. The versatile catalysts have different structures and different resting states for multifaceted amide hydrogenation, but the common structure produced upon reaction with H 2 , which catalyzes hydrogenation, seems to be "H-Ru-N-H."

  13. Electronic effects of ruthenium-catalyzed [3+2]-cycloaddition of alkynes and azides

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Duenren

    2010-11-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of ruthenium-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (RuAAC) reactions is presented and various electronic analyses were conducted to provide a basis in understanding the observed regioselectivity of the 1,2,3-triazole products. Computational studies using density functional theory (DFT) and atoms in molecules quantum theory (AIM) further yield fresh details on the electronic factors that determine the regioselectivity in the RuAAC. It is found that the formation of 1,2,3-triazole products is irreversible and from the Hammett study, the pathway involving a vinyl cationic intermediate is ruled out. The electronic effect favors the formation of 5-electron-donating-group substituted-1,2,3-trizoles. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. How phenyl makes a difference: mechanistic insights into the ruthenium( ii )-catalysed isomerisation of allylic alcohols

    KAUST Repository

    Manzini, Simone

    2013-10-16

    [RuCl(η5-3-phenylindenyl)(PPh3)2] (1) has been shown to be a highly active catalyst for the isomerisation of allylic alcohols to the corresponding ketones. A variety of substrates undergo the transformation, typically with 0.25-0.5 mol% of catalyst at room temperature, outperforming commonly-used complexes such as [RuCl(Cp)(PPh3) 2] and [RuCl(η5-indenyl)(PPh3) 2]. Mechanistic experiments and density functional theory have been employed to investigate the mechanism and understand the effect of catalyst structure on reactivity. These investigations suggest a oxo-π-allyl mechanism is in operation, avoiding intermediate ruthenium hydride complexes and leading to a characteristic 1,3-deuterium shift. Important mechanistic insights from DFT and experiments also allowed for the design of a protocol that expands the scope of the transformation to include primary allylic alcohols. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. In situ chemical synthesis of ruthenium oxide/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for electrochemical capacitor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Kwang-Heon; Yoon, Seung-Beom; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Park, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2013-08-07

    An in situ chemical synthesis approach has been developed to prepare ruthenium oxide/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanocomposites. It is found that as the C/O ratio increases, the number density of RuO2 nanoparticles decreases, because the chemical interaction between the Ru ions and the oxygen-containing functional groups provides anchoring sites where the nucleation of particles takes place. For electrochemical capacitor applications, the microwave-hydrothermal process was carried out to improve the conductivity of RGO in RuO2/RGO nanocomposites. The significant improvement in capacitance and high rate capability might result from the RuO2 nanoparticles used as spacers that make the interior layers of the reduced graphene oxide electrode available for electrolyte access.

  16. Elaboration of strontium ruthenium oxide thin films on metal substrates by chemical solution deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seveno, R.; Braud, A.; Gundel, H.W.

    2005-01-01

    In order to improve the structural interface between a metal substrate and a lead zirconate titanate (Pb(ZrTi)O 3 , PZT) ferroelectric thin film, the elaboration of strontium ruthenium oxide (SrRuO 3 ) by chemical solution deposition is studied. The SrRuO 3 thin films were realized by multiple spin-coating technique and the temperature of the rapid thermal annealing process was optimized. The crystallization behavior was examined by X-ray diffraction; surface analyses using scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope techniques showed the influence of the SrRuO 3 layer at the interface PZT/metal on the morphology of the ferroelectric thin film. From the electrical measurements, a coercive electric field around 25 kV/cm and a remanent polarization of approximately 30 μC/cm were found

  17. Electronic effects of ruthenium-catalyzed [3+2]-cycloaddition of alkynes and azides

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Duenren; Kuan, Tingchun; Li, YuKai; Lee, Richmond; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of ruthenium-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (RuAAC) reactions is presented and various electronic analyses were conducted to provide a basis in understanding the observed regioselectivity of the 1,2,3-triazole products. Computational studies using density functional theory (DFT) and atoms in molecules quantum theory (AIM) further yield fresh details on the electronic factors that determine the regioselectivity in the RuAAC. It is found that the formation of 1,2,3-triazole products is irreversible and from the Hammett study, the pathway involving a vinyl cationic intermediate is ruled out. The electronic effect favors the formation of 5-electron-donating-group substituted-1,2,3-trizoles. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. RutheniumII Complexes bearing Fused Polycyclic Ligands: From Fundamental Aspects to Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Troian-Gautier

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we first discuss the photophysics reported in the literature for mononuclear ruthenium complexes bearing ligands with extended aromaticity such as dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (DPPZ, tetrapyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c:3'',2''-h:2''',3'''-j]-phenazine (TPPHZ,  tetrapyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c:3'',2''-h:2''',3'''-j]acridine (TPAC, 1,10-phenanthrolino[5,6-b]1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene (PHEHAT 9,11,20,22-tetraaza- tetrapyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c:3'',2''-l:2''',3'''-n]pentacene (TATPP, etc. Photophysical properties of binuclear and polynuclear complexes based on these extended ligands are then reported. We finally develop the use of binuclear complexes with extended π-systems for applications such as photocatalysis.

  19. Molecular characterization of kerogens by mild selective chemical degradation - ruthenium tetroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, R.J.; Standen, G.; Eglinton, G. (University of Bristol, Bristol (UK). Organic Geochemistry Unit)

    1991-06-01

    Molecular characterization of two kerogen isolates (Messel and Kimmeridge Clay), two kerogen-rich shales (green River and Maoming) and a coal, (Loy Yang) was undertaken using selective chemical degradation with ruthenium tetroxide (RuO{sub 4}). The RuO{sub 4} oxidation gave extracts which were soluble in dichloromethane and contained series of straight chain monocarboxylic acids, {alpha},{omega}-dicarboxylic acids, branched mono- and dicarboxylic acids, isoprenoid and cyclic acids. Straight chain carboxylic acids were predominant (65-87% of quantified chromatogram components for the range of sedimentary organic matter studied), reflecting the major content of polymethylene chains in these kerogens. This mild, oxidative technique serves to differentiate kerogens at a molecular level, thereby supplementing existing conventional chemical, pyrolytic, n.m.r. and other techniques. 39 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. How phenyl makes a difference: mechanistic insights into the ruthenium( ii )-catalysed isomerisation of allylic alcohols

    KAUST Repository

    Manzini, Simone; Poater, Albert; Nelson, David J.; Cavallo, Luigi; Nolan, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    [RuCl(η5-3-phenylindenyl)(PPh3)2] (1) has been shown to be a highly active catalyst for the isomerisation of allylic alcohols to the corresponding ketones. A variety of substrates undergo the transformation, typically with 0.25-0.5 mol% of catalyst at room temperature, outperforming commonly-used complexes such as [RuCl(Cp)(PPh3) 2] and [RuCl(η5-indenyl)(PPh3) 2]. Mechanistic experiments and density functional theory have been employed to investigate the mechanism and understand the effect of catalyst structure on reactivity. These investigations suggest a oxo-π-allyl mechanism is in operation, avoiding intermediate ruthenium hydride complexes and leading to a characteristic 1,3-deuterium shift. Important mechanistic insights from DFT and experiments also allowed for the design of a protocol that expands the scope of the transformation to include primary allylic alcohols. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Electrical characterisation of ruthenium Schottky contacts on n-Ge (1 0 0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chawanda, Albert, E-mail: albert.chawanda@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Midlands State University, Bag 9055, Gweru (Zimbabwe); Nyamhere, Cloud [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Box 7700, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Auret, Francois D.; Nel, Jacqueline M.; Mtangi, Wilbert; Diale, Mmatsae [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    Ruthenium (Ru) Schottky contacts were fabricated on n-Ge (1 0 0) by electron beam deposition. Current-voltage (I-V), deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), and Laplace-DLTS techniques were used to characterise the as-deposited and annealed Ru/n-Ge (1 0 0) Schottky contacts. The variation of the electrical properties of the Ru samples annealed between 25 Degree-Sign C and 575 Degree-Sign C indicates the formation of two phases of ruthenium germanide. After Ru Schottky contacts fabrication, an electron trap at 0.38 eV below the conduction band with capture cross section of 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} cm{sup -2} is the only detectable electron trap. The hole traps at 0.09, 0.15, 0.27 and 0.30 eV above the valence band with capture cross sections of 7.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} cm{sup -2}, 7.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} cm{sup -2}, 2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} cm{sup -2} and 6.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} cm{sup -2}, respectively, were observed in the as-deposited Ru Schottky contacts. The hole trap H(0.30) is the prominent single acceptor level of the E-centre, and H(0.09) is the third charge state of the E-centre. H(0.27) shows some reverse annealing and reaches a maximum concentration at 225 Degree-Sign C and anneals out after 350 Degree-Sign C. This trap is strongly believed to be V-Sb{sub 2} complex formed from the annealing of V-Sb defect centre.

  2. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Michael, E-mail: mvschaefer@mail.usf.edu, E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Schlaf, Rudy, E-mail: mvschaefer@mail.usf.edu, E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru{sup 0}) and its oxide (RuO{sub 2}) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru{sup 0} and RuO{sub 2} films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO{sub 2} and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.{sup 0} An interface dipole of up to −0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO{sub 2}/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  3. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Michael; Schlaf, Rudy

    2015-08-01

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru0) and its oxide (RuO2) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru0 and RuO2 films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO2 and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.0 An interface dipole of up to -0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO2/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  4. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Michael; Schlaf, Rudy

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru 0 ) and its oxide (RuO 2 ) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru 0 and RuO 2 films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO 2 and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru. 0 An interface dipole of up to −0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO 2 /OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups

  5. Anti-Leishmania activity of new ruthenium(II) complexes: Effect on parasite-host interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Mônica S; Gonçalves, Yasmim G; Nunes, Débora C O; Napolitano, Danielle R; Maia, Pedro I S; Rodrigues, Renata S; Rodrigues, Veridiana M; Von Poelhsitz, Gustavo; Yoneyama, Kelly A G

    2017-10-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania. The many complications presented by the current treatment - including high toxicity, high cost and parasite resistance - make the development of new therapeutic agents indispensable. The present study aims to evaluate the anti-Leishmania potential of new ruthenium(II) complexes, cis‑[Ru II (η 2 -O 2 CR)(dppm) 2 ]PF 6 , with dppm=bis(diphenylphosphino)methane and R=4-butylbenzoate (bbato) 1, 4-(methylthio)benzoate (mtbato) 2 and 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzoate (hmxbato) 3, in promastigote cytotoxicity and their effect on parasite-host interaction. The cytotoxicity of complexes was analyzed by MTT assay against Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum promastigotes and the murine macrophage (RAW 264.7). The effect of complexes on parasite-host interaction was evaluated by in vitro infectivity assay performed in the presence of two different concentrations of each complex: the promastigote IC 50 value and the concentration nontoxic to 90% of RAW 264.7 macrophages. Complexes 1-3 exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against all Leishmania species assayed. The IC 50 values ranged from 7.52-12.59μM (complex 1); 0.70-3.28μM (complex 2) and 0.52-1.75μM (complex 3). All complexes significantly inhibited the infectivity index at both tested concentrations. The infectivity inhibitions ranged from 37 to 85%. Interestingly, the infectivity inhibitions due to complex action did not differ significantly at either of the tested concentrations, except for the complex 1 against Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum. The infectivity inhibitions resulted from reductions in both percentage of infected macrophages and number of parasites per macrophage. Taken together the results suggest remarkable leishmanicidal activity in vitro by these new ruthenium(II) complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis, structure, DNA binding and anticancer activity of mixed ligand ruthenium(II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilewska, Agnieszka; Masternak, Joanna; Kazimierczuk, Katarzyna; Trynda, Justyna; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Barszcz, Barbara

    2018-03-01

    In order to obtain a potential chemotherapeutic which is not affected on the normal BALB/3T3 cell line, a new arene ruthenium(II) complex {[RuCl(L1)(η6-p-cymene)]PF6}2 · H2O has been synthesized by a direct reaction of precursor, [{(η6-p-cymene)Ru(μ-Cl)}2Cl2], with N,N-chelating ligand (L1 - 2,2‧-bis(4,5-dimethylimidazole). The compound has been fully characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, IR, UV-Vis and 1H, 13C NMR spectroscopies. X-ray analysis have confirmed that the compound crystallized in the monoclinic group Cc as an inversion twin. The asymmetric unit contains two symmetrically independent cationic complexes [RuCl(L1)(η6-p-cymene)]+ whose charge is balanced by two PF6- counterions. The shape of each cationic coordination polyhedral can be described as a distorted dodecahedron and shows a typical piano-stool geometry. In addition, an analysis of the crystal structure and the Hirshfeld surface analysis were used to detect and visualize important hydrogen bonds and intermolecular interaction. Moreover, the antiproliferative behavior of the obtained complex was assayed against three human cells: MV-4-11, LoVo, MCF-7 and BALB/3T3 - normal mice fibroblast cells. To predict a binding mode, a potential interaction of ruthenium complex with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been explored using UV absorption and circular dichroism (CD).

  7. Synthesis and Catalytic Hydrogen Transfer Reaction of Ruthenium(II) Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Jung Ik; Kim, Aram; Noh, Hui Bog; Lee, Hyun Ju; Shim, Yoon Bo; Park, Kang Hyun

    2012-01-01

    The ruthenium(II) complex [Ru(bpy) 2 -(PhenTPy)] was synthesized, and used for the transfer hydrogenation of ketones and the desired products were obtained in good yield. Based on the presented results, transition-metal complexes can be used as catalysts for a wide range of organic transformations. The relationship between the electro-reduction current density and temperature are being examined in this laboratory. Attempts to improve the catalytic activity and determine the transfer hydrogenation mechanism are currently in progress. The catalytic hydrogenation of a ketone is a basic and critical process for making many types of alcohols used as the final products and precursors in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, flavor, fragrance, materials, and fine chemicals industries. The catalytic hydrogenation process developed by Noyori is a very attractive process. Formic acid and 2-propanol have been used extensively as hydrogenation sources. The advantage of using 2-propanol as a hydrogen source is that the only side product will be acetone, which can be removed easily during the workup process. Hydrogen transfer (HT) catalysis, which generates alcohols through the reduction of ketones, is an attractive protocol that is used widely. Ruthenium(II) complexes are the most useful catalysts for the hydrogen transfer (HT) of ketones. In this method, a highly active catalytic system employs a transition metal as a catalyst to synthesize alcohols, and is a replacement for the hydrogen-using hydrogenation process. The most active system is based on Ru, Rh and Ir, which includes a nitrogen ligand that facilitates the formation of a catalytically active hydride and phosphorus

  8. Bis(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complexes with an aliphatic sulfinato donor: synthesis, characterization, and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Motoshi; Tsuge, Kiyoshi; Igashira-Kamiyama, Asako; Konno, Takumi

    2011-06-06

    Treatment of a thiolato-bridged Ru(II)Ag(I)Ru(II) trinuclear complex, [Ag{Ru(aet)(bpy)(2)}(2)](3+) (aet = 2-aminoethanthiolate; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), with NaI in aqueous ethanol under an aerobic condition afforded a mononuclear ruthenium(II) complex having an S-bonded sulfinato group, [1](+) ([Ru(aesi-N, S)(bpy)(2)](+) (aesi = 2-aminoethanesulfinate)). Similar treatment of optically active isomers of an analogous Ru(II)Ag(I)Ru(II) trinuclear complex, Δ(D)Δ(D)- and Λ(D)Λ(D)-[Ag{Ru(d-Hpen-O,S)(bpy)(2)}(2)](3+) (d-pen = d-penicillaminate), with NaI also produced mononuclear ruthenium(II) isomers with an S-bonded sulfinato group, Δ(D)- and Λ(D)-[2](+) ([Ru(d-Hpsi-O,S)(bpy)(2)](+) (d-psi = d-penicillaminesulfinate)), respectively, retaining the bidentate-O,S coordination mode of a d-Hpen ligand and the absolute configuration (Δ or Λ) about a Ru(II) center. On refluxing in water, the Δ(D) isomer of [2](+) underwent a linkage isomerization to form Δ(D)-[3] (+) ([Ru(d-Hpsi-N,S)(bpy)(2)](+)), in which a d-Hpsi ligand coordinates to a Ru(II) center in a bidentate-N,S mode. Complexes [1](+), Δ(D)- and Λ(D)-[2](+), and Δ(D)-[3](+) were fully characterized by electronic absorption, CD, NMR, and IR spectroscopies, together with single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The electrochemical properties of these complexes, which are highly dependent on the coordination mode of sulfinate ligands, are also described. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. Towards a rational design of ruthenium CO2 hydrogenation catalysts by Ab initio metadynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakawa, Atsushi; Iannuzzi, Marcella; Hutter, Jürg; Baiker, Alfons

    2007-01-01

    Complete reaction pathways relevant to CO2 hydrogenation by using a homogeneous ruthenium dihydride catalyst ([Ru(dmpe)2H2], dmpe=Me2PCH2CH2PMe2) have been investigated by ab initio metadynamics. This approach has allowed reaction intermediates to be identified and free-energy profiles to be calculated, which provide new insights into the experimentally observed reaction pathway. Our simulations indicate that CO2 insertion, which leads to the formation of formate complexes, proceeds by a concerted insertion mechanism. It is a rapid and direct process with a relatively low activation barrier, which is in agreement with experimental observations. Subsequent H2 insertion into the formate--Ru complex, which leads to the formation of formic acid, instead occurs via an intermediate [Ru(eta2-H2)] complex in which the molecular hydrogen coordinates to the ruthenium center and interacts weakly with the formate group. This step has been identified as the rate-limiting step. The reaction completes by hydrogen transfer from the [Ru(eta2-H2)] complex to the formate oxygen atom, which forms a dihydrogen-bonded Ru--HHO(CHO) complex. The activation energy for the H2 insertion step is lower for the trans isomer than for the cis isomer. A simple measure of the catalytic activity was proposed based on the structure of the transition state of the identified rate-limiting step. From this measure, the relationship between catalysts with different ligands and their experimental catalytic activities can be explained.

  10. Synthesis and Catalytic Hydrogen Transfer Reaction of Ruthenium(II) Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Jung Ik; Kim, Aram; Noh, Hui Bog; Lee, Hyun Ju; Shim, Yoon Bo; Park, Kang Hyun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The ruthenium(II) complex [Ru(bpy){sub 2}-(PhenTPy)] was synthesized, and used for the transfer hydrogenation of ketones and the desired products were obtained in good yield. Based on the presented results, transition-metal complexes can be used as catalysts for a wide range of organic transformations. The relationship between the electro-reduction current density and temperature are being examined in this laboratory. Attempts to improve the catalytic activity and determine the transfer hydrogenation mechanism are currently in progress. The catalytic hydrogenation of a ketone is a basic and critical process for making many types of alcohols used as the final products and precursors in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, flavor, fragrance, materials, and fine chemicals industries. The catalytic hydrogenation process developed by Noyori is a very attractive process. Formic acid and 2-propanol have been used extensively as hydrogenation sources. The advantage of using 2-propanol as a hydrogen source is that the only side product will be acetone, which can be removed easily during the workup process. Hydrogen transfer (HT) catalysis, which generates alcohols through the reduction of ketones, is an attractive protocol that is used widely. Ruthenium(II) complexes are the most useful catalysts for the hydrogen transfer (HT) of ketones. In this method, a highly active catalytic system employs a transition metal as a catalyst to synthesize alcohols, and is a replacement for the hydrogen-using hydrogenation process. The most active system is based on Ru, Rh and Ir, which includes a nitrogen ligand that facilitates the formation of a catalytically active hydride and phosphorus.

  11. Electron Transfer Mediator Effects in Water Oxidation Catalysis by Solution and Surface-Bound Ruthenium Bpy-Dicarboxylate Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, Matthew V.; Sherman, Benjamin D.; Marquard, Seth L.; Fang, Zhen; Ashford, Dennis L.; Wee, Kyung-Ryang; Gold, Alexander S.; Alibabaei, Leila; Rudd, Jennifer A.; Coggins, Michael K.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2015-11-12

    Electrocatalytic water oxidation by the catalyst, ruthenium 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylate (bda) bis-isoquinoline (isoq), [Ru(bda)(isoq)2], 1, was investigated at metal oxide electrodes surface-derivatized with electron transfer (ET) mediators. At indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) in pH 7.2 in H2PO4–/HPO42– buffers in 0.5 M NaClO4 with added acetonitrile (MeCN), the catalytic activity of 1 is enhanced by the surface-bound redox mediators [Ru (4,4'-PO3H2-bpy)(4,4'-R-bpy)2]2+ (RuPbpyR22+, R = Br, H, Me, or OMe, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Rate-limiting ET between the Ru3+ form of the mediator and the RuIV(O) form in the [RuV/IV(O)]+/0 couple of 1 is observed at relatively high concentrations of HPO42– buffer base under conditions where O···O bond formation is facilitated by atom-proton transfer (APT). For the solution [Ru(bpy)3]3+/2+ mediator couple and 1 as the catalyst, catalytic currents vary systematically with the concentration of mediator and the HPO42– buffer base concentration. Electron transfer mediation of water oxidation catalysis was also investigated on nanoparticle TiO2 electrodes co-loaded with catalyst [Ru(bda)(py-4-O(CH2)3-PO3H2)2], 2, (py = pyridine) and RuPbpyR22+ (R = H, Me, or OMe) with an interplay between rate-limiting catalyst oxidation and rate-limiting O···O bond formation by APT. Lastly, the co-loaded assembly RuPbpyR22+ + 2 has been investigated in a dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cell for water splitting.

  12. Optimizations of large area quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biancardo, M.; West, K.; Krebs, Frederik C

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we address optimizations of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) through the combination of important issues like semi-transparency, quasi-solid-state constructions and low-cost realization of serially connected modules. DSSCs with a transparency of 50% in the visible region, moderate...... encouraging results. A short circuit current (I-sc) of 4.45 mA cm(-2) with an open circuit voltage (V-oc) of 0.5 V were recorded in standard solar cells sensitized by cis-bis(thiocyano) ruthenium(II)-bis-2, 2'-bipyridine-4, 4'-dicarboxylate. Up-scaling tests demonstrate the easy realization of a 625 cm(2...

  13. Towards Renewable Iodide Sources for Electrolytes in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Sagaidak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel family of iodide salts and ionic liquids based on different carbohydrate core units is herein described for application in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC. The influence of the molecular skeleton and the cationic structure on the electrolyte properties, device performance and on interfacial charge transfer has been investigated. In combination with the C106 polypyridyl ruthenium sensitizer, power conversion efficiencies lying between 5.0% and 7.3% under standard Air Mass (A.M. 1.5G conditions were obtained in association with a low volatile methoxypropionitrile (MPN-based electrolyte.

  14. Synthesis, characterization, in-vitro antimicrobial properties, molecular docking and DFT studies of 3-{(E-[(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-ylimino]methyl} naphthalen-2-ol and Heteroleptic Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II and Zn(II complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chioma Festus

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Heteroleptic divalent metal complexes [M(L (bipy(Y]•nH2O (where M = Mn, Co, Ni, and Zn; L = Schiff base; bipy = 2,2’-bipyridine; Y = OAc and n = 0, 1 have been synthesized from pyrimidine Schiff base ligand 3-{(E-[(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-ylimino]methyl} naphthalen-2-ol, 2,2’-bipyridine and metal(II acetate salts. The Schiff base and its complexes were characterized by analytical (CHN elemental analyses, solubility, melting point, conductivity measurements, spectral (IR, UV-vis, 1H and 13C-NMR and MS and magnetometry. The elemental analyses, Uv-vis spectra and room temperature magnetic moment data provide evidence of six coordinated octahedral geometry for the complexes. The metal complexes’ low molar conductivity values in dimethylsulphoxide suggested that they were non-ionic in nature. The compounds displayed moderate to good antimicrobial and antifungal activities against S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, B. cereus, P. mirabilis, K. oxytoca, A. niger, A. flevus and R. Stolonifer. The compounds also exhibited good antioxidant potentials with ferrous ion chelation and, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging assays. Molecular docking studies showed a good interaction with drug targets used. The structural and electronic properties of complexes were further confirmed by density functional theory calculations.

  15. Atomic layer deposition of ruthenium on plasma-treated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes for high-performance ultracapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Woo; Kim, Byungwoo; Park, Suk Won; Kim, Woong; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2014-10-31

    It is challenging to realize a conformal metal coating by atomic layer deposition (ALD) because of the high surface energy of metals. In this study, ALD of ruthenium (Ru) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was carried out. To activate the surface of CNTs that lack surface functional groups essential for ALD, oxygen plasma was applied ex situ before ALD. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy confirmed surface activation of CNTs by the plasma pretreatment. Transmission electron microscopy analysis with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy composition mapping showed that ALD Ru grew conformally along CNTs walls. ALD Ru/CNTs were electrochemically oxidized to ruthenium oxide (RuOx) that can be a potentially useful candidate for use in the electrodes of ultracapacitors. Electrode performance of RuOx/CNTs was evaluated using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements.

  16. Ruthenium(II)-catalysed remote C-H alkylations as a versatile platform to meta-decorated arenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Korvorapun, Korkit; de Sarkar, Suman; Rogge, Torben; Burns, David J.; Warratz, Svenja; Ackermann, Lutz

    2017-06-01

    The full control of positional selectivity is of prime importance in C-H activation technology. Chelation assistance served as the stimulus for the development of a plethora of ortho-selective arene functionalizations. In sharp contrast, meta-selective C-H functionalizations continue to be scarce, with all ruthenium-catalysed transformations currently requiring difficult to remove or modify nitrogen-containing heterocycles. Herein, we describe a unifying concept to access a wealth of meta-decorated arenes by a unique arene ligand effect in proximity-induced ruthenium(II) C-H activation catalysis. The transformative nature of our strategy is mirrored by providing a step-economical entry to a range of meta-substituted arenes, including ketones, acids, amines and phenols--key structural motifs in crop protection, material sciences, medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical industries.

  17. Flow-injection chemiluminescent determination of estrogen benzoate using the tris(1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II)-permanganate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Cao, Wei; Qiao, Shuang; Liu, Wenwen; Yang, Jinghe

    2011-01-01

    Chemiluminescence (CL) detection for the determination of estrogen benzoate, using the reaction of tris(1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II)-Na(2)SO(3)-permanganate, is described. This method is based on the CL reaction of estrogen benzoate (EB) with acidic potassium permanganate and tris(1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II). The CL intensity is greatly enhanced when Na(2)SO(3) is added. After optimization of the different experimental parameters, a calibration graph for estrogen benzoate is linear in the range 0.05-10 µg/mL. The 3 s limit of detection is 0.024 µg/mL and the relative standard deviation was 1.3% for 1.0 µg/mL estrogen benzoate (n = 11). This proposed method was successfully applied to commercial injection samples and emulsion cosmetics. The mechanism of CL reaction was also studied. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Ruthenium-platinum bimetallic catalysts supported on silica: characterization and study of benzene hydrogenation and CO methanation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarty, D.K.; Rao, K.M.; Sundararaman, N.; Chandavar, K.

    1986-12-15

    Ru-Pt/SiO/sub 2/ bimetallic catalysts with varying Ru:Pt ratio have been prepared and studied with the aim to establish if they contain coclusters or isolated ruthenium and platinum particles. X-ray diffraction studies show that individual crystallites of ruthenium and platinum are present and no coclusters are formed. Metal dispersion has been determined by hydrogen chemisorption and surface composition of the catalysts has been obtained from XPS. It was found that preoxidation of the catalysts prior to reduction is essential for good platinum dispersion. The experimental turnover number (TN) for benzene hydrogenation on the bimetallic catalysts agrees very well with that of the weighted average on the individual metal catalysts and this may be taken as a kinetic evidence for the absence of coclusters. Carbon monoxide methanation activity of the bimetallic catalysts is quite similar to that of the supported platinum catalyst. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays in Rose Bengal-based dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, Basudev; Batabyal, Sudip K.; Pal, Amlan J. [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Department of Solid State Physics, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2007-05-23

    We fabricate dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) using vertically oriented, high density, and crystalline array of ZnO nanowires, which can be a suitable alternative to titanium dioxide nanoparticle films. The vertical nanowires provide fast routes or channels for electron transport to the substrate electrode. As an alternative to conventional ruthenium complex, we introduce Rose Bengal dye, which acts as a photosensitizer in the dye-sensitized solar cells. The dye energetically matches the ZnO with usual KI-I{sub 2} redox couple for dye-sensitized solar cell applications. (author)

  20. A new electrochemical sensor containing a film of chitosan-supported ruthenium: detection and quantification of sildenafil citrate and acetaminophen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delolo, Fabio Godoy; Rodrigues, Claudia; Silva, Monize Martins da; Batista, Alzir Azevedo, E-mail: fabiodelolo@hotmail.com, E-mail: daab@power.ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica. Lab. de Estrutura e Reatividade de Compostos Inorganicos; Dinelli, Luis Rogerio [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), Ituiutaba, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Integradas do Pontal; Delling, Felix Nicolai; Zukerman-Schpector, Julio [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica. Lab. de Cristalografia Estereodinamica e Modelagem Molecular

    2014-03-15

    This work presents the construction of a novel electrochemical sensor for detection of organic analytes, using a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with a chitosan-supported ruthenium film. The ruthenium-chitosan film was obtained starting from the mer-[RuCl{sub 3}(dppb)(H{sub 2}O)] complex as a [1,4-bis(diphenylphosphine)butane] (dppb) precursor, and chitosan (QT). The structure of the chitosan-supported ruthenium film on the surface of the glassy carbon electrode was characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) techniques. The glassy carbon electrode was modified with a film formed from the evaporation of 5 μL of a solution composed of 5 mg chitosan-supported ruthenium (RuQT) in 10 mL of 0.1 mol L{sup -1} acetic acid. The modified electrode was tested as a sensor for sildenafil citrate (Viagra® 50 mg) and acetaminophen (Tylenol®) detection. The technique utilized for these analyses was differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in 0.1 mol L{sup -1} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH 1.0) and 0.1 mol L{sup -1} CH{sub 3}COOK (pH 6.5) as supporting electrolyte. All analyses were carried out during a month using the same electrode. The electrode was washed only with water in between the analyses, keeping it in the refrigerator when it was not in use. This electrode was stable during the period utilized showing no degradation and presenting a linear response over the evaluated concentration interval (1.25 × 10{sup -5} to 4.99 × 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}). (author)

  1. Ligand-accelerated activation of strong C-H bonds of alkanes by a (salen)ruthenium(VI)-nitrido complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wai-Lun; Lam, William W Y; Kwong, Hoi-Ki; Yiu, Shek-Man; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2012-09-03

    Kinetic and mechanistic studies on the intermolecular activation of strong C-H bonds of alkanes by a (salen)ruthenium(VI) nitride were performed. The initial, rate-limiting step, the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the alkane to Ru(VI)≡N, generates Ru(V)=NH and RC·HCH(2)R. The following steps involve N-rebound and desaturation. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A new electrochemical sensor containing a film of chitosan-supported ruthenium: detection and quantification of sildenafil citrate and acetaminophen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delolo, Fabio Godoy; Rodrigues, Claudia; Silva, Monize Martins da; Batista, Alzir Azevedo; Dinelli, Luis Rogerio; Delling, Felix Nicolai; Zukerman-Schpector, Julio

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the construction of a novel electrochemical sensor for detection of organic analytes, using a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with a chitosan-supported ruthenium film. The ruthenium-chitosan film was obtained starting from the mer-[RuCl 3 (dppb)(H 2 O)] complex as a [1,4-bis(diphenylphosphine)butane] (dppb) precursor, and chitosan (QT). The structure of the chitosan-supported ruthenium film on the surface of the glassy carbon electrode was characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) techniques. The glassy carbon electrode was modified with a film formed from the evaporation of 5 μL of a solution composed of 5 mg chitosan-supported ruthenium (RuQT) in 10 mL of 0.1 mol L -1 acetic acid. The modified electrode was tested as a sensor for sildenafil citrate (Viagra® 50 mg) and acetaminophen (Tylenol®) detection. The technique utilized for these analyses was differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in 0.1 mol L -1 H 2 SO 4 (pH 1.0) and 0.1 mol L -1 CH 3 COOK (pH 6.5) as supporting electrolyte. All analyses were carried out during a month using the same electrode. The electrode was washed only with water in between the analyses, keeping it in the refrigerator when it was not in use. This electrode was stable during the period utilized showing no degradation and presenting a linear response over the evaluated concentration interval (1.25 × 10 -5 to 4.99 × 10 -4 mol L -1 ). (author)

  3. Density functional theory based QSAR study of ruthenium (II) antitumor drugs and their interactions with xanthine oxidoreductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Paritosh; Das, Dharitri

    2013-01-01

    Transition metal containing drugs have been used intensely for their potential anticancer activities. Platinum drugs have been used successfully for the treatment of cancer. However, these drugs have severe drawbacks including unwanted side effects, drug resistance and ineffectiveness towards some of cancers. Therefore scientists are searching for new drugs to solve these problems, and Ruthenium coordination compounds have been found effective alternatives to platinum coordination drugs

  4. Disposable biosensor based on cathodic electrochemiluminescence of tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) for uric acid determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesta-Claver, J.; Rodríguez-Gómez, R. [ECsens, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Campus Fuentenueva, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Capitán-Vallvey, L.F., E-mail: lcapitan@ugr.es [ECsens, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Campus Fuentenueva, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2013-04-03

    Highlights: ► Cathodic ECL offers conventional and non-aggressive analysis conditions. ► The ECL hydrogen peroxide/ruthenium complex system for uric acid determination is novel. ► The ruthenium complex is electrochemically immobilized on graphite screen-printed electrodes. ► The quantification of the uric acid is based on a Stern–Volmer type equation. ► The use of the cathodic ECL working methodology reduces interferences during analysis. -- Abstract: A new method for uric acid (UA) determination based on the quenching of the cathodic ECL of the tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium(II)–uricase system is described. The biosensor is based on a double-layer design containing first tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}) electrochemically immobilized on graphite screen-printed cells and uricase in chitosan as a second layer. The uric acid biosensing is based on the ECL quenching produced by uric acid over the cathodic ECL caused by immobilized Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} in the presence of uricase. The use of a −1.1 V pulse for 1 s with a dwelling time of 10 s makes it possible to estimate the initial enzymatic rate, which is used as the analytical signal. The Stern–Volmer type calibration function shows a dynamic range from 1.0 × 10{sup −5} to 1.0 × 10{sup −3} M with a limit of detection of 3.1 × 10{sup −6} M and an accuracy of 13.6% (1.0 × 10{sup −4} M, n = 5) as relative standard deviation. Satisfactory results were obtained for urine samples, creating an affordable alternative for uric acid determination.

  5. Ru-OSO coordination photogenerated at 100 K in tetraammineaqua(sulfur dioxide)ruthenium(II) (±)-camphorsulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Anthony E; Cole, Jacqueline M; d'Almeida, Thierry; Low, Kian Sing

    2012-02-06

    The photoinduced O-bound coordination mode in RuSO(2) complexes, previously observed only at 13 K, has been generated at 100 K in tetraammineaqua(sulfur dioxide)ruthenium(II) (±)-camphorsulfonate. This coordination state, often denoted MS1, decays to the η(2)-bound MS2 state, with an estimated half-life of 3.4(8) h and a long-lived population of 2.9(4)% at 120 K.

  6. Nanoengineering of Ruthenium and Platinum-based Nanocatalysts by Continuous-Flow Chemistry for Renewable Energy Applications

    KAUST Repository

    AlYami, Noktan Mohammed

    2017-04-15

    This thesis presents an integrated study of nanocatalysts for heterogenous catalytic and electrochemical processes using pure ruthenium (Ru) with mixed-phase and platinum-based nanomaterials synthesized by continuous-flow chemistry. There are three major challenges to the application of nanomaterials in heterogenous catalytic reactions and electrocatalytic processes in acidic solution. These challenges are the following: (i) controlling the size, shape and crystallography of nanoparticles to give the best catalytic properties, (ii) scaling these nanoparticles up to a commercial quantity (kg per day) and (iii) making stable nanoparticles that can be used catalytically without degrading in acidic electrolytes. Some crucial limitations of these nanostructured materials in energy conversion and storage applications were overcome by continuous-flow chemistry. By using a continuous-flow reactor, the creation of scalable nanoparticle systems was achieved and their functionality was modified to control the nanoparticles’ physical and chemical characteristics. The nanoparticles were also tested for long-term stability, to make sure these nanoparticles were feasible under realistic working conditions. These nanoparticles are (1) shape- and crystallography-controlled ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles, (2) size-controlled platinum-metal (Pt-M= nickel (Ni) & copper (Cu)) nanooctahedra (while maintaining morphology) and (3) core-shell platinum@ruthenium (Pt@Ru) nanoparticles where an ultrathin ruthenium shell was templated onto the platinum core. Thus, a complete experimental validation of the formation of a scalable amount of these nanoparticles and their catalytic activity and stability towards the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in acid medium, hydrolysis of ammonia borane (AB) along with plausible explanations were provided.

  7. Studies on the interaction of benzotriazole (a corrosion inibitor) with the ruthenium (II) (III) ammincomplexes and pentacyanoferrate (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza R, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Some studies on the interaction of benzotriazole with the aquapentacyanoferrate (II), aquapentaamminruthenium (II) and cis-and trans-(NH 3 ) 4 Ru(H 2 O) 2 2+ complexes are described. The reactions, substituted products and complexes production are demonstrated. The absorption bands for the ammine (benzotriazole) and ruthenium (II) complexes as well as the activation parameters and kinetics of reactions are discussed. (M.J.C.) [pt

  8. Quantum chemical interpretation of redox properties of ruthenium complexes with vinyl and TCNX type non-innocent ligands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Záliš, Stanislav; Winter, R. F.; Kaim, W.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 254, 13-14 (2010), s. 1383-1396 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 139; GA MŠk 1P05OC068; GA AV ČR KAN100400702; GA MŠk OC09043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : density functional thoery * non-innocent ligands * ruthenium Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 10.018, year: 2010

  9. Disposable biosensor based on cathodic electrochemiluminescence of tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) for uric acid determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesta-Claver, J.; Rodríguez-Gómez, R.; Capitán-Vallvey, L.F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cathodic ECL offers conventional and non-aggressive analysis conditions. ► The ECL hydrogen peroxide/ruthenium complex system for uric acid determination is novel. ► The ruthenium complex is electrochemically immobilized on graphite screen-printed electrodes. ► The quantification of the uric acid is based on a Stern–Volmer type equation. ► The use of the cathodic ECL working methodology reduces interferences during analysis. -- Abstract: A new method for uric acid (UA) determination based on the quenching of the cathodic ECL of the tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium(II)–uricase system is described. The biosensor is based on a double-layer design containing first tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy) 3 2+ ) electrochemically immobilized on graphite screen-printed cells and uricase in chitosan as a second layer. The uric acid biosensing is based on the ECL quenching produced by uric acid over the cathodic ECL caused by immobilized Ru(bpy) 3 2+ in the presence of uricase. The use of a −1.1 V pulse for 1 s with a dwelling time of 10 s makes it possible to estimate the initial enzymatic rate, which is used as the analytical signal. The Stern–Volmer type calibration function shows a dynamic range from 1.0 × 10 −5 to 1.0 × 10 −3 M with a limit of detection of 3.1 × 10 −6 M and an accuracy of 13.6% (1.0 × 10 −4 M, n = 5) as relative standard deviation. Satisfactory results were obtained for urine samples, creating an affordable alternative for uric acid determination

  10. Separation of the noble metals ruthenium and palladium from nitric acid solution of the nuclear fuel reprocessing containing complexing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafourian, H.

    1989-06-01

    Two extraction chromatographic techniques have been developed. N'N diethylthiourea (DETU), which forms complexes with ruthenium that can be retained on an AG50W-X2 ion exchanger, has proved to be a suitable reagent. The structures of these complexes were elucidated by electrophoresis, ion exchange and IR spectroscopy. Under the same conditions Pd forms an insoluble DETU-complex of the formula [Pd(DETU) 4 ] 2+ , which allows the separation of this metal quantitatively. With regard to the application of the developed technique for recovery of the mentioned noble metals from dissolver residues of the nuclear fuel reprocessing, comparative studies were carried out for accompanying fission product nuclides and actinides such as Mo, Tc, Zr, Ce, U and Pu. It was found out that no complex between diethylthiourea and the fission products zirconium, molybdenum and cerium and the actinides uranium, plutonium and americium were formed. Technetium, which was originally present as pertechnetate, is reduced to Tc(IV) and retained on the cation exchanger together with ruthenium. Ruthenium was eluted with 6 M HNO 3 . The efficiency of the developed process has been demonstrated with simulated solutions. The achieved decontamination factors ranged from 10 2 to 10 6 depending on the nuclide. (orig./RB) [de

  11. Synthesis and characterization of branched fcc/hcp ruthenium nanostructures and their catalytic activity in ammonia borane hydrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    AlYami, Noktan

    2018-01-30

    Several systems have shown the ability to stabilize uncommon crystal structures during the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. By tailoring the nanoparticle crystal structure, the physical and chemical properties of the particles can also be controlled. Herein, we first synthesized branched nanoparticles of mixed hcp/fcc ruthenium, which were formed using tungsten carbonyl [W(CO)6] as both a reducing agent and a source of carbon monoxide. The branched particles were formed from multiple particulates off a central core. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) clearly showed that the branched structures consisted of aligned hcp crystal domains, a mixture of fcc and hcp crystal domains with several defects and misalignments, and particles that contained multiple cores and branches. Branched particles were also formed with molybdenum carbonyl [Mo(CO)6], and faceted particles of hcp and fcc particles were formed with Re2(CO)10 as a carbon monoxide source. Without metal carbonyls, small particles of spherical hcp ruthenium were produced, and their size could be controlled by the selection of the precursor. The ruthenium nanoparticles were tested for ammonia borane hydrolysis; the branched nanoparticles were more reactive for catalytic hydrogen evolution than the faceted hcp/fcc nanoparticles or the spherical hcp nanoparticles. This work showcases the potential of crystal phase engineering of transition metal nanoparticles by different carbon monoxide precursors for tailoring their catalytic reactivity.

  12. Nitrile-functionalized ruthenium nanoparticles: charge delocalization through Ru − N ≡ C interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fengqi; Huang, Lin; Zou, Jiasui; Yan, Jinwu; Zhu, Jiaying; Kang, Xiongwu; Chen, Shaowei

    2017-01-01

    Ruthenium nanoparticles (2.06 ± 0.46 nm in diameter) were stabilized by the self-assembly of nitrile molecules onto the ruthenium colloid surface by virtue of the formation of Ru−N≡C interfacial bonding linkages. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that there were about 63 nitrile ligands per nanoparticle, corresponding to an average molecular footprint of 22.4 Å 2 . Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies suggested an end-on configuration of the nitrile moiety on the metal core surface. Meanwhile, infrared measurements showed that the C≡N stretch red-shifted from 2246 to 1944 cm −1 upon adsorption on the nanoparticle surfaces, as confirmed by 15 N isotopic labeling. This apparent red-shift suggests extensive intraparticle charge delocalization, which was further manifested by photoluminescence measurements of 1-cyanopyrene-functionalized ruthenium nanoparticles that exhibited a red shift of 40 nm of the emission maximum, in comparison to that of free monomers. The results further highlight the significance of metal−organic contacts in the manipulation of the dynamics of intraparticle charge transfer and the nanoparticle optical and electronic properties.

  13. Nitrile-functionalized ruthenium nanoparticles: charge delocalization through Ru − N ≡ C interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fengqi; Huang, Lin; Zou, Jiasui [South China University of Technology, New Energy Research Institute, School of Environment and Energy, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Centre (China); Yan, Jinwu; Zhu, Jiaying [South China University of Technology, School of Bioscience and Bioengineering, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Centre (China); Kang, Xiongwu, E-mail: esxkang@scut.edu.cn; Chen, Shaowei, E-mail: shaowei@ucsc.edu [South China University of Technology, New Energy Research Institute, School of Environment and Energy, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Centre (China)

    2017-03-15

    Ruthenium nanoparticles (2.06 ± 0.46 nm in diameter) were stabilized by the self-assembly of nitrile molecules onto the ruthenium colloid surface by virtue of the formation of Ru−N≡C interfacial bonding linkages. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that there were about 63 nitrile ligands per nanoparticle, corresponding to an average molecular footprint of 22.4 Å{sup 2}. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies suggested an end-on configuration of the nitrile moiety on the metal core surface. Meanwhile, infrared measurements showed that the C≡N stretch red-shifted from 2246 to 1944 cm{sup −1} upon adsorption on the nanoparticle surfaces, as confirmed by {sup 15}N isotopic labeling. This apparent red-shift suggests extensive intraparticle charge delocalization, which was further manifested by photoluminescence measurements of 1-cyanopyrene-functionalized ruthenium nanoparticles that exhibited a red shift of 40 nm of the emission maximum, in comparison to that of free monomers. The results further highlight the significance of metal−organic contacts in the manipulation of the dynamics of intraparticle charge transfer and the nanoparticle optical and electronic properties.

  14. Electronic state of ruthenium deposited onto oxide supports: An XPS study taking into account the final state effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larichev, Yurii V.; Moroz, Boris L.; Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic state of ruthenium in the supported Ru/EO x (EO x = MgO, Al 2 O 3 or SiO 2 ) catalysts prepared by with the use of Ru(OH)Cl 3 or Ru(acac) 3 (acac = acetylacetonate) and reduced with H 2 at 723 K is characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in the Ru 3d, Cl 2p and O 1s regions. The influence of the final state effects (the differential charging and variation of the relaxation energy) on the binding energy (BE) of Ru 3d 5/2 core level measured for supported Ru nanoparticles is estimated by comparison of the Fermi levels and the modified Auger parameters determined for the Ru/EO x samples with the corresponding characteristics of the bulk Ru metal. It is found that the negative shift of the Ru 3d 5/2 peak which is observed in the spectrum of ruthenium deposited onto MgO (BE = 279.5-279.7 eV) with respect to that of Ru black (BE = 280.2 eV) or ruthenium supported on γ-Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 (BE = 280.4 eV) is caused not by the transfer of electron density from basic sites of MgO, as considered earlier, but by the differential charging of the supported Ru particles compared with the support surface. Correction for the differential charging value reveals that the initial state energies of ruthenium in the Ru/EO x systems are almost identical (BE = 280.5 ± 0.1 eV) irrespectively of acid-base properties of the support, the mean size of supported Ru crystallites (within the range of 2-10 nm) and the surface Cl content. The results obtained suggest that the difference in ammonia synthesis activity between the Ru catalysts supported on MgO and on the acidic supports is accounted for by not different electronic state of ruthenium on the surface of these oxides but by some other reasons.

  15. Sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003741.htm Sensitivity analysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sensitivity analysis determines the effectiveness of antibiotics against microorganisms (germs) ...

  16. XPS investigations of ruthenium deposited onto representative inner surfaces of nuclear reactor containment buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Direction de la Prevention des Accidents Majeurs (DPAM), Centre de Cadarache, BP3-13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)]. E-mail: christian.mun@irsn.fr; Ehrhardt, J.J. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (LCPME) UMR 7564, CNRS-Nancy University-405, rue de Vandoeuvre 54600 Villers-les-Nancy (France)]. E-mail: ehrhardt@lcpe.cnrs-nancy.fr; Lambert, J. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (LCPME) UMR 7564, CNRS-Nancy University-405, rue de Vandoeuvre 54600 Villers-les-Nancy (France); Madic, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, Centre de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)]. E-mail: charles.madic@cea.fr

    2007-07-15

    In the case of a hypothetical severe accident in a nuclear power plant, interactions of gaseous RuO{sub 4} with reactor containment building surfaces (stainless steel and epoxy paint) could possibly lead to a black Ru-containing deposit on these surfaces. Some scenarios include the possibility of formation of highly radiotoxic RuO{sub 4}(g) by the interactions of these deposits with the oxidizing medium induced by air radiolysis, in the reactor containment building, and consequently dispersion of this species. Therefore, the accurate determination of the chemical nature of ruthenium in the deposits is of the high importance for safety studies. An experiment was designed to model the interactions of RuO{sub 4}(g) with samples of stainless steel and of steel covered with epoxy paint. Then, these deposits have been carefully characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The analysis by XPS of Ru deposits formed by interaction of RuO{sub 4}(g), revealed that the ruthenium is likely to be in the IV oxidation state, as the shapes of the Ru 3d core levels are very similar with those observed on the RuO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O reference powder sample. The analysis of O 1s peaks indicates a large component attributed to the hydroxyl functional groups. From these results, it was concluded that Ru was present on the surface of the deposits as an oxyhydroxide of Ru(IV). It has also to be pointed out that the presence of 'pure' RuO{sub 2}, or of a thin layer of RuO{sub 3} or Ru{sub 2}O{sub 5}, coming from the decomposition of RuO{sub 4} on the surface of samples of stainless steel and epoxy paint, could be ruled out. These findings will be used for further investigations of the possible revolatilisation phenomena induced by ozone.

  17. Photochromic ruthenium sulfoxide complexes: evidence for isomerization through a conical intersection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Beth Anne; Mockus, Nicholas V; Butcher, Dennis P; Lutterman, Daniel A; Turro, Claudia; Petersen, Jeffrey L; Rack, Jeffrey J

    2009-09-07

    The complexes [Ru(bpy)(2)(OS)](PF(6)) and [Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](PF(6)), where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, OS is 2-methylthiobenzoate, and OSO is 2-methylsulfinylbenzoate, have been studied. The electrochemical and photochemical reactivity of [Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](+) is consistent with an isomerization of the bound sulfoxide from S-bonded (S-) to O-bonded (O-) following irradiation or electrochemical oxidation. Charge transfer excitation of [Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](+) in MeOH results in the appearance of two new metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) maxima at 355 and 496 nm, while the peak at 396 nm diminishes in intensity. The isomerization is reversible at room temperature in alcohol or propylene carbonate solution. In the absence of light, solutions of O-[Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](+) revert to S-[Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](+). Kinetic analysis reveals a biexponential decay with rate constants of 5.66(3) x 10(-4) s(-1) and 3.1(1) x 10(-5) s(-1). Cyclic voltammograms of S-[Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](+) are consistent with electron-transfer-triggered isomerization of the sulfoxide. Analysis of these voltammograms reveal E(S)(o)' = 0.86 V and E(O)(o)' = 0.49 V versus Ag/Ag(+) for the S- and O-bonded Ru(3+/2+) couples, respectively, in propylene carbonate. We found k(S-->O) = 0.090(15) s(-1) in propylene carbonate and k(S-->O) = 0.11(3) s(-1) in acetonitrile on Ru(III), which is considerably slower than has been reported for other sulfoxide isomerizations on ruthenium polypyridyl complexes following oxidation. The photoisomerization quantum yield (Phi(S-->O) = 0.45, methanol) is quite large, indicating a rapid excited state isomerization rate constant. The kinetic trace at 500 nm is monoexponential with tau = 150 ps, which is assigned to the excited S-->O isomerization rate. There is no spectroscopic or kinetic evidence for an O-bonded (3)MLCT excited state in the spectral evolution of S-[Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](+) to O-[Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](+). Thus, isomerization occurs nonadiabatically from an S-bonded (or eta(2

  18. Dye-sensitized solar cells based on nanostructured zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conradt, Jonas; Maier-Flaig, Florian; Sartor, Janos; Fallert, Johannes [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Szmytkowski, Jedrzej; Kalt, Heinz [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe (Germany); Reinhard, Manuel; Colsmann, Alexander [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Lichttechnisches Institut, Karlsruhe (Germany); Lemmer, Uli [Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Lichttechnisches Institut, Karlsruhe (Germany); Balaban, Teodor Silviu [Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid solar cells represent a promising (cost-efficient) alternative to pure inorganic solar cells. We present dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) which are based on a zinc oxide (ZnO) electrode covered with a ruthenium dye. Our work focuses on the morphology of the ZnO electrode and its impact on the photovoltaic performance of the solar cell. Nanocrystalline ZnO powder layers and arrays of nanorods are incorporated into the DSSCs. The ZnO nanorods are grown by vapor transport deposition. The morphology and doping concentration of the rods can be controlled by the choice of substrate material, growth condition and catalytic metal layers. The nanorod arrays are expected to fasten the electron transport towards the anode and thereby improve the solar cell efficiency. In addition, novel self-assembling (porphyrin) dyes are tested as sensitizer within a DSSC.

  19. TBP 20% - diluent/HNO3/H2O liquid-liquid extraction system: equilibrium normalization data of nitric acid, ruthenium and zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.A.L.G. de.

    1984-01-01

    The extraction behaviour of nitric acid, nitrosyl-ruthenium nitrate and zirconium hydroxide nitrate in the system tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) 20% - diluent was studied. The main purpose was to obtain enough data to elaborate process flowsheets for the treatment of irradiated uranium fuels. During the runs, the equilibrium diagrams of nitric acid, ruthenium and zirconium were settled. From the achieved data, the influence of nitric acid, ruthenium, zirconium and nitrate ions concentration in the aqueous phase was checked. Furthermore, the density and the surface tension of the aqueous and organic phases were determined, gathering the interfacial tension after the contact between the phases. A comparison among the obtained equilibrium data and the existing one from literature allowed the elaboration of mathematical models to express the distribution behaviour of nitric acid, ruthenium and zirconium as a function of nitrate ions concentration in the aqueous phase. The reduction of TBP concentration from 30% v/v (normally used) to 20% v/v, has shown no influence in the extraction behaviour of the elements. A decreasing in the distribution values was observed and that means an important factor during the decontamination of uranium from its contaminants, ruthenium and zirconium. (Author) [pt

  20. Mechanism of Water Oxidation Catalyzed by a Dinuclear Ruthenium Complex Bridged by Anthraquinone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Wada

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized 1,8-bis(2,2′:6′,2″-terpyrid-4′-ylanthraquinone (btpyaq as a new dimerizing ligand and determined its single crystal structure by X-ray analysis. The dinuclear Ruthenium complex [Ru2(µ-Cl(bpy2(btpyaq](BF43 ([3](BF43, bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine was used as a catalyst for water oxidation to oxygen with (NH42[Ce(NO36] as the oxidant (turnover numbers = 248. The initial reaction rate of oxygen evolution was directly proportional to the concentration of the catalyst and independent of the oxidant concentration. The cyclic voltammogram of [3](BF43 in water at pH 1.3 showed an irreversible catalytic current above +1.6 V (vs. SCE, with two quasi-reversible waves and one irreversible wave at E1/2 = +0.62, +0.82 V, and Epa = +1.13 V, respectively. UV-vis and Raman spectra of [3](BF43 with controlled-potential electrolysis at +1.40 V revealed that [Ru(IV=O O=Ru(IV]4+ is stable under electrolysis conditions. [Ru(III, Ru(II] species are recovered after dissociation of an oxygen molecule from the active species in the catalytic cycle. These results clearly indicate that an O–O bond is formed via [Ru(V=O O=Ru(IV]5+.

  1. Catalytic transformation of carbon dioxide and methane into syngas over ruthenium and platinum supported hydroxyapatites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rêgo De Vasconcelos, Bruna; Zhao, Lulu; Sharrock, Patrick; Nzihou, Ange; Pham Minh, Doan, E-mail: doan.phamminh@mines-albi.fr

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Formation of nanoparticles of Pt and Ru on hydroxyapatite surface support (HAP). • Pt catalyst more active and stable than Ru catalyst in dry reforming of methane (DRM). • Low carbon deposition on the surface of Pt catalyst after reaction. • Quantification of water as by-product of the reaction for the first time. • Good mass balance of the reaction. - Abstract: This work focused on the catalytic transformation of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into syngas (mixture of CO and H{sub 2}). Ruthenium- and platinum-based catalysts were prepared using hydroxyapatite (HAP) as catalyst support. Different methods for metal deposition were used including incipient wetness impregnation (IWI), excess liquid phase impregnation (LIM), and cationic exchange (CEX). Metal particle size varied in large range from less than 1 nm to dozens nm. All catalysts were active at 400–700 °C but only Pt catalyst prepared by IWI method (Pt/HAP IWI) was found stable. The catalytic performance of Pt/HAP IWI could be comparable with the literature data on noble metal-based catalysts, prepared on metal oxide supports. For the first time, water was experimentally quantified as a by-product of the reaction. This helped to correctly buckle the mass balance of the process.

  2. Uranium(VI) and ruthenium extraction by dialkyldithio-phosphoric acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, R.; Musikas, C.

    1980-01-01

    Oxygen donors like dialkylphosphoric acids are good extractants for actinide ions, but little is known about their sulfur homologs. Investigations of U(VI) and Ru extraction from various aqueous media are reported. This includes extraction of U(VI) from nitric, perchloric, and phosphoric acids by solutions of dialkyldithiophosphoric acids in dodecane or benzene. Extraction of U(VI) by synergistic mixtures, of which at least one of the components is a sulfur donor, has been investigated. The extracted species have been identified, and a comparison with the complexes obtained by extraction with the homologous oxygen donors is made. The sulfur-actinide bond is weaker than the oxygen-actinide one, but in some synergistic extractions the dialkyldithiophosphonates are more efficient than the oxygen donors. In addition to size effects, this behavior could be attributed to the weakness of the hydrogen bonds of the SH groups, which allows a greater variety of the ligands to enter the coordination sphere of the metal. Ruthenium, like the d-transition elements, gives strong bonds with the sulfur donors. However, its extraction from nitric acid is slow. We investigated the influence of several parameters on the distribution coefficients and found that the presence of a reagent which destroys nitrous ions is necessary to achieve quantitative extraction. The role of RuNO groups is also discussed

  3. Partition of ruthenium-106 between the fresh water environment and crayfish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, G.G.; Ginsberg, E.

    1976-01-01

    Crayfish of two species, Orconectes obscurus and Cambarus robustus, were identified in West Valley, New York, in streams contaminated with radioactive wastes. 106 Ru accounted for over 90% of the gamma radioactivity in specimens collected in 1972, and had higher concentrations in the crayfish than in fish from that site. Crayfish are suggested as indicator organisms for 106 Ru. In subsequent aquarium experiments, crayfish exposed to water labeled with inorganic complexes of 106 Ru concentrated the dissolved ruthenium an average of 9 x and accumulated 50% of the equilibrium body burden in approximately 10 hr, with the bulk of the isotope bound at the surface of the exoskeleton. If food was also exposed to the labeled water, uptake was faster and high concentrations were found in the digestive gland, which showed concentration factors in excess of 25 x. Releases were slower and bimodal, with approximately 10% of body burden remaining after 1 or 2 months in repeated changes of water. Data describe the partition of 106 Ru to colloidal aggregates and organically-bound sediments, and its availability for bioconcentration. (author)

  4. Hydrous Ruthenium Oxide Nanoparticles Anchored to Graphene and Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Foam for Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Guo, Shirui; Lee, Ilkeun; Ahmed, Kazi; Zhong, Jiebin; Favors, Zachary; Zaera, Francisco; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.

    2014-01-01

    In real life applications, supercapacitors (SCs) often can only be used as part of a hybrid system together with other high energy storage devices due to their relatively lower energy density in comparison to other types of energy storage devices such as batteries and fuel cells. Increasing the energy density of SCs will have a huge impact on the development of future energy storage devices by broadening the area of application for SCs. Here, we report a simple and scalable way of preparing a three-dimensional (3D) sub-5 nm hydrous ruthenium oxide (RuO2) anchored graphene and CNT hybrid foam (RGM) architecture for high-performance supercapacitor electrodes. This RGM architecture demonstrates a novel graphene foam conformally covered with hybrid networks of RuO2 nanoparticles and anchored CNTs. SCs based on RGM show superior gravimetric and per-area capacitive performance (specific capacitance: 502.78 F g−1, areal capacitance: 1.11 F cm−2) which leads to an exceptionally high energy density of 39.28 Wh kg−1 and power density of 128.01 kW kg−1. The electrochemical stability, excellent capacitive performance, and the ease of preparation suggest this RGM system is promising for future energy storage applications. PMID:24663242

  5. Bioorthogonal Diversification of Peptides through Selective Ruthenium(II)-Catalyzed C-H Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schischko, Alexandra; Ren, Hongjun; Kaplaneris, Nikolaos; Ackermann, Lutz

    2017-02-01

    Methods for the chemoselective modification of amino acids and peptides are powerful techniques in biomolecular chemistry. Among other applications, they enable the total synthesis of artificial peptides. In recent years, significant momentum has been gained by exploiting palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling for peptide modification. Despite major advances, the prefunctionalization elements on the coupling partners translate into undesired byproduct formation and lengthy synthetic operations. In sharp contrast, we herein illustrate the unprecedented use of versatile ruthenium(II)carboxylate catalysis for the step-economical late-stage diversification of α- and β-amino acids, as well as peptides, through chemo-selective C-H arylation under racemization-free reaction conditions. The ligand-accelerated C-H activation strategy proved water-tolerant and set the stage for direct fluorescence labelling as well as various modes of peptide ligation with excellent levels of positional selectivity in a bioorthogonal fashion. The synthetic utility of our approach is further demonstrated by twofold C-H arylations for the complexity-increasing assembly of artificial peptides within a multicatalytic C-H activation manifold. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. MWCNT-ruthenium oxide composite paste electrode as non-enzymatic glucose sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Ramin M A; Ab Ghani, Sulaiman

    2012-01-01

    A non-enzymatic glucose sensor of multi-walled carbon nanotube-ruthenium oxide/composite paste electrode (MWCNT-RuO(2)/CPE) was developed. The electrode was characterized by using XRD, SEM, TEM and EIS. Meanwhile, cyclic voltammetry and amperometry were used to check on the performances of the MWCNT-RuO(2)/CPE towards glucose. The proposed electrode has displayed a synergistic effect of RuO(2) and MWCNT on the electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose in 3M NaOH. This was possible via the formation of transitions of two redox pairs, viz. Ru(VI)/Ru(IV) and Ru(VII)/Ru(VI). A linear range of 0.5-50mM glucose and a limit of detection of 33 μM glucose (S/N=3) were observed. There was no significant interference observable from the traditional interferences, viz. ascorbic acid and uric acid. Indeed, results so obtained have indicated that the developed MWCNT-RuO(2)/CPE would pave the way for a better future to glucose sensor development as its fabrication was without the use of any enzyme. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Alkyl Chain Growth on a Transition Metal Center: How Does Iron Compare to Ruthenium and Osmium?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mala A. Sainna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Industrial Fischer-Tropsch processes involve the synthesis of hydrocarbons usually on metal surface catalysts. On the other hand, very few homogeneous catalysts are known to perform a Fischer-Tropsch style of reaction. In recent work, we established the catalytic properties of a diruthenium-platinum carbene complex, [(CpRu2(μ2-H (μ2-NHCH3(μ3-CPtCH3(P(CH332](COn+ with n = 0, 2 and Cp = η5-C5(CH35, and showed it to react efficiently by initial hydrogen atom transfer followed by methyl transfer to form an alkyl chain on the Ru-center. In particular, the catalytic efficiency was shown to increase after the addition of two CO molecules. As such, this system could be viewed as a potential homogeneous Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. Herein, we have engineered the catalytic center of the catalyst and investigated the reactivity of trimetal carbene complexes of the same type using iron, ruthenium and osmium at the central metal scaffold. The work shows that the reactivity should increase from diosmium to diruthenium to diiron; however, a non-linear trend is observed due to multiple factors contributing to the individual barrier heights. We identified all individual components of these reaction steps in detail and established the difference in reactivity of the various complexes.

  8. Ultrafast relaxation dynamics of amine-substituted bipyridyl ruthenium(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongwei; Wang, Xian; Yang, WenWen; He, Guiying; Kuang, Zhuoran; Li, Yang; Xia, Andong; Zhong, Yu-Wu; Kong, Fan'ao

    2017-09-01

    The excited state properties of a series of ruthenium(II) amine-substituted bipyridyl complexes, [Ru(bpy)n(NNbpy)3-n]2+, were investigated by steady-state and transient absorption spectroscopy, as well as quantum chemical calculations. The steady-state absorption spectra of these complexes in CH3CN show a distinct red-shift of the 1MLCT absorption with increasing numbers of amine substituent, whereas the emission spectra indicate an energy gap order of [Ru(bpy)3]2+ > [Ru(bpy)2(NNbpy)]2+ > [Ru(NNbpy)3]2+ > [Ru(bpy)(NNbpy)2]2+. Nanosecond, femtosecond transient absorption and electrochemical measurements suggest that NNbpy ligand has a strong influence on the electronic and emission properties of these complexes, due to electron-rich amine substituent. We illustrate how the numbers of amine substituent modulate the spectroscopic properties of transition metal complexes, which is related to the design of new electro-active systems with novel photoelectrochemical properties.

  9. Laser Spectroscopy of Ruthenium Containing Diatomic Molecules: RuH/D and RuP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Allan G.; Konder, Ricarda M.; Nickerson, Nicole M.; Linton, Colan; Tokaryk, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    In the last few years, the Cheung group in Hong Kong and the Steimle group in Arizona have successfully studied several ruthenium containing diatomic molecules, RuX (X =C, O, N, B, using the laser-ablation molecular jet technique. Based on this success, the UNB spectroscopy group decided to try and find the optical signatures of other RuX molecules. Using CH_3OH and PH_3 as reactant gases, the RuH and RuP diatomic molecules have been detected in surveys of the 420 - 675 nm spectral region. RuD has also been made using fully deuterated methanol as a reactant. Dispersed fluorescence experiments have been performed to determine ground state vibrational frequencies and the presence of any low-lying electronic states. Rotationally resolved spectra for these molecules have also been taken and the analysis is proceeding. The most recent results will be presented. F. Wang et al., Journal of Chemical Physics 139, 174318 (2013). N. Wang et al., Journal of Physical Chemistry A 117, 13279 (2013). T. Steimle et al., Journal of Chemical Physics 119, 12965 (2003). N. Wang et al., Chemical Physics Letters 547, 21 (2012).

  10. Alkyl Chain Growth on a Transition Metal Center: How Does Iron Compare to Ruthenium and Osmium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainna, Mala A.; de Visser, Sam P.

    2015-01-01

    Industrial Fischer-Tropsch processes involve the synthesis of hydrocarbons usually on metal surface catalysts. On the other hand, very few homogeneous catalysts are known to perform a Fischer-Tropsch style of reaction. In recent work, we established the catalytic properties of a diruthenium-platinum carbene complex, [(CpRu)2(μ2-H)(μ2-NHCH3)(μ3-C)PtCH3(P(CH3)3)2](CO)n+ with n = 0, 2 and Cp = η5-C5(CH3)5, and showed it to react efficiently by initial hydrogen atom transfer followed by methyl transfer to form an alkyl chain on the Ru-center. In particular, the catalytic efficiency was shown to increase after the addition of two CO molecules. As such, this system could be viewed as a potential homogeneous Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. Herein, we have engineered the catalytic center of the catalyst and investigated the reactivity of trimetal carbene complexes of the same type using iron, ruthenium and osmium at the central metal scaffold. The work shows that the reactivity should increase from diosmium to diruthenium to diiron; however, a non-linear trend is observed due to multiple factors contributing to the individual barrier heights. We identified all individual components of these reaction steps in detail and established the difference in reactivity of the various complexes. PMID:26426009

  11. Hydrous ruthenium oxide nanoparticles anchored to graphene and carbon nanotube hybrid foam for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Guo, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lee, I. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Ahmed, K. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Zhong, J. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Favors, Z. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Zaera, F. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Ozkan, M. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Ozkan, C. S [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2014-03-25

    In real life applications, supercapacitors (SCs) often can only be used as part of a hybrid system together with other high energy storage devices due to their relatively lower energy density in comparison to other types of energy storage devices such as batteries and fuel cells. Increasing the energy density of SCs will have a huge impact on the development of future energy storage devices by broadening the area of application for SCs. Here, we report a simple and scalable way of preparing a three-dimensional (3D) sub-5 nm hydrous ruthenium oxide (RuO₂) anchored graphene and CNT hybrid foam (RGM) architecture for high-performance supercapacitor electrodes. This RGM architecture demonstrates a novel graphene foam conformally covered with hybrid networks of RuO₂ nanoparticles and anchored CNTs. SCs based on RGM show superior gravimetric and per-area capacitive performance (specific capacitance: 502.78 F g⁻¹, areal capacitance: 1.11 F cm⁻²) which leads to an exceptionally high energy density of 39.28 Wh kg⁻¹ and power density of 128.01 kW kg⁻¹. The electrochemical stability, excellent capacitive performance, and the ease of preparation suggest this RGM system is promising for future energy storage applications.

  12. Ruthenium(III) diphenyldithiocarbamate as mediator for the electrocatalytic oxidation of sulfhydryl compounds at graphite electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalini, B.; Sriman Narayanan, S.

    1998-01-01

    Ruthenium(III) diphenyldithiocarbamate was used as mediator to modify graphite electrode by abrasive method. The modified electrode was characterized electrochemically by cyclic voltammetry. The electrode was scanned between 0.0 V to +0.8 V. An anodic peak at + 0.39 V and a cathodic peak at +0.24 V have been observed for a scan rate of 100 mV/s. The electrode has been characterized at various scan rate and pHs in 0.1 M KNO 3 solution. Sulfhydryl compounds, cysteine and glutathione, were electro catalytically oxidised at the modified electrode. pH variation was studied to optimize the conditions for their estimation. Linear response for cysteine is in the range of 0.00-15.20 ppm, with a correlation coefficient (r), of 0.9993. The linear range for glutathione is 0.00-30.40 ppm, with a value of 0.999 for r. The electrocatalytic oxidation of both cysteine and glutathione gave reproducible current values with a standard deviation of 0.1686 for 10 repetitive determinations. The stability and reproducibility of the electrode for the determination of cysteine and glutathione were also discussed. The electrocatalytic oxidation of the sulfhydryl compounds were also studied in hydrodynamic environment. (author)

  13. Ruthenium/Graphene-like Layered Carbon Composite as an Efficient Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Electrocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Lu, Jinfeng; Ai, Yuejie; Ji, Yongfei; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Wan, Lijun

    2016-12-28

    Efficient water splitting through electrocatalysis has been studied extensively in modern energy devices, while the development of catalysts with activity and stability comparable to those of Pt is still a great challenge. In this work, we successfully developed a facile route to synthesize graphene-like layered carbon (GLC) from a layered silicate template. The obtained GLC has layered structure similar to that of the template and can be used as support to load ultrasmall Ru nanoparticles on it in supercritical water. The specific structure and surface properties of GLC enable Ru nanoparticles to disperse highly uniformly on it even at a large loading amount (62 wt %). When the novel Ru/GLC was used as catalyst on a glass carbon electrode for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in a 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 solution, it exhibits an extremely low onset potential of only 3 mV and a small Tafel slope of 46 mV/decade. The outstanding performance proved that Ru/GLC is highly active catalyst for HER, comparable with transition-metal dichalcogenides or selenides. As the price of ruthenium is much lower than platinum, our study shows that Ru/GLC might be a promising candidate as an HER catalyst in future energy applications.

  14. Trapped in imidazole: how to accumulate multiple photoelectrons on a black-absorbing ruthenium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedler, Linda; Kupfer, Stephan; de Moraes, Inês Rabelo; Wächtler, Maria; Beckert, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen; Rau, Sven; Dietzek, Benjamin

    2014-03-24

    Ruthenium dyes incorporating a 4H-imidazole chromophore as a ligand exhibit a spectrally broad absorption in the UV/Vis region. Furthermore, they show the ability to store two electrons within the 4H-imidazole ligand. These features render them promising molecular systems, for example, as inter- or intramolecular electron relays. To optimize the structures with respect to their electron-storage capability, it is crucial to understand the impact of structural changes accompanying photoinduced charge transfer in the electronic intermediates of multistep electron-transfer processes. The photophysical properties of these (reactive) intermediates might impact the function of the molecular systems quite substantially. However, the spectroscopic study of short-lived intermediates in stepwise multielectron-transfer processes is experimentally challenging. To this end, this contribution reports on the electrochemical generation of anions identical to intermediate structures and their spectroscopic characterization by in situ resonance Raman and UV/Vis spectroelectrochemistry and computational methods. Thereby, an efficient two-electron pathway to the 4H-imidazole electron-accepting ligand is identified. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Photoconductivity enhancement and charge transport properties in ruthenium-containing block copolymer/carbon nanotube hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Kin Cheung; Hau, King In; Chan, Wai Kin

    2018-04-05

    Functional polymer/carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid materials can serve as a good model for light harvesting systems based on CNTs. This paper presents the synthesis of block copolymer/CNT hybrids and the characterization of their photocurrent responses by both experimental and computational approaches. A series of functional diblock copolymers was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerizations for the dispersion and functionalization of CNTs. The block copolymers contain photosensitizing ruthenium complexes and modified pyrene-based anchoring units. The photocurrent responses of the polymer/CNT hybrids were measured by photoconductive atomic force microscopy (PCAFM), from which the experimental data were analyzed by vigorous statistical models. The difference in photocurrent response among different hybrids was correlated to the conformations of the hybrids, which were elucidated by molecular dynamics simulations, and the electronic properties of polymers. The photoresponse of the block copolymer/CNT hybrids can be enhanced by introducing an electron-accepting block between the photosensitizing block and the CNT. We have demonstrated that the application of a rigorous statistical methodology can unravel the charge transport properties of these hybrid materials and provide general guidelines for the design of molecular light harvesting systems.

  16. Catalytic transformation of carbon dioxide and methane into syngas over ruthenium and platinum supported hydroxyapatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rêgo De Vasconcelos, Bruna; Zhao, Lulu; Sharrock, Patrick; Nzihou, Ange; Pham Minh, Doan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Formation of nanoparticles of Pt and Ru on hydroxyapatite surface support (HAP). • Pt catalyst more active and stable than Ru catalyst in dry reforming of methane (DRM). • Low carbon deposition on the surface of Pt catalyst after reaction. • Quantification of water as by-product of the reaction for the first time. • Good mass balance of the reaction. - Abstract: This work focused on the catalytic transformation of methane (CH 4 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into syngas (mixture of CO and H 2 ). Ruthenium- and platinum-based catalysts were prepared using hydroxyapatite (HAP) as catalyst support. Different methods for metal deposition were used including incipient wetness impregnation (IWI), excess liquid phase impregnation (LIM), and cationic exchange (CEX). Metal particle size varied in large range from less than 1 nm to dozens nm. All catalysts were active at 400–700 °C but only Pt catalyst prepared by IWI method (Pt/HAP IWI) was found stable. The catalytic performance of Pt/HAP IWI could be comparable with the literature data on noble metal-based catalysts, prepared on metal oxide supports. For the first time, water was experimentally quantified as a by-product of the reaction. This helped to correctly buckle the mass balance of the process.

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis of hydrous ruthenium oxide/graphene sheets for high-performance supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Na; Tian, Jianhua; Shan, Zhongqiang; Chen, Kuan; Liao, Wenming

    2013-01-01

    Ruthenium oxide particles were supported on graphene sheets (GS) by hydrothermal and low temperature annealing process. The GS was prepared from graphene oxide by an expansion process and different expanding temperatures were studied and polystyrene sulfonate sodium was used as dispersion agent of hydrophobic GS. Different Ru content of the RuO 2 /GS composites on the influence of the electrochemical properties was studied. Atomic force microscope analysis was applied to test the layers of GS. The morphology of GS and RuO 2 /GS composites were confirmed by field emission transmission electron microscopy analysis. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and liquid-nitrogen cryosorption were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the GS and RuO 2 /GS. The RuO 2 /GS (Ru:40 wt%) composites used as electrode materials of supercapacitors exhibited a specific capacitance of 551 F/g at 1 A/g in 1 M H 2 SO 4 electrolyte. Besides, both the rate capability and cycle performance of RuO 2 /GS composites had a great improvement compared with GS

  18. Stacking fault density and bond orientational order of fcc ruthenium nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Okkyun; Sakata, Osami; Kim, Jae Myung; Hiroi, Satoshi; Song, Chulho; Kumara, Loku Singgappulige Rosantha; Ohara, Koji; Dekura, Shun; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    We investigated crystal structure deviations of catalytic nanoparticles (NPs) using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. The samples were fcc ruthenium (Ru) NPs with diameters of 2.4, 3.5, 3.9, and 5.4 nm. We analyzed average crystal structures by applying the line profile method to a stacking fault model and local crystal structures using bond orientational order (BOO) parameters. The reflection peaks shifted depending on rules that apply to each stacking fault. We evaluated the quantitative stacking faults densities for fcc Ru NPs, and the stacking fault per number of layers was 2-4, which is quite large. Our analysis shows that the fcc Ru 2.4 nm-diameter NPs have a considerably high stacking fault density. The B factor tends to increase with the increasing stacking fault density. A structural parameter that we define from the BOO parameters exhibits a significant difference from the ideal value of the fcc structure. This indicates that the fcc Ru NPs are highly disordered.

  19. Cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates as catalyst prototypes for self-induced hydrogenation of carboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruto, Masayuki; Saito, Susumu

    2015-08-28

    Carboxylic acids are ubiquitous in bio-renewable and petrochemical sources of carbon. Hydrogenation of carboxylic acids to yield alcohols produces water as the only byproduct, and thus represents a possible next generation, sustainable method for the production of these alternative energy carriers/platform chemicals on a large scale. Reported herein are molecular insights into cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates ([Ru(OCOR)](+)) as prototypical catalysts for the hydrogenation of carboxylic acids. The substrate-derived coordinated carboxylate was found to function initially as a proton acceptor for the heterolytic cleavage of dihydrogen, and subsequently also as an acceptor for the hydride from [Ru-H](+), which was generated in the first step (self-induced catalysis). The hydrogenation proceeded selectively and at high levels of functional group tolerance, a feature that is challenging to achieve with existing heterogeneous/homogeneous catalyst systems. These fundamental insights are expected to significantly benefit the future development of metal carboxylate-catalysed hydrogenation processes of bio-renewable resources.

  20. Facile radiolytic synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles on graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, J.V., E-mail: jvrojas@vcu.edu [Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, 401 West Main Street, Richmond, Virginia, 23284 (United States); Toro-Gonzalez, M.; Molina-Higgins, M.C. [Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, 401 West Main Street, Richmond, Virginia, 23284 (United States); Castano, C.E., E-mail: cecastanolond@vcu.edu [Nanomaterials Core Characterization Facility, Chemical and Life Science Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, 601 West Main Street, Richmond, Virginia, 23284 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Facile radiolytic synthesis of Ru nanoparticles on graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes. • Homogeneously distributed Rh nanoparticles on supports are ∼2.5 nm in size. • Simultaneous reduction of graphene oxide and Ru ions occurs during the synthesis. • Ru-O bonds evidenced the interaction of the nanoparticles with the support. - Abstract: Ruthenium nanoparticles on pristine (MWCNT) and functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNT), and graphene oxide have been prepared through a facile, single step radiolytic method at room temperature, and ambient pressure. This synthesis process relies on the interaction of high energy gamma rays from a {sup 60}Co source with the water in the aqueous solutions containing the Ru precursor, leading to the generation of highly reducing species that further reduce the Ru metal ions to zero valence state. Transmission electron microscopy and X-Ray diffraction revealed that the nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed on the surface of the supports with an average size of ∼2.5 nm. X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that the interaction of the Ru nanoparticles with the supports occurred through oxygenated functionalities, creating metal-oxygen bonds. This method demonstrates to be a simple and clean approach to produce well dispersed nanoparticles on the aforementioned supports without the need of any hazardous chemical.