WorldWideScience

Sample records for heterogeneous plant material

  1. Influence of weight and type of planting material on fruit quality and its heterogeneity in pineapple [Ananas comosus (L.) Merrill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassinou Hotegni, V Nicodème; Lommen, Willemien J M; Agbossou, Euloge K; Struik, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Cultural practices can affect the quality of pineapple fruits and its variation. The objectives of this study were to investigate (a) effects of weight class and type of planting material on fruit quality, heterogeneity in quality and proportion and yield of fruits meeting European export standards, and (b) the improvement in quality, proportion and yield of fruits meeting export standards when flowering was induced at optimum time. Experiments were conducted in Benin with cvs Sugarloaf (a Perola type) and Smooth Cayenne. In cv. Sugarloaf, experimental factors were weight class of planting material (light, mixed, heavy) and time of flowering induction (farmers', optimum) (Experiment 1). In cv. Smooth Cayenne an additional experimental factor was the type of planting material (hapas, ground suckers, a mixture of the two) (Experiment 2). Fruits from heavy planting material had higher infructescence and fruit weights, longer infructescences, shorter crowns, and smaller crown: infructescence length than fruits from light planting material. The type of planting material in Experiment 2 did not significantly affect fruit quality except crown length: fruits from hapas had shorter crowns than those from ground suckers. Crops from heavy planting material had a higher proportion and yield of fruits meeting export standards than those from other weight classes in Experiment 1 only; also the type of planting material in Experiment 2 did not affect these variates. Heterogeneity in fruit quality was usually not reduced by selecting only light or heavy planting material instead of mixing weights; incidentally the coefficient of variation was significantly reduced in fruits from heavy slips only. Heterogeneity was also not reduced by not mixing hapas and ground suckers. Flowering induction at optimum time increased the proportion and yield of fruits meeting export standards in fruits from light and mixed slip weights and in those from the mixture of heavy hapas plus ground suckers.

  2. Heterogeneous Materials I and Heterogeneous Materials II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, K M

    2004-01-01

    In these two volumes the author provides a comprehensive survey of the various mathematically-based models used in the research literature to predict the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of hetereogeneous materials, i.e., materials containing two or more phases such as fibre-reinforced polymers, cast iron and porous ceramic kiln furniture. Volume I covers linear properties such as linear dielectric constant, effective electrical conductivity and elastic moduli, while Volume II covers nonlinear properties, fracture and atomistic and multiscale modelling. Where appropriate, particular attention is paid to the use of fractal geometry and percolation theory in describing the structure and properties of these materials. The books are advanced level texts reflecting the research interests of the author which will be of significant interest to research scientists working at the forefront of the areas covered by the books. Others working more generally in the field of materials science interested in comparing predictions of properties with experimental results may well find the mathematical level quite daunting initially, as it is apparent that the author assumes a level of mathematics consistent with that taught in final year undergraduate and graduate theoretical physics courses. However, for such readers it is well worth persevering because of the in-depth coverage to which the various models are subjected, and also because of the extensive reference lists at the back of both volumes which direct readers to the various source references in the scientific literature. Thus, for the wider materials science scientific community the two volumes will be a valuable library resource. While I would have liked to see more comparison with experimental data on both ideal and 'real' heterogeneous materials than is provided by the author and a discussion of how to model strong nonlinear current--voltage behaviour in systems such as zinc oxide varistors, my overall

  3. Micromechanics of heterogeneous materials

    CERN Document Server

    Buryachenko, Valeriy

    2007-01-01

    Here is an accurate and timely account of micromechanics, which spans materials science, mechanical engineering, applied mathematics, technical physics, geophysics, and biology. The book features rigorous and unified theoretical methods of applied mathematics and statistical physics in the material science of microheterogeneous media. Uniquely, it offers a useful demonstration of the systematic and fundamental research of the microstructure of the wide class of heterogeneous materials of natural and synthetic nature.

  4. Homogenisation of heterogeneous viscoplastic materials.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, van der O.; Schreurs, P.J.G.; Meijer, H.E.H.; Anderson, P.D.; Kruijt, P.G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Heterogeneous materials have been used extensively in the past few decades, since their mechanical properties, such as strength, stiffness and toughness are being improved continuously. Experimental work has clearly demonstrated the significant influence of the micromechanical phenomena on the

  5. Industrial Membrane Filtration and Short-bed Fractal Separation Systems for Separating Monomers from Heterogeneous Plant Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearney, M; Kochergin, V; Hess, R; Foust, T; Herbst, R; Mann, N

    2005-03-31

    Large-scale displacement of petroleum will come from low-cost cellulosic feedstocks such as straw and corn stover crop residues. This project has taken a step toward making this projection a reality by reducing capital and energy costs, the two largest cost factors associated with converting cellulosic biomass to chemicals and fuels. The technology exists for using acid or enzyme hydrolysis processes to convert biomass feedstock (i.e., waste cellulose such as straw, corn stover, and wood) into their base monomeric sugar building blocks, which can, in turn, be processed into chemicals and fuels using a number of innovative fermentation technologies. However, while these processes are technically possible, practical and economic barriers make these processes only marginally feasible or not feasible at all. These barriers are due in part to the complexity and large fixed and recurring capital costs of unit operations including filtration, chromatographic separation, and ion exchange. This project was designed to help remove these barriers by developing and implementing new purification and separation technologies that will reduce the capital costs of the purification and chromatographic separation units by 50% to 70%. The technologies fundamental to these improvements are: (a) highly efficient clarification and purification systems that use screening and membrane filtration to eliminate suspended solids and colloidal material from feed streams and (b) fractal technology based chromatographic separation and ion exchange systems that can substitute for conventional systems but at much smaller size and cost. A non-hazardous ''raw sugar beet juice'' stream (75 to 100 gal/min) was used for prototype testing of these technologies. This raw beet juice stream from the Amalgamated Sugar LLC plant in Twin Falls, Idaho contained abrasive materials and membrane foulants. Its characteristics were representative of an industrial-scale heterogeneous plant extract

  6. Computational Mechanics for Heterogeneous Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechman, Jeremy B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baczewski, Andrew David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bond, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Erikson, William W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lehoucq, Richard B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mondy, Lisa Ann [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Noble, David R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pierce, Flint [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); van Swol, Frank B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yarrington, Cole [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The subject of this work is the development of models for the numerical simulation of matter, momentum, and energy balance in heterogeneous materials. These are materials that consist of multiple phases or species or that are structured on some (perhaps many) scale(s). By computational mechanics we mean to refer generally to the standard type of modeling that is done at the level of macroscopic balance laws (mass, momentum, energy). We will refer to the flow or flux of these quantities in a generalized sense as transport. At issue here are the forms of the governing equations in these complex materials which are potentially strongly inhomogeneous below some correlation length scale and are yet homogeneous on larger length scales. The question then becomes one of how to model this behavior and what are the proper multi-scale equations to capture the transport mechanisms across scales. To address this we look to the area of generalized stochastic process that underlie the transport processes in homogeneous materials. The archetypal example being the relationship between a random walk or Brownian motion stochastic processes and the associated Fokker-Planck or diffusion equation. Here we are interested in how this classical setting changes when inhomogeneities or correlations in structure are introduced into the problem. Aspects of non-classical behavior need to be addressed, such as non-Fickian behavior of the mean-squared-displacement (MSD) and non-Gaussian behavior of the underlying probability distribution of jumps. We present an experimental technique and apparatus built to investigate some of these issues. We also discuss diffusive processes in inhomogeneous systems, and the role of the chemical potential in diffusion of hard spheres is considered. Also, the relevance to liquid metal solutions is considered. Finally we present an example of how inhomogeneities in material microstructure introduce fluctuations at the meso-scale for a thermal conduction problem

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Heterogeneous Materials I and Heterogeneous Materials II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, K. M.

    2004-02-01

    In these two volumes the author provides a comprehensive survey of the various mathematically-based models used in the research literature to predict the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of hetereogeneous materials, i.e., materials containing two or more phases such as fibre-reinforced polymers, cast iron and porous ceramic kiln furniture. Volume I covers linear properties such as linear dielectric constant, effective electrical conductivity and elastic moduli, while Volume II covers nonlinear properties, fracture and atomistic and multiscale modelling. Where appropriate, particular attention is paid to the use of fractal geometry and percolation theory in describing the structure and properties of these materials. The books are advanced level texts reflecting the research interests of the author which will be of significant interest to research scientists working at the forefront of the areas covered by the books. Others working more generally in the field\

  8. Micromechanics Based Failure Analysis of Heterogeneous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertse, Hamsasew M.

    In recent decades, heterogeneous materials are extensively used in various industries such as aerospace, defense, automotive and others due to their desirable specific properties and excellent capability of accumulating damage. Despite their wide use, there are numerous challenges associated with the application of these materials. One of the main challenges is lack of accurate tools to predict the initiation, progression and final failure of these materials under various thermomechanical loading conditions. Although failure is usually treated at the macro and meso-scale level, the initiation and growth of failure is a complex phenomena across multiple scales. The objective of this work is to enable the mechanics of structure genome (MSG) and its companion code SwiftComp to analyze the initial failure (also called static failure), progressive failure, and fatigue failure of heterogeneous materials using micromechanics approach. The initial failure is evaluated at each numerical integration point using pointwise and nonlocal approach for each constituent of the heterogeneous materials. The effects of imperfect interfaces among constituents of heterogeneous materials are also investigated using a linear traction-displacement model. Moreover, the progressive and fatigue damage analyses are conducted using continuum damage mechanics (CDM) approach. The various failure criteria are also applied at a material point to analyze progressive damage in each constituent. The constitutive equation of a damaged material is formulated based on a consistent irreversible thermodynamics approach. The overall tangent modulus of uncoupled elastoplastic damage for negligible back stress effect is derived. The initiation of plasticity and damage in each constituent is evaluated at each numerical integration point using a nonlocal approach. The accumulated plastic strain and anisotropic damage evolution variables are iteratively solved using an incremental algorithm. The damage analyses

  9. Shock interactions with heterogeneous energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrington, Cole D.; Wixom, Ryan R.; Damm, David L.

    2018-03-01

    The complex physical phenomenon of shock wave interaction with material heterogeneities has significant importance and nevertheless remains little understood. In many materials, the observed macroscale response to shock loading is governed by characteristics of the microstructure. Yet, the majority of computational studies aimed at predicting phenomena affected by these processes, such as the initiation and propagation of detonation waves in explosives or shock propagation in geological materials, employ continuum material and reactive burn model treatment. In an effort to highlight the grain-scale processes that underlie the observable effects in an energetic system, a grain-scale model for hexanitrostilbene (HNS) has been developed. The measured microstructures were used to produce synthetic computational representations of the pore structure, and a density functional theory molecular dynamics derived equation of state (EOS) was used for the fully dense HNS matrix. The explicit inclusion of the microstructure along with a fully dense EOS resulted in close agreement with historical shock compression experiments. More recent experiments on the dynamic reaction threshold were also reproduced by inclusion of a global kinetics model. The complete model was shown to reproduce accurately the expected response of this heterogeneous material to shock loading. Mesoscale simulations were shown to provide a clear insight into the nature of threshold behavior and are a way to understand complex physical phenomena.

  10. Nuclear power plant cable materials :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celina, Mathias C.; Gillen, Kenneth T; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2013-05-01

    A selective literature review was conducted to assess whether currently available accelerated aging and original qualification data could be used to establish operational margins for the continued use of cable insulation and jacketing materials in nuclear power plant environments. The materials are subject to chemical and physical degradation under extended radiationthermal- oxidative conditions. Of particular interest were the circumstances under which existing aging data could be used to predict whether aged materials should pass loss of coolant accident (LOCA) performance requirements. Original LOCA qualification testing usually involved accelerated aging simulations of the 40-year expected ambient aging conditions followed by a LOCA simulation. The accelerated aging simulations were conducted under rapid accelerated aging conditions that did not account for many of the known limitations in accelerated polymer aging and therefore did not correctly simulate actual aging conditions. These highly accelerated aging conditions resulted in insulation materials with mostly inert aging processes as well as jacket materials where oxidative damage dropped quickly away from the air-exposed outside jacket surface. Therefore, for most LOCA performance predictions, testing appears to have relied upon heterogeneous aging behavior with oxidation often limited to the exterior of the cable cross-section a situation which is not comparable with the nearly homogenous oxidative aging that will occur over decades under low dose rate and low temperature plant conditions. The historical aging conditions are therefore insufficient to determine with reasonable confidence the remaining operational margins for these materials. This does not necessarily imply that the existing 40-year-old materials would fail if LOCA conditions occurred, but rather that unambiguous statements about the current aging state and anticipated LOCA performance cannot be provided based on

  11. Heterogeneous Monolithic Integration of Single-Crystal Organic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Sun; Baek, Jangmi; Park, Yoonkyung; Lee, Lynn; Hyon, Jinho; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Shrestha, Nabeen K; Kang, Youngjong; Sung, Myung Mo

    2017-02-01

    Manufacturing high-performance organic electronic circuits requires the effective heterogeneous integration of different nanoscale organic materials with uniform morphology and high crystallinity in a desired arrangement. In particular, the development of high-performance organic electronic and optoelectronic devices relies on high-quality single crystals that show optimal intrinsic charge-transport properties and electrical performance. Moreover, the heterogeneous integration of organic materials on a single substrate in a monolithic way is highly demanded for the production of fundamental organic electronic components as well as complex integrated circuits. Many of the various methods that have been designed to pattern multiple heterogeneous organic materials on a substrate and the heterogeneous integration of organic single crystals with their crystal growth are described here. Critical issues that have been encountered in the development of high-performance organic integrated electronics are also addressed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Heterogeneity in pineapple fruit quality results from plant heterogeneity at flower induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassinou Hotegni, V Nicodème; Lommen, Willemien J M; Agbossou, Euloge K; Struik, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity in fruit quality constitutes a major constraint in agri-food chains. In this paper the sources of the heterogeneity in pineapple in the field were studied in four experiments in commercial pineapple fields. The aims were to determine (a) whether differences in pineapple fruit quality among individual fruits are associated with differences in vigor of the individual plants within the crop at the time of artificial flower induction; and (b) whether the side shoots produced by the plant during the generative phase account for the fruit quality heterogeneity. Two pineapple cultivars were considered: cv. Sugarloaf and cv. Smooth Cayenne. Plant vigor at the time of artificial flower induction was measured by three variates: the number of functional leaves, the D-leaf length and their cross product. Fruit quality attributes measured at harvest time included external attributes (weight and height of fruit, infructescence and crown) and internal quality attributes [total soluble solids (TSS), pH, translucent flesh]. Results showed that the heterogeneity in fruit weight was a consequence of the heterogeneity in vigor of the plants at the moment of flower induction; that effect was mainly on the infructescence weight and less or not on the crown weight. The associations between plant vigor variates at flower induction and the internal quality attributes of the fruit were poor and/or not consistent across experiments. The weight of the slips (side shoots) explained part of the heterogeneity in fruit weight, infructescence weight and fruit height in cv. Sugarloaf. Possibilities for reducing the variation in fruit quality by precise cultural practices are discussed.

  13. Heterogeneity in pineapple fruit quality results from plant heterogeneity at flower induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Nicodeme eFassinou Hotegni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity in fruit quality constitutes a major constraint in agri-food chains. In this paper the sources of the heterogeneity in pineapple in the field were studied in four experiments in commercial pineapple fields. The aims were to determine (a whether differences in pineapple fruit quality among individual fruits are associated with differences in vigor of the individual plants within the crop at the time of artificial flower induction; and (b whether the side shoots produced by the plant during the generative phase account for the fruit quality heterogeneity. Two pineapple cultivars were considered: cv. Sugarloaf and cv. Smooth Cayenne. Plant vigor at the time of artificial flower induction was measured by three variates: the number of functional leaves, the D-leaf length and their cross product. Fruit quality attributes measured at harvest time included external attributes (weight and height of fruit, infructescence and crown and internal quality attributes (total soluble solids, pH, translucent flesh. Results showed that the heterogeneity in fruit weight was a consequence of the heterogeneity in vigor of the plants at the moment of flower induction; that effect was mainly on the infructescence weight and less or not on the crown weight. The association between plant vigor variates at flower induction and the internal quality attributes of the fruit were poor and/or not consistent across experiments. The weight of the slips (side shoots, explained part of the heterogeneity in fruit weight, infructescence weight and fruit height in cv. Sugarloaf. Possibilities for reducing the variation in fruit quality by precise cultural practices are discussed.

  14. New heavy scintillating materials for precise heterogeneous EM-calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britvich, G.I.; Britvich, I.G.; Vasil'chenko, V.G.; Lishin, V.A.; Obraztsov, V.F.; Polyakov, V.A.; Solovjev, A.S.; Ryzhikov, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation shows some optical and scintillation properties of new scintillating media, based on heavy composite materials and an inorganic crystal CsI:Br, intended for the creation of precise heterogeneous EM-calorimeters with the energy resolution σ/E congruent with 4-5% E-radical. The possibility to use cheap heavy scintillating plates based on optical ceramics as active media in heterogeneous EM-calorimeters is considered

  15. Ontology based heterogeneous materials database integration and semantic query

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuai; Qian, Quan

    2017-10-01

    Materials digital data, high throughput experiments and high throughput computations are regarded as three key pillars of materials genome initiatives. With the fast growth of materials data, the integration and sharing of data is very urgent, that has gradually become a hot topic of materials informatics. Due to the lack of semantic description, it is difficult to integrate data deeply in semantic level when adopting the conventional heterogeneous database integration approaches such as federal database or data warehouse. In this paper, a semantic integration method is proposed to create the semantic ontology by extracting the database schema semi-automatically. Other heterogeneous databases are integrated to the ontology by means of relational algebra and the rooted graph. Based on integrated ontology, semantic query can be done using SPARQL. During the experiments, two world famous First Principle Computational databases, OQMD and Materials Project are used as the integration targets, which show the availability and effectiveness of our method.

  16. Predicting sample lifetimes in creep fracture of heterogeneous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Juha; Ovaska, Markus; Miksic, Amandine; Laurson, Lasse; Alava, Mikko J.

    2016-08-01

    Materials flow—under creep or constant loads—and, finally, fail. The prediction of sample lifetimes is an important and highly challenging problem because of the inherently heterogeneous nature of most materials that results in large sample-to-sample lifetime fluctuations, even under the same conditions. We study creep deformation of paper sheets as one heterogeneous material and thus show how to predict lifetimes of individual samples by exploiting the "universal" features in the sample-inherent creep curves, particularly the passage to an accelerating creep rate. Using simulations of a viscoelastic fiber bundle model, we illustrate how deformation localization controls the shape of the creep curve and thus the degree of lifetime predictability.

  17. Probing the structure of heterogeneous diluted materials by diffraction tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleuet, Pierre; Welcomme, Eléonore; Dooryhée, Eric; Susini, Jean; Hodeau, Jean-Louis; Walter, Philippe

    2008-06-01

    The advent of nanosciences calls for the development of local structural probes, in particular to characterize ill-ordered or heterogeneous materials. Furthermore, because materials properties are often related to their heterogeneity and the hierarchical arrangement of their structure, different structural probes covering a wide range of scales are required. X-ray diffraction is one of the prime structural methods but suffers from a relatively poor detection limit, whereas transmission electron analysis involves destructive sample preparation. Here we show the potential of coupling pencil-beam tomography with X-ray diffraction to examine unidentified phases in nanomaterials and polycrystalline materials. The demonstration is carried out on a high-pressure pellet containing several carbon phases and on a heterogeneous powder containing chalcedony and iron pigments. The present method enables a non-invasive structural refinement with a weight sensitivity of one part per thousand. It enables the extraction of the scattering patterns of amorphous and crystalline compounds with similar atomic densities and compositions. Furthermore, such a diffraction-tomography experiment can be carried out simultaneously with X-ray fluorescence, Compton and absorption tomographies, enabling a multimodal analysis of prime importance in materials science, chemistry, geology, environmental science, medical science, palaeontology and cultural heritage.

  18. Irradiation plant for flowable material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosshard, E.

    1975-01-01

    The irradiation plant can be used to treat various flowable materials including effluent or sewage sludge. The plant contains a concrete vessel in which a partition is mounted to form two coaxial irradiation chambers through which the flowable material can be circulated by means of an impeller. The partition can be formed to house tubes of radiation sources and to provide a venturi-like member about the impeller. The operation of the impeller is reversed periodically to assure movement of both heavy and light particles in the flow. (U.S.)

  19. Ion beam analysis of diffusion in heterogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, A.S.; Jenneson, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Ion-beam analysis has been applied to a variety of problems involving diffusion in heterogeneous materials. An energy loss technique has been used to study both the diffusion of water and the surface segregation of fluoropolymers in polymeric matrices. A scanning micro-beam technique has been developed to allow water concentrations in hydrophilic polymers and cements to be measured together with associated solute elements. It has also been applied to the diffusion of shampoo into hair. (orig.)

  20. Ion beam analysis of diffusion in heterogeneous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clough, A.S.; Jenneson, P.M. [Surrey Univ., Guildford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1998-04-01

    Ion-beam analysis has been applied to a variety of problems involving diffusion in heterogeneous materials. An energy loss technique has been used to study both the diffusion of water and the surface segregation of fluoropolymers in polymeric matrices. A scanning micro-beam technique has been developed to allow water concentrations in hydrophilic polymers and cements to be measured together with associated solute elements. It has also been applied to the diffusion of shampoo into hair. (orig.) 13 refs.

  1. Analyzing the Heterogeneous Hierarchy of Cultural Heritage Materials: Analytical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentelman, Karen

    2017-06-12

    Objects of cultural heritage significance are created using a wide variety of materials, or mixtures of materials, and often exhibit heterogeneity on multiple length scales. The effective study of these complex constructions thus requires the use of a suite of complementary analytical technologies. Moreover, because of the importance and irreplaceability of most cultural heritage objects, researchers favor analytical techniques that can be employed noninvasively, i.e., without having to remove any material for analysis. As such, analytical imaging has emerged as an important approach for the study of cultural heritage. Imaging technologies commonly employed, from the macroscale through the micro- to nanoscale, are discussed with respect to how the information obtained helps us understand artists' materials and methods, the cultures in which the objects were created, how the objects may have changed over time, and importantly, how we may develop strategies for their preservation.

  2. Employment policies at the plant level : job and worker flows for heterogeneous labour in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Salvanes, Kjell Gunnar

    1999-01-01

    Despite the large degree of plant-specific heterogeneity in turnover patterns recently found in the gross job and worker literature, very little is known about the sources of the heterogeneity in plant level employment policies. The present paper, studies in detail the employment management policies for heterogeneous plants and for heterogeneous labour, using a matched worker-employer data set for Norway. Within an econometric framework, I find that the job and worker flows above ...

  3. Scattering theory and effective medium approximations to heterogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubernatis, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    The formal analogy existing between problems studied in the microscopic theory of disordered alloys and problems concerned with the effective (macroscopic) behavior of heterogeneous materials is discussed. Attention is focused on (1) analogous approximations (effective medium approximations) developed for the microscopic problems by scattering theory concepts and techniques, but for the macroscopic problems principally by intuitive means, (2) the link, provided by scattering theory, of the intuitively developed approximations to a well-defined perturbative analysis, (3) the possible presence of conditionally convergent integrals in effective medium approximations

  4. Attractive and repulsive cracks in a heterogeneous material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Huillard, Guillaume; Vanel, Loïc; Ciliberto, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    We study experimentally the paths of an assembly of cracks growing in interaction in a heterogeneous two-dimensional elastic brittle material submitted to uniaxial stress. For a given initial crack assembly geometry, we observe two types of crack path. The first one corresponds to a repulsion followed by an attraction on one end of the crack and a tip-to-tip attraction on the other end. The second one corresponds to a pure attraction. Only one of the crack path types is observed in a given sample. Thus, selection between the two types appears as a statistical collective process

  5. Computing effective properties of random heterogeneous materials on heterogeneous parallel processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidi, Tiziano; Scocchi, Giulio; Grossi, Loris; Pusterla, Simone; D'Angelo, Claudio; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Ortona, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    In recent decades, finite element (FE) techniques have been extensively used for predicting effective properties of random heterogeneous materials. In the case of very complex microstructures, the choice of numerical methods for the solution of this problem can offer some advantages over classical analytical approaches, and it allows the use of digital images obtained from real material samples (e.g., using computed tomography). On the other hand, having a large number of elements is often necessary for properly describing complex microstructures, ultimately leading to extremely time-consuming computations and high memory requirements. With the final objective of reducing these limitations, we improved an existing freely available FE code for the computation of effective conductivity (electrical and thermal) of microstructure digital models. To allow execution on hardware combining multi-core CPUs and a GPU, we first translated the original algorithm from Fortran to C, and we subdivided it into software components. Then, we enhanced the C version of the algorithm for parallel processing with heterogeneous processors. With the goal of maximizing the obtained performances and limiting resource consumption, we utilized a software architecture based on stream processing, event-driven scheduling, and dynamic load balancing. The parallel processing version of the algorithm has been validated using a simple microstructure consisting of a single sphere located at the centre of a cubic box, yielding consistent results. Finally, the code was used for the calculation of the effective thermal conductivity of a digital model of a real sample (a ceramic foam obtained using X-ray computed tomography). On a computer equipped with dual hexa-core Intel Xeon X5670 processors and an NVIDIA Tesla C2050, the parallel application version features near to linear speed-up progression when using only the CPU cores. It executes more than 20 times faster when additionally using the GPU.

  6. Thin inclusion approach for modelling of heterogeneous conducting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, Nikolay; Smirnova, Alevtina; Gorgun, Haluk; Sammes, Nigel

    Experimental data show that heterogeneous nanostructure of solid oxide and polymer electrolyte fuel cells could be approximated as an infinite set of fiber-like or penny-shaped inclusions in a continuous medium. Inclusions can be arranged in a cluster mode and regular or random order. In the newly proposed theoretical model of nanostructured material, the most attention is paid to the small aspect ratio of structural elements as well as to some model problems of electrostatics. The proposed integral equation for electric potential caused by the charge distributed over the single circular or elliptic cylindrical conductor of finite length, as a single unit of a nanostructured material, has been asymptotically simplified for the small aspect ratio and solved numerically. The result demonstrates that surface density changes slightly in the middle part of the thin domain and has boundary layers localized near the edges. It is anticipated, that contribution of boundary layer solution to the surface density is significant and cannot be governed by classic equation for smooth linear charge. The role of the cross-section shape is also investigated. Proposed approach is sufficiently simple, robust and allows extension to either regular or irregular system of various inclusions. This approach can be used for the development of the system of conducting inclusions, which are commonly present in nanostructured materials used for solid oxide and polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEMFC) materials.

  7. Final Report: Nanoscale Dynamical Heterogeneity in Complex Magnetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevan, Stephen [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2016-05-27

    A magnetic object can be demagnetized by dropping it on a hard surface, but what does ‘demagnetized’ actually mean? In 1919 Heinrich Barkhausen proved the existence of magnetic domains, which are regions of uniform magnetization that are much larger than atoms but much smaller than a macroscopic object. A material is fully magnetized when domain magnetizations are aligned, while it is demagnetized when the domain magnetizations are randomly oriented and the net magnetization is zero. The heterogeneity of a demagnetized object leads to interesting questions. Magnets are unstable when their poles align, and stable when their poles anti-align, so why is the magnetized state ever stable? What do domains look like? What is the structure of a domain wall? How does the magnetized state transform to the demagnetized state? How do domains appear and disappear? What are the statistical properties of domains and how do these vary as the domain pattern evolves? Some of these questions remain the focus of intense study nearly a century after Barkhausen’s discovery. For example, just a few years ago a new kind of magnetic texture called a skyrmion was discovered. A skyrmion is a magnetic domain that is a nanometer-scale, topologically protected vortex. ‘Topologically protected’ means that skyrmions are hard to destroy and so are stable for extended periods. Skyrmions are characterized by integral quantum numbers and are observed to move with little dissipation and so could store and process information with very low power input. Our research project uses soft x-rays, which offer very high magnetic contrast, to probe magnetic heterogeneity and to measure how it evolves in time under external influences. We will condition a soft x-ray beam so that the wave fronts will be coherent, that is, they will be smooth and well-defined. When coherent soft x-ray beam interacts with a magnetic material, the magnetic heterogeneity is imprinted onto the wave fronts and projected into

  8. A consequence of local equilibration and heterogeneity in glassy materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthier, Ludovic

    2003-01-01

    The existence of a generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem observed in simulations and experiments performed in various glassy materials is related to the concepts of local equilibration and heterogeneity in space. Assuming the existence of a dynamic coherence length scale up to which the system is locally equilibrated, we extend previous generalizations of the FDT relating static to dynamic quantities to the physically relevant domain where asymptotic limits of large times and sizes are not reached. The formulation relies on a simple scaling argument and thus does not have the character of a theorem. Extensive numerical simulations support this proposition. Our results quite generally apply to systems with slow dynamics, independently of the space dimensionality, the chosen dynamics or the presence of disorder

  9. Criticality conditions of heterogeneous energetic materials under shock loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Anas; Rai, Nirmal Kumar; Sen, Oishik; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2017-06-01

    Shock interaction with the microstructural heterogeneities of energetic materials can lead to the formation of locally heated regions known as hot spots. These hot spots are the potential sites where chemical reaction may be initiated. However, the ability of a hot spot to initiate chemical reaction depends on its size, shape and strength (temperature). Previous study by Tarver et al. has shown that there exists a critical size and temperature for a given shape (spherical, cylindrical, and planar) of the hot spot above which reaction initiation is imminent. Tarver et al. assumed a constant temperature variation in the hot spot. However, the meso-scale simulations show that the temperature distribution within a hot spot formed from processes such as void collapse is seldom constant. Also, the shape of a hot spot can be arbitrary. This work is an attempt towards development of a critical hot spot curve which is a function of loading strength, duration and void morphology. To achieve the aforementioned goal, mesoscale simulations are conducted on porous HMX material. The process is repeated for different loading conditions and void sizes. The hot spots formed in the process are examined for criticality depending on whether they will ignite or not. The metamodel is used to obtain criticality curves and is compared with the critical hot spot curve of Tarver et al.

  10. Tamarisk coalition - native riparian plant materials program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy Kolegas

    2012-01-01

    The Tamarisk Coalition (TC), a nonprofit organization dedicated to riparian restoration in the western United States, has created a Native Plant Materials Program to address the identified need for native riparian plant species for use in revegetation efforts on the Colorado Plateau. The specific components of the Native Plant Materials Program include: 1) provide seed...

  11. Effects of soil nutrient heterogeneity on intraspecific competition in the invasive, clonal plant Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Dong, Bi-Cheng; Alpert, Peter; Li, Hong-Li; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Lei, Guang-Chun; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2012-03-01

    Fine-scale, spatial heterogeneity in soil nutrient availability can increase the growth of individual plants, the productivity of plant communities and interspecific competition. If this is due to the ability of plants to concentrate their roots where nutrient levels are high, then nutrient heterogeneity should have little effect on intraspecific competition, especially when there are no genotypic differences between individuals in root plasticity. We tested this hypothesis in a widespread, clonal species in which individual plants are known to respond to nutrient heterogeneity. Plants derived from a single clone of Alternanthera philoxeroides were grown in the greenhouse at low or high density (four or 16 plants per 27·5 × 27·5-cm container) with homogeneous or heterogeneous availability of soil nutrients, keeping total nutrient availability per container constant. After 9 weeks, measurements of size, dry mass and morphology were taken. Plants grew more in the heterogeneous than in the homogeneous treatment, showing that heterogeneity promoted performance; they grew less in the high- than in the low-density treatment, showing that plants competed. There was no interactive effect of nutrient heterogeneity and plant density, supporting the hypothesis that heterogeneity does not affect intraspecific competition in the absence of genotypic differences in plasticity. Treatments did not affect morphological characteristics such as specific leaf area or root/shoot ratio. Results indicate that fine-scale, spatial heterogeneity in the availability of soil nutrients does not increase competition when plants are genetically identical, consistent with the suggestion that effects of heterogeneity on competition depend upon differences in plasticity between individuals. Heterogeneity is only likely to increase the spread of monoclonal, invasive populations such as that of A. philoxeroides in China.

  12. Selective pruning in pineapple plants as means to reduce heterogeneity in fruit quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassinou Hotegni, V.N.; Lommen, W.J.M.; Struik, P.C.; Agbossou, E.K.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity in fruit quality (size and taste) is a major problem in pineapple production chains. The possibilities were investigated of reducing the heterogeneity in pineapple in the field by pruning slips on selected plants, in order to promote the fruit growth on these plants. Slips are side

  13. Heterogeneity in pineapple fruit quality results from plant heterogeneity at flower induction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassinou Hotegni, V.N.; Lommen, W.J.M.; Agbossou, E.K.; Struik, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity in fruit quality constitutes a major constraint in agri-food chains. In this paper the sources of the heterogeneity in pineapple in the field were studied in four experiments in commercial pineapple fields. The aims were to determine (a) whether differences in pineapple fruit quality

  14. Spatial heterogeneity of plant-soil feedback affects root interactions and interspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Marloes; Ravenek, Janneke M; Smit-Tiekstra, Annemiek E; van der Paauw, Jan Willem; de Caluwe, Hannie; van der Putten, Wim H; de Kroon, Hans; Mommer, Liesje

    2015-08-01

    Plant-soil feedback is receiving increasing interest as a factor influencing plant competition and species coexistence in grasslands. However, we do not know how spatial distribution of plant-soil feedback affects plant below-ground interactions. We investigated the way in which spatial heterogeneity of soil biota affects competitive interactions in grassland plant species. We performed a pairwise competition experiment combined with heterogeneous distribution of soil biota using four grassland plant species and their soil biota. Patches were applied as quadrants of 'own' and 'foreign' soils from all plant species in all pairwise combinations. To evaluate interspecific root responses, species-specific root biomass was quantified using real-time PCR. All plant species suffered negative soil feedback, but strength was species-specific, reflected by a decrease in root growth in own compared with foreign soil. Reduction in root growth in own patches by the superior plant competitor provided opportunities for inferior competitors to increase root biomass in these patches. These patterns did not cascade into above-ground effects during our experiment. We show that root distributions can be determined by spatial heterogeneity of soil biota, affecting plant below-ground competitive interactions. Thus, spatial heterogeneity of soil biota may contribute to plant species coexistence in species-rich grasslands. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Interfacial mechanisms of heterogeneous Fenton reactions catalyzed by iron-based materials: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Yang, Xiaofang; Men, Bin; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous Fenton reaction can generate highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH) from reactions between recyclable solid catalysts and H2O2 at acidic or even circumneutral pH. Hence, it can effectively oxidize refractory organics in water or soils and has become a promising environmentally friendly treatment technology. Due to the complex reaction system, the mechanism behind heterogeneous Fenton reactions remains unresolved but fascinating, and is crucial for understanding Fenton chemistry and the development and application of efficient heterogeneous Fenton technologies. Iron-based materials usually possess high catalytic activity, low cost, negligible toxicity and easy recovery, and are a superior type of heterogeneous Fenton catalysts. Therefore, this article reviews the fundamental but important interfacial mechanisms of heterogeneous Fenton reactions catalyzed by iron-based materials. OH, hydroperoxyl radicals/superoxide anions (HO2/O2(-)) and high-valent iron are the three main types of reactive oxygen species (ROS), with different oxidation reactivity and selectivity. Based on the mechanisms of ROS generation, the interfacial mechanisms of heterogeneous Fenton systems can be classified as the homogeneous Fenton mechanism induced by surface-leached iron, the heterogeneous catalysis mechanism, and the heterogeneous reaction-induced homogeneous mechanism. Different heterogeneous Fenton systems catalyzed by characteristic iron-based materials are comprehensively reviewed. Finally, related future research directions are also suggested. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Spatial heterogeneity in soil microbes alters outcomes of plant competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen C Abbott

    Full Text Available Plant species vary greatly in their responsiveness to nutritional soil mutualists, such as mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobia, and this responsiveness is associated with a trade-off in allocation to root structures for resource uptake. As a result, the outcome of plant competition can change with the density of mutualists, with microbe-responsive plant species having high competitive ability when mutualists are abundant and non-responsive plants having high competitive ability with low densities of mutualists. When responsive plant species also allow mutualists to grow to greater densities, changes in mutualist density can generate a positive feedback, reinforcing an initial advantage to either plant type. We study a model of mutualist-mediated competition to understand outcomes of plant-plant interactions within a patchy environment. We find that a microbe-responsive plant can exclude a non-responsive plant from some initial conditions, but it must do so across the landscape including in the microbe-free areas where it is a poorer competitor. Otherwise, the non-responsive plant will persist in both mutualist-free and mutualist-rich regions. We apply our general findings to two different biological scenarios: invasion of a non-responsive plant into an established microbe-responsive native population, and successional replacement of non-responders by microbe-responsive species. We find that resistance to invasion is greatest when seed dispersal by the native plant is modest and dispersal by the invader is greater. Nonetheless, a native plant that relies on microbial mutualists for competitive dominance may be particularly vulnerable to invasion because any disturbance that temporarily reduces its density or that of the mutualist creates a window for a non-responsive invader to establish dominance. We further find that the positive feedbacks from associations with beneficial soil microbes create resistance to successional turnover. Our theoretical

  17. Spatial heterogeneity in soil microbes alters outcomes of plant competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Karen C; Karst, Justine; Biederman, Lori A; Borrett, Stuart R; Hastings, Alan; Walsh, Vonda; Bever, James D

    2015-01-01

    Plant species vary greatly in their responsiveness to nutritional soil mutualists, such as mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobia, and this responsiveness is associated with a trade-off in allocation to root structures for resource uptake. As a result, the outcome of plant competition can change with the density of mutualists, with microbe-responsive plant species having high competitive ability when mutualists are abundant and non-responsive plants having high competitive ability with low densities of mutualists. When responsive plant species also allow mutualists to grow to greater densities, changes in mutualist density can generate a positive feedback, reinforcing an initial advantage to either plant type. We study a model of mutualist-mediated competition to understand outcomes of plant-plant interactions within a patchy environment. We find that a microbe-responsive plant can exclude a non-responsive plant from some initial conditions, but it must do so across the landscape including in the microbe-free areas where it is a poorer competitor. Otherwise, the non-responsive plant will persist in both mutualist-free and mutualist-rich regions. We apply our general findings to two different biological scenarios: invasion of a non-responsive plant into an established microbe-responsive native population, and successional replacement of non-responders by microbe-responsive species. We find that resistance to invasion is greatest when seed dispersal by the native plant is modest and dispersal by the invader is greater. Nonetheless, a native plant that relies on microbial mutualists for competitive dominance may be particularly vulnerable to invasion because any disturbance that temporarily reduces its density or that of the mutualist creates a window for a non-responsive invader to establish dominance. We further find that the positive feedbacks from associations with beneficial soil microbes create resistance to successional turnover. Our theoretical results constitute an

  18. Identification Damage Model for Thermomechanical Degradation of Ductile Heterogeneous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, A. El; Yakhloufi, M. H. El; Khamlichi, A.

    2017-05-01

    The failure of ductile materials subject to high thermal and mechanical loading rates is notably affected by material inertia. The mechanisms of fatigue-crack propagation are examined with particular emphasis on the similarities and differences between cyclic crack growth in ductile materials, such as metals, and corresponding behavior in brittle materials, such as intermetallic and ceramics. Numerical simulations of crack propagation in a cylindrical specimen demonstrate that the proposed method provides an effective means to simulate ductile fracture in large scale cylindrical structures with engineering accuracy. The influence of damage on the intensity of the destruction of materials is studied as well.

  19. Materials availability for fusion power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Erickson, L.E.; Engel, R.L.; Foley, T.J.

    1976-09-01

    A preliminary assessment was made of the estimated total U.S. material usage with and without fusion power plants as well as the U.S. and foreign reserves and resources, and U.S. production capacity. The potential environmental impacts of fusion power plant material procurement were also reviewed including land alteration and resultant chemical releases. To provide a general measure for the impact of material procurement for fusion reactors, land requirements were estimated for mining and disposing of waste from mining

  20. Enthalpy recovery in glassy materials: Heterogeneous versus homogenous models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazinani, Shobeir K. S.; Richert, Ranko

    2012-05-01

    Models of enthalpy relaxations of glasses are the basis for understanding physical aging, scanning calorimetry, and other phenomena that involve non-equilibrium and non-linear dynamics. We compare models in terms of the nature of the relaxation dynamics, heterogeneous versus homogeneous, with focus on the Kovacs-Aklonis-Hutchinson-Ramos (KAHR) and the Tool-Narayanaswamy-Moynihan (TNM) approaches. Of particular interest is identifying the situations for which experimental data are capable of discriminating the heterogeneous from the homogeneous scenario. The ad hoc assumption of a single fictive temperature, Tf, is common to many models, including KAHR and TNM. It is shown that only for such single-Tf models, enthalpy relaxation of a glass is a two-point correlation function in reduced time, implying that experimental results are not decisive regarding the underlying nature of the dynamics of enthalpy relaxation. We also find that the restriction of the common TNM model to a Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts type relaxation pattern limits the applicability of this approach, as the particular choice regarding the distribution of relaxation times is a more critical factor compared with isothermal relaxation experiments. As a result, significant improvements in fitting calorimetry data can be achieved with subtle adjustments in the underlying relaxation time distribution.

  1. Plio-Pleistocene climate change and geographic heterogeneity in plant diversity-environment relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenning, J.-C.; Normand, Signe; Skov, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    Plio-Pleistocene climate change may have induced geographic heterogeneity in plant species richness-environment relationships in Europe due to greater in situ species survival and speciation rates in southern Europe. We formulate distinct hypotheses on how Plio-Pleistocene climate change may have...... affected richness-topographic heterogeneity and richness-water-energy availability relationships, causing steeper relationships in southern Europe. We investigated these hypotheses using data from Atlas Florae Europaeae on the distribution of 3069 species and geographically weighted regression (GWR). Our...... analyses showed that plant species richness generally increased with topographic heterogeneity (ln-transformed altitudinal range) and actual evapotranspiration (AET). We also found evidence for strong geographic heterogeneity in the species richness-environment relationship, with a greater increase...

  2. Methods of producing compounds from plant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werpy, Todd A [West Richland, WA; Schmidt, Andrew J [Richland, WA; Frye, Jr., John G.; Zacher, Alan H. , Franz; James A. , Alnajjar; Mikhail S. , Neuenschwander; Gary G. , Alderson; Eric V. , Orth; Rick J. , Abbas; Charles A. , Beery; Kyle E. , Rammelsberg; Anne M. , Kim; Catherine, J [Decatur, IL

    2010-01-26

    The invention includes methods of processing plant material by adding water to form a mixture, heating the mixture, and separating a liquid component from a solid-comprising component. At least one of the liquid component and the solid-comprising component undergoes additional processing. Processing of the solid-comprising component produces oils, and processing of the liquid component produces one or more of glycerol, ethylene glycol, lactic acid and propylene glycol. The invention includes a process of forming glycerol, ethylene glycol, lactic acid and propylene glycol from plant matter by adding water, heating and filtering the plant matter. The filtrate containing starch, starch fragments, hemicellulose and fragments of hemicellulose is treated to form linear poly-alcohols which are then cleaved to produce one or more of glycerol, ethylene glycol, lactic acid and propylene glycol. The invention also includes a method of producing free and/or complexed sterols and stanols from plant material.

  3. Methods of producing compounds from plant material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werpy, Todd A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Frye, Jr., John G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Franz, James A.; Alnajjar, Mikhail S.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Alderson, Eric V.; Orth, Rick J.; Abbas, Charles A.; Beery, Kyle E.; Rammelsberg, Anne M.; Kim, Catherine J.

    2006-01-03

    The invention includes methods of processing plant material by adding water to form a mixture, heating the mixture, and separating a liquid component from a solid-comprising component. At least one of the liquid component and the solid-comprising component undergoes additional processing. Processing of the solid-comprising component produces oils, and processing of the liquid component produces one or more of glycerol, ethylene glycol, lactic acid and propylene glycol. The invention includes a process of forming glycerol, ethylene glycol, lactic acid and propylene glycol from plant matter by adding water, heating and filtering the plant matter. The filtrate containing starch, starch fragments, hemicellulose and fragments of hemicellulose is treated to form linear poly-alcohols which are then cleaved to produce one or more of glycerol, ethylene glycol, lactic acid and propylene glycol. The invention also includes a method of producing free and/or complexed sterols and stanols from plant material.

  4. Plants and fungi in the era of heterogeneous plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opekarová, M; Malinsky, J; Tanner, W

    2010-09-01

    Examples from yeast and plant cells are described that show that their plasma membrane is laterally compartmented. Distinct lateral domains encompassing both specific lipids and integral proteins coexist within the plane of the plasma membrane. The compartments are either spatially stable and include distinct sets of proteins, or they are transiently formed to accomplish diverse functions. They are not related to lipid rafts or their clusters, as defined for mammalian cells. This review summarises only well-documented compartments of plasma membranes from plants and fungi, which have been recognised using microscopic approaches. In several cases, physiological functions of the membrane compartmentation are revealed.

  5. Spatial environmental heterogeneity affects plant growth and thermal performance on a green roof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckland-Nicks, Michael; Heim, Amy; Lundholm, Jeremy, E-mail: jlundholm@smu.ca

    2016-05-15

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services, including stormwater retention and reductions in heat transfer through the roof. Microclimates, as well as designed features of green roofs, such as substrate and vegetation, affect the magnitude of these services. Many green roofs are partially shaded by surrounding buildings, but the effects of this within-roof spatial environmental heterogeneity on thermal performance and other ecosystem services have not been examined. We quantified the effects of spatial heterogeneity in solar radiation, substrate depth and other variables affected by these drivers on vegetation and ecosystem services in an extensive green roof. Spatial heterogeneity in substrate depth and insolation were correlated with differential growth, survival and flowering in two focal plant species. These effects were likely driven by the resulting spatial heterogeneity in substrate temperature and moisture content. Thermal performance (indicated by heat flux and substrate temperature) was influenced by spatial heterogeneity in vegetation cover and substrate depth. Areas with less insolation were cooler in summer and had greater substrate moisture, leading to more favorable conditions for plant growth and survival. Spatial variation in substrate moisture (7%–26% volumetric moisture content) and temperature (21 °C–36 °C) during hot sunny conditions in summer could cause large differences in stormwater retention and heat flux within a single green roof. Shaded areas promote smaller heat fluxes through the roof, leading to energy savings, but lower evapotranspiration in these areas should reduce stormwater retention capacity. Spatial heterogeneity can thus result in trade-offs between different ecosystem services. The effects of these spatial heterogeneities are likely widespread in green roofs. Structures that provide shelter from sun and wind may be productively utilized to design higher functioning green roofs and increase biodiversity by providing habitat

  6. Spatial environmental heterogeneity affects plant growth and thermal performance on a green roof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckland-Nicks, Michael; Heim, Amy; Lundholm, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services, including stormwater retention and reductions in heat transfer through the roof. Microclimates, as well as designed features of green roofs, such as substrate and vegetation, affect the magnitude of these services. Many green roofs are partially shaded by surrounding buildings, but the effects of this within-roof spatial environmental heterogeneity on thermal performance and other ecosystem services have not been examined. We quantified the effects of spatial heterogeneity in solar radiation, substrate depth and other variables affected by these drivers on vegetation and ecosystem services in an extensive green roof. Spatial heterogeneity in substrate depth and insolation were correlated with differential growth, survival and flowering in two focal plant species. These effects were likely driven by the resulting spatial heterogeneity in substrate temperature and moisture content. Thermal performance (indicated by heat flux and substrate temperature) was influenced by spatial heterogeneity in vegetation cover and substrate depth. Areas with less insolation were cooler in summer and had greater substrate moisture, leading to more favorable conditions for plant growth and survival. Spatial variation in substrate moisture (7%–26% volumetric moisture content) and temperature (21 °C–36 °C) during hot sunny conditions in summer could cause large differences in stormwater retention and heat flux within a single green roof. Shaded areas promote smaller heat fluxes through the roof, leading to energy savings, but lower evapotranspiration in these areas should reduce stormwater retention capacity. Spatial heterogeneity can thus result in trade-offs between different ecosystem services. The effects of these spatial heterogeneities are likely widespread in green roofs. Structures that provide shelter from sun and wind may be productively utilized to design higher functioning green roofs and increase biodiversity by providing habitat

  7. Cavitational synthesis of nanostructured inorganic materials for enhanced heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausz, Ivo Michael

    The synthesis of nanostructured inorganic materials by hydrodynamic cavitation processing was investigated. The goal of this work was to develop a general synthesis technique for nanostructured materials with a control over crystallite size in the 1--20 nm range. Materials with crystallite sizes in this range have shown enhanced catalytic activity compared to materials with larger crystallite sizes. Several supported and unsupported inorganic materials were studied to understand the effects of cavitation on crystallite size. Cavitation processing of calcium fluoride resulted in more spherical particles, attached to one another by melted necks. This work produced the first evidence of shock wave heating of nanostructured materials by hydrodynamic cavitation processing. Hydrodynamic cavitation synthesis of various catalytic support materials indicated that their phase composition and purity could be controlled by adjustment of the processing parameters. Zirconia/alumina supports synthesized using hydro-dynamic cavitation and calcined to 1368 K retained a high purity cubic zirconia phase, whereas classically prepared samples showed a phase transformation to monoclinic zirconia. Similarly, the synthesis of alumina resulted in materials with varying Bohmite and Bayerite contents as a function of the process parameters. High temperature calcination resulted in stable alumina supports with varying amounts of delta-, and theta-alumina. Synthesis studies of palladium and silver showed modest variations in crystallite size as a function of cavitation process parameters. Calcination resulted in larger grain materials, indicating a disappearance of intergrain boundaries. Based on these results, a new synthesis method was studied involving controlled agglomeration of small silver crystallites by hydrodynamic cavitation processing, followed by deposition on alumina. The optimal pH, concentration, and processing time for controlling the silver crystallite size in the cavitation

  8. Spatial heterogeneity in light supply affects intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Wang

    Full Text Available Spatial heterogeneity in light supply is common in nature. Many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous light supply on growth, morphology, physiology and biomass allocation of clonal plants, but few have tested those effects on intraspecific competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (no competition or nine ramets (with intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant, Duchesnea indica, in three homogeneous light conditions (high, medium and low light intensity and two heterogeneous ones differing in patch size (large and small patch treatments. The total light in the two heterogeneous treatments was the same as that in the homogeneous medium light treatment. Both decreasing light intensity and intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth (biomass, number of ramets and total stolon length of D. indica. As compared with the homogeneous medium light treatment, the large patch treatment significantly increased the growth of D. indica without intraspecific competition. However, the growth of D. indica with competition did not differ among the homogeneous medium light, the large and the small patch treatments. Consequently, light heterogeneity significantly increased intraspecific competition intensity, as measured by the decreased log response ratio. These results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in light supply can alter intraspecific interactions of clonal plants.

  9. Intermittency and roughening in the failure of brittle heterogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonamy, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Stress enhancement in the vicinity of brittle cracks makes the macro-scale failure properties extremely sensitive to the micro-scale material disorder. Therefore, (i) fracturing systems often display a jerky dynamics, so-called crackling noise, with seemingly random sudden energy release spanning over a broad range of scales, reminiscent of earthquakes; (ii) fracture surfaces exhibit roughness at scales much larger than that of material microstructure. Here, I provide a critical review of experiments and simulations performed in this context, highlighting the existence of universal scaling features, independent of both the material and the loading conditions, reminiscent of critical phenomena. I finally discuss recent stochastic descriptions of crack growth in brittle disordered media that seem to capture qualitatively-and sometimes quantitatively-these scaling features.

  10. Advanced power plant materials, design and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roddy, D. (ed.) [Newcastle University (United Kingdom). Sir Joseph Swan Institute

    2010-07-01

    The book is a comprehensive reference on the state of the art of gas-fired and coal-fired power plants, their major components and performance improvement options. Selected chapters are: Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant design and technology by Y. Zhu, and H. C. Frey; Improving thermal cycle efficiency in advanced power plants: water and steam chemistry and materials performance by B. Dooley; Advanced carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) gas separation membrane development for power plants by A. Basile, F. Gallucci, and P. Morrone; Advanced flue gas cleaning systems for sulphur oxides (SOx), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and mercury emissions control in power plants by S. Miller and B.G. Miller; Advanced flue gas dedusting systems and filters for ash and particulate emissions control in power plants by B.G. Miller; Advanced sensors for combustion monitoring in power plants: towards smart high-density sensor networks by M. Yu and A.K. Gupta; Advanced monitoring and process control technology for coal-fired power plants by Y. Yan; Low-rank coal properties, upgrading and utilisation for improving the fuel flexibility of advanced power plants by T. Dlouhy; Development and integration of underground coal gasification (UCG) for improving the environmental impact of advanced power plants by M. Green; Development and application of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage for improving the environmental impact of advanced power plants by B. McPherson; and Advanced technologies for syngas and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production from fossil-fuel feedstocks in power plants by P. Chiesa.

  11. Transient computational homogenization for heterogeneous materials under dynamic excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, N.K.H.; Kouznetsova, V.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel transient computational homogenization procedure that is suitable for the modelling of the evolution in space and in time of materials with non-steady state microstructure, such as metamaterials. This transient scheme is an extension of the classical (first-order)

  12. Dynamic High-Pressure Behavior of Hierarchical Heterogeneous Geological Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    plate-impact experiments. The peak stress, particle velocity, or shock velocity, are measured using point diagnostics employing either stress gauges or...and porous geological materials. In this prior work, they obtained the Hugoniot states for a 60:40 volumetric mixture of ice and sand [8], to...in copper capsule, backed with PMMA. The instrumentation includes two PVDF stress gauges , VISAR, and ToA shorting pins. 44mm ø ~5mm thick sample

  13. Numerical solution of Stefan's problem to heterogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basombrio, F.G.

    1996-01-01

    We present an extension of the methodology developed by R.H. Nochetto et al. to solve the Stefan problem, to situations for which the physical properties are dependent on the spatial point (thermic non-homogeneous materials). In this report, the theoretical and computational aspects are described. With the purpose of showing the performance of programme FASES2, two illustrative examples are included. (author). 6 refs., 2 figs

  14. Determination of mercury in plant material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickard, J A; Martin, J T

    1960-07-01

    An analytical procedure used for the determination of traces of mercury in plant material is described. The conditions of combustion of organic matter are controlled to avoid loss of mercury and EDTA is used to reduce the values for apparent mercury on uncontaminated samples. Satisfactory recoveries of mercury added to apples, tomatoes and coffee are obtained. 10 references, 1 table.

  15. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2003-10-20

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

  16. How Design of Online Learning Materials can Accommodate the Heterogeneity in Student Abilities, Aptitudes and Aspirations

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, Simon; Hardy, Judy; Hill, Jon; McKain, David; University of Gloucestershire

    2008-01-01

    We describe the challenges facing higher education in terms of the heterogeneity of the cohort of students that arrive at university. The reasons why such diversity exists are many: students differ widely in terms of their preparedness for study at university, their degree choice aspirations and the issue of motivation for study of a particular subject. We illustrate how well-designed e-learning course materials can support many of the particular facets of heterogeneity by offering an inheren...

  17. Heterogeneous reaction mechanisms and kinetics relevant to the CVD of semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creighton, J.R.; Coltrin, M.E.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the state of the art in experimental and theoretical techniques for determining reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions relevant to the chemical vapor deposition of semiconductor materials. It summarizes the most common ultra-high vacuum experimental techniques that are used and the types of rate information available from each. Several case studies of specific chemical systems relevant to the microelectronics industry are described. Theoretical methods for calculating heterogeneous reaction rate constants are also summarized.

  18. Aktau Plastics Plant Explosives Material Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CASE JR.,ROGER S.

    1999-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been cooperating with the Republic of Kazakhstanin Combined Threat Reduction (CTR) activities at the BN350 reactor located at the Mangyshlak Atomic Energy Complex (MAEC) in the city of Aktau, Kazakhstan since 1994. DOE contract personnel have been stationed at this facility for the last two years and DOE representatives regularly visit this location to oversee the continuing cooperative activities. Continued future cooperation is planned. A Russian news report in September 1999 indicated that 75 metric tons of organic peroxides stored at the Plastics Plant near Aktau were in danger of exploding and killing or injuring nearby residents. To ensure the health and safety of the personnel at the BN350 site, the DOE conducted a study to investigate the potential danger to the BN350 site posed by these materials at the Plastics Plant. The study conclusion was that while the organic peroxides do have hazards associated with them, the BN350 site is a safe distance from the Plastics Plant. Further, because the Plastics Plant and MAEC have cooperative fire-fighting agreements,and the Plastics Plant had exhausted its reserve of fire-fighting foam, there was the possibility of the Plastics Plant depleting the store of fire-fighting foam at the BN350 site. Subsequently, the DOE decided to purchase fire-fighting foam for the Plastics Plant to ensure the availability of free-fighting foam at the BN350 site.

  19. Material control for a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundquist, D.; Bray, G.; Donelson, S.; Glancy, J.; Gozani, T.; Harris, L.; McNamera, R.; Pence, D.; Ringham, M.

    1976-01-01

    Adequate control of special nuclear material (SNM) implies a basic knowledge of the quantities of SNM processed through or contained within a fuels processing facility with sufficient accuracy that diversion of the SNM for deleterious purposes can be detected in a timely manner. This report to the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) describes the primary process streams containing plutonium that are handled routinely within a spent fuel reprocessing plant and conversion facility. As an aid in implementing the objectives of the accountability system in a realistic situation, the Allied General Nuclear Services (AGNS) reprocessing plant now under construction near Barnwell, South Carolina, was chosen as the study model. The AGNS plant processes are discussed in detail emphasizing those portions of the process that contain significant quantities of plutonium. The unit processes within the separations plant, nitrate storage, plutonium product facility and the analytical laboratory are described with regard to the SNM control system currently planned for use in the facilities. A general discussion of laboratory techniques, nondestructive assay and process instrumentation for plutonium process and product material from a reprocessing plant is included. A comprehensive discussion is given of holdup measurements in plutonium recycle facilities. A brief preliminary overview is presented of alternative processing strategies for LWR fuel. An extensive review and summary of modeling efforts for liquid-liquid extraction cycles is included. A comprehensive bibliography of previous modeling efforts is covered

  20. Spatial environmental heterogeneity affects plant growth and thermal performance on a green roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland-Nicks, Michael; Heim, Amy; Lundholm, Jeremy

    2016-05-15

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services, including stormwater retention and reductions in heat transfer through the roof. Microclimates, as well as designed features of green roofs, such as substrate and vegetation, affect the magnitude of these services. Many green roofs are partially shaded by surrounding buildings, but the effects of this within-roof spatial environmental heterogeneity on thermal performance and other ecosystem services have not been examined. We quantified the effects of spatial heterogeneity in solar radiation, substrate depth and other variables affected by these drivers on vegetation and ecosystem services in an extensive green roof. Spatial heterogeneity in substrate depth and insolation were correlated with differential growth, survival and flowering in two focal plant species. These effects were likely driven by the resulting spatial heterogeneity in substrate temperature and moisture content. Thermal performance (indicated by heat flux and substrate temperature) was influenced by spatial heterogeneity in vegetation cover and substrate depth. Areas with less insolation were cooler in summer and had greater substrate moisture, leading to more favorable conditions for plant growth and survival. Spatial variation in substrate moisture (7%-26% volumetric moisture content) and temperature (21°C-36°C) during hot sunny conditions in summer could cause large differences in stormwater retention and heat flux within a single green roof. Shaded areas promote smaller heat fluxes through the roof, leading to energy savings, but lower evapotranspiration in these areas should reduce stormwater retention capacity. Spatial heterogeneity can thus result in trade-offs between different ecosystem services. The effects of these spatial heterogeneities are likely widespread in green roofs. Structures that provide shelter from sun and wind may be productively utilized to design higher functioning green roofs and increase biodiversity by providing habitat

  1. Materials and Breakdown Phenomena: Heterogeneous Molybdenum Metallic Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Marcelli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Technological activities to design, manufacture, and test new accelerating devices using different materials and methods is under way all over the world. The main goal of these studies is to increase the accelerating gradients and reduce the probability of radio-frequency (RF breakdown. Indeed, it is still not clear why, by increasing the intensity of the applied field, intense surface damage is observed in copper structures, limiting the lifetime and, therefore, the practical applications. A possible solution is represented by a coating of a relatively thick layer of molybdenum in order to improve the breakdown rate. molybdenum can be reliably grown on different substrates with a negligible strain and, for thicknesses up to 600 nm, with a resistivity < 100–150·μΩ cm. Moreover, Mo coatings with controlled composition, internal stress, and roughness may allow improving thermo-mechanical properties reaching values not attainable by uncoated copper. Although the Mo conductivity remains lower compared to Cu, a Mo coating represents a very interesting option for high gradient accelerator components manufactured in copper.

  2. The effect of material heterogeneity in curved composite beams for use in aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoole, Brendan J.; Santare, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams for use in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing a gradient in material properties in both the radial and tangential directions. The analysis procedure uses a separate two-dimensional elasticity solution for the stresses in the flanges and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring the forces and displacements match at the section boundaries. Analysis is performed for curved beams loaded in pure bending and uniform pressure. The beams can be of any general cross-section such as a hat, T-, I-, or J-beam. Preliminary results show that geometry of the beam dictates the effect of heterogeneity on performance. Heterogeneity plays a much larger role in beams with a small average radius to depth ratio, R/t, where R is the average radius of the beam and t is the difference between the inside and outside radius. Results of the analysis are in the form of stresses and displacements, and they are compared to both mechanics of materials and numerical solutions obtained using finite element analysis.

  3. Student reasoning while investigating plant material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Näs

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this project, 10-12 year old students in three classes, investigated plant material to learn more about plants and photosynthesis. The research study was conducted to reveal the students’ scientific reasoning during their work. The eleven different tasks helped students investigate plant anatomy, plant physiology, and the gases involved in photosynthesis and respiration. The study was carried out in three ordinary classrooms. The collected data consisted of audio-taped discussions, students’ notebooks, and field notes. Students’ discussions and written work, during the different plant tasks, were analysed to see how the students’ learning and understanding processes developed. The analysis is descriptive and uses categories from a modified general typology of student’s epistemological reasoning. The study shows students’ level of interest in doing the tasks, their struggle with new words and concepts, and how they develop their knowledge about plant physiology. The study confirms thatstudents, in this age group, develop understanding and show an interest in complicated processes in natural science, e.g. photosynthesis.

  4. Heterogeneous catalytic materials solid state chemistry, surface chemistry and catalytic behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Busca, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous Catalytic Materials discusses experimental methods and the latest developments in three areas of research: heterogeneous catalysis; surface chemistry; and the chemistry of catalysts. Catalytic materials are those solids that allow the chemical reaction to occur efficiently and cost-effectively. This book provides you with all necessary information to synthesize, characterize, and relate the properties of a catalyst to its behavior, enabling you to select the appropriate catalyst for the process and reactor system. Oxides (used both as catalysts and as supports for cata

  5. Materials qualification for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braconi, F.

    1987-01-01

    The supply of materials to be used in the fabrication of components submitted to pressure destined to Atucha II nuclear power plant must fulfill the quality assurance requirements in accordance with the international standards. With the aim of promoting the national participation in CNA II, ENACE had the need to adapt these requirements to the national industry conditions and to the availability of official entities' qualification and inspection. As a uniform and normalized assessment for the qualification of materials did not exist in the country, ENACE had to develop a materials suppliers qualification system. This paper presents a suppliers qualification procedure, its application limits and the alternative procedures for the acceptance of individual stock and for the stock materials purchase. (Author)

  6. Synchrony of plant cellular circadian clocks with heterogeneous properties under light/dark cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masaaki; Muranaka, Tomoaki; Ito, Shogo; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2017-03-22

    Individual cells in a plant can work independently as circadian clocks, and their properties are the basis of various circadian phenomena. The behaviour of individual cellular clocks in Lemna gibba was orderly under 24-h light/dark cycles despite their heterogeneous free-running periods (FRPs). Here, we reveal the entrainment habits of heterogeneous cellular clocks using non-24-h light/dark cycles (T-cycles). The cellular rhythms of AtCCA1::LUC under T = 16 h cycles showed heterogeneous entrainment that was associated with their heterogeneous FRPs. Under T = 12 h cycles, most cells showed rhythms having ~24-h periods. This suggested that the lower limit of entrainment to the light/dark cycles of heterogeneous cellular circadian clocks is set to a period longer than 12 h, which enables them to be synchronous under ~24-h daily cycles without being perturbed by short light/dark cycles. The entrainment habits of individual cellular clocks are likely to be the basis of the circadian behaviour of plant under the natural day-night cycle with noisy environmental fluctuations. We further suggest that modifications of EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) in individual cells deviate the entrainability to shorter T-cycles possibly by altering both the FRPs and light responsiveness.

  7. DOE Energy Frontiers Research Center for Heterogeneous Functional Materials; the “HeteroFoaM Center”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reifsnider, Kenneth Leonard [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-11-03

    Synopsis of five year accomplishments: Devices that convert and store energy are generally made from heterogeneous constituent materials that act and interact to selectively conduct, transport, and separate mass, heat, and charge. Controlling these actions and interactions enables the technical breakthroughs that have made fuel cells, batteries, and solid state membranes, for example, essential parts of our society. In the biological sense, these materials are ‘vascular’ rather than primitive ‘cellular’ materials, in which the arrangements and configurations of the constituents (including their void phases) play essential and definitive roles in their functional capabilities. In 2009 a group of investigators, with lifetime investments of effort in the understanding of heterogeneous materials, recognized that the design of such material systems is not an optimization problem as such. Local interactions of the constituents create “emergent” properties and responses that are not part of the formal set of constituent characteristics, in much the same sense that society and culture is created by the group interactions of the people involved. The design of emergent properties is an open question in all formal science, but for energy materials the lack of this foundation science relegates development tasks to Edisonian trial and error, with anecdotal success and frequent costly failures. That group defined, for the first time, multi-scale heterogeneous functional materials with functional disordered and void phase regions as “HeteroFoaM,” and formed the first multidisciplinary research team to define and codify the foundation science of that material class. The primary goal of the HeteroFoaM Center was, and is, to create and establish the multi-scale fundamental knowledge and related methodology required for the rational and systematic multiphysics design of heterogeneous functional materials and their interfaces and surfaces for applications in energy

  8. Effect of material property heterogeneity on biomechanical modeling of prostate under deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samavati, Navid; McGrath, Deirdre M; Ménard, Cynthia; Jewett, Michael A S; Van der Kwast, Theo; Brock, Kristy K

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical model based deformable image registration has been widely used to account for prostate deformation in various medical imaging procedures. Biomechanical material properties are important components of a biomechanical model. In this study, the effect of incorporating tumor-specific material properties in the prostate biomechanical model was investigated to provide insight into the potential impact of material heterogeneity on the prostate deformation calculations. First, a simple spherical prostate and tumor model was used to analytically describe the deformations and demonstrate the fundamental effect of changes in the tumor volume and stiffness in the modeled deformation. Next, using a clinical prostate model, a parametric approach was used to describe the variations in the heterogeneous prostate model by changing tumor volume, stiffness, and location, to show the differences in the modeled deformation between heterogeneous and homogeneous prostate models. Finally, five clinical prostatectomy examples were used in separately performed homogeneous and heterogeneous biomechanical model based registrations to describe the deformations between 3D reconstructed histopathology images and ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging, and examine the potential clinical impact of modeling biomechanical heterogeneity of the prostate. The analytical formulation showed that increasing the tumor volume and stiffness could significantly increase the impact of the heterogeneous prostate model in the calculated displacement differences compared to the homogeneous model. The parametric approach using a single prostate model indicated up to 4.8 mm of displacement difference at the tumor boundary compared to a homogeneous model. Such differences in the deformation of the prostate could be potentially clinically significant given the voxel size of the ex vivo MR images (0.3  ×  0.3  ×  0.3 mm). However, no significant changes in the registration accuracy were

  9. Assessment of Genetic Heterogeneity in Structured Plant Populations Using Multivariate Whole-Genome Regression Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehermeier, Christina; Schön, Chris-Carolin; de Los Campos, Gustavo

    2015-09-01

    Plant breeding populations exhibit varying levels of structure and admixture; these features are likely to induce heterogeneity of marker effects across subpopulations. Traditionally, structure has been dealt with as a potential confounder, and various methods exist to "correct" for population stratification. However, these methods induce a mean correction that does not account for heterogeneity of marker effects. The animal breeding literature offers a few recent studies that consider modeling genetic heterogeneity in multibreed data, using multivariate models. However, these methods have received little attention in plant breeding where population structure can have different forms. In this article we address the problem of analyzing data from heterogeneous plant breeding populations, using three approaches: (a) a model that ignores population structure [A-genome-based best linear unbiased prediction (A-GBLUP)], (b) a stratified (i.e., within-group) analysis (W-GBLUP), and (c) a multivariate approach that uses multigroup data and accounts for heterogeneity (MG-GBLUP). The performance of the three models was assessed on three different data sets: a diversity panel of rice (Oryza sativa), a maize (Zea mays L.) half-sib panel, and a wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) data set that originated from plant breeding programs. The estimated genomic correlations between subpopulations varied from null to moderate, depending on the genetic distance between subpopulations and traits. Our assessment of prediction accuracy features cases where ignoring population structure leads to a parsimonious more powerful model as well as others where the multivariate and stratified approaches have higher predictive power. In general, the multivariate approach appeared slightly more robust than either the A- or the W-GBLUP. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. An artificial compressibility CBS method for modelling heat transfer and fluid flow in heterogeneous porous materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malan, AG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available to modelling both forced convection as well as heat transfer and fluid flow through heterogeneous saturated porous materials via an edge-based finite volume discretization scheme. A volume-averaged set of local thermal disequilibrium governing equations...

  11. A review of predictive nonlinear theories for multiscale modeling of heterogeneous materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matous, K.; Geers, M.G.D.; Kouznetsova, V.; Gillman, A.

    2017-01-01

    Since the beginning of the industrial age, material performance and design have been in the midst of innovation of many disruptive technologies. Today’s electronics, space, medical, transportation, and other industries are enriched by development, design and deployment of composite, heterogeneous

  12. Low temperature bonding of heterogeneous materials using Al2O3 as an intermediate layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahoo, Hitesh Kumar; Ottaviano, Luisa; Zheng, Yi

    2018-01-01

    bonding solution for heterogeneous material systems has not yet been developed. This has been a roadblock in the realization of novel devices which need the integration of new semiconductor platforms such as III-V on Si, Ge on Sapphire, LiNbO3 on GaAs etc. The large thermal expansion coefficient mismatch...

  13. Correction for gamma-ray self-attenuation in regular heterogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, J.L.

    1981-09-01

    A procedure for determining the total correction factor for gamma-ray self-attenuation in regular heterogeneous materials is derived and discussed. The result of a practical application of the procedure to the passive gamma-ray assay of the 235 U content of high-temperature gas reactor fuel is presented

  14. Materials in machine, plant, and apparatus construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenauer, H.; Hampe, E.; Hoehne, D.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered under the following headings: principles of materials economy and selection, designation of materials, general construction materials; materials for tools, materials for low temperatures, materials for high temperatures, materials for corrosive stress, materials with high wear resistance and friction materials, sliding and bearing materials, materials for spring load, materials for joints, and materials for nuclear reactors

  15. Experimental identification of elastoplastic behavior of heterogeneous materials under complex loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madani, Tarik

    2015-01-01

    The present work follows a first approach where a strategy for identifying the shape and the parameters of cohesive-zone laws has been developed for homogeneous materials. The extension of this method to heterogeneous material requires the knowledge of the local stress state. The study aims at developing a local characterization method for mechanical properties and stresses. This method is based on the constitutive equation gap principles and relies on the knowledge of mechanical kinematic fields and particularly of the strain fields. These fields are obtained by the numerical differentiation of displacement fields measured by digital image correlation. This identification method is based on the iterative minimization of an energy norm involving the secant elastoplastic tensor. Various numerical simulations were used to illustrate the performances of the procedure for locally identifying heterogeneous property fields, and to characterize its robustness and its stability with respect to noise to the values of the algorithm initialization parameter and to the mesh refinement. Finally, various experimental tests with different specimen geometries were performed and a test has been developed to obtain a controlled heterogeneous initial state. The multilinear elastoplastic identification results showed the ability of the method to identify the local behavior properties on heterogeneous materials. (author)

  16. Plant corrosion: prediction of materials performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strutt, J.E.; Nicholls, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen papers have been compiled forming a book on computer-based approaches to corrosion prediction in a wide range of industrial sectors, including the chemical, petrochemical and power generation industries. Two papers have been selected and indexed separately. The first describes a system operating within BNFL's Reprocessing Division to predict materials performance in corrosive conditions to aid future plant design. The second describes the truncation of the distribution function of pit depths during high temperature oxidation of a 20Cr austenitic steel in the fuel cladding in AGR systems. (U.K.)

  17. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

    2003-01-20

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to

  18. A Method to Represent Heterogeneous Materials for Rapid Prototyping: The Matryoshka Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Shuangyan; Frank, Matthew C; Anderson, Donald D; Brown, Thomas D

    The purpose of this paper is to present a new method for representing heterogeneous materials using nested STL shells, based, in particular, on the density distributions of human bones. Nested STL shells, called Matryoshka models, are described, based on their namesake Russian nesting dolls. In this approach, polygonal models, such as STL shells, are "stacked" inside one another to represent different material regions. The Matryoshka model addresses the challenge of representing different densities and different types of bone when reverse engineering from medical images. The Matryoshka model is generated via an iterative process of thresholding the Hounsfield Unit (HU) data using computed tomography (CT), thereby delineating regions of progressively increasing bone density. These nested shells can represent regions starting with the medullary (bone marrow) canal, up through and including the outer surface of the bone. The Matryoshka approach introduced can be used to generate accurate models of heterogeneous materials in an automated fashion, avoiding the challenge of hand-creating an assembly model for input to multi-material additive or subtractive manufacturing. This paper presents a new method for describing heterogeneous materials: in this case, the density distribution in a human bone. The authors show how the Matryoshka model can be used to plan harvesting locations for creating custom rapid allograft bone implants from donor bone. An implementation of a proposed harvesting method is demonstrated, followed by a case study using subtractive rapid prototyping to harvest a bone implant from a human tibia surrogate.

  19. Accuracy increasing in the nuclear-physical analysis of mineral raw materials of heterogeneous composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pak, Yu.; Vdovkin, A.; Pak, D.

    2002-01-01

    In the practice of the instrumental nuclear-physical analysis, because of the simple realization and very deep research, the gamma-albedo method is widely used. When realizing the gamma-albedo method the problem of macro-heterogeneity account arises. The intensity of the gamma-radiation scattered by the analyzed medium is in general case a function of material and granulometric composition. Macro-heterogeneity effect on the intensity value of scattered gamma-radiation can be considered from the two points of view. On one hand, the intensity of scattered by the heterogeneous medium gamma-radiation a function of the particle sizes and differential function of their distribution. Variations of the particle sizes non-correlated with the defined component content lead to the dispersion of the intensity value. On the other hand, the heterogeneous medium is represented by the system of randomly distributed particles of the defined component and filler and this leads to the static fluctuation of the defined component content in the studied medium. The total methodological error at the expense of macro- heterogeneity are presented as a result of the simultaneous action of the above-mentioned factors. Thus, the problem of estimation of the total error at the expense of macro heterogeneity reduces to the defining of the gamma-albedo method sensitivity to the defined component content and to the particle sizes, taking into account the analytical expression presence, which describes the scattered gamma-radiation dependence upon the material and granulometric composition of the analyzed heterogeneous object. Mathematical modeling of the total error minimization process of the gamma-albedo analysis at the expense of heterogeneity has been carried out on the basis of approximation of heterogeneous media by the set of flat and parallel layers of variable height and single gamma-radiation interaction approach. The results obtained show that for the methodical error minimization in

  20. New plant releases from the USDA-NRCS Aberdeen, Idaho, Plant Materials Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. St. John; P. Blaker

    2001-01-01

    The Plant Materials Center at Aberdeen, Idaho, is operated by the United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service. The purpose of the Plant Materials Center is to evaluate and release plant materials for conservation use and to develop and transfer new technology for the establishment and management of plants. The Center serves portions...

  1. A review of predictive nonlinear theories for multiscale modeling of heterogeneous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matouš, Karel, E-mail: kmatous@nd.edu [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Geers, Marc G.D.; Kouznetsova, Varvara G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gillman, Andrew [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Since the beginning of the industrial age, material performance and design have been in the midst of innovation of many disruptive technologies. Today's electronics, space, medical, transportation, and other industries are enriched by development, design and deployment of composite, heterogeneous and multifunctional materials. As a result, materials innovation is now considerably outpaced by other aspects from component design to product cycle. In this article, we review predictive nonlinear theories for multiscale modeling of heterogeneous materials. Deeper attention is given to multiscale modeling in space and to computational homogenization in addressing challenging materials science questions. Moreover, we discuss a state-of-the-art platform in predictive image-based, multiscale modeling with co-designed simulations and experiments that executes on the world's largest supercomputers. Such a modeling framework consists of experimental tools, computational methods, and digital data strategies. Once fully completed, this collaborative and interdisciplinary framework can be the basis of Virtual Materials Testing standards and aids in the development of new material formulations. Moreover, it will decrease the time to market of innovative products.

  2. A review of predictive nonlinear theories for multiscale modeling of heterogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matouš, Karel; Geers, Marc G.D.; Kouznetsova, Varvara G.; Gillman, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Since the beginning of the industrial age, material performance and design have been in the midst of innovation of many disruptive technologies. Today's electronics, space, medical, transportation, and other industries are enriched by development, design and deployment of composite, heterogeneous and multifunctional materials. As a result, materials innovation is now considerably outpaced by other aspects from component design to product cycle. In this article, we review predictive nonlinear theories for multiscale modeling of heterogeneous materials. Deeper attention is given to multiscale modeling in space and to computational homogenization in addressing challenging materials science questions. Moreover, we discuss a state-of-the-art platform in predictive image-based, multiscale modeling with co-designed simulations and experiments that executes on the world's largest supercomputers. Such a modeling framework consists of experimental tools, computational methods, and digital data strategies. Once fully completed, this collaborative and interdisciplinary framework can be the basis of Virtual Materials Testing standards and aids in the development of new material formulations. Moreover, it will decrease the time to market of innovative products.

  3. A review of predictive nonlinear theories for multiscale modeling of heterogeneous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matouš, Karel; Geers, Marc G. D.; Kouznetsova, Varvara G.; Gillman, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Since the beginning of the industrial age, material performance and design have been in the midst of innovation of many disruptive technologies. Today's electronics, space, medical, transportation, and other industries are enriched by development, design and deployment of composite, heterogeneous and multifunctional materials. As a result, materials innovation is now considerably outpaced by other aspects from component design to product cycle. In this article, we review predictive nonlinear theories for multiscale modeling of heterogeneous materials. Deeper attention is given to multiscale modeling in space and to computational homogenization in addressing challenging materials science questions. Moreover, we discuss a state-of-the-art platform in predictive image-based, multiscale modeling with co-designed simulations and experiments that executes on the world's largest supercomputers. Such a modeling framework consists of experimental tools, computational methods, and digital data strategies. Once fully completed, this collaborative and interdisciplinary framework can be the basis of Virtual Materials Testing standards and aids in the development of new material formulations. Moreover, it will decrease the time to market of innovative products.

  4. LDRD final report : mesoscale modeling of dynamic loading of heterogeneous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Voth, Thomas Eugene [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Furnish, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Material response to dynamic loading is often dominated by microstructure (grain structure, porosity, inclusions, defects). An example critically important to Sandia's mission is dynamic strength of polycrystalline metals where heterogeneities lead to localization of deformation and loss of shear strength. Microstructural effects are of broad importance to the scientific community and several institutions within DoD and DOE; however, current models rely on inaccurate assumptions about mechanisms at the sub-continuum or mesoscale. Consequently, there is a critical need for accurate and robust methods for modeling heterogeneous material response at this lower length scale. This report summarizes work performed as part of an LDRD effort (FY11 to FY13; project number 151364) to meet these needs.

  5. A Modified SPH Method for Dynamic Failure Simulation of Heterogeneous Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH method is applied to simulate the failure process of heterogeneous materials. An elastoplastic damage model based on an extension form of the unified twin shear strength (UTSS criterion is adopted. Polycrystalline modeling is introduced to generate the artificial microstructure of specimen for the dynamic simulation of Brazilian splitting test and uniaxial compression test. The strain rate effect on the predicted dynamic tensile and compressive strength is discussed. The final failure patterns and the dynamic strength increments demonstrate good agreements with experimental results. It is illustrated that the polycrystalline modeling approach combined with the SPH method is promising to simulate more complex failure process of heterogeneous materials.

  6. The fluid control mechanism of bionic structural heterogeneous composite materials and its potential application in enhancing pump efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Tian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that the structure of dolphin skin controls fluid media dynamically. Gaining inspiration from this phenomenon, a kind of bionic structural heterogeneous composite material was designed. The bionic structural heterogeneous composite material is composed of two materials: a rigid metal base layer with bionic structures and an elastic polymer surface layer with the corresponding mirror structures. The fluid control mechanism of the bionic structural heterogeneous composite material was investigated using a fluid–solid interaction method in ANSYS Workbench. The results indicated that the bionic structural heterogeneous composite material’s fluid control mechanism is its elastic deformation, which is caused by the coupling action between the elastic surface material and the bionic structure. This deformation can decrease the velocity gradient of the fluid boundary layer through changing the fluid–solid actual contact surface and reduce the frictional force. The bionic structural heterogeneous composite material can also absorb some energy through elastic deformation and avoid energy loss. The bionic structural heterogeneous composite material was applied to the impeller of a centrifugal pump in a contrast experiment, increasing the pump efficiency by 5% without changing the hydraulic model of the impeller. The development of this bionic structural heterogeneous composite material will be straightforward from an engineering point of view, and it will have valuable practical applications.

  7. CuInS[sub 2] with lamellar morphology; 2: Photoelectrochemical behavior of heterogeneous material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cattarin, S. (Inst. di Polarografia ed Elettrochimica Preparativa del C.N.R., Padova (Italy)); Guerriero, P. (Inst. di Chimica e Tecnologie Inorganiche e dei Materiali Avanzati del C.N.R., Padova (Italy)); Razzini, G. (Applicata del Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Fisica); Lewerenz, H.J. (Hahn-Meitner-Inst., Berlin (Germany))

    1994-05-01

    Lamellar CuInS[sub 2] material grown in a steep temperature gradient shows heterogeneous composition and complex photoeffects. Besides predominant n-type behavior, the electrode surface has areas with intrinsic or p-type conductivity, the latter usually corresponding to indium-rich regions. An inverted (cathodic) photocurrent is observed at n-type electrodes polarized under accumulation conditions. Both spectral dependence, with a pronounced peak for energies around the bandgap, and quantum yields > 1 suggest that these photoeffects originate from photoconductivity phenomena in the crystal bulk. Variability in electronic properties limits the average performance of the material in solar cells.

  8. Sulfur mineralization of different plant materials labelled with 35 S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu Junior, Cassio H.

    1993-01-01

    This study was carried out, in green house conditions, with the objective of evaluating the effect of incorporation in soil of different plant materials labelled with 35 S and of incubation periods on the availability of sulfur to the bean test plants and on the dynamic of this element in the soil. The bean test plants dry matter yield ranged from 2.00 to 3.79 g/plant, the S content and absorption ranged from 118.20 to 194.04 mg/100 g and 2.61 to 6.34 mg/plant respectively. The 35 S derived from the incorporated bean plant material contributed with 12 to 256% of total S absorbed by bean test plant; rice plant material contributed with 12 to 22%; soybean plant material contributed 11 to 18%; corn plant material at rate of 7 g with, 11 to 19% and corn at rate of 3.5 g; with 7 to 1%. Plant material incorporation showed 35 S using efficiency by bean test plant of 21.41 to 9.94% by incorporated rice plant material, of 16.12 to 7.79% by rice material, of 13.11 to 6.49% by soybean material, of 10.24 to 6.21% by corn at rate of 3.5 g and of 7.41 to 3.81% by corn at rate of 7 g.Incorporated plant material with C/S relationship near 120, such as bean and rice, promoted desirable and favorable alteration in soil, while materials with C/S higher than 250, such as soybean and corn, led to unsatisfactory and undesirable alteration. The characteristic of incorporated plant materials which more affected its behavior was the C/S relationship, which depended on its physiological stage on collect timing. (author)

  9. A Method to Represent Heterogeneous Materials for Rapid Prototyping: The Matryoshka Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Shuangyan; Frank, Matthew C.; Anderson, Donald D.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present a new method for representing heterogeneous materials using nested STL shells, based, in particular, on the density distributions of human bones. Design/methodology/approach Nested STL shells, called Matryoshka models, are described, based on their namesake Russian nesting dolls. In this approach, polygonal models, such as STL shells, are “stacked” inside one another to represent different material regions. The Matryoshka model addresses the challenge of representing different densities and different types of bone when reverse engineering from medical images. The Matryoshka model is generated via an iterative process of thresholding the Hounsfield Unit (HU) data using computed tomography (CT), thereby delineating regions of progressively increasing bone density. These nested shells can represent regions starting with the medullary (bone marrow) canal, up through and including the outer surface of the bone. Findings The Matryoshka approach introduced can be used to generate accurate models of heterogeneous materials in an automated fashion, avoiding the challenge of hand-creating an assembly model for input to multi-material additive or subtractive manufacturing. Originality/Value This paper presents a new method for describing heterogeneous materials: in this case, the density distribution in a human bone. The authors show how the Matryoshka model can be used to plan harvesting locations for creating custom rapid allograft bone implants from donor bone. An implementation of a proposed harvesting method is demonstrated, followed by a case study using subtractive rapid prototyping to harvest a bone implant from a human tibia surrogate. PMID:26120277

  10. Imaging of heterogeneous materials by prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, Parrish; Prettyman, Tom; Lestone, John

    1999-01-01

    We have used a Tomographic Gamma Scanner (TGS) to produce tomographic Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Imaging of heterogeneous matrices [T.H. Prettyman, R.J. Estep, G.A. Sheppard, Trans. Am. Nucl. Soc. 69 (1993) 183-184]. The TGS was modified by the addition of graphite reflectors that contain isotopic neutron sources for sample interrogation. We are in the process of developing the analysis methodology necessary for a quantitative assay of large containers of heterogeneous material. This nondestructive analysis technique can be used for material characterization and the determination of neutron assay correction factors. The most difficult question to be answered is the determination of the source to sample coupling term. To assist in the determination of the coupling term we have obtained images for a range of samples that are very well characterized; such as, homogenous pseudo one-dimensional samples to three-dimensional heterogeneous samples. We then compare the measurements to Monte Carlo N-particle calculations. For an accurate quantitative measurement it is also necessary to determine the sample gamma-ray self attenuation at higher gamma-ray energies, namely pair production should be incorporated into the analysis codes

  11. Imaging of heterogeneous materials by prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, P.; Prettyman, T.; Lestone, J.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have used a tomographic gamma scanner (TGS) to produce tomographic prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis imaging (PGNAA) of heterogeneous matrices. The TGS was modified by the addition of graphite reflectors that contain isotopic neutron sources for sample interrogation. The authors are in the process of developing the analysis methodology necessary for a quantitative assay of large containers of heterogeneous material. This nondestructive analysis (NDA) technique can be used for material characterization and the determination of neutron assay correction factors. The most difficult question to be answered is the determination of the source-to-sample coupling term. To assist in the determination of the coupling term, the authors have obtained images for a range of sample that are very well characterized, such as, homogenous pseudo one-dimensional samples to three-dimensional heterogeneous samples. They then compare the measurements to MCNP calculations. For an accurate quantitative measurement, it is also necessary to determine the sample gamma-ray self attenuation at higher gamma-ray energies, namely pair production should be incorporated into the analysis codes

  12. Root foraging increases performance of the clonal plant Potentilla reptans in heterogeneous nutrient environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengwen; van Kleunen, Mark; During, Heinjo J; Werger, Marinus J A

    2013-01-01

    Plastic root-foraging responses have been widely recognized as an important strategy for plants to explore heterogeneously distributed resources. However, the benefits and costs of root foraging have received little attention. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew pairs of connected ramets of 22 genotypes of the stoloniferous plant Potentilla reptans in paired pots, between which the contrast in nutrient availability was set as null, medium and high, but with the total nutrient amount kept the same. We calculated root-foraging intensity of each individual ramet pair as the difference in root mass between paired ramets divided by the total root mass. For each genotype, we then calculated root-foraging ability as the slope of the regression of root-foraging intensity against patch contrast. For all genotypes, root-foraging intensity increased with patch contrast and the total biomass and number of offspring ramets were lowest at high patch contrast. Among genotypes, root-foraging intensity was positively related to production of offspring ramets and biomass in the high patch-contrast treatment, which indicates an evolutionary benefit of root foraging in heterogeneous environments. However, we found no significant evidence that the ability of plastic foraging imposes costs under homogeneous conditions (i.e. when foraging is not needed). Our results show that plants of P. reptans adjust their root-foraging intensity according to patch contrast. Moreover, the results show that the root foraging has an evolutionary advantage in heterogeneous environments, while costs of having the ability of plastic root foraging were absent or very small.

  13. Modeling of heterogeneous elastic materials by the multiscale hp-adaptive finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimczak, Marek; Cecot, Witold

    2018-01-01

    We present an enhancement of the multiscale finite element method (MsFEM) by combining it with the hp-adaptive FEM. Such a discretization-based homogenization technique is a versatile tool for modeling heterogeneous materials with fast oscillating elasticity coefficients. No assumption on periodicity of the domain is required. In order to avoid direct, so-called overkill mesh computations, a coarse mesh with effective stiffness matrices is used and special shape functions are constructed to account for the local heterogeneities at the micro resolution. The automatic adaptivity (hp-type at the macro resolution and h-type at the micro resolution) increases efficiency of computation. In this paper details of the modified MsFEM are presented and a numerical test performed on a Fichera corner domain is presented in order to validate the proposed approach.

  14. A Critical Plane-energy Model for Multiaxial Fatigue Life Prediction of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Haoyang

    A new critical plane-energy model is proposed in this thesis for multiaxial fatigue life prediction of homogeneous and heterogeneous materials. Brief review of existing methods, especially on the critical plane-based and energy-based methods, are given first. Special focus is on one critical plane approach which has been shown to work for both brittle and ductile metals. The key idea is to automatically change the critical plane orientation with respect to different materials and stress states. One potential drawback of the developed model is that it needs an empirical calibration parameter for non-proportional multiaxial loadings since only the strain terms are used and the out-of-phase hardening cannot be considered. The energy-based model using the critical plane concept is proposed with help of the Mroz-Garud hardening rule to explicitly include the effect of non-proportional hardening under fatigue cyclic loadings. Thus, the empirical calibration for non-proportional loading is not needed since the out-of-phase hardening is naturally included in the stress calculation. The model predictions are compared with experimental data from open literature and it is shown the proposed model can work for both proportional and non-proportional loadings without the empirical calibration. Next, the model is extended for the fatigue analysis of heterogeneous materials integrating with finite element method. Fatigue crack initiation of representative volume of heterogeneous materials is analyzed using the developed critical plane-energy model and special focus is on the microstructure effect on the multiaxial fatigue life predictions. Several conclusions and future work is drawn based on the proposed study.

  15. Energy, material and land requirement of a fusion plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleisner, Liselotte; Hamacher, T.; Cabal, H.

    2001-01-01

    The energy and material necessary to construct a power plant and the land covered by the plant are indicators for the ‘consumption’ of environment by a certain technology. Based on current knowledge, estimations show that the material necessary to construct a fusion plant will exceed the material...... requirement of a fission plant by a factor of two. The material requirement for a fusion plant is roughly 2000 t/MW and little less than 1000 t/MW for a fission plant. The land requirement for a fusion plant is roughly 300 m2/MW and the land requirement for a fission plant is a little less than 200 m2/MW...... less ‘environment’ for the construction than renewable technologies, especially wind and solar....

  16. Predicting plant distribution in an heterogeneous Alpine landscape: does soil matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Aline; Cianfrani, Carmen; Pradervand, Jean-Nicolas; Guisan, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Topographic and climatic factors are usually used to predict plant distribution because they are known to explain their presence or absence. Soil properties have been widely shown to influence plant growth and distributions. However, they are rarely taken into account as predictors of plant species distribution models (SDM) in an edaphically heterogeneous landscape. Or, when it happens, interpolation techniques are used to project soil factors in space. In heterogeneous landscape, such as in the Alps region, where soil properties change abruptly as a function of environmental conditions over short distances, interpolation techniques require a huge quantities of samples to be efficient. This is costly and time consuming, and bring more errors than predictive approach for an equivalent number of samples. In this study we aimed to assess whether soil proprieties may be generalized over entire mountainous geographic extents and can improve predictions of plant distributions over traditional topo-climatic predictors. First, we used a predictive approach to map two soil proprieties based on field measurements in the western Swiss Alps region; the soil pH and the ratio of stable isotopes 13C/12C (called δ13CSOM). We used ensemble forecasting techniques combining together several predictive algorithms to build models of the geographic variation in the values of both soil proprieties and projected them in the entire study area. As predictive factors, we employed very high resolution topo-climatic data. In a second step, output maps from the previous task were used as an input for vegetation regional models. We integrated the predicted soil proprieties to a set of basic topo-climatic predictors known to be important to model plants species. Then we modelled the distribution of 156 plant species inhabiting the study area. Finally, we compared the quality of the models having or not soil proprieties as predictors to evaluate their effect on the predictive power of our models

  17. Dynamics of the rupture precursors for heterogeneous materials: application to vitreous polymers foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschanel, St.

    2005-12-01

    New physical approaches concerning the damage mechanisms consist to consider the rupture phenomenon as the critical point of a phase transition. Rupture can then result for some materials by a percolation of microcracks. This multi-crack implies the choice of heterogeneous materials. Mechanical tests on solid polymer foams have been carried out until rupture and have been coupled to the follow-up of the acoustic activity. The energies distributions reveal power laws independently of the material density, of the load mode or of the behaviour laws. On the other hand, the agreement with a power law of time periods seems to require a quasi constant stress on the most part of the test. The trend of the cumulated energy in the case of creep experiments seems to present a power law on a narrow period of time. On the other hand, for tensile tests, no power law has been observed. (O.M.)

  18. Material heterogeneity in cancellous bone promotes deformation recovery after mechanical failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ashley M; Matheny, Jonathan B; Keaveny, Tony M; Taylor, David; Rimnac, Clare M; Hernandez, Christopher J

    2016-03-15

    Many natural structures use a foam core and solid outer shell to achieve high strength and stiffness with relatively small amounts of mass. Biological foams, however, must also resist crack growth. The process of crack propagation within the struts of a foam is not well understood and is complicated by the foam microstructure. We demonstrate that in cancellous bone, the foam-like component of whole bones, damage propagation during cyclic loading is dictated not by local tissue stresses but by heterogeneity of material properties associated with increased ductility of strut surfaces. The increase in surface ductility is unexpected because it is the opposite pattern generated by surface treatments to increase fatigue life in man-made materials, which often result in reduced surface ductility. We show that the more ductile surfaces of cancellous bone are a result of reduced accumulation of advanced glycation end products compared with the strut interior. Damage is therefore likely to accumulate in strut centers making cancellous bone more tolerant of stress concentrations at strut surfaces. Hence, the structure is able to recover more deformation after failure and return to a closer approximation of its original shape. Increased recovery of deformation is a passive mechanism seen in biology for setting a broken bone that allows for a better approximation of initial shape during healing processes and is likely the most important mechanical function. Our findings suggest a previously unidentified biomimetic design strategy in which tissue level material heterogeneity in foams can be used to improve deformation recovery after failure.

  19. Investigating heterogeneous nucleation in peritectic materials via the phase-field method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmerich, Heike; Siquieri, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Here we propose a phase-field approach to investigate the influence of convection on peritectic growth as well as the heterogeneous nucleation kinetics of peritectic systems. For this purpose we derive a phase-field model for peritectic growth taking into account fluid flow in the melt, which is convergent to the underlying sharp interface problem in the thin interface limit (Karma and Rappel 1996 Phys. Rev. E 53 R3017). Moreover, we employ our new phase-field model to study the heterogeneous nucleation kinetics of peritectic material systems. Our approach is based on a similar approach towards homogeneous nucleation in Granasy et al (2003 Interface and Transport Dynamics (Springer Lecture Notes in Computational Science and Engineering vol 32) ed Emmerich et al (Berlin: Springer) p 190). We applied our model successfully to extend the nucleation rate predicted by classical nucleation theory for an additional morphological term relevant for peritectic growth. Further applications to understand the mechanisms and consequences of heterogeneous nucleation kinetics in more detail are discussed

  20. Low temperature bonding of heterogeneous materials using Al2O3 as an intermediate layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahoo, Hitesh Kumar; Ottaviano, Luisa; Zheng, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Integration of heterogeneous materials is crucial for many nanophotonic devices. The integration is often achieved by bonding using polymer adhesives or metals. A much better and cleaner option is direct wafer bonding, but the high annealing temperatures required make it a much less attractive...... atomic layer deposited Al2O3 an excellent choice for the intermediate layer. The authors have optimized the bonding process to achieve a high interface energy of 1.7 J/m2 for a low temperature annealing of 300 °C. The authors also demonstrate wafer bonding of InP to SiO2 on Si and GaAs to sapphire using...

  1. Scanning ion micro-beam techniques for measuring diffusion in heterogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenneson, P.M.; Clough, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    A raster scanning MeV micro-beam of 1 H + or 3 He + ions was used to study the diffusion of small molecules in heterogeneous materials. The location of elemental contaminants (heavier than Lithium) in polymer insulated cables was studied with 1 H micro-Particle Induced X-ray Emission (μPIXE). Concentration profiles of a deuterated molecule in a hair fibre were determined with 3 He micro-Nuclear Reaction Analysis (μNRA). Chlorine and heavy water (D 2 0) diffusion into cement pastes were profiled using a combination of 3 He μPIXE and μNRA. (authors)

  2. New materials for boilers in USC power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Sung Ho; Hong, Seok Joo

    2003-01-01

    The efficiency of boiler in fossil power plants is a strong function of steam temperature and pressure. Thus, the main technology of increasing boiler efficiency is the development of stronger high temperature materials, capable of operating under high stresses at ever increasing temperature. This paper will presents the new material relating to boiler of USC power plant

  3. Use of anthocyanin extracted from natural plant materials to develop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work was to study the optimal conditions for anthocyanin extraction from natural plant materials in order to develop a pH test kit. The plant materials used were butterfly pea flower (BPF), roselle red flower (RRF) and dragon fruit peel (DFP). The solvents used in this study were distilled water, 1% HCl/95% ...

  4. Sulfurized limonite as material for fast decomposition of organic compounds by heterogeneous Fenton reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, Kei; Tanaka, Toshinori; Tsuda, Yutaka; Ban, Masahiro; Koveke, Edwin P.; Koinuma, Michio; Ohira, Shin-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Used limonite degrades organic compounds by heterogeneous Fenton reaction. • Sulfurized limonite removes methylene blue color in seconds. • Recycled limonite can be used for biogas purification and wastewater treatment. - Abstract: Rapid decomposition of wastewater contaminants using sulfurized limonite (S-limonite) was investigated. Limonite is used for desulfurization of biogases, and S-limonite is obtained from desulfurization plants as solid waste. In this work, the profitable use of S-limonite in water treatment was examined. The divalent Fe in S-limonite was expected to produce OH radicals, as Fe 2+ ions and limonite thermally treated with H 2 do. Methylene blue was used for batch-wise monitoring of the decomposition performance. The decomposition rate was fast and the methylene blue solution color disappeared in only 10 s when a small amount of H 2 O 2 was added (1 mM in the sample solution) in the presence of S-limonite. The OH radicals were formed by a heterogeneous reaction on the S-limonite surface and Fenton reaction with dissolved Fe 2+ . The decomposition of pentachlorophenol was also examined; it was successfully decomposed in batch-wise tests. The surfaces of limonite before sulfurization, S-limonite, and S-limonite after use for water treatment were performed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that S-limonite reverted to limonite after being used for water treatment

  5. Sulfurized limonite as material for fast decomposition of organic compounds by heterogeneous Fenton reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, Kei, E-mail: todakei@sci.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Tanaka, Toshinori; Tsuda, Yutaka; Ban, Masahiro; Koveke, Edwin P. [Department of Chemistry, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Koinuma, Michio [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Ohira, Shin-Ichi [Department of Chemistry, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Used limonite degrades organic compounds by heterogeneous Fenton reaction. • Sulfurized limonite removes methylene blue color in seconds. • Recycled limonite can be used for biogas purification and wastewater treatment. - Abstract: Rapid decomposition of wastewater contaminants using sulfurized limonite (S-limonite) was investigated. Limonite is used for desulfurization of biogases, and S-limonite is obtained from desulfurization plants as solid waste. In this work, the profitable use of S-limonite in water treatment was examined. The divalent Fe in S-limonite was expected to produce OH radicals, as Fe{sup 2+} ions and limonite thermally treated with H{sub 2} do. Methylene blue was used for batch-wise monitoring of the decomposition performance. The decomposition rate was fast and the methylene blue solution color disappeared in only 10 s when a small amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was added (1 mM in the sample solution) in the presence of S-limonite. The OH radicals were formed by a heterogeneous reaction on the S-limonite surface and Fenton reaction with dissolved Fe{sup 2+}. The decomposition of pentachlorophenol was also examined; it was successfully decomposed in batch-wise tests. The surfaces of limonite before sulfurization, S-limonite, and S-limonite after use for water treatment were performed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that S-limonite reverted to limonite after being used for water treatment.

  6. Conduction and Narrow Escape in Dense, Disordered, Particulate-based Heterogeneous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechman, Jeremy

    For optimal and reliable performance, many technological devices rely on complex, disordered heterogeneous or composite materials and their associated manufacturing processes. Examples include many powder and particulate-based materials found in phyrotechnic devices for car airbags, electrodes in energy storage devices, and various advanced composite materials. Due to their technological importance and complex structure, these materials have been the subject of much research in a number of fields. Moreover, the advent of new manufacturing techniques based on powder bed and particulate process routes, the potential of functional nano-structured materials, and the additional recognition of persistent shortcomings in predicting reliable performance of high consequence applications; leading to ballooning costs of fielding and maintaining advanced technologies, should motivate renewed efforts in understanding, predicting and controlling these materials' fabrication and behavior. Our particular effort seeks to understand the link between the top-down control presented in specific non-equilibrium processes routes (i.e., manufacturing processes) and the variability and uncertainty of the end product performance. Our ultimate aim is to quantify the variability inherent in these constrained dynamical or random processes and to use it to optimize and predict resulting material properties/performance and to inform component design with precise margins. In fact, this raises a set of deep and broad-ranging issues that have been recognized and as touching the core of a major research challenge at Sandia National Laboratories. In this talk, we will give an overview of recent efforts to address aspects of this vision. In particular the case of conductive properties of packed particulate materials will be highlighted. Combining a number of existing approaches we will discuss new insights and potential directions for further development toward the stated goal. Sandia National

  7. Spatial heterogeneity regulates plant-pollinator networks across multiple landscape scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Freitas Moreira

    Full Text Available Mutualistic plant-pollinator interactions play a key role in biodiversity conservation and ecosystem functioning. In a community, the combination of these interactions can generate emergent properties, e.g., robustness and resilience to disturbances such as fluctuations in populations and extinctions. Given that these systems are hierarchical and complex, environmental changes must have multiple levels of influence. In addition, changes in habitat quality and in the landscape structure are important threats to plants, pollinators and their interactions. However, despite the importance of these phenomena for the understanding of biological systems, as well as for conservation and management strategies, few studies have empirically evaluated these effects at the network level. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence of local conditions and landscape structure at multiple scales on the characteristics of plant-pollinator networks. This study was conducted in agri-natural lands in Chapada Diamantina, Bahia, Brazil. Pollinators were collected in 27 sampling units distributed orthogonally along a gradient of proportion of agriculture and landscape diversity. The Akaike information criterion was used to select models that best fit the metrics for network characteristics, comparing four hypotheses represented by a set of a priori candidate models with specific combinations of the proportion of agriculture, the average shape of the landscape elements, the diversity of the landscape and the structure of local vegetation. The results indicate that a reduction of habitat quality and landscape heterogeneity can cause species loss and decrease of networks nestedness. These structural changes can reduce robustness and resilience of plant-pollinator networks what compromises the reproductive success of plants, the maintenance of biodiversity and the pollination service stability. We also discuss the possible explanations for

  8. Spatial heterogeneity regulates plant-pollinator networks across multiple landscape scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Eduardo Freitas; Boscolo, Danilo; Viana, Blandina Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Mutualistic plant-pollinator interactions play a key role in biodiversity conservation and ecosystem functioning. In a community, the combination of these interactions can generate emergent properties, e.g., robustness and resilience to disturbances such as fluctuations in populations and extinctions. Given that these systems are hierarchical and complex, environmental changes must have multiple levels of influence. In addition, changes in habitat quality and in the landscape structure are important threats to plants, pollinators and their interactions. However, despite the importance of these phenomena for the understanding of biological systems, as well as for conservation and management strategies, few studies have empirically evaluated these effects at the network level. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence of local conditions and landscape structure at multiple scales on the characteristics of plant-pollinator networks. This study was conducted in agri-natural lands in Chapada Diamantina, Bahia, Brazil. Pollinators were collected in 27 sampling units distributed orthogonally along a gradient of proportion of agriculture and landscape diversity. The Akaike information criterion was used to select models that best fit the metrics for network characteristics, comparing four hypotheses represented by a set of a priori candidate models with specific combinations of the proportion of agriculture, the average shape of the landscape elements, the diversity of the landscape and the structure of local vegetation. The results indicate that a reduction of habitat quality and landscape heterogeneity can cause species loss and decrease of networks nestedness. These structural changes can reduce robustness and resilience of plant-pollinator networks what compromises the reproductive success of plants, the maintenance of biodiversity and the pollination service stability. We also discuss the possible explanations for these relationships and

  9. 2D evaluation of spectral LIBS data derived from heterogeneous materials using cluster algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, C.; Millar, S.; Grothe, S.; Wilsch, G.

    2017-08-01

    Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is capable of providing spatially resolved element maps in regard to the chemical composition of the sample. The evaluation of heterogeneous materials is often a challenging task, especially in the case of phase boundaries. In order to determine information about a certain phase of a material, the need for a method that offers an objective evaluation is necessary. This paper will introduce a cluster algorithm in the case of heterogeneous building materials (concrete) to separate the spectral information of non-relevant aggregates and cement matrix. In civil engineering, the information about the quantitative ingress of harmful species like Cl-, Na+ and SO42- is of great interest in the evaluation of the remaining lifetime of structures (Millar et al., 2015; Wilsch et al., 2005). These species trigger different damage processes such as the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) or the chloride-induced corrosion of the reinforcement. Therefore, a discrimination between the different phases, mainly cement matrix and aggregates, is highly important (Weritz et al., 2006). For the 2D evaluation, the expectation-maximization-algorithm (EM algorithm; Ester and Sander, 2000) has been tested for the application presented in this work. The method has been introduced and different figures of merit have been presented according to recommendations given in Haddad et al. (2014). Advantages of this method will be highlighted. After phase separation, non-relevant information can be excluded and only the wanted phase displayed. Using a set of samples with known and unknown composition, the EM-clustering method has been validated regarding to Gustavo González and Ángeles Herrador (2007).

  10. An automatic granular structure generation and finite element analysis of heterogeneous semi-solid materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifi, Hamid; Larouche, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The quality of cast metal products depends on the capacity of the semi-solid metal to sustain the stresses generated during the casting. Predicting the evolution of these stresses with accuracy in the solidification interval should be highly helpful to avoid the formation of defects like hot tearing. This task is however very difficult because of the heterogeneous nature of the material. In this paper, we propose to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of a metal during solidification using a mesh generation technique of the heterogeneous semi-solid material for a finite element analysis at the microscopic level. This task is done on a two-dimensional (2D) domain in which the granular structure of the solid phase is generated surrounded by an intergranular and interdendritc liquid phase. Some basic solid grains are first constructed and projected in the 2D domain with random orientations and scale factors. Depending on their orientation, the basic grains are combined to produce larger grains or separated by a liquid film. Different basic grain shapes can produce different granular structures of the mushy zone. As a result, using this automatic grain generation procedure, we can investigate the effect of grain shapes and sizes on the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the semi-solid material. The granular models are automatically converted to the finite element meshes. The solid grains and the liquid phase are meshed properly using quadrilateral elements. This method has been used to simulate the microstructure of a binary aluminium–copper alloy (Al–5.8 wt% Cu) when the fraction solid is 0.92. Using the finite element method and the Mie–Grüneisen equation of state for the liquid phase, the transient mechanical behaviour of the mushy zone under tensile loading has been investigated. The stress distribution and the bridges, which are formed during the tensile loading, have been detected. (paper)

  11. Field heritability of a plant adaptation to fire in heterogeneous landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, M C; González-Martínez, S C; Pausas, J G

    2015-11-01

    The strong association observed between fire regimes and variation in plant adaptations to fire suggests a rapid response to fire as an agent of selection. It also suggests that fire-related traits are heritable, a precondition for evolutionary change. One example is serotiny, the accumulation of seeds in unopened fruits or cones until the next fire, an important strategy for plant population persistence in fire-prone ecosystems. Here, we evaluate the potential of this trait to respond to natural selection in its natural setting. For this, we use a SNP marker approach to estimate genetic variance and heritability of serotiny directly in the field for two Mediterranean pine species. Study populations were large and heterogeneous in climatic conditions and fire regime. We first estimated the realized relatedness among trees from genotypes, and then partitioned the phenotypic variance in serotiny using Bayesian animal models that incorporated environmental predictors. As expected, field heritability was smaller (around 0.10 for both species) than previous estimates under common garden conditions (0.20). An estimate on a subset of stands with more homogeneous environmental conditions was not different from that in the complete set of stands, suggesting that our models correctly captured the environmental variation at the spatial scale of the study. Our results highlight the importance of measuring quantitative genetic parameters in natural populations, where environmental heterogeneity is a critical aspect. The heritability of serotiny, although not high, combined with high phenotypic variance within populations, confirms the potential of this fire-related trait for evolutionary change in the wild. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Materials in flue gas condensation plants; Materialval vid roekgaskondensering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, Barbara; Nordling Magnus

    2003-02-01

    This project is the first part of a larger project. In the part reported here, materials for flue gas condensers have been investigated by contact with plant owners and suppliers and by a literature review of reported failures. If it is decided to continue with another part of the project, a number of materials will be long term tested on site. The project is complementary to an earlier project, which investigated the operating experiences from flue gas condensers in biomass fired cogeneration plants. In the project materials (steel and polymeric) suitable for long term testing in existing plants are discussed. It is proposed that testing in the second part of the project is made with material coupons in one plant fired with only biomass and one plant where biomass is co fired with other fuels. In the biomass fired plant a number of steel materials should be tested. In the co fired plant, with its harsher operating conditions, the same steel materials plus a number of polymeric materials should be tested. Materials suitable for testing are summarised in the report.

  13. Analytical methods to characterize heterogeneous raw material for thermal spray process: cored wire Inconel 625

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, T.; Bonebeau, S.; Drehmann, R.; Grund, T.; Pawlowski, L.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    In wire arc spraying, the raw material needs to exhibit sufficient formability and ductility in order to be processed. By using an electrically conductive, metallic sheath, it is also possible to handle non-conductive and/or brittle materials such as ceramics. In comparison to massive wire, a cored wire has a heterogeneous material distribution. Due to this fact and the complex thermodynamic processes during wire arc spraying, it is very difficult to predict the resulting chemical composition in the coating with sufficient accuracy. An Inconel 625 cored wire was used to investigate this issue. In a comparative study, the analytical results of the raw material were compared to arc sprayed coatings and droplets, which were remelted in an arc furnace under argon atmosphere. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis were used to determine the chemical composition. The phase determination was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results were related to the manufacturer specifications and evaluated in respect to differences in the chemical composition. The comparison between the feedstock powder, the remelted droplets and the thermally sprayed coatings allows to evaluate the influence of the processing methods on the resulting chemical and phase composition.

  14. Fast Physically Accurate Rendering of Multimodal Signatures of Distributed Fracture in Heterogeneous Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visell, Yon

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a fast, physically accurate method for synthesizing multimodal, acoustic and haptic, signatures of distributed fracture in quasi-brittle heterogeneous materials, such as wood, granular media, or other fiber composites. Fracture processes in these materials are challenging to simulate with existing methods, due to the prevalence of large numbers of disordered, quasi-random spatial degrees of freedom, representing the complex physical state of a sample over the geometric volume of interest. Here, I develop an algorithm for simulating such processes, building on a class of statistical lattice models of fracture that have been widely investigated in the physics literature. This algorithm is enabled through a recently published mathematical construction based on the inverse transform method of random number sampling. It yields a purely time domain stochastic jump process representing stress fluctuations in the medium. The latter can be readily extended by a mean field approximation that captures the averaged constitutive (stress-strain) behavior of the material. Numerical simulations and interactive examples demonstrate the ability of these algorithms to generate physically plausible acoustic and haptic signatures of fracture in complex, natural materials interactively at audio sampling rates.

  15. Project for a beam line consecrated to soft condensed matter, common heterogeneous materials and non-crystalline materials on soleil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ne, F.; Zemb, T.

    1998-01-01

    This project is a part of the 'SOLEIL' synchrotron project. The camera proposed is optimized for small angle x-ray scattering in the domain of soft condensed matter, common heterogeneous materials such as wood, cements, glass, and more generally non-crystalline materials. The beam line is designed to allow a quick succession of different users without time consuming adjustments. Therefore, optical settings are minimized, taking into account the pluri-disciplinary nature of the analysis possibilities. To this end, the technical requirements are as follows. First and essentially, the wave-length has to be fixed and set around 12 keV. Focusing mirrors, optics to sample and sample to detector distances, and the size of the detector allow for a wide range of wave vector to be used. Rejection rate will be lower, and angular dynamical range will be larger than any of the current synchrotron lines. We want this line to be, and to stay, complementary to more specific systems, such as reflectivity experiments or grazing angle scattering experiments. However, we are thinking of an adaptation to ultra small angle scattering mode, based on the Bonse and Hart camera. Such equipment, actually a kind of 'Instamatic' of the reciprocal space, will fulfill to the need of chemical engineers, biophysicists or material scientists interested in hard as well as soft condensed matter. It will allow a large amount of experiments per time unit. (author)

  16. External costs of material recycling strategies for fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallberg, B.; Aquilonius, K.; Lechon, Y.; Cabal, H.; Saez, R.M.; Schneider, T.; Lepicard, S.; Ward, D.; Hamacher, T.; Korhonen, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper is based on studies performed within the framework of the project Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF3). Several fusion power plant designs (SEAFP Models 1-6) were compared focusing on part of the plant's life cycle: environmental impact of recycling the materials. Recycling was considered for materials replaced during normal operation, as well as materials from decommissioning of the plant. Environmental impact was assessed and expressed as external cost normalised with the total electrical energy output during plant operation. The methodology used for this study has been developed by the Commission of the European Union within the frame of the ExternE project. External costs for recycling, normalised with the energy production during plant operation, are very low compared with those for other energy sources. Results indicate that a high degree of recycling is preferable, at least when considering external costs, because external costs of manufacturing of new materials and disposal costs are higher

  17. Rare earth element abundances and distribution patterns in plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aidid, S.B.

    1994-01-01

    Eight out of the fourteen rare earth elements were estimated from the leaves of Pelthophorum pterocarpum, the leaves and roots of Impatiens balsamina, and the soils from four sampling sites by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The chondrite normalized rare earth element abundances and distribution patterns in the plant materials were found to be significantly correlated to the abundances of the rare earth elements occurring in the soils. The extent of accumulation of the rare earth elements in some plant materials was also governed by the age of the plants and the plant organs. (author) 16 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  18. Effect of Different Loading Conditions on the Nucleation and Development of Shear Zones Around Material Heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybacki, E.; Nardini, L.; Morales, L. F.; Dresen, G.

    2017-12-01

    Rock deformation at depths in the Earth's crust is often localized in high temperature shear zones, which occur in the field at different scales and in a variety of lithologies. The presence of material heterogeneities has long been recognized to be an important cause for shear zones evolution, but the mechanisms controlling initiation and development of localization are not fully understood, and the question of which loading conditions (constant stress or constant deformation rate) are most favourable is still open. To better understand the effect of boundary conditions on shear zone nucleation around heterogeneities, we performed a series of torsion experiments under constant twist rate (CTR) and constant torque (CT) conditions in a Paterson-type deformation apparatus. The sample assemblage consisted of copper-jacketed Carrara marble hollow cylinders with one weak inclusion of Solnhofen limestone. The CTR experiments were performed at maximum bulk strain rates of 1.8-1.9*10-4 s-1, yielding shear stresses of 19-20 MPa. CT tests were conducted at shear stresses between 18.4 and 19.8 MPa resulting in shear strain rates of 1-2*10-4 s-1. All experiments were run at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure. Maximum bulk shear strains (γ) were ca. 0.3 and 1. Strain localized within the host marble in front of the inclusion in an area termed process zone. Here grain size reduction is intense and local shear strain (estimated from markers on the jackets) is up to 8 times higher than the applied bulk strain, rapidly dropping to 2 times higher at larger distance from the inclusion. The evolution of key microstructural parameters such as average grain size and average grain orientation spread (GOS, a measure of lattice distortion) within the process zone, determined by electron backscatter diffraction analysis, differs significantly as a function of loading conditions. Both parameters indicate that, independent of bulk strain and distance from the inclusion, the

  19. Alaska Plant Materials Center | Division of Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Management Plan for Alaska, 2005 2017 AK Potato Seed Certification Handbook Tobacco Rattle Virus in Peonies Virus and Thrips Vectors Resources Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook Pacific Northwest Potato Production Disease Risk Monitoring Publications and Reports Late Blight Management Plan for Alaska

  20. Risk spreading, habitat selection and division of biomass in a submerged clonal plant: Responses to heterogeneous copper pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Xue; Wang, Haowen; Wang, Qingfeng; Rudstam, Lars G.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity of contaminant-stress can be an important environmental factor for clonal plants. We focused on Cu transport among the clones, the foraging or fugitive behavior and biomass allocation of submerged plant, Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara, exposed to heterogeneous sediments. This study was carried out in aquatic mesocosms between March and September 2010. Cu accumulated in contaminated ramets was exported horizontally via stolons to other ramets in uncontaminated patches, and then transported both acropetally to leaves and basipetally to belowground structures. There was no indication that V. natans adopted morphological plasticity in response to heterogeneous contaminated habitat. In contrast to predictions, more biomass was allocated to belowground tissues in contaminated patches. We concluded that risk of Cu stress spread among submerged clones, and V. natans did not actively select habitat in contaminated patchy environment. Furthermore, V. natans adopted compensatory investments instead of division of labor to acquire nutrient and survive. -- Highlights: ► Response of submerged clonal plant in heterogeneous Cu soil was studied. ► Cu can spread among V. natans clones in contaminated patches. ► Ramets of V. natans grow randomly instead of habitat selection actively. ► Individual growth in patchy pollution was relative independent rather than DoL. -- Cu can spread among V. natans clones and the clones grow randomly and relative independent in heterogeneous Cu-contaminated sediment

  1. Individual species-area relationship of woody plant communities in a heterogeneous subtropical monsoon rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Han; Lin, Yi-Ching; Wiegand, Thorsten; Nakazawa, Takefumi; Su, Sheng-Hsin; Hsieh, Chih-Hao; Ding, Tzung-Su

    2015-01-01

    The spatial structure of species richness is often characterized by the species-area relationship (SAR). However, the SAR approach rarely considers the spatial variability of individual plants that arises from species interactions and species' habitat associations. Here, we explored how the interactions of individual plants of target species influence SAR patterns at a range of neighborhood distances. We analyzed the data of 113,988 woody plants of 110 species from the Fushan Forest Dynamics Plot (25 ha), northern Taiwan, which is a subtropical rainforest heavily influenced by typhoons. We classified 34 dominant species into 3 species types (i.e., accumulator, repeller, or no effect) by testing how the individual species-area relationship (i.e., statistics describing how neighborhood species richness changes around individuals) of target species departs (i.e., positively, negatively, or with no obvious trend) from a null model that accounts for habitat association. Deviation from the null model suggests that the net effect of species' interactions increases (accumulate) or decreases (repel) neighborhood species richness. We found that (i) accumulators were dominant at small interaction distances (30 m); (iii) repellers were rarely detected; and (iv) large-sized and abundant species tended to be accumulators. The findings suggest that positive species interactions have the potential to accumulate neighborhood species richness, particularly through size- and density-dependent mechanisms. We hypothesized that the frequently disturbed environment of this subtropical rainforest (e.g., typhoon-driven natural disturbances such as landslides, soil erosion, flooding, and windthrow) might create the spatial heterogeneity of species richness and promote positive species interactions.

  2. Dry coniferous forest restoration and understory plant diversity: The importance of community heterogeneity and the scale of observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erich Kyle Dodson; David W. Peterson

    2010-01-01

    Maintaining understory plant species diversity is an important management goal as forest restoration and fuel reduction treatments are applied extensively to dry coniferous forests of western North America. However, understory diversity is a function of both local species richness (number of species in a sample unit) and community heterogeneity (beta diversity) at...

  3. Erosion and corrosion of nuclear power plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This conference is composed of 23 papers, grouped in 3 sessions which main themes are: analysis of corrosion and erosion damages of nuclear power plant equipment and influence of water chemistry, temperature, irradiations, metallurgical and electrochemical factors, flow assisted cracking, stress cracking; monitoring and control of erosion and corrosion in nuclear power plants; susceptibility of structural materials to erosion and corrosion and ways to improve the resistance of materials, steels, coatings, etc. to erosion, corrosion and cracking

  4. Foundational literature for moving native plant materials in changing climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary I. Williams; Kas Dumroese; Jeremy Pinto; Martin F. Jurgensen

    2015-01-01

    Seed transfer guidelines and zones are used to manage the movement of plant materials, but by the end of the century many landscapes across the globe will have climates that are incompatible with current vegetation. The mismatch in rates between climate change and plant migration and adaptation will pose significant challenges for natural resource managers, especially...

  5. Revisiting Rebound Effects from Material Resource Use. Indications for Germany Considering Social Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Buhl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the original investigation by William Stanley Jevons, compensations of energy savings due to improved energy efficiency are mostly analyzed by providing energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions. In support of a sustainable resource management, this paper analyzes so-called rebound effects based on resource use. Material flows and associated expenditures by households allow for calculating resource intensities and marginal propensities to consume. Marginal propensities to consume are estimated from data of the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP in order to account for indirect rebound effects for food, housing and mobility. Resource intensities are estimated in terms of total material requirements per household final consumption expenditures along the Classification of Individual Consumption according to Purpose (COICOP. Eventually, rebound effects are indicated on the basis of published saving scenarios in resource and energy demand for Germany. In sum, compensations due to rebound effects are lowest for food while the highest compensations are induced for mobility. This is foremost the result of a relatively high resource intensity of food and a relatively low resource intensity in mobility. Findings are provided by giving various propensity scenarios in order to cope with income differences in Germany. The author concludes that policies on resource conservation need to reconsider rebound effects under the aspect of social heterogeneity.

  6. Materials Investigation for Power Plants Industry. Seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szteke, W.; Wasiak, J.; Bilous, W.; Przyborska, M.; Wagner, T.; Wojciechowska, J.; Zubowski, B.

    2006-01-01

    The Report is an assembly of the papers concerning perspectives of evolution of power in Poland. The material and diagnostic problems occurring the exploitation of power station as well as gas pipelines are discussed. The progress in the accommodation of the Polish technical prescriptions to the European law is described

  7. Uptake by plants of radionuclides from FUSRAP waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Radionuclides from FUSRAP wastes potentially may be taken up by plants during remedial action activities and permanent near-surface burial of contaminated materials. In order to better understand the propensity of radionuclides to accumulate in plant tissue, soil and plant factors influencing the uptake and accumulation of radionuclides by plants are reviewed. In addition, data describing the uptake of the principal radionuclides present in FUSRAP wastes (uranium-238, thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210, and polonium-210) are summarized. All five radionuclides can accumulate in plant root tissue to some extent, and there is potential for the translocation and accumulation of these radionuclides in plant shoot tissue. Of these five radionuclides, radium-226 appears to have the greatest potential for translocation and accumulation in plant shoot tissue. 28 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  8. Uptake by plants of radionuclides from FUSRAP waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Radionuclides from FUSRAP wastes potentially may be taken up by plants during remedial action activities and permanent near-surface burial of contaminated materials. In order to better understand the propensity of radionuclides to accumulate in plant tissue, soil and plant factors influencing the uptake and accumulation of radionuclides by plants are reviewed. In addition, data describing the uptake of the principal radionuclides present in FUSRAP wastes (uranium-238, thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210, and polonium-210) are summarized. All five radionuclides can accumulate in plant root tissue to some extent, and there is potential for the translocation and accumulation of these radionuclides in plant shoot tissue. Of these five radionuclides, radium-226 appears to have the greatest potential for translocation and accumulation in plant shoot tissue. 28 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  9. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.; Congemi, J.

    1991-05-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1988 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1988 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized. 16 tabs

  10. Treatment of liquid wastes from decontamination of nuclear power plants by heterogeneous photocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgada, Maria Eugenia

    2002-01-01

    In nuclear power plants high radiation fields are produced, not only in the core but also in the auxiliary systems, due, mainly, to the activation of corrosion products by means of a mechanism known as 'Activity Transport'.With the purpose of reducing at minimum values the intensity of radiation fields and of avoiding the operative problems generated by the deposition of oxides in tanks and pipelines, it is necessary to remove the oxide films, carriers of activity, from the components in auxiliary systems in nuclear power plants and this is usually carried on by chemical cleaning.This process, known as decontamination, is done employing mixtures of oligocarboxilic acids such as NTA, EDTA, oxalic acid, citric acid, etc., at concentration nearly 1% and pH 3-4.The resulting liquid wastes of this process cannot be discharged directly to the environment but must be properly treated.Conventional treatments such as thermolysis, chemical oxidation and others show some problems and, in addition, some of these substances are resistant to degradation.Previous work done in the Unidad de Actividad Quimica del Centro Atomico Constituyentes (UAQ-CAC) indicated that Heterogeneous Photocatalysis, belonging to the Advanced Oxidation Technologies (AOTs), could be a useful procedure for the treatment of liquid decontamination wastes. This method consists on the irradiation of an aqueous suspension of a semiconductor, generally TiO 2 , containing the substrate to be degraded, employing wavelengths shorter than the semiconductor's 'band-gap'.In this way, oxidant and reducing molecules are generated.The advantages compared to other AOTs are its low cost, the ability to work at room temperature and pressure, it uses only oxygen as oxidizing agent and can be operated in 'batch' and continuum.In the present work we employed a recycling system, with a black-light tubular UV lamp (366nm) installed inside as the source of illumination, to study the degradation of oxalic and citric acid by

  11. DNA barcoding of medicinal plant material for identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because of the increasing demand for herbal remedies and for authentication of the source material, it is vital to provide a single database containing information about authentic plant materials and their potential adulterants. The database should provide DNA barcodes for data retrieval and similar...

  12. Prevention of spontaneous combustion of backfilled plant waste material.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adamski, SA

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Since Grootegeluk Coal Mine commenced operation in 1980 all plant discards and inter-burden material have been stacked on discards dumps, a practice that has led to the spontaneous combustion of the waste material on these dumps. From 1980 to 1988...

  13. Material control and accountancy at EDF PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Cormis, F.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the comprehensive system which is developed and implemented at Electricite de France to provide a single reliable nuclear material control and accounting system for all nuclear plants. This software aims at several objectives among which are: the control and the accountancy of nuclear material at the plant, the optimization of the consistency of data by minimizing the possibility of transcription errors, the fulfillment of the statutory requirements by automatic transfer of reports to national and international safeguards authorities, the servicing of other EDF users of nuclear material data for technical or commercial purposes

  14. Reuse of contaminated material from nuclear-power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melichar, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Some building structures of decommissioned nuclear power plants are contaminated to a very low extent. Little experience is so far available concerning the recycling and furher exploitation of such materials, the majority of which is constituted by concrete and steel. The mass and activities of the metal parts of the Bohunice A-1 nuclear power plant are estimated and the major contaminant radionuclides are listed. Czechoslovak as well as foreign regulations concerning radioactive material handling are cited and criteria for releasing such materials for further use are discussed. (M.D.). 7 tabs., 3 figs, 28 refs

  15. Creep property testing of energy power plant component material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitiswati, Sri; Histori; Triyadi, Ari; Haryanto, Mudi

    1999-01-01

    Creep testing of SA213 T12 boiler piping material from fossil plant, Suralaya has been done. The aim of the testing is to know the creep behaviour of SA213 T12 boiler piping material which has been used more than 10 yeas, what is the material still followed ideal creep curve (there are primary stage, secondary stage, and tertiary stage). This possibility could happened because the material which has been used more than 10 years usually will be through ageing process because corrosion. The testing was conducted in 520 0C, with variety load between 4% until 50% maximum allowable load based on strength of the material in 520 0C

  16. Metal- and Carbon-Based Materials as Heterogeneous Electrocatalysts for CO₂ Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Azam; Ullah, Haseeb; Nasir, Jamal Abdul; Shuda, Suzanne; Chen, Wei; Khan, M Abdullah

    2018-05-01

    Climate change caused by continuous rising level of CO2 and the depletion of fossil fuels reserves has made it highly desirable to electrochemically convert CO2 into fuels and commodity chemicals. Implementing this approach will close the carbon cycle by recycling CO2 providing a sustainable way to store energy in the chemical bonds of portable molecular fuels. In order to make the process commercially viable, the challenge of slow kinetics of CO2 electroreduction and low energy efficiency of the process need to be addressed. To this end, this review summarizes the progress made in the past few years in the development of heterogeneous electrocatalysts with a focus on nanostructured material for CO2 reduction to CO, HCOOH/HCOO-, CH2O, CH4, H2C2O4/HC2O-4, C2H4, CH3OH, CH3CH2OH, etc. The electrocatalysts presented here are classified into metals, metal alloys, metal oxides, metal chalcogenides and carbon based materials on the basis of their elemental composition, whose performance is discussed in light of catalyst activity, product selectivity, Faradaic efficiency (FE), catalytic durability and in selected cases mechanism of CO2 electroreduction. The effect of particle size, morphology and solution-electrolyte type and composition on the catalyst property/activity is also discussed and finally some strategies are proposed for the development of CO2 electroreduction catalysts. The aim of this article is to review the recent advances in the field of CO2 electroreduction in order to further facilitate research and development in this area.

  17. Self-consistent clustering analysis: an efficient multiscale scheme for inelastic heterogeneous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z.; Bessa, M. A.; Liu, W.K.

    2017-10-25

    A predictive computational theory is shown for modeling complex, hierarchical materials ranging from metal alloys to polymer nanocomposites. The theory can capture complex mechanisms such as plasticity and failure that span across multiple length scales. This general multiscale material modeling theory relies on sound principles of mathematics and mechanics, and a cutting-edge reduced order modeling method named self-consistent clustering analysis (SCA) [Zeliang Liu, M.A. Bessa, Wing Kam Liu, “Self-consistent clustering analysis: An efficient multi-scale scheme for inelastic heterogeneous materials,” Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg. 306 (2016) 319–341]. SCA reduces by several orders of magnitude the computational cost of micromechanical and concurrent multiscale simulations, while retaining the microstructure information. This remarkable increase in efficiency is achieved with a data-driven clustering method. Computationally expensive operations are performed in the so-called offline stage, where degrees of freedom (DOFs) are agglomerated into clusters. The interaction tensor of these clusters is computed. In the online or predictive stage, the Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation is solved cluster-wise using a self-consistent scheme to ensure solution accuracy and avoid path dependence. To construct a concurrent multiscale model, this scheme is applied at each material point in a macroscale structure, replacing a conventional constitutive model with the average response computed from the microscale model using just the SCA online stage. A regularized damage theory is incorporated in the microscale that avoids the mesh and RVE size dependence that commonly plagues microscale damage calculations. The SCA method is illustrated with two cases: a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) structure with the concurrent multiscale model and an application to fatigue prediction for additively manufactured metals. For the CFRP problem, a speed up estimated to be about

  18. Heterogeneity of soil surface ammonium concentration and other characteristics, related to plant specific variability in a Mediterranean-type ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Cristina; Bio, Ana M.F.; Jullioti, Aldo; Tavares, Alice; Dias, Teresa; Martins-Loucao, Maria Amelia

    2008-01-01

    Heterogeneity and dynamics of eight soil surface characteristics essential for plants-ammonium and nitrate concentrations, water content, temperature, pH, organic matter, nitrification and ammonification rates-were studied in a Mediterranean-type ecosystem on four occasions over a year. Soil properties varied seasonally and were influenced by plant species. Nitrate and ammonium were present in the soil at similar concentrations throughout the year. The positive correlation between them at the time of greatest plant development indicates that ammonium is a readily available nitrogen source in Mediterranean-type ecosystems. The results presented here suggest that plant cover significantly affects soil surface characteristics. - In Mediterranean-type ecosystems ammonium is present in the soil throughout the year and its concentration is dependent on plant cover

  19. of Effect of different organic materials on plant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehrnosh eskandari

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Using organic matter, such as, peat and vermicompost as soil amendment, increases aeration, water infiltration, water holding capacity and nutrients of soil . A greenhouse experiment was performed to study the effect of organic materials on plant growth characteristics, total biomass and grain weight of chickpea with four treatments; 1 Soil + 3% peat (PS, 2 Sterile soil + 3% peat (SPS, 3 Soil + vermicompost (1:6 (VCS, 4 control (C in a completely randomized design with four replications. The results showed that the maximum germination percentage, number of branch and number of pod per plant were observed in SPS treatment due to the avoidance of harmful microbial impacts. Plant height in this treatment reduced, whereas, no significant differences in total dry matter per plant and dry weight of chickpea per plant were observed compared to control. Plant growth consist of plant height, number of branch and number of pod per plant in vermicompost and soil + peat treatment reduced in the early stages probably because of plant - microbes interaction effects. Application of vermicompost increased fresh and dry weight, pod dry weight and single grain weight, probably due to more plant nutrient availability in this treatment when compared with other treatments.

  20. PLANETARY-SCALE STRONTIUM ISOTOPIC HETEROGENEITY AND THE AGE OF VOLATILE DEPLETION OF EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moynier, Frederic; Podosek, Frank A. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science and McDonnell Center for Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Day, James M. D. [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA 92093-0244 (United States); Okui, Wataru; Yokoyama, Tetsuya [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Bouvier, Audrey [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0231 (United States); Walker, Richard J., E-mail: moynier@levee.wustl.edu, E-mail: fap@levee.wustl.edu, E-mail: jmdday@ucsd.edu, E-mail: rjwalker@umd.edu, E-mail: okui.w.aa@m.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: tetsuya.yoko@geo.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: abouvier@umn.edu [Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    Isotopic anomalies in planetary materials reflect both early solar nebular heterogeneity inherited from presolar stellar sources and processes that generated non-mass-dependent isotopic fractionations. The characterization of isotopic variations in heavy elements among early solar system materials yields important insight into the stellar environment and formation of the solar system, and about initial isotopic ratios relevant to long-term chronological applications. One such heavy element, strontium, is a central element in the geosciences due to wide application of the long-lived {sup 87}Rb-{sup 87}Sr radioactive as a chronometer. We show that the stable isotopes of Sr were heterogeneously distributed at both the mineral scale and the planetary scale in the early solar system, and also that the Sr isotopic heterogeneities correlate with mass-independent oxygen isotope variations, with only CI chondrites plotting outside of this correlation. The correlation implies that most solar system material formed by mixing of at least two isotopically distinct components: a CV-chondrite-like component and an O-chondrite-like component, and possibly a distinct CI-chondrite-like component. The heterogeneous distribution of Sr isotopes may indicate that variations in initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr of early solar system materials reflect isotopic heterogeneity instead of having chronological significance, as interpreted previously. For example, given the differences in {sup 84}Sr/{sup 86}Sr between calcium aluminum inclusions and eucrites ({epsilon}{sup 84}Sr > 2), the difference in age between these materials would be {approx}6 Ma shorter than previously interpreted, placing the Sr chronology in agreement with other long- and short-lived isotope systems, such as U-Pb and Mn-Cr.

  1. Nicotine Analysis in Several Non-Tobacco Plant Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldoveanu Serban C.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Present study describes the determination of nicotine in various plant samples with a low content of this compound. Nicotine is found naturally in plants from the Solanaceae family. The plants from Nicotiana genus contain large levels of nicotine. However, only low levels are present in plants from Solanum genus including potato, tomato, eggplant, and from Capsicum genus, which are used as food. Because the levels of nicotine in these materials are in the range of parts per billion, the measurements are difficult and the results are very different from study to study. The present study evaluated the level of nicotine in a number of plants (fruits, roots, leaves, tubers from Solanaceae family (not including Nicotiana genus and from several other vegetables commonly used as food. The analysis consisted of the treatment of plant material with an aqueous solution 5% NaOH at 70°C for 30 min, followed by extraction with TBME containing d3-nicotine as an internal standard. The TBME organic layer was analyzed on a 7890B/7000C GC-MS/MS system with a 30 m × 0.25 mm, 0.25 μm film CAM column. The MS/MS system worked in MRM positive ionization mode monitoring the transition 162 - 84 for nicotine and 165 - 87 for d3-nicotine. Particular attention was given to the preservation of the intact levels of nicotine in the plant material. The plant material was analyzed as is, without drying and with minimal exposure to contaminations. Separately, the moisture of the plant material was measured in order to report the nicotine level on a dry-basis. Levels of nicotine around 180 ng/g dry material were obtained for tomatoes and eggplant (fruit and lower levels were obtained for green pepper and potato. Similar levels to that in the tomato fruit were detected in tomato leaves. Materials from other plant families also showed traces of nicotine. [Beitr. Tabakforsch. Int. 27 (2016 54-59

  2. Production of biogas from plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuer, J.

    1980-12-01

    Different crop residues from agriculture and horticulture were investigated for feasibility of producing biogas. The anaerobic fermentation has been performed in batch system fermentation reactors (5 liters) at mesophilic conditions (35 degrees C). Content of volatile solids (VS/TS) in raw materials varied from 78.5 percent in silage from top of sugar beet to 97.3 percent in straw of rye. The highest content of lignin was found in stalks of Jerusalem artichoke (49.6 percent), stalks of horse bean (47.6 percent) and the lowest in leaves of cauliflower (9.5 percent), top of sugar beet and leaves of cabbage (11 percent) in both. Ratio of carbon to nitrogen was the highest in the straw of rye (60) and the lowest in silage from top of sugar beet (11) and in leaves of cauliflower (11). Rate of biogas production during the first 13 days of fermentation was about 27 liters per kg TS per day, achieved from top of sugar beet. Typical mean rate of biogas production, about 9 liters per kg TS per day, was performed during the first 40 days of retention time from straw of wheat and stalks of rape. Top of sugar beet and manure slurry have had the shortest effective retention time ca 20 days. Maximum total yield of biogas (427.0 liters per kg TS) was achieved from top of sugar beet. From manure slurry 257.5 liters biogas per kg TS was obtained. Methane content in biogas produced during the final 7 days of retention time was the highest from silage from top of artichoke (72.8 percent), stalks of horse bean (71.6 percent) and straw of wheat (71.0 percent). The lowest percentage of methane (59.0 percent) was found in biogas from top of sugar beet.

  3. Meso-Scale Modeling of Spall in a Heterogeneous Two-Phase Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Harry Keo [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2008-07-11

    The influence of the heterogeneous second-phase particle structure and applied loading conditions on the ductile spall response of a model two-phase material was investigated. Quantitative metallography, three-dimensional (3D) meso-scale simulations (MSS), and small-scale spall experiments provided the foundation for this study. Nodular ductile iron (NDI) was selected as the model two-phase material for this study because it contains a large and readily identifiable second- phase particle population. Second-phase particles serve as the primary void nucleation sites in NDI and are, therefore, central to its ductile spall response. A mathematical model was developed for the NDI second-phase volume fraction that accounted for the non-uniform particle size and spacing distributions within the framework of a length-scale dependent Gaussian probability distribution function (PDF). This model was based on novel multiscale sampling measurements. A methodology was also developed for the computer generation of representative particle structures based on their mathematical description, enabling 3D MSS. MSS were used to investigate the effects of second-phase particle volume fraction and particle size, loading conditions, and physical domain size of simulation on the ductile spall response of a model two-phase material. MSS results reinforce existing model predictions, where the spall strength metric (SSM) logarithmically decreases with increasing particle volume fraction. While SSM predictions are nearly independent of applied load conditions at lower loading rates, which is consistent with previous studies, loading dependencies are observed at higher loading rates. There is also a logarithmic decrease in SSM for increasing (initial) void size, as well. A model was developed to account for the effects of loading rate, particle size, matrix sound-speed, and, in the NDI-specific case, the probabilistic particle volume fraction model. Small-scale spall experiments were designed

  4. Conformational heterogeneity of the Pfr chromophore in plant and cyanobacterial phytochromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eVelazquez Escobar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytochromes are biological photoreceptors that can be reversibly photoconverted between a dark and photoactivated state. The underlying reaction sequences are initiated by the photoisomerisation of the tetrapyrrole cofactor, which in plant and cyanobacterial phytochromes are a phytochromobilin (PB and a phycocyanobilin (PCB, respectively. The transition between the two states represents an on/off-switch of the output module activating or deactivating downstream physiological processes. In addition, the photoactivated state, i.e. Pfr in canonical phytochromes, can be thermally reverted to the dark state (Pr. The present study aimed to improve our understanding of the specific reactivity of various PB- and PCB-binding phytochromes in the Pfr state by analyzing the cofactor structure by vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Resonance Raman (RR spectroscopy revealed two Pfr conformers (Pfr-I and Pfr-II forming a temperature-dependent conformational equilibrium. The two sub-states - found in all phytochromes studied, albeit with different relative contributions - differ in structural details of the C-D and A-B methine bridges. In the Pfr-I sub-state the torsion between the rings C and D is larger by ca. 10o compared to Pfr-II. This structural difference is presumably related to different hydrogen bonding interactions of ring D as revealed by time-resolved IR spectroscopic studies of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1. The transitions between the two sub-states are evidently too fast (i.e., nanosecond time scale to be resolved by NMR spectroscopy which could not detect a structural heterogeneity of the chromophore in Pfr. The implications of the present findings for the dark reversion of the Pfr state are discussed.

  5. Plant materials program. Progress report, June 1980-May 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, W.; Cubicciotti, D.; Fox, M.; Giannuzzi, A.; Gilman, J.; Jones, R.; McIlree, A.

    1981-11-01

    This is the first annual progress report of the Plant Materials Subprogram, which was organized in May 1980 to address corrosion-related materials problems in light water reactors. The first section of the report provides an overview of plant materials problems which have a high impact on plant availability. These include pipe and pressure vessel cracking, condenser leakage, turbine disc cracking, and steam generator tube denting and cracking. The status and goals of research and development work related to each of these problems are reviewed briefly. Subsequent report sections provide more detailed reviews of significant progress in the relevant technical topic areas: intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels; environmentally-assisted cracking of carbon and low alloy steels; intergranular stress corrosion cracking of nickel-base alloys; and improved fabrication technology

  6. Plant Materials Program: progress June 1981 to May 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, W.; Cubicciotti, D.; Fox, M.; Giannuzzi, A.; Gilman, J.; Jones, R.

    1983-02-01

    This is the second annual progress report of the Plant Materials Subprogram, which was organized in May 1980 to address corrosion-related materials problems in light water reactors. The first section of the report provides an overview of plant materials problems which have a high impact on plant availability. These include pipe and pressure vessel cracking, condenser leakage, turbine disc cracking, steam geerator tube attack and cracking, and cracking of nickel alloy springs, beams and pins. The status and goals of research and development work related to each of these problems are reviewed briefly. Subsequent report sections provide more detailed reviews of significant progress in the relevant technical topic areas: intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels; environmentally-assisted cracking of carbon and low alloy steels; intergranular stress corrosion cracking of nickel-base alloys; and improved fabrication technology

  7. Plant Materials Program: progress June 1981-May 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, W.; Cubicciotti, D.; Fox, M.; Giannuzzi, A.; Gilman, J.; Jones, R.

    1983-02-01

    This is the second annual progress report of the Plant Materials Subprogram, which was organized in May 1980 to address corrosion-related materials problems in light water reactors. The first section of the report provides an overview of plant materials problems which have impact on plant availability. These include pipe and pressure vessel cracking, condenser leakage, turbine disc cracking, steam generator tube attack and cracking, and cracking of nickel alloy springs, beams and pins. The status and goals of research and development work related to each of these problems are reviewed briefly. Subsequent report sections provide more detailed reviews of significant progress in the relevant technical topic area: integranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels; environmentally-assisted cracking of carbon and low alloy steels; intergranular stress corrosion cracking of nickel-base alloys; and improved fabrication technology

  8. Effect of lunar materials on plant tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkinshaw, C. H.; Venketeswaran, S.; Baur, P. S.; Croley, T. E.; Scholes, V. E.; Weete, J. D.; Halliwell, R. S.; Hall, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Lunar material collected during the Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 missions has been used to treat 12 species of higher plant tissue cultures. Biochemical and morphological studies have been conducted on several of these species. Tobacco tissue cultures treated with 0.22 g of lunar material exhibited increased greening more complex chloroplasts, less cytoplasmic vacuolation and greater vesiculation. Pine tissue cultures reacted to treatment by an increased deposition of tannin-like materials. The percentage of dry weight and soluble protein was increased in cultures treated with either lunar or terrestrial rock materials.

  9. Contribution of Topography and Incident Solar Radiation to Variation of Soil and Plant Litter at an Area with Heterogeneous Terrain

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Cito Nettesheim; Tiago de Conto; Marcos Gervasio Pereira; Deivid Lopes Machado

    2015-01-01

    Natural processes that determine soil and plant litter properties are controlled by multiple factors. However, little attention has been given to distinguishing the effects of environmental factors from the effects of spatial structure of the area on the distribution of soil and litter properties in tropical ecosystems covering heterogeneous topographies. The aim of this study was to assess patterns of soil and litter variation in a tropical area that intercepts different levels of solar radi...

  10. Materials and methods to increase plant growth and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirst, Matias

    2017-05-16

    The present invention relates to materials and methods for modulating growth rates, yield, and/or resistance to drought conditions in plants. In one embodiment, a method of the invention comprises increasing expression of an hc1 gene (or a homolog thereof that provides for substantially the same activity), or increasing expression or activity of the protein encoded by an hc1 gene thereof, in a plant, wherein expression of the hc1 gene or expression or activity of the protein encoded by an hc1 gene results in increased growth rate, yield, and/or drought resistance in the plant.

  11. Heterogeneity in Ethnoecological Knowledge and Management of Medicinal Plants in the Himalayas of Nepal: Implications for Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar Ghimire

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance accorded to ethnoecological knowledge for suggesting new paths in scientific research, understanding ecological processes, and designing sustainable management of natural resources has grown in recent years. However, variation in knowledge and practices, both within and across cultures, has not been given much attention in resource management nor in developing scientific understanding of the ecological status of key resources. In this paper, we discuss the heterogeneity and complexity of local ecological knowledge in relation to its practical and institutional context with respect to management of Himalayan medicinal plants. We show factors affecting this variation, and discuss how knowledge is put into action. We assessed variation in knowledge relating to the diversity of medicinal plant species, their distribution, medicinal uses, biological traits, ecology, and management within and between two culturally different social groups living in villages located in the Shey-Phoksundo National Park and its buffer zone in northwestern Nepal. Heterogeneity in levels of knowledge and in practices both within and between these groups corresponds to differences in level of specialization in relation to medicinal plants, to socio-cultural and institutional contexts, and to extra-local factors that govern people's activities. We argue that understanding the heterogeneity of knowledge and practices within a given area is crucial to design management practices that build on the intricate links between knowledge, practices, and institutional context. It is also important to develop ecological studies that will best inform management.

  12. Implications of fusion power plant studies for materials requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, Ian; Ward, David; Dudarev, Sergei

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the key requirements for fusion materials, as these have emerged from studies of commercial fusion power plants. The objective of the international fusion programme is the creation of power stations that will have very attractive safety and environmental features and viable economics. Fusion power plant studies have shown that these objectives may be achieved without requiring extreme advances in materials. But it is required that existing candidate materials perform at least as well as envisaged in the environment of fusion neutrons, heat fluxes and particle fluxes. The development of advanced materials would bring further benefits. The work required entails the investigation of many intellectually exciting physics issues of great scientific interest, and of wider application than fusion. In addition to giving an overview, selected aspects of the science, of particular physics interest, are illustrated

  13. Using thermal power plants waste for building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduik, R. S.; Smoliakov, A. K.; Timokhin, R. A.; Batarshin, V. O.; Yevdokimova, Yu G.

    2017-10-01

    The recycled use of thermal power plants (TPPs) wastes in the building materials production is formulated. The possibility of using of TPPs fly ash as part of the cement composite binder for concrete is assessed. The results of X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis as well as and materials photomicrographs are presented. It was revealed that the fly ash of TPPs of Russian Primorsky Krai is suitable for use as a filler in cement binding based on its chemical composition.

  14. Radioactive materials in ashes from peat fired plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlandsson, B.; Hedvall, R.

    1984-11-01

    Measurements of the gamma radiation have been used for determination of radioactive materials in peat ashes from five Swedish heating plants. The results show that the amount of radioactive materials was almost the same in all samples. The concentration of 125 Sb, 137 Cs, 144 Cs and 155 Eu were in good conformity with the concentrations found in the environment. The 235 U-concentration was hardly possible to measure. (Edv)

  15. Overexpression of an Arabidopsis heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein gene, AtRNP1, affects plant growth and reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Xiuyang; Wang, Bing; Liu, Erlong; Chen, Ni; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) participate in diverse regulations of plant growth and environmental stress responses. In this work, an Arabidopsis hnRNP of unknown function, AtRNP1, was investigated. We found that AtRNP1 gene is highly expressed in rosette and cauline leaves, and slightly induced under drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. We performed homologous overexpression of AtRNP1 and found that the transgenic plants showed shortened root length and plant height, and accelerated flowering. In addition, the transgenic plants also showed reduced tolerance to drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. Further studies revealed that under both normal and stress conditions, the proline contents in the transgenic plants are markedly decreased, associated with reduced expression levels of a proline synthase gene and several stress-responsive genes. These results suggested that the overexpression of AtRNP1 negatively affects plant growth and abiotic stress tolerance. - Highlights: • AtRNP1 is a widely expressed gene and its expression is slightly induced under abiotic stresses. • AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 affects plant growth. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses. • AtRNP1 overexpression plants show decreased proline accumulation and stress-responsive gene expressions.

  16. Overexpression of an Arabidopsis heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein gene, AtRNP1, affects plant growth and reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhenyu, E-mail: wzy72609@163.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Zhao, Xiuyang, E-mail: xiuzh@psb.vib-ugent.be [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Wang, Bing, E-mail: wangbing@ibcas.ac.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Liu, Erlong, E-mail: liuel14@lzu.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Chen, Ni, E-mail: 63710156@qq.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Zhang, Wei, E-mail: wzhang1216@yahoo.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Bio-Energy Crops, School of Life Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Liu, Heng, E-mail: hengliu@lzu.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China)

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) participate in diverse regulations of plant growth and environmental stress responses. In this work, an Arabidopsis hnRNP of unknown function, AtRNP1, was investigated. We found that AtRNP1 gene is highly expressed in rosette and cauline leaves, and slightly induced under drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. We performed homologous overexpression of AtRNP1 and found that the transgenic plants showed shortened root length and plant height, and accelerated flowering. In addition, the transgenic plants also showed reduced tolerance to drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. Further studies revealed that under both normal and stress conditions, the proline contents in the transgenic plants are markedly decreased, associated with reduced expression levels of a proline synthase gene and several stress-responsive genes. These results suggested that the overexpression of AtRNP1 negatively affects plant growth and abiotic stress tolerance. - Highlights: • AtRNP1 is a widely expressed gene and its expression is slightly induced under abiotic stresses. • AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 affects plant growth. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses. • AtRNP1 overexpression plants show decreased proline accumulation and stress-responsive gene expressions.

  17. Availability and temporal heterogeneity of water supply affect the vertical distribution and mortality of a belowground herbivore and consequently plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Tomonori; Kachi, Naoki; Suzuki, Jun-Ichirou

    2014-01-01

    We examined how the volume and temporal heterogeneity of water supply changed the vertical distribution and mortality of a belowground herbivore, and consequently affected plant biomass. Plantago lanceolata (Plantaginaceae) seedlings were grown at one per pot under different combinations of water volume (large or small volume) and heterogeneity (homogeneous water conditions, watered every day; heterogeneous conditions, watered every 4 days) in the presence or absence of a larva of the belowground herbivorous insect, Anomala cuprea (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). The larva was confined in different vertical distributions to top feeding zone (top treatment), middle feeding zone (middle treatment), or bottom feeding zone (bottom treatment); alternatively no larva was introduced (control treatment) or larval movement was not confined (free treatment). Three-way interaction between water volume, heterogeneity, and the herbivore significantly affected plant biomass. With a large water volume, plant biomass was lower in free treatment than in control treatment regardless of heterogeneity. Plant biomass in free treatment was as low as in top treatment. With a small water volume and in free treatment, plant biomass was low (similar to that under top treatment) under homogeneous water conditions but high under heterogeneous ones (similar to that under middle or bottom treatment). Therefore, there was little effect of belowground herbivory on plant growth under heterogeneous water conditions. In other watering regimes, herbivores would be distributed in the shallow soil and reduced root biomass. Herbivore mortality was high with homogeneous application of a large volume or heterogeneous application of a small water volume. Under the large water volume, plant biomass was high in pots in which the herbivore had died. Thus, the combinations of water volume and heterogeneity affected plant growth via the change of a belowground herbivore.

  18. Observations of White-backed Vultures eating plant material in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    campbell

    small quantities of the green leaves and eagerly feed on dried leaves after the first winter frost without obvious negative effects (H. Stehn, pers. obs.). On being informed of the incident, NT was intrigued, as he had never heard of vultures eating plant material and as White-backed. Vultures eat primarily soft body parts and do ...

  19. Extraction of secondary metabolites from plant material: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starmans, D.A.J.; Nijhuis, H.H.

    1996-01-01

    This review article intends to give an overview of the developments in the extraction technology of secondary metabolites from plant material. There are three types of conventional extraction techniques. In order of increasing technological difficulty, these involve the use of solvents, steam or

  20. Outline of material accountancy system for Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Touko; Yamazaki Yoshihiro; Ai, Hironobu

    2004-01-01

    In January 2004, Facility Attachment (FA) for Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) was entered into force and the safeguards has been implemented in accordance with the FA. So operator must carry out the effectual material accountancy on the basis of facility operation. RRP is large and complex facility and operated based on automatic and remote system. For efficient material accounting viewpoint, the system especially automatic data collection is established using RRP computer network. The paper describes the outline of material accountancy system, the structure of RRP computer network including how to collect the source data, to convert the batch data and the reporting. (author)

  1. Materials control and accountability at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denning, G.E.; Britschgi, J.J.; Spraktes, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The ICPP high enriched uranium recovery process has historically been operated as a single Material Balance Area (MBA), with input and output measurement capabilities. Safeguards initiated changes in the last five years have resulted in significant materials control and accountability improvements. Those changes include semi-automation of process accountability measurement, data collection and recording; definition of Sub-MBAs; standard plant cleanouts; and, bimonthly inventory estimates. Process monitoring capabilities are also being installed to provide independent operational procedural compliance verification, process anomaly detection, and enhanced materials traceability. Development of a sensitivity analysis approach to defining process measurement requirements is in progress

  2. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Chiral Cylindrical Molecular Complexes: Functional Heterogeneous Liquid-Solid Materials Formed by Helicene Oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozomi Saito

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chiral cylindrical molecular complexes of homo- and hetero-double-helices derived from helicene oligomers self-assemble in solution, providing functional heterogeneous liquid-solid materials. Gels and liotropic liquid crystals are formed by fibril self-assembly in solution; molecular monolayers and fibril films are formed by self-assembly on solid surfaces; gels containing gold nanoparticles emit light; silica nanoparticles aggregate and adsorb double-helices. Notable dynamics appears during self-assembly, including multistep self-assembly, solid surface catalyzed double-helix formation, sigmoidal and stairwise kinetics, molecular recognition of nanoparticles, discontinuous self-assembly, materials clocking, chiral symmetry breaking and homogeneous-heterogeneous transitions. These phenomena are derived from strong intercomplex interactions of chiral cylindrical molecular complexes.

  3. A hyperspectral approach to estimating biomass and plant production in a heterogeneous restored temperate peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, K. B.; Schile, L. M.; Windham-Myers, L.; Kelly, M.; Hatala, J.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2012-12-01

    inundation and NPV. fAPAR values were combined with GPP estimates at the field scale from eddy correlation flux measurements to develop a LUE model of plant production. To compare the effectiveness of broadband vs. narrowband indices in predicting biomass and fAPAR, we simulated eight multispectral World View-2 (WV-2) bands and 164 hyperspectral Hyperion bands with the field spectroradiometer data. We calculated NDVI-type two band vegetation indices (TBVI) using all possible band combinations, with a total of 28 WV-2 indices and 13,366 Hyperion indices. Biomass estimation was affected by water depth; regression of cattail biomass to TBVI680,910 produced a R2 that was 47% higher (R2 = 0.53) when water levels were under 50 cm compared to when water levels were over 50 cm (R2 = 0.28). fAPAR estimation was affected by the density of NPV; regression of fAPAR to TBVI539,1114 when PARtransmitted was measured above thatch was 49% higher (R2 = 0.50) than when PARtransmitted was measured below thatch (R2 = 0.20, TBVI1286,1266). Accounting for background effects in this heterogeneous environment will aid in the development of robust indices that can be applied to other wetland sites for estimates of carbon storage potential across large extents.

  4. Contaminated fluid filtration plant using pneumatically renewable granulated material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, J.-C.; Messirejean, Pierre.

    1980-01-01

    This invention concerns a plant for the filtration of a contaminated fluid flow using a granulated material capable of absorbing or adsorbing the contaminants. This plant includes a filtration box within which there is at least one appreciably vertical filtering bed filled with the material and crossed by the fluid flow, loading and discharge compartments respectively located at the top and bottom of the box, each in communication with the filtering bed and an air-actuated transfer system for loading and discharging this bed through these compartments. Facilities of this kind are used mainly in the nuclear and chemical engineering industries to rid their waste of radio-iodines, generally constituted by elementary iodine and methyl iodide, or of toxic gases that contaminate them. The granulated material, whose job it is to trap these contaminants by adsorption or absorption, is generally composed of active carbon or zeolites whose utilisation time is limited [fr

  5. Leaf spray: direct chemical analysis of plant material and living plants by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangjiang; Wang, He; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2011-10-15

    The chemical constituents of intact plant material, including living plants, are examined by a simple spray method that provides real-time information on sugars, amino acids, fatty acids, lipids, and alkaloids. The experiment is applicable to various plant parts and is demonstrated for a wide variety of species. An electrical potential is applied to the plant and its natural sap, or an applied solvent generates an electrospray that carries endogenous chemicals into an adjacent benchtop or miniature mass spectrometer. The sharp tip needed to create a high electric field can be either natural (e.g., bean sprout) or a small nick can be cut in a leaf, fruit, bark, etc. Stress-induced changes in glucosinolates can be followed on the minute time scale in several plants, including potted vegetables. Differences in spatial distributions and the possibility of studying plant metabolism are demonstrated. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Landscape configurational heterogeneity by small-scale agriculture, not crop diversity, maintains pollinators and plant reproduction in western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Annika L; Kormann, Urs G; Tscharntke, Teja; Clough, Yann; Baillod, Aliette Bosem; Sirami, Clélia; Fahrig, Lenore; Martin, Jean-Louis; Baudry, Jacques; Bertrand, Colette; Bosch, Jordi; Brotons, Lluís; Burel, Françoise; Georges, Romain; Giralt, David; Marcos-García, María Á; Ricarte, Antonio; Siriwardena, Gavin; Batáry, Péter

    2018-02-14

    Agricultural intensification is one of the main causes for the current biodiversity crisis. While reversing habitat loss on agricultural land is challenging, increasing the farmland configurational heterogeneity (higher field border density) and farmland compositional heterogeneity (higher crop diversity) has been proposed to counteract some habitat loss. Here, we tested whether increased farmland configurational and compositional heterogeneity promote wild pollinators and plant reproduction in 229 landscapes located in four major western European agricultural regions. High-field border density consistently increased wild bee abundance and seed set of radish ( Raphanus sativus ), probably through enhanced connectivity. In particular, we demonstrate the importance of crop-crop borders for pollinator movement as an additional experiment showed higher transfer of a pollen analogue along crop-crop borders than across fields or along semi-natural crop borders. By contrast, high crop diversity reduced bee abundance, probably due to an increase of crop types with particularly intensive management. This highlights the importance of crop identity when higher crop diversity is promoted. Our results show that small-scale agricultural systems can boost pollinators and plant reproduction. Agri-environmental policies should therefore aim to halt and reverse the current trend of increasing field sizes and to reduce the amount of crop types with particularly intensive management. © 2018 The Author(s).

  7. Investigation of strain heterogeneities by laser scanning extensometry in strain ageing materials: application to zirconium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graff, S.; Forest, S.; Strudel, J.L. [Centre des Materiaux / UMR 7633, Ecole des Mines de Paris / CNRS, BP 87, 91003 Evry (France); Dierke, H.; Neuhauser, H. [Institut fur Physik der Kondensierten Materie, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Prioul, C. [MSSMAT, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry (France); Bechade, J.L. [SRMA, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2005-07-01

    Laser scanning extensometry was used to detect and characterize propagating plastic instabilities such as the Luders bands at the millimeter scale. Spatio-temporal plastic heterogeneities are due to either static or dynamic strain ageing (SSA and DSA) phenomena. Regarding zirconium alloys, different type of heterogeneities were observed: their features strongly depended on mechanical test conditions. In one case, they appeared to be non propagating but preserved along the stress-strain curve and were associated with SSA effects such as stress peaks after relaxation periods or after unloading steps with waiting times. In other case, they appeared as non propagating but were not associated with SSA effects. (authors)

  8. Investigation of strain heterogeneities by laser scanning extensometry in strain ageing materials: application to zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graff, S.; Forest, S.; Strudel, J.L.; Dierke, H.; Neuhauser, H.; Prioul, C.; Bechade, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Laser scanning extensometry was used to detect and characterize propagating plastic instabilities such as the Luders bands at the millimeter scale. Spatio-temporal plastic heterogeneities are due to either static or dynamic strain ageing (SSA and DSA) phenomena. Regarding zirconium alloys, different type of heterogeneities were observed: their features strongly depended on mechanical test conditions. In one case, they appeared to be non propagating but preserved along the stress-strain curve and were associated with SSA effects such as stress peaks after relaxation periods or after unloading steps with waiting times. In other case, they appeared as non propagating but were not associated with SSA effects. (authors)

  9. Thermal heterogeneity within aqueous materials quantified by 1H NMR spectroscopy: Multiparametric validation in silico and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Norbert W.; Bernard, Monique

    2018-02-01

    We recently suggested a new paradigm for statistical analysis of thermal heterogeneity in (semi-)aqueous materials by 1H NMR spectroscopy, using water as a temperature probe. Here, we present a comprehensive in silico and in vitro validation that demonstrates the ability of this new technique to provide accurate quantitative parameters characterizing the statistical distribution of temperature values in a volume of (semi-)aqueous matter. First, line shape parameters of numerically simulated water 1H NMR spectra are systematically varied to study a range of mathematically well-defined temperature distributions. Then, corresponding models based on measured 1H NMR spectra of agarose gel are analyzed. In addition, dedicated samples based on hydrogels or biological tissue are designed to produce temperature gradients changing over time, and dynamic NMR spectroscopy is employed to analyze the resulting temperature profiles at sub-second temporal resolution. Accuracy and consistency of the previously introduced statistical descriptors of temperature heterogeneity are determined: weighted median and mean temperature, standard deviation, temperature range, temperature mode(s), kurtosis, skewness, entropy, and relative areas under temperature curves. Potential and limitations of this method for quantitative analysis of thermal heterogeneity in (semi-)aqueous materials are discussed in view of prospective applications in materials science as well as biology and medicine.

  10. Nuclear material control systems for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    Paragraph 70.51(c) of 10 CFR Part 70 requires each licensee who is authorized to possess at any one time special nuclear material in a quantity exceeding one effective kilogram to establish, maintain, and follow written material control and accounting procedures that are sufficient to enable the licensee to account for the special nuclear material in his possession under license. While other paragraphs and sections of Part 70 provide specific requirements for nuclear material control systems for fuel cycle plants, such detailed requirements are not included for nuclear power reactors. This guide identifies elements acceptable to the NRC staff for a nuclear material control system for nuclear power reactors. (U.S.)

  11. IAEA verification of materials accounting in commercial reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutmacher, R.G.; Hakkila, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    The reprocessing plants currently under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards have design capacities up to 210 tonnes of heavy metal per year. All of the plants use conventional materials accounting for safeguards. However, several larger commercial reprocessing plants are being designed with capacities of 350 to 1200 tonnes of heavy metal per year. It is likely that many of these plants, as well as some of the existing smaller ones, will adopt near-real-time materials accounting. The major effect of the combination of larger plants and near-real-time accounting on IAEA safeguards will be the demand for greater timeliness of verification. Continuous inspector presence may be required, as well as more on-site measurements by the inspector. In this paper, the authors review what needs to be verified, as well as current inspector activities in the process area. The bulk of the paper describes rapid, easy-to-use measurement techniques and instruments that may be applied to on-site verification measurements

  12. Hydrogen storage by carbon materials synthesized from oil seeds and fibrous plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon, Maheshwar; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Jaybhaye, Sandesh [Nanotechnology Research Center, Birla College, Kalyan 421304 (India); Soga, T.; Afre, Rakesh [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Dasgupta, K. [Powder Metallurgy Division, BARC, Trombay 400 085 (India); Sharon, Madhuri [Monad Nanotech Pvt. Ltd., A702 Bhawani Tower, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2007-12-15

    Carbon materials of various morphologies have been synthesized by pyrolysis of various oil-seeds and plant's fibrous materials. These materials are characterized by SEM and Raman. Surface areas of these materials are determined by methylene blue method. These carbon porous materials are used for hydrogen storage. Carbon fibers with channel type structure are obtained from baggas and coconut fibers. It is reported that amongst the different plant based precursors studied, carbon from soyabean (1.09 wt%) and baggas (2.05 wt%) gave the better capacity to store hydrogen at 11kg/m{sup 2} pressure of hydrogen at room temperature. Efforts are made to correlate the hydrogen adsorption capacity with intensities and peak positions of G- and D-band obtained with carbon materials synthesized from plant based precursors. It is suggested that carbon materials whose G-band is around 1575cm{sup -1} and the intensity of D-band is less compared to G-band, may be useful material for hydrogen adsorption study. (author)

  13. Microbial mineralization processes in Antarctic soils and on plant material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boelter, M.

    1991-01-01

    Soil samples and different plant material from the maritime and continental Antarctic were analyzed for their actual and potential respiration by different methods: total CO 2 -evolution, biological oxygen demand and use of 14C-labeled glucose which may serve as a model for dissolved organic carbohydrates. Since these methods are argued to indicate the mineralization of different fractions of the total organic material by different actual populations, a comparison between the data from these techniques is carried out with regard to their contributions of the total organic matter debris in these environments. The part of respired material calculated from 14C-studies may contribute to nearly 90% of the metabolized material. Results show that the individual fractions differ significantly with respect to the parent material. There are several aspects which have to be taken into account when looking at these data: the original content of water; the contents of dissolved and particulate carbohydrates; and, other edaphic factors. Of special interest is the overall respiration of plant material (mainly lichens) which is strongly influenced by the bacterial respiration of dissolved carbohydrates, probably by ongrowing organisms due to their efficiency in using dissolved organic matter. In terms of respiratory activity, the (bacterial) respiration of glucose may contribute to more than 50% of the total CO 2 -evolution. This influences considerably the modeling of overall respiration of plant material in those environments where close interactions between different parts of the system are very important for their life strategy. Further, the bacterial part may be an overlooked part of metabolic rates in Antarctic lichens

  14. Effect of clonal integration on nitrogen cycling in rhizosphere of rhizomatous clonal plant, Phyllostachys bissetii, under heterogeneous light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Chen, Jing-Song; Xue, Ge; Peng, Yuanying; Song, Hui-Xing

    2018-07-01

    Clonal integration plays an important role in clonal plant adapting to heterogeneous habitats. It was postulated that clonal integration could exhibit positive effects on nitrogen cycling in the rhizosphere of clonal plant subjected to heterogeneous light conditions. An in-situ experiment was conducted using clonal fragments of Phyllostachys bissetii with two successive ramets. Shading treatments were applied to offspring or mother ramets, respectively, whereas counterparts were treated to full sunlight. Rhizomes between two successive ramets were either severed or connected. Extracellular enzyme activities and nitrogen turnover were measured, as well as soil properties. Abundance of functional genes (archaeal or bacterial amoA, nifH) in the rhizosphere of shaded, offspring or mother ramets were determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Carbon or nitrogen availabilities were significantly influenced by clonal integration in the rhizosphere of shaded ramets. Clonal integration significantly increased extracellular enzyme activities and abundance of functional genes in the rhizosphere of shaded ramets. When rhizomes were connected, higher nitrogen turnover (nitrogen mineralization or nitrification rates) was exhibited in the rhizosphere of shaded offspring ramets. However, nitrogen turnover was significantly decreased by clonal integration in the rhizosphere of shaded mother ramets. Path analysis indicated that nitrogen turnover in the rhizosphere of shaded, offspring or mother ramets were primarily driven by the response of soil microorganisms to dissolved organic carbon or nitrogen. This unique in-situ experiment provided insights into the mechanism of nutrient recycling mediated by clonal integration. It was suggested that effects of clonal integration on the rhizosphere microbial processes were dependent on direction of photosynthates transport in clonal plant subjected to heterogeneous light conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  15. Impact of aging and material structure on CANDU plant performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeau, E.; Ballyk, J.; Ghalavand, N.

    2011-01-01

    In-service behaviour of pressure tubes is a key factor in the assessment of safety margins during plant operation. Pressure tube deformation (diametral expansion) affects fuel bundle dry out characteristics resulting in reduced margin to trip for some events. Pressure tube aging mechanisms also erode design margins on fuel channels or interfacing reactor components. The degradation mechanisms of interest are primarily deformation, loss of fracture resistance and hydrogen ingress. CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium, a registered trademark of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited used under exclusive licence by Candu Energy Inc.) owners and operators need to maximize plant capacity factor and meet or exceed the reactor design life targets while maintaining safety margins. The degradation of pressure tube material and geometry are characterized through a program of inspection, material surveillance and assessment and need to be managed to optimize plant performance. Candu is improving pressure tubes installed in new build and life extension projects. Improvements include changes designed to reduce or mitigate the impact of pressure tube elongation and diametral expansion rates, improvement of pressure tube fracture properties, and reduction of the implications of hydrogen ingress. In addition, Candu provides an extensive array of engineering services designed to assess the condition of pressure tubes and address the impact of pressure tube degradation on safety margins and plant performance. These services include periodic and in-service inspection and material surveillance of pressure tubes and deterministic and probabilistic assessment of pressure tube fitness for service to applicable standards. Activities designed to mitigate the impact of pressure tube deformation on safety margins include steam generator cleaning, which improves trip margins, and trip design assessment to optimize reactor trip set points restoring safety and operating margins. This paper provides an

  16. Impact of aging and material structure on CANDU plant performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeau, E.; Ballyk, J.; Ghalavand, N. [Candu Energy Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In-service behaviour of pressure tubes is a key factor in the assessment of safety margins during plant operation. Pressure tube deformation (diametral expansion) affects fuel bundle dry out characteristics resulting in reduced margin to trip for some events. Pressure tube aging mechanisms also erode design margins on fuel channels or interfacing reactor components. The degradation mechanisms of interest are primarily deformation, loss of fracture resistance and hydrogen ingress. CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium, a registered trademark of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited used under exclusive licence by Candu Energy Inc.) owners and operators need to maximize plant capacity factor and meet or exceed the reactor design life targets while maintaining safety margins. The degradation of pressure tube material and geometry are characterized through a program of inspection, material surveillance and assessment and need to be managed to optimize plant performance. Candu is improving pressure tubes installed in new build and life extension projects. Improvements include changes designed to reduce or mitigate the impact of pressure tube elongation and diametral expansion rates, improvement of pressure tube fracture properties, and reduction of the implications of hydrogen ingress. In addition, Candu provides an extensive array of engineering services designed to assess the condition of pressure tubes and address the impact of pressure tube degradation on safety margins and plant performance. These services include periodic and in-service inspection and material surveillance of pressure tubes and deterministic and probabilistic assessment of pressure tube fitness for service to applicable standards. Activities designed to mitigate the impact of pressure tube deformation on safety margins include steam generator cleaning, which improves trip margins, and trip design assessment to optimize reactor trip set points restoring safety and operating margins. This paper provides an

  17. Preparation of plant-specific NDA reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abedin-Zadeh, R.; Beetle, T.; Kuhn, E.; Terrey, D.; Turel, S.; Busca, G.; Guardini, S.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of having suitable and well characterized non-destructive assay (NDA) reference materials for the verification activities of the safeguards control authorities is stressed. The Euratom Inspectorate and the IAEA have initiated an extensive programme for the procurement and preparation of Joint Euratom/IAEA safeguards NDA reference materials with the active participation of the Ispra Establishment of the Euratom Joint Research Centre. The different type and nature of materials, condition of measurements, and plant characteristics and provisions had to be taken into account for plant-specific NDA reference materials. The preparation of each reference material was planned case by case and specific criteria such as limitations in different facilities, measurement capabilities, conditions, product availability and population variability are being ascertained. A procurement scheme was prepared describing step-by-step procedures detailing responsibilities, measurement conditions, destructive analysis schemes, desired characteristics and methods of data evaluation. This paper describes the principles and procedures carried out for the preparation of a reference MOX pin, low enriched uranium reference rods, low enriched uranium reference drums, reference MTR assemblies, and THTR reference pebbles. The scheme for each characterization technique is presented. (author)

  18. Application of ceramic and glass materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamnabard, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic and glass are high temperature materials that can be used in many fields of application in nuclear industries. First, it is known that nuclear fuel UO 2 is a ceramic material. Also, ability to absorb neutrons without forming long lived radio-nuclides make the non-oxide ceramics attractive as an absorbent for neutron radiation arising in nuclear power plants. Glass-ceramic materials are a new type of ceramic that produced by the controlled nucleation and crystallization of glass, and have several advantages such as very low or null porosity, uniformity of microstructure, high chemical resistance etc. over conventional powder processed ceramics. These ceramic materials are synthesized in different systems based on their properties and applications. In nuclear industries, those are resistant to leaching and radiation damage for thousands of years, Such as glass-ceramics designed for radioactive waste immobilization and machinable glass-ceramics are used. This article introduces requirements of different glass and ceramic materials used in nuclear power plants and have been focused on developments in properties and application of them

  19. Effect of different sizes of planting material on the growth and yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, a significant (P<0.05) effect was recorded in cap diameter (3.68cm) from the 20g weight planting material. Stipe height and girth did not show any significant difference amongst the treatments. The 60g planting material weight recorded more shoots than the 20g and 40g planting material sizes. The 60g planting ...

  20. Comparison of one-dimensional probabilistic finite element method with direct numerical simulation of dynamically loaded heterogeneous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Joshua; Voth, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Material response to dynamic loading is often dominated by microstructure such as grain topology, porosity, inclusions, and defects; however, many models rely on assumptions of homogeneity. We use the probabilistic finite element method (WK Liu, IJNME, 1986) to introduce local uncertainty to account for material heterogeneity. The PFEM uses statistical information about the local material response (i.e., its expectation, coefficient of variation, and autocorrelation) drawn from knowledge of the microstructure, single crystal behavior, and direct numerical simulation (DNS) to determine the expectation and covariance of the system response (velocity, strain, stress, etc). This approach is compared to resolved grain-scale simulations of the equivalent system. The microstructures used for the DNS are produced using Monte Carlo simulations of grain growth, and a sufficient number of realizations are computed to ensure a meaningful comparison. Finally, comments are made regarding the suitability of one-dimensional PFEM for modeling material heterogeneity. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R and D) Program is responsible for performing R and D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R and D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for

  3. The uncertainties calculation of acoustic method for measurement of dissipative properties of heterogeneous non-metallic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мaryna O. Golofeyeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effective use of heterogeneous non-metallic materials and structures needs measurement of reliable values of dissipation characteristics, as well as common factors of their change during the loading process. Aim: The aim of this study is to prepare the budget for measurement uncertainty of dissipative properties of composite materials. Materials and Methods: The method used to study the vibrational energy dissipation characteristics based on coupling of vibrations damping decrement and acoustic velocity in a non-metallic heterogeneous material is reviewed. The proposed method allows finding the dependence of damping on vibrations amplitude and frequency of strain-stress state of material. Results: Research of the accuracy of measurement method during the definition of decrement attenuation of fluctuations in synthegran was performed. The international approach for evaluation of measurements quality is used. It includes the common practice international rules for uncertainty expression and their summation. These rules are used as internationally acknowledged confidence measure to the measurement results, which includes testing. The uncertainties budgeting of acoustic method for measurement of dissipative properties of materials were compiled. Conclusions: It was defined that there are two groups of reasons resulting in errors during measurement of materials dissipative properties. The first group of errors contains of parameters changing of calibrated bump in tolerance limits, displacement of sensor in repeated placement to measurement point, layer thickness variation of contact agent because of irregular hold-down of resolvers to control surface, inaccuracy in reading and etc. The second group of errors is linked with density and Poisson’s ratio measurement errors, distance between sensors, time difference between signals of vibroacoustic sensors.

  4. Contribution of Topography and Incident Solar Radiation to Variation of Soil and Plant Litter at an Area with Heterogeneous Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Cito Nettesheim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural processes that determine soil and plant litter properties are controlled by multiple factors. However, little attention has been given to distinguishing the effects of environmental factors from the effects of spatial structure of the area on the distribution of soil and litter properties in tropical ecosystems covering heterogeneous topographies. The aim of this study was to assess patterns of soil and litter variation in a tropical area that intercepts different levels of solar radiation throughout the year since its topography has slopes predominantly facing opposing geographic directions. Soil data (pH, C, N, P, H+Al, Ca, Mg, K, Al, Na, sand, and silt and plant litter data (N, K, Ca, P, and Mg were gathered together with the geographic coordinates (to model the spatial structure of 40 sampling units established at two sites composed of slopes predominantly facing northwest and southeast (20 units each. Soil and litter chemical properties varied more among slopes within similar geographic orientations than between the slopes facing opposing directions. Both the incident solar radiation and the spatial structure of the area were relevant in explaining the patterns detected in variation of soil and plant litter. Individual contributions of incident solar radiation to explain the variation in the properties evaluated suggested that this and other environmental factors may play a particularly relevant role in determining soil and plant litter distribution in tropical areas with heterogeneous topography. Furthermore, this study corroborates that the spatial structure of the area also plays an important role in the distribution of soil and litter within this type of landscape, which appears to be consistent with the action of water movement mechanisms in such areas.

  5. Development and evaluation of high temperature materials for power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.; Schubert, F.

    1992-01-01

    The development of high temperature materials requires the evaluation of the interaction of microstructure and mechanical properties, the implementation of the microstructural aspects in the constitutive equations for the analysis of loads in a high temperature component and verification of the materials reactions. In this way the full potential of materials properties can be better used. This fundamental method is the basis for the formulation of the structural design code KTA 3221 'Metallic HTR Components'. The method of 'design by analysis' is also activated for large internally cooled turbine blades for stationary gas turbines in combined cycle power plants. This kind of exploratory analysis during the dimensioning procedure are discussed with two examples: He/He-heat exchanger produced of NiCr23Co12Mo (Alloy 617) and turbine blades made of superalloys (e.g. IN 738 LC). (author)

  6. Effect of decontamination on nuclear power plant primary circuit materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezina, M.; Kupca, L.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of repeated decontamination on the properties of structural materials of the WWER-440 primary coolant circuit was examined. Three kinds of specimens of 08Kh18Ni10T steel were used for radioactivity-free laboratory experiments; they included material obtained from assembly additions to the V-2 nuclear power plant primary piping, and a sheet of the CSN 17247 steel. Various chemical, electrochemical and semi-dry electrochemical decontamination procedures were tested. Chemical decontamination was based on the conventional AP(20/5)-CITROX(20/20) procedure and its variants; NP-CITROX type procedures with various compositions were also employed. Solutions based on oxalic acid were tested for the electrochemical and semi-dry electrochemical decontamination. The results of measurements of mass losses of the surfaces, of changes in the corrosion resistance and in the mechanical properties of the materials due to repeated decontamination are summarized. (Z.S.). 12 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs

  7. Possibilities of avoidance and control of bacterial plant diseases when using pathogen-tested (certified) or - treated planting material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, J.; Wenneker, M.

    2002-01-01

    Testing of planting material for freedom from phytopathogenic bacteria is an important, although not exclusive, method for control of bacterial diseases of plants. Ideally, pathogen-free or pathogen-/disease-resistant planting material is desirable, but this situation is not always possible on a

  8. Features in the aspect of materials in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    1992-01-01

    The process of the reprocessing plant installed in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture, by Japan Nuclear Fuel Service Co., Ltd. is the Purex wet process experienced in Japan and abroad, and which can obtain the uranium and plutonium products of high purity at high recovery rate. This process is to melt spent fuel with nitric acid, and extract and separate uranium, plutonium and fission products from the obtained solution by utilizing the difference in chemical properties. The yearly amount of treatment of the reprocessing plant of this company is 800 t uranium. In order to ensure the safety in the reprocessing plant that handles the solution with high radioactivity, the function of confining radioactive substances in definite areas is demanded. For the purpose, the machinery, equipment and piping containing radioactive substances are made of the materials having the corrosion resistance against nitric acid, and welded structure is adopted to prevent leakage. Negative pressure is maintained in waste gas treatment facilities in relation to cells, and in the cells in relation to the building. The outline of the facilities, the materials of the main machinery and equipment, and the applied technologies are reported. (K.I.)

  9. Enzymatic determination of cadmium, zinc, and lead in plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muginova, S.V.; Veselova, I.A.; Parova, L.M.; Shekhovtseva, T.N.

    2008-01-01

    Prospects are outlined for using the following enzymes (native and immobilized on polyurethane foam) in the rapid and highly sensitive determination of cadmium, zinc, and lead ions in plant materials (wild grass, fresh pea, and grape): horseradish peroxidase and alkaline phosphatases isolated from chicken intestine and Greenland seal small intestine. The analytical ranges of the above metals are 1x10 -3 -25; 7x10 -3 -250, and 3x10 -2 -67 mg/kg dry matter, respectively. The enzymatic determination procedures developed are based on the inhibiting effect of metal ions on the catalytic activity of peroxidase in the oxidation of o-dianisidine with hydrogen peroxide and alkaline phosphatases in the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The rates of enzymatic reactions were monitored spectrophotometrically or visually. In the analysis of plant extracts, their high acidity was diminished by choosing optimum dilution factors and pH values for test samples and the nature and concentration of a buffer solution. The interference of iron(III) was removed by introducing a 0.1 M tartaric acid solution into the indicator reaction. The accuracy of the results of the enzymatic determination of cadmium, zinc, and lead in plant materials was supported by atomic absorption spectrometry and anodic stripping voltammetry [ru

  10. Method for accounting for macroscopic heterogeneities in reactor material balance generation in fuel cycle simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagdatlioglu, Cem, E-mail: cemb@utexas.edu; Schneider, Erich

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Describes addition of spatially dependent power sharing to a previous methodology. • The methodology is used for calculating the input and output isotopics and burnup. • Generalizes to simulate reactors with strong spatial and flux heterogeneities. • Presents cases where the old approach would not have been sufficient. - Abstract: This paper describes the addition of spatially dependent power sharing to a methodology used for calculating the input and output isotopics and burnup of nuclear reactors within a nuclear fuel cycle simulator. Neutron balance and depletion calculations are carried out using pre-calculated fluence-based libraries. These libraries track the transmutation and neutron economy evolution of unit masses of nuclides available in input fuel. The work presented in the paper generalizes the method to simulate reactors that contain more than one type of fuel as well as strong spatial and flux heterogeneities, for instance breeders with a driver–blanket configuration. To achieve this, spatial flux calculations are used to determine the fluence-dependent relative average fluxes inside macroscopic spatial regions. These fluxes are then used to determine the average power of macroscopic spatial regions as well as to more accurately calculate region-specific transmutation rates. The paper presents several cases where the fluence based approach alone would not have been sufficient to determine results.

  11. Job creation, heterogeneous workers and technical change : matched worker/plant data : evidence from Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Salvanes, Kjell G.; Førre, Svein Erik

    2001-01-01

    Abstract: Using matched worker/plant level data for Norway, theories explaining the change in skill composition are assessed using direct evidence on the job creation and destruction for high, medium and low skilled workers. Skill based job creation is analysed in detail for plants in a high-skill service sector and in low- and high-tech manufacturing sectors. Given a compressed wage structure in Norway and increased supply of high skilled workers, the supply of skills may also explain the...

  12. Habitat Heterogeneity Affects Plant and Arthropod Species Diversity and Turnover in Traditional Cornfields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Eliana; Rös, Matthias; Bonilla, María Argenis; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of the agricultural frontier by the clearing of remnant forests has led to human-dominated landscape mosaics. Previous studies have evaluated the effect of these landscape mosaics on arthropod diversity at local spatial scales in temperate and tropical regions, but little is known about fragmentation effects in crop systems, such as the complex tropical traditional crop systems that maintain a high diversity of weeds and arthropods in low-Andean regions. To understand the factors that influence patterns of diversity in human-dominated landscapes, we investigate the effect of land use types on plant and arthropod diversity in traditionally managed cornfields, via surveys of plants and arthropods in twelve traditional cornfields in the Colombian Andes. We estimated alpha and beta diversity to analyze changes in diversity related to land uses within a radius of 100 m to 1 km around each cornfield. We observed that forests influenced alpha diversity of plants, but not of arthropods. Agricultural lands had a positive relationship with plants and herbivores, but a negative relationship with predators. Pastures positively influenced the diversity of plants and arthropods. In addition, forest cover seemed to influence changes in plant species composition and species turnover of herbivore communities among cornfields. The dominant plant species varied among fields, resulting in high differentiation of plant communities. Predator communities also exhibited high turnover among cornfields, but differences in composition arose mainly among rare species. The crop system evaluated in this study represents a widespread situation in the tropics, therefore, our results can be of broad significance. Our findings suggest that traditional agriculture may not homogenize biological communities, but instead could maintain the regional pool of species through high beta diversity.

  13. Habitat Heterogeneity Affects Plant and Arthropod Species Diversity and Turnover in Traditional Cornfields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Martínez

    Full Text Available The expansion of the agricultural frontier by the clearing of remnant forests has led to human-dominated landscape mosaics. Previous studies have evaluated the effect of these landscape mosaics on arthropod diversity at local spatial scales in temperate and tropical regions, but little is known about fragmentation effects in crop systems, such as the complex tropical traditional crop systems that maintain a high diversity of weeds and arthropods in low-Andean regions. To understand the factors that influence patterns of diversity in human-dominated landscapes, we investigate the effect of land use types on plant and arthropod diversity in traditionally managed cornfields, via surveys of plants and arthropods in twelve traditional cornfields in the Colombian Andes. We estimated alpha and beta diversity to analyze changes in diversity related to land uses within a radius of 100 m to 1 km around each cornfield. We observed that forests influenced alpha diversity of plants, but not of arthropods. Agricultural lands had a positive relationship with plants and herbivores, but a negative relationship with predators. Pastures positively influenced the diversity of plants and arthropods. In addition, forest cover seemed to influence changes in plant species composition and species turnover of herbivore communities among cornfields. The dominant plant species varied among fields, resulting in high differentiation of plant communities. Predator communities also exhibited high turnover among cornfields, but differences in composition arose mainly among rare species. The crop system evaluated in this study represents a widespread situation in the tropics, therefore, our results can be of broad significance. Our findings suggest that traditional agriculture may not homogenize biological communities, but instead could maintain the regional pool of species through high beta diversity.

  14. Materials Problems and Solutions in Biomass Fired Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Hede; Montgomery, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. In woodchip boilers, a similar corrosion rate and corrosion mechanism has on some occasions been observed. Co-firing of straw (10 and 20% energy basis) with coal has shown corrosion rates lower than those in straw-fired plants......Due to Denmark’s pledge to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, biomass is utilised increasingly as a fuel for generating energy. Extensive research and demonstration projects especially in the area of material performance for biomass fired boilers have been undertaken to make biomass a viable fuel...... resource. When straw is combusted, potassium chloride and potassium sulphate are present in ash products, which condense on superheater components. This gives rise to specific chlorine corrosion problems not previously encountered in coal-fired power plants. The type of corrosion attack can be directly...

  15. Characterization of NORM material produced in a water treatment plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suursoo, S.; Kiisk, M.; Jantsikene, A.; Koch, R.; Isakar, K.; Realo, E. [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics (Estonia); Lumiste, L. [Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia)

    2014-07-01

    In February 2012 a water treatment plant was opened in Viimsi, Estonia. The plant is designed for removal of iron, manganese, and radium from groundwater. The first 2 years of operation have shown that the purification process generates significant amounts of materials with elevated radium levels. The treatment plant is fed by nine wells, which open to radium-rich aquifers. Purification is achieved by aeration and filtration processes. Aerated water is led through two successive filter columns, first of them is filled with MnO{sub 2} coated material FMH and filtration sand, the second one with zeolite. The plant has five parallel treatment lines with a total of 95 tons of FMH + filtration sand, and 45 tons of zeolite. The average capacity of the facility has been 2400 m{sup 3}/day. Yearly input of radium to the plant is estimated to be 325 MBq for Ra-226, and 420 MBq for Ra-228. Most of the radium (about 90%) accumulates in the filter columns. Some 8-9% of it is removed by backwash water during regular filter backwash cycles. To characterize radium accumulation and its removal by backwash in detail, treatment line no. 5 is sampled monthly for filter materials and backwash water. A steady growth of radium activity concentrations is apparent in both filter materials. In the top layer of the first stage filter (FMH+sand), Ra-226 and Ra-228 activity concentrations (per unit dry weight) reached (1540 ± 60) Bq/kg and (2510 ± 50) Bq/kg (k=2), respectively, by April 2013. At the same time, radium content in the top layer of the second stage filter (zeolite) was an order of magnitude higher: (19 600 ± 130) Bq/kg for Ra-226, and (22 260 ± 170) Bq/kg for Ra-228 (k=2). Radium is not evenly distributed throughout the filter columns. A rough estimate can be given that after 1.25 years of operation (by April 2013) the accumulated activities in treatment line no. 5 reached 1000 MBq for Ra-226 and 1200 MBq for Ra-228. Although filters are the most important type of NORM

  16. Power plant wastes capitalization as geopolymeric building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Litu, Loredana; Harja, Maria

    2017-11-01

    In this innovative study, we are present an investigation over the properties of geopolymeric materials prepared using ash supplied by power plant Iasi, Romania and sodium hydroxide solutions/pellets. Having as objective a minimum consumption of energy and materials was developed a class of advanced eco-materials. New synthesized materials can be used as a binder for cement replacement or for the removal/immobilization of pollutants from waste waters or soils. It offers an advanced and low cost-effective solution too many problems, where waste must be capitalized. The geopolymer formation, by hydrothermal method, is influenced by: temperature (20-600°C), alkali concentration (2M-6M), solid /liquid ratio (1-2), ash composition, time of heating (2-48 h), etc. The behaviour of the FTIR peak of 6M sample indicated upper quantity of geopolymer formation at the first stage of the reaction. XRD spectra indicated phases like sodalite, faujasite, Na-Y, which are known phases of geopolymer/zeolite. Advanced destroyed of ash particles due to geopolymerisation reaction were observed when the temperature was higher. At the constant temperature the percentage of geopolymer increases with increasing of curing time, from 4-48 h. Geopolymer materials are environmentally friendly, for its obtaining energy consumption, and CO2 emission is reduced compared to cement binder.

  17. Three-dimensional Reconstruction and Homogenization of Heterogeneous Materials Using Statistical Correlation Functions and FEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baniassadi, Majid; Mortazavi, Behzad; Hamedani, Amani; Garmestani, Hamid; Ahzi, Said; Fathi-Torbaghan, Madjid; Ruch, David; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-01-31

    In this study, a previously developed reconstruction methodology is extended to three-dimensional reconstruction of a three-phase microstructure, based on two-point correlation functions and two-point cluster functions. The reconstruction process has been implemented based on hybrid stochastic methodology for simulating the virtual microstructure. While different phases of the heterogeneous medium are represented by different cells, growth of these cells is controlled by optimizing parameters such as rotation, shrinkage, translation, distribution and growth rates of the cells. Based on the reconstructed microstructure, finite element method (FEM) was used to compute the effective elastic modulus and effective thermal conductivity. A statistical approach, based on two-point correlation functions, was also used to directly estimate the effective properties of the developed microstructures. Good agreement between the predicted results from FEM analysis and statistical methods was found confirming the efficiency of the statistical methods for prediction of thermo-mechanical properties of three-phase composites.

  18. Thermomechanical behaviour of two heterogeneous tungsten materials via 2D and 3D image-based FEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zivelonghi, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    An advanced numerical procedure based on imaging of the material microstructure (Image- Based Finite Element Method or Image-Based FEM) was extended and applied to model the thermomechanical behaviour of novel materials for fusion applications. Two tungsten based heterogeneous materials with different random morphologies have been chosen as challenging case studies: (1) a two-phase mixed ductile-brittle W/CuCr1Zr composite and (2) vacuum plasma-sprayed tungsten (VPS-W 75 vol.%), a porous coating system with complex dual-scale microstructure. Both materials are designed for the future fusion reactor DEMO: W/CuCr1Zr as main constituent of a layered functionally graded joint between plasma-facing armor and heat sink whereas VPS-W for covering the first wall of the reactor vessel in direct contact with the plasma. The primary focus of this work was to investigate the mesoscopic material behaviour and the linkage to the macroscopic response in modeling failure and heat-transfer. Particular care was taken in validating and integrating simulation findings with experimental inputs. The solution of the local thermomechanical behaviour directly on the real material microstructure enabled meaningful insights into the complex failure mechanism of both materials. For W/CuCr1Zr full macroscopic stress-strain curves including the softening and failure part could be simulated and compared with experimental ones at different temperatures, finding an overall good agreement. The comparison of simulated and experimental macroscopic behaviour of plastic deformation and rupture also showed the possibility to indirectly estimate micro- and mesoscale material parameters. Both heat conduction and elastic behaviour of VPS-W have been extensively investigated. New capabilities of the Image-Based FEM could be shown: decomposition of the heat transfer reduction as due to the individual morphological phases and back-fitting of the reduced stiffness at interlamellar boundaries. The

  19. 7 CFR 330.210a - Administrative instructions listing approved packing materials for plant pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... materials for plant pests. 330.210a Section 330.210a Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Plant Pests § 330.210a Administrative instructions listing approved packing materials for plant pests. (a) The...

  20. Development of a formalism of movable cellular automaton method for numerical modeling of fracture of heterogeneous elastic-plastic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Psakhie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A general approach to realization of models of elasticity, plasticity and fracture of heterogeneous materials within the framework of particle-based numerical methods is proposed in the paper. It is based on building many-body forces of particle interaction, which provide response of particle ensemble correctly conforming to the response (including elastic-plastic behavior and fracture of simulated solids. Implementation of proposed approach within particle-based methods is demonstrated by the example of the movable cellular automaton (MCA method, which integrates the possibilities of particle-based discrete element method (DEM and cellular automaton methods. Emergent advantages of the developed approach to formulation of many-body interaction are discussed. Main of them are its applicability to various realizations of the concept of discrete elements and a possibility to realize various rheological models (including elastic-plastic or visco-elastic-plastic and models of fracture to study deformation and fracture of solid-phase materials and media. Capabilities of particle-based modeling of heterogeneous solids are demonstrated by the problem of simulation of deformation and fracture of particle-reinforced metal-ceramic composites.

  1. Compliant heterogeneous assemblies of micro-VCSELs as a new materials platform for integrated optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongseok; Lee, Sung-Min; Kwong, Anthony; Yoon, Jongseung

    2015-03-01

    Despite many unique advantages, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) have been available mostly on rigid, planar wafers over restricted areas, thereby limiting their usage for applications that can benefit from large-scale, programmable assemblies, hybrid integration with dissimilar materials and devices, or mechanically flexible constructions. Here, materials design and fabrication strategies that address these limitations of conventional VCSELs are presented. Specialized design of epitaxial materials and etching processes, together with printing-based deterministic assemblies and substrate thermal engineering, enabled defect-free release of microscale VCSELs and their device- and circuit-level implementation on non-native, flexible substrates with performance comparable to devices on the growth substrate.

  2. Bentonite as a waste isolation pilot plant shaft sealing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daemen, J.; Ran, Chongwei

    1996-12-01

    Current designs of the shaft sealing system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) propose using bentonite as a primary sealing component. The shaft sealing designs anticipate that compacted bentonite sealing components can perform through the 10,000-year regulatory period and beyond. To evaluate the acceptability of bentonite as a sealing material for the WIPP, this report identifies references that deal with the properties and characteristics of bentonite that may affect its behavior in the WIPP environment. This report reviews published studies that discuss using bentonite as sealing material for nuclear waste disposal, environmental restoration, toxic and chemical waste disposal, landfill liners, and applications in the petroleum industry. This report identifies the physical and chemical properties, stability and seal construction technologies of bentonite seals in shafts, especially in a saline brine environment. This report focuses on permeability, swelling pressure, strength, stiffness, longevity, and densification properties of bentonites

  3. Bentonite as a waste isolation pilot plant shaft sealing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daemen, J.; Ran, Chongwei [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Current designs of the shaft sealing system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) propose using bentonite as a primary sealing component. The shaft sealing designs anticipate that compacted bentonite sealing components can perform through the 10,000-year regulatory period and beyond. To evaluate the acceptability of bentonite as a sealing material for the WIPP, this report identifies references that deal with the properties and characteristics of bentonite that may affect its behavior in the WIPP environment. This report reviews published studies that discuss using bentonite as sealing material for nuclear waste disposal, environmental restoration, toxic and chemical waste disposal, landfill liners, and applications in the petroleum industry. This report identifies the physical and chemical properties, stability and seal construction technologies of bentonite seals in shafts, especially in a saline brine environment. This report focuses on permeability, swelling pressure, strength, stiffness, longevity, and densification properties of bentonites.

  4. Boiler materials for ultra supercritical coal power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purgert, Robert [Energy Industries of Ohio, Independence, OH (United States); Shingledecker, John [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Pschirer, James [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (Untied States); Ganta, Reddy [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (Untied States); Weitzel, Paul [The Babcock & Wilcox Company, Baberton, OH (United States); Sarver, Jeff [The Babcock & Wilcox Company, Baberton, OH (United States); Vitalis, Brian [Riley Power Inc., Worchester, WA (United States); Gagliano, Michael [Foster Wheeler North America Corp., Hampton, NJ (United States); Stanko, Greg [Foster Wheeler North America Corp., Hampton, NJ (United States); Tortorelli, Peter [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have undertaken a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) steam conditions up to 760°C (1400°F) and 35 MPa (5000 psi). A limiting factor to achieving these higher temperatures and pressures for future A-USC plants are the materials of construction. The goal of this project is to assess/develop materials technology to build and operate an A-USC boiler capable of delivering steam with conditions up to 760°C (1400°F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). The project has successfully met this goal through a focused long-term public-private consortium partnership. The project was based on an R&D plan developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and an industry consortium that supplemented the recommendations of several DOE workshops on the subject of advanced materials. In view of the variety of skills and expertise required for the successful completion of the proposed work, a consortium led by the Energy Industries of Ohio (EIO) with cost-sharing participation of all the major domestic boiler manufacturers, ALSTOM Power (Alstom), Babcock and Wilcox Power Generation Group, Inc. (B&W), Foster Wheeler (FW), and Riley Power, Inc. (Riley), technical management by EPRI and research conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developed. The project has clearly identified and tested materials that can withstand 760°C (1400°F) steam conditions and can also make a 700°C (1300°F) plant more economically attractive. In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys have been assessed to provide a basis for

  5. Exploring Heterogeneous and Time-Varying Materials for Photonic Applications, Towards Solutions for the Manipulation and Confinement of Light.

    KAUST Repository

    San Roman Alerigi, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several decades our understanding and meticulous characterization of the transient and spatial properties of materials evolved rapidly. The results present an exciting field for discovery, and craft materials to control and reshape light that we are just beginning to fathom. State-of-the-art nano-deposition processes, for example, can be utilized to build stratified waveguides made of thin dielectric layers, which put together result in a material with effective abnormal dispersion. Moreover, materials once deemed well known are revealing astonishing properties, v.gr. chalcogenide glasses undergo an atomic reconfiguration when illuminated with electrons or photons, this ensues in a temporal modification of its permittivity and permeability which could be used to build new Photonic Integrated Circuits.. This work revolves around the characterization and model of heterogeneous and time-varying materials and their applications, revisits Maxwell's equations in the context of nonlinear space- and time-varying media, and based on it introduces a numerical scheme that can be used to model waves in this kind of media. Finally some interesting applications for light confinement and beam transformations are shown.

  6. Exploring Heterogeneous and Time-Varying Materials for Photonic Applications, Towards Solutions for the Manipulation and Confinement of Light.

    KAUST Repository

    San Roman Alerigi, Damian

    2014-11-01

    Over the past several decades our understanding and meticulous characterization of the transient and spatial properties of materials evolved rapidly. The results present an exciting field for discovery, and craft materials to control and reshape light that we are just beginning to fathom. State-of-the-art nano-deposition processes, for example, can be utilized to build stratified waveguides made of thin dielectric layers, which put together result in a material with effective abnormal dispersion. Moreover, materials once deemed well known are revealing astonishing properties, v.gr. chalcogenide glasses undergo an atomic reconfiguration when illuminated with electrons or photons, this ensues in a temporal modification of its permittivity and permeability which could be used to build new Photonic Integrated Circuits.. This work revolves around the characterization and model of heterogeneous and time-varying materials and their applications, revisits Maxwell\\'s equations in the context of nonlinear space- and time-varying media, and based on it introduces a numerical scheme that can be used to model waves in this kind of media. Finally some interesting applications for light confinement and beam transformations are shown.

  7. Agent-based Integration of Complex and Heterogeneous Distributed Energy Resources in Virtual Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Umair, Aisha; Demazeau, Yves

    2017-01-01

    A Virtual Power Plant aggregates several Distributed Energy Resources in order to expose them as a single, controllable entity. This enables smaller Distributed Energy Resources to take part in Demand Response programs which traditionally only targeted larger consumers. To date, models for Virtual...

  8. Supplementary Material for: Whole genome sequencing reveals genomic heterogeneity and antibiotic purification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Black, PA

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Whole genome sequencing has revolutionised the interrogation of mycobacterial genomes. Recent studies have reported conflicting findings on the genomic stability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during the evolution of drug resistance. In an age where whole genome sequencing is increasingly relied upon for defining the structure of bacterial genomes, it is important to investigate the reliability of next generation sequencing to identify clonal variants present in a minor percentage of the population. This study aimed to define a reliable cut-off for identification of low frequency sequence variants and to subsequently investigate genetic heterogeneity and the evolution of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from single colonies from 14 rifampicin mono-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates, as well as the primary cultures and follow up MDR cultures from two of these patients. The whole genomes of the M. tuberculosis isolates were sequenced using either the Illumina MiSeq or Illumina HiSeq platforms. Sequences were analysed with an in-house pipeline. Results Using next-generation sequencing in combination with Sanger sequencing and statistical analysis we defined a read frequency cut-off of 30 % to identify low frequency M. tuberculosis variants with high confidence. Using this cut-off we demonstrated a high rate of genetic diversity between single colonies isolated from one population, showing that by using the current sequencing technology, single colonies are not a true reflection of the genetic diversity within a whole population and vice versa. We further showed that numerous heterogeneous variants emerge and then disappear during the evolution of isoniazid resistance within individual patients. Our findings allowed us to formulate a model for the selective bottleneck which occurs during the course of infection, acting as a genomic purification event. Conclusions Our study demonstrated true levels of genetic

  9. Countermeasure technologies against materials deterioration of nuclear power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    This report was tentative safety standard on countermeasure technologies against materials deterioration of nuclear power plant components issued in 2004 on the base of the testing data obtained until March 2004, which was to be applied for technical evaluation for lifetime management of aged plants and preventive maintenance or repair of neutron irradiated components such as core shrouds and jet pumps. In order to prevent stress corrosion cracks (SCCs) of austenitic stainless steel welds of reactor components, thermal surface modification using laser beams was used on neutron irradiated materials with laser cladding or surface melting process methods by limiting heat input according to amount of accumulated helium so as to prevent crack initiation caused by helium bubble growth and coalescence. Laser cladding method of laser welding using molten sleeve set inside pipe surface to prevent SCCs of nickel-chromium-iron alloy welds, alloy 690 cladding method using tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding to prevent SCCs of nickel-chromium-iron alloy welds for dissimilar joints of pipes, and laser surface solid solution heat treatment method of laser irradiation on surfaces to prevent SCCs of austenitic stainless steel welds were also included as repair technologies. (T. Tanaka)

  10. TEM investigation of plant-irradiated NPP bolt material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakarinen, J.; Ehrnsten, U.; Keinaenen, H.; Karlsen, W.; Karlsen, T.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) was used to examine irradiation-induced damage in material removed from two different bolts from two different nuclear power plants. One section came from a French PWR, was made of CW AISI 316, and included a section of the bolt that had accumulated a dose of approximately 15 dpa during 19 operation cycles at 350 - 390 C. degrees. Another section came from a VVER bolt that was removed from the plant due to indications found in non-destructive examinations (NDE). The VVER bolt was made of solution annealed titanium stabilized 0X18H10T (corresponding to Type AISI 321) and had accumulated a fluence of 2.9 dpa. During the removal of that bolt, it was found that the bolt washer had been inappropriately spot welded to the shielding plate during assembly. Destructive investigations showed that the bolt had two large intergranular cracks, and the TEM samples were prepared from the material adjacent to those cracks. The PWR bolt had not failed, although cracks in the bolts with a similar history had been found previously. The fluence for the cold-worked AISI 316 PWR bolt was estimated to be about 15 dpa. Both the examined bolts showed a clear radiation induced segregation of alloying elements at the grain boundaries (GB-RIS), the presence of dislocation loops, the formation of precipitates, and linear deformation microstructures. Additionally, voids were found from the PWR bolt and the VVER bolt had a high density of dislocations. (authors)

  11. An Extended VIKOR-Based Approach for Pumped Hydro Energy Storage Plant Site Selection with Heterogeneous Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunna Wu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The selection of a desirable site for constructing a pumped hydro energy storage plant (PHESP plays a vital important role in the whole life cycle. However, little research has been done on the site selection of PHESP, which affects the rapid development of PHESP. Therefore, this paper aims to select the most ideal PHESP site from numerous candidate alternatives using the multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM technique. Firstly, a comprehensive evaluation criteria system is established for the first time. Then, considering quantitative and qualitative criteria coexist in this system, multiple types of representations, including crisp numerical values (CNVs, triangular intuitionistic fuzzy numbers (TIFNs, and 2-dimension uncertain linguistic variables (2DULVs, are employed to deal with heterogeneous criteria information. To determine the weight of criteria and fully take the preference of the decision makers (DMs into account, the analytic hierarchy process (AHP method is applied for criteria weighting. After that, an extended Vlsekriterijumska Optimizacija I Kompromisno Resenje (VIKOR method is utilized to provide compromise solutions for the PHESP site considering such heterogeneous information. At last, the proposed model is then applied in a case study of Zhejiang province, China to illustrate its practicality and efficiency. The result shows the Changlongshan should be selected as the optimal PHESP.

  12. Extended finite element method and its application in heterogeneous materials with inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Chengbin; Jiang Shouyan; Ying Zongquan

    2010-01-01

    To simplify the technology of finite element mesh generation for particle reinforced material, enrichment techniques is used to account for the material interfaces in the framework of extended finite element method (XFEM). The geometry of material distribution is described by level set function, which allows one to model the internal boundaries of the microstructure without the adaptation of the mesh. The enrichment function is used to improve the shape function of classical finite element method (FEM) for the nodes supporting the elements cut by the interface. The key issue of XFEM including constructing displacement pattern, establishment of the governing equation and scheme of numerical integration is also presented. It is not necessarily matching the internal features of the inclusions using XFEM, so the generation of finite element mesh can be performed easily. Finally, a plate with multi-circular inclusions under uniaxial tension is simulated by XFEM and FEM, respectively. The results show that XFEM is highly effective and efficient.

  13. Toward Multi-scale Modeling and simulation of conduction in heterogeneous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechman, Jeremy B. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bolintineanu, Dan [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cooper, Marcia A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Erikson, William W. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Foiles, Stephen M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kay, Jeffrey J [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Phinney, Leslie M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Piekos, Edward S. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Specht, Paul Elliott [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wixom, Ryan R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yarrington, Cole [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes a project in which the authors sought to develop and deploy: (i) experimental techniques to elucidate the complex, multiscale nature of thermal transport in particle-based materials; and (ii) modeling approaches to address current challenges in predicting performance variability of materials (e.g., identifying and characterizing physical- chemical processes and their couplings across multiple length and time scales, modeling information transfer between scales, and statically and dynamically resolving material structure and its evolution during manufacturing and device performance). Experimentally, several capabilities were successfully advanced. As discussed in Chapter 2 a flash diffusivity capability for measuring homogeneous thermal conductivity of pyrotechnic powders (and beyond) was advanced; leading to enhanced characterization of pyrotechnic materials and properties impacting component development. Chapter 4 describes success for the first time, although preliminary, in resolving thermal fields at speeds and spatial scales relevant to energetic components. Chapter 7 summarizes the first ever (as far as the authors know) application of TDTR to actual pyrotechnic materials. This is the first attempt to actually characterize these materials at the interfacial scale. On the modeling side, new capabilities in image processing of experimental microstructures and direct numerical simulation on complicated structures were advanced (see Chapters 3 and 5). In addition, modeling work described in Chapter 8 led to improved prediction of interface thermal conductance from first principles calculations. Toward the second point, for a model system of packed particles, significant headway was made in implementing numerical algorithms and collecting data to justify the approach in terms of highlighting the phenomena at play and pointing the way forward in developing and informing the kind of modeling approach originally envisioned (see Chapter 6). In

  14. Identification of spatial variability and heterogeneity of the Culebra dolomite at the waste isolation pilot plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauheim, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Culebra dolomite is an heterogeneous, locally fractured medium whose transmissivity varies over seven orders of magnitude in the vicinity of the Waste isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico, USA. The spatial distribution of hydraulic properties within the Culebra has been defined by performing 150 hydraulic tests at 41 well locations. Different scales of tests are performed to provide data for different purposes. Small-scale tests such as drillstem tests and slug tests, and intermediate-scale pumping tests provide point data useful in developing initial parameters for numerical modeling. Large-scale pumping tests provide information on the distribution of fractures between widely spaced wells, and also provide data for model calibration. Tracer tests provide data on transport mechanisms needed for transport modeling. 7 figs.; 16 refs

  15. Identification of spatial variability and heterogeneity of the Culebra dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauheim, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Culebra dolomite is a heterogeneous, locally fractured medium whose transmissivity varies over seven orders of magnitude in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site in southeastern New Mexico, USA. The spatial distribution of hydraulic properties within the Culebra has been defined by performing 150 hydraulic tests at 41 well locations. Different scales of tests are performing 150 hydraulic tests at 41 well locations. Different scales of tests are performed to provide data for different purposes. Small-scale tests such as drillstem tests and slug tests, and short, intermediate-scale pumping tests provide point data useful in developing initial parameters for numerical modeling. Large-scale pumping tests provide information on the distribution of fractures between widely spaced wells, and also provide data for model calibration. Tracer tests provide data on transport mechanisms needed for transport modeling. 16 refs., 7 figs

  16. A method for determination of complete mechanical characteristics of heterogeneous-structured materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maj

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the possibilities to evaluate by a modified low-cycle fatigue test the quality of materials characterised by different structures and the resulting mechanical properties. The method was described by computer program (MLCF, adjusted to the operating parameters of a versatile testing machine.

  17. Contribution to the X-ray diffraction analysis method of the micro-structural and mechanical state of heterogenous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, V.

    2003-09-01

    The analysis of internal stresses through X-ray diffraction (DRX) has been used to study the micro-structure of various heterogenous materials: two-phase materials, composite materials, coated materials and alloys such as Ti-Al, Inconel-600 and 20CDV5-08 steel. In the case of the Ti-Al alloy we have achieved for the first time the experimental assessment of the compliance constant, of the level of internal stresses, and of the behaviour law of each phase as a function of the changes in duplex micro-structures. Local, direct and accurate information given by DRX have been used to feed micro-mechanical simulations and the results of the simulation are consistent with macroscopic mechanical testing. Accurate DRX analyses on CMC (ceramic matrix composite) have allowed us to confirm the thermal origin of internal stresses. As for thick copper layers made through thermal projection, DRX method combined to in-situ tensile testing has permitted us to measure the elasticity modulus and the distribution of macroscopic stresses inside the coating and the substrate. We have also determined the elastic limit of a TiN layer on a steel substrate. (A.C.)

  18. Material balance areas and frequencies for large reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, T.

    1994-01-01

    It has long been recognized that facilities with a large nuclear material throughput will probably not meet the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) goal for detecting trickle diversion of plutonium over periods of about one year. The reason is that measurement errors for plutonium concentration and for liquid volume are often approximately relative over a fairly wide range of true values. Therefore, large throughput facilities will tend to have large uncertainties assigned to their annual throughput. By the same argument, if frequent balances are performed over small material balance areas, then the uncertainty associated with each balance period for each balance area will be small. However, trickle diversion would still be difficult to detect statistically. Because the IAEA will soon be faced with safeguarding a new large-scale reprocessing plant in Japan, it is timely to reconsider the advantages and disadvantages of performing frequent material balances over small balance areas (individual tanks where feasible). Therefore, in this paper the authors present some simulation results to study the effect of balance frequency on loss detection probability, and further simulation results to study possibilities introduced by choosing small balance areas. They conclude by recommending frequent balances over small areas

  19. Investigation into mechanical properties of joints of heterogeneous materials brazed with high-temperature solders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomenko, V.I.; Merkushev, V.P.; Borodina, L.M.; Sycheva, T.S.; Tokhtina, O.A.; Frolov, N.N.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanical properties of copper joints with copper, 12Kh18M10T steel and KhD50 composite obtained by vacuum brazing by copper-titanium solder as compared with properties of joints brazed by PSr 72 and PMFOTsr 6-4-0.03 solders in hydrogen are studied. Dependences of joints strength on temperature of contact - reactive vacuum brazing are obtained. Possible applications of joints of dissimilar materials in electrovacuum devices subjected to the effect of dynamic loadings are established

  20. Drivers of spatial heterogeneity in nitrogen processing among three alpine plant communities in the Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, A. C.; Beers, A.; Grinath, J.; Bowman, W. D.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen cycling across the globe has been fundamentally altered due to regional elevated N deposition and there is a cascade of ecosystem consequences including shifts in species composition, eutrophication, and soil acidification. Making predictions that encompass the factors that drive these ecosystem changes has frequently been limited to single ecosystem types, or areas with fairly homogenous abiotic conditions. The alpine is an ecosystem type that exhibits changes under relatively low levels of N depositions due to short growing seasons and shallow soils limiting N storage. While recent work provided estimates for the magnitude of N associated with ecosystem changes, less is known about the within-site factors that may interact to stabilize or amplify the differential response of N pools under future conditions of resource deposition. To examine numerous potential within-site and regional factors (both biotic and abiotic) affecting ecosystem N pools we examined the relationship between those factors and a suite of ecosystem pools of N followed by model selection procedures and structural equation modelling. Measurements were conducted at Niwot Ridge Long Term Ecological Research site and in Rocky Mountain National Park in three distinct alpine meadow ecosystems (dry, moist, and wet meadows). These meadows span a moisture gradient as well as plant community composition, thereby providing high variability of potential biotic and abiotic drivers across small spatial scales in the alpine. In general, regional scale abiotic factors such as site levels of annual average N deposition or precipitation were poor predictors of seasonal pools of N, while spring soil water pools of N were negatively correlated with elevation. Models containing multiple abiotic and biotic drivers, however, were best at predicting soil and plant pools of N across the two sites. Future analysis will include highlight interactions among with-site factors affecting N pools in the alpine using

  1. Radiation effects on organic materials in nuclear plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, M.B.; Davis, M.V.

    1981-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to identify information useful in determining the lowest level at which radiation causes damage to nuclear plant equipment. Information was sought concerning synergistic effects of radiation and other environmental stresses. Organic polymers are often identified as the weak elements in equipment. Data on radiation effects are summarized for 50 generic name plastics and 16 elastomers. Coatings, lubricants, and adhesives are treated as separate groups. Inorganics and metallics are considered briefly. With a few noted exceptions, these are more radiation resistant than organic materials. Some semiconductor devices and electronic assemblies are extremely sensitive to radiation. Any damage threshold including these would be too low to be of practical value. With that exception, equipment exposed to less than 10 4 rads should not be significantly affected. Equipment containing no Teflon should not be significantly affected by 10 5 rads. Data concerning synergistic effects and radiation sensitization are discussed. The authors suggest correlations between the two effects

  2. Materials Problems and Solutions in Biomass fired plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Hede; Montgomery, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    be directly ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. In woodchip boilers, a similar corrosion rate and corrosion mechanism has on some occasions been observed. Cofiring of straw (10 and 20% energy basis) with coal has shown corrosion rates lower than those in straw fired......Owing to Denmark's pledge to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, biomass is being increasingly utilised as a fuel for generating energy. Extensive research and development projects, especially in the area of material performance for biomass fired boilers, have been undertaken to make biomass a viable...... fuel resource. When straw is combusted, potassium chloride and potassium sulphate are present in ash products, which condense on superheater components. This gives rise to specific chlorine corrosion problems not previously encountered in coal fired power plants. The type of corrosion attack can...

  3. Radioactive contaminants in raw materials and foodstuffs of plant origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankovicj, S.; Krainchanicj, M.; Stankovicj, A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the results of activity level of radioactive caesium 134 and 137 in the samples of raw materials (barley, oats, soybean, sunflower, pumpkin seed, hops, shreded sugar beet, maize), animal feedstuffs (alfalfa, alfalfa meal, rape, concentrates fed to chickens, pigs or bpvines, dry turnip shreds) and foodstuff of plant origin (lettuce, spinach, cabbage, carrot, celery, cucumber, tomato, olives, sesame). All samples - produced locally on the major part but also including some imported stuff -have been subjected to continuous gamma spectrometry starting with the Chernobyl accident in 1986 through 1989. The highest activity of caesium was recorded in the samples of animal feedstuffs (alfalfa, alfalfa meal, rape) in the years 1986 and 1987. In time, however, the activity tends to drop considerably. (author) 4 refs.; 3 tabs

  4. DA and NDA measurement of nuclear materials Mayak reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzekun, E.G.; Lelyuk, G.A.; Sazhnov, V.K.

    1999-01-01

    Methods of nuclear material (NM) analysis and their quality assurance at the laboratory of RT-1 plant of PA Mayak are reviewed as applicable to the NM control and accounting system. The impact of analysis quality on the NM control and accounting system quality is analyzed. It has been shown that major component of the inventory difference for plutonium is caused by the errors of its measurement in the initial solution. The expedience of decreasing this error from 5 % to 1-1.5 % has been substantiated. Errors of plutonium detection on the other flows of NM at the facility prove to be acceptable for the NM control and accounting system. Accuracy of uranium concentration measurements proved to be satisfactory for all NM flows [ru

  5. Extraction Methods for the Isolation of Isoflavonoids from Plant Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blicharski Tomasz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to describe and compare selected traditional and modern extraction methods employed in the isolation of isoflavonoids from plants. Conventional methods such as maceration, percolation, or Soxhlet extraction are still frequently used in phytochemical analysis. Despite their flexibility, traditional extraction techniques have significant drawbacks, including the need for a significant investment of time, energy, and starting material, and a requirement for large amounts of potentially toxic solvents. Moreover, these techniques are difficult to automate, produce considerable amount of waste and pose a risk of degradation of thermolabile compounds. Modern extraction methods, such as: ultrasound-assisted extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, accelerated solvent extraction, supercritical fluid extraction, and negative pressure cavitation extraction, can be regarded as remedies for the aforementioned problems. This manuscript discusses the use of the most relevant extraction techniques in the process of isolation of isoflavonoids, secondary metabolites that have been found to have a plethora of biological and pharmacological activities.

  6. Plant development effects of biochars from different raw materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cely, Paola; Méndez, Ana; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Gascó, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    Biochar can provide multiple benefits in the ecosystem. However, the presence of phytotoxic compounds in some biochars is an important concern that needs to be addressed and that depends on the raw material and the pyrolysis conditions used in biochar production. For example, sewage sludge biochars can have elevated heavy metal contents as they were present in the feedstock and were enriched during pyrolysis. Also during carbonization, some phytotoxic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polyphenols or volatile organic compounds (VOCs) could be formed representing a risk of contamination to soils and crops. In this work we report the results from seed germination and plant development for three biochars prepared from wood, paper sludge plus wheat husks and sewage sludge. Five higher plant species (cress, lentils, cucumber, tomato and lettuce) were studied. Biochar from wood shows seed inhibition in several species and the paper sludge biochar on lettuce. For the rest, the effect on seed germination was positive. No inhibition of root growth was detected, but in some cases leaves and stems growth were inhibited. Our results are significant in terms of advancing or current understanding on the impacts of biochar on vegetative growth and linking those effects to biochar properties.

  7. Targeted identification of short interspersed nuclear element families shows their widespread existence and extreme heterogeneity in plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Torsten; Döbel, Thomas; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Junghans, Holger; Weisshaar, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons that are highly abundant, heterogeneous, and mostly not annotated in eukaryotic genomes. We developed a tool designated SINE-Finder for the targeted discovery of tRNA-derived SINEs. We analyzed sequence data of 16 plant genomes, including 13 angiosperms and three gymnosperms and identified 17,829 full-length and truncated SINEs falling into 31 families showing the widespread occurrence of SINEs in higher plants. The investigation focused on potato (Solanum tuberosum), resulting in the detection of seven different SolS SINE families consisting of 1489 full-length and 870 5' truncated copies. Consensus sequences of full-length members range in size from 106 to 244 bp depending on the SINE family. SolS SINEs populated related species and evolved separately, which led to some distinct subfamilies. Solanaceae SINEs are dispersed along chromosomes and distributed without clustering but with preferred integration into short A-rich motifs. They emerged more than 23 million years ago and were species specifically amplified during the radiation of potato, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). We show that tobacco TS retrotransposons are composite SINEs consisting of the 3' end of a long interspersed nuclear element integrated downstream of a nonhomologous SINE family followed by successfully colonization of the genome. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the formation of TS as a spontaneous event, which could be typical for the emergence of SINE families.

  8. Targeted Identification of Short Interspersed Nuclear Element Families Shows Their Widespread Existence and Extreme Heterogeneity in Plant Genomes[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Torsten; Döbel, Thomas; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Junghans, Holger; Weisshaar, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons that are highly abundant, heterogeneous, and mostly not annotated in eukaryotic genomes. We developed a tool designated SINE-Finder for the targeted discovery of tRNA-derived SINEs. We analyzed sequence data of 16 plant genomes, including 13 angiosperms and three gymnosperms and identified 17,829 full-length and truncated SINEs falling into 31 families showing the widespread occurrence of SINEs in higher plants. The investigation focused on potato (Solanum tuberosum), resulting in the detection of seven different SolS SINE families consisting of 1489 full-length and 870 5′ truncated copies. Consensus sequences of full-length members range in size from 106 to 244 bp depending on the SINE family. SolS SINEs populated related species and evolved separately, which led to some distinct subfamilies. Solanaceae SINEs are dispersed along chromosomes and distributed without clustering but with preferred integration into short A-rich motifs. They emerged more than 23 million years ago and were species specifically amplified during the radiation of potato, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). We show that tobacco TS retrotransposons are composite SINEs consisting of the 3′ end of a long interspersed nuclear element integrated downstream of a nonhomologous SINE family followed by successfully colonization of the genome. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the formation of TS as a spontaneous event, which could be typical for the emergence of SINE families. PMID:21908723

  9. Accessible triple-phase boundary length: A performance metric to account for transport pathways in heterogeneous electrochemical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajo, A.; Cocco, A. P.; DeGostin, M. B.; Peracchio, A. A.; Cassenti, B. N.; Cantoni, M.; Van herle, J.; Chiu, W. K. S.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of materials for electrochemical energy conversion and storage depends upon the number of electrocatalytic sites available for reaction and their accessibility by the transport of reactants and products. For solid oxide fuel/electrolysis cell materials, standard 3-D measurements such as connected triple-phase boundary (TPB) length and effective transport properties partially inform on how local geometry and network topology causes variability in TPB accessibility. A new measurement, the accessible TPB, is proposed to quantify these effects in detail and characterize material performance. The approach probes the reticulated pathways to each TPB using an analytical electrochemical fin model applied to a 3-D discrete representation of the heterogeneous structure provided by skeleton-based partitioning. The method is tested on artificial and real structures imaged by 3-D x-ray and electron microscopy. The accessible TPB is not uniform and the pattern varies depending upon the structure. Connected TPBs can be even passivated. The sensitivity to manipulations of the local 3-D geometry and topology that standard measurements cannot capture is demonstrated. The clear presence of preferential pathways showcases a non-uniform utilization of the 3-D structure that potentially affects the performance and the resilience to alterations due to degradation phenomena. The concepts presented also apply to electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices such as other types of fuel cells, electrolyzers, batteries and capacitors.

  10. An analytical model accounting for tip shape evolution during atom probe analysis of heterogeneous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, N; Larson, D J; Geiser, B P; Duguay, S; Vurpillot, F; Blavette, D

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model describing the field evaporation dynamics of a tip made of a thin layer deposited on a substrate is presented in this paper. The difference in evaporation field between the materials is taken into account in this approach in which the tip shape is modeled at a mesoscopic scale. It was found that the non-existence of sharp edge on the surface is a sufficient condition to derive the morphological evolution during successive evaporation of the layers. This modeling gives an instantaneous and smooth analytical representation of the surface that shows good agreement with finite difference simulations results, and a specific regime of evaporation was highlighted when the substrate is a low evaporation field phase. In addition, the model makes it possible to calculate theoretically the tip analyzed volume, potentially opening up new horizons for atom probe tomographic reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Microstructural Quantification, Property Prediction, and Stochastic Reconstruction of Heterogeneous Materials Using Limited X-Ray Tomography Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hechao

    An accurate knowledge of the complex microstructure of a heterogeneous material is crucial for quantitative structure-property relations establishment and its performance prediction and optimization. X-ray tomography has provided a non-destructive means for microstructure characterization in both 3D and 4D (i.e., structural evolution over time). Traditional reconstruction algorithms like filtered-back-projection (FBP) method or algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART) require huge number of tomographic projections and segmentation process before conducting microstructural quantification. This can be quite time consuming and computationally intensive. In this thesis, a novel procedure is first presented that allows one to directly extract key structural information in forms of spatial correlation functions from limited x-ray tomography data. The key component of the procedure is the computation of a "probability map", which provides the probability of an arbitrary point in the material system belonging to specific phase. The correlation functions of interest are then readily computed from the probability map. Using effective medium theory, accurate predictions of physical properties (e.g., elastic moduli) can be obtained. Secondly, a stochastic optimization procedure that enables one to accurately reconstruct material microstructure from a small number of x-ray tomographic projections (e.g., 20 - 40) is presented. Moreover, a stochastic procedure for multi-modal data fusion is proposed, where both X-ray projections and correlation functions computed from limited 2D optical images are fused to accurately reconstruct complex heterogeneous materials in 3D. This multi-modal reconstruction algorithm is proved to be able to integrate the complementary data to perform an excellent optimization procedure, which indicates its high efficiency in using limited structural information. Finally, the accuracy of the stochastic reconstruction procedure using limited X

  12. Design of solar drying-plant for bulk material drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Horbaj

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A generally well-known high energy requirement for technological processes of drying and the fact that the world’s supplyof the conventional energy sources has considerably decreased are the decisive factors forcing us to look for some new, if possible,renewable energy sources for this process by emphasising their environmental reliability. One of the possibilities how to replace, atleast partly, the conventional energy sources – heat in a drying process is solar energy.Air-drying of bulk materials usually has a series of disadvantages such as time expenditure, drying defects in the bulk materialand inadequate final moisture content. A method that obviates or reduces the disadvantages of air-drying and, at the same time, reducesthe costs of kiln drying, is drying with solar heat. Solar energy can replace a large part of this depletable energy since solar energy cansupply heat at the temperatures most often used to dry bulk material. Solar drying-plant offer an attractive solution.

  13. 78 FR 38739 - Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... Systems for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Regulatory guide; issuance... Guide (RG) 5.29, ``Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants... material control and accounting. This guide applies to all nuclear power plants. ADDRESSES: Please refer to...

  14. A medium-term coalition-forming model of heterogeneous DERs for a commercial virtual power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabanzadeh, Morteza; Sheikh-El-Eslami, Mohammad-Kazem; Haghifam, Mahmoud-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A medium-term coalition-forming scheme is proposed for commercial VPPs. • Decision making on the optimal selection of VPP coalition members, bilateral and forward contracting, and pool involvement. • VPP acts as an arbitrageur by exercising arbitrage between diverse energy trading floors. • Stochastic programming approach applied to characterize the uncertainty and to derive informed decisions. - Abstract: Within a medium-term market horizon, this research work provides a methodology that allows a commercial virtual power plant (CVPP) to form an optimal coalition of heterogeneous distributed energy resources (DERs) based on weekly bilateral contracting, futures-market involvement, and pool participation. The established model aims at composing an optimal portfolio of available DERs and jointly takes into account the risk associated with the energy trading strategy of the CVPP. Perceiving the fact that pool prices have highly uncertain nature, a framework based on stochastic programming approach is utilized to model this decision-making problem. The proposed framework consists of two stages. The first stage deals with decisions regarding DERs optimal selection for the VPP coalition, the amount of agreed quantity in the bilateral negotiation, and the type and quantity selection of futures-market contracts as well. In the second stage, decisions are made based on the most plausible realizations of the stochastic prices in the day-ahead market. For a given pre-specified risk level on profit volatility, the main objective is to maximize the expected profit for the VPP manager over the planning horizon. The efficiency and applicability of the developed model is illustrated and analyzed by its implementation in a system with few heterogeneous DERs and through different scenarios, and finally thereby meaningful conclusions are duly drawn.

  15. Materials for Nuclear Plants From Safe Design to Residual Life Assessments

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffelner, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The clamor for non-carbon dioxide emitting energy production has directly  impacted on the development of nuclear energy. As new nuclear plants are built, plans and designs are continually being developed to manage the range of challenging requirement and problems that nuclear plants face especially when managing the greatly increased operating temperatures, irradiation doses and extended design life spans. Materials for Nuclear Plants: From Safe Design to Residual Life Assessments  provides a comprehensive treatment of the structural materials for nuclear power plants with emphasis on advanced design concepts.   Materials for Nuclear Plants: From Safe Design to Residual Life Assessments approaches structural materials with a systemic approach. Important components and materials currently in use as well as those which can be considered in future designs are detailed, whilst the damage mechanisms responsible for plant ageing are discussed and explained. Methodologies for materials characterization, material...

  16. Material and orientation dependent activity for heterogeneously catalyzed carbon-bromine bond homolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walch, Hermann; Gutzler, Rico; Sirtl, Thomas; Eder, Georg; Lackinger, Markus [LMU Munich, Section Crystallography (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Adsorption of the organic molecule 1,3,5-tris(4-bromophenyl)benzene on different metallic substrates, namely Cu(111), Ag(111) and Ag(110) has been studied by variable temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). Depending on substrate temperature, material and orientation, we observe a surface-catalyzed dehalogenation reaction. Deposition onto the catalytically active substrates Cu(111) and Ag(110) held at room temperature leads to cleavage of the carbon-bromine bonds and subsequent formation of protopolymers, i.e radical metal coordination complexes. However upon deposition on Ag(111) no such reaction has been observed. Instead, various self-assembled ordered structures based on intact molecules could be identified. Also sublimation onto either substrate held at 80 K did not result in any dehalogenation, thereby exemplifying that the dehalogenation reaction is thermally activated. We explain the differences in catalytic activity by charge transfer into unoccupied molecular orbitals and subsequent destabilization of the C-Br bond, whereby enhanced molecule-substrate interaction leads to an increasing magnitude of charge transfer. The interaction strength follows the general reactivity order Cu>Ag>Au for (111) faces and is generally enhanced on higher corrugated surfaces as the (110) facet in case of fcc substrates.

  17. Adsorption-regeneration by heterogeneous Fenton process using modified carbon and clay materials for removal of indigo blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almazán-Sánchez, Perla Tatiana; Solache-Ríos, Marcos J; Linares-Hernández, Ivonne; Martínez-Miranda, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Indigo blue dye is mainly used in dyeing of denim clothes and its presence in water bodies could have adverse effects on the aquatic system; for this reason, the objective of this study was to promote the removal of indigo blue dye from aqueous solutions by iron and copper electrochemically modified clay and activated carbon and the saturated materials were regenerated by a Fenton-like process. Montmorillonite clay was modified at pH 2 and 7; activated carbon at pH 2 and pH of the system. The elemental X-ray dispersive spectroscopy analysis showed that the optimum pH for modification of montmorillonite with iron and copper was 7 and for activated carbon was 2. The dye used in this work was characterized by infrared. Unmodified and modified clay samples showed the highest removal efficiencies of the dye (90-100%) in the pH interval from 2 to 10 whereas the removal efficiencies decrease as pH increases for samples modified at pH 2. Unmodified clay and copper-modified activated carbon at pH 2 were the most efficient activated materials for the removal of the dye. The adsorption kinetics data of all materials were best adjusted to the pseudo-second-order model, indicating a chemisorption mechanism and the adsorption isotherms data showed that the materials have a heterogeneous surface. The iron-modified clay could be regenerated by a photo-Fenton-like process through four adsorption-regeneration cycles, with 90% removal efficiency.

  18. Assessment of materials selection and performance for direct-coal- liquefaction plants in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, A.R.; Judkins, R.R.; Keiser, J.R.

    1996-09-01

    Several direct coal liquefaction processes have been demonstrated at the pilot plant level in the United States. Presently only one plant remains operational, namely, the Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc., 4.0- ton-per-day process development unit in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. The period from 1974 to 1982 saw the greatest amount of development of direct coal liquefaction in the United States with four major pilot plants being devoted to variants of this technology. The plants included the SRC-I plant at Wilsonville, Alabama, which operated from 1974 to 1992; the SRC-I/II plant at Fort Lewis, Washington, which operated from 1974 to 1981; the H-Coal plant at Catlettsburg, Kentucky, which operated from 1980 to 1982; and the Exxon Coal Liquefaction Pilot Plant at Baytown, Texas, which operated from 1980 to 1982. Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientists and engineers were actively involved in many phases and technical disciplines at all four of these plants, especially in materials testing, evaluation, and failure analyses. In addition, ORNL materials scientists and engineers conducted reviews of the demonstration and commercial plant designs for materials selections. The ORNL staff members worked closely with materials engineers at the pilot plants in identifying causes of materials degradation and failures, and in identifying solutions to these problems. This report provides a comprehensive summary of those materials activities. Materials performance data from laboratory and coal liquefaction pilot plant tests, failure analyses, and analyses of components after use in pilot plants were reviewed and assessed to determine the extent and causes of materials degradation in direct coal liquefaction process environments. Reviews of demonstration and commercial plant design documents for materials selections were conducted. These reviews and assessments are presented to capture the knowledge base on the most likely materials of construction for direct coal liquefaction plants.

  19. Ignition criterion for heterogeneous energetic materials based on hotspot size-temperature threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, A.; Kim, S.; Horie, Y.; Zhou, M.

    2013-02-01

    A criterion for the ignition of granular explosives (GXs) and polymer-bonded explosives (PBXs) under shock and non-shock loading is developed. The formulation is based on integration of a quantification of the distributions of the sizes and locations of hotspots in loading events using a cohesive finite element method (CFEM) developed recently and the characterization by Tarver et al. [C. M. Tarver et al., "Critical conditions for impact- and shock-induced hot spots in solid explosives," J. Phys. Chem. 100, 5794-5799 (1996)] of the critical size-temperature threshold of hotspots required for chemical ignition of solid explosives. The criterion, along with the CFEM capability to quantify the thermal-mechanical behavior of GXs and PBXs, allows the critical impact velocity for ignition, time to ignition, and critical input energy at ignition to be determined as functions of material composition, microstructure, and loading conditions. The applicability of the relation between the critical input energy (E) and impact velocity of James [H. R. James, "An extension to the critical energy criterion used to predict shock initiation thresholds," Propellants, Explos., Pyrotech. 21, 8-13 (1996)] for shock loading is examined, leading to a modified interpretation, which is sensitive to microstructure and loading condition. As an application, numerical studies are undertaken to evaluate the ignition threshold of granular high melting point eXplosive, octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,2,3,5-tetrazocine (HMX) and HMX/Estane PBX under loading with impact velocities up to 350 ms-1 and strain rates up to 105 s-1. Results show that, for the GX, the time to criticality (tc) is strongly influenced by initial porosity, but is insensitive to grain size. Analyses also lead to a quantification of the differences between the responses of the GXs and PBXs in terms of critical impact velocity for ignition, time to ignition, and critical input energy at ignition. Since the framework permits

  20. Analysis of phosphate esters in plant material. Extraction and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isherwood, F A; Barrett, F C

    1967-09-01

    1. A critical study was made of the quantitative extraction of nucleotide and sugar phosphates from plant tissue by either boiling aqueous ethanol or cold trichloroacetic acid. The effect of the extraction technique on the inactivation of the enzymes in the plant tissue and the possibility of adsorption of the phosphate esters on the cell wall were especially considered. 2. In the recommended method the plant tissue was frozen in liquid nitrogen, ground to a powder and then blended with cold aqueous trichloroacetic acid containing 8-hydroxyquinoline to prevent adsorption. 3. The extract contained large amounts of trichloroacetic acid, cations, chloride, sugars, amino acids, hydroxy organic acids, phytic acid, orthophosphoric acid and high-molecular-weight material including some phosphorus-containing compounds. All of these were removed as they were liable to interfere with the chromatographic or enzymic assay of the individual nucleotide or sugar phosphates. 4. The procedure was as follows: the last traces of trichloroacetic acid were extracted with ether after the solution had been passed through a column of Dowex AG 50 in the hydrogen form to remove all cations. High-molecular-weight compounds were removed by ultrafiltration and low-molecular-weight solutes by a two-stage chromatography on cellulose columns with organic solvents. In the first stage, sugars, amino acids, chloride and phytic acid were separated by using a basic solvent (propan-1-ol-water-aqueous ammonia) and, in the second stage, the organic acids and orthophosphoric acid were separated by using an acidic solvent (di-isopropyl ether-formic acid-2-methylpropan-2-ol-water). The final solution of nucleotide and sugar phosphates was substantially free from other solutes and was suitable for the detection of individual phosphate esters by either chromatography or enzymic assay. 5. The recovery of d-glucose 6-phosphate or adenosine 5'-triphosphate added to a trichloroacetic acid extract simulating that

  1. Interpreting Carbon Fluxes from a Spatially Heterogeneous Peatland with Thawing Permafrost: Scaling from Plant Community Scale to Ecosystem Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, S. R.; Roulet, N. T.; Strachan, I. B.; Crill, P. M.; Persson, A.; Pelletier, L.; Watt, C.

    2014-12-01

    Various microforms, created by spatial differential thawing of permafrost, make up the subarctic heterogeneous Stordalen peatland complex (68°22'N, 19°03'E), near Abisko, Sweden. This results in significantly different peatland vegetation communities across short distances, as well as differences in wetness, temperature and peat substrates. We have been measuring the spatially integrated CO2, heat and water vapour fluxes from this peatland complex using eddy covariance and the CO2 exchange from specific plant communities within the EC tower footprint since spring 2008. With this data we are examining if it is possible to derive the spatially integrated ecosystem-wide fluxes from community-level simple light use efficiency (LUE) and ecosystem respiration (ER) models. These models have been developed using several years of continuous autochamber flux measurements for the three major plant functional types (PFTs) as well as knowledge of the spatial variability of the vegetation, water table and active layer depths. LIDAR was used to produce a 1 m resolution digital evaluation model of the complex and the spatial distribution of PFTs was obtained from concurrent high-resolution digital colour air photography trained from vegetation surveys. Continuous water table depths have been measured for four years at over 40 locations in the complex, and peat temperatures and active layer depths are surveyed every 10 days at more than 100 locations. The EC footprint is calculated for every half-hour and the PFT based models are run with the corresponding environmental variables weighted for the PFTs within the EC footprint. Our results show that the Sphagnum, palsa, and sedge PFTs have distinctly different LUE models, and that the tower fluxes are dominated by a blend of the Sphagnum and palsa PFTs. We also see a distinctly different energy partitioning between the fetches containing intact palsa and those with thawed palsa: the evaporative efficiency is higher and the Bowen

  2. Heterogeneous Photochemistry of Agrochemicals at the Leaf Surface: A Case Study of Plant Activator Acibenzolar-S-methyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleiman, M; de Sainte Claire, P; Richard, C

    2017-09-06

    The photoreactivity of plant activator benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester (BTH), commonly named acibenzolar-S-methyl, was studied on the surfaces of glass, paraffinic wax films, and apple leaves. Experiments were carried out in a solar simulator using pure and formulated BTH (BION). Surface photoproducts were identified using liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization and high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry, while volatile photoproducts were characterized using an online thermal desorption system coupled to a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system. Pure BTH degraded quickly on wax surfaces with a half-life of 5.0 ± 0.5 h, whereas photolysis of formulated BTH was 7 times slower (t 1/2 = 36 ± 14 h). On the other hand, formulated BTH was found to photolyze quickly on detached apple leaves with a half-life of 2.8 h ± 0.4 h. This drastic difference in photoreactivity was attributed to the nature and spreading of the BTH deposit, as influenced by the surfactant and surface characteristics. Abiotic stress of irradiated apple leaf was also shown to produce OH radicals which might contribute to the enhanced photodegradability. Eight surface photoproducts were identified, whereas GC-MS analyses revealed the formation of gaseous dimethyl disulfide and methanethiol. The yield of dimethyl disulfide ranged between 1.5% and 12%, and a significant fraction of dimethyl disulfide produced was found to be absorbed by the leaf. This is the first study to report on the formation of volatile chemicals and OH radicals during agrochemical photolysis on plant surfaces. The developed experimental approach can provide valuable insights into the heterogeneous photoreactivity of sprayed agrochemicals and could help improve dissipation models.

  3. The life prediction study of Rokkasho reprocessing plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Yano, M.; Takizawa, M.; Shibata, S.

    1998-01-01

    The life prediction study of major equipment materials used in heavily corrosive nitric acid solutions of the RRP was carried out. The nitric acid recovery made of type 304ULC austenitic steel and the dissolver made of type 705 metallic zirconium are selected on the present study. This study is composed of major three programs, namely, the mock-up tests by small-sized equipments simulated to the practical design, laboratory tests for examining corrosion controlling factors by small specimens and to establish the data base system for the life prediction. Important parameters on this study was extracted with analyzing the past data of the life prediction on the Tokai reprocessing equipments. The mock-ups design was made by considering the quantitative evaluation of the most important parts on objective equipments, namely, heat conducting tubes in an acid recovery evaporator and a thermal jacket in a dissolver. From pre-examinations, the effects of radioactive species, nitric acid solution chemistry, the corrosion mechanisms were elucidated. Mock-up testing conditions corrosion monitoring methods and a data base concept for the the life prediction were selected from pre-examination data by referencing the plant operation planning. (author)

  4. Treatment of decontamination liquid waste of nuclear power plant components by heterogeneous photo catalysis with a continuous recirculation equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litter, Marta I.; La Gamma, Ana M.; Chocron, Mauricio; Blesa, Miguel A.; Repetto, Pablo

    1999-01-01

    It has been designed a bench scale, recirculation device, for testing the degradation of solutions of ethylendiamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) by heterogeneous photo catalysis under irradiation with UV and titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ). Solutions of EDTA have been employed at concentrations and pH values similar to those used when a decontamination of nuclear power plant equipment is carried out. The circuit is composed of a photo reactor, a heat exchanger, a reservoir tank and a peristaltic pump. In the present paper, the results of the experiments of photo catalytic degradation of aqueous suspensions of TiO 2 (Degussa P-25) 1 g/L with EDTA (10 g/L) at pH 3.7 and 25 degree C and two irradiation wavelengths (366 and 254 nm) have been presented. At 366 nm the full degradation of EDTA has occurred in 10 hours. The 95% degradation of total organic carbon (TOC) has been achieved after 39 hours of irradiation. The irradiation at 254 nm in the same conditions has been much less effective (EDTA and TOC reduction of approximately 1%), due to a screening effect produced by the semiconductor. (author)

  5. Imaging of plant materials using indirect desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janfelt, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Indirect desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) imaging is a method for imaging distributions of metabolites in plant materials, in particular leaves and petals. The challenge in direct imaging of such plant materials with DESI-MS is particularly the protective layer of cu...... of interest from parts of their matrix while preserving the spatial information in the two dimensions. The imprint can then easily be imaged by DESI-MS. The method delivers simple and robust mass spectrometry imaging of plant material with very high success ratios....... of cuticular wax present in leaves and petals. The cuticle protects the plant from drying out, but also makes it difficult for the DESI sprayer to reach the analytes of interest inside the plant material. A solution to this problem is to imprint the plant material onto a surface, thus releasing the analytes...

  6. Plant-based raw material: Improved food quality for better nutrition via plant genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der I.M.; Bovy, A.G.; Bosch, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Plants form the basis of the human food chain. Characteristics of plants are therefore crucial to the quantity and quality of human food. In this review, it is discussed how technological developments in the area of plant genomics and plant genetics help to mobilise the potential of plants to

  7. Low temperature bonding of heterogeneous materials using Al2O3 as an intermediate layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahoo, Hitesh Kumar; Ottaviano, Luisa; Zheng, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Integration of heterogeneous materials is crucial for many nanophotonic devices. The integration is often achieved by bonding using polymer adhesives or metals. A much better and cleaner option is direct wafer bonding, but the high annealing temperatures required make it a much less attractive...

  8. Laboratory Testing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Surrogate Waste Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, S.; Bronowski, D.; Pfeifle, T.; Herrick, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The waste is emplaced in rooms excavated in the bedded Salado salt formation at a depth of 655 m below the ground surface. After emplacement of the waste, the repository will be sealed and decommissioned. WIPP Performance Assessment modeling of the underground material response requires a full and accurate understanding of coupled mechanical, hydrological, and geochemical processes and how they evolve with time. This study was part of a broader test program focused on room closure, specifically the compaction behavior of waste and the constitutive relations to model this behavior. The goal of this study was to develop an improved waste constitutive model. The model parameters are developed based on a well designed set of test data. The constitutive model will then be used to realistically model evolution of the underground and to better understand the impacts on repository performance. The present study results are focused on laboratory testing of surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes correspond to a conservative estimate of the degraded containers and TRU waste materials after the 10,000 year regulatory period. Testing consists of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial tests performed on surrogate waste recipes that were previously developed by Hansen et al. (1997). These recipes can be divided into materials that simulate 50% and 100% degraded waste by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion, as well as the decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers. Axial, lateral, and volumetric strain and axial and lateral stress measurements were made. Two unique testing techniques were developed during the course of the experimental program. The first involves the use of dilatometry to measure sample volumetric strain under a hydrostatic condition. Bulk

  9. Micromechanical modelling of heterogeneous materials in transient conditions: contributions for the study of the ageing of structural components under service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, R.

    2010-01-01

    The modelling of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials is increasingly based on microstructural parameters. Within this framework, homogenisation methods have the advantage of providing deductive methods which, starting from the properties and space distribution of each constituent, deduce the effective properties of the heterogeneous material. Nevertheless, many applications make still difficult the use of homogenisation methods. It is in particular the case of structural materials presenting elastic-viscoplastic behaviours and subjected to both non-monotone and ageing loadings. To progress on the treatment by homogenisation of these useful situations constitutes precisely the main idea of the various contributions presented in this work.For linear elasticity, new expressions for the computation of the Eshelby tensor are first of all established in order to improve the efficiency of homogenisation methods usually used. Always for linear behaviours but now viscoelastic, various approximations associated with the use of the theorem of correspondence are studied and compared. The equivalence of one of these approximations (the so-called 'collocation method') with an internal variables formulation of the effective behaviour is shown. This internal variables formulation leads to exact results in some situations and strongly simplifies the treatment of ageing linear viscoelastic behaviours. In the case of elastic-viscoplastic behaviours, is added to the previous difficulty (viscoelastic coupling) that of the treatment of nonlinear behaviour. Comparisons made between various families of estimates make it possible to determine the effects of the various approximations needed to deal with these nonlinearities. An improvement is also proposed and implemented in a particular case while the extension of this internal variable formulation to nonlinear behaviours is discussed. Finally, full-field computations of microstructures are also tackled by considering the

  10. Steam Turbine Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, R.; Hawk, J.; Schwant, R.; Saha, D.; Totemeier, T.; Goodstine, S.; McNally, M.; Allen, D. B.; Purgert, Robert

    2009-06-30

    The Ultrasupercritical (USC) Steam Turbine Materials Development Program is sponsored and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ohio Coal Development Office, through grants to Energy Industries of Ohio (EIO), a non-profit organization contracted to manage and direct the project. The program is co-funded by the General Electric Company, Alstom Power, Siemens Power Generation (formerly Siemens Westinghouse), and the Electric Power Research Institute, each organization having subcontracted with EIO and contributing teams of personnel to perform the requisite research. The program is focused on identifying, evaluating, and qualifying advanced alloys for utilization in coal-fired power plants that need to withstand steam turbine operating conditions up to 760°C (1400°F) and 35 MPa (5000 psi). For these conditions, components exposed to the highest temperatures and stresses will need to be constructed from nickel-based alloys with higher elevated temperature strength than the highchromium ferritic steels currently used in today's high-temperature steam turbines. In addition to the strength requirements, these alloys must also be weldable and resistant to environmental effects such as steam oxidation and solid particle erosion. In the present project, candidate materials with the required creep strength at desired temperatures have been identified. Coatings that can resist oxidation and solid particle erosion have also been identified. The ability to perform dissimilar welds between nickel base alloys and ferritic steels have been demonstrated, and the properties of the welds have been evaluated. Results of this three-year study that was completed in 2009 are described in this final report. Additional work is being planned and will commence in 2009. The specific objectives of the future studies will include conducting more detailed evaluations of the weld-ability, mechanical properties and repair-ability of the selected candidate alloys for rotors

  11. Symposium on application of new materials to nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The papers on the application of new materials for upgrading LWRs, the application of new materials to FBRs, the application of new materials to high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the application of new materials to nuclear fusion reactors, engineering ceremics shape memorizing alloys and metal base composite materials are collected in this book. As for LWRs, the change of materials for LWR components and the present status of the research and development of the application of new materials in ANERI are described. As for the application of new materials to a demonstration FBR, high Cr-Mo steel, high ductility stainless steel, neutron resistant stainless steel and low cobalt case hardening material are explained, and the development of new materials for practical FBRs is discussed. As for high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the materials for control rod cladding tubes, heat exchangers and high temperature piping, fuel cladding, moderator and reflector, and heat insulator are described. As for nuclear fusion reactors, the structural materials, the materials facing plasma, and superconductive materials, electrode materials and others are discussed. (K.I.)

  12. Certification of materials for steam generator condensor and regeneration heat exchanger for nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevanovicj, M.V.; Jovashevicj, V.J.; Jovashevicj, V.D.J.; Spasicj, Zh.Lj.

    1977-01-01

    In the construction of a nuclear power plant almost all known materials are used. The choice depends on working conditions. In this work standard specifications of contemporary materials that take part in larger quantities in the following components of the secondary circuit of PWR-type nuclear power plant are proposed: steam generator with moisture separator, condensor and regenerative heat eXchanger

  13. Simulation of the decomposition and nitrogen mineralization of aboveground plant material in two unfertilized grassland ecosystems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemhof, H.S.; Berendse, F.

    1995-01-01

    A simple model of the decomposition and nitrogen mineralization of plant material from two unfertilized grassland ecosystems has been developed, with only the proportion of leaves and stems in the original material, the initial nitrogen contents of these plant parts and temperature as input data.

  14. Miscanthus plants used as an alternative biofuel material. The basic studies on ecology and molecular evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chang-Hung [Graduate Institute of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, College of Life Sciences, China Medical University, Taichung 404 (China)

    2009-08-15

    Miscanthus Anderss, widely distributed in Asia and Pacific Islands, possesses 20 species. Of which 8 species and 1 variety were recorded in Chinese Mainland; 6 species and 1 variety found in Japan; 5 species and 3 varieties distributed in Taiwan; 3 species documented in the Philippines; and rest of species have been recorded in Jawa, eastern Himalaya, and Sikkim. The plant is a C{sub 4} perennial grass with high productivity of biomass. In the 19th and early 20th centuries in Taiwan, Miscanthus was a very important crop used for forage grass, clothing, and shelter, etc. The relatively high germination, and high yield of biomass made the plant available for people of Taiwan including aboriginal. The taxonomic study of Miscanthus plants was much done by several scientists, and its ecological study has been only taken by the present author since 1972. Chou and his associates paid a great attention to elucidate the mechanism of dominance of Miscanthus vegetation and found that allelopathy plays an important role. In addition, the population biology of Miscanthus taxa by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoreses technique to examine the patterns of peroxidase and esterase among populations (over 100) of Miscanthus in Taiwan were conducted. They also elucidated the phylogenetic relationship among species and varieties in Taiwan. Chou and Ueng proposed an evolutionary trend of Miscanthus species, indicating that the Miscanthus sinensis was assumed to be the origin of Miscanthus Anderss, which evolved to M. sinensis var. formosana, and M. sinensis var. flavidus, and M. sinensis var. transmorrisonensis, and Miscanthus floridulus was thought to be an out group of M. sinensis complex. Moreover, molecular phylogeny was attempted to clarify the population heterogeneity of M. sinensis complex, resulting in a substantial information. It would be available for making hybridization between Miscanthus species and its related species, such as Saccharum (sugar cane) spp. which is a

  15. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta Forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne C S McIntosh

    Full Text Available Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and for anticipating impacts of changing disturbance regimes. Our primary objective was to examine the patterns of fine-scale variation in understory plant communities and their relationships to above- and below-ground resource and environmental heterogeneity within mature lodgepole pine forests. We assessed composition and diversity of understory vegetation in relation to heterogeneity of both the above-ground (canopy tree density, canopy and tall shrub basal area and cover, downed wood biomass, litter cover and below-ground (soil nutrient availability, decomposition, forest floor thickness, pH, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs and multiple carbon-source substrate-induced respiration (MSIR of the forest floor microbial community environment. There was notable variation in fine-scale plant community composition; cluster and indicator species analyses of the 24 most commonly occurring understory species distinguished four assemblages, one for which a pioneer forb species had the highest cover levels, and three others that were characterized by different bryophyte species having the highest cover. Constrained ordination (distance-based redundancy analysis showed that two above-ground (mean tree diameter, litter cover and eight below-ground (forest floor pH, plant available boron, microbial community composition and function as indicated by MSIR and PLFAs properties were associated with variation in understory plant community composition. These results provide

  16. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Anne C S; Macdonald, S Ellen; Quideau, Sylvie A

    2016-01-01

    Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand) scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and for anticipating impacts of changing disturbance regimes. Our primary objective was to examine the patterns of fine-scale variation in understory plant communities and their relationships to above- and below-ground resource and environmental heterogeneity within mature lodgepole pine forests. We assessed composition and diversity of understory vegetation in relation to heterogeneity of both the above-ground (canopy tree density, canopy and tall shrub basal area and cover, downed wood biomass, litter cover) and below-ground (soil nutrient availability, decomposition, forest floor thickness, pH, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and multiple carbon-source substrate-induced respiration (MSIR) of the forest floor microbial community) environment. There was notable variation in fine-scale plant community composition; cluster and indicator species analyses of the 24 most commonly occurring understory species distinguished four assemblages, one for which a pioneer forb species had the highest cover levels, and three others that were characterized by different bryophyte species having the highest cover. Constrained ordination (distance-based redundancy analysis) showed that two above-ground (mean tree diameter, litter cover) and eight below-ground (forest floor pH, plant available boron, microbial community composition and function as indicated by MSIR and PLFAs) properties were associated with variation in understory plant community composition. These results provide novel insights

  17. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Anne C. S.; Macdonald, S. Ellen; Quideau, Sylvie A.

    2016-01-01

    Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand) scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and for anticipating impacts of changing disturbance regimes. Our primary objective was to examine the patterns of fine-scale variation in understory plant communities and their relationships to above- and below-ground resource and environmental heterogeneity within mature lodgepole pine forests. We assessed composition and diversity of understory vegetation in relation to heterogeneity of both the above-ground (canopy tree density, canopy and tall shrub basal area and cover, downed wood biomass, litter cover) and below-ground (soil nutrient availability, decomposition, forest floor thickness, pH, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and multiple carbon-source substrate-induced respiration (MSIR) of the forest floor microbial community) environment. There was notable variation in fine-scale plant community composition; cluster and indicator species analyses of the 24 most commonly occurring understory species distinguished four assemblages, one for which a pioneer forb species had the highest cover levels, and three others that were characterized by different bryophyte species having the highest cover. Constrained ordination (distance-based redundancy analysis) showed that two above-ground (mean tree diameter, litter cover) and eight below-ground (forest floor pH, plant available boron, microbial community composition and function as indicated by MSIR and PLFAs) properties were associated with variation in understory plant community composition. These results provide novel insights

  18. The research on the material management system in nuclear power plant construction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xuegeng; Huang Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    According to the module construction speciality of nuclear power plant, this article analyzes the relationship between the actual amount of the material transported to the construction site and the planed needs of the material, and points out the zero inventory management target in the nuclear power plant construction site. Based on this, the article put forward a nuclear power plant material management system which is based on the 'pull' information driver. This system is composed by material coding sub-system, procurement and site material integrated management sub-system and project control sub-system, and is driven by the material demand from construction site to realize the JIT purchasing. This structure of the system can reduce the gap between the actual amount of the material transported to the site and the planed needs of the material and achieve the target of reducing storage at construction site. (authors)

  19. Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Baker, A.L.; Cobb, D.D.

    1980-04-01

    The following appendices are included: aqueous reprocessing and conversion technology, reference facilities, process design and operating features relevant to materials accounting, operator's safeguards system structure, design principles of dynamic materials accounting systems, modeling and simulation approach, optimization of measurement control, aspects of international verification problem, security and reliability of materials measurement and accounting system, estimation of in-process inventory in solvent-extraction contactors, conventional measurement techniques, near-real-time measurement techniques, isotopic correlation techniques, instrumentation available to IAEA inspectors, and integration of materials accounting and containment and surveillance

  20. Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Baker, A.L.; Cobb, D.D.

    1980-04-01

    The following appendices are included: aqueous reprocessing and conversion technology, reference facilities, process design and operating features relevant to materials accounting, operator's safeguards system structure, design principles of dynamic materials accounting systems, modeling and simulation approach, optimization of measurement control, aspects of international verification problem, security and reliability of materials measurement and accounting system, estimation of in-process inventory in solvent-extraction contactors, conventional measurement techniques, near-real-time measurement techniques, isotopic correlation techniques, instrumentation available to IAEA inspectors, and integration of materials accounting and containment and surveillance. (DLC)

  1. Application of Mössbauer spectroscopy in industrial heterogeneous catalysis: effect of oxidant on FePO{sub 4} material phase transformations in direct methanol synthesis from methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasireddy, Venkata D. B. C., E-mail: dasireddy@ki.si [National Institute of Chemistry, Department of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering (Slovenia); Khan, Faiza B. [Energy Technology (South Africa); Hanzel, Darko [Jozef Stefan Institute (Slovenia); Bharuth-Ram, Krish [Durban University of Technology, Physics Department (South Africa); Likozar, Blaž [National Institute of Chemistry, Department of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering (Slovenia)

    2017-11-15

    The effect of the FePO{sub 4} material phase transformation in the direct selective oxidation of methane to methanol was studied using various oxidants, i.e. O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and N{sub 2}O. The phases of the heterogeneous catalyst applied, before and after the reactions, were characterized by M¨ossbauer spectroscopy. The main reaction products were methanol, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, whereas formaldehyde was produced in rather minute amounts. The Mössbauer spectra showed the change of the initial catalyst material, FePO{sub 4} (tridymite-like phase (tdm)), to the reduced metal form, iron(II) pyrophosphate, Fe{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}, and thereafter, the material phase change was governed by the oxidation with individual oxidizing species.Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements applied along with X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies on fresh, reduced and spent catalytic materials demonstrated a transformation of the catalyst to a mixture of phases which depended on operating process conditions. Generally, activity was low and should be a subject of further material optimization and engineering, while the selectivity towards methanol at low temperatures applied was adequate. The proceeding redox mechanism should thus play a key role in catalytic material design, while the advantage of iron-based heterogeneous catalysts primarily lies in them being comparably inexpensive and comprising non-critical raw materials only.

  2. Classification of scrap material from nuclear power plants as acceptable for recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, C.

    1983-06-01

    The Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection has in a principal decision accepted that scrap material from nuclear power plants, that contains or may contain radioactive material, can be recirculated. The document is an English translation of the background material for the Board meeting decision and gives some guide-lines for the authority when dealing with this questions. (author)

  3. PSO 5806 Material development for waste-to-energy plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Jørgen; Frederiksen, Jens; Larsen, Ole Hede

    2010-01-01

    The vision of this project (PSO 5806) is to throw light and focus on some of the refractory material characteristics of major importance to predictable service.......The vision of this project (PSO 5806) is to throw light and focus on some of the refractory material characteristics of major importance to predictable service....

  4. Domestic Material Content in Molten-Salt Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, Craig [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurup, Parthiv [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Akar, Sertac [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-08-26

    This study lists material composition data for two concentrating solar power (CSP) plant designs: a molten-salt power tower and a hypothetical parabolic trough plant, both of which employ a molten salt for the heat transfer fluid (HTF) and thermal storage media. The two designs have equivalent generating and thermal energy storage capacities. The material content of the saltHTF trough plant was approximately 25% lower than a comparably sized conventional oil-HTF parabolic trough plant. The significant reduction in oil, salt, metal, and insulation mass by switching to a salt-HTF design is expected to reduce the capital cost and LCOE for the parabolic trough system.

  5. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

    2004-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

  6. Response of plant species to coal-mine soil materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, A.D.; Tucker, T.C.; Thames, J.L.

    1983-03-01

    The two-year Black Mesa Coal Mine Research Study on the area near Kayenta, Arizona investigating the growth and establishment of seven plant species in unmined soil and coal-mined soils found that plant species grew better in unmined soil and that irrigation is essential during seedling establishment for the effective stabilization of coal-mined soils in a semi-arid environment. Differences among the species included variations in germination, response to irrigation, seedling establishment, and stem growth. 12 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Plant for processing radioactive materials or toxic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, W.; Schneider, V.; Kiy, M.; Schneider, G.

    1980-01-01

    In the fuel element manufacturing plant, there are several steel vessels which can only be entered via air locks. Inside these steel vessels, there are groups of glove boxes. For safety reasons, the pressure in the steel vessels is kept higher than that in the glove boxes for plutonium treatment and lower than that in the building by suitable equipment. (DG) [de

  8. Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.; Barnes, J.W.; Scheinman, L.

    1980-04-01

    The second volume describes the requirements and functions of materials measurement and accounting systems (MMAS) and conceptual designs for an MMAS incorporating both conventional and near-real-time (dynamic) measurement and accounting techniques. Effectiveness evaluations, based on recently developed modeling, simulation, and analysis procedures, show that conventional accountability can meet IAEA goal quantities and detection times in these reference facilities only for low-enriched uranium. Dynamic materials accounting may meet IAEA goals for detecting the abrupt (1-3 weeks) diversion of 8 kg of plutonium. Current materials accounting techniques probably cannot meet the 1-y protracted-diversion goal of 8 kg for plutonium

  9. Analysis of requirements for teaching materials based on the course bioinformatics for plant metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balqis, Widodo, Lukiati, Betty; Amin, Mohamad

    2017-05-01

    A way to improve the quality of learning in the course of Plant Metabolism in the Department of Biology, State University of Malang, is to develop teaching materials. This research evaluates the needs of bioinformatics-based teaching material in the course Plant Metabolism by the Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate (ADDIE) development model. Data were collected through questionnaires distributed to the students in the Plant Metabolism course of the Department of Biology, University of Malang, and analysis of the plan of lectures semester (RPS). Learning gains of this course show that it is not yet integrated into the field of bioinformatics. All respondents stated that plant metabolism books do not include bioinformatics and fail to explain the metabolism of a chemical compound of a local plant in Indonesia. Respondents thought that bioinformatics can explain examples and metabolism of a secondary metabolite analysis techniques and discuss potential medicinal compounds from local plants. As many as 65% of the respondents said that the existing metabolism book could not be used to understand secondary metabolism in lectures of plant metabolism. Therefore, the development of teaching materials including plant metabolism-based bioinformatics is important to improve the understanding of the lecture material in plant metabolism.

  10. Listing the investment costs and producing material analyses for given plants for energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.J.; Hansen, K.; Schoen, R.; Wassmann, B.

    1989-01-01

    In this comparison, the investment and material cost for the following plants are examined: 1. Solar service water treatment plants, 2. Solar heating plants, 3. Conventional comparative plants, 4. Heat pump heating plants, 5. Nuclear power stations and hardcoal-fired power stations, and 6. Wind energy converters. The technique of energy conversion of each is generally explained. In the appendix, points of the use of energy are given for the manufacture of components of the heating and installation trade. Specific energy costs per product unit are compiled for the different branches. (UA) [de

  11. Materials concepts in PWR power plants. An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa e Silva, A.L.V.

    1987-01-01

    Some measures to reduce the risk of exposure in case of nuclear accidents are presented. Some material questions concerning the integrity of reactor pressure vessel, the containment vessel and external systems are discussed. (E.G.) [pt

  12. Low activation structural material candidates for fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty, C.B.A.; Cook, I.

    1997-06-01

    Under the SEAL Programme of the European Long-Term Fusion Safety Programme, an assessment was performed of a number of possible blanket structural materials. These included the steels then under consideration in the European Blanket Programme, as well as materials being considered for investigation in the Advanced Materials Programme. Calculations were performed, using SEAFP methods, of the activation properties of the materials, and these were related, based on the SEAFP experience, to assessments of S and E performance. The materials investigated were the SEAFP low-activation martensitic steel (LA12TaLC); a Japanese low-activation martensitic steel (F-82H), a range of compositional variants about this steel; the vanadium-titanium-chromium alloy which was the original proposal of the ITER JCT for the ITER in-vessel components; a titanium-aluminium intermetallic (Ti-Al) which is under investigation in Japan; and silicon carbide composite (SiC). Assessed impurities were included in the compositions of these materials, and they have very important impacts on the activation properties. Lack of sufficiently detailed data on the composition of chromium alloys precluded their inclusion in the study. (UK)

  13. Nuclear power plant control and instrumentation 1993. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The regular meeting of the International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (IWG-NPPCI) was organized in order to summarize operating experience of nuclear power plant control systems, gain a general overview of activities in development of modern control systems and receive recommendations on the further directions and particular measures within the Agency's programme. The meeting was held at the Merlin-Gerin Headquarters in Paris and was attended by twenty one national delegates and observers from 17 countries. The present volume contains: (1) report on the meeting of the IWG-NPPCI, Paris, 21-22 October 1993, (2) report by the scientific secretary on the major activities of IAEA during 1991-1993 in the NPPCI area, and (3) reports of the national representatives to the International Working Group on NPPCI. The papers and discussions with practical experience and described actual problems encountered. Emphasis was placed on the technical, industrial and economic aspects of the introduction of modern control systems and on the improvement of plant availability and safety. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Selection of construction materials for equipment in an experimental reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizrahi, R.; Cragnolino, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    A review is made of the most significant corrosion problems that may be present in different stages of the process in a spent fuel reprocessing plant. The influence of different variables is analyzed: concentration of nitric acid and other oxidizing species, temperature, etc., in corrosion of materials of most frequent use in pipings and equipment. The materials are austenitic stainless steels and refractory metals, especially zirconium and its alloys. Both general and localized corrosion phenomena are analyzed for these materials. Selection criteria for the use of adequate material in different components of the plant are also discussed. (author). 32 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Enhancing materials management programs in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassaballa, M.M.; Malak, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Materials management programs for the nuclear utilities in the United States are continually being affected, concurrent with the gradual disappearance of qualified component and replacement parts vendors by regulatory concerns about procurement and materials management. In addition, current economic and competitive pressures are forcing utilities to seek avenues for reducing procurement costs for safety-related items. In response to these concerns, initiatives have been undertaken and engineering guidelines have been developed by the nuclear power industry-sponsored organizations, such as the Electric Power Research Institute and the Nuclear Management Resources Council. It is our experience that successful materials management programs require a multitude of engineering disciplines and experience and are composed of three major elements: strategic procurement plan, parts classification and procurement data base, and enhancement tools. This paper provides a brief description of each of the three elements

  16. Experiences with liquid scintillation counting of 3H, 14C and 35S from plant material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.

    1974-01-01

    Relative merits of different methods in radioassay of three soft beta emitting isotopes like 3 H, 14 C and 35 S from plant material have been assessed. The methods used are: (1) combustion method (2) use of tissue solubilizing agents and (3) wet digestion method. Results show that determinations of 14 C by combustion method; 3 H by combustion and Mahin and Lofberg's method; and 35 S by wet digestion method are superior for plant material than the other methods tried. (author)

  17. Osmotic potential of Zinnia elegans plant material affects the yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To examine whether the growth conditions that determine leaf osmolarity (LO) affect the final %TE, we used three light intensities (50, 70 and 100 μmol.m-2s-1) and three electrical conductivity (EC) levels (EC 2, 4 and 6 dS.m-1 ) in hydroponic systems to induce different osmolarities in leaf materials from two cultivars (cvs) of ...

  18. Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.; Barnes, J.W.; Scheinman, L.

    1980-04-01

    The first volume of this report summarizes the results and conclusions for this study of conventional and advanced nuclear materials accounting systems applicable for both large (1500 MTHM/y) and small (210 MTHM/y) spent-fuel reprocessing facilities subject to international verification

  19. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

  20. Disentangling the effects of root foraging and inherent growth rate on plant biomass accumulation in heterogeneous environments : a modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, B.; Kroon, de H.; Kovel, de C.G.F.; Bosch, van den F.

    1999-01-01

    Empirical evidence indicates that fast-growing species generally display a higher degree of selective root placement in heterogeneous environments than slow-growing species. Such root foraging is accomplished by root morphological responses, but since some morphological responses are simply the

  1. Obtaining of Grafted Planting Material at Some Romanian Tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalina Doltu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The tomatoes have highest share in Romanian crops from protected spaces (greenhouses, solariums. The grafting is an agronomical technique that induces or improves some qualities of the tomato cultivars (resistance to soil diseases and pests, resistance to abiotic factors, quantity and quality of fruit production. The research was aimed the establishing of the technological stages for producing of scion and rootstock seedlings from L. esculentum species, to obtain compatible phenotype when is grafted. The observations of this research were conducted on Department of Horticultural Cultures in Protected Spaces from Horting Institute Bucharest. The experience was carry out on a cultivar collection consisting from L. esculentum plants: scions (‘Siriana’–F1 hybrid and ‘Buzău 1600’– variety, creations from the germplasm bank of Research and Development Station for Vegetable Growing Buzău Romania (VDRS Buzău and rootstock (‘Groundforce’–F1 hybrid. The plant diameters were correlated for a grafting by the annexation method, cutting at 45 degrees. The grafting was performed successfully. The technological steps have achieved phenotypic compatibility of the symbiotes when was the grafting by annexation. The technology for producing of scion and rootstock seedlings at these Romanian tomatoes (‘Siriana’ and ‘Buzău’ 1600 was established for the crops in protected spaces in south area of Romania.

  2. Incorporation of plant materials in the control of root pathogens in muskmelon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Mirne de Macêdo Dantas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of plant materials[Sunn Hemp (Crotalaria juncea, Castor Bean (Ricinus communis L., Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz and Neem (Azadirachta indica] and the times of incorporation of these materials in regards to the incidence of root rot in melon was evaluated in Ceará state, Brazil. The experiment was conducted in a commercial area with a history of root pathogens in cucurbitaceae. The randomized block design was used, in a 5 x 3 factorial arrangement with four repetitions. The treatments consisted of a combination of four plant materials (sunn hemp, castor beans, cassava and neem and a control with no soil incorporation of plant material and three times of incorporation (28, 21, and 14 days before the transplanting of the seedlings. Lower incidence of root rot was observed in practically all of the treatments where materials were incorporated at different times, with variation between the materials, corresponding with the time of incorporation, in relation to the soil without plant material. The pathogens isolated from the symptomatic muskmelon plants were Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Monosporascus cannonballus and Rhizoctonia solani, F. solani being encountered most frequently.

  3. Plant Materials are Sustainable Substrates Supporting New Technologies of Plant-Only-Based Culture Media for in vitro Culturing of the Plant Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Elhussein F; Sarhan, Mohamed S; Daanaa, Hassan-Sibroe A; Abdou, Mennatullah; Morsi, Ahmed T; Abdelfadeel, Mohamed R; Elsawey, Hend; Nemr, Rahma; El-Tahan, Mahmoud; Hamza, Mervat A; Abbas, Mohamed; Youssef, Hanan H; Abdelhadi, Abdelhadi A; Amer, Wafaa M; Fayez, Mohamed; Ruppel, Silke; Hegazi, Nabil A

    2018-03-29

    In order to improve the culturability and biomass production of rhizobacteria, we previously introduced plant-only-based culture media. We herein attempted to widen the scope of plant materials suitable for the preparation of plant-only-based culture media. We chemically analyzed the refuse of turfgrass, cactus, and clover. They were sufficiently rich to support good in vitro growth by rhizobacteria isolates representing Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. They were also adequate and efficient to produce a cell biomass in liquid batch cultures. These culture media were as sufficient as artificial culture media for the cultivation and recovery of the in situ rhizobacteria of barley (Hordeum murinum L.). Based on culture-dependent (CFU plate counting) and culture-independent analyses (qPCR), mowed turfgrass, in particular, supported the highest culturable population of barley endophytes, representing >16% of the total bacterial number quantified with qPCR. This accurately reflected the endophytic community composition, in terms of diversity indices (S', H', and D') based on PCR-DGGE, and clustered the plant culture media together with the qPCR root populations away from the artificial culture media. Despite the promiscuous nature of the plant materials tested to culture the plant microbiome, our results indicated that plant materials of a homologous nature to the tested host plant, at least at the family level, and/or of the same environment were more likely to be selected. Plant-only-based culture media require further refinements in order to provide selectivity for the in vitro growth of members of the plant microbiome, particularly difficult-to-culture bacteria. This will provide insights into their hidden roles in the environment and support future culturomic studies.

  4. Heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 in the radiation chemical purification of exhaust gases of thermoelectric power plants from oxides of nitrogen and sulfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimova, T.S.; Gerasimov, G.Ya.; Tokmacheva, I.P.

    1992-01-01

    Questions associated with numerical modeling of the heterogeneous oxidation of SO 2 in exhaust gases of thermoelectric power plants, induced by irradiation of the gas with a flux of fast electrons, are discussed. In constructing a mathematical model of the process it is considered that a phase equilibrium exists between the gas and the aerosol drops formed in the gas under the radiation influence, and the rate of the process is determined by the rate of liquid-phase oxidation of SO 2 by nitrogen dioxide in dissolved form. 7 refs., 4 figs

  5. Quality control of three main materials for civil construction of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Feng

    2011-01-01

    The construction and operation of nuclear power plant is a systematic engineering. To ensure quality and safety of nuclear power plants, each work from design to operation can have certain impact on the quality and safety of the project. The quality of each related work shall be controlled. Starting from the quality control over raw materials for the civil construction of nuclear power plant, this article mainly analyzes how to control the quality and manage the three main materials of steel, concrete and modular parts in the civil construction. (author)

  6. Materials Investigation for Power Plants and Power Industry. Seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szteke, W.; Wasiak, J.; Bilous, W.; Przyborska, M.; Wagner, T.; Wojciechowska, J.; Zubowski, B.

    2005-01-01

    The Report is an assembly of the papers concerning the present state and perspectives of evolution of power industry in Poland, in this the development of atomic energy. The material and diagnostic problems occurring the exploitation of power station as well as gas pipelines are also discussed. The progress in the accommodation of the Polish technical prescriptions to the European law is also described. (authors)

  7. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants: Annual report, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.; Congemi, J.

    1987-08-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1984 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1984 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  8. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants (1976)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, T.R.

    1978-11-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1976 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1976 release data are compared with previous year releases in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized

  9. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Annual report 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, T.R.

    1978-11-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1977 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1977 release data are compared with previous years releases in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized

  10. Surface treatments for material protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, P.K.; Gadiyar, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    The paper highlights some of the surface treatment methods used in nuclear power plants to improve their performance. The corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys results from the formation of an adherent and protective film of ZrO 2 . Graphite coating of zircaloy-2 cladding minimizes the susceptibility to environmental induced cracking. Magnetite formation during the hot conditioning operation improves the corrosion resistance of carbon steel as well as controls the spread of radioactivity. It has been illustrated how the surface treatment is helpful for redistributing residual stress to facilitate conversion of tensile stress to compressive stress to mitigate failures due to stress corrosion and fatigue corrosion. Inhibitors and passivators can modify the surface conditions (in situ) of condenser tubes and cooling water systems. These aspects have been dealt in the text of the paper. (author). 8 refs., 3 figures

  11. Decomposition of macrophytes with uniformly C-14-labelled plant material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, G.

    1979-01-01

    Uniform labelling of plant such as macrophytes is relatively difficult to obtain. In my experiments I used samples of ripe stems and leaves of labelled maize which had grown for 110 days in a 14 Co 2 atmosphere. These samples were laid in a glass bowl for in situ and in vitro experiments under similar conditions of light and temperature. The aim of this study was to determine the shift of carbon through chosen compartments of a core (water, sediments, bacteria, invertebrates, atmosphere) and to understand the mineralization process with type of particulate organic matter. At low temperature (7 0 C), leaching of organic matter in the first 5 days increases bacteria activity, then radioactivity-incorporation level declines to the 60th day; CO 2 production was measured during experiments and was varying between 60% and 75% of used carbon of the tissue. (orig.) [de

  12. Structural materials requirements for in-vessel components of fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, B. van der

    2000-01-01

    The economic production of fusion energy is determined by principal choices such as using magnetic plasma confinement or generating inertial fusion energy. The first generation power plants will use deuterium and tritium mixtures as fuel, producing large amounts of highly energetic neutrons resulting in radiation damage in materials. In the far future the advanced fuels, 3 He or 11 B, determine power plant designs with less radiation damage than in the first generation. The first generation power plants design must anticipate radiation damage. Solid sacrificing armour or liquid layers could limit component replacements costs to economic levels. There is more than radiation damage resistance to determine the successful application of structural materials. High endurance against cyclic loading is a prominent requirement, both for magnetic and inertial fusion energy power plants. For high efficiency and compactness of the plant, elevated temperature behaviour should be attractive. Safety and environmental requirements demand that materials have low activation potential and little toxic effects under both normal and accident conditions. The long-term contenders for fusion power plant components near the plasma are materials in the range from innovative steels, such as reduced activation ferritic martensitic steels, to highly advanced ceramic composites based on silicon carbide, and chromium alloys. The steels follow an evolutionary path to basic plant efficiencies. The competition on the energy market in the middle of the next century might necessitate the riskier but more rewarding development of SiCSiC composites or chromium alloys

  13. Effects of different drying processes on the concentrations of metals and metalloids in plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anawar, H.M.; Canha, N.; Freitas, M.C; Santa Regina, I.; Garcia-Sanchez, A.

    2011-01-01

    The drying process of fresh plant materials may affect the porous structure, dehydration and a number of quality characteristics of these materials. Therefore, this study has investigated the effect of different drying processes on the variation of metal and metalloid concentrations in the dried plant materials. Seven varieties of native plant species collected from Sao Domingos mine were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) to investigate the effects of freeze-drying (FD), ambient air-drying (AAD) and oven-drying (OD) process on the concentrations of metals and metalloids in the plant biomass. Comparison of ambient air-dried, oven-dried and freeze-dried preparations allows a phenomenological description of the dehydration artefacts. In the quantitative analysis of metals and metalloids, FD and OD plant samples show the higher concentrations of metals and metalloids when compared to those in the AAD plant biomass. The freeze-drying process is comparatively reliable for determination of metals and metalloids concentrations in plant materials. (author)

  14. Planting on the slope of Yangjiang nuclear power plant by spraying combined materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ning

    2010-01-01

    During the development and construction of nuclear power projects, in order to prevent ecological degradation and soil erosion of slope hazards, taking practical measures in the works or plant is particularly important. through the main high slope green field application of Yangjiang nuclear power plant, introducing mixed vegetation spraying techniques and characteristics of the construction process, for similar projects it is also a good guide. (author)

  15. Contribution to the studies on the mineral content of plant material through radioactivation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourcy, A.

    1968-03-01

    Radioactivation analysis is by its great sensibility or its rapidity quite helpful in plant biology and agronomy. Specific composition of plants and results to obtain in biological experimentation have needed a practical research on analytical methods for plant materials, using for radioactivation swimming-pool reactor neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons from a generator. Dosage process for 25 elements is exposed, taking account of the interest of the analysis for each element, the average amount occurring in plants and the result obtained. Many applications are developed, concerning nutrition physiology, genetics, parasitology, toxicology, control of manufactured agricultural and pharmaceutical products industrial and pesticides residues, ecology, radioecology and biochemistry. (author) [fr

  16. Liquid scintillation counting of calcium-45 in plant and soil material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waller, S.S.; Dodd, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The recovery efficiencies of 45 Ca, for plant material using dry ashing with HCL as the extractant, and for soils using column extraction with MgCl 2 as the extractant, have been determined. The extraction and detection procedures, using available scintillation solvent systems, are given and show a combination of a high counting efficiency with high recovery efficiencies. The extraction procedures are simple, involving minimal operator time, and allow simultaneous 45 Ca determination in both plant and soil material. Both extraction procedures exhibit good reproducibility over a wide range of specific activities while being relatively insensitive to quenching and carrier calcium normally encountered in plant and soil material. These procedures are particularly useful in ecological studies requiring the examination of a large number of plant and/or soil samples over a wide range of radioactive concentrations. (U.K.)

  17. Development of in-plant reference material for composition of chinese cabbage with certified selenium content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Chupahin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In-plant reference material for composition of Chinese cabbage with certified selenium content was developed for accuracy control of the results of selenium determination and within-laboratory quality control of analytical work in the analysis of food raw material.

  18. [Design of plant leaf bionic camouflage materials based on spectral analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Jie; Liu, Zhi-Ming; Hu, Bi-Ru; Wu, Wen-Jian

    2011-06-01

    The influence of structure parameters and contents of plant leaves on their reflectance spectra was analyzed using the PROSPECT model. The result showed that the bionic camouflage materials should be provided with coarse surface and spongy inner structure, the refractive index of main content must be close to that of plant leaves, the contents of materials should contain chlorophyll and water, and the content of C-H bond must be strictly controlled. Based on the analysis above, a novel camouflage material, which was constituted by coarse transparent waterproof surface, chlorophyll, water and spongy material, was designed. The result of verifiable experiment showed that the reflectance spectra of camouflage material exhibited the same characteristics as those of plant leaves. The similarity coefficient of reflectance spectrum of the camouflage material and camphor leaves was 0.988 1, and the characteristics of camouflage material did not change after sunlight treatment for three months. The bionic camouflage material, who exhibited a high spectral similarity with plant leaves and a good weather resistance, will be an available method for reconnaissance of hyperspectral imaging hopefully.

  19. Losses of the elements during dry ashing of plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Nobuhiro; Higuchi, Hideo; Hamaguchi, Hiroshi; Tomura, Kenji.

    1981-01-01

    Dry ashing technique has been considered to cause potential errors due to loss of elements by volatilisation or by reaction with the vessel. To obtain an overall view of elemental loss, the dry ashing was applied to the standard reference materials such as Orchard leaves(NBS) and Bamboo leaves. The ashing condition was as follows; The temperature varied from 200 0 C to 800 0 C by stepwise heating and the duration of heating at each temperature was 24 h. Concentrations of 25 elements in a sample were determined by means of atomic absorption spectrometry and neutron activation analysis using a Ge(Li) detector. The results obtained were as follows; (1) The losses for alkali elements were dependent on crucible materials and sample species. The losses increased with temperature and they were serious when a silica dish was used. (2) The loss for mercury was found above 110 0 C and simply increased with temperature. On the other hand, chlorine, bromine, selenium and chromium showed complicated patterns in which the first losses occurred at 200 0 C, no additional losses being observed at each following step of heating between 200 0 C and 450 0 C, and they increased again above 500 0 C. (3) The losses for arsenic and antimony occurred at 200 0 C, but any losses could not be observed above 200 0 C. (4) No losses were detected over the temperature range studied for alkaline earths, rare earths, vanadium, manganese, iron, cobalt, zinc and aluminum. (author)

  20. Innovative plant protection means prepared natural raw materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Lomtadze

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Were developed new compositions preparation against pests and diseases of plant: Insekto-acaricide “Antipest”, Fungicide “Antifungal”, a drug against of overwintering pests “Proinsekt” and nutritious preparation “Si-humate”.The effectiveness of trial oil-emulsion preparation “Proinsect” was assessed by the spread of pests - San Jose scale (Diaspidiotus perniciosus and mountain ash bentwing (Leucoptera scitella Costa on treated trees. According to field testing, the efficiency of preparation “Proinsect” exceeds the effectiveness of one of the best imported oily preparation “Sipcomol”, which was selected as a reference.Joint content in composition of synthetic pyretroids with turpentine oil, supposedly synergism takes place (turpentines cause prolonged action of synthetic pyrethroid. In working solutions, obtained from turpentine oil containing composition concentration of pyretroid is low, but it is enough during the whole period of pest development cycle. According to the comparative field testing of “Antipest” and imported preparations, against for fruits pests their efficiency is at almost one level, despite the low content (by 30–40% of pyrethroid (cypermethrin in “Antipest”.The developed phosphate preparation “Antifungal” is a little bit less effective compared to Bordeaux mixture. If well take into account significant decrease of intensity of disease spread and development after the action of phosphate preparation, also very low toxicity zinc hydro- and dihydrophosphates compared to the blue vitriol (Copper(II sulfate, the developed fungicide preparation can be successfully used instead of traditional Bordeaux mixture and in particular against the peach leaf curl.According to the results of field trials, effect, of developed silicon containing humic nutrient composition -“Si-humate” on experimental 2-year-old seedlings apples and peach is on the average 15–17% better than the control ones in

  1. Plant distribution patterns related to species characteristics and spatial and temporal habitat heterogeneity in a network of ditch banks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertsema, W.; Sprangers, J.T.C.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this study we investigated the relationship between the distribution patterns of a number of herbaceous plant species and the isolation and age of habitat patches. The study was conducted for a network of ditch banks in an agricultural landscape in The Netherlands. Thirteen plant species were

  2. Does resource availability, resource heterogeneity or species turnover mediate changes in plant species richness in grazed grasslands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, C; Blair, JM; Knapp, AK

    2003-01-01

    Grazing by large ungulates often increases plant species richness in grasslands of moderate to high productivity. In a mesic North American grassland with and without the presence of bison (Bos bison), a native ungulate grazer, three non-exclusive hypotheses for increased plant species richness in

  3. The use of ferritic materials in light water reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of ferritic materials in LWR power plant components. The two principal types of LWR systems, the boiling water reactor (BWR) and the pressurized water reactor (PWR) are described. The evolution of the construction materials, including plates and forgings, is presented. The fabrication process for both reactors constructed with plates and forgings are described in detail. Typical mechanical properties of the reactor vessel materials are presented. Finally, one critical issue radiation embrittlement dealing with ferritic materials is discussed. This has been one of the major issues regarding the use of ferritic material in the construction of LWR pressure vessels

  4. Plant waste materials from restaurants as the adsorbents for dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Marija D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has demonstrated the valorization of inexpensive and readily available restaurant waste containing most consumed food and beverage residues as adsorbents for methylene blue dye. Coffee, tea, lettuce and citrus waste have been utilized without any pre-treatment, thus the adsorption capacities and dye removal efficiency were determined. Coffee waste showed highest adsorbent capacity, followed by tea, lettuce and citrus waste. The dye removal was more effective as dye concentration increases from 5 up to 60 mg/L. The favorable results obtained for lettuce waste have been especially encouraged, as this material has not been commonly employed for sorption purposes. Equilibrium data fitted very well in a Freundlich isotherm model, whereas pseudo-second-order kinetic model describes the process behavior. Restaurant waste performed rapid dye removal at no cost, so it can be adopted and widely used in industries for contaminated water treatment.

  5. Nuclear material control and accountancy in a radiochemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    The measurement systems in use at Savannah River Site, SRS, to determine material balance around dissolution of fuel, separation and purification of actinides to a nitrate product are described. To ensure that volume accuracy's are as expected, SRS has implemented a volumetric measurement control program to control errors and to detect anomalies. The program consists of periodic instrument calibrations, comparison of in-tank density measurements. An analytical quality control program is in place at SRS to provide assurance that analysis are reliable and to estimate and monitor method performance. Checks include the analysis of standard prior to the use of each method each shift the method is used. At SRS cumulative inventory difference is compared to the combined errors for the balance. The results from current evaluations for uranium and plutonium balances are presented [ru

  6. Irradiation creep of candidate materials for advanced nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J., E-mail: jiachao.chen@psi.ch; Jung, P.; Hoffelner, W.

    2013-10-15

    In the present paper, irradiation creep results of an intermetallic TiAl alloy and two ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are summarized. In situ irradiation creep measurements were performed using homogeneous implantation with α- and p-particles to maximum doses of 0.8 dpa at displacement damage rates of 2–8 × 10{sup −6} dpa/s. The strains of miniaturized flat dog-bone specimens were monitored under uniaxial tensile stresses ranging from 20 to 400 MPa at temperatures of 573, 673 and 773 K, respectively. The effects of material composition, ODS particle size, and bombarding particle on the irradiation creep compliance was studied and results are compared to literature data. Evolution of microstructure during helium implantation was investigated in detail by TEM and is discussed with respect to irradiation creep models.

  7. Aspects of cleaning environmental materials for multi-element analysis, e.g. plant samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markert, B.

    1992-01-01

    Cleaning of samples is often the first step in the entire procedure of sample preparation in environmental trace element research. The question must generally be raised of whether cleaning is meaningful before chemical investigations with plant material (e.g. for the determination of transfer factors in the soil/plant system) or not (e.g. for food chain analysis in the plant/animal system). The most varied cleaning procedures for plant samples are currently available ranging from dry and wet wiping of the leaf or needle surface up to the complete removal of the cuticule with the aid of chlorofom. There is at present no standardized cleaning procedure for plant samples so that it is frequently not possible to compare analytical data from different working groups studying the same plant species. (orig.)

  8. The nuclear materials control and accountability internal audit program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    The internal audit program of the Nuclear Material Control and Accountability (NMCandA) Department at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, through inventory-verification audits, inventory-observation audits, procedures audits, and records audits, evaluates the adequacy of material accounting and control systems and procedures throughout the Plant; appraises and verifies the accuracy and reliability of accountability records and reports; assures the consistent application of generally accepted accounting principles in accounting for nuclear materials; and assures compliance with the Department of Energy (DOE) and NMCandA procedures and requirements. The internal audit program has significantly strengthened the control and accountability of nuclear materials through improving the system of internal control over nuclear materials, increasing the awareness of materials control and accountability concerns within the Plant's material balance areas (MBAs), strengthening the existence of audit trails within the overall accounting system for nuclear materials, improving the accuracy and timeliness of data submitted to the nuclear materials accountability system, auditing the NMCandA accounting system to ensure its accuracy and reliability, and ensuring that all components of that system (general ledgers, subsidiary ledgers, inventory listings, etc.) are in agreement among themselves

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.E. Mizia; W.E. Windes; W.R. Corwin; T.D. Burchell; C.E. Duty; Y. Katoh; J.W. Klett; T.E. McGreevy; R.K. Nanstad; W. Ren; P.L. Rittenhouse; L.L. Snead; R.W. Swindeman; D.F. Wlson

    2007-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 950°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Some of the general and administrative aspects of the R&D Plan include: • Expand American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Codes and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standards in support of the NGNP Materials R&D Program. • Define and develop inspection needs and the procedures for those inspections. • Support selected university materials related R&D activities that would be of direct benefit to the NGNP Project. • Support international materials related collaboration activities through the DOE sponsored Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Materials and Components (M&C) Project Management Board (PMB). • Support document review activities through the Materials Review Committee (MRC) or other suitable forum.

  10. Preparative treatment with NaOH to selectively concentrate iron oxides of a Chilean volcanic soil material to produce effective heterogeneous Fenton catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzo, Valentina; Pizarro, Carmen; Rubio, María Angélica; Cavalcante, Luis Carlos Duarte; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; Fabris, José Domingos

    2011-01-01

    A Chilean volcanic Ultisol material was first size-fractionated so as to obtain the fraction with mean particle sizes φ   − 1 NaOH, in an attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of the selective chemical dissolution to concentrate iron oxides, as a preparation procedure before using the materials as heterogeneous Fenton catalysts. The effects of those treatments on the iron oxides mineralogy were monitored with Mössbauer spectroscopy. The NaOH-treated samples were tested as catalysts towards the H 2 O 2 decomposition. Three or five sequential NaOH treatments were found to be comparably effective, by concentrating nearly the same proportion of iron oxides in the remaining solid phase (25.1 ± 0.4 and 23.3 ± 0.2 mass%, respectively). 298 K-Mössbauer patterns were similar for both samples, with a central (super)paramagnetic Fe 3 +  doublet and a broad sextet, assignable to several closely coexisting magnetically ordered forms of iron oxides. Despite of this nearly similar effect of the two treatments, the Ultisol material treated three times with NaOH presents higher heterogeneous catalytic efficiency and is more suitable to decompose H 2 O 2 than that with five treatments.

  11. The material control and accounting system model development in the Radiochemical plant of Siberian Chemical Combine (SChC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozyrev, A.S.; Purygin, V.Ya.; Skuratov, V.A.; Lapotkov, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear material (NM) control and accounting computerized system is designed to automatically account NM reception, movement and storage at the Radiochemical Plant. The objective of this system development is to provide a constant surveillance over the process material movement, to improve their accountability and administrative work, to upgrade the plant protection against possible NM thefts, stealing and diversion, to rule out any casual errors of operators, to improve the timeliness and significance (reliability) of information about nuclear materials. The NM control and accounting system at the Radiochemical Plant should be based on the computerized network. It must keep track of all the material movements in each Material Balance Areas: material receipt from other plant; material local movement within the plant; material shipment to other plants; generation of required documents about NM movements and its accounting [ru

  12. Development of the system for the estimation of materials flow in pyrochemical reprocessing plant. Characteristic evaluation of the oxide electrowinning plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Nobuo; Tozawa, Katuhiro; Sato, Koji

    2002-07-01

    The operation of the plant with the non-aqueous reprocessing technology depends on the materials handling equipment closely. Because the value of decontamination factor of the products in the plant is low, treatment of nuclear materials requires remote operation technology. So the system for the evaluation of materials flow in the plant was built to evaluate the production ability of the plant and to check out the plant operation from the viewpoint of materials flow. The system is only based on information of the treatment abilities of materials handling machines and process installations and the arrangement of process installations in the reprocessing cell that influences a way to operate materials handling machines intensity. Therefore the system can be used to estimate the characteristics of non-aqueous plants that are not in detail design stage. The amount of production and the characteristics of the oxide electrowinning plant (operation term 200days/year, plant capacity 50tHM/year in design) designed in Feasibility Study Phase1 were estimated using the system. The results show that the practical amount of production of the plant design is about 88% of the designed value. To increase the amount of production, it is more useful to speed up materials handling machine time than to install new installation or to give priority to conduct bottleneck processes. It is because materials handling influences the production ability of the plant deeply. (author)

  13. Authentication of nuclear-material assays made with in-plant instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, C.R.; Hsue, S.T.; Russo, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper develops a general approach for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) authentication of nuclear material assays made with in-plant instruments under facility operator control. The IAEA is evaluating the use of in-plant instruments as a part of international safeguards at large bulk-handling facilities, such as reprocessing plants, fuel fabrication plants, and enrichment plants. One of the major technical problems associated with IAEA use of data from in-plant instruments is the need to show that there has been no tampering with the measurements. Two fundamentally different methods are discussed that can be used by IAEA inspectors to independently verify (or authenticate) measurements made with in-plant instruments. Method 1, called external authentication, uses a protected IAEA measurement technique to compare in-plant instrument results with IAEA results. Method 2, called internal authentication, uses protected IAEA standards, known physical constants, and special test procedures to determine the performance characteristics of the in-plant instrument. The importance of measurement control programs to detect normally expected instrument failures and procedural errors is also addressed. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of factors that should be considered by the designers of new in-plant instruments in order to facilitate IAEA authentication procedures

  14. Development and modification of materials applied for reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Yamanouchi, N.; Kikuchi, M.; Kuriki, Y.; Tamura, M.

    1991-01-01

    To attain sufficient reliability of materials for chemical reaction vessels used in nitric acid environments of reprocessing process, the optimization of R-304ULC steels and developments of alternative alloys against the trans-passive corrosion were made. Following composition adjustment and the thermomechanical treatment so-called SAR were selected in the former; to control Cr and Ni contents upper limits of type 304L standard, to exclude minor elements within engineeringly available, to control Si contents 0.1-0.2 wt%. Plates and pipes of the optimized R-304ULC showed a good corrosion resistance both results of long time immersion in nitric acid production process and the evaluation of tunneling corrosion resistance, comparing with commercial heats. 30%Cr Ni base alloy added sufficient amounts of W and Si was selected in the latter for attaining sufficient corrosion resistances in a wide range of passive to trans-passive. It is concluded that both inhibition of anodic- and cathodic-reactions are required to attain sufficient corrosion resistances in highly oxidizing environments like boiling nitric acid solutions. (author)

  15. Project Plan For Remove Special Nuclear Material (SNM) from Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BARTLETT, W.D.

    1999-01-01

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Remove SNM Materials. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP Remove SNM Materials project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baseline to manage the execution of the Remove SNM Materials project. Any deviation to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process. The Remove SNM Materials project provides the necessary support and controls required for DOE-HQ, DOE-RL, BWHC, and other DOE Complex Contractors the path forward to negotiate shipped/receiver agreements, schedule shipments, and transfer material out of PFP to enable final deactivation

  16. The contribution of woody plant materials on the several conditions in a space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Baba, Keiichi; Suzuki, Toshisada; Kimura, Shunta; Sato, Seigo; Katoh, Hiroshi; Abe, Yusuke; Katayama, Takeshi

    Woody plant materials have several utilization elements in our habitation environment on earth. The studies of woody plants under a space-environment in the vegetable kingdom have a high contribution to the study of various and exotic environmental responses, too. Woody plants can produce an excess oxygen, woody materials for the living cabin, and provide a biomass by cultivating crops and other species of creatures. Tree material would become to be a tool in closed bio-ecosystems such as an environment in a space. We named the trees used as material for the experiment related to space environments “CosmoBon”, small tree bonsai. Japanese cherry tree, “Sakura”, is famous and lovely tree in Japan. One species of “Sakura”, “Mamezakura, Prunus incisa”, is not only lovely tree species, but also suitable tree for the model tree of our purpose. The species of Prunus incisa is originally grown in volcano environment. That species of Sakura is originally grown on Mt. Fuji aria, oligotrophic place. We will try to build the best utilization usage of woody plant under the space environment by “Mamezakura” as a model tree. Here, we will show the importance of uniformity of materials when we will use the tree materials in a space environment. We will also discuss that tree has a high possibility of utilization under the space environments by using our several results related to this research.

  17. Proceedings of the Tripartite Seminar on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control at Radiochemical Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The problems of creation and operation of nuclear materials (NM) control and accounting systems and their components at radiochemical plants were discussed in seminar during November 2-6 of 1998. There were 63 Russian and 25 foreign participants in seminar. The seminar programme includes following sessions and articles: the aspects of State NM control and accountancy; NM control and accounting in radiochemical plants and at separate stages of reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and irradiated fuel elements of commercial reactors; NM control and accountancy in storage facilities of radiochemical plants; NM control and accounting computerization, material balance assessment, preparation of reports; qualitative and quantitative measurements in NM control and accounting at radiochemical plants destructive analysis techniques [ru

  18. Future Applications in Quantitative Isotopic Tracing using Homogeneously Carbon-13 Labelled Plant Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaets, Johanna I.F.; Chen, Janet; Resch, Christian; Mayr, Leopold; Weltin, Georg; Heiling, Maria; Gruber, Roman; Dercon, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    Carbon-13 ("1"3C) and nitrogen-15 ("1"5N) labelled plant material is increasingly being used to trace the fate of plant-derived C and N into the atmosphere, soil, water and organisms in many studies, including those investigating the potential of soils to store greenhouse gases belowground. Storage of C in soils can offset and even reduce atmospheric levels of the greenhouse gas, CO_2, and interest in such studies is growing due to problems associated with anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions impacting climate change. Reduction of N loss in soils is also of great interest, as it reduces release of the greenhouse gas, N_2O, into the atmosphere. However, accurate quantitative tracing of plant-derived C and N in such research is only possible if plant material is labelled both homogeneously and in sufficient quantities.

  19. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for analysis of plant materials: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Dário; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel; Gomes, Marcos da Silva; Souza, Paulino Florêncio de; Leme, Flavio de Oliveira; Gustavo Cofani dos Santos, Luis; Krug, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    Developments and contributions of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the determination of elements in plant materials are reviewed. Several applications where the solid samples are interrogated by simply focusing the laser pulses directly onto a fresh or dried surface of leaves, roots, fruits, vegetables, wood and pollen are presented. For quantitative purposes aiming at plant nutrition diagnosis, the test sample presentation in the form of pressed pellets, prepared from clean, dried and properly ground/homogenized leaves, and the use of univariate or multivariate calibration strategies are revisited. - Highlights: ► Qualitative and quantitative LIBS analysis of plant materials are reviewed. ► Fresh or dried leaves, fruits, roots and pellets can be easily interrogated by LIBS. ► LIBS is a powerful tool for plant nutrition diagnosis and elemental mapping. ► Intended LIBS users will find a survey of applications in a comprehensive table.

  20. An analysis of the development and application of plant protection UAV based on advanced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan-hui; Wei, Neng; Quan, Zhi-cheng; Huang, Yu-rong

    2018-06-01

    The development and application of a number of advanced materials plant protection unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is an important part of the comprehensive production of agricultural modernization. The paper is taken as an example of Guangxi No. 1 agricultural service aviation science and Technology Co., Ltd. This paper introduces the internal and external environment of the research and development of the plant protection UAV for the advanced materials of the company. The external environment focuses on the role of the plant protection UAV on the development of the agricultural mechanization; the internal environment focuses on the advantages of the UAV in technology research, market promotion and application, which is imperative. Finally, according to the background of the whole industry, we put forward some suggestions for the developing opportunities and challenges faced by plant protection UAV, hoping to proving some ideas for operators, experts and scholars engaged in agricultural industry.

  1. 21 CFR 1308.35 - Exemption of certain cannabis plant material, and products made therefrom, that contain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemption of certain cannabis plant material, and... ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Exempt Cannabis Plant... cannabis plant material, and products made therefrom, that contain tetrahydrocannabinols. (a) Any processed...

  2. Modelling the diurnal and seasonal dynamics of soil CO2 exchange in a semiarid ecosystem with high plant-interspace heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jinnan; Wang, Ben; Jia, Xin; Feng, Wei; Zha, Tianshan; Kellomäki, Seppo; Peltola, Heli

    2018-01-01

    We used process-based modelling to investigate the roles of carbon-flux (C-flux) components and plant-interspace heterogeneities in regulating soil CO2 exchanges (FS) in a dryland ecosystem with sparse vegetation. To simulate the diurnal and seasonal dynamics of FS, the modelling considered simultaneously the CO2 production, transport and surface exchanges (e.g. biocrust photosynthesis, respiration and photodegradation). The model was parameterized and validated with multivariate data measured during the years 2013-2014 in a semiarid shrubland ecosystem in Yanchi, northwestern China. The model simulation showed that soil rewetting could enhance CO2 dissolution and delay the emission of CO2 produced from rooting zone. In addition, an ineligible fraction of respired CO2 might be removed from soil volumes under respiration chambers by lateral water flows and root uptakes. During rewetting, the lichen-crusted soil could shift temporally from net CO2 source to sink due to the activated photosynthesis of biocrust but the restricted CO2 emissions from subsoil. The presence of plant cover could decrease the root-zone CO2 production and biocrust C sequestration but increase the temperature sensitivities of these fluxes. On the other hand, the sensitivities of root-zone emissions to water content were lower under canopy, which may be due to the advection of water flows from the interspace to canopy. To conclude, the complexity and plant-interspace heterogeneities of soil C processes should be carefully considered to extrapolate findings from chamber to ecosystem scales and to predict the ecosystem responses to climate change and extreme climatic events. Our model can serve as a useful tool to simulate the soil CO2 efflux dynamics in dryland ecosystems.

  3. Nuclear materials accountancy in an industrial MOX fuel fabrication plant safeguards versus commercial aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canck, H. de; Ingels, R.; Lefevre, R.

    1991-01-01

    In a modern MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant, with a large throughput of nuclear materials, computerized real-time accountancy systems are applied. Following regulations and prescriptions imposed by the Inspectorates EURATOM-IAEA, the State and also by internal plant safety rules, the accountancy is kept in plutonium element, uranium element and 235 U for enriched uranium. In practice, Safeguards Authorities are concerned with quantities of the element (U tot , Pu tot ) and to some extent with its fissile content. Custom Authorities are for historical reasons, interested in fissile quantities (U fiss , Pu fiss ) whereas owners wish to recover the energetic value of their material (Pu equivalent). Balancing the accountancy simultaneously in all these related but not proportional units is a new problem in a MOX-plant where pool accountancy is applied. This paper indicates possible ways to solve the balancing problem created by these different units used for expressing nuclear material quantities

  4. Antifoaming materials in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) heavy water plants. Thermical stability. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfino, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    In Girlder sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants hydrogen sulfide-water systems are inherentely foaming, so the adding of antifoaming materials is of great importance. These may be of high volatility, pyrolizable or chemically unstable in plant operation conditions (water and hydrogen sulfide at 2 MPa, up to 230 deg C). About twenty commercial surfactants were studied from the point of view of their thermical stability. (Author) [es

  5. Characterization of heterogeneous SiO2 materials by scanning electron microscope and micro fluorescence XAS techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khouchaf, L.; Boinski, F.; Tuilier, M.H.; Flank, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Micro X-ray absorption near edge structure XANES and micro fluorescence experiments have been carried out using X-ray microbeam from synchrotron radiation source with high brightness to investigate the local structural evolutions of heterogeneous and natural SiO 2 submitted to alkali-silica reaction ASR process. Compared to elemental maps obtained by Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope ESEM, micro fluorescence X maps showed the diffusion of potassium cations inside the grains with higher accuracy. Si K-edge spectra show the disorder induced by the dissolution of the grain from the outside to the inside. Potassium K-edge spectra do not show significant changes around K cations. The breaking of Si-O-Si bonds and the disorder of the (SiO 4 ) n network may be affected to potassium cations

  6. Characterization of heterogeneous SiO{sub 2} materials by scanning electron microscope and micro fluorescence XAS techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khouchaf, L. [Centre de Recherche de l' Ecole des Mines deDouai, 941, rue Charles Bourseul, BP. 10838, 59508 Douai (France)]. E-mail: khouchaf@ensm-douai.fr; Boinski, F. [Centre de Recherche de l' Ecole des Mines deDouai, 941, rue Charles Bourseul, BP. 10838, 59508 Douai (France); Tuilier, M.H. [GMP Equipe de recherche: MMPF, Universite de Haute-Alsace, 61 rue Albert Camus, F-68093, Mulhouse Cedex (France); Flank, A.M. [SOLEIL and Swiss Light Source SLS CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2006-11-15

    Micro X-ray absorption near edge structure XANES and micro fluorescence experiments have been carried out using X-ray microbeam from synchrotron radiation source with high brightness to investigate the local structural evolutions of heterogeneous and natural SiO{sub 2} submitted to alkali-silica reaction ASR process. Compared to elemental maps obtained by Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope ESEM, micro fluorescence X maps showed the diffusion of potassium cations inside the grains with higher accuracy. Si K-edge spectra show the disorder induced by the dissolution of the grain from the outside to the inside. Potassium K-edge spectra do not show significant changes around K cations. The breaking of Si-O-Si bonds and the disorder of the (SiO{sub 4}) {sub n} network may be affected to potassium cations.

  7. Nondestructive assay technology and in-plant dynamic materials control: ''DYMAC''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppin, G.R.; Maraman, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced system of in-plant materials control known as DYMAC, Dynamic Materials Control, is being developed. This major safeguards R and D effort merges state-of-the-art nondestructive assay instrumentation and computer technology, with the clear objective of demonstrating a workable, cost-effective system of stringent, real time control of nuclear materials in a modern plutonium processing facility. Emphasis is placed on developing practical solutions to generic problems of materials measurement and control, so that resulting safeguards techniques and instrumentation will have widespread applicability throughout the nuclear community. (auth)

  8. Development of conventional fatigue database for structure materials of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bing

    2002-01-01

    Management system of the conventional fatigue database for structure materials of nuclear power plant (NPP) is developed. The database included the parameters of design curves, i.e., the stress-life, survival probability-stress-life, strain-life, survival probability-strain-life, stress-strain and survival probability-stress-strain curves, and corresponding information of materials and testing conditions. Two ways, by materials name or by the inter-bounds of material mechanical properties, are constructed to search the database. From the searched information it can be conveniently performed of the conventional fatigue design analysis and reliability assessment of structures

  9. Plant-inspired adaptive structures and materials for morphing and actuation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suyi; Wang, K W

    2016-12-20

    Plants exhibit a variety of reversible motions, from the slow opening of pine cones to the impulsive closing of Venus flytrap leaves. These motions are achieved without muscles and they have inspired a wide spectrum of engineered materials and structures. This review summarizes the recent developments of plant-inspired adaptive structures and materials for morphing and actuation. We begin with a brief overview of the actuation strategies and physiological features associated to these plant movements, showing that different combinations of these strategies and features can lead to motions with different deformation characteristics and response speeds. Then we offer a comprehensive survey of the plant-inspired morphing and actuation systems, including pressurized cellular structures, osmotic actuation, anisotropic hygroscopic materials, and bistable systems for rapid movements. Although these engineered systems are vastly different in terms of their size scales and intended applications, their working principles are all related to the actuation strategies and physiological features in plants. This review is to promote future cross-disciplinary studies between plant biology and engineering, which can foster new solutions for many applications such as morphing airframes, soft robotics and kinetic architectures.

  10. The adhesion characteristics of protective coating materials for the containment structure in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Kook; Shin, Jae-Chul

    2003-01-01

    Protective coating materials used in the containment structures should be durable for the designed 30 to 40 year lifetime of a nuclear power plant. At the present, these materials have not yet been developed. Therefore it is very important to keep the durability of the protective coating materials through persistent maintenance, and in order to achieve this, understanding the adhesion characteristics of the coating materials is of utmost importance. Therefore, this study attempts to find any methods for durability maintenance of these protective coating materials. To accomplish these aims, this study applied an experimental deterioration environment condition relevant to Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Main Steam Line Break (MSLB), categorized as of Design Basis Accident (DBA), onto steel liner plate specimens covered with protective coating materials. Adhesion tests were performed on these deteriorated coating materials to characterize the physical properties and through these tests, the quantitative adhesion characteristics according to the history of deterioration environment were found

  11. Towards a more consolidated approach to material data management in life assessment of power plant components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, A.; Maile, K. [MPA Stuttgart (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The presentation discusses the necessity of having a more consolidated (unified, possibly `European`) framework for all (not only pure experimental) material data needed for optimized life management and assessment of high-temperature and other components in power and process plants. After setting the main requirements for such a system, a description of efforts done in this direction at MPA Stuttgart in the area of high-temperature components in power plants is given. Furthermore, a reference to other relevant efforts elsewhere is made and an example of practical application of the proposed solution described (optimized material selection and life assessment of high-temperature piping). (orig.) 10 refs.

  12. Towards a more consolidated approach to material data management in life assessment of power plant components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, A; Maile, K [MPA Stuttgart (Germany)

    1999-12-31

    The presentation discusses the necessity of having a more consolidated (unified, possibly `European`) framework for all (not only pure experimental) material data needed for optimized life management and assessment of high-temperature and other components in power and process plants. After setting the main requirements for such a system, a description of efforts done in this direction at MPA Stuttgart in the area of high-temperature components in power plants is given. Furthermore, a reference to other relevant efforts elsewhere is made and an example of practical application of the proposed solution described (optimized material selection and life assessment of high-temperature piping). (orig.) 10 refs.

  13. Synthesis of functional materials by radiation and qualification testing of organic materials in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nho, Young Chang; Kim, Ki Yup; Kang, Phil Hyun and others; Jun, Hong Jae; Suh, Dong Hak; Lee, Young Moo; Min, Byung Kak; Bae, You Han

    2003-05-01

    The radiation crosslinking and grafting can be easily adjusted and is easily reproducible by controlling the radiation dose. These studies aim to develop new biomaterials such as covering for burns and wound, and controlled release of drug. A radiation technology was used to develop PTC materials useful in devices that limit electric fault currents. Radiation-curing of fiber-matrix composites is a promising application. There are a number of advantages to radiation curing of composites, compared with conventional thermal processing. Radiation curing at ambient temperature allows tighter control of part dimensions, and elimination of internal stresses which otherwise occur on cooling and which reduce material strength. These studies involved radiation curing of epoxy resins with various fibers and filler for structural application for aerospace and sport goods. The chain scission is the basis of other radiation treatments aimed at enhancing processing characteristics of polymers. These studies aim to make PTFE powder from PTFE scrap using the radiation degradation which allows incorporation of the material into coatings, inks etc. Low density polyethylene, crosslinked polyethylene, ethylene propylene rubber, and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber as cable insulating, seathing and sealing materials were irradiated for the accelerated ageing tests. Degradation was investigated by measuring dielectric analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and dynamic mechanical analysis. Dielectric tanδ, storage modulus and loss modulus were increased with irradiation doses. However, decomposition temperature decreased with irradiation doses

  14. Analysis of difficulties accounting and evaluating nuclear material of PWR fuel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Min; Jue Ji; Liu Tianshu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nuclear materials accountancy must be developed for nuclear facilities, which is required by regulatory in China. Currently, there are some unresolved problems for nuclear materials accountancy of bulk nuclear facilities. Purpose: The retention values and measurement errors are analyzed in nuclear materials accountancy of Power Water Reactor (PWR) fuel plant to meet the regulatory requirements. Methods: On the basis of nuclear material accounting and evaluation data of PWR fuel plant, a deep analysis research including ratio among random error variance, long-term systematic error variance, short-term systematic error variance and total error involving Material Unaccounted For (MUF) evaluation is developed by the retention value measure in equipment and pipeline. Results: In the equipment pipeline, the holdup estimation error and its total proportion are not more than 5% and 1.5%, respectively. And the holdup estimation can be regraded as a constant in the PWR nuclear material accountancy. Random error variance, long-term systematic error variance, short-term systematic error variance of overall measurement, and analytical and sampling methods are also obtained. A valuable reference is provided for nuclear material accountancy. Conclusion: In nuclear material accountancy, the retention value can be considered as a constant. The long-term systematic error is a main factor in all errors, especially in overall measurement error and sampling error: The long-term systematic errors of overall measurement and sampling are considered important in the PWR nuclear material accountancy. The proposals and measures are applied to the nuclear materials accountancy of PWR fuel plant, and the capacity of nuclear materials accountancy is improved. (authors)

  15. Proposal for guidelines for the physical protection of nuclear materials, plants and transports in Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    The guidelines are based on recommendations in the IAEA's ''Physical Protection of Nuclear Material,'' INFCIRC/225/rev.1. In accordance with practice in other countries, the guidelines give more detailed requirements for the protection of reactor plants than those given in the IAEA's present recommendations, which put more emphasis on the protection of nuclear materials. The measures to be taken for nuclear plants, or nuclear transports, are proposed made to fit the potential risk that the more closely defined actions imply. It is suggested that the more detailed rules for the scope of the protection of plants or materials should be laid down by the National Agency on the basis of recommendations made by the Inspectorate of Nuclear Installations, which in turn are based on the safety documentation of the plant/material owners. It is further proposed that the National Agency, again on a recommendation from the Inspectorate, should lay down more detailed guidelines for the reporting of changes in stocks or transports of nuclear materials. (author)

  16. Reduced activation structural materials for fusion power plants - The European Union program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, B. van der; Le Marois, G.; Moeslang, A.; Victoria, M.

    2003-01-01

    The competition of fusion power plants with the renewable energy sources in the second half of the 21st century requires structural materials operating at high temperatures, and sufficient radiation resistance to ensure high plant efficiency and availability. The reduced activation materials development in the EU counts several steps regarding the radiation damage resistance: 75 dpa for DEMO and 150 dpa and beyond for power plants. The maximum operating temperature development line ranges from the present day from the present day feasible 600 K up to 1300- K in advanced power plants. The reduced activation steel, RAS, forms the reference for the development efforts. EUROFER has been manufactured in the EU on industrial scale with specified purity and mechanical properties up to 825 K. The oxide dispersion strengthened , ODS, variety of RAS should reach the 925 K operation limit. The EU has selected silicon carbide ceramic composite as the primary high temperature, 1300 K, goal. On a small scale the potential of tungsten alloys for higher temperatures is investigated. The present test environments for radiation resistance are insufficient to provide data for DEMO. Hence the support of the EU for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation facility. The computational modelling is expected to guide the materials development and the design of near plasma components. The EU co-operates closely with Japan, the RF and US in IEA and IAEA co-ordinated agreements, which are highly beneficial for the fusion structural materials development. (author)

  17. Heterogeneous Organo-Catalysis: Sustainable Pathways to Furanics from Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucose and fructose are among the most abundant plant-derived materials1 and have been converted into useful building units often used in the drug discovery and polymer architecture.2 Unfortunately, most of these conversions require mineral acids and complex heterogeneous cataly...

  18. Project plan remove special nuclear material from PFP project plutonium finishing plant; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BARTLETT, W.D.

    1999-01-01

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Remove Special Nuclear Material (SNM) Materials. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617,Rev. 0. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for PFP Remove SNM Materials project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Remove SNM Materials project. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process

  19. Project plan remove special nuclear material from PFP project plutonium finishing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BARTLETT, W.D.

    1999-01-01

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Remove Special Nuclear Material (SNM) Materials. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for PFP Remove SNM Materials project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Remove SNM Materials project. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process

  20. Radiation resistance of cable insulation and jacket materials for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Minoru; Kon, Shuji; Nishikawa, Ichiro

    1978-01-01

    The cables for use in nuclear power plants are required to satisfy the specific environmental resistance and excellent flame resistance as stipulated in IEEE Std. 383. The materials to be used to cables intended for this specific purpose of use must therefore be strictly tested so as to evaluate their flame resistance in addition to compliance with various environmental requirements, such as heat resistance, water-vapor resistance, and radiation resistance. This paper describes general information on radiation resistance and deterioration of various high-molecular materials, suggests the direction of efforts to be made to improve their properties including flame resistance of various rubber and plastic materials for cables to be used in nuclear power plants, and indicates the performance characteristics of such materials. (author)

  1. Coordinated safeguards for materials management in a fuel reprocessing plant. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Kern, E.A.; Schelonka, E.P.; Shipley, J.P.; Smith, D.B.; Augustson, R.H.; Barnes, J.W.

    1977-09-01

    A materials management system is described for safeguarding special nuclear materials in a fuel-reprocessing plant. Recently developed nondestructive-analysis techniques and process-monitoring devices are combined with conventional chemical analyses and process-control instrumentation for improved materials accounting data. Unit-process accounting based on dynamic material balances permits localization of diversion in time and space, and the application of advanced statistical methods supported by decision-analysis theory ensures optimum use of accounting information for detecting diversion. This coordinated safeguards system provides maximum effectiveness consistent with modest cost and minimum process interference. Modeling and simulation techniques are used to evaluate the sensitivity of the system to single and multiple thefts and to compare various safeguards options. The study identifies design criteria that would improve the safeguardability of future plants

  2. Establishment growth and bud bank formation in Epilobium angustifolium: the effects of nutrient availability, plant injury and environmental heterogeneity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Jitka; Pokorná, Adéla; Klimeš, Leoš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 2 (2009), s. 195-201 ISSN 1916-2790 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/06/0723 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : potential bud bank * adventitious root-sprouting * juvenile plant Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.904, year: 2009

  3. Can epigenetic control explain pronounced within plant heterogeneity of meiosis in a translocation trisome of Secale L.?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sybenga, J.

    2012-01-01

    Meiotic metaphase I configuration frequencies were determined in different tillers of genetically related plants of rye (Secale cereale L.) heterozygous for reciprocal translocation T248W (between chromosome arms 1RS and 6RS) and with an additional (telocentric) arm 1RS. Seventeen different

  4. Raccoon Use of Den Trees and Plant Associations in Western Mesophytic Forests: Tree Attributes and Availability or Landscape Heterogeneity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston P. Smith; Keith M. Endres

    2012-01-01

    We monitored 15 radio-collared raccoons (Procyon lotor) on Davies Island in March 1987 - May 1988 to determine the extent to which individual tree attributes or spatial configuration of plant associations (habitat types) across the land-scape influenced den use. Of 1091 verified den sites, 428 were in tree cavities. Raccoon occurrence among 4 cover...

  5. Why are most aquatic plants widely distributed? Dispersal, clonal growth and small-scale heterogeneity in a stressful environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santamaria, L.

    2002-01-01

    Non-marine aquatic vascular plants generally show broad distributional ranges. Climatic factors seem to have limited effects on their distributions, besides the determination of major disjunctions (tropical-temperate-subarctic). Dispersal should have been frequent enough to assure the quick

  6. Plant growth response in experimental soilless mixes prepared from coal combustion products and organic waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, S.; Watson, M.; Dick, W.A. [Ohio State University, Wooster, OH (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Large quantities of organic materials such as animal manures, yard trimmings, and biosolids are produced each year. Beneficial use options for them are often limited, and composting has been proposed as a way to better manage these organic materials. Similarly, burning of coal created 125 million tons of coal combustion products (CCP) in the United States in 2006. An estimated 53 million tons of CCP were reused, whereas the remainder was deposited in landfills. By combining CCP and composted organic materials (COM), we were able to create soilless plant growth mixes with physicochemical conditions that can support excellent plant growth. An additional benefit is the conservation of natural raw materials, such as peat, which is generally used for making soilless mixes. Experimental mixes were formulated by combining CCP and COM at ratios ranging from 2:8 to 8:2 (vol/vol), respectively. Water content at saturation for the created mixes was 63% to 72%, whereas for the commercial control, it was 77%. pH values for the best performing mixes ranged between 5.9 and 6.8. Electrical conductivity and concentrations of required plant nutrient were also within plant growth recommendations for container media. Significantly (P < 0.0001) higher plant biomass growth (7%-130%) was observed in the experimental mixes compared with a commercial mix. No additional fertilizers were provided during the experiment, and reduced fertilization costs can thus accrue as an added benefit to the grower. In summary, combining CCP and COM, derived from source materials often viewed as wastes, can create highly productive plant growth mixes.

  7. Material and welding development of anchor plates to build nuclear power plant by blue arc process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibelli, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    To build nuclear power plants, anchor plates are plenty used. These anchor plates serve as a system with the purpose to fix many heavy components or a simple stair. Considering the necessity of element fabrication fastly, with reasonable economy and quality, the arc study welding process (blue arc) was used. A special development of the material concept as well as a welding procedure and a subsuppliers qualification of the raw material was necessary. (Author) [pt

  8. Review of scientific Research results in identification of plant raw materials in food products

    OpenAIRE

    GOLUBTSOVA YU. V.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the science-based capabilities have been generated to develop and test various identification methods of food products and reveal adulteration using advanced technique and processes. This article reviews researches and developments to identify the plant raw materials in food products based on morphological, anatomic, physical and chemical test methods and the latest DNA-technologies. Review of physical, chemical, anatomic and morphological test methods to identify raw materials bot...

  9. Statistical analysis of nuclear material weighing systems at the Oak Ridge - Y-12 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, A.H.

    1980-04-01

    The variation in weight measurements on the electronic scales purchased for the Dynamic Special Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability System (DYMCAS) has been characterized and estimated to be more than is acceptable when using the current weighing methods. New weighing procedures have been developed which substantially reduce this variation and bring the weight errors within the Y-12 Plant Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability Department's desired +- 2-g accuracy

  10. Low activation material design methodology for reduction of radio-active wastes of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, A.; Satou, M.; Nogami, S.; Kakinuma, N.; Kinno, M.; Hayashi, K.

    2007-01-01

    Most of the concrete shielding walls and pipes around a reactor pressure vessel of a light water reactor become low level radioactive waste at decommission phase because they contain radioactive nuclides by thermal-neutron irradiation during its operation. The radioactivity of some low level radioactive wastes is close to the clearance level. It is very desirable in terms of life cycle cost reduction that the radioactivity of those low level radioactive wastes is decreased below clearance level. In case of light water reactors, however, methodology of low activation design of a nuclear plant has not been established yet because the reactor is a large-scale facility and has various structural materials. The Objectives of this work are to develop low activation material design methodology and material fabrication for reduction of radio-active wastes of nuclear power plant such as reinforced concrete. To realize fabrication of reduced radioactive concrete, it is necessary to develop (1) the database of the chemical composition of raw materials to select low activation materials, (2) the tool for calculation of the neutron flux and the spectrum distribution of nuclear plants to evaluate radioactivity of reactor components, (3) optimization of material process conditions to produce the low activation cement and the low activation steels. Results of the data base development, calculation tools and trial production of low activation cements will be presented. (authors)

  11. Increase of efficiency of plant materials heat treatment in tubular reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Golubkovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In agriculture products of pyrolysis of plant materials in the form of waste of the main production can be applied as a source of heat and electric power. Besides, their use prevents ecological pollution of the soil and the atmosphere. Pyrolysis plants can be used for work with tubular reactors anywhere. Due to them farmers can dry grain, using waste heat of diesel generators, heatgenerators, boiler plants and receiving thus gaseous products, liquid and firm fractions. A technology based on cyclic and continuous plant mass movement by a piston in a pipe from a loading site to a place of unloading of a firm phase consistently through cameras of drying, pyrolysis, condensation of gaseous products. Exhaust furnace gases with a temperature up to 600 degrees Celsius are given countercurrent material movement from a power equipment. The gaseous, liquid and firm products from the pyrolysis camera are used for heat and electric power generation. Calculation of parameters of subdrying and pyrolysis cameras is necessary for effective and steady operation of the tubular reactor. The authors determined the speed of raw materials movement, and also duration of drying and pyrolysis in working chambers. An analysis of a simplified mathematical model of process was confirmed with results of experiments. Models of heat treatment of wet plant materials in tubular reactors are worked out on a basis of equality of speeds of material movement in the reactor and distribution of a temperature front in material on radius. The authors defined estimated characteristic for determination of tubular reactor productivity and size of heat, required for drying and pyrolysis.

  12. Treatment of heterogeneous mixed wastes: Enzyme degradation of cellulosic materials contaminated with hazardous organics and toxic and radioactive metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderberg, L.A.; Foreman, T.M.; Attrep, M. Jr.; Brainard, J.R.; Sauer, N.

    1999-01-01

    The redirection and downsizing of the US Department of Energy's nuclear weapons complex requires that many facilities be decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D). At Los Alamos National Laboratory, much of the low-level radioactive, mixed, and hazardous/chemical waste volume handled by waste management operations was produced by D and D and environmental restoration activities. A combination of technologies--air stripping and biodegradation of volatile organics, enzymatic digestion of cellulosics, and metal ion extraction--was effective in treating a radiologically contaminated heterogeneous paint-stripping waste. Treatment of VOCs using a modified bioreactor avoided radioactive contamination of byproduct biomass and inhibition of biodegradation by toxic metal ions in the waste. Cellulase digestion of bulk cellulose minimized the final solid waste volume by 80%. Moreover, the residue passed TCLP for RCRA metals. Hazardous metals and radioactivity in byproduct sugar solutions were removed using polymer filtration, which employs a combination of water-soluble chelating polymers and ultrafiltration to separate and concentrate metal contaminants. Polymer filtration was used to concentrate RCRA metals and radioactivity into <5% of the original wastewater volume. Permeate solutions had no detectable radioactivity and were below RCRA-allowable discharge limits for Pb and Cr

  13. Effects of transverse electric field and heterogeneity of a poorly electrically conducting fluid saturated nanoporous zeolites acquiring smart material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudraiah, N.; Ranganna, G.; Shilpa, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explain a Mathematical Model involving Darcy linear drag, Forchheimer quadratic drag, horizontal density gradient and the variation of electrical conductivity due to organic substances dissolved in a heterogeneous Boussinesq poorly conducting couple stress fluid flow (PCPCSFF) through Nano Porous Zeolites regarded as densely packed porous media. Initially, the flow is at rest and set in motion due to initial piecewise horizontal concentration gradient. Analytical solutions, for electric potential using the Maxwell field equations and for velocity and density using nonlinear Darcy – Forchheimer equation in the presence of couple stress and electric force are obtained using the method of time series evolution. The analytical solutions for streamlines and density are computed for different values of time, t, for a particular value of electric number W 1 and couple stress parameter β and the results are depicted graphically in figures 1 and 2. From these figures we found that the streamlines are closer in the region of x 0 and the density profiles are concentrated in the lower region and develop curvature in the presence of electric field and couple stress parameter. The physical reason for the nature of streamlines and density profiles are given in the last section and some important conclusions are drawn. (author)

  14. Constructing wetlands: measuring and modeling feedbacks of oxidation processes between plants and clay-rich material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaltink, Rémon; Dekker, Stefan C.; Griffioen, Jasper; Wassen, Martin J.

    2016-04-01

    Interest is growing in using soft sediment as a building material in eco-engineering projects. Wetland construction in the Dutch lake Markermeer is an example: here the option of dredging some of the clay-rich lake-bed sediment and using it to construct 10.000 ha of wetland will soon go under construction. Natural processes will be utilized during and after construction to accelerate ecosystem development. Knowing that plants can eco-engineer their environment via positive or negative biogeochemical plant-soil feedbacks, we conducted a six-month greenhouse experiment to identify the key biogeochemical processes in the mud when Phragmites australis is used as an eco-engineering species. We applied inverse biogeochemical modeling to link observed changes in pore water composition to biogeochemical processes. Two months after transplantation we observed reduced plant growth and shriveling as well as yellowing of foliage. The N:P ratios of plant tissue were low and were affected not by hampered uptake of N but by enhanced uptake of P. Plant analyses revealed high Fe concentrations in the leaves and roots. Sulfate concentrations rose drastically in our experiment due to pyrite oxidation; as reduction of sulfate will decouple Fe-P in reducing conditions, we argue that plant-induced iron toxicity hampered plant growth, forming a negative feedback loop, while simultaneously there was a positive feedback loop, as iron toxicity promotes P mobilization as a result of reduced conditions through root death, thereby stimulating plant growth and regeneration. Given these two feedback mechanisms, we propose that when building wetlands from these mud deposits Fe-tolerant species are used rather than species that thrive in N-limited conditions. The results presented in this study demonstrate the importance of studying the biogeochemical properties of the building material and the feedback mechanisms between plant and soil prior to finalizing the design of the eco-engineering project.

  15. MULCHING MATERIALS OF PLANT ORIGIN AT POTATO GROWING IN ASTRAKHAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Bairambekov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of phytogenous mulching materials based on local processed raw materials at potato cultivation in irrigated conditions of the Astrakhan region has allowed optimization of temperature and moisture regime of the soil. It was found that in case of the spring term of planting, the mulching has increased the soil temperature up to 0,6-0,9°C on April-May at a depth of 0,10 m as compared to the control. During heat period, mulching materials have decreased the soil temperature. Antecedent soil water under mulching materials in the phase of tubers formation was on 1,15-1,19 times higher than in the control variant without mulching. The most effective materials for the soils of different grain-size distribution were determined: for the heavy-loamy soil the best mulching material was straw, for the sandy loam soil the more efficient mulching was saw-dust.

  16. Economics of production of biogas from specifically-grown plant material. [New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, D. J.

    1977-10-15

    The production of biogas from plant materials is technologically very simple, and is the only process currently available (other than direct burning) for conversion of cellulose materials into energy or fuels that is feasible at a farm-scale, or even a home-scale, as well as a large industrial plant scale. For this reason the economics of biogas production can be considered at the farm-scale as well as the industrial scale. An accurate assessment of the economics at the farm-scale is possible, because commercially produced units are now available in New Zealand and in operation. However, although large-scale plants have been proposed and costed in the USA for the conversion of the cellulose component of garbage into biogas, operational data are not yet available, and the costing has not been applied to the use of specifically-grown plant material. Nevertheless, the large-scale plants envisaged use a large number of digesters each of 100,000 gallons capacity and can thus be regarded as a combination of farm-size units, although with some economics in digester size, number of pumps required, etc. For these reasons, this review of the economics of biogas production is based on the operation of commercial 20,000 gallon digesters available in NZ for farm-scale use. Factors governing the economics of farm-scale and industrial-scale production of biogas will be discussed in section 6.

  17. Materials characterization capabilities at DOE Nuclear Weapons Laboratories and Production Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyper, J.W.

    1984-06-01

    The materials characterization and analytical chemistry capabilities at the 11 DOE Nuclear Weapons Laboratories or Production Plants have been surveyed and compared. In general, all laboratories have similar capabilities and equipment. Facilities or capabilities that are unique or that exist at only a few laboratories are described in detail

  18. Active materials for adaptive architectural envelopes based on plant adaptation principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlen Lopez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors present research into adaptive architectural envelopes that adapt to environmental changes using active materials, as a result of application of biomimetic principles from plants to architecture. Buildings use large amounts of energy in order to maintain their internal comfort, because conventional buildings are designed to provide a static design solution. Most of the current solutions for facades are not designed for optimum adaptation to contextual issues and needs, while biological solutions to adaptation are often complex, multi-functional and highly responsive. We focus on plant adaptations to the environment, as, due to their immobility, they have developed special means of protection against weather changing conditions. Furthermore, recent developments in new technologies are allowing the possibility to transfer these plant adaptation strategies to technical implementation. These technologies include: multi-material 3D printing, advances in materials science and new capabilities in simulation software. Unlike traditional mechanical activation used for dynamic systems in kinetic facades, adaptive architectural envelopes require no complex electronics, sensors, or actuators. The paper proposes a research of the relationship that can be developed between active materials and environmental issues in order to propose innovative and low-tech design strategies to achieve living envelopes according to plant adaptation principles.  

  19. A useful single-solution polychrome stain for plant material...Brook Cyte-Chrome I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley L Krugman; Julia F. Littlefield

    1968-01-01

    Fresh and chemically fixed sectioned plant material can be quickly stained by applying a Brook Cyte Chrome I polychrome stain. Staining time averaged only about 10 minutes. And exact timing of staining and de-staining is not as critical as with most of the commonly used stains. The overall quality is comparable to that of the traditional stains.

  20. A strategy for maximizing native plant material diversity for ecological restoration, germplasm conservation and genecology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta Youtie; Nancy Shaw; Matt Fisk; Scott Jensen

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important steps in planning a restoration project is careful selection of ecologically adapted native plant material. As species-specific seed zone maps are not available for most species in the Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Wyoming big sagebrush) ecoregion in the Great Basin, USA, we are employing a provisional seed zone map based on annual...

  1. A model Apparatus for Isolation of Volatile Oils from Various Plant Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi T. AI-Kaisey

    2018-02-01

    The present paper givas a detailed description of apparatus which were sutable for isola.tion the lighter and tile heavier u.('-m water volatile oils fronl differenet plant materials. Meanwhile tbe purity of tile concentrates were ex lrined by g-aS liquid chromato graphy( GLe.

  2. Special conditions for the application of coating materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boetius, I.

    1980-01-01

    Proceeding from the special conditions for the application of coating materials in nuclear power plants the following factors influencing the decontamination of surface coatings are discussed from the point of view of radiation protection: abrasion resistance, waterproofness, mechanical and adhesion strength, and permeability. For practical use it is recommended to test the surface tightness of coatings with radiation-exposed specimens

  3. Effect of canker size on availability of cassava planting materials in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta L.) production is highly limited by cassava anthracnose disease (CAD) which causes significant losses in planting materials. An experiment was laid out at Ihiagwa, Owern in Nigeria with eighteen treatments replicated three times. Disease severity was scored on a scale of 1-5, and disease ...

  4. 1064nm FT-Raman spectroscopy for investigations of plant cell walls and other biomass materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy with its various special techniques and methods has been applied to study plant biomass for about 30 years. Such investigations have been performed at both macro- and micro-levels. However, with the availability of the Near Infrared (NIR) (1064 nm) Fourier Transform (FT)-Raman instruments where, in most materials, successful fluorescence suppression...

  5. The potential of novel native plant materials for the restoration of novel ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Jones

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Extensive ecological change has been sustained by many dryland ecosystems throughout the world, resulting in conversion to so-called novel ecosystems. It is within such ecological contexts that native plant materials destined for ecological applications must be able to function. In the Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis [Beetle & A.M. Young] S.L. Welsh ecosystems of the Intermountain West, for example, novel ecosystem structure and functioning are pervasive. Invasive species, particularly annual grasses, fuel repeated wildfires that drive previously stable ecosystem states across thresholds to less desirable states that are highly recalcitrant to restoration efforts. Structural changes include reductions of native flora, damage to biological soil crusts, and alterations to soil microbiota. Functional changes include altered hydrologic and nutrient cycling, leading to permanent losses of soil organic matter and nitrogen that favor the invaders. We argue that there is an important place in restoration for plant materials that are novel and/or non-local that have been developed to be more effective in the novel ecosystems for which they are intended, thus qualifying them as “ecologically appropriate.” Such plant materials may be considered as an alternative to natural/local “genetically appropriate” plant materials, which are sometimes deemed best adapted due to vetting by historical evolutionary processes.

  6. Different effects of surface heterogeneous atoms of porous and non-porous carbonaceous materials on adsorption of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane in aqueous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weifeng; Ni, Jinzhi

    2017-05-01

    The surface heterogeneous atoms of carbonaceous materials (CMs) play an important role in adsorption of organic pollutants. However, little is known about the surface heterogeneous atoms of CMs might generate different effect on adsorption of hydrophobic organic compounds by porous carbonaceous materials - activated carbons (ACs) and non-porous carbonaceous materials (NPCMs). In this study, we observed that the surface oxygen and nitrogen atoms could decrease the adsorption affinity of both ACs and NPCMs for 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TeCA), but the degree of decreasing effects were very different. The increasing content of surface oxygen and nitrogen ([O + N]) caused a sharper decrease in adsorption affinity of ACs (slope of lg (k d /SA) vs [O + N]: -0.098∼-0.16) than that of NPCMs (slope of lg (k d /SA) vs [O + N]: -0.025∼-0.059) for TeCA. It was due to the water cluster formed by the surface hydrophilic atoms that could block the micropores and generate massive invalid adsorption sites in the micropores of ACs, while the water cluster only occupied the surface adsorption sites of NPCMs. Furthermore, with the increasing concentration of dissolved TeCA, the effect of surface area on adsorption affinity of NPCMs for TeCA kept constant while the effect of [O + N] decreased due to the competitive adsorption between water molecule and TeCA on the surface of NPCMs, meanwhile, both the effects of micropore volume and [O + N] on adsorption affinity of ACs for TeCA were decreased due to the mechanism of micropore volume filling. These findings are valuable for providing a deep insight into the adsorption mechanisms of CMs for TeCA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Study on Salt Attack Protection of Structural and Finishing Materials in Power Plant Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, W B; Kweon, K J; Suh, Y P; Nah, H S; Lee, K J; Park, D S; Jo, Y K [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    This is a final report written by both KEPRI and KICT as a co-operative research titled {sup A} study on Salt Protection of Structural and Finishings in Power Plant Structures{sup .} This study presented the methods to prevent the chloride-induced corrosion of power plant structures through collection and analysis of research datum relating to design, construction and maintenance for the prevention of structural and finishing materials, thru material performance tests for anti-corrosion under many kinds of chloride-induced corrosion environments. As a result, this study proposed the guidelines for design, construction and maintenance of power plant structures due to chloride-induced corrosion. (author). 257 refs., 111 figs., 86 tabs.

  8. A Study on Salt Attack Protection of Structural and Finishing Materials in Power Plant Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, W.B.; Kweon, K.J.; Suh, Y.P.; Nah, H.S.; Lee, K.J.; Park, D.S.; Jo, Y.K. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This is a final report written by both KEPRI and KICT as a co-operative research titled {sup A} study on Salt Protection of Structural and Finishings in Power Plant Structures{sup .} This study presented the methods to prevent the chloride-induced corrosion of power plant structures through collection and analysis of research datum relating to design, construction and maintenance for the prevention of structural and finishing materials, thru material performance tests for anti-corrosion under many kinds of chloride-induced corrosion environments. As a result, this study proposed the guidelines for design, construction and maintenance of power plant structures due to chloride-induced corrosion. (author). 257 refs., 111 figs., 86 tabs.

  9. The effects of dune slopes and material heterogeneity on the thermal behavior of dune fields in Mars' Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, P. M.; Putzig, N. E.; Van Kooten, S.; Fenton, L. K.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the effects of slopes on the thermal properties of three dune fields in Mars' southern hemisphere. Although slope has important thermal effects, it is not the main driver of observed apparent thermal inertia (ATI) for these dunes. Comparing the ATI seasonal behavior as derived from Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data with that modeled for compositional heterogeneities, we found that TES results correlate best with models of duricrust overlying and/or horizontally mixing with fines. We measured slopes and aspects in digital terrain models created from High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images of dunes within Proctor, Kaiser, and Wirtz craters. Using the MARSTHERM web toolset, we incorporated the slopes and aspects together with TES albedo, TES thermal inertia, surface pressure, and TES dust opacity, into models of seasonal ATI. Models that incorporate sub-pixel slopes show seasonal day and night ATI values that differ from the TES results by 0-300 J m-2 K-1 s-½. In addition, the models' day-night differences are opposite in sign from those of the TES results, indicating that factors other than slope are involved. We therefore compared the TES data to model results for a broad range of horizontally mixed and two-layered surfaces to seek other possible controls on the observed data, finding that a surface layer of higher thermal inertia is a likely contributor. However, it is clear from this study that the overall composition and morphology of the dune fields are more complex than currently available models allow. Future work will combine slopes with other model parameters such as multi-layered surfaces and lateral changes in layer thickness. Coupling these improvements with broader seasonal coverage from the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) at more thermally favorable times of day would allow more accurate characterization of dune thermal behavior.

  10. Pulsed laser deposited heterogeneous mixture of Li2Se-Sb2Se3 nanocomposite as a new storage lithium material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Le; Chen Jie; Fu Zhengwen

    2010-01-01

    Li 2 Se-Sb 2 Se 3 nanocomposites with a highly heterogeneous mixture have been fabricated by reactive pulsed laser deposition method. The electrochemical properties of the as-deposited Li 2 Se-Sb 2 Se 3 thin film during the first charging and discharging have been investigated by the galvanostatic cycling and cyclic voltammetry measurements for the first time. By using ex situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) measurements, the decomposition of Li 2 Se driven by Sb 2 Se 3 under the electrochemical potential is revealed. In the first cycle, the oxidation peaks at 2.5 V and 3.2 V and the reduction peaks at 2.0 V can be attributed to the decomposition and formation of Li 2 Se with the conversion reaction of Sb 2 Se 3 into Sb 2 Se 5 . Our findings demonstrate that nanocomposite Li 2 Se-Sb 2 Se 3 can possess very high electrochemical activity. These results present a special case of solid-state heterogeneous electrochemistry with both nanostructured binary materials.

  11. Ultrastructural changes of cell walls under intense mechanical treatment of selective plant raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, Aleksey L.; Ryabchikova, E.I.; Korolev, K.G.; Lomovsky, O.I.

    2012-01-01

    Structural changes of cell walls under intense mechanical treatment of corn straw and oil-palm fibers were studied by electron and light microscopy. Differences in the character of destruction of plant biomass were revealed, and the dependence of destruction mechanisms on the structure of cell walls and lignin content was demonstrated. We suggest that the high reactivity of the particles of corn straw (about 18% of lignin) after intense mechanical treatment is related to disordering of cell walls and an increase of the surface area, while in the case of oil palm (10% of lignin) the major contribution into an increase in the reactivity is made by an increase of surface area. -- Highlights: ► Structure of cell walls determines the processes of plant materials' destruction. ► Ultrastructure of highly lignified materials strongly disordering by mechanical action. ► Ultrastructure of low-lignified materials is not disordering by mechanical action.

  12. The effect of morphology and surface composition on radiation resistance of heterogeneous material CdS-PbS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyar, I. V., E-mail: imalyar@yandex.ru; Stetsyura, S. V., E-mail: stetsyurasv@info.sgu.ru [Chernyshevsky Saratov State University (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    As a result of a complex study of the heterophase photosensitive material CdS-PbS by the methods of scanning electron microscopy and Auger spectrometry, it has been found that the radiation resistance of this material depends on the morphology and phase composition at its surface. It is shown that, as the temperature of annealing is increased, aggregations with predominant content of PbS grow; simultaneously, the composition of these aggregations varies as a consequence of the reaction of substitution of sulfur atoms with oxygen atoms. The latter of the aforementioned processes brings about a decrease in the radiation resistance of the heterophase photosensitive material CdS-PbS, which is accounted for by a decrease in the gettering due to appearance of an intermediate oxidized layer between PbS and CdS. An increase in the sizes and number of spherical aggregations at the surface, which consist of crystallites with predominant content of PbS, brings about an increase in the radiation resistance.

  13. Multi-scale modeling of the thermo-hydro- mechanical behaviour of heterogeneous materials. Application to cement-based materials under severe loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grondin, Frederic Alain

    2005-01-01

    The work of modeling presented here relates to the study of the thermo-hydro- mechanical behaviour of porous materials based on hydraulic binder such as concrete, High Performance Concrete or more generally cement-based materials. This work is based on the exploitation of the Digital Concrete model, of the finite element code Symphonie developed in the Scientific and Technical Centre for Building (CSTB), in coupling with the homogenization methods to obtain macroscopic behaviour laws drawn from the Micro-Macro relations. Scales of investigation, macroscopic and microscopic, has been exploited by simulation in order to allow the comprehension fine of the behaviour of cement-based materials according to thermal, hydrous and mechanical loads. It appears necessary to take into account various scales of modeling. In order to study the behaviour of the structure, we are brought to reduce the scale of investigation to study the material more particularly. The research tasks presented suggest a new approach for the identification of the multi-physic behaviour of materials by simulation. In complement of the purely experimental approach, based on observations on the sample with measurements of the apparent parameters on the macroscopic scale, this new approach allows to obtain the fine analysis of elementary mechanisms in acting within the material. These elementary mechanisms are at the origin of the evolution of the macroscopic parameters measured in experimental tests. In this work, coefficients of the thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour law of porous materials and the equivalent hydraulic conductivity were obtained by a multi-scales approach. Applications has been carried out on the study of the damaged behaviour of cement-based materials, in the objective to determine the elasticity tensor and the permeability tensor of a High Performance Concrete at high temperatures under a mechanical load. Also, the study of the strain evolution of cement-based materials at low

  14. Closed vessel miniaturized microwave assisted chelating extraction for determination of trace metals in plant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Sezin; Duering, Rolf-Alexander

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, the use of closed vessel microwave assisted extraction (MAE) for plant samples has shown increasing research interest which will probably substitute conventional procedures in the future due to their general disadvantages including consumption of time and solvents. The objective of this study was to demonstrate an innovative miniaturized closed vessel microwave assisted extraction (µMAE) method under the use of EDTA (µMAE-EDTA) to determine metal contents (Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) in plant samples (Lolio-Cynosuretum) by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Validation of the method was done by comparison of the results with another miniaturized closed vessel microwave HNO3 method (µMAE-H) and with two other macro scale MAE procedures (MAE-H and MAE-EDTA) which were applied by using a mixture of nitric acid (HNO3) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (MAE-H) and EDTA (MAE-EDTA), respectively. The already established MAE-H method is taken into consideration as a reference validation MAE method for plant material. A conventional plant extraction (CE) method, based on dry ashing and dissolving of the plant material in HNO3, was used as a confidence comparative method. Certified plant reference materials (CRMs) were used for comparison of recovery rates from different extraction protocols. This allowed the validation of the applicability of the µMAE-EDTA procedure. For 36 real plant samples with triplicates each, µMAE-EDTA showed the same extraction yields as the MAE-H in the determination of Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn contents in plant samples. Analytical parameters in µMAE-EDTA should be further investigated and adapted for other metals of interest. By the reduction and elimination of the use of hazardous chemicals in environmental analysis and thus allowing a better understanding of metal distribution and accumulation process in plants and also the metal transfer from soil to plants and into the food chain, µ

  15. Compatibility of Space Nuclear Power Plant Materials in an Inert He/Xe Working Gas Containing Reactive Impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MM Hall

    2006-01-01

    A major materials selection and qualification issue identified in the Space Materials Plan is the potential for creating materials compatibility problems by combining dissimilar reactor core, Brayton Unit and other power conversion plant materials in a recirculating, inert He/Xe gas loop containing reactive impurity gases. Reported here are results of equilibrium thermochemical analyses that address the compatibility of space nuclear power plant (SNPP) materials in high temperature impure He gas environments. These studies provide early information regarding the constraints that exist for SNPP materials selection and provide guidance for establishing test objectives and environments for SNPP materials qualification testing

  16. The modification of glassy carbon and gold electrodes with aryl diazonium salt: The impact of the electrode materials on the rate of heterogeneous electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guozhen; Liu Jingquan; Boecking, Till; Eggers, Paul K.; Gooding, J. Justin

    2005-01-01

    The heterogeneous electron-transfer properties of ferrocenemethylamine coupled to a series of mixed 4-carboxyphenyl/phenyl monolayers on glassy carbon (GC) and gold electrodes were investigated, by cyclic voltammetry, in aqueous buffer solutions. The electrodes were derivatized in a step-wise process. Electrochemical reduction of mixtures of 4-carboxyphenyl and phenyl diazonium salts on the electrode surfaces yielded stable monolayers. The introduction of carboxylic acid moieties onto the surfaces was verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Subsequently the 4-carboxyphenyl moieties were activated using water-soluble carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide and reacted with ferrocenemethylamine. The rate constants of electron transfer through the monolayer systems were determined from cyclic voltammograms using the Marcus theory for electron transfer and were found to be an order of magnitude higher for the ferrocene-modified monolayer systems on gold than those on GC electrodes. The results suggest the electrode material has an important influence on the rate of electron transfer

  17. Aging predictions in nuclear power plants: Crosslinked polyolefin and EPR cable insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.

    1991-06-01

    In two earlier reports, we derived a time-temperature-dose rate superposition methodology, which, when applicable, can be used to predict cable degradation versus dose rate, temperature and exposure time. This methodology results in long-term predictive capabilities at the low dose rates appropriate to ambient nuclear power plant aging environments. The methodology was successfully applied to numerous important cable materials used in nuclear applications and the extrapolated predictions were verified by comparisons with long-term (7 to 12 year) results for similar or identical materials aged in nuclear environments. In this report, we test the methodology on three crosslinked polyolefin (CLPO) and two ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cable insulation materials. The methodology applies to one of the CLPO materials and one of the EPR materials, allowing predictions to be made for these materials under low dose-rate, low temperature conditions. For the other materials, it is determined that, at low temperatures, a decrease in temperature at a constant radiation dose rate leads to an increase in the degradation rate for the mechanical properties. Since these results contradict the fundamental assumption underlying time-temperature-dose rate superposition, this methodology cannot be applied to such data. As indicated in the earlier reports, such anomalous results might be expected when attempting to model data taken across the crystalline melting region of semicrystalline materials. Nonetheless, the existing experimental evidence suggests that these CLPO and EPR materials have substantial aging endurance for typical reactor conditions. 28 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Development of a computerized nuclear materials control and accounting system for a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.M.; Ehinger, M.H.; Joseph, C.; Madeen, M.L.

    1979-07-01

    A computerized nuclear materials control and accounting system (CNMCAS) for a fuel reprocessing plant is being developed by Allied-General Nuclear Services at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant. Development work includes on-line demonstration of near real-time measurement, measurement control, accounting, and processing monitoring/process surveillance activities during test process runs using natural uranium. A technique for estimating in-process inventory is also being developed. This paper describes development work performed and planned, plus significant design features required to integrate CNMCAS into an advanced safeguards system

  19. Determination of molybdenum in plant reference material by thermal-ionization isotope-dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saumer, M.; Gantner, E.; Reinhardt, J.; Ache, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical method is described for the determination of the concentration and the isotopic composition of molybdenum in plant samples using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. After microwave acid digestion and liquid-liquid extractive separation with Amberlite LA-2, the molybdenum isotopes are measured as MoO 3 - -ions in a quadrupole mass spectrometer. In all cases, the relative standard deviation of the measurements of both natural and spike molybdenum was better than 3% for all ratios measured. The concentration of molybdenum found in three different plant reference materials agreed well with the certified values. (orig.)

  20. Development of a computerized nuclear materials control and accounting system for a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.M.; Ehinger, M.H.; Joseph, C.; Madeen, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    A computerized nuclear materials control and accounting system (CNMCAS) for a fuel reprocessing plant is being developed by Allied-General Nuclear Services at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant. Development work includes on-line demonstration of near real-time measurement, measurement control, accounting, and processing monitoring/process surveillance activities during test process runs using natural uranium. A technique for estimating in-process inventory is also being developed. This paper describes development work performed and planned, plus significant design features required to integrate CNMCAS into an advanced safeguards system. 2 refs

  1. Evaluation of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the determination of micronutrients in plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevizan, Lilian Cristina; Santos, Dario; Elgul Samad, Ricardo; Dias Vieira, Nilson; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Aparecida Rufini, Iolanda; Krug, Francisco Jose

    2009-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been evaluated for the determination of micronutrients (B, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn) in pellets of plant materials, using NIST, BCR and GBW biological certified reference materials for analytical calibration. Pellets of approximately 2 mm thick and 15 mm diameter were prepared by transferring 0.5 g of powdered material to a 15 mm die set and applying 8.0 tons cm -2 . An experimental setup was designed by using a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm (200 mJ per pulse, 10 Hz) and an Echelle spectrometer with ICCD detector. Repeatability precision varied from 4 to 30% from measurements obtained in 10 different positions (8 laser shots per test portion) in the same sample pellet. Limits of detection were appropriate for routine analysis of plant materials and were 2.2 mg kg -1 B, 3.0 mg kg -1 Cu, 3.6 mg kg -1 Fe, 1.8 mg kg -1 Mn and 1.2 mg kg -1 Zn. Analysis of different plant samples were carried out by LIBS and results were compared with those obtained by ICP OES after wet acid decomposition.

  2. Calculation of coal power plant cost on agricultural and material building impact of emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochamad Nasrullah; Wiku Lulus Widodo

    2016-01-01

    Calculation for externally cost of Coal Power Plant (CPP) is very important. This paper is focus on CPP appear SO 2 impact on agricultural plant and material building. AGRIMAT'S model from International Atomic Energy Agency is model one be used to account environmental damage for air impact because SO 2 emission. Analysis method use Impact Pathways Assessment: Determining characteristic source, Exposure Response Functions (ERF), Impacts and Damage Costs, and Monetary Unit Cost. Result for calculate shows that SO 2 that issued CPP, if value of SO 2 is 19,3 μg/m3, damage cost begins valuably positive. It shows that the land around CPP has decrease prosperity, and it will disadvantage for agricultural plant. On material building, SO 2 resulting damage cost. The increase humidity price therefore damage cost on material building will increase cost. But if concentration SO 2 increase therefore damage cost that is appear on material building decrease. Expected this result can added with external cost on health impact of CPP. External cost was done at developed countries. If it is done at Indonesia, therefore generation cost with fossil as more expensive and will get implication on issue cut back gases greenhouse. On the other side, renewable energy and also alternative energy as nuclear have opportunity at national energy mix system. (author)

  3. [Plants' materials and synthetic agonists of cannabinoid receptors use as a substitute of Marihuana, appearing in a current forensic toxicology practice of evidence materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geppert, Bogna; Tezyk, Artur; Florek, Ewa; Zaba, Czesław

    2010-01-01

    Cannabis sativa species Indica (Marihuana) is nowadays one of the most common plant drug, with psychoactive activity, presently appearing on the illegal market in Poland. It is reported that frequency of securing evidential materials so called substitute of Marihuana, is growing rapidly during the last few years. The substitutes of Marihuana occurring on the market are of natural or synthetic origins, for example different species of raw plants' materials having action similar to Cannabis or raw plants' materials with no psychoactive properities but with an addition of components so called synthetic cannabinoids. The review presents recent developments in drug market and current problems of forensic toxicology on the example of Marihuana.

  4. Synthesis of nanometer-size inorganic materials for the examination of particle size effects on heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Sean Christian

    The effect of acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation on the precipitation of inorganic catalytic materials, specifically titania supported gold, was investigated. The overall objective was to understand the fundamental factors involved in synthesizing nanometer-size catalytic materials in the 1--10 nm range in a cavitating field. Materials with grain sizes in this range have been associated with enhanced catalytic activity compared to larger grain size materials. A new chemical approach was used to produce titania supported gold by co-precipitation with higher gold yields compared to other synthesis methods. Using this approach, it was determined that acoustic cavitation was unable to influence the gold mean crystallite size compared to non-sonicated catalysts. However, gold concentration on the catalysts was found to be very important for CO oxidation activity. By decreasing the gold concentration from a weight loading of 0.50% down to approximately 0.05%, the rate of reaction per mole of gold was found to increase by a factor of 19. Hydrodynamic cavitation at low pressures (6.9--48 bar) was determined to have no effect on gold crystallite size at a fixed gold content for the same precipitation technique used in the acoustic cavitation studies. By changing the chemistry of the precipitation system, however, it was found that a synergy existed between the dilution of the gold precursor solution, the orifice diameter, and the reducing agent addition rate. Individually, these factors were found to have little effect and only their interaction allowed gold grain size control in the range of 8--80 nm. Further modification of the system chemistry and the use of hydrodynamic cavitation at pressures in excess of 690 bar allowed the systematic control of gold crystallite size in the range of 2--9 nm for catalysts containing 2.27 +/- 0.17% gold. In addition, it was shown that the enhanced mixing due to cavitation led to larger gold yields compared to classical syntheses. The

  5. Systems, methods, and software for determining spatially variable distributions of the dielectric properties of a heterogeneous material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, Stephen P.

    2018-05-15

    Systems, methods, and software for measuring the spatially variable relative dielectric permittivity of materials along a linear or otherwise configured sensor element, and more specifically the spatial variability of soil moisture in one dimension as inferred from the dielectric profile of the soil matrix surrounding a linear sensor element. Various methods provided herein combine advances in the processing of time domain reflectometry data with innovations in physical sensing apparatuses. These advancements enable high temporal (and thus spatial) resolution of electrical reflectance continuously along an insulated waveguide that is permanently emplaced in contact with adjacent soils. The spatially resolved reflectance is directly related to impedance changes along the waveguide that are dominated by electrical permittivity contrast due to variations in soil moisture. Various methods described herein are thus able to monitor soil moisture in profile with high spatial resolution.

  6. Biosafety Procedure for Safe Handling of Genetically Modified Plant Materials in Bio Design Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaiton Ahmad; Shuhaimi Shamsudin; Mohamed Najli Mohamed Yasin; Affrida Abu Hassan; Mohd Zaid Hassan; Rusli Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Bio Design Facility is the specifically designed glass house for propagation, screening and analysis of high quality plant varieties developed through biotechnology or a combination of nuclear technology and biotechnology. High quality plant varieties especially genetically modified plants (GMO) require a special glass house facility for propagation and screening to isolate them from cross-pollinating with wild type varieties in surrounding ecosystem, and for carrying out evaluation of possible risks of the plants to human, animal and environment before they are proven safe for field trials or commercial release. This facility which was developed under the Ninth Malaysia Plan is classified as the Plant Containment Level 2 and is compliance with the bio safety regulations and guidance for the safe release of GMO according to Malaysian Bio safety Act 2007. Bio Design Facility is fully operational since 2010 and in 2012, it has also been certified as the glass house for post-entry quarantine by The Department of Agriculture. This paper summarizes the bio safety procedure for a safe, controlled and contained growing and evaluation of GMO in Bio Design Facility. This procedure covers the physical (containment and equipment's) and operational (including responsibility, code of practice, growing, decontamination and disposal of plant materials, emergency and contingency plan) aspects of the facility. (author)

  7. Evaluation of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the determination of macronutrients in plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevizan, Lilian Cristina [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000, Piracicaba-SP (Brazil)], E-mail: lilian@conectcor.com.br; Santos, Dario [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo - UNIFESP, Rua Prof. Artur Riedel 275, 09972-270, Diadema-SP (Brazil); Elgul Samad, Ricardo; Dias Vieira, Nilson [Centro de Lasers e Aplicacoes, IPEN/CNEN-SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil); Seimi Nomura, Cassiana [Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adelia 166, 09210-170, Santo Andre-SP (Brazil); Nunes, Lidiane Cristina [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rod. Washington Luis, km 235, 13565-905, Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil); Rufini, Iolanda Aparecida; Krug, Francisco Jose [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000, Piracicaba-SP (Brazil)

    2008-10-15

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has become an analytical tool for the direct analysis of a large variety of materials in order to provide qualitative and/or quantitative information. However, there is a lack of information for LIBS analysis of agricultural and environmental samples. In this work a LIBS system has been evaluated for the determination of macronutrients (P, K, Ca, Mg) in pellets of vegetal reference materials. An experimental setup was designed by using a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm and an Echelle spectrometer with ICCD detector. The plasma temperature was estimated by Boltzmann plots and instrumental parameters such as delay time, lens-to-sample distance and pulse energy were evaluated. Certified reference materials as well as reference materials were used for analytical calibrations of P, K, Ca, and Mg. Most results of the direct analysis of plant samples by LIBS were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by ICP OES after wet acid decomposition.

  8. Evaluation of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the determination of macronutrients in plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevizan, Lilian Cristina; Santos, Dario; Elgul Samad, Ricardo; Dias Vieira, Nilson; Seimi Nomura, Cassiana; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Rufini, Iolanda Aparecida; Krug, Francisco Jose

    2008-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has become an analytical tool for the direct analysis of a large variety of materials in order to provide qualitative and/or quantitative information. However, there is a lack of information for LIBS analysis of agricultural and environmental samples. In this work a LIBS system has been evaluated for the determination of macronutrients (P, K, Ca, Mg) in pellets of vegetal reference materials. An experimental setup was designed by using a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm and an Echelle spectrometer with ICCD detector. The plasma temperature was estimated by Boltzmann plots and instrumental parameters such as delay time, lens-to-sample distance and pulse energy were evaluated. Certified reference materials as well as reference materials were used for analytical calibrations of P, K, Ca, and Mg. Most results of the direct analysis of plant samples by LIBS were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by ICP OES after wet acid decomposition

  9. Materials selection for process equipment in the Hanford waste vitrification plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmore, M R; Jensen, G A

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to vitrify defense liquid high-level wastes and transuranic wastes stored at Hanford. The HWVP Functional Design Criteria (FDC) requires that materials used for fabrication of remote process equipment and piping in the facility be compatible with the expected waste stream compositions and process conditions. To satisfy FDC requirements, corrosion-resistant materials have been evaluated under simulated HWVP-specific conditions and recommendations have been made for HWVP applications. The materials recommendations provide to the project architect/engineer the best available corrosion rate information for the materials under the expected HWVP process conditions. Existing data and sound engineering judgement must be used and a solid technical basis must be developed to define an approach to selecting suitable construction materials for the HWVP. This report contains the strategy, approach, criteria, and technical basis developed for selecting materials of construction. Based on materials testing specific to HWVP and on related outside testing, this report recommends for constructing specific process equipment and identifies future testing needs to complete verification of the performance of the selected materials. 30 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Effect of operating conditions and environment on properties of materials of PWR type nuclear power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, M.

    1987-01-01

    Operating reliability and service life of PWR type nuclear power plants are discussed with respect to the material properties of the plant components. The effects of the operating environment on the material properties and the methods of their determination are characterized. Discussed are core materials, such as fuel, its cladding and regulating rod materials, and the materials of pipes, steam generators and condensers. The advances in the production of pressure vessel materials and their degradation during operation are treated in great detail. (Z.M.)

  11. Contribution to the determination of the neutronic parameters uncertainties of a compact heterogeneous core: the material testing Jules Horowitz reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Salvo, J.

    2002-01-01

    The design studies of the future Material Testing Reactor Jules Horowitz require the development of an adapted neutronic calculation route. To guarantee good accuracy and save time cost, some approximations with deterministic modelling (APOLLO2 / CRONOS2) are needed. As no relevant integral experiments are yet available to ensure the accuracy of the calculation, the results need to be validated by a rigorous methodical approach, which is based on comparison against numerical benchmarks (Monte Carlo TRIPOLI4 code). In order to complete the validation results, sensitivity coefficients of main neutronic parameters to nuclear data are very useful to get an estimate of the final uncertainty on the calculation. Unfortunately, most of covariance information is missing in the recent evaluated files such as JEF-2.2. To generate missing covariance matrices, a method based on the comparison of different independent evaluations is used in this study. Special attention is paid to the determination of sensitivity coefficients, using perturbation methods and direct calculations. This study points out the importance of the non-diagonal elements of the covariance matrices as well as the neutron capture cross section uncertainty of the 27Al in the thermal range. In complement to uncertainty studies, it will be still necessary to obtain integral experimental validation of the Jules Horowitz Reactor neutronic parameters calculations. (author)

  12. Treatments of non-wood plant fibres used as reinforcement in composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Ange Arsène

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a summary of the knowledge on fibres and pulps of non wood tropical plants used as reinforcement in cementitious composites accumulated during the recent years by Guadeloupean and Brazilian teams participating in collaborative work. Vegetable fibres represent a good alternative as non-conventional materials for the construction of ecological and sustainable buildings. The use of such renewable resources contributes to the development of sustainable technologies. The main objective of the paper is to emphasize the use of agricultural wastes in the production of cement based composites. The botanical, chemical, physical, morphological and mechanical properties of fibres from various plants are described. The effects of different treatments on physical, chemical and mechanical properties of fibres are presented. The most effective treatments in influencing the mechanical and physical properties are pyrolysis and alkaline ones, according to the type of plant. The final choice will have to consider fibre availability, and treatment costs.

  13. Design of training centres for nuclear power plants. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists` meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to provide an international forum for presentation and discussion of experiences in the design and operation of training centres for nuclear power plant personnel. The term ``training centre``, as used during this meeting, includes both those facilities that are dedicated to provide training for an individual nuclear power plants, and that are often located near that plant, as well as facilities that provide training for multiple NPPs, and which are operated by vendors or by utility organizations that are not directly controlled by the NPP organizations which they serve. The topic, ``design of training centres`` was used in its broadest sense to include not only facilities (such as classrooms, laboratories and simulators), but also design of: training organizations; training programmes and materials; and examination/evaluation methods. Refs, figs, tabs.

  14. Computerization of operation and maintenance for nuclear power plants. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report provides a resource for computerization of activities in plant operation and maintenance. Experience gained from design and implementation of various computer systems around the world is described. The material may be useful as a guide to modification and upgrading of existing plants as well as design and engineering of new plants. It should be particularly of interest to managers and engineers who are engaged in planning, bidding, specifying or designing computer systems for operation and maintenance applications. The technical document is the result of a series of advisory and consultant meetings held by the IAEA in Vienna in 1991 - 1994. The document was prepared with the participation of experts from Canada, France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Russia, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the United States. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Design of training centres for nuclear power plants. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to provide an international forum for presentation and discussion of experiences in the design and operation of training centres for nuclear power plant personnel. The term ''training centre'', as used during this meeting, includes both those facilities that are dedicated to provide training for an individual nuclear power plants, and that are often located near that plant, as well as facilities that provide training for multiple NPPs, and which are operated by vendors or by utility organizations that are not directly controlled by the NPP organizations which they serve. The topic, ''design of training centres'' was used in its broadest sense to include not only facilities (such as classrooms, laboratories and simulators), but also design of: training organizations; training programmes and materials; and examination/evaluation methods. Refs, figs, tabs

  16. Computerization of nuclear material accounting and control at storage facilities of RT-1 plant, PA Mayak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakhmal'nik, V.I.; Menshchikov, Yu.L.; Mozhaev, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    Computerized system for nuclear material (NM) accounting and control at RT-1 plant is being created on the basis of advanced engineering and programming tools, which give a possibility to ensure prompt access to the information required, to unify the accounting and report documentation, make statistical processing of the data, and trace the NM transfers in the chain of its storage at facilities of RT-1 plant. Currently, the accounting is performed in parallel, both by the old methods and with computerized system. The following functions are performed by the system at the current stage: input of data on the end product's (plutonium dioxide) quantitative and qualitative composition; data input on the localization of containers with finished products at storage facilities of the plant and the product's temporary characteristics; selective verification of the data on containers and batches, according to the criteria prespecified by the user; data protection against unauthorized access; data archiving; report documents formation and providing [ru

  17. Material protection control and accounting program activities at the Urals electrochemical integrated plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAllister, S.

    1997-01-01

    The Urals Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) is the Russian Federation's largest uranium enrichment plant and one of three sites in Russia blending high enriched uranium (HEU) into commercial grade low enriched uranium. UEIP is located approximately 70 km north of Yekaterinburg in the closed city of Novouralsk (formerly Sverdlovsk- 44). DOE's MPC ampersand A program first met with UEIP in June of 1996, however because of some contractual issues the work did not start until September of 1997. The six national laboratories participating in DOE's Material Protection Control and Accounting program are cooperating with UEIP to enhance the capabilities of the physical protection, access control, and nuclear material control and accounting systems. The MPC ampersand A work at UEIP is expected to be completed during fiscal year 2001

  18. Site layout and balance of plant design for an accelerator-driven materials processing complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunliffe, J.; Taussig, R.; Ghose, S. [Bechtel Corporation, San Francisco, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    High energy proton beam accelerators are under consideration for use in radioisotope production, surplus weapons material destruction, radioactive waste transmutation, and thorium-based energy conversion cycles. While there are unique aspects to each of these applications that must be accommodated in the design of the associated facility, all share a set of fundamental characteristics that in large measure dictate the site layout features and many balance-of-plant (BOP) design requirements found to be common to all. This paper defines these key design determinants and goes on to discuss the manner in which they have been accommodated in the pre-conceptual design for a particular materials production application. An estimate of the costs associated with this BOP design is also presented with the aim of guiding future evaluations where the basic plant designs are similar to that of this specific case.

  19. Knowledge of ageing phenomenons of materials used in the PWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vancon, D.; Meyzaud, Y.; Soulat, P.

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear power plants with PWR type reactors are planned to work during forty years and are the subject of studies aiming to check their integrity during all their life. The materials used to the fabrication of the components can be submitted different stress. The temperature, the mechanical constraints, the irradiation are examples of stress which can make the materials getting old. This text presents three themes: the ageing by irradiation, the thermal ageing and the corrosion, and their principle industrial consequences. (N.C.)

  20. Monitoring for radioactive materials releasing to environment in M310 reformatived nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Zhenyu; Yang Guangli; Xu Guang

    2012-01-01

    Airborne radioactive materials of nuclear power plant (NPP) releases to the environment from the stack of NPP. Radioactive liquid waste releases of the ocean, the fluvial and the lake through the liquid waste letdyke of NPP. Further more, a few radioactive waste may be taken out of the NPP by vehicle or personnel. For the purpose of strict management and control above-mentioned waste, we use detect equipment monitoring radioactive waste of NPP. Management and control for the releasing of radioactive material to the environment in M310 reformatived NPP is strict and safety. (authors)

  1. Methods for nuclear material control used in the basic production of a typical radiochemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kositsyn, V.F.; Mukhortov, N.F.; Korovin, Yu.I.; Rudenko, V.S.; Petrov, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Techniques for destructive and non-destructive assay of the component and isotopic composition of nuclear materials are described, namely gravimetric, titrimetric, coulometric, mass spectrometry, as well as those based on registration of neutron and γ radiations. Their metrologic characteristics are described. The techniques described are suggested to be used for nuclear material (NM) control and accounting purposes at the model radiochemical plant for processing irradiated fuel subassemblies from power reactors. The measurement control program is also described. This program is intended for the measurement quality assurance in the framework of NM control and accountancy system [ru

  2. Savannah River Plant's Accountability Inventory Management System (AIMS) (Nuclear materials inventory control)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croom, R.G.

    1976-06-01

    The Accountability Inventory Management System (AIMS) is a new computer inventory control system for nuclear materials at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina. The system has two major components, inventory files and system parameter files. AIMS, part of the overall safeguards program, maintains an up-to-date record of nuclear material by location, produces reports required by ERDA in addition to onplant reports, and is capable of a wide range of response to changing input/output requirements through use of user-prepared parameter cards, as opposed to basic system reprogramming

  3. Measurements of the radioactivity of power plant by-products processed into construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinkowski, S.A.; Dudelewski, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    The subject of the recycling of residual products comprising, inter alia, fly ash and slags accuring from the combustion of black and brown coal in modern coal dust boilers in the power industry has been topical for a number of years. Numerous discussions and articles in technical periodicals and the daily press have revolved around the problem of the radioactivity of construction materials or construction elements obtained from fly ash or slags of power plant. In Poland, this was a forbidden subject until the publication in 1980 by the Warsaw institute of construction technology of standard no. 234 entitled: 'Recommendations for establishing the natural radioactivity of products processed into construction materials'. (orig.) [de

  4. Preliminary concepts: coordinated safeguards for materials management in a thorium--uranium fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Shipley, J.P.

    1978-10-01

    This report addresses preliminary concepts for coordinated safeguards materials management in a typical generic thorium--uranium-fueled light-water reactor (LWR) fuels reprocessing plant. The reference facility is designed to recover thorium and uranium from first-generation (denatured 235 U) startup fuels, first-recycle and equilibrium (denatured 233 U) thorium--uranium LWR fuels, and to recover the plutonium generated in the 238 U denaturant as well. 12 figures, 3 tables

  5. High-throughput and homogeneous 13C-labelling of plant material for fair carbon accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaets, J.I.F.; Resch, C.; Mayr, L.; Weltin, G.; Heiling, M.; Gruber, R.; Dercon, G.

    2016-01-01

    With growing political acknowledgement of the anthropogenic drivers and consequences of climate change, the development of carbon accounting mechanisms is essential for fair greenhouse gas emission mitigation policies. Therefore, carbon storage and emission must be accurately quantified. Plant material labelled with 13 C can be used to measure carbon storage in soil and carbon losses via CO 2 emission to the atmosphere from various cropping practices through in situ and incubation experiments.

  6. Modified application of HS-SPME for quality evaluation of essential oil plant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Szewczyk, Joanna; Dybowski, Michal P

    2016-01-01

    The main limitation in the standard application of head space analysis employing solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) for the evaluation of plants as sources of essential oils (EOs) are different quantitative relations of EO components from those obtained by direct analysis of EO which was got in the steam distillation (SD) process from the same plant (EO/SD). The results presented in the paper for thyme, mint, sage, basil, savory, and marjoram prove that the quantitative relations of EO components established by HS-SPME procedure and direct analysis of EO/SD are similar when the plant material in the HS-SPME process is replaced by its suspension in oil of the same physicochemical character as that of SPME fiber coating. The observed differences in the thyme EO composition estimated by both procedures are insignificant (F(exp)plant material quality and thus may improve the efficiency of analytical laboratories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Control of Varroa Mite (Varroa destructor on Honeybees by Aromatic Oils and Plant Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.K. Nazer

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of several volatile plant oils, plant materials and fluvalinate (Apistan® strips on the control of the mite Varroa destructor on honeybee (Apis mellifera L. colonies was studied. The volatile oils were: clove, lavender, peppermint, sage, and thyme. The plant materials were: cumin fruits, eucalyptus leaves, and worm wood flowers. For each tested material, three treatment periods were carried out. Each period lasted for 24 days followed by eight days no-treatment. Within each treatment period, an average of three to six treatments were applied. Dead mites were counted one hour before and after each treatment. An increase in dead mites was recorded for the three treatment periods. It indicated that worm wood flowers, peppermint oil and clove oil treatments gave the best results in the control of Varroa mites but not significantly different than the control. The overall increase in the dead mites was 3.92, 3.62 and 3.34 fold, respectively.

  8. Metal-free carbon materials-catalyzed sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation processes: A review on heterogeneous catalysts and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingxia; Mao, Qiming; Zhou, Yaoyu; Wei, Jianhong; Liu, Xiaocheng; Yang, Junying; Luo, Lin; Zhang, Jiachao; Chen, Hong; Chen, Hongbo; Tang, Lin

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), especially sulfate radical based AOPs have been widely used in various fields of wastewater treatment due to their capability and adaptability in decontamination. Recently, metal-free carbon materials catalysts in sulfate radical production has been more and more concerned because these materials have been demonstrated to be promising alternatives to conventional metal-based catalysts, but the review of metal-free catalysts is rare. The present review outlines the current state of knowledge on the generation of sulfate radical using metal-free catalysts including carbon nanotubes, graphene, mesoporous carbon, activated carbon, activated carbon fiber, nanodiamond. The mechanism such as the radical pathway and non-radical pathway, and factors influencing of the activation of sulfate radical was also be revealed. Knowledge gaps and research needs have been identified, which include the perspectives on challenges related to metal-free catalyst, heterogeneous metal-free catalyst/persulfate systems and their potential in practical environmental remediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Heterogeneous photocatalysis on construction materials: effect of catalyst properties on the efficiency for degrading NOx and self cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengtsson, N.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the effect of some properties of different catalysts on the photocatalytic activity. The efficiency has been determined for two different processes: NOx abatement and self-cleaning for Rhodamine B and tobacco extract being, the TiO2 based photocatalyst, supported as coatings on white mortar. Eight different catalysts were tested, seven commercial ones and one home-made catalyst with improved visible light absorption properties. Additionally, some of them were submitted to exposition to water and/or calcinations to alter their physical properties. A kinetic approach was used to evaluate the photocatalytic activity, being the first reaction constant (for NO and just empirical constants (for self-cleaning the parameters used for the comparison of the different materials. As a result, the efficiency, even for ranking, is dependent on the type of contaminant used in the experiment. In general, NO oxidation and tobacco followed similar trends while no clear relations were found for Rhodamine B.En este trabajo se analiza el efecto de las propiedades de distintos catalizadores en la actividad fotocatalítica de degradación de NOx y autolimpieza, para Rodamina B y extracto de tabaco. Se han ensayado ocho fotocatalizadores, basados en TiO2 y soportados sobre mortero blanco; siete de ellos comerciales y uno sintetizado en el laboratorio con absorción mejorada en el visible. Adicionalmente, las propiedades físicas de algunos de ellos se alteraron mediante tratamientos con agua y/o por calcinación. La actividad fotocatalítica se ha evaluado mediante aproximación cinética, siendo la constante de reacción de primer orden (para NO y constantes empíricas de ajuste (para autolimpieza los parámetros de comparación entre materiales. Como resultado, la eficiencia depende del contaminante utilizado en el experimento de evaluación. En general, en este estudio, oxidación de NO y de extracto de tabaco presentan tendencias similares

  10. New materials for thermal energy storage in concentrated solar power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Luis; Collares-Pereira, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Solar Thermal Electricity (STE) is an important alternative to PV electricity production, not only because it is getting more cost competitive with the continuous growth in installed capacity, engineering and associated innovations, but also, because of its unique dispatch ability advantage as a result of the already well established 2-tank energy storage using molten salts (MS). In recent years, research has been performed, on direct MS systems, to which features like modularity and combinations with other (solid) thermal storage materials are considered with the goal of achieving lower investment cost. Several alternative materials and systems have been studied. In this research, storage materials were identified with thermo-physical data being presented for different rocks (e.g. quartzite), super concrete, and other appropriate solid materials. Among the new materials being proposed like rocks from old quarries, an interesting option is the incorporation of solid waste material from old mines belonging to the Iberian Pyritic Belt. These are currently handled as byproducts of past mine activity, and can potentially constitute an environmental hazard due to their chemical (metal) content. This paper presents these materials, as part of a broad study to improve the current concept of solar energy storage for STE plants, and additionally presents a potentially valuable solution for environmental protection related to re-use of mining waste.

  11. Propagating quality planting material to improve plant health and crop performance, key practices for dessert banana, plantain and cooking banana: illustrated guide

    OpenAIRE

    Staver, Charles; Lescot, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Available in English, French, Spanish and Arabic, on line and on CD-ROM, this illustrated guide summarizes the key practices for producing clean planting material of banana with a high yield potential for smallholders, depending on the pests and diseases which are present. The guide is also designed to contribute to better planning of the propagation of planting material for rural development and disaster relief projects. (Résumé d'auteur)

  12. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of selected materials for steam plant bolting applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, P.; Noga, J.O.; Ogundele, G.

    1996-12-01

    The incidence of alloy steel bolting failure in nuclear and fossil fired generating plants was discussed. The problem manifests itself in the form of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. A study was conducted to rank the susceptibility of three materials (Alloy AISI, type 4140, Alloy ASTM A564-92AXM 13 and Inconel 718) to stress corrosion cracking and to determine threshold stress intensity factors of currently used and alternate alloys in service environments typically encountered in steam generating utility plants. Although most alloy steel bolting failures have involved Cr-Mo, failures have also been reported for all the above mentioned materials. Attempts to minimize the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking have involved a ban on molybdenum disulphide, limiting bolt tightening torque and placing an upper limit on bolt hardness, and by correlation on tensile strength. Slow strain rate and wedge opening-loading specimen tests were used to evaluate commonly used and superior alternative bolting materials. Electrochemical polarization tests were also conducted. Threshold stresses in a H{sub 2}S environment were determined according to NACE standard TM-01-77. Results showed that, to a certain degree, all tested materials were susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. They ranked as follows from best to worst performance: (1) the Inconel 718, (2) alloy SM 13, and (3) alloy 4140. 9 refs., 20 tabs., 34 figs.

  13. Materials Integrity Analysis for Application of Hyper Duplex Stainless Steels to Korean Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hyun Young; Park, Heung Bae; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Soon Tae; Kim, Young Sik; Kim, Kwang Tae; Jhang, Yoon Young

    2010-01-01

    Hyper duplex stainless steels have been developed in Korea for the purpose of application to the seawater system of Korean nuclear power plants. This system supplies seawater to cooling water heat exchanger tubes, related pipes and chlorine injection system. In normal operation, seawater is supplied to heat exchanger through the exit of circulating water pump headers, and the heat exchanged sea water is extracted to the discharge pipes in circulating water system connected to the circulating water discharge lines. The high flow velocity of some part of seawater system in nuclear power plants accelerates damages of components. Therefore, high strength and high corrosion resistant steels need to be applied for this environment. Hyper duplex stainless steel (27Cr-7.0Ni-2.5Mo-3.2W-0.35N) has been newly developed in Korea and is being improved for applying to nuclear power plants. In this study, the physical and mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of newly developed materials are quantitatively evaluated in comparative to commercial stainless steels in other countries. The properties of weld and HAZ (heat affected zone) are analyzed and the best compositions are suggested. The optimum conditions in welding process are derived for ensuring the volume fraction of ferrite(α) and austenite(γ) in HAZ and controlling weld cracks. For applying these materials to the seawater heat exchanger, CCT and CPT in weldments are measured. As a result of all experiments, it was found that the newly developed hyper duplex stainless steel WREMBA has higher corrosion resistance and mechanical properties than those of super austenitic stainless steels including welded area. It is expected to be a promising material for seawater systems of Korean nuclear power plants

  14. Optimization of the retention of radioactive material from the airborne effluents of reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonka, H.; Horn, H.-G.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation-protection ordinance of the Federal Republic of Germany does not know the expression 'optimization in radiological protection'. In order to gain experiences with the cost-benefit analysis for the retention of radioactive material from nuclear facilities as proposed in ICRP 26, this method has been applied on the emission of radioactive material with the airborne effluents of reprocessing plants. The reference plant has an annual throughput of 1500 t of spent LWR-fuel. Basing on this plant, two smaller plants (350 t/a, 700 t/a) are also analysed. The cost-benefit-analysis is carried-out for H3, C14, Kr85, J129 and aerosols. For these nuclides as well as for the three plant-sizes, the methods of retention, the estimated annual costs of retention, the emission rates for the different retention measures and the resulting collective-dose commitments are shown. Based on an α-value of 8000 $/man-Sv (20,000 DM/Man-Sv) the cost-benefit analysis shows no optimum for H3 and Kr 85. The optimum C14 as well as iodine retention is a high-efficiency scrubber and an iodine filter, respectively for the dissolver off-gas. For aerosols the cost-benefit analysis shows an optimum for the filtration of the dissolver off-gas by means of HEPA filters. For the other aerosol-sources, condensation, scrubbing and additional droplet separation from the off-gas is optimum. Reasons differing from cost-benefit analysis require HEPA filters for all major aerosol-sources. (author)

  15. Materials, manufacture and testing of pressurized components of high-power steam power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blind, D.; Foehl, J.; Issler, L.; Schellhammer, W.; Sturm, D.; Kussmaul, K.; Heinrich, D.; Meyer, H.J.; Prestel, W.

    1981-01-01

    This is the first German review of materials, production and testing of pressure components of high-capacity steam power plants. The authors have been working in this field for years; their special subject has been the availability and reliability of pressure vessels, in particular in nuclear engineering. Fundamentals are presented as well as the findings obtained at the state Materials Testing Institute in Stuttgart. The material is presented in a well-structured classification; the most recent international findings, especially of the USA, are presented. This is possible due to the close cooperation between the Stuttgart institute and a number of US research institutes. The new subject of fracture mechanics is treated in some detail; its fundamentals are discussed from the American point of view while German considerations - in particular of the Reactor Safety Commission - are taken into account in the field of applications. (orig.) [de

  16. Natural radionuclides in coal and waste material originating from coal fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marovic, Gordana; Franic, Zdenko; Sencar, Jasminka; Petrinec, Branko; Bituh, Tomislav; Kovac, Jadranka

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents long-term investigations of natural radioactivity in coal, used for power production in the coal-fired power plant (CFPP) situated on the Adriatic coast, and resulting slag and ash. Activity concentrations of 40 K, 232 Th, 226 Ra and 238 U in used coal and resulting waste material have been measured for 25 years. As expected, it was demonstrated that the content of radionuclides in deposited bottom and filter ash material are closely related with radionuclide activity concentrations and mineral matter fraction in used coals. The external hazard index has been calculated and discussed for the slag and ash depository. During the first decade of operation of the CFPP has been used domestic coal produced in nearby area characterized by higher background radiation compared with the rest of Croatia. Therefore, the coal itself had relatively high 226 Ra and 238 U activity concentrations while potassium and thorium content was very low, 40 K activity concentrations being 2-9% and those of 232 Th 1-3% of total activity. As, in addition, the sulphur concentrations in coal were very high use of domestic coal was gradually abandoned till it was completely substituted by imported coal originated from various sources and of low natural radioactivity. Upon this, activity concentrations of uranium series radionuclides in deposited waste materials decreased significantly. Consequently, waste material i.e., slag and ash, generated in the last several years of coal fired power plant operation could be readily used in cement industry and as additive to other building materials, without any special restrictions according to the Croatian regulations dealing with building materials and European directives. (author)

  17. Material development for waste to energy plants. Overlay welding and refractory linings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noergaard Hansson, A.

    2011-02-15

    Waste is an extremely corrosive fuel. In order to recover a higher percentage of the energy in waste, waste incineration plants have developed from purely heat producing units to heat and power producing units. The change in concept results in higher material temperatures and thereby faster material degradation. As a result material failures have been observed in many waste incineration plants. The purpose of this project was to develop materials with higher resistance to the corrosive elements, in order to reduce the cost of maintenance, increase the availability, and increase the efficiency. The focus is on overlay welding and refractory linings. Inconel 625, alloy 50, alloy 686, and Super 625 offer equivalent corrosion protection at panel walls. 100% overlay performs better than 50% overlay. The corrosion morphology changes with increasing temperature from pitting and general corrosion to pitting and selective corrosion (dendritic core or grain boundaries). The previously observed detrimental effect of Fe on the corrosion resistance was not confirmed. It probably depends on factors such as microstructure of the alloy and local metal temperature. Ni-overlay also reduces the corrosion rates on superheater tubes. However, the superheater environment is less aggressive than the water wall environment. Failure of refractory linings is linked to excess porosity, detrimental reactions between raw materials and other mix constituents, volume growth reactions between base material and salt depositions, and thermal stress induced crack formation. Free water and not decomposition of hydrates causes spalling and cracking during the initial heating of refractory linings. Finite Element analysis confirms the stress levels between steel and refractory with the higher stress level at the top of the panel wall tube. A number of LCC mixes were formulated, adjusted and tested. Mixes with low open porosities ({approx} 10%) and state of the art resistance to KCl were achieved. (LN)

  18. A quantitative approach to design of material accounting system for a complex facility. Study at the PNC reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikawa, K.

    1994-01-01

    An approach to a design of nuclear materials accounting sysyem for a complex facility in Japan is discussed. Near-real-time materials accountancy model studied at the PNC reprocessing plant is described. Main features of the computerized nuclear materials accounting system are considered as well as the PROMAC - C code algorithm for statistical data processing is presented. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Current Perspective in the International Trade of Medicinal Plants Material: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasisht, Karan; Sharma, Neetika; Karan, Maninder

    2016-01-01

    The recent years have seen an increased interest in medicinal plants together with the therapeutic use of phytochemicals. Medicinal plants are utilized by the industry for the production of extracts, phytopharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals and cosmeceuticals and their use is expected to grow faster than the conventional drugs. The enormous demand of medicinal plant material has resulted in huge trade both at domestic and international levels. The trade data of medicinal plant material with commodity code HS 1211 (SITC.4, code 292.4) and their derived/related products which are traded under different commodity codes has been acquired from COMTRADE, Trade Map, country reports, technical documents etc for the period 2001 to 2014. The data was analyzed using statistical tools to draw conclusions. The significant features of the global trade; the leading source, consumer, import and export countries; and the striking trends are presented. The trade of the ten key countries and the selected important items is also discussed in detail. The conservative figure of trade of medicinal plants materials and their derived/related products including extracts, essential oils, phytopharmaceuticals, gums, spices used in medicine, tannins for pharmaceutical use, ingredients for cosmetics etc. as calculated from the global export data for the year 2014 is estimated at USD 33 billion. The average global export in medicinal plants under HS 1211 for the fourteen year period was USD 1.92 billion for 601,357 tons per annum and for the year 2014 it stood at 702,813 tons valued at USD 3.60 billion. For the studied period, an annual average growth rate (AAGR) of 2.4% in volumes and 9.2% in values of export was observed. Nearly 30% of the global trade is made up by top two countries of the import and export. China and India from Asia; Egypt and Morocco from Africa; Poland, Bulgaria and Albania from Europe; Chile and Peru from South America are important supply sources. The USA, Japan and Europe

  20. Heterogeneous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author) [pt

  1. Development of a method for analyzing traces of ruthenium in plant materials and determination of the transfer factors soil/plant for ruthenium compounds from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasius, E.; Huth, R.; Neumann, W.

    1988-01-01

    In an artificial humous and sandy soil spiked with 106 Ru as RuO 2 and RuCl 3 , pasture grass was grown under artificial illumination in our laboratory. The amounts of ruthenium taken up by the plants were determined by γ-spectrometry. For open-air investigations with pasture grass, wheat and potatoes inactive ruthenium(III) chloride and ruthenium nitrosylchloride were used. Ruthenium was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after destroying the organic material and concentrating the solution. The concentration and chemical form of the ruthenium exert an unimportant influence on the transfer factor. For the pasture-grass, the stems of wheat and the weed of potatoes it amounts to 0.00005 to 0.0015, for the ear of wheat to about 0.00005. In peeled potatoes there was no ruthenium detectable, therefore the limit of detection leads to a transfer factor ≤ 0.00001. So it is evident that ruthenium is little available for the roots of the plants. In the event of an accident in a nuclear plant the uptake of radioactive ruthenium by roots has only negligible radioecological consequences. This applies even if 50 years of ruthenium enrichment in the soil are assumed. (orig./RB)

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Steam Generator and Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Wright

    2010-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2804)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Wright

    2008-04-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for

  4. THE BIODEGRADABILITY AND MECHANICAL STRENGTH OF NUTRITIVE POTS FOR VEGETABLE PLANTING BASED ON LIGNOCELLULOSE COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petronela Nechita

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering the mild degradation strength and the fact that it may be an organic matter reserve for the soil, in the past years lignocellulosic materials have been used as fibrous raw materials in the manufacture of biodegradable nutritive pots for the seedling in vegetable containerized production. This paper analyses the behavior of the nutritive pots made from biodegradable composites for the vegetable seedling production process, focusing on their mechanical strength properties and biodegradability. It was found that the biodegradability of composite materials obtained from a mixture of secondary cellulosic fibers, peat, and additives, is strongly influenced by the presence or absence of the rhizosphere effect and the synergistic relations set in the culture substrate between the plant roots and microorganisms, which develop permanently the recycling and solubilization of mineral nutrients. The results showed that the presence in the substrate of some complex populations made by heterotrophic bacteria favors full degradation of the pulp and lignin contained in the substrate and pots composition. Therefore, unlike the reference sample (plant-free, cultivated versions exhibited an intense biodegradation on the account of rhizosphere effect.

  5. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.I.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary investigations of a heterogeneous gas core reactor (HGCR) concept suggest that this potential power reactor offers distinct advantages over other existing or conceptual reactor power plants. One of the most favorable features of the HGCR is the flexibility of the power producing system which allows it to be efficiently designed to conform to a desired optimum condition without major conceptual changes. The arrangement of bundles of moderator/coolant channels in a fissionable gas or mixture of gases makes a truly heterogeneous nuclear reactor core. It is this full heterogeneity for a gas-fueled reactor core which accounts for the novelty of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and leads to noted significant advantages over previous gas core systems with respect to neutron and fuel economy, power density, and heat transfer characteristics. The purpose of this work is to provide an insight into the design, operating characteristics, and safety of a heterogeneous gas core reactor system. The studies consist mainly of neutronic, energetic and kinetic analyses of the power producing and conversion systems as a preliminary assessment of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and basic design. The results of the conducted research indicate a high potential for the heterogeneous gas core reactor system as an electrical power generating unit (either large or small), with an overall efficiency as high as 40 to 45%. The HGCR system is found to be stable and safe, under the conditions imposed upon the analyses conducted in this work, due to the inherent safety of ann expanding gaseous fuel and the intrinsic feedback effects of the gas and water coolant

  6. Approach to IAEA material-balance verification at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, D.M.; Sanborn, J.B.; Younkin, J.M.; DeVito, V.J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a potential approach by which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) might verify the nuclear-material balance at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP). The strategy makes use of the attributes and variables measurement verification approach, whereby the IAEA would perform independent measurements on a randomly selected subset of the items comprising the U-235 flows and inventories at the plant. In addition, the MUF-D statistic is used as the test statistic for the detection of diversion. The paper includes descriptions of the potential verification activities, as well as calculations of: (1) attributes and variables sample sizes for the various strata, (2) standard deviations of the relevant test statistics, and (3) the detection sensitivity which the IAEA might achieve by this verification strategy at GCEP

  7. Effects of temperature, ultraviolet radiation and pectin methyl esterase on aerobic methane release from plant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, D; Mikkelsen, T N; Obro, J; Willats, W G T; Ambus, P

    2009-11-01

    This study examines the effects of different irradiance types on aerobic methane (CH(4)) efflux rates from terrestrial plant material. Furthermore, the role of the enzyme pectin methyl esterase (PME) on CH(4) efflux potential was also examined. Different types of plant tissue and purified pectin were incubated in glass vials with different combinations of irradiation and/or temperature. Purified dry pectin was incubated in solution, and with or without PME. Before and after incubation, the concentration of CH(4) was measured with a gas chromatograph. Rates of CH(4) emission were found to depend exponentially on temperature and linearly on UV-B irradiance. UV-B had a greater stimulating effect than UV-A, while visible light had no effect on emission rates. PME was found to substantially reduce the potential for aerobic CH(4) emissions upon demethylation of pectin.

  8. Materials in flue gas condensation plants. Stage 2; Materialval vid roekgaskondensering. Etapp 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordling, Magnus; Bergman, Gunnar; Baeck, Gustaf; Jacobsson, Karin; Pahverk, Helen; Roemhild, Stefanie

    2004-12-01

    The corrosion resistance of some metallic and polymeric materials has been investigated in the flue gas scrubbers/condensers in the power plants at Igelsta using waste wood and Brista using bio fuel in the boilers. The materials were exposed inside the inlet part of the condenser and inside the flue gas duct after the condenser. In Brista, the polymeric materials were also exposed to the hot flue gases inside the duct before the condenser. The temperature of the gases before and after the condenser in Brista was 140 deg C and 50-60 deg C, respectively. In Igelsta, the flue gas temperature after the condenser was 45 deg C. The metallic coupons in the condenser were located in the spray-zone, both in Igelsta and Brista. That was true also for the polymeric material in Brista. In both plants, the wash-solution had a pH of 7-8, a temperature of 30 deg C, and a low content of chloride. The metallic materials investigated were stainless steels of the following grades: 17-12-2.5, 2205, SAF2507 and 254SMO. The major part of the polymeric materials investigated consisted of FRP laminates, which were made with different combinations of resin type of surface veil and type of chopped strand mat (CSM). Laminates with a new type of vinyl ester resin, Atlac E-Nova FW 1045, a new type of a stress-corrosion-resistant glass-fibre called Arcotex, and two types of surface reinforcement of carbon fibre have been compared to laminates of common type. Laminates with a special reinforcement of the type 3-D fabric were also included as well as five polypropylene materials (PP) with varying degree of stabilisation, two glass-flake materials applied on carbon steel and a butyl rubber. The corrosion resistance of the materials was evaluated after seven a months exposure at the different positions in the plants. The stainless steel materials were evaluated with respect to uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice attack. The corrosion resistance of the polymeric materials was evaluated with

  9. Relationships between in vivo microdamage and the remarkable regional material and strain heterogeneity of cortical bone of adult deer, elk, sheep and horse calcanei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedros, John G; Sybrowsky, Christian L; Anderson, Wm Erick; Chow, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Natural loading of the calcanei of deer, elk, sheep and horses produces marked regional differences in prevalent/predominant strain modes: compression in the dorsal cortex, shear in medial–lateral cortices, and tension/shear in the plantar cortex. This consistent non-uniform strain distribution is useful for investigating mechanisms that mediate the development of the remarkable regional material variations of these bones (e.g. collagen orientation, mineralization, remodeling rates and secondary osteon morphotypes, size and population density). Regional differences in strain-mode-specific microdamage prevalence and/or morphology might evoke and sustain the remodeling that produces this material heterogeneity in accordance with local strain characteristics. Adult calcanei from 11 animals of each species (deer, elk, sheep and horses) were transversely sectioned and examined using light and confocal microscopy. With light microscopy, 20 linear microcracks were identified (deer: 10; elk: six; horse: four; sheep: none), and with confocal microscopy substantially more microdamage with typically non-linear morphology was identified (deer: 45; elk: 24; horse: 15; sheep: none). No clear regional patterns of strain-mode-specific microdamage were found in the three species with microdamage. In these species, the highest overall concentrations occurred in the plantar cortex. This might reflect increased susceptibility of microdamage in habitual tension/shear. Absence of detectable microdamage in sheep calcanei may represent the (presumably) relatively greater physical activity of deer, elk and horses. Absence of differences in microdamage prevalence/morphology between dorsal, medial and lateral cortices of these bones, and the general absence of spatial patterns of strain-mode-specific microdamage, might reflect the prior emergence of non-uniform osteon-mediated adaptations that reduce deleterious concentrations of microdamage by the adult stage of bone development. PMID

  10. Characterization of process holdup material at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.E.; Miller, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The cascade material balance area at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant is characterized by continuous, large, in-process inventories of gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) and very large inputs and outputs of UF 6 over a complete range of 235 U enrichments. Monthly inventories are conducted to quantify the in-place material, but the inventory techniques are blind to material not in the gas phase. Material is removed from the gas phase by any one of four mechanisms: (1) freeze-outs which are the solidification of UF 6 , (2) inleakage of wet air which produces solid uranium oxyfluorides, (3) consumption of uranium through UF 6 reaction with internal metal surfaces, and (4) adsorption of UF 6 on internal surfaces. This presentation describes efforts to better characterize and, where possible, to eliminate or reduce the effects of these mechanisms on material accountability. Freeze-outs and wet air deposits occur under absormal operating conditions, and techniques are available to prevent, detect and reverse them. Consumption and adsorption occur under normal operating conditions and are more complex to manage, however, computer models have been developed to quantify monthly the net effects due to consumption and adsorption. These models have shown that consumption and adsorption effects on inventory differences are significant

  11. Evolution of sourdough microbiota in spontaneous sourdoughs started with different plant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripari, Valery; Gänzle, Michael G; Berardi, Enrico

    2016-09-02

    The preparation of sourdough in bakeries may include the use of inocula, e.g. fruits, flowers or rumen cuts to accelerate the process of selection of suitable microorganisms. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of these inocula on the microbial evolution in sourdoughs. First, the microbiota of nineteen traditional sourdoughs that were initially started with diverse inocula was identified. Second, de novo sourdoughs were started with plant materials and the evolution of sourdough microbiota was investigated by culture, and by high-resolution melting curve quantitative PCR (HRM-qPCR). This study developed a new protocol for HRM-qPCR analysis of yeast microbiota in sourdough, and indicates this independent culture method suitable for characterization of yeasts. Microbiota of traditional sourdoughs were largely independent from the use of inoculum, however, Acetobacter spp. were identified only in sourdoughs started with apple flowers or apple pulp. In de novo sourdoughs started with plant materials, microbiota rapidly stabilized, and were characterized by Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus graminis, or Lactobacillus rossiae, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as dominant species. Competition experiments revealed that the ecological fitness of L. plantarum, L. graminis, and L. rossiae in wheat or rye malt sourdoughs was lower when compared to L. sanfranciscensis, demonstrating that their presence in de novo sourdoughs reflects dispersal limitation. In conclusion, establishment of microbiota in de novo sourdoughs is dispersal limited. This study provides scientific support for the artisanal practice to inoculate de novo sourdoughs with flowers, berries, or related plant material. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Evaluation of Blue Value in different plant materials as a tool for rapid starch determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogusław Samotus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the concentration of starch in plant materials from the intensity of the blue iodine complex, it is necessary to know the Blue Value (B.V., which is defined in this paper as the absorbancy of 100 mg of a starch-iodine complex in 100 ml of aqueous solution. An adequate amount of plant material is treated with a hot CaCl2 solution for 1/2 hour and the solute is diluted to 25 ml with CaCl2. This basic solution serves to measure absorbancy, as well as for starch determination. The first measurement is done by the dilution of a proper amount of basic solution with water and after adding a diluted iodine-iodide solution the reading of B.V. is taken off. The second measurement is done by the precipitation of a starch iodine complex from a proper amount of the basic solution, which is then purified, destroyed by Na2SO3 solution, and starch is determined by the anthrone method. These two readings serve for the establishing of B.V. for the starch. Once established, B.V. can be used for starch determination in the proper plant material. A high degree of variation of the B.V. was found. The highest B.V. was obtained for wrinkled pea seeds (17.4; walnut, potato, smooth pea and pear gave values from 12.6 to 11.0, common bean and broad bean - 10.3 and 9.7, Triticale, carrot, rye, wheat and garden parsley from 8.7 to 8.0 and maize, oat, normal rice from 7.6 to 6.2. The B.V. for amylose was 25.3, for potato starch 12.4, soluble starch 11.9, wheat starch 8.8 and for Triticale and rye starches, 8.7.

  13. Hydrological dispersion of radioactive material in relation to nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This Guide discusses the dispersion of normal and accidental releases of radioactive materials from nuclear power plants into surface water, including the washout of airborne radionuclides, and gives recommendations on information to be collected during the various stages of the siting procedure, a minimum measurement programme and the selection and validation of appropriate mathematical models for predicting dispersion. Guidelines are also provided for the optimal use of models for a specific site situation and for defining the necessary input parameters. Results of existing validation studies are given

  14. The radiolytic cracking decomposion of the plant cellulose materials and their chemcial properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shou Hongxia

    1987-01-01

    Under the treatment with high energy radiation, plant cellulose materials undergo a series of changes in chemical and physical properties. This paper describes the chemical changes of water-soluble carbohydrate, easy-to-hydrolyse carbohydrate, hard-to-hydrolyse carbohydrate, amino acid and protein in rice straw after irradiation with 60 Co γ-ray. The content of water-soluble carbohydrate in rice straw can be increased significantly by such treatment. The combination treatment of irradiation and acid or alkali soaker can reduce the dose for the radiolytic cracking decomposition and produce a good effect

  15. Evaluation of residual life of material of power plant construction elements after long-term operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osasyuk, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    Existing methods are analyzed for estimation of residual resource of elements of constructions, working in creep conditions. A suggested and experimentally verified new method of residual durability forecasting is described permitting the value of the supplementary resource to be specified according to the real state of the material after preoperation. Evaluation results are given for residual life of steam lines received by different methods and advantages of the technique proposed are shown. Reliability of the new technique is confirmed by steam line operation at thermal power plants

  16. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for analysis of pellets of plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Marcos S. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, km 235, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Schenk, Emily R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Santos, Dário [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Professor Arthur Riedel 275, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco José [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Almirall, José R., E-mail: almirall@fiu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States)

    2014-04-01

    An evaluation of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (LAICP OES) for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. Ground leaves of orange citrus, soy and sugarcane were comminuted using a high-speed ball mill, pressed into pellets and sampled directly with laser ablation and analyzed by ICP OES. The limits of detection (LODs) for the method ranged from as low as 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} for Zn to as high as 94 mg kg{sup −1} for K but were generally below 6 mg kg{sup −1} for most of the elements of interest. A certified reference material consisting of a similar matrix (NIST SRM 1547 peach leaves) was used to check the accuracy of the calibration and the reported method resulted in an average bias of ∼ 5% for all the elements of interest. The precision for the reported method ranged from as low as 4% relative standard deviation (RSD) for Mn to as high as 17% RSD for Zn but averaged ∼ 6.5% RSD for all the elements (n = 10). The proposed method was tested for the determination of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained for the corresponding acid digests by ICP-OES, no differences being observed by applying a paired t-test at the 95% confidence level. The reported direct solid sampling method provides a fast alternative to acid digestion that results in similar and appropriate analytical figures of merit with regard to sensitivity, accuracy and precision for plant material analysis. - Highlights: • An evaluation of LA-ICP-OES for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. • Orange citrus, soy and sugarcane plants were pressed into pellets and sampled directly. • The element menu consisted of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B. • LODs for the method ranged from 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} for Zn to 94 mg kg{sup −1} for K. • The precision ranged from 4% RSD for Mn to 17% RSD for Zn (∼ 6.5% RSD average)

  17. A graphical technique for distinguishing plant material and soil from atmospheric deposition in biomonitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    The paper explores the limits to which a new graphical technique can distinguish the various hierarchical levels of sources of trace elements within biomonitors. When applied to data from Portuguese lichens, it appears to resolve four levels of sources, from plant material down to individual types of pollution. Careful factor analysis appears to offer very similar results, being weaker than the graphical method in some aspects and stronger in others. As a result, it now seems possible to determine sources for elements in lichens with better precision and confidence than was available previously. (author)

  18. Nuclear power plant diagnostics - Safety aspects and licensing. Report of a technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) was to review developed systems and methods in diagnostics in the scope of their impacts and importance to the safety of Nuclear Power Plants. Papers presented on TCM came from different sources, from developers, from manufacturers, from licensing authorities and from NPP personal. They reflect up to date status in the given subject. Participants of TCM formulated three working groups to elaborate different questions which were raised during the discussions. Their results are reflected in the three chapter titles of the given material. Annex 1 to this document contains presentations made at the Technical Committee Meeting. Refs, figs, tabs

  19. Air-cleaning philosophy in a nuclear-materials fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, F.Y.; Yoder, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    At the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant there is a major ventilation improvement project underway. To achieve the desired goals of ALARA regarding radioactivity and toxic material releases and natural phenomena insults, a comprehensive air-cleaning philosophy and policy statement was developed. Design of the upgraded systems were evaluated against these statements and we believe that upon completion of the projects that an efficient system will be demonstrated. the design permits reuse and heat recovery of ventilation air, the optimization of sampling points to reduce analytical laboratory services. This paper discusses the basis of the philosophy and the engineering features incorporated to meet this stated objective. Points of compromise are noted

  20. Overview of an automated, near realtime materials accounting system in use at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.C. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A reliable material accounting system is a requirement for the operation of any nuclear facility. At the Savannah River Plant, an automated, near realtime, accounting system has been developed to provide such reliability. The system's design provides timely detection of diversion or accounting problems by monitoring the activity in 18 unit process areas (UPAs). Material balance calculations are performed for each UPA after a batch of material has completed a processing step. In most cases, an inventory difference (ID) for a UPA is established at least every 24 hours. Detection of an accounting problem is further enhanced by an online measurement control program. This program evaluates the performance of most measurement equipment every 12 hours. Error estimates are propagated when a material balance is closed to provide a realtime limit of error for the inventory difference. To minimize false alarms, the data must be reliable and free of input errors. Solution volumes, container identifications, material weights, etc., are all collected via direct computer connections. Manual data input is used only as a backup to the automated system. Automatic data collection also provides a quick and easy method of entering accounting data. Data entry is therefore performed simultaneously with production operations, without reducing throughput. Finally, requests for analytical results required to determine nuclear material concentrations are made online. Concentrations are determined using one of ten assay devices or by analysis performed in a dedicated laboratory. When results are available, the information is posted on the accounting computer and any required adjustments are performed automatically. If necessary, material balances are reclosed to reflect the ID changes caused by a posted results

  1. Manipulator and materials handling systems for reactor decommissioning -Cooperation between the university and the plant operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreck, G.; Bach, F. W.; Haferkamp, H.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear reactor dismantling requires suitable handling systems for tools and disassembled components, as well as qualified and reliable disassembly and cutting techniques. From the angle of radiation protection, remote-controlled handling techniques and underwater techniques are the methods of choice, the latter particularly in continuation of plant operating conditions, and this all the more the more disassembly work proceeds towards the reactor core. With the experience accumulated for 20 years now by the Institut fuer Werkstoffkunde (materials science) of Hannover University by basic research and application-oriented development work in the field of thermal cutting technology, especially plasma arc cutting techniques, as well as development work in the field of remote-controlled materials handling systems, the institute is the cut-out partner for disassembly tasks in reactor decommissioning. (Orig./DG) [de

  2. Preliminary experiences with material testing at the oxyfuel pilot plant at Schwarze Pumpe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjoernhede, Anders [Vattenfall Power, Gothenborg (Sweden); Montgomery, Melanie [Technical Univ. Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Inst. for Mekanisk Teknologi; Vattenfall Heat Nordic, Lyngby (Denmark); Bjurman, Martin; Henderson, Pamela [Vattenfall AB (Sweden). Research and Development; Gerhardt, Alexander [Vattenfall AB, Berlin (Germany). Research and Development

    2010-07-01

    Several material related issues may arise from oxyfuel combustion of coal due to the presence of CO{sub 2} but also as an effect of the partial recirculation of the flue gas. Two examples are increased corrosion and carburisation which may limit steam data, hence limiting the efficiency. A number of corrosion tests, in both conventional air-firing and oxyfuel mode, have been made in Vattenfalls 30 MW oxyfuel pilot plant located in Schwarze Pumpe, Germany. Internally cooled corrosion probes, equipped with ferritic, austenitic, super austenitic steels as well as Ni-based and FeCrAl alloys, simulating superheaters, economisers and air preheaters were exposed for up to 1500 hrs. The analyses show an indication of higher material wastage in oxyfuel compared to air combustion especially at the lower exposure temperatures. This may be due to increased sulphur concentration in corrosion front, increased heat flux, carburisation or other precipitate formations on austenitic steels and Ni-based alloys. (orig.)

  3. Nuclear power plant containment metallic pressure boundary materials and plans for collecting and presenting their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oland, C.B.

    1995-04-01

    A program is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL to assist the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)) in their assessment of the effects of degradation (primarily corrosion) on the structural capacity and leaktight integrity of metal containments and steel liners of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to characterize and quantify manifestations of corrosion on the properties of steels used to construct containment pressure boundary components. This report describes a plan for use in collecting and presenting data and information on ferrous alloys permitted for use in construction of pressure retaining components in concrete and metal containments. Discussions about various degradation mechanisms that could potentially affect the mechanical properties of these materials are also included. Conclusions and recommendations presented in this report will be used to guide the collection of data and information that will be used to prepare a material properties data base for containment steels

  4. Birds and butterflies respond to soil-induced habitat heterogeneity in experimental plantings of tallgrass prairie species managed as agroenergy feedstocks in Iowa, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The positive association between habitat heterogeneity and species diversity has been well-documented for many taxa at various spatial and temporal scales, and the maintenance of habitat heterogeneity in agricultural landscapes has been promoted as a key strategy in efforts to conserve biodiversity....

  5. Hot Water Treatment, Trunk Diseases and Other Critical Factors in the Production of High-Quality Grapevine Planting Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Waite

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the critical factors on which successful grapevine propagation depends and discusses the steps that can be taken to improve the quality of planting material available to growers. Spasmodic occurrences of young vine decline and the failure of planting material have plagued the wine industry since the 1990s. The syndrome now described as Petri disease has been identified as the probable cause of many of the failures, but hot water treatment (HWT of dormant cuttings (50°C/30 min, for the control of Phaeomoniella chlamydospora and other endogenous pathogens, has also been implicated in the losses. HWT is known to cause a temporary switch to fermentative respiration and early retarded growth in treated material, particularly in Pinot Noir, but the effects of HWT on dormant vine tissue are not yet fully understood. Poor nursery hygiene and poor storage and handling practices during propagation and planting have also been implicated in vine failure. Demand for planting material has exceeded supply and there has been little incentive for nurseries to improve their standards. The quality of planting material could be significantly improved by changing nursery practices, particularly by discontinuing the practice of soaking cuttings in water, treated or untreated, and by improving general standards of nursery hygiene and the management of cool rooms. There is a need to develop a set of universal quality standards for cuttings and rooted vines. Growers also need to be made aware of the characteristics and benefits of high quality planting material.

  6. THE DEVELOPMENT OF PLANTS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF CONCENTRATED PASTES OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLE RAW MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. Magomedov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Developed a new system for producing concentrated semi-finished products in the form of pastes for the food industry. Currently, an important task of the food industry is the creation of new products with the aim of improving the structure of the range, saving scarce raw materials, as well as reduce sugar intake; development of product functionality and products with extended shelf life. The use of local non-traditional types of plant materials can contribute to solving existing problems. Fruit and vegetable pastes are a valuable food products which can be used as a semifinished product in the confectionery, bakery, food concentrates industry. Fruit and vegetable purees have a distinct structurally viscous or pseudo-plastic properties and concentration form a very viscous mass. Already in the beginning of the process of concentration, i.e. at a relatively low degree of evaporation that leads to a rapid increase in the viscosity of the concentrate mass and reduce evaporation. With increasing temperature is the burning mass, and also change its color and flavor. Therefore, for the concentration of fruit and vegetable purees, you must use equipment whose design takes into account the possible rheological and thermal problems. The analysis of literary data structures evaporators and studies, we developed a system for producing concentrated pastes of fruit and vegetable raw materials. Developed installation can increase the quality of the finished product due to the intensification of the process of concentration, to reduce material and energy resources, increase productivity.

  7. IAEA TC Project 'Strengthening safety and reliability of fuel and materials in nuclear power plants'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makihara, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The Regional TC Project in Europe RER9076 'Strengthening Safety and Reliability of Fuel and Materials in Nuclear Power Plants' was launched in 2003 as a four-year project and was subsequently extended in 2006 to run through 2008. The purpose of the Project is to support the Central and Eastern European countries with the necessary tools to fulfill their own fuel and material licensing needs. The main objective will be to provide quality data on fuel and materials irradiated in power reactors and in dedicated experiments carried out in material test reactors (MTRs). Within the framework of the Project, ten tasks were implemented. These included experiments performed at the test facilities in the region, training courses and workshops related to fuel safety. While several tasks are expected to be completed by the end of RER9076, some remain. It would be desirable to initiate a new RER Project from the next TC cycle (2009-2011) in order to take over RER9076 and to implement new tasks required for enhancing fuel safety in the region. (author)

  8. Heterogeneous Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Davide; Guerraoui, Rachid; Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Koldehofe, Boris; Mogensen, Martin; Monod, Maxime; Quéma, Vivien

    Gossip-based information dissemination protocols are considered easy to deploy, scalable and resilient to network dynamics. Load-balancing is inherent in these protocols as the dissemination work is evenly spread among all nodes. Yet, large-scale distributed systems are usually heterogeneous with respect to network capabilities such as bandwidth. In practice, a blind load-balancing strategy might significantly hamper the performance of the gossip dissemination.

  9. Derived heuristics-based consistent optimization of material flow in a gold processing plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, Christie; Deb, Kalyanmoy

    2018-01-01

    Material flow in a chemical processing plant often follows complicated control laws and involves plant capacity constraints. Importantly, the process involves discrete scenarios which when modelled in a programming format involves if-then-else statements. Therefore, a formulation of an optimization problem of such processes becomes complicated with nonlinear and non-differentiable objective and constraint functions. In handling such problems using classical point-based approaches, users often have to resort to modifications and indirect ways of representing the problem to suit the restrictions associated with classical methods. In a particular gold processing plant optimization problem, these facts are demonstrated by showing results from MATLAB®'s well-known fmincon routine. Thereafter, a customized evolutionary optimization procedure which is capable of handling all complexities offered by the problem is developed. Although the evolutionary approach produced results with comparatively less variance over multiple runs, the performance has been enhanced by introducing derived heuristics associated with the problem. In this article, the development and usage of derived heuristics in a practical problem are presented and their importance in a quick convergence of the overall algorithm is demonstrated.

  10. PWSCC issues and material aging management for nuclear power plants in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Seong Sik; Lim, Yun Soo; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Sung Woo; Kim, Hong Pyo [Nuclear Materials Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of alloy 600 in a PWR has been reported in the control rod drive mechanism (CRDM). Beginning in the mid-seventies, the pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants suffered from a sequence of SCC events mostly confined to S/G tubes, initially ODSCC, and then PWSCC. PWSCC was first reported in Bugey 3 vessel head penetration made of forged alloy 600 materials in September 1991. Other PWRs experienced cracking attributed to the PWSCC of the major primary side weld area made from alloy 182 at the end of the year 2000. Examples of dissimilar metal butt welds between the main austenitic stainless steel primary circuit piping and the outlet pressure vessel nozzles are the cracking of Ringhals 4, V. C. Summer and some J-groove welds of the CRDM of the RVH at Oconee 1. In addition to the Reactor Vessel Head (RVH), the PWSCC of alloy 182/82 has been reported at bottom mounted instrumentation (BMI) nozzle J-welds, steam generator(SG) J-weld drain nozzle, and SG tube sheet cladding. Two cases of boric acid precipitation were reported at the bottom head surface of a SG in Korea. Cracking was found in the cold leg drain nozzles made of alloy 600 in two units, hot side nozzles were fabricated with alloy 690 from the beginning. The cracking of steam generator tubings made of alloy 600 is another concern in Korea, because some plants still have alloy 600 HTMA tubings. The flow accelerated corrosion of secondary pipings is another type of corrosion problems, though it has not been treated as a severe problem in Korea. To properly manage the corrosion issues and seek out research items for maintaining the integrity of nuclear plants, the PRIMA-Net (Proactive Research and Innovative Material Aging Network) was organized in 2007. The research and development expert group consists of a National research laboratory (KAERI), regulatory body (KINS), utility (KHNP), engineering and design company (KEPCO EC), manufacturer (Doosan Heavy

  11. Materials integrity analysis for application of POSCO developed STS to Korean Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun-Young, Ch.; Tae-Eun, J.; Young-Sik, K.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: POSCO has developed duplex stainless steel (S32750) and hyper super duplex stainless steels for the purpose of using them in the secondary circulation cooling water system in Korean nuclear power plants. This system supplies seawater to cooling water heat exchanger tubes, related pipes and chlorine injection system. In normal operation, seawater is supplied to heat exchanger through the exit of circulation pump headers and the heat exchanged sea water is extracted to the discharge pipes in circulation cooling water system connected to the circulation water discharge lines. The flow velocity of circulation cooling water system in nuclear power plants is high and damages of components from corrosion are severe. Therefore, this environment makes requiring of using high strength and high corrosion resistant steels. Hyper duplex stainless steel (27Cr-7.0Ni-2.5Mo-3.2W-0.35N) has been newly developed in Korea and is being improved for applying to nuclear power plants. In this study, the physical and mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of currently producing stainless steels and newly developed materials are qualitatively evaluated in comparative to commercial stainless steels in other countries. The properties of weld are analyzed and the best compositions of welding rod are suggested. The optimum weld condition is derived for ensuring HAZ phase ratios and controlling weld cracks. For applying these materials to the seawater heat exchanger, CCT and CPT in weldments are measured using mock-up tube testers that are newly designed for this study. Coupons of candidate materials are introduced in the real system and corrosion resistance of them are analyzed. As results of all experiments, the current CCT and CPT criteria in Korean nuclear power plants are reviewed, and the more actual and strengthened criteria will be suggested. The real scale components made of newly developed hyper super duplex stainless steel will be applied to

  12. Application of high temperature phase change materials for improved efficiency in waste-to-energy plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Magro, Fabio; Xu, Haoxin; Nardin, Gioacchino; Romagnoli, Alessandro

    2018-03-01

    This study reports the thermal analysis of a novel thermal energy storage based on high temperature phase change material (PCM) used to improve efficiency in waste-to-energy plants. Current waste-to-energy plants efficiency is limited by the steam generation cycle which is carried out with boilers composed by water-walls (i.e. radiant evaporators), evaporators, economizers and superheaters. Although being well established, this technology is subjected to limitations related with high temperature corrosion and fluctuation in steam production due to the non-homogenous composition of solid waste; this leads to increased maintenance costs and limited plants availability and electrical efficiency. The proposed solution in this paper consists of replacing the typical refractory brick installed in the combustion chamber with a PCM-based refractory brick capable of storing a variable heat flux and to release it on demand as a steady heat flux. By means of this technology it is possible to mitigate steam production fluctuation, to increase temperature of superheated steam over current corrosion limits (450°C) without using coated superheaters and to increase the electrical efficiency beyond 34%. In the current paper a detailed thermo-mechanical analysis has been carried out in order to compare the performance of the PCM-based refractory brick against the traditional alumina refractory bricks. The PCM considered in this paper is aluminium (and its alloys) whereas its container consists of high density ceramics (such as Al 2 O 3 , AlN and Si 3 N 4 ); the different coefficient of linear thermal expansion for the different materials requires a detailed thermo-mechanical analysis to be carried out to ascertain the feasibility of the proposed technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantifying spatial heterogeneity from images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomerantz, Andrew E; Song Yiqiao

    2008-01-01

    Visualization techniques are extremely useful for characterizing natural materials with complex spatial structure. Although many powerful imaging modalities exist, simple display of the images often does not convey the underlying spatial structure. Instead, quantitative image analysis can extract the most important features of the imaged object in a manner that is easier to comprehend and to compare from sample to sample. This paper describes the formulation of the heterogeneity spectrum to show the extent of spatial heterogeneity as a function of length scale for all length scales to which a particular measurement is sensitive. This technique is especially relevant for describing materials that simultaneously present spatial heterogeneity at multiple length scales. In this paper, the heterogeneity spectrum is applied for the first time to images from optical microscopy. The spectrum is measured for thin section images of complex carbonate rock cores showing heterogeneity at several length scales in the range 10-10 000 μm.

  14. Visualization and quantification of heterogeneous diffusion rates in granodiorite samples by X-ray absorption imaging. Diffusion within gouge materials, altered rim and intact rock matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, S.J.; Tidwell, V.C.; Uchida, M.

    2001-01-01

    Matrix diffusion is one of the most important contaminant migration retardation processes in crystalline rocks. Performance assessment calculations in various countries assume that only the area of the fracture surface where advection is active provides access to the rock matrix. However, accessibility to the matrix could be significantly enhanced with diffusion into stagnant zones, fracture fillings, and through an alteration rim in the matrix. Laboratory visualization experiments were conducted on granodiorite samples to investigate and quantify diffusion rates within different zones of a Cretaceous granodiorite. Samples were collected from the Kamaishi experimental site in the northern part of the main island of Japan. Diffusion of iodine out of the sample is visualized and rates are measured using x-ray absorption imaging. X-ray images allow for measurements of relative iodine concentration and relative iodine mass as a function of time and two-dimensional space at a sub-millimeter spatial resolution. In addition, two-dimensional heterogeneous porosity fields (at the same resolution as the relative concentration fields) are measured. This imaging technique allows for a greater understanding of the spatial variability of diffusion rates than can be accomplished with standard bulk measurements. It was found that diffusion rates were fastest in partially gouge-filled fractures. Diffusion rates in the recrystallized calcite-based fracture-filling material were up to an order of magnitude lower than in gouge-filled fractures. Diffusion in altered matrix around the fractures was over an order of magnitude lower than that in the gouge-filled fractures. Healed fractures did not appear to have different diffusion rates than the unaltered matrix

  15. Visualization and quantification of heterogeneous diffusion rates in granodiorite samples by X-ray absorption imaging. Diffusion within gouge materials, altered rim and intact rock matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, S.J.; Tidwell, V.C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Uchida, M. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    Matrix diffusion is one of the most important contaminant migration retardation processes in crystalline rocks. Performance assessment calculations in various countries assume that only the area of the fracture surface where advection is active provides access to the rock matrix. However, accessibility to the matrix could be significantly enhanced with diffusion into stagnant zones, fracture fillings, and through an alteration rim in the matrix. Laboratory visualization experiments were conducted on granodiorite samples to investigate and quantify diffusion rates within different zones of a Cretaceous granodiorite. Samples were collected from the Kamaishi experimental site in the northern part of the main island of Japan. Diffusion of iodine out of the sample is visualized and rates are measured using x-ray absorption imaging. X-ray images allow for measurements of relative iodine concentration and relative iodine mass as a function of time and two-dimensional space at a sub-millimeter spatial resolution. In addition, two-dimensional heterogeneous porosity fields (at the same resolution as the relative concentration fields) are measured. This imaging technique allows for a greater understanding of the spatial variability of diffusion rates than can be accomplished with standard bulk measurements. It was found that diffusion rates were fastest in partially gouge-filled fractures. Diffusion rates in the recrystallized calcite-based fracture-filling material were up to an order of magnitude lower than in gouge-filled fractures. Diffusion in altered matrix around the fractures was over an order of magnitude lower than that in the gouge-filled fractures. Healed fractures did not appear to have different diffusion rates than the unaltered matrix.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF THE REFERENCE MATERIALS PRODUCTION BRANCH IN THE JOINT STOCK COMPANY "THE GULIDOV KRASNOYARSK NON-FERROUS METALS PLANT"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Shatnykh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the development of the branch for the reference materials production in the Joint Stock Company "The Gulidov Krasnoyarsk Non-Ferrous Metals Plant" (JSC "Krastsvetmet". Here the most important workings for reference materials including the work for the London precious metal exchange, current and future works are stated.

  17. Metallic substrate materials for thin film oxygen transport membranes for application in a fossil power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Y.; Baumann, S.; Sebold, D.; Meulenberg, W.A.; Stoever, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energieforschung (IEF) - IEF-1 Materials Synthesis and Processing

    2010-07-01

    La{sub 0.58}Sr{sub 0.4}CO{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF58428) and Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CO{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 3-{delta}} (BSCF5582) exhibit high oxygen permeability due to their high ionic and electronic conductivity. For this reason they are under discussion for application in oxygen transport membranes (OTMs) in zero-emission power plants using oxyfuel technology. A thin film membrane which can increase the oxygen flux is beneficial and a structural substrate is required. Two types of Ni-base alloys were studied as substrate material candidates with a number of advantages, such as high strength, high temperature stability, easy joining and similar thermal expansion coefficient to the selected perovskite materials. Chemical compositions and thermal expansion coefficients of Ni-base alloys were measured in this study. LSCF58428 and BSCF5582 layers were screen printed on Ni-based alloys and co-fired at high temperature in air. The microstructure and element analysis of samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and EDX). A Ni-base alloy, MCrAlY, with a high Al content was the most suitable substrate material, and showed better chemical compatibility with perovskite materials at high temperature than Hastelloy X, which is a chromia-forming Ni-base alloy. A reaction occurred between Sr in the perovskite and the alumina surface layers on MCr-AlY. However, the reaction zone did not increase in thickness during medium-term annealing at 800 C in air. Hence, it is expected that this reaction will not prevent the application of MCr-AlY as a substrate material. (orig.)

  18. Mechanochemical modification of the composition and structure of plant raw materials to control the combustion of alternative fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bychkov Aleksey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibilities of mechanochemistry in processing of renewable lignocellulose raw material into solid kinds of biofuel are demonstrated in this work. A review of lignocellulose raw materials promising for our country is presented. These raw materials include wastes from agriculture and forestry, and the biomass of rapidly growing plants. The physicochemical properties of lignocellulose materials with different delignification degrees were modeled with the help of the artificial mixtures of plant raw material with purified cellulose and lignin. The data illustrating the effect of disperse state and lignin content on the reactivity of the material in subsequent combustion are presented. The tests at the combustion bench with the thermal power up to 5 MW allowed determining the optimal combustion parameters for the obtained biofuel in the autothermal mode.

  19. Statistical models for thermal ageing of steel materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persoz, M.

    1996-01-01

    Some category of steel materials in nuclear power plants may be subjected to thermal ageing, whose extent depends on the steel chemical composition and the ageing parameters, i.e. temperature and duration. This ageing affects the 'impact strength' of the materials, which is a mechanical property. In order to assess the residual lifetime of these components, a probabilistic study has been launched, which takes into account the scatter over the input parameters of the mechanical model. Predictive formulae for estimating the impact strength of aged materials are important input data of the model. A data base has been created with impact strength results obtained from an ageing program in laboratory and statistical treatments have been undertaken. Two kinds of model have been developed, with non linear regression methods (PROC NLIN, available in SAS/STAT). The first one, using a hyperbolic tangent function, is partly based on physical considerations, and the second one, of an exponential type, is purely statistically built. The difficulties consist in selecting the significant parameters and attributing initial values to the coefficients, which is a requirement of the NLIN procedure. This global statistical analysis has led to general models that are unction of the chemical variables and the ageing parameters. These models are as precise (if not more) as local models that had been developed earlier for some specific values of ageing temperature and ageing duration. This paper describes the data and the methodology used to build the models and analyses the results given by the SAS system. (author)

  20. Stabilization/solidification of battery debris ampersand lead impacted material at Schuylkill Metals, Plant City, Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anguiano, T.; Floyd, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Schuylkill Metals facility in Plant City Florida (SMPCI) operated as a battery recycling facility for approximately 13 years. During its operation, the facility disposed of battery components in surrounding wetland areas. In March of 1991 the U.S. EPA and SMPCI entered into a Consent Decree for the remediation of the SMPCI site using stabilization/solidification and on-site disposal. In November of 1994, ENTACT began remediation at the facility and to date has successfully stabilized/solidified over 228,000 tons of lead impacted battery components and lead impacted material. The ENTACT process reduces the size of the material to be treated to ensure that complete mixing of the phosphate/cement additive is achieved thereby promoting the chemical reactions of stabilization and solidification. ENTACT has met the following performance criteria for treated material at the SMPCI site: (1) Hydraulic Conductivity less than 1x10 -6 cm/s, (2) Unconfined Compressive Strength greater than 50 psi, (3) Lead, Cadmium, Arsenic, Chromium TCLP Leachability below hazardous levels

  1. Tentative to use wastes from thermal power plants for construction building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Quoc-Bao; Phan, To-Anh-Vu; Tran, Minh-Tung; Le, Duc-Hien

    2018-04-01

    Thermal power plants (TPP) generates wastes (bottom and fly ashes) which become a serious environmental problem in Vietnam. Indeed, although in several countries fly ash can be used for cement industry, fly ash from actual TPP in Vietnam does not have enough good quality for cement production, because the fly ash treatment phase has not yet included in the generations of existing Vietnamese TPP. That is why bottom ash and fly ash purely become wastes and their evacuation is an urgent demand of the society. This paper presents an investigation using fly and bottom ashes in the manufacturing of construction materials. The main aims of this study is to reduce environmental impacts of fly and bottom ashes, and to test another non-conventional binder to replace cement in the manufacture of unburnt bricks. Several proportions of fly ash, bottom ash, cement, gravel, sand and water were tested to manufacture concretes. Then, geopolymer was prepared from the fly ash and an activator. Specimens were tested in uniaxial compressions. Results showed that the cement concrete tested had the compressive strengths which could be used for low rise constructions and the material using geopolymer could be used for non-load-bearing materials (unburnt bricks).

  2. Optimal measurement uncertainties for materials accounting in a fast breeder reactor spent-fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayem, H.A.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    Optimization techniques are used to calculate measurement uncertainties for materials accountability instruments in a fast breeder reactor spent-fuel reprocessing plant. Optimal measurement uncertainties are calculated so that performance goals for detecting materials loss are achieved while minimizing the total instrument development cost. Improved materials accounting in the chemical separations process (111 kg Pu/day) to meet 8-kg plutonium abrupt (1 day) and 40-kg plutonium protracted (6 months) loss-detection goals requires: process tank volume and concentration measurements having precisions less than or equal to 1%; accountability and plutonium sample tank volume measurements having precisions less than or equal to 0.3%, short-term correlated errors less than or equal to 0.04%, and long-term correlated errors less than or equal to 0.04%; and accountability and plutonium sample tank concentration measurements having precisions less than or equal to 0.4%, short-term correlated errors less than or equal to 0.1%, and long-term correlated errors less than or equal to 0.05%

  3. Area effect on galvanic corrosion of condenser materials with titanium tubes in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Seong Sik; Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Uh Chul

    1993-01-01

    Titanium tubes have recently been used in condensers of nuclear power plants since titanium has very good corrosion resistance to seawater. However, when it is connected to Cu alloys as tube sheet materials and these Cu alloys are connected to carbon steels as water box materials, it makes significant galvanic corrosion on connected materials. It is expected from electrochemical tests that the corrosion rate of carbon steel will increase when it is galvanically coupled with Ti or Cu in sea water and the corrosion rate of Cu will increase when it is coupled with Ti, of this couple is exposed to sea water for a long time. It is also expected that the surface area ratios, R 1 (surface area of carbon steel/surface area of Ti) and R 2 (surface area of carbon steel/surface area of Cu) are very improtant for the galvanic corrosion of carbon steel and that these should not be kept to low values in order to minimize the galvanic corrosion on the carbon steel of the water box. Immersed galvanic corrosion tests show that the corrosion rate of carbon steel is 4.4 mpy when this ratio is 10 -2 . The galvanic corrosion rate of this carbon steel is increased from 4.4 mpy to 13 mpy at this area ratio, 1, when this connected galvanic specimen is galvanically coupled with a Ti tube. This can be rationalized by the combined effects of R 1 and R 2 on the polarization curve. (Author)

  4. Verification of nuclear material balances: General theory and application to a highly enriched uranium fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avenhaus, R.; Beedgen, R.; Neu, H.

    1980-08-01

    In the theoretical part it is shown that under the assumption, that in case of diversion the operator falsifies all data by a class specific amount, it is optimal in the sense of the probability of detection to use the difference MUF-D as the test statistics. However, as there are arguments for keeping the two tests separately, and furthermore, as it is not clear that the combined test statistics is optimal for any diversion strategy, the overall guaranteed probability of detection for the bivariate test is determined. A numerical example is given applying the theoretical part. Using the material balance data of a Highly Enriched Uranium fabrication plant the variances of MUF, D (no diversion) and MUF-D are calculated with the help of the standard deviations of operator and inspector measurements. The two inventories of the material balance are stratified. The samples sizes of the strata and the total inspection effort for data verification are determined by game theoretical methods (attribute sampling). On the basis of these results the overall detection probability of the combined system (data verification and material accountancy) is determined both for the MUF-D test and the bivariate (D,MUF) test as a function of the goal quantity. The results of both tests are evaluated for different diversion strategies. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Natural and construction materials and plant products. Raw materials, constructional physics, design and construction. 2. upd. and enl. ed.; Natuerliche und pflanzliche Baustoffe. Rohstoff - Bauphysik - Konstruktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzmann, Gerhard; Wangelin, Matthias; Bruns, Rainer

    2012-07-01

    The book discusses all relevant renewable constructional materials made from fibre or dyeing plants along with their physical and chemical fundamentals. Protection of resources, environmental protection, and pollutants in constructional materials are gone into as well. [German] Dieses Buch behandelt alle wichtige nachwachsenden, pflanzlichen Baustoffe aus Faser- und Faerberpflanzen sowie dazugehoerige physikalische und chemische Grundlagen. Angesprochen werden auch Ressourcen- und Umweltschutz sowie Schadstoffe aus Bauprodukten.

  6. Determination of silicon in plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Paulino Florêncio de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Centro de Tecnologia Canavieira, PO Box 162, 13400-970 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Santos, Dário [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Prof. Artur Riedel, 275, 09972-270, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Silva Gomes, Marcos da [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Guerra, Marcelo Braga Bueno [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco José, E-mail: fjkrug@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-05-01

    In spite of the importance of Si for improving the productivity of many important crops, such as those from the Poaceae family (e.g. sugar cane, maize, wheat, rice), its quantitative determination in plants is seldom carried out and restricted to few laboratories in the world. There is a survey of methods in the literature, but most of them are either laborious or difficult to validate in view of the low availability of reference materials with a certified Si mass fraction. The aim of this study is to propose a method for the direct determination of Si in pellets of plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The experimental setup was designed by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm (5 ns, 10 Hz) and the emission signals were collected by lenses into an optical fiber coupled to an Echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified charge-coupled device. Experiments were carried out with leaves from 24 sugar cane varieties, with mass fractions varying from ca. 2 to 10 g kg{sup −1} Si. Pellets prepared from cryogenically ground leaves were used as test samples for both method development and validation of the calibration model. Best results were obtained when the test samples were interrogated with laser fluence of 50 J cm{sup −2} (750 μm spot size) and measurements carried out at Si I 212.412 nm emission line. The results obtained by LIBS were compared with those from inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after oven-induced alkaline digestion, and no significant differences were observed after applying the Student's t-test at 95% confidence level. The trueness of the proposed LIBS method was also confirmed from the analysis of CRM GBW 07603 (Bush branches and leaves). - Highlights: • This is the first application of LIBS for determination of Si in plant materials. • Data indicate that the method is appropriate for Si diagnosis in routine analysis. • Silicon can be simultaneously determined with macro- and

  7. Determination of silicon in plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Paulino Florêncio de; Santos, Dário; Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Silva Gomes, Marcos da; Guerra, Marcelo Braga Bueno; Krug, Francisco José

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the importance of Si for improving the productivity of many important crops, such as those from the Poaceae family (e.g. sugar cane, maize, wheat, rice), its quantitative determination in plants is seldom carried out and restricted to few laboratories in the world. There is a survey of methods in the literature, but most of them are either laborious or difficult to validate in view of the low availability of reference materials with a certified Si mass fraction. The aim of this study is to propose a method for the direct determination of Si in pellets of plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The experimental setup was designed by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm (5 ns, 10 Hz) and the emission signals were collected by lenses into an optical fiber coupled to an Echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified charge-coupled device. Experiments were carried out with leaves from 24 sugar cane varieties, with mass fractions varying from ca. 2 to 10 g kg −1 Si. Pellets prepared from cryogenically ground leaves were used as test samples for both method development and validation of the calibration model. Best results were obtained when the test samples were interrogated with laser fluence of 50 J cm −2 (750 μm spot size) and measurements carried out at Si I 212.412 nm emission line. The results obtained by LIBS were compared with those from inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after oven-induced alkaline digestion, and no significant differences were observed after applying the Student's t-test at 95% confidence level. The trueness of the proposed LIBS method was also confirmed from the analysis of CRM GBW 07603 (Bush branches and leaves). - Highlights: • This is the first application of LIBS for determination of Si in plant materials. • Data indicate that the method is appropriate for Si diagnosis in routine analysis. • Silicon can be simultaneously determined with macro- and micronutrients

  8. Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-03-21

    In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for

  9. Ageing studies on materials, components and process instruments used in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bora, J.S.

    1997-04-01

    This report is a compilation of test results of thermal and radiation ageing tests carried out in the laboratory over a period of 25 years on diverse engineering materials, components and instruments used in nuclear power plants. Test items covered are different types of electrical cables, elastomers, surface coatings, electrical and electronics components and process instruments. Effects of thermal and radiation ageing on performance parameters are shown in tabular forms. Apart from finding the characteristics, capabilities and limitations of test items, ageing research has helped in pin-pointing sub-standard and critical parts and necessary corrective action has been taken. This report is expected to be quite useful to the manufacturers users and researchers for reference and guidance. (author)

  10. Degradation evaluation of high temperature pipeline material for power plant using ultrasonic noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Chung, Min Hwa; Cho, Yong Sang; Lee, In Cheol

    2001-01-01

    Boiler high-temperature pipelines such as main steam pipe, header and steam drum in fossil power plants are degraded by creep and thermal fatigue damage due to severe operating conditions such as high temperature and high pressure for an extended period time. Conventional measurement techniques for measuring creep damage have such disadvantages as complex preparation and measurement procedures, too many control parameters. And also these techniques have low practicality and applied only to component surfaces with good accessibility. In this paper, artificial degradation test and ultrasonic measurement for their degraded specimens were carried out for the purpose of evaluation for creep and thermal fatigue damage. Absolute measuring method of quantitative ultrasonic measurement for material degradation was established, and long term creep/thermal fatigue degradation tests using life prediction formula were carried out. As a result of ultrasonic tests for crept and thermal fatigued specimens, we conformed that the ultrasonic noise linearly increased in proportion to the increase of degradation.

  11. JORDANIAN ZEOLITIC TUFF AS A RAW MATERIAL FOR THE PREPARATION OF SUBSTRATES USED FOR PLANT GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Manolov

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the problems faced in front of industry for potting media is limited amount of quality row materials (mainly peat for unlimited production of quality substrates in the future. The using of natural minerals for production of substrates or as amendments for existing substrates is possible solution for this problem. The natural zeolites with their specific properties – high CEC, high content of macro and microelements are one of good alternatives to the traditional potting media. Each zeolite deposit has unique chemical composition, physical and mechanical properties. That is why obligatory preliminary condition for their successful application in agriculture is caring out of biological study with agricultural plants for determination of the optimal parameters of chemical and physicochemical properties of the substrates.

  12. Evaluation of automated analysis of 15N and total N in plant material and soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    Simultaneous determination of N-15 and total N using an automated nitrogen analyser interfaced to a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (ANA-MS method) was evaluated. The coefficient of variation (CV) of repeated analyses of homogeneous standards and samples at natural abundance...... was lower than 0.1%. The CV of repeated analyses of N-15-labelled plant material and soil samples varied between 0.3% and 1.1%. The reproducibility of repeated total N analyses using the automated method was comparable to results obtained with a semi-micro Kjeldahl procedure. However, the automated method...... analysis showed that the recovery of inorganic N in the NH3 trap was lower when the N was diffused from water than from 2 M KCl. The results also indicated that different proportions of the NO3- and the NH4+ in aqueous solution were recovered in the trap after combined diffusion. The method is most suited...

  13. Fungal enzyme production in seeds of transgenic canola plants for conversion of cellulosic materials to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, K.J.; Beauchemin, K.A. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB (Canada); Moloney, M.M. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1997-07-01

    The fuel alcohol industry makes use of industrial enzymes to effectively degrade fibrous plant cell walls. Carbohydrates in cellulosic materials are in the form of complex sugars that can be hydrolyzed to simple sugars by fungal fibrolytic enzymes such as cellulases and xylanases. This study was conducted to find a cost effective way to produce fibrolytic enzymes using gene fusion technology in which a xylanase gene and a cellulase gene from two fungal species are introduced into canola to be a carrier for the production of these enzymes. The two genes had been analyzed for maximal enzymatic activity to minimize side effects. Results of the study demonstrated the stability and potential of transgenic oil-bodies as an immobilized enzyme matrix, and showed that it is possible to express fibrolytic enzymes in canola.

  14. NDA systems to support nuclear material control and accounting in spent fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.C.B.; Clark, P.A.; Nicols, O.P.; Whitehouse, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    Detailed descriptions of a number of instrument systems relating to accountancy and safeguarding of plutonium operations and storage on Thermal Oxide Plant (Thorp) are provided. The systems described include the Plutonium Inventory Measurement System (PIMS), used to provide Near Real Time Materials Accountancy (NRTMA) information within the Thorp plutonium finishing area; the Product Can Contents Monitor (PCCM), used to verify can weight measurements and isotopic composition and; the In-Store Plutonium Verification Monitor, used to provide in-situ measurements of plutonium in cans whilst they are in their storage channels. These nondestructive systems are necessarily combined with other physical security, surveillance and identification arrangements for the handling and storage of plutonium product cans [ru

  15. High-throughput analysis of amino acids in plant materials by single quadrupole mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl-Lassen, Rasmus; van Hecke, Jan Julien Josef; Jørgensen, Henning

    2018-01-01

    that it is very time consuming with typical chromatographic run times of 70 min or more. Results: We have here developed a high-throughput method for analysis of amino acid profiles in plant materials. The method combines classical protein hydrolysis and derivatization with fast separation by UHPLC and detection...... reducing the overall analytical costs compared to methods based on more advanced mass spectrometers....... by a single quadrupole (QDa) mass spectrometer. The chromatographic run time is reduced to 10 min and the precision, accuracy and sensitivity of the method are in line with other recent methods utilizing advanced and more expensive mass spectrometers. The sensitivity of the method is at least a factor 10...

  16. PLE in the analysis of plant compounds. Part II: One-cycle PLE in determining total amount of analyte in plant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Wianowska, Dorota

    2005-04-29

    Pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) is recognised as one of the most effective sample preparation methods. Despite the enhanced extraction power of PLE, the full recovery of an analyte from plant material may require multiple extractions of the same sample. The presented investigations show the possibility of estimating the true concentration value of an analyte in plant material employing one-cycle PLE in which plant samples of different weight are used. The performed experiments show a linear dependence between the reciprocal value of the analyte amount (E*), extracted in single-step PLE from a plant matrix, and the ratio of plant material mass to extrahent volume (m(p)/V(s)). Hence, time-consuming multi-step PLE can be replaced by a few single-step PLEs performed at different (m(p)/V(s)) ratios. The concentrations of rutin in Sambucus nigra L. and caffeine in tea and coffee estimated by means of the tested procedure are almost the same as their concentrations estimated by multiple PLE.

  17. Turning Waste into Value: Nanosized Natural Plant Materials of Solanum incanum L. and Pterocarpus erinaceus Poir with Promising Antimicrobial Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharoon Griffin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous plants are known to exhibit considerable biological activities in the fields of medicine and agriculture, yet access to their active ingredients is often complicated, cumbersome and expensive. As a consequence, many plants harbouring potential drugs or green phyto-protectants go largely unnoticed, especially in poorer countries which, at the same time, are in desperate need of antimicrobial agents. As in the case of plants such as the Jericho tomato, Solanum incanum, and the common African tree Pterocarpus erinaceus, nanosizing of original plant materials may provide an interesting alternative to extensive extraction and isolation procedures. Indeed, it is straightforward to obtain considerable amounts of such common, often weed-like plants, and to mill the dried material to more or less uniform particles of microscopic and nanoscopic size. These particles exhibit activity against Steinernema feltiae or Escherichia coli, which is comparable to the ones seen for processed extracts of the same, respective plants. As S. feltiae is used as a model nematode indicative of possible phyto-protective uses in the agricultural arena, these findings also showcase the potential of nanosizing of crude “waste” plant materials for specific practical applications, especially—but not exclusively—in developing countries lacking a more sophisticated industrial infrastructure.

  18. Effect of turbine materials on power generation efficiency from free water vortex hydro power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sritram, P; Treedet, W; Suntivarakorn, R

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study the effect of turbine materials on power generation efficiency from the water free vortex hydro power plant made of steel and aluminium. These turbines consisted of five blades and were twisted with angles along the height of water. These blades were the maximum width of 45 cm. and height of 32 cm. These turbines were made and experimented for the water free vortex hydro power plant in the laboratory with the water flow rate of 0.68, 1.33, 1.61, 2.31, 2.96 and 3.63 m 3 /min and an electrical load of 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 W respectively. The experimental results were calculated to find out the torque, electric power, and electricity production efficiency. From the experiment, the results showed that the maximum power generation efficiency of steel and aluminium turbine were 33.56% and 34.79% respectively. From the result at the maximum water flow rate of 3.63 m 3 /min, it was found that the torque value and electricity production efficiency of aluminium turbine was higher than that of steel turbine at the average of 8.4% and 8.14%, respectively. This result showed that light weight of water turbine can increase the torque and power generation efficiency. (paper)

  19. Environmental status of plant-based industries. Biomass and bio-materials; Bilan environnemental des filieres vegetales. Biomasse et biomateriaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vindimian, E; Boeglin, N; Houillon, G; Osset, Ph; Vial, E; Leguern, Y; Gosse, G; Gabrielle, B; Dohy, M; Bewa, H; Rigal, L; Guilbert, St; Cesar, G; Pandard, P; Oster, D; Normand, N; Piccardi, M; Garoux, V; Arnaud, L; Barbier, J; Mougin, G; Krausz, P; Pluquet, V; Massacrier, L; Dussaud, J

    2005-07-01

    The French agency of environment and energy mastery (Ademe) and the agency of Agriculture for chemistry and energy (Agrice) have jointly organized these technical days about the potentialities of plant-based products in front of the big environmental stakes of the diversification of energy sources, the development of new outputs for agriculture and the opening of new fields of industrial innovation. This document gathers the articles and transparencies of the presentations given during these 2 days of conference: 1 - Biomass and life cycle analysis (LCA) - impacts and benefits: introduction to LCA (E. Vindimian), keys to understand this environmental evaluation tool (N. Boeglin); environmental status of plant-based industries for chemistry, materials and energy: LCA knowledge status, plant versus fossil (G. Houillon), detailed analysis of 2 industries: agro-materials and bio-polymers (J. Payet); example of environmental and LCA studies: energy and greenhouse gas statuses of the biofuel production processes (P. Osset, E. Vial), LCA of collective and industrial wood-fueled space heating (Y. Leguern), contribution and limitations of LCA for plant-based industries (G. Gosse, B. Gabrielle), conclusion of the first day (M. Dohy). 2 - Biomass and materials: a reality: biomaterials in the Agrice program (H. Bewa), plant-derived materials: resources, status and perspectives (L. Rigal); biopolymers: overview of the industrial use of biopolymers: materials and markets, applications (S. Guibert), degradation mechanisms of biopolymers used in agriculture: biodegradability, eco-toxicity and accumulation in soils (G. Cesar, P. Pandard), present and future regulatory framework: specifications and methods of biodegradability evaluation of materials for agriculture and horticulture (D. Oster), standardization: necessity and possibilities (N. Normand); vegetable fibers and composite materials: market of new vegetable fiber uses (M. Piccardi, V. Garoux), vegetable particulates and

  20. Naturally occurring radionuclides in materials derived from urban water treatment plants in southeast Queensland, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinschmidt, Ross; Akber, Riaz

    2008-01-01

    An assessment of radiologically enhanced residual materials generated during treatment of domestic water supplies in southeast Queensland, Australia, was conducted. Radioactivity concentrations of U-238, Th-232, Ra-226, Rn-222, and Po-210 in water, sourced from both surface water catchments and groundwater resources were examined both pre- and post-treatment under typical water treatment operations. Surface water treatment processes included sedimentation, coagulation, flocculation and filtration, while the groundwater was treated using cation exchange, reverse osmosis, activated charcoal or methods similar to surface water treatment. Waste products generated as a result of treatment included sediments and sludges, filtration media, exhausted ion exchange resin, backwash and wastewaters. Elevated residual concentrations of radionuclides were identified in these waste products. The waste product activity concentrations were used to model the radiological impact of the materials when either utilised for beneficial purposes, or upon disposal. The results indicate that, under current water resource exploitation programs, reuse or disposal of the treatment wastes from large scale urban water treatment plants in Australia do not pose a significant radiological risk

  1. Assessment of radioactive material released from a fuel fabrication plant under accidental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This report evaluates the amounts of fissile material released both inside and outside a mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant (MOFFP) for light water reactors. The first section begins with a descriptive study of fissile material containment systems, and the methods available for quantifying accident occurrence probabilities. In addition to accidents common to all industrial facilities, other much rarer accidents were considered, such as aircraft crashes. The minimum occurrence probability limit for consideration in this study was set at 10 -6 per annum. The second part of this report attempts to assess the consequences of the accidents considered (i.e. with occurrence probabilities exceeding 10 -6 per annum) by determining maximum values for such accidents. Acts of sabotage and other accidents of this type are beyond the scope of this study and were not taken into consideration. The most serious potential accident would be a fire involving all of the glove boxes in the PuO 2 powder calcination and preparation cell, which could release 76.5 mg of PuO 2 powder into the atmosphere; the occurrence probability of such an accident, however, is slight (less than 10 -5 per annum). The second possibility, is a specially nuclear hazard that would release fission products into the atmosphere. The occurrence probability of such an accident is currently evaluated at 10 -3 per annum

  2. Microwave assisted extraction for trace element analysis of plant materials by ICP-AES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowska-Burnecka, J. [Wroclaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Chemii

    2000-11-01

    Application of microwave assisted extraction for the decomposition and dissolution of plant samples for trace metal determination by ICP-AES was examined. Dried onion, leaves of spinach beet and three reference materials CTA-OTL-1, CTA-VTL-2 and CL-1 were analyzed. Water, EDTA and hydrochloric acid (0.01, 0.10 and 1.0 M, respectively) were used as leaching solutions. The extraction efficiency was investigated by comparison of the results with those obtained after microwave wet digestion. HCl was found to be very suitable for quantitative extraction of B, Ba, Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn from the samples. For reference materials, the measured concentrations are well consistent with the certified values. The use of EDTA led to a complete extraction of B, Cd, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn. Water was found to be a good leaching solution for boron. For extraction with HCl and EDTA, the RSD values for the concentrations measured were below 8% for most of the elements. (orig.)

  3. Microwave assisted extraction for trace element analysis of plant materials by ICP-AES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowska-Burnecka, J

    2000-11-01

    Application of microwave assisted extraction for the decomposition and dissolution of plant samples for trace metal determination by ICP-AES was examined. Dried onion, leaves of spinach beet and three reference materials CTA-OTL-1, CTA-VTL-2 and CL-1 were analyzed. Water, EDTA and hydrochloric acid (0.01, 0.10 and 1.0 M, respectively) were used as leaching solutions. The extraction efficiency was investigated by comparison of the results with those obtained after microwave wet digestion. HCl was found to be very suitable for quantitative extraction of B, Ba, Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn from the samples. For reference materials, the measured concentrations are well consistent with the certified values. The use of EDTA led to a complete extraction of B, Cd, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn. Water was found to be a good leaching solution for boron. For extraction with HCl and EDTA, the RSD values for the concentrations measured were below 8% for most of the elements.

  4. Evaluation of the metabolic fate of munitions material (TNT & RDX) in plant systems and initial assessment of material interaction with plant genetic material. Validation of the metabolic fate of munitions materials (TNT, RDX) in mature crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.J.; Harvey, S.D.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    The goals of this effort were to confirm and expand data related to the behavior and impacts of munitions residues upon human food chain components. Plant species employed included corn (Zea mays), alfalfa (Medicago sativa). spinach (Spinacea oleraceae), and carrot (Daucus carota). Plants were grown from seed to maturity (70 to 120 days) in a low-fertility soil (Burbank) amended with either {sup 14}C-TNT or {sup 14}C-RDX at which time they were harvested and analyzed for munitions uptake, partitioning, and chemical form of the munition or munition-metabolite. All four of the plant species used in this study accumulated the {sup 14}C-TNT- and RDX-derived label. The carrot, alfalfa, and corn demonstrated a higher percentage of label retained in the roots (62, 73, and 83% respectively). The spinach contained less activity in its root (36%) but also contained the highest TNT specific activity observed (>4600 jig TNT equivalents/g dry wt.). The specific uptake values of RDX for the spinach and alfalfa were comparable to those previously reported for wheat and bean (314 to 590 {mu}g RDX-equivalents/g dry wt. respectively). An exception to this may be the carrot where the specific activity was found to exceed 4200 {mu}g RDX-equivalents/g dry wt. in the shoot. The total accumulation of TNT by the plants ranged from 1.24% for the spinach to 2.34% for the carrot. The RDX plants ranging from 15% for the spinach to 37% for the carrot. There was no identifiable TNT or amino dinitrotoluene (ADNT) isomers present in the plants however, the parent RDX compound was found at significant levels in the shoot of alfalfa (> 1 80 {mu}g/g) and corn (>18 {mu}g/g).

  5. Potential of plant materials for the management of cowpea bruchid callosobruchus analis (coleoptera: bruchidae) in gram cicer arietinum during storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwar, M.; Ahmad, N.; Tofique, M.

    2012-01-01

    Present research was carried out to identify alternatives to synthetic insecticides to control cowpea weevil Callosobruchus analis (F.) population in gram seed (Cicer arietinum L.), during storage. The efficacies of three plant materials such as Nicotiana tabacum, Citrullus colocythis and Aloe vera were assessed to determine their insecticidal activities against survival of bruchid C. analis on seeds of gram varieties viz., CM-98 and Jubiha-1. These plant materials tested reduced weevil infestation and emergence as compared with untreated control seeds. Seeds treatment with A. vera followed by N. tabacum reduced maximum pest damage over C. colocythis, which proved least effective to control C. analis population. Consequently, the tested plant materials should be given due consideration for effective gram protection as a component of integrated pest management approach in storage. (author)

  6. Antifoaming materials studies in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) heavy water plants. Chemical and thermical stability. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfino, C.A.; Rojo, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    In Girlder sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants hydrogen sulfide-water systems are inherentely foaming, so the adding of antifoaming materials is of great importance. These may be of high volatility, pyrolizable or chemically unstable in plant operation conditions (water and hydrogen sulfide at 2 MPa, up to 230 deg C). Five commercial surfactants were studied from the point of view of their chemical and thermical stability in order to select the most suitable. (Author) [es

  7. Direct containment heating experiments in Zion Nuclear Power Plant geometry using prototypic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, J.L.; McUmber, L.M.; Spencer, B.W.

    1993-01-01

    Direct Containment Heating (DCH) experiments have been completed which utilize prototypic core materials. The experiments reported on here are a continuation of the Integral Effects Testing (IET) DCH program. The experiments incorporated a 1/40 scale model of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant containment structures. The model included representations of the primary system volume, RPV lower head, cavity and instrument tunnel, and the lower containment structures. The experiments were steam driven. Iron-alumina thermite with chromium was used as a core melt stimulant in the earlier IET experiments. These earlier IET experiments at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) provided useful data on the effect of scale on DCH phenomena; however, a significant question concerns the potential experiment distortions introduced by the use of non-prototypic iron/alumina thermite. Therefore, further testing with prototypic materials has been carried out at ANL. Three tests have been completed, DCH-U1A, U1B and U2. DCH-U1A and U1B employed an inerted containment atmosphere and are counterpart to the IET-1RR test with iron/alumina thermite. DCH-U2 employed nominally the same atmosphere composition of its counterpart iron/alumina test, IET-6. All tests, with prototypic material, have produced lower peak containment pressure rises; 45, 111 and 185 kPa in U1A, U1B and U2, compared to 150 and 250 kPa IET-1RR and 6. Hydrogen production, due to metal-steam reactions, was 33% larger in U1B and U2 compared to IET-1RR and IET-6. The pressurization efficiency was consistently lower for the corium tests compared to the IET tests

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan, Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.E. Mizia; W.E. Windes; W.R. Corwin; T.D. Burchell; C.E. Duty; Y. Katoh; J.W. Klett; T.E. McGreevy; R.K. Nanstad; W. Ren; P.L. Rittenhouse; L.L. Snead; R.W. Swindeman; D.F. Wlson

    2006-01-01

    This is the 2006 update (Revision 3) of the NGNP Materials Research and Development Program Plan. This law established that the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary of Energy shall establish a ''Next Generation Nuclear Plant'' (NGNP) project. The NGNP project named in the Act was given the following attributes and guiding principles to manage its development: (1) The NGNP consists of research, development, design (R and DD), construction, and operation of a prototype reactor to generate electricity and hydrogen; (2) The project shall be managed by the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy; (3) The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) shall be the lead DOE laboratory for the NGNP; (4) The INL shall establish collaborations with selected institutions of higher education, other research institutes and international researchers; (5) The INL shall organize an industrial consortium of partners for cost-shared R and DD, construction; (6) The project shall be sited at the INL; (7) The project shall be licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and by July, 2008 the NRC and DOE shall jointly submit a licensing strategy to Congress; (8) The project shall be organized to maximize technical interchange with the nuclear power industry, nuclear power plant construction firms, the chemical process industry and to seek international cooperation, participation and contributions; (9) The Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) shall review all program plans for the NGNP; (10) Phase 1 of the project (selection of hydrogen production technology, conduct R and DD and initial design activities) shall be completed no later than September 30, 2011; (11) Phase 2 of the project (continue R and DD, develop final design, apply for a license, construct and start operations) shall be completed by September 30, 2021; and (12) Provision for authorization of appropriations was made. As a result of the direction provided, the INL and the DOE issued an NGNP Preliminary Project Management

  9. Quantitative data on the fire behavior of combustible materials found in nuclear power plants: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowlen, S.P.

    1987-02-01

    This report presents the findings of a task in which currently available fire research literature was reviewed for quantitative data on the burning characteristics of combustible materials that are found in nuclear power plants. The materials considered for which quantitative data were available include cable insulation materials, flammable liquids, furniture, trash and general refuse, and wood and wood products. A total of 90 figures and tables, taken primarily from the referenced works, which summarize the available quantitative fire characterization information for these materials is presented

  10. The materials concept in German light water reactors. A contribution to plant safety, economic performance and damage prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilg, Ulf

    2008-01-01

    Major decisions taken as early as in the planning and construction phases of nuclear power plants may influence overall plant life. Component quality at the beginning of plant life is determined very much also by a balanced inclusion of the 'design, choice of materials, manufacturing and inspection' elements. One example of the holistic treatment of design, choice of material, and manufacture of important safety-related components in pressurized water reactors is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in which the ferritic compound tubes, with inside claddings, for the control rod drive nozzles are screwed into the vessel top. Also the choice of Incoloy 800 for the steam generator tubes, and the design of the main coolant pipes with inside claddings as seamless pipe bends / straight pipes with integrated nozzles connected to mixed welds with austenitic pipes are other special design features of the Siemens/KWU plants. A demonstrably high quality standard by international comparison to this day has been exhibited by the austenitic RPV internals of boiling water reactors, which were made of a low-carbon Nb-stabilized austenitic steel grade by optimum manufacturing technologies. The same material is used for backfitting austenitic pipes. Reliable and safe operation of German nuclear power plants has been demonstrated for more than 4 decades. One major element in this performance is the materials concept adopted in Germany also in the interest of damage prevention. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of biological activities and chemical constituent of storage medicinal plant materials used as a traditional medicine in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu Prasad Pandey

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The main aims of the study were to evaluate the phytochemicals, antioxidant, antibacterial and chemical constituents of storage medicinal plant materials used as a traditional medicine in Nepal. Methods: Phytochemical screening, total phenolic content, total flavonoid content, antibacterial activities, anti-oxidant assay of the crude extract (water, methanol, n-hexane and acetone were carried out to identify the biological activities and phytonutrients present in the different extract. The chemical constituents present in the crude extract were analyzed using the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC equipped with UV detector. Results: Evaluated medicinal plant materials were found to have diverse phytonutrients. Results revealed that methanol extract of Pakhanved and Jethimadhu have highest total flavonoids and polyphenol content. Among the selected medicinal plant materials Jethimadhu extract revealed the highest antioxidant activities. Furthermore, evaluated medicinal plants extract were found to exert a range of in vitro growth inhibition activity against both gram positive and gram negative species. The highest antibacterial activities were observed in the case of methanol extract, whereas, least activity was observed with the hexane extract. HPLC analysis of the acetone extract of Jethimadhu reveals the presence of diosmetin. Conclusions: Our result revealed that among the five evaluated medicinal plant materials, Jethimadhu extract revealed biological activities and exhibits a higher amount of polyphenol and flavonoid content. [J Complement Med Res 2017; 6(4.000: 369-377

  12. Partnering with a local concrete block manufacturing plant to improve quality of construction materials in Haiti’s Central Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Gordon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a successful ongoing partnership between Clemson Engineers for Developing Countries (CEDC and a concrete masonry unit (CMU manufacturing plant in rural Haiti. The infrastructure destruction and resulting loss of life of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti highlighted the need for improved building materials and codes. This partnership has helped to improve the strength of CMUs in the plant, both creating a safer local built environment and expanding the economic opportunities for this plant. Using samples of aggregate and cement from the site in Haiti, students in Clemson performed experiments to optimise the CMU mix design and made other suggestions to improve efficiency and quality of their product. Consistency continues to be a challenge for the CMU plant, and this paper also describes proposed procedures to help the plant implement quality control and quality assurance plans.

  13. Multiplex PCR for specific and robust detection of Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum in pure culture and infected plant material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriko, John; Aritua, V.; Mortensen, Carmen Nieves

    2012-01-01

    The present study developed a pathovar-specific PCR for the detection of Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm), the cause of banana xanthomonas wilt, by amplification of a 265-bp region of the gene encoding the general secretion pathway protein D (GspD). A distinct DNA fragment......-specific PCR was successfully multiplexed with internal control primers targeting 16S rDNA for application on DNA from bacterial cultures and with primers targeting plant mitochondrial 26S rDNA for application on DNA extracted from plant material. Diagnostic discrimination of healthy and infected plants...

  14. Effect of the planting material on the incidence of dry rot in Colocasia esculenta (L. Schott and Xanthosoma spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Espinosa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The cocoyam (Xanthosoma spp. and Colocasia esculenta is a monocot plant with vegetative propagation. This work was developed with the aim of determining the effect of the planting material type on the incidence of dry rot in two cultivars of Colocasia and Xanthosoma genera. Primary and secondary rhizomes, crowns of primary rhizomes and in vitro plants were used. The plantation was maintained for twelve months and the plants were characterized morphologically in the growing stage. Besides, it was determined the incidence of dry rot per treatment at growing and harvest stage. Finally, the yield was determined. When in vitro plants were used the percentage of incidence and intensity of the damage of dry rot was less in both cultivars. The yield in primary rhizomes and overall was significantly higher. The results indicated the superiority of in vitro plants as initial plantation material over the traditional seed used in taro culture. Furthermore, it allows the designing a seed production program by biotechnological methods. Key words: clone, cocoyam, dry rot, in vitro plants.

  15. The role of structural materials in the vulnerability of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debarberis, L.; Simola, K.; Ballesteros, A.; Kryukov, A.; Brumovsky, M.

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear power plants (NPPs) world-wide are generally very robustly designed and constructed, capable to stand very extreme conditions. Small design differences from this point of view can be found among the various reactor types of the same generation; PWR, WWER, ets. The NPP structures are thus designed to accommodate all originally thinkable unwanted conditions, to cope with various extreme scenarios and respond safely to the various considered initiating events. In addition to the robust design, a series of complex redundant and diverse safety barriers, following a defence in depth concept, have been developed to avoid negative consequences, or at least mitigate the consequences of the events. Recently, questions and debates are appearing with regard to the vulnerability of the NPPs and their possible exposure to external threats; like for example terrorist attacks involving few individuals able to by-pass security and introducing small charges of explosive inside or near-by such containments. The role of the structural materials is in these situations very important for the safety of the NPP. The worst consequences of an event can contemplate of course huge environmental damage, like release of radio-activity combined with possible human losses and considerable direct costs, and financial and logistic indirect consequences. Such negative consequences are especially impacting the nuclear industry; in fact, it can be foreseen that a single accident or serious incident may put in danger the complete NPP fleet operation simply due to public opinion justified pressure. The response of the structures subjected to non-design impacts is discussed and reviewed in this paper. Although the main focus is on structural integrity, the paper also discusses the overall risk assessment of terrorist attacks presenting the link between structural analyses and plant risk analysis

  16. Development of a multiplex DNA-based traceability tool for crop plant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhuijzen, Marleen M; van Dijk, Jeroen P; Prins, Theo W; Van Hoef, A M Angeline; Seyfarth, Ralf; Kok, Esther J

    2012-01-01

    The authenticity of food is of increasing importance for producers, retailers and consumers. All groups benefit from the correct labelling of the contents of food products. Producers and retailers want to guarantee the origin of their products and check for adulteration with cheaper or inferior ingredients. Consumers are also more demanding about the origin of their food for various socioeconomic reasons. In contrast to this increasing demand, correct labelling has become much more complex because of global transportation networks of raw materials and processed food products. Within the European integrated research project 'Tracing the origin of food' (TRACE), a DNA-based multiplex detection tool was developed-the padlock probe ligation and microarray detection (PPLMD) tool. In this paper, this method is extended to a 15-plex traceability tool with a focus on products of commercial importance such as the emmer wheat Farro della Garfagnana (FdG) and Basmati rice. The specificity of 14 plant-related padlock probes was determined and initially validated in mixtures comprising seven or nine plant species/varieties. One nucleotide