WorldWideScience

Sample records for heterogeneous subsurface environments

  1. Enhanced Groundwater Recharge Rates and Altered Recharge Sensitivity to Climate Variability Through Subsurface Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Andreas; Gleeson, Tom; Wada, Yoshihide; Wagener, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    Our environment is heterogeneous. In hydrological sciences, the heterogeneity of subsurface properties, such as hydraulic conductivities or porosities, exerts an important control on water balance. This notably includes groundwater recharge, which is an important variable for efficient and sustainable groundwater resources management. Current large-scale hydrological models do not adequately consider this subsurface heterogeneity. Here we show that regions with strong subsurface heterogeneity have enhanced present and future recharge rates due to a different sensitivity of recharge to climate variability compared with regions with homogeneous subsurface properties. Our study domain comprises the carbonate rock regions of Europe, Northern Africa, and the Middle East, which cover 25 of the total land area. We compare the simulations of two large-scale hydrological models, one of them accounting for subsurface heterogeneity. Carbonate rock regions strongly exhibit karstification, which is known to produce particularly strong subsurface heterogeneity. Aquifers from these regions contribute up to half of the drinking water supply for some European countries. Our results suggest that water management for these regions cannot rely on most of the presently available projections of groundwater recharge because spatially variable storages and spatial concentration of recharge result in actual recharge rates that are up to four times larger for present conditions and changes up to five times larger for potential future conditions than previously estimated. These differences in recharge rates for strongly heterogeneous regions suggest a need for groundwater management strategies that are adapted to the fast transit of water from the surface to the aquifers.

  2. The potential of imaging subsurface heterogeneities by local, natural earthquakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishitsuji, Y.; Doi, I.; Draganov, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a new imaging technique of subsurface heterogeneities that uses Sp-waves from natural earthquakes. This technique can be used as a first screening tool in frontier exploration areas before conventional active exploration. Analyzing Sp-waves from 28 earthquakes (Mj 2.0 to 4.2)

  3. Enhanced groundwater recharge rates and altered recharge sensitivity to climate variability through subsurface heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Andreas; Gleeson, Tom; Wagener, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    Our environment is heterogeneous. In hydrological sciences, the heterogeneity of subsurface properties, such as hydraulic conductivities or porosities, exerts an important control on water balance. This notably includes groundwater recharge, which is an important variable for efficient and sustainable groundwater resources management. Current large-scale hydrological models do not adequately consider this subsurface heterogeneity. Here we show that regions with strong subsurface heterogeneity have enhanced present and future recharge rates due to a different sensitivity of recharge to climate variability compared with regions with homogeneous subsurface properties. Our study domain comprises the carbonate rock regions of Europe, Northern Africa, and the Middle East, which cover ∼25% of the total land area. We compare the simulations of two large-scale hydrological models, one of them accounting for subsurface heterogeneity. Carbonate rock regions strongly exhibit “karstification,” which is known to produce particularly strong subsurface heterogeneity. Aquifers from these regions contribute up to half of the drinking water supply for some European countries. Our results suggest that water management for these regions cannot rely on most of the presently available projections of groundwater recharge because spatially variable storages and spatial concentration of recharge result in actual recharge rates that are up to four times larger for present conditions and changes up to five times larger for potential future conditions than previously estimated. These differences in recharge rates for strongly heterogeneous regions suggest a need for groundwater management strategies that are adapted to the fast transit of water from the surface to the aquifers. PMID:28242703

  4. RADIOIODINE GEOCHEMISTRY IN THE SRS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.; Emerson, H.; Powell, B.; Roberts, K.; Zhang, S.; Xu, C.; Schwer, K.; Li, H.; Ho, Y.; Denham, M.; Yeager, C.; Santschi, P.

    2013-05-16

    Iodine-129 is one of the key risk drivers for several Savannah River Site (SRS) performance assessments (PA), including that for the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility in E-Area. In an effort to reduce the uncertainty associated with the conceptual model and the input values used in PA, several studies have recently been conducted dealing with radioiodine geochemistry at the SRS. The objective of this report was to review these recent studies and evaluate their implications on SRS PA calculations. For the first time, these studies measured iodine speciation in SRS groundwater and provided technical justification for assuming the presence of more strongly sorbing species (iodate and organo-iodine), and measured greater iodine sediment sorption when experiments included these newly identified species; specifically they measured greater sorption coefficients (K{sub d} values: the concentration ratio of iodine on the solid phase divided by the concentration in the aqueous phase). Based on these recent studies, new best estimates were proposed for future PA calculations. The new K{sub d} values are greater than previous recommended values. These proposed K{sub d} values reflect a better understanding of iodine geochemistry in the SRS subsurface environment, which permits reducing the associated conservatism included in the original estimates to account for uncertainty. Among the key contributing discoveries supporting the contention that the K{sub d} values should be increased are that: 1) not only iodide (I{sup -}), but also the more strongly sorbing iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}) species exists in SRS groundwater (average total iodine = 15% iodide, 42% iodate, and 43% organoiodine), 2) when iodine was added as iodate, the measured K{sub d} values were 2 to 6 times greater than when the iodine was added as iodide, and perhaps most importantly, 3) higher desorption (10 to 20 mL/g) than (ad)sorption (all previous studies) K{sub d} values were measured. The implications of this

  5. Subsurface high-resolution definition of subsurface heterogeneity for understanding the biodynamics of natural field systems: Advancing the ability for scaling to field conditions. 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, E.L.

    1997-01-01

    'This research is an integrated physical (geophysical and hydrologic) and microbial study using innovative geophysical imaging and microbial characterization methods to identify key scales of physical heterogeneities that affect the biodynamics of natural subsurface environments. Data from controlled laboratory and in situ experiments at the INEEL Test Area North (TAN) site are being used to determine the dominant physical characteristics (lithologic, structural, and hydrologic) that can be imaged in situ and correlated with microbial properties. Emphasis is being placed on identifying fundamental scales of variation of physical parameters that control transport behavior relative to predicting subsurface microbial dynamics. The outcome will be an improved understanding of the relationship between physical and microbial heterogeneity, thus facilitating the design of bioremediation strategies in similar environments. This work is an extension of basic research on natural heterogeneity first initiated within the DOE/OHER Subsurface Science Program (SSP) and is intended to be one of the building blocks of an integrated and collaborative approach with an INEEL/PNNL effort aimed at understanding the effect of physical heterogeneity on transport properties and biodynamics in natural systems. The work is closely integrated with other EMSP projects at INEEL (Rick Colwell et al.) and PNNL (Fred Brockman and Jim Fredrickson).'

  6. Subsurface high resolution definition of subsurface heterogeneity for understanding the biodynamics of natural field systems: Advancing the ability for scaling to field conditions. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, E.L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (US); Brockman, F.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US)

    1998-06-01

    'This research is an integrated physical (geophysical and hydrologic) and microbial study using innovative geophysical imaging and microbial characterization methods to identify key scales of physical heterogeneities that affect the biodynamics of natural subsurface environments. Data from controlled laboratory and in-situ experiments at the INEEL Test Area North (TAN) site are being used to determine the dominant physical characteristics (lithologic, structural, and hydrologic) that can be imaged in-situ and correlated with microbial properties. The overall goal of this research is to contribute to the understanding of the interrelationships between transport properties and spatially varying physical, chemical, and microbiological heterogeneity. The outcome will be an improved understanding of the relationship between physical and microbial heterogeneity, thus facilitating the design of bioremediation strategies in similar environments. This report summarizes work as of May 1998, the second year of the project. This work is an extension of basic research on natural heterogeneity first initiated within the DOE/OHER Subsurface Science Program (SSP) and is intended to be one of the building blocks of an integrated and collaborative approach with an INEEL/PNNL effort aimed at understanding the effect of physical heterogeneity on transport properties and biodynamics in natural systems. The work is closely integrated with other EMSP projects at INEEL (Rick Colwell et al.) and PNNL (Fred Brockman and Jim Fredrickson).'

  7. Microbial activities in deep subsurface environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, T.J.; Raione, E.G.; White, D.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Inst. for Applied Microbiology]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., Knoxville, TN (United States); Fliermans, C.B. [E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Plant

    1988-12-31

    Activities of microorganisms residing in terrestrial deep subsurface sediments were examined in forty-six sediment samples from three aseptically sampled boreholes. Radiolabeled time course experiments assessing in situ microbial activities were initiated within 30 minutes of core recovery. [{sup 14}C-1-] Acetate incorporation into lipids. [methyl-{sup 3}H-]thymidine incorporation into DNA, [{sup 14}C-2-]acetate and [{sup 14}C-U-]glucose mineralization in addition to microbial enrichment and enumeration studies were examined in surface and subsurface sediments. Surface soils contained the greatest biomass and activities followed by the shallow aquifer zones. Water saturated subsurface sediments exhibited three to four orders of magnitude greater activity and culturable microorganisms than the dense clay zones. Regardless of depth, sediments which contained more than 20% clays exhibited the lowest activities and culturable microorganisms.

  8. Subsurface Environment Sampler for Improved In Situ Characterization of Subsurface Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, E. P.; Ruppert, L. F.; Orem, W. H.; McIntosh, J. C.; Cunningham, A. B.; Fields, M. W.; Hiebert, R.; Hyatt, R.

    2016-12-01

    There is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by the extraction and transport of fossil fuels. This threat increases the need for improved groundwater monitoring and the ability to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. The characterization of subsurface microbial communities could provide an ideal biomonitoring tool for the assessment of subsurface contamination due to prokaryotes environmental ubiquity, rapidity of response to environmental perturbation and the important role they play in hydrocarbon degradation and bioremediation. New DNA sequencing technologies provide the opportunity to cost-effectively identify the vast subsurface microbial ecosystem, but use of this new technology is restricted due to issues with sampling. Prior subsurface microbiology studies have relied on core samples that are expensive to obtain hard to collect aseptically and/or ground water samples that do not reflect in situ microbial densities or activities. The development of down-well incubation of sterile sediment with a Diffusive Microbial Sampler (DMS) has emerged as an alternative method to sample subsurface microbial communities that minimizes cost and contamination issues associated with traditional methods. We have designed a Subsurface Environment Sampler with a DMS module that could enable the anaerobic transport of the in situ microbial community from the field for laboratory bioremediation studies. This sampler could provide an inexpensive and standard method for subsurface microbial sampling which would make this tool useful for Federal, State, private and local agencies interested in monitoring contamination or the effectiveness of bioremediation activities in subsurface aquifers.

  9. Variability of soil potential for biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a heterogeneous subsurface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Andreas Houlberg; Poulsen, Tjalfe; Mortensen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    for biodegradation was highly variable, which from autoregressive state-space modeling was partly explained by changes in soil air-filled porosity and gravimetric water content. The results suggest considering biological heterogeneity when evaluating the fate of contaminants in the subsurface....

  10. Characterizing subsurface hydraulic heterogeneity of alluvial fan using riverstage fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Li; Yeh, Tian-Chyi Jim; Wen, Jet-Chau; Huang, Shao-Yang; Zha, Yuanyuan; Tsai, Jui-Pin; Hao, Yonghong; Liang, Yue

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the ability of riverstage tomography to estimate 2-D spatial distribution of hydraulic diffusivity (D) of Zhuoshui River alluvial fan, Taiwan, using groundwater level data from 65 wells and stream stage data from 5 gauging stations. In order to accomplish this objective, wavelet analysis is first conducted to investigate the temporal characteristics of groundwater level, precipitation, and stream stage. The results of the analysis show that variations of groundwater level and stream stage are highly correlated over seasonal and annual periods while that between precipitation is less significant. Subsequently, spatial cross-correlation between seasonal variations of groundwater level and riverstage data is analyzed. It is found that the correlation contour map reflects the pattern of sediment distribution of the fan. This finding is further substantiated by the cross-correlation analysis using both noisy and noise-free groundwater and riverstage data of a synthetic aquifer, where aquifer heterogeneity is known exactly. The ability of riverstage tomography is then tested with these synthetic data sets to estimate D distribution. Finally, the riverstage tomography is applied to the alluvial fan. The results of the application reveal that the apex and southeast of the alluvial fan are regions with relatively high D and the D values gradually decrease toward the shoreline of the fan. In addition, D at northern alluvial fan is slightly larger than that at southern. These findings are consistent with the geologic evolution of this alluvial fan.

  11. Transfers in heterogeneous environments; Transferts en milieux heterogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flesselles, J.M. [Saint-Gobain Recherche, 93 - Aubervilliers (France); Gouesbet, G.; Mees, L.; Roze, C.; Girasole, Th.; Grehan, G. [Laboratoire d' Electromagnetisme et Systemes Particulaires (LESP), UMR CNRS 6614, CORIA. Universite de Rouen et INSA de Rouen, 76 - Saint-Etienne du Rouvray (France); Goyheneche, J.M.; Vignoles, G.; Coindreau, O. [Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux (LCTS), UMR 5801, 33 - Pessac (France); Moyne, Ch. [LEMTA (UMR 7563) CNRS-INPL-UHP, 54 - Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Coussy, O. [Institut Navier - ENPC, 77 - Marne-la-Vallee (France); Lassabatere, Th. [Electricite de France Les Renardieres, Dept. Materiaux Mecanique des Composants, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France); Tadrist, L. [IUSTI - UMR 6595, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers the articles and transparencies of the invited talks given at the 2004 French congress of thermal engineering about transfers in heterogeneous environment. Content: transfer phenomena in industrial glass furnaces; simple and multiple scattering diagnosis by femto-second pulsed laser: application to particulate diagnoses; thermal modeling of thermo-structural composites; hybrid mixtures theory, average volumic measurement, periodical or stochastic homogenization: advance in scale change processes; thermo-hydro-chemical-mechanical coupling in porous medium: application to young concrete structures and to clay barriers of disposal facilities; transfers and flows in fluidization: recent advances and future challenges. (J.S.)

  12. Change in ocean subsurface environment to suppress tropical cyclone intensification under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping; Lin, I. -I; Chou, Chia; Huang, Rong-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are hazardous natural disasters. Because TC intensification is significantly controlled by atmosphere and ocean environments, changes in these environments may cause changes in TC intensity. Changes in surface and subsurface ocean conditions can both influence a TC's intensification. Regarding global warming, minimal exploration of the subsurface ocean has been undertaken. Here we investigate future subsurface ocean environment changes projected by 22 state-of-the-art climate models and suggest a suppressive effect of subsurface oceans on the intensification of future TCs. Under global warming, the subsurface vertical temperature profile can be sharpened in important TC regions, which may contribute to a stronger ocean coupling (cooling) effect during the intensification of future TCs. Regarding a TC, future subsurface ocean environments may be more suppressive than the existing subsurface ocean environments. This suppressive effect is not spatially uniform and may be weak in certain local areas. PMID:25982028

  13. Final report for grant number DE-FG02-06ER64244 to the University of Idaho (RW Smith)-coupling between flow and precipitation in heterogeneous subsurface environments and effects on contaminant fate and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W. [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Beig, Mikala S. [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gebrehiwet, Tsigabu [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Corriveau, Catherine E. [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Redden, George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fujita, Yoshiko [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2010-06-18

    Engineered remediation strategies for inducing mineral precipitation in the subsurface typically involve the introduction of at least one reactant either by direct injection or by in situ generation. The localization of reactant sources means a wide range of saturation states and ion ratios will be created as reactants are mixed: These conditions together can result in a wide range of precipitation rates, as well as impact which mineral phase precipitates. This is potentially important for the capacity of the precipitates to take up of trace metal contaminants, for their long term stability. Aragonite, for example, is able to sequester a larger amount of Sr than calcite. However, aragonite is less stable under typical groundwater conditions, and so may release sequestered Sr over time as the aragonite transforms to a more stable phase. In addition, previous experimental studies have indicated that other system constituents may influence calcium carbonate precipitation and consequently the Sr uptake potential of a system. For example, dissolved organic carbon (at levels typical of groundwaters) can suppress crystal growth. As a result, the continuous nucleation of small crystals, rather than growth of existing crystals, may be the dominant mode of precipitation. This has the potential for greater uptake of Sr because the smaller crystal sizes associated with nucleated calcite may more readily accommodate the distortion resulting from substitution of the larger Sr ion for Ca ions than can larger crystals. However, these smaller crystals may also be less stable and over the long term release Sr as a result of Ostwald ripening. To better understand the formation and composition of relevant calcium carbonate mineral phases two related series of mineral precipitation experiments were conducted. The first series of experiments, conducted using a Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) operated at steady state rates of precipitation was focused on understanding the

  14. Media Distribution in Heterogeneous Environments using IP-Multicast

    OpenAIRE

    Parnes, Peter

    1998-01-01

    This document discusses problems and solutions around distribution of media in heterogeneous environments when using IP-multicast. This document discusses problems and solutions around distribution of media in heterogeneous environments when using IP-multicast.

  15. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    such couplings provide important insight into the strength of interaction between photo-active pigments in protein-pigment complexes. Recently, attention has been payed to how the environment modifies or even controls the electronic couplings. To enable such theoretical predictions, a fully polarizable embedding......-order multipole moments. We use this extended model to systematically examine three different ways of obtaining EET couplings in a heterogeneous medium ranging from use of the exact transition density to a point-dipole approximation. Several interesting observations are made including that explicit use...... of transition densities in the calculation of the electronic couplings - also when including the explicit environment contribution - can be replaced by a much simpler transition point charge description without comprising the quality of the model predictions....

  16. Potential impact of soil microbial heterogeneity on the persistence of hydrocarbons in contaminated subsurface soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleer, Sam; Adetutu, Eric M; Weber, John; Ball, Andrew S; Juhasz, Albert L

    2014-04-01

    In situ bioremediation is potentially a cost effective treatment strategy for subsurface soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, however, limited information is available regarding the impact of soil spatial heterogeneity on bioremediation efficacy. In this study, we assessed issues associated with hydrocarbon biodegradation and soil spatial heterogeneity (samples designated as FTF 1, 5 and 8) from a site in which in situ bioremediation was proposed for hydrocarbon removal. Test pit activities showed similarities in FTF soil profiles with elevated hydrocarbon concentrations detected in all soils at 2 m below ground surface. However, PCR-DGGE-based cluster analysis showed that the bacterial community in FTF 5 (at 2 m) was substantially different (53% dissimilar) and 2-3 fold more diverse than communities in FTF 1 and 8 (with 80% similarity). When hydrocarbon degrading potential was assessed, differences were observed in the extent of (14)C-benzene mineralisation under aerobic conditions with FTF 5 exhibiting the highest hydrocarbon removal potential compared to FTF 1 and 8. Further analysis indicated that the FTF 5 microbial community was substantially different from other FTF samples and dominated by putative hydrocarbon degraders belonging to Pseudomonads, Xanthomonads and Enterobacteria. However, hydrocarbon removal in FTF 5 under anaerobic conditions with nitrate and sulphate electron acceptors was limited suggesting that aerobic conditions were crucial for hydrocarbon removal. This study highlights the importance of assessing available microbial capacity prior to bioremediation and shows that the site's spatial heterogeneity can adversely affect the success of in situ bioremediation unless area-specific optimizations are performed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Adapting RRT growth for heterogeneous environments

    KAUST Repository

    Denny, Jory

    2013-11-01

    Rapidly-exploring Random Trees (RRTs) are effective for a wide range of applications ranging from kinodynamic planning to motion planning under uncertainty. However, RRTs are not as efficient when exploring heterogeneous environments and do not adapt to the space. For example, in difficult areas an expensive RRT growth method might be appropriate, while in open areas inexpensive growth methods should be chosen. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm, Adaptive RRT, that adapts RRT growth to the current exploration area using a two level growth selection mechanism. At the first level, we select groups of expansion methods according to the visibility of the node being expanded. Second, we use a cost-sensitive learning approach to select a sampler from the group of expansion methods chosen. Also, we propose a novel definition of visibility for RRT nodes which can be computed in an online manner and used by Adaptive RRT to select an appropriate expansion method. We present the algorithm and experimental analysis on a broad range of problems showing not only its adaptability, but efficiency gains achieved by adapting exploration methods appropriately. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Microbial Transport and Fate in the Subsurface Environment: Introduction to the Special Section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A; Schijven, Jack; Harter, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Microorganisms constitute an almost exclusive form of life in the earth's subsurface environment (not including caves), particularly at depths exceeding the soil horizon. While of broad interest to ecology and geology, scientific interest in the fate and transport of microorganisms, particularly those introduced through the anthropogenic environment, has focused on understanding the subsurface environment as a pathway for human pathogens and on optimizing the use of microbial organisms for remediation of potable groundwater. This special section, inspired by the 2014 Ninth International Symposium for Subsurface Microbiology, brings together recent efforts to better understand the spatiotemporal occurrence of anthropogenic microbial groundwater contamination and the fate and transport of microbes in the subsurface environment: in soils, deep unsaturated zones, and within aquifer systems. Work includes field reconnaissance, controlled laboratory studies to improve our understanding of specific fate and transport processes, and the development and application of improved mechanistic understanding of microbial fate and transport processes in the subsurface environment. The findings confirm and also challenge the limitations of our current understanding of highly complex microbial fate and transport processes across spatiotemporal scales in the subsurface environment; they also add to the increasing knowledge base to improve our ability to protect drinking water resources and perform in situ environmental remediation. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  19. Joint hydrogeological and hydrogeophysical models to map subsurface heterogeneity and to model transport processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Laura; Giudici, Mauro; De Franco, Roberto; Mele, Mauro; Vassena, Chiara

    2014-05-01

    Hydraulic conductivity and electrical resistivity of the alluvial sediments depend, among the others, on textures and soil saturation. Characterization of the subsurface heterogeneity and monitoring the dynamics of groundwater can be accomplished by the collection of geoelectrical and hydraulic data and by the joint modeling of the corresponding physical processes. A research project, during which it has been developing an interpretative tool that profits from DC geoelectrical and hydraulic measurements, aims to provide a further step towards this objective. Two original computer codes, both based on conservative finite differences schemes, have been developed to solve the hydrological (YAGMOD) and the geoelectrical (YAELMOD) forward problems. The subsurface is considered to be subdivided in hydro-geo-bodies, which are regions occupied by geological materials (hydro-geo-facies, HGF) which share the same geoelectrical and hydrodynamic characteristics, namely phenomenological laws that relate electrical resistivity and hydraulic conductivity to texture, soil saturation and pore water conductivity, through specific phenomenological parameters for each HGF. If the spatial distribution of HGFs is estimated from a collection of lithological data (e.g. boreholes) and if the spatial distribution of soil saturation and pore water conductivity is known, then the hydraulic conductivity and electrical resistivity fields could be reconstructed. The developed interpretative tool could then apply an iterative procedure that repeatedly solves the hydraulic and electrical forward problem for different stress condition of the aquifer by changing the estimated HGF parameters, as a basic step to match experimental data with model outcomes, by the application of an approach based on the Kalman filter. In particular the goal of this presentation is to assess the sensitivity of some of the model features on the results and on the capability of the interpretative tool. The focus is on a

  20. Effects of Heterogeneities, Sampling Frequencies, Tools and Methods on Uncertainties in Subsurface Contaminant Concentration Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzedine, S. M.; McNab, W. W.

    2007-12-01

    Long-term monitoring (LTM) is particularly important for contaminants which are mitigated by natural processes of dilution, dispersion, and degradation. At many sites, LTM can require decades of expensive sampling at tens or even hundreds of existing monitoring wells, resulting in hundreds of thousands, or millions of dollars per year for sampling and data management. Therefore, contaminant sampling tools, methods and frequencies are chosen to minimize waste and data management costs while ensuring a reliable and informative time-history of contaminant measurement for regulatory compliance. The interplay play between cause (i.e. subsurface heterogeneities, sampling techniques, measurement frequencies) and effect (unreliable data and measurements gap) has been overlooked in many field applications which can lead to inconsistencies in time- histories of contaminant samples. In this study we address the relationship between cause and effect for different hydrogeological sampling settings: porous and fractured media. A numerical model has been developed using AMR-FEM to solve the physicochemical processes that take place in the aquifer and the monitoring well. In the latter, the flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations while in the former the flow is governed by the diffusivity equation; both are fully coupled to mimic stressed conditions and to assess the effect of dynamic sampling tool on the formation surrounding the monitoring well. First of all, different sampling tools (i.e., Easy Pump, Snapper Grab Sampler) were simulated in a monitoring well screened in different homogeneous layered aquifers to assess their effect on the sampling measurements. Secondly, in order to make the computer runs more CPU efficient the flow in the monitoring well was replaced by its counterpart flow in porous media with infinite permeability and the new model was used to simulate the effect of heterogeneities, sampling depth, sampling tool and sampling frequencies on the

  1. Analyses of heterogeneous deformation and subsurface fatigue crack generation in alpha titanium alloy at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umezawa, Osamu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama, 240-8501 (Japan); Morita, Motoaki [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama, 240-8501, Japan and Now Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Yuasa, Takayuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama, 240-8501, Japan and Now Nippon Steel and Sumitomo Metal, Kashima, 314-0014 (Japan); Morooka, Satoshi [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama, 240-8501, Japan and Now Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hino, Tokyo 191-0065 (Japan); Ono, Yoshinori; Yuri, Tetsumi; Ogata, Toshio [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-01-27

    Subsurface crack initiation in high-cycle fatigue has been detected as (0001) transgranular facet in titanium alloys at low temperature. The discussion on the subsurface crack generation was reviewed. Analyses by neutron diffraction and full constraints model under tension mode as well as crystallographic identification of the facet were focused. The accumulated tensile stress along <0001> may be responsible to initial microcracking on (0001) and the crack opening.

  2. Effective sensing approach for assessment and monitoring of in-situ biodegradation in a subsurface environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong X.

    1999-02-01

    Rapid assessment and monitoring of biological conditions in a subsurface environment is becoming more and more important as bioremediation approaches become widely used in environmental cleanup. Remediation monitoring is also more challenging for in-situ remedial approaches, such as bioventing, biosparging, or passive bioremediation, where conventional 'inlet' and 'outlet' monitoring can no longer be applied. A sensing approach using subsurface chemical sensors offers a cost- effective alternative for remediation monitoring. Additional benefits of deploying subsurface sensors include continuous and unattended measurement with minimum disturbance to the subsurface condition. In a series of field studies, an electrochemical oxygen sensor, a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) carbon dioxide sensor, and two hydrocarbons sensors were employed for monitoring in-situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. Biodegradation rates were effectively measured through an in-situ respiration measurement using subsurface oxygen and carbon dioxide sensors. The high sensitivity of the carbon dioxide sensor to small change in the concentration enables rapid respiration measurements. Subsurface hydrocarbon sensors offer a means to monitor the progress of remediation and the migration of contaminant vapors during the remediation. The chemical sensors tested are clearly cost effective for remediation monitoring. The strengths of oxygen and carbon dioxide sensors are complimentary to each other. Strengths and limitations of different hydrocarbon sensors were also noted. Balancing cost and performance of sensors is crucial for environmental remediation application.

  3. [Influences of matter variations on pollution buffer capacity of landfill leachate polluted subsurface environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Zhao, Yong-sheng; Zhou, Rui; Hong, Mei; Zhang, Wei-hong; Zhu, Zhi-guo

    2009-12-01

    Columns filled with fine sand were constructed to investigate influences of subsurface environment and main constituent variations caused by landfill leachate pollution on pH buffer capacity and redox buffer capacity of sediments. Experimental results indicated that the subsurface environment had significant impacts on pH and redox buffer capacity. The pH buffer capacity increased 12.4%, 10.8%, 19.8% and 11.1% in MGZ/SRZ, IRZ, NRZ and ORZ compared with background value, respectively. pH buffer and redox buffer were interaction and inter-promotion, which influenced natural attenuation processes of pollutants in subsurface directly. Content of iron oxides, organic substrate, SOC2(2-) and NH4+ -N in sediments had different impacts on pH buffer and redox buffer capacity, and the overall pollution buffer capacity of system was comprehensive results of constituents.

  4. Microbial transformations of natural organic compounds and radionuclides in subsurface environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, A.J.

    1985-10-01

    A major national concern in the subsurface disposal of energy wastes is the contamination of ground and surface waters by waste leachates containing radionuclides, toxic metals, and organic compounds. Microorganisms play an important role in the transformation of organic compounds, radionuclides, and toxic metals present in the waste and affect their mobility in subsurface environments. Microbial processes involved in dissolution, mobilization, and immobilization of toxic metals under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are briefly reviewed. Metal complexing agents and several organic acids produced by microbial action affect mobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in subsurface environments. Information on the persistence of and biodegradation rates of synthetic as well as microbiologically produced complexing agents is scarce but important in determining the mobility of metal organic complexes in subsoils. Several gaps in knowledge in the area of microbial transformation of naturally occurring organics, radionuclides, and toxic metals have been identified, and further basic research has been suggested. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. Job Scheduling in a Heterogeneous Grid Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Hong-Zhang; Smith, Warren; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    2004-01-01

    Computational grids have the potential for solving large-scale scientific problems using heterogeneous and geographically distributed resources. However, a number of major technical hurdles must be overcome before this potential can be realized. One problem that is critical to effective utilization of computational grids is the efficient scheduling of jobs. This work addresses this problem by describing and evaluating a grid scheduling architecture and three job migration algorithms. The architecture is scalable and does not assume control of local site resources. The job migration policies use the availability and performance of computer systems, the network bandwidth available between systems, and the volume of input and output data associated with each job. An extensive performance comparison is presented using real workloads from leading computational centers. The results, based on several key metrics, demonstrate that the performance of our distributed migration algorithms is significantly greater than that of a local scheduling framework and comparable to a non-scalable global scheduling approach.

  6. Microbial (per)chlorate reduction in hot subsurface environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebensteiner, M.

    2014-01-01

     

    The microbial reduction of chlorate and perchlorate has been known for long as a respiratory process of mesophilic bacteria that thrive in diverse environments such as soils, marine and freshwater sediments. Chlorate and perchlorate are found in nature deriving from anthropogenic and

  7. Higher rates of sex evolve in spatially heterogeneous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becks, Lutz; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2010-11-04

    The evolution and maintenance of sexual reproduction has puzzled biologists for decades. Although this field is rich in hypotheses, experimental evidence is scarce. Some important experiments have demonstrated differences in evolutionary rates between sexual and asexual populations; other experiments have documented evolutionary changes in phenomena related to genetic mixing, such as recombination and selfing. However, direct experiments of the evolution of sex within populations are extremely rare (but see ref. 12). Here we use the rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, which is capable of both sexual and asexual reproduction, to test recent theory predicting that there is more opportunity for sex to evolve in spatially heterogeneous environments. Replicated experimental populations of rotifers were maintained in homogeneous environments, composed of either high- or low-quality food habitats, or in heterogeneous environments that consisted of a mix of the two habitats. For populations maintained in either type of homogeneous environment, the rate of sex evolves rapidly towards zero. In contrast, higher rates of sex evolve in populations experiencing spatially heterogeneous environments. The data indicate that the higher level of sex observed under heterogeneity is not due to sex being less costly or selection against sex being less efficient; rather sex is sufficiently advantageous in heterogeneous environments to overwhelm its inherent costs. Counter to some alternative theories for the evolution of sex, there is no evidence that genetic drift plays any part in the evolution of sex in these populations.

  8. A review of heterogeneous sediments in coastal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, K. T.; Elmore, P. A.

    2008-08-01

    The influence of heterogeneous sediment properties on coastal processes is commonly underestimated due to the difficulty in characterizing and quantifying these types of sediments. Careful examination of previous research reveals that not only is sediment heterogeneity significant in terms of its impact on coastal processes, but that heterogeneous sedimentary environments comprise the majority of the world's coasts. Using geologic and oceanographic field descriptions as a guide, we define sediment heterogeneity to include mixed grain sizes or types, spatial diversity in sediment properties and bedforms, and/or rapidly changing sediment characteristics. We categorize the dominant heterogeneous environments as 1) gravel-sand coasts, 2) sorted bedform fields, 3) sand-ridge fields, 4) cheniers, 5) mud transgressed coasts, 6) mixed tidal flats, and 7) graded foreshores and surf zones. We also specifically tabulate numerical ranges of sediment heterogeneity within each category. These categorizations exemplify the numerous natural patterns of important sediment variability and suggest that environmental characterizations that generalize complexity in terms of simplified descriptions, such as median grain size, are insufficient to describe the influence of many coastal sediments.

  9. Battlespace Awareness: Heterogeneous Sensor Maps of Large Scale, Complex Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-13

    Simple Way to Prevent Neural Networks from Overfitting.” In: Journal of Machine Learning Research 15.1 (2014), pp. 1929–1958. [133] Art B Owen. “A robust...Awareness: Heterogeneous Sensor Maps of Large-Scale, Complex Sb. GRANT NUMBER Environments Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER... environment . Until recently, these maps were restricted to sparse, 2D representations due to computational, memory, and sensor limitations. With the

  10. Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Pt. 2; Microbes and the subsurface environment for MEOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khire, J.M.; Khan, M.I. (National Chemical Lab., Pune (India). Div. of Biochemical Sciences)

    1994-03-01

    In Part 1 of this review, the importance of microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) was stressed along with the historical background and proposed mechanisms involved in MEOR. In this second part the main focus is on the types of organisms used, the effect of the subsurface environment, and future work in the MEOR process. MEOR is a multidisciplinary process that includes chemistry, microbiology, chemical engineering, geotechnical engineering, genetic engineering, and environmental engineering. (Author)

  11. Mobility management for SIP sessions in a heterogeneous network environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romijn, Willem A.; Plas, Dirk-Jaap; Bijwaard, D.; Meeuwissen, Erik; van Ooijen, Gijs

    2004-01-01

    The next generation of communication networks is expected to create a heterogeneous network environment encompassing an ever-increasing number of different access networks and end-user terminals that will enable the introduction of and provide access to numerous feature-rich end-user services. It is

  12. Graph Partitioning for Parallel Applications in Heterogeneous Grid Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisws, Rupak; Kumar, Shailendra; Das, Sajal K.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The problem of partitioning irregular graphs and meshes for parallel computations on homogeneous systems has been extensively studied. However, these partitioning schemes fail when the target system architecture exhibits heterogeneity in resource characteristics. With the emergence of technologies such as the Grid, it is imperative to study the partitioning problem taking into consideration the differing capabilities of such distributed heterogeneous systems. In our model, the heterogeneous system consists of processors with varying processing power and an underlying non-uniform communication network. We present in this paper a novel multilevel partitioning scheme for irregular graphs and meshes, that takes into account issues pertinent to Grid computing environments. Our partitioning algorithm, called MiniMax, generates and maps partitions onto a heterogeneous system with the objective of minimizing the maximum execution time of the parallel distributed application. For experimental performance study, we have considered both a realistic mesh problem from NASA as well as synthetic workloads. Simulation results demonstrate that MiniMax generates high quality partitions for various classes of applications targeted for parallel execution in a distributed heterogeneous environment.

  13. Novel Archaea and Bacteria in a hydrologically isolated deep subsurface environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Brockman, Fred J.; Fredrickson, James K.

    1997-07-01

    Total community DNA and RNA were extracted from a deep (188 m), saturated, mesophilic (17 degree(s)C), low biomass (10(superscript 4) cells g(superscript -1)) subsurface paleosol. 16S rDNA was amplified by PCR using universal eubacterial or archaeal primers and cloned. Cloned 16S rDNA fragments were sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. A novel clade of Crenarchaea were discovered which are most closely related to a single clone recovered from an Fe-S hot spring (80 degree(s)C). Novel Bacterial sequences were also found which branch deeply in the universal phylogenetic tree in association with Chloroflexus, Deinococcus, and Thermus. Total RNA analysis suggested that the novel Crenarchaea were active in this environment. Geological and hydrologic properties of the sediment indicate that microbial and nutrient transport between individual strata are restricted, and are consistent with chemolithoautotrophic metabolisms of cultured Crenarchaea involving the H(subscript 2)/SO(subscript 4) electron donor/acceptor couple. The physical properties of the surrounding lithologies suggest that these novel microorganisms are descendants of the microbial communities originally deposited with the sediment ca. 6 - 8 Mya. Identification of these novel, active microorganisms in an oligotrophic, hydrologically isolated subsurface system provides an opportunity and species-specific nucleic acid sequences and probes necessary to study long-term microbial survival in terrestrial subsurface environments.

  14. Microbial Fossils from Terrestrial Subsurface Hydrothermal Environments: Examples and Implications for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Beda A.; Farmer, Jack; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The recognition of biological signatures in ancient epithermal deposits has special relevance for studies of early blaspheme evolution and in exploring for past life on Mars. Recently, proposals for the existence of an extensive subsurface blaspheme on Earth, dominated by chemoautotrophic microbial life, has gained prominence. However, reports of fossilized microbial remains, or biosedimentary structures (e.g. stromatolites) from the deposits of ancient subsurface systems, are rare. Microbial preservation is favoured where high population densities co-exist with rapid mineral precipitation. Near-surface epithetical systems with strong gradients in temperature and redox are good candidates for the abundant growth and fossilization of microorganisms, and are also favorable environments for the precipitation of ore minerals. Therefore, we might expect microbial remain, to be particularly well preserved in various kinds of hydrothermal and diagenetic mineral precipitates that formed below the upper temperature limit for life (approx. 120 C).

  15. Approaches to identifying reservoir heterogeneity and reserve growth opportunities from subsurface data: The Oficina Formation, Budare field, Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, D.S.; Raeuchle, S.K.; Holtz, M.H. [Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    We applied an integrated geologic, geophysical, and engineering approach devised to identify heterogeneities in the subsurface that might lead to reserve growth opportunities in our analysis of the Oficina Formation at Budare field, Venezuela. The approach involves 4 key steps: (1) Determine geologic reservoir architecture; (2) Investigate trends in reservoir fluid flow; (3) Integrate fluid flow trends with reservoir architecture; and (4) Estimate original oil-in-place, residual oil saturation, and remaining mobile oil, to identify opportunities for reserve growth. There are three main oil-producing reservoirs in the Oficina Formation that were deposited in a bed-load fluvial system, an incised valley-fill, and a barrier-strandplain system. Reservoir continuity is complex because, in addition to lateral facies variability, the major Oficina depositional systems were internally subdivided by high-frequency stratigraphic surfaces. These surfaces define times of intermittent lacustrine and marine flooding events that punctuated the fluvial and marginal marine sedimentation, respectively. Syn and post depositional faulting further disrupted reservoir continuity. Trends in fluid flow established from initial fluid levels, response to recompletion workovers, and pressure depletion data demonstrated barriers to lateral and vertical fluid flow caused by a combination of reservoir facies pinchout, flooding shale markers, and the faults. Considerable reserve growth potential exists at Budare field because the reservoir units are highly compartment by the depositional heterogeneity and structural complexity. Numerous reserve growth opportunities were identified in attics updip of existing production, in untapped or incompletely drained compartments, and in field extensions.

  16. Influence of substrate heterogeneity on the hydraulic residence time and removal efficiency of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza-Diaz, O.; Brovelli, A.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2009-04-01

    Horizontal, subsurface flow constructed wetlands are wastewater treatment devices. The influent polluted water flows through a porous substrate where the contaminants are removed, for example by microbial oxidation, surface adsorption and mineral precipitation. These systems are widely used with varying degrees of success to treat municipal and agricultural contaminated waters and remove the organic carbon and nutrient load. Constructed wetlands are an appealing and promising technology, because they (i) are potentially very efficient in removing the pollutants, (ii) require only a small external energy input and (iii) require low maintenance. However, practical experience has shown that the observed purification rate is highly variable and is often much smaller than expected. One of the numerous reasons proposed to explain the variable efficiency of constructed wetlands is the existence of highly conductive zones within the porous substrate, which produce a dramatic reduction of the hydraulic residence time and therefore directly decreases the overall water purification rate. This work aims to understand quantitatively the relationship between the spatial variability in the hydraulic properties of the substrate and the effective residence time in constructed wetlands. We conducted two suites of stochastic numerical simulations, modelling the transport of a conservative tracer in a three-dimensional simulated constructed wetland in one case, and the microbial oxidation of a carbon source in the other. Within each group of simulations, different hydraulic conductivity fields were tested. These were based on a log-normal, spatially correlated random field (with exponential spatial correlation). The amount of heterogeneity was varied by changing the variance correlation length in the three directions. For each set of parameters, different realizations are considered to deduce both the expected residence time for a certain amount of heterogeneity, and its range of

  17. Laboratory and Field Evidence for Long-Term Starvation Survival of Microorganisms in Subsurface Terrestrial Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieft, T.L. [Biology Dept., New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Murphy, E.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Amy, P.S.; Haldeman, D.L. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ringelberg, D. B. [Center for Environmental Biotechnology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    BIOGEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND NUTRIENT FLUX IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS INDICATES THAT INHABITANT MICROORGANISMS EXPERIENCE SEVERE NUTRIENT LIMITATION. USING LABORATORY AND FIELD METHODS, WE HAVE BEEN TESTING STARVATION SURVIVAL IN SUBSURFACE MICROORGANISMS. IN MICROCOSM EXPERIMENTS, WE HAVE SHOWN THAT STRAINS OF TWO COMMONLY ISOLATED SUBSURFACE GENERA, ARTHROBACTER AND PSEUDOMONAS, ARE ABLE TO MAINTAIN VIABILITY IN LOW-NUTRIENT, NATURAL SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS FOR OVER ONE YEAR. THESE NON-SPORE-FORMING BACTERIA UNDERGO RAPID INITIAL MINIATURIZATION FOLLOWED BY A STABILIZATION OF CELL SIZE. MEMBRANE LIPID PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACID (PLFA) PROFILES OF THE PSEUDOMONAS ARE CONSISTENT WITH ADAPTATION TO NUTRIENT STRESS; ARTHROBACTER APPARENTLY RESPONDS TO NUTRIENT DEPRIVATION WITHOUT ALTERING MEMBRANE PLFA. TO TEST SURVIVABILITY OF MICROORGANISMS OVER A GEOLOGIC TIME SCALE, WE CHARACTERIZED MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES IN A SEQUENCE OF UNSATURATED SEDIMENTS RANGING IN AGE FROM MODEM TO {gt}780,000 years. Sediments were relatively uniform silts in Eastern Washington State. Porewater ages at depth (measured by the chloride mass-balance approach) were as old as 3,600 years. Microbial abundance, biomass, and activities (measured by direct counts, culture counts, total PLFAs, and radiorespirometry) declined with sediment age. The pattern is consistent with laboratory microcosm studies of Microbial survival: rapid short-term change followed by long-term survival of a proportion of cells. Even the oldest sediments evinced a small but viable Microbial community. Microbial survival appeared to be a function of sediment age. Porewater age appeared to influence the markup of surviving communities, as indicated by PLFA profiles. Sites with different Porewater recharge rates and patterns of Pleistocene flooding had different communities.

  18. Integrating non-colocated well and geophysical data to capture subsurface heterogeneity at an aquifer recharge and recovery site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Ian P.; Hermans, Thomas; Knight, Rosemary; Caers, Jef; Cameron, David A.; Regnery, Julia; McCray, John E.

    2017-12-01

    Geophysical data have proven to be very useful for lithological characterization. However, quantitatively integrating the information gained from acquiring geophysical data generally requires colocated lithological and geophysical data for constructing a rock-physics relationship. In this contribution, the issue of integrating noncolocated geophysical and lithological data is addressed, and the results are applied to simulate groundwater flow in a heterogeneous aquifer in the Prairie Waters Project North Campus aquifer recharge site, Colorado. Two methods of constructing a rock-physics transform between electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data and lithology measurements are assessed. In the first approach, a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) is used to fit a bimodal lognormal distribution to horizontal crosssections of the ERT resistivity histogram. In the second approach, a spatial bootstrap is applied to approximate the rock-physics relationship. The rock-physics transforms provide soft data for multiple point statistics (MPS) simulations. Subsurface models are used to run groundwater flow and tracer test simulations. Each model's uncalibrated, predicted breakthrough time is evaluated based on its agreement with measured subsurface travel time values from infiltration basins to selected groundwater recovery wells. We find that incorporating geophysical information into uncalibrated flow models reduces the difference with observed values, as compared to flow models without geophysical information incorporated. The integration of geophysical data also narrows the variance of predicted tracer breakthrough times substantially. Accuracy is highest and variance is lowest in breakthrough predictions generated by the MLE-based rock-physics transform. Calibrating the ensemble of geophysically constrained models would help produce a suite of realistic flow models for predictive purposes at the site. We find that the success of breakthrough predictions is highly

  19. How does layered heterogeneity affect the ability of subsurface dams to clean up coastal aquifers contaminated with seawater intrusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoulhalik, Antoifi; Ahmed, Ashraf A.

    2017-10-01

    The main purpose of this work was to examine how aquifer layering impacts the ability of subsurface dams to retain seawater intrusion (SWI) and to clean up contaminated coastal aquifers using both experimental and numerical techniques. Four different layering configurations were investigated, including a homogeneous case (case H), and three different layered cases where a low permeability layer was set at the top of the aquifer (case LH), at the middle part of the aquifer as interlayer (case HLH), and at the lower part of the aquifer (case HL). The subsurface dam was able to retain the saltwater wedge associated with a drop of the hydraulic gradient from 0.0158 down to 0.0095 in all the cases, thereby achieving up to 78% reduction in the saltwater toe length. In cases LH and HLH, the start of the saltwater spillage was delayed compared to the homogeneous case, and the time taken for the freshwater zone to be fully contaminated (post-spillage) was twice and three times longer, respectively. By contrast, the existence of a low K layer at the bottom of the aquifer (case HL) considerably weakened the ability of dams to retain the intrusion, allowing for quicker saltwater spillage past the wall. The natural cleanup of SWI-contaminated coastal aquifers was, for the first time, evidenced in heterogeneous settings. Depending on the stratification pattern, the presence of stratified layers however prolonged the cleanup time to various degrees, compared to the homogeneous scenario, particularly in case HL, where the cleanup time was nearly 50% longer.

  20. Effect of electrochemical corrosion on the subsurface microstructure evolution of a CoCrMo alloy in albumin containing environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhongwei; Yan, Yu, E-mail: yanyu@ustb.edu.cn; Su, Yanjing; Qiao, Lijie

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Accelerated electrochemical corrosion results in severer plastic deformation with finer grains. • Lower applied potential can increase protein adsorption on sample surfaces. • The tribo-film decreases the shear stresses and relief subsurface deformation. • Tribocorrosion induced passive film can suppress the annihilation of stacking faults. - Abstract: The subsurface microstructures of metallic implants play a key role in bio-tribocorrosion. Due to wear or change of local environment, the implant surface can have inhomogeneous electrochemical corrosion properties. In this work, the effect of electrochemical corrosion conditions on the subsurface microstructure evolution of CoCrMo alloys for artificial joints was investigated. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) was employed to observe the subsurface microstructures of worn areas at different applied potentials in a simulated physiological solution. The results showed that applied potentials could affect the severity of the subsurface deformation not only by changing the surface passivation but also affecting the adsorption of protein on the alloy surface.

  1. High Resolution Definition of Subsurface Heterogeneity for Understanding the Biodynamics of Natural Field Systems: Advancing the Ability for Scaling to Field Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, Ernest L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    1999-12-31

    This research is an integrated project which uses physical (geophysical and hydrologic) and innovative geophysical imaging and microbial characterization methods to identify key scales of physical heterogeneities that affect bioremediation. In the this effort data from controlled laboratory and in situ experiments at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) site were used to determine the dominant physical characteristics (lithologic, structural, and hydrologic) that can be imaged in situ and correlated with flow and transport properties. Emphasis was placed on identifying fundamental scales of variation of physical parameters that control transport behavior relative to subsurface microbial dynamics that could be used to develop a predictive model. A key hypothesis of the work was that nutrient flux and transport properties are key factors in controlling microbial dynamics, and that geophysical techniques could be used to identify the critical physical properties and scales controlling transport. This hypothesis was essentially validated. The goal was not only to develop and apply methods to monitor the spatial and temporal distribution of the bioremediation in fractured sites such as TAN, but also to develop methods applicable to a wider range of DOE sites. The outcome has been an improved understanding of the relationship between physical, chemical and microbial processes in heterogeneous environments, thus applicable to the design and monitoring of bioremediation strategies for a variety of environments. In this EMSP work we demonstrated that high resolution geophysical methods have considerable resolving power, especially when linked with modern advanced processing and interpretation. In terms of basic science, in addition to providing innovative methods for monitoring bioremediation, the work also provided a strong motivation for developing and extending high resolution geophysical methods.

  2. HeNCE: A Heterogeneous Network Computing Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Beguelin

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Network computing seeks to utilize the aggregate resources of many networked computers to solve a single problem. In so doing it is often possible to obtain supercomputer performance from an inexpensive local area network. The drawback is that network computing is complicated and error prone when done by hand, especially if the computers have different operating systems and data formats and are thus heterogeneous. The heterogeneous network computing environment (HeNCE is an integrated graphical environment for creating and running parallel programs over a heterogeneous collection of computers. It is built on a lower level package called parallel virtual machine (PVM. The HeNCE philosophy of parallel programming is to have the programmer graphically specify the parallelism of a computation and to automate, as much as possible, the tasks of writing, compiling, executing, debugging, and tracing the network computation. Key to HeNCE is a graphical language based on directed graphs that describe the parallelism and data dependencies of an application. Nodes in the graphs represent conventional Fortran or C subroutines and the arcs represent data and control flow. This article describes the present state of HeNCE, its capabilities, limitations, and areas of future research.

  3. Heterogenous Acceleration for Linear Algebra in Multi-coprocessor Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luszczek, Piotr R [ORNL; Tomov, Stanimire Z [ORNL; Dongarra, Jack J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We present an efficient and scalable programming model for the development of linear algebra in heterogeneous multi-coprocessor environments. The model incorporates some of the current best design and implementation practices for the heterogeneous acceleration of dense linear algebra (DLA). Examples are given as the basis for solving linear systems' algorithms - the LU, QR, and Cholesky factorizations. To generate the extreme level of parallelism needed for the efficient use of coprocessors, algorithms of interest are redesigned and then split into well-chosen computational tasks. The tasks execution is scheduled over the computational components of a hybrid system of multi-core CPUs and coprocessors using a light-weight runtime system. The use of lightweight runtime systems keeps scheduling overhead low, while enabling the expression of parallelism through otherwise sequential code. This simplifies the development efforts and allows the exploration of the unique strengths of the various hardware components.

  4. Fluxes of water and energy in physically heterogeneous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breshears, D.D.; Barnes, F.J.; Davenport, D.W. [and others

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Fluxes of water and energy at the near-surface environment are tightly interrelated with a heterogeneous vegetation pattern that is a mosaic of tree canopies and intercanopy area. The objective was to improve the ability to predict these interrelationships, which are not well quantified. The authors (1) quantified how vegetation overstory determines the patterns of soil moisture and near-ground solar radiation, (2) developed spatial neighborhood analyses that demonstrated how woody plants exploit canopy/intercanopy heterogeneity, (3) developed a spatially explicit model for predicting near-ground solar radiation for sites along a grassland-forest continuum, (4) developed a water balance model that predicted temporal shifts in soil moisture between canopy and intercanopy patches, and (5) used the collective results to assess large-scale ecosystem responses to climate variations that lead to accelerated soil erosion.

  5. Theoretical analysis of non-Gaussian heterogeneity effects on subsurface flow and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Monica; Guadagnini, Alberto; Neuman, Shlomo P.

    2017-04-01

    Much of the stochastic groundwater literature is devoted to the analysis of flow and transport in Gaussian or multi-Gaussian log hydraulic conductivity (or transmissivity) fields, Y(x)=ln\\func K(x) (x being a position vector), characterized by one or (less frequently) a multiplicity of spatial correlation scales. Yet Y and many other variables and their (spatial or temporal) increments, ΔY, are known to be generally non-Gaussian. One common manifestation of non-Gaussianity is that whereas frequency distributions of Y often exhibit mild peaks and light tails, those of increments ΔY are generally symmetric with peaks that grow sharper, and tails that become heavier, as separation scale or lag between pairs of Y values decreases. A statistical model that captures these disparate, scale-dependent distributions of Y and ΔY in a unified and consistent manner has been recently proposed by us. This new "generalized sub-Gaussian (GSG)" model has the form Y(x)=U(x)G(x) where G(x) is (generally, but not necessarily) a multiscale Gaussian random field and U(x) is a nonnegative subordinator independent of G. The purpose of this paper is to explore analytically, in an elementary manner, lead-order effects that non-Gaussian heterogeneity described by the GSG model have on the stochastic description of flow and transport. Recognizing that perturbation expansion of hydraulic conductivity K=eY diverges when Y is sub-Gaussian, we render the expansion convergent by truncating Y's domain of definition. We then demonstrate theoretically and illustrate by way of numerical examples that, as the domain of truncation expands, (a) the variance of truncated Y (denoted by Yt) approaches that of Y and (b) the pdf (and thereby moments) of Yt increments approach those of Y increments and, as a consequence, the variogram of Yt approaches that of Y. This in turn guarantees that perturbing Kt=etY to second order in σYt (the standard deviation of Yt) yields results which approach those we obtain

  6. Low Pressure Tolerance by Methanogens in an Aqueous Environment: Implications for Subsurface Life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickol, R. L.; Kral, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    The low pressure at the surface of Mars (average: 6 mbar) is one potentially biocidal factor that any extant life on the planet would need to endure. Near subsurface life, while shielded from ultraviolet radiation, would also be exposed to this low pressure environment, as the atmospheric gas-phase pressure increases very gradually with depth. Few studies have focused on low pressure as inhibitory to the growth or survival of organisms. However, recent work has uncovered a potential constraint to bacterial growth below 25 mbar. The study reported here tested the survivability of four methanogen species ( Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum, Methanococcus maripaludis) under low pressure conditions approaching average martian surface pressure (6 mbar - 143 mbar) in an aqueous environment. Each of the four species survived exposure of varying length (3 days - 21 days) at pressures down to 6 mbar. This research is an important stepping-stone to determining if methanogens can actively metabolize/grow under these low pressures. Additionally, the recently discovered recurring slope lineae suggest that liquid water columns may connect the surface to deeper levels in the subsurface. If that is the case, any organism being transported in the water column would encounter the changing pressures during the transport.

  7. Helical Nanomachines for Fast Mechanical Mapping of Heterogeneous Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Arijit

    2016-01-01

    Artificial micro and nano machines have been envisioned and demonstrated as potential candidates for variety of applications, ranging from targeted drug or gene delivery, cell manipulation, environmental sensing and many more. Here, we demonstrate the application of helical nanomachines that can measure and map the local rheological properties of a complex heterogeneous environment. The position of the helical nanomachine was controlled precisely using magnetic fields, while the instantaneous orientation provided an estimation of the viscosity of the surrounding medium with high spatial and temporal accuracy. Apart from providing viscosity estimates in purely viscous and viscoelastic media with shear rate independent viscosity (Boger fluids), their motion was also found to be extremely sensitive to fluid elasticity. Taken together we report a promising new technique of mapping the rheological properties of a complex fluidic environment by helical nanomachines with high spatial and temporal resolutions, a func...

  8. Deployment Environment for a Swarm of Heterogeneous Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Abukhalil

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to develop a framework that can deploy and provide coordination between multiple heterogeneous agents when a swarm robotic system adopts a decentralized approach; each robot evaluates its relative rank among the other robots in terms of travel distance and cost to the goal. Accordingly, robots are allocated to the sub-tasks for which they have the highest rank (utility. This paper provides an analysis of existing swarm control environments and proposes a software environment that facilitates a rapid deployment of multiple robotic agents. The framework (UBSwarm exploits our utility-based task allocation algorithm. UBSwarm configures these robots and assigns the group of robots a particular task from a set of available tasks. Two major tasks have been introduced that show the performance of a robotic group. This robotic group is composed of heterogeneous agents. In the results, a premature example that has prior knowledge about the experiment shows whether or not the robots are able to accomplish the task.

  9. Relationship between the adhesive properties of bacteria and their transport and colonization in the subsurface environment. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, M.

    1997-03-13

    The adhesion of bacteria to sediment particle or rock surfaces considerably effects their transport in subsurface environments. This research focuses on the macromolecular properties of bacteria that determine their adhesiveness and on the significance of adhesion in transport of subsurface bacteria. Specific objectives include (1) to obtain adhesion mutants of subsurface Pseudomonas species altered in surface adhesives; (2) to determine alterations in adhesives in selected mutants; (3) to evaluate the effect of adhesiveness on transport and long-term distribution and colonization of bacteria in porous media. Primary methods will be tranposon mutagenesis to generate adhesion mutants, biochemical analyses of cell surface polymers, and the use of laboratory columns containing subsurface materials to study the distribution and transport of bacteria along flow paths over time.

  10. Impact of treated wastewater irrigation on heterogeneity and on the fate of salts and nutrients in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Hochberg, C.; Furman, A.; Weisbrod, N.

    2013-12-01

    Reuse of treated wastewater (TWW) for irrigation is one of the solutions to water shortage. Not only it saves water, it also supplies organic matter (OM) and other nutrients to the soil. However, long term application of TWW can affect soil physical and chemical properties. Additionally, substances added via TWW irrigation can accentuate already existent soil heterogeneity, which may impact physical and chemical processes in soils. As more agricultural fields are being irrigated with TWW, it is crucial to understand its implications on soils. The objectives of this research are to investigate: (a) the impact of TWW irrigation on soil heterogeneity, and on hydraulic processes; and (b) the fate of salts and nutrients in the subsurface in soils irrigated with TWW vs. tap water (TP). The experiment is carried out in Lachish farm, Israel. Two trenches were dug and a sensors network of 38 tensiometers, 37 TDRs, 6 redox probes, and 38 thermocouples was installed in high resolution in each cross section (1.5 x 1.5 m). The cross sections are 13 meters apart in a vineyard irrigated for over 10 years with TP and TWW. One cross section is in a TP area while the other is in TWW area. Soil samples were collected according to visually observed heterogeneity of the soil profiles and randomly. Chemical analyses were conducted in both soil and water samples. In addition, infiltration rate, Leaf Area Index (LAI), and harvest yield were determined. For irrigation water analyses, DOM in TWW is higher than TP (average concentrations of 25.9 and 1.4 mg/L, respectively). Soil organic matter is in average 1% higher in soils irrigated with TWW in the first 10 cm, while for lower depths OM content is the same under both treatments. No repellency was detected for either soils (WDPT40%). ESP, EC and pH were higher for TWW soils, but not high enough to be characterized as saline and/or sodic. However, it presented SAR and EC levels of moderate infiltration reduction risk. Infiltration rate was

  11. Increasing Robustness of Multi-homed Systems in Heterogeneous Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Rohlik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, packet error rate in fixed networks can be considered as a negligible value. However, the increasing requirements for transmission speed of mobile devices, heterogeneous technology, and other high frequency sources cause interference growth within the electromagnetic spectrum. This affects the overall reliability and throughput of the network and may cause undesirable operation malfunction of application-level services. Higher speeds can be achieved by advanced modulation techniques, but at the price of lower resistance against the interference. On the other hand, error-correcting codes or higher-level protocols are utilized to correct the delivery failures. We introduce a novel method for increasing robustness of communication for multi-homed systems in heterogeneous environment. Furthermore, we propose a security measure to ensure confidentiality, integrity and availability of the transmitted data without influencing the transmission parameters. Finally, we show positive impact of the proposed method on transmission efficiency and effective throughput, especially in networks with high probability of error occurrence.

  12. Distributed Heterogeneous Relational Data Warehouse In A Grid Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Iqbal, S; Newman, H B; Bunn, Julian J.; Iqbal, Saima; Newman, Harvey B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines how a "Distributed Heterogeneous Relational Data Warehouse" can be integrated in a Grid environment that will provide physicists with efficient access to large and small object collections drawn from databases at multiple sites. This paper investigates the requirements of Grid-enabling such a warehouse, and explores how these requirements may be met by extensions to existing Grid middleware. We present initial results obtained with a working prototype warehouse of this kind using both SQLServer and Oracle9i, where a Grid-enabled web-services interface makes it easier for web-applications to access the distributed contents of the databases securely. Based on the success of the prototype, we proposes a framework for using heterogeneous relational data warehouse through the web-service interface and create a single "Virtual Database System" for users. The ability to transparently access data in this way, as shown in prototype, is likely to be a very powerful facility for HENP and other grid u...

  13. A Cognitive Approach to Network Monitoring in Heterogeneous Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihovska, Albena D.

    2007-01-01

    of information (QoI). QoI means QoS while all the requirements for dependability, security, privacy and trust are satisfied at the highest possible level. This work proposes and describes an approach to network monitoring in a heterogeneous communication environment based on use of cognitive techniques...... for efficient resource allocation, provisioning of network resources or for detection of security violations into the traditional network monitoring approach. The paper describes the cognitive monitoring architecture, the required physical and logical entities, and their functionalities. Further, the paper......Abstract— Introducing intelligence by means of cognition for managing, protecting, processing, and delivering of information in mobile communication systems is the way towards ubiquitous, converged and secure communications. In this context, this paper introduces the concept of quality...

  14. Sampling animal sign in heterogeneous environments: how much is enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Joseph D.; Arkle, Robert S.; Rachlow, Janet L.; Vierling, Kerri T.; Pilliod, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Animal ecologists often use animal sign as a surrogate for direct observation of organisms, especially when species are secretive or difficult to observe. Spatial heterogeneity in arid environments makes it challenging to consistently detect and precisely characterize animal sign, which can bias estimates of animal abundance or habitat use. Piute ground squirrels (Urocitellus mollis) and Owyhee harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex salinus) live in arid environments and are fossorial, which can make them difficult to observe directly. Their relative abundance can be assessed using sign (i.e., burrows and nests). We implemented an over-sampling framework (i.e., recorded an excessive amount of information) with two observers to 1) identify a sampling intensity that balanced precision with our resource constraints, and 2) assess classification and detection of squirrel burrows and ant nests across vegetation conditions. We sampled 20 1-ha plots for ground squirrel burrows and ant nests using six 4 m × 100 m belt transects. Analyses of precision and sampling effort indicated that three belt transects covering 1200 m2 per ha provided sufficient precision, while minimizing effort. Regardless of vegetation conditions, counts by two observers were strongly correlated for ground squirrel burrows (r = 0.99, P sampling designs in many ecological contexts.

  15. Predator behaviour and predation risk in the heterogeneous Arctic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Nicolas; Careau, Vincent; Gauthier, Gilles; Giroux, Jean-François

    2008-05-01

    1. Habitat heterogeneity and predator behaviour can strongly affect predator-prey interactions but these factors are rarely considered simultaneously, especially when systems encompass multiple predators and prey. 2. In the Arctic, greater snow geese Anser caerulescens atlanticus L. nest in two structurally different habitats: wetlands that form intricate networks of water channels, and mesic tundra where such obstacles are absent. In this heterogeneous environment, goose eggs are exposed to two types of predators: the arctic fox Vulpes lagopus L. and a diversity of avian predators. We hypothesized that, contrary to birds, the hunting ability of foxes would be impaired by the structurally complex wetland habitat, resulting in a lower predation risk for goose eggs. 3. In addition, lemmings, the main prey of foxes, show strong population cycles. We thus further examined how their fluctuations influenced the interaction between habitat heterogeneity and fox predation on goose eggs. 4. An experimental approach with artificial nests suggested that foxes were faster than avian predators to find unattended goose nests in mesic tundra whereas the reverse was true in wetlands. Foxes spent 3.5 times more time between consecutive attacks on real goose nests in wetlands than in mesic tundra. Their attacks on goose nests were also half as successful in wetlands than in mesic tundra whereas no difference was found for avian predators. 5. Nesting success in wetlands (65%) was higher than in mesic tundra (56%) but the difference between habitats increased during lemming crashes (15%) compared to other phases of the cycle (5%). Nests located at the edge of wetland patches were also less successful than central ones, suggesting a gradient in accessibility of goose nests in wetlands for foxes. 6. Our study shows that the structural complexity of wetlands decreases predation risk from foxes but not avian predators in arctic-nesting birds. Our results also demonstrate that cyclic

  16. Extinctions in heterogeneous environments and the evolution of modularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashtan, Nadav; Parter, Merav; Dekel, Erez; Mayo, Avi E; Alon, Uri

    2009-08-01

    Extinctions of local subpopulations are common events in nature. Here, we ask whether such extinctions can affect the design of biological networks within organisms over evolutionary timescales. We study the impact of extinction events on modularity of biological systems, a common architectural principle found on multiple scales in biology. As a model system, we use networks that evolve toward goals specified as desired input-output relationships. We use an extinction-recolonization model, in which metapopulations occupy and migrate between different localities. Each locality displays a different environmental condition (goal), but shares the same set of subgoals with other localities. We find that in the absence of extinction events, the evolved computational networks are typically highly optimal for their localities with a nonmodular structure. In contrast, when local populations go extinct from time to time, we find that the evolved networks are modular in structure. Modular circuitry is selected because of its ability to adapt rapidly to the conditions of the free niche following an extinction event. This rapid adaptation is mainly achieved through genetic recombination of modules between immigrants from neighboring local populations. This study suggests, therefore, that extinctions in heterogeneous environments promote the evolution of modular biological network structure, allowing local populations to effectively recombine their modules to recolonize niches.

  17. Heterogeneous information sharing of sensor information in contested environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampler, Jason A.; Hsieh, Chien; Toth, Andrew; Sheatsley, Ryan

    2017-05-01

    The inherent nature of unattended sensors makes these devices most vulnerable to detection, exploitation, and denial in contested environments. Physical access is often cited as the easiest way to compromise any device or network. A new mechanism for mitigating these types of attacks developed under the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, ASD(R and E) project, "Smoke Screen in Cyberspace", was demonstrated in a live, over-the-air experiment. Smoke Screen encrypts, slices up, and disburses redundant fragments of files throughout the network. Recovery is only possible after recovering all fragments and attacking/denying one or more nodes does not limit the availability of other fragment copies in the network. This experiment proved the feasibility of redundant file fragmentation, and is the foundation for developing sophisticated methods to blacklist compromised nodes, move data fragments from risks of compromise, and forward stored data fragments closer to the anticipated retrieval point. This paper outlines initial results in scalability of node members, fragment size, file size, and performance in a heterogeneous network consisting of the Wireless Network after Next (WNaN) radio and Common Sensor Radio (CSR).

  18. Akuna: An Open Source User Environment for Managing Subsurface Simulation Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, V. L.; Agarwal, D.; Bensema, K.; Finsterle, S.; Gable, C. W.; Keating, E. H.; Krishnan, H.; Lansing, C.; Moeglein, W.; Pau, G. S. H.; Porter, E.; Scheibe, T. D.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is investing in development of a numerical modeling toolset called ASCEM (Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management) to support modeling analyses at legacy waste sites. ASCEM is an open source and modular computing framework that incorporates new advances and tools for predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM toolset includes both a Platform with Integrated Toolsets (called Akuna) and a High-Performance Computing multi-process simulator (called Amanzi). The focus of this presentation is on Akuna, an open-source user environment that manages subsurface simulation workflows and associated data and metadata. In this presentation, key elements of Akuna are demonstrated, which includes toolsets for model setup, database management, sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, uncertainty quantification, and visualization of both model setup and simulation results. A key component of the workflow is in the automated job launching and monitoring capabilities, which allow a user to submit and monitor simulation runs on high-performance, parallel computers. Visualization of large outputs can also be performed without moving data back to local resources. These capabilities make high-performance computing accessible to the users who might not be familiar with batch queue systems and usage protocols on different supercomputers and clusters.

  19. Application of AMDS mortar as a treatment agent for arsenic in subsurface environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Lee, H.; Choi, U. K.; Yang, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    Among the treatment technologies available for As in soil and groundwater, adsorption or precipitation using acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge has become a promised technique because of high efficiency, inexpensiveness and simple to handling. The adsorbents were prepared by addition of Cement, Joomoonjin sand, fly ash, and Ca(OH)2 to air dry AMD sludge. In this work, the adsorption of As (III) and As (V) on AMDS mortar has been studied as a function of kinetic, pH, and initial arsenic concentration. Results of batch study showed that 75-90% of both As (III) and As (V) were removed at pH 7. Arsenic adsorption capacities were the highest at neutral pH condition and the adsorption equilibrium time reached in 7 days using AMDS mortar. Additionally, the adsorption kinetic process is expressed well by pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption capacities of AMDS mortar for As(III) and As(V) were found 19.04 and 30.75 mg g-1, respectively. The results of As (III) adsorption isotherms were fitted well to the Freundlich model. Moreover, As (V) adsorption isotherms were fitted well to the Langmuir model rather than Freundlich model. Based on experimental results in this study, we could conclude that AMDS mortar can be effectively used for arsenic removal agent from subsurface environment.

  20. A geological model for the management of subsurface data in the urban environment of Barcelona and surrounding area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Ángel Marazuela, Miguel; Velasco, Violeta; Diviu, Marc; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; Álvarez-Marrón, Joaquina

    2016-09-01

    The overdevelopment of cities since the industrial revolution has shown the need to incorporate a sound geological knowledge in the management of required subsurface infrastructures and in the assessment of increasingly needed groundwater resources. Additionally, the scarcity of outcrops and the technical difficulty to conduct underground exploration in urban areas highlights the importance of implementing efficient management plans that deal with the legacy of heterogeneous subsurface information. To deal with these difficulties, a methodology has been proposed to integrate all the available spatio-temporal data into a comprehensive spatial database and a set of tools that facilitates the analysis and processing of the existing and newly added data for the city of Barcelona (NE Spain). Here we present the resulting actual subsurface 3-D geological model that incorporates and articulates all the information stored in the database. The methodology applied to Barcelona benefited from a good collaboration between administrative bodies and researchers that enabled the realization of a comprehensive geological database despite logistic difficulties. Currently, the public administration and also private sectors both benefit from the geological understanding acquired in the city of Barcelona, for example, when preparing the hydrogeological models used in groundwater assessment plans. The methodology further facilitates the continuous incorporation of new data in the implementation and sustainable management of urban groundwater, and also contributes to significantly reducing the costs of new infrastructures.

  1. The interactions between nanoscale zero-valent iron and microbes in the subsurface environment: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yankai [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Dong, Haoran, E-mail: dongh@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Zeng, Guangming; Tang, Lin; Jiang, Zhao; Zhang, Cong; Deng, Junmin; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yi [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • The interactions between various microbes and NZVI were summarized. • The adverse and positive effects of NZVI on the growth of microbes were reviewed. • The synergistic effects of NZVI and bacteria on pollutant removal were reviewed. • The effects of iron-reducing bacteria on the aged NZVI were reviewed. • Future challenges to study the interactions between NZVI and microbes are suggested. - Abstract: Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles, applied for in-situ subsurface remediation, are inevitable to interact with various microbes in the remediation sites directly or indirectly. This review summarizes their interactions, including the effects of NZVI on microbial activity and growth, the synergistic effect of NZVI and microbes on the contaminant removal, and the effects of microbes on the aging of NZVI. NZVI could exert either inhibitive or stimulative effects on the growth of microbes. The mechanisms of NZVI cytotoxicity (i.e., the inhibitive effect) include physical damage and biochemical destruction. The stimulative effects of NZVI on certain bacteria are associated with the creation of appropriate living environment, either through providing electron donor (e.g., H{sub 2}) or carbon sources (e.g., the engineered organic surface modifiers), or through eliminating the noxious substances that can cause bactericidal consequence. As a result of the positive interaction, the combination of NZVI and some microbes shows synergistic effect on contaminant removal. Additionally, the aged NZVI can be utilized by some iron-reducing bacteria, resulting in the transformation of Fe(III) to Fe(II), which can further contribute to the contaminant reduction. However, the Fe(III)-reduction process can probably induce environmental risks, such as environmental methylation and remobilization of the previously entrapped heavy metals.

  2. On the possibility of galactic cosmic ray-induced radiolysis-powered life in subsurface environments in the Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atri, Dimitra

    2016-10-01

    Photosynthesis is a mechanism developed by terrestrial life to utilize the energy from photons of solar origin for biological use. Subsurface regions are isolated from the photosphere, and consequently are incapable of utilizing this energy. This opens up the opportunity for life to evolve alternative mechanisms for harvesting available energy. Bacterium Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, found 2.8 km deep in a South African mine, harvests energy from radiolysis, induced by particles emitted from radioactive U, Th and K present in surrounding rock. Another radiation source in the subsurface environments is secondary particles generated by galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). Using Monte Carlo simulations, it is shown that it is a steady source of energy comparable to that produced by radioactive substances, and the possibility of a slow metabolizing life flourishing on it cannot be ruled out. Two mechanisms are proposed through which GCR-induced secondary particles can be utilized for biological use in subsurface environments: (i) GCRs injecting energy in the environment through particle-induced radiolysis and (ii) organic synthesis from GCR secondaries interacting with the medium. Laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses are also proposed. Implications of these mechanisms on finding life in the Solar System and elsewhere in the Universe are discussed. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Distributed computations in a dynamic, heterogeneous Grid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dramlitsch, Thomas

    2003-06-01

    In order to face the rapidly increasing need for computational resources of various scientific and engineering applications one has to think of new ways to make more efficient use of the worlds current computational resources. In this respect, the growing speed of wide area networks made a new kind of distributed computing possible: Metacomputing or (distributed) Grid computing. This is a rather new and uncharted field in computational science. The rapidly increasing speed of networks even outperforms the average increase of processor speed: Processor speeds double on average each 18 month whereas network bandwidths double every 9 months. Due to this development of local and wide area networks Grid computing will certainly play a key role in the future of parallel computing. This type of distributed computing, however, distinguishes from the traditional parallel computing in many ways since it has to deal with many problems not occurring in classical parallel computing. Those problems are for example heterogeneity, authentication and slow networks to mention only a few. Some of those problems, e.g. the allocation of distributed resources along with the providing of information about these resources to the application have been already attacked by the Globus software. Unfortunately, as far as we know, hardly any application or middle-ware software takes advantage of this information, since most parallelizing algorithms for finite differencing codes are implicitly designed for single supercomputer or cluster execution. We show that although it is possible to apply classical parallelizing algorithms in a Grid environment, in most cases the observed efficiency of the executed code is very poor. In this work we are closing this gap. In our thesis, we will - show that an execution of classical parallel codes in Grid environments is possible but very slow - analyze this situation of bad performance, nail down bottlenecks in communication, remove unnecessary overhead and

  4. Thin film subsurface environments; Advanced X-ray spectroscopies and a novel Bayesian inference modeling algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jonathan R.

    New condensed matter metrologies are being used to probe ever smaller length scales. In support of the diverse field of materials research synchrotron based spectroscopies provide sub-micron spatial resolutions and a breadth of photon wavelengths for scientific studies. For electronic materials the thinnest layers in a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) device have been reduced to just a few nanometers. This raises concerns for layer uniformity, complete surface coverage, and interfacial quality. Deposition processes like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been shown to deposit the needed high-quality films for the requisite thicknesses. However, new materials beget new chemistries and, unfortunately, unwanted side-reactions and by-products. CVD/ALD tools and chemical precursors provided by our collaborators at Air Liquide utilized these new chemistries and films were deposited for which novel spectroscopic characterization methods were used. The second portion of the thesis focuses on fading and decomposing paint pigments in iconic artworks. Efforts have been directed towards understanding the micro-environments causing degradation. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) and variable kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (VKE-XPS) are advanced XPS techniques capable of elucidating both chemical environments and electronic band structures in sub-surface regions of electronic materials. HAXPES has been used to study the electronic band structure in a typical CMOS structure; it will be shown that unexpected band alignments are associated with the presence of electronic charges near a buried interface. Additionally, a computational modeling algorithm, Bayes-Sim, was developed to reconstruct compositional depth profiles (CDP) using VKE-XPS data sets; a subset algorithm also reconstructs CDP from angle-resolved XPS data. Reconstructed CDP produced by Bayes-Sim were most strongly correlated to the real

  5. Bifurcation analysis of a diffusive predator–prey model in spatially heterogeneous environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate positive steady states of a diffusive predator–prey model in spatially heterogeneous environment. In comparison with the spatially homogeneous environment, the dynamics of the predator–prey model of spatial heterogeneity is more complicated. Our studies show that if dispersal rate of the prey is treated as a bifurcation parameter, for some certain ranges of death rate and dispersal rate of the predator, there exist multiply positive steady state solutions bifurcating from semi-trivial steady state of the model in spatially heterogeneous environment, whereas there exists only one positive steady state solution which bifurcates from semi-trivial steady state of the model in homogeneous environment.

  6. Mosquito population regulation and larval source management in heterogeneous environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Smith

    Full Text Available An important question for mosquito population dynamics, mosquito-borne pathogen transmission and vector control is how mosquito populations are regulated. Here we develop simple models with heterogeneity in egg laying patterns and in the responses of larval populations to crowding in aquatic habitats. We use the models to evaluate how such heterogeneity affects mosquito population regulation and the effects of larval source management (LSM. We revisit the notion of a carrying capacity and show how heterogeneity changes our understanding of density dependence and the outcome of LSM. Crowding in and productivity of aquatic habitats is highly uneven unless egg-laying distributions are fine-tuned to match the distribution of habitats' carrying capacities. LSM reduces mosquito population density linearly with coverage if adult mosquitoes avoid laying eggs in treated habitats, but quadratically if eggs are laid in treated habitats and the effort is therefore wasted (i.e., treating 50% of habitat reduces mosquito density by approximately 75%. Unsurprisingly, targeting (i.e. treating a subset of the most productive pools gives much larger reductions for similar coverage, but with poor targeting, increasing coverage could increase adult mosquito population densities if eggs are laid in higher capacity habitats. Our analysis suggests that, in some contexts, LSM models that accounts for heterogeneity in production of adult mosquitoes provide theoretical support for pursuing mosquito-borne disease prevention through strategic and repeated application of modern larvicides.

  7. The InSight Mars Lander and Its Effect on the Subsurface Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Matthew A.; Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Grott, Matthias; Piqueux, Sylvain; Mueller, Nils; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Spohn, Tilman

    2017-10-01

    The 2018 InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) Mission has the mission goal of providing insitu data for the first measurement of the geothermal heat flow of Mars. The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3) will take thermal conductivity and thermal gradient measurements to approximately 5 m depth. By necessity, this measurement will be made within a few meters of the lander. This means that thermal perturbations from the lander will modify local surface and subsurface temperature measurements. For HP3's sensitive thermal gradient measurements, this spacecraft influence will be important to model and parameterize. Here we present a basic 3D model of thermal effects of the lander on its surroundings. Though lander perturbations significantly alter subsurface temperatures, a successful thermal gradient measurement will be possible in all thermal conditions by proper (>3 m depth) placement of the heat flow probe.

  8. Use of large-scale multi-configuration EMI measurements to characterize heterogeneous subsurface structures and their impact on crop productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogi, Cosimo; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Kaufmann, Manuela Sarah; von Hebel, Christian; van der Kruk, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-04-01

    Soil subsurface structures can play a key role in crop performance, especially during water stress periods. Geophysical techniques like electromagnetic induction EMI have been shown to be able of providing information about dominant shallow subsurface features. However, previous work with EMI has typically not reached beyond the field scale. The objective of this study is to use large-scale multi-configuration EMI to characterize patterns of soil structural organization (layering and texture) and the associated impact on crop vegetation at the km2 scale. For this, we carried out an intensive measurement campaign and collected high spatial resolution multi-configuration EMI data on an agricultural area of approx. 1 km2 (102 ha) near Selhausen (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) with a maximum depth of investigation of around 2.5 m. We measured using two EMI instruments simultaneously with a total of nine coil configurations. The instruments were placed inside polyethylene sleds that were pulled by an all-terrain-vehicle along parallel lines with a spacing of 2 to 2.5 m. The driving speed was between 5 and 7 km h-1 and we used a 0.2 Hz sampling frequency to obtain an in-line resolution of approximately 0.3 m. The survey area consists of almost 50 different fields managed in different way. The EMI measurements were collected between April and December 2016 within a few days after the harvest of each field. After data acquisition, EMI data were automatically filtered, temperature corrected, and interpolated onto a common grid. The resulting EMI maps allowed us to identify three main areas with different subsurface heterogeneities. The differences between these areas are likely related to the late quaternary geological history (Pleistocene and Holocene) of the area that resulted in spatially variable soil texture and layering, which has a strong impact on spatio-temporal soil water content variability. The high resolution surveys also allowed us to identify small scale

  9. Microbial structures in an Alpine Thermal Spring - Microscopic techniques for the examination of Biofilms in a Subsurface Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion; Pierson, Elisabeth; Janssen, Geert-Jan; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2010-05-01

    The research into extreme environments hast important implications for biology and other sciences. Many of the organisms found there provide insights into the history of Earth. Life exists in all niches where water is present in liquid form. Isolated environments such as caves and other subsurface locations are of interest for geomicrobiological studies. And because of their "extra-terrestrial" conditions such as darkness and mostly extreme physicochemical state they are also of astrobiological interest. The slightly radioactive thermal spring at Bad Gastein (Austria) was therefore examined for the occurrence of subsurface microbial communities. The surfaces of the submerged rocks in this warm spring were overgrown by microbial mats. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) performed by the late Dr. Wolfgang Heinen revealed an interesting morphological diversity in biofilms found in this environment (1, 2). Molecular analysis of the community structure of the radioactive subsurface thermal spring was performed by Weidler et al. (3). The growth of these mats was simulated using sterile glass slides which were exposed to the water stream of the spring. Those mats were analysed microscopically. Staining, using fluorescent dyes such as 4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindol (DAPI), gave an overview of the microbial diversity of these biofilms. Additional SEM samples were prepared using different fixation protocols. Scanning confocal laser microscopy (SCLM) allowed a three dimensional view of the analysed biofilms. This work presents some electron micrographs of Dr. Heinen and additionally new microscopic studies of the biofilms formed on the glass slides. The appearances of the new SEM micrographs were compared to those of Dr. Heinen that were done several years ago. The morphology and small-scale distribution in the microbial mat was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. The examination of natural biomats and biofilms grown on glass slides using several microscopical techniques

  10. Predicting user movements in heterogeneous indoor environments by reservoir computing

    OpenAIRE

    Bacciu, Davide; Barsocchi, Paolo; Chessa, Stefano; Gallicchio, Claudio; Micheli, Alessio

    2011-01-01

    Anticipating user localization by making accurate predictions on its indoor movement patterns is a fundamental challenge for achieving higher degrees of personalization and reactivity in smart-home environments. We propose an approach to real-time movement forecasting founding on the efficient Reservoir Computing paradigm, predicting user movements based on streams of Received Signal Strengths collected by wireless motes distributed in the home environment. The ability of the system to genera...

  11. IEPLC Framework, Automated Communication in a Heterogeneous Control System Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Locci, F

    2014-01-01

    In CERN accelerators control system several components are essential such as: Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), PCI Extensions for Instrumentation (PXI), and other micro-controller families. Together with their weaknesses and their strength points they typically present custom communication protocols and it is therefore difficult to federate them into the control system using a single communication strategy. Furthermore this dependency to the physical device interfaces and protocols makes most of the code not reusable and the replacement of old technology a difficult problem. The purpose of IEPLC ([1]) is to mitigate the communication issues given by this heterogeneity; it proposes a framework to define communication interfaces in a hardware independent manner. In addition it automatically generates all the resources needed on master side (typically represented by a FEC: Front-End Computer) and slave side (typically represented by the controller) to implement a common and generic Ethernet communication. Th...

  12. 3D Game Content Distributed Adaptation in Heterogeneous Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berretty Robert-Paul

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Most current multiplayer 3D games can only be played on a single dedicated platform (a particular computer, console, or cell phone, requiring specifically designed content and communication over a predefined network. Below we show how, by using signal processing techniques such as multiresolution representation and scalable coding for all the components of a 3D graphics object (geometry, texture, and animation, we enable online dynamic content adaptation, and thus delivery of the same content over heterogeneous networks to terminals with very different profiles, and its rendering on them. We present quantitative results demonstrating how the best displayed quality versus computational complexity versus bandwidth tradeoffs have been achieved, given the distributed resources available over the end-to-end content delivery chain. Additionally, we use state-of-the-art, standardised content representation and compression formats (MPEG-4 AFX, JPEG 2000, XML, enabling deployment over existing infrastructure, while keeping hooks to well-established practices in the game industry.

  13. 3D Game Content Distributed Adaptation in Heterogeneous Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán, Francisco; Preda, Marius; Lafruit, Gauthier; Villegas, Paulo; Berretty, Robert-Paul

    2007-12-01

    Most current multiplayer 3D games can only be played on a single dedicated platform (a particular computer, console, or cell phone), requiring specifically designed content and communication over a predefined network. Below we show how, by using signal processing techniques such as multiresolution representation and scalable coding for all the components of a 3D graphics object (geometry, texture, and animation), we enable online dynamic content adaptation, and thus delivery of the same content over heterogeneous networks to terminals with very different profiles, and its rendering on them. We present quantitative results demonstrating how the best displayed quality versus computational complexity versus bandwidth tradeoffs have been achieved, given the distributed resources available over the end-to-end content delivery chain. Additionally, we use state-of-the-art, standardised content representation and compression formats (MPEG-4 AFX, JPEG 2000, XML), enabling deployment over existing infrastructure, while keeping hooks to well-established practices in the game industry.

  14. Physiological and phylogenetic study of microbes from geochemically and hydrogeologically diverse subsurface environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balkwill, D.L.; Reeves, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    The present document is an interim technical report in which we describe the research which has been completed during the seven-month period since the start of the grant. Progress is summarized in two main areas. The first is microbiological characterization of subsurface materials from the Hanford reservation and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and the second is phylogenetic characterization of these microorganisms. The major tools used for phylogenetic characterization are RFLP analysis of PCR derived material and 16S rRNA sequencing. A description of manuscripts ready for publication is also provided. 4 refs. (MHB)

  15. Plio-Pleistocene climate change and geographic heterogeneity in plant diversity-environment relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenning, J.-C.; Normand, Signe; Skov, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    Plio-Pleistocene climate change may have induced geographic heterogeneity in plant species richness-environment relationships in Europe due to greater in situ species survival and speciation rates in southern Europe. We formulate distinct hypotheses on how Plio-Pleistocene climate change may have...... for the contrasting findings for the two richness-environment relationships. In conclusion, we find support for the idea that Plio-Pleistocene climate change may sometimes affect current species richness-environment relationships via its effects on regional species pools. However, further studies integrating...... analyses showed that plant species richness generally increased with topographic heterogeneity (ln-transformed altitudinal range) and actual evapotranspiration (AET). We also found evidence for strong geographic heterogeneity in the species richness-environment relationship, with a greater increase...

  16. Yucatan Subsurface Stratigraphy from Geophysical Data, Well Logs and Core Analyses in the Chicxulub Impact Crater and Implications for Target Heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, I.; Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Camargo, A. Z.; Perez-Cruz, G.

    2011-12-01

    Asymmetries in the geophysical signature of Chicxulub crater are being evaluated to investigate on effects of impact angle and trajectory and pre-existing target structural controls for final crater form. Early studies interpreted asymmetries in the gravity anomaly in the offshore sector to propose oblique either northwest- and northeast-directed trajectories. An oblique impact was correlated to the global ejecta distribution and enhanced environmental disturbance. In contrast, recent studies using marine seismic data and computer modeling have shown that crater asymmetries correlate with pre-existing undulations of the Cretaceous continental shelf, suggesting a structural control of target heterogeneities. Documentation of Yucatan subsurface stratigraphy has been limited by lack of outcrops of pre-Paleogene rocks. The extensive cover of platform carbonate rocks has not been affected by faulting or deformation and with no rivers cutting the carbonates, information comes mainly from the drilling programs and geophysical surveys. Here we revisit the subsurface stratigraphy in the crater area from the well log data and cores retrieved in the drilling projects and marine seismic reflection profiles. Other source of information being exploited comes from the impact breccias, which contain a sampling of disrupted target sequences, including crystalline basement and Mesozoic sediments. We analyze gravity and seismic data from the various exploration surveys, including multiple Pemex profiles in the platform and the Chicxulub experiments. Analyses of well log data and seismic profiles identify contacts for Lower Cretaceous, Cretaceous/Jurassic and K/Pg boundaries. Results show that the Cretaceous continental shelf was shallower on the south and southwest than on the east, with emerged areas in Quintana Roo and Belize. Mesozoic and upper Paleozoic sediments show variable thickness, possibly reflecting the crystalline basement regional structure. Paleozoic and Precambrian

  17. Efficiently Building On-line Tools for Distributed Heterogeneous Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Günther Rackl; Thomas Ludwig; Markus Lindermeier; Alexandros Stamatakis

    2002-01-01

    Software development is getting more and more complex, especially within distributed middleware-based environments. A major drawback during the overall software development process is the lack of on-line tools, i.e. tools applied as soon as there is a running prototype of an application. The MIMO MIddleware MOnitor provides a solution to this problem by implementing a framework for an efficient development of on-line tools. This paper presents a methodology for developing on-line tools with M...

  18. Microbiome composition and geochemical characteristics of deep subsurface high-pressure environment, Pyhäsalmi mine Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna eMiettinen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pyhäsalmi mine in central Finland provides an excellent opportunity to study microbial and geochemical processes in a deep subsurface crystalline rock environment through near-vertical drill holes that reach to a depth of more than two kilometers below the surface. However, microbial sampling was challenging in this high-pressure environment. Nucleic acid yields obtained were extremely low when compared to the cell counts detected (1.4 x 10^4 cells/mL in water. The water for nucleic acid analysis went through high decompression (60 to 130 bar during sampling, whereas water samples for detection of cell counts by microscopy could be collected with slow decompression. No clear cells could be identified in water that went through high decompression. The high-pressure decompression may have damaged part of the cells and the nucleic acids escaped through the filter. The microbial diversity was analyzed from two drill holes by pyrosequencing amplicons of the bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and from the fungal ITS regions from both DNA and RNA fractions. The identified prokaryotic diversity was low, dominated by Firmicute, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria species that are common in deep subsurface environments. The archaeal diversity consisted mainly of Methanobacteriales. Ascomycota dominated the fungal diversity and fungi were discovered to be active and to produce ribosomes in the deep oligotrophic biosphere. The deep fluids from the Pyhäsalmi mine shared several features with other deep Precambrian continental subsurface environments including saline, Ca-dominated water and stable isotope compositions positioning left from the meteoric water line. The dissolved gas phase was dominated by nitrogen but the gas composition clearly differed from that of atmospheric air. Despite carbon-poor conditions indicated by the lack of carbon-rich fracture fillings and only minor amounts of dissolved carbon detected in formation waters, some methane was

  19. Microbiome composition and geochemical characteristics of deep subsurface high-pressure environment, Pyhäsalmi mine Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Hanna; Kietäväinen, Riikka; Sohlberg, Elina; Numminen, Mikko; Ahonen, Lasse; Itävaara, Merja

    2015-01-01

    Pyhäsalmi mine in central Finland provides an excellent opportunity to study microbial and geochemical processes in a deep subsurface crystalline rock environment through near-vertical drill holes that reach to a depth of more than two kilometers below the surface. However, microbial sampling was challenging in this high-pressure environment. Nucleic acid yields obtained were extremely low when compared to the cell counts detected (1.4 × 104 cells mL−1) in water. The water for nucleic acid analysis went through high decompression (60–130 bar) during sampling, whereas water samples for detection of cell counts by microscopy could be collected with slow decompression. No clear cells could be identified in water that went through high decompression. The high-pressure decompression may have damaged part of the cells and the nucleic acids escaped through the filter. The microbial diversity was analyzed from two drill holes by pyrosequencing amplicons of the bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and from the fungal ITS regions from both DNA and RNA fractions. The identified prokaryotic diversity was low, dominated by Firmicute, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria species that are common in deep subsurface environments. The archaeal diversity consisted mainly of Methanobacteriales. Ascomycota dominated the fungal diversity and fungi were discovered to be active and to produce ribosomes in the deep oligotrophic biosphere. The deep fluids from the Pyhäsalmi mine shared several features with other deep Precambrian continental subsurface environments including saline, Ca-dominated water and stable isotope compositions positioning left from the meteoric water line. The dissolved gas phase was dominated by nitrogen but the gas composition clearly differed from that of atmospheric air. Despite carbon-poor conditions indicated by the lack of carbon-rich fracture fillings and only minor amounts of dissolved carbon detected in formation waters, some methane was found in the drill

  20. Efficiently Building On-line Tools for Distributed Heterogeneous Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Rackl

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Software development is getting more and more complex, especially within distributed middleware-based environments. A major drawback during the overall software development process is the lack of on-line tools, i.e. tools applied as soon as there is a running prototype of an application. The MIMO MIddleware MOnitor provides a solution to this problem by implementing a framework for an efficient development of on-line tools. This paper presents a methodology for developing on-line tools with MIMO. As an example scenario, we choose a distributed medical image reconstruction application, which represents a test case with high performance requirements. Our distributed, CORBA-based application is instrumented for being observed with MIMO and related tools. Additionally, load balancing mechanisms are integrated for further performance improvements. As a result, we obtain an integrated tool environment for observing and steering the image reconstruction application. By using our rapid tool development process, the integration of on-line tools shows to be very convenient and enables an efficient tool deployment.

  1. Mission planning for heterogeneous uxvs operating in a post disaster urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    environment . Otherwise, if the potential is not tapped, the efforts of our forefathers in the development of technologies will be wasted. Technologies ...FOR HETEROGENEOUS UxVs OPERATING IN A POST-DISASTER URBAN ENVIRONMENT by Choon Seng Leon Mark Tan September 2017 Thesis Advisor: Oleg...DISASTER URBAN ENVIRONMENT 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Choon Seng Leon Mark Tan 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval

  2. Immobilization of uranium and neptunium by microorganisms in subsurface crystalline rock environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawczyk-Baersch, Evelyn; Schmeide, Katja; Bok, Frank [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, P.O. Box 51 01 19, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Pedersen, Karsten [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    In crystalline rock, the dominant transport medium for radionuclides is groundwater flowing through subsurface fractures. Since groundwater is containing microorganisms, fracture surfaces support biological growth of microbial communities, the so-called bio-films. The microbial diversity of these bio-films depends on the microbial consortia and the chemical composition of the fracture water. Subsurface bio-films have a significant effect on the adsorption capacity of host rock formations by forming a barrier between the rock surface and the groundwater. They can significantly affect subsurface biogeochemical interactions, leading to the immobilization and adsorption of radionuclides. Microbial studies were performed to evaluate the relevance of microbial processes for the immobilization of radionuclides in a deep crystalline repository for high-level radioactive waste. Studies were performed in Olkiluoto, in the rock characterization facility ONKALO in Finland, and in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in Sweden. Massive 5-10-mm thick bio-films were observed in both sites attached to tunnel walls where groundwater was seeping from bedrock fractures. In experiments the effect of uranium on bio-films was studied on site in the ONKALO tunnel by adding UO{sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} with a final U-concentration of 1.0x10{sup -5} M to the fracture water in a self-constructed flow cell by using detached bio-film samples. bio-film specimens collected for transmission electron microscopy studies indicated that uranium in the bio-film was immobilized intracellularly in microorganisms as needle-shaped uranyl phosphate minerals, similar to meta-Autunite (Ca[UO{sub 2}]{sub 2}[PO{sub 4}]{sub 2}.10-12H{sub 2}O). In contrast, thermodynamic calculation of the theoretical predominant fields of uranium species and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the formation of aqueous uranium carbonate species Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}UO{sub 2

  3. On the experimental evolution of specialization and diversity in heterogeneous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmin, Jean-Nicolas; Kassen, Rees

    2007-04-01

    Environmental variance can be decomposed into two components: the contrast among patches in the optimal phenotype and the variance in productivity among patches. Both components can influence the outcome of selection in heterogeneous environments. In general genetic diversity within a population should increase as the contrast among patches increases. As the variance in productivity increases, on the other hand, individual niche breadth should decrease since the response to selection becomes dominated by adaptation to the most productive patch. We tested this interpretation of diversity in heterogeneous environments by selecting the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens over several hundred generations in pair-wise mixtures of four carbon substrates. We then assessed the response to selection in the mixtures in terms of performance on each component substrate. The results provide general support for this interpretation of the environmental variance and suggest further that competition among genotypes promotes diversification in heterogeneous environments.

  4. A Simulation Environment for Bio-inspired Heterogeneous Chained Modular Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Brunete

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new simulation environment aimed at heterogeneous chained modular robots. This simulator allows for the testing of the feasibility of the design, the checking of how the modules will perform in the field, and the verifying of the hardware, electronics and communication designs before the prototype is built, saving time and resources. The paper shows how the simulator is built and how it can be set up to adapt to new designs. It also gives some examples of its use showing different heterogeneous modular robots running in different environments.

  5. Fourier transform infrared spectral detection of life in polar subsurface environments and its application to Mars exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Louisa J; Johnson, Diane; Cockell, Charles S; Grady, Monica M

    2015-09-01

    Cryptoendolithic lichen communities of the Dry Valleys, Antarctica, survive in an extremely inhospitable environment, finding refuge in microscopic niches where conditions suitable for life exist. Such "within-rock" communities may have evolved on Mars when conditions for life on the surface deteriorated to such an extent that they could no longer survive. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of unprepared whole-rock Antarctic Beacon sandstones was used to vertically profile molecular vibrations of fatty acids, proteins, and carboxylic acids created by endolithic communities. Spectral biosignatures were found localized to lichen-rich areas and were absent in crustal regions and the bulk rock substrate. These cryptoendolithic profiles will aid similar spectroscopic investigations of organic biosignatures during future Martian subsurface studies and will help in the identification of similar communities in other localities across the Earth.

  6. INTEGRATED OUTCROP AND SUBSURFACE STUDIES OF THE INTERWELL ENVIRONMENT OF CARBONATE RESERVOIRS: CLEAR FORK (LEONARDIAN-AGE) RESERVOIRS, WEST TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Jerry Lucia

    2002-01-31

    This is the final report of the project ''Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonardian-Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico'', Department of Energy contract no. DE-AC26-98BC15105 and is the third in a series of similar projects funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy and The University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology, Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonates. All three projects focus on the integration of outcrop and subsurface data for the purpose of developing improved methods for modeling petrophysical properties in the interwell environment. The first project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-89BC14470, was a study of San Andres outcrops in the Algerita Escarpment, Guadalupe Mountains, Texas and New Mexico, and the Seminole San Andres reservoir, Permian Basin. This study established the basic concepts for constructing a reservoir model using sequence-stratigraphic principles and rock-fabric, petrophysical relationships. The second project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-93BC14895, was a study of Grayburg outcrops in the Brokeoff Mountains, New Mexico, and the South Cowden Grayburg reservoir, Permian Basin. This study developed a sequence-stratigraphic succession for the Grayburg and improved methods for locating remaining hydrocarbons in carbonate ramp reservoirs. The current study is of the Clear Fork Group in Apache Canyon, Sierra Diablo Mountains, West Texas, and the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir, Permian Basin. The focus was on scales of heterogeneity, imaging high- and low-permeability layers, and the impact of fractures on reservoir performance. In this study (1) the Clear Fork cycle stratigraphy is defined, (2) important scales of petrophysical variability are confirmed, (3) a unique rock-fabric, petrophysical relationship is defined, (4) a porosity method for correlating high-frequency cycles and defining rock

  7. Watershed scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Green, Stefan [University of Illinois, Chicago; Canion, Andy [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Overholt, Will [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Prakash, Om [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wafula, Dennis [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Hubbard, Daniela [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Watson, David B [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale, and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH < 4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta that were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified, and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota, and within a single genus within the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

  8. A Hybrid Density Functional Theory/Molecular Mechanics Approach for Linear Response Properties in Heterogeneous Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Li, Xin; Sandberg, Jaime A R; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Ågren, Hans

    2014-03-11

    We introduce a density functional theory/molecular mechanical approach for computation of linear response properties of molecules in heterogeneous environments, such as metal surfaces or nanoparticles embedded in solvents. The heterogeneous embedding environment, consisting from metallic and nonmetallic parts, is described by combined force fields, where conventional force fields are used for the nonmetallic part and capacitance-polarization-based force fields are used for the metallic part. The presented approach enables studies of properties and spectra of systems embedded in or placed at arbitrary shaped metallic surfaces, clusters, or nanoparticles. The capability and performance of the proposed approach is illustrated by sample calculations of optical absorption spectra of thymidine absorbed on gold surfaces in an aqueous environment, where we study how different organizations of the gold surface and how the combined, nonadditive effect of the two environments is reflected in the optical absorption spectrum.

  9. Designing an MOOC as an agent-platform aggregating heterogeneous virtual learning environments

    OpenAIRE

    Wautelet, Yves; Heng, Samedi; Kolp, Manuel; Penserini, Loris; Poelmans, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    With the emergence of cloud technologies, on the one hand, and social networks, on the other hand, the possibilities for e-learning have been drastically enhanced in the latest years. Virtual Learning Environments (VLE) can now indeed contain a huge amount of learning resources; in parallel, large user communities are available in social networks. These nevertheless remain different systems but, by using these heterogeneous software environments together, the possibilities for interaction cou...

  10. Designing a MOOC as an Agent-Platform Aggregating Heterogeneous Virtual Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Wautelet, Yves; Heng, Samedi; Kolp, Manuel; Penserini, Loris; Poelmans, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    With the emergence of cloud technologies on the one hand and social networks on the other hand, the possibilities for e-learning have been considerably enhanced in the latest years. Virtual Learning Environments (VLE) can now indeed contain a huge amount of learning resources; in parallel large user communities are available in social networks. Nevertheless, these systems remain different but, by using these heterogeneous software environments together, the possibilities for interaction could...

  11. Subjective usability of speech, touch and gesture in a heterogeneous multi-display environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.P.J. de; Tak, S.; Toet, A.; Schultz, S.; Wijbenga, J.P.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2013-01-01

    Several interaction techniques have been proposed to enable transfer of information between different displays in heterogeneous multi-display environments. However, it is not clear whether subjective user preference for these different techniques depends on the nature of the displays between which

  12. Service-life prediction of reinforced concrete structures in subsurface environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ki Jung; Jung, Hae Ryong; Park, Joo Wan [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    This paper focuses on the estimation of durability and service-life of reinforced concrete structures in Wolsong Low- and intermediate-level wastes Disposal Center (WLDC) in Korea. There are six disposal silos located in the saturated environment. The silo concrete is degraded due to reactions with groundwater and chemical attacks, and finally it will lose its properties as a transport barrier. The infiltration of sulfate and magnesium, leaching of potassium hydroxide, and chlorine induced corrosion are the most significant factors for degradation of reinforced concrete structure in underground environment. From the result of evaluation of the degradation time for each factor, the degradation rate of the reinforced concrete due to sulfate and magnesium is 1.308×10{sup -3} cm/yr, and it is estimated to take 48,000 years for full degradation while potassium hydroxide is leached in depth of less than 1.5 cm at 1,000 years after the initiation of degradation. In case of chlorine induced corrosion, it takes 1,648 years to initiate corrosion in the main reinforced bar and 2,288 years to reach the lifetime limit of the structural integrity, and thus it is evaluated as the most significant factor.

  13. Watershed-scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment cocontaminated with uranium and nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasrotia, Puja; Green, Stefan J; Canion, Andy; Overholt, Will A; Prakash, Om; Wafula, Denis; Hubbard, Daniela; Watson, David B; Schadt, Christopher W; Brooks, Scott C; Kostka, Joel E

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment cocontaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution, and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semiquantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic small-subunit rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from the subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH libraries of site groundwater samples, were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota and within a single genus of the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

  14. Invasive alien plants benefit more from clonal integration in heterogeneous environments than natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Jian; Müller-Schärer, Heinz; van Kleunen, Mark; Cai, Ai-Ming; Zhang, Ping; Yan, Rong; Dong, Bi-Cheng; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2017-12-01

    What confers invasive alien plants a competitive advantage over native plants remains open to debate. Many of the world's worst invasive alien plants are clonal and able to share resources within clones (clonal integration), particularly in heterogeneous environments. Here, we tested the hypothesis that clonal integration benefits invasive clonal plants more than natives and thus confers invasives a competitive advantage. We selected five congeneric and naturally co-occurring pairs of invasive alien and native clonal plants in China, and grew pairs of connected and disconnected ramets under heterogeneous light, soil nutrient and water conditions that are commonly encountered by alien plants during their invasion into new areas. Clonal integration increased biomass of all plants in all three heterogeneous resource environments. However, invasive plants benefited more from clonal integration than natives. Consequently, invasive plants produced more biomass than natives. Our results indicate that clonal integration may confer invasive alien clonal plants a competitive advantage over natives. Therefore, differences in the ability of clonal integration could potentially explain, at least partly, the invasion success of alien clonal plants in areas where resources are heterogeneously distributed. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Mobility management for highly mobile users and vehicular networks in heterogeneous environments

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Karl; Åhlund, Christer; Gukhool, Balkrishna Sharma; Cherkaoui, Soumaya

    2008-01-01

      With the recent developments in wireless networks, different radio access technologies are used in different places depending on capacity in terms of throughput, cell size, scalability etc. In this context, mobile users, and in particular highly mobile users and vehicular networks, will see an increasing number and variety of wireless access points enabling Internet connectivity. Such a heterogeneous networking environment needs, however, an efficient mobility management scheme offering ...

  16. A study of the impact of scheduling parameters in heterogeneous computing environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Sarah S [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a tool for exploring system scheduler parameter settings in a heterogeneous computing environment. Through the coupling of simulation and optimization techniques, this work investigates optimal scheduling intervals, the impact of job arrival prediction on scheduling, as well as how to best apply fair use policies. The developed simulation framework is quick and modular, enabling decision makers to further explore decisions in real-time regarding scheduling policies or parameter changes.

  17. Performance of subsurface flow constructed wetland mesocosms in enhancing nutrient removal from municipal wastewater in warm tropical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateganya, Najib Lukooya; Kazibwe, Alex; Langergraber, Guenter; Okot-Okumu, James; Hein, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient-rich effluents from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have significantly contributed to eutrophication of surface waters in East Africa. We used vertical (VF, 0.2 m(2)) and horizontal (HF, 0.45 m(2)) subsurface flow (SSF) constructed wetland (CW) configurations to design single-stage mesocosms planted with Cyperus papyrus, and operating under batch hydraulic loading regime (at a mean organic loading rate of 20 g COD m(-2) d(-1) for HF and 77 g COD m(-2) d(-1) for VF beds). The aim of the investigation was to assess the performance of SSF CWs as hotspots of nutrient transformation and removal processes between the WWTP and the receiving natural urban wetland environment in Kampala, Uganda. C. papyrus coupled with batch loading enhanced aerobic conditions and high efficiency regarding the elimination of suspended solids, organic matter, and nutrients with significant performance (P < .05) in VF mesocosms. The mean N and P elimination rates (g m(-2) d(-1)) were 9.16 N and 5.41 P in planted VF, and 1.97 N and 1.02 P in planted HF mesocosms, respectively. The lowest mean nutrient elimination rate (g m(-2) d(-1)) was 1.10 N and 0.62 P found in unplanted HF controls. Nutrient accumulation in plants and sediment retention were found to be essential processes. It can be concluded that whereas the SSF CWs may not function as independent treatment systems, they could be easily adopted as flexible and technologically less intensive options at a local scale, to increase the resilience of receiving environments by buffering peak loads from WWTPs.

  18. Local electric fields and molecular properties in heterogeneous environments through polarizable embedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Kongsted, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    the additional effective external field effect, i.e., the manifestations of the environment polarization induced by the external field, which allows for the calculation of properties defined in terms of the external field. Within a response framework, we report calculations of the one- and two-photon absorption......In spectroscopies, the local field experienced by a molecule embedded in an environment will be different from the externally applied electromagnetic field, and this difference may significantly alter the response and transition properties of the molecule. The polarizable embedding (PE) model has...... previously been developed to model the local field contribution stemming from the direct molecule-environment coupling of the electromagnetic response properties of molecules in solution as well as in heterogeneous environments, such as proteins. Here we present an extension of this approach to address...

  19. Search efficiency of biased migration towards stationary or moving targets in heterogeneously structured environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimzade, Youness; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2017-12-01

    Efficient search acts as a strong selective force in biological systems ranging from cellular populations to predator-prey systems. The search processes commonly involve finding a stationary or mobile target within a heterogeneously structured environment where obstacles limit migration. An open generic question is whether random or directionally biased motions or a combination of both provide an optimal search efficiency and how that depends on the motility and density of targets and obstacles. To address this question, we develop a simple model that involves a random walker searching for its targets in a heterogeneous medium of bond percolation square lattice and used mean first passage time (〈T 〉 ) as an indication of average search time. Our analysis reveals a dual effect of directional bias on the minimum value of 〈T 〉 . For a homogeneous medium, directionality always decreases 〈T 〉 and a pure directional migration (a ballistic motion) serves as the optimized strategy, while for a heterogeneous environment, we find that the optimized strategy involves a combination of directed and random migrations. The relative contribution of these modes is determined by the density of obstacles and motility of targets. Existence of randomness and motility of targets add to the efficiency of search. Our study reveals generic and simple rules that govern search efficiency. Our findings might find application in a number of areas including immunology, cell biology, ecology, and robotics.

  20. Ecology and distribution of a new biomarker linked to 1,2-dichloropropane dechlorination in subsurface environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Crespo, E.; Loeffler, F. E.

    2011-12-01

    of dehalospiring populations in subsurface environments.

  1. Integrated subsurface water solutions for coastal environments through integrated pump&treat and aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdikaki, Martha; Kallioras, Andreas; Christoforidis, Christophoros; Iossifidis, Dimitris; Zafeiropoulos, Anastasios; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Makropoulos, Christos; Raat, Klaasjan; van den Berg, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Coastal wetlands in semi-arid regions, as in Circum-Mediterranean, are considered important ecosystems that provide valuable services to human population and the environment, such as: flood protection, erosion control, wildlife habitat, water quality, recreation and carbon sequestration. Un-managed surface and groundwater exploitation in these areas usually leads to deterioration of such sensitive ecosystems by means of water resources degradation and/or increased salinity. Groundwater usually plays a vital role for the sustainability of these hydrological systems, as the underlying aquifers operate as regulators for both quantity and quality of their waters. Multi-layer and multi-objective Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) systems can be proved effective groundwater engineered solutions for the restoration of deteriorated coastal wetlands in semi- and arid regions. The plain of Marathon is a typical Mediterranean environment that hosts a naturally occurring -and today degraded- coastal wetland with the characteristics of a distinct ecosystem linked to a typical coastal hydrogeological system of a semi-arid region; and therefore can serve as a model for similar systems world-wide. The geo-hydrological setting of the area involves a multi-layer aquifer system consisting of (i) an upper un-consolidated formation of depositional unit dominated mostly by fluvial sediments and (ii) the surrounding and underlying karstified marbles; both being linked to the investigated wetland and also subjected to seawater encroachment. A smart engineered MAR system via an optimised Pump & Treat system integrated with an Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) scheme in this area would include the abstraction of brackish groundwater from the deeper karst aquifer at a location close to the shoreline and direct treatment with Reverse Osmosis (RO). for desalination. Two-fold re-use scheme of the purified effluent can then be engineered for (i) the restoration of the coastal wetland; and (ii

  2. Development of a Survivable Cloud Multi-Robot Framework for Heterogeneous Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Osunmakinde

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cloud robotics is a paradigm that allows for robots to offload computationally intensive and data storage requirements into the cloud by providing a secure and customizable environment. The challenge for cloud robotics is the inherent problem of cloud disconnection. A major assumption made in the development of the current cloud robotics frameworks is that the connection between the cloud and the robot is always available. However, for multi-robots working in heterogeneous environments, the connection between the cloud and the robots cannot always be guaranteed. This work serves to assist with the challenge of disconnection in cloud robotics by proposing a survivable cloud multi-robotics (SCMR framework for heterogeneous environments. The SCMR framework leverages the combination of a virtual ad hoc network formed by robot-to-robot communication and a physical cloud infrastructure formed by robot-to-cloud communications. The quality of service (QoS on the SCMR framework was tested and validated by determining the optimal energy utilization and time of response (ToR on drivability analysis with and without cloud connection. The design trade-off, including the result, is between the computation energy for the robot execution and the offloading energy for the cloud execution.

  3. Methods to optimize livestock breeding programs with genotype by environment interaction and genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    Genotype by environment interaction (G × E) and genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance are both related to genetic variation in environmental sensitivity. Both phenomena can have consequences for livestock breeding programs. This thesis focuses on developing methods to optimize livestock

  4. The diffusive logistic model with a free boundary in a heterogeneous time-periodic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Weiwei; Peng, Rui; Wei, Lei

    2017-09-01

    This paper is concerned with a diffusive logistic model with advection and a free boundary in a spatially heterogeneous and time periodic environment. Such a model may be used to describe the spreading of a new or invasive species with the free boundary representing the expanding front. Under more general assumptions on the initial data and the function standing for the intrinsic growth rate of the species, sharp criteria for spreading and vanishing are established, and estimates for spreading speed when spreading occurs are also derived. The obtained results considerably improve and complement the existing ones, especially those of [11,25].

  5. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments: A Systematic Investigation of Different Quantum Chemical Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmann, Casper; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    such couplings provide important insight into the strength of interaction between photo-active pigments in protein-pigment complexes. Recently, attention has been payed to how the environment modifies or even controls the electronic couplings. To enable such theoretical predictions, a fully polarizable embedding......-order multipole moments. We use this extended model to systematically examine three different ways of obtaining EET couplings in a heterogeneous medium ranging from use of the exact transition density to a point-dipole approximation. Several interesting observations are made including that explicit use...... of transition densities in the calculation of the electronic couplings - also when including the explicit environment contribution - can be replaced by a much simpler transition point charge description without comprising the quality of the model predictions....

  6. Quantifying and relating land-surface and subsurface variability in permafrost environments using lidar and surface geophsical datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Susan S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gangodagmage, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dafflon, B [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Wainwright, H [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Peterson, J [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gusmeroli, A [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Ulrich, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Wu, Yuxin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rowland, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tweedie, Craig [University of Texas, El Paso; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of permafrost dynamics and its critical impact on climate feedbacks warrant continued development of advanced high-latitude terrestrial ecosystem characterization and monitoring approaches. In this study, we explore the value of remote sensing and surface geophysical data for characterizing land surface and subsurface properties and their linkages in an Alaskan Coastal Plain ecosystem. We base our study on data collected at the end of the 2011 growing season in the Barrow Environmental Observatory, where a nested suite of measurements were collected within a polygon-dominated region including: surface ground penetrating radar, electromagnetic, and electrical resistance tomography data; thaw depth, soil temperature and moisture content, soil texture, soil carbon and nitrogen content, and major and trace cations. Previously-collected lidar data were also available for the study. Analysis of the datasets, individually and in combination, revealed the utility of the methods for characterizing critical land-surface and subsurface properties and associated spatial zonation. Lidar analysis was performed to extract geomorphic metrics (such as slope, curvature, and directed distance of polygons), which potentially indicate drainage potential and permafrost deformation state. Cluster analysis of these lidar-obtained attributes suggested that the land surface can be grouped into three spatially coherent zones, each having a dominant geomorphic expression including: a high centered polygon zone, a low centered polygon zone and a transitional zone. Comparison of the geophysical attributes from radar, electrical resistance tomography, and electromagnetic data with point measurements suggests that the surface geophysical data can provide very high-resolution information about subsurface properties that affect ecosystem feedbacks to climate, such as thaw depth and moisture content. Cluster analysis suggested that the geophysical attributes also varied spatially in a

  7. Geophysical Imaging for Investigating the Delivery and Distribution of Amendments in the Heterogeneous Subsurface of the F.E. Warren AFB

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    proppant into the subsurface using hydraulic fracturing. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and seismic datasets were acquired before...changes in pore fluid total dissolved solids (TDS). In particular, we hypothesized that the replacement of the fracture proppants with HRC® would...high-frequency piezo source, (6) adding dye to proppant , and (7) drilling borehole at fracture location. Bottom row from left to right: (8) ERT well

  8. Temporal and Spatial Heterogeneities of Surface Fluxes in an Urban Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, J. K.; Smith, J. A.; Baeck, M. L.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Ramamurthy, P.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we examine the regional climatology of the water cycle in urban environments through analyses of the surface energy balance. Analyses center on long-term observations (2007 - 2011) and land-surface model simulations of latent and sensible heat flux for the Princeton University campus. Model analyses are based on the Noah Land Surface Model (LSM), which is widely used for problems involving coupled land-atmospheric interactions. The research site is characterized by a mixture of grassland, trees, and urban surfaces. Partitioning of net radiation between latent and sensible heat flux plays an important role in determining the regional rainfall climatology. This research is motivated by the following question: How does temporal variability of soil moisture and vegetation state affect the partitioning of net radiation between latent and sensible heat flux in a heterogeneous urban environment? We use turbulent-flux measurements at a 5-minute time scale from an eddy covariance station, as well as measurements of the surface radiation balance (upwelling and downwelling longwave and shortwave), meteorological variables, CO2 concentration, soil moisture, and precipitation. Additionally, a water vapor-CO2 (q-c) flux similarity method developed by Scanlon and Kustas (2010) was implemented to partition the measured latent heat flux at the eddy covariance station into bare soil evaporation and transpiration components; results from this partitioning are used to examine the Noah land-surface model formulation. We show that: 1.) soil moisture plays an important role in the surface energy balance, even for this heterogeneous urban environment, 2.) the Noah LSM does a poor job of capturing soil moisture variability, due largely to inadequate representation of vertical structure of urban soils, 3.) seasonal variation of vegetation state is important for the surface energy balance, and 4.) the bare-soil evaporation simulated by the Noah LSM exhibits a positive

  9. The impact of resource quality on the evolution of virulence in spatially heterogeneous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Min; Boots, Mike

    2017-03-07

    Understanding the drivers of parasite evolution and in particular disease virulence remains a major focus of evolutionary theory. Here, we examine the role of resource quality and in particular spatial environmental heterogeneity in the distribution of these resources on the evolution of virulence. There may be direct effects of resources on host susceptibility and pathogenicity alongside effects on reproduction that indirectly impact host-parasite population dynamics. Therefore, we assume that high resource quality may lead to both increased host reproduction and/or increased disease resistance. In completely mixed populations there is no effect of resource quality on the outcome of disease evolution. However, when there are local interactions higher resource quality generally selects for higher virulence/transmission for both linear and saturating transmission-virulence trade-off assumptions. The exception is that in castrators (i.e., infected hosts have no reproduction), higher virulence is selected for both low and high resource qualities at mixed local and global infection. Heterogeneity in the distribution of environment resources only has an effect on the outcome in castrators where random distributions generally select for higher virulence. Overall, our results further underline the importance of considering spatial structure in order to understand evolutionary processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Origins of heterogeneity in Streptococcus mutans competence: interpreting an environment-sensitive signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Stephen J.; Son, Minjun

    2017-02-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on chemical signaling and environmental cues to regulate disease-causing behavior in complex microenvironments. The human pathogen Streptococcus mutans employs a particularly complex signaling and sensing scheme to regulate genetic competence and other virulence behaviors in the oral biofilms it inhabits. Individual S. mutans cells make the decision to enter the competent state by integrating chemical and physical cues received from their microenvironment along with endogenously produced peptide signals. Studies at the single-cell level, using microfluidics to control the extracellular environment, provide physical insight into how the cells process these inputs to generate complex and often heterogeneous outputs. Fine changes in environmental stimuli can dramatically alter the behavior of the competence circuit. Small shifts in pH can switch the quorum sensing response on or off, while peptide-rich media appear to switch the output from a unimodal to a bimodal behavior. Therefore, depending on environmental cues, the quorum sensing circuitry can either synchronize virulence across the population, or initiate and amplify heterogeneity in that behavior. Much of this complex behavior can be understood within the framework of a quorum sensing system that can operate both as an intercellular signaling mechanism and intracellularly as a noisy bimodal switch.

  11. Aram Chaos: a Long Lived Subsurface Aqueous Environment with Strong Water Resources Potential for Human Missions on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, L.; Mueller, R.; Niles, P. B.; Glotch, T.; Archer, P. D.; Bell, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aram Chaos, Mars is a crater 280 kilometers in diameter with elevations circa. minus 2 to minus 3 kilometers below datum that provides a compelling landing site for future human explorers as it features multiple scientific regions of interest (ROI) paired with a rich extensible Resource ROI that features poly-hydrated sulfates [1]. The geologic history of Aram Chaos suggests several past episodes of groundwater recharge and infilling by liquid water, ice, and other materials [1-3]. The creation of the fractured region with no known terrestrial equivalent may have been caused by melting of deep ice reservoirs that triggered the collapse of terrain followed by catastrophic water outflows over the region. Aram Chaos is of particular scientific interest because it is hypothesized that the chaotic terrain may be the source of water that contributed to the creation of nearby valleys such as Ares Vallis flowing toward Chryse Planitia. The liquid water was likely sourced as groundwater and therefore represents water derived from a protected subsurface environment making it a compelling astrobiological site [2]. The past history of water is also represented by high concentrations of hematite, Fe-oxyhydroxides, mono-hydrated and poly-hydrated sulfates [1, 2]. Poly-hydrated sulfates are likely to contain abundant water that evolves at temperatures below 500 degrees Centigrade thus conferring Aram Chaos a potentially high value for early in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) [4]. The geologic history also calls for future prospecting of deep ice deposits and possibly liquid water via deep drilling. The most recent stratigraphic units in the central part of Aram Chaos are not fractured, and are part of a dome-shaped formation that features bright, poorly-consolidated material that contains both hydrated sulfates and ferric oxides according to OMEGA (Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces et l'Activité) data [5]. These surface material characteristics are

  12. Techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides in contaminated subsurface environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, P.M.; Watson, D.B.; Blake, D.A.; Beard, L.P.; Brooks, S.C.; Carley, J.M.; Criddle, C.S.; Doll, W.E.; Fields, M.W.; Fendorf, S.E.; Geesey, G.G.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Hubbard, S.S.; Istok, J.D.; Kelly, S.; Kemner, K.M.; Peacock, A.D.; Spalding, B.P.; White, D.C.; Wolf, A.; Wu, W.; Zhou, J.

    2004-11-14

    Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex face a daunting challenge of remediating huge below inventories of legacy radioactive and toxic metal waste. More often than not, the scope of the problem is massive, particularly in the high recharge, humid regions east of the Mississippi river, where the off-site migration of contaminants continues to plague soil water, groundwater, and surface water sources. As of 2002, contaminated sites are closing rapidly and many remediation strategies have chosen to leave contaminants in-place. In situ barriers, surface caps, and bioremediation are often the remedial strategies of chose. By choosing to leave contaminants in-place, we must accept the fact that the contaminants will continue to interact with subsurface and surface media. Contaminant interactions with the geosphere are complex and investigating long term changes and interactive processes is imperative to verifying risks. We must be able to understand the consequences of our action or inaction. The focus of this manuscript is to describe recent technical developments for assessing the performance of in situ bioremediation and immobilization of subsurface metals and radionuclides. Research within DOE's NABIR and EMSP programs has been investigating the possibility of using subsurface microorganisms to convert redox sensitive toxic metals and radionuclides (e.g. Cr, U, Tc, Co) into a less soluble, less mobile forms. Much of the research is motivated by the likelihood that subsurface metal-reducing bacteria can be stimulated to effectively alter the redox state of metals and radionuclides so that they are immobilized in situ for long time periods. The approach is difficult, however, since subsurface media and waste constituents are complex with competing electron acceptors and hydrogeological conditions making biostimulation a challenge. Performance assessment of in situ biostimulation strategies is also difficult and typically requires detailed

  13. An Evolutionary Video Assignment Optimization Technique for VOD System in Heterogeneous Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King-Man Ho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the video assignment problem of a hierarchical Video-on-Demand (VOD system in heterogeneous environments where different quality levels of videos can be encoded using either replication or layering. In such systems, videos are delivered to clients either through a proxy server or video broadcast/unicast channels. The objective of our work is to determine the appropriate coding strategy as well as the suitable delivery mechanism for a specific quality level of a video such that the overall system blocking probability is minimized. In order to find a near-optimal solution for such a complex video assignment problem, an evolutionary approach based on genetic algorithm (GA is proposed. From the results, it is shown that the system performance can be significantly enhanced by efficiently coupling the various techniques.

  14. Event heap: a coordination infrastructure for dynamic heterogeneous application interactions in ubiquitous computing environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Bradley E.; Fox, Armando; Winograd, Terry A.; Hanrahan, Patrick M.

    2010-04-20

    An efficient and adaptive middleware infrastructure called the Event Heap system dynamically coordinates application interactions and communications in a ubiquitous computing environment, e.g., an interactive workspace, having heterogeneous software applications running on various machines and devices across different platforms. Applications exchange events via the Event Heap. Each event is characterized by a set of unordered, named fields. Events are routed by matching certain attributes in the fields. The source and target versions of each field are automatically set when an event is posted or used as a template. The Event Heap system implements a unique combination of features, both intrinsic to tuplespaces and specific to the Event Heap, including content based addressing, support for routing patterns, standard routing fields, limited data persistence, query persistence/registration, transparent communication, self-description, flexible typing, logical/physical centralization, portable client API, at most once per source first-in-first-out ordering, and modular restartability.

  15. A Mathematical Model of Collective Cell Migration in a Three-Dimensional, Heterogeneous Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonko, David P.; Manning, Lathiena; Starz-Gaiano, Michelle; Peercy, Bradford E.

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is essential in animal development, homeostasis, and disease progression, but many questions remain unanswered about how this process is controlled. While many kinds of individual cell movements have been characterized, less effort has been directed towards understanding how clusters of cells migrate collectively through heterogeneous, cellular environments. To explore this, we have focused on the migration of the border cells during Drosophila egg development. In this case, a cluster of different cell types coalesce and traverse as a group between large cells, called nurse cells, in the center of the egg chamber. We have developed a new model for this collective cell migration based on the forces of adhesion, repulsion, migration and stochastic fluctuation to generate the movement of discrete cells. We implement the model using Identical Math Cells, or IMCs. IMCs can each represent one biological cell of the system, or can be aggregated using increased adhesion forces to model the dynamics of larger biological cells. The domain of interest is filled with IMCs, each assigned specific biophysical properties to mimic a diversity of cell types. Using this system, we have successfully simulated the migration of the border cell cluster through an environment filled with larger cells, which represent nurse cells. Interestingly, our simulations suggest that the forces utilized in this model are sufficient to produce behaviors of the cluster that are observed in vivo, such as rotation. Our framework was developed to capture a heterogeneous cell population, and our implementation strategy allows for diverse, but precise, initial position specification over a three- dimensional domain. Therefore, we believe that this model will be useful for not only examining aspects of Drosophila oogenesis, but also for modeling other two or three-dimensional systems that have multiple cell types and where investigating the forces between cells is of interest. PMID:25875645

  16. A mathematical model of collective cell migration in a three-dimensional, heterogeneous environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Stonko

    Full Text Available Cell migration is essential in animal development, homeostasis, and disease progression, but many questions remain unanswered about how this process is controlled. While many kinds of individual cell movements have been characterized, less effort has been directed towards understanding how clusters of cells migrate collectively through heterogeneous, cellular environments. To explore this, we have focused on the migration of the border cells during Drosophila egg development. In this case, a cluster of different cell types coalesce and traverse as a group between large cells, called nurse cells, in the center of the egg chamber. We have developed a new model for this collective cell migration based on the forces of adhesion, repulsion, migration and stochastic fluctuation to generate the movement of discrete cells. We implement the model using Identical Math Cells, or IMCs. IMCs can each represent one biological cell of the system, or can be aggregated using increased adhesion forces to model the dynamics of larger biological cells. The domain of interest is filled with IMCs, each assigned specific biophysical properties to mimic a diversity of cell types. Using this system, we have successfully simulated the migration of the border cell cluster through an environment filled with larger cells, which represent nurse cells. Interestingly, our simulations suggest that the forces utilized in this model are sufficient to produce behaviors of the cluster that are observed in vivo, such as rotation. Our framework was developed to capture a heterogeneous cell population, and our implementation strategy allows for diverse, but precise, initial position specification over a three- dimensional domain. Therefore, we believe that this model will be useful for not only examining aspects of Drosophila oogenesis, but also for modeling other two or three-dimensional systems that have multiple cell types and where investigating the forces between cells is of

  17. Heterogeneity in avian richness-environment relationships along the Pacific Crest Trail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. McGrann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Predictions of the responses of montane bird communities to climate change generally presuppose that species and assemblages hold constant relationships to temperature across large study regions. However, comparative studies of avian communities exploring the factors that currently shape species richness patterns rarely analyze relationships across neighboring ecological regions of the same mountain chain. Evaluations of the intrinsic regional differences in species-environment relationships are needed to better inform expectations of how bird communities may be affected by future climate change. In this study, we evaluated the relative importance of three environmental factors (temperature, precipitation, and net primary productivity in structuring avian richness patterns along a continuous mega-transect. We followed the route of the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT (32.58° N to 42.00° N, ranging in elevation from 365 to 4020 m on the California cordillera and completed avian point counts on 3578 systematically established survey plots. We divided this mega-transect into five sections, which corresponded to distinct ecological regions along the mountain chain. Regions differed both for elevation-richness patterns, exhibiting linear and unimodal trends, and for model-supported environmental drivers of patterns, with some richness-environment correlations changing sign across adjacent regions. These results were robust to sampling bias, regional species availability, and spatial autocorrelation. Although seasonal variation in avian movements may have limited influence on our results, we conclude that intrinsic regional environments affect bird species richness differently in each of these sections on the PCT, thus creating region-specific species-environment relationships. Appreciation of regional environmental heterogeneity will only increase in light of forecasted climate change, where regional predictions often diverge greatly from global trends

  18. Application of multiple-point geostatistics on modelling pumping tests and tracer tests in heterogeneous environments with complex geological structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huysmans, Marijke; Dassargues, Alain

    2014-05-01

    In heterogeneous environments with complex geological structures, analysis of pumping and tracer tests is often problematic. Standard interpretation methods do not account for heterogeneity or simulate this heterogeneity introducing empirical zonation of the calibrated parameters or using variogram-based geostatistical techniques that are often not able to describe realistic heterogeneity in complex geological environments where e.g. sedimentary structures, multi-facies deposits, structures with large connectivity or curvi-linear structures can be present. Multiple-point geostatistics aims to overcome the limitations of the variogram and can be applied in different research domains to simulate heterogeneity in complex environments. In this project, multiple-point geostatistics is applied to the interpretation of pumping tests and a tracer test in an actual case of a sandy heterogeneous aquifer. This study allows to deduce the main advantages and disadvantages of this technique compared to variogram-based techniques for interpretation of pumping tests and tracer tests. A pumping test and a tracer test were performed in the same sandbar deposit consisting of cross-bedded units composed of materials with different grain sizes and hydraulic conductivities. The pumping test and the tracer test are analyzed with a local 3D groundwater model in which fine-scale sedimentary heterogeneity is modelled using multiple-point geostatistics. To reduce CPU and RAM requirements of the multiple-point geostatistical simulation steps, edge properties indicating the presence of irregularly-shaped surfaces are directly simulated. Results show that for the pumping test as well as for the tracer test, incorporating heterogeneity results in a better fit between observed and calculated drawdowns/concentrations. The improvement of the fit is however not as large as expected. In this paper, the reasons for these somewhat unsatisfactory results are explored and recommendations for future

  19. A finite mixture model for genotype and environment interactions: Detecting latent population heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Nathan A.; Neale, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Approaches such as DeFries-Fulker extremes regression (LaBuda et al., 1986) are commonly used in genetically informative studies to assess whether familial resemblance varies as a function of the scores of pairs of twins. While useful for detecting such effects, formal modelling of differences in variance components as a function of pairs' trait scores is rarely attempted. We therefore present a finite mixture model which specifies that the population consists of latent groups which may differ in i) their means, and ii) the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors on within-group variation and covariation. This model may be considered as a special case of a factor mixture model, which combines the features of a latent class model with those of a latent trait model. Various models for the class membership of twin pairs may be employed, including additive genetic, common environment, specific environment or major locus (QTL) factors. Simulation results based on variance components derived from Turkheimer and colleagues (2003), illustrate the impact of factors such as the difference in group means and variance components on the feasibility of correctly estimating the parameters of the mixture model. Model-fitting analyses estimated group heritability as .49, which is significantly greater than heritability for the rest of the population in early childhood. These results suggest that factor mixture modelling is sufficiently robust for detecting heterogeneous populations even when group mean differences are modest. PMID:16790151

  20. Lab-scale simulation of the fate and transport of nano zero-valent iron in subsurface environments: aggregation, sedimentation, and contaminant desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Lo, Irene M C; Dong, Haoran; Rao, Pinhua; Mak, Mark S H

    2012-08-15

    Heavy metal removal using nano zero-valent iron (NZVI) has drawn growing attention due to the ease of application and high removal efficiency. However, uncertainties regarding its fate and transport in subsurface environments have raised concerns that require further exploration. In this study, aggregation, sedimentation, and Cr/As desorption of three types of NZVIs were investigated under various conditions. It was found that the aggregation behavior of the NZVIs differed from one another in regard to reaction time and ionic strength, associated with the respective critical size for sedimentation. Sedimentation of NZVIs was positively related to the concentrations and average particle sizes. The sedimentation kinetics of NZVI followed two concomitant processes, i.e., (1) direct sedimentation of larger particles, and (2) initial aggregation and then sedimentation of smaller particles. When loaded with Cr/As, NZVIs tended to deposit faster, possibly due to the precipitation of Cr/As onto the nanoparticle surfaces resulting in larger particle sizes. Moreover, desorption of Cr/As from Cr/As loaded NZVIs was detected in the presence of typical groundwater ions, as well as natural organic matter, and poses a potential risk to the subsurface environment. The desorption of Cr was linearly related to the release of iron ions, while As desorption was mitigated when the immobilization of Cr increased. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Microbial-sized, carboxylate-modified microspheres as surrogate tracers in a variety of subsurface environments: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ronald W.; Metge, David W.; LeBlanc, Denis R.

    2017-01-01

    Since 1986, fluorescent carboxylate-modified polystyrene/latex microspheres (FCM) have been co-injected into aquifers along with conservative tracers and viruses, bacteria, and (or) protozoa. Use of FCM has resulted in new information about subsurface transport behaviors of microorganisms in fractured crystalline rock, karst limestone, soils, and granular aquifers. FCM have been used as surrogates for oocysts of the pathogenic protist Cryptosporidium parvum in karst limestone and granular drinking-water aquifers. The advantages of FCM in subsurface transport studies are that they are safe in tracer applications, negatively charged, easy to detect, chemically inert, and available in wide range of sizes. The limitations of FCM are that the quantities needed for some field transport studies can be prohibitively expensive and that their surface characteristics may not match the microorganisms of interest. These limitations may be ameliorated, in part by using chemically modified FCM so that their surface characteristics are a better match to that of the organisms. Also, more sensitive methods of detection may allow using smaller quantities of FCM. To assess how the transport behaviors of FCM and pathogens might compare at the field scale, it is helpful to conduct side-by-side comparisons of their transport behaviors using the geologic media and site-specific conditions that characterize the field site.

  2. Terrestrial Subsurface Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2015-10-15

    The Earth’s crust is a solid cool layer that overlays the mantle, with a varying thickness of between 30-50 km on continental plates, and 5-10 km on oceanic plates. Continental crust is composed of a variety of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks that weather and re-form over geologic cycles lasting millions to billions of years. At the crust surface, these weathered minerals and organic material combine to produce a variety of soils types that provide suitable habitats and niches for abundant microbial diversity (see Chapter 4). Beneath this soil zone is the subsurface. Once thought to be relatively free of microorganisms, recent estimates have calculated that between 1016-1017 g C biomass (2-19% of Earth’s total biomass) may be present in this environment (Whitman et al., 1998;McMahon and Parnell, 2014). Microbial life in the subsurface exists across a wide range of habitats: in pores associated with relatively shallow unconsolidated aquifer sediments to fractures in bedrock formations that are more than a kilometer deep, where extreme lithostatic pressures and temperatures are encountered. While these different environments contain varying physical and chemical conditions, the absence of light is a constant. Despite this, diverse physiologies and metabolisms enable microorganisms to harness energy and carbon for growth in water-filled pore spaces and fractures. Carbon and other element cycles are driven by microbial activity, which has implications for both natural processes and human activities in the subsurface, e.g., bacteria play key roles in both hydrocarbon formation and degradation. Hydrocarbons are a major focus for human utilization of the subsurface, via oil and gas extraction and potential geologic CO2 sequestration. The subsurface is also utilized or being considered for sequestered storage of high-level radioactive waste from nuclear power generation and residual waste from past production of weapons grade nuclear materials. While our

  3. Convergent Foraging Tactics of Marine Predators with Different Feeding Strategies across Heterogeneous Ocean Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Queiroz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Advances in satellite tracking and archival technologies now allow marine animal movements and behavior to be recorded at much finer temporal scales, providing a more detailed ecological understanding that can potentially be applicable to conservation and management strategies. Pelagic sharks are commercially exploited worldwide with current concerns that populations are declining, however, how pelagic sharks use exploited environments remains enigmatic for most species. Here we analyzed high-resolution dive depth profiles of two pelagic shark species with contrasting feeding strategies to investigate movement patterns in relation to environmental heterogeneity. Seven macropredatory blue (Prionace glauca and six plankton-feeding basking (Cetorhinus maximus sharks were tagged with pop-off satellite-linked archival tags in the North Atlantic Ocean to examine habitat use and investigate the function of dives. We grouped dives of both species into five major categories based on the two-dimensional dive profile shape. Each dive-shape class presented similar frequency and characteristics among the two species with U- and V-shaped dives predominating. We tested the spatial occurrence of different U- and V-shape dive parameters in response to environmental field gradients and found that mean depth and mean depth range decreased with increasing levels of primary productivity (chlorophyll “a”, whereas ascent velocities displayed a positive correlation. The results suggest that a planktivore and a macropredator responded behaviourally in similar ways to environmental heterogeneity. This indicates fine-scale dive profiles of shark species with different feeding strategies can be used to identify key marine habitats, such as foraging areas where sharks aggregate and which may represent target areas for conservation.

  4. Subsurface Contamination Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Yuan

    2001-12-12

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the

  5. Adaptive neighbor connection for PRMs: A natural fit for heterogeneous environments and parallelism

    KAUST Repository

    Ekenna, Chinwe

    2013-11-01

    Probabilistic Roadmap Methods (PRMs) are widely used motion planning methods that sample robot configurations (nodes) and connect them to form a graph (roadmap) containing feasible trajectories. Many PRM variants propose different strategies for each of the steps and choosing among them is problem dependent. Planning in heterogeneous environments and/or on parallel machines necessitates dividing the problem into regions where these choices have to be made for each one. Hand-selecting the best method for each region becomes infeasible. In particular, there are many ways to select connection candidates, and choosing the appropriate strategy is input dependent. In this paper, we present a general connection framework that adaptively selects a neighbor finding strategy from a candidate set of options. Our framework learns which strategy to use by examining their success rates and costs. It frees the user of the burden of selecting the best strategy and allows the selection to change over time. We perform experiments on rigid bodies of varying geometry and articulated linkages up to 37 degrees of freedom. Our results show that strategy performance is indeed problem/region dependent, and our adaptive method harnesses their strengths. Over all problems studied, our method differs the least from manual selection of the best method, and if one were to manually select a single method across all problems, the performance can be quite poor. Our method is able to adapt to changing sampling density and learns different strategies for each region when the problem is partitioned for parallelism. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. M-RATS: Mobile-based Radio Access Technology Selector for Heterogeneous Wireless Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tudzarov

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless heterogeneous environments are a common reality today and will be so even more in the future. This paper is focused on providing a wireless access selection method for the future mobile terminals that will use naturally inspired algorithms for best network selection. The novel algorithm uses mobile terminal measurements from different radio access technologies within a given time window. The network selection is based on specified criteria, whose number can be increased as needed. Each criterion is modeled with a membership function associated with Fuzzy Logic controllers, which are optimized by using Particle Swarm Optimization. Each criterion is weighted, with the aim to assign the influence on the decision for a radio access network. Hence, our proposed algorithm implements past knowledge of the service performances of available wireless networks used by the mobile, to make a decision for network selection on given time intervals. The main contribution in the algorithm for wireless access network selection is in the usage of nature inspired algorithms, such as Particle Swarm Optimization – PSO, for optimization of Fuzzy Logic controllers, as well as usage of a Genetic Algorithm for optimization of decision making based on multi-criteria inputs. The simulation analysis has shown that the proposed algorithm gives a better probability of satisfied users compared to other existing wireless network selection algorithms.

  7. A De-Centralized Scheduling and Load Balancing Algorithm for Heterogeneous Grid Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Manish; Das, Sajal K.; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In the past two decades, numerous scheduling and load balancing techniques have been proposed for locally distributed multiprocessor systems. However, they all suffer from significant deficiencies when extended to a Grid environment: some use a centralized approach that renders the algorithm unscalable, while others assume the overhead involved in searching for appropriate resources to be negligible. Furthermore, classical scheduling algorithms do not consider a Grid node to be N-resource rich and merely work towards maximizing the utilization of one of the resources. In this paper we propose a new scheduling and load balancing algorithm for a generalized Grid model of N-resource nodes that not only takes into account the node and network heterogeneity, but also considers the overhead involved in coordinating among the nodes. Our algorithm is de-centralized, scalable, and overlaps the node coordination time of the actual processing of ready jobs, thus saving valuable clock cycles needed for making decisions. The proposed algorithm is studied by conducting simulations using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) paradigm.

  8. Bacteria and game theory: the rise and fall of cooperation in spatially heterogeneous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Guillaume; Vyawahare, Saurabh; Austin, Robert H

    2014-08-06

    One of the predictions of game theory is that cooperative behaviours are vulnerable to exploitation by selfish individuals, but this result seemingly contradicts the survival of cooperation observed in nature. In this review, we will introduce game theoretical concepts that lead to this conclusion and show how the spatial competition dynamics between microorganisms can be used to model the survival and maintenance of cooperation. In particular, we focus on how Escherichia coli bacteria with a growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype maintain a proliferative phenotype when faced with overcrowding to gain a fitness advantage over wild-type populations. We review recent experimental approaches studying the growth dynamics of competing GASP and wild-type strains of E. coli inside interconnected microfabricated habitats and use a game theoretical approach to analyse the observed inter-species interactions. We describe how the use of evolutionary game theory and the ideal free distribution accurately models the spatial distribution of cooperative and selfish individuals in spatially heterogeneous environments. Using bacteria as a model system of cooperative and selfish behaviours may lead to a better understanding of the competition dynamics of other organisms-including tumour-host interactions during cancer development and metastasis.

  9. Modeling microbial dynamics in heterogeneous environments: Growth on soil carbon sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resat, Haluk; Bailey, Vanessa L.; McCue, Lee Ann; Konopka, Allan

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new hybrid model to study how microbial dynamics are affected by the heterogeneity in the physical structure of the environment. The modeling framework can represent porous media such as soil. The individual based biological model can explicitly simulate microbial diversity, and cell metabolism is regulated via optimal allocation of cellular resources to enzyme synthesis, control of growth rate by protein synthesis capacity, and shifts to dormancy. This model was developed to study how microbial community functioning is influenced by local environmental conditions and by the functional attributes of individual microbes. Different strategies for acquisition of carbon from polymeric cellulose were investigated. Bacteria that express membrane-associated hydrolase had different growth and survival dynamics in soil pores than bacteria that release extracellular hydrolases. The kinetic differences may suggest different functional roles for these two classes of microbes in cellulose utilization. Our model predicted an emergent behavior in which co-existence led to higher cellulose utilization efficiency and reduced stochasticity. Microbial community dynamics were simulated at two spatial scales: micro-pores that resemble 6-20 {micro}m size portions of the soil physical structure and in 111 {micro}m size soil aggregates with a random pore structure. Trends in dynamic properties were very similar at these two scales, implying that micro-scale studies can be useful approximations to aggregate scale studies when local effects on microbial dynamics are studied.

  10. A Novel Anti-Stealth Technique Based on Stratospheric Balloon-Borne Radar in Heterogeneous Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbary, Mohamed; Zong, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Radar cross section (RCS) of a stealth target model like F-117A can be improved by multichannel stratospheric balloon-borne bistatic radar at higher aspect angle. The potential problem is that the stealth target may produce range walk in clutter heterogeneous environments, thus it is difficult to determine the range ambiguity under quadratic range cell migration (QRCM). In this paper, a novel detection technique known as hybrid modified fractional-radon Fourier transform (MFrRFT) and knowledge-aided space-time adaptive processes (KA-STAP) is proposed to impact this kind of problem simultaneously. KA-STAP is applied to suppress the non-homogeneous clutter in the received data, and MFrRFT is used to eliminate the QRCM along with the second-order keystone transform (SOKT), so as to estimate the range ambiguity and compensate the stealth target's range walk. The hybrid MFrRFT/KA-STAP scheme is simple and applicable to the small RCS of fast stealth target with a long-time coherent integration. Finally, to achieve high accuracy of locating stealth target, a non-parametric detection technique based on Legendre orthogonal polynomials is applied to reconstruct the probability density function (pdf) of real RCS data predicted by physical optics (PO) approximation method.

  11. Lévy-like behaviour in deterministic models of intelligent agents exploring heterogeneous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, D.; Miramontes, O.; Larralde, H.

    2009-10-01

    Many studies on animal and human movement patterns report the existence of scaling laws and power-law distributions. Whereas a number of random walk models have been proposed to explain observations, in many situations individuals actually rely on mental maps to explore strongly heterogeneous environments. In this work, we study a model of a deterministic walker, visiting sites randomly distributed on the plane and with varying weight or attractiveness. At each step, the walker minimizes a function that depends on the distance to the next unvisited target (cost) and on the weight of that target (gain). If the target weight distribution is a power law, p(k) ~ k-β, in some range of the exponent β, the foraging medium induces movements that are similar to Lévy flights and are characterized by non-trivial exponents. We explore variations of the choice rule in order to test the robustness of the model and argue that the addition of noise has a limited impact on the dynamics in strongly disordered media.

  12. Final technical report for project titled Quantitative Characterization of Cell Aggregation/Adhesion as Predictor for Distribution and Transport of Microorganisms in Subsurface Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, April Z. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Wan, Kai-tak [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-09-02

    This project aims to explore and develop enabling methodology and techniques for nano-scale characterization of microbe cell surface contact mechanics, interactions and adhesion quantities that allow for identification and quantification of indicative properties related to microorganism migration and transport behavior in porous media and in subsurface environments. Microbe transport has wide impact and therefore is of great interest in various environmental applications such as in situ or enhanced subsurface bioremediation,filtration processes for water and wastewater treatments and protection of drinking water supplies. Although great progress has been made towards understanding the identities and activities of these microorganisms in the subsurface, to date, little is known of the mechanisms that govern the mobility and transport of microorganisms in DOE’s contaminated sites, making the outcomes of in situ natural attenuation or contaminant stability enhancement unpredictable. Conventionally, movement of microorganisms was believed to follows the rules governing solute (particle) transport. However, recent studies revealed that cell surface properties, especially those pertaining to cell attachment/adhesion and aggregation behavior, can cause the microbe behavior to deviate from non-viable particles and hence greatly influence the mobility and distribution of microorganisms in porous media.This complexity highlights the need to obtain detailed information of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions in order to improve and refine the conceptual and quantitative model development for fate and transport of microorganisms and contaminant in subsurface. Traditional cell surface characterization methods are not sufficient to fully predict the deposition rates and transport behaviors of microorganism observed. A breakthrough of methodology that would allow for quantitative and molecular-level description of intrinsic cell surface properties indicative for cell

  13. Application-Driven OAM Framework for Heterogeneous IoT Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sterle, Janez; Sedlar, Urban; Rugelj, Miha; Kos, Andrej; Volk, Mojca

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel approach for providing a comprehensive operational picture of heterogeneous networks by collecting system information from physical, data-link, network and application layers using...

  14. The fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in the subsurface environment. Transportation and transformation mechanism; Il destino ambientale degli idrocarburi petroliferi nel sottosuolo. Meccanismi di trasporto e di trasformazione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerlia, T. [Stazione sperimentale per i combustibili, San Donato Milanese, MI (Italy)

    2000-11-01

    Understanding the fate of petroleum products in the soil systems is the starting point to evaluate and predict pollution migration and to design remedial actions. Several processes and chemical-physical parameters are involved. The key parameters influencing transport and transformation mechanisms of petroleum hydrocarbons in the subsurface environment are considered. [Italian] La comprensione del destino dei prodotti petroliferi nel suolo e nel sottosuolo e' premessa essenziale per valutare e per prevedere la diffusione e le conseguenze dell'inquinamento e per programmare le azioni di contenimento e di bonifica. Molteplici gli aspetti coinvolti. Vengono presi in esame i parametri chiave che influenzano i meccanismi di trasporto e di trasformazione degli idrocarburi petroliferi nel suolo.

  15. Characterization of active members in C and N cycles in the subsurface environment of the Witwatersrand Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, M. R.; Lau, C. M.; Tetteh, G.; Snyder, L.; Kieft, T. L.; Lollar, B. S.; Li, L.; Maphanga, S.; van Heerden, E.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Fracture fluid from various depths and locations in Beatrix gold mine (Gold Fields Ltd.), located in the Welkom region on the 2.9 Ga Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa has been previously studied. Research has shown differential geochemistry data and distinctive community structure which varies from the dominance of different Proteobacterial classes in waters with paleometeoric 18O and 2H signatures including methanotrophs to one dominated by Firmicutes including Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator-like taxa, which are associated with more saline waters with high concentrations of dissolved H2, hydrocarbons from water-rock reaction and 18O and 2H signatures above the Global Meteoric Water Line. Archaea seem to be a minority and all are euryarchaeota including methanogenic genera. The question is:Which of them are actively driving the subsurface C and N cycles? At shaft 3 on level 26, 1.3 kmbls, fracture water from 42 m behind the tunnel wall located in the Main quartzite formation was collected and analyzed. The temperature, pH, Eh, dissolved O2 and salinity of this hydrocarbon-containing fracture water ranged from 35 to 38°C, 8.2 to 8.8, -30 to -100 mV, 0.3 to 30 μM and 4.2 to 4.3 ppt, respectively. Gas comprised 60% CH4 and 20% N2. The same fracture formerly yielded Halicephalobus mephisto, the first reported subsurface nematode. Microorganisms were captured on filters in two field seasons. Defined by 16S rDNA, 2011 January sample contains β-Proteobacteria (50%), Firmicutes (39%) and α- and γ-Proteobacteria (7%). Of the Firmicutes, 90% were represented by Ca. D. audaxviator. All archaea detected are closestly related to sequences also reported from South African gold mines, with Crenarchaeota accounting for 77% of the clones. Prospective methane-oxidation and production were assessed by amplifying genes encoding for particulate methane monooxygenase alpha subunit (pmoA) and methyl-coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit (mcrA). PmoA genes of Type II

  16. A Novel Energy-Aware Distributed Clustering Algorithm for Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks in the Mobile Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Wkram, Chris Hadri; Duan, Jiajie; Chou, Jarong

    2015-12-10

    In order to prolong the network lifetime, energy-efficient protocols adapted to the features of wireless sensor networks should be used. This paper explores in depth the nature of heterogeneous wireless sensor networks, and finally proposes an algorithm to address the problem of finding an effective pathway for heterogeneous clustering energy. The proposed algorithm implements cluster head selection according to the degree of energy attenuation during the network's running and the degree of candidate nodes' effective coverage on the whole network, so as to obtain an even energy consumption over the whole network for the situation with high degree of coverage. Simulation results show that the proposed clustering protocol has better adaptability to heterogeneous environments than existing clustering algorithms in prolonging the network lifetime.

  17. A Novel Energy-Aware Distributed Clustering Algorithm for Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks in the Mobile Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Gao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to prolong the network lifetime, energy-efficient protocols adapted to the features of wireless sensor networks should be used. This paper explores in depth the nature of heterogeneous wireless sensor networks, and finally proposes an algorithm to address the problem of finding an effective pathway for heterogeneous clustering energy. The proposed algorithm implements cluster head selection according to the degree of energy attenuation during the network’s running and the degree of candidate nodes’ effective coverage on the whole network, so as to obtain an even energy consumption over the whole network for the situation with high degree of coverage. Simulation results show that the proposed clustering protocol has better adaptability to heterogeneous environments than existing clustering algorithms in prolonging the network lifetime.

  18. Secondary minerals from salt caves in the Atacama Desert (Chile: a hyperarid and hypersaline environment with potential analogies to the Martian subsurface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo De Waele

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 15 years several expeditions by French, American and especially Italian cavers have unveiled over 50 caves in the Cordillera de la Sal (Atacama Desert, Northern Chile. Many of these caves contain a variety of speleothems and minerals, some of which have rarely been observed within karst systems. Most of the secondary deposits in these caves are composed of halite, but also other halide, carbonate, sulphate, nitrate, phosphate, and silicate minerals have been found. Among the sixteen cave mineral species recognized, atacamite, darapskite, blödite, leonite, anhydrite, and especially antarcticite are worth mentioning. In one of the samples an unknown Ca-Sr-bearing chloride mineral has also been discovered, but it has not been possible to carry out detailed mineralogical analyses. These often-rare minerals have formed in this region due to the very extreme hyperarid and salt-rich environment. This research reports the mineralogical results and proposes the genetical mechanisms leading to the formation of antarcticite, powdery anhydrite, and the paragenesis of the halite-darapskite-blödite. This study also shows that Atacama caves may be excellent analogues to study weathering processes and subsurface secondary minerals in hyperarid and hypersaline environments on Mars.

  19. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Michael J.

    2005-06-01

    Natural selection in highly radioactive waste sites may yield bacteria with favorable bioremediating characteristics. However, until recently the microbial ecology of such environments has remained unexplored because of the high costs and technical complexities associated with extracting and characterizing samples from such sites. We have examined the bacterial ecology within radioactive sediments from a high-level nuclear waste plume in the vadose zone on the DOE?s Hanford Site in south-central Washington state (Fredrickson et al, 2004). Manganese-dependent, radiation resistant bacteria have been isolated from this contaminated site including the highly Mn-dependent Deinococcus and Arthrobacter spp.

  20. Subsurface cavity detection in a karst environment using electrical resistivity (er: a case study from yongweol-ri, South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooq Muhammad

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    ABSTRACT

    Karst voids were encountered during road construction in Yongweol-ri, South Korea. Attempts to determine the extent of the karst voids through drilling was expensive, time-consuming and too dangerous. An electrical resistivity survey was thus carried out to investigate current subsurface geology beneath the proposed road network. This investigation was aimed at imaging karstic voids and detecting areas prone to ground subsidence through the collapse of cavities beneath a road segment overlying such features. A numerical modelling study preceded the field survey to determine whether the electrical resistivity method could identify such features. The field data set consisted of eleven electric profiles acquired using dipoledipole array; electrical resistivity profiles (100 m and 300 m length were measured using a dipole-dipole electrode configuration and electrode spacing was kept at 5 m to ensure good coverage of the study area. The resistivity data was inverted using 2D and 3D algorithms based on the least squares smoothness constraint technique. The inverted resistivity images provide a clear view of weathered soils, the distribution of weak areas or karst voids and bed rock. Several low resistivity areas were identified and the subsequent drilling of such anomalous areas led to the discovery of several weak zones or clayfilled underground cavities; the drilling results had excellent correlation with the resistivity images. The electrical resistivity imaging result proved precise and extremely efficient in delineating the karstic void investigation and should be taken into account when choosing an investigation technique to be used at complex geological sites. A remedial action plan involving consolidation grouting work has been suggested prior to road construction.


  1. A flexible unified architecture to support heterogeneous multi-device learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giemza, Adam; Bollen, Lars; Jansen, Marc; Ulrich Hoppe, H.

    2013-01-01

    Since the personal ownership of mobile devices has increased steadily over the last decade, many students own personal mobile devices that can reasonably be integrated into mobile learning scenarios. Besides all the benefits this option brings, there are also drawbacks, such as the heterogeneity of

  2. Applying the Earth System Grid Security System in a Heterogeneous Environment of Data Access Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Philip; Lawrence, Bryan; Lowe, Dominic; Norton, Peter; Pascoe, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    CEDA (Centre for Environmental Data Archival) based at STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory is host to the BADC (British Atmospheric Data Centre) and NEODC (NERC Earth Observation Data Centre) with data holdings of over half a Petabyte. In the coming months this figure is set to increase by over one Petabyte through the BADC's role as one of three data centres to host the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5) core archive of climate model data. Quite apart from the problem of managing the storage of such large volumes there is the challenge of collating the data together from the modelling centres around the world and enabling access to these data for the user community. An infrastructure to support this is being developed under the US Earth System Grid (ESG) and related projects bringing together participating organisations together in a federation. The ESG architecture defines Gateways, the web interfaces that enable users to access data and data serving applications organised into Data Nodes. The BADC has been working in collaboration with US Earth System Grid team and other partners to develop a security system to restrict access to data. This provides single sign-on via both OpenID and PKI based means and uses role based authorisation facilitated by SAML and OpenID based interfaces for attribute retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the access control architecture and look at how this has been implemented for CEDA. CEDA has developed an expertise in data access and information services over several years through a number of projects to develop and enhance these capabilities. Participation in CMIP5 comes at a time when a number of other software development activities are coming to fruition. New services are in the process of being deployed alongside services making up the system for ESG. The security system must apply access control across this heterogeneous environment of different data services and technologies. One strand

  3. Environmental heterogeneity generates opposite gene-by-environment interactions for two fitness-related traits within a population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culumber, Zachary W; Schumer, Molly; Monks, Scott; Tobler, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Theory predicts that environmental heterogeneity offers a potential solution to the maintenance of genetic variation within populations, but empirical evidence remains sparse. The live-bearing fish Xiphophorus variatus exhibits polymorphism at a single locus, with different alleles resulting in up to five distinct melanistic "tailspot" patterns within populations. We investigated the effects of heterogeneity in two ubiquitous environmental variables (temperature and food availability) on two fitness-related traits (upper thermal limits and body condition) in two different tailspot types (wild-type and upper cut crescent). We found gene-by-environment (G × E) interactions between tailspot type and food level affecting upper thermal limits (UTL), as well as between tailspot type and thermal environment affecting body condition. Exploring mechanistic bases underlying these G × E patterns, we found no differences between tailspot types in hsp70 gene expression despite significant overall increases in expression under both thermal and food stress. Similarly, there was no difference in routine metabolic rates between the tailspot types. The reversal of relative performance of the two tailspot types under different environmental conditions revealed a mechanism by which environmental heterogeneity can balance polymorphism within populations through selection on different fitness-related traits. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  4. Evolutionary Game Theory-Based Evaluation of P2P File-Sharing Systems in Heterogeneous Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Matsuda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peer-to-Peer (P2P file sharing is one of key technologies for achieving attractive P2P multimedia social networking. In P2P file-sharing systems, file availability is improved by cooperative users who cache and share files. Note that file caching carries costs such as storage consumption and processing load. In addition, users have different degrees of cooperativity in file caching and they are in different surrounding environments arising from the topological structure of P2P networks. With evolutionary game theory, this paper evaluates the performance of P2P file sharing systems in such heterogeneous environments. Using micro-macro dynamics, we analyze the impact of the heterogeneity of user selfishness on the file availability and system stability. Further, through simulation experiments with agent-based dynamics, we reveal how other aspects, for example, synchronization among nodes and topological structure, affect the system performance. Both analytical and simulation results show that the environmental heterogeneity contributes to the file availability and system stability.

  5. Grid heterogeneity in in-silico experiments: an exploration of drug screening using DOCK on cloud environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Wen-Wai; Chien, Shu; Kusumoto, Yasuyuki; Date, Susumu; Haga, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale in-silico screening is a necessary part of drug discovery and Grid computing is one answer to this demand. A disadvantage of using Grid computing is the heterogeneous computational environments characteristic of a Grid. In our study, we have found that for the molecular docking simulation program DOCK, different clusters within a Grid organization can yield inconsistent results. Because DOCK in-silico virtual screening (VS) is currently used to help select chemical compounds to test with in-vitro experiments, such differences have little effect on the validity of using virtual screening before subsequent steps in the drug discovery process. However, it is difficult to predict whether the accumulation of these discrepancies over sequentially repeated VS experiments will significantly alter the results if VS is used as the primary means for identifying potential drugs. Moreover, such discrepancies may be unacceptable for other applications requiring more stringent thresholds. This highlights the need for establishing a more complete solution to provide the best scientific accuracy when executing an application across Grids. One possible solution to platform heterogeneity in DOCK performance explored in our study involved the use of virtual machines as a layer of abstraction. This study investigated the feasibility and practicality of using virtual machine and recent cloud computing technologies in a biological research application. We examined the differences and variations of DOCK VS variables, across a Grid environment composed of different clusters, with and without virtualization. The uniform computer environment provided by virtual machines eliminated inconsistent DOCK VS results caused by heterogeneous clusters, however, the execution time for the DOCK VS increased. In our particular experiments, overhead costs were found to be an average of 41% and 2% in execution time for two different clusters, while the actual magnitudes of the execution time

  6. Influence of snowpack and melt energy heterogeneity on snow cover depletion and snowmelt runoff simulation in a cold mountain environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBeer, Chris M.; Pomeroy, John W.

    2017-10-01

    snowpack energetics over the distributions) was found to yield similar SCD and discharge results as simulations that resolved internal energy differences. Spatial/internal snowpack melt energy effects are more pronounced at times earlier in spring before the main period of snowmelt and SCD, as shown in previously published work. The paper discusses the importance of these findings as they apply to the warranted complexity of snowmelt process simulation in cold mountain environments, and shows how the end-of-winter SWE distribution represents an effective means of resolving snow cover heterogeneity at multiple scales for modelling, even in steep and complex terrain.

  7. Investigating Seismic Wave Scattering in Heterogeneous Environments and Implications for Seismic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongajum, Emmanuel Leinyuy

    2011-07-01

    Inhomogeneities in the earth (fractures, layering, shape, composition) are responsible for seismic wave scattering and contribute towards amplitude, travel time, frequency and spectral fluctuations observed in seismic records. This thesis presents findings that complement our understanding of seismic scattering and imaging in heterogeneous media. Interest focused on probing the correlation between spatial variations in attributes that characterize the state (physical, chemical) of rocks and seismic waveform data with consideration towards potential implications for seismic survey design to optimize imaging, imaging with converted waves, microseismic monitoring, velocity modeling and imaging of lithological boundaries. The highlights of the research strategy include: • The use of stochastic methods to build realistic earth models that characterize the 1D, 2D and 3D spatial variations in rock properties. These petrophysical earth models are conditioned by experimental ("hard") data such as geology, wave velocities and density from case study areas like the Bosumtwi impact crater and the base metal deposits in Nash Creek (Canada) and Thompson (Canada). The distributions of the sulfide mineralization at Nash Creek and at Thompson represent two end members of the heterogeneity spectrum. While the sulfide mineralization at Nash Creek is highly disseminated in nature, the sulfide rich zones at Thompson occur as well defined volumes (lens-shaped) having a strong density contrast with respect to the host rocks. • Analysis of modeled forward (transmitted) and backward scattered wave propagation in the heterogeneous earth models. As a result of a study aimed at correlating resonant frequencies to scale length parameters, it is observed that the efficiency of the spectral ratio method is undermined by its sensitivity to the interference between P- and S-waves as well as the impedance contrast. It is also demonstrated that travel time of direct arrivals (transmitted waves

  8. Ecogenomic characterization of a marine microorganism belonging to a Firmicutes lineage that is widespread in both terrestrial and oceanic subsurface environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbluth, S.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Tringe, S. G.; Stepanauskas, R.; Rappe, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Large-volumes of basalt-hosted fluids from the sediment-covered subseafloor were collected in July 2011 from a horizon extending 29-117 meters below the sediment-rock interface at borehole 1362B, as well as from a deep horizon extending 193-292 meters below the sediment-rock interface at borehole 1362A, which are two of the latest generation of borehole observatories on the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Environmental DNA was sequenced from one fluid sample collected from each borehole, and a genomic bin related to the terrestrial Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator lineage within the Firmicutes phylum of bacteria was identified. The near-complete bacterial genome, herein named Candidatus Desulfopertinax inferamarinus, is composed of six scaffolds totaling 1.78 Mbp in length. Despite vast differences in geography and environment of origin, phylogenomic analysis indicate that D. inferamarinus and D. audaxviator form a monophyletic clade to the exclusion of all other sequenced genomes. Similar to its terrestrial relative, the draft genome of the marine D. inferamarinus revealed a motile, sporulating, sulfate-reducing, chemoautotrophic thermophile that is capable of synthesizing all amino acids and fixing inorganic carbon via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. Unlike the terrestrial clade, relatively few integrases and transposases were identified. The marine genome described here provides evidence that a life-style adapted to the isolated deep subsurface environment is a general feature of the broader, globally-distributed Desulforudis/Desulfopertinax lineage and provides insight into the adaptations required for microbial life in the marine versus terrestrial deep biospheres.

  9. A local segmentation parameter optimization approach for mapping heterogeneous urban environments using VHR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippa, Tais; Georganos, Stefanos; Lennert, Moritz; Vanhuysse, Sabine; Wolff, Eléonore

    2017-10-01

    Mapping large heterogeneous urban areas using object-based image analysis (OBIA) remains challenging, especially with respect to the segmentation process. This could be explained both by the complex arrangement of heterogeneous land-cover classes and by the high diversity of urban patterns which can be encountered throughout the scene. In this context, using a single segmentation parameter to obtain satisfying segmentation results for the whole scene can be impossible. Nonetheless, it is possible to subdivide the whole city into smaller local zones, rather homogeneous according to their urban pattern. These zones can then be used to optimize the segmentation parameter locally, instead of using the whole image or a single representative spatial subset. This paper assesses the contribution of a local approach for the optimization of segmentation parameter compared to a global approach. Ouagadougou, located in sub-Saharan Africa, is used as case studies. First, the whole scene is segmented using a single globally optimized segmentation parameter. Second, the city is subdivided into 283 local zones, homogeneous in terms of building size and building density. Each local zone is then segmented using a locally optimized segmentation parameter. Unsupervised segmentation parameter optimization (USPO), relying on an optimization function which tends to maximize both intra-object homogeneity and inter-object heterogeneity, is used to select the segmentation parameter automatically for both approaches. Finally, a land-use/land-cover classification is performed using the Random Forest (RF) classifier. The results reveal that the local approach outperforms the global one, especially by limiting confusions between buildings and their bare-soil neighbors.

  10. Sources and Sinks: A Stochastic Model of Evolution in Heterogeneous Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, Rutger; Hwa, Terence

    2010-12-01

    We study evolution driven by spatial heterogeneity in a stochastic model of source-sink ecologies. A sink is a habitat where mortality exceeds reproduction so that a local population persists only due to immigration from a source. Immigrants can, however, adapt to conditions in the sink by mutation. To characterize the adaptation rate, we derive expressions for the first arrival time of adapted mutants. The joint effects of migration, mutation, birth, and death result in two distinct parameter regimes. These results may pertain to the rapid evolution of drug-resistant pathogens and insects.

  11. Subsurface Biogeochemistry of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Univ. Relations and Science Education; Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst.

    2016-06-29

    A major scientific challenge in environmental sciences is to identify the dominant processes controlling actinide transport in the environment. It is estimated that currently, over 2200 metric tons of plutonium (Pu) have been deposited in the subsurface worldwide, a number that increases yearly with additional spent nuclear fuel (Ewing et al., 2010). Plutonium has been shown to migrate on the scale of kilometers, giving way to a critical concern that the fundamental biogeochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface are not well understood (Kersting et al., 1999; Novikov et al., 2006; Santschi et al., 2002). Neptunium (Np) is less prevalent in the environment; however, it is predicted to be a significant long-term dose contributor in high-level nuclear waste. Our focus on Np chemistry in this Science Plan is intended to help formulate a better understanding of Pu redox transformations in the environment and clarify the differences between the two long-lived actinides. The research approach of our Science Plan combines (1) Fundamental Mechanistic Studies that identify and quantify biogeochemical processes that control actinide behavior in solution and on solids, (2) Field Integration Studies that investigate the transport characteristics of Pu and test our conceptual understanding of actinide transport, and (3) Actinide Research Capabilities that allow us to achieve the objectives of this Scientific Focus Area (SFA and provide new opportunities for advancing actinide environmental chemistry. These three Research Thrusts form the basis of our SFA Science Program (Figure 1).

  12. Real rock-microfluidic flow cell: A test bed for real-time in situ analysis of flow, transport, and reaction in a subsurface reactive transport environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajveer; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn A; Fouke, Bruce W; Sanford, Robert A; Carrera, Martin; Werth, Charles J

    2017-09-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological interactions between groundwater and sedimentary rock directly control the fundamental subsurface properties such as porosity, permeability, and flow. This is true for a variety of subsurface scenarios, ranging from shallow groundwater aquifers to deeply buried hydrocarbon reservoirs. Microfluidic flow cells are now commonly being used to study these processes at the pore scale in simplified pore structures meant to mimic subsurface reservoirs. However, these micromodels are typically fabricated from glass, silicon, or polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and are therefore incapable of replicating the geochemical reactivity and complex three-dimensional pore networks present in subsurface lithologies. To address these limitations, we developed a new microfluidic experimental test bed, herein called the Real Rock-Microfluidic Flow Cell (RR-MFC). A porous 500μm-thick real rock sample of the Clair Group sandstone from a subsurface hydrocarbon reservoir of the North Sea was prepared and mounted inside a PDMS microfluidic channel, creating a dynamic flow-through experimental platform for real-time tracking of subsurface reactive transport. Transmitted and reflected microscopy, cathodoluminescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and confocal laser microscopy techniques were used to (1) determine the mineralogy, geochemistry, and pore networks within the sandstone inserted in the RR-MFC, (2) analyze non-reactive tracer breakthrough in two- and (depth-limited) three-dimensions, and (3) characterize multiphase flow. The RR-MFC is the first microfluidic experimental platform that allows direct visualization of flow and transport in the pore space of a real subsurface reservoir rock sample, and holds potential to advance our understandings of reactive transport and other subsurface processes relevant to pollutant transport and cleanup in groundwater, as well as energy recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Future of Subsurface Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, T. J.

    2006-12-01

    Existing monitoring and characterization technologies can cover only a small fraction of the subsurface, and the information collected cannot be used to effectively manage current and future drought and other water- related problems. Subsurface sciences need a breakthrough "instrument" to greatly expand and deepen our ability to "see into the groundwater basin." The theme of this talk is to promote the idea of collecting data intelligently and analyzing data smartly for characterization of the subsurface at high resolutions beyond the capabilities of current technology. Specifically, we argue that tomographic surveying is a smart approach, which collects data more cost-effectively and less invasively than existing technologies to characterize the subsurface environments. Limitations of a single type (hydrologic, chemical or geophysical) of tomographic survey then motivate fusion of different types of tomographic surveys such that each survey takes advantage of others to overcome its weakness to reach its optimal capability in a reciprocal manner. A basin is an appropriate scale for the purpose of water resources management. Therefore, the field-scale data collection and fusion concept/technology is expanded to basin-scale characterizations. In order to facilitate these basin-scale tomographic surveys, fusion of passive basin-scale tomographys are suggested that exploit recurrent natural stimuli (e,g., lightning, earthquakes, storm events, barometric variations, river- stage variations, etc.) as sources of excitations, along with implementation of sensor networks that provide long-term and spatially distributed monitoring of signals on the land surface and in the subsurface. This vision for basin-scale subsurface characterization undoubtedly faces unprecedented technological challenges and requires interdisciplinary collaborations (e.g., surface and subsurface hydrology, geophysics, geology, geochemist, information technology, applied mathematics, atmospheric

  14. Contrasting patterns in the small-scale heterogeneity of human helminth infections in urban and rural environments in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Simon; Alexander, Neal; Geiger, Stefan; Moyeed, Rana A; Stander, Julian; Fleming, Fiona; Hotez, Peter J; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Bethony, Jeffrey

    2006-09-01

    Marked heterogeneity exists in the patterns of parasitic infection between individuals, households and communities. Analysis of parasite distributions within populations is complicated by the fact that parasite distributions are highly aggregated and few studies have explicitly incorporated this distribution when investigating small-scale spatial heterogeneities. This study aimed to quantify the small-scale (within- and between-household) heterogeneity of helminth infection in an area of Minas Gerais State, Brazil, with rural and urban sectors. Parasitological data from a cross-sectional survey of 1,249 individuals aged 0-86 years from 242 households were analysed. Within-household clustering of infection was assessed using random effect logistic regression models and between-household spatial heterogeneity was assessed using a Bayesian negative binomial spatial model. The overall prevalence of hookworm (Necator americanus) was 66.9%, the prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni was 44.9% and the prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides was 48.8%. Statistical analysis indicated significant (within) household and (between household) spatial clustering of hookworm in both rural and urban areas and of S. mansoni in rural areas. There was no evidence of either household or spatial clustering of S. mansoni in urban areas. The spatial correlation of S. mansoni was estimated to reduce by half over a distance of 700 m in the rural area. Rural hookworm had a much smaller half-distance (28 m) and urban hookworm showed an even smaller half-distance (12 m). We suggest that such species-specific differences in patterns of infection by environment are primarily due to variation in exposure and parasite life cycle, although host genetic factors cannot be ruled out.

  15. Cultural Capital in Context: Heterogeneous Returns to Cultural Capital Across Schooling Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ida Gran; Jæger, Mads Meier

    2015-01-01

    This paper tests two competing explanations of differences in returns to cultural capital across schooling environments: Cultural reproduction (cultural capital yields a higher returns in high-achieving environments than in low-achieving ones) and cultural mobility (cultural capital yields higher....... These results principally support the cultural mobility explanation and suggest that research should pay explicit attention to the institutional contexts in which cultural capital is converted into educational success....

  16. Atrazine degradation using chemical-free process of USUV: Analysis of the micro-heterogeneous environments and the degradation mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, L.J., E-mail: xulijie827@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Chu, W., E-mail: cewchu@polyu.edu.hk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Graham, Nigel, E-mail: n.graham@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two chemical-free AOP processes are combined to enhance atrazine degradation. • ATZ degradation in sonophotolytic process was analyzed using a previous proposed model. • The micro-bubble/liquid heterogeneous environments in sonolytic processes were investigated. • The salt effects on different sonolytic processes were examined. • ATZ degradation mechanisms were investigated and pathways were proposed. - Abstract: The effectiveness of sonolysis (US), photolysis (UV), and sonophotolysis (USUV) for the degradation of atrazine (ATZ) was investigated. An untypical kinetics analysis was found useful to describe the combined process, which is compatible to pseudo first-order kinetics. The heterogeneous environments of two different ultrasounds (20 and 400 kHz) were evaluated. The heterogeneous distribution of ATZ in the ultrasonic solution was found critical in determining the reaction rates at different frequencies. The presence of NaCl would promote/inhibit the rates by the growth and decline of “salting out” effect and surface tension. The benefits of combining these two processes were for the first time investigated from the aspect of promoting the intermediates degradation which were resistant in individual processes. UV caused a rapid transformation of ATZ to 2-hydroxyatrazine (OIET), which was insensitive to UV irradiation; however, US and USUV were able to degrade OIET and other intermediates through • OH attack. On the other hand, UV irradiation also could promote radical generation via H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition, thereby resulting in less accumulation of more hydrophilic intermediates, which are difficult to degradation in the US process. Reaction pathways for ATZ degradation by all three processes are proposed. USUV achieved the greatest degree of ATZ mineralization with more than 60% TOC removed, contributed solely by the oxidation of side chains. Ammeline was found to be the only end-product in both US

  17. FUZZY-LOGIC BASED CALL ADMISSION CONTROL FOR A HETEROGENEOUS RADIO ENVIRONMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramkumar, Venkata; Mihovska, Albena D.; Prasad, Neeli R.

    evalueret for en heterogen radio access-teknologier (rotter) scenario. Den QoS parametre varierer afhængigt af den type af ansøgninger, og aftalen mellem udbyderen og brugeren. Den foreslåede CAC er baseret på en fuzzy logik mekanisme, der består af to etaper, i første omgang den bedste celle i hver RAT er...... valgt ved hjælp af en fuzzy sproglig controller, og i anden fase den bedste RAT baseret på brugerens præferencer er valgt ved hjælp den fuzzy flere attribut beslutningsprocessen (MADM) metode. Resultaterne viser, at brugeren kan vælge den bedste celle i hver RAT bruge cellen udvælgelse algoritme og...

  18. The role of spatial heterogeneity of the environment in soil fauna recovery after fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongalsky, K. B.; Zaitsev, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Forest fires are almost always heterogeneous, leaving less-disturbed sites that are potentially suitable as habitats for soil-dwelling creatures. The recovery of large soil animal communities after fires is therefore dependent on the spatial structure of the burned habitats. The role of locally less disturbed sites in the survival of soil macrofauna communities along with traditionally considered immigration from the surrounding undisturbed habitats is shown by the example of burnt areas located in three geographically distant regions of European Russia. Such unburned soil cover sites (perfugia) occupy 5-10% of the total burned habitats. Initially, perfugia are characterized by much higher (200-300% of the average across a burned area) diversity and abundance of soil fauna. A geostatistical method made it possible to estimate the perfugia size for soil macrofauna at 3-8 m.

  19. Use of CAH-degrading bacteria as test-organisms for evaluating the impact of fine zerovalent iron particles on the anaerobic subsurface environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velimirovic, Milica; Simons, Queenie; Bastiaens, Leen

    2015-09-01

    The release of fine zerovalent iron (ZVI) particles in the environment after being introduced for in-situ treatment of compounds like chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) may raise questions toward environmental safety, especially for nanoscale materials. Classical single-species ecotoxicity tests do focus on aerobic conditions and are only relevant for the scenario when ZVI-particles reach surface water. Herein, we present an alternative approach where a CAH-degrading mixed bacterial culture was used as test-organisms relevant for the anaerobic subsurface. The impact of different ZVI particles on the bacterial culture was evaluated mainly by quantifying ATP, a reporter molecule giving a general indication of the microbial activity. These lab-scale batch tests were performed in liquid medium, without protecting and buffering aquifer material, as such representing worst-case scenario. The activity of the bacterial culture was negatively influenced by nanoscale zerovalent iron at doses as low as 0.05 g L(-1). On the other hand, concentrations up to 2 g L(-1) of several different types of microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles stimulated the activity. However, very high doses of 15-30 g L(-1) of mZVI showed an inhibiting effect on the bacterial community. Negative effects of ZVIs were confirmed by H2 accumulation in the batch reactors and the absence of lactate consumption. Observed inhibition also corresponded to a pH increase above 7.5, explicable by ZVI corrosion that was found to be dose-dependent. The obtained results suggest that low doses of mZVIs will not show severe inhibition effects on the microbial community once used for in-situ treatment of CAHs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Heterogeneity of environments associated with transmission of visceral leishmaniasis in South-Eastern France and implication for control strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Faucher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visceral leishmaniasis due to Leishmania infantum is currently spreading into new foci across Europe. Leishmania infantum transmission in the Old World was reported to be strongly associated with a few specific environments. Environmental changes due to global warming or human activity were therefore incriminated in the spread of the disease. However, comprehensive studies were lacking to reliably identify all the environments at risk and thereby optimize monitoring and control strategy. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We exhaustively collected 328 cases of autochthonous visceral leishmaniasis from 1993 to 2009 in South-Eastern France. Leishmaniasis incidence decreased from 31 yearly cases between 1993 and 1997 to 12 yearly cases between 2005 and 2009 mostly because Leishmania/HIV coinfection were less frequent. No spread of human visceral leishmaniasis was observed in the studied region. Two major foci were identified, associated with opposite environments: whereas one involved semi-rural hillside environments partly made of mixed forests, the other involved urban and peri-urban areas in and around the region main town, Marseille. The two neighboring foci were related to differing environments despite similar vectors (P. perniciosus, canine reservoir, parasite (L. infantum zymodeme MON-1, and human host. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This unprecedented collection of cases highlighted the occurrence of protracted urban transmission of L. infantum in France, a worrisome finding as the disease is currently spreading in other areas around the Mediterranean. These results complete previous studies about more widespread canine leishmaniasis or human asymptomatic carriage. This first application of systematic geostatistical methods to European human visceral leishmaniasis demonstrated an unsuspected heterogeneity of environments associated with the transmission of the disease. These findings modify the current view of leishmaniasis epidemiology. They

  1. Can Professional Environments in Schools Promote Teacher Development? Explaining Heterogeneity in Returns to Teaching Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Matthew A; Papay, John P

    2014-12-01

    Although wide variation in teacher effectiveness is well established, much less is known about differences in teacher improvement over time. We document that average returns to teaching experience mask large variation across individual teachers and across groups of teachers working in different schools. We examine the role of school context in explaining these differences using a measure of the professional environment constructed from teachers responses to state-wide surveys. Our analyses show that teachers working in more supportive professional environments improve their effectiveness more over time than teachers working in less supportive contexts. On average, teachers working in schools at the 75th percentile of professional environment ratings improved 38% more than teachers in schools at the 25th percentile after 10 years.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A HETEROGENIC DISTRIBUTED ENVIRONMENT FOR SPATIAL DATA PROCESSING USING CLOUD TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Garov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We are developing a unified distributed communication environment for processing of spatial data which integrates web-, desktop- and mobile platforms and combines volunteer computing model and public cloud possibilities. The main idea is to create a flexible working environment for research groups, which may be scaled according to required data volume and computing power, while keeping infrastructure costs at minimum. It is based upon the "single window" principle, which combines data access via geoportal functionality, processing possibilities and communication between researchers. Using an innovative software environment the recently developed planetary information system (http://cartsrv.mexlab.ru/geoportal will be updated. The new system will provide spatial data processing, analysis and 3D-visualization and will be tested based on freely available Earth remote sensing data as well as Solar system planetary images from various missions. Based on this approach it will be possible to organize the research and representation of results on a new technology level, which provides more possibilities for immediate and direct reuse of research materials, including data, algorithms, methodology, and components. The new software environment is targeted at remote scientific teams, and will provide access to existing spatial distributed information for which we suggest implementation of a user interface as an advanced front-end, e.g., for virtual globe system.

  3. Development of a Heterogenic Distributed Environment for Spatial Data Processing Using Cloud Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garov, A. S.; Karachevtseva, I. P.; Matveev, E. V.; Zubarev, A. E.; Florinsky, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    We are developing a unified distributed communication environment for processing of spatial data which integrates web-, desktop- and mobile platforms and combines volunteer computing model and public cloud possibilities. The main idea is to create a flexible working environment for research groups, which may be scaled according to required data volume and computing power, while keeping infrastructure costs at minimum. It is based upon the "single window" principle, which combines data access via geoportal functionality, processing possibilities and communication between researchers. Using an innovative software environment the recently developed planetary information system (http://cartsrv.mexlab.ru/geoportal) will be updated. The new system will provide spatial data processing, analysis and 3D-visualization and will be tested based on freely available Earth remote sensing data as well as Solar system planetary images from various missions. Based on this approach it will be possible to organize the research and representation of results on a new technology level, which provides more possibilities for immediate and direct reuse of research materials, including data, algorithms, methodology, and components. The new software environment is targeted at remote scientific teams, and will provide access to existing spatial distributed information for which we suggest implementation of a user interface as an advanced front-end, e.g., for virtual globe system.

  4. Bioaccessible Porosity: A new approach to assess residual contamination after bioremediation of hydrophobic organic compounds in sub-surface microporous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, A.; Ghoshal, S.

    2016-12-01

    We define a new parameter, "bioaccessible porosity", the fraction of aggregate volume accessible to soil bacteria, towards a priori assessment of hydrocarbon bioremediation end points. Microbial uptake of poorly soluble hydrocarbons occurs through direct uptake or micellar solubilzation/emulsification associated with biosurfactant production, and requires close proximity of bacteria and hydrocarbon phase. In subsurface microporous environments, bioremediation rates are attenuated when residual hydrophobic contamination is entrapped in sterically restrictive environments which is not accessible to soil bacteria. This study presents new approaches for characterization of the microstructure of porous media and as well, the ability of indigenous hydrocarbon degraders to access to a range of pore sizes. Bacterial access to poorly soluble hydrocarbons in soil micro pores were simulated with bioreactors with membranes with different pore sizes containing the hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, Dietzia maris. D. maris is Gram-positive, and nonmotile that we isolated as the major hydrocarbon degrader from a fine-grained, weathered, hydrocarbon-contaminated site soil. Under nutritional stress, planktonic D. maris cells were aggregated and accessed 5 µm but not 3 µm and smaller pores. However, when hexadecane was available at the pore mouth, D. maris colonized the pore mouth, and accessed pores as small as 0.4 µm. This suggests bacterial accessibility to different pore sizes is regulated by nutritional conditions. A combination of X-ray micro-CT scanning, gas adsorption and mercury intrusion porosimetry was used to characterize the range of pore sizes of soil aggregates. In case of the studied contaminated soil, the bioaccessible porosity were determined as 25% , 27% and 29% (assuming 4, 1, 0.4 µm respectively as accessibility criteria), and about 2.7% of aggregate volume was attributed to 0.006-0.4 µm pores. The 2% aggregate volume at an assumed saturation of 10% could

  5. Variability of drainage and solute leaching in heterogeneous urban vegetation environs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, H.; Beecham, S.; Hassanli, A. M.; Ingleton, G.

    2013-11-01

    Deep percolation enhancement from recycled wastewater irrigation may contribute to salt accumulation and water table elevation that can ultimately cause soil and ground water degradation. Variation of drainage rate and solute leaching were investigated in an urban park containing heterogeneous landscape plants that were irrigated with recycled wastewater. Field monitoring was undertaken at Veale Gardens in the Adelaide Parklands, Australia. Based on landscape variation in Veale Gardens, two landscape zones were defined: one being largely covered with turf grasses with few trees and shrubs (MG) with the second zone being mostly trees and shrubs with intermittent turf grasses (MT). Experiments were performed on two zero-tension lysimeters placed horizontally 100 cm below ground to monitor the variation of volume and quality indicators of drained water for four seasons. The outcomes showed a significant variation of drainage quantity and quality in the MT and MG zones. The low vegetation cover in the MG zone resulted in more drained water than in the high vegetation cover (MT zone). In both zones, more drainage water was collected in winter than in other seasons. This is in spite of the input water showing a maximum rate in summer. The seasonal salinities measured in the two lysimeters showed very similar trends with the lowest salinity rate in autumn with the levels increasing through winter and spring. Chemical analyses of leachate solute and salt loading indicated no impact from using recycled wastewater.

  6. Spatial and temporal distribution of drainage and solute leaching in heterogeneous urban vegetation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, H.; Beecham, S.; Hassanli, A. M.; Ingleton, G.

    2013-05-01

    Deep percolation enhancement from recycled wastewater irrigation may contribute to salt accumulation and water table elevation that can ultimately cause soil and ground water degradation. The spatial and temporal variation of drainage rate and solute leaching were investigated in an urban park containing heterogeneous landscape plants that were irrigated with recycled wastewater. Field monitoring was undertaken at Veale Gardens in the Adelaide Parklands, Australia. Based on the landscape variation in Veale Gardens, two landscape zones were defined: one being largely covered with turf grasses with few trees and shrubs (MG) with the second zone being mostly trees and shrubs with intermittent turf grasses (MT). Experiments were performed using two zero-tension lysimeters placed horizontally 100 cm below ground to monitor the spatio-temporal behaviour of drained water and nutrient loadings for four seasons. The outcomes showed a large spatial and temporal variation of drainage quantity and quality in the MT and MG zones. The low vegetation cover in the MG zone resulted in more drained water than in the high vegetation cover (MT zone). In both zones, more drainage water was collected in winter than in other seasons. This is in spite of the input water showing a maximum rate in summer. The seasonal salinities measured in the two lysimeters showed very similar trends with the lowest salinity rate in autumn with the levels increasing through winter and spring. Chemical analyses of the leachate solute indicated no detrimental impact from using recycled wastewater during the study period.

  7. Using noise to control heterogeneity of isogenic populations in homogenous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Gritti, Nicola; Keegstra, Johannes M; Soltani, Mohammad; Munsky, Brian

    2015-06-18

    We explore the extent to which the phenotypes of individual, genetically identical cells can be controlled independently from each other using only a single homogeneous environmental input. We show that such control is theoretically impossible if restricted to a deterministic setting, but it can be achieved readily if one exploits heterogeneities introduced at the single-cell level due to stochastic fluctuations in gene regulation. Using stochastic analyses of a bistable genetic toggle switch, we develop a control strategy that maximizes the chances that a chosen cell will express one phenotype, while the rest express another. The control mechanism uses UV radiation to enhance identically protein degradation in all cells. Control of individual cells is made possible only by monitoring stochastic protein fluctuations and applying UV control at favorable times and levels. For two identical cells, our stochastic control law can drive protein expression of a chosen cell above its neighbor with a better than 99% success rate. In a population of 30 identical cells, we can drive a given cell to remain consistently within the top 20%. Although cellular noise typically impairs predictability for biological responses, our results show that it can also simultaneously improve controllability for those same responses.

  8. Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) habitat preference in a heterogeneous, urban, coastal environment

    OpenAIRE

    Cribb, Nardi; Miller, Cara; Seuront, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited information is available regarding the habitat preference of the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) in South Australian estuarine environments. The need to overcome this paucity of information is crucial for management and conservation initiatives. This preliminary study investigates the space-time patterns of habitat preference by the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin in the Port Adelaide River-Barker Inlet estuary, a South Australian, urbanised, coastal envi...

  9. Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) habitat preference in a heterogeneous, urban, coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited information is available regarding the habitat preference of the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) in South Australian estuarine environments. The need to overcome this paucity of information is crucial for management and conservation initiatives. This preliminary study investigates the space-time patterns of habitat preference by the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin in the Port Adelaide River-Barker Inlet estuary, a South Australian, urbanised, coastal environment. More specifically, the study aim was to identify a potential preference between bare sand substrate and seagrass beds, the two habitat types present in this environment, through the resighting frequency of recognisable individual dolphins. Results Photo-identification surveys covering the 118 km2 sanctuary area were conducted over 2 survey periods May to August 2006 and from March 2009 to February 2010. Sighting frequency of recognisable individual Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins established a significant preference for the bare sand habitat. More specifically, 72 and 18% of the individuals sighted at least on two occasions were observed in the bare sand and seagrass habitats respectively. This trend was consistently observed at both seasonal and annual scales, suggesting a consistency in the distinct use of these two habitats. Conclusions It is anticipated that these results will benefit the further development of management and conservation strategies. PMID:23369354

  10. 3rd hand smoking; heterogeneous oxidation of nicotine and secondary aerosol formation in the indoor environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Lauren; Dubowski, Yael

    2010-05-01

    Tobacco smoking is well known as a significant source of primary indoor air pollutants. However, only recently has it been recognized that the impact of Tobacco smoking may continue even after the cigarette has been extinguished (i.e., third hand smoke) due to the effect of indoor surfaces. These surfaces may affect the fate of tobacco smoke in the form of secondary reactions and pollutants, including secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometry with Attenuated Total Reflection (FTIR-ATR) in tandem with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizing (SMPS) system was used to monitor the ozonation of cellulose sorbed nicotine and resulting SOA formation. SOA formation began at onset of ozone introduction ([O3] = 60 ± 5 ppb) with a size distribution of dp ≤ 25 nm, and was determined to be a result of heterogeneous reaction (opposed to homogeneous). SOA yield from reacted surface nicotine was on the order of 10 %. Simultaneous to SOA monitoring, FTIR-ATR spectra showed surface changes in the nicotine film as the reaction progressed, revealing a pseudo first-order surface reaction rate of 0.0026 ± 0.0008 min-1. Identified surface oxidation products included: cotinine, myosmine, methylnicotinamide and nicotyrine. Surface reaction rate was found to be partially inhibited at high relative humidity. Given the toxicity of some of the identified products (e.g., cotinine has shown potential mutagenicity and teratogenicity) and that small particles may contribute to adverse health effects, the present study indicates that exposure to 3rd hand smoke ozonation products may pose additional health risks.

  11. System-on-Chip Environment: A SpecC-Based Framework for Heterogeneous MPSoC Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D. Gajski

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The constantly growing complexity of embedded systems is a challenge that drives the development of novel design automation techniques. C-based system-level design addresses the complexity challenge by raising the level of abstraction and integrating the design processes for the heterogeneous system components. In this article, we present a comprehensive design framework, the system-on-chip environment (SCE which is based on the influential SpecC language and methodology. SCE implements a top-down system design flow based on a specify-explore-refine paradigm with support for heterogeneous target platforms consisting of custom hardware components, embedded software processors, dedicated IP blocks, and complex communication bus architectures. Starting from an abstract specification of the desired system, models at various levels of abstraction are automatically generated through successive step-wise refinement, resulting in a pin-and cycle-accurate system implementation. The seamless integration of automatic model generation, estimation, and verification tools enables rapid design space exploration and efficient MPSoC implementation. Using a large set of industrial-strength examples with a wide range of target architectures, our experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our framework and show significant productivity gains in design time.

  12. System-on-Chip Environment: A SpecC-Based Framework for Heterogeneous MPSoC Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dömer Rainer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The constantly growing complexity of embedded systems is a challenge that drives the development of novel design automation techniques. C-based system-level design addresses the complexity challenge by raising the level of abstraction and integrating the design processes for the heterogeneous system components. In this article, we present a comprehensive design framework, the system-on-chip environment (SCE which is based on the influential SpecC language and methodology. SCE implements a top-down system design flow based on a specify-explore-refine paradigm with support for heterogeneous target platforms consisting of custom hardware components, embedded software processors, dedicated IP blocks, and complex communication bus architectures. Starting from an abstract specification of the desired system, models at various levels of abstraction are automatically generated through successive step-wise refinement, resulting in a pin-and cycle-accurate system implementation. The seamless integration of automatic model generation, estimation, and verification tools enables rapid design space exploration and efficient MPSoC implementation. Using a large set of industrial-strength examples with a wide range of target architectures, our experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our framework and show significant productivity gains in design time.

  13. Do existing classification systems capture mountain snowpack heterogeneity? Accounting for spatial variability in a changing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, C.; Godsey, S.; Harpold, A. A.; Link, T. E.; Rajagopal, S.; Larsen, L.

    2016-12-01

    Spatial patterns of snow accumulation and melt control water and nutrient fluxes from mountain landscapes and determine the dynamics of resource availability for nearby human and ecological communities. Because seasonal snowpack is sensitive to changes in regional climate, there is a growing need for a snowpack classification system that (1) recognizes salient processes, (2) captures the variance of the system, (3) recognizes temporal and/or spatial change, and (4) has application to predicting snowmelt runoff regimes. Previous classification systems have focused on textural and stratigraphic snow characteristics or climatological observations to map broad geographic classes (e.g. maritime, continental, ephemeral, etc.). While these approaches have revealed general patterns, they may not capture the spatial heterogeneity of snowpack characteristics that are common across high relief terrain. Here, we use 1 km resolution gridded outputs from a physically based, spatially-distributed energy- and mass-balance snow model (SNODAS) to produce a snow classification system for the western U.S. and Great Plains. To meet the outlined criterion, we initially explored the ability of a large number of metrics (13) to characterize the amount, timing, and melt-rate of snowpack. Principal components analysis and pairwise correlations were used to identify a subset of metrics (6) that captured the variance of the system but also contributed unique information. K-means was used to delineate 12 process-based groups that reveal both climatic and orographic influences on snowpack accumulation, timing, and melt rate. The important effects of elevation-mediated processes in our classification system suggest a greater spatial diversity in snowpack patterns than suggested by previous characterizations (e.g. maritime-to-continental). Application of the system from the early 2000's to present reveals that interannual temporal and spatial variability have been greatest in the Columbia Plateau

  14. The impact of selection, gene flow and demographic history on heterogeneous genomic divergence: three-spine sticklebacks in divergent environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferchaud, Anne-Laure; Hansen, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous genomic divergence between populations may reflect selection, but should also be seen in conjunction with gene flow and drift, particularly population bottlenecks. Marine and freshwater three-spine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) populations often exhibit different lateral armour plate morphs. Moreover, strikingly parallel genomic footprints across different marine-freshwater population pairs are interpreted as parallel evolution and gene reuse. Nevertheless, in some geographic regions like the North Sea and Baltic Sea, different patterns are observed. Freshwater populations in coastal regions are often dominated by marine morphs, suggesting that gene flow overwhelms selection, and genomic parallelism may also be less pronounced. We used RAD sequencing for analysing 28 888 SNPs in two marine and seven freshwater populations in Denmark, Europe. Freshwater populations represented a variety of environments: river populations accessible to gene flow from marine sticklebacks and large and small isolated lakes with and without fish predators. Sticklebacks in an accessible river environment showed minimal morphological and genomewide divergence from marine populations, supporting the hypothesis of gene flow overriding selection. Allele frequency spectra suggested bottlenecks in all freshwater populations, and particularly two small lake populations. However, genomic footprints ascribed to selection could nevertheless be identified. No genomic regions were consistent freshwater-marine outliers, and parallelism was much lower than in other comparable studies. Two genomic regions previously described to be under divergent selection in freshwater and marine populations were outliers between different freshwater populations. We ascribe these patterns to stronger environmental heterogeneity among freshwater populations in our study as compared to most other studies, although the demographic history involving bottlenecks should also be considered in the

  15. Heterogeneity and Scaling in Geologic Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory N. Boitnott; Gilles Y. Bussod; Paul N. Hagin; Stephen R. Brown

    2005-04-18

    The accurate characterization and remediation of contaminated subsurface environments requires the detailed knowledge of subsurface structures and flow paths. Enormous resources are invested in scoping and characterizing sites using core sampling, 3-D geophysical surveys, well tests, etc.... Unfortunately, much of the information acquired is lost to compromises and simplifications made in constructing numerical grids for the simulators used to predict flow and transport from the contaminated area to the accessible environment. In rocks and soils, the bulk geophysical and transport properties of the matrix and of fracture systems are determined by the juxtaposition of geometric features at many length scales. In the interest of computational efficiency, recognized heterogeneities are simplified, averaged out, or entirely ignored in spite of recent studies that recognize that: (1) Structural and lithologic heterogeneities exist on all scales in rocks. (2) Small heterogeneities influence, and can control the physical and chemical properties of rocks. In this work we propose a physically based approach for the description and treatment of heterogeneities, that highlights the use of laboratory equipment designed to measure the effect on physical properties of fine scale heterogeneities observed in rocks and soils. We then discuss the development of an integration methodology that uses these measurements to develop and upscale flow and transport models. Predictive simulations are 'calibrated' to the measured heterogeneity data, and subsequently upscaled in a way that is consistent with the transport physics and the efficient use of environmental geophysics. This methodology provides a more accurate interpretation and representation of the subsurface for both environmental engineering and remediation. We show through examples, (i) the important influence of even subtle heterogeneity in the interpreting of geophysical data, and (ii) how physically based upscaling

  16. Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow: A Basic Research Agenda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); DePaolo, Donald J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Pietraß, Tanja [USDOE Office of Science, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-05-22

    From beneath the surface of the earth, we currently obtain about 80-percent of the energy our nation consumes each year. In the future we have the potential to generate billions of watts of electrical power from clean, green, geothermal energy sources. Our planet’s subsurface can also serve as a reservoir for storing energy produced from intermittent sources such as wind and solar, and it could provide safe, long-term storage of excess carbon dioxide, energy waste products and other hazardous materials. However, it is impossible to underestimate the complexities of the subsurface world. These complexities challenge our ability to acquire the scientific knowledge needed for the efficient and safe exploitation of its resources. To more effectively harness subsurface resources while mitigating the impacts of developing and using these resources, the U.S. Department of Energy established SubTER – the Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D Crosscut team. This DOE multi-office team engaged scientists and engineers from the national laboratories to assess and make recommendations for improving energy-related subsurface engineering. The SubTER team produced a plan with the overall objective of “adaptive control of subsurface fractures and fluid flow.”This plan revolved around four core technological pillars—Intelligent Wellbore Systems that sustain the integrity of the wellbore environment; Subsurface Stress and Induced Seismicity programs that guide and optimize sustainable energy strategies while reducing the risks associated with subsurface injections; Permeability Manipulation studies that improve methods of enhancing, impeding and eliminating fluid flow; and New Subsurface Signals that transform our ability to see into and characterize subsurface systems. The SubTER team developed an extensive R&D plan for advancing technologies within these four core pillars and also identified several areas where new technologies would require additional basic research

  17. Adaptation and heterogeneity of Escherichia coli MC1000 growing in complex environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puentes-Téllez, Pilar; Hansen, Martin Asser; Sørensen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    In a study aiming to assess bacterial evolution in complex growth media, we evaluated the long-term adaptive response of Escherichia coli MC1000 in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium. Seven parallel populations were founded and followed over 150 days in sequential batch cultures under three different oxygen...... conditions (defined environments), and 19 evolved forms were isolated. The emergence of forms with enhanced fitness was evident in competition experiments of all evolved forms versus the ancestral strain. The evolved forms were then subjected to phenotypic and genomic analyses relative to the ancestor...... in galR, a repressor of the galactose operon. Concomitantly, the new forms revealed enhanced growth on galactose as well as galactose-containing disaccharides. This response was likely driven by the LB medium....

  18. Analysis of Energy Consumption Performance towards Optimal Radioplanning of Wireless Sensor Networks in Heterogeneous Indoor Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lopez Iturri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the impact of complex indoor environment in the deployment and energy consumption of a wireless sensor network infrastructure is analyzed. The variable nature of the radio channel is analyzed by means of deterministic in-house 3D ray launching simulation of an indoor scenario, in which wireless sensors, based on an in-house CyFi implementation, typically used for environmental monitoring, are located. Received signal power and current consumption measurement results of the in-house designed wireless motes have been obtained, stating that adequate consideration of the network topology and morphology lead to optimal performance and power consumption reduction. The use of radioplanning techniques therefore aid in the deployment of more energy efficient elements, optimizing the overall performance of the variety of deployed wireless systems within the indoor scenario.

  19. Multi-Robot Systems for Subsurface Planetary Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a heterogeneous multi-robot team developed as a platform for effective subsurface planetary exploration. State-of-art robotic exploration...

  20. Cloud-Based Parameter-Driven Statistical Services and Resource Allocation in a Heterogeneous Platform on Enterprise Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungju Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental key for enterprise users is a cloud-based parameter-driven statistical service and it has become a substantial impact on companies worldwide. In this paper, we demonstrate the statistical analysis for some certain criteria that are related to data and applied to the cloud server for a comparison of results. In addition, we present a statistical analysis and cloud-based resource allocation method for a heterogeneous platform environment by performing a data and information analysis with consideration of the application workload and the server capacity, and subsequently propose a service prediction model using a polynomial regression model. In particular, our aim is to provide stable service in a given large-scale enterprise cloud computing environment. The virtual machines (VMs for cloud-based services are assigned to each server with a special methodology to satisfy the uniform utilization distribution model. It is also implemented between users and the platform, which is a main idea of our cloud computing system. Based on the experimental results, we confirm that our prediction model can provide sufficient resources for statistical services to large-scale users while satisfying the uniform utilization distribution.

  1. A Middleware Based Approach to Dynamically Deploy Location Based Services onto Heterogeneous Mobile Devices Using Bluetooth in Indoor Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Pampa; Sen, Rijurekha; Das, Pradip K.

    Several methods for providing location based service (LBS) to mobile devices in indoor environment using wireless technologies like WLAN, RFID and Bluetooth have been proposed, implemented and evaluated. However, most of them do not focus on heterogeneity of mobile platforms, memory constraint of mobile devices, the adaptability of client or device to the new services it discovers whenever it reaches a new location. In this paper, we have proposed a Middleware based approach of LBS provision in the indoor environment, where a Bluetooth enabled Base Station (BS) detects Bluetooth enabled mobile devices and pushes a proper client application only to those devices that belong to some registered subscriber of LBS. This dynamic deployment enables the mobile clients to access any new service without having preinstalled interface to that service beforehand and thus the client's memory consumption is reduced. Our proposed work also addresses the other issues like authenticating the clients before providing them LBSs and introducing paid services. We have evaluated its performance in term of file transfer time with respect to file size and throughput with respect to distance. Experimental results on service consumption time by the mobile client for different services are also presented.

  2. A pseudospectral method for the simulation of 3-D ultrasonic and seismic waves in heterogeneous poroelastic borehole environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidler, Rolf; Carcione, José M.; Holliger, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    We present a novel approach for the comprehensive, flexible and accurate simulation of poroelastic wave propagation in 3-D cylindrical coordinates. An important application of this method is the realistic modelling of complex seismic wave phenomena in fluid-filled boreholes, which represents a major, as of yet largely unresolved, problem in exploration geophysics. To this end, we consider a numerical mesh consisting of three concentric domains representing the borehole fluid in the centre followed by the mudcake and/or casing, and the surrounding porous formation. The spatial discretization is based on a Chebyshev expansion in the radial direction and Fourier expansions in the vertical and azimuthal directions as well as a Runge-Kutta integration scheme for the time evolution. Trigonometric interpolation and a domain decomposition method based on the method of characteristics are used to match the boundary conditions at the fluid/porous-solid and porous-solid/porous-solid interfaces as well as to reduce the number of gridpoints in the innermost domain for computational efficiency. We apply this novel modelling approach to the particularly challenging scenario of near-surface borehole environments. To this end, we compare 3-D heterogeneous and corresponding rotationally invariant simulations, assess the sensitivity of Stoneley waves to formation permeability in the presence of a casing and evaluate the effects of an excavation damage zone behind a casing on sonic log recordings. Our results indicate that only first arrival times of fast modes are reasonably well described by rotationally invariant approximations of 3-D heterogenous media. We also find that Stoneley waves are indeed remarkably sensitive to the average permeability behind a perforated PVC casing, and that the presence of an excavation damage zone behind a casing tends to dominate the overall signature of recorded seismograms.

  3. An investigation into heterogeneity of variance for milk and fat yields of Holstein cows in Brazilian herd environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Claudio Napolis

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity of variance in Brazilian herd environments was studied using first-lactation 305-day mature equivalent (ME milk and fat records of Holstein cows. Herds were divided into two categories, according to low or high herd-year phenotypic standard deviation for ME milk (HYSD. There were 330 sires with daughter records in both HYSD categories. Components of (covariance, heritability, and genetic correlations for milk and fat yields were estimated using a sire model from bivariate analyses with a restricted maximum likelihood (REML derivative-free algorithm. Sire and residual variances for milk yield in low HYSD herds were 79 and 57% of those obtained in high HYSD herd. For fat yield they were 67 and 60%, respectively. Heritabilities for milk and fat yields in low HYSD herds were larger (0.30 and 0.22 than in high HYSD herds (0.23 and 0.20. Genetic correlation between expression in low and high HYSD herds was 0.997 for milk yield and 0.985 for fat yield. Expected correlated response in low HYSD herds based on sires selected on half-sister information from high HYSD was 0.89 kg/kg for milk and 0.80 kg/kg for fat yield. Genetic evaluations in Brazil need to account for heterogeneity of variances to increase the accuracy of evaluations and the selection efficiency for milk and fat yields of Holstein cows. Selection response will be lower in low variance herds than in high variance herds because of reduced differences in daughter response and among breeding values of sires in low HYSD herds. Genetic investments in sire selection to improve production are more likely to be successful in high HYSD herds than in low HYSD Brazilian herds.

  4. Examination of the seepage face boundary condition in subsurface and coupled surface/subsurface hydrological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudeler, C.; Paniconi, C.; Pasetto, D.; Putti, M.

    2017-03-01

    A seepage face is a nonlinear dynamic boundary that strongly affects pressure head distributions, water table fluctuations, and flow patterns. Its handling in hydrological models, especially under complex conditions such as heterogeneity and coupled surface/subsurface flow, has not been extensively studied. In this paper, we compare the treatment of the seepage face as a static (Dirichlet) versus dynamic boundary condition, we assess its resolution under conditions of layered heterogeneity, we examine its interaction with a catchment outlet boundary, and we investigate the effects of surface/subsurface exchanges on seepage faces forming at the land surface. The analyses are carried out with an integrated catchment hydrological model. Numerical simulations are performed for a synthetic rectangular sloping aquifer and for an experimental hillslope from the Landscape Evolution Observatory. The results show that the static boundary condition is not always an adequate stand-in for a dynamic seepage face boundary condition, especially under conditions of high rainfall, steep slope, or heterogeneity; that hillslopes with layered heterogeneity give rise to multiple seepage faces that can be highly dynamic; that seepage face and outlet boundaries can coexist in an integrated hydrological model and both play an important role; and that seepage faces at the land surface are not always controlled by subsurface flow. The paper also presents a generalized algorithm for resolving seepage face outflow that handles heterogeneity in a simple way, is applicable to unstructured grids, and is shown experimentally to be equivalent to the treatment of atmospheric boundary conditions in subsurface flow models.

  5. Hydrogen utilization potential in subsurface sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikari, Rishi Ram; Glombitza, Clemens; Nickel, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Subsurface microbial communities undertake many terminal electron-accepting processes, often simultaneously. Using a tritium-based assay, we measured the potential hydrogen oxidation catalyzed by hydrogenase enzymes in several subsurface sedimentary environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial...... Pacific, and Gulf of Mexico) with different predominant electron-acceptors. Hydrogenases constitute a diverse family of enzymes expressed by microorganisms that utilize molecular hydrogen as a metabolic substrate, product, or intermediate. The assay reveals the potential for utilizing molecular hydrogen...

  6. Microbial life in the deep terrestrial subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliermans, C.B. [E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Lab.; Balkwill, D.L. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Beeman, R.E. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

    1988-12-31

    The distribution and function of microorganisms is a vital issue in microbial ecology. The US Department of Energy`s Program, ``Microbiology of the Deep Subsurface,`` concentrates on establishing fundamental scientific information about organisms at depth, and the use of these organisms for remediation of contaminants in deep vadose zone and groundwater environments. This investigation effectively extends the Biosphere hundreds of meters into the Geosphere and has implications to a variety of subsurface activities.

  7. Metalliferous Biosignatures for Deep Subsurface Microbial Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Parnell, John; Brolly, Connor; Spinks, Sam; Bowden, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of microbes and metals is widely assumed to have occurred in surface or very shallow subsurface environments. However new evidence suggests that much microbial activity occurs in the deep subsurface. Fluvial, lacustrine and aeolian ?red beds? contain widespread centimetre-scale reduction spheroids in which a pale reduced spheroid in otherwise red rocks contains a metalliferous core. Most of the reduction of Fe (III) in sediments is caused by Fe (III) reducing bacteria. They ha...

  8. Subsurface Microbiology and Biogeochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Fletcher, Madilyn

    2001-05-01

    Jim contributed a chapter to this book, in addition to co-editing it with Madilyn Fletcher. Fredrickson, J. K., and M. Fletcher. (eds.) 2001 Subsurface Microbiology and Biogeochemistry. Wiley-Liss, Inc., New York.

  9. Electrical Subsurface Grounding Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.M. Calle

    2000-11-01

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to determine the present grounding requirements of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) subsurface electrical system and to verify that the actual grounding system and devices satisfy the requirements.

  10. Subsurface Intrusion Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-25

    fre­ quency seismic vibrations and can therefore detect even rela­ tively small vibrations associated with tunneling or other subsurface activity...may indicate a surreptitious attempt to cross the boundary protected by system 100. Activity in digging or moving within tunnel 160 creates seismic ...magnitude of seismic vibrations associated with subsurface activity indicative of unauthorized attempts to tunnel across the boundary protected by

  11. Design And Planning Of E- Learning EnvironmentE-Education System On Heterogeneous Wireless Network Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ThandarOo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this research is to provide a more efficient and effective communication method between teacher and student with the use of heterogeneous network. Moreover the effective use of heterogeneous network can be emphasized. The system of e-education can develop utilizing wireless network.The e-Education system can help students to communicate with their teacher more easily and effectively using a heterogeneous wireless network system. In this wireless network system students who are blind or dumb will also be able to communicate and learn from the teacher as normal students can do. All the devices or laptops will be connected on wireless LAN. Even when the teacher is not around he will be able to help his students with their study or give instructions easily by using the mobile phone to send text or voice signal. When the teacher sends information to the dumb student it will be converted into sign language for the student to be able to understand. When the dumb student sends the information to the teacher it will be converted into text for the teacher to understand. For the blind student text instructions from the teacher will be converted into audio signal using text-to-speech conversion.Thus the performance of heterogeneous wireless network model can evaluate by using Robust Optimization Method. Therefore the e-Education systems performance improves by evaluating Robust Optimization Method.

  12. Biogeochemical transformations and fluxes in redox-stratified environments: from the shallow coastal ocean to the deep subsurface. Geologica Ultraiectina (291)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arndt, S.

    2008-01-01

    Biogeochemical activity is often concentrated at interfaces where the supplies of bioessential elements and energy converge. Processes in these environments control to a large extent the exchange fluxes between the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere and, therefore, play an important

  13. Influence of biofilms on colloid mobility in the subsurface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strathmann, M.; Leon Morales, C.F.; Flemming, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    Transport processes in subsurface environments are determined by complex interactions between the soil matrix and dissolved as well as particulate substances. Biofilms play an important role in the transport of colloids in the subsurface, since biofilms cover the solid soil matrix and hence

  14. The impact of aquifer heterogeneity on the performance of aquifer thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, W.T.; Valstar, J.R.; Gaans, van P.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity in hydraulic properties of the subsurface is not accounted for in current design calculations of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). However, the subsurface is heterogeneous and thus affects the heat distribution around ATES wells. In this paper, the influence of heterogeneity on

  15. Improving the biodegradative capacity of subsurface bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romine, M.F.; Brockman, F.J.

    1993-04-01

    The continual release of large volumes of synthetic materials into the environment by agricultural and industrial sources over the last few decades has resulted in pollution of the subsurface environment. Cleanup has been difficult because of the relative inaccessibility of the contaminants caused by their wide dispersal in the deep subsurface, often at low concentrations and in large volumes. As a possible solution for these problems, interest in the introduction of biodegradative bacteria for in situ remediation of these sites has increased greatly in recent years (Timmis et al. 1988). Selection of biodegradative microbes to apply in such cleanup is limited to those strains that can survive among the native bacterial and predator community members at the particular pH, temperature, and moisture status of the site (Alexander, 1984). The use of microorganisms isolated from subsurface environments would be advantageous because the organisms are already adapted to the subsurface conditions. The options are further narrowed to strains that are able to degrade the contaminant rapidly, even in the presence of highly recalcitrant anthropogenic waste mixtures, and in conditions that do not require addition of further toxic compounds for the expression of the biodegradative capacity (Sayler et al. 1990). These obstacles can be overcome by placing the genes of well-characterized biodegradative enzymes under the control of promoters that can be regulated by inexpensive and nontoxic external factors and then moving the new genetic constructs into diverse groups of subsurface microbes. ne objective of this research is to test this hypothesis by comparing expression of two different toluene biodegradative enzymatic pathways from two different regulatable promoters in a variety of subsurface isolates.

  16. MSTS - Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator theory manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M.D.; Nichols, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy, through the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office, has designated the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada for detailed study as the candidate US geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Site characterization will determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for the potential waste repository. If the site is determined suitable, subsequent studies and characterization will be conducted to obtain authorization from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct the potential waste repository. A principal component of the characterization and licensing processes involves numerically predicting the thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment of the Yucca Mountain site to the potential repository over a 10,000-year period. The thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment to the repository is anticipated to include complex processes of countercurrent vapor and liquid migration, multiple-phase heat transfer, multiple-phase transport, and geochemical reactions. Numerical simulators based on mathematical descriptions of these subsurface phenomena are required to make numerical predictions of the thermal and hydrologic response of the Yucca Mountain subsurface environment The engineering simulator called the Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator (MSTS) was developed at the request of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office to produce numerical predictions of subsurface flow and transport phenomena at the potential Yucca Mountain site. This document delineates the design architecture and describes the specific computational algorithms that compose MSTS. Details for using MSTS and sample problems are given in the {open_quotes}User`s Guide and Reference{close_quotes} companion document.

  17. Subsurface connection methods for subsurface heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Bass, Ronald Marshall (Houston, TX); Kim, Dong Sub (Sugar Land, TX); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX); Keltner, Thomas Joseph (Spring, TX); Carl, Jr., Frederick Gordon (Houston, TX)

    2010-12-28

    A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a first elongated heater in a first opening in the formation. The first elongated heater includes an exposed metal section in a portion of the first opening. The portion is below a layer of the formation to be heated. The exposed metal section is exposed to the formation. A second elongated heater is in a second opening in the formation. The second opening connects to the first opening at or near the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated. At least a portion of an exposed metal section of the second elongated heater is electrically coupled to at least a portion of the exposed metal section of the first elongated heater in the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated.

  18. SUBSURFACE EMPLACEMENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Wilson; R. Novotny

    1999-11-22

    The objective of this analysis is to identify issues and criteria that apply to the design of the Subsurface Emplacement Transportation System (SET). The SET consists of the track used by the waste package handling equipment, the conductors and related equipment used to supply electrical power to that equipment, and the instrumentation and controls used to monitor and operate those track and power supply systems. Major considerations of this analysis include: (1) Operational life of the SET; (2) Geometric constraints on the track layout; (3) Operating loads on the track; (4) Environmentally induced loads on the track; (5) Power supply (electrification) requirements; and (6) Instrumentation and control requirements. This analysis will provide the basis for development of the system description document (SDD) for the SET. This analysis also defines the interfaces that need to be considered in the design of the SET. These interfaces include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Waste handling building; (2) Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface site layout; (3) Waste Emplacement System (WES); (4) Waste Retrieval System (WRS); (5) Ground Control System (GCS); (6) Ex-Container System (XCS); (7) Subsurface Electrical Distribution System (SED); (8) MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System (OMC); (9) Subsurface Facility System (SFS); (10) Subsurface Fire Protection System (SFR); (11) Performance Confirmation Emplacement Drift Monitoring System (PCM); and (12) Backfill Emplacement System (BES).

  19. Characterizing subsurface textural properties using electromagnetic induction mapping and geostatistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu, Hiruy

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution of soil textural properties at the watershed scale is important for understanding spatial patterns of water movement, and in determining soil moisture storage and soil hydraulic transport properties. Capturing the heterogeneous nature of the subsurface without exhaustive and costly sampling presents a significant challenge. Soil scientists and geologists have adapted geophysical methods that measure a surrogate property related to the vital underlying process. Apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) is such a proxy, providing a measure of charge mobility due to application of an electric field, and is highly correlated to the electrical conductivity of the soil solution, clay percentage, and water content. Electromagnetic induction (EMI) provides the possibility of obtaining high resolution images of ECa across a landscape to identify subtle changes in subsurface properties. The aim of this study was to better characterize subsurface textural properties using EMI mapping and geostatistical analysis techniques. The effect of variable temperature environments on EMI instrumental response, and EC a -- depth relationship were first determined. Then a procedure of repeated EMI mapping at varying soil water content was developed and integrated with temporal stability analysis to capture the time invariant properties of spatial soil texture on an agricultural field. In addition, an EMI imaging approach of densely sampling the subsurface of the Reynolds Mountain East watershed was presented using kriging to interpolate, and Sequential Gaussian Simulation to estimate the uncertainty in the maps. Due to the relative time-invariant characteristics of textural properties, it was possible to correlate clay samples collected over three seasons to ECa data of one mapping event. Kriging methods [ordinary kriging (OK), cokriging (CK), and regression kriging (RK)] were then used to integrate various levels of information (clay percentage, ECa

  20. Statistical multi-path exposure method for assessing the whole-body SAR in a heterogeneous human body model in a realistic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeeren, Günter; Joseph, Wout; Martens, Luc

    2013-04-01

    Assessing the whole-body absorption in a human in a realistic environment requires a statistical approach covering all possible exposure situations. This article describes the development of a statistical multi-path exposure method for heterogeneous realistic human body models. The method is applied for the 6-year-old Virtual Family boy (VFB) exposed to the GSM downlink at 950 MHz. It is shown that the whole-body SAR does not differ significantly over the different environments at an operating frequency of 950 MHz. Furthermore, the whole-body SAR in the VFB for multi-path exposure exceeds the whole-body SAR for worst-case single-incident plane wave exposure by 3.6%. Moreover, the ICNIRP reference levels are not conservative with the basic restrictions in 0.3% of the exposure samples for the VFB at the GSM downlink of 950 MHz. The homogeneous spheroid with the dielectric properties of the head suggested by the IEC underestimates the absorption compared to realistic human body models. Moreover, the variation in the whole-body SAR for realistic human body models is larger than for homogeneous spheroid models. This is mainly due to the heterogeneity of the tissues and the irregular shape of the realistic human body model compared to homogeneous spheroid human body models. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Performance Analysis of IEEE 802.15.4 Compliant Wireless Devices for Heterogeneous Indoor Home Automation Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Nazabal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of topology as well as morphology of complex indoor scenarios in the deployment of wireless sensor networks and wireless systems applied to home and building automation systems is analyzed. The existence of loss mechanisms such as material absorption (walls, furniture, etc. and strong multipath components as well as the increase in the number of wireless sensors within indoor scenarios increases the relevance in the configuration of the heterogeneous wireless systems. Simulation results by means of empirical-based models are compared with an in-house 3D ray launching code as well as measurement results from wireless sensor networks illustrate the strong influence of the indoor scenario in the overall performance. The use of adequate radioplanning strategies lead to optimal wireless network deployments in terms of capacity, quality of service, and reduced power consumption.

  2. Energy transfer at heterogeneous protein-protein interfaces to investigate the molecular behaviour in the crowding environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Chikashi

    2017-03-15

    Investigation of the behaviour of proteins in crowded environments is crucial for understanding the role of proteins in biological environments. In this study, the behaviour of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in crowded (highly concentrated) environments was investigated using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy as a model system. By using energy transfer as a molecular ruler, the crowding effect was clearly observed in the time resolved spectra. In addition, by using both time resolved anisotropy measurement and Raman spectroscopy, more detail insights from conformational and dynamic points of view were described. Consequently, it was revealed that in the highly concentrated solution, most of the BSA molecules are in the fast-reversible oligomeric state and the association at the "hard" and "soft" interfaces between protein surfaces occurred in a highly crowded environment with the aid of a charge-charge and short-range attractive interface. From both the conformational and dynamic aspects, the detail spectroscopic understanding of the behaviour of BSA in the crowding environment was obtained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Taking chances and making mistakes: non-genetic phenotypic heterogeneity and its consequences for surviving in dynamic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boxtel, Coco; van Heerden, Johan H; Nordholt, Niclas; Schmidt, Phillipp; Bruggeman, Frank J

    2017-07-01

    Natural selection has shaped the strategies for survival and growth of microorganisms. The success of microorganisms depends not only on slow evolutionary tuning but also on the ability to adapt to unpredictable changes in their environment. In principle, adaptive strategies range from purely deterministic mechanisms to those that exploit the randomness intrinsic to many cellular and molecular processes. Depending on the environment and selective pressures, particular strategies can lie somewhere along this continuum. In recent years, non-genetic cell-to-cell differences have received a lot of attention, not least because of their potential impact on the ability of microbial populations to survive in dynamic environments. Using several examples, we describe the origins of spontaneous and induced mechanisms of phenotypic adaptation. We identify some of the commonalities of these examples and consider the potential role of chance and constraints in microbial phenotypic adaptation. © 2017 The Author(s).

  4. Service-oriented model-encapsulation strategy for sharing and integrating heterogeneous geo-analysis models in an open web environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Songshan; Chen, Min; Wen, Yongning; Lu, Guonian

    2016-04-01

    Earth environment is extremely complicated and constantly changing; thus, it is widely accepted that the use of a single geo-analysis model cannot accurately represent all details when solving complex geo-problems. Over several years of research, numerous geo-analysis models have been developed. However, a collaborative barrier between model providers and model users still exists. The development of cloud computing has provided a new and promising approach for sharing and integrating geo-analysis models across an open web environment. To share and integrate these heterogeneous models, encapsulation studies should be conducted that are aimed at shielding original execution differences to create services which can be reused in the web environment. Although some model service standards (such as Web Processing Service (WPS) and Geo Processing Workflow (GPW)) have been designed and developed to help researchers construct model services, various problems regarding model encapsulation remain. (1) The descriptions of geo-analysis models are complicated and typically require rich-text descriptions and case-study illustrations, which are difficult to fully represent within a single web request (such as the GetCapabilities and DescribeProcess operations in the WPS standard). (2) Although Web Service technologies can be used to publish model services, model users who want to use a geo-analysis model and copy the model service into another computer still encounter problems (e.g., they cannot access the model deployment dependencies information). This study presents a strategy for encapsulating geo-analysis models to reduce problems encountered when sharing models between model providers and model users and supports the tasks with different web service standards (e.g., the WPS standard). A description method for heterogeneous geo-analysis models is studied. Based on the model description information, the methods for encapsulating the model-execution program to model services and

  5. Adaptive Multiscale Finite Element Method for Subsurface Flow Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Esch, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Natural geological formations generally show multiscale structural and functional heterogeneity evolving over many orders of magnitude in space and time. In subsurface hydrological simulations the geological model focuses on the structural hierarchy of physical sub units and the flow model addresses

  6. Photophysical properties and excited state intramolecular proton transfer in 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-(4-methoxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoic acid in homogeneous solvents and micro-heterogeneous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gashnga, Pynsakhiat Miki [Centre for Advanced Studies, Department of Chemistry, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022, Meghalaya (India); Singh, T. Sanjoy [Department of Chemistry, Assam University, Silchar 788011, Assam (India); Baul, Tushar S. Basu [Centre for Advanced Studies, Department of Chemistry, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022, Meghalaya (India); Mitra, Sivaprasad, E-mail: smitra@nehu.ac.in [Centre for Advanced Studies, Department of Chemistry, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022, Meghalaya (India)

    2014-04-15

    A systematic study on the photophysical properties and excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) behavior of 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-(4-methoxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoic acid, is reported using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in homogeneous solvents as well as in different micro-heterogeneous environments. Depending on the nature of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IHB), the salicylic acid derivative may exist in two different ground state conformers (I and II). Structure I having IHB between the carbonyl oxygen and phenolic hydrogen can undergo ESIPT upon excitation as evidenced by largely Stokes-shifted fluorescence at ∼455 nm; whereas, normal fluorescence in the blue side of the spectrum (∼410 nm) is due to the spontaneous emission from conformer II. The results in homogeneous solvents were compared with those in bio-mimicking environments of β-cyclodextrin (CD) and surfactants. The intensity of the ESIPT fluorescence increases substantially upon encapsulation of the probe into the cyclodextrin as well as micellar nano-cavities. Detailed analysis of the spectroscopic data indicates that the probe forms 1:1 complex with CD in aqueous medium. Binding constant of the probe with the micelles as well as critical micelle concentration was obtained from the variation of fluorescence intensity on increasing concentration of different surfactants in aqueous medium. -- Highlights: • Steady state and time resolved fluorescence study on ESIPT in HMBA. • Dual fluorescence corresponding to the pro- and non-ESIPT structures. • Modulation of ESIPT fluorescence in micro-heterogeneous environments. • 1:1 stoichiometry for interaction with cyclodextrin. • Calculation of binding constant and other physico-chemical properties from fluorescence titration data in surfactants.

  7. Vegetation mapping from high-resolution satellite images in the heterogeneous arid environments of Socotra Island (Yemen)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatesta, Luca; Attorre, Fabio; Altobelli, Alfredo; Adeeb, Ahmed; De Sanctis, Michele; Taleb, Nadim M.; Scholte, Paul T.; Vitale, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Socotra Island (Yemen), a global biodiversity hotspot, is characterized by high geomorphological and biological diversity. In this study, we present a high-resolution vegetation map of the island based on combining vegetation analysis and classification with remote sensing. Two different image classification approaches were tested to assess the most accurate one in mapping the vegetation mosaic of Socotra. Spectral signatures of the vegetation classes were obtained through a Gaussian mixture distribution model, and a sequential maximum a posteriori (SMAP) classification was applied to account for the heterogeneity and the complex spatial pattern of the arid vegetation. This approach was compared to the traditional maximum likelihood (ML) classification. Satellite data were represented by a RapidEye image with 5 m pixel resolution and five spectral bands. Classified vegetation relevés were used to obtain the training and evaluation sets for the main plant communities. Postclassification sorting was performed to adjust the classification through various rule-based operations. Twenty-eight classes were mapped, and SMAP, with an accuracy of 87%, proved to be more effective than ML (accuracy: 66%). The resulting map will represent an important instrument for the elaboration of conservation strategies and the sustainable use of natural resources in the island.

  8. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  9. Balancing energy budget in a central-place forager: which habitat to select in a heterogeneous environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patenaude-Monette, Martin; Bélisle, Marc; Giroux, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Foraging animals are influenced by the distribution of food resources and predation risk that both vary in space and time. These constraints likely shape trade-offs involving time, energy, nutrition, and predator avoidance leading to a sequence of locations visited by individuals. According to the marginal-value theorem (MVT), a central-place forager must either increase load size or energy content when foraging farther from their central place. Although such a decision rule has the potential to shape movement and habitat selection patterns, few studies have addressed the mechanisms underlying habitat use at the landscape scale. Our objective was therefore to determine how Ring-billed gulls (Larus delawarensis) select their foraging habitats while nesting in a colony located in a heterogeneous landscape. Based on locations obtained by fine-scale GPS tracking, we used resource selection functions (RSFs) and residence time analyses to identify habitats selected by gulls for foraging during the incubation and brood rearing periods. We then combined this information to gull survey data, feeding rates, stomach contents, and calorimetric analyses to assess potential trade-offs. Throughout the breeding season, gulls selected landfills and transhipment sites that provided higher mean energy intake than agricultural lands or riparian habitats. They used landfills located farther from the colony where no deterrence program had been implemented but avoided those located closer where deterrence measures took place. On the other hand, gulls selected intensively cultured lands located relatively close to the colony during incubation. The number of gulls was then greater in fields covered by bare soil and peaked during soil preparation and seed sowing, which greatly increase food availability. Breeding Ring-billed gulls thus select habitats according to both their foraging profitability and distance from their nest while accounting for predation risk. This supports the

  10. Balancing energy budget in a central-place forager: which habitat to select in a heterogeneous environment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Patenaude-Monette

    Full Text Available Foraging animals are influenced by the distribution of food resources and predation risk that both vary in space and time. These constraints likely shape trade-offs involving time, energy, nutrition, and predator avoidance leading to a sequence of locations visited by individuals. According to the marginal-value theorem (MVT, a central-place forager must either increase load size or energy content when foraging farther from their central place. Although such a decision rule has the potential to shape movement and habitat selection patterns, few studies have addressed the mechanisms underlying habitat use at the landscape scale. Our objective was therefore to determine how Ring-billed gulls (Larus delawarensis select their foraging habitats while nesting in a colony located in a heterogeneous landscape. Based on locations obtained by fine-scale GPS tracking, we used resource selection functions (RSFs and residence time analyses to identify habitats selected by gulls for foraging during the incubation and brood rearing periods. We then combined this information to gull survey data, feeding rates, stomach contents, and calorimetric analyses to assess potential trade-offs. Throughout the breeding season, gulls selected landfills and transhipment sites that provided higher mean energy intake than agricultural lands or riparian habitats. They used landfills located farther from the colony where no deterrence program had been implemented but avoided those located closer where deterrence measures took place. On the other hand, gulls selected intensively cultured lands located relatively close to the colony during incubation. The number of gulls was then greater in fields covered by bare soil and peaked during soil preparation and seed sowing, which greatly increase food availability. Breeding Ring-billed gulls thus select habitats according to both their foraging profitability and distance from their nest while accounting for predation risk. This

  11. Residential Environment Induced Preference Heterogeneity for River Ecosystem Service Improvements: A Comparison between Urban and Rural Households in the Wei River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengtong Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses residential environment induced preference heterogeneity regarding ecosystem services improvements of a river basin by comparing urban and rural residents’ welfare estimates. In a choice experiment, the ecological improvements are described in terms of several observable ecological indicators set in an experimental design. Given the fact that economic and environmental conditions differ for urban and rural residents in China, the utility they derive from ecological restoration is hypothesized to differ. The urban and rural residents’ survey data were modeled separately using mixed logit models. The results reveal that water quality and water quantity, measured by unit of level improvement and percentage improvement, respectively, hold the highest marginal utility values in all respondents’ models. Urban and rural residents have the same preference regarding expanding soil erosion control areas and landscape improvement. However, they have statistically significant different utility for water quality, water quantity, forest coverage, ecotourism improvements, and reducing soil erosion intensity. Generally, urban residents express a higher implicit price for most of the ecological indicators. The findings imply that policy makers should take existing preference heterogeneity into account in designing ecosystem payment schemes and allocating resources.

  12. Removing 2,4-dichlorophenol from aqueous environments by heterogeneous catalytic ozonation using synthesized MgO nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Leili; Bazrafshan, Edris; Noroozifar, Meissam; Ansari-Moghaddam, Alireza; Barahuie, Farahnaz; Balarak, Davoud

    2017-12-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) is one of the seriously toxic chlorophenol compounds found in agricultural environments, in water disinfected by chlorine, and in outgoing effluents from the pulp and paper industries and paper manufacturing factories. This research studied the feasibility of using MgO nanoparticles (MgO-NPs) as a catalyst in the ozonation process for removing 2,4-DCP from aqueous environments under laboratory conditions. This study was conducted using a laboratory-scale semi-continuous reactor. It studied the effects of critical variables such as solution pH, ozonation time, dose of MgO-NPs and initial 2,4-DCP concentration. A statistical model of response surface model (RSM) was designed and utilized to obtain the optimum experimental conditions. Analysis of the data showed that initial concentration of 2,4-DCP and dose of MgO-NPs had the maximum effect on the response variable (percentage degradation of 2,4-DCP). Moreover, based on analysis of variance on the model, the optimum removal conditions were reaction time of 50 min, pH > 7, initial 2,4-DCP concentration of less than 50 mg/L, and an MgO-NPs dose of 0.3 mg/L. Under these optimum conditions, a removal efficiency of 99.99% was achieved. In addition, results indicated that catalytic ozonation in the presence of MgO-NPs was very efficient at removing 2,4-DCP from aqueous environments.

  13. An Analysis of the Network Selection Problem for Heterogeneous Environments with User-Operator Joint Satisfaction and Multi-RAT Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Escudero-Garzás

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The trend in wireless networks is that several wireless radio access technologies (RATs coexist in the same area, forming heterogeneous networks in which the users may connect to any of the available RATs. The problem of associating a user to the most suitable RAT, known as network selection problem (NSP, is of capital importance for the satisfaction of the users in these emerging environments. However, also the satisfaction of the operator is important in this scenario. In this work, we propose that a connection may be served by more than one RAT by using multi-RAT terminals. We formulate the NSP with multiple RAT association based on utility functions that take into consideration both user’s satisfaction and provider’s satisfaction. As users are characterized according to their expected quality of service, our results exhaustively analyze the influence of the user’s profile, along with the network topology and the type of applications served.

  14. Microbial methanogenesis in subsurface oil and coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslé, Margaux; Dromart, Gilles; Oger, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    It is now clear that active methanogens are present in the deep-subsurface. This paper reviews microbial population structures and the biodegradation of organic compounds to methane in situ within oil reservoirs and coal deposits. It summarizes our current knowledge of methanogenes and methanogenesis, fermenters, synthrophs and microbial metabolism of complex organic compounds in these two widely occurring organic-rich subsurface environments. This review is not intended to be an exhaustive report of microbial diversity. Rather, it illustrates the similarities and differences between the two environments with specific examples, from the nature of the organic molecules to the methanogenic metabolic pathways and the structure of the microbial populations to demonstrate that widely diverging microbial populations show surprisingly similar metabolic capabilities. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical validation of automated audiometry with continuous noise-monitoring in a clinically heterogeneous population outside a sound-treated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan-Jones, Christopher G; Eikelboom, Robert H; Swanepoel, De Wet; Friedland, Peter L; Atlas, Marcus D

    2016-09-01

    Examine the accuracy of automated audiometry in a clinically heterogeneous population of adults using the KUDUwave automated audiometer. Prospective accuracy study. Manual audiometry was performed in a sound-treated room and automated audiometry was not conducted in a sound-treated environment. 42 consecutively recruited participants from a tertiary otolaryngology department in Western Australia. Absolute mean differences ranged between 5.12-9.68 dB (air-conduction) and 8.26-15 dB (bone-conduction). A total of 86.5% of manual and automated 4FAs were within 10 dB (i.e. ±5 dB); 94.8% were within 15 dB. However, there were significant (p audiometry at 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz (air-conduction) and 500 and 1000 Hz (bone-conduction). The effect of age (≥55 years) on accuracy (p = 0.014) was not significant on linear regression (p > 0.05; R(2) =( ) 0.11). The presence of a hearing loss (better ear ≥26 dB) did not significantly affect accuracy (p = 0.604; air-conduction), (p = 0.218; bone-conduction). This study provides clinical validation of automated audiometry using the KUDUwave in a clinically heterogeneous population, without the use of a sound-treated environment. Whilst threshold variations were statistically significant, future research is needed to ascertain the clinical significance of such variation.

  16. Geomicrobiology of extremely acidic subsurface environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David Barrie

    2012-07-01

    Extreme acidophiles (microorganisms with pH optima of Harz mountains in Germany) and a sulfidic cave (Frasissi, Italy) are reviewed. In addition, the contrasting geomicrobiology of two abandoned sulfide mineral mines in north Wales is described. Both are extremely acidic (pH~2) and low-temperature (8-9 °C) sites, but one (Cae Coch) is essentially a dry mine with isolated pockets of water, while the other (Mynydd Parys) contains a vast underground lake that was partially drained several years ago. The microbial communities in these two mines exhibit different relative abundances and often different species of archaea and bacteria. Wooden pit props, submerged in the underground lake, act as a slow-release source of organic carbon in the subterranean Mynydd Parys lake, supporting a microbial community that is more enriched with heterotrophic microorganisms. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemolithotrophy in the continental deep subsurface: Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Rose Osburn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The deep subsurface is an enormous repository of microbial life. However, the metabolic capabilities of these microorganisms and the degree to which they are dependent on surface processes are largely unknown. Due to the logistical difficulty of sampling and inherent heterogeneity, the microbial populations of the terrestrial subsurface are poorly characterized. In an effort to better understand the biogeochemistry of deep terrestrial habitats, we evaluate the energetic yield of chemolithotrophic metabolisms and microbial diversity in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF in the former Homestake Gold Mine, SD, USA. Geochemical data, energetic modeling, and DNA sequencing were combined with principle component analysis to describe this deep (down to 8100 ft below surface, terrestrial environment. SURF provides access into an iron-rich Paleoproterozoic metasedimentary deposit that contains deeply circulating groundwater. Geochemical analyses of subsurface fluids reveal enormous geochemical diversity ranging widely in salinity, oxidation state (ORP 330 to -328 mV, and concentrations of redox sensitive species (e.g., Fe2+ from near 0 to 6.2 mg/L and ΣS2- from 7 to 2778 μg/L. As a direct result of this compositional buffet, Gibbs energy calculations reveal an abundance of energy for microorganisms from the oxidation of sulfur, iron, nitrogen, methane, and manganese. Pyrotag DNA sequencing reveals diverse communities of chemolithoautotrophs, thermophiles, aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophs, and numerous uncultivated clades. Extrapolated across the mine footprint, these data suggest a complex spatial mosaic of subsurface primary productivity that is in good agreement with predicted energy yields. Notably, we report Gibbs energy normalized both per mole of reaction and per kg fluid (energy density and find the later to be more consistent with observed physiologies and environmental conditions. Further application of this approach will

  18. Chemolithotrophy in the continental deep subsurface: Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, Magdalena R; LaRowe, Douglas E; Momper, Lily M; Amend, Jan P

    2014-01-01

    The deep subsurface is an enormous repository of microbial life. However, the metabolic capabilities of these microorganisms and the degree to which they are dependent on surface processes are largely unknown. Due to the logistical difficulty of sampling and inherent heterogeneity, the microbial populations of the terrestrial subsurface are poorly characterized. In an effort to better understand the biogeochemistry of deep terrestrial habitats, we evaluate the energetic yield of chemolithotrophic metabolisms and microbial diversity in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in the former Homestake Gold Mine, SD, USA. Geochemical data, energetic modeling, and DNA sequencing were combined with principle component analysis to describe this deep (down to 8100 ft below surface), terrestrial environment. SURF provides access into an iron-rich Paleoproterozoic metasedimentary deposit that contains deeply circulating groundwater. Geochemical analyses of subsurface fluids reveal enormous geochemical diversity ranging widely in salinity, oxidation state (ORP 330 to -328 mV), and concentrations of redox sensitive species (e.g., Fe(2+) from near 0 to 6.2 mg/L and Σ S(2-) from 7 to 2778μg/L). As a direct result of this compositional buffet, Gibbs energy calculations reveal an abundance of energy for microorganisms from the oxidation of sulfur, iron, nitrogen, methane, and manganese. Pyrotag DNA sequencing reveals diverse communities of chemolithoautotrophs, thermophiles, aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophs, and numerous uncultivated clades. Extrapolated across the mine footprint, these data suggest a complex spatial mosaic of subsurface primary productivity that is in good agreement with predicted energy yields. Notably, we report Gibbs energy normalized both per mole of reaction and per kg fluid (energy density) and find the later to be more consistent with observed physiologies and environmental conditions. Further application of this approach will significantly

  19. Patterns of livestock activity on heterogeneous subalpine pastures reveal distinct responses to spatial autocorrelation, environment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homburger, Hermel; Lüscher, Andreas; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Schneider, Manuel K

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the impact of grazing livestock on pasture ecosystems, it is essential to quantify pasture use intensity at a fine spatial scale and the factors influencing its distribution. The observation and analysis of animal activity is greatly facilitated by remote tracking technology and new statistical frameworks allowing for rapid inference on spatially correlated data. We used these advances to study activity patterns of GPS-tracked cows in six summer-grazing areas in the Swiss Alps that differed in environmental conditions as well as livestock management. Recorded GPS positions were assigned to the activities of grazing, resting, and walking, and were discretized on a regular grid. Regression models with spatially structured effects were fitted to the spatial activity patterns using Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation. They indicated that terrain slope, forage quality, and stocking rate were the primary factors determining cow activity in the six study areas. Terrain slope significantly reduced livestock activity in five of the six areas and sparse forage availability significantly reduced grazing in all areas. In three areas, grazing pressure imposed by the pasture rotation was observable in the grazing pattern. Insolation, distance to the shed, and distance to water were less important for cow activity. In addition to the main factors identified across all study areas, we found effects operating only in individual areas, which were partly explained by specific environmental and management characteristics. In study areas with few paddocks, environmental variables exerted a stronger control on livestock activity than in areas with a short stocking period per paddock. The data demonstrated that a strict pasture rotation with short stocking periods is necessary to influence livestock activity, and hence potential effects on ecosystem processes. Without grazing management, livestock activity is primarily determined by the environment. Such

  20. Metalliferous Biosignatures for Deep Subsurface Microbial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, John; Brolly, Connor; Spinks, Sam; Bowden, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    The interaction of microbes and metals is widely assumed to have occurred in surface or very shallow subsurface environments. However new evidence suggests that much microbial activity occurs in the deep subsurface. Fluvial, lacustrine and aeolian `red beds' contain widespread centimetre-scale reduction spheroids in which a pale reduced spheroid in otherwise red rocks contains a metalliferous core. Most of the reduction of Fe (III) in sediments is caused by Fe (III) reducing bacteria. They have the potential to reduce a range of metals and metalloids, including V, Cu, Mo, U and Se, by substituting them for Fe (III) as electron acceptors, which are all elements common in reduction spheroids. The spheroidal morphology indicates that they were formed at depth, after compaction, which is consistent with a microbial formation. Given that the consequences of Fe (III) reduction have a visual expression, they are potential biosignatures during exploration of the terrestrial and extraterrestrial geological record. There is debate about the energy available from Fe (III) reduction on Mars, but the abundance of iron in Martian soils makes it one of the most valuable prospects for life there. Entrapment of the microbes themselves as fossils is possible, but a more realistic target during the exploration of Mars would be the colour contrasts reflecting selective reduction or oxidation. This can be achieved by analysing quartz grains across a reduction spheroid using Raman spectroscopy, which demonstrates its suitability for life detection in subsurface environments. Microbial action is the most suitable explanation for the formation of reduction spheroids and may act as metalliferous biosignatures for deep subsurface microbial activity.

  1. Metalliferous Biosignatures for Deep Subsurface Microbial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, John; Brolly, Connor; Spinks, Sam; Bowden, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    The interaction of microbes and metals is widely assumed to have occurred in surface or very shallow subsurface environments. However new evidence suggests that much microbial activity occurs in the deep subsurface. Fluvial, lacustrine and aeolian 'red beds' contain widespread centimetre-scale reduction spheroids in which a pale reduced spheroid in otherwise red rocks contains a metalliferous core. Most of the reduction of Fe (III) in sediments is caused by Fe (III) reducing bacteria. They have the potential to reduce a range of metals and metalloids, including V, Cu, Mo, U and Se, by substituting them for Fe (III) as electron acceptors, which are all elements common in reduction spheroids. The spheroidal morphology indicates that they were formed at depth, after compaction, which is consistent with a microbial formation. Given that the consequences of Fe (III) reduction have a visual expression, they are potential biosignatures during exploration of the terrestrial and extraterrestrial geological record. There is debate about the energy available from Fe (III) reduction on Mars, but the abundance of iron in Martian soils makes it one of the most valuable prospects for life there. Entrapment of the microbes themselves as fossils is possible, but a more realistic target during the exploration of Mars would be the colour contrasts reflecting selective reduction or oxidation. This can be achieved by analysing quartz grains across a reduction spheroid using Raman spectroscopy, which demonstrates its suitability for life detection in subsurface environments. Microbial action is the most suitable explanation for the formation of reduction spheroids and may act as metalliferous biosignatures for deep subsurface microbial activity.

  2. Cultivation Of Deep Subsurface Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrzut, Natalia; Casar, Caitlin; Osburn, Magdalena R.

    2018-01-01

    The potential habitability of surface environments on other planets in our solar system is limited by exposure to extreme radiation and desiccation. In contrast, subsurface environments may offer protection from these stressors and are potential reservoirs for liquid water and energy that support microbial life (Michalski et al., 2013) and are thus of interest to the astrobiology community. The samples used in this project were extracted from the Deep Mine Microbial Observatory (DeMMO) in the former Homestake Mine at depths of 800 to 2000 feet underground (Osburn et al., 2014). Phylogenetic data from these sites indicates the lack of cultured representatives within the community. We used geochemical data to guide media design to cultivate and isolate organisms from the DeMMO communities. Media used for cultivation varied from heterotrophic with oxygen, nitrate or sulfate to autotrophic media with ammonia or ferrous iron. Environmental fluid was used as inoculum in batch cultivation and strains were isolated via serial transfers or dilution to extinction. These methods resulted in isolating aerobic heterotrophs, nitrate reducers, sulfate reducers, ammonia oxidizers, and ferric iron reducers. DNA sequencing of these strains is underway to confirm which species they belong to. This project is part of the NASA Astrobiology Institute Life Underground initiative to detect and characterize subsurface microbial life; by characterizing the intraterrestrials, the life living deep within Earth’s crust, we aim to understand the controls on how and where life survives in subsurface settings. Cultivation of terrestrial deep subsurface microbes will provide insight into the survival mechanisms of intraterrestrials guiding the search for these life forms on other planets.

  3. Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The term environment refers to the internal and external context in which organizations operate. For some scholars, environment is defined as an arrangement of political, economic, social and cultural factors existing in a given context that have an impact on organizational processes and structures....... For others, environment is a generic term describing a large variety of stakeholders and how these interact and act upon organizations. Organizations and their environment are mutually interdependent and organizational communications are highly affected by the environment. This entry examines the origin...... and development of organization-environment interdependence, the nature of the concept of environment and its relevance for communication scholarships and activities....

  4. Time series analysis of contaminant transport in the subsurface: applications to conservative tracer and engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chunmei; Li, Yusong

    2014-08-01

    Accurately predicting the transport of contaminants in the field is subject to multiple sources of uncertainty due to the variability of geological settings, the complexity of field measurements, and the scarcity of data. Such uncertainties can be amplified when modeling some emerging contaminants, such as engineered nanomaterials, when a fundamental understanding of their fate and transport is lacking. Typical field work includes collecting concentration at a certain location for an extended period of time, or measuring the movement of plume for an extended period time, which would result in a time series of observation data. This work presents an effort to evaluate the possibility of applying time series analysis, particularly, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models, to forecast contaminant transport and distribution in the subsurface environment. ARIMA modeling was first assessed in terms of its capability to forecast tracer transport at two field sites, which had different levels of heterogeneity. After that, this study evaluated the applicability of ARIMA modeling to predict the transport of engineered nanomaterials at field sites, including field measured data of nanoscale zero valent iron and (nZVI) and numerically generated data for the transport of nano-fullerene aggregates (nC60). This proof-of-concept effort demonstrates the possibility of applying ARIMA to predict the contaminant transport in the subsurface environment. Like many other statistical models, ARIMA modeling is only descriptive and not explanatory. The limitation and the challenge associated with applying ARIMA modeling to contaminant transport in the subsurface are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Biogenic Carbon on Mars: A Subsurface Chauvinistic Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstott, T. C.; Lau, C. Y. M.; Magnabosco, C.; Harris, R.; Chen, Y.; Slater, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Kieft, T. L.; van Heerden, E.; Borgonie, G.; Dong, H.

    2015-12-01

    A review of 150 publications on the subsurface microbiology of the continental subsurface provides ~1,400 measurements of cellular abundances down to 4,800 meter depth. These data suggest that the continental subsurface biomass is comprised of ~1016-17 grams of carbon, which is higher than the most recent estimates of ~1015 grams of carbon (1 Gt) for the marine deep biosphere. If life developed early in Martian history and Mars sustained an active hydrological cycle during its first 500 million years, then is it possible that Mars could have developed a subsurface biomass of comparable size to that of Earth? Such a biomass would comprise a much larger fraction of the total known Martian carbon budget than does the subsurface biomass on Earth. More importantly could a remnant of this subsurface biosphere survive to the present day? To determine how sustainable subsurface life could be in isolation from the surface we have been studying subsurface fracture fluids from the Precambrian Shields in South Africa and Canada. In these environments the energetically efficient and deeply rooted acetyl-CoA pathway for carbon fixation plays a central role for chemolithoautotrophic primary producers that form the base of the biomass pyramid. These primary producers appear to be sustained indefinitely by H2 generated through serpentinization and radiolytic reactions. Carbon isotope data suggest that in some subsurface locations a much larger population of secondary consumers are sustained by the primary production of biogenic CH4 from a much smaller population of methanogens. These inverted biomass and energy pyramids sustained by the cycling of CH4 could have been and could still be active on Mars. The C and H isotopic signatures of Martian CH4 remain key tools in identifying potential signatures of an extant Martian biosphere. Based upon our results to date cavity ring-down spectroscopic technologies provide an option for making these measurements on future rover missions.

  6. Heterogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Nanoparticles at Environmental Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Young-Shin; Kim, Doyoon; Neil, Chelsea W

    2016-09-20

    Mineral nucleation is a phase transformation of aqueous components to solids with an accompanying creation of new surfaces. In this evolutional, yet elusive, process, nuclei often form at environmental interfaces, which provide remarkably reactive sites for heterogeneous nucleation and growth. Naturally occurring nucleation processes significantly contribute to the biogeochemical cycles of important components in the Earth's crust, such as iron and manganese oxide minerals and calcium carbonate. However, in recent decades, these cycles have been significantly altered by anthropogenic activities, which affect the aqueous chemistry and equilibrium of both surface and subsurface systems. These alterations can trigger the dissolution of existing minerals and formation of new nanoparticles (i.e., nucleation and growth) and consequently change the porosity and permeability of geomedia in subsurface environments. Newly formed nanoparticles can also actively interact with components in natural and engineered aquatic systems, including those posing a significant hazard such as arsenic. These interactions can bilaterally influence the fate and transport of both newly formed nanoparticles and aqueous components. Due to their importance in natural and engineered processes, heterogeneous nucleation at environmental interfaces has started to receive more attention. However, a lack of time-resolved in situ analyses makes the evaluation of heterogeneous nucleation challenging because the physicochemical properties of both the nuclei and surfaces significantly and dynamically change with time and aqueous chemistry. This Account reviews our in situ kinetic studies of the heterogeneous nucleation and growth behaviors of iron(III) (hydr)oxide, calcium carbonate, and manganese (hydr)oxide minerals in aqueous systems. In particular, we utilized simultaneous small-angle and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/GISAXS) to investigate in situ and in real-time the effects of

  7. Subsurface Facility System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-31

    The Subsurface Facility System encompasses the location, arrangement, size, and spacing of the underground openings. This subsurface system includes accesses, alcoves, and drifts. This system provides access to the underground, provides for the emplacement of waste packages, provides openings to allow safe and secure work conditions, and interfaces with the natural barrier. This system includes what is now the Exploratory Studies Facility. The Subsurface Facility System physical location and general arrangement help support the long-term waste isolation objectives of the repository. The Subsurface Facility System locates the repository openings away from main traces of major faults, away from exposure to erosion, above the probable maximum flood elevation, and above the water table. The general arrangement, size, and spacing of the emplacement drifts support disposal of the entire inventory of waste packages based on the emplacement strategy. The Subsurface Facility System provides access ramps to safely facilitate development and emplacement operations. The Subsurface Facility System supports the development and emplacement operations by providing subsurface space for such systems as ventilation, utilities, safety, monitoring, and transportation.

  8. Complex Systems Science for Subsurface Fate and Transport Report from the August 2009 Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-03-01

    The subsurface environment, which encompasses the vadose and saturated zones, is a heterogeneous, geologically complex domain. Believed to contain a large percentage of Earth's biomass in the form of microorganisms, the subsurface is a dynamic zone where important biogeochemical cycles work to sustain life. Actively linked to the atmosphere and biosphere through the hydrologic and carbon cycles, the subsurface serves as a storage location for much of Earth's fresh water. Coupled hydrological, microbiological, and geochemical processes occurring within the subsurface environment cause the local and regional natural chemical fluxes that govern water quality. These processes play a vital role in the formation of soil, economically important fossil fuels, mineral deposits, and other natural resources. Cleaning up Department of Energy (DOE) lands impacted by legacy wastes and using the subsurface for carbon sequestration or nuclear waste isolation require a firm understanding of these processes and the documented means to characterize the vertical and spatial distribution of subsurface properties directing water, nutrient, and contaminant flows. This information, along with credible, predictive models that integrate hydrological, microbiological, and geochemical knowledge over a range of scales, is needed to forecast the sustainability of subsurface water systems and to devise ways to manage and manipulate dynamic in situ processes for beneficial outcomes. Predictive models provide the context for knowledge integration. They are the primary tools for forecasting the evolving geochemistry or microbial ecology of groundwater under various scenarios and for assessing and optimizing the potential effectiveness of proposed approaches to carbon sequestration, waste isolation, or environmental remediation. An iterative approach of modeling and experimentation can reveal powerful insights into the behavior of subsurface systems. State-of-science understanding codified

  9. The Mojave vadose zone: a subsurface biosphere analogue for Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, William; Salas, Everett; Bhartia, Rohit; Beegle, Luther W

    2013-07-01

    If life ever evolved on the surface of Mars, it is unlikely that it would still survive there today, but as Mars evolved from a wet planet to an arid one, the subsurface environment may have presented a refuge from increasingly hostile surface conditions. Since the last glacial maximum, the Mojave Desert has experienced a similar shift from a wet to a dry environment, giving us the opportunity to study here on Earth how subsurface ecosystems in an arid environment adapt to increasingly barren surface conditions. In this paper, we advocate studying the vadose zone ecosystem of the Mojave Desert as an analogue for possible subsurface biospheres on Mars. We also describe several examples of Mars-like terrain found in the Mojave region and discuss ecological insights that might be gained by a thorough examination of the vadose zone in these specific terrains. Examples described include distributary fans (deltas, alluvial fans, etc.), paleosols overlain by basaltic lava flows, and evaporite deposits.

  10. Wireless Sensor Network Based Subsurface Contaminant Plume Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    conventional WSN . VSN enabled closed loop system consumes more energy than the VSN only system, because of the commands that are send to the nodes. Energy ...predict future plume behavior. This proof-of-concept research aimed at demonstrating the use of an intelligent Wireless Sensor Network ( WSN ) to...Network ( WSN ) to monitor contaminant plume movement in naturally heterogeneous subsurface formations to advance the sensor networking based monitoring

  11. Hydrogen utilization potential in subsurface sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Ram Adhikari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface microbial communities undertake many terminal electron-accepting processes, often simultaneously. Using a tritium-based assay, we measured the potential hydrogen oxidation catalyzed by hydrogenase enzymes in several subsurface sedimentary environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial Pacific and Gulf of Mexico with different predominant electron-acceptors. Hydrogenases constitute a diverse family of enzymes expressed by microorganisms that utilize molecular hydrogen as a metabolic substrate, product or intermediate. The assay reveals the potential for utilizing molecular hydrogen and allows qualitative detection of microbial activity irrespective of the predominant electron-accepting process. Because the method only requires samples frozen immediately after recovery, the assay can be used for identifying microbial activity in subsurface ecosystems without the need to preserve live material.We measured potential hydrogen oxidation rates in all samples from multiple depths at several sites that collectively span a wide range of environmental conditions and biogeochemical zones. Potential activity normalized to total cell abundance ranges over five orders of magnitude and varies, dependent upon the predominant terminal electron acceptor. Lowest per-cell potential rates characterize the zone of nitrate reduction and highest per-cell potential rates occur in the methanogenic zone. Possible reasons for this relationship to predominant electron acceptor include (i increasing importance of fermentation in successively deeper biogeochemical zones and (ii adaptation of H2ases to successively higher concentrations of H2 in successively deeper zones.

  12. Hydrogen Utilization Potential in Subsurface Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Rishi R; Glombitza, Clemens; Nickel, Julia C; Anderson, Chloe H; Dunlea, Ann G; Spivack, Arthur J; Murray, Richard W; D'Hondt, Steven; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Subsurface microbial communities undertake many terminal electron-accepting processes, often simultaneously. Using a tritium-based assay, we measured the potential hydrogen oxidation catalyzed by hydrogenase enzymes in several subsurface sedimentary environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial Pacific, and Gulf of Mexico) with different predominant electron-acceptors. Hydrogenases constitute a diverse family of enzymes expressed by microorganisms that utilize molecular hydrogen as a metabolic substrate, product, or intermediate. The assay reveals the potential for utilizing molecular hydrogen and allows qualitative detection of microbial activity irrespective of the predominant electron-accepting process. Because the method only requires samples frozen immediately after recovery, the assay can be used for identifying microbial activity in subsurface ecosystems without the need to preserve live material. We measured potential hydrogen oxidation rates in all samples from multiple depths at several sites that collectively span a wide range of environmental conditions and biogeochemical zones. Potential activity normalized to total cell abundance ranges over five orders of magnitude and varies, dependent upon the predominant terminal electron acceptor. Lowest per-cell potential rates characterize the zone of nitrate reduction and highest per-cell potential rates occur in the methanogenic zone. Possible reasons for this relationship to predominant electron acceptor include (i) increasing importance of fermentation in successively deeper biogeochemical zones and (ii) adaptation of H2ases to successively higher concentrations of H2 in successively deeper zones.

  13. Geochemical Sensors of Fracturing in the Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogstad, E. J.; Burghardt, J. A.; Shen, S.; Wellsandt, T. C.; Brown, C. F.

    2016-12-01

    Although advancements have been made in the use of tracers for subsurface interrogation, there continue to be issues correlating results from laboratory experiments to field tests involving the analysis of tracers in flow back fluids. One of the largest confounding factors is due to the heterogeneity of the natural system vs. the materials used in bench-scale tests. Many laboratory tests use field-relevant materials; however, the samples are typically processed (i.e., crushed) such that they no longer represent the physical whole rock configuration of the reservoir. To avoid this shortcoming, we used specialized high pressure/temperature test equipment to quantitatively measure the development, surface area, and interconnectivity of hydraulically induced fractures on whole rock cores. The application involves the use of novel element-pair tracers (consisting of a suite of rare earth elements [REE]) to elucidate the total surface of the fractured system. Initial results indicate that interaction of the tracer with multiple rock types produces a significant depletion in select REE, largely as a function of surface area of the rock, and less as a function of the time of interaction. Three-dimensional X-ray microtomography is being used to validate surface area estimates derived via analysis of the chemical tracers. This talk will demonstrate how this novel sensor approach affords a simple, low-cost alternative for subsurface interrogation of fracture development.

  14. Nanoscale subsurface imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, M.; Ding, Y.; Tetard, L.

    2017-05-01

    The ability to probe structures and functional properties of complex systems at the nanoscale, both at their surface and in their volume, has drawn substantial attention in recent years. Besides detecting heterogeneities, cracks and defects below the surface, more advanced explorations of chemical or electrical properties are of great interest. In this article, we review some approaches developed to explore heterogeneities below the surface, including recent progress in the different aspects of metrology in optics, electron microscopy, and scanning probe microscopy. We discuss the principle and mechanisms of image formation associated with each technique, including data acquisition, data analysis and modeling for nanoscale structural and functional imaging. We highlight the advances based on atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our discussion first introduces methods providing structural information of the buried structures, such as position in the volume and geometry. Next we present how functional properties including conductivity, capacitance, and composition can be extracted from the modalities available to date and how they could eventually enable tomography reconstructions of systems such as overlay structures in transistors or living systems. Finally we propose a perspective regarding the outstanding challenges and needs to push the field forward.

  15. Recently deglaciated high-altitude soils of the Himalaya: diverse environments, heterogenous bacterial communities and long-range dust inputs from the upper troposphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaz Stres

    Full Text Available The Himalaya with its altitude and geographical position forms a barrier to atmospheric transport, which produces much aqueous-particle monsoon precipitation and makes it the largest continuous ice-covered area outside polar regions. There is a paucity of data on high-altitude microbial communities, their native environments and responses to environmental-spatial variables relative to seasonal and deglaciation events.Soils were sampled along altitude transects from 5000 m to 6000 m to determine environmental, spatial and seasonal factors structuring bacterial communities characterized by 16 S rRNA gene deep sequencing. Dust traps and fresh-snow samples were used to assess dust abundance and viability, community structure and abundance of dust associated microbial communities. Significantly different habitats among the altitude-transect samples corresponded to both phylogenetically distant and closely-related communities at distances as short as 50 m showing high community spatial divergence. High within-group variability that was related to an order of magnitude higher dust deposition obscured seasonal and temporal rearrangements in microbial communities. Although dust particle and associated cell deposition rates were highly correlated, seasonal dust communities of bacteria were distinct and differed significantly from recipient soil communities. Analysis of closest relatives to dust OTUs, HYSPLIT back-calculation of airmass trajectories and small dust particle size (4-12 µm suggested that the deposited dust and microbes came from distant continental, lacustrine and marine sources, e.g. Sahara, India, Caspian Sea and Tibetan plateau. Cyanobacteria represented less than 0.5% of microbial communities suggesting that the microbial communities benefitted from (codeposited carbon which was reflected in the psychrotolerant nature of dust-particle associated bacteria.The spatial, environmental and temporal complexity of the high-altitude soils of the

  16. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a heterogeneous catalysis course which has elements of materials processing embedded in the classical format of catalytic mechanisms and surface chemistry. A course outline and list of examples of recent review papers written by students are provided. (MVL)

  17. HETEROGENEOUS INTEGRATION TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-24

    the “product component” is a result of technology push only, it struggles to fit into a conservative system environment . If the “product component...makes the categorization difficult. In a technology push environment , the evolution of technology is easier to track since it starts evolving from a... environmental information. The role of the heterogeneous integration technology for reducing the size and the power consumption of small sensors was studied

  18. Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

    2003-12-17

    The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce

  19. Subsurface Event Detection and Classification Using Wireless Signal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhannad T. Suleiman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface environment sensing and monitoring applications such as detection of water intrusion or a landslide, which could significantly change the physical properties of the host soil, can be accomplished using a novel concept, Wireless Signal Networks (WSiNs. The wireless signal networks take advantage of the variations of radio signal strength on the distributed underground sensor nodes of WSiNs to monitor and characterize the sensed area. To characterize subsurface environments for event detection and classification, this paper provides a detailed list and experimental data of soil properties on how radio propagation is affected by soil properties in subsurface communication environments. Experiments demonstrated that calibrated wireless signal strength variations can be used as indicators to sense changes in the subsurface environment. The concept of WSiNs for the subsurface event detection is evaluated with applications such as detection of water intrusion, relative density change, and relative motion using actual underground sensor nodes. To classify geo-events using the measured signal strength as a main indicator of geo-events, we propose a window-based minimum distance classifier based on Bayesian decision theory. The window-based classifier for wireless signal networks has two steps: event detection and event classification. With the event detection, the window-based classifier classifies geo-events on the event occurring regions that are called a classification window. The proposed window-based classification method is evaluated with a water leakage experiment in which the data has been measured in laboratory experiments. In these experiments, the proposed detection and classification method based on wireless signal network can detect and classify subsurface events.

  20. Differential subsidence and its effect on subsurface infrastructure: predicting probability of pipeline failure (STOOP project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Renée; Dabekaussen, Willem; Hijma, Marc; Wiersma, Ane; Abspoel-Bukman, Linda; Boeije, Remco; Courage, Wim; van der Geest, Johan; Hamburg, Marc; Harmsma, Edwin; Helmholt, Kristian; van den Heuvel, Frank; Kruse, Henk; Langius, Erik; Lazovik, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Due to heterogeneity of the subsurface in the delta environment of the Netherlands, differential subsidence over short distances results in tension and subsequent wear of subsurface infrastructure, such as water and gas pipelines. Due to uncertainties in the build-up of the subsurface, however, it is unknown where this problem is the most prominent. This is a problem for asset managers deciding when a pipeline needs replacement: damaged pipelines endanger security of supply and pose a significant threat to safety, yet premature replacement raises needless expenses. In both cases, costs - financial or other - are high. Therefore, an interdisciplinary research team of geotechnicians, geologists and Big Data engineers from research institutes TNO, Deltares and SkyGeo developed a stochastic model to predict differential subsidence and the probability of consequent pipeline failure on a (sub-)street level. In this project pipeline data from company databases is combined with a stochastic geological model and information on (historical) groundwater levels and overburden material. Probability of pipeline failure is modelled by a coupling with a subsidence model and two separate models on pipeline behaviour under stress, using a probabilistic approach. The total length of pipelines (approx. 200.000 km operational in the Netherlands) and the complexity of the model chain that is needed to calculate a chance of failure, results in large computational challenges, as it requires massive evaluation of possible scenarios to reach the required level of confidence. To cope with this, a scalable computational infrastructure has been developed, composing a model workflow in which components have a heterogeneous technological basis. Three pilot areas covering an urban, a rural and a mixed environment, characterised by different groundwater-management strategies and different overburden histories, are used to evaluate the differences in subsidence and uncertainties that come with

  1. Endoscopic subsurface imaging in tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Staggs, M; Radousky, H B

    2001-02-12

    The objective of this work is to develop endoscopic subsurface optical imaging technology that will be able to image different tissue components located underneath the surface of the tissue at an imaging depth of up to 1 centimeter. This effort is based on the utilization of existing technology and components developed for medical endoscopes with the incorporation of the appropriate modifications to implement the spectral and polarization difference imaging technique. This subsurface imaging technique employs polarization and spectral light discrimination in combination with image processing to remove a large portion of the image information from the outer layers of the tissue which leads to enhancement of the contrast and image quality of subsurface tissue structures.

  2. VISUALIZATION OF REGISTERED SUBSURFACE ANATOMY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method for visualization of subsurface anatomy includes obtaining a first image from a first camera and a second image from a second camera or a second channel of the first camera, where the first and second images contain shared anatomical structures. The second camera and the second...... channel of the first camera are capable of imaging anatomy beneath the surface in ultra-violet, visual, or infra-red spectrum. A data processor is configured for computing registration of the first image to the second image to provide visualization of subsurface anatomy during surgical procedures...

  3. Phylogenetic evidence of noteworthy microflora from the subsurface of the former Homestake gold mine, Lead, South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, E J; Elliott, T J; Vahrenkamp, J M; Roggenthen, W M; Sani, R K; Anderson, C M; Bang, S S

    2010-01-01

    Molecular characterization of subsurface microbial communities in the former Homestake gold mine, South Dakota, was carried out by 16S rDNA sequence analysis using a water sample and a weathered soil-like sample. Geochemical analyses indicated that both samples were high in sulphur, rich in nitrogen and salt, but with significantly different metal concentrations. Microbial diversity comparisons unexpectedly revealed three distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota, typically identified from marine environments, and one OTU belonging to a potentially novel phylum that fell sister to Thaumarchaeota. To our knowledge this is only the second report of Thaumarchaeota in a terrestrial environment. The majority of the clones from Archaea sequence libraries fell into two closely related OTUs and were grouped most closely to an ammonia-oxidizing, carbon-fixing and halophilic thaumarchaeote genus, Nitrosopumilus. The two samples showed neither Euryarchaeota nor Crenarchaeota members that have often been identified from other subsurface terrestrial ecosystems. Bacteria OTUs containing the highest percentage of sequences were related to sulphur-oxidizing bacteria of the orders Chromatiales and Thiotrichales. Community members of Bacteria from individual Homestake ecosystems were heterogeneous and distinctive to each community, with unique phylotypes identified within each sample.

  4. Resolving Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölzenspies, Jurriaan; Dela Cruz, Gelo Victoriano; M Brickman, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    sets of pluripotency and differentiation markers. It has become increasingly apparent that this transcriptional heterogeneity is an important characteristic of ESC culture. By sorting for specific populations of ESCs it is possible to enrich for cells with a capacity to colonize the embryo proper...

  5. Scenario simulation based assessment of subsurface energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, C.; Bauer, S.; Dahmke, A.

    2014-12-01

    Energy production from renewable sources such as solar or wind power is characterized by temporally varying power supply. The politically intended transition towards renewable energies in Germany („Energiewende") hence requires the installation of energy storage technologies to compensate for the fluctuating production. In this context, subsurface energy storage represents a viable option due to large potential storage capacities and the wide prevalence of suited geological formations. Technologies for subsurface energy storage comprise cavern or deep porous media storage of synthetic hydrogen or methane from electrolysis and methanization, or compressed air, as well as heat storage in shallow or moderately deep porous formations. Pressure build-up, fluid displacement or temperature changes induced by such operations may affect local and regional groundwater flow, geomechanical behavior, groundwater geochemistry and microbiology. Moreover, subsurface energy storage may interact and possibly be in conflict with other "uses" like drinking water abstraction or ecological goods and functions. An utilization of the subsurface for energy storage therefore requires an adequate system and process understanding for the evaluation and assessment of possible impacts of specific storage operations on other types of subsurface use, the affected environment and protected entities. This contribution presents the framework of the ANGUS+ project, in which tools and methods are developed for these types of assessments. Synthetic but still realistic scenarios of geological energy storage are derived and parameterized for representative North German storage sites by data acquisition and evaluation, and experimental work. Coupled numerical hydraulic, thermal, mechanical and reactive transport (THMC) simulation tools are developed and applied to simulate the energy storage and subsurface usage scenarios, which are analyzed for an assessment and generalization of the imposed THMC

  6. Measuring Heterogeneous Reaction Rates with ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy to Evaluate Chemical Fates in an Atmospheric Environment: A Physical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jason E.; Zeng, Guang; Maron, Marta K.; Mach, Mindy; Dwebi, Iman; Liu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an undergraduate laboratory experiment to measure heterogeneous liquid/gas reaction kinetics (ozone-oleic acid and ozone-phenothrin) using a flow reactor coupled to an attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometer. The experiment is specially designed for an upper-level undergraduate Physical…

  7. Integrated Surface/subsurface flow modeling in PFLOTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, Scott L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Understanding soil water, groundwater, and shallow surface water dynamics as an integrated hydrological system is critical for understanding the Earth’s critical zone, the thin outer layer at our planet’s surface where vegetation, soil, rock, and gases interact to regulate the environment. Computational tools that take this view of soil moisture and shallow surface flows as a single integrated system are typically referred to as integrated surface/subsurface hydrology models. We extend the open-source, highly parallel, subsurface flow and reactive transport simulator PFLOTRAN to accommodate surface flows. In contrast to most previous implementations, we do not represent a distinct surface system. Instead, the vertical gradient in hydraulic head at the land surface is neglected, which allows the surface flow system to be eliminated and incorporated directly into the subsurface system. This tight coupling approach leads to a robust capability and also greatly simplifies implementation in existing subsurface simulators such as PFLOTRAN. Successful comparisons to independent numerical solutions build confidence in the approximation and implementation. Example simulations of the Walker Branch and East Fork Poplar Creek watersheds near Oak Ridge, Tennessee demonstrate the robustness of the approach in geometrically complex applications. The lack of a robust integrated surface/subsurface hydrology capability had been a barrier to PFLOTRAN’s use in critical zone studies. This work addresses that capability gap, thus enabling PFLOTRAN as a community platform for building integrated models of the critical zone.

  8. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Auken, Esben; Bamberg, Charlotte A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface...... conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root...... the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface...

  9. Predictability of Subsurface Temperature and the AMOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y.; Schubert, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    GEOS 5 coupled model is extensively used for experimental decadal climate prediction. Understanding the limits of decadal ocean predictability is critical for making progress in these efforts. Using this model, we study the subsurface temperature initial value predictability, the variability of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and its impacts on the global climate. Our approach is to utilize the idealized data assimilation technology developed at the GMAO. The technique 'replay' allows us to assess, for example, the impact of the surface wind stresses and/or precipitation on the ocean in a very well controlled environment. By running the coupled model in replay mode we can in fact constrain the model using any existing reanalysis data set. We replay the model constraining (nudging) it to the MERRA reanalysis in various fields from 1948-2012. The fields, u,v,T,q,ps, are adjusted towards the 6-hourly analyzed fields in atmosphere. The simulated AMOC variability is studied with a 400-year-long segment of replay integration. The 84 cases of 10-year hindcasts are initialized from 4 different replay cycles. Here, the variability and predictability are examined further by a measure to quantify how much the subsurface temperature and AMOC variability has been influenced by atmospheric forcing and by ocean internal variability. The simulated impact of the AMOC on the multi-decadal variability of the SST, sea surface height (SSH) and sea ice extent is also studied.

  10. Heterogeneous Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Davide; Guerraoui, Rachid; Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Koldehofe, Boris; Mogensen, Martin; Monod, Maxime; Quéma, Vivien

    Gossip-based information dissemination protocols are considered easy to deploy, scalable and resilient to network dynamics. Load-balancing is inherent in these protocols as the dissemination work is evenly spread among all nodes. Yet, large-scale distributed systems are usually heterogeneous with respect to network capabilities such as bandwidth. In practice, a blind load-balancing strategy might significantly hamper the performance of the gossip dissemination.

  11. A fully subordinated linear flow model for hillslope subsurface stormflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Baeumer, Boris; Chen, Li; Reeves, Donald M.; Sun, HongGuang

    2017-04-01

    Hillslope subsurface stormflow exhibits complex patterns when natural soils with multiscale heterogeneity impart a spatiotemporally nonlocal memory on flow dynamics. To efficiently quantify such nonlocal flow responses, this technical note proposes a fully subordinated flow (FSF) equation where the time- and flow-subordination capture the temporal and spatial memory, respectively. Results show that the time-subordination component of the FSF model captures a wide range of delayed flow response due to various degrees of soil heterogeneity (especially for low-conductivity zones), while the model's flow-subordination term accounts for the rapid flow responses along preferential flow paths. In the FSF model, parameters defining spatiotemporal memory functions may be related to soil properties, while other parameters such as scalar factors controlling the overall advection and diffusion are difficult to predict and can be estimated from subsurface stormflow hydrographs. These parameters can be constants at the hillslope scale because the spatiotemporal subordination, an upscaling technique, can capture the impact of system heterogeneity on flow dynamics, leading to a linear FSF model that might be applicable for various slopes. Valid scale, limitation and extension of the FSF model, and modification of the model for other complex hydrological dynamics are also discussed.

  12. Advantages of Electromagnetic Interferometry Applied to Ground-Penetrating Radar : Non-Destructive Inspection and Characterization of the Subsurface Without Transmitting Anything

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feld, R.

    2017-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is a non-destructive method that images the subsurface using radar. A transmitter generates a radar pulse. This signal propagates into the ground where it reflects against subsurface heterogeneities, and travels back to the surface. A receiver records the reflected

  13. Integrated geomechanical modelling for deep subsurface damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, J.D. van; Orlic, B.; Zijl, W.; Jongerius, P.; Schreppers, G.J.; Hendriks, M.

    2001-01-01

    Government, E&P and mining industry increasingly demand fundamental insight and accurate predictions on subsurface and surface deformation and damage due to exploitation of subsurface natural resources, and subsurface storage of energy residues (e.g. CO2). At this moment deformation is difficult to

  14. Influence of trial design, heterogeneity and regulatory environment on the results of clinical trials: An appraisal in the context of recent trials on acute stroke intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P R Srijithesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The outcome of randomized controlled trials can vary depending on the eligibility criteria of the patients entering into the trial, as well as the heterogeneity of the eligible population and/or the interventions. If the subject population and/or interventions are heterogeneous, the final outcome of the trial depends on the degree of concordance of effects of the subgroups of interventions on the subgroups of the subject population. The considerations that go into the calculation of sample size and determination of the study stopping rules also would affect the nature of the outcome of the study. In this paper we try to examine these phenomena with respect to the recent trials on endovascular therapy in acute ischemic stroke.

  15. Use of genotype × environment interaction model to accommodate genetic heterogeneity for residual feed intake, dry matter intake, net energy in milk, and metabolic body weight in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, C; de Los Campos, G; VandeHaar, M J; Spurlock, D M; Armentano, L E; Coffey, M; de Haas, Y; Veerkamp, R F; Staples, C R; Connor, E E; Wang, Z; Hanigan, M D; Tempelman, R J; Weigel, K A

    2017-03-01

    Feed efficiency in dairy cattle has gained much attention recently. Due to the cost-prohibitive measurement of individual feed intakes, combining data from multiple countries is often necessary to ensure an adequate reference population. It may then be essential to model genetic heterogeneity when making inferences about feed efficiency or selecting efficient cattle using genomic information. In this study, we constructed a marker × environment interaction model that decomposed marker effects into main effects and interaction components that were specific to each environment. We compared environment-specific variance component estimates and prediction accuracies from the interaction model analyses, an across-environment analyses ignoring population stratification, and a within-environment analyses using an international feed efficiency data set. Phenotypes included residual feed intake, dry matter intake, net energy in milk, and metabolic body weight from 3,656 cows measured in 3 broadly defined environments: North America (NAM), the Netherlands (NLD), and Scotland (SAC). Genotypic data included 57,574 single nucleotide polymorphisms per animal. The interaction model gave the highest prediction accuracy for metabolic body weight, which had the largest estimated heritabilities ranging from 0.37 to 0.55. The within-environment model performed the best when predicting residual feed intake, which had the lowest estimated heritabilities ranging from 0.13 to 0.41. For traits (dry matter intake and net energy in milk) with intermediate estimated heritabilities (0.21 to 0.50 and 0.17 to 0.53, respectively), performance of the 3 models was comparable. Genomic correlations between environments also were computed using variance component estimates from the interaction model. Averaged across all traits, genomic correlations were highest between NAM and NLD, and lowest between NAM and SAC. In conclusion, the interaction model provided a novel way to evaluate traits measured in

  16. Subsurface Noble Gas Sampling Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, C. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sun, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-18

    The intent of this document is to provide information about best available approaches for performing subsurface soil gas sampling during an On Site Inspection or OSI. This information is based on field sampling experiments, computer simulations and data from the NA-22 Noble Gas Signature Experiment Test Bed at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS). The approaches should optimize the gas concentration from the subsurface cavity or chimney regime while simultaneously minimizing the potential for atmospheric radioxenon and near-surface Argon-37 contamination. Where possible, we quantitatively assess differences in sampling practices for the same sets of environmental conditions. We recognize that all sampling scenarios cannot be addressed. However, if this document helps to inform the intuition of the reader about addressing the challenges resulting from the inevitable deviations from the scenario assumed here, it will have achieved its goal.

  17. Colloid formation in groundwater: effect of phosphate, manganese, silicate and dissolved organic matter on the dynamic heterogeneous oxidation of ferrous iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthoorn, A.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Weng, L.P.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2004-01-01

    Subsurface aeration is the in situ oxidation of Fe from groundwater that is used to make drinking water potable. When subsurface aeration is applied to an anaerobic groundwater system with pH > 7, Fe(II) is oxidised heterogeneously. The heterogeneous oxidation of Fe(II) can result in the in situ

  18. Detection of microbial Life in the Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan-Lotter, H.; Fendrihan, S.; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, M.; Legat, A.; Gruber, C.; Weidler, G.; Gerbl, F.

    2007-08-01

    In recent years microbial communities were detected, which dwell in rocks, soil and caves deep below the surface of the Earth. This has led to a new view of the diversity of the terrestrial biosphere and of the physico-chemical boundaries for life. Two types of subterranean environments are Permo-Triassic salt sediments and thermal radioactive springs from igneous rocks in the Alps. Viable extremely halophilic archaea were isolated from ancient salt sediments which are estimated to be about 250 million years old (1). Chemotaxonomic and molecular characterization showed that they represent novel species, e. g. Halococcus salifodinae, Hcc. dombrowskiiand Halobacterium noricense. Simulation experiments with artificial halite suggested that these microorganisms probably survived while embedded in fluid inclusions. In the thermal springs, evidence for numerous novel microorganisms was found by 16S rDNA sequencing and probing for some metabolic genes; in addition, scanning electron microscopy of biofilms on the rock surfaces revealed great diversity of morphotypes (2). These communities appear to be active and growing, although their energy and carbon sources are entirely unknown. The characterization of subsurface inhabitants is of astrobiological relevance since extraterrestrial halite has been detected (3) and since microbial life on Mars, if existent, may have retreated into the subsurface. As a long-term goal, a thorough census of terrestrial microorganisms should be taken and their survival potential be determined in view of future missions for the search for extraterrestrial life, including planning precautions against possible forward contamination by space probes. (1) Fendrihan, S., Legat, A., Gruber, C., Pfaffenhuemer, M., Weidler, G., Gerbl, F., Stan-Lotter, H. (2006) Extremely halophilic archaea and the issue of long term microbial survival. Reviews in Environmental Science and Bio/technology 5, 1569-1605. (2) Weidler, G.W., Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, M., Gerbl

  19. The Effect of Variation in Developmental Mode on the Population Dynamics of a Spionid Polychaete (Pygospio elegans) in a Heterogeneous Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thonig, Anne

    2018-01-01

    by the short life span of P. elegans and sweepstakes reproductive success. Additionally, stochastic events, such as rain storms, can lead to abrupt drops in salinity which can be detrimental for P. elegans and hence introduce further changes in population structure. Seasonal dynamics, including sexual...... might indicate that environmental impacts are of greater importance in shaping population dynamics than are species interactions. Switches in developmental mode could reflect a strategy for coping with life in an unpredictable, heterogeneous habitat. Although switches in developmental mode were...

  20. On the effects of subsurface parameters on evaporite dissolution (Switzerland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidane, Ali; Zechner, Eric; Huggenberger, Peter; Younes, Anis

    2014-05-01

    Uncontrolled subsurface evaporite dissolution could lead to hazards such as land subsidence. Observed subsidences in a study area of Northwestern Switzerland were mainly due to subsurface dissolution (subrosion) of evaporites such as halite and gypsum. A set of 2D density driven flow simulations were evaluated along 1000 m long and 150 m deep 2D cross sections within the study area that is characterized by tectonic horst and graben structures. The simulations were conducted to study the effect of the different subsurface parameters that could affect the dissolution process. The heterogeneity of normal faults and its impact on the dissolution of evaporites is studied by considering several permeable faults that include non-permeable areas. The mixed finite element method (MFE) is used to solve the flow equation, coupled with the multipoint flux approximation (MPFA) and the discontinuous Galerkin method (DG) to solve the diffusion and the advection parts of the transport equation. Results show that the number of faults above the lower aquifer that contains the salt layer is considered as the most important factor that affects the dissolution compared to the other investigated parameters of thickness of the zone above the halite formation, a dynamic conductivity of the lower aquifer, and varying boundary conditions in the upper aquifer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. ASSESSMENT OF THE SUBSURFACE FATE OF MONOETHANOLAMINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A. Sorensen; John R. Gallagher; Lori G. Kays

    2000-05-01

    Burial of amine reclaimer unit sludges and system filters has resulted in contamination of soil at the CanOxy Okotoks decommissioned sour gas-processing plant with amines, amine byproducts, and salts. A three-phase research program was devised to investigate the natural attenuation process that controls the subsurface transport and fate of these contaminants and to apply the results toward the development of a strategy for the remediation of this type of contamination in soils. Phase I experimental activities examined interactions between monoethanolamine (MEA) and sediment, the biodegradability of MEA in soils at various concentrations and temperatures, and the biodegradability of MEA sludge contamination in a soil slurry bioreactor. The transport and fate of MEA in the subsurface was found to be highly dependant on the nature of the release, particularly MEA concentration and conditions of the subsurface environment, i.e., pH, temperature, and oxygen availability. Pure compound biodegradation experiments in soil demonstrated rapid biodegradation of MEA under aerobic conditions and moderate temperatures (>6 C). Phase II landfarming activities confirmed that these contaminants are readily biodegradable in soil under ideal laboratory conditions, yet considerable toxicity was observed in the remaining material. Examination of water extracts from the treated soil suggested that the toxicity is water-soluble. Phase II activities led to the conclusion that landfarming is not the most desirable bioremediation technique; however, an engineered biopile with a leachate collection system could remove the remaining toxic fraction from the soil. Phase III was initiated to conduct field-based experimental activities to examine the optimized remediation technology. A pilot-scale engineered biopile was constructed at a decommissioned gas-sweetening facility in Okotoks, Alberta, Canada. On the basis of a review of the analytical and performance data generated from soil and

  2. Planetary science and exploration in the deep subsurface: results from the MINAR Program, Boulby Mine, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payler, Samuel J.; Biddle, Jennifer F.; Coates, Andrew J.; Cousins, Claire R.; Cross, Rachel E.; Cullen, David C.; Downs, Michael T.; Direito, Susana O. L.; Edwards, Thomas; Gray, Amber L.; Genis, Jac; Gunn, Matthew; Hansford, Graeme M.; Harkness, Patrick; Holt, John; Josset, Jean-Luc; Li, Xuan; Lees, David S.; Lim, Darlene S. S.; McHugh, Melissa; McLuckie, David; Meehan, Emma; Paling, Sean M.; Souchon, Audrey; Yeoman, Louise; Cockell, Charles S.

    2017-04-01

    The subsurface exploration of other planetary bodies can be used to unravel their geological history and assess their habitability. On Mars in particular, present-day habitable conditions may be restricted to the subsurface. Using a deep subsurface mine, we carried out a program of extraterrestrial analog research - MINe Analog Research (MINAR). MINAR aims to carry out the scientific study of the deep subsurface and test instrumentation designed for planetary surface exploration by investigating deep subsurface geology, whilst establishing the potential this technology has to be transferred into the mining industry. An integrated multi-instrument suite was used to investigate samples of representative evaporite minerals from a subsurface Permian evaporite sequence, in particular to assess mineral and elemental variations which provide small-scale regions of enhanced habitability. The instruments used were the Panoramic Camera emulator, Close-Up Imager, Raman spectrometer, Small Planetary Linear Impulse Tool, Ultrasonic drill and handheld X-ray diffraction (XRD). We present science results from the analog research and show that these instruments can be used to investigate in situ the geological context and mineralogical variations of a deep subsurface environment, and thus habitability, from millimetre to metre scales. We also show that these instruments are complementary. For example, the identification of primary evaporite minerals such as NaCl and KCl, which are difficult to detect by portable Raman spectrometers, can be accomplished with XRD. By contrast, Raman is highly effective at locating and detecting mineral inclusions in primary evaporite minerals. MINAR demonstrates the effective use of a deep subsurface environment for planetary instrument development, understanding the habitability of extreme deep subsurface environments on Earth and other planetary bodies, and advancing the use of space technology in economic mining.

  3. Different effects of surface heterogeneous atoms of porous and non-porous carbonaceous materials on adsorption of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane in aqueous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weifeng; Ni, Jinzhi

    2017-05-01

    The surface heterogeneous atoms of carbonaceous materials (CMs) play an important role in adsorption of organic pollutants. However, little is known about the surface heterogeneous atoms of CMs might generate different effect on adsorption of hydrophobic organic compounds by porous carbonaceous materials - activated carbons (ACs) and non-porous carbonaceous materials (NPCMs). In this study, we observed that the surface oxygen and nitrogen atoms could decrease the adsorption affinity of both ACs and NPCMs for 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TeCA), but the degree of decreasing effects were very different. The increasing content of surface oxygen and nitrogen ([O + N]) caused a sharper decrease in adsorption affinity of ACs (slope of lg (k d /SA) vs [O + N]: -0.098∼-0.16) than that of NPCMs (slope of lg (k d /SA) vs [O + N]: -0.025∼-0.059) for TeCA. It was due to the water cluster formed by the surface hydrophilic atoms that could block the micropores and generate massive invalid adsorption sites in the micropores of ACs, while the water cluster only occupied the surface adsorption sites of NPCMs. Furthermore, with the increasing concentration of dissolved TeCA, the effect of surface area on adsorption affinity of NPCMs for TeCA kept constant while the effect of [O + N] decreased due to the competitive adsorption between water molecule and TeCA on the surface of NPCMs, meanwhile, both the effects of micropore volume and [O + N] on adsorption affinity of ACs for TeCA were decreased due to the mechanism of micropore volume filling. These findings are valuable for providing a deep insight into the adsorption mechanisms of CMs for TeCA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taillefert, Martial [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This project investigated the geochemical and microbial processes associated with the biomineralization of radionuclides in subsurface soils. During this study, it was determined that microbial communities from the Oak Ridge Field Research subsurface are able to express phosphatase activities that hydrolyze exogenous organophosphate compounds and result in the non-reductive bioimmobilization of U(VI) phosphate minerals in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The changes of the microbial community structure associated with the biomineralization of U(VI) was determined to identify the main organisms involved in the biomineralization process, and the complete genome of two isolates was sequenced. In addition, it was determined that both phytate, the main source of natural organophosphate compounds in natural environments, and polyphosphate accumulated in cells could also be hydrolyzed by native microbial population to liberate enough orthophosphate and precipitate uranium phosphate minerals. Finally, the minerals produced during this process are stable in low pH conditions or environments where the production of dissolved inorganic carbon is moderate. These findings suggest that the biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate minerals is an attractive bioremediation strategy to uranium bioreduction in low pH uranium-contaminated environments. These efforts support the goals of the SBR long-term performance measure by providing key information on "biological processes influencing the form and mobility of DOE contaminants in the subsurface".

  5. Exploratory data analysis on data generated in the DOE subsurface microbiology program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meglen, R.R.

    1990-06-01

    The preliminary results from the innovative subsurface microbiology research program indicate that new data on the nature of the link between the geosphere and biosphere have been generated. The diversity of scientific disciplines represented in the subsurface microbiology program reflects the complexity of the system under study. The research carried out by national laboratory and university research scientists is addressing fundamental questions about the abundance of microorganisms and factors controlling microbial activity in the complex subsurface hydrologic and geochemical environment. Long-term implications of this research for mitigating contamination are clear and researchers share the broader objective of linking the basic science with applied work.

  6. Calculation notes that support accident scenario and consequence development for the subsurface leak remaining subsurface accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-12

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Subsurface Leak Remaining Subsurface. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  7. Calculation notes that support accident scenario and consequence development for the subsurface leak remaining subsurface accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-19

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Subsurface Leak Remaining Subsurface. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  8. Distribution and activity of hydrogenase enzymes in subsurface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, R.; Nickel, J.; Glombitza, C.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S. L.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Metabolically active microbial communities are present in a wide range of subsurface environments. Techniques like enumeration of microbial cells, activity measurements with radiotracer assays and the analysis of porewater constituents are currently being used to explore the subsurface biosphere, alongside with molecular biological analyses. However, many of these techniques reach their detection limits due to low microbial activity and abundance. Direct measurements of microbial turnover not just face issues of insufficient sensitivity, they only provide information about a single specific process rather than an overall microbial activity. Since hydrogenase enzymes are intracellular and ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, the enzyme activity represents a measure of total activity of the entire microbial community. A hydrogenase activity assay could quantify total metabolic activity without having to identify specific processes. This would be a major advantage in subsurface biosphere studies, where several metabolic processes can occur simultaneously. We quantified hydrogenase enzyme activity and distribution in sediment samples from different aquatic subsurface environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial Pacific and Gulf of Mexico) using a tritium-based assay. We found enzyme activity at all sites and depths. Volumetric hydrogenase activity did not show much variability between sites and sampling depths, whereas cell-specific activity ranged from 10-5 to 1 nmol H2 cell-1 d-1. Activity was lowest in sediment layers where nitrate was detected. Higher activity was associated with samples in which sulfate was the predominant electron acceptor. We found highest activity in samples from environments with >10 ppm methane in the pore water. The results show that cell-specific hydrogenase enzyme activity increases with decreasing energy yield of the electron acceptor used. It is not possible to convert volumetric or cell-specific hydrogenase activity into a

  9. Is the even distribution of insecticide-treated cattle essential for tsetse control? Modelling the impact of baits in heterogeneous environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve J Torr

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eliminating Rhodesian sleeping sickness, the zoonotic form of Human African Trypanosomiasis, can be achieved only through interventions against the vectors, species of tsetse (Glossina. The use of insecticide-treated cattle is the most cost-effective method of controlling tsetse but its impact might be compromised by the patchy distribution of livestock. A deterministic simulation model was used to analyse the effects of spatial heterogeneities in habitat and baits (insecticide-treated cattle and targets on the distribution and abundance of tsetse. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The simulated area comprised an operational block extending 32 km from an area of good habitat from which tsetse might invade. Within the operational block, habitat comprised good areas mixed with poor ones where survival probabilities and population densities were lower. In good habitat, the natural daily mortalities of adults averaged 6.14% for males and 3.07% for females; the population grew 8.4× in a year following a 90% reduction in densities of adults and pupae, but expired when the population density of males was reduced to 3 km wide are cattle-free then insecticide-treated targets should be deployed to compensate for the lack of cattle.

  10. The Life History of Flabellula baltica Smirnov (Gymnamoebae, Rhizopoda): Adaptations to a Spatially and Temporally Heterogeneous Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The polymorphic life history of the marine naked amoeba Flabellula baltica was studied. It can be interpreted in terms of adaptations to an environment that is patchy in time and space and it represents trade-off between longevity during starvation and the ability to initiate multiplication soon ...... after food resource become available. The life history also represents bet hedging in that different cells within a clonal culture may respond in different ways when food is depleted....

  11. Heterogeneous distribution of nanophase aluminosilicate weathering products: Interpreting Martian weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Rampe, E. B.

    2011-12-01

    extensive cryoturbation in the northern plains indicates that subsurface materials have been brought to the surface, thus any vertical compositional heterogeneity resulting from weathering may have been subsequently homogenized. However, small-scale compositional heterogeneities could persist. Although high-silica material may coat particulates that comprise much of the surface, it may only represent only a micro-environment of the subsurface weathering. For example, although we suggest that the northern plains contain a silica-rich allophanic phase, weathering may also have produced more aluminous phases that are undetected in spectra because they do not form coatings. In addition, we will consider the possibility that Martian weathering produces poorly crystalline aluminosilicate phases that are structurally different from true allophane. We will report on the thermal infrared spectral difference between these phases. The details of Martian weathering processes that can be inferred from detection of allophane are limited by how well vertical and micro-environmental heterogeneities are understood and compensated for, for which input from the terrestrial weathering and soil science communities is essential.

  12. Microbial processes and subsurface contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molz, Fred J.

    A Chapman Conference entitled “Microbial Processes in the Transport, Fate, and In Situ Treatment of Subsurface Contaminants” was held in Snowbird, Utah, October 1-3, 1986. Members of the program committee and session chairmen were Lenore Clesceri (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N.Y.), David Gibson (University of Texas, Austin), James Mercer (GeoTrans, Inc., Herndon , Va.), Donald Michelsen (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg), Fred Molz (Auburn University, Auburn, Ala.), Bruce Rittman (University of Illinois, Urbana), Gary Sayler (University of Tennessee, Knoxville), and John T. Wilson (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ada, Okla.). The following report attempts to highlight the six sessions that constituted the conference. For additional information, including a bound summary and abstracts, contact Fred J. Molz, Civil Engineering Department, Auburn University, AL 36849 (telephone: 205-826-4321).

  13. Characterization of the Geology of Subsurface Shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: The 2D electrical resistivity imaging study is the rising tool used for characterization of the geology of subsurface diamondiferous shallow conglomerate and geological condition at Baragadi, Panna District,. Madhya Pradesh, India. In the present study, the 2D electrical resistivity imaging of subsurface shallow ...

  14. Combining L- and X-Band SAR Interferometry to Assess Ground Displacements in Heterogeneous Coastal Environments: The Po River Delta and Venice Lagoon, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Tosi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available From leveling to SAR-based interferometry, the monitoring of land subsidence in coastal transitional environments significantly improved. However, the simultaneous assessment of the ground movements in these peculiar environments is still challenging. This is due to the presence of relatively small built-up zones and infrastructures, e.g., coastal infrastructures, bridges, and river embankments, within large natural or rural lands, e.g., river deltas, lagoons, and farmland. In this paper we present a multi-band SAR methodology to integrate COSMO-SkyMed and ALOS-PALSAR images. The method consists of a proper combination of the very high-resolution X-band Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI, which achieves high-density and precise measurements on single structures and constructed areas, with L-band Short-Baseline SAR Interferometry (SBAS, properly implemented to raise its effectiveness in retrieving information in vegetated and wet zones. The combined methodology is applied on the Po River Delta and Venice coastland, Northern Italy, using 16 ALOS-PALSAR and 31 COSMO-SkyMed images covering the period between 2007 and 2011. After a proper calibration of the single PSI and SBAS solution using available GPS records, the datasets have been combined at both the regional and local scales. The measured displacements range from ~0 mm/yr down to −35 mm/yr. The results reveal the variable pattern of the subsidence characterizing the more natural and rural environments without losing the accuracy in quantifying the sinking of urban areas and infrastructures. Moreover, they allow improving the interpretation of the natural and anthropogenic processes responsible for the ongoing subsidence.

  15. Effect of wettability alteration on long-term behavior of fluids in subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandara, Uditha C.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-01-13

    Wettability is an important factor affecting fluid behavior in the subsurface, including oil, gas, and supercritical CO$_2$ in deep geological reservoirs. For example, CO$_2$ is generally assumed to behave as a non-wetting fluid, which favors safe storage. However, because of chemical heterogeneity of the reservoirs, mixed wettability conditions can exist. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that with time, the wettability of super-critical CO$_2$ may change from non-wetting to partially-wetting due to changes in electrostatic interactions. These changes are caused by chemical reactions between dissolved CO$_2$ and its environment. To date, the effect of wettability alteration and mixed wettability on the long term fate of injected CO$_2$ has not well been studied. Here, we use the multiphase Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) Model to study complex pore-scale processes involved in geological CO$_2$ sequestration, including the effect of spatial and temporal wettability variations on long-term distribution of CO$_2$ in porous media. Results reveal that in the absence of dissolution of supercritical CO$_2$ and precipitation of carbonate minerals (mineral trapping), the amount of trapped supercritical CO$_2$ significantly decreases as the wettability of the porous media changes from brine-wet to partial-wet or CO$_2$-wet.

  16. Soil Physical Constraints on Intrinsic Biodegradation of Petroleum Vapors in a Layered Subsurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Andreas H; Henriksen, Kaj; Mortensen, Lars; Scow, Kate M; Moldrup, Per

    2010-02-01

    Naturally occurring biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the vadose zone depends on the physical soil environment influencing field-scale gas exchange and pore-scale microbial metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the effect of soil physical heterogeneity on biodegradation of petroleum vapors in a 16-m-deep, layered vadose zone. Soil slurry experiments (soil/water ratio 10:30 w/w, 25°C) on benzene biodegradation under aerobic and well-mixed conditions indicated that the biodegradation potential in different textured soil samples was related to soil type rather than depth, in the order: sandy loam > fine sand > limestone. Similarly, O(2) consumption rates during in situ respiration tests performed at the site were higher in the sandy loam than in the fine sand, although the difference was less significant than in the slurries. Laboratory and field data generally agreed well and suggested a significant potential for aerobic biodegradation, even with nutrient-poor and deep subsurface conditions. In slurries of the sandy loam, the biodegradation potential declined with increasing in situ water saturation (i.e., decreasing air-filled porosity in the field). This showed a relation between antecedent undisturbed field conditions and the slurry biodegradation potential, and suggested airfilled porosity to be a key factor for the intrinsic biodegradation potential in the field.

  17. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 3: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Natural and Anthropogenic Influences on the Release of Contaminants to the Subsurface Environment from Waste Source Terms at the INEEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul L. Wichlacz

    2003-09-01

    This source-term summary document is intended to describe the current understanding of contaminant source terms and the conceptual model for potential source-term release to the environment at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), as presented in published INEEL reports. The document presents a generalized conceptual model of the sources of contamination and describes the general categories of source terms, primary waste forms, and factors that affect the release of contaminants from the waste form into the vadose zone and Snake River Plain Aquifer. Where the information has previously been published and is readily available, summaries of the inventory of contaminants are also included. Uncertainties that affect the estimation of the source term release are also discussed where they have been identified by the Source Term Technical Advisory Group. Areas in which additional information are needed (i.e., research needs) are also identified.

  18. Density dependence of clutch size: habitat heterogeneity or individual adjustment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, C.

    1998-01-01

    1. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain density- dependent patterns in reproduction. The habitat heterogeneity hypothesis (HHH) explains density-dependent reproduction at the population level from poorer quality territories in heterogeneous environments only being occupied at high densities.

  19. Subsurface flow in lowland river gravel bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, E. N.; Dunne, T.

    2017-09-01

    Geomorphic and hydraulic processes, which form gravel bars in large lowland rivers, have distinctive characteristics that control the magnitude and spatial patterns of infiltration and exfiltration between rivers and their immediate subsurface environments. We present a bedform-infiltration relation together with a set of field measurements along two reaches of the San Joaquin River, CA to illustrate the conditions required for infiltration and exfiltration of flow between a stream and its undulating bed, and a numerical model to investigate the factors that affect paths and residence times of flow through barforms at different discharges. It is shown that asymmetry of bar morphology is a first-order control on the extent and location of infiltration, which would otherwise produce equal areas of infiltration and exfiltration under the assumption of sinusoidal bedforms. Hydraulic conductivity varies by orders of magnitude due to fine sediment accumulation and downstream coarsening related to the process of bar evolution. This systematic variability not only controls the magnitude of infiltration, but also the residence time of flow through the bed. The lowest hydraulic conductivity along the reach occurred where the difference between the topographic gradient and the water-surface gradient is at a maximum and thus where infiltration would be greatest into a homogeneous bar, indicating the importance of managing sand supply to maintain the ventilation and flow through salmon spawning riffles. Numerical simulations corroborate our interpretation that infiltration patterns and rates are controlled by distinctive features of bar morphology.

  20. The thermal impact of subsurface building structures on urban groundwater resources - A paradigmatic example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epting, Jannis; Scheidler, Stefan; Affolter, Annette; Borer, Paul; Mueller, Matthias H; Egli, Lukas; García-Gil, Alejandro; Huggenberger, Peter

    2017-10-15

    Shallow subsurface thermal regimes in urban areas are increasingly impacted by anthropogenic activities, which include infrastructure development like underground traffic lines as well as industrial and residential subsurface buildings. In combination with the progressive use of shallow geothermal energy systems, this results in the so-called subsurface urban heat island effect. This article emphasizes the importance of considering the thermal impact of subsurface structures, which commonly is underestimated due to missing information and of reliable subsurface temperature data. Based on synthetic heat-transport models different settings of the urban environment were investigated, including: (1) hydraulic gradients and conductivities, which result in different groundwater flow velocities; (2) aquifer properties like groundwater thickness to aquitard and depth to water table; and (3) constructional features, such as building depths and thermal properties of building structures. Our results demonstrate that with rising groundwater flow velocities, the heat-load from building structures increase, whereas down-gradient groundwater temperatures decrease. Thermal impacts on subsurface resources therefore have to be related to the permeability of aquifers and hydraulic boundary conditions. In regard to the urban settings of Basel, Switzerland, flow velocities of around 1 md-1 delineate a marker where either down-gradient temperature deviations or heat-loads into the subsurface are more relevant. Furthermore, no direct thermal influence on groundwater resources should be expected for aquifers with groundwater thicknesses larger 10m and when the distance of the building structure to the groundwater table is higher than around 10m. We demonstrate that measuring temperature changes down-gradient of subsurface structures is insufficient overall to assess thermal impacts, particularly in urban areas. Moreover, in areas which are densely urbanized, and where groundwater flow

  1. Geomorphic factors related to the persistence of subsurface oil from the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Zachary; Michel, Jacqueline; Hayes, Miles O.; Irvine, Gail V.; Short, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Oil from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill has persisted along shorelines of Prince William Sound, Alaska, for more than two decades as both surface and subsurface oil residues. To better understand the distribution of persistent subsurface oil and assess the potential need for further restoration, a thorough and quantitative understanding of the geomorphic factors controlling the presence or absence of subsurface oil is required. Data on oiling and geomorphic features were collected at 198 sites in Prince William Sound to identify and quantify the relationships among these geomorphic factors and the presence and absence of persistent subsurface oil. Geomorphic factors associated with the presence of subsurface oil were initial oil exposure, substrate permeability, topographic slope, low exposure to waves, armoring on gravel beaches, tombolos, natural breakwaters, and rubble accumulations. Geomorphic factors associated with the absence of subsurface oil were impermeable bedrock; platforms with thin sediment veneer; fine-grained, well-sorted gravel beaches with no armor; and low-permeability, raised bay-bottom beaches. Relationships were found between the geomorphic and physical site characteristics and the likelihood of encountering persistent subsurface oiling at those sites. There is quantitative evidence of more complex interactions between the overall wave energy incident at a site and the presence of fine-scale geomorphic features that may have provided smaller, local wave energy sheltering of oil. Similarly, these data provide evidence for interactions between the shoreline slope and the presence of angular rubble, with decreased likelihood for encountering subsurface oil at steeply sloped sites except at high-angle sheltered rubble shoreline locations. These results reinforce the idea that the interactions of beach permeability, stability, and site-specific wave exposure are key drivers for subsurface oil persistence in exposed and intermittently exposed mixed

  2. Communication: Stiff and soft nano-environments and the "Octopus Effect" are the crux of ionic liquid structural and dynamical heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ryan P.; Araque, Juan C.; Margulis, Claudio J.

    2017-08-01

    In a recent set of articles [J. C. Araque et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119(23), 7015-7029 (2015) and J. C. Araque et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 204504 (2016)], we proposed the idea that for small neutral and charged solutes dissolved in ionic liquids, deviation from simple hydrodynamic predictions in translational and rotational dynamics can be explained in terms of diffusion through nano-environments that are stiff (high electrostriction, charge density, and number density) and others that are soft (charge depleted). The current article takes a purely solvent-centric approach in trying to provide molecular detail and intuitive visual understanding of time-dependent local mobility focusing on the most common case of an ionic liquid with well defined polar and apolar nano-domains. We find that at intermediate time scales, apolar regions are fluid, whereas the charge network is much less mobile. Because apolar domains and cationic heads must diffuse as single species, at long time the difference in mobility also necessarily dissipates.

  3. Impact of high power interference sources in planning and deployment of wireless sensor networks and devices in the 2.4 GHz frequency band in heterogeneous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturri, Peio López; Nazábal, Juan Antonio; Azpilicueta, Leire; Rodriguez, Pablo; Beruete, Miguel; Fernández-Valdivielso, Carlos; Falcone, Francisco

    2012-11-12

    In this work, the impact of radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens and its effect on 802.15.4 ZigBee-compliant wireless sensor networks operating in the 2.4 GHz Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) band is analyzed. By means of a novel radioplanning approach, based on electromagnetic field simulation of a microwave oven and determination of equivalent radiation sources applied to an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, estimation of the microwave oven’s power leakage is obtained for the complete volume of an indoor scenario. The magnitude and the variable nature of the interference is analyzed and the impact in the radio link quality in operating wireless sensors is estimated and compared with radio channel measurements as well as packet measurements. The measurement results reveal the importance of selecting an adequate 802.15.4 channel, as well as the Wireless Sensor Network deployment strategy within this type of environment, in order to optimize energy consumption and increase the overall network performance. The proposed method enables one to estimate potential interference effects in devices operating within the 2.4 GHz band in the complete scenario, prior to wireless sensor network deployment, which can aid in achieving the most optimal network topology.

  4. Impact of High Power Interference Sources in Planning and Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks and Devices in the 2.4 GHz Frequency Band in Heterogeneous Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Falcone

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the impact of radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens and its effect on 802.15.4 ZigBee-compliant wireless sensor networks operating in the 2.4 GHz Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM band is analyzed. By means of a novel radioplanning approach, based on electromagnetic field simulation of a microwave oven and determination of equivalent radiation sources applied to an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, estimation of the microwave oven’s power leakage is obtained for the complete volume of an indoor scenario. The magnitude and the variable nature of the interference is analyzed and the impact in the radio link quality in operating wireless sensors is estimated and compared with radio channel measurements as well as packet measurements. The measurement results reveal the importance of selecting an adequate 802.15.4 channel, as well as the Wireless Sensor Network deployment strategy within this type of environment, in order to optimize energy consumption and increase the overall network performance. The proposed method enables one to estimate potential interference effects in devices operating within the 2.4 GHz band in the complete scenario, prior to wireless sensor network deployment, which can aid in achieving the most optimal network topology.

  5. Ma_MISS on ExoMars: Mineralogical Characterization of the Martian Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Altieri, Francesca; Ammannito, Eleonora; Biondi, David; De Angelis, Simone; Meini, Marco; Mondello, Giuseppe; Novi, Samuele; Paolinetti, Riccardo; Soldani, Massimo; Mugnuolo, Raffaele; Pirrotta, Simone; Vago, Jorge L.; Ma_MISS Team

    2017-07-01

    The Ma_MISS (Mars Multispectral Imager for Subsurface Studies) experiment is the visible and near infrared (VNIR) miniaturized spectrometer hosted by the drill system of the ExoMars 2020 rover. Ma_MISS will perform IR spectral reflectance investigations in the 0.4-2.2 μm range to characterize the mineralogy of excavated borehole walls at different depths (between 0 and 2 m). The spectral sampling is about 20 nm, whereas the spatial resolution over the target is 120 μm. Making use of the drill's movement, the instrument slit can scan a ring and build up hyperspectral images of a borehole. The main goal of the Ma_MISS instrument is to study the martian subsurface environment. Access to the martian subsurface is crucial to our ability to constrain the nature, timing, and duration of alteration and sedimentation processes on Mars, as well as habitability conditions. Subsurface deposits likely host and preserve H2O ice and hydrated materials that will contribute to our understanding of the H2O geochemical environment (both in the liquid and in the solid state) at the ExoMars 2020 landing site. The Ma_MISS spectral range and sampling capabilities have been carefully selected to allow the study of minerals and ices in situ before the collection of samples. Ma_MISS will be implemented to accomplish the following scientific objectives: (1) determine the composition of subsurface materials, (2) map the distribution of subsurface H2O and volatiles, (3) characterize important optical and physical properties of materials (e.g., grain size), and (4) produce a stratigraphic column that will inform with regard to subsurface geological processes. The Ma_MISS findings will help to refine essential criteria that will aid in our selection of the most interesting subsurface formations from which to collect samples.

  6. Hydrogen diffusion on Fe surface and into subsurface from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiangjian; Chen, Jun; Sun, Y. M.; Liang, Tianshui

    2016-12-01

    The chemisorption of atomic hydrogen on metal surface and into subsurface is of great importance to understand the fundamental diffusion mechanism in heterogenous catalysis and hydrogen-induced embrittlement. Using spin-polarized density functional theory, we show that hydrogen prefers the quasi four-fold hollow site near typical Hollow site on Fe(110) and that four-fold hollow site on Fe(100). A very weak surface reconstruction effect induced by hydrogen coverage is reported. Two three-dimensional (3D) potential energy surfaces (PESs) are constructed for modelling hydrogen diffusion on Fe surface and into subsurface by interpolating ab initio energy points (∼1200 for each surface). We appraise the accuracy of PES and plot some contours of potential energies at different adsorption heights including the important subsurface regions. Furthermore, possible minimum energy pathways for hydrogen diffusion on Fe surface and into subsurface are searched out based on these 3D PESs using a mesh method. These pathways are in good agreement with those obtained from the nudged elastic band method. Some trapping regions into subsurface for hydrogen chemisorption are shown and the diffusion coefficient is estimated by classical transition state theory.

  7. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research FY11 Second Quarter Performance Measure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2011-03-31

    The Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Long Term Measure for 2011 under the Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) measure is to "Refine subsurface transport models by developing computational methods to link important processes impacting contaminant transport at smaller scales to the field scale." The second quarter performance measure is to "Provide a report on computational methods linking genome-enabled understanding of microbial metabolism with reactive transport models to describe processes impacting contaminant transport in the subsurface." Microorganisms such as bacteria are by definition small (typically on the order of a micron in size), and their behavior is controlled by their local biogeochemical environment (typically within a single pore or a biofilm on a grain surface, on the order of tens of microns in size). However, their metabolic activity exerts strong influence on the transport and fate of groundwater contaminants of significant concern at DOE sites, in contaminant plumes with spatial extents of meters to kilometers. This report describes progress and key findings from research aimed at integrating models of microbial metabolism based on genomic information (small scale) with models of contaminant fate and transport in aquifers (field scale).

  8. Geomicrobiology and Metagenomics of Terrestrial Deep Subsurface Microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itävaara, M; Salavirta, H; Marjamaa, K; Ruskeeniemi, T

    2016-01-01

    Fractures in the deep subsurface of Earth's crust are inhabited by diverse microbial communities that participate in biogeochemical cycles of the Earth. Life on Earth, which arose c. 3.5-4.0 billion years ago, reaches down at least 5 km in the crust. Deep mines, caves, and boreholes have provided scientists with opportunities to sample deep subsurface microbiomes and to obtain information on the species diversity and functions. A wide variety of bacteria, archaea, eukaryotes, and viruses are now known to reside in the crust, but their functions are still largely unknown. The crust at different depths has varying geological composition and hosts endemic microbiomes accordingly. The diversity is driven by geological formations and gases evolving from deeper depths. Cooperation among different species is still mostly unexplored, but viruses are known to restrict density of bacterial and archaeal populations. Due to the complex growth requirements of the deep subsurface microbiomes, the new knowledge about their diversity and functions is mostly obtained by molecular methods, eg, meta'omics'. Geomicrobiology is a multidisciplinary research area combining disciplines from geology, mineralogy, geochemistry, and microbiology. Geomicrobiology is concerned with the interaction of microorganisms and geological processes. At the surface of mineralogical or rock surfaces, geomicrobial processes occur mainly under aerobic conditions. In the deep subsurface, however, the environmental conditions are reducing and anaerobic. The present chapter describes the world of microbiomes in deep terrestrial geological environments as well as metagenomic and metatranscriptomic methods suitable for studies of these enigmatic communities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. PERISCOPE: PERIapsis Subsurface Cave OPtical Explorer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lunar sub-surface exploration has been a topic of discussion since the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter identified openings (cave skylights) on the surface of the moon...

  10. Electrical resistivity determination of subsurface layers, subsoil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrical resistivity determination of subsurface layers, subsoil competence and soil corrosivity at and engineering site location in Akungba-Akoko, southwestern Nigeria. A I Idornigie, M O Olorunfemi, A A Omitogun ...

  11. High-resolution subsurface water-ice distributions on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandfield, Joshua L

    2007-05-03

    Theoretical models indicate that water ice is stable in the shallow subsurface (depths of Mars at high latitudes. These models have been mainly supported by the observed presence of large concentrations of hydrogen detected by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer suite of instruments on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The models and measurements are consistent with a water-ice table that steadily increases in depth with decreasing latitude. More detailed modelling has predicted that the depth at which water ice is stable can be highly variable, owing to local surface heterogeneities such as rocks and slopes, and the thermal inertia of the ground cover. Measurements have, however, been limited to the footprint (several hundred kilometres) of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer suite, preventing the observations from documenting more detailed water-ice distributions. Here I show that by observing the seasonal temperature response of the martian surface with the Thermal Emission Imaging System on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft, it is possible to observe such heterogeneities at subkilometre scale. These observations show significant regional and local water-ice depth variability, and, in some cases, support distributions in the subsurface predicted by atmospheric exchange and vapour diffusion models. The presence of water ice where it follows the depth of stability under current climatic conditions implies an active martian water cycle that responds to orbit-driven climate cycles. Several regions also have apparent deviations from the theoretical stability level, indicating that additional factors influence the ice-table depth. The high-resolution measurements show that the depth to the water-ice table is highly variable within the potential Phoenix spacecraft landing ellipses, and is likely to be variable at scales that may be sampled by the spacecraft.

  12. Microbial Colonization of Earth's Subsurface: A Thermodynamically Consistent Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethke, C. M.; Sanford, R. A.; Jin, Q.; Kirk, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of how anaerobic microbes have come to distribute themselves within Earth's crust is an ecologic question that must be posed subject to the laws of thermodynamics, but a question that cannot be understood in light of thermodynamics alone. We use here the results of theory and quantitative modeling, field observations, and long-term laboratory experiments to argue that subsurface communities are composed of groups of microbes that cooperate as well as compete, and whose existence reflects a tight balance between reproduction and cell death. The most significant functional groups colonizing the anoxic crust, classified by electron accepting process, are the methanogens, sulfate reducers, and ferric iron reducers. An anaerobe can harvest the energy it needs to live and reproduce only to the extent that energy available to it in the environment exceeds the cell's internal levels. When methanogens transfer or dismutate electrons, they capture little energy, so as to preserve a thermodynamic drive for their catabolic reaction. In this way, they maximize their environmental range, but grow slowly. Sulfate reducers adopt a different strategy, striving to capture energy quickly and grow rapidly. Iron reduction consumes acid, so the energy available to iron reducers varies sharply with pH. The iron reducers can grow rapidly under acidic conditions, but an alkaline environment may leave them insufficient energy to live. Methane producers are vulnerable to exclusion in the subsurface, as is broadly appreciated, but not because of energetic limitations. Instead, the methanogens require abundant energy substrates in order to reproduce quickly enough to replace cells as they die. Sulfate reducers and iron reducers, instead of working to exclude each other by competing for limited energy sources, as is commonly believed, thrive in mutualistic communities. The three functional groups by necessity compete in their environments for limited sources of energy, but the manner

  13. Extracting subsurface fingerprints using optical coherence tomography

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Akhoury, SS

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface Fingerprints using Optical Coherence Tomography Sharat Saurabh Akhoury, Luke Nicholas Darlow Modelling and Digital Science, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, South Africa Abstract Physiologists have found... that fingerprint patterns exist in the inner layers (viz. papillary junction) of the skin of the fingertip. However, conventional acquisition systems do not have capabilities to extract fingerprints at subsurface layers of the finger for use in identity...

  14. Geophysical subsurface imaging and interface identification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendley, Kevin; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Day, David Minot; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Weiss, Chester Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Electromagnetic induction is a classic geophysical exploration method designed for subsurface characterization--in particular, sensing the presence of geologic heterogeneities and fluids such as groundwater and hydrocarbons. Several approaches to the computational problems associated with predicting and interpreting electromagnetic phenomena in and around the earth are addressed herein. Publications resulting from the project include [31]. To obtain accurate and physically meaningful numerical simulations of natural phenomena, computational algorithms should operate in discrete settings that reflect the structure of governing mathematical models. In section 2, the extension of algebraic multigrid methods for the time domain eddy current equations to the frequency domain problem is discussed. Software was developed and is available in Trilinos ML package. In section 3 we consider finite element approximations of De Rham's complex. We describe how to develop a family of finite element spaces that forms an exact sequence on hexahedral grids. The ensuing family of non-affine finite elements is called a van Welij complex, after the work [37] of van Welij who first proposed a general method for developing tangentially and normally continuous vector fields on hexahedral elements. The use of this complex is illustrated for the eddy current equations and a conservation law problem. Software was developed and is available in the Ptenos finite element package. The more popular methods of geophysical inversion seek solutions to an unconstrained optimization problem by imposing stabilizing constraints in the form of smoothing operators on some enormous set of model parameters (i.e. ''over-parametrize and regularize''). In contrast we investigate an alternative approach whereby sharp jumps in material properties are preserved in the solution by choosing as model parameters a modest set of variables which describe an interface between adjacent regions in

  15. Coordination Frictions and Job Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Christian Daniel

    This paper develops and extends a dynamic, discrete time, job to worker matching model in which jobs are heterogeneous in equilibrium. The key assumptions of this economic environment are (i) matching is directed and (ii) coordination frictions lead to heterogeneous local labor markets. We de- rive...... a number of new theoretical results, which are essential for the empirical application of this type of model to matched employer-employee microdata. First, we o¤er a robust equilibrium concept in which there is a continu- ous dispersion of job productivities and wages. Second, we show that our model can...... be readily solved with continuous exogenous worker heterogene- ity, where high type workers (high outside options and productivity) earn higher wages in high type jobs and are hired at least as frequently to the better job types as low type workers (low outside options and productivity). Third, we...

  16. Simulation of DNAPL migration in heterogeneous translucent porous media based on estimation of representative elementary volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming; Wu, Jianfeng; Wu, Jichun

    2017-10-01

    When the dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) comes into the subsurface environment, its migration behavior is crucially affected by the permeability and entry pressure of subsurface porous media. A prerequisite for accurately simulating DNAPL migration in aquifers is then the determination of the permeability, entry pressure and corresponding representative elementary volumes (REV) of porous media. However, the permeability, entry pressure and corresponding representative elementary volumes (REV) are hard to determine clearly. This study utilizes the light transmission micro-tomography (LTM) method to determine the permeability and entry pressure of two dimensional (2D) translucent porous media and integrates the LTM with a criterion of relative gradient error to quantify the corresponding REV of porous media. As a result, the DNAPL migration in porous media might be accurately simulated by discretizing the model at the REV dimension. To validate the quantification methods, an experiment of perchloroethylene (PCE) migration is conducted in a two-dimensional heterogeneous bench-scale aquifer cell. Based on the quantifications of permeability, entry pressure and REV scales of 2D porous media determined by the LTM and relative gradient error, different models with different sizes of discretization grid are used to simulate the PCE migration. It is shown that the model based on REV size agrees well with the experimental results over the entire migration period including calibration, verification and validation processes. This helps to better understand the microstructures of porous media and achieve accurately simulating DNAPL migration in aquifers based on the REV estimation.

  17. A Direct Method of Hydraulic Conductivity Structure Identification for Subsurface Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Jiao, J.

    2016-12-01

    Solute transport in aquifers is strongly influenced by the spatial distribution of subsurface hydraulic conductivity (K), while limited drilling in data-sparse environments typically results in lack of data characterizing both the K and the in-situ fluid flow boundary conditions (BC). To characterize such environments, we present an efficient direct inverse method to simultaneously identify aquifer K pattern, its values, and the flow field. The method ensures fluid flow continuity using local approximate solutions of the governing equation conditioned to limited hydraulic measurements, while physics of the flow is enforced making the inverse problem well-posed. A single system of equations is assembled and solved, from which parameters and BC can be simultaneously estimated. For problems with irregular and regular K distributions, inversion is demonstrated for different measurement types, quality, and quantity. When measurement error is increased, the estimated K pattern is largely insensitive to the error, although the inverted flow field suffers greater inaccuracy. Local conductivity and Darcy flux measurements are found to have similar information content, although subtle differences exist in the inverted flow fields when long-term contaminant release is simulated. Local conductivity measurements lead to better identification of conductivity pattern, values, and the hydraulic head field; Darcy flux measurements lead to more accurate estimation of the velocity field and thus improved transport predictions. Overall, the velocity fields estimated based on the hydraulic data can lead to reasonable predictions of contaminant migration and breakthrough under unknown aquifer BC. We further argue that the goal of pattern inversion is to recover a sufficient level of detail to make transport prediction approximately accurate. Depending on the desired accuracy, fine-scale heterogeneity can be recovered only at increased characterization cost. Future work will (1) evaluate

  18. [Review on landscape heterogeneity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yutao; Yu, Xinxiao; Guang, Wenbin

    2002-04-01

    On the base of precedent studies, the occurring mechanism, classification, measurement methods, and the important role of landscape heterogeneity in landscape ecology were reviewed. The inner and outer uncertain factors result in landscape heterogeneity. Landscape heterogeneity has close relations with landscape stability, landscape design, architecture, management and disturbance, scale and ecological diversity in ecology. Complexity of landscape heterogeneity research, non-system of measurement indices and methods, difficulties and limitations of landscape heterogeneity modelling were all discussed respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the theory and methods of ecological complexity should be used to improve landscape heterogeneity research.

  19. Mucrobial Stabilization of Plutonium in the Subsurface Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honeyman, B. D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Environmental Science and Engineering Div., Lab. for Applied and Environmental Radiochemistry; Francis, A. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Environmental Sciences Dept.; Dodge, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Environmental Sciences Dept.; Gillow, J. B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Environmental Sciences Dept.; Sanschi, P. H. [Texas A & M Univ., Galveston, TX (United States). Dept. of Oceanography

    2004-06-01

    This report outlines the results of work performed at the Colorado School of Mines, Brookhaven National Laboratory and Texas A and M University during the second reporting phase of this project. The sub-projects focused on this year include: (1) Biotransformation of Pu-contaminated soil; (2) Environmental colloids at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; (3) Production, isolation and characterization of EPS (exopolymeric substances, or exopolysaccharides); (4) Colloid trapping; (5) Determination of stability constants of complexes of Pu(IV) with organic ligands; and (6) The role of bacterial EPS in the transport of Pu through saturated porous media.

  20. First Science Results from MARSIS Subsurface Sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaut, J. J.; Picardi, G.; Calabrese, D.; Cicchetti, A.; Clifford, S.; Farrell, W.; Federico, C.; Frigeri, A.; Gurnett, D.; Huff, R.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, W.; Jordan, R.; Kirchner, D.; Leuschen, C.; Masdea, A.; Orosei, R.; Phillips, R.; Safaeinili, A.; Seu, R.; Stofan, E.; Watters, T.

    2005-12-01

    The Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS), aboard the Mars Express orbiter, began routine science observations in early July, 2005. The radar operates in two primary modes, subsurface sounding and ionospheric sounding. The objective of the subsurface experiment is to detect and characterize subsurface material discontinuities in the upper several km of the martian crust, some of which may be related to the presence of water (liquid or solid). In the subsurface sounding mode, one or two of four frequency bands in the range of 1.3-5.5 MHz can be selected. The lower frequency bands are expected to penetrate more deeply, but cannot be used when the dayside ionosphere is beneath the spacecraft. The orbit of Mars Express oscillates between periods of day and night peripases; July and August, 2005 included some nightside coverage, while September-November are dayside only. Subsurface sounding data have a lateral resolution of 5-10 km and a vertical resolution of 100 m in free space (about 50 m in crustal materials). The MARSIS radar has been performing nominally since turn-on. Echoes from the surface are typically strong, with signal-to-noise ratios in the range of 30-50 dB. Later returns from off-nadir topographic clutter are evident and easily modeled using MOLA topography data. Many late echoes are observed that cannot be explained as topographic clutter. These features are under investigation as potential subsurface interfaces. As the periapsis of the Mars Express orbit migrates toward the south pole, the polar layered deposits and related landforms will be observed by MARSIS on the nightside. In addition, numerous targets of interest in the southern mid-latitudes will be acquired during the nightside, including the floors of Hellas and Argyre basins, and the regions of strong remnant crustal magnetization.

  1. Feasibility and induced effects of subsurface porous media hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmann Pfeiffer, Wolf; Li, Dedong; Wang, Bo; Bauer, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    Fluctuations in energy production from renewable sources like wind or solar power can lead to shortages in energy supply which can be mitigated using energy storage concepts. Underground storage of hydrogen in porous sandstone formations could be a storage option for large amounts of energy over long storage cycles. However, this use of the subsurface requires an analysis of possible interactions with other uses of the subsurface such as geothermal energy storage or groundwater abstraction. This study aims at quantifying the feasibility of porous media hydrogen storage to provide stored energy on a timescale of several days to weeks as well as possible impacts on the subsurface. The hypothetical storage site is based on an anticlinal structure located in Schleswig-Holstein, northern Germany. The storage is injected and extracted using five wells completed in a partially eroded, heterogeneous sandstone layer in the top of the structure at a depth of about 500 m. The storage formation was parameterized based on a local facies model with intrinsic permeabilities of 250-2500 mD and porosities of 35-40%. Storage initialization and subsequent storage cycles, each consisting of a hydrogen injection and extraction, were numerically simulated. The simulation results indicate the general feasibility of this hydrogen storage concept. The simulated sandstone formation is able to provide an average of around 1480 t of hydrogen per week (1830 TJ) which is about 5% of the total weekly energy production or about 10% of the weekly energy consumption of Schleswig-Holstein with the hydrogen production rate being the limiting factor of the overall performance. Induced hydraulic effects are a result of the induced overpressure within the storage formation. Propagation of the pressure signal does not strongly depend on the formation heterogeneity and thus shows approximately radial characteristics with one bar pressure change in distances of about 5 km from the injection wells. Thermal

  2. Pesticide biotransformation and fate in heterogeneous environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.P.M.

    1997-01-01

    The effects and relative impacts of environmental variables on the behaviour of pesticides, through the effect on pesticide-degrading microorganisms, was studied in a broad spectrum and covered the most relevant emission routes. It is shown that the effect of landscape geochemistry, which

  3. Link-Heterogeneity vs. Node-Heterogeneity in Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Beaumont, Olivier; Rosenberg, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Heterogeneity in resources pervades all modern computing platforms. How do the effects of heterogeneity depend on which resources differ among computers in a platform? Some answers are derived within a formal framework, by comparing heterogeneity in computing power (node-heterogeneity) with heterogeneity in communication speed (link-heterogeneity). The former genre of heterogeneity seems much easier to understand than the latter.

  4. Replikasi Unidirectional pada Heterogen Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendro Nindito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of diverse database technology in enterprise today can not be avoided. Thus, technology is needed to generate information in real time. The purpose of this research is to discuss a database replication technology that can be applied in heterogeneous database environments. In this study we use Windows-based MS SQL Server database to Linux-based Oracle database as the goal. The research method used is prototyping where development can be done quickly and testing of working models of the interaction process is done through repeated. From this research it is obtained that the database replication technolgy using Oracle Golden Gate can be applied in heterogeneous environments in real time as well.

  5. Final report - Microbial pathways for the reduction of mercury in saturated subsurface sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamar barkay; Lily Young; Gerben Zylstra

    2009-08-25

    Mercury is a component of mixed wastes that have contaminated vast areas of the deep subsurface as a result of nuclear weapon and energy production. While this mercury is mostly bound to soil constituents episodes of groundwater contamination are known in some cases resulting in potable water super saturated with Hg(0). Microbial processes that reduce Hg(II) to the elemental form Hg(0) in the saturated subsurface sediments may contribute to this problem. When we started the project, only one microbial pathway for the reduction of Hg(II), the one mediated by the mer operon in mercury resistant bacteria was known. As we had previously demonstrated that the mer mediated process occurred in highly contaminated environments (Schaefer et al., 2004), and mercury concentrations in the subsurface were reported to be low (Krabbenhoft and Babiarz, 1992), we hypothesized that other microbial processes might be active in reducing Hg(II) to Hg(0) in saturated subsurface environments. The specific goals of our projects were: (1) Investigating the potential for Hg(II) reduction under varying electron accepting conditions in subsurface sediments and relating these potential to mer gene distribution; and (2) Examining the physiological and biochemical characteristics of the interactions of anaerobic bacteria with mercury. The results are briefly summarized with references to published papers and manuscripts in preparation where details about our research can be found. Additional information may be found in copies of our published manuscripts and conference proceedings, and our yearly reports that were submitted through the RIMS system.

  6. Heterogeneous network architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2006-01-01

    Future networks will be heterogeneous! Due to the sheer size of networks (e.g., the Internet) upgrades cannot be instantaneous and thus heterogeneity appears. This means that instead of trying to find the olution, networks hould be designed as being heterogeneous. One of the key equirements here...

  7. DWH MC 252: Subsurface Oil Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle-Krause, C. J.; Boyer, T.; Murray, D.

    2010-12-01

    , previous research and modeling were combined to tell the story of the DWH MC 252 from the subsurface perspective. The Comprehensive Deepwater Oil and Gas model (CDOG, Yapa and Xie, 2005), and the General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment (GNOME, Beegle-Krause, 1999) were used with the NOAA Gulf of Mexico Model nowcast/forecast model to understand the 3D evolution of the subsurface spill. Model/observational comparisons are favorable, though limitations of the available models are apparent. Historical perspective on Thunder Horse (a deepwater well incident that was a dress-rehearsal for the DWH MC 252, Beegle-Krause and Walton, 2004), transitioning models from research to operations, and research needs will also be discussed.

  8. Subsurface geothermal energy utilisation in high-rise buildings; Oberflaechennahe Geothermie: Nutzung im Hochhausbau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaher, M. [ELE Erdbaulaboratorium Essen Ingenieurgesellschaft fuer Geotechnik mbH/ELE Frankfurt/Rhein-Main, Weiterstadt (Germany); Bialon, E. [ABG Allgemeine Baubetreuungsgesellschaft mbH, Koeln (Germany); Berchtold, P. [PB Ing.-Buero fuer Energie und Haustechnik, Sarnen (Switzerland)

    2005-06-01

    Utilisation of subsurface geothermal heat is an interesting option because of its high availability and environment-friendly nature. For economic optimisation, the main geothermal and technical facility parameters must be matched optimally. This is an interdisciplinary task for the projecting engineer in all phases of projecting, implementation, and operation. (orig.)

  9. A study of P-band SAR applicability and performance for Mars exploration: Imaging subsurface geology and detecting shallow moisture

    OpenAIRE

    Paillou, Philippe; Lasne, Y.; Heggy, Essam; Malézieux, J.-M.; Ruffie, G.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade, orbital images of the Martian surface revealed key evidences about the history of the planet environment (craters, faults, paleo-lakes and rivers), partially hidden under a widespread layer of aeolian deposits. Furthermore, several recent observations and studies support the hypothesis that water could be found in the shallow sub-surface of Mars. Low frequency SAR – Synthetic Aperture Radar – has demonstrated its subsurface imaging capabilities on Earth, especially in ar...

  10. Twin screw subsurface and surface multiphase pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dass, P. [CAN-K GROUP OF COMPANIES, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    A new subsurface twin screw multiphase pump has been developed to replace ESP and other artificial lift technologies. This technology has been under development for a few years, has been field tested and is now going for commercial applications. The subsurface twin screw technology consists of a pair of screws that do not touch and can be run with a top drive or submersible motor; and it carries a lot of benefits. This technology is easy to install and its low slippage makes it highly efficient with heavy oil. In addition twin screw multiphase pumps are capable of handling high viscosity fluids and thus their utilization can save water when used in thermal applications. It also induces savings of chemicals because asphaltenes do not break down easily as well as a reduction in SOR. The subsurface twin screw multiphase pump presented herein is an advanced technology which could be used in thermal applications.

  11. Autonomous microexplosives subsurface tracing system final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engler, Bruce Phillip; Nogan, John; Melof, Brian Matthew; Uhl, James Eugene; Dulleck, George R., Jr.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Rivas, Raul R.; Cooper, Paul W.; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Kravitz, Stanley H.

    2004-04-01

    The objective of the autonomous micro-explosive subsurface tracing system is to image the location and geometry of hydraulically induced fractures in subsurface petroleum reservoirs. This system is based on the insertion of a swarm of autonomous micro-explosive packages during the fracturing process, with subsequent triggering of the energetic material to create an array of micro-seismic sources that can be detected and analyzed using existing seismic receiver arrays and analysis software. The project included investigations of energetic mixtures, triggering systems, package size and shape, and seismic output. Given the current absence of any technology capable of such high resolution mapping of subsurface structures, this technology has the potential for major impact on petroleum industry, which spends approximately $1 billion dollar per year on hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States alone.

  12. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    In support of its vision for technological excellence, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) has identified three strategic goals. The three goals of the SCFA are: Contain and/or stabilize contamination sources that pose an imminent threat to surface and ground waters; Delineate DNAPL contamination in the subsurface and remediate DNAPL-contaminated soils and ground water; and Remove a full range of metal and radionuclide contamination in soils and ground water. To meet the challenges of remediating subsurface contaminants in soils and ground water, SCFA funded more than 40 technologies in fiscal year 1997. These technologies are grouped according to the following product lines: Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids; Metals and Radionuclides; Source Term Containment; and Source Term Remediation. This report briefly describes the SCFA 1997 technologies and showcases a few key technologies in each product line.

  13. Control of biologically active degradation zones by vertical heterogeneity: Applications in fractured media. 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colwell, F.S.; Smith, R.W.; McKinley, J.; Fredrickson, J.; Onstott, T.C.; Reysenbach, A.L.

    1997-11-01

    'The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between of biologically active contaminant degradation zones in a fractured, subsurface medium and vertical geological heterogeneities. The research is being performed on samples collected from the Test Area North (TAN) site at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) where a dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) plume is migrating in the basalts and interbed sediments of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer. Research results are leading to an enhanced understanding of the constraints that the geochemical and hydrological environment place on the activities and distribution of TCE-degrading organisms in this fractured subsurface medium. Enhanced understanding allows better decisions to be made regarding the use of remedial technologies such as natural attenuation and in situ bioremediation at geologically complex waste sites. Through this research, investigations conducted by the Subsurface Science Program (SSP) at TAN are being extended in order to develop a mechanistic understanding of the coupled geomicrobial and hydrogeochemical processes that are necessary to predict the field-scale intrinsic degradation rates of TCE. The research objective is being accomplished by characterizing paired cores and water samples from boreholes located in differing geochemical and flow environments within the plume. Analysis of these samples will allow the determination of the spatial correlation and microbial characterization. The results presented in this report consist primarily of TAN-33 data as many of those analyses have been completed. Nearly all of the TAN-37 data has yet to be acquired. It should be noted that most of the cores were collected from zones that consist of relatively competent, massive basalt. This was because the authors were doubtful about the quality of samples obtained from rubble zones due to potential alteration by the drilling fluids. Thus

  14. Feedbacks between hydrological heterogeneity and bioremediation induced biogeochemical transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englert, A.; Hubbard, S.S.; Williams, K.H.; Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.

    2009-04-15

    For guiding optimal design and interpretation of in-situ treatments that strongly perturb subsurface systems, knowledge about the spatial and temporal patterns of mass transport and reaction intensities are important. Here, a procedure was developed and applied to time-lapse concentrations of a conservative tracer (bromide), an injected amendment (acetate) and reactive species (iron(II), uranium(VI) and sulfate) associated with two field scale biostimulation experiments, which were conducted successively at the same field location over two years. The procedure is based on a temporal moment analysis approach that relies on a streamtube approximation. The study shows that biostimulated reactions can be considerably influenced by subsurface hydrological and geochemical heterogeneities: the delivery of bromide and acetate and the intensity of the sulfate reduction is interpreted to be predominantly driven by the hydrological heterogeneity, while the intensity of the iron reduction is interpreted to be primarily controlled by the geochemical heterogeneity. The intensity of the uranium(VI) reduction appears to be impacted by both the hydrological and geochemical heterogeneity. Finally, the study documents the existence of feedbacks between hydrological heterogeneity and remediation-induced biogeochemical transformations at the field scale, particularly the development of precipitates that may cause clogging and flow rerouting.

  15. Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh [Houston, TX; Bass, Ronald M [Houston, TX

    2012-04-24

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

  16. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  17. Heterogeneity and Microeconometrics Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browning, Martin; Carro, Jesus

    Presented at the 2005 Econometric Society World Congress Plenary Session on "Modelling Heterogeneity". We survey the treatment of heterogeneity in applied microeconometrics analyses. There are three themes. First, there is usually much more heterogeneity than empirical researchers allow for. Second......, the inappropriate treatment of heterogeneity can lead to serious error when estimating outcomes of interest. Finally, once we move away from the traditional linear model with a single 'fixed effect', it is very difficult to account for heterogeneity and fit the data and maintain coherence with theory structures....... The latter task is one for economists: "heterogeneity is too important to be left to the statisticians". The paper concludes with a report of our own research on dynamic discrete choice models that allow for maximal heterogeneity...

  18. Key subsurface data help to refine Trinity aquifer hydrostratigraphic units, south-central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blome, Charles D.; Clark, Allan K.

    2014-01-01

    The geologic framework and hydrologic characteristics of aquifers are important components for studying the nation’s subsurface heterogeneity and predicting its hydraulic budgets. Detailed study of an aquifer’s subsurface hydrostratigraphy is needed to understand both its geologic and hydrologic frameworks. Surface hydrostratigraphic mapping can also help characterize the spatial distribution and hydraulic connectivity of an aquifer’s permeable zones. Advances in three-dimensional (3-D) mapping and modeling have also enabled geoscientists to visualize the spatial relations between the saturated and unsaturated lithologies. This detailed study of two borehole cores, collected in 2001 on the Camp Stanley Storage Activity (CSSA) area, provided the foundation for revising a number of hydrostratigraphic units representing the middle zone of the Trinity aquifer. The CSSA area is a restricted military facility that encompasses approximately 4,000 acres and is located in Boerne, Texas, northwest of the city of San Antonio. Studying both the surface and subsurface geology of the CSSA area are integral parts of a U.S. Geological Survey project funded through the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program. This modification of hydrostratigraphic units is being applied to all subsurface data used to construct a proposed 3-D EarthVision model of the CSSA area and areas to the south and west.

  19. Atomic-Scale Chemical, Physical and Electronic Properties of the Subsurface Hydride of Palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20

    We employed low-temperature, extreme-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to investigate the roles of subsurface hydride (H) and deuteride (D) in the surface reconstruction and surface reactivity of Pd{110}. Specifically, we gained the ability to tailor the surface structure of Pd{110} both by preparation method and by deposition of deuterium from the gas phase. We observed thiophene at low coverage on Pd{110} to determine its adsorption orientation and electronic structure through scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) – namely, conductance spectroscopy and differential conductance imaging. We developed the methods necessary to coadsorb D adatoms with thiophene molecules, and to induce the reaction of individual molecules with predefined subsurface H or D features. In the case of Pd{110}, we found a much more pronounced effect from subsurface D, as it is influenced by the surface directionality. These experiments facilitate an understanding of the role of surface and subsurface H and D in heterogeneous catalytic processes, specifically in the hydrodesulfuization (HDS) of thiophene, an important and ubiquitous component found to be detrimental to petroleum refining.

  20. Entrapment and dissolution of DNAPLs in heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A; Rathfelder, Klaus M; Lang, John; Abriola, Linda M

    2003-12-01

    Two-dimensional multiphase flow and transport simulators were refined and used to numerically investigate the entrapment and dissolution behavior of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in heterogeneous porous media containing spatial variations in wettability. Measured hydraulic properties, residual saturations, and dissolution parameters were employed in these simulations. Entrapment was quantified using experimentally verified hydraulic property and residual saturation models that account for hysteresis and wettability variations. The nonequilibrium dissolution of PCE was modeled using independent estimates of the film mass transfer coefficient and interfacial area for entrapped and continuous (PCE pools or films) saturations. Flow simulations demonstrate that the spatial distribution of PCE is highly dependent on subsurface wettability characteristics that create differences in PCE retention mechanisms and the presence of subsurface capillary barriers. For a given soil texture, the maximum and minimum PCE infiltration depth was obtained when the sand had intermediate (an organic-wet mass fraction of 25%) and strong (water- or organic-wet) wettability conditions, respectively. In heterogeneous systems, subsurface wettability variations were also found to enhance or diminish the performance of soil texture-induced capillary barriers. The dissolution behavior of PCE was found to depend on the soil wettability and the spatial PCE distribution. Shorter dissolution times tended to occur when PCE was distributed over large regions due to an increased access of flowing water to the PCE. In heterogeneous systems, capillary barriers that produced high PCE saturations tended to exhibit longer dissolution times.

  1. Paleo-ocean environments before and after the Ordovician glaciation and the correlation with heterogeneous marine black shale: a stratigraphic case study of Wufeng-Longmaxi formation in Fuling, Sichuan basin, SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yangbo; Hao, Fang; Lu, Yongchao

    2017-04-01

    The discovery of Fuling gas field in the Sichuan basin led China shale gas exploration to an unprecedented boom. The most important shale gas plays are the upper Ordovician Wufeng formation and Lower Silurian Longmaxi formation which demonstrate intriguing characteristics which are comprising of stable regional distribution, high abundance of organic matter, high thermal maturity and high brittle mineral content etc. As the Ordovician-Silurian transition was a critical interval in Earth's history marked by dramatic climatic, oceanic, and biological turnovers; these two advantageous organic rich shale deposited before and after Hirnantian glaciation are showing differences in many aspects. In this study, the stratigraphy and lithofacies within the stratigraphy framework of the upper Ordovician Wufeng formation and Lower Silurian Longmaxi formation in Fuling were quantitatively analyzed based on outcrops, cores, well logs data, and geochemical proxies. A total of three third-order sequences were divided based on the recognition of four third-order boundaries. The Wufeng Formation is equivalent to a third-order sequence and is subdivided into a transgressive system tract (TST) (black shale of lower Wufeng Formation) and a highstand system tract (HST) (Guanyinqiao Member of upper Wufeng Formation). Long-1 Member is equivalent to a third-order sequence and is subdivided into a TST, an early highstand system tract (EHST) and a late highstand system tract (LHST); Long-2 and Long-3 Member are combined to be one third-order sequence and is subdivided into a lowstand system tract (LST), a TST and a HST. Sequence development and sedimentary environment characteristics were analyzed within each system tract unit. TOC% was correlated to V/Cr and EF-Ni respectively within each system tract unit, suggesting paleoproductivity and water redox condition are the main controlling factors of organic enrichment and its preservation. The heterogeneity in shale lithofacies throughout the

  2. Intercellular Genomics of Subsurface Microbial Colonies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortoleva, Peter [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Tuncay, Kagan [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Gannon, Dennis [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Meile, Christof [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2007-02-14

    This report summarizes progress in the second year of this project. The objective is to develop methods and software to predict the spatial configuration, properties and temporal evolution of microbial colonies in the subsurface. To accomplish this, we integrate models of intracellular processes, cell-host medium exchange and reaction-transport dynamics on the colony scale. At the conclusion of the project, we aim to have the foundations of a predictive mathematical model and software that captures the three scales of these systems – the intracellular, pore, and colony wide spatial scales. In the second year of the project, we refined our transcriptional regulatory network discovery (TRND) approach that utilizes gene expression data along with phylogenic similarity and gene ontology analyses and applied it successfully to E.coli, human B cells, and Geobacter sulfurreducens. We have developed a new Web interface, GeoGen, which is tailored to the reconstruction of microbial TRNs and solely focuses on Geobacter as one of DOE’s high priority microbes. Our developments are designed such that the frameworks for the TRND and GeoGen can readily be used for other microbes of interest to the DOE. In the context of modeling a single bacterium, we are actively pursuing both steady-state and kinetic approaches. The steady-state approach is based on a flux balance that uses maximizing biomass growth rate as its objective, subjected to various biochemical constraints, for the optimal values of reaction rates and uptake/release of metabolites. For the kinetic approach, we use Karyote, a rigorous cell model developed by us for an earlier DOE grant and the DARPA BioSPICE Project. We are also investigating the interplay between bacterial colonies and environment at both pore and macroscopic scales. The pore scale models use detailed representations for realistic porous media accounting for the distribution of grain size whereas the macroscopic models employ the Darcy-type flow

  3. Electrical resistivity determination of subsurface layers, subsoil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A geophysical investigation involving the electrical resistivity method was carried out at a site located in the eastern part of Akungba-Akoko, southwestern Nigeria. The aim of the investigation was to characterize the site according to subsurface lithologic layering, subsoil competence and soil corrosivity, which may affect the ...

  4. Linear Regression Models for Estimating True Subsurface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    47

    For the fact that subsurface resistivity is nonlinear, the datasets were first. 14 transformed into logarithmic scale to satisfy the basic regression assumptions. Three. 15 models, one each for the three array types, are thus developed based on simple linear. 16 relationships between the dependent and independent variables.

  5. Characterization of the Geology of Subsurface Shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, the 2D electrical resistivity imaging of subsurface shallow conglomerate has been generated using through Computerized Resistivity Meter (CRM -500) and the Wenner electrode configuration has been used for 2D electrical resistivity imaging studies. The measured apparent resistivity values have ...

  6. Analysis and design of instrumented subsurface mooring

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Sakhardande, R.N.; Nayak, B.U.; Somanatha, G.S.

    be simplified. The objective of the present study is to design and analyse single point subsurface instrumented mooring system under a three dimensional current profile. A software 'SUBAM' is developed in FORTRAN-77 and it is applied to analyse a shallow water...

  7. Microscale heterogeneity explains experimental variability and non-linearity in soil organic matter mineralisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth E Falconer

    Full Text Available Soil respiration represents the second largest CO2 flux from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere, and a small rise could significantly contribute to further increase in atmospheric CO2. Unfortunately, the extent of this effect cannot be quantified reliably, and the outcomes of experiments designed to study soil respiration remain notoriously unpredictable. In this context, the mathematical simulations described in this article suggest that assumptions of linearity and presumed irrelevance of micro-scale heterogeneity, commonly made in quantitative models of microbial growth in subsurface environments and used in carbon stock models, do not appear warranted. Results indicate that microbial growth is non-linear and, at given average nutrient concentrations, strongly dependent on the microscale distribution of both nutrients and microbes. These observations have far-reaching consequences, in terms of both experiments and theory. They indicate that traditional, macroscopic soil measurements are inadequate to predict microbial responses, in particular to rising temperature conditions, and that an explicit account is required of microscale heterogeneity. Furthermore, models should evolve beyond traditional, but overly simplistic, assumptions of linearity of microbial responses to bulk nutrient concentrations. The development of a new generation of models along these lines, and in particular incorporating upscaled information about microscale processes, will undoubtedly be challenging, but appears to be key to understanding the extent to which soil carbon mineralization could further accelerate climate change.

  8. Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, S.E.

    1999-07-28

    This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media. The code is designed specifically to handle complex multi-layer and/or heterogeneous aquifer systems in an efficient manner and accommodates a wide range of boundary conditions. Additionally, 1-D and 2-D (in Cartesian coordinates) problems are handled in FACT by simply limiting the number of elements in a particular direction(s) to one. The governing equations in FACT are formulated only in Cartesian coordinates.

  9. Fluids in subsurface environments : A symposium : Transactions of the 6th annual meeting of the Southwestern Federation of Geological Societies, at Midland, Texas, January 30, 31 and February 1, 1964. A. Young and J.E. Galley (editors). Am. Assoc. Petrol. Geologists, Tulsa, Okla., 1965, 414 pp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manten, A.A.

    1966-01-01

    The volume under review - the proceedings of the annual meeting of the Southwestern (U.S.) Federation of Geological Societies - has a very strong regional accent in its array of reports, which largely concentrate on the subsurface fluids in the Texas-New Mexico area. Because of, or despite this

  10. Stochastic and deterministic assembly processes in subsurface microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegen, James C; Lin, Xueju; Konopka, Allan E; Fredrickson, James K

    2012-09-01

    A major goal of microbial community ecology is to understand the forces that structure community composition. Deterministic selection by specific environmental factors is sometimes important, but in other cases stochastic or ecologically neutral processes dominate. Lacking is a unified conceptual framework aiming to understand why deterministic processes dominate in some contexts but not others. Here we work toward such a framework. By testing predictions derived from general ecological theory we aim to uncover factors that govern the relative influences of deterministic and stochastic processes. We couple spatiotemporal data on subsurface microbial communities and environmental parameters with metrics and null models of within and between community phylogenetic composition. Testing for phylogenetic signal in organismal niches showed that more closely related taxa have more similar habitat associations. Community phylogenetic analyses further showed that ecologically similar taxa coexist to a greater degree than expected by chance. Environmental filtering thus deterministically governs subsurface microbial community composition. More importantly, the influence of deterministic environmental filtering relative to stochastic factors was maximized at both ends of an environmental variation gradient. A stronger role of stochastic factors was, however, supported through analyses of phylogenetic temporal turnover. Although phylogenetic turnover was on average faster than expected, most pairwise comparisons were not themselves significantly non-random. The relative influence of deterministic environmental filtering over community dynamics was elevated, however, in the most temporally and spatially variable environments. Our results point to general rules governing the relative influences of stochastic and deterministic processes across micro- and macro-organisms.

  11. [Tumor genetic heterogeneity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Ling; Chu, Jia-You; Wang, Ming-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Although the majority of spontaneous tumors derive from a single cell, people have come to realize intra-tumor heterogeneity of individual tumors. Human cancers frequently display substantial difference in phenotypic features, such as the degree of differentiation, cell proliferation rate, invasion and metastatic potential, response to therapy and many other aspects. Molecular biology studies have confirmed the occurrence of new mutations during the process of tumor progression, which provide more powerful evidences to show the existence of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity. This re-view will focus on recent major advances in the study of tumor genetic heterogeneity. Considering that genetic heterogene-ity analysis can provide important information to indicate how long normal cells transform into tumor cells and how to spread and migrate, we firstly describe experimental evidences of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity. Then we discuss the research value of genetic diversity in the evolutionary history of human individual tumor, introduce the two modes of the genetic heterogeneity - cancer stem cell model and the clonal evolution model, and summarize the implications of in-tra-tumor heterogeneity studies in metastasis and therapy. In addition, the article presents the research methods of genetic heterogeneity, including specific gene and genome-wide level, pointing out their strengths and limitations.

  12. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  13. The Effects of Surface and Subsurface Structural Anomalies on the Detectability of Shallow Aquifers on Europa by Sounding Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggy, E.; Scabbia, G.

    2014-12-01

    Clutter from surface topography can compromise the sounding radar capability to detect shallow subsurface features in several planetary environments. Herein we investigate the effect of surface and subsurface structural anomalies on the detectability of potential shallow aquifers for the case of Europa ice penetrating radars. We investigate the surface and volume scattering effects arising from the cratering, geothermal and ice tectonic structural elements associated with Europa's geological evolution. Using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method we modeled the radar wave propagation through Europa's subsurface in the frequency range from 9 to 30 MHz for two Europa geoelectrical models representing the thermally conductive and convective subsurface models. These geoelectrical models are then meshed to match the subsurface structural models for the most common two types of terrains on Europa, i.e. the Double Ridges and the Chaos Terrain, represented. Our simulations suggest that shallow aquifer detection in the first 3 km of the Europa subsurface can be achieved in most types of terrains for the conductive models and derive the constraints for its detectability in the terrains that are hypothesized to be formed from convective thermal activity. Both the large subsurface fractures and the brittle-ductile interface and their slopes variation are also possible to detect in the simulated radargrams for various surface roughness conditions. Our results suggests that quantifying the surface and volume scattering effects arising respectively from topographic and roughness conditions and subsurface structural anomalies through FDTD simulations is crucial to optimize the future sounding radar orbital data acquisitions. We will also present the added value of using interferometric and passive acquisitions to reduce the ambiguities of the complex clutter and maximize subsurface detectability of aquifers.

  14. Effect of heterogeneities on evaluating earthquake triggering of volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Takekawa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent researches have indicated coupling between volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Some of them calculated static stress transfer in subsurface induced by the occurrences of earthquakes. Most of their analyses ignored the spatial heterogeneity in subsurface, or only took into account the rigidity layering in the crust. On the other hand, a smaller scale heterogeneity of around hundreds of meters has been suggested by geophysical investigations. It is difficult to reflect that kind of heterogeneity in analysis models because accurate distributions of fluctuation are not well understood in many cases. Thus, the effect of the ignorance of the smaller scale heterogeneity on evaluating the earthquake triggering of volcanic eruptions is also not well understood. In the present study, we investigate the influence of the assumption of homogeneity on evaluating earthquake triggering of volcanic eruptions using finite element simulations. The crust is treated as a stochastic media with different heterogeneous parameters (correlation length and magnitude of velocity perturbation in our simulations. We adopt exponential and von Karman functions as spatial auto-correlation functions (ACF. In all our simulation results, the ignorance of the smaller scale heterogeneity leads to underestimation of the failure pressure around a chamber wall, which relates to dyke initiation. The magnitude of the velocity perturbation has a larger effect on the tensile failure at the chamber wall than the difference of the ACF and the correlation length. The maximum effect on the failure pressure in all our simulations is about twice larger than that in the homogeneous case. This indicates that the estimation of the earthquake triggering due to static stress transfer should take account of the heterogeneity of around hundreds of meters.

  15. Modelling of deep subsurface for geohazard risk assessment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlic, B.; Eijs, R. van

    2002-01-01

    Exploitation of subsurface natural resources, and subsurface storage of energy residues, may cause subsurface and surface deformation and damage to property. Deformation is generally difficult to assess and prove, although economical, environmental and societal interests are huge in terms of strain

  16. 4. Modelling Interconnectedness of Subsurface Flow Processes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    The study determined subsurface flow processes of 92.3 ha catchment area in order to examine functional relationship among ... subsurface flows, a combination of interflow and groundwater flow, had the two components contributing to stream flow on days ...... Modeling of Water Subsurface Lateral Movement on Top of a ...

  17. Akuna - Integrated Toolsets Supporting Advanced Subsurface Flow and Transport Simulations for Environmental Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchardt, Karen L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Finsterle, Stefan A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gable, Carl W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gorton, Ian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gosink, Luke J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Keating, Elizabeth H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lansing, Carina S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Joerg [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Moeglein, William A.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pau, George S.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Porter, Ellen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Purohit, Sumit [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rockhold, Mark L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shoshani, Arie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-04-24

    A next generation open source subsurface simulator and user environment for environmental management is being developed through a collaborative effort across Department of Energy National Laboratories. The flow and transport simulator, Amanzi, will be capable of modeling complex subsurface environments and processes using both unstructured and adaptive meshes at very fine spatial resolutions that require supercomputing-scale resources. The user environment, Akuna, provides users with a range of tools to manage environmental and simulator data sets, create models, manage and share simulation data, and visualize results. Underlying the user interface are core toolsets that provide algorithms for sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, and uncertainty quantification. Akuna is open-source, cross platform software that is initially being demonstrated on the Hanford BC Cribs remediation site. In this paper, we describe the emerging capabilities of Akuna and illustrate how these are being applied to the BC Cribs site.

  18. Mapping to assess feasibility of using subsurface intakes for SWRO, Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Dehwah, Abdullah

    2013-11-19

    Use of subsurface intakes for seawater reverse osmosis desalination (SWRO) systems is known to improve raw water quality, reduce use of chemicals, improve operational reliability, and reduce the life cycle cost of desalination. A key issue in planning for the development of a SWRO facility that would potentially use a subsurface intake is the characterization of the coastal and nearshore geology of a region to ascertain the types of subsurface intakes that could be used and their respective costs. It is the purpose of this research to document a new methodology that can be used for planning and assessment of the feasibility of using subsurface intake systems for SWRO facilities at any location in the world. The Red Sea shoreline and nearshore area of Saudi Arabia were mapped and sediments were sampled from the Yemen border north of the Jordan border, a distance of about 1,950 km. Seventeen different coastal environments were defined, mapped, and correlated to the feasibility of using various types of subsurface intake systems. Six environments were found to have favorable characteristics for development of large-scale subsurface intakes. The most favorable of these coastal environments includes: (1) beaches and nearshore areas containing carbonate or siliciclastic sands with minimum mud concentrations and environmentally sensitive bottom community biota or fauna (A1, A2, and A3), limestone rocky shorelines with an offshore carbonate or siliciclastic sand bottom underlain by soft limestone and a barren area lying between the shoreline and the offshore reef (B1, B5), and wadi sediments on the beach (mixture of pebbles, gravel, and sand) with a corresponding nearshore area containing either siliciclastic sand and/or a marine hard ground (soft limestone or sandstone) (C2). It was found that seabed galleries were the subsurface intake type with the highest feasibility for development of large-capacity intakes. The geological characteristics of the offshore sea bottom

  19. Exploring tumor heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fessler, E.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease, which is reflected both on the cellular and the population level. Advances in detection, diagnosis, and treatment of malignancies have increased survival time of cancer patients; yet, the heterogeneity observed within and between tumors complicates accurate

  20. Enhanced characterization of fracture compliance heterogeneity using multiple reflections and data-driven Green's function retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minato, S.; Ghose, R.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial heterogeneity along a fracture is a key determinant for fracture-associated mechanical and hydraulic properties of the subsurface. Laboratory experiments have been performed to test the applicability of the nonwelded interface representation to predict the frequency- and

  1. Geostatistical description of geological heterogeneity in clayey till as input for improved characterization of contaminated sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Timo Christian; Klint, K.E.S.; Renard, P.

    2010-01-01

    In low-permeability clay tills subsurface transport is governed by preferential flow in sand lenses and fractures. A proper geological model requires the integration of these features, i.e. the spatial distribution of the geological heterogeneities. Detailed mapping of sand lenses has been done...

  2. Flows and chemical reactions in heterogeneous mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Prud'homme, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This book - a sequel of previous publications 'Flows and Chemical Reactions' and 'Chemical Reactions in Flows and Homogeneous Mixtures' - is devoted to flows with chemical reactions in heterogeneous environmentsHeterogeneous media in this volume include interfaces and lines. They may be the site of radiation. Each type of flow is the subject of a chapter in this volume. We consider first, in Chapter 1, the question of the generation of environments biphasic individuals: dusty gas, mist, bubble flow.  Chapter 2 is devoted to the study at the mesoscopic scale: particle-fluid exchange of mom

  3. Timing and Distribution of Single-Layered Ejecta Craters Imply Sporadic Preservation of Tropical Subsurface Ice on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchoff, Michelle R.; Grimm, Robert E.

    2018-01-01

    Determining the evolution of tropical subsurface ice is a key component to understanding Mars's climate and geologic history. Study of an intriguing crater type on Mars—layered ejecta craters, which likely form by tapping subsurface ice—may provide constraints on this evolution. Layered ejecta craters have a continuous ejecta deposit with a fluidized-flow appearance. Single-layered ejecta (SLE) craters are the most common and dominate at tropical latitudes and therefore offer the best opportunity to derive new constraints on the temporal evolution of low-latitude subsurface ice. We estimate model formation ages of 54 SLE craters with diameter (D) ≥ 5 km using the density of small, superposed craters with D D 1 km indicates that ice could be preserved as shallow as 100 m or less at those locations. Finally, there is a striking spatial mixing in an area of highlands near the equator of layered and radial (lunar-like ballistic) ejecta craters; the latter form where there are insufficient concentrations of subsurface ice. This implies strong spatial heterogeneity in the concentration of tropical subsurface ice.

  4. Blooms and subsurface phytoplankton layers on the Scotian Shelf: Insights from profiling gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Tetjana; Craig, Susanne E.; Comeau, Adam; Davis, Richard; Dever, Mathieu; Beck, Matthew

    2017-08-01

    Understanding how phytoplankton respond to their physical environment is key to predicting how bloom dynamics might change under future climate change scenarios. Phytoplankton are at the base of most marine food webs and play an important role in drawing CO2 out of the atmosphere. Using nearly 5 years of simultaneous CTD, irradiance, chlorophyll a fluorescence and optical backscattering observations obtained from Slocum glider missions, we observed the subsurface phytoplankton populations across the Scotian Shelf, near Halifax (Nova Scotia, Canada) along with their physical environment. Bloom conditions were observed in each of the 5 springs, with the average chlorophyll in the upper 60 m of water generally exceeding 3 mg m- 3. These blooms occurred when the upper water column stratification was at its lowest, in apparent contradiction of the critical depth hypothesis. A subsurface chlorophyll layer was observed each summer at about 30 m depth, which was below the base of the mixed layer. This subsurface layer lasted 3-4 months and contained, on average, 1/4 of the integrated water column chlorophyll found during the spring bloom. This suggests that a significant portion of the primary productivity over the Scotian Shelf occurs at depths that cannot be observed by satellites-highlighting the importance of including subsurface observations in the monitoring of future changes to primary productivity in the ocean.

  5. Directional Dipole Model for Subsurface Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Hachisuka, Toshiya; Kjeldsen, Thomas Kim

    2014-01-01

    Rendering translucent materials using Monte Carlo ray tracing is computationally expensive due to a large number of subsurface scattering events. Faster approaches are based on analytical models derived from diffusion theory. While such analytical models are efficient, they miss out on some...... translucency effects in the rendered result. We present an improved analytical model for subsurface scattering that captures translucency effects present in the reference solutions but remaining absent with existing models. The key difference is that our model is based on ray source diffusion, rather than...... point source diffusion. A ray source corresponds better to the light that refracts through the surface of a translucent material. Using this ray source, we are able to take the direction of the incident light ray and the direction toward the point of emergence into account. We use a dipole construction...

  6. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2006-10-17

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  7. Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy DeVol

    2006-06-30

    Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitoed in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media.

  8. Drill Embedded Nanosensors For Planetary Subsurface Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a carbon nanotube (CNT) sensor for water vapor detection under Martian Conditions and the miniaturized electronics can be embedded in the drill bit for collecting sensor data and transmit it to a computer wirelessly.This capability will enable the real time measurement of ice during drilling. With this real time and in-situ measurement, subsurface ice detection can be easy, fast, precise and low cost.

  9. Monitoring Subsurface Objects Using Resonant Seismic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, V.; Korneev, V.

    2008-12-01

    The numerical modeling results and field data indicate that some contrast subsurface objects (such as tunnels, caves, pipes, filled pits, and fluid-filled fractures) are capable to trap seismic energy and generate durable resonant oscillations. These oscillations are comprised of surface types of circumferential waves which multiply rotate around the object. Resonant emission of such trapped energy occurs primarily in form of shear body waves that can be detected by remotely placed receivers. Resonant emission reveals itself in form of sharp resonant peaks for the late parts of the records, when all strong direct and primary reflected waves are gone. These peaks are observed in the field data for a buried barrel filled with water, in 2D finite- difference modeling results and in exact canonical solution for a fluid-filled sphere. Computed movie for diffraction of a plane wave upon low-velocity elastic sphere confirms generation of resonances by durable surface waves. We show that resonant emission has characteristic quasi-hyperbolic travel-time patterns on shot-gathers. Inversion of these patterns can be performed in frequency domain after muting strong direct and primary scattered waves. Subsurface objects can be detected and imaged at a single resonance frequency without an accurate knowledge about source trigger time. Imaging of subsurface objects requires information about shear velocity distribution in an embedding medium, which can be done interactively during inversion. Resonant emission data processing is done using KinetiK Professional visualization and processing software.

  10. Evaluating the Competitive Use of the Subsurface: The Influence of Energy Storage and Production in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, R.; Becker, B.; Flemisch, B.

    2015-12-01

    The natural subsurface is gaining in importance for a variety of engineering applications related to energy supply. At the same time it is already utilized in many ways. On the one hand, the subsurface with its groundwater system represents the most important source of drinking water; on the other hand, it contains natural resources such as petroleum, natural gas and coal. In recent years, the subsurface has been gaining importance as a resource of energy and as an energy and waste repository. It can serve as a short-, medium- or long-term storage medium for energy in various forms, e.g. in the form of methane (CH4), hydrogen (H2) or compressed air. The subsurface is also attracting increasing interest as a natural source of energy, regarding, for instance, the extraction of fossil methane by hydraulic fracturing or the utilization of geothermal energy as a renewable energy source. As a result, with increasing exploitation, resource conflicts are becoming more and more common and complex. Modeling concepts for simulating multiphase flow that can reproduce the high complexity of the underlying processes in an efficient way need to be developed. The application of these model concepts is of great importance with respect to feasibility, risk analysis, storage capacity and sensitivity issues. This talk will give an overview on possible utilization conflicts in subsurface systems and how the groundwater is affected. It will focus on presenting fundamental properties and functions of a compositional multiphase system in a porous medium and introduce basic multiscale and multiphysics concepts as well as formulate conser­vation laws for simulating energy storage in the subsurface. Large-scale simulations that show the general applicability of the modeling concepts of such complicated natural systems, especially the impact on the groundwater of simultaneously using geothermal energy and storing chemical and thermal energy, and how such real large-scale systems provide a

  11. Analysis of Surface Heterogeneity Effects with Mesoscale Terrestrial Modeling Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmer, C.

    2015-12-01

    An improved understanding of the full variability in the weather and climate system is crucial for reducing the uncertainty in weather forecasting and climate prediction, and to aid policy makers to develop adaptation and mitigation strategies. A yet unknown part of uncertainty in the predictions from the numerical models is caused by the negligence of non-resolved land surface heterogeneity and the sub-surface dynamics and their potential impact on the state of the atmosphere. At the same time, mesoscale numerical models using finer horizontal grid resolution [O(1)km] can suffer from inconsistencies and neglected scale-dependencies in ABL parameterizations and non-resolved effects of integrated surface-subsurface lateral flow at this scale. Our present knowledge suggests large-eddy-simulation (LES) as an eventual solution to overcome the inadequacy of the physical parameterizations in the atmosphere in this transition scale, yet we are constrained by the computational resources, memory management, big-data, when using LES for regional domains. For the present, there is a need for scale-aware parameterizations not only in the atmosphere but also in the land surface and subsurface model components. In this study, we use the recently developed Terrestrial Systems Modeling Platform (TerrSysMP) as a numerical tool to analyze the uncertainty in the simulation of surface exchange fluxes and boundary layer circulations at grid resolutions of the order of 1km, and explore the sensitivity of the atmospheric boundary layer evolution and convective rainfall processes on land surface heterogeneity.

  12. Heterogeneous Multicore Processor Technologies for Embedded Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Uchiyama, Kunio; Kasahara, Hironori; Nojiri, Tohru; Noda, Hideyuki; Tawara, Yasuhiro; Idehara, Akio; Iwata, Kenichi; Shikano, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    To satisfy the higher requirements of digitally converged embedded systems, this book describes heterogeneous multicore technology that uses various kinds of low-power embedded processor cores on a single chip. With this technology, heterogeneous parallelism can be implemented on an SoC, and greater flexibility and superior performance per watt can then be achieved. This book defines the heterogeneous multicore architecture and explains in detail several embedded processor cores including CPU cores and special-purpose processor cores that achieve highly arithmetic-level parallelism. The authors developed three multicore chips (called RP-1, RP-2, and RP-X) according to the defined architecture with the introduced processor cores. The chip implementations, software environments, and applications running on the chips are also explained in the book. Provides readers an overview and practical discussion of heterogeneous multicore technologies from both a hardware and software point of view; Discusses a new, high-p...

  13. Heterogeneous continuous-time random walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.; Tupikina, Liubov

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a heterogeneous continuous-time random walk (HCTRW) model as a versatile analytical formalism for studying and modeling diffusion processes in heterogeneous structures, such as porous or disordered media, multiscale or crowded environments, weighted graphs or networks. We derive the exact form of the propagator and investigate the effects of spatiotemporal heterogeneities onto the diffusive dynamics via the spectral properties of the generalized transition matrix. In particular, we show how the distribution of first-passage times changes due to local and global heterogeneities of the medium. The HCTRW formalism offers a unified mathematical language to address various diffusion-reaction problems, with numerous applications in material sciences, physics, chemistry, biology, and social sciences.

  14. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  15. Using Bacterial Surrogates to Assess Pathogen Transport in the Subsurface: Laboratory and Field Indications of Co-Transport Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelko, M.; Stimson, J. R.; McLellan, N. L.; Mesquita, M.

    2009-12-01

    Prediction of the transport and fate of colloids and nanoparticles in porous media environments remains challenging because factors such as experimental scale, subsurface heterogeneity, and variable flow paths and fluxes have made it difficult to relate laboratory outcomes to field performance. Moreover, field studies have been plagued with inadequate consideration of ground water flow, reliance on unproven “surrogate” parameters, non-detects at the extraction well, and limited sampling. Riverbank filtration (RBF) is an example of an application for which some predictive capacity regarding colloid transport is desirable. RBF is a relatively low-cost, natural water treatment technology in which surface water contaminants are removed or degraded as the infiltrating water flows from a surface source to abstraction wells. RBF has been used for water treatment for at least 200 years and its potential to provide a significant barrier to microorganisms has been demonstrated. Assignment of microbial treatment credits for RBF remains a regulatory challenge because strategies for demonstrating effective subsurface filtration of organisms are not standardized. The potential passage of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum through RBF systems is of particular regulatory concern because these pathogens are known to be resistant to conventional disinfection processes. The transport or relatively small, pathogenic viruses through RBF systems is also a common concern. To comply with the U.S. Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule, utilities with sufficiently high levels of Cryptosporidium oocysts in their source water must amend existing treatment by choosing from a ‘‘toolbox’’ of technologies, including RBF. Aerobic bacterial spores have been evaluated and proposed by some as surrogates for evaluating drinking water treatment plant performance; they also have been proposed as potential surrogates for Cryptosporidium removal during subsurface filtration

  16. Use of genotype × environment interaction model to accommodate genetic heterogeneity for residual feed intake, dry matter intake, net energy in milk, and metabolic body weight in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, C.; Campos, de los G.; VandeHaar, M.J.; Spurlock, D.M.; Armentano, L.E.; Coffey, M.; Haas, de Y.; Veerkamp, R.F.; Staples, C.R.; Connor, E.E.; Wang, Z.; Hanigan, M.D.; Tempelman, R.J.; Weigel, K.A.

    2017-01-01

    Feed efficiency in dairy cattle has gained much attention recently. Due to the cost-prohibitive measurement of individual feed intakes, combining data from multiple countries is often necessary to ensure an adequate reference population. It may then be essential to model genetic heterogeneity

  17. Use of marker × environment interaction whole genome regression model to incorporate genetic heterogeneity for residual feed intake, dry matter intake, net energy in milk, and metabolic body weight in dairy cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feed efficiency in dairy cattle has gained much attention recently. Due to the cost prohibitive measurement of individual phenotypes, combining data from multiple countries is usually necessary to enlarge the reference population. In this scenario, it is essential to model genetic heterogeneity when...

  18. Use of genotype x environment interaction model to accommodate genetic heterogeneity for residual feed intake, dry matter intake, net energy in milk, and metabolic body weight in dairy cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feed efficiency in dairy cattle has gained much attention recently. Due to the cost-prohibitive measurement of individual feed intakes, combining data from multiple countries is often necessary to ensure an adequate reference population. It may then be essential to model genetic heterogeneity when m...

  19. Multigrid Solution of the 3D Elastic Subsurface Stress Field for Heterogeneous Materials in Contact Mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffy, Hugo; Venner, Cornelis H.

    2014-01-01

    The need to increase efficiency, stimulates the development of new materials tailored to specific applications and thermal/mechanical loading conditions, e.g. by controlling the property variations on a local scale: layered, graded, granular, porous and fibre-reinforced. For design and optimization

  20. Improved Heterogeneous Distance Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, D. R.; Martinez, T. R.

    1996-01-01

    Instance-based learning techniques typically handle continuous and linear input values well, but often do not handle nominal input attributes appropriately. The Value Difference Metric (VDM) was designed to find reasonable distance values between nominal attribute values, but it largely ignores continuous attributes, requiring discretization to map continuous values into nominal values. This paper proposes three new heterogeneous distance functions, called the Heterogeneous Value Difference M...

  1. Subsurface multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport modeling using high-performance computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Glenn; Lichtner, Peter; Lu, Chuan

    2007-07-01

    Numerical modeling is a critical tool to the U.S. Department of Energy for evaluating the environmental impact of remediation strategies for subsurface legacy waste sites. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical complexity of many sites overwhelms the capabilities of even most state of the art groundwater models. Of particular concern is the representation of highly-heterogeneous stratified rock/soil layers in the subsurface and the biological and geochemical interactions of chemical species within multiple fluid phases. There is clearly a need for higher-resolution modeling (i.e. increased spatial and temporal resolution) and increasingly mechanistic descriptions of subsurface physicochemical processes (i.e. increased chemical degrees of freedom). We present SciDAC-funded research being performed in furthering the development of PFLOTRAN, a parallel multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model. Written in Fortran90, PFLOTRAN is founded upon PETSc data structures and solvers. We are employing PFLOTRAN to simulate uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area, a contaminated site of major concern to the Department of Energy, the State of Washington, and other government agencies. By leveraging the billions of degrees of freedom available through high-performance computation using tens of thousands of processors, we can better characterize the release of uranium into groundwater and its subsequent transport to the Columbia River, and thereby better understand and evaluate the effectiveness of various proposed remediation strategies.

  2. Conceptual Model of Iodine Behavior in the Subsurface at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Christian D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Last, George V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Michelle H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kaplan, Daniel I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The fate and transport of 129I in the environment and potential remediation technologies are currently being studied as part of environmental remediation activities at the Hanford Site. A conceptual model describing the nature and extent of subsurface contamination, factors that control plume behavior, and factors relevant to potential remediation processes is needed to support environmental remedy decisions. Because 129I is an uncommon contaminant, relevant remediation experience and scientific literature are limited. Thus, the conceptual model also needs to both describe known contaminant and biogeochemical process information and to identify aspects about which additional information needed to effectively support remedy decisions. this document summarizes the conceptual model of iodine behavior relevant to iodine in the subsurface environment at the Hanford site.

  3. LIBS Sensor for Sub-surface CO2 Leak Detection in Carbon Sequestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinesh JAIN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring carbon sequestration poses numerous challenges to the sensor community. For example, the subsurface environment is notoriously harsh, with large potential mechanical, thermal, and chemical stresses, making long-term stability and survival a challenge to any potential in situ monitoring method. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been demonstrated as a promising technology for chemical monitoring of harsh environments and hard to reach places. LIBS has a real- time monitoring capability and can be used for the elemental and isotopic analysis of solid, liquid, and gas samples. The flexibility of the probe design and the use of fiber- optics has made LIBS particularly suited for remote measurements. The paper focuses on developing a LIBS instrument for downhole high-pressure, high-temperature brine experiments, where CO2 leakage could result in changes in the trace mineral composition of an aquifer. The progress in fabricating a compact, robust, and simple LIBS sensor for widespread subsurface leak detection is presented.

  4. Social heterogeneity and children's nutrition in the rural environment La heterogeneidad social y la nutrición infantil en el medio rural A heterogeneidade social e a nutrição infantil no meio rural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Rocha

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: this study is inserted in an Interdisciplinary Program of Research and aims to learn about the nutritional situation and life context of children under five in the rural environment of Arambaré/RS, Brazil, through an epidemiological cross-sectional descriptive study. METHOD: the data of anthropometrical assessment (Weight/Age, Age/Height, Weight/Height expressed in Z scores, whose reference population is that of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS were analyzed in the Epinut software, and the semi-structured form applied to the child's responsible was analyzed through descriptive statistics in the Epi-Info 6.04. RESULTS: It is evidenced that the nutritional problems vary within the social heterogeneity present in the municipality. There are different levels of vulnerability to illness. CONCLUSION: this study demonstrates the importance of understanding the social dynamics modelling individual behavior that reflects on health.OBJETIVOS: El estudio se inserta en un Programa Interdisciplinar de Investigación y objetiva conocer la situación nutricional y el contexto de vida del universo de niños menores de cinco años del medio rural de Arambaré/RS, Brasil, a través de un estudio epidemiológico del tipo seccional descriptivo. MÉTODOS: Los datos de la evaluación antropométrica (peso/edad, edad/estatura, peso/estatura fueron analizados en el Epinut, y los del formulario semi-estructurado aplicado al responsable del niño fueron analizados vía estatística descriptiva en el Epi-info 6.04. RESULTADOS: Se constata que los problemas nutricionales varían dentro de la heterogeneidad social presente en el municipio, lo que representa diferentes grados de vulnerabilidad al adolecimiento. CONCLUSIONES: Se demostró la importancia de comprender las dinámicas sociales que modulan los comportamientos de los individuos y repercuten sobre su salud.OBJETIVOS: o estudo insere-se num Programa Interdisciplinar de Pesquisa e objetiva

  5. Some ecological mechanisms to generate habitability in planetary subsurface areas by chemolithotrophic communities: the Río Tinto subsurface ecosystem as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Remolar, David C; Gómez, Felipe; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Schelble, Rachel T; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amils, Ricardo

    2008-02-01

    Chemolithotrophic communities that colonize subsurface habitats have great relevance for the astrobiological exploration of our Solar System. We hypothesize that the chemical and thermal stabilization of an environment through microbial activity could make a given planetary region habitable. The MARTE project ground-truth drilling campaigns that sampled cryptic subsurface microbial communities in the basement of the Río Tinto headwaters have shown that acidic surficial habitats are the result of the microbial oxidation of pyritic ores. The oxidation process is exothermic and releases heat under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. These microbial communities can maintain the subsurface habitat temperature through storage heat if the subsurface temperature does not exceed their maximum growth temperature. In the acidic solutions of the Río Tinto, ferric iron acts as an effective buffer for controlling water pH. Under anaerobic conditions, ferric iron is the oxidant used by microbes to decompose pyrite through the production of sulfate, ferrous iron, and protons. The integration between the physical and chemical processes mediated by microorganisms with those driven by the local geology and hydrology have led us to hypothesize that thermal and chemical regulation mechanisms exist in this environment and that these homeostatic mechanisms could play an essential role in creating habitable areas for other types of microorganisms. Therefore, searching for the physicochemical expression of extinct and extant homeostatic mechanisms through physical and chemical anomalies in the Mars crust (i.e., local thermal gradient or high concentration of unusual products such as ferric sulfates precipitated out from acidic solutions produced by hypothetical microbial communities) could be a first step in the search for biological traces of a putative extant or extinct Mars biosphere.

  6. DOE ER63951-3 Final Report: An Integrated Assessment of Geochemical and Community Structure Determinants of Metal Reduction Rates in Subsurface Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Pfiffner

    2010-06-28

    The objective of this research was to examine the importance of microbial community structure in influencing uranium reduction rates in subsurface sediments. If the redox state alone is the key to metal reduction, then any organisms that can utilize the oxygen and nitrate in the subsurface can change the geochemical conditions so metal reduction becomes an energetically favored reaction. Thus, community structure would not be critical in determining rates or extent of metal reduction unless community structure influenced the rate of change in redox. Alternatively, some microbes may directly catalyze metal reduction (e.g., specifically reduce U). In this case the composition of the community may be more important and specific types of electron donors may promote the production of communities that are more adept at U reduction. Our results helped determine if the type of electron donor or the preexisting community is important in the bioremediation of metal-contaminated environments subjected to biostimulation. In a series of experiments at the DOE FRC site in Oak Ridge we have consistently shown that all substrates promoted nitrate reduction, while glucose, ethanol, and acetate always promoted U reduction. Methanol only occasionally promoted extensive U reduction which is possibly due to community heterogeneity. There appeared to be limitations imposed on the community related to some substrates (e.g. methanol and pyruvate). Membrane lipid analyses (phospholipids and respiratory quinones) indicated different communities depending on electron donor used. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone libraries indicated distinct differences among communities even in treatments that promoted U reduction. Thus, there was enough metabolic diversity to accommodate many different electron donors resulting in the U bioimmobilization.

  7. Habitat heterogeneity favors asexual reproduction in natural populations of grassthrips

    OpenAIRE

    Lavanchy, Guillaume; Strehler, Marie; Llanos Roman, Maria Noemi; Lessard-Therrien, Malie; Humbert, Jean-Yves; Dumas, Zoé; Jalvingh, Kirsten; Ghali, Karim; García-Cuenca, Amaranta Fontcuberta; Zijlstra, Bart; Arlettaz, Raphaël; Schwander, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Explaining the overwhelming success of sex among eukaryotes is difficult given the obvious costs of sex relative to asexuality. Different studies have shown that sex can provide benefits in spatially heterogeneous environments under specific conditions, but whether spatial heterogeneity commonly contributes to the maintenance of sex in natural populations remains unknown. We experimentally manipulated habitat heterogeneity for sexual and asexual thrips lineages in natural populations and unde...

  8. The Search for Sustainable Subsurface Habitats on Mars, and the Sampling of Impact Ejecta

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Lindgren; Magnus Ivarsson

    2010-01-01

    On Earth, the deep subsurface biosphere of both the oceanic and the continental crust is well known for surviving harsh conditions and environments characterized by high temperatures, high pressures, extreme pHs, and the absence of sunlight. The microorganisms of the terrestrial deep biosphere have an excellent capacity for adapting to changing geochemistry, as the alteration of the crust proceeds and the conditions of their habitats slowly change. Despite an almost complete isolation from su...

  9. Using Muons to Image the Subsurface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonal, Nedra [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cashion, Avery Ted [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cieslewski, Grzegorz [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dorsey, Daniel J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Foris, Adam [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Timothy J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, Barry L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Su, Jiann-Cherng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dreesen, Wendi [NSTec, Livermore, CA (United States); Green, J. Andrew [NSTec, Livermore, CA (United States); Schwellenbach, David [NSTec, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Muons are subatomic particles that can penetrate the earth 's crust several kilometers and may be useful for subsurface characterization . The absorption rate of muons depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Muons are more sensitive to density variation than other phenomena, including gravity, making them beneficial for subsurface investigation . Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and the detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, muon tomography can resolve features to the sub-meter scale. This work consists of three parts to address the use of muons for subsurface characterization : 1) assess the use of muon scattering for estimating density differences of common rock types, 2 ) using muon flux to detect a void in rock, 3) measure muon direction by designing a new detector. Results from this project lay the groundwork for future directions in this field. Low-density objects can be detected by muons even when enclosed in high-density material like lead, and even small changes in density (e.g. changes due to fracturing of material) can be detected. Rock density has a linear relationship with muon scattering density per rock volume when this ratio is greater than 0.10 . Limitations on using muon scattering to assess density changes among common rock types have been identified. However, other analysis methods may show improved results for these relatively low density materials. Simulations show that muons can be used to image void space (e.g. tunnels) within rock but experimental results have been ambiguous. Improvements are suggested to improve imaging voids such as tunnels through rocks. Finally, a muon detector has been designed and tested to measure muon direction, which will improve signal-to-noise ratio and help address fundamental questions about the source of upgoing muons .

  10. Noble gas fractionation during subsurface gas migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Larson, Toti E.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-09-01

    Environmental monitoring of shale gas production and geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage requires identification of subsurface gas sources. Noble gases provide a powerful tool to distinguish different sources if the modifications of the gas composition during transport can be accounted for. Despite the recognition of compositional changes due to gas migration in the subsurface, the interpretation of geochemical data relies largely on zero-dimensional mixing and fractionation models. Here we present two-phase flow column experiments that demonstrate these changes. Water containing a dissolved noble gas is displaced by gas comprised of CO2 and argon. We observe a characteristic pattern of initial co-enrichment of noble gases from both phases in banks at the gas front, followed by a depletion of the dissolved noble gas. The enrichment of the co-injected noble gas is due to the dissolution of the more soluble major gas component, while the enrichment of the dissolved noble gas is due to stripping from the groundwater. These processes amount to chromatographic separations that occur during two-phase flow and can be predicted by the theory of gas injection. This theory provides a mechanistic basis for noble gas fractionation during gas migration and improves our ability to identify subsurface gas sources after post-genetic modification. Finally, we show that compositional changes due to two-phase flow can qualitatively explain the spatial compositional trends observed within the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir and some regional compositional trends observed in drinking water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett shale regions. In both cases, only the migration of a gas with constant source composition is required, rather than multi-stage mixing and fractionation models previously proposed.

  11. Structure and function of subsurface microbial communities affecting radionuclide transport and bioimmobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostka, Joel E. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Prakash, Om [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Green, Stefan J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Akob, Denise [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Kerkhof, Lee [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Chin, Kuk-Jeong [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Sheth, Mili [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Keller, Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Venkateswaran, Amudhan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Elkins, James G. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Stucki, Joseph W. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Our objectives were to: 1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), 2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and 3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations. Field sampling was conducted at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The ORFRC subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. In short, we effectively addressed all 3 stated objectives of the project. In particular, we isolated and characterized a large number of novel anaerobes with a high bioremediation potential that can be used as model organisms, and we are now able to quantify the function of subsurface sedimentary microbial communities in situ using state-of-the-art gene expression methods (molecular proxies).

  12. Interim report: Manipulation of natural subsurface processes: Field research and validation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchter, J.S.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E. [and others

    1994-11-01

    Often the only alternative for treating deep subsurface contamination is in situ manipulation of natural processes to change the mobility or form of contaminants. However, the complex interactions of natural subsurface physical, chemical, and microbial processes limit the predictability of the system-wide impact of manipulation based on current knowledge. This report is a summary of research conducted to examine the feasibility of controlling the oxidation-reduction (redox) potential of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State by introducing chemical reagents and microbial nutrients. The experiment would allow the testing of concepts and hypotheses developed from fundamental research in the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Subsurface Science Program. Furthermore, the achievement of such control is expected to have implications for in situ remediation of dispersed aqueous contaminants in the subsurface environment at DOE sites nationwide, and particularly at the Hanford Site. This interim report summarizes initial research that was conducted between July 1990 and October 1991.

  13. Abiotic Dissolution of a Tetrachloroethene (PCE) Pool in an Anaerobic Sand Tank Aquifer System with Heterogeneous Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Sara; Seagren, Eric; Becker, Jennifer

    2017-04-01

    Intrinsic and engineered in situ bioremediation are made technologically challenging by the physically and chemically heterogeneous nature of the subsurface environment. Subsurface heterogeneities are important because they influence interfacial mass-transfer processes that impact the availability of substrates to the microorganisms. The laboratory experiments reported here examined the dissolution of a dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) tetrachloroethene (PCE) pool, and transport of the dissolved PCE plume in a aquifer simulated system with heterogeneous flow. These abiotic experiments were performed in a saturated intermediate-scale flow cell (1.2 m), with flow parallel to the PCE pool. A steady-state mass balance approach was used to estimate the PCE dissolution rate at two different flow rates. As expected, increasing the flow rate decreased the effluent dissolved PCE concentration and increased the dissolution flux. However, the effluent PCE concentration was higher than expected based on modeling predictions assuming a uniform distribution of flow across the depth of the tank. Nonreactive tracer studies confirmed that there was a velocity profile with depth, with the slowest velocity at the top of the tank, and the highest velocity at the bottom of the tank, possible due to consolidation of the sand that occurred during a wetting/drainage cycle. Revised modeling using the vertical flow variation provided an improved prediction of the effluent PCE concentration. These results have important implications for predicting DNAPL pool dissolution in the field. Whereas experimental systems in the laboratory typically employ porous media with uniform flow distribution, flow heterogeneities are the rule rather than the exception in the field, and it is well known that velocity impacts pool dissolution. In the case of this experimental system, the pore water velocity near the pool was greater than the average pore water velocity across the system, resulting in a

  14. Forward modeling of gravity data using geostatistically generated subsurface density variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Using geostatistical models of density variations in the subsurface, constrained by geologic data, forward models of gravity anomalies can be generated by discretizing the subsurface and calculating the cumulative effect of each cell (pixel). The results of such stochastically generated forward gravity anomalies can be compared with the observed gravity anomalies to find density models that match the observed data. These models have an advantage over forward gravity anomalies generated using polygonal bodies of homogeneous density because generating numerous realizations explores a larger region of the solution space. The stochastic modeling can be thought of as dividing the forward model into two components: that due to the shape of each geologic unit and that due to the heterogeneous distribution of density within each geologic unit. The modeling demonstrates that the internally heterogeneous distribution of density within each geologic unit can contribute significantly to the resulting calculated forward gravity anomaly. Furthermore, the stochastic models match observed statistical properties of geologic units, the solution space is more broadly explored by producing a suite of successful models, and the likelihood of a particular conceptual geologic model can be compared. The Vaca Fault near Travis Air Force Base, California, can be successfully modeled as a normal or strike-slip fault, with the normal fault model being slightly more probable. It can also be modeled as a reverse fault, although this structural geologic configuration is highly unlikely given the realizations we explored.

  15. Engineering Microbial Metabolite Dynamics and Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Alexander C; Hartline, Christopher J; Zhang, Fuzhong

    2017-10-01

    As yields for biological chemical production in microorganisms approach their theoretical maximum, metabolic engineering requires new tools, and approaches for improvements beyond what traditional strategies can achieve. Engineering metabolite dynamics and metabolite heterogeneity is necessary to achieve further improvements in product titers, productivities, and yields. Metabolite dynamics, the ensemble change in metabolite concentration over time, arise from the need for microbes to adapt their metabolism in response to the extracellular environment and are important for controlling growth and productivity in industrial fermentations. Metabolite heterogeneity, the cell-to-cell variation in a metabolite concentration in an isoclonal population, has a significant impact on ensemble productivity. Recent advances in single cell analysis enable a more complete understanding of the processes driving metabolite heterogeneity and reveal metabolic engineering targets. The authors present an overview of the mechanistic origins of metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity, why they are important, their potential effects in chemical production processes, and tools and strategies for engineering metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity. The authors emphasize that the ability to control metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity will bring new avenues of engineering to increase productivity of microbial strains. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Subsurface profiling using integrated geophysical methods for 2D site response analysis in Bangalore city, India: a new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Deepu; Anbazhagan, P.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, site response analysis has become a mandatory step for the design of important structures. Subsurface investigation is an essential step, from where the input parameters for the site response study like density, shear wave velocity (Vs), thickness and damping characteristics, etc, are obtained. Most site response studies at shallow bedrock sites are one-dimensional (1D) and are usually carried out by using Vs from multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) or a standard penetration test (SPT) for N values with assumptions that soil layers are horizontal, uniform and homogeneous. These assumptions are not completely true in shallow bedrock regions as soil deposits are heterogeneous. The objective of this study is to generate the actual subsurface profiles in two-dimensions at shallow bedrock regions using integrated subsurface investigation testing. The study area selected for this work is Bangalore, India. Three survey lines were selected in Bangalore at two different locations; one at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) Campus and the other at Whitefield. Geophysical surveys like ground penetrating radar (GPR) and 2D MASW were carried out at these survey lines. Geophysical test results are compared and validated with a conventional geotechnical SPT. At the IISc site, the soil profile is obtained from a trench excavated for a proposed pipeline used to compare the geophysical test results. Test results show that GPR is very useful to delineate subsurface layers, especially for shallow depths at both sites (IISc Campus and Whitefield). MASW survey results show variation of Vs values and layer thickness comparatively at deeper depths for both sites. They also show higher density soil strata with high Vs value obtained at the IISc Campus site, whereas at the Whitefield site weaker soil with low shear velocity is observed. Combining these two geophysical methods helped to generate representative 2D subsurface profiles. These subsurface profiles can be

  17. Requirements and Algorithms for Cooperation of Heterogeneous Radio Access Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihovska, Albena D.; Tragos, Elias; Mino, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    This paper defines the requirements for cooperation of heterogeneous radio access networks (RANs) and proposes a novel radio resource management (RRM) framework for support of mobility and quality of service (QoS) in a heterogeneous communication environment comprising IMT-Advanced and legacy...

  18. On the programmability of heterogeneous massively-parallel computing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gelado Fernández, Isaac

    2010-01-01

    Heterogeneous parallel computing combines general purpose processors with accelerators to efficiently execute both sequential control-intensive and data-parallel phases of applications. Existing programming models for heterogeneous parallel computing impose added coding complexity when compared to traditional sequential shared-memory programming models for homogeneous systems. This extra code complexity is assumable in supercomputing environments, where programmability is sacrificed in pursui...

  19. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, P.; Vandergraft, J.; Blohm, M.; Porter, D.

    1993-08-01

    A geophysical data fusion methodology is under development to combine data from complementary geophysical sensors and incorporate geophysical understanding to obtain three dimensional images of the subsurface. The research reported here is the first phase of a three phase project. The project focuses on the characterization of thin clay lenses (aquitards) in a highly stratified sand and clay coastal geology to depths of up to 300 feet. The sensor suite used in this work includes time-domain electromagnetic induction (TDEM) and near surface seismic techniques. During this first phase of the project, enhancements to the acquisition and processing of TDEM data were studied, by use of simulated data, to assess improvements for the detection of thin clay layers. Secondly, studies were made of the use of compressional wave and shear wave seismic reflection data by using state-of-the-art high frequency vibrator technology. Finally, a newly developed processing technique, called 'data fusion' was implemented to process the geophysical data, and to incorporate a mathematical model of the subsurface strata. Examples are given of the results when applied to real seismic data collected at Hanford, WA, and for simulated data based on the geology of the Savannah River Site.

  20. Method and apparatus for subsurface exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Brian (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A subsurface explorer (SSX) for exploring beneath the terrestrial surface of planetary bodies such as the Earth, Mars, or comets. This exploration activity utilizes appropriate sensors and instrument to evaluate the composition, structure, mineralogy and possibly biology of the subsurface medium, as well as perhaps the ability to return samples of that medium back to the surface. The vehicle comprises an elongated skin or body having a front end and a rear end, with a nose piece at the front end for imparting force to composition material of the planetary body. Force is provided by a hammer mechanism to the back side of a nose piece from within the body of the vehicle. In the preferred embodiment, a motor spins an intermediate shaft having two non-uniform threads along with a hammer which engages these threads with two conical rollers. A brake assembly halts the rotation of the intermediate shaft, causing the conical roller to spin down the non-uniform thread to rapidly and efficiently convert the rotational kinetic energy of the hammer into translational energy.

  1. Atmospheric energy for subsurface life on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, B. P.; Yung, Y. L.; Nealson, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    The location and density of biologically useful energy sources on Mars will limit the biomass, spatial distribution, and organism size of any biota. Subsurface Martian organisms could be supplied with a large energy flux from the oxidation of photochemically produced atmospheric H(2) and CO diffusing into the regolith. However, surface abundance measurements of these gases demonstrate that no more than a few percent of this available flux is actually being consumed, suggesting that biological activity driven by atmospheric H(2) and CO is limited in the top few hundred meters of the subsurface. This is significant because the available but unused energy is extremely large: for organisms at 30-m depth, it is 2,000 times previous estimates of hydrothermal and chemical weathering energy and far exceeds the energy derivable from other atmospheric gases. This also implies that the apparent scarcity of life on Mars is not attributable to lack of energy. Instead, the availability of liquid water may be a more important factor limiting biological activity because the photochemical energy flux can only penetrate to 100- to 1,000-m depth, where most H(2)O is probably frozen. Because both atmospheric and Viking lander soil data provide little evidence for biological activity, the detection of short-lived trace gases will probably be a better indicator of any extant Martian life.

  2. Instruments for subsurface monitoring of geothermal subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Rourke, J.E.; Ranson, B.B.

    1979-07-01

    The requirements for a subsurface geothermal subsidence instrument were reviewed. Available instruments for monitoring subsurface displacements, both vertical and horizontal, were studied and the most capable instruments identified. Techniques and materials for improving existing or developing new instruments were evaluated. Elements of sensor and signal technology with potential for high temperature monitoring of subsidence were identified. Drawing from these studies, methods to adapt production wells for monitoring were proposed and several new instrumentation systems were conceptually designed. Finally, four instrumentation systems were selected for future development. These systems are: triple sensor induction sensor probe (with casing collar markers); triple sensor gamma ray detector probe (with radioactive markers); triple sensor reed switch probe (with magnet markers); and triple sensor oscillator-type magnet detector probe (with magnet markers). All are designed for use in well casing incorporating slip couplings or bellows sections, although the gamma ray detector probe may also be used in unlined holes. These systems all measure vertical moement. Instruments to measure horizontal displacement due to geothermal subsidence were studied and the required instrument performance was judged to be beyond the state-of-the-art. Thus, no conceptual designs for instruments to monitor horizontal movement are included.

  3. Method of imaging the electrical conductivity distribution of a subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy C.

    2017-09-26

    A method of imaging electrical conductivity distribution of a subsurface containing metallic structures with known locations and dimensions is disclosed. Current is injected into the subsurface to measure electrical potentials using multiple sets of electrodes, thus generating electrical resistivity tomography measurements. A numeric code is applied to simulate the measured potentials in the presence of the metallic structures. An inversion code is applied that utilizes the electrical resistivity tomography measurements and the simulated measured potentials to image the subsurface electrical conductivity distribution and remove effects of the subsurface metallic structures with known locations and dimensions.

  4. Subsurface Conditions Controlling Uranium Incorporation in Iron Oxides: A Redox Stable Sink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendorf, Scott [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-04-05

    Toxic metals and radionuclides throughout the U.S. Department of Energy Complex pose a serious threat to ecosystems and to human health. Of particular concern is the redox-sensitive radionuclide uranium, which is classified as a priority pollutant in soils and groundwaters at most DOE sites owing to its large inventory, its health risks, and its mobility with respect to primary waste sources. The goal of this research was to contribute to the long-term mission of the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Program by determining reactions of uranium with iron (hydr)oxides that lead to long-term stabilization of this pervasive contaminant. The research objectives of this project were thus to (1) identify the (bio)geochemical conditions, including those of the solid-phase, promoting uranium incorporation in Fe (hydr)oxides, (2) determine the magnitude of uranium incorporation under a variety of relevant subsurface conditions in order to quantify the importance of this pathway when in competition with reduction or adsorption; (3) identify the mechanism(s) of U(VI/V) incorporation in Fe (hydr)oxides; and (4) determine the stability of these phases under different biogeochemical (inclusive of redox) conditions. Our research demonstrates that redox transformations are capable of achieving U incorporation into goethite at ambient temperatures, and that this transformation occurs within days at U and Fe(II) concentrations that are common in subsurface geochemical environments with natural ferrihydrites—inclusive of those with natural impurities. Increasing Fe(II) or U concentration, or initial pH, made U(VI) reduction to U(IV) a more competitive sequestration pathway in this system, presumably by increasing the relative rate of U reduction. Uranium concentrations commonly found in contaminated subsurface environments are often on the order of 1-10 μM, and groundwater Fe(II) concentrations can reach exceed 1 mM in reduced zones of the subsurface. The redox-driven U(V) incorporation

  5. Microbial communities in the deep subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Lee R.

    The diversity of microbial populations and microbial communities within the earth's subsurface is summarized in this review. Scientists are currently exploring the subsurface and addressing questions of microbial diversity, the interactions among microorganisms, and mechanisms for maintenance of subsurface microbial communities. Heterotrophic anaerobic microbial communities exist in relatively permeable sandstone or sandy sediments, located adjacent to organic-rich deposits. These microorganisms appear to be maintained by the consumption of organic compounds derived from adjacent deposits. Sources of organic material serving as electron donors include lignite-rich Eocene sediments beneath the Texas coastal plain, organic-rich Cretaceous shales from the southwestern US, as well as Cretaceous clays containing organic materials and fermentative bacteria from the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Additionally, highly diverse microbial communities occur in regions where a source of organic matter is not apparent but where igneous rock is present. Examples include the basalt-rich subsurface of the Columbia River valley and the granitic subsurface regions of Sweden and Canada. These subsurface microbial communities appear to be maintained by the action of lithotrophic bacteria growing on H2 that is chemically generated within the subsurface. Other deep-dwelling microbial communities exist within the deep sediments of oceans. These systems often rely on anaerobic metabolism and sulfate reduction. Microbial colonization extends to the depths below which high temperatures limit the ability of microbes to survive. Energy sources for the organisms living in the oceanic subsurface may originate as oceanic sedimentary deposits. In this review, each of these microbial communities is discussed in detail with specific reference to their energy sources, their observed growth patterns, and their diverse composition. This information is critical to develop further understanding of subsurface

  6. Green heterogeneous wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Muhammad; Nee, Hans-Peter; Qaraqe, Khalid A; Serpedin, Erchin

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the emerging research topic "green (energy efficient) wireless networks" which has drawn huge attention recently from both academia and industry. This topic is highly motivated due to important environmental, financial, and quality-of-experience (QoE) considerations. Specifically, the high energy consumption of the wireless networks manifests in approximately 2% of all CO2 emissions worldwide. This book presents the authors’ visions and solutions for deployment of energy efficient (green) heterogeneous wireless communication networks. The book consists of three major parts. The first part provides an introduction to the "green networks" concept, the second part targets the green multi-homing resource allocation problem, and the third chapter presents a novel deployment of device-to-device (D2D) communications and its successful integration in Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets). The book is novel in that it specifically targets green networking in a heterogeneous wireless medium, which re...

  7. Management of Distributed and Extendible Heterogeneous Radio Architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramkumar, Venkata; Mihovska, Albena D.; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2009-01-01

    Wireless communication systems are dynamic by nature, which comes from several factors, namely: radio propagation impairments, traffic changes, interference conditions, user mobility, etc. In a heterogeneous environment, , the dynamic network behavior calls for a dynamic management of the radio r...

  8. Heterogeneity of variance and its implications on dairy cattle breeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and evaluated for within herd variation using univariate animal model procedures. Variance components were estimated by derivative free REML algorithm, and significance tests done using the Fmax procedure. Phenotypic, additive genetic and residual variances were heterogeneous across production environments.

  9. Application-specific mesh-based heterogeneous FPGA architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Parvez, Husain

    2011-01-01

    This volume presents a new exploration environment for mesh-based, heterogeneous FPGA architectures. Readers will find a description of state-of-the-art techniques for reducing area requirements, which both increase performance and enable power reduction.

  10. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  11. The DOE Subsurface (SubTER) Initiative: Revolutionizing Responsible use of the Subsurface for Energy Production and Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, S. S.; Walck, M. C.; Blankenship, D.; Bonneville, A.; Bromhal, G. S.; Daley, T. M.; Pawar, R.; Polsky, Y.; Mattson, E.; Mellors, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    The subsurface supplies more than 80% of the U.S.'s total energy needs through geothermal and hydrocarbon strategies and also provides vast potential for safe storage of CO2 and disposal of nuclear waste. Responsible and efficient use of the subsurface poses many challenges, many of which require the capability to monitor and manipulate sub-surface stress, fractures, and fluid flow at all scales. Adaptive control of subsurface fractures and flow is a multi-disciplinary challenge that, if achieved, has the potential to transform all subsurface energy strategies. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's SubTER (Subsurface Technology and Engineering Research development and demonstration) initiative, a multi-National Laboratory team is developing next-generation approaches that will allow for adaptive control of subsurface fractures and flow. SubTER has identified an initial suite of technical thrust areas to focus work, and has initiated a number of small projects. This presentation will describe early progress associated with the SubTER technical topic areas of wellbore integrity, subsurface stress and induced seismicity, permeability manipulation and new subsurface signals. It will also describe SubTER plans, and provide a venue to solicit suggestions and discuss potential partnerships associated with future research directions.

  12. Translation of geophysical log responses to estimate subsurface hydrogeologic properties at the Hanford 300 Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, T. C.; Herron, M. M.; Ward, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    The geology and chemistry of the subsurface environment are fundamental factors controlling contaminant fate and transport, and thus play a critical role in remediation efforts at DOE sites. However, the subsurface is often heterogeneous and not well characterized. Petrophysical models that relate borehole neutron and gamma ray data to reservoir properties such as clay content, matrix density, porosity, and permeability are critical in the formation of meaningful reactive transport models. The objectives of our research are to: (1) analyze core and outcrop samples from representative facies for a variety of mineralogical, chemical and physical properties, (2) predict the response of a variety of neutron and gamma logging tools based on these measurements, (3) develop algorithms to translate log responses into formation properties useful for input in flow and reactive transport models such as matrix density, lithology, porosity, and permeability. Our analysis of selected core samples from Hanford well 399-3-18 (C4999) reveals significant correlations between K, Th, and U concentrations and both matrix density and total clay, as determined by pycmometry and Dual Range Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Based on these relationships, we developed algorithms to predict total clay and matrix density from existing spectral gamma logs. The availability of laboratory bulk density data allows us to compute porosity estimates for our sample set. The comparison of clay content and porosity reveals a relationship that is consistent with the relationship observed by Marion et al. (1992) and others, suggesting the existence of both clay-supported and framework (or grain) supported domains and the ability to estimate porosity from clay content. Further, the availability of total clay, matrix density, and porosity permit application of the k-Lambda model as a means to estimate permeability. These results, although limited, suggest the path towards developing

  13. The Search for Sustainable Subsurface Habitats on Mars, and the Sampling of Impact Ejecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Lindgren

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available On Earth, the deep subsurface biosphere of both the oceanic and the continental crust is well known for surviving harsh conditions and environments characterized by high temperatures, high pressures, extreme pHs, and the absence of sunlight. The microorganisms of the terrestrial deep biosphere have an excellent capacity for adapting to changing geochemistry, as the alteration of the crust proceeds and the conditions of their habitats slowly change. Despite an almost complete isolation from surface conditions and the surface biosphere, the deep biosphere of the crustal rocks has endured over geologic time. This indicates that the deep biosphere is a self-sufficient system, independent of the global events that occur at the surface, such as impacts, glaciations, sea level fluctuations, and climate changes. With our sustainable terrestrial subsurface biosphere in mind, the subsurface on Mars has often been suggested as the most plausible place to search for fossil Martian life, or even present Martian life. Since the Martian surface is more or less sterile, subsurface settings are the only place on Mars where life could have been sustained over geologic time. To detect a deep biosphere in the Martian basement, drilling is a requirement. However, near future Mars sample return missions are limited by the mission’s payload, which excludes heavy drilling equipment and restrict the missions to only dig the topmost meter of the Martian soil. Therefore, the sampling and analysis of Martian impact ejecta has been suggested as a way of accessing the deeper Martian subsurface without using heavy drilling equipment. Impact cratering is a natural geological process capable of excavating and exposing large amounts of rock material from great depths up to the surface. Several studies of terrestrial impact deposits show the preservation of pre-impact biosignatures, such as fossilized organisms and chemical biological markers. Therefore, if the Martian

  14. Potential for nitrogen fixation and nitrification in the granite-hosted subsurface at Henderson Mine, CO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eSwanner

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The existence of life in the deep terrestrial subsurface is established, yet few studies have investigated the origin of nitrogen that supports deep life. Previously, 16S rRNA gene surveys catalogued a diverse microbial community in subsurface fluids draining from boreholes 3000 feet deep at Henderson Mine, CO (Sahl et al., 2008. The prior characterization of the fluid chemistry and microbial community forms the basis for the further investigation here of the source of NH4+. The reported fluids chemistry included N2, NH4+ (5-112 μM, NO2- (27-48 μM and NO3- (17-72 μM. In this study, the correlation between low NH4+ concentrations in dominantly meteoric fluids and higher NH4+ in rock-reacted fluids is used to hypothesize that NH4+ is sourced from NH4+-bearing biotite. However, biotite samples from the host rocks and ore-body minerals were analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR microscopy and none contained NH4+. However, the nitrogenase-encoding gene nifH was successfully amplified from DNA of the fluid sample with high NH4+, suggesting that subsurface microbes have the capability to fix N2. If so, unregulated nitrogen fixation may account for the relatively high NH4+ concentrations in the fluids. Additionally, the amoA and nxrB genes for archeaeal ammonium monooxygenase and nitrite oxidoreductase, respectively, were amplified from the high-NH4+ fluid DNA, while bacterial amoA genes were not. Putative nitrifying organisms are closely related to ammonium-oxidizing Crenarchaeota and nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospira detected in other subsurface sites based upon 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Thermodynamic calculations underscore the importance of NH4+ as an energy source in a subsurface nitrification pathway. These results suggest that the subsurface microbial community at Henderson is adapted to the low nutrient and energy environment by their capability of fixing nitrogen, and that fixed nitrogen may support subsurface biomass via nitrification.

  15. Subsurface data visualization in Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijnen, Robbert; Smelik, Ruben; Appleton, Rick; van Maanen, Peter-Paul

    2017-04-01

    Due to their increasing complexity and size, visualization of geological data is becoming more and more important. It enables detailed examining and reviewing of large volumes of geological data and it is often used as a communication tool for reporting and education to demonstrate the importance of the geology to policy makers. In the Netherlands two types of nation-wide geological models are available: 1) Layer-based models in which the subsurface is represented by a series of tops and bases of geological or hydrogeological units, and 2) Voxel models in which the subsurface is subdivided in a regular grid of voxels that can contain different properties per voxel. The Geological Survey of the Netherlands (GSN) provides an interactive web portal that delivers maps and vertical cross-sections of such layer-based and voxel models. From this portal you can download a 3D subsurface viewer that can visualize the voxel model data of an area of 20 × 25 km with 100 × 100 × 5 meter voxel resolution on a desktop computer. Virtual Reality (VR) technology enables us to enhance the visualization of this volumetric data in a more natural way as compared to a standard desktop, keyboard mouse setup. The use of VR for data visualization is not new but recent developments has made expensive hardware and complex setups unnecessary. The availability of consumer of-the-shelf VR hardware enabled us to create an new intuitive and low visualization tool. A VR viewer has been implemented using the HTC Vive head set and allows visualization and analysis of the GSN voxel model data with geological or hydrogeological units. The user can navigate freely around the voxel data (20 × 25 km) which is presented in a virtual room at a scale of 2 × 2 or 3 × 3 meters. To enable analysis, e.g. hydraulic conductivity, the user can select filters to remove specific hydrogeological units. The user can also use slicing to cut-off specific sections of the voxel data to get a closer look. This slicing

  16. Targeted Cancer Therapy: Correlative Light-Electron Microscopy Shows RGD-Targeted ZnO Nanoparticles Dissolve in the Intracellular Environment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells and Cause Apoptosis with Intratumor Heterogeneity (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 11/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Basmah A; Greenwood, Christina; Abuelela, Ayman F; Bharath, Anil A; Chen, Shu; Theodorou, Ioannis; Douglas, Trevor; Uchida, Maskai; Ryan, Mary; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Porter, Alexandra E

    2016-06-01

    On page 1310 J. S. Merzaban, A. E. Porter, and co-workers present fluorescently labeled RGD-targeted ZnO nanoparticles (NPs; green) for the targeted delivery of cytotoxic ZnO to integrin αvβ3 receptors expressed on triple negative breast cancer cells. Correlative light-electron microscopy shows that NPs dissolve into ionic Zn(2+) (blue) upon uptake and cause apoptosis (red) with intra-tumor heterogeneity, thereby providing a possible strategy for targeted breast cancer therapy. Cover design by Ivan Gromicho. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Deep subsurface microbiology of 64-71 million year old inactive seamounts along the Louisville Seamount Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvan, J. B.; Morono, Y.; Grim, S.; Inagaki, F.; Edwards, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    common. Samples from different lithologies in hole U1374A grouped together, indicating more similarity to each other than to samples from hole U1376A. However, samples from different lithologies in hole U1376A were not similar to other samples from the same site, indicating some differences in the microbial communities between the two seamounts. Preliminary analysis of the metagenomic data will provide further assessment of community structure and reveal likely metabolisms present in the LSC subsurface. Altogether, the biomass data, pyrotag analysis and metagenomic sequencing provide a well-balanced analysis of subsurface microbiology in an old oceanic crustal environment. Wessel, P., Sandwell, D. T. & Kim, S. S. (2010). The Global Seamount Census. Oceanography 23, 24-33.

  18. Heterogeneity and option pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benninga, Simon; Mayshar, Joram

    2000-01-01

    An economy with agents having constant yet heterogeneous degrees of relative risk aversion prices assets as though there were a single decreasing relative risk aversion pricing representative agent. The pricing kernel has fat tails and option prices do not conform to the Black-Scholes formula.

  19. Why does heterogeneity matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.B. Pierce

    2007-01-01

    This is a review of the book "Ecosystem function in heterogeneous landscapes" published in 2005. The authors are G. Lovett, C. Jones, M.G. Turner, and K.C. Weathers. It was published by Springer, New York. The book is a synthesis of the 10th Gary conference held at the Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York, in 2003.

  20. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based

  1. Receiver Heterogeneity Helps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, Erika R.; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity amongst devices and desired service are commonly seen as a source of additional challenges for setting up an efficient multi-layer multicast service. In particular, devices requiring only the base layer can become a key bottleneck to the performance for other devices. This paper...

  2. Heterogeneity of Intellectual Assets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, Johan Henrich; Lund Jensen, Rasmus; Valentin, Finn

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with methodological issues of assessing the composition and level ofheterogeneity of firms' intellectual assets. It develops an original metric - referred to asthe H-index - for measuring heterogeneity using data extracted from patent documents.The main purpose is to improve...

  3. Quantifying hidden individual heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Ulrich; Lenart, Adam; Vaupel, James W.

    Aging is assumed to be driven by the accumulation of damage or some other aging factor which shapes demographic patterns, including the classical late age mortality plateaus. However to date, heterogeneity in these damage stages is not observed. Here, we estimate underlying stage distributions...

  4. Heterogeneity of Dutch rainfall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witter, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Rainfall data for the Netherlands have been used in this study to investigate aspects of heterogeneity of rainfall, in particular local differences in rainfall levels, time trends in rainfall, and local differences in rainfall trend. The possible effect of urbanization and industrialization on the

  5. Heterogeneous computing in economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziubinski, Matt P.; Grassi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the potential of heterogeneous computing in solving dynamic equilibrium models in economics. We illustrate the power and simplicity of C++ Accelerated Massive Parallelism (C++ AMP) recently introduced by Microsoft. Starting from the same exercise as Aldrich et al. (J Econ Dyn...

  6. Scales of mantle heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. C.; Akber-Knutson, S.; Konter, J.; Kellogg, J.; Hart, S.; Kellogg, L. H.; Romanowicz, B.

    2004-12-01

    A long-standing question in mantle dynamics concerns the scale of heterogeneity in the mantle. Mantle convection tends to both destroy (through stirring) and create (through melt extraction and subduction) heterogeneity in bulk and trace element composition. Over time, these competing processes create variations in geochemical composition along mid-oceanic ridges and among oceanic islands, spanning a range of scales from extremely long wavelength (for example, the DUPAL anomaly) to very small scale (for example, variations amongst melt inclusions). While geochemical data and seismic observations can be used to constrain the length scales of mantle heterogeneity, dynamical mixing calculations can illustrate the processes and timescales involved in stirring and mixing. At the Summer 2004 CIDER workshop on Relating Geochemical and Seismological Heterogeneity in the Earth's Mantle, an interdisciplinary group evaluated scales of heterogeneity in the Earth's mantle using a combined analysis of geochemical data, seismological data and results of numerical models of mixing. We mined the PetDB database for isotopic data from glass and whole rock analyses for the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and the East Pacific Rise (EPR), projecting them along the ridge length. We examined Sr isotope variability along the East Pacific rise by looking at the difference in Sr ratio between adjacent samples as a function of distance between the samples. The East Pacific Rise exhibits an overall bowl shape of normal MORB characteristics, with higher values in the higher latitudes (there is, however, an unfortunate gap in sampling, roughly 2000 km long). These background characteristics are punctuated with spikes in values at various locations, some, but not all of which are associated with off-axis volcanism. A Lomb-Scargle periodogram for unevenly spaced data was utilized to construct a power spectrum of the scale lengths of heterogeneity along both ridges. Using the same isotopic systems (Sr, Nd

  7. Single cell genomics indicates horizontal gene transfer and viral infections in a deep subsurface Firmicutes population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eLabonté

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A major fraction of Earth's prokaryotic biomass dwells in the deep subsurface, where cellular abundances per volume of sample are lower, metabolism is slower, and generation times are longer than those in surface terrestrial and marine environments. How these conditions impact biotic interactions and evolutionary processes is largely unknown. Here we employed single cell genomics to analyze cell-to-cell genome content variability and signatures of horizontal gene transfer (HGT and viral infections in five cells of Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, which were collected from a three km-deep fracture water in the 2.9 Ga-old Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa. Between 0 and 32 % of genes recovered from single cells were not present in the original, metagenomic assembly of Desulforudis, which was obtained from a neighboring subsurface fracture. We found a transposable prophage, a retron, multiple clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs and restriction-modification systems, and an unusually high frequency of transposases in the analyzed single cell genomes. This indicates that recombination, HGT and viral infections are prevalent evolutionary events in the studied population of microorganisms inhabiting a highly stable deep subsurface environment.

  8. Microbial Diversity in the Columbia River Basalt Group and the Context for Life in Subsurface Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavalleur, H. J.; Smith, A.; Fisk, M. R.; Colwell, F. S.

    2012-12-01

    Large igneous provinces constitute a sizable volume of porous and fractured materials in the Earth's crust and many of these environments exist within the boundaries of survival for subsurface life. The results of microbiological studies of basalts and other igneous materials in subsurface settings hint at the types of microbes that dwell in these environments. We investigated the microbes in aquifers in the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and also considered the microbial communities in subsurface basalts more broadly to determine if there are recurrent themes in the types of microbes and the nature of diversity present in these geological systems. Bacteria and Archaea collected from five intervals in the CRBG were examined using high-throughput DNA sequencing directed at the 16S rRNA genes. The highest bacterial biomass and the highest bacterial diversity were observed in the deepest samples (>1018 meters below land surface) whereas the highest archaeal diversity was detected in the shallowest samples (Crenarchaeota. Based on 16S rRNA sequence similarities to known microbes, both basaltic regions have taxa with representative physiologies likely to include hydrogen oxidation, iron and sulfur metabolism, acetogenesis, and hydrocarbon metabolism. Research on the microbiology of basalt rich provinces on the planet has informed our understanding of biogeochemical cycling where igneous rocks dominate. The knowledge gained in these investigations also promotes our ability to verify the remediation of contaminants and the sequestration of carbon in basalts.

  9. Heterogeneous Metal Catalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Eaqub Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation reactions may be considered as the heart of chemical synthesis. However, the indiscriminate uses of harsh and corrosive chemicals in this endeavor are threating to the ecosystems, public health, and terrestrial, aquatic, and aerial flora and fauna. Heterogeneous catalysts with various supports are brought to the spotlight because of their excellent capabilities to accelerate the rate of chemical reactions with low cost. They also minimize the use of chemicals in industries and thus are friendly and green to the environment. However, heterogeneous oxidation catalysis are not comprehensively presented in literature. In this short review, we clearly depicted the current state of catalytic oxidation reactions in chemical industries with specific emphasis on heterogeneous catalysts. We outlined here both the synthesis and applications of important oxidation catalysts. We believe it would serve as a reference guide for the selection of oxidation catalysts for both industries and academics.

  10. Voice over IP in Wireless Heterogeneous Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fathi, Hanane; Chakraborty, Shyam; Prasad, Ramjee

    with the deployment of wireless heterogeneous systems, both speech and data traffic are carrried over wireless links by the same IP-based packet-switched infrastructure. However, this combination faces some challenges due to the inherent properties of the wireless network. The requirements for good quality VoIP...... communications are difficult to achieve in a time-varying environment due to channel errors and traffic congestion and across different systems. The provision of VoIP in wireless heterogeneous networks requires a set of time-efficient control mechanisms to support a VoIP session with acceptable quality....... The focus of Voice over IP in Wierless Heterogeneous Networks is on mechanisms that affect the VoIP user satisfaction  while not explicitly involved in the media session. This relates to the extra delays introduced by the security and the signaling protocols used to set up an authorized VoIP session...

  11. Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard C. Logan

    2001-07-30

    This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

  12. Acclimation of subsurface microbial communities to mercury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lipthay, Julia R.; Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Oregaard, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    We studied the acclimation to mercury of bacterial communities of different depths from contaminated and noncontaminated floodplain soils. The level of mercury tolerance of the bacterial communities from the contaminated site was higher than those of the reference site. Furthermore, the level...... of mercury tolerance and functional versatility of bacterial communities in contaminated soils initially were higher for surface soil, compared with the deeper soils. However, following new mercury exposure, no differences between bacterial communities were observed, which indicates a high adaptive potential...... of the subsurface communities, possibly due to differences in the availability of mercury. IncP-1 trfA genes were detected in extracted community DNA from all soil depths of the contaminated site, and this finding was correlated to the isolation of four different mercury-resistance plasmids, all belonging...

  13. Air-water flow in subsurface systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, A.; Mishra, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater traces its roots to tackle challenges of safe and reliable drinking water and food production. When the groundwater level rises, air pressure in the unsaturated Vadose zone increases, forcing air to escape from the ground surface. Abnormally high and low subsurface air pressure can be generated when the groundwater system, rainfall, and sea level fluctuation are favorably combined [Jiao and Li, 2004]. Through this process, contamination in the form of volatile gases may diffuse from the ground surface into residential areas, or possibly move into groundwater from industrial waste sites. It is therefore crucial to understand the combined effects of air-water flow in groundwater system. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally the effects of air and water flow in groundwater system.

  14. Gravimetric examination of Hagia Sophia's subsurface structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Jürgen; Gerstenecker, Carl; Gürkan, Onur

    1996-10-01

    The subsurface structure of Hagia Sophia, one of the oldest sacred monuments in the world built between 532 537 under the reign of Justinian in today's Istanbul, has been investigated by using two relative LaCoste-Romberg gravimeters in order to detect hidden cavities which have also served as earthquake dampers in similar constructions. On the building's ground floor a grid of 100 points with a grid size of about 4.m was measured. The mean gravimetric point error was ± 3.10-8 ms-2. The result of the examination is that cavities were not detected in the inner central part of Hagia Sophia with a larger diameter than 8.m down to a depth of about 20.m, and Hagia Sophia's foundation was found to be a slope of natural rock with a downward inclination to the East that has a small crest symmetrical to the building's East-West axis.

  15. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy....45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling radioactive tracer material to use protective gloves and, if required by the license, other protective clothing and...

  16. Subsurface melting of nylon by friction-induced vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroegop, P.H.; Bosma, R.

    1985-01-01

    Dry sliding of nylon on steel may lead to subsurface recrystallization of the polymer. This phenomenon is described and explained by subsurface melting due to internal heating as a result of the dissipation of frictioninduced vibrations at frequencies above 10 kHz. A vibration model relating the

  17. Modelling Interconnectedness of Subsurface Flow Processes from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study determined subsurface flow processes of 92.3 ha catchment area in order to examine functional relationship among the surface and subsurface flow variables from the water balance components data. Days without rainfall had zero infiltration while peak values of infiltrated water corresponded with peak rainfall.

  18. Geochemical characterization of subsurface sediments in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Traditionally, the Netherlands' subsurface is mainly used to obtain good quality drinking and industrial waters from the different aquifers. Due to the lack of space on the surface, increasing environmental problems and demand for energy, the subsurface will be used increasingly for other

  19. 75 FR 1276 - Requirements for Subsurface Safety Valve Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... Minerals Management Service 30 CFR Part 250 RIN 1010-AD45 Requirements for Subsurface Safety Valve Equipment AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The MMS is... Subsurface Safety Valve Equipment (API Spec 14A) into its regulations. The MMS is incorporating the Eleventh...

  20. Agriculture and wildlife: ecological implications of subsurface irrigation drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Dennis Lemly

    1994-01-01

    Subsurface agricultural irrigation drainage is a wastewater with the potential to severely impact wetlands and wildlife populations. Widespread poisoning of migratory birds by drainwater contaminants has occurred in the western United States and waterfowl populations are threatened in the Pacific and Central flyways. Irrigated agriculture could produce subsurface...

  1. Imaging the Subsurface with Upgoing Muons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.; Schwellenbach, D.; Dreesen, W.; Green, A.

    2014-12-01

    We assess the feasibility of imaging the subsurface using upgoing muons. Traditional muon imaging focuses on more-prevalent downgoing muons. Muons are subatomic particles capable of penetrating the earth's crust several kilometers. Downgoing muons have been used to image the Pyramid of Khafre of Giza, various volcanoes, and smaller targets like cargo. Unfortunately, utilizing downgoing muons requires below-target detectors. For aboveground objects like a volcano, the detector is placed at the volcano's base and the top portion of the volcano is imaged. For underground targets like tunnels, the detector would have to be placed below the tunnel in a deeper tunnel or adjacent borehole, which can be costly and impractical for some locations. Additionally, detecting and characterizing subsurface features like voids from tunnels can be difficult. Typical characterization methods like sonar, seismic, and ground penetrating radar have shown mixed success. Voids have a marked density contrast with surrounding materials, so using methods sensitive to density variations would be ideal. High-energy cosmic ray muons are more sensitive to density variation than other phenomena, including gravity. Their absorption rate depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, tomography using downgoing muons can resolve features to the sub-meter scale. We present results of exploratory work, which demonstrates that upgoing muon fluxes appear sufficient to achieve target detection within a few months. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Correlative Light-Electron Microscopy Shows RGD-Targeted ZnO Nanoparticles Dissolve in the Intracellular Environment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells and Cause Apoptosis with Intratumor Heterogeneity

    KAUST Repository

    Othman, Basmah A.

    2016-04-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are reported to show a high degree of cancer cell selectivity with potential use in cancer imaging and therapy. Questions remain about the mode by which the ZnO NPs cause cell death, whether they exert an intra- or extracellular effect, and the resistance among different cancer cell types to ZnO NP exposure. The present study quantifies the variability between the cellular toxicity, dynamics of cellular uptake, and dissolution of bare and RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp)-targeted ZnO NPs by MDA-MB-231 cells. Compared to bare ZnO NPs, RGD-targeting of the ZnO NPs to integrin αvβ3 receptors expressed on MDA-MB-231 cells appears to increase the toxicity of the ZnO NPs to breast cancer cells at lower doses. Confocal microscopy of live MDA-MB-231 cells confirms uptake of both classes of ZnO NPs with a commensurate rise in intracellular Zn2+ concentration prior to cell death. The response of the cells within the population to intracellular Zn2+ is highly heterogeneous. In addition, the results emphasize the utility of dynamic and quantitative imaging in understanding cell uptake and processing of targeted therapeutic ZnO NPs at the cellular level by heterogeneous cancer cell populations, which can be crucial for the development of optimized treatment strategies.

  3. Astrobiological Field Campaign to a Volcanosedimentary Mars Analogue Methane Producing Subsurface Protected Ecosystem: Imuruk Lake (Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gómez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Viking missions reported adverse conditions for life in Mars surface. High hydrogen signal obtained by Mars orbiters has increased the interest in subsurface prospection as putative protected Mars environment with life potential. Permafrost has attracted considerable interest from an astrobiological point of view due to the recently reported results from the Mars exploration rovers. Considerable studies have been developed on extreme ecosystems and permafrost in particular, to evaluate the possibility of life on Mars and to test specific automated life detection instruments for space missions. The biodiversity of permafrost located on the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve has been studied as an example of subsurface protected niche of astrobiological interest. Different conventional (enrichment and isolation and molecular ecology techniques (cloning, fluorescence “in situ” probe hybridization, FISH have been used for isolation and bacterial identification.

  4. Field Simulation of a Drilling Mission to Mars to Search for Subsurface Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, C. R.; Lemke, L. G.; Cannon, H.; Glass, B.; Dunagan, S.; Zavaleta, J.; Miller, D.; Gomez-Elvira, J.

    2005-01-01

    The discovery of near surface ground ice by the Mars Odyssey mission and the abundant evidence for recent Gulley features observed by the Mars Global Surveyor mission support longstanding theoretical arguments for subsurface liquid water on Mars. Thus, implementing the Mars program goal to search for life points to drilling on Mars to reach liquid water, collecting samples and analyzing them with instrumentation to detect in situ organisms and biomarker compounds. Searching for life in the subsurface of Mars will require drilling, sample extraction and handling, and new technologies to find and identify biomarker compounds and search for living organisms. In spite of its obvious advantages, robotic drilling for Mars exploration is in its technological infancy and has yet to be demonstrated in even a terrestrial field environment.

  5. Subsurface water and clay mineral formation during the early history of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, Bethany L; Mustard, John F; Murchie, Scott L; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Meunier, Alain; Fraeman, Abigail A; Langevin, Yves

    2011-11-02

    Clay minerals, recently discovered to be widespread in Mars's Noachian terrains, indicate long-duration interaction between water and rock over 3.7 billion years ago. Analysis of how they formed should indicate what environmental conditions prevailed on early Mars. If clays formed near the surface by weathering, as is common on Earth, their presence would indicate past surface conditions warmer and wetter than at present. However, available data instead indicate substantial Martian clay formation by hydrothermal groundwater circulation and a Noachian rock record dominated by evidence of subsurface waters. Cold, arid conditions with only transient surface water may have characterized Mars's surface for over 4 billion years, since the early-Noachian period, and the longest-duration aqueous, potentially habitable environments may have been in the subsurface.

  6. Multi-Regional Reactive Transport Due to Strong Anisotropy in Unsaturated Soils with Evolving Scales of Heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xinghua Mo

    2006-10-13

    Anisotropic and heterogeneous flow in unsaturated porous media is dependent on saturation conditions, and currently there exist limited options that adequately model this phenomenon. The phenomenon of lateral spreading commonly attributed to anisotropy can move contaminants beyond compliance boundaries at unexpected velocitites essentially bypassing large regions of the subsurface.

  7. Evaluation of the hydrological flow paths in a gravel bed filter modeling a horizontal subsurface flow wetland by using a multi-tracer experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkigt, Jan; Stumpp, Christine; Małoszewski, Piotr; Nijenhuis, Ivonne

    2018-04-15

    In recent years, constructed wetland systems have become into focus as means of cost-efficient organic contaminant management. Wetland systems provide a highly reactive environment in which several removal pathways of organic chemicals may be present at the same time; however, specific elimination processes and hydraulic conditions are usually separately investigated and thus not fully understood. The flow system in a three dimensional pilot-scale horizontal subsurface constructed wetland was investigated applying a multi-tracer test combined with a mathematical model to evaluate the flow and transport processes. The results indicate the existence of a multiple flow system with two distinct flow paths through the gravel bed and a preferential flow at the bottom transporting 68% of tracer mass resulting from the inflow design of the model wetland system. There the removal of main contaminant chlorobenzene was up to 52% based on different calculation approaches. Determined retention times in the range of 22d to 32.5d the wetland has a heterogeneous flow pattern. Differences between simulated and measured tracer concentrations in the upper sediment indicate diffusion dominated processes due to stagnant water zones. The tracer study combining experimental evaluation with mathematical modeling demonstrated the complexity of flow and transport processes in the constructed wetlands which need to be taken into account during interpretation of the determining attenuation processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

    2011-06-15

    The objectives of this project were to: (1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), (2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and (3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. A total of 20 publications (16 published or 'in press' and 4 in review), 10 invited talks, and 43 contributed seminars/ meeting presentations were completed during the past four years of the project. PI Kostka served on one proposal review panel each year for the U.S. DOE Office of Science during the four year project period. The PI leveraged funds from the state of Florida to purchase new instrumentation that aided the project. Support was also leveraged by the PI from the Joint Genome Institute in the form of two successful proposals for genome sequencing. Draft genomes are now available for two novel species isolated during our studies and 5 more genomes are in the pipeline. We effectively addressed each of the three project objectives and research highlights are provided. Task I - Isolation and characterization of novel anaerobes: (1) A wide range of pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and denitrifying bacteria (32 strains) were isolated from subsurface sediments of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination of uranium and nitrate. These isolates which

  9. A Cloud Based Framework For Monitoring And Predicting Subsurface System Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, R. J.; Rodzianko, A.; Johnson, D. V.; Soltanian, M. R.; Dwivedi, D.; Dafflon, B.; Tran, A. P.; Versteeg, O. J.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface system behavior is driven and controlled by the interplay of physical, chemical, and biological processes which occur at multiple temporal and spatial scales. Capabilities to monitor, understand and predict this behavior in an effective and timely manner are needed for both scientific purposes and for effective subsurface system management. Such capabilities require three elements: Models, Data and an enabling cyberinfrastructure, which allow users to use these models and data in an effective manner. Under a DOE Office of Science funded STTR award Subsurface Insights and LBNL have designed and implemented a cloud based predictive assimilation framework (PAF) which automatically ingests, controls quality and stores heterogeneous physical and chemical subsurface data and processes these data using different inversion and modeling codes to provide information on the current state and evolution of subsurface systems. PAF is implemented as a modular cloud based software application with five components: (1) data acquisition, (2) data management, (3) data assimilation and processing, (4) visualization and result delivery and (5) orchestration. Serverside PAF uses ZF2 (a PHP web application framework) and Python and both open source (ODM2) and in house developed data models. Clientside PAF uses CSS and JS to allow for interactive data visualization and analysis. Client side modularity (which allows for a responsive interface) of the system is achieved by implementing each core capability of PAF (such as data visualization, user configuration and control, electrical geophysical monitoring and email/SMS alerts on data streams) as a SPA (Single Page Application). One of the recent enhancements is the full integration of a number of flow and mass transport and parameter estimation codes (e.g., MODFLOW, MT3DMS, PHT3D, TOUGH, PFLOTRAN) in this framework. This integration allows for autonomous and user controlled modeling of hydrological and geochemical processes. In

  10. Subsurface planetary data streamed on the web by 2D and 3D visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seu, R.; Abbattista, C.; Tragni, M.; Catallo, C.

    2013-09-01

    Subsurface data analysis and visualization represents one of the main aspects in Planetary Observation (i.e. search for water or geological characterization). The data are collected by subsurface sounding radars as instruments on-board of planetary space missions. The products and the demonstrators shown in this paper are based on the Sharad Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and Marsis Mars Express mission data, and are used in the ASI PROC (Planetary Radar Operation Center) facility in Matera. Generally, subsurface data are represented as 2D radargrams in the perspective of space track and z axes (perpendicular to the subsurface) but as standalone pictures and without direct correlation to other data acquisition or knowledge on the planet. In many case there are plenty of data from other sensors of the same mission, or other ones, with high continuity in time and in space and especially around the scientific sites of interest (i.e. candidate landing areas or particular scientific interesting sites). The 2D perspective is good to analyze single acquisitions and to perform detailed analysis on the returned echoes but a better way is to approach the analysis of a 3D visualization model generated from the entire stack of data. This approach allows to navigate the subsurface in all directions and analyze different sections and slices or moreover navigate the iso-surfaces with respect to a value (or interval). The last one allows to isolate one or more iso-surfaces and remove, in the visualization mode, other data not interesting for the analysis; finally it helps to individuate the underground 3D bodies. Another aspect is the need to link the onground data, as imaging, to the underground one by geographical and context field of view. The 3D model allows the synoptic analysis of all available data. That visualization models need a preprocessing of the data to re-project all heterogeneous data in a common coordinate system; finally it is necessary to proceed with the

  11. Information and Heterogeneous Beliefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Qin, Zhenjiang

    2014-01-01

    In an incomplete market with heterogeneous prior beliefs, we show public information can have a substantial impact on the ex ante cost of capital, trading volume, and investor welfare. The Pareto effcient public information system is the system enjoying the maximum ex ante cost of capital...... ante risk premium is unaffected by the informativeness of the public information system. Similar results are obtained in a production economy, but the impact on the ex ante cost of capital is dampened compared to the exchange economy due to welfare improving reductions in real investments to smooth...... and the maximum expected abnormal trading volume. Imperfect public information increases the gains-to-trade based on heterogeneously updated posterior beliefs. In an exchange economy, this leads to higher growth in the investors' certainty equivalents and, thus, a higher equilibrium interest rate, whereas the ex...

  12. Micromechanics of heterogeneous materials

    CERN Document Server

    Buryachenko, Valeriy

    2007-01-01

    Here is an accurate and timely account of micromechanics, which spans materials science, mechanical engineering, applied mathematics, technical physics, geophysics, and biology. The book features rigorous and unified theoretical methods of applied mathematics and statistical physics in the material science of microheterogeneous media. Uniquely, it offers a useful demonstration of the systematic and fundamental research of the microstructure of the wide class of heterogeneous materials of natural and synthetic nature.

  13. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-containing support, (c) activating the chromium-based silica-containing support, (d) chemically reducing the activated chromium-based silica-containing support to produce a precursor catalyst, (e) r...

  14. [Optimization of aerobic/anaerobic subsurface flow constructed wetlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-Min; Shan, Shi; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yang; Wang, Zheng-Yu

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies showed that setting aerobic and anaerobic paragraph segments in the subsurface constructed wetlands (SFCWs) can improve the COD, NH4(+)-N, and TN removal rate, whereas the oxygen enrichment environment which produced by the artificial aeration could restrain the NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N removal process, and to a certain extent, inhibit the denitrification in SFCWs Therefore, in this research the structure and technology of SFCW with aerobic and anaerobic paragraph segments were optimized, by using the multi-point water inflow and setting the corresponding section for the extra pollutant removal. Results showed that with the hydraulic load of 0.06 m3 x (m2 x d)(-1), the COD, NH4(+)-N and TN removal efficiencies in the optimized SFCW achieved 91.6%, 100% and 87.7% respectively. COD/N increased to 10 speedily after the inflow supplement. The multi-point water inflow could add carbon sources, and simultaneously maximum utilization of wetland to remove pollutants. The optimized SFCW could achieve the purposes of purification process optimization, and provide theoretical basis and application foundation for improving the total nitrogen removal efficiency.

  15. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L. [BDM Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  16. Dynamic heterogeneity in life histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Steiner, Uli; Orzack, Steven Hecht

    2009-01-01

    generate dynamic heterogeneity: life-history differences produced by stochastic stratum dynamics. We characterize dynamic heterogeneity in a range of species across taxa by properties of the Markov chain: the entropy, which describes the extent of heterogeneity, and the subdominant eigenvalue, which...... distributions of lifetime reproductive success. Dynamic heterogeneity contrasts with fixed heterogeneity: unobserved differences that generate variation between life histories. We show by an example that observed distributions of lifetime reproductive success are often consistent with the claim that little...... or no fixed heterogeneity influences this trait. We propose that dynamic heterogeneity provides a 'neutral' model for assessing the possible role of unobserved 'quality' differences between individuals. We discuss fitness for dynamic life histories, and the implications of dynamic heterogeneity...

  17. Cooperative and heterogeneous indoor localization experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Denis, Benoit; Raulefs, Ronald; Fleury, Bernard; Uguen, Bernard; Amiot, Nicolas; Celis, L.; Dominguez,, J; Koldsgaard,, M.B; Laaraiedh, Mohamed; Noureddine,, H; Staudinger,, E; Steinboeck, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    International audience; In this paper we present the results of real-life localization experiments performed in an unprecedented cooperative and heterogeneous wireless context. These measurements are based on ZigBee and orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) devices, respectively endowed with received signal strength indicator (RSSI) and round trip delay (RTD) estimation capabilities. More particularly we emulate a multi-standard terminal, moving in a typical indoor environment, wh...

  18. Renormalization group methods in subsurface hydrology: overview and applications in hydraulic conductivity upscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T.

    2003-12-01

    The renormalization group (RG) approach is a powerful theoretical framework, more suitable for upscaling strong heterogeneity than low-order perturbation expansions. Applications of RG methods in subsurface hydrology include the calculation of (1) macroscopic transport parameters such as effective and equivalent hydraulic conductivity and dispersion coefficients, and (2) anomalous exponents characterizing the dispersion of contaminants due to long-range conductivity correlations or broad (heavy-tailed) distributions of the groundwater velocity. First, we review the main ideas of RG methods and their hydrological applications. Then, we focus on the hydraulic conductivity in saturated porous media with isotropic lognormal heterogeneity, and we present an RG calculation based on the replica method. The RG analysis gives rigorous support to the exponential conjecture for the effective hydraulic conductivity [Water Resour. Res. 19 (1) (1983) 161]. Using numerical simulations in two dimensions with a bimodal conductivity distribution, we demonstrate that the exponential expression is not suitable for all types of heterogeneity. We also introduce an RG coarse-grained conductivity and investigate its applications in estimating the conductivity of blocks or flow domains with finite size. Finally, we define the fractional effective dimension, and we show that it justifies fractal exponents in the range 1-2/ d⩽ α<1 (where d is the actual medium dimension) in the geostatistical power average.

  19. Genetic heterogeneity of retinitis pigmentosa

    OpenAIRE

    Hartono, Hartono

    2015-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity is a phenomenon in which a genetic disease can be transmitted by several modes of inheritance. The understanding of genetic heterogeneity is important in giving genetic counselling.The presence of genetic heterogeneity can be explained by the existence of:1.different mutant alleles at a single locus, and2.mutant alleles at different loci affecting the same enzyme or protein, or affecting different enzymes or proteins.To have an overall understanding of genetic heterogene...

  20. Tumor Heterogeneity in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turashvili, Gulisa; Brogi, Edi

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and differs greatly among different patients (intertumor heterogeneity) and even within each individual tumor (intratumor heterogeneity). Clinical and morphologic intertumor heterogeneity is reflected by staging systems and histopathologic classification of breast cancer. Heterogeneity in the expression of established prognostic and predictive biomarkers, hormone receptors, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 oncoprotein is the basis for targeted treatment. Molecular classifications are indicators of genetic tumor heterogeneity, which is probed with multigene assays and can lead to improved stratification into low- and high-risk groups for personalized therapy. Intratumor heterogeneity occurs at the morphologic, genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic levels, creating diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumor heterogeneity that are relevant to the development of treatment resistance is a major area of research. Despite the improved knowledge of the complex genetic and phenotypic features underpinning tumor heterogeneity, there has been only limited advancement in diagnostic, prognostic, or predictive strategies for breast cancer. The current guidelines for reporting of biomarkers aim to maximize patient eligibility for targeted therapy, but do not take into account intratumor heterogeneity. The molecular classification of breast cancer is not implemented in routine clinical practice. Additional studies and in-depth analysis are required to understand the clinical significance of rapidly accumulating data. This review highlights inter- and intratumor heterogeneity of breast carcinoma with special emphasis on pathologic findings, and provides insights into the clinical significance of molecular and cellular mechanisms of heterogeneity. PMID:29276709

  1. Enhanced Amendment Delivery to Overcome Subsurface Physical Remediation Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L.; Truex, M. J.; Oostrom, M.; Szecsody, J. E.; Vermeul, V.; Li, X.

    2013-12-01

    Waste discharges can result in contamination of the unsaturated zone (vadose zone) and the water saturated zone (aquifer). To restore the environment, many in situ remediation technologies rely on delivery of remedial reagents (amendments) to the subsurface that treat or help remove contamination. However, through numerous remediation applications, the remediation industry has recognized that a major issue with in situ remediation is the difficulty in achieving an even spatial distribution of remedial amendments to the contamination zones in an aquifer or in the vadose zone. Poor amendment delivery leads to ineffective environmental restoration because some of the contaminants are not contacted by the amendment and, therefore, not treated or removed. This challenge often leads to a failure in environment restoration. Researches are being conducted to develop enhanced remediation amendment delivery approaches using shear thinning fluids (STFs) for aquifer and aqueous foams for vadose zone. STFs have properties that promote more uniform delivery of injected solutions so that amendments are able to reach low-permeability zones in an aquifer. These low-permeability zones are most difficult to reach with conventional delivery approaches, yet often contain the high contamination concentrations. Foam delivery is targeted for distribution of aqueous, gaseous amendments, and remedial nano-particles to the vadose zone. Foam transport in the vadose zone provides significant advantages for lateral distribution of amendments compared to aqueous-phase transport, improves uniformity of distribution compared to both aqueous- and gas-phase injection, and enables delivery of a broader range of remediation amendments than can be delivered in the gas phase.

  2. The DOE Subsurface Microbial Culture Collection (SMCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balkwill, David L.

    2006-05-23

    The primary activities associated with maintenance of the Subsurface Microbial Culture Collection (SMCC) were designed to ensure that the collection served as a valuable resource to DOE-funded and other scientists, especially DOE-funded scientists associated with the NABIR Program. These activities were carried out throughout the period covered by this report and in-cluded: (1) assistance in the selection of cultures for research, (2) distribution of cultures and/or data on request, (3) incorporation of newly isolated microbial strains, (4) preservation of newly isolated strains, (5) partial characterization of newly isolated strains, (6) development and main-tenance of representative subsets of cultures, (6) screening of SMCC strains for specific charac-teristics, (7) phylogenetic characterization of SMCC strains, (8) development and maintenance of a SMCC website, (9) maintenance of the SMCC databases, (10) archiving of SMCC records, and (11) quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) activities. We describe in the Final Technical Report our accomplishments related to these activities during the period covered by this report.

  3. [Clogging characteristics of the subsurface flow wetland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lu; Wang, Shi-He; Huang, Juan; Liu, Yang; Wang, Feng

    2008-03-01

    In order to resolve clogging problem of constructed wetlands caused by improper design or imperfect management and reveal the clogging mechanism, clogging characteristics of the horizontal flow reed wetland and vertical flow reed wetland were studied. Operation stabilities of two types of wetlands were compared. It shows that organic matter accumulates in medium and the concentration is 1.5% - 5%. It mostly occurs in the fore section of top layer in wetland and the concentration is 4% - 5%. The negative correlation between the organic matter content and the subsurface depth was demonstrated. The clogging mechanisms in the horizontal flow wetland and the vertical flow wetland are different. The hydraulic retention time of the horizontal flow wetland is 3.5154 d which is shortened by 21.88%. While the hydraulic retention time of the vertical flow wetland is 5.4648 d and extended by 21.44%. The results indicate that clogging decreases the treatment capacity and running stability conspicuously. The clogging phenomenon of the vertical flow wetland is worse comparatively.

  4. Migration and Entrapment of DNAPLs in Heterogeneous Systems: Impact of Waste and Porous Medium Composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linda M. Abriola; Avery H. Demond

    2005-01-10

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) pose a significant threat to soil and groundwater at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Evidence suggests that subsurface wettability variations are present at many of these sites as a result of spatical and temporal variations in aqueous phase chemistry, contaminant aging, mineralogy and organic matter. The presence of such heterogeneity may significantly influence DNAPL migration and entrapment in the saturated zone.

  5. Spatial heterogeneity in the structure of the planktonic food web in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Kathrine; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Bo Pedersen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    The distributions of bacteria, phytoplankton, protozooplankton and copepod biomass and activity were examined in relation to hydrographic characteristics of the water column on 2 cruises in the North Sea (August 1991 and May 1992). On both cruises. the greatest phytoplankton biomass concentrations...... into larger zooplankters. We argue that heterogeneity in the nutrient status of phytoplankton in the subsurface peak can be important in controlling the type ('classical' or 'regenerated') of planktonic food web found in the water column as a whole...

  6. Theory and numerical application of subsurface flow and transport for transient freezing conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Center

    1995-04-01

    Protective barriers are being investigated for the containment of radioactive waste within subsurface environments. Predicting the effectiveness of cryogenic barriers and near-surface barriers in temperate or arctic climates requires capabilities for numerically modeling subsurface flow and transport for freezing soil conditions. A predictive numerical model is developed herein to simulate the flow and transport of radioactive solutes for three-phase (water-ice-air) systems under freezing conditions. This physically based model simulates the simultaneous flow of water, air, heat, and radioactive solutes through variably saturated and variably frozen geologic media. Expressions for ice (frozen water) and liquid water saturations as functions of temperature, interfacial pressure differences, and osmotic potential are developed from nonhysteretic versions of the Brooks and Corey and van Genuchten functions for soil moisture retention. Aqueous relative permeability functions for variably saturated and variably frozen geologic media are developed from the Mualem and Burdine theories for predicting relative permeability of unsaturated soil. Soil deformations, caused by freezing and melting transitions, are neglected. Algorithms developed for predicting ice and liquid water saturations and aqueous-phase permeabilities were incorporated into the finite-difference based numerical simulator STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases). Application of the theory is demonstrated by the solution of heat and mass transport in a horizontal cylinder of partially saturated porous media with differentially cooled ends, with the colder end held below the liquid water freezing point. This problem represents an essential capability for modeling cryogenic barriers in variably saturated geologic media.

  7. Microbial Signatures of Two Marine Subsurface Sites in the Same Geographic Region (Eastern Equatorial Pacific)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, A. J.; Biddle, J.; House, C. H.

    2012-12-01

    Drilling expeditions from which marine subsurface sediment samples are obtained are extremely expensive, and thus, it is not possible to sample every location of the ocean floor extensively. As a result, estimations of the contribution of subsurface microbial communities in geochemical cycles and nutrient reservoirs are based on generalizations, which assume that subsurface microbial communities in close proximity are similar as long as there are not major chemical or physical differences in the environments. However, to date, there has been no study comparing the microbial communities in two or more highly similar and geographically close drill cores. In this study, we were fortunate to have obtained samples from two locations within the Eastern Equatorial Pacific, at sites which were both geographically close, and geochemically and lithologically very similar. Using samples from three depths at both of these sites, we are performing a molecular comparison of the microbial communities using next generation metagenomic sequencing. This comparison encompasses both phylogenetic and functional properties. In addition to the comparison between sites, we are also employing a methodology duplicate with one sample, which has rarely been done with metagenomic studies. Finally, we are also exploring the effects of whole genome amplification (WGA) on sequence analysis of extracted DNA samples, via the use of multiple WGA methods on aliquots of the same sample, with an unamplified control as a reference. Preliminary data from the first sample sequenced shows the over-amplification of archaea—particularly Thaumarchaeota—after amplification using multiple displacement amplification, as compared with the unamplified control.

  8. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Lead Laboratory Providing Technical Assistance to the DOE Weapons Complex in Subsurface Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, J. A. Jr.; Corey, J. C.

    2002-02-27

    The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), a DOE-HQ EM-50 organization, is hosted and managed at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. SCFA is an integrated program chartered to find technology and scientific solutions to address DOE subsurface environmental restoration problems throughout the DOE Weapons Complex. Since its inception in 1989, the SCFA program has resulted in a total of 269 deployments of 83 innovative technologies. Until recently, the primary thrust of the program has been to develop, demonstrate, and deploy those remediation technology alternatives that are solutions to technology needs identified by the DOE Sites. Over the last several years, the DOE Sites began to express a need not only for innovative technologies, but also for technical assistance. In response to this need, DOE-HQ EM-50, in collaboration with and in support of a Strategic Lab Council recommendation directed each of its Focus Areas to implement a Lead Laboratory Concept to enhance their technical capabilities. Because each Focus Area is unique as defined by the contrast in either the type of contaminants involved or the environments in which they are found, the Focus Areas were given latitude in how they set up and implemented the Lead Lab Concept. The configuration of choice for the SCFA was a Lead-Partner Lab arrangement. Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) teamed with the SCFA as the Focus Area's Lead Laboratory. SRTC then partnered with the DOE National Laboratories to create a virtual consulting function within DOE. The National Laboratories were established to help solve the Nation's most difficult problems, drawing from a resource pool of the most talented and gifted scientists and engineers. Following that logic, SRTC, through the Lead-Partner Lab arrangement, has that same resource base to draw from to provide assistance to any SCFA DOE customer throughout the Complex. This paper briefly describes how this particular arrangement is

  9. Identification and Simulation of Subsurface Soil patterns using hidden Markov random fields and remote sensing and geophysical EMI data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Wellmann, Florian; Verweij, Elizabeth; von Hebel, Christian; van der Kruk, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Lateral and vertical spatial heterogeneity of subsurface properties such as soil texture and structure influences the available water and resource supply for crop growth. High-resolution mapping of subsurface structures using non-invasive geo-referenced geophysical measurements, like electromagnetic induction (EMI), enables a characterization of 3D soil structures, which have shown correlations to remote sensing information of the crop states. The benefit of EMI is that it can return 3D subsurface information, however the spatial dimensions are limited due to the labor intensive measurement procedure. Although active and passive sensors mounted on air- or space-borne platforms return 2D images, they have much larger spatial dimensions. Combining both approaches provides us with a potential pathway to extend the detailed 3D geophysical information to a larger area by using remote sensing information. In this study, we aim at extracting and providing insights into the spatial and statistical correlation of the geophysical and remote sensing observations of the soil/vegetation continuum system. To this end, two key points need to be addressed: 1) how to detect and recognize the geometric patterns (i.e., spatial heterogeneity) from multiple data sets, and 2) how to quantitatively describe the statistical correlation between remote sensing information and geophysical measurements. In the current study, the spatial domain is restricted to shallow depths up to 3 meters, and the geostatistical database contains normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) derived from RapidEye satellite images and apparent electrical conductivities (ECa) measured from multi-receiver EMI sensors for nine depths of exploration ranging from 0-2.7 m. The integrated data sets are mapped into both the physical space (i.e. the spatial domain) and feature space (i.e. a two-dimensional space framed by the NDVI and the ECa data). Hidden Markov Random Fields (HMRF) are employed to model the

  10. Flow heterogeneity in reservoir rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosman, A.; Simon, R.

    1975-01-01

    A study by Chevron Oil Field Research Co. shows that microscopic flow heterogeneity values are essential for interpreting laboratory displacement data and properly evaluating field displacement projects. Chevron discusses microscopic flow heterogeneity in reservoir rocks: a measuring method, results of some measurements, and several applications to reservoir engineering problems. Heterogeneity is expressed in terms of both breakthrough recovery and the Dykstra-Parsons permeability variation. Microscopic flow heterogeneity in a reservoir rock is related to pore size, pore shape, and location of the different pore sizes that determine flow paths of various permeabilities. This flow heterogeneity affects secondary recovery displacement efficiency, residual oil and water saturations, and capillary pressure measurements.

  11. Optimal Control of Partially Miscible Two-Phase Flow with Applications to Subsurface CO2 Sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    Simon, Moritz

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by applications in subsurface CO2 sequestration, we investigate constrained optimal control problems with partially miscible two-phase flow in porous media. The objective is, e.g., to maximize the amount of trapped CO2 in an underground reservoir after a fixed period of CO2 injection, where the time-dependent injection rates in multiple wells are used as control parameters. We describe the governing two-phase two-component Darcy flow PDE system and formulate the optimal control problem. For the discretization we use a variant of the BOX method, a locally conservative control-volume FE method. The timestep-wise Lagrangian of the control problem is implemented as a functional in the PDE toolbox Sundance, which is part of the HPC software Trilinos. The resulting MPI parallelized Sundance state and adjoint solvers are linked to the interior point optimization package IPOPT. Finally, we present some numerical results in a heterogeneous model reservoir.

  12. A Greedy Approach for Placement of Subsurface Aquifer Wells in an Ensemble Filtering Framework

    KAUST Repository

    El Gharamti, Mohamad

    2015-11-26

    Optimizing wells placement may help in better understanding subsurface solute transport and detecting contaminant plumes. In this work, we use the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) as a data assimilation tool and propose a greedy observational design algorithm to optimally select aquifer wells locations for updating the prior contaminant ensemble. The algorithm is greedy in the sense that it operates sequentially, without taking into account expected future gains. The selection criteria is based on maximizing the information gain that the EnKF carries during the update of the prior uncertainties. We test the efficiency of this algorithm in a synthetic aquifer system where a contaminant plume is set to migrate over a 30 years period across a heterogenous domain.

  13. Physico-chemical and Mineralogical Characterisation of Subsurface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , moisture content, bulk density (Db), porosity, surface area, pH, electrical conductivity (EC), and cation exchange ... Grain size analyses of the subsurface sediments revealed sandy loam, silty loam, and silt as the main textural classes.

  14. West Twin Creek Alaska Subsurface Bromide Tracer Experiment, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data was produced as part of a subsurface tracer experiment performed on a boreal hillslope in July, 2015. The data is separated into three files: 'Well...

  15. A hydrogen-based subsurface microbial community dominated by methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, F.H.; O'Neil, Kyle; Bradley, P.M.; Methe, B.A.; Ciufo, S.A.; Knobel, L.L.; Lovley, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    The search for extraterrestrial life may be facilitated if ecosystems can be found on Earth that exist under conditions analogous to those present on other planets or moons. It has been proposed, on the basis of geochemical and thermodynamic considerations, that geologically derived hydrogen might support subsurface microbial communities on Mars and Europa in which methanogens form the base of the ecosystem1-5. Here we describe a unique subsurface microbial community in which hydrogen-consuming, methane-producing Archaea far outnumber the Bacteria. More than 90% of the 16s ribosomal DNA sequences recovered from hydrothermal waters circulating through deeply buried igneous rocks in Idaho are related to hydrogen-using methanogenic microorganisms. Geochemical characterization indicates that geothermal hydrogen, not organic carbon, is the primary energy source for this methanogen-dominated microbial community. These results demonstrate that hydrogen-based methanogenic communities do occur in Earth's subsurface, providing an analogue for possible subsurface microbial ecosystems on other planets.

  16. Sub-Surface Oil Monitoring Cruise (GU1002, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Objectives were to evaluate ability of acoustic echosounder measurements to detect and localize a sub-surface plume of oil or related hydrocarbons released from the...

  17. Broadband Counter-Wound Spiral Antenna for Subsurface Radar Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yong, Lim

    2003-01-01

    .... An overall design strategy is outlined, together with a more detailed treatment of the ground-penetrating radar supersystems and topics which are relevant to effective subsurface radar operation...

  18. The Migration and Entrapment of DNAPLs in Physically and Chemically Heterogeneous Porous Media - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/15/2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abriola, L. M.; Demond, A. H.

    2000-09-15

    Hazardous dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), such as chlorinated solvents, are slightly water soluble and pose a serious threat to soil and groundwater supplies in many portions of the United States. The migration and entrapment of DNAPLs in the subsurface environment is typically believed to be controlled by physical heterogeneities; i.e, layers and lenses of contrasting soil texture. The rationale for this assumption is that capillarity, as determined by the soil texture, is the dominant transport mechanism. Capillarity also depends on interfacial tension and medium wettability. Interfacial tension and medium wettability may be spatially and temporally dependent due to variations in aqueous phase chemistry, contaminant aging, and/or variations in mineralogy and organic matter distributions. Such chemical heterogeneities have largely been ignored to date, even though they are known to have dramatic effects on the hydraulic property relations. Numerical multiphase flow and transport models typically assume that solids are water-wet and that interfacial tension is constant. The primary objective of this research is to investigate the influence of coupled physical and chemical heterogeneities on the migration and entrapment of DNAPLs. This objective will be accomplished through a combination of laboratory and numerical experiments. Laboratory experiments will be conducted to examine: (i) aqueous phase chemistry effects on medium wettability and interfacial tension; and (ii) relative permeability-saturation-capillary pressure relations for chemically heterogeneous systems. An important objective of this research is to modify a two-dimensional multiphase flow and transport model to account for chemically and physically heterogeneous systems. This numerical simulator will be used in conjunction with independently measured parameters to simulate two-dimensional DNAPL infiltration experiments. Comparisons of simulated and laboratory data will provide a means to

  19. The effect of pavement-watering on subsurface pavement temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Hendel, Martin; Royon, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Pavement-watering is currently viewed as a potential climate change adaptation and urban heat island mitigation technique. The effects of pavement-watering on pavement temperature measured 5 cm deep are presented and discussed. Subsurface temperature measurements could not be used to improve or optimize pavement-watering methods as was seen in previous work on surface temperatures or subsurface pavement heat flux measurements.

  20. Seismic Imaging of Open Subsurface Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, S. C.; Pitarka, A.; Matzel, E.; Aguiar, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Injection of high-pressure fluid into the subsurface is proven to stimulate geothermal, oil, and gas production by opening cracks that increase permeability. The effectiveness of increasing permeability by high-pressure injection has been revolutionized by the introduction of "proppants" into the injected fluid to keep cracks open after the pressure of the stimulation activity ends. The network of fractures produced during stimulation is most commonly inferred by the location of micro-earthquakes. However, existing (closed) fractures may open aseismically, so the whole fracture network may not be imaged by micro-seismic locations alone. Further, whether all new fractures remain open and for how long remains unclear. Open cracks, even fluid-filled cracks, scatter seismic waves because traction forces are not transmitted across the gap. Numerical simulation confirms that an open crack with dimensions on the order of 10 meters can scatter enough seismic energy to change the coda of seismic signals. Our simulations show that changes in seismic coda due to newly opened fractures are only a few percent of peak seismogram amplitudes, making signals from open cracks difficult to identify. We are developing advanced signal processing methods to identify candidate signals that originate from open cracks. These methods are based on differencing seismograms that are recorded before and after high-pressure fluid injection events to identify changes in the coda. The origins of candidate signals are located using time-reversal techniques to determine if the signals are indeed associated with a coherent structure. The source of scattered energy is compared to micro-seismic event locations to determine whether cracks opened seismically or aseismically. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675612.

  1. Paracetamol removal in subsurface flow constructed wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Ezio; Verlicchi, Paola; Young, Thomas M.

    2011-07-01

    SummaryIn this study two pilot scale Horizontal Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands (HSFCWs) near Lecce, Italy, planted with different macrophytes ( Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia) and an unplanted control were assessed for their effectiveness in removing paracetamol. Residence time distributions (RTDs) for the two beds indicated that the Typha bed was characterized by a void volume fraction (porosity) of 0.16 and exhibited more ideal plug flow behavior (Pe = 29.7) than the Phragmites bed (Pe = 26.7), which had similar porosity. The measured hydraulic residence times in the planted beds were 35.8 and 36.7 h when the flow was equal to 1 m 3/d. The Phragmites bed exhibited a range of paracetamol removals from 51.7% for a Hydraulic Loading Rate (HLR) of 240 mm/d to 87% with 120 mm/d HLR and 99.9% with 30 mm/d. The Typha bed showed a similar behavior with percentages of removal slightly lower, ranging from 46.7% (HLR of 240 mm/d) to >99.9% (hydraulic loading rate of 30 mm/d). At the same HLR values the unplanted bed removed between 51.3% and 97.6% of the paracetamol. In all three treatments the paracetamol removal was higher with flow of 1 m 3/d and an area of approx. 7.5 m 2 (half bed) than in the case of flow equal to 0.5 m 3/d with a surface treatment of approx. 3.75 m 2. A first order model for paracetamol removal was evaluated and half lives of 5.16 to 10.2 h were obtained.

  2. Phenotypic heterogeneity of Streptococcus mutans in dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupf, S; Hannig, M; Breitung, K; Schellenberger, W; Eschrich, K; Remmerbach, T; Kneist, S

    2008-12-01

    Information concerning phenotypic heterogeneity of Streptococcus mutans in carious dentin is sparse. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) facilitates the phenotypic differentiation of bacteria to the subspecies level. To verify a supposed influence of restorative treatment on the phenotypic heterogeneity of S. mutans, we isolated and compared a total of 222 S. mutans strains from dentin samples of 21 human deciduous molars during caries excavation (T(1)) and 8 wks (T(2)) after removal of the temporary restoration. Phenotypic heterogeneity was determined by MALDI-TOF-MS and hierarchical clustering. Thirty-six distinct S. mutans phenotypes could be identified. Although indistinguishable phenotypes were found in the same teeth at T(1) and T(2), as well as in different teeth of individual participants, the phenotypic heterogeneity increased significantly, from 1.4 phenotypes per S. mutans-positive dentin sample at T(1) to 2.2 phenotypes at T(2). We attribute this to an adaptation of S. mutans to the modified environment under the restoration following caries excavation.

  3. The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Jung, Hun-Bok; Konishi, Hiromi; Boyanov, Maxim; Sun, Yubing; Mishra, Bhoopesh

    2013-10-16

    Most reactive surfaces in clay-dominated sediments are present within nanopores (pores of nm dimension). The behavior of geological fluids and minerals in nanopores is significantly different from those in normal non-nanoporous environments. The effect of nanopore surfaces on U(VI) sorption/desorption and reduction is likely to be significant in clay-rich subsurface environments. Our research results from both model nanopore system and natural sediments from both model system (synthetic nanopore alumina) and sediments from the ORNL Field Research Center prove that U(VI) sorption on nanopore surfaces can be greatly enhanced by nanopore confinement environments. The results from the project provide advanced mechanistic, quantitative information on the physiochemical controls on uranium sorption and redox behavior in subsurface sediments. The influence of nanopore surfaces on coupled uranium sorption/desorption and reduction processes is significant in virtually all subsurface environments, because most reactive surfaces are in fact nanopore surfaces. The results will enhance transfer of our laboratory-based research to a major field research initiative where reductive uranium immobilization is being investigated. Our results will also provide the basic science for developing in-situ colloidal barrier of nanoporous alumina in support of environmental remediation and long term stewardship of DOE sites.

  4. Statistical Analysis of Nitrogen in the Soil of Constructed Wetland with Horizontal Sub-Surface Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubaszek Anita

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The removal of nitrogen compounds in constructed wetlands depends on various physical, chemical and biomechanical factors as well as on conditions of the environment. The paper presents the results of a statistical analysis of the depositing of nitrogen at HSSF (horizontal subsurface flow construcred wetland. The results of the substrate showed that the highest contents of nitrogen existed in the surface soil layer up to 20 cm of the depth. Nitrogen accumulation decreased in the deposit with depth, and in the direction of the wastewater flow.

  5. Large epidemic thresholds emerge in heterogeneous networks of heterogeneous nodes

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Yang; Ming Tang; Thilo Gross

    2015-01-01

    One of the famous results of network science states that networks with heterogeneous connectivity are more susceptible to epidemic spreading than their more homogeneous counterparts. In particular, in networks of identical nodes it has been shown that network heterogeneity, i.e. a broad degree distribution, can lower the epidemic threshold at which epidemics can invade the system. Network heterogeneity can thus allow diseases with lower transmission probabilities to persist and spread. Howeve...

  6. Large epidemic thresholds emerge in heterogeneous networks of heterogeneous nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Tang, Ming; Gross, Thilo

    2015-08-21

    One of the famous results of network science states that networks with heterogeneous connectivity are more susceptible to epidemic spreading than their more homogeneous counterparts. In particular, in networks of identical nodes it has been shown that network heterogeneity, i.e. a broad degree distribution, can lower the epidemic threshold at which epidemics can invade the system. Network heterogeneity can thus allow diseases with lower transmission probabilities to persist and spread. However, it has been pointed out that networks in which the properties of nodes are intrinsically heterogeneous can be very resilient to disease spreading. Heterogeneity in structure can enhance or diminish the resilience of networks with heterogeneous nodes, depending on the correlations between the topological and intrinsic properties. Here, we consider a plausible scenario where people have intrinsic differences in susceptibility and adapt their social network structure to the presence of the disease. We show that the resilience of networks with heterogeneous connectivity can surpass those of networks with homogeneous connectivity. For epidemiology, this implies that network heterogeneity should not be studied in isolation, it is instead the heterogeneity of infection risk that determines the likelihood of outbreaks.

  7. Predicting subsurface uranium transport: Mechanistic modeling constrained by experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottman, Michael; Schenkeveld, Walter D. C.; Kraemer, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) munitions and their widespread use throughout conflict zones around the world pose a persistent health threat to the inhabitants of those areas long after the conclusion of active combat. However, little emphasis has been put on developing a comprehensive, quantitative tool for use in remediation and hazard avoidance planning in a wide range of environments. In this context, we report experimental data on U interaction with soils and sediments. Here, we strive to improve existing risk assessment modeling paradigms by incorporating a variety of experimental data into a mechanistic U transport model for subsurface environments. 20 different soils and sediments from a variety of environments were chosen to represent a range of geochemical parameters that are relevant to U transport. The parameters included pH, organic matter content, CaCO3, Fe content and speciation, and clay content. pH ranged from 3 to 10, organic matter content from 6 to 120 g kg-1, CaCO3 from 0 to 700 g kg-1, amorphous Fe content from 0.3 to 6 g kg-1 and clay content from 4 to 580 g kg-1. Sorption experiments were then performed, and linear isotherms were constructed. Sorption experiment results show that among separate sets of sediments and soils, there is an inverse correlation between both soil pH and CaCO¬3 concentration relative to U sorptive affinity. The geological materials with the highest and lowest sorptive affinities for U differed in CaCO3 and organic matter concentrations, as well as clay content and pH. In a further step, we are testing if transport behavior in saturated porous media can be predicted based on adsorption isotherms and generic geochemical parameters, and comparing these modeling predictions with the results from column experiments. The comparison of these two data sets will examine if U transport can be effectively predicted from reactive transport modeling that incorporates the generic geochemical parameters. This work will serve to show

  8. Heterogeneous logics of competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossin, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to demonstrate that in order to understand competition as a socially organizing phenomenon, we should not examine competition in isolation, but as constellations of heterogeneous logics. More precisely, the article is based on two main theoretical points: (1) Logics...... of competition are only realized as particular forms of social organization by virtue of interplaying with other kinds of logics, like legal logics. (2) Competition logics enjoy a peculiar status in-between constructedness and givenness; although competition depends on laws and mechanisms of socialization, we...... still experience competition as an expression of spontaneous human activities. On the basis of these perspectives, a study of fundamental rights of EU law, springing from the principle of ‘free movement of people’, is conducted. The first part of the empirical analysis seeks to detect the presence...

  9. Heterogenous networks and services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Su-En

    2006-01-01

    of the market. If mainstream technology firms do not address the disruption, it is likely they will fail and the new disruptive firm will grow in size and importance in the industry. As we move to 3G (3rd Generation Mobile Services) and beyond 3G, one of the biggest challenges is to bridge network heterogeneity...... representations of strategy, will then help to determine the success or failure of the technology. This is shown typically in the case of WiFi. WiFi is a wireless technology that addressed a new market, but was soon adopted as a complement by mobile operators into their suite of services. However, the future......This thesis considers the development of the mobile industry from a techno-economic perspective. Theory of disruptive technologies and related theories are examined and further developed. While much of technology change has been analysed on either a technical level or a market level, another plane...

  10. What's down below? Current and potential future applications of geophysical techniques to identify subsurface permafrost conditions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, T. A.; Bjella, K.; Campbell, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    For infrastructure design, operations, and maintenance requirements in the North the ability to accurately and efficiently detect the presence (or absence) of ground ice in permafrost terrains is a serious challenge. Ground ice features including ice wedges, thermokarst cave-ice, and segregation ice are present in a variety of spatial scales and patterns. Currently, most engineering applications use borehole logging and sampling to extrapolate conditions at the point scale. However, there is high risk of over or under estimating the presence of frozen or unfrozen features when relying on borehole information alone. In addition, boreholes are costly, especially for planning linear structures like roads or runways. Predicted climate warming will provide further challenges for infrastructure development and transportation operations where permafrost degradation occurs. Accurately identifying the subsurface character in permafrost terrains will allow engineers and planners to cost effectively create novel infrastructure designs to withstand the changing environment. There is thus a great need for a low cost rapidly deployable, spatially extensive means of 'measuring' subsurface conditions. Geophysical measurements, both terrestrial and airborne, have strong potential to revolutionize our way of mapping subsurface conditions. Many studies in continuous and discontinuous permafrost have used geophysical measurements to identify discrete features and repeatable patterns in the subsurface. The most common measurements include galvanic and capacitive coupled resistivity, ground penetrating radar, and multi frequency electromagnetic induction techniques. Each of these measurements has strengths, weaknesses, and limitations. By combining horizontal geophysical measurements, downhole geophysics, multispectral remote sensing images, LiDAR measurements, and soil and vegetation mapping we can start to assemble a holistic view of how surface conditions and standoff measurements

  11. Seismic Techniques for Subsurface Voids Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritto, Roland; Korneev, Valeri; Elobaid Elnaiem, Ali; Mohamed, Fathelrahman; Sadooni, Fadhil

    2016-04-01

    orthogonal transmission surveys to detect and locate the object. Furthermore, we showed that ambient noise recordings may generate data with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to successfully detect and locate subsurface voids. Being able to use ambient noise recordings would eliminate the need to employ active seismic sources that are time consuming and more expensive to operate.

  12. Heterogeneity in recombinant protein production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin; Johanson, Ted; Lundin, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    contribute to make a population in a fermenter heterogeneous, resulting in cell-to-cell variation in physiological parameters of the microbial culture. Our study aims at investigating how population heterogeneity and recombinant protein production is affected by environmental gradients in bioreactors...... are simulated in small bioreactors and the population heterogeneity can be visualised by analysing single cells with flow cytometry. This can give new insights to cell physiology and recombinant protein production at the industrial scale....

  13. Modeling Approaches for Describing Microbial Population Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita

    population consists of cells in different states, and it implies a heterogeneous distribution of activities (e.g. respiration, product yield), including different responses to extracellular stimuli. The existence of a heterogeneous cell population may explain the lower productivities obtained......) to predict distributions of certain population properties including particle size, mass or volume, and molecular weight. Similarly, PBM allow for a mathematical description of distributed cell properties within microbial populations. Cell total protein content distributions (a measure of cell mass) have been...... population dynamics, in response to the substrate consumption observed during batch cultivation. Cell size and cell cycle position distributions were used to describe the cell population. A two-stage PBM was developed and coupled to an unstructured model describing the extracellular environment. The good...

  14. Final Technical Report: Viral Infection of Subsurface Microorganisms and Metal/Radionuclide Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Karrie A.; Bender, Kelly S.; Li, Yusong

    2013-09-28

    Microbially mediated metabolisms have been identified as a significant factor either directly or indirectly impacting the fate and transport of heavy metal/radionuclide contaminants. To date microorganisms have been isolated from contaminated environments. Examination of annotated finished genome sequences of many of these subsurface isolates from DOE sites, revealed evidence of prior viral infection. To date the role that viruses play influencing microbial mortality and the resulting community structure which directly influences biogeochemical cycling in soils and sedimentary environments remains poorly understood. The objective of this exploratory study was to investigate the role of viral infection of subsurface bacteria and the formation of contaminant-bearing viral particles. This objective was approached by examining the following working hypotheses: (i) subsurface microorganisms are susceptible to viral infections by the indigenous subsurface viral community, and (ii) viral surfaces will adsorb heavy metals and radionuclides. Our results have addressed basic research needed to accomplish the BER Long Term Measure to provide sufficient scientific understanding such that DOE sites would be able to incorporate coupled physical, chemical and biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation or natural attenuation and long-term stewardship by establishing viral-microbial relationships on the subsequent fate and transport of heavy metals and radionuclides. Here we demonstrated that viruses play a significant role in microbial mortality and community structure in terrestrial subsurface sedimentary systems. The production of viral-like particles within subsurface sediments in response to biostimulation with dissolved organic carbon and a terminal electron acceptor resulted in the production of viral-like particles. Organic carbon alone did not result in significant viral production and required the addition of a terminal electron acceptor

  15. Space Qualified Heterogeneous Processing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro proposes to develop a radiation hardened, monolithic, heterogeneous processor for space imaging and radar systems. High performance processors are needed...

  16. Characterization of accumulated precipitates during subsurface iron removal

    KAUST Repository

    Van Halem, Doris

    2011-01-01

    The principle of subsurface iron removal for drinking water supply is that aerated water is periodically injected into the aquifer through a tube well. On its way into the aquifer, the injected O2-rich water oxidizes adsorbed Fe 2+, creating a subsurface oxidation zone. When groundwater abstraction is resumed, the soluble Fe 2+ is adsorbed and water with reduced Fe concentrations is abstracted for multiple volumes of the injection water. In this article, Fe accumulation deposits in the aquifer near subsurface treatment wells were identified and characterized to assess the sustainability of subsurface iron removal regarding clogging of the aquifer and the potential co-accumulation of other groundwater constituents, such as As. Chemical extraction of soil samples, with Acid-Oxalate and HNO3, showed that Fe had accumulated at specific depths near subsurface iron removal wells after 12 years of operation. Whether it was due to preferred flow paths or geochemical mineralogy conditions; subsurface iron removal clearly favoured certain soil layers. The total Fe content increased between 11.5 and 390.8 mmol/kg ds in the affected soil layers, and the accumulated Fe was found to be 56-100% crystalline. These results suggest that precipitated amorphous Fe hydroxides have transformed to Fe hydroxides of higher crystallinity. These crystalline, compact Fe hydroxides have not noticeably clogged the investigated well and/or aquifer between 1996 and 2008. The subsurface iron removal wells even need less frequent rehabilitation, as drawdown increases more slowly than in normal production wells. Other groundwater constituents, such as Mn, As and Sr were found to co-accumulate with Fe. Acid extraction and ESEM-EDX showed that Ca occurred together with Fe and by X-ray Powder Diffraction it was identified as calcite. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Major phylum-level differences between porefluid and host rock bacterial communities in the terrestrial deep subsurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momper, Lily; Kiel Reese, Brandi; Zinke, Laura; Wanger, Greg; Osburn, Magdalena R; Moser, Duane; Amend, Jan P

    2017-10-01

    Earth's deep subsurface biosphere (DSB) is home to a vast number and wide variety of microorganisms. Although difficult to access and sample, deep subsurface environments have been probed through drilling programs, exploration of mines and sampling of deeply sourced vents and springs. In an effort to understand the ecology of deep terrestrial habitats, we examined bacterial diversity in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), the former Homestake gold mine, in South Dakota, USA. Whole genomic DNA was extracted from deeply circulating groundwater and corresponding host rock (at a depth of 1.45 km below ground surface). Pyrotag DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed diverse communities of putative chemolithoautotrophs, aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophs, numerous candidate phyla and unique rock-associated microbial assemblage. There was a clear and near-total separation of communities between SURF deeply circulating fracture fluids and SURF host-rocks. Sequencing data from SURF compared against five similarly sequenced terrestrial subsurface sites in Europe and North America revealed classes Clostridia and Betaproteobacteria were dominant in terrestrial fluids. This study presents a unique analysis showing differences in terrestrial subsurface microbial communities between fracture fluids and host rock through which those fluids permeate. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effects of subsurface aeration and trinexapac-ethyl application on soil microbial communities in a creeping bentgrass putting green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Y.; Stoeckel, D.M.; Van Santen, E.; Walker, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivity of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis palustris Huds.) to the extreme heat found in the southeastern United States has led to the development of new greens-management methods. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of subsurface aeration and growth regulator applications on soil microbial communities and mycorrhizal colonization rates in a creeping bentgrass putting green. Two cultivars (Crenshaw and Penncross), a growth regulator (trinexapacethyl), and subsurface aeration were evaluated in cool and warm seasons. Total bacterial counts were higher in whole (unsieved) soils than in sieved soils, indicating a richer rhizosphere soil environment. Mycorrhizal infection rates were higher in trinexapac-ethyl (TE) treated plants. High levels of hyphal colonization and relatively low arbuscule and vesicle occurrence were observed. Principal components analysis of whole-soil fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles indicated that warm-season microbial populations in whole and sieved soils had similar constituents, but the populations differed in the cool season. FAME profiles did not indicate that subsurface aeration and TE application affected soil microbial community structure. This is the first reported study investigating the influences of subsurface aeration and TE application on soil microorganisms in a turfgrass putting green soil.

  19. Experimental validation of a sub-surface model of solar power for distributed marine sensor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Gregory G.; Cantin, Heather P.; Shafer, Michael W.

    2016-04-01

    The capabilities of distributed sensor systems such as marine wildlife telemetry tags could be significantly enhanced through the integration of photovoltaic modules. Photovoltaic cells could be used to supplement the primary batteries for wildlife telemetry tags to allow for extended tag deployments, wherein larger amounts of data could be collected and transmitted in near real time. In this article, we present experimental results used to validate and improve key aspects of our original model for sub-surface solar power. We discuss the test methods and results, comparing analytic predictions to experimental results. In a previous work, we introduced a model for sub-surface solar power that used analytic models and empirical data to predict the solar irradiance available for harvest at any depth under the ocean's surface over the course of a year. This model presented underwater photovoltaic transduction as a viable means of supplementing energy for marine wildlife telemetry tags. The additional data provided by improvements in daily energy budgets would enhance the temporal and spatial comprehension of the host's activities and/or environments. Photovoltaic transduction is one method that has not been widely deployed in the sub-surface marine environments despite widespread use on terrestrial and avian species wildlife tag systems. Until now, the use of photovoltaic cells for underwater energy harvesting has generally been disregarded as a viable energy source in this arena. In addition to marine telemetry systems, photovoltaic energy harvesting systems could also serve as a means of energy supply for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), as well as submersible buoys for oceanographic data collection.

  20. Conceptual Model of Iodine Behavior in the Subsurface at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Christian D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Szecsody, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kyle, Jennifer E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tfaily, Malak M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snyder, Michelle MV [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, Kirk J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saunders, Danielle L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawter, Amanda R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Oostrom, Martijn L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tartakovsky, Guzel D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leavy, Ian I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McElroy, Erin M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Appriou, Delphine [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sahajpal, Rahul [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carroll, Matthew M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chu, Rosalie K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cordova, Elsa [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Last, George V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Hope [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kaplan, Daniel I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Garcia, Whitney L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kerisit, Sebastien N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Odeta [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bowden, Mark E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Frances N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Toyoda, Jason G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Plymale, Andrew E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Isotopes of iodine were generated during plutonium production within the nine production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The short half-life 131I that was released from the fuel into the atmosphere during the dissolution process (when the fuel was dissolved) in the Hanford Site 200 Area is no longer present at concentrations of concern in the environment. The long half-life 129I generated at the Hanford Site during reactor operations was (1) stored in single-shell and double-shell tanks, (2) discharged to liquid disposal sites (e.g., cribs and trenches), (3) released to the atmosphere during fuel reprocessing operations, or (4) captured by off-gas absorbent devices (silver reactors) at chemical separations plants (PUREX, B-Plant, T-Plant, and REDOX). Releases of 129I to the subsurface have resulted in several large, though dilute, plumes in the groundwater. There is also 129I remaining in the vadose zone beneath disposal or leak locations. The fate and transport of 129I in the environment and potential remediation technologies are currently being studied as part of environmental remediation activities at the Hanford Site. A conceptual model describing the nature and extent of subsurface contamination, factors that control plume behavior, and factors relevant to potential remediation processes is needed to support environmental remedy decisions. Because 129I is an uncommon contaminant, relevant remediation experience and scientific literature are limited. In addition, its behavior in subsurface is different from that of other more common and important contaminants (e.g., U, Cr and Tc) in terms of sorption (adsorption and precipitation), and aqueous phase species transformation via redox reactions. Thus, the conceptual model also needs to both describe known contaminant and biogeochemical process information and identify aspects about which additional information is needed to effectively support remedy decisions.

  1. Subsurface Organics in Aseptic Cores From the MARTE Robotic Drilling Experiment: Ground truth and Contamination Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorsi, R.; Stoker, C. R.

    2006-12-01

    The subsurface is the key environment for searching for life on planets lacking surface life. This includes the search for past/present life on Mars where possible subsurface life could exist [1]. The Mars-Analog-Rio-Tinto-Experiment (MARTE) performed a simulation of a Mars robotic drilling at the RT Borehole#7 Site ~6.07m, atop a massive-pyrite deposit from the Iberian Pyritic Belt. The RT site is considered an important analog of Sinus Meridiani on Mars, an ideal model analog for a subsurface Martian setting [2], and a relevant example of deep subsurface microbial community including aerobic and anaerobic chemoautotrophs [4-5]. Searching for microbes or bulk organics of biological origin in a subsurface sample from a planet is a key scientific objective of Robotic drilling missions. During the 2005 Field experiment 28 minicores were robotically handled and subsampled for life detection experiments under anti-contamination protocols. Ground truth included visual observation of cores and lab based Elemental and Isotope Ratios Mass Spectrometry analysis (EA-IRMS) of bulk organics in Hematite and Gohetite-rich gossanized tuffs, gossan and clay layers within 0-6m-depth. C-org and N-tot vary up to four orders of magnitude among the litter (~11Wt%, 0-1cm) and the mineralized (~3Wt%, 1-3cm) layers, and the first 6 m-depth (C-org=0.02-0.38Wt%). Overall, the distribution/ preservation of plant and soil-derived organics (d13C-org = 26 per mil to 24 per mil) is ten times higher (C-org=0.33Wt%) that in hematite-poor clays, or where rootlets are present, than in hematite- rich samples (C-org=handling and environmental dust loadings on cleaned/sterilized control surfaces (e.g., 6,782-36,243RLU/cm2). Cleanliness/sterility can be maintained by applying a simple sterile protocol under field conditions. Science results from this research will support future Astrobiology driven drilling mission planned on Mars. Specifically, ground truth offers relevant insights to assess strengths

  2. Effects of Hydraulic Frac Fluids on Subsurface Microbial Communities in Gas Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Núria; Krüger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Shale gas is being considered as a complementary energy resource to coal or other fossil fuels. The exploitation of unconventional gas reservoirs requires the use of advanced drilling techniques and hydraulic stimulation (fracking). During fracking operations, large amounts of fluids (fresh water, proppants and chemical additives) are injected at high pressures into the formations, to produce fractures and fissures, and thus to release gas from the source rock into the wellbore. The injected fluids partly remain in the formation, while about 20 to 40% of the originally injected fluid flows back to the surface, together with formation waters, sometimes containing dissolved hydrocarbons, high salt concentrations, etc. The overall production operation will likely affect and be affected by subsurface microbial communities associated to the shale formations. On the one hand microbial activity (like growth, biofilm formation) can cause unwanted processes like corrosion, clogging, etc. On the other hand, the introduction of frac fluids could either enhance microbial growth or cause toxicity to the shale-associated microbial communities. To investigate the potential impacts of changing environmental reservoir conditions, like temperature, salinity, oxgen content and pH, as well as the introduction of frac or geogenic chemicals on subsurface microbial communities, laboratory experiments under in situ conditions (i.e. high temperatures and pressures) are being conducted. Enrichment cultures with samples from several subsurface environments (e.g. shale and coal deposits, gas reservoirs, geothermal fluids) have been set up using a variety of carbon sources, including hydrocarbons and typical frac chemicals. Classical microbiological and molecular analysis are used to determine changes in the microbial abundance, community structure and function after the exposure to different single frac chemicals, "artificial" frac fluids or production waters. On the other hand, potential

  3. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a ``heterogeneity matrix`` based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  4. Scaling Effects of Cr(VI) Reduction Kinetics. The Role of Geochemical Heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Li, Li [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The natural subsurface is highly heterogeneous with minerals distributed in different spatial patterns. Fundamental understanding of how mineral spatial distribution patterns regulate sorption process is important for predicting the transport and fate of chemicals. Existing studies about the sorption was carried out in well-mixed batch reactors or uniformly packed columns, with few data available on the effects of spatial heterogeneities. As a result, there is a lack of data and understanding on how spatial heterogeneities control sorption processes. In this project, we aim to understand and develop modeling capabilities to predict the sorption of Cr(VI), an omnipresent contaminant in natural systems due to its natural occurrence and industrial utilization. We systematically examine the role of spatial patterns of illite, a common clay, in determining the extent of transport limitation and scaling effects associated with Cr(VI) sorption capacity and kinetics using column experiments and reactive transport modeling. Our results showed that the sorbed mass and rates can differ by an order of magnitude due to of the illite spatial heterogeneities and transport limitation. With constraints from data, we also developed the capabilities of modeling Cr(VI) in heterogeneous media. The developed model is then utilized to understand the general principles that govern the relationship between sorption and connectivity, a key measure of the spatial pattern characteristics. This correlation can be used to estimate Cr(VI) sorption characteristics in heterogeneous porous media. Insights gained here bridge gaps between laboratory and field application in hydrogeology and geochemical field, and advance predictive understanding of reactive transport processes in the natural heterogeneous subsurface. We believe that these findings will be of interest to a large number of environmental geochemists and engineers, hydrogeologists, and those interested in contaminant fate and transport

  5. Multiprocessor programming environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.B.; Fornaro, R.

    1988-12-01

    Programming tools and techniques have been well developed for traditional uniprocessor computer systems. The focus of this research project is on the development of a programming environment for a high speed real time heterogeneous multiprocessor system, with special emphasis on languages and compilers. The new tools and techniques will allow a smooth transition for programmers with experience only on single processor systems.

  6. A fast and environment-friendly method for determination of chemical oxygen demand by using the heterogeneous Fenton-like process (H2O2/Fe(3-x)Co(x)O4 nanoparticles) as an oxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Lorena C R; Oliveira, Thaís R O; Souza, Elias C; Bomfeti, Cleide A; Gonçalves, Andrea M; Oliveira, Luiz C A; Barbosa, Fernando; Pereira, Márcio C; Rodrigues, Jairo L

    2015-04-01

    An easy, fast and environment-friendly method for COD determination in water is proposed. The procedure is based on the oxidation of organic matter by the H2O2/Fe(3-x)Co(x)O4 system. The Fe(3-x)Co(x)O4 nanoparticles activate the H2O2 molecule to produce hydroxyl radicals, which are highly reactive for oxidizing organic matter in an aqueous medium. After the oxidation step, the organic matter amounts can be quantified by comparing the quantity of H2O2 consumed. Moreover, the proposed COD method has several distinct advantages, since it does not use toxic reagents and the oxidation reaction of organic matter is conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Method detection limit is 2.0 mg L(-1) with intra- and inter-day precision lower than 1% (n=5). The calibration graph is linear in the range of 2.0-50 mg L(-1) with a sample throughput of 25 samples h(-1). Data are validated based on the analysis of six contaminated river water samples by the proposed method and by using a comparative method validated and marketed by Merck, with good agreement between the results (t test, 95%). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Heterogeneity of an earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, T.; Petrova, A.

    2009-04-01

    The study of magnetic anomaly field structure of the Barents Sea water area along seismic and extended profiles intersecting known fields is carried out. Geomagnetic and density sections down to 40 km depth are constructed. This allowed the estimation of heterogeneities of the Barents Sea water area deep structure. The analysis of geomagnetic and density sections along extended profiles showed the confinedness of oil-and-gas bearing provinces to deep permeable zones characterized by reduced magnetic and density features. Based on the analysis of permeable zones, regional diagnostic features similar to those obtained earlier in oil-and-gas bearing provinces in other regions, for example, in Timan-Pechora, Volga-Urals and Siberian, as well as in the Northern and Norwegian seas water areas, are revealed. The analysis of magnetic and gravity fields over the region area allowed the delineation of weakened zones as intersection areas of weakly magnetic areals with reduced density. Within the Barents Sea water area, permeable areas with lenticular-laminated structure of the upper and lower Earth's crust containing weakly magnetic areals with reduced rock density within the depth range of 8-12 and 15-20 km are revealed. Such ratio of magnetic and density heterogeneities in the Earth's crust is characteristic for zones with proved oil-and-gas content in the European part of the Atlantic Ocean water area. North Kildin field on 1 AR profile is confined to a trough with thick weakly magnetic stratum discontinuously traced to a depth of 6-10 km. At a depth of approximately 15 km, a lens of weakly magnetic and porous formations is observed. Ludlov field in the North Barents trough is confined to a zone of weakly magnetic rocks with reduced density traced to a depth of 8-9 km. Deeper, at Н=15 km, a lenticular areal of weakly magnetic formations with reduced density is observed. The profile transecting the Stockman field shows that it is located in the central part of a permeable

  8. Wave energy focusing to subsurface poroelastic formations to promote oil mobilization

    KAUST Repository

    Karve, P. M.

    2015-04-22

    We discuss an inverse source formulation aimed at focusing wave energy produced by ground surface sources to target subsurface poroelastic formations. The intent of the focusing is to facilitate or enhance the mobility of oil entrapped within the target formation. The underlying forward wave propagation problem is cast in two spatial dimensions for a heterogeneous poroelastic target embedded within a heterogeneous elastic semi-infinite host. The semi-infiniteness of the elastic host is simulated by augmenting the (finite) computational domain with a buffer of perfectly matched layers. The inverse source algorithm is based on a systematic framework of partial-differential-equation-constrained optimization. It is demonstrated, via numerical experiments, that the algorithm is capable of converging to the spatial and temporal characteristics of surface loads that maximize energy delivery to the target formation. Consequently, the methodology is well-suited for designing field implementations that could meet a desired oil mobility threshold. Even though the methodology, and the results presented herein are in two dimensions, extensions to three dimensions are straightforward.

  9. Peeking Beneath the Caldera: Communicating Subsurface Knowledge of Newberry Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark-Moser, M.; Rose, K.; Schultz, J.; Cameron, E.

    2016-12-01

    "Imaging the Subsurface: Enhanced Geothermal Systems and Exploring Beneath Newberry Volcano" is an interactive website that presents a three-dimensional subsurface model of Newberry Volcano developed at National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Created using the Story Maps application by ArcGIS Online, this format's dynamic capabilities provide the user the opportunity for multimedia engagement with the datasets and information used to build the subsurface model. This website allows for an interactive experience that the user dictates, including interactive maps, instructive videos and video capture of the subsurface model, and linked information throughout the text. This Story Map offers a general background on the technology of enhanced geothermal systems and the geologic and development history of Newberry Volcano before presenting NETL's modeling efforts that support the installation of enhanced geothermal systems. The model is driven by multiple geologic and geophysical datasets to compare and contrast results which allow for the targeting of potential EGS sites and the reduction of subsurface uncertainty. This Story Map aims to communicate to a broad audience, and provides a platform to effectively introduce the model to researchers and stakeholders.

  10. Lower-Temperature Subsurface Layout and Ventilation Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christine L. Linden; Edward G. Thomas

    2001-06-20

    This analysis combines work scope identified as subsurface facility (SSF) low temperature (LT) Facilities System and SSF LT Ventilation System in the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001b, pp. 6 and 7, and pp. 13 and 14). In accordance with this technical work plan (TWP), this analysis is performed using AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models. It also incorporates the procedure AP-SI.1Q, Software Management. The purpose of this analysis is to develop an overall subsurface layout system and the overall ventilation system concepts that address a lower-temperature operating mode for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The objective of this analysis is to provide a technical design product that supports the lower-temperature operating mode concept for the revision of the system description documents and to provide a basis for the system description document design descriptions. The overall subsurface layout analysis develops and describes the overall subsurface layout, including performance confirmation facilities (also referred to as Test and Evaluation Facilities) for the Site Recommendation design. This analysis also incorporates current program directives for thermal management.

  11. Subsurface Biodegradation in a Fractured Basement Reservoir, Shropshire, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, John; Baba, Mas'ud; Bowden, Stephen; Muirhead, David

    2017-04-01

    Subsurface Biodegradation in a Fractured Basement Reservoir, Shropshire, UK. John Parnell, Mas'ud Baba, Stephen Bowden, David Muirhead Subsurface biodegradation in current oil reservoirs is well established, but there are few examples of fossil subsurface degradation. Biomarker compositions of viscous and solid oil residues ('bitumen') in fractured Precambrian and other basement rocks below the Carboniferous cover in Shropshire, UK, show that they are variably biodegraded. High levels of 25-norhopanes imply that degradation occurred in the subsurface. Lower levels of 25-norhopanes occur in active seepages. Liquid oil trapped in fluid inclusions in mineral veins in the fractured basement confirm that the oil was emplaced fresh before subsurface degradation. A Triassic age for the veins implies a 200 million year history of hydrocarbon migration in the basement rocks. The data record microbial colonization of a fractured basement reservoir, and add to evidence in modern basement aquifers for microbial activity in deep fracture systems. Buried basement highs may be especially favourable to colonization, through channelling fluid flow to shallow depths and relatively low temperatures

  12. Asset management to support urban land and subsurface management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maring, Linda; Blauw, Maaike

    2018-02-15

    Pressure on urban areas increases by demographic and climate change. To enable healthy, adaptive and liveable urban areas different strategies are needed. One of the strategies is to make better use of subsurface space and its functions. Asset management of the Subsurface (AMS) contributes to this. Asset management provides transparency of trade-offs between performance, cost and risks throughout the entire lifecycle of these assets. AMS is based on traditional asset management methods, but it does not only take man-made assets in the subsurface into account. AMS also considers the natural functions that the subsurface, including groundwater, has to offer (ecosystem services). A Dutch community of practice consisting of national and municipal authorities, a consultancy-engineering and a research institute are developing AMS in practice in order to 1) enhance the urban underground space planning (using its benefits, avoiding problems) and 2) use, manage and maintain the (urban) subsurface and its functions. The method is currently still under development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Heterogeneity: multilingualism and democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Jürgen Krumm

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Linguistic diversity and multilingualism o